National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for hor se trap

  1. Charge trapping and de-trapping in isolated CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals under an external electric field: Indirect evidence for a permanent dipole moment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zang, Huidong; Cristea, Mihail; Shen, Xuan; Liu, Mingzhao; Camino, Fernando; Cotlet, Mircea

    2015-08-05

    Single nanoparticle studies of charge trapping and de-trapping in core/shell CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals incorporated into an insulating matrix and subjected to an external electric field demonstrate the ability to reversibly modulate the exciton dynamics and photoluminescence blinking while providing indirect evidence for the existence of a permanent ground state dipole moment in such nanocrystals. A model assuming the presence of energetically deep charge traps physically aligned along the direction of the permanent dipole is proposed in order to explain the dynamics of nanocrystal blinking in the presence of a permanent dipole moment.

  2. Recombination luminescence and trap levels in undoped and Al-doped ZnO thin films on quartz and GaSe (0 0 0 1) substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evtodiev, I.; Caraman, I.; Leontie, L.; Rusu, D.-I.; Dafinei, A.; Nedeff, V.; Lazar, G.

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZnO films on GaSe create electron trapping states and PL recombination levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zn and Al diffusion in GaSe produces low-energy widening of its PL emission. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZnO:Al films on GaSe lamellas are suitable for gas-discharge lamp applications. -- Abstract: Photoluminescence spectra of ZnO and ZnO:Al (1.00, 2.00 and 5.00 at.%) films on GaSe (0 0 0 1) lamellas and amorphous quartz substrates, obtained by annealing, at 700 K, of undoped and Al-doped metal films, are investigated. For all samples, the nonequilibrium charge carriers recombine by radiative band-to-band transitions with energy of 3.27 eV, via recombination levels created by the monoionized oxygen atoms, forming the impurity band laying in the region 2.00 - 2.70 eV. Al doping induces an additional recombination level at 1.13 eV above the top of the valence band of ZnO films on GaSe substrates. As a result of thermal diffusion of Zn and Al into the GaSe interface layer from ZnO:Al/GaSe heterojunction, electron trap levels located at 0.22 eV and 0.26 eV below the conduction band edge of GaSe, as well as a deep recombination level, responsible for the luminescent emission in the region 1.10 - 1.40 eV, are created.

  3. COLD TRAPS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, W.I.

    1958-09-30

    A cold trap is presented for removing a condensable component from a gas mixture by cooling. It consists of a shell, the exterior surface of which is chilled by a refrigerant, and conductive fins welded inside the shell to condense the gas, and distribute the condensate evenly throughout the length of the trap, so that the trap may function until it becomes completely filled with the condensed solid. The contents may then be removed as either a gas or as a liquid by heating the trap. This device has particuinr use as a means for removing uranium hexafluoride from the gaseous diffusion separation process during equipment breakdown and repair periods.

  4. VACUUM TRAP

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gordon, H.S.

    1959-09-15

    An improved adsorption vacuum trap for use in vacuum systems was designed. The distinguishing feature is the placement of a plurality of torsionally deformed metallic fins within a vacuum jacket extending from the walls to the central axis so that substantially all gas molecules pass through the jacket will impinge upon the fin surfaces. T fins are heated by direct metallic conduction, thereby ol taining a uniform temperature at the adeorbing surfaces so that essentially all of the condensible impurities from the evacuating gas are removed from the vacuum system.

  5. COLD TRAP

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Milleron, N.

    1963-03-12

    An improved linear-flow cold trap is designed for highvacuum applications such as mitigating back migration of diffusion pump oil moiecules. A central pot of liquid nitrogen is nested within and supported by a surrounding, vertical, helical coil of metai sheet, all enveloped by a larger, upright, cylindrical, vacuum vessel. The vertical interstices between successive turns of the coil afford lineal, axial, high-vacuum passages between open mouths at top and bottom of said vessel, while the coil, being cold by virtue of thermal contact of its innermost turn with the nitrogen pot, affords expansive proximate condensation surfaces. (AEC)

  6. Microfabricated ion trap array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blain, Matthew G.; Fleming, James G.

    2006-12-26

    A microfabricated ion trap array, comprising a plurality of ion traps having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale ion traps to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microfabricated ion trap array with on-chip circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of the microfabricated ion trap array can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  7. Simplifying steam trap selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Debat, R.J. )

    1994-01-01

    In the current economic world order, there is an obligation to eliminate waste and conserve economic and natural resources. One trap blowing 100-lb of steam through a 1/4-in. orifice can cost more than $12,000 a year in wasted energy. Richard J. Debat of Armstrong International, Inc. explains the operating principles of the four basic types of steam traps as the first step in simplifying the selection process so the right trap can be specified for a given application.

  8. Steam trap monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ryan, M.J.

    1987-05-04

    A steam trap monitor positioned downstream of a steam trap in a closed steam system includes a first sensor (a hot finger) for measuring the energy of condensate and a second sensor (a cold finger) for measuring the total energy of condensate and steam in the line. The hot finger includes one or more thermocouples for detecting condensate level and energy, while the cold finger contains a liquid with a lower boiling temperature than that of water. Vapor pressure from the liquid is used to do work such as displacing a piston or bellow in providing an indication of total energy (steam + condensate) of the system. Processing means coupled to and responsive to outputs from the hot and cold fingers subtracts the former from the latter to provide an indication of the presence of steam downstream from the trap indicating that the steam trap is malfunctioning. 2 figs.

  9. Microfabricated cylindrical ion trap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blain, Matthew G.

    2005-03-22

    A microscale cylindrical ion trap, having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale cylindrical ion trap to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The microscale CIT has a reduced ion mean free path, allowing operation at higher pressures with less expensive and less bulky vacuum pumping system, and with lower battery power than conventional- and miniature-sized ion traps. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microscale cylindrical ion trap with on-chip integrated circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of microscale cylindrical ion traps can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  10. Thermoelectrically cooled water trap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Micheels, Ronald H.

    2006-02-21

    A water trap system based on a thermoelectric cooling device is employed to remove a major fraction of the water from air samples, prior to analysis of these samples for chemical composition, by a variety of analytical techniques where water vapor interferes with the measurement process. These analytical techniques include infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, ion mobility spectrometry and gas chromatography. The thermoelectric system for trapping water present in air samples can substantially improve detection sensitivity in these analytical techniques when it is necessary to measure trace analytes with concentrations in the ppm (parts per million) or ppb (parts per billion) partial pressure range. The thermoelectric trap design is compact and amenable to use in a portable gas monitoring instrumentation.

  11. Asymmetric ion trap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barlow, S.E.; Alexander, M.L.; Follansbee, J.C.

    1997-12-02

    An ion trap having two end cap electrodes disposed asymmetrically about a center of a ring electrode is disclosed. The inner surface of the end cap electrodes are conformed to an asymmetric pair of equipotential lines of the harmonic formed by the application of voltages to the electrodes. The asymmetry of the end cap electrodes allows ejection of charged species through the closer of the two electrodes which in turn allows for simultaneously detecting anions and cations expelled from the ion trap through the use of two detectors charged with opposite polarity. 4 figs.

  12. Asymmetric ion trap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barlow, Stephan E.; Alexander, Michael L.; Follansbee, James C.

    1997-01-01

    An ion trap having two end cap electrodes disposed asymmetrically about a center of a ring electrode. The inner surface of the end cap electrodes are conformed to an asymmetric pair of equipotential lines of the harmonic formed by the application of voltages to the electrodes. The asymmetry of the end cap electrodes allows ejection of charged species through the closer of the two electrodes which in turn allows for simultaneously detecting anions and cations expelled from the ion trap through the use of two detectors charged with opposite polarity.

  13. Steam trap monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ryan, Michael J. (Plainfield, IL)

    1988-01-01

    A steam trap monitor positioned downstream of a steam trap in a closed steam system includes a first sensor (the combination of a hot finger and thermocouple well) for measuring the energy of condensate and a second sensor (a cold finger) for measuring the total energy of condensate and steam in the line. The hot finger includes one or more thermocouples for detecting condensate level and energy, while the cold finger contains a liquid with a lower boiling temperature than that of water. Vapor pressure from the liquid is used to do work such as displacing a piston or bellows in providing an indication of total energy (steam+condensate) of the system. Processing means coupled to and responsive to outputs from the thermocouple well hot and cold fingers subtracts the condensate energy as measured by the hot finger and thermocouple well from the total energy as measured by the cold finger to provide an indication of the presence of steam downstream from the trap indicating that the steam trap is malfunctioning.

  14. WATER-TRAPPED WORLDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menou, Kristen [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Although tidally locked habitable planets orbiting nearby M-dwarf stars are among the best astronomical targets to search for extrasolar life, they may also be deficient in volatiles and water. Climate models for this class of planets show atmospheric transport of water from the dayside to the nightside, where it is precipitated as snow and trapped as ice. Since ice only slowly flows back to the dayside upon accumulation, the resulting hydrological cycle can trap a large amount of water in the form of nightside ice. Using ice sheet dynamical and thermodynamical constraints, I illustrate how planets with less than about a quarter the Earth's oceans could trap most of their surface water on the nightside. This would leave their dayside, where habitable conditions are met, potentially dry. The amount and distribution of residual liquid water on the dayside depend on a variety of geophysical factors, including the efficiency of rock weathering at regulating atmospheric CO{sub 2} as dayside ocean basins dry up. Water-trapped worlds with dry daysides may offer similar advantages as land planets for habitability, by contrast with worlds where more abundant water freely flows around the globe.

  15. Radial cold trap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grundy, Brian R.

    1981-01-01

    The radial cold trap comprises a housing having a plurality of mesh bands disposed therein. The mesh bands comprise concentrically arranged bands of mesh with the mesh specific surface area of each band increasing from the outermost mesh band to the innermost mesh band. An inlet nozzle is attached to the outside section of the housing while an outlet nozzle is attached to the inner portion of the housing so as to be concentrically connected to the innermost mesh band. An inlet baffle having orifices therein may be disposed around the outermost mesh band and within the housing for directing the flow of the fluid from the inlet nozzle to the outermost mesh band in a uniform manner. The flow of fluid passes through each consecutive mesh band and into the outlet nozzle. The circular pattern of the symmetrically arranged mesh packing allows for better utilization of the entire cold trap volume.

  16. Radial cold trap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grundy, B.R.

    1981-09-29

    The radial cold trap comprises a housing having a plurality of mesh bands disposed therein. The mesh bands comprise concentrically arranged bands of mesh with the mesh specific surface area of each band increasing from the outermost mesh band to the innermost mesh band. An inlet nozzle is attached to the outside section of the housing while an outlet nozzle is attached to the inner portion of the housing so as to be concentrically connected to the innermost mesh band. An inlet baffle having orifices therein may be disposed around the outermost mesh band and within the housing for directing the flow of the fluid from the inlet nozzle to the outermost mesh band in a uniform manner. The flow of fluid passes through each consecutive mesh band and into the outlet nozzle. The circular pattern of the symmetrically arranged mesh packing allows for better utilization of the entire cold trap volume. 2 figs.

  17. Filter vapor trap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guon, Jerold

    1976-04-13

    A sintered filter trap is adapted for insertion in a gas stream of sodium vapor to condense and deposit sodium thereon. The filter is heated and operated above the melting temperature of sodium, resulting in a more efficient means to remove sodium particulates from the effluent inert gas emanating from the surface of a liquid sodium pool. Preferably the filter leaves are precoated with a natrophobic coating such as tetracosane.

  18. Audit unto others hor ellipsis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maday, J.H. Jr.

    1992-05-01

    My first encounter with a quality assurance auditor is reminiscent of an old Dodge commercial. You remember The old sheriff, masked in mirrored sunglasses, paunch hanging over his gun belt, prophesying, You're in a heap o' trouble boy '' Well, my auditor could have been kin to the sheriff; they had the same posture, attitude, and mirrored sunglasses. Plus, my auditor wore a black leather vest and sported a Buffalo Bill'' goatee. While certainly memorable, both gentlemen were far from pleasant. I'm fairly certain that the compliance auditor of old deserved this perceived association with his law enforcement counterpart. Both believed in enforcing the letter of the law, or their interpretations of it. Neither seemed capable of exercising interpretive powers, but instead relied on winning through intimidation, possibly with an eye toward claiming some version of a monthly Quota Award. Is the auditor of today any better perceived Because this first encounter of the worst kind'' made a lasting impression on me, I have dedicated considerable time and effort trying to avoid being perceived as another sheriff when I conduct audits. In my auditing career, I am determined to capitalize on each opportunity to turn negative situations, as experienced by the auditee, into meaningful opportunities for improved performance. I want to treat the auditee the way I want to be treated when I am being audited. (author)

  19. Gated charged-particle trap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benner, W. Henry

    1999-01-01

    The design and operation of a new type of charged-particle trap provides simultaneous measurements of mass, charge, and velocity of large electrospray ions. The trap consists of a detector tube mounted between two sets of center-bored trapping plates. Voltages applied to the trapping plates define symmetrically-opposing potential valleys which guide axially-injected ions to cycle back and forth through the charge-detection tube. A low noise charge-sensitive amplifier, connected to the tube, reproduces the image charge of individual ions as they pass through the detector tube. Ion mass is calculated from measurement of ion charge and velocity following each passage through the detector.

  20. Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Print In photoelectron spectroscopy experiments performed at the ALS, a group of researchers has found that electronic transitions normally...

  1. Greenpower Trap Mufflerl System

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Water GREENPOWER TRAP-MUFFLER(tm) System (US Patent #6892531, 5085049, PCT, others pending) www.dieselnet.com/dr.rim Catalyst/DPF EGR Accumulator Air Intake Filter Turbo Charger Engine Intercooler EGR+water vapor Clean Exhaust PM 93% NOx 50% ECU E-Igniter FBC/OBC Water Lubrication Fuel + FBC Emissions Test Results Verified by Japan Automotive Research Inst., Tokyo, Japan 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 Before After NOx 2.676 5.51 g/kwH 51.4% 0 0.05 0.1 0.15 0.2 0.25 0.3 Before After PM g/kwH 0.278 0.03 89.2% NOx

  2. Thermostatic steam trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, A.H.; Mac Nicol, A.E.

    1987-03-03

    A thermostatic trap is described for a heating system having a feed pipe connected to a source of steam and a discharge pipe for discharge of condensate and comprising: housing means defining a volume and comprising a bowl shaped body, a removable cover therefor, a housing inlet pipe portion projecting from a side wall portion of the body and adapted for connection to the discharge pipe. A housing outlet pipe portion projects from a bottom wall portion of the body, and an outlet orifice defined by the bottom wall portion and extends between the volume and the outlet pipe portion; a valve body means retained within the volume and comprising an end wall, a side wall and a retaining ring portion that together define a valve chamber. The end wall defines a valve inlet opening communicating with the chamber and an annular valve seat within the chamber and encircling the valve inlet opening. The valve body means comprises a valve outlet pipe that defines a valve outlet opening axially aligned with the valve inlet opening and communicating with the chamber, the outlet pipe being fixed in the outlet orifice; a resilient, annular seal means disposed within the valve chamber and encircling the valve inlet opening; and a bi-metallic disc disposed within the valve chamber between the annular seal means and the outlet opening and having an outer peripheral portion retained by the retaining ring portion of the valve body means.

  3. Protection #2: Trap and Remove Sediment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Trap and Remove Sediment Protection 2: Trap and Remove Sediment The 3 Protections Defense in Depth August 1, 2013 Sediment behind LA Canyon weir is sampled and excavated...

  4. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dietrich, D.D.; Keville, R.F.

    1995-09-19

    An ion trap is described which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10{sup 9} and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10{sup 4} ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products. 10 figs.

  5. Gated charged-particle trap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benner, W.H.

    1999-03-09

    The design and operation of a new type of charged-particle trap provides simultaneous measurements of mass, charge, and velocity of large electrospray ions. The trap consists of a detector tube mounted between two sets of center-bored trapping plates. Voltages applied to the trapping plates define symmetrically-opposing potential valleys which guide axially-injected ions to cycle back and forth through the charge-detection tube. A low noise charge-sensitive amplifier, connected to the tube, reproduces the image charge of individual ions as they pass through the detector tube. Ion mass is calculated from measurement of ion charge and velocity following each passage through the detector. 5 figs.

  6. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dietrich, Daniel D.; Keville, Robert F.

    1995-01-01

    An ion trap which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10.sup.9 and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10.sup.4 ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products.

  7. Hydrodynamic enhanced dielectrophoretic particle trapping

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miles, Robin R.

    2003-12-09

    Hydrodynamic enhanced dielectrophoretic particle trapping carried out by introducing a side stream into the main stream to squeeze the fluid containing particles close to the electrodes producing the dielelectrophoretic forces. The region of most effective or the strongest forces in the manipulating fields of the electrodes producing the dielectrophoretic forces is close to the electrodes, within 100 .mu.m from the electrodes. The particle trapping arrangement uses a series of electrodes with an AC field placed between pairs of electrodes, which causes trapping of particles along the edges of the electrodes. By forcing an incoming flow stream containing cells and DNA, for example, close to the electrodes using another flow stream improves the efficiency of the DNA trapping.

  8. Inspect and Repair Steam Traps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-01-01

    This revised ITP tip sheet on inspecting and repairing steam traps provide how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

  9. Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Print In photoelectron spectroscopy experiments performed at the ALS, a group of researchers has found that electronic transitions normally thought to be forbidden can in fact be excited in conjunction with certain types of molecular vibrations. Specifically, they found that when the symmetry of a linear triatomic molecule is broken by asymmetric vibrational modes, photoelectrons can become temporarily trapped by the molecule before ultimately escaping,

  10. Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Print In photoelectron spectroscopy experiments performed at the ALS, a group of researchers has found that electronic transitions normally thought to be forbidden can in fact be excited in conjunction with certain types of molecular vibrations. Specifically, they found that when the symmetry of a linear triatomic molecule is broken by asymmetric vibrational modes, photoelectrons can become temporarily trapped by the molecule before ultimately escaping,

  11. Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Print In photoelectron spectroscopy experiments performed at the ALS, a group of researchers has found that electronic transitions normally thought to be forbidden can in fact be excited in conjunction with certain types of molecular vibrations. Specifically, they found that when the symmetry of a linear triatomic molecule is broken by asymmetric vibrational modes, photoelectrons can become temporarily trapped by the molecule before ultimately escaping,

  12. Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Print Wednesday, 27 April 2005 00:00 In photoelectron spectroscopy experiments performed at the ALS, a group of researchers has found that electronic transitions normally thought to be forbidden can in fact be excited in conjunction with certain types of molecular vibrations. Specifically, they found that when the symmetry of a linear triatomic molecule is broken by asymmetric vibrational modes, photoelectrons can

  13. Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Print In photoelectron spectroscopy experiments performed at the ALS, a group of researchers has found that electronic transitions normally thought to be forbidden can in fact be excited in conjunction with certain types of molecular vibrations. Specifically, they found that when the symmetry of a linear triatomic molecule is broken by asymmetric vibrational modes, photoelectrons can become temporarily trapped by the molecule before ultimately escaping,

  14. Universal collisional activation ion trap mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McLuckey, Scott A.; Goeringer, Douglas E.; Glish, Gary L.

    1993-01-01

    A universal collisional activation ion trap comprises an ion trapping means containing a bath gas and having connected thereto a noise signal generator. A method of operating a universal collisional activation ion trap comprises the steps of: providing an ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a bath gas; and, generating a noise signal within the ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a substance that, when acted upon by the noise signal, undergoes collisional activation to form product ions.

  15. Universal collisional activation ion trap mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McLuckey, S.A.; Goeringer, D.E.; Glish, G.L.

    1993-04-27

    A universal collisional activation ion trap comprises an ion trapping means containing a bath gas and having connected thereto a noise signal generator. A method of operating a universal collisional activation ion trap comprises the steps of: providing an ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a bath gas; and, generating a noise signal within the ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a substance that, when acted upon by the noise signal, undergoes collisional activation to form product ions.

  16. Microfabricated linear Paul-Straubel ion trap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mangan, Michael A.; Blain, Matthew G.; Tigges, Chris P.; Linker, Kevin L.

    2011-04-19

    An array of microfabricated linear Paul-Straubel ion traps can be used for mass spectrometric applications. Each ion trap comprises two parallel inner RF electrodes and two parallel outer DC control electrodes symmetric about a central trap axis and suspended over an opening in a substrate. Neighboring ion traps in the array can share a common outer DC control electrode. The ions confined transversely by an RF quadrupole electric field potential well on the ion trap axis. The array can trap a wide array of ions.

  17. VACUUM TRAP AND VALVE COMBINATION

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Milleron, N.; Levenson, L.

    1963-02-19

    This patent relates to a vacuum trap and valve combination suitable for use in large ultra-high vacuum systems. The vacuum trap is a chamber having an inlet and outlet opening which may be made to communicate with a chamber to be evacuated and a diffusion pump, respectively. A valve is designed to hermeticaliy seal with inlet opening and, when opened, block the line-of- sight'' between the inlet and outlet openings, while allowing a large flow path between the opened vaive and the side walls of the trap. The interior of the trap and the side of the valve facing the inlet opening are covered with an impurity absorbent, such as Zeolite or activated aluminum. Besides the advantage of combining two components of a vacuum system into one, the present invention removes the need for a baffle between the pump and the chamber to be evacuated. In one use of a specific embodiment of this invention, the transmission probability was 45 and the partial pressure of the pump fluid vapor in the vacuum chamber was at least 100 times lower than its vapor pressure. (AEC)

  18. Ion temperature gradient driven turbulence with strong trapped...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    driven turbulence with strong trapped ion resonance is presented. The role of trapped ion granulations, clusters of trapped ions correlated by precession resonance, is the focus. ...

  19. Guide to Orifice Plate Steam Traps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oland, C.B.

    2001-01-11

    This guide was prepared to serve as a foundation for making informed decisions about when orifice plate steam traps should be considered for use in new or existing steam systems. It presents background information about different types of steam traps and defines their unique functional and operational characteristics. The advantages and disadvantages associated with using orifice plate steam traps are provided to highlight their capabilities and limitations. Finally, recommendations for using orifice plate steam traps are presented, and possible applications are identified.

  20. Microscale ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN); Witten, William B. (Lancing, TN); Kornienko, Oleg (Lansdale, PA)

    2002-01-01

    An ion trap for mass spectrometric chemical analysis of ions is delineated. The ion trap includes a central electrode having an aperture; a pair of insulators, each having an aperture; a pair of end cap electrodes, each having an aperture; a first electronic signal source coupled to the central electrode; a second electronic signal source coupled to the end cap electrodes. The central electrode, insulators, and end cap electrodes are united in a sandwich construction where their respective apertures are coaxially aligned and symmetric about an axis to form a partially enclosed cavity having an effective radius r.sub.0 and an effective length 2z.sub.0, wherein r.sub.0 and/or z.sub.0 are less than 1.0 mm, and a ratio z.sub.0 /r.sub.0 is greater than 0.83.

  1. Ion traps fabricated in a CMOS foundry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehta, K. K.; Ram, R. J.; Eltony, A. M.; Chuang, I. L.; Bruzewicz, C. D.; Sage, J. M. Chiaverini, J.

    2014-07-28

    We demonstrate trapping in a surface-electrode ion trap fabricated in a 90-nm CMOS (complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor) foundry process utilizing the top metal layer of the process for the trap electrodes. The process includes doped active regions and metal interconnect layers, allowing for co-fabrication of standard CMOS circuitry as well as devices for optical control and measurement. With one of the interconnect layers defining a ground plane between the trap electrode layer and the p-type doped silicon substrate, ion loading is robust and trapping is stable. We measure a motional heating rate comparable to those seen in surface-electrode traps of similar size. This demonstration of scalable quantum computing hardware utilizing a commercial CMOS process opens the door to integration and co-fabrication of electronics and photonics for large-scale quantum processing in trapped-ion arrays.

  2. Electrostatic particle trap for ion beam sputter deposition ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The electrostatic particle trap consists of an array of electrode surfaces, each ... particle; trap; consists; array; electrode; surfaces; maintained; electrostatic; ...

  3. Quantum chaos of an ion trapped in a linear ion trap (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Quantum chaos of an ion trapped in a linear ion trap Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Quantum chaos of an ion trapped in a linear ion trap We describe the transition to quantum chaos of an ion trapped in a linear ion trap and interacting with two laser fields. Under the conditions of adiabatic illumination of the upper level of the ion, and when the frequencies of the two laser beams are slightly different, the system is reduced to a quantum linear oscillator

  4. Solon SE | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Name: Solon SE Place: Berlin, Berlin, Germany Zip: D-12489 Sector: Solar Product: Manufacturer of PV modules and tracking systems, and integrator of solar...

  5. Cavity sideband cooling of trapped molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kowalewski, Markus; Vivie-Riedle, Regina de [Department of Chemistry, Ludwig-Maximilian-Universitaet, D-81377 Munich (Germany); Morigi, Giovanna [Departament de Fisica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Theoretische Physik, Universitaet des Saarlandes, D-66041 Saarbruecken (Germany); Pinkse, Pepijn W. H. [MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500AE Enschede (Netherlands)

    2011-09-15

    The efficiency of cavity sideband cooling of trapped molecules is theoretically investigated for the case in which the infrared transition between two rovibrational states is used as a cycling transition. The molecules are assumed to be trapped either by a radiofrequency or optical trapping potential, depending on whether they are charged or neutral, and confined inside a high-finesse optical resonator that enhances radiative emission into the cavity mode. Using realistic experimental parameters and COS as a representative molecular example, we show that in this setup, cooling to the trap ground state is feasible.

  6. Measurements of PM Traps | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Measurements of PM Traps 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentantion: West Virginia University PDF icon 2004deerclark.pdf More Documents & Publications ...

  7. Audit unto others{hor_ellipsis}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maday, J.H. Jr.

    1992-05-01

    My first encounter with a quality assurance auditor is reminiscent of an old Dodge commercial. You remember? The old sheriff, masked in mirrored sunglasses, paunch hanging over his gun belt, prophesying, ``You`re in a heap o` trouble boy!`` Well, my auditor could have been kin to the sheriff; they had the same posture, attitude, and mirrored sunglasses. Plus, my auditor wore a black leather vest and sported a ``Buffalo Bill`` goatee. While certainly memorable, both gentlemen were far from pleasant. I`m fairly certain that the compliance auditor of old deserved this perceived association with his law enforcement counterpart. Both believed in enforcing the letter of the law, or their interpretations of it. Neither seemed capable of exercising interpretive powers, but instead relied on winning through intimidation, possibly with an eye toward claiming some version of a monthly Quota Award. Is the auditor of today any better perceived? Because this ``first encounter of the worst kind`` made a lasting impression on me, I have dedicated considerable time and effort trying to avoid being perceived as another sheriff when I conduct audits. In my auditing career, I am determined to capitalize on each opportunity to turn negative situations, as experienced by the auditee, into meaningful opportunities for improved performance. I want to treat the auditee the way I want to be treated when I am being audited. (author)

  8. The Paul Trap Simulator Experiment (PTSX) | Princeton Plasma...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Paul Trap Simulator Experiment (PTSX) The Paul Trap Simulator Experiment (PTSX) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory doesn't trap people named...

  9. NAC 503 - Hunting, Fishing and Trapping | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fishing and TrappingLegal Abstract These code sections outline the protective measures and restrictions on hunting, fishing, and trapping in the state of Nevada. Published...

  10. Inspect and Repair Steam Traps, Energy Tips: STEAM, Steam Tip...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... There are four basic ways to test steam traps: temperature, sound, visual, and electronic. Recommended Steam Trap Testing Intervals * High-Pressure (150 psig and above): Weekly to ...

  11. Requirements-Driven Diesel Catalyzed Particulate Trap Design...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Requirements-Driven Diesel Catalyzed Particulate Trap Design and Optimization Requirements-Driven Diesel Catalyzed Particulate Trap Design and Optimization 2005 Diesel Engine ...

  12. Dynamic trapping near a quantum critical point (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dynamic trapping near a quantum critical point Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dynamic trapping near a quantum critical point Authors: Kolodrubetz, Michael ; Katz, ...

  13. Bear Trap Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Trap Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Bear Trap Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Bear...

  14. Resources-PHaSe-EFRC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resources This webpage is provided for legacy archive purposes only, as of 30 April 2015. However, the facilities and resources created under PHaSE (thanks to the support of the U.S. Department of Energy) remain available for their original purpose of investigating organic-based electronic materials. Resources As a national and regional center of excellence for energy research, PHaSE has access to many resources linked from the Department of Energy and the greater UMass Amherst campus, as well

  15. News-PHaSe-EFRC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News and Highlights Saxony This page shows highlights and news items about PHaSE activities, research achievements, and people; archived items can be accessed by year at the menu to the left. If you have questions about any items, or want to know more, please contact either Tom Russell or D. Venkataraman. Final archive date: 26 April

  16. Protection #2: Trap and Remove Sediment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Trap and Remove Sediment Protection #2: Trap and Remove Sediment The 3 Protections = Defense in Depth August 1, 2013 Sediment behind LA Canyon weir is sampled and excavated regularly. As of 2012, no sediment required disposal as hazardous or radioactive waste. Sediment behind LA Canyon weir is sampled and excavated regularly. As of 2012, no sediment required disposal as hazardous or radioactive waste. The 3 Protections Protection #1: Remove the source of contamination Protection #2: Stabilize,

  17. Antihydrogen Trapped in the ALPHA Experiment

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    In 2010 the ALPHA collaboration succeeded in trapping antihydrogen atoms for the first time.[i]  Stored antihydrogen promises to be a unique tool for making high precision measurements of the structure of this first anti-atom. Achieving this milestone presented several substantial experimental challenges and this talk will describe how they were overcome.   The unique design features of the ALPHA apparatus will be explained.[ii]  These allow a high intensity positron source and an antiproton imaging detector similar to the one used in the ATHENA[iii] experiment to be combined with an innovative magnet design of the anti-atom trap. This seeks to minimise the perturbations to trapped charged particles which may cause particle loss and heating[iv].   The diagnostic techniques used to measure the diameter, number, density, and temperatures of both plasmas will be presented as will the methods developed to actively compress and cool of both plasma species to sizes and temperatures [v],[vi], [vii] where trapping attempts with a reasonable chance of success can be tried.   The results of the successful trapping experiments will be outlined as well as some subsequent experiments to improve the trapping rate and storage time. [i] 'Trapped antihydrogen' G.B. Andresen et al., Nature 468, 673 (2010) [ii]'A Magnetic Trap for Antihydrogen Confinement' W. Bertsche et al., Nucl. Instr. Meth. Phys. Res. A566, 746 (2006) [iii] Production and detection of cold antihydrogen atoms M.Amoretti et al., Nature 419, 456 (2002). [iv]' Antihydrogen formation dynamics in a multipolar neutral anti-atom trap' G.B. Andresen et al., Phys. Lett. B 685, 141 (2010) [v]' Evaporative Cooling of Antiprotons to Cryogenic Temperatures',                                   G.B. Andresen et al. Phys. Rev. Lett 105, 013003 (2010) [vi]'Compression of Antiproton Clouds for Antihydrogen Trapping' G. B. Andresen et al. Phys. Rev. Lett 100, 203401 (2008) [vii]  'Autoresonant Excitation of Antiproton Plasmas' G.B. Andresen et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 025002 (2011) Organizer: Ferdinand Hahn PH/DT Detector Seminar webpage  

  18. RYPOS Trap Field Demonstrations Part 1 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    depetrillo1.pdf More Documents & Publications RYPOS Trap Field Demonstrations Part 2

  19. RYPOS Trap Field Demonstrations Part 2 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    depetrillo2.pdf More Documents & Publications RYPOS Trap Field Demonstrations Part 1

  20. Review of Orifice Plate Steam Traps | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Review of Orifice Plate Steam Traps Review of Orifice Plate Steam Traps This guide was prepared to serve as a foundation for making informed decisions about when orifice plate steam traps should be considered for use in new or existing steam systems. It presents background information about different types of steam traps and defines their unique functional and operational characteristics. The advantages and disadvantages associated with using orifice plate steam traps are provided to highlight

  1. Ion funnel ion trap and process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Belov, Mikhail E [Richland, WA; Ibrahim, Yehia M [Richland, WA; Clowers, Biran H [West Richland, WA; Prior, David C [Hermiston, OR; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2011-02-15

    An ion funnel trap is described that includes a inlet portion, a trapping portion, and a outlet portion that couples, in normal operation, with an ion funnel. The ion trap operates efficiently at a pressure of .about.1 Torr and provides for: 1) removal of low mass-to-charge (m/z) ion species, 2) ion accumulation efficiency of up to 80%, 3) charge capacity of .about.10,000,000 elementary charges, 4) ion ejection time of 40 to 200 .mu.s, and 5) optimized variable ion accumulation times. Ion accumulation with low concentration peptide mixtures has shown an increase in analyte signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) of a factor of 30, and a greater than 10-fold improvement in SNR for multiply charged analytes.

  2. Signal enhancement using a switchable magnetic trap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beer, Neil Reginald

    2012-05-29

    A system for analyzing a sample including providing a microchannel flow channel; associating the sample with magnetic nanoparticles or magnetic polystyrene-coated beads; moving the sample with said magnetic nanoparticles or magnetic polystyrene-coated beads in the microchannel flow channel; holding the sample with the magnetic nanoparticles or magnetic polystyrene-coated beads in a magnetic trap in the microchannel flow channel; and analyzing the sample obtaining an enhanced analysis signal. An apparatus for analysis of a sample includes magnetic particles connected to the sample, a microchip, a flow channel in the microchip, a source of carrier fluid connected to the flow channel for moving the sample in the flow channel, an electromagnet trap connected to the flow line for selectively magnetically trapping the sample and the magnetic particles, and an analyzer for analyzing the sample.

  3. I2SE | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    I2SE Jump to: navigation, search Name: I2SE Place: Leipzig, Germany Zip: 4103 Sector: Efficiency Product: IT company providing solutions for energy efficiency and data...

  4. SE Project Srl | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: SE Project Srl Place: San Pietro, Italy Zip: 35010 Sector: Solar Product: Italian manufacturer and supplier of solar modules and solar technology. References: SE...

  5. Thermal electric vapor trap arrangement and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alger, T.

    1988-03-15

    A technique for trapping vapor within a section of a tube is disclosed herein. This technique utilizes a conventional, readily providable thermal electric device having a hot side and a cold side and means for powering the device to accomplish this. The cold side of this device is positioned sufficiently close to a predetermined section of the tube and is made sufficiently cold so that any condensable vapor passing through the predetermined tube section is condensed and trapped, preferably within the predetermined tube section itself. 4 figs.

  6. Thermal electric vapor trap arrangement and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alger, Terry (Tracy, CA)

    1988-01-01

    A technique for trapping vapor within a section of a tube is disclosed herein. This technique utilizes a conventional, readily providable thermal electric device having a hot side and a cold side and means for powering the device to accomplish this. The cold side of this device is positioned sufficiently close to a predetermined section of the tube and is made sufficiently cold so that any condensable vapor passing through the predetermined tube section is condensed and trapped, preferably within the predetermined tube section itself.

  7. Entanglement generation in planar Penning traps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martins, Ana M.; Mendonca, J. T.; Guerreiro, A.; Vieira, V. R.

    2010-07-15

    We investigate the generation of entanglement between the axial degrees of freedom of electrons confined in separated locations in planar Penning traps. We show that there are two different sources of entanglement: one is related with the mechanism of switching on and off the electrical coupling between the two electrons, and the other is due to the two-quanta-transition term of the coupling interaction. We show that the degree of entanglement can be controlled by adjusting the strength of the coupling between the traps and the time of interaction. We show that the coupled electrons behave as a temporal active interferometer.

  8. Ball-grid array architecture for microfabricated ion traps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guise, Nicholas D. Fallek, Spencer D.; Stevens, Kelly E.; Brown, K. R.; Volin, Curtis; Harter, Alexa W.; Amini, Jason M.; Higashi, Robert E.; Lu, Son Thai; Chanhvongsak, Helen M.; Nguyen, Thi A.; Marcus, Matthew S.; Ohnstein, Thomas R.; Youngner, Daniel W.

    2015-05-07

    State-of-the-art microfabricated ion traps for quantum information research are approaching nearly one hundred control electrodes. We report here on the development and testing of a new architecture for microfabricated ion traps, built around ball-grid array (BGA) connections, that is suitable for increasingly complex trap designs. In the BGA trap, through-substrate vias bring electrical signals from the back side of the trap die to the surface trap structure on the top side. Gold-ball bump bonds connect the back side of the trap die to an interposer for signal routing from the carrier. Trench capacitors fabricated into the trap die replace area-intensive surface or edge capacitors. Wirebonds in the BGA architecture are moved to the interposer. These last two features allow the trap die to be reduced to only the area required to produce trapping fields. The smaller trap dimensions allow tight focusing of an addressing laser beam for fast single-qubit rotations. Performance of the BGA trap as characterized with {sup 40}Ca{sup +} ions is comparable to previous surface-electrode traps in terms of ion heating rate, mode frequency stability, and storage lifetime. We demonstrate two-qubit entanglement operations with {sup 171}Yb{sup +} ions in a second BGA trap.

  9. Bucket-type steam traps removed in $82K retrofit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poplett, J.

    1985-08-19

    A retrofit of 481 mostly failed steam traps at Martin Marietta's Aerospace Division should reduce steam costs by $70,000 and require little or no maintenance. Payback should occur within 14 months. The new traps include orifice, bellow-type thermostatic, and float-type traps that have few or no moving parts. Lack of maintenance was responsible for the poor performance of the bucket traps that were replaced, although manufacturers of the bucket traps disagree that replacement of certain parts is necessary every six months. The author describes the design and operation of each type of trap.

  10. Review of Orifice Plate Steam Traps | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Review of Orifice Plate Steam Traps Review of Orifice Plate Steam Traps This guide was prepared to serve as a foundation for making informed decisions about when orifice plate...

  11. Thermal Deactivation Mechanisms of Fully-Formed Lean NOx Trap...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Deactivation Mechanisms of Fully-Formed Lean NOx Trap Catalysts Aged by LeanRich Cycling Thermal Deactivation Mechanisms of Fully-Formed Lean NOx Trap Catalysts Aged by LeanRich ...

  12. Emittance and Current of Electrons Trapped in a Plasma Wakefield

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Accelerator (Conference) | SciTech Connect Emittance and Current of Electrons Trapped in a Plasma Wakefield Accelerator Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Emittance and Current of Electrons Trapped in a Plasma Wakefield Accelerator In recent experiments plasma electrons became trapped in a plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA). The transverse size of these trapped electrons on a downstream diagnostic yields an upper limit measurement of transverse normalized emittance divided by peak

  13. Trapping and Measuring Charged Particles in Liquids - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Portal Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Trapping and Measuring Charged Particles in Liquids Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication Printable fact sheet (552 KB) Planar aqueous Paul trap (PAPT) devices and experimental platform Planar aqueous Paul trap (PAPT) devices and experimental platform Technology Marketing SummaryA nanoscale version of the Paul ion trap was developed by

  14. November 18, 2010: Antimatter Trapped and Stored | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8, 2010: Antimatter Trapped and Stored November 18, 2010: Antimatter Trapped and Stored November 18, 2010: Antimatter Trapped and Stored November 18, 2010 The Department's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) announces that atoms of antimatter have been trapped and stored for the first time in a magnetic bottle-like device by the ALPHA collaboration, an international team of scientists working at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research near Geneva, Switzerland. Scientists

  15. Ball-grid array architecture for microfabricated ion traps (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Ball-grid array architecture for microfabricated ion traps Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ball-grid array architecture for microfabricated ion traps State-of-the-art microfabricated ion traps for quantum information research are approaching nearly one hundred control electrodes. We report here on the development and testing of a new architecture for microfabricated ion traps, built around ball-grid array (BGA) connections, that is suitable for

  16. High voltage gas insulated transmission line with continuous particle trapping

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cookson, Alan H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Dale, Steinar J. (Monroeville, PA)

    1983-01-01

    This invention provides a novel high voltage gas insulated transmission line utilizing insulating supports spaced at intervals with snap-in means for supporting a continuous trapping apparatus and said trapping apparatus having perforations and cutouts to facilitate trapping of contaminating particles and system flexibility.

  17. Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside formations of shale - fine grained sedimentary rocks that can be rich sources of petroleum and natural gas. Just a few years ago, much of this resource was considered uneconomical to produce. But Office of Fossil Energy (FE) research helped refine cost-effective horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing technologies, protective environmental practices and data development, making hundreds of trillions of cubic feet of gas technically recoverable where

  18. Non-vanishing ponderomotive AC electrophoretic effect for particle trapping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guan, Weihau; Park, Jae Hyun nmn; Krstic, Predrag S; Reed, Mark A

    2011-01-01

    We present here a study on overlooked aspects of alternating current (AC) electrokinetics AC electrophoretic (ACEP) phenomena. The dynamics of a particle with both polarizability and net charges in a non-uniform AC electric trapping field is investigated. It is found that either electrophoretic (EP) or dielectrophoretic (DEP) effects can dominate the trapping dynamics, depending on experimental conditions. A dimensionless parameter gamma is developed to predict the relative strength of EP and DEP effects in a quadrupole AC field. An ACEP trap is feasible for charged particles in salt-free or low salt concentration solutions. In contrast to DEP traps, an ACEP trap favors the downscaling of the particle size.

  19. Zinc-oxide charge trapping memory cell with ultra-thin chromium-oxide trapping layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Atab, Nazek; Rizk, Ayman; Nayfeh, Ammar; Okyay, Ali K.; UNAM-National Nanotechnology Research Center and Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara

    2013-11-15

    A functional zinc-oxide based SONOS memory cell with ultra-thin chromium oxide trapping layer was fabricated. A 5 nm CrO{sub 2} layer is deposited between Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) steps. A threshold voltage (V{sub t}) shift of 2.6V was achieved with a 10V programming voltage. Also for a 2V V{sub t} shift, the memory with CrO{sub 2} layer has a low programming voltage of 7.2V. Moreover, the deep trapping levels in CrO{sub 2} layer allows for additional scaling of the tunnel oxide due to an increase in the retention time. In addition, the structure was simulated using Physics Based TCAD. The results of the simulation fit very well with the experimental results providing an understanding of the charge trapping and tunneling physics.

  20. Gas turbine engines with particle traps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boyd, Gary L.; Sumner, D. Warren; Sheoran, Yogendra; Judd, Z. Daniel

    1992-01-01

    A gas turbine engine (10) incorporates a particle trap (46) that forms an entrapment region (73) in a plenum (24) which extends from within the combustor (18) to the inlet (32) of a radial-inflow turbine (52, 54). The engine (10) is thereby adapted to entrap particles that originate downstream from the compressor (14) and are otherwise propelled by combustion gas (22) into the turbine (52, 54). Carbonaceous particles that are dislodged from the inner wall (50) of the combustor (18) are incinerated within the entrapment region (73) during operation of the engine (10).

  1. Isotopic abundance in atom trap trace analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lu, Zheng-Tian; Hu, Shiu-Ming; Jiang, Wei; Mueller, Peter

    2014-03-18

    A method and system for detecting ratios and amounts of isotopes of noble gases. The method and system is constructed to be able to measure noble gas isotopes in water and ice, which helps reveal the geological age of the samples and understand their movements. The method and system uses a combination of a cooled discharge source, a beam collimator, a beam slower and magneto-optic trap with a laser to apply resonance frequency energy to the noble gas to be quenched and detected.

  2. Sales lag sparks steam trap diversity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, E.

    1980-03-03

    Competing manufacturers have broadened their product range and customer services in an effort to survive a tightened market and the introduction of unconventional devices. Users and vendors agree that rising energy costs now give inspection and maintenance of steam traps top priority. New products on the market are described. Competition has led to some questionable advertising and legal action. Fixed orifice and temperature-actuated valves are among the alternative products offered. Models of the major manufacturers are compared by type, pressure and condensate load range, primary use, and price.

  3. Q Cells SE | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Q-Cells SE Place: Thalheim, Brandenburg, Germany Zip: 6766 Product: German PV cell manufacturer; also makes strategic venture capital and corporate investments....

  4. Facilities-Resources-PHaSe-EFRC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facilities Glove box photo UMass Amherst PHaSE EFRC participants and collaborators have access to the main Photovoltaic & Optical Spectroscopy Facility in Conte B523524 and its...

  5. Li2Se as a Neutron Scintillator

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Du, Mao-Hua; Shi, Hongliang; Singh, David J.

    2015-06-23

    We show that Li2Se:Te is a potential neutron scintillator material based on density functional calculations. Li2Se exhibits a number of properties favorable for efficient neutron detection, such as a high Li concentration for neutron absorption, a small effective atomic mass and a low density for reduced sensitivity to background gamma rays, and a small band gap for a high light yield. Our calculations show that Te doping should lead to the formation of deep acceptor complex VLi-TeSe, which can facilitate efficient light emission, similar to the emission activation in Te doped ZnSe.

  6. Oxidation of ultrathin GaSe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Edwin Beechem; McDonald, Anthony E.; Ohta, Taisuke; Howell, Stephen W.; Kalugin, Nikolai G.; Kowalski, Brian M.; Brumbach, Michael T.; Spataru, Catalin D.; Pask, Jesse A.

    2015-10-26

    Oxidation of exfoliated gallium selenide (GaSe) is investigated through Raman, photoluminescence, Auger, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. Photoluminescence and Raman intensity reductions associated with spectral features of GaSe are shown to coincide with the emergence of signatures emanating from the by-products of the oxidation reaction, namely, Ga2Se3 and amorphous Se. Furthermore, photoinduced oxidation is initiated over a portion of a flake highlighting the potential for laser based patterning of two-dimensional heterostructures via selective oxidation.

  7. Oxidation of ultrathin GaSe

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Thomas Edwin Beechem; McDonald, Anthony E.; Ohta, Taisuke; Howell, Stephen W.; Kalugin, Nikolai G.; Kowalski, Brian M.; Brumbach, Michael T.; Spataru, Catalin D.; Pask, Jesse A.

    2015-10-26

    Oxidation of exfoliated gallium selenide (GaSe) is investigated through Raman, photoluminescence, Auger, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. Photoluminescence and Raman intensity reductions associated with spectral features of GaSe are shown to coincide with the emergence of signatures emanating from the by-products of the oxidation reaction, namely, Ga2Se3 and amorphous Se. Furthermore, photoinduced oxidation is initiated over a portion of a flake highlighting the potential for laser based patterning of two-dimensional heterostructures via selective oxidation.

  8. Templates-Resources-PHaSe-EFRC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    templates 36 inch high by 48 inch wide, landscape poster template with PHaSE acknowledgements (PPT file download) 36 inch high by 48 inch wide, landscape poster template with PHaSE acknowledgements, 12-panel layout (typical pattern used by UMass PSE) (PPT file download) 42 inch high by 48 inch wide, landscape poster template with PHaSE acknowledgements (PPT file download) 36 inch high by 48 inch wide, portrait poster template with PHaSE acknowledgements (PPT file download) 16:9 Slide Templates

  9. Mesoscopic supersolid of dipoles in a trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golomedov, A. E.; Astrakharchik, G. E.; Lozovik, Yu. E.

    2011-09-15

    A mesoscopic system of dipolar bosons trapped by a harmonic potential is considered. The system has a number of physical realizations including dipole excitons, atoms with large dipolar moment, polar molecules, and Rydberg atoms in inhomogeneous electric field. We carry out a diffusion Monte Carlo simulation to define the quantum properties of a two-dimensional system of trapped dipoles at zero temperature. In dimensionless units the system is described by two control parameters, namely, the number of particles and the strength of the interparticle interaction. We have shown that when the interparticle interaction is strong enough a mesoscopic crystal is formed. As the strength of interactions is decreased a multistage melting takes place. Off-diagonal order in the system is tested using natural-orbitals analysis. We have found that the system might be Bose condensed even in the case of strong interparticle interactions. There is a set of parameters for which a spatially ordered structure is formed while simultaneously the fraction of Bose-condensed particles is nonzero. This might be considered as a realization of a mesoscopic supersolid.

  10. Identification of microscopic hole-trapping mechanisms in nitride semiconductors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    John L. Lyons; Krishnaswamy, Karthik; Luke Gordon; Van de Walle, Chris G.; Anderson, Janotti

    2015-12-17

    Hole trapping has been observed in nitride heterostructure devices, where the Fermi level is in the vicinity of the valence-band maximum. Using hybrid density functional calculations, we examine microscopic mechanisms for hole trapping in GaN and AlN. In a defect-free material, hole trapping does not spontaneously occur, but trapping can occur in the vicinity of impurities, such as C-a common unintentional impurity in nitrides. As a result, using Schrödinger-Poisson simulations, we assess the effects of C-derived hole traps on N-face high-electron mobility transistors, which we find to be more detrimental than the previously proposed interface traps.

  11. Effects of magnetization on fusion product trapping and secondary neutron

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    spectra (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Effects of magnetization on fusion product trapping and secondary neutron spectra « Prev Next » Title: Effects of magnetization on fusion product trapping and secondary neutron spectra In magnetizing the fusion fuel in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) systems, we found that the required stagnation pressure and density can be relaxed dramatically. This happens because the magnetic field insulates the hot fuel from the cold pusher and traps the charged

  12. Light Trapping, Absorption and Solar Energy Harvesting by Artificial

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Materials (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Light Trapping, Absorption and Solar Energy Harvesting by Artificial Materials Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Light Trapping, Absorption and Solar Energy Harvesting by Artificial Materials We provide designs of thin-film solar cells utilizing optimized photonic-crystal light-trapping and numerical simulations of their solar-to-electrical power conversion efficiencies. Authors: John, Sajeev [1] + Show Author

  13. A Sub-Millimeter Solenoid Device for Trapping Paramagnetic Microbeads

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect A Sub-Millimeter Solenoid Device for Trapping Paramagnetic Microbeads Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A Sub-Millimeter Solenoid Device for Trapping Paramagnetic Microbeads We present the design and preliminary evaluation of a paramagnetic microsphere trapping and separation device consisting of a copper solenoid wrapped around a 1.3 mm diameter glass capillary. The magnetization and subsequent dipole-dipole interaction of paramagnetic spheres under

  14. Gas insulated transmission line having tapered particle trapping ring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cookson, Alan H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1982-01-01

    A gas-insulated transmission line includes an outer sheath, an inner conductor, insulating supports and an insulating gas. A particle-trapping ring is secured to each insulating support, and it is comprised of a central portion and two tapered end portions. The ends of the particle trapping ring have a smaller diameter than the central portion of the ring, so as to enable the use of the particle trapping ring in a curved transmission line.

  15. Steam trap maintenance management saves $180,000 annually

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franks, F.C.; Wickersham, C.

    1985-12-01

    The Reichhold Chemical plant is located in Elizabeth, NJ. At this location, the cost of steam had skyrocketed to $5.30 per million Btu. The plant has 600 steam traps manufactured by ten different companies. Some 17 different models of traps are used with 33 piping configurations. There are five different operating pressures throughout the plant ranging from 15-175 psig, including 30, 65, and 120 psig. Five different applications of steam usage can be broken down as follows: steam tracing (56%); drip (21%); comfort heating (18%); tank coil (4%); and process (1%). In the fall of 1983, the annual yearly inspection of steam traps was supplanted with an independent trap survey service, specializing in detecting the malfunctioning of various types of steam traps. The basic program included location and tagging of all steam traps; survey and inspection of steam trap population; development of a trap map; and full computer analysis of collected data. It was determined that approximately 3919 lb/hr of steam could be saved by repairing the failed open traps and implementing the report's recommendations. There were also benefits from fixing the failed closed traps which were out of service at the time of the survey. These traps do not allow the flow of steam or condensate to pass through the orifice. This condition causes condensate to back up and reduce efficiency. The maintenance management has been pleased with the results and recommendations of the program. It has provided them with a complete inventory and status report of the 600 traps plantwide. It saved $180,000 over the previous year in energy expenditures. This was the most important contribution in lowering the plant energy costs.

  16. Thermostatic/orifice trap reduces fuel, repair costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-11-01

    This article is an evaluation of a steam trap that combines the continuous drain oriface with a thermostatically controlled trap oriface to efficiently remove condensate from virtually any steam system within its operating limits. This trap effectively reduces fuel and repair costs and has a capacity of 6000 il/hr, handles various pressures up to 600 psig, and operates against back pressures up to 90% of inlet pressure.

  17. Traps identification in Copper-Indium-Gallium-Sulfur-Selenide...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Traps identification in Copper-Indium-Gallium-Sulfur-Selenide Solar Cells Completed with Various Buffer Layers by Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy Citation ...

  18. Lean NOx Trap Regeneration Selectivity Towards N2O -- Similarities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lean NOx Trap Regeneration Selectivity Towards N2O -- Similarities and Differences Between ... More Documents & Publications Spatiotemporal Distribution of NOx Storage: a Factor ...

  19. Wolf Trap, Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bureau 2005 Place to 2006 CBSA Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWolfTrap,Virginia&oldid253815" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs updating...

  20. Inspect and Repair Steam Traps | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon Inspect and Repair Steam Traps (January 2012) More Documents & Publications Flash High-Pressure Condensate to Regenerate Low-Pressure Steam Steam Pressure Reduction: ...

  1. Debris trap in a turbine cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilson, Ian David

    2002-01-01

    In a turbine having a rotor and a plurality of stages, each stage comprising a row of buckets mounted on the rotor for rotation therewith; and wherein the buckets of at least one of the stages are cooled by steam, the improvement comprising at least one axially extending cooling steam supply conduit communicating with an at least partially annular steam supply manifold; one or more axially extending cooling steam feed tubes connected to the manifold at a location radially outwardly of the cooling steam supply conduit, the feed tubes arranged to supply cooling steam to the buckets of at least one of the plurality of stages; the manifold extending radially beyond the feed tubes to thereby create a debris trap region for collecting debris under centrifugal loading caused by rotation of the rotor.

  2. Penning trap mass measurements on nobelium isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dworschak, M.; Block, M.; Ackermann, D.; Herfurth, F.; Hessberger, F. P.; Hofmann, S.; Vorobyev, G. K.; Audi, G.; Blaum, K.; Droese, C.; Marx, G.; Schweikhard, L.; Eliseev, S.; Ketter, J.; Fleckenstein, T.; Haettner, E.; Plass, W. R.; Scheidenberger, C.; Ketelaer, J.; Kluge, H.-J.

    2010-06-15

    The Penning trap mass spectrometer SHIPTRAP at GSI Darmstadt allows accurate mass measurements of radionuclides, produced in fusion-evaporation reactions and separated by the velocity filter SHIP from the primary beam. Recently, the masses of the three nobelium isotopes {sup 252-254}No were determined. These are the first direct mass measurements of transuranium elements, which provide new anchor points in this region. The heavy nuclides were produced in cold-fusion reactions by irradiating a PbS target with a {sup 48}Ca beam, resulting in production rates of the nuclei of interest of about one atom per second. In combination with data from decay spectroscopy our results are used to perform a new atomic-mass evaluation in this region.

  3. Contaminant trap for gas-insulated apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adcock, James L.; Pace, Marshall O.; Christophorou, Loucas G.

    1984-01-01

    A contaminant trap for a gas-insulated electrical conductor is provided. A resinous dielectric body such as Kel-F wax, grease or other sticky polymeric or oligomeric compound is disposed on the inside wall of the outer housing for the conductor. The resinous body is sufficiently sticky at ambient temperatures to immobilize contaminant particles in the insulating gas on the exposed surfaces thereof. An electric resistance heating element is disposed in the resinous body to selectively raise the temperature of the resinous body to a molten state so that the contaminant particles collected on the surface of the body sink into the body so that the surface of the resinous body is renewed to a particle-less condition and, when cooled, returns to a sticky collecting surface.

  4. Contact Us-About-PHaSe-EFRC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    contact us The following information is for legacy archival purposes only, as of 30 April 2015! PHaSE EFRC Main Office Conte Research Center A515 (area code=413) Phone 413-577-0041, FAX 413-545-1510 Thomas P. Russell (Conte A515) Polymer Science & Engineering PHaSE EFRC Co-Director 577-1516 Paul M. Lahti (Goessmann 141) Chemistry PHaSE EFRC Co-Director 545-4890 Volodimyr Duzhko (Conte A529) Facility Director Photovoltaic Facility Director 577-0902 External Advisory Board Members Gui Bazan

  5. Charge Trapping in High Efficiency Alternating Copolymers: Implications in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Organic Photovoltaic Device Efficiency | ANSER Center | Argonne-Northwestern National Laboratory Charge Trapping in High Efficiency Alternating Copolymers: Implications in Organic Photovoltaic Device Efficiency Home > Research > ANSER Research Highlights > Charge Trapping in High Efficiency Alternating Copolymers: Implications in Organic Photovoltaic Device Efficiency

  6. Fundamental Electroweak Studies using Trapped Ions & Atoms

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    collaboration performs fundamental electroweak studies on trapped ions & atoms. We use neutral atom and ion trapping techniques at radioactive ion beam facilities here and elsewhere to provide near-ideal sources of β-decaying nuclei. Our goal is to measure - very precisely - properties of the charged electroweak interaction and search for new particles and forces. Last modified: Oct 03, 2011

  7. Quantum chaos of an ion trapped in a linear ion trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berman, Gennady P. [Theoretical Division T-13, and CNLS, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Theoretical Division T-13, and CNLS, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); James, Daniel F. V. [Theoretical Division T-4, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Theoretical Division T-4, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Kamenev, Dimitri I. [Theoretical Division T-13, and CNLS, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States) [Theoretical Division T-13, and CNLS, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Nizhny Novgorod State University, Nizhny Novgorod, 603600, Russia (Russian Federation)

    2000-06-01

    We describe the transition to quantum chaos of an ion trapped in a linear ion trap and interacting with two laser fields. Under the conditions of adiabatic illumination of the upper level of the ion, and when the frequencies of the two laser beams are slightly different, the system is reduced to a quantum linear oscillator interacting with a monochromatic wave. The property of localization over the quantum resonance cells is proposed to exploit in order to facilitate the process of measurement of the probability distribution of an ion on the vibrational levels. In the regime of strong chaos the time-averaged values of the energy and dispersion of energy are computed and compared with the corresponding classical quantities for different values of the perturbation amplitude. In the exact resonance case, the classical analog of the system possesses an infinite inhomogeneous stochastic web. We analyze the quantum dynamics inside the inhomogeneous web. It is shown that the quantum system mimics on average the dynamics of the corresponding classical system. Formation of the quantum resonance cells is illustrated in the case of a finite detuning from the exact resonance, and under increasing of the wave amplitude. The parameters of the model and the initial conditions are close to the real physical situation which can be realized in the system of cold trapped ion perturbed by two lasers fields with close frequencies. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  8. SE Drive Technik | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Drive Technik Jump to: navigation, search Name: SE Drive Technik Place: Bochum, Germany Zip: 44791 Product: Germany-based R&D subsidiary of Indian turbine maker Suzlon. References:...

  9. 2013 Archives-News-PHaSe-EFRC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Archives Volodimyr Duzhko photo Volodimyr Duzhko promoted to (extension) Assistant Professor of Polymer Science & Engineering. PHaSE is pleased to announce that Facility Director Dr. Volodimyr Duzhko has been promoted to extension Assistant Professor of Polymer Science & Engineering. Volodimyr is a semiconductor physicist with considerable experience in polymer materials. Since joining PHaSE, he has trained over 70 people to use 10 instruments in the Photovoltaic & Optical

  10. Electrostatic particle trap for ion beam sputter deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vernon, Stephen P.; Burkhart, Scott C.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the interception and trapping of or reflection of charged particulate matter generated in ion beam sputter deposition. The apparatus involves an electrostatic particle trap which generates electrostatic fields in the vicinity of the substrate on which target material is being deposited. The electrostatic particle trap consists of an array of electrode surfaces, each maintained at an electrostatic potential, and with their surfaces parallel or perpendicular to the surface of the substrate. The method involves interception and trapping of or reflection of charged particles achieved by generating electrostatic fields in the vicinity of the substrate, and configuring the fields to force the charged particulate material away from the substrate. The electrostatic charged particle trap enables prevention of charged particles from being deposited on the substrate thereby enabling the deposition of extremely low defect density films, such as required for reflective masks of an extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) system.

  11. A Pneumatic Actuated Microfluidic Beads-Trapping Device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, Guocheng; Cai, Ziliang; Wang, Jun; Wang, Wanjun; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-08-20

    The development of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic microbeads trapping device is reported in this paper. Besides fluid channels, the proposed device includes a pneumatic control chamber and a beads-trapping chamber with a filter array structure. The pneumatic flow control chamber and the beads-trapping chamber are vertically stacked and separated by a thin membrane. By adjusting the pressure in the pneumatic control chamber, the membrane can either be pushed against the filter array to set the device in trapping mode or be released to set the device in releasing mode. In this paper, a computational fluid dynamics simulation was conducted to optimize the geometry design of the filter array structure; the device fabrication was also carried out. The prototype device was tested and the preliminary experimental results showed that it can be used as a beads-trapping unit for various biochemistry and analytical chemistry applications, especially for flow injection analysis systems.

  12. Optical trapping apparatus, methods and applications using photonic crystal resonators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erickson, David; Chen, Yih-Fan

    2015-06-16

    A plurality of photonic crystal resonator optical trapping apparatuses and a plurality optical trapping methods using the plurality of photonic crystal resonator optical trapping apparatuses include located and formed over a substrate a photonic waveguide that is coupled (i.e., either separately coupled or integrally coupled) with a photonic crystal resonator. In a particular embodiment, the photonic waveguide and the photonic crystal resonator comprise a monocrystalline silicon (or other) photonic material absent any chemical functionalization. In another particular embodiment, the photonic waveguide and the photonic crystal resonator comprise a silicon nitride material which when actuating the photonic crystal resonator optical trapping apparatus with a 1064 nanometer resonant photonic radiation wavelength (or other resonant photonic radiation wavelength in a range from about 700 to about 1200 nanometers) provides no appreciable heating of an aqueous sample fluid that is analyzed by the photonic crystal resonator optical trapping apparatus.

  13. Ionization-Induced Electron Trapping inUltrarelativistic Plasma Wakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oz, E.; Deng, S.; Katsouleas, T.; Muggli, P.; Barnes, C.D.; Blumenfeld, I.; Decker, F.J.; Emma, P.; Hogan, M.J.; Ischebeck, R.; Iverson, R.H.; Kirby, N.; Krejcik, P.; O'Connell, C.; Siemann, R.H.; Walz, D.; Auerbach, D.; Clayton, C.E.; Huang, C.; Johnson, D.K.; Joshi, C.; /UCLA

    2007-04-06

    The onset of trapping of electrons born inside a highly relativistic, 3D beam-driven plasma wake is investigated. Trapping occurs in the transition regions of a Li plasma confined by He gas. Li plasma electrons support the wake, and higher ionization potential He atoms are ionized as the beam is focused by Li ions and can be trapped. As the wake amplitude is increased, the onset of trapping is observed. Some electrons gain up to 7.6 GeV in a 30.5 cm plasma. The experimentally inferred trapping threshold is at a wake amplitude of 36 GV/m, in good agreement with an analytical model and PIC simulations.

  14. Cast-to-shape electrokinetic trapping medium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shepodd, Timothy J.; Franklin, Elizabeth; Prickett, Zane T.; Artau, Alexander

    2006-05-30

    A three-dimensional microporous polymer network material, or monolith, cast-to-shape in a microchannel. The polymer monolith, produced by a phase separation process, is capable of trapping and retaining charged protein species from a mixture of charged and uncharged species under the influence of an applied electric field. The retained charged protein species are released from the porous polymer monolith by a pressure driven flow in the substantial absence of the electric field. The pressure driven flow is independent of direction and thus neither means to reverse fluid flow nor a multi-directional flow field is required, a single flow through the porous polymer monolith can be employed, in contrast to prior art systems. The monolithic polymer material produced by the invention can function as a chromatographic medium. Moreover, by virtue of its ability to retain charged protein species and quantitatively release the retained species the porous polymer monolith can serve as a means for concentrating charged protein species from, for example, a dilute solution.

  15. Cast-to-shape electrokinetic trapping medium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shepodd, Timothy J.; Franklin, Elizabeth; Prickett, Zane T.; Artau, Alexander

    2004-08-03

    A three-dimensional microporous polymer network material, or monolith, cast-to-shape in a microchannel. The polymer monolith, produced by a phase separation process, is capable of trapping and retaining charged protein species from a mixture of charged and uncharged species under the influence of an applied electric field. The retained charged protein species are released from the porous polymer monolith by a pressure driven flow in the substantial absence of the electric field. The pressure driven flow is independent of direction and thus neither means to reverse fluid flow nor a multi-directional flow field is required, a single flow through the porous polymer monolith can be employed, in contrast to prior art systems. The monolithic polymer material produced by the invention can function as a chromatographic medium. Moreover, by virtue of its ability to retain charged protein species and quantitatively release the retained species the porous polymer monolith can serve as a means for concentrating charged protein species from, for example, a dilute solution.

  16. Hydrogen isotope trapping in Al-Cu binary alloys

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chao, Paul; Karnesky, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the trapping mechanisms for hydrogen isotopes in Al–X Cu (0.0 at. % < X < 3.5 at. %) alloys were investigated using thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS), electrical conductivity, and differential scanning calorimetry. Constant heating rate TDS was used to determine microstructural trap energies and occupancies. In addition to the trapping states in pure Al reported in the literature (interstitial lattice sites, dislocations, and vacancies), a trap site due to Al–Cu intermetallic precipitates is observed. The binding energy of this precipitate trap is (18 ± 3) kJ•mol–1 (0.19 ± 0.03 eV). Typical occupancy of this trap is high;more » for Al–2.6 at. % Cu (a Cu composition comparable to that in AA2219) charged at 200 °C with 130 MPa D2 for 68 days, there is ca. there is 3.15×10–7 mol D bound to the precipitate trap per mol of Al, accounting for a third of the D in the charged sample.« less

  17. Hydrogen isotope trapping in Al-Cu binary alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chao, Paul; Karnesky, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the trapping mechanisms for hydrogen isotopes in Al–X Cu (0.0 at. % < X < 3.5 at. %) alloys were investigated using thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS), electrical conductivity, and differential scanning calorimetry. Constant heating rate TDS was used to determine microstructural trap energies and occupancies. In addition to the trapping states in pure Al reported in the literature (interstitial lattice sites, dislocations, and vacancies), a trap site due to Al–Cu intermetallic precipitates is observed. The binding energy of this precipitate trap is (18 ± 3) kJ•mol–1 (0.19 ± 0.03 eV). Typical occupancy of this trap is high; for Al–2.6 at. % Cu (a Cu composition comparable to that in AA2219) charged at 200 °C with 130 MPa D2 for 68 days, there is ca. there is 3.15×10–7 mol D bound to the precipitate trap per mol of Al, accounting for a third of the D in the charged sample.

  18. A transferable force field for CdS-CdSe-PbS-PbSe solid systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, Zhaochuan; Vlugt, Thijs J. H.; Koster, Rik S.; Fang, Changming; Huis, Marijn A. van; Wang, Shuaiwei; Yalcin, Anil O.; Tichelaar, Frans D.; Zandbergen, Henny W.

    2014-12-28

    A transferable force field for the PbSe-CdSe solid system using the partially charged rigid ion model has been successfully developed and was used to study the cation exchange in PbSe-CdSe heteronanocrystals [A. O. Yalcin et al., Atomic resolution monitoring of cation exchange in CdSe-PbSe heteronanocrystals during epitaxial solid-solid-vapor growth, Nano Lett. 14, 36613667 (2014)]. In this work, we extend this force field by including another two important binary semiconductors, PbS and CdS, and provide detailed information on the validation of this force field. The parameterization combines Bader charge analysis, empirical fitting, and ab initio energy surface fitting. When compared with experimental data and density functional theory calculations, it is shown that a wide range of physical properties of bulk PbS, PbSe, CdS, CdSe, and their mixed phases can be accurately reproduced using this force field. The choice of functional forms and parameterization strategy is demonstrated to be rational and effective. This transferable force field can be used in various studies on II-VI and IV-VI semiconductor materials consisting of CdS, CdSe, PbS, and PbSe. Here, we demonstrate the applicability of the force field model by molecular dynamics simulations whereby transformations are initiated by cation exchange.

  19. Using malaise traps to sample ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulyshen, Michael D., James L. Hanula, and Scott Horn

    2005-01-01

    Pitfall traps provide an easy and inexpensive way to sample ground-dwelling arthropods (Spence and Niemela 1994; Spence et al. 1997; Abildsnes and Tommeras 2000) and have been used exclusively in many studies of the abundance and diversity of ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae). Despite the popularity of this trapping technique, pitfall traps have many disadvantages. For example, they often fail to collect both small (Spence and Niemela 1994) and ? ????trap-shy?¢??? species (Benest 1989), eventually deplete the local carabid population (Digweed et al. 1995), require a species to be ground-dwelling in order to be captured (Liebherr and Mahar 1979), and produce different results depending on trap diameter and material, type of preservative used, and trap placement (Greenslade 1964; Luff 1975; Work et al. 2002). Further complications arise from seasonal patterns of movement among the beetles themselves (Maelfait and Desender 1990), as well as numerous climatic factors, differences in plant cover, and variable surface conditions (Adis 1979). Because of these limitations, pitfall trap data give an incomplete picture of the carabid community and should be interpreted carefully. Additional methods, such as use of Berlese funnels and litter washing (Spence and Niemela 1994), collection from lights (Usis and MacLean 1998), and deployment of flight intercept devices (Liebherr and Mahar 1979; Paarmann and Stork 1987), should be incorporated in surveys to better ascertain the species composition and relative numbers of ground beetles. Flight intercept devices, like pitfall traps, have the advantage of being easy to use and replicate, but their value to carabid surveys is largely unknown. Here we demonstrate the effectiveness of Malaise traps for sampling ground beetles in a bottomland hardwood forest.

  20. Using malaise traps to sample ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulyshen, Michael D., James L. Hanula, and Scott Horn

    2005-01-01

    Pitfall traps provide an easy and inexpensive way to sample ground-dwelling arthropods (Spence and Niemela 1994; Spence et al. 1997; Abildsnes and Tommeras 2000) and have been used exclusively in many studies of the abundance and diversity of ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae). Despite the popularity of this trapping technique, pitfall traps have many disadvantages. For example, they often fail to collect both small (Spence and Niemela 1994) and ?¢????trap-shy?¢??? species (Benest 1989), eventually deplete the local carabid population (Digweed et al. 1995), require a species to be ground-dwelling in order to be captured (Liebherr and Mahar 1979), and produce different results depending on trap diameter and material, type of preservative used, and trap placement (Greenslade 1964; Luff 1975; Work et al. 2002). Further complications arise from seasonal patterns of movement among the beetles themselves (Maelfait and Desender 1990), as well as numerous climatic factors, differences in plant cover, and variable surface conditions (Adis 1979). Because of these limitations, pitfall trap data give an incomplete picture of the carabid community and should be interpreted carefully. Additional methods, such as use of Berlese funnels and litter washing (Spence and Niemela 1994), collection from lights (Usis and MacLean 1998), and deployment of flight intercept devices (Liebherr and Mahar 1979; Paarmann and Stork 1987), should be incorporated in surveys to better ascertain the species composition and relative numbers of ground beetles. Flight intercept devices, like pitfall traps, have the advantage of being easy to use and replicate, but their value to carabid surveys is largely unknown. Here we demonstrate the effectiveness of Malaise traps for sampling ground beetles in a bottomland hardwood forest.

  1. Movement of particles using sequentially activated dielectrophoretic particle trapping

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miles, Robin R.

    2004-02-03

    Manipulation of DNA and cells/spores using dielectrophoretic (DEP) forces to perform sample preparation protocols for polymerized chain reaction (PCR) based assays for various applications. This is accomplished by movement of particles using sequentially activated dielectrophoretic particle trapping. DEP forces induce a dipole in particles, and these particles can be trapped in non-uniform fields. The particles can be trapped in the high field strength region of one set of electrodes. By switching off this field and switching on an adjacent electrodes, particles can be moved down a channel with little or no flow.

  2. Trap seal for open circuit liquid cooled turbines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grondahl, Clayton M.; Germain, Malcolm R.

    1980-01-01

    An improved trap seal for open circuit liquid cooled turbines is disclosed. The trap seal of the present invention includes an annular recess formed in the supply conduit of cooling channels formed in the airfoil of the turbine buckets. A cylindrical insert is located in the annular recesses and has a plurality of axial grooves formed along the outer periphery thereof and a central recess formed in one end thereof. The axial grooves and central recess formed in the cylindrical insert cooperate with the annular recess to define a plurality of S-shaped trap seals which permit the passage of liquid coolant but prohibit passage of gaseous coolant.

  3. 2011 Archives-News-PHaSe-EFRC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Archives solar cells video clip Solar Cells from Plastics? Mission Possible at the PHaSE energy research center, UMass Amherst!, a YouTube video about work at PHaSE, debuted on 24 March 2011. This video is part of our center's contributions to the Energy Frontier Research Centers Summit & Forum on 25-27 May 2011, which is further described below. Many thanks to Harihara Venkatraman (DV group, ERG 1) and Dr. Emily Pentzer (Emrick group, ERG 1) for starring in the video clip, along with

  4. Synergies of High-Efficiency Clean Combustion and Lean NOx Trap...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Synergies of High-Efficiency Clean Combustion and Lean NOx Trap Catalysts Synergies of High-Efficiency Clean Combustion and Lean NOx Trap Catalysts investigation of potential ...

  5. Fuel traps: mapping stability via water association.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rempe, Susan L.; Clawson, Jacalyn S.; Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Alam, Todd M; Leung, Kevin; Varma, Sameer; Sabo, Dubravko; Martin, Marcus Gary; Cygan, Randall Timothy

    2007-03-01

    Hydrogen storage is a key enabling technology required for attaining a hydrogen-based economy. Fundamental research can reveal the underlying principles controlling hydrogen uptake and release by storage materials, and also aid in characterizing and designing novel storage materials. New ideas for hydrogen storage materials come from exploiting the properties of hydrophobic hydration, which refers to water s ability to stabilize, by its mode of association, specific structures under specific conditions. Although hydrogen was always considered too small to support the formation of solid clathrate hydrate structures, exciting new experiments show that water traps hydrogen molecules at conditions of low temperatures and moderate pressures. Hydrogen release is accomplished by simple warming. While these experiments lend credibility to the idea that water could form an environmentally attractive alternative storage compound for hydrogen fuel, which would advance our nation s goals of attaining a hydrogen-based economy, much work is yet required to understand and realize the full potential of clathrate hydrates for hydrogen storage. Here we undertake theoretical studies of hydrogen in water to establish a firm foundation for predictive work on clathrate hydrate H{sub 2} storage capabilities. Using molecular simulation and statistical mechanical theories based in part on quantum mechanical descriptions of molecular interactions, we characterize the interactions between hydrogen and liquid water in terms of structural and thermodynamic properties. In the process we validate classical force field models of hydrogen in water and discover new features of hydrophobic hydration that impact problems in both energy technology and biology. Finally, we predict hydrogen occupancy in the small and large cages of hydrogen clathrate hydrates, a property unresolved by previous experimental and theoretical work.

  6. Laser-driven Sisyphus cooling in an optical dipole trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivanov, Vladyslav V.; Gupta, Subhadeep

    2011-12-15

    We propose a laser-driven Sisyphus-cooling scheme for atoms confined in a far-off resonance optical dipole trap. Utilizing the differential trap-induced ac Stark shift, two electronic levels of the atom are resonantly coupled by a cooling laser preferentially near the trap bottom. After absorption of a cooling photon, the atom loses energy by climbing the steeper potential, and then spontaneously decays preferentially away from the trap bottom. The proposed method is particularly suited to cooling alkaline-earth-metal-like atoms where two-level systems with narrow electronic transitions are present. Numerical simulations for the cases of {sup 88}Sr and {sup 174}Yb demonstrate the expected recoil and Doppler temperature limits. The method requires a relatively small number of scattered photons and can potentially lead to phase-space densities approaching quantum degeneracy in subsecond time scales.

  7. Stories of Discovery & Innovation: Trapping the Light Fantastic...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Stories of Discovery & Innovation: Trapping the Light Fantastic Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page New solar cell design uses advanced optics and nanotechnology to ...

  8. Stable Metal-Organic Frameworks Containing Single-Molecule Traps...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stable Metal-Organic Frameworks Containing Single-Molecule Traps for Enzyme Encapsulation Previous Next List Dawei Feng, Tian-Fu Liu, Jie Su, Mathieu Bosch, Zhangwen Wei, Wei Wan,...

  9. Requirements-Driven Diesel Catalyzed Particulate Trap Design and

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Optimization | Department of Energy harris.pdf More Documents & Publications Diesel Emission Control Technology Review Investigation of Aging Mechanisms in Lean NOx Traps Diesel Particulate Filters: Market Introducution in Europe

  10. Electron source for a mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dietrich, D.D.; Keville, R.F.

    1995-12-19

    An ion trap is described which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10{sup 9} and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10{sup 4} ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products. 10 figs.

  11. Electron source for a mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dietrich, Daniel D.; Keville, Robert F.

    1995-01-01

    An ion trap which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10.sup.9 and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10.sup.4 ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products.

  12. Inspect and Repair Steam Traps - Steam Tip Sheet #1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-31

    This revised AMO tip sheet on inspecting and repairing steam traps provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

  13. Effects of magnetization on fusion product trapping and secondary neutron

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    spectra (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Effects of magnetization on fusion product trapping and secondary neutron spectra « Prev Next » Title: Effects of magnetization on fusion product trapping and secondary neutron spectra × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science (PAGES). This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize

  14. Generic equilibration dynamics of planar defects in trapped atomic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    superfluids (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Generic equilibration dynamics of planar defects in trapped atomic superfluids « Prev Next » Title: Generic equilibration dynamics of planar defects in trapped atomic superfluids Authors: Scherpelz, Peter ; Padavić, Karmela ; Murray, Andy ; Glatz, Andreas ; Aranson, Igor S. ; Levin, K. Publication Date: 2015-03-18 OSTI Identifier: 1179955 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review A Additional Journal Information: Journal

  15. Advanced Gasification Mercury/Trace Metal Control with Monolith Traps

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Advanced Gasification Mercury/Trace Metal Control with Monolith Traps Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Advanced Gasification Mercury/Trace Metal Control with Monolith Traps × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy

  16. Generic equilibration dynamics of planar defects in trapped atomic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    superfluids (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Generic equilibration dynamics of planar defects in trapped atomic superfluids Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Generic equilibration dynamics of planar defects in trapped atomic superfluids Authors: Scherpelz, Peter ; Padavić, Karmela ; Murray, Andy ; Glatz, Andreas ; Aranson, Igor S. ; Levin, K. Publication Date: 2015-03-18 OSTI Identifier: 1179955 Type: Publisher's Accepted

  17. Grooved impactor and inertial trap for sampling inhalable particulate matter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loo, Billy W.

    1984-01-01

    An inertial trap and grooved impactor for providing a sharp cutoff for particles over 15 microns from entering an inhalable particulate sampler. The impactor head has a tapered surface and is provided with V-shaped grooves. The tapered surface functions for reducing particle blow-off or reentrainment while the grooves prevent particle bounce. Water droplets and any resuspended material over the 15 micron size are collected by the inertial trap and deposited in a reservoir associated with the impactor.

  18. Anisotropy in CdSe quantum rods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Liang-shi

    2003-09-01

    The size-dependent optical and electronic properties of semiconductor nanocrystals have drawn much attention in the past decade, and have been very well understood for spherical ones. The advent of the synthetic methods to make rod-like CdSe nanocrystals with wurtzite structure has offered us a new opportunity to study their properties as functions of their shape. This dissertation includes three main parts: synthesis of CdSe nanorods with tightly controlled widths and lengths, their optical and dielectric properties, and their large-scale assembly, all of which are either directly or indirectly caused by the uniaxial crystallographic structure of wurtzite CdSe. The hexagonal wurtzite structure is believed to be the primary reason for the growth of CdSe nanorods. It represents itself in the kinetic stabilization of the rod-like particles over the spherical ones in the presence of phosphonic acids. By varying the composition of the surfactant mixture used for synthesis we have achieved tight control of the widths and lengths of the nanorods. The synthesis of monodisperse CdSe nanorods enables us to systematically study their size-dependent properties. For example, room temperature single particle fluorescence spectroscopy has shown that nanorods emit linearly polarized photoluminescence. Theoretical calculations have shown that it is due to the crossing between the two highest occupied electronic levels with increasing aspect ratio. We also measured the permanent electric dipole moment of the nanorods with transient electric birefringence technique. Experimental results on nanorods with different sizes show that the dipole moment is linear to the particle volume, indicating that it originates from the non-centrosymmetric hexagonal lattice. The elongation of the nanocrystals also results in the anisotropic inter-particle interaction. One of the consequences is the formation of liquid crystalline phases when the nanorods are dispersed in solvent to a high enough concentration. The preparation of the stable liquid crystalline solution of CdSe nanorods is described, as well as the large-scale alignment of the nanorods by taking advantage of the long-range orientational correlation in the liquid crystals. In addition, we investigated the phase diagram of the nanorod solution, as a step toward understanding the possible role of the long-range attractive interaction between the nanorods in the formation of lyotropic liquid crystals.

  19. Single-step in-situ synthesis and optical properties of ZnSe nanostructured dielectric nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dey, Chirantan; Rahaman Molla, Atiar; Tarafder, Anal; Karmakar, Basudeb; Kr Mishra, Manish; De, Goutam; Goswami, Madhumita; Kothiyal, G. P.

    2014-04-07

    This work provides the evidence of visible red photoluminescent light emission from ZnSe nanocrystals (NCs) grown within a dielectric (borosilicate glass) matrix synthesized by a single step in-situ technique for the first time and the NC sizes were controlled by varying only the concentration of ZnSe in glass matrix. The ZnSe NCs were investigated by UV-Vis optical absorption spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The sizes of the ZnSe NCs estimated from the TEM images are found to alter in the range of 2–53 nm. Their smaller sizes of the NCs were also calculated by using the optical absorption spectra and the effective mass approximation model. The band gap enlargements both for carrier and exciton confinements were evaluated and found to be changed in the range of 0–1.0 eV. The Raman spectroscopic studies showed blue shifted Raman peaks of ZnSe at 295 and 315 cm{sup −1} indicating phonon confinement effect as well as compressive stress effect on the surface atoms of the NCs. Red photoluminescence in ZnSe-glass nanocomposite reveals a broad multiple-peak structure due to overlapping of emission from NC size related electron-hole recombination (∼707 nm) and emissions from defects to traps, which were formed due to Se and Zn vacancies signifying potential application in photonics.

  20. UMass-Resources-PHaSe-EFRC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UMass Resources UMass logo The following links provide information about important local (UMass Amherst) campus and departmental offices and resources, including major interdepartmental research centers that pursue work closely akin to research that was initiated or expanded under PHaSE. The last four links go to sites with energy or research news of potential interest to scientists interested in organic electronic materails. Major UMass User Facilities Vice-Chancellor for Research UMass

  1. EFRC Resources-Resources-PHaSe-EFRC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EFRC Resources EFRC map Last update 30 April 2015. The following links mostly provide information about accessing specialty equipment and the main instrument facilities that were created by PHaSE during 2009-2015. The last three links guide readers to information that is useful to anyone seriously interested in photovoltaics. Photovoltaic & Spectroscopy Facility Specialty Equipment for Electronic Materials Facility User Reservation Site NREL AM1.5 Solar Radiance Standard NREL Solar Cell

  2. Organization-About-PHaSe-EFRC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About Mission Statement (PDF) Organization Contact Us organization This webpage is provided for legacy archive purposes only, as of 30 April 2015. The day to day operations of the University of Massachusetts Amherst PHaSE EFRC are administered by co-directors. Russell is the Samuel Conte Distingushed Professor of Polymer Science and Engineering, with years of previous experience at IBM Research, over 620 publications and 21 patents for polymer chemistry and physics. Lahti has over 29 years at

  3. 2010 Archives-News-PHaSe-EFRC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 Archives PHaSE welcomes Dr. Lawrence Friedman as our new Managing Director. Larry comes to us with strong backgrounds in both academic and industrial experience. He is well acquainted with UMass Amherst from his time at Bayer Materials Science, where he was much involved in doctoral level recruiting and in academic/industrial liaison work as Head of University Relations. Before this, he was at Polaroid doing work in flims research as a manager and senior scientist. His academic credentials

  4. 2013 Archives-News-PHaSe-EFRC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Archives PHaSE EFRC work was featured in an MRS-TV video production, UMASS Amherst -- Optimal Design: Interdisciplinary Teamwork from Synthesis to Production, that was highlighted on electronic signage throughout the Fall 2014 Boston Materials Research Society meeting. Major vignettes were shown from Maroudas group, DV group, Emrick group. Both faculty and undergraduates/graduates/postdocs described EFRC work and work being carried out by closely allied groups interested in energy-related

  5. Applications of Admittance Spectroscopy in Photovoltaic Devices Beyond Majority Carrier Trapping Defects: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, J. V.; Crandall, R. S.; Repins, I. L.; Nardes, A. M.; Levi, D. H.; Sulima, O.

    2011-07-01

    Admittance spectroscopy is commonly used to characterize majority-carrier trapping defects. In today's practical photovoltaic devices, however, a number of other physical mechanisms may contribute to the admittance measurement and interfere with the data interpretation. Such challenges arise due to the violation of basic assumptions of conventional admittance spectroscopy such as single-junction, ohmic contact, highly conductive absorbers, and measurement in reverse bias. We exploit such violations to devise admittance spectroscopy-based methods for studying the respective origins of 'interference': majority-carrier mobility, non-ohmic contact potential barrier, minority-carrier inversion at hetero-interface, and minority-carrier lifetime in a device environment. These methods are applied to a variety of photovoltaic technologies: CdTe, Cu(In,Ga)Se2, Si HIT cells, and organic photovoltaic materials.

  6. System and method for trapping and measuring a charged particle in a liquid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reed, Mark A; Krstic, Predrag S; Guan, Weihua; Zhao, Xiongce

    2013-07-23

    A system and method for trapping a charged particle is disclosed. A time-varying periodic multipole electric potential is generated in a trapping volume. A charged particle under the influence of the multipole electric field is confined to the trapping volume. A three electrode configuration giving rise to a 3D Paul trap and a four planar electrode configuration giving rise to a 2D Paul trap are disclosed.

  7. System and method for trapping and measuring a charged particle in a liquid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reed, Mark A; Krstic, Predrag S; Guan, Weihua; Zhao, Xiongce

    2012-10-23

    A system and method for trapping a charged particle is disclosed. A time-varying periodic multipole electric potential is generated in a trapping volume. A charged particle under the influence of the multipole electric field is confined to the trapping volume. A three electrode configuration giving rise to a 3D Paul trap and a four planar electrode configuration giving rise to a 2D Paul trap are disclosed.

  8. 2009 Archives-News-PHaSe-EFRC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    09 Archives U.S. DOE Announces Energy Frontier Research Centers (08/2009) UMass Amherst EFRC Proposal (08/2009) EFRC Funding Distributed to Successful Centers (08/2009) PHaSE co-director Paul Lahti led off a set of presentations organized by the UMass Amherst Research & Liaison office to meet with a delegation of scientists from various technical research centers of the Gipuzkoa province in the Basque region of northern Spain. The delegation was organized through the Tecnalia Corporation,

  9. 2012 Archives-News-PHaSe-EFRC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Archives Tom Russell photo Joint work by Tom Russell, Alex Briseno, and coworkers describes fabrication and a significant degree of device optimization of a low band polymer pDPP/PCBM solar cell, in an article published in Advanced Materials. Photoconversion efficiency up to 5.6% with a fill factor of 60% were obtained. Morphology control based on solvent mixture tuning was critically important for best electrical output. [read more] PHaSE members D. Venkataraman and Tom Russell have edited a

  10. Haier: Compromise Agreement (2011-SE-1428) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compromise Agreement (2011-SE-1428) Haier: Compromise Agreement (2011-SE-1428) April 23, 2013 DOE and Haier America Trading, LLC entered into a Compromise Agreement to resolve a ...

  11. SeQuential Pacific Biodiesel LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pacific Biodiesel LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: SeQuential-Pacific Biodiesel LLC Place: Oregon Sector: Biofuels Product: JV between SeQuential Biofuels, Pacific Biodiesel,...

  12. Computer analysis of sodium cold trap design and performance. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McPheeters, C.C.; Raue, D.J.

    1983-11-01

    Normal steam-side corrosion of steam-generator tubes in Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBRs) results in liberation of hydrogen, and most of this hydrogen diffuses through the tubes into the heat-transfer sodium and must be removed by the purification system. Cold traps are normally used to purify sodium, and they operate by cooling the sodium to temperatures near the melting point, where soluble impurities including hydrogen and oxygen precipitate as NaH and Na/sub 2/O, respectively. A computer model was developed to simulate the processes that occur in sodium cold traps. The Model for Analyzing Sodium Cold Traps (MASCOT) simulates any desired configuration of mesh arrangements and dimensions and calculates pressure drops and flow distributions, temperature profiles, impurity concentration profiles, and impurity mass distributions.

  13. Recent progress in tailoring trap-based positron beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Natisin, M. R.; Hurst, N. C.; Danielson, J. R.; Surko, C. M. [Physics Department, University of California, San Diego La Jolla CA 92093-0319 (United States)

    2013-03-19

    Recent progress is described to implement two approaches to specially tailor trap-based positron beams. Experiments and simulations are presented to understand the limits on the energy spread and pulse duration of positron beams extracted from a Penning-Malmberg (PM) trap after the particles have been buffer-gas cooled (or heated) in the range of temperatures 1000 {>=} T {>=} 300 K. These simulations are also used to predict beam performance for cryogenically cooled positrons. Experiments and simulations are also presented to understand the properties of beams formed when plasmas are tailored in a PM trap in a 5 tesla magnetic field, then non-adiabatically extracted from the field using a specially designed high-permeability grid to create a new class of electrostatically guided beams.

  14. Photoinduced Surface Oxidation and Its Effect on the Exciton Dynamics of CdSe Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hines, Douglas A.; Becker, Matthew A.; Kamat, Prashant V.

    2012-11-14

    With increased interest in semiconductor nanoparticles for use in quantum dot solar cells there comes a need to understand the long-term photostability of such materials. Colloidal CdSe quantum dots (QDs) were suspended in toluene and stored in combinations of light/dark and N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} to simulate four possible benchtop storage environments. CdSe QDs stored in a dark, oxygen-free environment were observed to better retain their optical properties over the course of 90 days. The excited state lifetimes, determined through femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy, of air-equilibrated samples exposed to light exhibit a decrease in average lifetime (0.81 ns) when compared to samples stored in a nitrogen/dark environment (8.3 ns). A photoetching technique commonly used for controlled reduction of QD size was found to induce energetic trap states to CdSe QDs and accelerate the rate of electron-hole recombination. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis confirms surface oxidation, the extent of which is shown to be dependent on the thickness of the ligand shell.

  15. Advanced Gasification Mercury/Trace Metal Control with Monolith Traps

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Advanced Gasification Mercury/Trace Metal Control with Monolith Traps Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Advanced Gasification Mercury/Trace Metal Control with Monolith Traps Two Corning monoliths and a non-carbon-based material have been identified as potential additives for mercury capture in syngas at temperatures above 400°F and pressure of 600 psig. A new Corning monolith formulation, GR-F1-2189, described as an active sample appeared to be

  16. Electron beam ion source and electron beam ion trap (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, Reinard [Scientific Software Service, Kapellenweg 2a, D-63571 Gelnhausen (Germany); Kester, Oliver [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) and its trap variant [electron beam ion trap (EBIT)] celebrated their 40th and 20th anniversary, respectively, at the EBIS/T Symposium 2007 in Heidelberg. These technologically challenging sources of highly charged ions have seen a broad development in many countries over the last decades. In contrast to most other ion sources the recipe of improvement was not ''sorcery'' but a clear understanding of the physical laws and obeying the technological constraints. This review will report important achievements of the past as well as promising developments in the future.

  17. Three dimensional separation trap based on dielectrophoresis and use thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.

    2004-05-04

    An apparatus is adapted to separate target materials from other materials in a flow containing the target materials and other materials. A dielectrophoretic trap is adapted to receive the target materials and the other materials. At least one electrode system is provided in the trap. The electrode system has a three-dimensional configuration. The electrode system includes a first electrode and a second electrode that are shaped and positioned relative to each such that application of an electrical voltage to the first electrode and the second electrode creates a dielectrophoretic force and said dielectrophoretic force does not reach zero between the first electrode and the second electrode.

  18. Photo-instability of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots in poly(methylmethacrylate) film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Hongyi; Liu, Yu; Ye, Xiaoling; Chen, Yonghai

    2013-12-28

    The photo-instability of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) has been studied under varied conditions. We discussed the main features of the evolution of photoluminescence (PL) intensity and energy at different laser powers, which showed critical dependences on the environment. The PL red shift in a vacuum showed strong temperature dependence, from which we concluded that the thermal activation energy for trapping states of the charge carriers was about 14.7 meV. Furthermore, the PL spectra showed asymmetric evolution during the laser irradiation, for which two possible explanations were discussed. Those results provided a comprehensive picture for the photo-instability of the colloidal QDs under different conditions.

  19. LgCOOleS, Se*&,,

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ; "Ofice Mem . m *" ' ' *IilCl:t Consists of & " ' / Of LgCOOleS, Se*&,, es * UNITED STATES G-OVERNM NT <;$)~~ 3i;t-j /Lj ' , ~~~' jCjC;O c) TO I LT. :s. Clnr!te, ,;or,~~~,~' , -.,,..:-:-Y"' r~-;i~.L.-Z.:r DATE: uL"C!.,?r 6, 1' ?L9 A meting mj: !1:1d in i:1CG bet,. _ ^ .- ',cel representatives 51 ;.2rshz:i sr.3 the A;.35 to nwotiztc .the prices for producing FY-1: (brow oxise), _1 I%-; (green salt and .?T-12 (he::.-iZluoriic) fcr the sc2or.d 3,uarter of

  20. Synthesis and optical study of green light emitting polymer coated CdSe/ZnSe core/shell nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tripathi, S.K.; Sharma, Mamta

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► Synthesis of Polymer coated core CdSe and CdSe/ZnSe core/shell NCs. ► From TEM image, the spherical nature of CdSe and CdSe/ZnSe is obtained. ► Exhibiting green band photoemission peak at 541 nm and 549 nm for CdSe core and CdSe/ZnSe core/shell NCs. ► The shell thickness has been calculated by using superposition of quantum confinement energy model. - Abstract: CdSe/ZnSe Core/Shell NCs dispersed in PVA are synthesized by chemical method at room temperature. This is characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), UV/Vis spectra and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). TEM image shows the spherical nature of CdSe/ZnSe core/shell NCs. The red shift of absorption and emission peak of CdSe/ZnSe core/shell NCs as compared to CdSe core confirmed the formation of core/shell. The superposition of quantum confinement energy model is used for calculation of thickness of ZnSe shell.

  1. Differentially pumped dual linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Owen, Benjamin C.; Kenttamaa, Hilkka I.

    2015-10-20

    The present disclosure provides a new tandem mass spectrometer and methods of using the same for analyzing charged particles. The differentially pumped dual linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer of the present disclose includes a combination of two linear quadrupole (LQIT) mass spectrometers with differentially pumped vacuum chambers.

  2. Single particle density of trapped interacting quantum gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bala, Renu; Bosse, J.; Pathak, K. N.

    2015-05-15

    An expression for single particle density for trapped interacting gases has been obtained in first order of interaction using Greens function method. Results are easily simplified for homogeneous quantum gases and are found to agree with famous results obtained by Huang-Yang-Luttinger and Lee-Yang.

  3. An extension of the multiple-trapping model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shkilev, V. P.

    2012-07-15

    The hopping charge transport in disordered semiconductors is considered. Using the concept of the transport energy level, macroscopic equations are derived that extend a multiple-trapping model to the case of semiconductors with both energy and spatial disorders. It is shown that, although both types of disorder can cause dispersive transport, the frequency dependence of conductivity is determined exclusively by the spatial disorder.

  4. GreenPowerTM Trap-Muffler System | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    GreenPowerTM Trap-Muffler System GreenPowerTM Trap-Muffler System Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 ...

  5. SulfaTrap(tm): Novel Sorbent to Clean Biogas for Fuel Cell Combined...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SulfaTrap(tm): Novel Sorbent to Clean Biogas for Fuel Cell Combined Heat and Power SulfaTrap(tm): Novel Sorbent to Clean Biogas for Fuel Cell Combined Heat and Power Improving ...

  6. Intra-catalyst Reductant Chemistry in Lean NOx Traps: A Study...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Intra-catalyst Reductant Chemistry in Lean NOx Traps: A Study on Sulfur Effects Intra-catalyst Reductant Chemistry in Lean NOx Traps: A Study on Sulfur Effects Presentation given ...

  7. SE-72/AS-72 generator system based on Se extraction/ As reextraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fassbender, Michael Ernst; Ballard, Beau D

    2013-09-10

    The preparation of a .sup.72Se/.sup.72As radioisotope generator involves forming an acidic aqueous solution of an irradiated alkali bromide target such as a NaBr target, oxidizing soluble bromide in the solution to elemental bromine, removing the elemental bromine, evaporating the resulting solution to a residue, removing hydrogen chloride from the residue, forming an acidic aqueous solution of the residue, adding a chelator that selectively forms a chelation complex with selenium, and extracting the chelation complex from the acidic aqueous solution into an organic phase. As the .sup.72Se generates .sup.72As in the organic phase, the .sup.72As may be extracted repeatedly from the organic phase with an aqueous acid solution.

  8. MgSe/ZnSe/CdSe coupled quantum wells grown on InP substrate with intersubband absorption covering 1.55??m

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Guopeng; Shen, Aidong; De Jesus, Joel; Tamargo, Maria C.

    2014-12-08

    The authors report the observation of intersubband (ISB) transitions in the optical communication wavelength region in MgSe/ZnSe/CdSe coupled quantum wells (QWs). The coupled QWs were grown on InP substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. By inserting ZnSe layers to compensate the strain, samples with high structural quality were obtained, as indicated by well resolved satellite peaks in high-resolution x-ray diffraction. The observed ISB transition energies agree well with the calculated values.

  9. SE-MA-NO Electric Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SE-MA-NO Electric Coop Jump to: navigation, search Name: SE-MA-NO Electric Coop Place: Missouri Phone Number: (417) 924-3291 Website: www.semano.com Facebook: https:...

  10. The role of ligands in the optical and electronic spectra of CdSe nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilina, Svletana; Sergei, Ivanov A; Victor, Klimov I; Sergei, Tretiak

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the impact of ligands on morphology, electronic structure, and optical response of the Cd33Se33 cluster, which already overlapps in size with the smallest synthesized CdSe quantum dots (QDs). Our Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations demonstrate significant surface reorganization both for the bare cluster and for the cluster capped by amine and phosphine oxide ligand models. We observe strong surface-ligand interactions leading to substantial charge redistribution and polarization effects on the surface. This effect results in the appearance of hybridized states, where the electronic density is spread over the cluster and the ligands. Neither the ligand's nor hybridized molecular orbitals appear as trap states inside or near the band gap of the QD. Instead, being optically dark, dense hybridized states from the edges of the valence and the conduction bands could open new relaxation channels for high energy photoexcitations. Comparing quantum dots passivated by different ligands, we found that hybridized states are denser in at the edge of the conduction band of the cluster ligated with phosphine oxide molecules than that with primary amines. Such a different manifestation of ligand binding may potentially lead to the faster electron relaxation in dots passivated by phosphine oxide than by amine ligands, which is in agreement with experimental data.

  11. Probing Interfacial Electronic States in CdSe Quantum Dots using Second Harmonic Generation Spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Doughty, Benjamin L; Ma, Yingzhong; Shaw, Robert W

    2015-01-01

    Understanding and rationally controlling the properties of nanomaterial surfaces is a rapidly expanding field of research due to the dramatic role they play on the optical and electronic properties vital to light harvesting, emitting and detection technologies. This information is essential to the continued development of synthetic approaches designed to tailor interfaces for optimal nanomaterial based device performance. In this work, closely spaced electronic excited states in model CdSe quantum dots (QDs) are resolved using second harmonic generation (SHG) spectroscopy, and the corresponding contributions from surface species to these states are assessed. Two distinct spectral features are observed in themore » SHG spectra, which are not readily identified in linear absorption and photoluminescence excitation spectra. These features include a weak band at 395 6 nm, which coincides with transitions to the 2S1/2 1Se state, and a much more pronounced band at 423 4 nm arising from electronic transitions to the 1P3/2 1Pe state. Chemical modification of the QD surfaces through oxidation resulted in disappearance of the SHG band corresponding to the 1P3/2 1Pe state, indicating prominent surface contributions. Signatures of deep trap states localized on the surfaces of the QDs are also observed. We further find that the SHG signal intensities depend strongly on the electronic states being probed and their relative surface contributions, thereby offering additional insight into the surface specificity of SHG signals from QDs.« less

  12. Goodman Manufacturing: Order (2011-SE-4301) | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Goodman Manufacturing: Order (2011-SE-4301) Goodman Manufacturing: Order (2011-SE-4301) March 2, 2012 DOE ordered Goodman Manufacturing Company, L.P., to pay a $14,800 civil penalty after finding Goodman had manufactured and distributed in commerce in the U.S. at least 74 units of commercial package air conditioner basic model CPC180*. PDF icon Goodman Manufacturing: Order (2011-SE-4301) More Documents & Publications Goodman Manufacturing: Proposed Penalty (2011-SE-4301) Goodman

  13. Perlick: Order (2013-SE-14001) | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Order (2013-SE-14001) Perlick: Order (2013-SE-14001) May 14, 2015 DOE ordered Perlick Corporation to pay a $168,200 civil penalty after finding Perlick had manufactured and distributed in commerce in the U.S. 841 units of basic model HP24F, a noncompliant freezer. The Order adopted a Compromise Agreement, which reflected settlement terms between DOE and Perlick. PDF icon Perlick: Order (2013-SE-14001) More Documents & Publications Perlick: Proposed Penalty (2013-SE-14001) Perlick: Order

  14. Morris: Order (2013-SE-5403) | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Order (2013-SE-5403) Morris: Order (2013-SE-5403) July 21, 2015 DOE ordered Morris Products, Inc. to pay a $170,720 civil penalty after finding Morris had manufactured and distributed in commerce in the U.S. a large quantity of noncompliant metal halide lamp fixtures. The Order adopted a Compromise Agreement, which reflected settlement terms between DOE and Morris. PDF icon Morris: Order (2013-SE-5403) More Documents & Publications Morris: Proposed Penalty (2013-SE-5403) Morris:

  15. Bose gas in a single-beam optical dipole trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simon, Lena; Strunz, Walter T.

    2010-06-15

    We study an ultracold Bose gas in an optical dipole trap consisting of one single focused laser beam. An analytical expression for the corresponding density of states beyond the usual harmonic approximation is obtained. We are thus able to discuss the existence of a critical temperature for Bose-Einstein condensation and find that the phase transition must be enabled by a cutoff near the threshold. Moreover, we study the dynamics of evaporative cooling and observe significant deviations from the findings for the well-established harmonic approximation. Furthermore, we investigate Bose-Einstein condensates in such a trap in Thomas-Fermi approximation and determine analytical expressions for chemical potential, internal energy, and Thomas-Fermi radii beyond the usual harmonic approximation.

  16. Dipole Excitation With A Paul Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacAskill, J. A.; Madzunkov, S. M.; Chutjian, A.

    2011-06-01

    Preliminary results are presented for the use of an auxiliary radiofrequency (rf) excitation voltage in combination with a high purity, high voltage rf generator to perform dipole excitation within a high precision Paul ion trap. These results show the effects of the excitation frequency over a continuous frequency range on the resultant mass spectra from the Paul trap with particular emphasis on ion ejection times, ion signal intensity, and peak shapes. Ion ejection times are found to decrease continuously with variations in dipole frequency about several resonant values and show remarkable symmetries. Signal intensities vary in a complex fashion with numerous resonant features and are driven to zero at specific frequency values. Observed intensity variations depict dipole excitations that target ions of all masses as well as individual masses. Substantial increases in mass resolution are obtained with resolving powers for nitrogen increasing from 114 to 325.

  17. Real-time calibration of a feedback trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gavrilov, Momčilo; Jun, Yonggun; Bechhoefer, John

    2014-09-15

    Feedback traps use closed-loop control to trap or manipulate small particles and molecules in solution. They have been applied to the measurement of physical and chemical properties of particles and to explore fundamental questions in the non-equilibrium statistical mechanics of small systems. These applications have been hampered by drifts in the electric forces used to manipulate the particles. Although the drifts are small for measurements on the order of seconds, they dominate on time scales of minutes or slower. Here, we show that a recursive maximum likelihood (RML) algorithm can allow real-time measurement and control of electric and stochastic forces over time scales of hours. Simulations show that the RML algorithm recovers known parameters accurately. Experimental estimates of diffusion coefficients are also consistent with expected physical properties.

  18. Trapping of dust and dust acoustic waves in laboratory plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prabhakara, H.R.; Tanna, V.L. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 424 (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 424 (India)

    1996-08-01

    Trapping of negatively charged dust particles is observed in a hot cathode plasma discharge when a layer of dust is exposed to the plasma. The particles are visible in the scattered He{endash}Ne laser light. The trajectories of individual particles have been photographed. The dust particles are excluded from the sheath region of any object in the plasma. The intensity of scattered light as well as the potential on a floating Langmuir probe show coherent fluctuations in the frequency range 1{endash}15 Hz. After several hours of exposure to the plasma, the dust layer develops striations similar to those on sand dunes. Trapping of dust particles by the plasma and the possible identification of the observed low-frequency fluctuations with dust acoustic waves are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Steven Chu: Laser Cooling and Trapping of Atoms

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Steven Chu Laser Cooling and Trapping of Atoms Resources with Additional Information * Interviews, Speeches, and Presentations * Patents Steven Chu Photo Credit: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Roy Kaltschmidt, Photographer Steven Chu was appointed by President Barack Obama to be the 12th Secretary of Energy and served in this capacity until April 22, 2013. He was previously Director of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Professor in the Physics Department at the University of

  20. Qualitative analysis of trapped Dirac fermions in graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jakubsk, Vt Krej?i?k, David

    2014-10-15

    We study the confinement of Dirac fermions in graphene and in carbon nanotubes by an external magnetic field, mechanical deformations or inhomogeneities in the substrate. By applying variational principles to the square of the Dirac operator, we obtain sufficient and necessary conditions for confinement of the quasi-particles. The rigorous theoretical results are illustrated on the realistic examples of the three classes of traps.

  1. Observation of cold Rb{sub 2} molecules trapped in an optical dipole trap using a laser-pulse-train technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menegatti, Carlos R.; Marangoni, Bruno S.; Marcassa, Luis G.

    2011-11-15

    In this work, we have developed and characterized a laser-pulse-train technique to observe cold Rb{sub 2} molecules trapped in an optical dipole trap. The molecules are produced in a magneto-optical trap, and then loaded into a crossed optical dipole trap. The time evolution of the molecular population is obtained by applying a laser pulse train, which photoionizes the ground-state molecules through intermediate molecular bands. Our results show that this technique allows us to obtain a faster data acquisition rate of the time evolution of the molecule population than other techniques.

  2. Single microbe trap and release in sub-microfluidics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.

    2013-05-08

    Lab-on-a-chip systems have substantially impacted the way life-sciences are explored; life on earth, however, comprises mostly of microbes, which due to their sub-micron dimensions and high mobility are more challenging to dynamically manipulate on-a-chip. To address this challenge, we developed a high resolution microfluidic system (submicrofluidics) fabricated by direct electron beam lithography that is capable of trapping single microbes and releasing them upon demand. The fabrication method enabled the integration of sub-micron indentations (400 nm) with millimetre-scale fluidic channels rapidly in a single processing step. The larger channels deliver the cell suspension and reagents, while the sub-micron indentations immobilize the cells by locally increasing the hydrodynamic resistance. By volume exclusion, single cell trapping was possible in this system without any surface treatment. By increasing the flow rate, the microbes overcome the trap barrier and pass through the narrow indentation without undergoing lysis with kinetics that depend on their size. The fabrication method and its performance are described, along with microbial characterisations using E. coli.

  3. WATER TRAPPING ON TIDALLY LOCKED TERRESTRIAL PLANETS REQUIRES SPECIAL CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Jun; Abbot, Dorian S.; Liu, Yonggang; Hu, Yongyun

    2014-12-01

    Surface liquid water is essential for standard planetary habitability. Calculations of atmospheric circulation on tidally locked planets around M stars suggest that this peculiar orbital configuration lends itself to the trapping of large amounts of water in kilometers-thick ice on the night side, potentially removing all liquid water from the day side where photosynthesis is possible. We study this problem using a global climate model including coupled atmosphere, ocean, land, and sea ice components as well as a continental ice sheet model driven by the climate model output. For a waterworld, we find that surface winds transport sea ice toward the day side and the ocean carries heat toward the night side. As a result, nightside sea ice remains O(10m) thick and nightside water trapping is insignificant. If a planet has large continents on its night side, they can grow ice sheets O(1000m) thick if the geothermal heat flux is similar to Earth's or smaller. Planets with a water complement similar to Earth's would therefore experience a large decrease in sea level when plate tectonics drives their continents onto the night side, but would not experience complete dayside dessiccation. Only planets with a geothermal heat flux lower than Earth's, much of their surface covered by continents, and a surface water reservoir O(10%) of Earth's would be susceptible to complete water trapping.

  4. Wide emission-tunable CdTeSe/ZnSe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Wide emission-tunable CdTeSeZnSeZnS core-shell quantum dots and their conjugation with E. coli O-157 Highlights: * QDs with variety morphology were obtained via an ...

  5. Two-dimensional GaSe/MoSe2 misfit bilayer heterojunctions by van der Waals epitaxy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Xufan; Lin, Ming-Wei; Lin, Junhao; Huang, Bing; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Ma, Cheng; Wang, Kai; Zhou, Wu; Pantelides, Sokrates T.; Chi, Miaofang; et al

    2016-04-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) heterostructures hold the promise for future atomically-thin electronics and optoelectronics due to their diverse functionalities. While heterostructures consisting of different transition metal dichacolgenide monolayers with well-matched lattices and novel physical properties have been successfully fabricated via van der Waals (vdW) or edge epitaxy, constructing heterostructures from monolayers of layered semiconductors with large lattice misfits still remains challenging. Here, we report the growth of monolayer GaSe/MoSe2 heterostructures with large lattice misfit by two-step chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Both vertically stacked and lateral heterostructures are demonstrated. The vertically stacked GaSe/MoSe2 heterostructures exhibit vdW epitaxy with well-aligned lattice orientation between themore » two layers, forming an incommensurate vdW heterostructure. However, the lateral heterostructures exhibit no lateral epitaxial alignment at the interface between GaSe and MoSe2 crystalline domains. Instead of a direct lateral connection at the boundary region where the same lattice orientation is observed between GaSe and MoSe2 monolayer domains in lateral GaSe/MoSe2 heterostructures, GaSe monolayers are found to overgrow MoSe2 during CVD, forming a stripe of vertically stacked vdW heterostructure at the crystal interface. Such vertically-stacked vdW GaSe/MoSe2 heterostructures are shown to form p-n junctions with effective transport and separation of photo-generated charge carriers between layers, resulting in a gate-tunable photovoltaic response. In conclusion, these GaSe/MoSe2 vdW heterostructures should have applications as gate-tunable field-effect transistors, photodetectors, and solar cells.« less

  6. Spectral photoresponse of ZnSe/GaAs(001) heterostructures with CdSe ultra-thin quantum well insertions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valverde-Chvez, D. A.; Sutara, F.; Hernndez-Caldern, I.

    2014-05-15

    We present a study of the spectral photoresponse (SPR) of ZnSe/GaAs(001) heterostructures for different ZnSe film thickness with and without CdSe ultra-thin quantum well (UTQW) insertions. We observe a significant increase of the SPR of heterostructures containing 3 monolayer thick CdSe UTQW insertions; these results encourage their use in photodetectors and solar cells.

  7. Twinning effect on photoluminescence spectra of ZnSe nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Jing; Wang, Chunrui Wu, Binhe; Xu, Xiaofeng; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Oh, Hongseok; Baek, Hyeonjun; Yi, Gyu-Chul

    2014-11-07

    Bandgap engineering in a single material along the axial length of nanowires may be realized by arranging periodic twinning, whose twin plane is vertical to the axial length of nanowires. In this paper, we report the effect of twin on photoluminescence of ZnSe nanowires, which refers to the bandgap of it. The exciton-related emission peaks of transverse twinning ZnSe nanowires manifest a 10-meV-blue-shift in comparison with those of longitudinal twinning ZnSe nanowires. The blue-shift is attributed to quantum confinement effect, which is influenced severely by the proportion of wurtzite ZnSe layers in ZnSe nanowires.

  8. Imaging electronic trap states in perovskite thin films with combined fluorescence and femtosecond transient absorption microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xiao, Kai; Ma, Ying -Zhong; Simpson, Mary Jane; Doughty, Benjamin; Yang, Bin

    2016-04-22

    Charge carrier trapping degrades the performance of organometallic halide perovskite solar cells. To characterize the locations of electronic trap states in a heterogeneous photoactive layer, a spatially resolved approach is essential. Here, we report a comparative study on methylammonium lead tri-iodide perovskite thin films subject to different thermal annealing times using a combined photoluminescence (PL) and femtosecond transient absorption microscopy (TAM) approach to spatially map trap states. This approach coregisters the initially populated electronic excited states with the regions that recombine radiatively. Although the TAM images are relatively homogeneous for both samples, the corresponding PL images are highly structured. Themore » remarkable variation in the PL intensities as compared to transient absorption signal amplitude suggests spatially dependent PL quantum efficiency, indicative of trapping events. Furthermore, detailed analysis enables identification of two trapping regimes: a densely packed trapping region and a sparse trapping area that appear as unique spatial features in scaled PL maps.« less

  9. Cesium trapping characteristics on fly ash filter according to different carrier gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, Jin-Myeong; Park, Jang-Jin; Song, Kee-Chan

    2007-07-01

    Fly ash, which is a kind of waste from a coal fired power plant, has been used as a trapping material because it contains silica and alumina suitable for forming pollucite (CsAlSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}). Fly ash is sintered in order to fabricate it into a self-standing filter. The effect of a carrier gas on a cesium trapping quantity is investigated to analyze the cesium trapping characteristics by the fly ash filter in a lab-scale experimental apparatus. The chemical form of the cesium trapped on the filter after trapping cesium is identified to be a pollucite phase regardless of the type of carrier gas. The trapping efficiency of cesium by the fly ash filter under the air and NO{sub x}/air conditions is up to 99.0 %. However, the trapping efficiency of the cesium under the SO{sub x} condition was decreased to 80.0 %. (authors)

  10. Ion Trap Array-Based Systems And Methods For Chemical Analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Whitten, William B [Oak Ridge, TN; Ramsey, J Michael [Knoxville, TN

    2005-08-23

    An ion trap-based system for chemical analysis includes an ion trap array. The ion trap array includes a plurality of ion traps arranged in a 2-dimensional array for initially confining ions. Each of the ion traps comprise a central electrode having an aperture, a first and second insulator each having an aperture sandwiching the central electrode, and first and second end cap electrodes each having an aperture sandwiching the first and second insulator. A structure for simultaneously directing a plurality of different species of ions out from the ion traps is provided. A spectrometer including a detector receives and identifies the ions. The trap array can be used with spectrometers including time-of-flight mass spectrometers and ion mobility spectrometers.

  11. X-ray irradiation induced changes in electron transport in stabilized a-Se photoconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walornyj, M.; Kasap, S. O.

    2013-12-07

    We have examined the effect of high-dose x-ray irradiation on electron transport in stabilized amorphous selenium (a-Se) x-ray photoconductive films (of the type used in x-ray image detectors) by measuring the electron lifetime ?{sub e} through interrupted-field time-of-flight experiments. X-ray induced effects have been examined through two types of experiments. In recovery experiments, the a-Se was preirradiated with and without an applied field (5 V/?m) during irradiation with sufficient dose (typically ?20 Gy at 21 C) to significantly reduce the electron lifetime by ?50%, and then the recovery of the lifetime was monitored as a function of time at three different temperatures, 10 C, 21 C, and 35 C. The lifetime recovery kinetics was exponential with a relaxation time ?{sub r} that is thermally activated with an activation energy of 1.66 eV. ?{sub r} is a few hours at 21 C and only a few minutes at 35 C. In experiments examining the irradiation induced effects, the a-Se film was repeatedly exposed to x-ray radiation and the changes in the drift mobility and lifetime were monitored as a function of accumulated dose D. There was no observable change in the drift mobility. At 21 C, the concentration of x-ray induced deep traps (or capture centers), N{sub d}, increases linearly with D (N{sub d} ? D) whereas at 35 C, the recovery process prevents a linear increase in N{sub d} with D, and N{sub d} saturates. In all cases, even under high dose irradiation (?50 Gy), the lifetime was recoverable to its original equilibrium (pre-exposure) value within a few relaxation times.

  12. CuInSe/sub 2/-based photoelectrochemical cells: their use in characterization of thin CuInSe/sub 2/ films, and as photovoltaic cells per se

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cahen, D.; Chen, Y.W.; Ireland, P.J.; Noufi, R.; Turner, J.A.; Rincon, C.; Bachmann, K.J.

    1984-05-01

    Photoelectrochemistry has been employed to characterize the p-CuInSe/sub 2/ component of the CdS/CuInSe/sub 2/ on-metal and a nonaqueous electrolyte containing a redox couple not specifically adsorbed onto the semiconductor, we can test the films for photovoltaic activity and obtain effective electronic properties of them, before CdS deposition, in a nondestructive manner. Electrochemical decomposition of CuInSe/sub 2/ was investigated in acetonitrile solutions to determine the mechanism of decomposition (n and p) in the dark and under illumination. Electrochemical, solution chemical and surface analyses confirmed at the light-assisted decomposition of CuInSe/sub 2/ resulted in metal ions and elemental chalcogen. On the basis of the results from the electrochemical decomposition, and studies on the solid state chemistry of the (Cu/sub 2/Se)/sub x/(In/sub 2/Se/sub 3/)/sub 1-x/ system and surface analyses, the CuInSe/sub 2//polyiodide interface was stabilized and up to 11.7% conversion efficiencies were obtained.

  13. Thermoelectric transport of Se-rich Ag{sub 2}Se in normal phases and phase transitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mi, Wenlong; Lv, Yanhong; Qiu, Pengfei; Shi, Xun E-mail: cld@mail.sic.ac.cn; Chen, Lidong E-mail: cld@mail.sic.ac.cn; Zhang, Tiansong

    2014-03-31

    Small amount of Se atoms are used to tune the carrier concentrations (n{sub H}) and electrical transport in Ag{sub 2}Se. Significant enhancements in power factor and thermoelectric figure of merit (zT) are observed in the compositions of Ag{sub 2}Se{sub 1.06} and Ag{sub 2}Se{sub 1.08}. The excessive Se atoms do not change the intrinsically electron-conducting character in Ag{sub 2}Se. The detailed analysis reveals the experiment optimum carrier concentration in Ag{sub 2}Se is around 5??10{sup 18}?cm{sup ?3}. We also investigate the temperature of maximum zT and the thermoelectric transport during the first order phase transitions using the recently developed measurement system.

  14. Influence of local capillary trapping on containment system effectiveness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryant, Steven

    2014-03-31

    Immobilization of CO2 injected into deep subsurface storage reservoirs is a critical component of risk assessment for geologic CO2 storage (GCS). Local capillary trapping (LCT) is a recently established mode of immobilization that arises when CO2 migrates due to buoyancy through heterogeneous storage reservoirs. This project sought to assess the amount and extent of LCT expected in storage formations under a range of injection conditions, and to confirm the persistence of LCT if the seal overlying the reservoir were to lose its integrity. Numerical simulation using commercial reservoir simulation software was conducted to assess the influence of injection. Laboratory experiments, modeling and numerical simulation were conducted to assess the effect of compromised seal integrity. Bench-scale (0.6 m by 0.6 m by 0.03 m) experiments with surrogate fluids provided the first empirical confirmation of the key concepts underlying LCT: accumulation of buoyant nonwetting phase at above residual saturations beneath capillary barriers in a variety of structures, which remains immobile under normal capillary pressure gradients. Immobilization of above-residual saturations is a critical distinction between LCT and the more familiar “residual saturation trapping.” To estimate the possible extent of LCT in a storage reservoir an algorithm was developed to identify all potential local traps, given the spatial distribution of capillary entry pressure in the reservoir. The algorithm assumes that the driving force for CO2 migration can be represented as a single value of “critical capillary entry pressure” Pc,entrycrit, such that cells with capillary entry pressure greater/less than Pc,entrycrit act as barriers/potential traps during CO2 migration. At intermediate values of Pc,entrycrit, the barrier regions become more laterally extensive in the reservoir, approaching a percolation threshold while non-barrier regions remain numerous. The maximum possible extent of LCT thus occurs at Pc,entrycrit near this threshold. Testing predictions of this simple algorithm against full-physics simulations of buoyancy-driven CO2 migration support the concept of critical capillary entry pressure. However, further research is needed to determine whether a single value of critical capillary entry pressure always applies and how that value can be determined a priori. Simulations of injection into high-resolution (cells 0.3 m on a side) 2D and 3D heterogeneous domains show two characteristic behaviors. At small gravity numbers (vertical flow velocity much less than horizontal flow velocity) the CO2 fills local traps as well as regions that would act as local barriers if CO2 were moving only due to buoyancy. When injection ceases, the CO2 migrates vertically to establish large saturations within local traps and residual saturation elsewhere. At large gravity numbers, the CO2 invades a smaller portion of the perforated interval. Within this smaller swept zone the local barriers are not invaded, but local traps are filled to large saturation during injection and remain during post-injection gravity-driven migration. The small gravity number behavior is expected in the region within 100 m of a vertical injection well at anticipated rates of injection for commercial GCS. Simulations of leakage scenarios (through-going region of large permeability imposed in overlying seal) indicate that LCT persists (i.e. CO2 remains held in a large fraction of the local iv traps) and the persistence is independent of injection rate during storage. Simulations of leakage for the limiting case of CO2 migrating vertically from an areally extensive emplacement in the lower portion of a reservoir showed similar strong persistence of LCT. This research has two broad implications for GCS. The first is that LCT can retain a significant fraction of the CO2 stored in a reservoir – above and beyond the residual saturation -- if the overlying seal were to fail. Thus frameworks for risk assessment should be extended to account for LCT. The second implication is that compared to pressure driven flow in reservoirs, CO2 migration and trapping behave in a qualitatively different manner in heterogeneous reservoirs when buoyancy is the dominant driving force for flow. Thus simulations of GCS that neglect capillary heterogeneity will fail to capture important features of the CO2 plume. While commercial reservoir simulation software can account for fine scale capillary heterogeneity, it has not been designed to work efficiently with such domains, and no simulators can handle fine-scale resolution throughout the reservoir. A possible way to upscale the migration and trapping is to apply an “effective residual saturation” to coarse-scale grids. While the extent of overall immobilization can be correlated in this way, all coarser grids failed to capture the distance traveled by the migrating CO2 for large gravity number. Thus it remains unclear how best to account for LCT in the routine simulation work-flow that will be needed for large-scale GCS. Alternatives meriting investigation include streamline methods, reduced-physics proxies (e.g. particle tracking), and biased invasion percolation algorithms, which are based on precisely the capillary heterogeneity essential for LCT.

  15. Point defects in CdTexSe1-x crystals grown from a Te-rich solution for applications in detecting radiation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gul, R.; Roy, U. N.; Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A.; Lee, W.; Yang, G.; Burger, A.; James, R. B.; et al

    2015-04-15

    We investigated cadmium telluride selenide (CdTeSe) crystals, newly grown by the Traveling Heater Method (THM), for the presence and abundance of point defects. Deep Level Transient spectroscopy (I-DLTS) was used to determine the energies of the traps, their capture cross sections, and densities. The bias across the detectors was varied from (1–30) V. Four types of point defects were identified, ranging from 10 meV to 0.35 eV. Two dominant traps at energies of 0.18 eV and 0.14 eV were studied in depth. Cd vacancies are found at lower concentrations than other point defects present in the material.

  16. Glass formation and the third harmonic generation of Cu{sub 2}SeGeSe{sub 2}As{sub 2}Se{sub 3} glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reshak, A. H.; Klymovych, O. S.; Zmiy, O. F.; Myronchuk, G. L.; Zamuruyeva, O. V.; Alahmed, Z. A.; Chysk, J.; Bila, Jiri; Kamarudin, H.

    2014-10-14

    We have performed the investigation of the nonlinear optical properties namely the third harmonic generation (THG) of the glass-formation region in the Cu{sub 2}SeGeSe{sub 2}As{sub 2}Se{sub 3} system. The samples were synthesized by direct single-temperature method from high-purity elementary substances. We have found that the value of disorder parameter ? depends on the composition of the glassy alloys. The measurements show that increasing the Cu{sub 2}Se concentration leads to increased slope of the absorption edge, which may be explained by the decrease of the height of random potential relief for the electrons in the tails of the state density which border the band edges. A very sharp increase in the THG at low temperature was observed. Significant enhancement in THG was obtained with decreasing the energy gap, which agreed well with the nonlinear optical susceptibilities obtained from other glasses.

  17. Philips: Order (2014-SE-48006) | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Order (2014-SE-48006) Philips: Order (2014-SE-48006) April 14, 2015 DOE ordered Philips Lighting North America Corp. to pay a $75,000 civil penalty after finding Philips had manufactured and distributed in commerce in the U.S. at least 12,275 units of a variety of illuminated exit sign models. The Order adopted a Compromise Agreement, which reflected settlement terms between DOE and Philips. PDF icon Philips: Order (2014-SE-48006) More Documents & Publications Philips: Proposed Penalty

  18. Everest Refrigeration: Order (2015-SE-42001) | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Order (2015-SE-42001) Everest Refrigeration: Order (2015-SE-42001) June 9, 2015 DOE ordered Bu Sung America Corporation (dba Everest Refrigeration) to pay a $12,080 civil penalty after finding Bu Sung had manufactured and distributed in commerce in the U.S. at least 64 units of noncompliant commercial refrigerator basic model ESGR3. The Order adopted a Compromise Agreement, which reflected settlement terms between DOE and Bu Sung. PDF icon Everest Refrigeration: Order (2015-SE-42001) More

  19. DOE - NNSA/NFO -- News & Views Accident Trap

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accident Traps Four Workers 1,800 Feet below Ground Photo - rescue from 1,800 feet below Over the past 42 years the Nevada Test Site has earned an excellent safety record. Thousands of workers have completed millions of accident-free hours at this heavy industry site. Since 1957 (no accurate records exist for 1951-56) there have been 46 fatalities on the Test Site, and six fatalities at other Test-Site-related locations. Being safety conscious and prepared minimizes the impact of the occasional

  20. Selective interactions in trapped ions: State reconstruction and quantum logic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solano, E.

    2005-01-01

    We propose the implementation of selective interactions of atom-motion subspaces in trapped ions. These interactions yield resonant exchange of population inside a selected subspace, leaving the others in a highly dispersive regime. Selectivity allows us to generate motional Fock (and other nonclassical) states with high purity out of a wide class of initial states, and becomes an unconventional cooling mechanism when the ground state is chosen. Individual population of number states can be distinctively measured, as well as the motional Wigner function. Furthermore, a protocol for implementing quantum logic through a suitable control of selective subspaces is presented.

  1. Selective control of the symmetric Dicke subspace in trapped ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, C. E.; Retamal, J. C.; Solano, E.

    2007-09-15

    We propose a method of manipulating selectively the symmetric Dicke subspace in the internal degrees of freedom of N trapped ions. We show that the direct access to ionic-motional subspaces, based on a suitable tuning of motion-dependent ac Stark shifts, induces a two-level dynamics involving previously selected ionic Dicke states. In this manner, it is possible to produce, sequentially and unitarily, ionic Dicke states with increasing excitation number. Moreover, we propose a probabilistic technique to produce directly any ionic Dicke state assuming suitable initial conditions.

  2. Nonideal fishbone instability excited by trapped energetic electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Y.; Tang, C. J.; Wang, Z. T.; Long, Y. X.; Dong, J. Q.

    2013-03-15

    It is shown that trapped energetic electrons can resonate with the collisionless m = 1 nonideal kink mode, therefore exciting the nonideal e-fishbone, which would often lead to a drop in soft x-ray emissivity and frequency chirping. The theory predictions agree well with the experimental observations of e-fishbone on HL-2A. It is also found that the effects of MHD energy of background plasma might be the reason for the observed phenomena: frequency chirping up and down, and V-font-style sweeping.

  3. Photovoltaic cell with light trapping for enhanced efficiency

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brener, Igal; Fofang, Nche Tumasang; Luk, Ting S.

    2015-11-19

    The efficiency of a photovoltaic cell is enhanced by light trapping using Mie-scattering nanostructures. In one embodiment, an array of nanocylinders is formed on the front surface of a silicon film to enhance forward scattering into the film, and an array of nanocylinders is formed on the back surface to enhance backscattering so that more light is absorbed within the silicon film. In an alternate embodiment, a mirror layer is formed on the back surface of the silicon film to reflect light within the film back toward the front-surface nanocylinder array.

  4. Charge Transfer Fluorescence and 34 nm Exciton Diffusion Length in Polymers with Electron Acceptor End Traps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaikowski, L.; Mauro, G.; Bird, M.; Karten, B.; Asaoka, S.; Wu, Q.; Cook, A. R.; Miller, J.

    2014-12-22

    Photoexcitation of conjugated poly-2,7-(9,9-dihexylfluorene) polyfluorenes with naphthylimide (NI) and anthraquinone (AQ) electron-acceptor end traps produces excitons that form charge transfer states at the end traps. Intramolecular singlet exciton transport to end traps was examined by steady state fluorescence for polyfluorenes of 17 to 127 repeat units in chloroform, dimethylformamide (DMF), tetrahydrofuran (THF), and p-xylene. End traps capture excitons and form charge transfer (CT) states at all polymer lengths and in all solvents. The CT nature of the end-trapped states is confirmed by their fluorescence spectra, solvent and trap group dependence and DFT descriptions. Quantum yields of CT fluorescence are as large as 46%. This strong CT emission is understood in terms of intensity borrowing. Energies of the CT states from onsets of the fluorescence spectra give the depths of the traps which vary with solvent polarity. For NI end traps the trap depths are 0.06 (p-xylene), 0.13 (THF) and 0.19 eV (CHCl3). For AQ, CT fluorescence could be observed only in p-xylene where the trap depth is 0.27 eV. Quantum yields, emission energies, charge transfer energies, solvent reorganization and vibrational energies were calculated. Fluorescence measurements on chains >100 repeat units indicate that end traps capture ~50% of the excitons, and that the exciton diffusion length LD =34 nm, which is much larger than diffusion lengths reported in polymer films or than previously known for diffusion along isolated chains. The efficiency of exciton capture depends on chain length, but not on trap depth, solvent polarity or which trap group is present.

  5. Charge transfer fluorescence and 34 nm exciton diffusion length in polymers with electron acceptor end traps

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zaikowski, Lori; Mauro, Gina; Bird, Matthew; Karten, Brianne; Asaoka, Sadayuki; Wu, Qin; Cook, Andrew R.; Miller, John R.

    2014-12-22

    Photoexcitation of conjugated poly-2,7-(9,9-dihexylfluorene) polyfluorenes with naphthylimide (NI) and anthraquinone (AQ) electron-acceptor end traps produces excitons that form charge transfer states at the end traps. Intramolecular singlet exciton transport to end traps was examined by steady state fluorescence for polyfluorenes of 17 to 127 repeat units in chloroform, dimethylformamide (DMF), tetrahydrofuran (THF), and p-xylene. End traps capture excitons and form charge transfer (CT) states at all polymer lengths and in all solvents. The CT nature of the end-trapped states is confirmed by their fluorescence spectra, solvent and trap group dependence and DFT descriptions. Quantum yields of CT fluorescence are asmore » large as 46%. This strong CT emission is understood in terms of intensity borrowing. Energies of the CT states from onsets of the fluorescence spectra give the depths of the traps which vary with solvent polarity. For NI end traps the trap depths are 0.06 (p-xylene), 0.13 (THF) and 0.19 eV (CHCl3). For AQ, CT fluorescence could be observed only in p-xylene where the trap depth is 0.27 eV. Quantum yields, emission energies, charge transfer energies, solvent reorganization and vibrational energies were calculated. Fluorescence measurements on chains >100 repeat units indicate that end traps capture ~50% of the excitons, and that the exciton diffusion length LD =34 nm, which is much larger than diffusion lengths reported in polymer films or than previously known for diffusion along isolated chains. As a result, the efficiency of exciton capture depends on chain length, but not on trap depth, solvent polarity or which trap group is present.« less

  6. U-105:Oracle Java SE Critical Patch Update Advisory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Multiple vulnerabilities were reported in Oracle Java SE. A remote user can execute arbitrary code on the target system. A remote user can cause denial of service conditions.

  7. Research Forum Schedule-Research-PHaSe-EFRC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Forum Schedule PHaSE Research Fora and Talks This webpage is provided for legacy archive purposes only, as of 30 April 2015.

  8. SeQuential Biofuels LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Biofuels LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: SeQuential Biofuels LLC Place: Portland, Oregon Zip: 97231 Sector: Biofuels Product: A biofuels marketing and distribution company...

  9. SE Idaho Load Service Update - June 10, 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SE-Idaho-Load-Service-Update---June-10,-2015 Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search Doing Business Expand Doing Business Customer Involvement Expand...

  10. CdSe self-assembled quantum dots with ZnCdMgSe barriers emitting throughout the visible spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez-Paz, M. Noemi; Zhou Xuecong; Munoz, Martin; Lu Hong; Sohel, Mohammad; Tamargo, Maria C.; Jean-Mary, Fleumingue; Akins, Daniel L.

    2004-12-27

    Self-assembled quantum dots of CdSe with ZnCdMgSe barriers have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy on InP substrates. The optical and microstructural properties were investigated using photoluminescence (PL) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements. Control and reproducibility of the quantum dot (QD) size leading to light emission throughout the entire visible spectrum range has been obtained by varying the CdSe deposition time. Longer CdSe deposition times result in a redshift of the PL peaks as a consequence of an increase of QD size. AFM studies demonstrate the presence of QDs in uncapped structures. A comparison of this QD system with CdSe/ZnSe shows that not only the strain but also the chemical properties of the system play an important role in QD formation.

  11. Project Closeout Report Francium trapping facility at Triumf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orozco, Luis A

    2014-09-30

    This is a report of the construction of a Francium Trapping Facility (FTF) at the Isotope Separator and Accelerator (ISAC) of TRIUMF in Vancouver, Canada, where the Francium Parity Non Conservation (FrPNC) international collaboration has its home. This facility will be used to study fundamental symmetries with high-resolution atomic spectroscopy. The primary scientific objective of the program is a measurement of the anapole moment of francium in a chain of isotopes by observing the parity violation induced by the weak interaction. The anapole moment of francium and associated signal are expected to be ten times larger than in cesium, the only element in which an anapole moment has been observed. The measurement will provide crucial information for better understanding weak hadronic interactions in the context of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). The methodology combines nuclear and particle physics techniques for the production of francium with precision measurements based on laser cooling and trapping and microwave spectroscopy. The program builds on an initial series of atomic spectroscopy measurements of the nuclear structure of francium, based on isotope shifts and hyperfine anomalies, before conducting the anapole moment measurements, these measurements performed during commissioning runs help understand the atomic and nuclear structure of Fr.

  12. Trapping ultracold gases near cryogenic materials with rapid reconfigurability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naides, Matthew A.; Turner, Richard W.; Lai, Ruby A.; DiSciacca, Jack M.; Lev, Benjamin L.

    2013-12-16

    We demonstrate an atom chip trapping system that allows the placement and high-resolution imaging of ultracold atoms within microns from any ?100??m-thin, UHV-compatible material, while also allowing sample exchange with minimal experimental downtime. The sample is not connected to the atom chip, allowing rapid exchange without perturbing the atom chip or laser cooling apparatus. Exchange of the sample and retrapping of atoms has been performed within a week turnaround, limited only by chamber baking. Moreover, the decoupling of sample and atom chip provides the ability to independently tune the sample temperature and its position with respect to the trapped ultracold gas, which itself may remain in the focus of a high-resolution imaging system. As a first demonstration of this system, we have confined a 700-nK cloud of 8??10{sup 4} {sup 87}Rb atoms within 100??m of a gold-mirrored 100-?m-thick silicon substrate. The substrate was cooled to 35?K without use of a heat shield, while the atom chip, 120??m away, remained at room temperature. Atoms may be imaged and retrapped every 16?s, allowing rapid data collection.

  13. Wide emission-tunable CdTeSe/ZnSe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots and their

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    conjugation with E. coli O-157 (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Wide emission-tunable CdTeSe/ZnSe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots and their conjugation with E. coli O-157 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Wide emission-tunable CdTeSe/ZnSe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots and their conjugation with E. coli O-157 Highlights: * QDs with variety morphology were obtained via an injection controlled process. * 3-D PL spectra of core-shell QDs show different excitation wavelength dependence. *

  14. Have the best available trap on the job, check design, installation, and maintenance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spires, F.; Toy, D.A.

    1986-12-01

    Industrial and commercial installations can have much more efficient steam systems with properly designed, installed, and maintained steam traps. Thirty years ago, steam trap maintenance did not have near the significance it does today; fuel costs have risen from about $0.30 per 1000 lb of steam to over 25 times that a few years ago to about 15 times that cost today. Worn or otherwise malfunctioning steam traps can take quite a toll on the energy bill, especially since most traps are designed to fail in the open position. Failure of just one steam trap with a 1/2'' diameter orifice in the open position can cost $45,090 a year. This article gives guidelines for the prevention of steam trap failures.

  15. Polarization-dependent atomic dipole traps behind a circular aperture for neutral-atom quantum computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gillen-Christandl, Katharina; Copsey, Bert D.

    2011-02-15

    The neutral-atom quantum computing community has successfully implemented almost all necessary steps for constructing a neutral-atom quantum computer. We present computational results of a study aimed at solving the remaining problem of creating a quantum memory with individually addressable sites for quantum computing. The basis of this quantum memory is the diffraction pattern formed by laser light incident on a circular aperture. Very close to the aperture, the diffraction pattern has localized bright and dark spots that can serve as red-detuned or blue-detuned atomic dipole traps. These traps are suitable for quantum computing even for moderate laser powers. In particular, for moderate laser intensities ({approx}100 W/cm{sup 2}) and comparatively small detunings ({approx}1000-10 000 linewidths), trap depths of {approx}1 mK and trap frequencies of several to tens of kilohertz are achieved. Our results indicate that these dipole traps can be moved by tilting the incident laser beams without significantly changing the trap properties. We also explored the polarization dependence of these dipole traps. We developed a code that calculates the trapping potential energy for any magnetic substate of any hyperfine ground state of any alkali-metal atom for any laser detuning much smaller than the fine-structure splitting for any given electric field distribution. We describe details of our calculations and include a summary of different notations and conventions for the reduced matrix element and how to convert it to SI units. We applied this code to these traps and found a method for bringing two traps together and apart controllably without expelling the atoms from the trap and without significant tunneling probability between the traps. This approach can be scaled up to a two-dimensional array of many pinholes, forming a quantum memory with single-site addressability, in which pairs of atoms can be brought together and apart for two-qubit gates for quantum computing.

  16. Using impedance measurements for detecting pathogens trapped in an electric field

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miles, Robin R.

    2004-07-20

    Impedance measurements between the electrodes in an electric field is utilized to detect the presence of pathogens trapped in the electric field. Since particles trapped in a field using the dielectiphoretic force changes the impedance between the electrodes by changing the dielectric material between the electrodes, the degree of particle trapping can be determined by measuring the impedance. This measurement is used to determine if sufficient pathogen have been collected to analyze further or potentially to identify the pathogen.

  17. Particle trapping: A key requisite of structure formation and stability of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Vlasov-Poisson plasmas (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Particle trapping: A key requisite of structure formation and stability of Vlasov-Poisson plasmas Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Particle trapping: A key requisite of structure formation and stability of Vlasov-Poisson plasmas Particle trapping is shown to control the existence of undamped coherent structures in Vlasov-Poisson plasmas and thereby affects the onset of plasma instability beyond the realm of linear Landau

  18. Scalable, High-Speed Measurement-Based Quantum Computer Using Trapped Ions

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Scalable, High-Speed Measurement-Based Quantum Computer Using Trapped Ions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Scalable, High-Speed Measurement-Based Quantum Computer Using Trapped Ions We describe a scalable, high-speed, and robust architecture for measurement-based quantum computing with trapped ions. Measurement-based architectures offer a way to speed up operation of a quantum computer significantly by parallelizing the slow entangling

  19. Ionization of polarized 3He+ ions in EBIS trap with slanted electrostatic mirror.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pikin,A.; Zelenski, A.; Kponou, A.; Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Prelee, K.; Raparia, D.

    2007-09-10

    Methods of producing the nuclear polarized {sup 3}He{sup +} ions and their ionization to {sup 3}H{sup ++} in ion trap of the electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) are discussed. Computer simulations show that injection and accumulation of {sup 3}He{sup +} ions in the EBIS trap with slanted electrostatic mirror can be very effective for injection times longer than the ion traversal time through the trap.

  20. DYNAMICAL STABILITY AND QUANTUM CHAOS OF IONS IN A LINEAR TRAP (1999002ER).

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: DYNAMICAL STABILITY AND QUANTUM CHAOS OF IONS IN A LINEAR TRAP (1999002ER). Citation Details In-Document Search Title: DYNAMICAL STABILITY AND QUANTUM CHAOS OF IONS IN A LINEAR TRAP (1999002ER). The realization of a paradigm chaotic system, namely the harmonically driven oscillator, in the quantum domain using cold trapped ions driven by lasers is theoretically investigated. The simplest characteristics of regular and chaotic dynamics

  1. Pre-Designed Single-Molecule Traps for CO2 Capture | Center for Gas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome Pre-Designed Single-Molecule Traps for CO2 Capture

  2. Lean NOx Trap Formulation Effect on Performance with In-Cylinder...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lean NOx Trap Formulation Effect on Performance with In-Cylinder Regeneration Strategies Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference ...

  3. Lean NOx Trap Catalysis for Lean Natural Gas Engine Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parks, II, James E; Storey, John Morse; Theiss, Timothy J; Ponnusamy, Senthil; Ferguson, Harley Douglas; Williams, Aaron M; Tassitano, James B

    2007-09-01

    Distributed energy is an approach for meeting energy needs that has several advantages. Distributed energy improves energy security during natural disasters or terrorist actions, improves transmission grid reliability by reducing grid load, and enhances power quality through voltage support and reactive power. In addition, distributed energy can be efficient since transmission losses are minimized. One prime mover for distributed energy is the natural gas reciprocating engine generator set. Natural gas reciprocating engines are flexible and scalable solutions for many distributed energy needs. The engines can be run continuously or occasionally as peak demand requires, and their operation and maintenance is straightforward. Furthermore, system efficiencies can be maximized when natural gas reciprocating engines are combined with thermal energy recovery for cooling, heating, and power applications. Expansion of natural gas reciprocating engines for distributed energy is dependent on several factors, but two prominent factors are efficiency and emissions. Efficiencies must be high enough to enable low operating costs, and emissions must be low enough to permit significant operation hours, especially in non-attainment areas where emissions are stringently regulated. To address these issues the U.S. Department of Energy and the California Energy Commission launched research and development programs called Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems (ARES) and Advanced Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines (ARICE), respectively. Fuel efficiency and low emissions are two primary goals of these programs. The work presented here was funded by the ARES program and, thus, addresses the ARES 2010 goals of 50% thermal efficiency (fuel efficiency) and <0.1 g/bhp-hr emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx). A summary of the goals for the ARES program is given in Table 1-1. ARICE 2007 goals are 45% thermal efficiency and <0.015 g/bhp-hr NOx. Several approaches for improving the efficiency and emissions of natural gas reciprocating engines are being pursued. Approaches include: stoichiometric engine operation with exhaust gas recirculation and three-way catalysis, advanced combustion modes such as homogeneous charge compression ignition, and extension of the lean combustion limit with advanced ignition concepts and/or hydrogen mixing. The research presented here addresses the technical approach of combining efficient lean spark-ignited natural gas combustion with low emissions obtained from a lean NOx trap catalyst aftertreatment system. This approach can be applied to current lean engine technology or advanced lean engines that may result from related efforts in lean limit extension. Furthermore, the lean NOx trap technology has synergy with hydrogen-assisted lean limit extension since hydrogen is produced from natural gas during the lean NOx trap catalyst system process. The approach is also applicable to other lean engines such as diesel engines, natural gas turbines, and lean gasoline engines; other research activities have focused on those applications. Some commercialization of the technology has occurred for automotive applications (both diesel and lean gasoline engine vehicles) and natural gas turbines for stationary power. The research here specifically addresses barriers to commercialization of the technology for large lean natural gas reciprocating engines for stationary power. The report presented here is a comprehensive collection of research conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on lean NOx trap catalysis for lean natural gas reciprocating engines. The research was performed in the Department of Energy's ARES program from 2003 to 2007 and covers several aspects of the technology. All studies were conducted at ORNL on a Cummins C8.3G+ natural gas engine chosen based on industry input to simulate large lean natural gas engines. Specific technical areas addressed by the research include: NOx reduction efficiency, partial oxidation and reforming chemistry, and the effects of sulfur poisons on the partial oxidation, reformer, and lean NOx trap catalysts. The initial work on NOx reduction efficiency demonstrated that NOx emissions <0.1 g/bhp-hr (the ARES goal) can be achieved with the lean NOx trap catalyst technology. Subsequent work focused on cost and size optimization and durability issues which addressed two specific ARES areas of interest to industry ('Cost of Power' and 'Availability, Reliability, and Maintainability', respectively). Thus, the research addressed the approach of the lean NOx trap catalyst technology toward the ARES goals as shown in Table 1-1.

  4. CdSe/ZnSe quantum dot structures grown by molecular beam epitaxy with a CdTe submonolayer stressor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sedova, I. V. Lyublinskaya, O. G.; Sorokin, S. V.; Sitnikova, A. A.; Toropov, A. A.; Donatini, F.; Dang, Si Le; Ivanov, S. V.

    2007-11-15

    A procedure for formation of CdSe quantum dots (QDs) in a ZnSe matrix is suggested. The procedure is based on the introduction of a CdTe submonolayer stressor deposited on the matrix surface just before deposition of the material of the QDs. (For CdTe/ZnSe structure, the relative lattice mismatch is {delta}a/a {approx} 14%.) The stressor forms small strained islands at the ZnSe surface, thus producing local fields of high elastic stresses controlling the process of the self-assembling of the QDs. According to the data of transmission electron microscopy, this procedure allows a considerable increase in the surface density of QDs, with a certain decrease in their lateral dimensions (down to 4.5 {+-} 1.5 nm). In the photoluminescence spectra, a noticeable ({approx}150 meV) shift of the peak to longer wavelengths from the position of the reference CdSe/ZnSe QD structure is observed. The shift is due to some transformation of the morphology of the QDs and an increase in the Cd content in the QDs. Comprehensive studies of the nanostructures by recording and analyzing the excitation spectra of photoluminescence, the time-resolved photoluminescence spectra, and the cathodoluminescence spectra show that the emission spectra involve two types of optical transitions, namely, the type-I transitions in the CdSeTe/ZnSe QDs and the type-II transitions caused mainly by the low cadmium content (Zn,Cd)(Se,Te)/ZnSe layer formed between the QDs.

  5. Traulsen: Order (2015-SE-42002) | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Order (2015-SE-42002) Traulsen: Order (2015-SE-42002) August 31, 2015 DOE ordered Traulsen - ITW Food Group LLC to pay a $52,600 civil penalty after finding Traulsen had manufactured and distributed in commerce in the U.S. at least 284 units of commercial refrigerator-freezer basic model RDT132DUT-HHS, a noncompliant product. The Order adopted a Compromise Agreement, which reflected settlement terms between DOE and Traulsen. PDF icon Traulsen: Order (2015-SE-42002) More Documents &

  6. Victory: Order (2015-SE-42033) | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Order (2015-SE-42033) Victory: Order (2015-SE-42033) October 27, 2015 DOE ordered Victory Refrigeration to pay a $1,600 civil penalty after finding Victory had manufactured and distributed in commerce in the U.S. at least 8 units of commercial refrigerator-freezer basic model RFS-1D-S1-EW-PT-HD, a noncompliant product. The Order adopted a Compromise Agreement, which reflected settlement terms between DOE and Victory. PDF icon Victory: Order (2015-SE-42033) More Documents & Publications

  7. Optical Probing of metamagnetic phases in epitaxial EuSe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galgano, G. D.; Henriques, A. B.; Bauer, G.; Springholz, G.

    2011-12-23

    EuSe is a wide gap magnetic semiconductors with a potential for applications in proof-of-concept spintronic devices. When the temperature is lowered, EuSe goes through sharp transitions between a variety of magnetic phases and is thus described as metamagnetic. The purpose of the present investigation is to correlate the magnetic order to the sharp dichroic doublet, discovered recently in high quality thin epitaxial layers of EuSe, grown by molecular beam epitaxy. We report detailed measurements of the doublet positions and intensities as a function of magnetic field in low temperatures, covering several magnetic phases.

  8. Trapping and aerogelation of nanoparticles in negative gravity hydrocarbon flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakrabarty, Rajan K.; Novosselov, Igor V.; Beres, Nicholas D.; Moosmller, Hans; Sorensen, Christopher M.; Stipe, Christopher B.

    2014-06-16

    We report the experimental realization of continuous carbon aerogel production using a flame aerosol reactor by operating it in negative gravity (?g; up-side-down configuration). Buoyancy opposes the fuel and air flow forces in ?g, which eliminates convectional outflow of nanoparticles from the flame and traps them in a distinctive non-tipping, flicker-free, cylindrical flame body, where they grow to millimeter-size aerogel particles and gravitationally fall out. Computational fluid dynamics simulations show that a closed-loop recirculation zone is set up in ?g flames, which reduces the time to gel for nanoparticles by ?10{sup 6}?s, compared to positive gravity (upward rising) flames. Our results open up new possibilities of one-step gas-phase synthesis of a wide variety of aerogels on an industrial scale.

  9. Gas turbine engine combustor can with trapped vortex cavity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burrus, David Louis; Joshi, Narendra Digamber; Haynes, Joel Meier; Feitelberg, Alan S.

    2005-10-04

    A gas turbine engine combustor can downstream of a pre-mixer has a pre-mixer flowpath therein and circumferentially spaced apart swirling vanes disposed across the pre-mixer flowpath. A primary fuel injector is positioned for injecting fuel into the pre-mixer flowpath. A combustion chamber surrounded by an annular combustor liner disposed in supply flow communication with the pre-mixer. An annular trapped dual vortex cavity located at an upstream end of the combustor liner is defined between an annular aft wall, an annular forward wall, and a circular radially outer wall formed therebetween. A cavity opening at a radially inner end of the cavity is spaced apart from the radially outer wall. Air injection first holes are disposed through the forward wall and air injection second holes are disposed through the aft wall. Fuel injection holes are disposed through at least one of the forward and aft walls.

  10. Lean Gasoline Engine Reductant Chemistry During Lean NOx Trap Regeneration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Jae-Soon; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y; Partridge Jr, William P; Parks, II, James E; Norman, Kevin M; Huff, Shean P; Chambon, Paul H; Thomas, John F

    2010-01-01

    Lean NOx Trap (LNT) catalysts can effectively reduce NOx from lean engine exhaust. Significant research for LNTs in diesel engine applications has been performed and has led to commercialization of the technology. For lean gasoline engine applications, advanced direct injection engines have led to a renewed interest in the potential for lean gasoline vehicles and, thereby, a renewed demand for lean NOx control. To understand the gasoline-based reductant chemistry during regeneration, a BMW lean gasoline vehicle has been studied on a chassis dynamometer. Exhaust samples were collected and analyzed for key reductant species such as H2, CO, NH3, and hydrocarbons during transient drive cycles. The relation of the reductant species to LNT performance will be discussed. Furthermore, the challenges of NOx storage in the lean gasoline application are reviewed.

  11. Analysis of electron dynamics in non-ideal Penning traps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coppa, G.; Mulas, R.; D'Angola, A.

    2012-06-15

    Penning traps that are used for particular applications, such as in ion pump technology, Larmor, bouncing, and diocotron frequencies, can be of the same order of magnitude. The paper deals with the dynamics of electrons confined in such devices starting from the study of the properties of the trajectories. In cases of interest, in which electron-neutral collision frequency is much smaller with respect to the characteristic frequencies of the motion, suitable time averages of the trajectories are introduced in order to simplify the analysis of the problem. In the work, time averages have been calculated in a simple way by using an approximate r-z decoupling of the effective potential. Results obtained with the method are presented and discussed in both linear and nonlinear regimes.

  12. Optical Properties of CdSe Nanoparticle Assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huser, T; Gerion, D; Zaitseva, N; Krol, D M; Leon, F R

    2003-11-24

    We report on three-dimensional fluorescence imaging of micron-size faceted crystals precipitated from solutions of CdSe nanocrystals. Such crystals have previously been suggested to be superlattices of CdSe quantum dots [1,2]. Possible applications for these materials include their use in optical and optoelectronic devices. The micron-size crystals were grown by slow evaporation from toluene solutions of CdSe nanocrystals in the range of 3-6 nm, produced by traditional wet-chemistry techniques. By using a confocal microscope with laser illumination, three-dimensional raster-scanning and synchronized hyper-spectral detection, we have generated spatial profiles of the fluorescence emission intensity and spectrum. The fluorescence data of the micro-crystals were compared with spectra of individual nanocrystals obtained from the same solution. The results do not support the assertion that these microcrystals consist of CdSe superlattices.

  13. Enhanced thermoelectric power and electronic correlations in RuSe?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Kefeng; Wang, Aifeng; Tomic, A.; Wang, Limin; Abeykoon, A. M. Milinda; Dooryhee, E.; Billinge, S. J.L.; Petrovic, C.

    2015-03-03

    We report the electronic structure, electric and thermal transport properties of Ru??xIrxSe? (x ? 0.2). RuSe? is a semiconductor that crystallizes in a cubic pyrite unit cell. The Seebeck coefficient of RuSe? exceeds -200 V/K around 730 K. Ir substitution results in the suppression of the resistivity and the Seebeck coefficient, suggesting the removal of the peaks in density of states near the Fermi level. Ru?.?Ir?.?Se? shows a semiconductor-metal crossover at about 30 K. The magnetic field restores the semiconducting behavior. Our results indicate the importance of the electronic correlations in enhanced thermoelectricity of RuSb?.

  14. Synthesis and properties of new CdSe-AgI-As{sub 2}Se{sub 3} chalcogenide glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kassem, M.; ULCO, LPCA, EAC CNRS 4493 F-59140 Dunkerque ; Le Coq, D.; Fourmentin, M.; Hindle, F.; Bokova, M.; Cuisset, A.; Masselin, P.; Bychkov, E.; ULCO, LPCA, EAC CNRS 4493 F-59140 Dunkerque

    2011-02-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Determination of the glass-forming region in the pseudo-ternary CdSe-AgI-As{sub 2}Se{sub 3} system. {yields} Characterization of macroscopic properties of the new CdSe-AgI-As{sub 2}Se{sub 3} glasses. {yields} Far infrared transmission of chalcogenide glasses. {yields} Characterization of the total conductivity of CdSe-AgI-As{sub 2}Se{sub 3} glasses. -- Abstract: The glass-forming region in the pseudo-ternary CdSe-AgI-As{sub 2}Se{sub 3} system was determined. Measurements including differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), density, and X-ray diffraction were performed. The effect resulting from the addition of CdSe or AgI has been highlighted by examining three series of different base glasses. The characteristic temperatures of the glass samples, including glass transition (T{sub g}), crystallisation (T{sub x}), and melting (T{sub m}) temperatures are reported and used to calculate their {Delta}T = T{sub x} - T{sub g} and their Hruby, H{sub r} = (T{sub x} - T{sub g})/(T{sub m} - T{sub x}), criteria. Evolution of the total electrical conductivity {sigma} and the room temperature conductivity {sigma}{sub 298} was also studied. The terahertz transparency domain in the 50-600 cm{sup -1} region was pointed for different chalcogenide glasses (ChGs) and the potential of the THz spectroscopy was suggested to obtain structural information on ChGs.

  15. Seaga: Noncompliance Determination (2015-SE-52001) | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Seaga: Noncompliance Determination (2015-SE-52001) Seaga: Noncompliance Determination (2015-SE-52001) June 19, 2015 DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Seaga Manufacturing, Inc. finding that the refrigerated bottle and canned beverage vending machine (BVM) basic model with name plate model SP536R does not comport with the energy conservation standards. DOE determined the product was noncompliant based on DOE testing. Seaga must immediately notify each person (or company) to

  16. Philips: Noncompliance Determination (2014-SE-48006) | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Noncompliance Determination (2014-SE-48006) Philips: Noncompliance Determination (2014-SE-48006) March 26, 2015 DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Philips Lighting North America Corp. finding that a variety of illuminated exit sign models do not comport with the energy conservation standards, based on information provided to DOE by Philips. DOE determined the products were noncompliant based on testing information provided by the company. Philips must immediately notify each

  17. Characterization of a state-insensitive dipole trap for cesium atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phoonthong, P.; Douglas, P.; Wickenbrock, A.; Renzoni, F.

    2010-07-15

    In this work we characterize a state-insensitive dipole trap for cold cesium atoms, as realized by tightly focusing a single running laser beam at the magic wavelength. The use of trapping light at the magic wavelength of 935.6 nm resulted in the same ac Stark shift for the {sup 6}S{sub 1/2} ground state and the {sup 6}P{sub 3/2} excited state. A complete characterization of the trap is given, which includes the dependence of the lifetime on the trap depth, an analysis of the important role played by a depumper beam, and a comparison with dipole trapping at different (nonmagic) wavelengths. In particular, we measured the differential light shift of the relevant optical transition as a function of the trapping light wavelength, and showed that it becomes zero at the magic wavelength. Our results are compared to previous realizations of state-insensitive dipole traps for cesium atoms. We also discuss the possible role of the state-insensitive trap, its limitations, and possible developments for the study of ground-state quantum coherence phenomena and related applications.

  18. Lean NOx Traps - Microstructural Studies of Real World and Model Catalysts

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    | Department of Energy 05 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters PDF icon 2005_deer_narula.pdf More Documents & Publications Low Temperature Emission Control Pre-Competitive Catalysis Research: Fundamental Sulfation/Desulfation Studies of Lean NOx Traps Investigation of Aging Mechanisms in Lean NOx Traps

  19. Development of Chemical Kinetic Models for Lean NOx Traps | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy 1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon ace035_larson_2011_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Development of Chemical Kinetic Models for Lean NOx Traps Benchmark Reaction Mechanisms and Kinetics for Lean NOx Traps CLEERS Coordination & Development of Catalyst Process Kinetic Data

  20. The Role of Electron Transport and Trapping in MOS Total-Dose Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleetwood, D.M.; Winokur, P.S.; Riewe, L.C.; Flament, O.; Paillet, P.; Leray, J.L.

    1999-07-19

    Radiation-induced hole and electron transport and trapping are fundamental to MOS total-dose models. Here we separate the effects of electron-hole annihilation and electron trapping on the neutralization of radiation-induced charge during switched-bias irradiation for hard and soft oxides, via combined thermally stimulated current (TSC) and capacitance-voltage measurements. We also show that present total-dose models cannot account for the thermal stability of deeply trapped electrons near the Si/SiO{sub 2} interface, or the inability of electrons in deep or shallow traps to contribute to TSC at positive bias following (1) room-temperature, (2) high-temperature, or (3) switched-bias irradiation. These results require revisions of modeling parameters and boundary conditions for hole and electron transport in SiO{sub 2}. The nature of deep and shallow electron traps in the near-interfacial SiO{sub 2} is discussed.

  1. Scattering of a tightly focused beam by an optically trapped particle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lock, James A.; Wrbanek, Susan Y.; Weiland, Kenneth E

    2006-05-20

    Near-forward scattering of an optically trapped 5-{mu}m-radius polystyrene latex sphere by the trapping beam was examined both theoretically and experimentally. Since the trapping beam is tightly focused, the beam fields superpose and interfere with the scattered fields in the forward hemisphere. The observed light intensity consists of a series of concentric bright and dark fringes centered about the forward-scattering direction. Both the number of fringes and their contrast depend on the position of the trapping beam focal waist with respect to the sphere. The fringes are caused by diffraction that is due to the truncation of the tail of the trapping beam as the beam is transmitted through the sphere.

  2. Adiabatic electron response and solitary wave generation by trapped particle nonlinearity in a hydrogen plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandal, Debraj; Sharma, Devendra [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2014-10-15

    The finite amplitude ion acoustic waves that trap electrons modify the structure of the evolving nonlinear soliton solutions. In the numerical simulations, self-consistently generated solitary waves are studied that emerge as a result of a current driven microinstability growing the ion acoustic mode in a collisionless Vlasov plasma. The growth saturates as a result of nonlinear effects governed by a combination of nonlinearities originating from the hydrodynamic model and kinetic particle trapping effects. The resulting solitary waves also coexist with a finite current and an electron plasma wave capable of perturbing the trapping potential. The results of multiscale simulation are analyzed and characterized following the kinetic prescription of undamped trapped particle mode in the form of phase space vortex solutions that are generalized form of Sagdeev's solitons and obey the solutions of a modified Korteweg-de Vries equation, accounting for a stronger nonlinearity originating from the electron trapping.

  3. Hydride vapor phase GaN films with reduced density of residual electrons and deep traps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polyakov, A. Y.; Smirnov, N. B.; Govorkov, A. V.; Yugova, T. G.; Cox, H.; Helava, H.; Makarov, Yu.; Usikov, A. S.

    2014-05-14

    Electrical properties and deep electron and hole traps spectra are compared for undoped n-GaN films grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) in the regular process (standard HVPE samples) and in HVPE process optimized for decreasing the concentration of residual donor impurities (improved HVPE samples). It is shown that the residual donor density can be reduced by optimization from ?10{sup 17}?cm{sup ?3} to (25)??10{sup 14}?cm{sup ?3}. The density of deep hole traps and deep electron traps decreases with decreased donor density, so that the concentration of deep hole traps in the improved samples is reduced to ?5??10{sup 13}?cm{sup ?3} versus 2.9??10{sup 16}?cm{sup ?3} in the standard samples, with a similar decrease in the electron traps concentration.

  4. Simultaneous magneto-optical trapping of bosonic and fermionic chromium atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chicireanu, R.; Pouderous, A.; Barbe, R.; Laburthe-Tolra, B.; Marechal, E.; Vernac, L.; Keller, J.-C.; Gorceix, O.

    2006-05-15

    We report on magneto-optical trapping of fermionic {sup 53}Cr atoms. A Zeeman-slowed atomic beam provides loading rates up to 3x10{sup 6} s{sup -1}. We present systematic characterization of the magneto-optical trap (MOT). We obtain up to 5x10{sup 5} atoms in the steady-state MOT. The atoms radiatively decay from the excited P state into metastable D states, and, due to the large dipolar magnetic moment of chromium atoms in these states, they can remain magnetically trapped in the quadrupole field gradient of the MOT. We study the accumulation of metastable {sup 53}Cr atoms in this magnetic trap. We also report on the simultaneous magneto-optical trapping of bosonic {sup 52}Cr and fermionic {sup 53}Cr atoms. Finally, we characterize the light-assisted collision losses in this Bose-Fermi cold mixture.

  5. Hybrid particle traps and conditioning procedure for gas insulated transmission lines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dale, Steinar J.; Cookson, Alan H.

    1982-01-01

    A gas insulated transmission line includes an outer sheath, an inner condor within the outer sheath, insulating supports supporting the inner conductor within the outer sheath, and an insulating gas electrically insulating the inner conductor from the outer sheath. An apertured particle trapping ring is disposed within the outer sheath, and the trapping ring has a pair of dielectric members secured at each longitudinal end thereof, with the dielectric members extending outwardly from the trapping ring along an arc. A support sheet having an adhesive coating thereon is secured to the trapping ring and disposed on the outer sheath within the low field region formed between the trapping ring and the outer sheath. A conditioning method used to condition the transmission line prior to activation in service comprises applying an AC voltage to the inner conductor in a plurality of voltage-time steps, with the voltage-time steps increasing in voltage magnitude while decreasing in time duration.

  6. The influence of interfaces on properties of thin-film inorganic structural isomers containing SnSeNbSe? Subunits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alemayehu, Matti B.; Falmbigl, Matthias; Ta, Kim; Johnson, David C.

    2015-08-28

    Inorganic isomers ([SnSe]1+?)m(NbSe?)n([SnSe]1+?)p(NbSe?)q([SnSe]1+?)r(NbSe?)s where m, n, p, q, r, and s are integers and m + p + r = n + q + s = 4 were prepared using the modulated elemental reactant technique. This series of all six possible isomers provides an opportunity to study the influence of interface density on properties while maintaining the same unit cell size and composition. As expected, all six compounds were observed to have the same atomic compositions and an almost c-axis lattice parameter of ?4.90 (5) nm, with a slight trend in the c-axis lattice parameter correlated with the different number of interfaces in the isomers: two, four and six. The structures of the constituents in the ab-plane were independent of one another, confirming the nonepitaxial relationship between them. The temperature dependent electrical resistivities revealed metallic behavior for all the six compounds. Surprisingly, the electrical resistivity at room temperature decreases with increasing number of interfaces. Hall measurements suggest this results from changes in carrier concentration, which increases with increasing thickness of the thickest SnSe block in the isomer. Carrier mobility scales with the thickness of the thickest NbSe? block due to increased interfacial scattering as the NbSe? blocks become thinner. The observed behavior suggests that the two constituents serve different purposes with respect to electrical transport. SnSe acts as a charge donor and NbSe? acts as the charge transport layer. This separation of function suggests that such heterostructures can be designed to optimize performance through choice of constituent, layer thickness, and layer sequence. A simplistic model, which predicts the properties of the complex isomers from a weighted sum of the properties of building blocks, was developed. A theoretical model is needed to predict the optimal compound for specific properties among the many potential compounds that can be prepared.

  7. Heterojunctions of model CdTe/CdSe mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Swol, Frank; Zhou, Xiaowang W.; Challa, Sivakumar R.; Martin, James E.

    2015-03-18

    We report on the strain behavior of compound mixtures of model group IIVI semiconductors. We use the StillingerWeber Hamiltonian that we recently introduced, specifically developed to model binary mixtures of group IIVI compounds such as CdTe and CdSe. We also employ molecular dynamics simulations to examine the behavior of thin sheets of material, bilayers of CdTe and CdSe. The lattice mismatch between the two compounds leads to a strong bending of the entire sheet, with about a 0.5 to 1 deflection between neighboring planes. To further analyze bilayer bending, we introduce a simple one-dimensional model and use energy minimization to find the angle of deflection. The analysis is equivalent to a least-squares straight line fit. We consider the effects of bilayers which are asymmetric with respect to the thickness of the CdTe and CdSe parts. We thus learn that the bending can be subdivided into four kinds depending on the compressive/tensile nature of each outer plane of the sheet. We use this approach to directly compare our findings with experimental results on the bending of CdTe/CdSe rods. To reduce the effects of the lattice mismatch we explore diffuse interfaces, where we mix (i.e. alloy) Te and Se, and estimate the strain response.

  8. Heterojunctions of model CdTe/CdSe mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Swol, Frank; Zhou, Xiaowang W.; Challa, Sivakumar R.; Martin, James E.

    2015-03-18

    We report on the strain behavior of compound mixtures of model group II-VI semiconductors. We use the Stillinger-Weber Hamiltonian that we recently introduced, specifically developed to model binary mixtures of group II-VI compounds such as CdTe and CdSe. We also employ molecular dynamics simulations to examine the behavior of thin sheets of material, bilayers of CdTe and CdSe. The lattice mismatch between the two compounds leads to a strong bending of the entire sheet, with about a 0.5 to 1° deflection between neighboring planes. To further analyze bilayer bending, we introduce a simple one-dimensional model and use energy minimization to find the angle of deflection. The analysis is equivalent to a least-squares straight line fit. We consider the effects of bilayers which are asymmetric with respect to the thickness of the CdTe and CdSe parts. We thus learn that the bending can be subdivided into four kinds depending on the compressive/tensile nature of each outer plane of the sheet. We use this approach to directly compare our findings with experimental results on the bending of CdTe/CdSe rods. To reduce the effects of the lattice mismatch we explore diffuse interfaces, where we mix (i.e. alloy) Te and Se, and estimate the strain response.

  9. EMPaSE: an Extensible Multi-Paradigm Simulation Environment

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-08-05

    EMPaSE is a hierarchical, extensible, modular modeling environment for developing and running hybrid simulations of sequential-modular, systems dynamics, discrete-event, and agent-based paradigms. It contains two principle components: a multi-paradigm simulation engine and a graphical user interface. EMPaSE models are defined through a hierarchically-defined set of computational modules that define the simulation logic. Inter-module communication occurs through two complimentary systems: pull-based "ports" for general computation patterns and push-based "plugs" for event processing. Entities (i.e. agents) withinmore » the simulation operate within an abstract multi-network environment. The EMPaSE simulation engine is designed around a flexible plug-in architecture, allowing simulations to import computational modules, engine customizations, and interfaces to external applications from independent plug-in libraries. The EMPaSE GUI environment provides an environment for graphically constructing, executing, and debugging EMPaSE models. As with the simulation engine, the GUI is constructed on top of an extensible architecture that supports rapid customization of the user experience through external plug-in libraries.« less

  10. Heterojunctions of model CdTe/CdSe mixtures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    van Swol, Frank; Zhou, Xiaowang W.; Challa, Sivakumar R.; Martin, James E.

    2015-03-18

    We report on the strain behavior of compound mixtures of model group II-VI semiconductors. We use the Stillinger-Weber Hamiltonian that we recently introduced, specifically developed to model binary mixtures of group II-VI compounds such as CdTe and CdSe. We also employ molecular dynamics simulations to examine the behavior of thin sheets of material, bilayers of CdTe and CdSe. The lattice mismatch between the two compounds leads to a strong bending of the entire sheet, with about a 0.5 to 1° deflection between neighboring planes. To further analyze bilayer bending, we introduce a simple one-dimensional model and use energy minimization tomore » find the angle of deflection. The analysis is equivalent to a least-squares straight line fit. We consider the effects of bilayers which are asymmetric with respect to the thickness of the CdTe and CdSe parts. We thus learn that the bending can be subdivided into four kinds depending on the compressive/tensile nature of each outer plane of the sheet. We use this approach to directly compare our findings with experimental results on the bending of CdTe/CdSe rods. To reduce the effects of the lattice mismatch we explore diffuse interfaces, where we mix (i.e. alloy) Te and Se, and estimate the strain response.« less

  11. Three-dimensional light trap for reflective particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neal, Daniel R.

    1999-01-01

    A system for containing either a reflective particle or a particle having an index of refraction lower than that of the surrounding media in a three-dimensional light cage. A light beam from a single source illuminates an optics system and generates a set of at least three discrete focussed beams that emanate from a single exit aperture and focus on to a focal plane located close to the particle. The set of focal spots defines a ring that surrounds the particle. The set of focussed beams creates a "light cage" and circumscribes a zone of no light within which the particle lies. The surrounding beams apply constraining forces (created by radiation pressure) to the particle, thereby containing it in a three-dimensional force field trap. A diffractive element, such as an aperture multiplexed lens, or either a Dammann grating or phase element in combination with a focusing lens, may be used to generate the beams. A zoom lens may be used to adjust the size of the light cage, permitting particles of various sizes to be captured and contained.

  12. Three-dimensional light trap for reflective particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neal, D.R.

    1999-08-17

    A system is disclosed for containing either a reflective particle or a particle having an index of refraction lower than that of the surrounding media in a three-dimensional light cage. A light beam from a single source illuminates an optics system and generates a set of at least three discrete focused beams that emanate from a single exit aperture and focus on to a focal plane located close to the particle. The set of focal spots defines a ring that surrounds the particle. The set of focused beams creates a ``light cage`` and circumscribes a zone of no light within which the particle lies. The surrounding beams apply constraining forces (created by radiation pressure) to the particle, thereby containing it in a three-dimensional force field trap. A diffractive element, such as an aperture multiplexed lens, or either a Dammann grating or phase element in combination with a focusing lens, may be used to generate the beams. A zoom lens may be used to adjust the size of the light cage, permitting particles of various sizes to be captured and contained. 10 figs.

  13. Certification Framework Based on Effective Trapping for Geologic Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Bryant, Steven L.; Nicot, Jean-Philippe

    2009-01-15

    We have developed a certification framework (CF) for certifying the safety and effectiveness of geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) sites. Safety and effectiveness are achieved if CO{sub 2} and displaced brine have no significant impact on humans, other living things, resources, or the environment. In the CF, we relate effective trapping to CO{sub 2} leakage risk which takes into account both the impact and probability of leakage. We achieve simplicity in the CF by using (1) wells and faults as the potential leakage pathways, (2) compartments to represent environmental resources that may be impacted by leakage, (3) CO{sub 2} fluxes and concentrations in the compartments as proxies for impact to vulnerable entities, (4) broad ranges of storage formation properties to generate a catalog of simulated plume movements, and (5) probabilities of intersection of the CO{sub 2} plume with the conduits and compartments. We demonstrate the approach on a hypothetical GCS site in a Texas Gulf Coast saline formation. Through its generality and flexibility, the CF can contribute to the assessment of risk of CO{sub 2} and brine leakage as part of the certification process for licensing and permitting of GCS sites around the world regardless of the specific regulations in place in any given country.

  14. Particle trap for compressed gas insulated transmission systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cookson, A.H.

    1984-04-26

    A particle trap is provided for gas insulated transmission lines having a central high voltage conductor supported within an outer coaxial conductive sheath by a dielectric support member. A cavity between the inner conductor and outer sheath is filled with a dielectric insulating gas. A cone-like particle deflector, mounted to the inner conductor, deflects moving particles away from the support member, to radially outer portions of the cavity. A conductive shield is disposed adjacent the outer sheath to form a field-free region in radially outer portions of the cavity, between the shield and the sheath. Particles traveling along the cavity are deflected by the cone-like deflector into the field-free region where they are held immobile. In a vertical embodiment, particles enter the field-free region through an upper end of a gap formed between shield and sheath members. In a horizontal embodiment, the deflector cone has a base which is terminated radially internally of the shield. Apertures in the shield located adjacent the deflector allow passage of deflected particles into the field-free region. The dielectric support member is thereby protected from contaminating particles that may otherwise come to rest thereon.

  15. Particle trap for compressed gas insulated transmission systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cookson, Alan H.

    1985-01-01

    A particle trap is provided for gas insulated transmission lines having a central high voltage conductor supported within an outer coaxial conductive sheath by a dielectric support member. A cavity between the inner conductor and outer sheath is filled with a dielectric insulating gas. A cone-like particle deflector, mounted to the inner conductor, deflects moving particles away from the support member, to radially outer portions of the cavity. A conductive shield is disposed adjacent the outer sheath to form a field-free region in radially outer portions of the cavity, between the shield and the sheath. Particles traveling along the cavity are deflected by the cone-like deflector into the field-free region where they are held immobile. In a vertical embodiment, particles enter the field-free region through an upper end of a gap formed between shield and sheath members. In a horizontal embodiment, the deflector cone has a base which is terminated radially internally of the shield. Apertures in the shield located adjacent the deflector allow passage of deflected particles into the field-free region. The dielectric support member is thereby protected from contaminating particles that may otherwise come to rest thereon.

  16. Eolian paleotopographic highs as stratigraphic traps: origin and distinction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eschner, T.B.; Kocurek, G.A.

    1985-02-01

    Significant hydrocarbon accumulations occur where eolian paleotopographic highs are preserved beneath transgressive marine deposits. Paleotopographic highs can represent erosional remnants of an unconformity, or partly preserved eolian dunes, or combinations of both. Paleotopography reflects the extent of modification undergone by eolian units prior to or during transgression. Modification varies between extremes of (1) destruction - where eolian deposits are deeply eroded and the former dunal profile is lost, and (2) preservation - where dunes and interdune areas are preserved nearly intact. The extent of modification that occurs during transgression is controlled primarily by (1) the energy of the transgressing sea, (2) the speed of transgression, and (3) the abundance of sand-stabilizing early cements or plants. High-energy seas destroy dunes through persistent erosion by tides and waves and by initiating dune collapse and mass flowage of dune sands. Preservation occurs where quiescent seas flood interdune areas and create shallow to periodically emergent marine environments, such as interdune sabkhas or tidal flats. Gradual filling of interdune areas with shallow marine sediments can fortify and preserve adjacent dunes. These varied processes that interact between marine and eolian environments to create different types of topography are exemplified in ancient eolian-marine sequences of the Western Interior of North America, and preserved Holocene dunes of coastal Australia. Different types of eolian highs can be recognized by analysis of bounding surfaces in outcrop or core. An understanding of eolian-marine processes and environments that create topography allows for prediction of areas of potential stratigraphic traps.

  17. Optoelectronically probing the density of nanowire surface trap states to the single state limit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan, Yaping

    2015-02-02

    Surface trap states play a dominant role in the optoelectronic properties of nanoscale devices. Understanding the surface trap states allows us to properly engineer the device surfaces for better performance. But characterization of surface trap states at nanoscale has been a formidable challenge using the traditional capacitive techniques. Here, we demonstrate a simple but powerful optoelectronic method to probe the density of nanowire surface trap states to the single state limit. In this method, we choose to tune the quasi-Fermi level across the bandgap of a silicon nanowire photoconductor, allowing for capture and emission of photogenerated charge carriers by surface trap states. The experimental data show that the energy density of nanowire surface trap states is in a range from 10{sup 9 }cm{sup −2}/eV at deep levels to 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −2}/eV near the conduction band edge. This optoelectronic method allows us to conveniently probe trap states of ultra-scaled nano/quantum devices at extremely high precision.

  18. Unconformity related traps and production, Lower Cretaceous through Mississippian Strata, central and northern Rocky Mountains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolson, J. )

    1990-05-01

    Unconformities provide a useful means of equating stratigraphic traps between basins. Systematic mapping can define new concepts through analogy, often from geographically separate areas. Lower Cretaceous through Mississippian surfaces in the central and northern Rockies provide examples. Late Mississippian and Early Pennsylvanian surfaces formed at least four paleodrainage basins separated by the Transcontinental arch. Tyler Formation valley fills (Montana, North Dakota) have produced more than 100 million BOE. Analogous targets in Utah remain untested, but the Mid-Continent Morrow trend continues to yield new reserves. Permian and Triassic paleodrainages filled primarily with seals and form regional traps. A breached Madison trap (Mississippian, Colorado), more than 350 million BOE (Permian Minnelusa, Wyoming), more than 8 billion BOE (from the White Rim Sandstone tar deposits Permian Utah), and eastern Williston basin (Mississippian) are examples. Minor basal valley fill trapping also occurs. Transgressive carbonate facies changes have trapped more than 40 million BOE (Permian Phosphoria Formation, Wyoming). Additional deep gas potential exists. Jurassic unconformities control seal distribution over Nugget Sandstone (Jurassic) reservoirs and partially control Mississippian porosity on the Sweetgrass arch (Montana). Minor paleohill trapping also occurs. Lower Cretaceous surfaces have trapped nearly 2 billion BOE hydrocarbons in 10 paleodrainage networks. Undrilled paleodrainage basins remain deep gas targets. The systematic examination of Rocky Mountain unconformities has been understudied. New exploration concepts and reserve additions await the creative interpreter.

  19. Porous materials with pre-designed single-molecule traps for CO2 selective adsorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, JR; Yu, JM; Lu, WG; Sun, LB; Sculley, J; Balbuena, PB; Zhou, HC

    2013-02-26

    Despite tremendous efforts, precise control in the synthesis of porous materials with pre-designed pore properties for desired applications remains challenging. Newly emerged porous metal-organic materials, such as metal-organic polyhedra and metal-organic frameworks, are amenable to design and property tuning, enabling precise control of functionality by accurate design of structures at the molecular level. Here we propose and validate, both experimentally and computationally, a precisely designed cavity, termed a 'single-molecule trap', with the desired size and properties suitable for trapping target CO2 molecules. Such a single-molecule trap can strengthen CO2-host interactions without evoking chemical bonding, thus showing potential for CO2 capture. Molecular single-molecule traps in the form of metal-organic polyhedra are designed, synthesised and tested for selective adsorption of CO2 over N-2 and CH4, demonstrating the trapping effect. Building these pre-designed single-molecule traps into extended frameworks yields metal-organic frameworks with efficient mass transfer, whereas the CO2 selective adsorption nature of single-molecule traps is preserved.

  20. Reduced Cu(InGa)Se2 Thickness in Solar Cells Using a Superstrate Configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafarman, William N.

    2015-03-30

    This project by the Institute of Energy Conversion (IEC) and the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Delaware sought to develop the technology and underlying science to enable reduced cost of Cu(InGa)Se2 manufacturing by reducing the thickness of the Cu(InGa)Se2 absorber layer by half compared to typical production. The approach to achieve this was to use the superstrate cell configuration in which light is incident on the cell through the glass. This structure facilitates optical enhancement approaches needed to achieve high efficiency with Cu(InGa)Se2 thicknesses less than 1 µm. The primary objective was to demonstrate a Cu(InGa)Se2 cell with absorber thickness 0.5 - 0.7 µm and 17% efficiency, along with a quantitative loss analysis to define a pathway to 20% efficiency. Additional objectives were the development of stable TCO and buffer layers or contact layers to withstand the Cu(InGa)Se2 deposition temperature and of advanced optical enhancement methods. The underlying fundamental science needed to effectively transition these outcomes to large scale was addressed by extensive materials and device characterization and by development of comprehensive optical models. Two different superstrate configurations have been investigated. A frontwall cell is illuminated through the glass to the primary front junction of the device. This configuration has been used for previous efforts on superstrate Cu(InGa)Se2 but performance has been limited by interdiffusion or reaction with CdS or other buffer layers. In this project, several approaches to overcome these limitations were explored using CdS, ZnO and ZnSe buffer layers. In each case, mechanisms that limit device performance were identified using detailed characterization of the materials and junctions. Due to the junction formation difficulties, efforts were concentrated on a new backwall configuration in which light is incident through the substrate into the back of the absorber layer. The primary junction is then formed after Cu(InGa)Se2 deposition. This allows the potential benefits of superstrate cells for optical enhancement while maintaining processing advantages of the substrate configuration and avoiding the harmful effects of high temperature deposition on p-n junction formation. Backwall devices have outperformed substrate cells at absorber thicknesses of 0.1-0.5 µm through enhanced JSC due to easy incorporation of a Ag reflector and, with light incident on the absorber, the elimination of parasitic absorption in the CdS buffer. An efficiency of 9.7% has been achieved for a backwall Cu(InGa)Se2 device with absorber thickness ~0.4 μm. A critical achievement that enabled implementation of the backwall cell was the development of a transparent back contact using MoO3 or WO3. Processes for controlled deposition of each material by reactive rf sputtering from metal targets were developed. These contacts have wide bandgaps making them well-suited for application as contacts for backwall devices as well as potential use in bifacial cells and as the top cell of tandem CuInSe2-based devices. Optical enhancement will be critical for further improvements. Wet chemical texturing of ZnO films has been developed for a simple, low cost light-trapping scheme for backwall superstrate devices to enhance long wavelength quantum efficiency. An aqueous oxalic acid etch was developed and found to strongly texture sputtered ZnO with high haze ≈ 0.9 observed across the whole spectrum. And finally, advanced optical models have been developed to assist the characterization and optimization of Cu(InGa)Se2 cells with thin absorbers

  1. GE Appliances: Order (2012-SE-1403) | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Appliances: Order (2012-SE-1403) GE Appliances: Order (2012-SE-1403) October 3, 2012 DOE ordered GE Appliances, a Division of General Electric Company to pay a $63,000 civil penalty after finding GE had privately labeled and distributed in commerce in the U.S. the 4-cubic-foot capacity refrigerator basic model SMR04GAZCS, which includes models SMR04GAZACS and SMR04GAZBCS. The Order adopted a Compromise Agreement, which reflected settlement terms between DOE and GE. PDF icon GE Appliances: Order

  2. Utility: Order (2016-SE-42003) | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    SE-42003) Utility: Order (2016-SE-42003) March 1, 2016 DOE ordered Utility Refrigerator to pay a $200 civil penalty after finding Utility manufactured and distributed in commerce in the U.S. 1 unit of a Utility brand commercial refrigerator, model PT-R-75-SS-3S-3S-N. The Order adopted a Compromise Agreement, which reflected settlement terms between DOE and Utility. Federal law subjects manufacturers and private labelers to civil penalties if those parties distribute in the U.S. products that do

  3. Sunshine Lighting: Order (2014-SE-54008) | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Sunshine Lighting: Order (2014-SE-54008) Sunshine Lighting: Order (2014-SE-54008) July 7, 2015 DOE ordered Lighting & Supplies, Inc. d/b/a Sunshine Lighting Company ("Sunshine") to pay a $150,000 civil penalty after finding Sunshine had manufactured and distributed in commerce in the U.S. 1780 units of Sunlite brand basic model 04937-SU and 1134 units of basic model 04952-SU, noncompliant metal halide lamp fixtures. The Order adopted a Compromise Agreement, which reflected

  4. Excited-State Relaxation in PbSe Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    An, J. M.; Califano, M.; Franceschetti, A.; Zunger, A.

    2008-01-01

    In solids the phonon-assisted, nonradiative decay from high-energy electronic excited states to low-energy electronic excited states is picosecond fast. It was hoped that electron and hole relaxation could be slowed down in quantum dots, due to the unavailability of phonons energy matched to the large energy-level spacings ('phonon-bottleneck'). However, excited-state relaxation was observed to be rather fast ({le}1 ps) in InP, CdSe, and ZnO dots, and explained by an efficient Auger mechanism, whereby the excess energy of electrons is nonradiatively transferred to holes, which can then rapidly decay by phonon emission, by virtue of the densely spaced valence-band levels. The recent emergence of PbSe as a novel quantum-dot material has rekindled the hope for a slow down of excited-state relaxation because hole relaxation was deemed to be ineffective on account of the widely spaced hole levels. The assumption of sparse hole energy levels in PbSe was based on an effective-mass argument based on the light effective mass of the hole. Surprisingly, fast intraband relaxation times of 1-7 ps were observed in PbSe quantum dots and have been considered contradictory with the Auger cooling mechanism because of the assumed sparsity of the hole energy levels. Our pseudopotential calculations, however, do not support the scenario of sparse hole levels in PbSe: Because of the existence of three valence-band maxima in the bulk PbSe band structure, hole energy levels are densely spaced, in contradiction with simple effective-mass models. The remaining question is whether the Auger decay channel is sufficiently fast to account for the fast intraband relaxation. Using the atomistic pseudopotential wave functions of Pb{sub 2046}Se{sub 2117} and Pb{sub 260}Se{sub 249} quantum dots, we explicitly calculated the electron-hole Coulomb integrals and the P {yields} S electron Auger relaxation rate. We find that the Auger mechanism can explain the experimentally observed P {yields} S intraband decay time scale without the need to invoke any exotic relaxation mechanisms.

  5. Generation and decay of entanglement in exciton/polariton trapped systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quiroga, L.; Tejedor, C.

    2011-12-23

    The entanglement evolution of interacting trapped solid-state bosons, i.e. excitons or polaritons, is theoretically studied. From an initially separable state the quasi-particle interactions generate boson entanglement which is degraded as dissipation takes place. Based on exact solutions of a Markovian Master equation at T = 0 K, we discuss how dissipation affects the quantum entanglement dynamics of coupled solid-state boson systems. The single trap Wigner function is also calculated and its relationship to the trapped boson entanglement is discussed.

  6. Optical trapping and rotation of airborne absorbing particles with a single focused laser beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Jinda; Li, Yong-qing, E-mail: liy@ecu.edu [Department of Physics, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina 27858-4353 (United States)] [Department of Physics, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina 27858-4353 (United States)

    2014-03-10

    We measure the periodic circular motion of single absorbing aerosol particles that are optically trapped with a single focused Gaussian beam and rotate around the laser propagation direction. The scattered light from the trapped particle is observed to be directional and change periodically at 0.420?kHz. The instantaneous positions of the moving particle within a rotation period are measured by a high-speed imaging technique using a charge coupled device camera and a repetitively pulsed light-emitting diode illumination. The centripetal acceleration of the trapped particle as high as ?20 times the gravitational acceleration is observed and is attributed to the photophoretic forces.

  7. Radial transport of energetic ions in the presence of trapped electron mode turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chowdhury, J.; Wang, W.; Ethier, S.; Manickam, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Ganesh, R. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2011-11-15

    The nature of transport of hot ions is studied in the presence of microturbulence generated by the trapped electron mode in a Tokamak using massively parallel, first principle based global nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation, and with the help of a passive tracer method. Passing and trapped hot ions are observed to exhibit inverse and inverse square scaling with energy, while those with isotropic pitch distribution are found to exhibit inverse dependence on energy. For all types of hot ions, namely, isotropic, passing, and trapped, the radial transport appears to be subdiffusive for the parameters considered.

  8. Rare-earth neutral metal injection into an electron beam ion trap plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magee, E. W., E-mail: magee1@llnl.gov; Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Hell, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Dr. Remeis-Sternwarte and ECAP, Universitt Erlangen-Nrnberg, 96049 Bamberg (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    We have designed and implemented a neutral metal vapor injector on the SuperEBIT high-energy electron beam ion trap at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A horizontally directed vapor of a europium metal is created using a thermal evaporation technique. The metal vapor is then spatially collimated prior to injection into the trap. The source's form and quantity constraints are significantly reduced making plasmas out of metal with vapor pressures ?10{sup ?7} Torr at ?1000?C more obtainable. A long pulsed or constant feed metal vapor injection method adds new flexibility by varying the timing of injection and rate of material being introduced into the trap.

  9. Light Trapping for Thin Silicon Solar Cells by Femtosecond Laser Texturing: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, B. G.; Lin, Y. T.; Sher, M. J.; Mazur, E.; Branz, H. M.

    2012-06-01

    Femtosecond laser texturing is used to create nano- to micron-scale surface roughness that strongly enhances light-trapping in thin crystalline silicon solar cells. Light trapping is crucial for thin solar cells where a single light-pass through the absorber is insufficient to capture the weakly absorbed red and near-infrared photons, especially with an indirect-gap semiconductor absorber layer such as crystalline Si which is less than 20 um thick. We achieve enhancement of the optical absorption from light-trapping that approaches the Yablonovitch limit.

  10. Method and apparatus for regenerating cold traps within liquid-metal systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKee, Jr., John M.

    1976-01-01

    Oxide and hydride impurities of a liquid metal such as sodium are removed from a cold trap by heating to a temperature at which the metal hydroxide is stable in a molten state. The partial pressure of hydrogen within the system is measured to determine if excess hydride or oxide is present. Excess hydride is removed by venting hydrogen gas while excess oxide can be converted to molten hydroxide through the addition of hydrogen. The resulting, molten hydroxide is drained from the trap which is then returned to service at cold trap temperatures within the liquid-metal system.

  11. Reverse Monte Carlo simulation of Se{sub 80}Te{sub 20} and Se{sub 80}Te{sub 15}Sb{sub 5} glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdel-Baset, A. M.; Rashad, M.; Moharram, A. H.

    2013-12-16

    Two-dimensional Monte Carlo of the total pair distribution functions g(r) is determined for Se{sub 80}Te{sub 20} and Se{sub 80}Te{sub 15}Sb{sub 5} alloys, and then it used to assemble the three-dimensional atomic configurations using the reverse Monte Carlo simulation. The partial pair distribution functions g{sub ij}(r) indicate that the basic structure unit in the Se{sub 80}Te{sub 15}Sb{sub 5} glass is di-antimony tri-selenide units connected together through Se-Se and Se-Te chain. The structure of Se{sub 80}Te{sub 20} alloys is a chain of Se-Te and Se-Se in addition to some rings of Se atoms.

  12. Orbitally-driven giant phonon anharmonicity in SnSe

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Chen W.; Hong, Jiawang; May, Andrew F.; Bansal, Dipanshu; Chi, Songxue; Hong, Tao; Ehlers, Georg; Delaire, Olivier A.

    2015-10-19

    We understand that elementary excitations and their couplings in condensed matter systems is critical to develop better energy-conversion devices. In thermoelectric materials, the heat-to-electricity conversion efficiency is directly improved by suppressing the propagation of phonon quasiparticles responsible for macroscopic thermal transport. The material with the current record for thermoelectric conversion efficiency, SnSe, achieves an ultra-low thermal conductivity, but the mechanism enabling this strong phonon scattering remains largely unknown. Using inelastic neutron scattering measurements and first-principles simulations, we mapped the four-dimensional phonon dispersion surfaces of SnSe, and revealed the origin of ionic-potential anharmonicity responsible for the unique properties of SnSe. Wemore » show that the giant phonon scattering arises from an unstable electronic structure, with orbital interactions leading to a ferroelectric-like lattice instability. Our results provide a microscopic picture connecting electronic structure and phonon anharmonicity in SnSe, and offers precious insights on how electron-phonon and phononphonon interactions may lead to the realization of ultra-low thermal conductivity.« less

  13. Orbitally-driven giant phonon anharmonicity in SnSe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Chen W.; Hong, Jiawang; May, Andrew F.; Bansal, Dipanshu; Chi, Songxue; Hong, Tao; Ehlers, Georg; Delaire, Olivier A.

    2015-10-19

    We understand that elementary excitations and their couplings in condensed matter systems is critical to develop better energy-conversion devices. In thermoelectric materials, the heat-to-electricity conversion efficiency is directly improved by suppressing the propagation of phonon quasiparticles responsible for macroscopic thermal transport. The material with the current record for thermoelectric conversion efficiency, SnSe, achieves an ultra-low thermal conductivity, but the mechanism enabling this strong phonon scattering remains largely unknown. Using inelastic neutron scattering measurements and first-principles simulations, we mapped the four-dimensional phonon dispersion surfaces of SnSe, and revealed the origin of ionic-potential anharmonicity responsible for the unique properties of SnSe. We show that the giant phonon scattering arises from an unstable electronic structure, with orbital interactions leading to a ferroelectric-like lattice instability. Our results provide a microscopic picture connecting electronic structure and phonon anharmonicity in SnSe, and offers precious insights on how electron-phonon and phononphonon interactions may lead to the realization of ultra-low thermal conductivity.

  14. Investigation of Aging Mechanisms in Lean NOx Traps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Crocker

    2010-03-31

    Lean NO{sub x} traps (LNTs) represent a promising technology for the abatement of NO{sub x} under lean conditions. Although LNTs are starting to find commercial application, the issue of catalyst durability remains problematic. LNT susceptibility to sulfur poisoning is the single most important factor determining effective catalyst lifetime. The NO{sub x} storage element of the catalyst has a greater affinity for SO{sub 3} than it does for NO{sub 2}, and the resulting sulfate is more stable than the stored nitrate. Although this sulfate can be removed from the catalyst by means of high temperature treatment under rich conditions, the required conditions give rise to deactivation mechanisms such as precious metal sintering, total surface area loss, and solid state reactions between the various oxides present. The principle objective of this project was to improve understanding of the mechanisms of lean NO{sub x} trap aging, and to understand the effect of washcoat composition on catalyst aging characteristics. The approach utilized involved detailed characterization of model catalysts prior to and after aging, in tandem with measurement of catalyst performance in NO{sub x} storage and reduction. In this manner, NO{sub x} storage and reduction characteristics were correlated with the evolution of catalyst physico-chemical properties upon aging. Rather than using poorly characterized proprietary catalysts, or simple model catalysts of the Pt/BaO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} type (representing the first generation of LNTs), Pt/Rh/BaO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts were employed which also incorporated CeO{sub 2} or CeO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2}, representing a model system which more accurately reflects current LNT formulations. Catalysts were prepared in which the concentration of each of the main components was systematically varied: Pt (50, 75 or 100 g/ft{sup 3}), Rh (10 or 20 g/ft{sup 3}), BaO (15, 30 or 45 g/L), and either CeO{sub 2} (0, 50 or 100 g/L) or CeO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} (0, 50 or 100 g/L). A high surface area La-stabilized alumina was used to support the BaO phase. Catalysts were obtained by washcoating onto standard cordierite substrates, the total washcoat loading being set at 260 g/L. La-stabilized alumina was used as the balance. Subsequent to de-greening, the NO{sub x} storage and reduction characteristics of the catalysts were evaluated on a bench reactor, after which the catalysts were aged on a bench reactor to the equivalent of ca. 75,000 miles of road aging using a published accelerated aging protocol. The aged catalysts were then subjected to the same evaluation proecdure used for the de-greened catalysts. In addition to the use of standard physico-chemical analytical techniques for studying the fresh and aged model catalysts, use was made of advanced analytical tools for characterizing their NO{sub x} storage/reduction and sulfation/desulfation characteristics, such as Spatially resolved capillary-inlet Mass Spectrometry (SpaciMS) and in situ Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS).

  15. Sulfate Storage and Stability on Common Lean NOx Trap Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ottinger, Nathan A; Toops, Todd J; Pihl, Josh A; Roop, Justin T; Choi, Jae-Soon; Partridge Jr, William P

    2012-01-01

    Components found in a commercial lean NO{sub x} trap have been studied in order to determine their impact on sulfate storage and release. A micro-reactor and a diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectrometer (DRIFTS) were used to compare components MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}, Pt/MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}, Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Pt/Ba/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Pt/CeO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2}, and Pt/Ba/CeO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2}, as well as physical mixtures of Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} + MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and Pt/Ba/CeO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} + MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}. Desulfation temperature profiles as well as DRIFTS NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} storage spectra are presented for all components. This systematic approach highlighted the ability of the underlying support to impact sulfate stability, in particular when Ba was supported on ceria-zirconia rather than alumina the desulfation temperature decreased by 60-120 C. A conceptual model of sulfation progression on the ceria-zirconia support is proposed that explains the high uptake of sulfur and low temperature release when it is employed. It was also determined that the close proximity of platinum is not necessary for much of the sulfation and desulfation chemistry that occurs, as physical mixtures with platinum dispersed on only one phase displayed similar behavior to samples with platinum dispersed on both phases.

  16. Ion Trapping, Storage, and Ejection in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xinyu; Garimella, Venkata BS; Prost, Spencer A.; Webb, Ian K.; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Tang, Keqi; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Anderson, Gordon A.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-06-16

    A structure for lossless ion manipulation (SLIM) module was constructed with electrode arrays patterned on a pair of parallel printed circuit boards (PCB) separated by 5 mm and utilized to investigate capabilities for ion trapping at 4 Torr. Positive ions were confined by application of RF having alternating phases on a series of inner rung electrodes and by positive DC potentials on surrounding guard electrodes on each PCB. An axial DC field was also introduced by stepwise varying the DC potential of the inner rung electrodes so as to control the ion transport and accumulation inside the ion trap. We show that ions could be trapped and accumulated with 100% efficiency, stored for at least 5 hours with no losses, and could be rapidly ejected from the SLIM trap.

  17. Vertically aligned gas-insulated transmission line having particle traps at the inner conductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dale, Steinar J.

    1984-01-01

    Gas insulated electrical apparatus having first and second conductors separated by an insulating support within an insulating gas environment, and particle traps disposed along the surface of the high potential conductor for trapping and inactivating foreign particles which may be present within the insulating gas medium. Several embodiments of the invention were developed which are particularly suited for vertically aligned gas insulated transmission lines. The particle traps are grooves or cavities formed into the walls of the tubular inner conductor, without extending into the hollow portion of the conductor. In other embodiments, the traps are appendages or insert flanges extending from the inner conductor, with the insulator supports contacting the appendages instead of the inner conductor.

  18. Trapping the Light Fantastic | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 07.07.11 Trapping the Light Fantastic New solar cell design uses ...

  19. Light trapping in thin film solar cells using textured photonic crystal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yi, Yasha; Kimerling, Lionel C.; Duan, Xiaoman; Zeng, Lirong

    2009-01-27

    A solar cell includes a photoactive region that receives light. A photonic crystal is coupled to the photoactive region, wherein the photonic crystal comprises a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) for trapping the light.

  20. Study of electron trapping by a transversely ellipsoidal bubble in the laser wake-field acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, Myung-Hoon; Kim, Young-Kuk; Hur, Min Sup

    2013-09-15

    We present electron trapping in an ellipsoidal bubble which is not well explained by the spherical bubble model by [Kostyukov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 175003 (2009)]. The formation of an ellipsoidal bubble, which is elongated transversely, frequently occurs when the spot size of the laser pulse is large compared to the plasma wavelength. First, we introduce the relation between the bubble size and the field slope inside the bubble in longitudinal and transverse directions. Then, we provide an ellipsoidal model of the bubble potential and investigate the electron trapping condition by numerical integration of the equations of motion. We found that the ellipsoidal model gives a significantly less restrictive trapping condition than that of the spherical bubble model. The trapping condition is compared with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations and the electron trajectory in test potential simulations.

  1. High Contrast Ramsey Fringes with Coherent-Population-Trapping Pulses in a Double Lambda Atomic System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zanon, T.; Guerandel, S.; Clercq, E. de; Holleville, D.; Dimarcq, N.; Clairon, A. [SYRTE, Observatoire de Paris, 61 Avenue de l'Observatoire, 75014 Paris (France)

    2005-05-20

    We report the observation of Raman-Ramsey fringes using a double lambda scheme creating coherent population trapping in an atomic ensemble combined with pulsed optical radiations. The observation was made in a Cs vapor mixed with N{sub 2} buffer gas in a closed cell. The double lambda scheme is created with lin perpendicular lin polarized laser beams leading to higher contrast than the usual simple lambda scheme. The pulsed trapping technique leads to narrow fringe widths scaling as 1/(2T) with high contrasts which are no longer limited by the saturation effect. This technique operates in a different way from the classical Ramsey sequence: the signal is done by applying a long trapping pulse to prepare the atomic state superposition, and fringe detection is accomplished by optical transmission during a short second trapping pulse without any perturbation of the dark state.

  2. Giant piezoelectricity of monolayer group IV monochalcogenides: SnSe, SnS, GeSe, and GeS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fei, Ruixiang; Yang, Li; Li, Wenbin; Li, Ju

    2015-10-26

    We predict enormous, anisotropic piezoelectric effects in intrinsic monolayer group IV monochalcogenides (MX, M=Sn or Ge, X=Se or S), including SnSe, SnS, GeSe, and GeS. Using first-principle simulations based on the modern theory of polarization, we find that their piezoelectric coefficients are about one to two orders of magnitude larger than those of other 2D materials, such as MoS{sub 2} and GaSe, and bulk quartz and AlN which are widely used in industry. This enhancement is a result of the unique “puckered” C{sub 2v} symmetry and electronic structure of monolayer group IV monochalcogenides. Given the achieved experimental advances in the fabrication of monolayers, their flexible character, and ability to withstand enormous strain, these 2D structures with giant piezoelectric effects may be promising for a broad range of applications such as nano-sized sensors, piezotronics, and energy harvesting in portable electronic devices.

  3. Direct probing of electron and hole trapping into nano-floating-gate in organic field-effect transistor nonvolatile memories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui, Ze-Qun; Wang, Shun; Chen, Jian-Mei; Gao, Xu; Dong, Bin E-mail: chilf@suda.edu.cn Chi, Li-Feng E-mail: chilf@suda.edu.cn Wang, Sui-Dong E-mail: chilf@suda.edu.cn

    2015-03-23

    Electron and hole trapping into the nano-floating-gate of a pentacene-based organic field-effect transistor nonvolatile memory is directly probed by Kelvin probe force microscopy. The probing is straightforward and non-destructive. The measured surface potential change can quantitatively profile the charge trapping, and the surface characterization results are in good accord with the corresponding device behavior. Both electrons and holes can be trapped into the nano-floating-gate, with a preference of electron trapping than hole trapping. The trapped charge quantity has an approximately linear relation with the programming/erasing gate bias, indicating that the charge trapping in the device is a field-controlled process.

  4. Activation of water soluble amines by halogens for trapping methyl radioactive iodine from air streams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deitz, Victor R.; Blachly, Charles H.

    1977-01-01

    Gas adsorbent charcoals impregnated with an aqueous solution of the reaction product of a tertiary amine and elemental iodine or bromine are better than 99 per cent efficient in trapping methyl iodine.sup.131. The chemical addition of iodine or bromine to the tertiary amine molecule increases the efficiency of the impregnated charcoal as a trapping agent, and in conjunction with the high flash point of the tertiary amine raises the ignition temperature of the impregnated charcoal.

  5. Extending Penning trap mass measurements with SHIPTRAP to the heaviest elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Block, M.; Ackermann, D.; Herfurth, F.; Hofmann, S.; Blaum, K.; Droese, C.; Marx, G.; Schweikhard, L.; Duellmann, Ch. E.; Eibach, M.; Eliseev, S.; Haettner, E.; Plass, W. R.; Scheidenberger, C.; Hessberger, F. P.; Ramirez, E. Minaya; Nesterenko, D.; and others

    2013-03-19

    Penning-trap mass spectrometry of radionuclides provides accurate mass values and absolute binding energies. Such mass measurements are sensitive indicators of the nuclear structure evolution far away from stability. Recently, direct mass measurements have been extended to the heavy elements nobelium (Z=102) and lawrencium (Z=103) with the Penning-trap mass spectrometer SHIPTRAP. The results probe nuclear shell effects at N=152. New developments will pave the way to access even heavier nuclides.

  6. Stories of Discovery & Innovation: Trapping the Light Fantastic| U.S. DOE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Office of Science (SC) Trapping the Light Fantastic Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) EFRCs Home Centers Research Science Highlights News & Events EFRC News EFRC Events DOE Announcements Publications History Contact BES Home 07.07.11 Stories of Discovery & Innovation: Trapping the Light Fantastic Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page New solar cell design uses advanced optics and nanotechnology to maximize performance and minimize cost. Discovery moves from lab

  7. Traps identification in Copper-Indium-Gallium-Sulfur-Selenide Solar Cells

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Completed with Various Buffer Layers by Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Traps identification in Copper-Indium-Gallium-Sulfur-Selenide Solar Cells Completed with Various Buffer Layers by Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Traps identification in Copper-Indium-Gallium-Sulfur-Selenide Solar Cells Completed with Various Buffer Layers by Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy Current-voltage

  8. Combining Low-Temperature Combustion with Lean-NOx Trap Yields Progress

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Toward Targets of Efficient NOx Control for Diesels | Department of Energy 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters PDF icon 2005_deer_huff.pdf More Documents & Publications Intra-catalyst Reductant Chemistry in Lean NOx Traps: A Study on Sulfur Effects Reductant Utilization in a LNT + SCR System Synergies of High-Efficiency Clean Combustion and Lean NOx Trap Catalysts

  9. Location Of Hole And Electron Traps On Nanocrystalline Anatase TiO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mercado, Candy C.; Knorr, Fritz J.; McHale, Jeanne L.; Usmani, Shirin M.; Ichimura, Andrew S.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.

    2012-05-17

    The defect photoluminescence from TiO2 nanoparticles in the anatase phase is reported for nanosheets which expose predominantly (001) surfaces, and compared to that from conventional anatase nanoparticles which expose mostly (101) surfaces. Also reported is the weak defect photoluminescence of TiO2 nanotubes, which we find using electron back-scattered diffraction to consist of walls which expose (110) and (100) facets. The nanotubes exhibit photoluminescence that is blue-shifted and much weaker than that from conventional TiO2 nanoparticles. Despite the preponderance of (001) surfaces in the nanosheet samples, they exhibit photoluminescence similar to that of conventional nanoparticles. We assign the broad visible photoluminescence of anatase nanoparticles to two overlapping distributions: hole trap emission associated with oxygen vacancies on (101) exposed surfaces, which peaks in the green, and a broader emission extending into the red which results from electron traps on under-coordinated titanium atoms, which are prevalent on (001) facets. The results of this study suggest how morphology of TiO2 nanoparticles could be optimized to control the distribution and activity of surface traps. Our results also shed light on the mechanism by which the TiCl4 surface treatment heals traps on anatase and mixed-phase TiO2 films, and reveals distinct differences in the trap-state distributions of TiO2 nanoparticles and nanotubes. The molecular basis for electron and hole traps and their spatial separation on different facets is discussed.

  10. Effect of dislocation trapping on deuterium diffusion in deformed, single-crystal Pd

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heuser, B.J.; King, J.S.

    1998-06-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to characterize deuterium trapping at dislocations in deformed, single-crystal Pd during in situ gas evolution experiments. Two methods of deformation were employed--cold rolling and hydride cycling--which create different dislocation arrangements or substructures in Pd. The reduction of the trapped deuterium concentration at dislocations during evolution was directly monitored with SANS. Exponential decay rates of the trapped concentration were observed for both sample types, as is expected in a bulk diffusion process modified by the dislocation trapping interaction. The deuterium concentration reduction proceeded 1.2 to 1.4 times faster in the cold-rolled sample material than in the cycled material. This is attributed to the presence of a smaller number of dislocation trapping sites in the cold-rolled material. The binding energy of deuterium at dislocations was determined by applying a diffusion-based model. A binding energy of 0.20 eV was found to characterize the trapping interaction in both cold-rolled and hydride-cycled Pd.

  11. Immobilization of Cesium Traps from the BN-350 Fast Reactor (Aktau, Kazakhstan)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. A. Michelbacher; C. Knight; O. G. Romanenko; I. L. Tazhibaeva; I. L. Yakovlev; A. V. Rovneyko; V. I. Maev; D. Wells; A. Herrick

    2011-03-01

    During BN-350 reactor operations and also during the initial stages of decommissioning, cesium traps were used to decontaminate the reactor’s primary sodium coolant. Two different types of carbon-based trap were used – the MAVR series, low ash granulated graphite adsorber (LAG) contained in a carrier designed to be inserted into the reactor core during shutdown; and a series of ex-reactor trap accumulators(TAs) which used reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) to reduce Cs-137 levels in the sodium after final reactor shutdown. In total four MAVRs and seven TAs were used at BN-350 to remove an estimated cumulative 755 TBq of cesium. The traps, which also contain residual sodium, need to be immobilized in an appropriate way to allow them to be consigned as waste packages for long term storage and, ultimately, disposal. The present paper reports on the current status of the implementation phase, with particular reference to the work done to date on the trap accumulators, which have the most similarity with the cesium traps used at other reactors.

  12. Epitaxial growth of CZT(S,Se) on silicon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bojarczuk, Nestor A.; Gershon, Talia S.; Guha, Supratik; Shin, Byungha; Zhu, Yu

    2016-03-15

    Techniques for epitaxial growth of CZT(S,Se) materials on Si are provided. In one aspect, a method of forming an epitaxial kesterite material is provided which includes the steps of: selecting a Si substrate based on a crystallographic orientation of the Si substrate; forming an epitaxial oxide interlayer on the Si substrate to enhance wettability of the epitaxial kesterite material on the Si substrate, wherein the epitaxial oxide interlayer is formed from a material that is lattice-matched to Si; and forming the epitaxial kesterite material on a side of the epitaxial oxide interlayer opposite the Si substrate, wherein the epitaxial kesterite material includes Cu, Zn, Sn, and at least one of S and Se, and wherein a crystallographic orientation of the epitaxial kesterite material is based on the crystallographic orientation of the Si substrate. A method of forming an epitaxial kesterite-based photovoltaic device and an epitaxial kesterite-based device are also provided.

  13. Deformation potentials of CdSe quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Jingbo; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2004-06-02

    The size dependent deformation potentials of CdSe quantum dots are studied by first principle and semi-empirical pseudopotentials calculations. They find that the amplitude of the quantum dot deformation potential is only slightly larger than the bulk value, and this increase is mostly caused by the off {Lambda} point deformation potentials in the bulk, which are larger in amplitude than the {Lambda} point deformation potential.

  14. Quantum confined acceptors and donors in InSe nanosheets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mudd, G. W.; Patan, A. Makarovsky, O.; Eaves, L.; Kudrynskyi, Z. R.; Kovalyuk, Z. D.; Fay, M. W.; Zlyomi, V.; Falko, V.

    2014-12-01

    We report on the radiative recombination of photo-excited carriers bound at native donors and acceptors in exfoliated nanoflakes of nominally undoped rhombohedral ?-polytype InSe. The binding energies of these states are found to increase with the decrease in flake thickness, L. We model their dependence on L using a two-dimensional hydrogenic model for impurities and show that they are strongly sensitive to the position of the impurities within the nanolayer.

  15. Crab trapping causes population decline and demographic changes in diamondback terrapins over two decades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorcas, M.E., J.D. Willson and J.W. Gibbons

    2007-01-01

    Diamondback terrapins (Malaclemys terrapin) are thought to be declining throughout their range. Although many factors have been proposed to contribute to terrapin declines, including increased predation of nests and adults, habitat loss and degradation, road mortality, commercial harvest for food, and mortality as bycatch in crab traps, few studies have provided evidence linking these agents to population declines. Because male and small female terrapins are most susceptible to mortality in crab traps, population declines should coincide with shifts in the age and size distributions of the population and a shift to a more female-biased sex ratio. We used twenty-one years of mark-recapture data (>2800 captures of 1399 individuals) from a declining diamondback terrapin population in South Carolina to test the prediction that the decline is the result of mortality in crab traps. Since the 1980s, the modal size of both male and female terrapins has increased substantially and the proportion that are females is higher than in earlier samples. Additionally, the population now contains more old and fewer young individuals than before. The changes in demography and sex ratio we observed suggest that this terrapin population has declined as a result of selective mortality of smaller individuals in crab traps. The use of bycatch-reduction devices on crab traps may help prevent terrapins from entering the traps, but current models are too large to prevent mortality of males and many females in this population. Future research should focus on design and testing of effective bycatch-reduction devices for specific regions and other methods to prevent terrapin mortality in crab traps.

  16. American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ref-Fuel of SE CT Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Biomass Facility Facility American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Sector Biomass Facility Type...

  17. V-181: Oracle Java SE Critical Patch Update Advisory - June 2013...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1: Oracle Java SE Critical Patch Update Advisory - June 2013 V-181: Oracle Java SE Critical Patch Update Advisory - June 2013 June 19, 2013 - 1:06am Addthis PROBLEM: Oracle Java SE...

  18. Bi-Se doped with Cu, p-type semiconductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bhattacharya, Raghu Nath; Phok, Sovannary; Parilla, Philip Anthony

    2013-08-20

    A Bi--Se doped with Cu, p-type semiconductor, preferably used as an absorber material in a photovoltaic device. Preferably the semiconductor has at least 20 molar percent Cu. In a preferred embodiment, the semiconductor comprises at least 28 molar percent of Cu. In one embodiment, the semiconductor comprises a molar percentage of Cu and Bi whereby the molar percentage of Cu divided by the molar percentage of Bi is greater than 1.2. In a preferred embodiment, the semiconductor is manufactured as a thin film having a thickness less than 600 nm.

  19. Pressure-dependent Optical Behaviors of Colloidal CdSe Nanoplatelets...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    dependent Optical Behaviors of Colloidal CdSe Nanoplatelets Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Pressure-dependent Optical Behaviors of Colloidal CdSe Nanoplatelets Authors: ...

  20. Trapping two types of particles using a double-ring-shaped radially polarized beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Yaoju; Ding Biaofeng; Suyama, Taikei

    2010-02-15

    An optical-trap method based on the illumination of a double-ring-shaped radially polarized beam (R-TEM{sub 11}*) is proposed. The numerical results based on the vector diffraction theory show that a highly focused R-TEM{sub 11}* beam not only can produce a bright spot but also can form an optical cage in the focal region by changing the truncation parameter {beta}, defined as the ratio of the radius of the aperture to the waist of the beam. The radiation forces acting on Rayleigh particles are calculated by using the Rayleigh scattering theory. The bright spot generated by the R-TEM{sub 11}* beam with a {beta} value close to 2 can three-dimensionally trap a particle with a refractive index larger than that of the ambient. An optical cage or three-dimensional dark spot generated by the R-TEM{sub 11}* beam with a {beta} value close to 1.3 can three-dimensionally trap a particle with refractive index smaller than that of the ambient. Because the adjustment of the truncation parameter can be actualized by simply changing the radius of a circular aperture inserted in the front of the lens, only one optical-trap system in the present method can be used to three-dimensionally trap two types of particles with different refractive indices.

  1. Dislocation-related trap levels in nitride-based light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venturi, Giulia; Castaldini, Antonio; Cavallini, Anna

    2014-05-26

    Deep level transient spectroscopy was performed on InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well light emitting diodes (LEDs) in order to determine the effect of the dislocation density on the deep intragap electronic levels. The LEDs were grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy on GaN templates with a high dislocation density of 8 10{sup 9} cm{sup ?2} and a low dislocation density of 3 10{sup 8} cm{sup ?2}. Three trapping levels for electrons were revealed, named A, A1, and B, with energies E{sub A}???0.04?eV, E{sub A1}???0.13?eV, and E{sub B}???0.54?eV, respectively. The trapping level A has a much higher concentration in the LEDs grown on the template with a high density of dislocations. The logarithmic dependence of the peak amplitude on the bias pulse width for traps A and A1 identifies the defects responsible for these traps as associated with linearly arranged defects. We conclude that traps A and A1 are dislocation-related intragap energy levels.

  2. The uses of electron beam ion traps in the study of highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, D.

    1994-11-02

    The Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) is a relatively new tool for the study of highly charged ions. Its development has led to a variety of new experimental opportunities; measurements have been performed with EBITs using techniques impossible with conventional ion sources or storage rings. In this paper, I will highlight the various experimental techniques we have developed and the results we have obtained using the EBIT and higher-energy Super-EBIT built at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The EBIT employs a high-current-density electron beam to trap, ionize, and excite a population of ions. The ions can be studied in situ or extracted from the trap for external experiments. The trapped ions form an ionization-state equilibrium determined by the relative ionization and recombination rates. Ions of several different elements may simultaneously be present in the trap. The ions are nearly at rest, and, for most systems, all in their ground-state configurations. The electron-ion interaction energy has a narrow distribution and can be varied over a wide range. We have used the EBIT devices for the measurement of electron-ion interactions, ion structure, ion-surface interactions, and the behavior of low-density plasmas.

  3. Region with trapped surfaces in spherical symmetry, its core, and their boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bengtsson, Ingemar; Senovilla, Jose M. M.

    2011-02-15

    We consider the region T in spacetime containing future-trapped closed surfaces and its boundary B, and derive some of their general properties. We then concentrate on the case of spherical symmetry, but the methods we use are general and applicable to other situations. We argue that closed trapped surfaces have a nonlocal property, ''clairvoyance'', which is inherited by B. We prove that B is not a marginally trapped tube in general, and that it can have portions in regions whose whole past is flat. For asymptotically flat black holes, we identify a general past barrier, well inside the event horizon, to the location of B under physically reasonable conditions. We also define the core Z of the trapped region as that part of T which is indispensable to sustain closed trapped surfaces. We prove that the unique spherically symmetric dynamical horizon is the boundary of such a core, and we argue that this may serve to single it out. To illustrate the results, some explicit examples are discussed, namely, Robertson-Walker geometries and the imploding Vaidya spacetime.

  4. Thermodynamic properties of model CdTe/CdSe mixtures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    van Swol, Frank; Zhou, Xiaowang W.; Challa, Sivakumar R.; Martin, James E.

    2015-02-20

    We report on the thermodynamic properties of binary compound mixtures of model groups II–VI semiconductors. We use the recently introduced Stillinger–Weber Hamiltonian to model binary mixtures of CdTe and CdSe. We use molecular dynamics simulations to calculate the volume and enthalpy of mixing as a function of mole fraction. The lattice parameter of the mixture closely follows Vegard's law: a linear relation. This implies that the excess volume is a cubic function of mole fraction. A connection is made with hard sphere models of mixed fcc and zincblende structures. We found that the potential energy exhibits a positive deviation frommore » ideal soluton behaviour; the excess enthalpy is nearly independent of temperatures studied (300 and 533 K) and is well described by a simple cubic function of the mole fraction. Using a regular solution approach (combining non-ideal behaviour for the enthalpy with ideal solution behaviour for the entropy of mixing), we arrive at the Gibbs free energy of the mixture. The Gibbs free energy results indicate that the CdTe and CdSe mixtures exhibit phase separation. The upper consolute temperature is found to be 335 K. Finally, we provide the surface energy as a function of composition. Moreover, it roughly follows ideal solution theory, but with a negative deviation (negative excess surface energy). This indicates that alloying increases the stability, even for nano-particles.« less

  5. Particle trap to sheath contact for a gas-insulated transmission line having a corrugated outer conductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fischer, William H.; Cookson, Alan H.; Yoon, Kue H.

    1984-04-10

    A particle trap to outer elongated conductor or sheath contact for gas-insulated transmission lines. The particle trap to outer sheath contact of the invention is applicable to gas-insulated transmission lines having either corrugated or non-corrugated outer sheaths. The contact of the invention includes an electrical contact disposed on a lever arm which in turn is rotatably disposed on the particle trap and biased in a direction to maintain contact between the electrical contact and the outer sheath.

  6. Particle trap to sheath non-binding contact for a gas-insulated transmission line having a corrugated outer conductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fischer, William H.

    1984-04-24

    A non-binding particle trap to outer sheath contact for use in gas insulated transmission lines having a corrugated outer conductor. The non-binding feature of the contact according to the teachings of the invention is accomplished by having a lever arm rotatably attached to a particle trap by a pivot support axis disposed parallel to the direction of travel of the inner conductor/insulator/particle trap assembly.

  7. Thermal Deactivation Mechanisms of Fully-Formed Lean NOx Trap Catalysts Aged by Lean/Rich Cycling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Catalysts in fully formulated lean NOx traps are aged and evaluated in a bench-flow reactor using simulated diesel engine exhaust.

  8. Understanding the Distributed Intra-Catalyst Impact of Sulfation on Water Gas Shift in a Lean NOx Trap Catalyst

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Lean NOx Trap catalyst is an aftertreatment technology for abatement of nitrogen-oxide emissions from lean-burn vehicle engines.

  9. Experimental nonlinear dynamical studies in cesium magneto-optical trap using time-series analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anwar, M. Islam, R.; Faisal, M.; Sikandar, M.; Ahmed, M.

    2015-03-30

    A magneto-optical trap of neutral atoms is essentially a dissipative quantum system. The fast thermal atoms continuously dissipate their energy to the environment via spontaneous emissions during the cooling. The atoms are, therefore, strongly coupled with the vacuum reservoir and the laser field. The vacuum fluctuations as well as the field fluctuations are imparted to the atoms as random photon recoils. Consequently, the external and internal dynamics of atoms becomes stochastic. In this paper, we have investigated the stochastic dynamics of the atoms in a magneto-optical trap during the loading process. The time series analysis of the fluorescence signal shows that the dynamics of the atoms evolves, like all dissipative systems, from deterministic to the chaotic regime. The subsequent disappearance and revival of chaos was attributed to chaos synchronization between spatially different atoms in the magneto-optical trap.

  10. Off-resonance energy absorption in a linear Paul trap due to mass selective resonant quenching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sivarajah, I.; Goodman, D. S.; Wells, J. E.; Smith, W. W.; Narducci, F. A.

    2013-11-15

    Linear Paul traps (LPT) are used in many experimental studies such as mass spectrometry, atom-ion collisions, and ion-molecule reactions. Mass selective resonant quenching (MSRQ) is implemented in LPT either to identify a charged particle's mass or to remove unwanted ions from a controlled experimental environment. In the latter case, MSRQ can introduce undesired heating to co-trapped ions of different mass, whose secular motion is off resonance with the quenching ac field, which we call off-resonance energy absorption (OREA). We present simulations and experimental evidence that show that the OREA increases exponentially with the number of ions loaded into the trap and with the amplitude of the off-resonance external ac field.

  11. Multi-particle trapping and manipulation by a high-frequency array transducer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Changhan; Kang, Bong Jin; Lee, Changyang; Kim, Hyung Ham Shung, K. Kirk

    2014-11-24

    We report the multiple micro-particle trapping and manipulation by a single-beam acoustic tweezer using a high-frequency array transducer. A single acoustic beam generated by a 30 MHz ultrasonic linear array transducer can entrap and transport multiple micro-particles located at the main lobe and the grating lobes. The distance between trapped particles can be adjusted by changing the transmit arrangement of array-based acoustic tweezers and subsequently the location of grating lobes. The experiment results showed that the proposed method can trap and manipulate multiple particles within a range of hundreds of micrometers. Due to its simplicity and low acoustic power, which is critical to protect cells from any thermal and mechanical damages, the technique may be used for transportation of cells in cell biology, biosensors, and tissue engineering.

  12. Importance of hydrophobic traps for proton diffusion in lyotropic liquid crystals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    McDaniel, Jesse G.; Yethiraj, Arun

    2016-03-04

    The diffusion of protons in self-assembled systems is potentially important for the design of efficient proton exchange membranes. In this work, we study proton dynamics in a low-water content, lamellar phase of an sodium-carboxylate gemini surfactant/water system using computer simulations. The hopping of protons via the Grotthuss mechanism is explicity allowed through the multi-state empirical valence bond (MS-EVB) method. We find that the hydronium ion is trapped on the hydrophobic side of the surfactant-water interface, and proton diffusion then proceeds by hopping between surface sites. The importance of hydrophobic traps is surprising, because one would expect the hydronium ions tomore » be trapped at the charged head-groups. The physics illustrated in this system should be relevant to the proton dynamics in other amphiphilic membrane systems, whenever there exists exposed hydrophobic surface regions.« less

  13. TRAPPED PROTON FLUXES AT LOW EARTH ORBITS MEASURED BY THE PAMELA EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adriani, O.; Bongi, M.; Barbarino, G. C.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Bellotti, R.; Bruno, A.; Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Carbone, R.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bottai, S.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Carlson, P.; Casolino, M.; De Donato, C.; De Santis, C.; De Simone, N.; Felice, V. Di; Castellini, G.; and others

    2015-01-20

    We report an accurate measurement of the geomagnetically trapped proton fluxes for kinetic energy above ∼70 MeV performed by the PAMELA mission at low Earth orbits (350 ÷ 610 km). Data were analyzed in the frame of the adiabatic theory of charged particle motion in the geomagnetic field. Flux properties were investigated in detail, providing a full characterization of the particle radiation in the South Atlantic Anomaly region, including locations, energy spectra, and pitch angle distributions. PAMELA results significantly improve the description of the Earth's radiation environment at low altitudes, placing important constraints on the trapping and interaction processes, and can be used to validate current trapped particle radiation models.

  14. Electron Traps Detected in p-type GaAsN Using Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, S.; Kurtz, S.; Friedman, D.; Ptak, A.; Ahrenkiel, R.; Crandall, R.

    2005-01-01

    The GaAsN alloy can have a band gap as small as 1.0 eV when the nitrogen composition is about 2%. Indium can also be added to the alloy to increase lattice matching to GaAs and Ge. These properties are advantageous for developing a highly-efficient, multi-junction solar cell. However, poor GaAsN cell properties, such as low open-circuit voltage, have led to inadequate performance. Deep-level transient spectroscopy of p-type GaAsN has identified an electron trap having an activation energy near 0.2 eV and a trap density of at least 1016 cm-3. This trap level appears with the addition of small amounts of nitrogen to GaAs, which also corresponds to an increased drop in open-circuit voltage.

  15. Luther-Emery Phase and Atomic-Density Waves in a Trapped Fermion Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao Xianlong; Rizzi, M.; Polini, Marco; Tosi, M. P.; Fazio, Rosario; Campo, V. L. Jr.; Capelle, K.

    2007-01-19

    The Luther-Emery liquid is a state of matter that is predicted to occur in one-dimensional systems of interacting fermions and is characterized by a gapless charge spectrum and a gapped spin spectrum. In this Letter we discuss a realization of the Luther-Emery phase in a trapped cold-atom gas. We study by means of the density-matrix renormalization-group technique a two-component atomic Fermi gas with attractive interactions subject to parabolic trapping inside an optical lattice. We demonstrate how this system exhibits compound phases characterized by the coexistence of spin pairing and atomic-density waves. A smooth crossover occurs with increasing magnitude of the atom-atom attraction to a state in which tightly bound spin-singlet dimers occupy the center of the trap. The existence of atomic-density waves could be detected in the elastic contribution to the light-scattering diffraction pattern.

  16. Characterization of trapped gas saturation and heterogeneity in core sampling using miscible-displacement experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D.H.; Jikich, S.A.

    1994-12-31

    Trapped gas saturation and permeability heterogeneity were evaluated in Berea cores at reservoir conditions, using standard miscible displacement experiments, with and without surfactants. Pressure and production history were influenced by core heterogeneity and foam lamellae formation when aqueous surfactant was present in the core. The objective of the dispersion-capacitance model was to estimate trapped gas saturations; however longitudinal dispersion and mass transfer also were examined. The results show that the dispersion-capacitance model accurately fits trapped gas saturation controlled by rock heterogeneities and foam lamellae for lamella generating mechanisms that allow a continuous gas phase (leave-behind lamellae). The practical applications resulting from this study can aid in core sample selection and scaling short laboratory corefloods to field dimensions for applications to foam stimulation and underground storage of natural gas.

  17. Light Trapping for High Efficiency Heterojunction Crystalline Si Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Q.; Xu, Y.; Iwaniczko, E.; Page, M.

    2011-04-01

    Light trapping plays an important role to achieve high short circuit current density (Jsc) and high efficiency for amorphous/crystalline Si heterojunction solar cells. Si heterojunction uses hydrogenated amorphous Si for emitter and back contact. This structure of solar cell posses highest open circuit voltage of 0.747 V at one sun for c-Si based solar cells. It also suggests that over 25% record-high efficiency is possible with further improvement of Jsc. Light trapping has two important tasks. The first one is to reduce the surface reflectance of light to zero for the solar spectrum that Si has a response. The second one is to increase the effective absorption length to capture all the photon. For Si heterojunction solar cell, surface texturing, anti-reflectance indium tin oxides (ITO) layer at the front and back are the key area to improve the light trapping.

  18. Unconventional gas hydrate seals may trap gas off southeast US. [North Carolina, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dillion, W.P.; Grow, J.A.; Paull, C.K.

    1980-01-07

    Seismic profiles have indicated to the US Geological Survey that an unconventional seal, created by gas hydrates that form in near-bottom sediments, may provide gas traps in continental slopes and rises offshore North and South Carolina. The most frequently cited evidence for the presence of gas hydrate in ocean sediments is the observation of a seismic reflection event that occurs about 1/2 s below and parallel with the seafloor. If gas-hydrate traps do exist, they will occur at very shallow sub-bottom depths of about 1600 ft (500m). Exploration of such traps will probably take place in the federally controlled Blake Ridge area off the coast of South Carolina where seismic data suggest a high incidence of gas hydrates. However, drilling through the gas-hydrate-cemented layer may require new engineering techniques for sealing the casing.

  19. Self-trapped exciton and core-valence luminescence in BaF{sub 2} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vistovskyy, V. V. Zhyshkovych, A. V.; Chornodolskyy, Ya. M.; Voloshinovskii, A. S.; Myagkota, O. S.; Gloskovskii, A.; Gektin, A. V.; Vasil'ev, A. N.; Rodnyi, P. A.

    2013-11-21

    The influence of the BaF{sub 2} nanoparticle size on the intensity of the self-trapped exciton luminescence and the radiative core-valence transitions is studied by the luminescence spectroscopy methods using synchrotron radiation. The decrease of the self-trapped exciton emission intensity at energies of exciting photons in the range of optical exciton creation (h? ? E{sub g}) is less sensitive to the reduction of the nanoparticle sizes than in the case of band-to-band excitation, where excitons are formed by the recombination way. The intensity of the core-valence luminescence shows considerably weaker dependence on the nanoparticle sizes in comparison with the intensity of self-trapped exciton luminescence. The revealed regularities are explained by considering the relationship between nanoparticle size and photoelectron or photohole thermalization length as well as the size of electronic excitations.

  20. ADVANCED GASIFICATION MERCURY/TRACE METAL CONTROL WITH MONOLITH TRAPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark A. Musich; Michael L. Swanson; Grant E. Dunham; Joshua J. Stanislowski

    2010-07-31

    Two Corning monoliths and a non-carbon-based material have been identified as potential additives for mercury capture in syngas at temperatures above 400F and pressure of 600 psig. A new Corning monolith formulation, GR-F1-2189, described as an active sample appeared to be the best monolith tested to date. The Corning SR Liquid monolith concept continues to be a strong candidate for mercury capture. Both monolith types allowed mercury reduction to below 5-?g/m3 (~5 ppb), a current U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) goal for trace metal control. Preparation methods for formulating the SR Liquid monolith impacted the ability of the monolith to capture mercury. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC)-prepared Noncarbon Sorbents 1 and 2 appeared to offer potential for sustained and significant reduction of mercury concentration in the simulated fuel gas. The Noncarbon Sorbent 1 allowed sustained mercury reduction to below 5-?g/m3 (~5 ppb). The non-carbon-based sorbent appeared to offer the potential for regeneration, that is, desorption of mercury by temperature swing (using nitrogen and steam at temperatures above where adsorption takes place). A Corning cordierite monolith treated with a Group IB metal offered limited potential as a mercury sorbent. However, a Corning carbon-based monolith containing prereduced metallic species similar to those found on the noncarbon sorbents did not exhibit significant or sustained mercury reduction. EERC sorbents prepared with Group IB and IIB selenide appeared to have some promise for mercury capture. Unfortunately, these sorbents also released Se, as was evidenced by the measurement of H2Se in the effluent gas. All sorbents tested with arsine or hydrogen selenide, including Corning monoliths and the Group IB and IIB metal-based materials, showed an ability to capture arsine or hydrogen selenide at 400F and 600 psig. Based on current testing, the noncarbon metal-based sorbents appear to be the most effective arsine and hydrogen selenide sorbents. The noncarbon sorbent was able to reduce the concentration to 0 ppb from a starting concentration of 120 ppb. This compares to the target value of 5 ppb (~17?g/m3). The EERC-prepared metal-based pellet and coprecipitate sorbents exhibited arsine reductions of 90% or greater, being below 10 ppb. Corning SR Liquid monoliths exhibited brief periods (<1 hour) of attaining 90% arsine reduction but were able to achieve greater than 80% reduction for several hours. With respect to hydrogen selenide, all Group IB and IIB metal-based sorbents tested exhibited 100% reduction from an inlet concentration of approximately 400 ppb. Corning SR Liquid monoliths exhibited an 82% reduction when two monoliths were tested simultaneously in series.

  1. Magnetooptical study of CdSe/ZnMnSe semimagnetic quantum-dot ensembles with n-type modulation doping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reshina, I. I. Ivanov, S. V.

    2014-12-15

    Magnetic and polarization investigations of the photoluminescence and resonant electron spin-flip Raman scattering in ensembles of self-organized CdSe/ZnMnSe semimagnetic quantum dots with n-type modulation doping are carried out. It is demonstrated that exciton transitions contribute to the photoluminescence band intensity, along with the transitions of trions in the singlet state. In the Hanle-effect measurements, negative circular polarization in zero magnetic field is observed, which is related to the optical orientation of a trion heavy hole. The lifetime and spin-relaxation time of a heavy hole are estimated as ?3 and ?1 ps, respectively. Such short times are assumed to be due to Auger recombination with the excitation of an intrinsic transition in a Mn{sup 2+} ion. Investigations of the photoluminescence-maximum intensity and shift in a longitudinal magnetic field at the ?{sup ?}?{sup +} and ?{sup ?}?{sup ?} polarizations reveal the pronounced spin polarization of electrons. Under resonant excitation conditions, a sharp increase in the photoluminescence-band maximum intensity at ?{sup ?} excitation polarization over the ?{sup +} one is observed. The Raman scattering peak at the electron spin-flip transition is observed upon resonant excitation in a transverse magnetic field in crossed linear polarizations. This peak is shown to be a Brillouin function of a magnetic field.

  2. High-precision Penning trap mass measurements for tests of the Standard Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaum, Klaus; Eliseev, Sergey; Nagy, Szilard

    2010-08-04

    With the nowadays achievable accuracy in Penning trap mass spectrometry on short-lived exotic nuclides as well as stable atoms, precision fundamental tests can be performed, among them a test of the Standard Model, in particular with regard to the weak interaction, the CPT symmetry conservation, and the unitarity of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark mixing matrix. In addition, accurate mass values of specific nuclides are important for neutrino physics. The presently best tests of the Standard Model with high-precision Penning trap mass spectrometry will be reviewed.

  3. Subtask 4.27 - Evaluation of the Multielement Sorbent Trap (MEST) Method at

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    an Illinois Coal-Fired Plant (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Subtask 4.27 - Evaluation of the Multielement Sorbent Trap (MEST) Method at an Illinois Coal-Fired Plant Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Subtask 4.27 - Evaluation of the Multielement Sorbent Trap (MEST) Method at an Illinois Coal-Fired Plant × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and

  4. Nitrogen Oxides as a Chemistry Trap in Detonating Oxygen-Rich Materials

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Nitrogen Oxides as a Chemistry Trap in Detonating Oxygen-Rich Materials Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nitrogen Oxides as a Chemistry Trap in Detonating Oxygen-Rich Materials Authors: Goldman, N ; Bastea, S Publication Date: 2014-07-31 OSTI Identifier: 1150034 Report Number(s): LLNL-PROC-658263 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC52-07NA27344 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Presented at: 15th International Detonation

  5. DYNAMICAL STABILITY AND QUANTUM CHAOS OF IONS IN A LINEAR TRAP (1999002ER).

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: DYNAMICAL STABILITY AND QUANTUM CHAOS OF IONS IN A LINEAR TRAP (1999002ER). Citation Details In-Document Search Title: DYNAMICAL STABILITY AND QUANTUM CHAOS OF IONS IN A LINEAR TRAP (1999002ER). × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional

  6. Ising antiferromagnet with ultracold bosonic mixtures confined in a harmonic trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guglielmino, M.; Penna, V.; Capogrosso-Sansone, B.

    2011-09-15

    We present accurate results based on quantum Monte Carlo simulations of two-component bosonic systems on a square lattice and in the presence of an external harmonic confinement. Starting from hopping parameters and interaction strengths which stabilize the Ising antiferromagnetic phase in the homogeneous case and at half-integer filling factor, we study how the presence of the harmonic confinement challenges the realization of such a phase. We consider realistic trapping frequencies and number of particles, and we establish under which conditions, i.e., total number of particles and population imbalance, the antiferromagnetic phase can be observed in the trap.

  7. Subtask 4.27 - Evaluation of the Multielement Sorbent Trap (MEST) Method at

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    an Illinois Coal-Fired Plant (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Subtask 4.27 - Evaluation of the Multielement Sorbent Trap (MEST) Method at an Illinois Coal-Fired Plant Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Subtask 4.27 - Evaluation of the Multielement Sorbent Trap (MEST) Method at an Illinois Coal-Fired Plant Owners of fossil fuel-fired power plants face the challenge of measuring stack emissions of trace metals and acid gases at much lower levels than in the past as a result of

  8. Photoluminescence study of the substitution of Cd by Zn during the growth by atomic layer epitaxy of alternate CdSe and ZnSe monolayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hernndez-Caldern, I.; Salcedo-Reyes, J. C.

    2014-05-15

    We present a study of the substitution of Cd atoms by Zn atoms during the growth of alternate ZnSe and CdSe compound monolayers (ML) by atomic layer epitaxy (ALE) as a function of substrate temperature. Samples contained two quantum wells (QWs), each one made of alternate CdSe and ZnSe monolayers with total thickness of 12 ML but different growth parameters. The QWs were studied by low temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. We show that the Cd content of underlying CdSe layers is affected by the exposure of the quantum well film to the Zn flux during the growth of ZnSe monolayers. The amount of Cd of the quantum well film decreases with higher exposures to the Zn flux. A brief discussion about the difficulties to grow the Zn{sub 0.5}Cd{sub 0.5}Se ordered alloy (CuAu-I type) by ALE is presented.

  9. Spatiotemporal Monte Carlo transport methods in x-ray semiconductor detectors: Application to pulse-height spectroscopy in a-Se

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang Yuan; Badal, Andreu; Allec, Nicholas; Karim, Karim S.; Badano, Aldo

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: The authors describe a detailed Monte Carlo (MC) method for the coupled transport of ionizing particles and charge carriers in amorphous selenium (a-Se) semiconductor x-ray detectors, and model the effect of statistical variations on the detected signal. Methods: A detailed transport code was developed for modeling the signal formation process in semiconductor x-ray detectors. The charge transport routines include three-dimensional spatial and temporal models of electron-hole pair transport taking into account recombination and trapping. Many electron-hole pairs are created simultaneously in bursts from energy deposition events. Carrier transport processes include drift due to external field and Coulombic interactions, and diffusion due to Brownian motion. Results: Pulse-height spectra (PHS) have been simulated with different transport conditions for a range of monoenergetic incident x-ray energies and mammography radiation beam qualities. Two methods for calculating Swank factors from simulated PHS are shown, one using the entire PHS distribution, and the other using the photopeak. The latter ignores contributions from Compton scattering and K-fluorescence. Comparisons differ by approximately 2% between experimental measurements and simulations. Conclusions: The a-Se x-ray detector PHS responses simulated in this work include three-dimensional spatial and temporal transport of electron-hole pairs. These PHS were used to calculate the Swank factor and compare it with experimental measurements. The Swank factor was shown to be a function of x-ray energy and applied electric field. Trapping and recombination models are all shown to affect the Swank factor.

  10. Landau damping and the onset of particle trapping in quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daligault, Jrme

    2014-04-15

    Using analytical theory and simulations, we assess the impact of quantum effects on non-linear wave-particle interactions in quantum plasmas. We more specifically focus on the resonant interaction between Langmuir waves and electrons, which, in classical plasmas, lead to particle trapping. Two regimes are identified depending on the difference between the time scale of oscillation t{sub B}(k)=?(m/eEk) of a trapped electron and the quantum time scale t{sub q}(k)=2m/?k{sup 2} related to recoil effect, where E and k are the wave amplitude and wave vector. In the classical-like regime, t{sub B}(k)?trapped in the wave troughs and greatly affect the evolution of the system long before the wave has had time to Landau damp by a large amount according to linear theory. In the quantum regime, t{sub B}(k)?>?t{sub q}(k), particle trapping is hampered by the finite recoil imparted to resonant electrons in their interactions with plasmons.

  11. Tapered laser rods as a means of minimizing the path length of trapped barrel mode rays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beach, Raymond J.; Honea, Eric C.; Payne, Stephen A.; Mercer, Ian; Perry, Michael D.

    2005-08-30

    By tapering the diameter of a flanged barrel laser rod over its length, the maximum trapped path length of a barrel mode can be dramatically reduced, thereby reducing the ability of the trapped spontaneous emission to negatively impact laser performance through amplified spontaneous emission (ASE). Laser rods with polished barrels and flanged end caps have found increasing application in diode array end-pumped laser systems. The polished barrel of the rod serves to confine diode array pump light within the rod. In systems utilizing an end-pumping geometry and such polished barrel laser rods, the pump light that is introduced into one or both ends of the laser rod, is ducted down the length of the rod via the total internal reflections (TIRs) that occur when the light strikes the rod's barrel. A disadvantage of using polished barrel laser rods is that such rods are very susceptible to barrel mode paths that can trap spontaneous emission over long path lengths. This trapped spontaneous emission can then be amplified through stimulated emission resulting in a situation where the stored energy available to the desired lasing mode is effectively depleted, which then negatively impacts the laser's performance, a result that is effectively reduced by introducing a taper onto the laser rod.

  12. A thermal desorption spectroscopy study of hydrogen trapping in polycrystalline α-uranium

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lillard, R. S.; Forsyth, R. T.

    2015-03-14

    The kinetics of hydrogen desorption from polycrystalline α-uranium (α-U) was examined using thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). The goal was to identify the major trap sites for hydrogen and their associated trap energies. In polycrystalline α-U six TDS adsorption peaks were observed at temperatures of 521 K, 556 K, 607 K, 681 K, 793 K and 905 K. In addition, the desorption was determined to be second order based on peak shape. The position of the first three peaks was consistent with desorption from UH3. To identify the trap site corresponding to the high temperature peaks the data were compared tomore » a plastically deformed sample and a high purity single crystal sample. The plastically deformed sample allowed the identification of trapping at dislocations while the single crystal sample allow for the identification of high angle boundaries and impurities. Thus, with respect to the desorption energy associated with each peak, values between 12.9 and 26.5 kJ/mole were measured.« less

  13. Dynamical stability and quantum chaos of ions in a linear trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berman, G. P. [Group T-13 and CNLS, University of California, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Group T-13 and CNLS, University of California, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); James, D. F. V. [Group T-4, University of California, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Group T-4, University of California, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Hughes, R. J. [Group P-23, University of California, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Group P-23, University of California, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Gulley, M. S. [Group P-25, University of California, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Group P-25, University of California, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Holzscheiter, M. H. [Group P-23, University of California, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Group P-23, University of California, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Lopez, G. V. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Guadalajara, Corregidora 500, S.R. 44420, Guadalajara, Jalisco, (Mexico)] [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Guadalajara, Corregidora 500, S.R. 44420, Guadalajara, Jalisco, (Mexico)

    2000-02-01

    The realization of a paradigm chaotic system, namely, the harmonically driven oscillator, in the quantum domain using cold trapped ions driven by lasers is theoretically investigated. The simplest characteristics of regular and chaotic dynamics are calculated. The possibilities of experimental realization are discussed. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  14. Dynamics of a single trapped ion inside a nonideal QED cavity at zero temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rangel, R.; Zagury, N.; Massoni, E.

    2004-02-01

    We consider a system consisting of a single ion in a Paul trap coupled to a cavity electromagnetic field mode. We analyze the fidelity of a scheme for quantum swapping between vibrational and cavity field states, when the system is in contact with a reservoir at zero temperature.

  15. GreenPower Trap Water-Muffler System | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    This hydrated EGR system reduces NOx and enhances fuel efficiency, and the DPF is catalyzed by the fuel-borne catalyst generated by the oil-borne catalyst system PDF icon deer09_rim.pdf More Documents & Publications DPF -"Hydrated EGR" Fuel Saver System GreenPowerTM Trap-Muffler

  16. Investigation of Aging Mechanisms in Lean NOx Traps | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    09 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon ace_26_crocker.pdf More Documents & Publications Pt-free, Perovskite-based Lean NOx Trap Catalysts CLEERS Coordination & Development of Catalyst Process Kinetic Data Lean NOx Reduction with Dual Layer LNT/SCR Catalysts

  17. Centrality measures highlight proton traps and access points to proton highways in kinetic Monte Carlo trajectories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krueger, Rachel A.; Haibach, Frederick G.; Fry, Dana L.; Gomez, Maria A.

    2015-04-21

    A centrality measure based on the time of first returns rather than the number of steps is developed and applied to finding proton traps and access points to proton highways in the doped perovskite oxides: AZr{sub 0.875}D{sub 0.125}O{sub 3}, where A is Ba or Sr and the dopant D is Y or Al. The high centrality region near the dopant is wider in the SrZrO{sub 3} systems than the BaZrO{sub 3} systems. In the aluminum-doped systems, a region of intermediate centrality (secondary region) is found in a plane away from the dopant. Kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) trajectories show that this secondary region is an entry to fast conduction planes in the aluminum-doped systems in contrast to the highest centrality area near the dopant trap. The yttrium-doped systems do not show this secondary region because the fast conduction routes are in the same plane as the dopant and hence already in the high centrality trapped area. This centrality measure complements kMC by highlighting key areas in trajectories. The limiting activation barriers found via kMC are in very good agreement with experiments and related to the barriers to escape dopant traps.

  18. A thermal desorption spectroscopy study of hydrogen trapping in polycrystalline ?-uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lillard, R. S.; Forsyth, R. T.

    2015-03-14

    The kinetics of hydrogen desorption from polycrystalline ?-uranium (?-U) was examined using thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). The goal was to identify the major trap sites for hydrogen and their associated trap energies. In polycrystalline ?-U six TDS adsorption peaks were observed at temperatures of 521 K, 556 K, 607 K, 681 K, 793 K and 905 K. In addition, the desorption was determined to be second order based on peak shape. The position of the first three peaks was consistent with desorption from UH3. To identify the trap site corresponding to the high temperature peaks the data were compared to a plastically deformed sample and a high purity single crystal sample. The plastically deformed sample allowed the identification of trapping at dislocations while the single crystal sample allow for the identification of high angle boundaries and impurities. Thus, with respect to the desorption energy associated with each peak, values between 12.9 and 26.5 kJ/mole were measured.

  19. Electron trap level of hydrogen incorporated nitrogen vacancies in silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonoda, Ken'ichiro Tsukuda, Eiji; Tanizawa, Motoaki; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    2015-03-14

    Hydrogen incorporation into nitrogen vacancies in silicon nitride and its effects on electron trap level are analyzed using simulation based on density functional theory with temperature- and pressure-dependent hydrogen chemical potential. If the silicon dangling bonds around a nitrogen vacancy are well separated each other, hydrogen incorporation is energetically stable up to 900?C, which is in agreement with the experimentally observed desorption temperature. On the other hand, if the dangling bonds strongly interact, the incorporation is energetically unfavorable even at room temperature because of steric hindrance. An electron trap level caused by a nitrogen vacancy becomes shallow by the hydrogen incorporation. An electron is trapped in a deep level created by a silicon dangling bond before hydrogen incorporation, whereas it is trapped in a shallow level created by an anti-bonding state of a silicon-silicon bond after hydrogen incorporation. The simulation results qualitatively explain the experiment, in which reduced hydrogen content in silicon nitride shows superior charge retention characteristics.

  20. Geek-Up[11.19.2010]: Molecular Stencils, GRETINA and Trapped Antimatter

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Argonne Lab scientists use molecular 'stencils' to help bring down solar costs, the most sensitive gamma-ray detector ever built for studies of the nucleus arrives at Berkeley Lab and an international team of scientists have trapped and stored atoms of antimatter for the first time -- all in this week's Geek-Up!

  1. The effects of deep level traps on the electrical properties of semi-insulating CdZnTe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zha, Gangqiang; Yang, Jian; Xu, Lingyan; Feng, Tao; Wang, Ning; Jie, Wanqi

    2014-01-28

    Deep level traps have considerable effects on the electrical properties and radiation detection performance of high resistivity CdZnTe. A deep-trap model for high resistivity CdZnTe was proposed in this paper. The high resistivity mechanism and the electrical properties were analyzed based on this model. High resistivity CdZnTe with high trap ionization energy E{sub t} can withstand high bias voltages. The leakage current is dependent on both the deep traps and the shallow impurities. The performance of a CdZnTe radiation detector will deteriorate at low temperatures, and the way in which sub-bandgap light excitation could improve the low temperature performance can be explained using the deep trap model.

  2. Small-angle neutron scattering measurement of deuterium trapping at dislocations and grain boundaries in palladium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heuser, B.J.

    1991-01-01

    Small angle neutron scattering measurements have been performed on deformed single and polycrystalline palladium with and without deuterium dissolved in the solution phase at room temperature. The purpose of these experiments was to directly measure the spatial distribution of trapped deuterium at dislocations in the deformed metal. The net scattering cross section for the same smaple with and without deuterium shows a behavior expected from deuterium correlation with dislocations froming rod-like scattering structures. The measured cross sections indicate the trapped deuterium is within 2 to 3 Burgers vectors of the dislocation core. On average 1 to 3 deuterons per {angstrom} are trapped at the dislocations in the deformed samples. The measurements also indicate the straight, rod-like correlation geometry extends on average 50 to 100 {angstrom} along the dislocations. Dislocation densities on the order of 5 {times} 10{sup 11} cm/cm{sup 3} were found for all samples investigated. Net scattering from a well annealed polycrystalline palladium sample exhibiting a behavior expected from spherical shells has been observed. This net scattering is attributed to deuterium trapping at grain boundaries in the polycrystalline sample. net scattering in excess of that expected from deuterium correlated at dislocations was also observed in a deformed polycrystalline measurement. This too is attributed to deuterium trapping at grain boundaries. The dislocation substructure of the deformed palladium samples was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). This analysis illustrated the cellular arrangement that evolved in palladium during cold working. The presence of MnO particles also was confirmed by TEM analysis.

  3. BASIN VER DE GREAT ER ANETH BU G BAR KER DOME HOR SESH OE UTE...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Map created June 2005; projection is UTM-13, NAD-27. Authors: Sam Limerick (1), Lucy Luo (1), Gary Long (2), David Morehouse (2), Jack Perrin (1), Steve Jackson (1) and Robert King ...

  4. BASIN VER DE GREAT ER ANETH BU G BAR KER DOME HOR SESH OE UTE...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    The data and methods used in their creation are detailed in a report, "Scientific Inventory of Onshore Federal Lands' Oil and Gas Resources and Reserves and the Extent and Nature ...

  5. BASIN VER DE GREAT ER ANETH BU G BAR KER DOME HOR SESH OE UTE...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Lands' Oil and Gas Resources and Reserves and the Extent and Nature of Restrictions to Their Development", prepared by the US Departments of Interior, Agriculture and Energy. ...

  6. BASIN VER DE GREAT ER ANETH BU G BAR KER DOME HOR SESH OE UTE DOME

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    BOE Reserve Class 0 20 40 10 30 Miles ± The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by Section 604 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act Amendments of 2000 (P.L. 106-469). The boundaries are not informed by subsurface structural information. The data and methods used in their creation are detailed in a report, "Scientific Inventory of Onshore

  7. BASIN VER DE GREAT ER ANETH BU G BAR KER DOME HOR SESH OE UTE DOME

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Reserve Class 0 20 40 10 30 Miles ± The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by Section 604 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act Amendments of 2000 (P.L. 106-469). The boundaries are not informed by subsurface structural information. The data and methods used in their creation are detailed in a report, "Scientific Inventory of Onshore

  8. BASIN VER DE GREAT ER ANETH BU G BAR KER DOME HOR SESH OE UTE DOME

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Liquids Reserve Class 0 20 40 10 30 Miles ± The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by Section 604 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act Amendments of 2000 (P.L. 106-469). The boundaries are not informed by subsurface structural information. The data and methods used in their creation are detailed in a report, "Scientific Inventory of

  9. Intersubband absorption in CdSe/Zn{sub x}Cd{sub y}Mg{sub 1-x-y}Se self-assembled quantum dot multilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, A.; Lu, H.; Charles, W.; Yokomizo, I.; Tamargo, M. C.; Franz, K. J.; Gmachl, C.; Zhang, S. K.; Zhou, X.; Alfano, R. R.; Liu, H. C.

    2007-02-12

    The authors report the observation of intersubband absorption in multilayers of CdSe/Zn{sub x}Cd{sub y}Mg{sub 1-x-y}Se self-assembled quantum dots. The samples were grown by molecular beam epitaxy on InP substrates. For samples with the CdSe dot layers doped with Cl and with the deposited CdSe equivalent layer thickness between 5.2 and 6.9 ML, peak absorption between 2.5 and 3.5 {mu}m was observed. These materials are promising for intersubband devices operating in the mid- and near-infrared ranges.

  10. Nanoimprinted Diffraction Gratings for Light Trapping in Crystal-Silicon Film Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dirk Weiss

    2010-11-29

    Crystal-silicon (c-Si) film photovoltaics hold the promise of combining the advantages of state-of-the-art wafer-silicon technology with the scalability and the inherently much lower cost of thin-film solar technologies. In the thickness range of 2-20 ?¼m very effective light trapping is essential to absorb sufficient red and near-infrared (NIR) light and reach targeted efficiencies of 16%â??18%, as defined by the U.S. National Solar Technology Roadmap. One proposed method is diffractive light trapping, which, at least in certain wavelength ranges, can theoretically outperform light trapping through random scattering at a rough surface or interface. The goals of this project were (1) to develop a nanoimprinting process for a high-refractive-index dielectric material, (2) to fabricate diffraction gratings as back-reflectors using this material, and (3) to demonstrate for a 2 ?¼m c-Si film an improvement in AM1.5 photon absorption of at least 80% relative to single-pass absorption. We achieved goals (1) and (2). We developed a soft-imprint method for sol-based titanium dioxide precursor films (index range 2.3-2.4) and integrated imprinted films in thin-film silicon devices. We did not fully reach goal (3): depending on the model used for interpretation of the optical experimental data, AM1.5 photon absorption was improved by only 53% (coherent electromagnetic model) to 66% (non-coherent ray-tracing model). When compared to a metallized flat reference film (double-pass absorption), the improvement due to the grating is only 6%, if the (more conservative) electromagnetic model is used. Other important achievements from this project were: -We perfected an imprinting method for another ceramic material, aluminum oxide phosphate, which is index-matched with glass. -We tested diffractive light trapping at different incidence angles and found positive evidence for light trapping for angles up to 50?°, although the light-trapping efficiency decreased with increasing incidence angle. -The extent of the trapped wavelength range scales with the refractive index of the dielectric material. The full benefit of a high refractive index, however, is only achieved if the dielectric layer underneath the grating layer (the â??residual layerâ??) is sufficiently thick (several 100 nm). For a very thin residual layer, the light wave is predominantly localized in the underlying material during diffraction, and this materialâ??s refractive index then determines the trapping range. The (welcomed) consequence is that if this material is the silicon absorber layer, e.g. in a thin-film superstrate configuration, a very large trapping range can be achieved even if a low-index dielectric is used. We tested this directly through light-trapping experiments in glass plates using two different imprinted dielectric materials, titanium dioxide (index range 2.3-2.4) and aluminum oxide phosphate (index 1.5), with thick and thin residual layers. -We tested both copper and aluminum as low-cost reflector alternatives to silver on the grating back sides. In the relevant wavelength range above 650 nm, copper not only has the same high reflectance as silver, but the diffraction efficiency is also on par with silver. -A total of five scientific publications resulting from this work have either been published or are in preparation for submission (see Detailed Technical Report, below). Two conference presentations were given. In conclusion, we successfully developed nanoimprinting techniques for two ceramic precursor materials and tested diffractive light trapping in c-Si and nc-Si:H thin-film devices. The measured amount of light trapping did not fully reach our target value. The lessons learned from this project, however, both concerning experimental techniques and theoretical/modeling methods, have been extensive. Light trapping remains a central issue in thin c-Si technology, and we recommend to the US Department of Energy to increase research in this important area.

  11. Current transient spectroscopy for trapping analysis on Au-free AlGaN/GaN Schottky barrier diode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, J. Groeseneken, G.; Stoffels, S.; Lenci, S.; Venegas, R.; Decoutere, S.; Bakeroot, B.

    2015-02-23

    This paper presents a combined technique of high voltage off-state stress and current transient measurements to investigate the trapping/de-trapping characteristics of Au-free AlGaN/GaN Schottky barrier diodes. The device features a symmetric three-terminal structure with a central anode contact surrounded by two separate cathodes. Under the diode off-state stress conditions, the two separate cathodes were electrically shorted. The de-trapping dynamics was studied by monitoring the recovery of the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) current at different temperatures by applying 0.5?V at cathode 2 while grounding cathode 1. During the recovery, the anode contact acts as a sensor of changes in diode leakage current. This leakage variation was found to be mainly due to the barrier height variation. With this method, the energy level and capture cross section of different traps in the AlGaN/GaN Schottky barrier diode can be extracted. Furthermore, the physical location of different trapping phenomena is indicated by studying the variation of the diode leakage current during the recovery. We have identified two distinct trapping mechanisms: (i) electron trapping at the AlGaN surface in the vicinity of the Schottky contact which results in the leakage reduction (barrier height ?{sub B} increase) together with R{sub ON} degradation; (ii) the electron trapping in the GaN channel layer which partially depletes the 2DEG. The physical origin of the two different traps is discussed in the text.

  12. Mode trap for absorbing transverse modes of an accelerated electron beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chojnacki, E.P.

    1994-05-31

    A mode trap to trap and absorb transverse modes formed by a beam in a linear accelerator includes a waveguide having a multiplicity of electrically conductive (preferably copper) irises and rings, each iris and ring including an aperture, and the irises and rings being stacked in a side-by-side, alternating fashion such that the apertures of the irises and rings are concentrically aligned. An absorbing material layer such as a dielectric is embedded in each iris and ring, and this absorbing material layer encircles, but is circumferentially spaced from its respective aperture. Each iris and ring includes a plurality of circumferentially spaced slots around its aperture and extending radially out toward its absorbing material layer. 9 figs.

  13. Mode trap for absorbing transverse modes of an accelerated electron beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chojnacki, Eric P.

    1994-01-01

    A mode trap to trap and absorb transverse modes formed by a beam in a linear accelerator includes a waveguide having a multiplicity of electrically conductive (preferably copper) irises and rings, each iris and ring including an aperture, and the irises and rings being stacked in a side-by-side, alternating fashion such that the apertures of the irises and rings are concentrically aligned. An absorbing material layer such as a dielectric is embedded in each iris and ring, and this absorbing material layer encircles, but is circumferentially spaced from its respective aperture. Each iris and ring includes a plurality of circumferentially spaced slots around its aperture and extending radially out toward its absorbing material layer.

  14. Role of fourth-order phase-space moments in collective modes of trapped Fermi gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiacchiera, Silvia; Lepers, Thomas; Davesne, Dany; Urban, Michael

    2011-10-15

    We study the transition from hydrodynamic to collisionless behavior in collective modes of ultracold trapped Fermi gases. To that end, we solve the Boltzmann equation for the trapped Fermi gas via the moments method. We showed previously that it is necessary to go beyond second-order moments if one wants to reproduce the results of a numerical solution of the Boltzmann equation. Here, we will give the detailed description of the method including fourth-order moments. We apply this method to the case of realistic parameters, and compare the results for the radial quadrupole and scissors modes at unitarity to experimental data obtained by the Innsbruck group. It turns out that the inclusion of fourth-order moments clearly improves the agreement with the experimental data. In particular, the fourth-order moments reduce the effect of collisions and therefore partially compensate the effect of the enhanced in-medium cross section at low temperatures.

  15. The regenerable trap oxidizer-An emission control technique for diesel engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abthoff, J.; Schuster, H.D.; Langer, H.J.; Loose, G.

    1985-01-01

    Daimler-Benz made an early start with the development of systems for the aftertreatment of the exhaust gas emitted by diesel engines. The more important limiting conditions could best be met by the provision of a ceramic, selfcleaning trap oxidizer (TO). In such filters, self-regeneration is effected continuously while driving without any external control. Either partial or complete regeneration is effected, depending on the temperature, oxygen content and rate of flow of the exhaust gas, the amount of soot in the filter and the period for which a given operating condition is maintained. Such a trap oxidizer was developed for a 3.0 liter turbocharged diesel engine to the extent necessary for series production and has been fitted to type 300 SD and 300 D turbocharged diesel of model year 1985 in California.

  16. Nanowire photonic crystal waveguides for single-atom trapping and strong light-matter interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, S.-P.; Hood, J. D.; Muniz, J. A.; Martin, M. J.; Hung, C.-L.; Kimble, H. J.; Norte, Richard; Meenehan, Sen M.; Cohen, Justin D.; Painter, Oskar

    2014-03-17

    We present a comprehensive study of dispersion-engineered nanowire photonic crystal waveguides suitable for experiments in quantum optics and atomic physics with optically trapped atoms. Detailed design methodology and specifications are provided, as are the processing steps used to create silicon nitride waveguides of low optical loss in the near-IR. Measurements of the waveguide optical properties and power-handling capability are also presented.

  17. Helium gas bubble trapped in liquid helium in high magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, H. Hannahs, S. T.; Markiewicz, W. D.; Weijers, H. W.

    2014-03-31

    High magnetic field magnets are used widely in the area of the condensed matter physics, material science, chemistry, geochemistry, and biology at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. New high field magnets of state-of-the-art are being pursued and developed at the lab, such as the current developing 32 T, 32 mm bore fully superconducting magnet. Liquid Helium (LHe) is used as the coolant for superconducting magnets or samples tested in a high magnetic field. When the magnetic field reaches a relatively high value the boil-off helium gas bubble generated by heat losses in the cryostat can be trapped in the LHe bath in the region where BzdBz/dz is less than negative 2100 T{sup 2}/m, instead of floating up to the top of LHe. Then the magnet or sample in the trapped bubble region may lose efficient cooling. In the development of the 32 T magnet, a prototype Yttrium Barium Copper Oxide coil of 6 double pancakes with an inner diameter of 40 mm and an outer diameter of 140 mm was fabricated and tested in a resistive magnet providing a background field of 15 T. The trapped gas bubble was observed in the tests when the prototype coil was ramped up to 7.5 T at a current of 200 A. This letter reports the test results on the trapped gas bubble and the comparison with the analytical results which shows they are in a good agreement.

  18. EBIT (Electron Beam Ion Trap), N-Division Experimental Physics. Annual report, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, D.

    1995-10-01

    The experimental groups in the Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) program continue to perform front-line research with trapped and extracted highly charged ions (HCI) in the areas of ion/surface interactions, atomic spectroscopy, electron-ion interaction and structure measurements, highly charged ion confinement, and EBIT development studies. The ion surface/interaction studies which were initiated five years ago have reached a stage where they an carry out routine investigations, as well as produce breakthrough results towards the development of novel nanotechnology. At EBIT and SuperEBIT studies of the x-ray emission from trapped ions continue to produce significant atomic structure data with high precision for few electron systems of high-Z ions. Furthermore, diagnostics development for magnetic and laser fusion, supporting research for the x-ray laser and weapons programs, and laboratory astrophysics experiments in support of NASA`s astrophysics program are a continuing effort. The two-electron contributions to the binding energy of helium like ions were measured for the first time. The results are significant because their precision is an order of magnitude better than those of competing measurements at accelerators, and the novel technique isolates the energy corrections that are the most interesting. The RETRAP project which was initiated three years ago has reached a stage where trapping, confining and electronic cooling of HCI ions up to Th{sup 80+} can be performed routinely. Measurements of the rates and cross sections for electron transfer from H{sub 2} performed to determine the lifetime of HCI up to Xe{sup q+} and Th{sup q+} (35 {le} q {le} 80) have been studied at mean energies estimated to be {approximately} 5 q eV. This combination of heavy ions with very high charges and very low energies is rare in nature, but may be encountered in planned fusion energy demonstration devices, in highly charged ion sources, or in certain astrophysical events.

  19. Assembling a ring-shaped crystal in a microfabricated surface ion trap

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stick, Daniel Lynn; Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM; Tabakov, Boyan; Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM; Benito, Francisco; Blain, Matthew; Clark, Craig R.; Clark, Susan; Haltli, Raymond A.; Maunz, Peter; et al

    2015-09-01

    We report on experiments with a microfabricated surface trap designed for confining a chain of ions in a ring. Uniform ion separation over most of the ring is achieved with a rotationally symmetric design and by measuring and suppressing undesired electric fields. After reducing stray fields, the ions are confined primarily by a radio-frequency pseudopotential and their mutual Coulomb repulsion. As a result, approximately 400 40Ca+ ions with an average separation of 9 μm comprise the ion crystal.

  20. Particle trap with dielectric barrier for use in gas insulated transmission lines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dale, S.J.

    1982-06-15

    A gas-insulated transmission line includes an outer sheath, an inner conductor within the outer sheath, insulating supports supporting the inner conductor within the outer sheath, and an insulating gas electrically insulating the inner conductor from the outer sheath. An apertured particle trapping electrode is disposed within the outer sheath, and the electrode has a pair of dielectric members secured at each longitudinal end thereof, with the dielectric members extending outwardly from the apertured electrode. 7 figs.

  1. Particle trap with dielectric barrier for use in gas insulated transmission lines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dale, Steinar J. (Monroeville, PA)

    1982-01-01

    A gas-insulated transmission line includes an outer sheath, an inner conductor within the outer sheath, insulating supports supporting the inner conductor within the outer sheath, and an insulating gas electrically insulating the inner conductor from the outer sheath. An apertured particle trapping electrode is disposed within the outer sheath, and the electrode has a pair of dielectric members secured at each longitudinal end thereof, with the dielectric members extending outwardly from the apertured electrode.

  2. Radiation detection system using semiconductor detector with differential carrier trapping and mobility

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Whited, Richard C. (Santa Barbara, CA)

    1981-01-01

    A system for obtaining improved resolution in relatively thick semiconductor radiation detectors, such as HgI.sub.2, which exhibit significant hole trapping. Two amplifiers are used: the first measures the charge collected and the second the contribution of the electrons to the charge collected. The outputs of the two amplifiers are utilized to unfold the total charge generated within the detector in response to a radiation event.

  3. Trapping of oil drops in a noncircular pore throat and mobilization upon contact with a surfactant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arriola, A.; Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.

    1983-02-01

    An experimental apparatus was developed to study trapping and mobilization of oil drops in a capillary of square cross section (100 microns X 100 microns (100 ..mu..m X 100 ..mu..m)) having a constriction also approximately square in shape. Experiments to investigate trapping consisted of injecting a drop of nonwetting phase liquid (''oil'') into a flowing water stream (wetting phase). Pre-equilibrated alcohol/water systems were used to study effects of interfacial tension (IFT). A drop was displaced toward the constriction by the flowing water. The behavior of the drop as it approached and was trapped by the constriction or as it moved through the constriction was observed as a function of flow rate, drop length, and IFT between the water and nonwetting liquid. Mobilization by surfactants was investigated by conducting a series of displacement experiments in the capillary cell. Data from the mobilization experiments allowed two mechanisms to be identified. In Mechanism 1, minute quantities of the surfactant and/or cosurfactant were carried ahead of the main surfactant slug by brine that bypassed the slug. This reduced the IFT between the oil and brine. The oil drop moved further into the constriction and a snap-off process ensued. Mechanism 2 occurred when a sharp interface of the surfactant slug contacted the trailing edge of a nonane drop that was either trapped or in a snap-off process. A series of events that mobilized the drop occurred over a very short time period (< 4.0 seconds). The events included rupture of the drop interface, rolling motions inside the drop with resulting emulsification, and passage of the emulsified drop through the pore constriction without snap-off.

  4. Atom Trap Trace Analysis at ANL | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Atom Trap Trace Analysis at ANL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science Applications of Nuclear Science Archives Small Business Innovation Research / Small Business Technology Transfer Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) Community Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301)

  5. Expanding the Repertoire of Chalcogenide Nanocrystal Networks: Ag2Se Gels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Aerogels by Cation Exchange Reactions | Energy Frontier Research Centers Expanding the Repertoire of Chalcogenide Nanocrystal Networks: Ag2Se Gels and Aerogels by Cation Exchange Reactions Home Author: Q. Yao, I. U. Arachchige, S. L. Brock Year: 2009 Abstract: Cation exchange is shown to be a simple and efficient method to prepare nanostructured Ag2Se gels and aerogels from CdSe gel precursors. Treatment of CdSe wet gels with AgNO3yields, for the first time, Ag2Se gels, and these are

  6. Species characterization and responses of subcortical insects to trap-logs and ethanol in a hardwood biomass plantation: Subcortical insects in hardwood plantations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coyle, David R.; Brissey, Courtney L.; Gandhi, Kamal J. K.

    2015-01-02

    1. We characterized subcortical insect assemblages in economically important eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoides Bartr.), sycamore (Platanus occidentalis L.) and sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) plantations in the southeastern U.S.A. Furthermore, we compared insect responses between freshly-cut plant material by placing traps directly over cut hardwood logs (trap-logs), traps baited with ethanol lures and unbaited (control) traps. 2. We captured a total of 15 506 insects representing 127 species in four families in 2011 and 2013. Approximately 9% and 62% of total species and individuals, respectively, and 23% and 79% of total Scolytinae species and individuals, respectively, were non-native to North America. 3. We captured more Scolytinae using cottonwood trap-logs compared with control traps in both years, although this was the case with sycamore and sweetgum only in 2013. More woodborers were captured using cottonwood and sweetgum trap-logs compared with control traps in both years, although only with sycamore in 2013. 4. Ethanol was an effective lure for capturing non-native Scolytinae; however, not all non-native species were captured using ethanol lures. Ambrosiophilus atratus (Eichhoff) and Hypothenemus crudiae (Panzer) were captured with both trap-logs and control traps, whereas Coccotrypes distinctus (Motschulsky) and Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff were only captured on trap-logs. 5. Indicator species analysis revealed that certain scolytines [e.g. Cnestus mutilates (Blandford) and Xylosandrus crassiusculus (Motschulsky)] showed significant associations with trap-logs or ethanol baits in poplar or sweetgum trap-logs. In general, the species composition of subcortical insects, especially woodboring insects, was distinct among the three tree species and between those associated with trap-logs and control traps.

  7. Precision polarization measurements of atoms in a far-off-resonance optical dipole trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, F.; Vieira, D. J.; Zhao, X.

    2011-01-15

    Precision measurement of atomic and nuclear polarization is an essential step for beta-asymmetry measurement of radioactive atoms. In this paper, we report the polarization measurement of Rb atoms in an yttrium-aluminum-garnet (YAG) far-off-resonance optical dipole trap. We have prepared a cold cloud of polarized Rb atoms in the YAG dipole trap by optical pumping and achieved an initial nuclear polarization of up to 97.2(5)%. The initial atom distribution in different Zeeman levels is measured by using a combination of microwave excitation, laser pushing, and atomic retrap techniques. The nuclear-spin polarization is further purified to 99.2(2)% in 10 s and maintained above 99% because the two-body collision loss rate between atoms in mixed spin states is greater than the one-body trap loss rate. Systematic effects on the nuclear polarization, including the off-resonance Raman scattering, magnetic field gradient, and background gas collisions, are discussed.

  8. Experimental investigation of plasma flows in open trap with toroidal diverter under ECR discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berezkin, A. V. Bragin, E. Yu. Zhil’tsov, V. A. Kulygin, V. M. Yanchenkov, S. V.

    2015-12-15

    The results of experimental investigations of plasma flows from an open trap with a toroidal diverter are presented. Cold plasma is generated when introducing microwave power under conditions of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR). The radiation is introduced by a waveguide through a vacuum-tight ceramic window across the axis of the device. By means of the Langmuir probes, the spatial distributions of plasma parameters are measured. The highest density is limited to a critical value n{sub c} (∼10{sup 12} cm{sup –3}) for the generator frequency under use. It is found that the temperature and density of the plasma in the trap and in escaping flows are almost independent of the radius when the ECR zone is located near the open-trap confinement region and the density is close to n{sub c}. At the density n < n{sub c}, ring plasma structures, which collapse under the action of a low-frequency instability, are observed near the separatrix. The possible mechanisms of the occurrence of plasma structures and the nature of the plasma streams are discussed.

  9. Microscopic model of electric-field-noise heating in ion traps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Safavi-Naini, A.; Rabl, P.; Weck, P. F.; Sadeghpour, H. R.

    2011-08-15

    Motional heating of ions in microfabricated traps is one of the open challenges hindering experimental realizations of large-scale quantum processing devices. Recently, a series of measurements of the heating rates in surface-electrode ion traps characterized their frequency, distance, and temperature dependencies, but our understanding of the microscopic origin of this noise remains incomplete. In this work we develop a theoretical model for the electric field noise which is associated with a random distribution of adsorbed atoms on the trap electrode surface. By using first-principles calculations of the fluctuating dipole moments of the adsorbed atoms we evaluate the distance, frequency, and temperature dependence of the resulting electric field fluctuation spectrum. Our theory reproduces correctly the d{sup -4} dependence with distance of the ion from the electrode surface and calculates the noise spectrum beyond the standard scenario of two-level fluctuators by incorporating all the relevant vibrational states. Our model predicts a regime of 1/f noise which commences at roughly the frequency of the fundamental phonon transition rate and a thermally activated noise spectrum which for higher temperatures exhibits a crossover as a function of frequency.

  10. Plasma regenerated particulate trap and NO.sub.x reduction system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Penetrante, Bernardino M.; Vogtlin, George E.; Merritt, Bernard T.; Brusasco, Raymond M.

    2000-01-01

    A non-catalytic two-stage process for removal of NO.sub.x and particulates from engine exhaust comprises a first stage that plasma converts NO to NO.sub.2 in the presence of O.sub.2 and hydrocarbons, and a second stage, which preferably occurs simultaneously with the first stage, that converts NO.sub.2 and carbon soot particles to respective environmentally benign gases that include N.sub.2 and CO.sub.2. By preconverting NO to NO.sub.2 in the first stage, the efficiency of the second stage for NO.sub.x reduction is enhanced while carbon soot from trapped particulates is simultaneously converted to CO.sub.2 when reacting with the NO.sub.2 (that converts to N.sub.2). For example, an internal combustion engine exhaust is connected by a pipe to a chamber where carbon-containing particulates are electrostatically trapped or filtered and a non-thermal plasma converts NO to NO.sub.2 in the presence of O.sub.2 and hydrocarbons. Volatile hydrocarbons (C.sub.x H.sub.y) from the trapped particulates are oxidized in the plasma and the remaining soot from the particulates reacts with the NO.sub.2 to convert NO.sub.2 to N.sub.2, and the soot to CO.sub.2. The nitrogen exhaust components remain in the gas phase throughout the process, with no accompanying adsorption.

  11. Effects of magnetization on fusion product trapping and secondary neutron spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, Patrick F.; Schmit, Paul F.; Hansen, Stephanie B.; Gomez, Matthew R.; Hahn, Kelly D.; Sinars, Daniel Brian; Peterson, Kyle J.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Sefkow, Adam B.; Awe, Thomas James; Harding, Eric; Jennings, Christopher A.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Chandler, Gordon A.; Cooper, Gary Wayne; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Geissel, Matthias; Harvey-Thompson, Adam James; Porter, John L.; Rochau, Gregory A.; Rovang, Dean C.; Ruiz, Carlos L.; Savage, Mark E.; Smith, Ian C.; Stygar, William A.; Herrmann, Mark

    2015-05-14

    In magnetizing the fusion fuel in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) systems, we found that the required stagnation pressure and density can be relaxed dramatically. This happens because the magnetic field insulates the hot fuel from the cold pusher and traps the charged fusion burn products. This trapping allows the burn products to deposit their energy in the fuel, facilitating plasma self-heating. Here, we report on a comprehensive theory of this trapping in a cylindrical DD plasma magnetized with a purely axial magnetic field. Using this theory, we are able to show that the secondary fusion reactions can be used to infer the magnetic field-radius product, BR, during fusion burn. This parameter, not ρR, is the primary confinement parameter in magnetized ICF. Using this method, we analyze data from recent Magnetized Liner InertialFusion experiments conducted on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories. Furthermore, we show that in these experiments BR ≈ 0.34(+0.14/-0.06) MG · cm, a ~ 14× increase in BR from the initial value, and confirming that the DD-fusion tritons are magnetized at stagnation. Lastly, this is the first experimental verification of charged burn product magnetization facilitated by compression of an initial seed magnetic flux.

  12. Effects of magnetization on fusion product trapping and secondary neutron spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Hansen, S. B.; Gomez, M. R.; Hahn, K. D.; Sinars, D. B.; Peterson, K. J.; Slutz, S. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Awe, T. J.; Harding, E.; Jennings, C. A.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Chandler, G. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Cuneo, M. E.; Geissel, M.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Porter, J. L.; Rochau, G. A.; and others

    2015-05-15

    By magnetizing the fusion fuel in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) systems, the required stagnation pressure and density can be relaxed dramatically. This happens because the magnetic field insulates the hot fuel from the cold pusher and traps the charged fusion burn products. This trapping allows the burn products to deposit their energy in the fuel, facilitating plasma self-heating. Here, we report on a comprehensive theory of this trapping in a cylindrical DD plasma magnetized with a purely axial magnetic field. Using this theory, we are able to show that the secondary fusion reactions can be used to infer the magnetic field-radius product, BR, during fusion burn. This parameter, not ρR, is the primary confinement parameter in magnetized ICF. Using this method, we analyze data from recent Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion experiments conducted on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories. We show that in these experiments BR ≈ 0.34(+0.14/−0.06) MG · cm, a ∼ 14× increase in BR from the initial value, and confirming that the DD-fusion tritons are magnetized at stagnation. This is the first experimental verification of charged burn product magnetization facilitated by compression of an initial seed magnetic flux.

  13. Characterization of trapped gas saturation and heterogeneity in core samples using miscible-displacement experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D.H.; Jikich, S.A.

    1994-12-31

    Trapped gas saturation and permeability heterogeneity were evaluated in Berea cores at reservoir conditions, using standard miscible displacement experiments, with and without surfactants. Pressure and production history were influenced by core heterogeneity and foam lamellae formation when aqueous surfactant was present in the core. A simple dispersion model and a three-coefficient dispersion-capacitance model (Coates-Smith) were fit to the experimental data. The dispersion-capacitance model successfully matched the experiments in which foam lamella formed, while the simple dispersion model was used only for determining initial core flow heterogeneity. The objective of the dispersion-capacitance model was to estimate trapped gas saturations; however longitudinal dispersion and mass transfer also were examined. The results show that the dispersion-capacitance model accurately fits trapped gas saturation controlled by rock heterogeneities and foam lamellae for lamella generating mechanisms that allow a continuous gas phase (leave-behind lamellae). The practical applications resulting from this study can aid in core sample selection and scaling short laboratory corefloods to field dimensions for applications to foam stimulation and underground storage of natural gas.

  14. Storage of Ultracold Neutrons in the Magneto-Gravitational Trap of the UCN Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salvat, D. J. [Indiana University] [Indiana University; Adamek, E. R. [Indiana University] [Indiana University; Barlow, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bowman, James D [ORNL] [ORNL; Broussard, L. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Callahan, N. B. [Indiana University] [Indiana University; Clayton, S. M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Cude-Woods, C. [Indiana University] [Indiana University; Currie, S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Dees, E. B. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh] [North Carolina State University, Raleigh; Fox, W. [Indiana University] [Indiana University; Geltenbort, P. [Inst Max Von Laue Paul Langevin, Grenoble, France] [Inst Max Von Laue Paul Langevin, Grenoble, France; Hickerson, K. P. [University of California, Los Angeles] [University of California, Los Angeles; Holley, A. T. [Indiana University] [Indiana University; Liu, C.-Y. [Indiana University] [Indiana University; Makela, M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Medina, J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Morley, D. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Morris, C. L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Penttila, Seppo I [ORNL] [ORNL; Ramsey, J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Saunders, A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Seestrom, S. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Sharapov, E. I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia] [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Sjue, S. K. L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Slaughter, B. A. [Indiana University] [Indiana University; Vanderwerp, J. [Indiana University] [Indiana University; VornDick, B. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh] [North Carolina State University, Raleigh; Walstrom, P. L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Wang, Z. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Womack, T. L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Young, A. R. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh] [North Carolina State University, Raleigh

    2014-01-01

    The UCN experiment is designed to measure the lifetime n of the free neutron by trapping ultracold neutrons (UCN) in a magneto-gravitational trap. An asymmetric bowl-shaped NdFeB magnet Halbach array confines low-field-seeking UCN within the apparatus, and a set of electromagnetic coils in a toroidal geometry provides a background holding field to eliminate depolarization-induced UCN loss caused by magnetic field nodes. We present a measurement of the storage time store of the trap by storing UCN for various times and counting the survivors. The data are consistent with a single exponential decay, and we find store = 860 19 s, within 1 of current global averages for n. The storage time with the holding field deactivated is found to be store = 470 160 s; this decreased storage time is due to the loss of UCN, which undergo Majorana spin flips while being stored. We discuss plans to increase the statistical sensitivity of the measurement and investigate potential systematic effects.

  15. Fluctuation characteristics and transport properties of collisionless trapped electron mode turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao Yong; Holod, Ihor; Zhang Wenlu; Lin Zhihong [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Klasky, Scott [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    The collisionless trapped electron mode turbulence is investigated by global gyrokinetic particle simulation. The zonal flow dominated by low frequency and short wavelength acts as a very important saturation mechanism. The turbulent eddies are mostly microscopic, but with a significant portion in the mesoscale. The ion heat transport is found to be diffusive and follows the local radial profile of the turbulence intensity. However, the electron heat transport demonstrates some nondiffusive features and only follows the global profile of the turbulence intensity. The nondiffusive features of the electron heat transport is further confirmed by nonlognormal statistics of the flux-surface-averaged electron heat flux. The radial and time correlation functions are calculated to obtain the radial correlation length and autocorrelation time. Characteristic time scale analysis shows that the zonal flow shearing time and eddy turnover time are very close to the effective decorrelation time, which suggests that the trapped electrons move with the fluid eddies. The fluidlike behaviors of the trapped electrons and the persistence of the mesoscale eddies contribute to the transition of the electron turbulent transport from gyro-Bohm scaling to Bohm scaling when the device size decreases.

  16. Elastic and surface energies: Two key parameters for CdSe quantum dot formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robin, Ivan-Christophe; Andre, Regis; Bougerol, Catherine; Aichele, Thomas; Tatarenko, Serge

    2006-06-05

    The two-dimensional-three-dimensional transition of a strained CdSe layer on (001) ZnSe induced by the use of amorphous selenium is studied. To precisely control the thickness of the CdSe layer, atomic layer epitaxy growth mode is used. Atomic force microscopy and reflection high-energy electron diffraction measurements reveal the formation of CdSe islands when 3 ML (monolayers) of CdSe, corresponding to the critical thickness, are deposited. When only 2.5 ML of CdSe are deposited another relaxation mechanism is observed, leading to the appearance of strong undulations on the surface. For a 3 ML thick CdSe layer, transmission electron microscopy images indicate that the formation of the islands occurs only after the amorphous selenium desorption.

  17. Method of synthesizing and growing copper-indium-diselenide (CuInSe.sub.2) crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ciszek, Theodore F.

    1987-01-01

    A process for preparing CuInSe.sub.2 crystals includes melting a sufficient quantity of B.sub.2 O.sub.3 along with stoichiometric quantities of Cu, In, and Se in a crucible in a high pressure atmosphere of inert gas to encapsulate the CuInSe.sub.2 melt and confine the Se to the crucible. Additional Se in the range of 1.8 to 2.2 percent over the stoichiometric quantity is preferred to make up for small amounts of Se lost in the process. The crystal is grown by inserting a seed crystal through the B.sub.2 O.sub.3 encapsulate into contact with the CuInSe.sub.2 melt and withdrawing the seed upwardly to grow the crystal thereon from the melt.

  18. Method of synthesizing and growing copper-indium-diselenide (CuInSe/sub 2/) crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ciszek, T.F.

    1984-11-29

    A process for preparing CuInSe/sub 2/ crystals includes melting a sufficient quantity of B/sub 2/O/sub 2/ along with stochiometric quantities of Cu, In, and Se in a crucible in a high-pressure atmosphere of inert gas to encapsulate the CuInSe/sub 2/ melt and confine the Se to the crucible. Additional Se in the range of 1.8 to 2.2% over the stochiometric quantity is preferred to make up for small amounts of Se lost in the process. The melt can then be cooled slowly to form the crystal as direct solidification, or the crystal can be grown by inserting a seed crystal through the B/sub 2/O/sub 3/ encapsulate into contact with the CuInSe/sub 2/ melt and withdrawing the seed upwardly to grow the crystal thereon from the melt.

  19. Electron tunneling spectroscopy study of electrically active traps in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Jie Cui, Sharon; Ma, T. P.; Hung, Ting-Hsiang; Nath, Digbijoy; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Rajan, Siddharth

    2013-11-25

    We investigate the energy levels of electron traps in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors by the use of electron tunneling spectroscopy. Detailed analysis of a typical spectrum, obtained in a wide gate bias range and with both bias polarities, suggests the existence of electron traps both in the bulk of AlGaN and at the AlGaN/GaN interface. The energy levels of the electron traps have been determined to lie within a 0.5?eV band below the conduction band minimum of AlGaN, and there is strong evidence suggesting that these traps contribute to Frenkel-Poole conduction through the AlGaN barrier.

  20. Role of self-trapped holes in the photoconductive gain of β-gallium oxide Schottky diodes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Armstrong, Andrew M.; Crawford, Mary H.; Jayawardena, Asanka; Ahyi, Ayayi; Dhar, Sarit

    2016-03-10

    Solar-blind photodetection and photoconductive gain > 50 corresponding to a responsivity > 8 A/W was observed for β-Ga2O3 Schottky photodiodes. We investigated the origin of photoconductive gain. Current-voltage characteristics of the diodes did not indicate avalanche breakdown, which excludes carrier multiplication by impact ionization as the source for gain. However, photocapacitance measurements indicated a mechanism for hole localization for above-band gap illumination, suggesting self-trapped hole formation. Comparison of photoconductivity and photocapacitance spectra indicated that self-trapped hole formation coincides with the strong photoconductive gain. We conclude that self-trapped hole formation near the Schottky diode lowers the effective Schottky barrier in reversemore » bias, producing photoconductive gain. Ascribing photoconductive gain to an inherent property like self-trapping of holes can explain the operation of a variety of β-Ga2O3 photodetectors.« less

  1. Radionuclide trap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McGuire, Joseph C.

    1978-01-01

    The deposition of radionuclides manganese-54, cobalt-58 and cobalt-60 from liquid sodium coolant is controlled by providing surfaces of nickel or high nickel alloys to extract the radionuclides from the liquid sodium, and by providing surfaces of tungsten, molybdenum or tantalum to prevent or retard radionuclide deposition.

  2. Electrical properties of In{sub 2}Se{sub 3} single crystals and photosensitivity of Al/In{sub 2}Se{sub 3} Schottky barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodnar, I. V.; Ilchuk, G. A.; Petrus', R. Yu.; Rud', V. Yu.; Rud', Yu. V.; Serginov, M.

    2009-09-15

    In{sub 2}Se{sub 3} single crystals {approx}40 mm long and 14 mm in diameter were grown by the Bridgman method. The composition of grown single crystals and their crystal structure were determined. The conductivity ({sigma}) and Hall constant (R) of grown single crystals were measured and the first Schottky barriers Al/n-In{sub 2}Se{sub 3} were fabricated. Rectification and photovoltaic effect were detected in the new structures. Based on the study of the photosensitivity spectra of Al/n-In{sub 2}Se{sub 3} structures, the nature of the interband transitions and band gap of In{sub 2}Se{sub 3} crystals were determined. It was concluded that the new structures can be applied to develop broadband photoconverters of optical radiation.

  3. Towards high efficiency thin-film crystalline silicon solar cells: The roles of light trapping and non-radiative recombinations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bozzola, A. Kowalczewski, P.; Andreani, L. C.

    2014-03-07

    Thin-film solar cells based on silicon have emerged as an alternative to standard thick wafers technology, but they are less efficient, because of incomplete absorption of sunlight, and non-radiative recombinations. In this paper, we focus on the case of crystalline silicon (c-Si) devices, and we present a full analytic electro-optical model for p-n junction solar cells with Lambertian light trapping. This model is validated against numerical solutions of the drift-diffusion equations. We use this model to investigate the interplay between light trapping, and bulk and surface recombination. Special attention is paid to surface recombination processes, which become more important in thinner devices. These effects are further amplified due to the textures required for light trapping, which lead to increased surface area. We show that c-Si solar cells with thickness of a few microns can overcome 20% efficiency and outperform bulk ones when light trapping is implemented. The optimal device thickness in presence of light trapping, bulk and surface recombination, is quantified to be in the range of 1080??m, depending on the bulk quality. These results hold, provided the effective surface recombination is kept below a critical level of the order of 100?cm/s. We discuss the possibility of meeting this requirement, in the context of state-of-the-art techniques for light trapping and surface passivation. We show that our predictions are within the capability of present day silicon technologies.

  4. Pulsed laser deposition of Mn doped CdSe quantum dots for improved solar cell performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dai, Qilin; Wang, Wenyong E-mail: jtang2@uwyo.edu; Tang, Jinke E-mail: jtang2@uwyo.edu; Sabio, Erwin M.

    2014-05-05

    In this work, we demonstrate (1) a facile method to prepare Mn doped CdSe quantum dots (QDs) on Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4} photoanodes by pulsed laser deposition and (2) improved device performance of quantum dot sensitized solar cells of the Mn doped QDs (CdSe:Mn) compared to the undoped QDs (CdSe). The band diagram of photoanode Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4} and sensitizer CdSe:Mn QD is proposed based on the incident-photon-to-electron conversion efficiency (IPCE) data. Mn-modified band structure leads to absorption at longer wavelengths than the undoped CdSe QDs, which is due to the exchange splitting of the CdSe:Mn conduction band by the Mn dopant. Three-fold increase in the IPCE efficiency has also been observed for the Mn doped samples.

  5. Electron Flood Charge Compensation Device for Ion Trap Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appelhans, Anthony David; Ward, Michael Blair; Olson, John Eric

    2002-11-01

    During secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analyses of organophosphorous compounds adsorbed onto soils, the measured anion signals were lower than expected and it was hypothesized that the low signals could be due to sample charging. An electron flood gun was designed, constructed and used to investigate sample charging of these and other sample types. The flood gun was integrated into one end cap of an ion trap secondary ion mass spectrometer and the design maintained the geometry of the self-stabilizing extraction optics used in this instrument. The SIMION ion optics program was used to design the flood gun, and experimental results agreed with the predicted performance. Results showed the low anion signals from the soils were not due to sample charging. Other insulating and conducting samples were tested using both a ReO4- and a Cs+ primary ion beam. The proximity of the sample and electron source to the ion trap aperture resulted in generation of background ions in the ion trap via electron impact (EI) ionization during the period the electron gun was flooding the sample region. When using the electron gun with the ReO4- primary beam, the required electron current was low enough that the EI background was negligible; however, the high electron flood current required with the Cs+ beam produced background EI ions that degraded the quality of the mass spectra. The consequences of the EI produced cations will have to be evaluated on a sample-by-sample basis when using electron flood. It was shown that the electron flood gun could be intentionally operated to produce EI spectra in this instrument. This offers the opportunity to measure, nearly simultaneously, species evaporating from a sample, via EI, and species bound to the surface, via SIMS.

  6. Porous materials with pre-designed single-molecule traps for CO2 selective

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    adsorption | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome Porous materials with pre-designed single-molecule traps for CO2 selective adsorption Previous Next List Jian-Rong Li, Jiamei Yu, Weigang Lu, Lin-Bing Sun, Julian Sculley, Perla B. Balbuena & Hong-Cai Zhou, Nature Communications 4, Article number: 1538, 2013, DOI: 10.1038/ncomms2552 ncomms2552.html Abstract: Despite tremendous efforts, precise control in the synthesis of porous materials with

  7. Stable Metal-Organic Frameworks Containing Single-Molecule Traps for Enzyme

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Encapsulation | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome Stable Metal-Organic Frameworks Containing Single-Molecule Traps for Enzyme Encapsulation Previous Next List Dawei Feng, Tian-Fu Liu, Jie Su, Mathieu Bosch, Zhangwen Wei, Wei Wan, Daqiang Yuan, Ying-Pin Chen, Xuan Wang, Kecheng Wang, Xizhen Lian, Zhi-Yuan Gu, Jihye Park, Xiaodong Zou & Hong-Cai Zhou, Nature Communications 6, 5979 (2015) DOI: 10.1038/ncomms6979 179 Abstract: Enzymatic

  8. Testing the density matrix expansion against ab initio calculations of trapped neutron drops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogner, S. K.; Hergert, H.; Furnstahl, R. J.; Kortelainen, Erno M; Stoitsov, M. V.; Maris, Pieter; Vary, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    Microscopic input to a universal nuclear energy density functional can be provided through the density matrix expansion (DME), which has recently been revived and improved. Several DME implementation strategies are tested for neutron drop systems in harmonic traps by comparing to Hartree-Fock (HF) and ab initio no-core full configuration (NCFC) calculations with a model interaction (Minnesota potential). The new DME with exact treatment of Hartree contributions is found to best reproduce HF results and supplementing the functional with fit Skyrme-like contact terms shows systematic improvement toward the full NCFC results.

  9. Electron collisions in the trapped gyro-Landau fluid transport model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staebler, G. M.; Kinsey, J. E.

    2010-12-15

    Accurately modeling electron collisions in the trapped gyro-Landau fluid (TGLF) equations has been a major challenge. Insights gained from numerically solving the gyrokinetic equation have lead to a significant improvement of the low order TGLF model. The theoretical motivation and verification of this model with the velocity-space gyrokinetic code GYRO[J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] will be presented. The improvement in the fidelity of TGLF to GYRO is shown to also lead to better prediction of experimental temperature profiles by TGLF for a dedicated collision frequency scan.

  10. Dirac Equation and Quantum Relativistic Effects in a Single Trapped Ion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamata, L.; Leon, J.; Schaetz, T.; Solano, E.

    2007-06-22

    We present a method of simulating the Dirac equation in 3+1 dimensions for a free spin-1/2 particle in a single trapped ion. The Dirac bispinor is represented by four ionic internal states, and position and momentum of the Dirac particle are associated with the respective ionic variables. We show also how to simulate the simplified 1+1 case, requiring the manipulation of only two internal levels and one motional degree of freedom. Moreover, we study relevant quantum-relativistic effects, like the Zitterbewegung and Klein's paradox, the transition from massless to massive fermions, and the relativistic and nonrelativistic limits, via the tuning of controllable experimental parameters.

  11. Quantum signatures of the self-trapping transition in attractive lattice bosons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buonsante, P.; Penna, V.; Vezzani, A.

    2010-10-15

    We consider the Bose-Hubbard model describing attractive bosonic particles hopping across the sites of a translation-invariant lattice and compare the relevant ground-state properties with those of the corresponding symmetry-breaking semiclassical nonlinear theory. The introduction of a suitable measure allows us to highlight many correspondences between the nonlinear theory and the inherently linear quantum theory, characterized by the well-known self-trapping phenomenon. In particular we demonstrate that the localization properties and bifurcation pattern of the semiclassical ground state can be clearly recognized at the quantum level. Our analysis highlights a finite-number effect.

  12. Spin Self-Rephasing and Very Long Coherence Times in a Trapped Atomic Ensemble

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deutsch, C.; Reinhard, F.; Schneider, T.; Laloee, F.; Reichel, J. [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, ENS, UPMC, CNRS, 24 rue Lhomond, 75005 Paris (France); Ramirez-Martinez, F.; Lacroute, C.; Rosenbusch, P. [LNE-SYRTE, Observatoire de Paris, UPMC, CNRS, 61 av de l'Observatoire, 75014 Paris (France); Fuchs, J. N.; Piechon, F. [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, CNRS UMR 8502, Univ. Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2010-07-09

    We perform Ramsey spectroscopy on the ground state of ultracold {sup 87}Rb atoms magnetically trapped on a chip in the Knudsen regime. Field inhomogeneities over the sample should limit the 1/e contrast decay time to about 3 s, while decay times of 58{+-}12 s are actually observed. We explain this surprising result by a spin self-rephasing mechanism induced by the identical spin rotation effect originating from particle indistinguishability. We propose a theory of this synchronization mechanism and obtain good agreement with the experimental observations. The effect is general and may appear in other physical systems.

  13. Assembling a ring-shaped crystal in a microfabricated surface ion trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stick, Daniel Lynn; Tabakov, Boyan; Benito, Francisco; Blain, Matthew; Clark, Craig R.; Clark, Susan; Haltli, Raymond A.; Maunz, Peter; Sterk, Jonathan D.; Tigges, Chris

    2015-09-01

    We report on experiments with a microfabricated surface trap designed for confining a chain of ions in a ring. Uniform ion separation over most of the ring is achieved with a rotationally symmetric design and by measuring and suppressing undesired electric fields. After reducing stray fields, the ions are confined primarily by a radio-frequency pseudopotential and their mutual Coulomb repulsion. As a result, approximately 400 40Ca+ ions with an average separation of 9 μm comprise the ion crystal.

  14. On the Equivalence of Trapped Colloids, Pinned Vortices, and Spin Ice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nisoli, Cristiano

    2014-04-23

    We investigate the recently reported analogies between pinned vortices in nano-structured superconductors or colloids in optical traps, and spin ice materials. The frustration of the two models, one describing colloids and vortices, the other describing spin ice, differs essentially. However, their effective energetics is made identical by the contribution of an emergent field associated to a topological charge. This equivalence extends to the local low-energy dynamics of the ice manifold, yet breaks down in lattices of mixed coordination, because of topological charge transfer between sub-latices.

  15. NOx Reduction with Natural Gas for Lean Large-Bore Engine Applications Using Lean NOx Trap Aftertreatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parks, JE

    2005-02-11

    Large-bore natural gas engines are used for distributed energy and gas compression since natural gas fuel offers a convenient and reliable fuel source via the natural gas pipeline and distribution infrastructure. Lean engines enable better fuel efficiency and lower operating costs; however, NOx emissions from lean engines are difficult to control. Technologies that reduce NOx in lean exhaust are desired to enable broader use of efficient lean engines. Lean NOx trap catalysts have demonstrated greater than 90% NOx reduction in lean exhaust from engines operating with gasoline, diesel, and natural gas fuels. In addition to the clean nature of the technology, lean NOx traps reduce NOx with the fuel source of the engine thereby eliminating the requirement for storage and handling of secondary fuels or reducing agents. A study of lean NOx trap catalysts for lean natural gas engines is presented here. Testing was performed on a Cummins C8.3G (CG-280) engine on a motor dynamometer. Lean NOx trap catalysts were tested for NOx reduction performance under various engine operating conditions, and the utilization of natural gas as the reductant fuel source was characterized. Engine test results show that temperature greatly affects the catalytic processes involved, specifically methane oxidation and NOx storage on the lean NOx trap. Additional studies on a bench flow reactor demonstrate the effect of precious metal loading (a primary cost factor) on lean NOx trap performance at different temperatures. Results and issues related to the potential of the lean NOx trap technology for large-bore engine applications will be discussed.

  16. Ligand-Mediated Modification of the Electronic Structure of CdSe Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Jonathan R.; Whitley, Heather D.; Meulenberg, Robert W.; Wolcott, Abraham; Zhang, Jin Z.; Prendergast, Peter; Lovingood, Derek D.; Strouse, Geoffrey F.; Ogitsu, Tadashi; Schwegler, Eric; Terminello, Louis J.; Van Buuren, Tony W.

    2012-05-18

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy and ab initio modeling of the experimental spectra have been used to investigate the effects of surface passivation on the unoccupied electronic states of CdSe quantum dots (QDs). Significant differences are observed in the unoccupied electronic structure of the CdSe QDs, which are shown to arise from variations in specific ligand-surface bonding interactions.

  17. Development of a Low Cost Insulated Foil Substrate for Cu(InGaSe)2 Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ERTEN ESER

    2012-01-22

    The project validated the use of stainless steel flexible substrate coated with silicone-based resin dielectric, developed by Dow Corning Corporation, for Cu(InGa)Se2 based photovoltaics. The projects driving force was the high performance of Cu(InGa)Se2 based photovoltaics coupled with potential cost reduction that could be achieved with dielectric coated SS web substrate.

  18. Surface Plasmon Excitation via Au Nanoparticles in CdSe Semiconductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pradhan, A. K.; Konda, R. B.; Mundle, R.; Mustafa, H.; Bamiduro, O.; Roy, U. N.; Cui, Y.; Burger, A.

    2008-10-23

    We present experimental evidence for the large Raman and photoluminescence enhancement in CdSe semiconductor films grown on Si and glass substrates due to excitation of surface plasmon resonances in proximate gold metal nanoparticles deposited on the surface of CdSe film. Heterojunction diodes containing n-CdSe on p-Si semiconductor were fabricated and the surface of the diodes was in situ coated with Au nanoparticles using the ultra-high vacuum pulsed-laser deposition technique. A significant enhancement of the photocurrent was obtained in CdSe/p-Si containing Au nanoparticles on the surface compared to CdSe/p-Si due to the enhanced photo-absorption within the semiconductor by the phenomenon of surface plasmon resonance. These observations suggest a variety of approaches for improving the performance of devices such as photodetectors, photovoltaic, and related devices, including biosensors.

  19. Electron scattering and nonlinear trapping by oblique whistler waves: The critical wave intensity for nonlinear effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Artemyev, A. V. Vasiliev, A. A.; Mourenas, D.; Krasnoselskikh, V. V.

    2014-10-15

    In this paper, we consider high-energy electron scattering and nonlinear trapping by oblique whistler waves via the Landau resonance. We use recent spacecraft observations in the radiation belts to construct the whistler wave model. The main purpose of the paper is to provide an estimate of the critical wave amplitude for which the nonlinear wave-particle resonant interaction becomes more important than particle scattering. To this aim, we derive an analytical expression describing the particle scattering by large amplitude whistler waves and compare the corresponding effect with the nonlinear particle acceleration due to trapping. The latter is much more rare but the corresponding change of energy is substantially larger than energy jumps due to scattering. We show that for reasonable wave amplitudes ?10100?mV/m of strong whistlers, the nonlinear effects are more important than the linear and nonlinear scattering for electrons with energies ?1050?keV. We test the dependencies of the critical wave amplitude on system parameters (background plasma density, wave frequency, etc.). We discuss the role of obtained results for the theoretical description of the nonlinear wave amplification in radiation belts.

  20. Enhanced memory effect with embedded graphene nanoplatelets in ZnO charge trapping layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Atab, Nazek; Nayfeh, Ammar; Cimen, Furkan; Alkis, Sabri; Okyay, Ali K.

    2014-07-21

    A charge trapping memory with graphene nanoplatelets embedded in atomic layer deposited ZnO (GNIZ) is demonstrated. The memory shows a large threshold voltage V{sub t} shift (4?V) at low operating voltage (6/?6?V), good retention (>10 yr), and good endurance characteristic (>10{sup 4} cycles). This memory performance is compared to control devices with graphene nanoplatelets (or ZnO) and a thicker tunnel oxide. These structures showed a reduced V{sub t} shift and retention characteristic. The GNIZ structure allows for scaling down the tunnel oxide thickness along with improving the memory window and retention of data. The larger V{sub t} shift indicates that the ZnO adds available trap states and enhances the emission and retention of charges. The charge emission mechanism in the memory structures with graphene nanoplatelets at an electric field E???5.57 MV/cm is found to be based on Fowler-Nordheim tunneling. The fabrication of this memory device is compatible with current semiconductor processing, therefore, has great potential in low-cost nano-memory applications.

  1. Trapping the M sub 1 and M sub 2 substrates of bacteriorhodopsin for electron diffraction studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkins, G.A.

    1992-05-01

    Visible and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorption spectroscopies are used to observe protein conformational changes occuring during the bacteriorhodopsin photocycle. Spectroscopic measurements which define the conditions under which bacteriorhodopsin can be isolated and trapped in two distinct substates of the m intermediate of the photocycle, M{sub 1}, and M{sub 2}, are described. A protocol that can be used for high-resolution electron diffraction studies is presented that will trap glucose-embedded purple membrane in the M{sub 1}and M{sub 2} substates at greater than 90% concentration. It was discovered that glucose alone does not provide a fully hydrated environment for bacteriorhodopsin. Equilibration of glucose-embedded samples at high humidity can result in a physical state that is demonstrably closer to the native, fully hydrated state. An extension of the C-T Model of bacteriorhodopsin functionality (Fodor et al., 1988; Mathies et al., 1991) is proposed based on FTIR results and guided by published spectra from resonance Raman and FTIR work. 105 refs.

  2. Spatial shaping for generating arbitrary optical dipole traps for ultracold degenerate gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Jeffrey G.; Hill, W. T.

    2014-10-15

    We present two spatial-shaping approaches phase and amplitude for creating two-dimensional optical dipole potentials for ultracold neutral atoms. When combined with an attractive or repulsive Gaussian sheet formed by an astigmatically focused beam, atoms are trapped in three dimensions resulting in planar confinement with an arbitrary network of potentials a free-space atom chip. The first approach utilizes an adaptation of the generalized phase-contrast technique to convert a phase structure embedded in a beam after traversing a phase mask, to an identical intensity profile in the image plane. Phase masks, and a requisite phase-contrast filter, can be chemically etched into optical material (e.g., fused silica) or implemented with spatial light modulators; etching provides the highest quality while spatial light modulators enable prototyping and realtime structure modification. This approach was demonstrated on an ensemble of thermal atoms. Amplitude shaping is possible when the potential structure is made as an opaque mask in the path of a dipole trap beam, followed by imaging the shadow onto the plane of the atoms. While much more lossy, this very simple and inexpensive approach can produce dipole potentials suitable for containing degenerate gases. High-quality amplitude masks can be produced with standard photolithography techniques. Amplitude shaping was demonstrated on a Bose-Einstein condensate.

  3. Perturbation analysis of trapped-particle dynamics in axisymmetric dipole geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duthoit, F.-X.; Brizard, A. J.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.

    2010-10-15

    The bounce-action-angle coordinates (J,{zeta}) for charged particles trapped in an axisymmetric dipole magnetic field are constructed by perturbation analysis. First, the lowest-order bounce-action-angle coordinates (J{sub 0},{zeta}{sub 0}) are derived for deeply trapped particles in the harmonic-oscillator approximation. Next, the Lie-transform perturbation method is used to derive higher-order anharmonic action-angle corrections (J=J{sub 0}+{epsilon}{sub t}J{sub 1}, {zeta}={zeta}{sub 0}+{epsilon}{sub t{zeta}1}), where the dimensionless parameter {epsilon}{sub t{identical_to}}(s{sub b}/r{sub e}){sup 2}<<1 is defined as the ratio of the turning-point distance |s{sub b}| (measured from the equator) along a magnetic field line labeled by the equatorial distance r{sub e}. Explicit expressions (with anharmonic corrections) for the canonical parallel coordinates s(J,{zeta}) and p{sub ||}(J,{zeta}) are presented, which satisfy the canonical identity {l_brace}s,p{sub ||{r_brace}{identical_to}}1. Lastly, analytical expressions for the bounce and drift frequencies (which include anharmonic corrections) yield excellent agreement with exact numerical results.

  4. Electron and recoil ion momentum imaging with a magneto-optically trapped target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubele, R.; Schuricke, M.; Goullon, J.; Lindenblatt, H.; Ferreira, N.; Laforge, A.; Brhl, E.; Globig, D.; Misra, D.; Sell, M.; Song, Z.; Wang, X.; Zhang, S.; Jesus, V. L. B. de; Kelkar, A.; Schneider, K.; Schulz, M.; Fischer, D.

    2015-03-15

    A reaction microscope (ReMi) has been combined with a magneto-optical trap (MOT) for the kinematically complete investigation of atomic break-up processes. With the novel MOTReMi apparatus, the momentum vectors of the fragments of laser-cooled and state-prepared lithium atoms are measured in coincidence and over the full solid angle. The first successful implementation of a MOTReMi could be realized due to an optimized design of the present setup, a nonstandard operation of the MOT, and by employing a switching cycle with alternating measuring and trapping periods. The very low target temperature in the MOT (?2 mK) allows for an excellent momentum resolution. Optical preparation of the target atoms in the excited Li 2{sup 2}P{sub 3/2} state was demonstrated providing an atomic polarization of close to 100%. While first experimental results were reported earlier, in this work, we focus on the technical description of the setup and its performance in commissioning experiments involving target ionization in 266 nm laser pulses and in collisions with projectile ions.

  5. Effect of reductive treatments on Pt behavior and NOx storage in lean NOx trap catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xianqin; Kim, Do Heui; Kwak, Ja Hun; Wang, Chong M.; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2011-10-01

    Lean NOx trap (LNT) catalysts represent a promising approach to meet increasingly stringent NOx emission regulations on diesel and other lean-burn engines. Pt material properties, including dispersion and particle size, are known to be important factors in determining NOx uptake performance, since Pt provides active sites for NO oxidation to NO2 necessary for storing NOx as nitrates, and for the reduction of nitrates to N2. In this work, the physicochemical properties of Pt in Pt-BaO/Al2O3 LNT catalysts, such as the Pt accessible surface area and particle size, were investigated by using various tools, such as irreversible volumetric H2 chemisorption, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD), following successive reductive treatments at elevated temperatures. NOx uptake activities were also measured to establish a relationship between the properties of Pt and NOx storage following identical high-temperature reductive treatments. We find that the reductive treatments of Pt-BaO/Al2O3 lean NOx trap catalysts at temperatures up to 500 C promote a significant increase in NOx uptake explained, in part, by an induced close interaction between Pt and BaO phases in the catalyst, thus enabling facilitation of the NOx storage process.

  6. Evidence for old crust in the provenance of the Trap Falls Formation, southwestern Connecticut

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDaniel, D.K.; Sevigny, J.H.; Bock, B.; Hanson, G.N.; McLennan, S.M. . Dept. of Earth and Space Sciences)

    1993-03-01

    The Trap Fall Formation is a multiply deformed, amphibolite facies metasedimentary sequence in southwestern Connecticut. It contains interlayered pelitic schists and lesser quartzites, and may represent turbidites. The major element compositions of 3 schists are compatible with a shale protolith. Their aluminous nature (CIA = 68--70) suggests a weathering history in the source, but may in part be a result of metamorphic processes. High SiO[sub 2] (85--91%) and Zr (305--370 ppm) concentrations in the quartzites are consistent with a significant component of recycled sediment in the source. A single abraded detrital zircon from a quartzite gives a concordant U-Pb age of 1,009 [plus minus] 6 Ma and suggests a source in Grenville-aged crust. E[sub Nd] at 450 Ma of [minus] 9.2 for one schist sample is also consistent with older crust. REE patterns for 2 pelitic schists and a quartzite (Fig.) are parallel to PAAS (post-Archean average shale). Thus the authors suggest that recycled sediment derived from older cratonic sources dominates the source for the Trap Falls Formation. Models for the tectonic setting of deposition should be consistent with these observations.

  7. Collision Processes of Highly Charged Ions with Electrons Studied with an Electron Beam Ion Trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Tsutomu; Ohtani, Shunsuke; Kavanagh, Anthony P.; Currell, Fred J.; Watanabe, Hirofumi; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Kato, Daiji; Li Yueming; Tong Xiaoming

    2009-09-10

    The electron beam ion trap in Tokyo (Tokyo-EBIT)is suitable for studying relativistic effects in the collisions of highly charged heavy ions with electrons because it can produce and trap very highly charged heavy ions which interact with a mono-energetic and unidirectional relativistic electron beam with an energy of up to 200 keV. Recently, we have been studying resonant processes in ionization and recombination by measuring the charge abundance inside the EBIT at the equilibrium. The abundance ratio between adjacent charge states varies slowly with the electron energy when there is no resonant process. However, when the electron energy coincides with the resonant energy at which ionization or recombination is enhanced, the abundance ratio can drastically change. Thus, the resonant processes can be studied by measuring the abundance ratio between adjacent ions as a function of electron beam energy. In this talk, recent progress for heavy ions with very high charge states up to He-like Bi{sup 81+}, is presented. For such ions, relativistic effects significantly affect the resonant processes. For example, the generalized Breit interaction (GBI) effect, which treats the retardation in the exchange of single virtual photon between the free and orbital electrons, has been clearly observed in the DR resonant strength in Li-like Bi{sup 80+}. Recently we have also found that the GBI effect plays an important role in the interference between non-resonant and resonant recombinations. Experimental results are presented in comparison with theoretical calculations.

  8. Tritium trapping in silicon carbide in contact with solid breeder under high flux isotope reactor irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. Katsui; Y. Katoh; A. Hasegawa; M. Shimada; Y. Hatano; T. Hinoki; S. Nogami; T. Tanaka; S. Nagata; T. Shikama

    2013-11-01

    The trapping of tritium in silicon carbide (SiC) injected from ceramic breeding materials was examined via tritium measurements using imaging plate (IP) techniques. Monolithic SiC in contact with ternary lithium oxide (lithium titanate and lithium aluminate) as a ceramic breeder was irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA. The distribution of photo-stimulated luminescence (PSL) of tritium in SiC was successfully obtained, which separated the contribution of 14C -rays to the PSL. The tritium incident from ceramic breeders was retained in the vicinity of the SiC surface even after irradiation at 1073 K over the duration of ~3000 h, while trapping of tritium was not observed in the bulk region. The PSL intensity near the SiC surface in contact with lithium titanate was higher than that obtained with lithium aluminate. The amount of the incident tritium and/or the formation of a Li2SiO3 phase on SiC due to the reaction with lithium aluminate under irradiation likely were responsible for this observation.

  9. Global strings in extra dimensions: The full map of solutions, matter trapping, and the hierarchy problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bronnikov, K. A.; Meierovich, B. E.

    2008-02-15

    We consider (d{sub 0} + 2)-dimensional configurations with global strings in two extra dimensions and a flat metric in d{sub 0} dimensions, endowed with a warp factor e{sup 2{gamma}} depending on the distance l from the string center. All possible regular solutions of the field equations are classified by the behavior of the warp factor and the extradimensional circular radius r(l). Solutions with r {yields} {infinity} and r {yields} const > 0 as l {yields} {infinity} are interpreted in terms of thick brane-world models. Solutions with r {yields} 0 as l {yields} l{sub c} > 0, i.e., those with a second center, are interpreted as either multibrane systems (which are appropriate for large enough distances l{sub c} between the centers) or as Kaluza-Klein-type configurations with extra dimensions invisible due to their smallness. In the case of the Mexican-hat symmetry-breaking potential, we build the full map of regular solutions on the ({epsilon}, {Gamma}) parameter plane, where {epsilon} acts as an effective cosmological constant and {Gamma} characterizes the gravitational field strength. The trapping properties of candidate brane worlds for test scalar fields are discussed. Good trapping properties for massive fields are found for models with increasing warp factors. Kaluza-Klein-type models are shown to have nontrivial warp factor behaviors, leading to matter particle mass spectra that seem promising from the standpoint of hierarchy problems.

  10. Global strings in extra dimensions: The full map of solutions, matter trapping, and the hierarchy problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bronnikov, K. A.; Meierovich, B. E.

    2008-02-15

    We consider (d{sub 0} + 2)-dimensional configurations with global strings in two extra dimensions and a flat metric in d{sub 0} dimensions, endowed with a warp factor e{sup 2{gamma}} depending on the distance l from the string center. All possible regular solutions of the field equations are classified by the behavior of the warp factor and the extradimensional circular radius r(l). Solutions with r {sup {yields}} {infinity} and r {sup {yields}} const > 0 as l {sup {yields}} {infinity} are interpreted in terms of thick brane-world models. Solutions with r {sup {yields}} 0 as l {sup {yields}} l{sub c} > 0, i.e., those with a second center, are interpreted as either multibrane systems (which are appropriate for large enough distances l{sub c} between the centers) or as Kaluza-Klein-type configurations with extra dimensions invisible due to their smallness. In the case of the Mexican-hat symmetry-breaking potential, we build the full map of regular solutions on the ({epsilon}, {gamma}) parameter plane, where {epsilon} acts as an effective cosmological constant and {gamma} characterizes the gravitational field strength. The trapping properties of candidate brane worlds for test scalar fields are discussed. Good trapping properties for massive fields are found for models with increasing warp factors. Kaluza-Klein-type models are shown to have nontrivial warp factor behaviors, leading to matter particle mass spectra that seem promising from the standpoint of hierarchy problems.

  11. Trapping in GaN-based metal-insulator-semiconductor transistors: Role of high drain bias and hot electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meneghini, M. Bisi, D.; Meneghesso, G.; Zanoni, E.

    2014-04-07

    This paper describes an extensive analysis of the role of off-state and semi-on state bias in inducing the trapping in GaN-based power High Electron Mobility Transistors. The study is based on combined pulsed characterization and on-resistance transient measurements. We demonstrate thatby changing the quiescent bias point from the off-state to the semi-on stateit is possible to separately analyze two relevant trapping mechanisms: (i) the trapping of electrons in the gate-drain access region, activated by the exposure to high drain bias in the off-state; (ii) the trapping of hot-electrons within the AlGaN barrier or the gate insulator, which occurs when the devices are operated in the semi-on state. The dependence of these two mechanisms on the bias conditions and on temperature, and the properties (activation energy and cross section) of the related traps are described in the text.

  12. Advanced quadrupole ion trap instrumentation for low level vehicle emissions measurements. CRADA final report for number ORNL93-0238

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLuckey, S.A.; Buchanan, M.V.; Asano, K.G.; Hart, K.J.; Goeringer, D.E.; Dearth, M.A.

    1997-09-01

    Quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry has been evaluated for its potential use in vehicle emissions measurements in vehicle test facilities as an analyzer for the top 15 compounds contributing to smog generation. A variety of ionization methods were explored including ion trap in situ chemical ionization, atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization, and nitric oxide chemical ionization in a glow discharge ionization source coupled with anion trap mass spectrometer. Emphasis was placed on the determination of hydrocarbons and oxygenated hydrocarbons at parts per million to parts per billion levels. Ion trap in situ water chemical ionization and atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization were both shown to be amenable to the analysis of arenes, alcohols, aldehydes and, to some degree, alkenes. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge also generated molecular ions of methyl-t-butyl ether (MTBE). Neither of these ionization methods, however, were found to generate diagnostic ions for the alkanes. Nitric oxide chemical ionization, on the other hand, was found to yield diagnostic ions for alkanes, alkenes, arenes, alcohols, aldehydes, and MTBE. The ability to measure a variety of hydrocarbons present at roughly 15 parts per billion at measurement rates of 3 Hz was demonstrated. These results have demonstrated that the ion trap has an excellent combination of sensitivity, specificity, speed, and flexibility with respect to the technical requirements of the top 15 analyzer.

  13. Generation of high charge state metal ion beams by electron cyclotron resonance heating of vacuum arc plasma in cusp trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikolaev, A. G.; Savkin, K. P.; Oks, E. M.; Vizir, A. V.; Yushkov, G. Yu.; Vodopyanov, A. V.; Izotov, I. V.; Mansfeld, D. A.

    2012-02-15

    A method for generating high charge state heavy metal ion beams based on high power microwave heating of vacuum arc plasma confined in a magnetic trap under electron cyclotron resonance conditions has been developed. A feature of the work described here is the use of a cusp magnetic field with inherent ''minimum-B'' structure as the confinement geometry, as opposed to a simple mirror device as we have reported on previously. The cusp configuration has been successfully used for microwave heating of gas discharge plasma and extraction from the plasma of highly charged, high current, gaseous ion beams. Now we use the trap for heavy metal ion beam generation. Two different approaches were used for injecting the vacuum arc metal plasma into the trap - axial injection from a miniature arc source located on-axis near the microwave window, and radial injection from sources mounted radially at the midplane of the trap. Here, we describe preliminary results of heating vacuum arc plasma in a cusp magnetic trap by pulsed (400 {mu}s) high power (up to 100 kW) microwave radiation at 37.5 GHz for the generation of highly charged heavy metal ion beams.

  14. An Energy Signature Scheme for Steam Trap Assessment and Flow Rate Estimation Using Pipe-Induced Acoustic Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olama, Mohammed M; Allgood, Glenn O; Kuruganti, Phani Teja; Lake, Joe E

    2012-01-01

    The US Congress has passed legislation dictating that all government agencies establish a plan and process for improving energy efficiencies at their sites. In response to this legislation, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has recently conducted a pilot study to explore the deployment of a wireless sensor system for a real-time measurement-based energy efficiency optimization framework within the steam distribution system within the ORNL campus. We make assessments on the real-time status of the distribution system by observing the state measurements of acoustic sensors mounted on the steam pipes/traps/valves. In this paper, we describe a spectral-based energy signature scheme that interprets acoustic vibration sensor data to estimate steam flow rates and assess steam traps health status. Experimental results show that the energy signature scheme has the potential to identify different steam trap health status and it has sufficient sensitivity to estimate steam flow rate. Moreover, results indicate a nearly quadratic relationship over the test region between the overall energy signature factor and flow rate in the pipe. The analysis based on estimated steam flow and steam trap status helps generate alerts that enable operators and maintenance personnel to take remedial action. The goal is to achieve significant energy-saving in steam lines by monitoring and acting on leaking steam pipes/traps/valves.

  15. Study of the recombination process at crystallite boundaries in CuIn{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} (CIGS) films by microwave photoconductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bocharov, K. V.; Novikov, G. F.; Hsieh, T. Y.; Gapanovich, M. V.; Jeng, M. J.

    2013-03-15

    The loss kinetics of photogenerated charge carriers in thin polycrystalline chalcopyrite CuIn{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} (CIGS) films has been studied by microwave photoconductivity (at 36 GHz). The films were synthesized using the ampoule method and three variants of physical vapor deposition with subsequent selenization: magnetron sputtering, thermal deposition, and modified thermal deposition with intermetallic precursors. The photoconductivity was excited by 8-ns nitrogen laser pulses with maximum intensity of 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} photons/cm per pulse. Measurements were performed in the temperature range 148-293 K. The photoresponse amplitude is found to depend linearly on the sizes of coherent-scattering regions in the film grains, which were calculated from X-ray diffraction data. The photoresponse decay obeys hyperbolic law. The photoresponse half-decay time increases with a decrease in both temperature and light intensity. It is shown that the recombination of free holes with trapped electrons is very efficient near the crystallite boundaries.

  16. Stress influenced trapping processes in Si based multi-quantum well structures and heavy ions implanted Si

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciurea, Magdalena Lidia Lazanu, Sorina

    2014-10-06

    Multi-quantum well structures and Si wafers implanted with heavy iodine and bismuth ions are studied in order to evaluate the influence of stress on the parameters of trapping centers. The experimental method of thermostimullatedcurrents without applied bias is used, and the trapping centers are filled by illumination. By modeling the discharge curves, we found in multilayered structures the parameters of both 'normal' traps and 'stress-induced' ones, the last having a Gaussian-shaped temperature dependence of the cross section. The stress field due to the presence of stopped heavy ions implanted into Si was modeled by a permanent electric field. The increase of the strain from the neighborhood of I ions to the neighborhood of Bi ions produces the broadening of some energy levels and also a temperature dependence of the cross sections for all levels.

  17. First Use of High Charge States for Mass Measurements of Short-Lived Nuclides in a Penning Trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ettenauer, S.; Gallant, A. T.; Dilling, J.; Simon, M. C.; Chaudhuri, A.; Mane, E.; Delheij, P.; Pearson, M. R.; Brunner, T.; Chowdhury, U.; Simon, V. V.; Brodeur, M.; Andreoiu, C.; Audi, G.; Lopez-Urrutia, J. R. Crespo; Ullrich, J.; Gwinner, G.; Lapierre, A.; Lunney, D.; Ringle, R.

    2011-12-30

    Penning trap mass measurements of short-lived nuclides have been performed for the first time with highly charged ions, using the TITAN facility at TRIUMF. Compared to singly charged ions, this provides an improvement in experimental precision that scales with the charge state q. Neutron-deficient Rb isotopes have been charge bred in an electron beam ion trap to q=8-12+ prior to injection into the Penning trap. In combination with the Ramsey excitation scheme, this unique setup creating low energy, highly charged ions at a radioactive beam facility opens the door to unrivaled precision with gains of 1-2 orders of magnitude. The method is particularly suited for short-lived nuclides such as the superallowed {beta} emitter {sup 74}Rb (T{sub 1/2}=65 ms). The determination of its atomic mass and an improved Q{sub EC} value are presented.

  18. Diurnal activity of soil surface arthropods in agroecosystems: design for an inexpensive time-sorting pitfall trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blumberg, A.Y.; Crossley, D.A. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The design for an inexpensive time-sorting pitfall trap is presented. The basis of the mechanism is a rotary stepping solenoid powered by lantern batteries. Traps were utilized to sample soil surface arthropods at two hour intervals for five 24 hr periods in 1983. One trap each was placed in conventional tillage (CT) and no-tillage (NT) agroecosystems. Soil arthropod surface activity was greatest in CT on 9 July during the dawn and dusk periods but the data did not indicate other dominant trends. Activity in NT was greatest during dusk on 27 June, but again no other dominant trends were evident. When CT and NT are combined over the sample dates, surface soil arthropod activity peaked during dusk, with a smaller activity peak at dawn. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Sorbent selection and design considerations for uranium trapping. [H-151 alumina, XF-100 alumina, F-1 alumina, sodium fluoride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, R.M.; Hobbs, W.E.; Norton, J.L.; Stephenson, M.J.

    1981-07-01

    The efficient removal of UF/sub 6/ from effluent streams can be accomplished through the selection of the best solid sorbent and the implementation of good design principles. Pressure losses, sorbent capacity, reaction kinetics, sorbent regeneration/uranium recovery requirements and the effects of other system components are the performance factors which are summarized. The commonly used uranium trapping materials highlighted are sodium fluoride, H-151 alumina, XF-100 alumina, and F-1 alumina. Sorbent selection and trap design have to be made on a case-by-case basis but the theoretical modeling studies and the evaluation of the performance factors presented can be used as a guide for other chemical trap applications.

  20. Structural phase transitions in Bi2Se3 under high pressure

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yu, Zhenhai; Gu, Genda; Wang, Lin; Hu, Qingyang; Zhao, Jinggeng; Yan, Shuai; Yang, Ke; Sinogeikin, Stanislav; Mao, Ho -kwang

    2015-11-02

    Raman spectroscopy and angle dispersive X-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments of bismuth selenide (Bi2Se3) have been carried out to pressures of 35.6 and 81.2 GPa, respectively, to explore its pressure-induced phase transformation. The experiments indicate that a progressive structural evolution occurs from an ambient rhombohedra phase (Space group (SG): R-3m) to monoclinic phase (SG: C2/m) and eventually to a high pressure body-centered tetragonal phase (SG: I4/mmm). Evidenced by our XRD data up to 81.2 GPa, the Bi2Se3 crystallizes into body-centered tetragonal structures rather than the recently reported disordered body-centered cubic (BCC) phase. Furthermore, first principles theoretical calculations favor the viewpoint thatmore » the I4/mmm phase Bi2Se3 can be stabilized under high pressure (>30 GPa). Remarkably, the Raman spectra of Bi2Se3 from this work (two independent runs) are still Raman active up to ~35 GPa. Furthermore, it is worthy to note that the disordered BCC phase at 27.8 GPa is not observed here. The remarkable difference in atomic radii of Bi and Se in Bi2Se3 may explain why Bi2Se3 shows different structural behavior than isocompounds Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3.« less

  1. Probing the size and environment induced phase transformation in CdSe quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karakoti, Ajay S.; Sanghavi, Shail P.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Yang, Ping; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2011-11-17

    The structural and electronic properties of CdSe quantum dots in toluene and drop-casted on Si wafer were investigated by in-situ micro X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and UV-Vis absorption and emission spectroscopy. The in-situ micro diffraction data show that the CdSe quantum dots capped with TOPO or hexadecylamine (HDA) in toluene exhibit predominantly wurtzite crystal structure, which undergoes a phase transformation to zinc blende crystal structure following drop casting on Si and this phase transition increases with decreasing the size of the CdSe quantum dots. Decreasing the size of quantum dots also increases the Se vacancies that facilitate the phase transformation. The X-ray photoelectron spectra show a systematic increase in the core level binding energies of Cd 3d and Se 3d, the band gap and the Cd/Se ratio as the size of the quantum dots decreases from 6.6nm to 2.1nm. This is attributed to the quantum confinement of CdSe crystallites by the capping ligands in toluene which increases with decreasing the size of the quantum dots. However, drop-casting quantum dots on Si alter the density and arrangement of capping ligands and solvent molecules on the quantum dots which causes significant phase transformation.

  2. Observation of structural relaxation during exciton self-trapping via excited-state resonant impulsive stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mance, J. G.; Felver, J. J.; Dexheimer, S. L.

    2015-02-28

    We detect the change in vibrational frequency associated with the transition from a delocalized to a localized electronic state using femtosecond vibrational wavepacket techniques. The experiments are carried out in the mixed-valence linear chain material [Pt(en){sub 2}][Pt(en){sub 2}Cl{sub 2}]?(ClO{sub 4}){sub 4} (en = ethylenediamine, C{sub 2}H{sub 8}N{sub 2}), a quasi-one-dimensional system with strong electron-phonon coupling. Vibrational spectroscopy of the equilibrated self-trapped exciton is carried out using a multiple pulse excitation technique: an initial pump pulse creates a population of delocalized excitons that self-trap and equilibrate, and a time-delayed second pump pulse tuned to the red-shifted absorption band of the self-trapped exciton impulsively excites vibrational wavepacket oscillations at the characteristic vibrational frequencies of the equilibrated self-trapped exciton state by the resonant impulsive stimulated Raman mechanism, acting on the excited state. The measurements yield oscillations at a frequency of 160 cm{sup ?1} corresponding to a Raman-active mode of the equilibrated self-trapped exciton with Pt-Cl stretching character. The 160 cm{sup ?1} frequency is shifted from the previously observed wavepacket frequency of 185 cm{sup ?1} associated with the initially generated exciton and from the 312 cm{sup ?1} Raman-active symmetric stretching mode of the ground electronic state. We relate the frequency shifts to the changes in charge distribution and local structure that create the potential that stabilizes the self-trapped state.

  3. Near-Unity Quantum Yields of Biexciton Emission from CdSe=CdS Nanocrystals

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Measured Using Single-Particle Spectroscopy (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Near-Unity Quantum Yields of Biexciton Emission from CdSe=CdS Nanocrystals Measured Using Single-Particle Spectroscopy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Near-Unity Quantum Yields of Biexciton Emission from CdSe=CdS Nanocrystals Measured Using Single-Particle Spectroscopy Biexciton photoluminescence (PL) quantum yields (Q2X) of individual CdSe/CdS core-shell nanocrystal quantum dots with various shell

  4. Optimal packing size of non-ligated CdSe nanoclusters for microstructure synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tefera, Anteneh G.; Mochena, Mogus D.; Johnson, Elijah; Dickerson, James

    2014-09-14

    Structural and electrostatic properties of nanoclusters of CdSe of diameter 1–2 nm are studied with first principle calculations to determine the optimal size for synthesizing microstructures. Based on robustness of the core structure, i.e., the retention of tetrahedral geometry, hexagonal ring structure, and overall wu{sup ¨}rtzite structure to surface relaxations, we conclude that nanoclusters of ~2 nm diameter are the best candidates to form a dense microstructure with minimal interstitial space. Se-terminated surfaces retain a zigzag structure as Se atoms are pulled out and Cd atoms are pulled in due to relaxation, therefore, are best suited for inter-nanocluster formations.

  5. An oleic acid-capped CdSe quantum-dot sensitized solar cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Jing; Song, J. L.; Deng, W. Q.; Sun, X. W.; Jiang, C. Y.; Lei, W.; Huang, J. H.; Liu, R. S.

    2009-04-13

    In this letter, we report an oleic acid (OA)-capped CdSe quantum-dot sensitized solar cell (QDSSC) with an improved performance. The TiO{sub 2}/OA-CdSe photoanode in a two-electrode device exhibited a photon-to-current conversion efficiency of 17.5% at 400 nm. At AM1.5G irradiation with 100 mW/cm{sup 2} light intensity, the QDSSCs based on OA-capped CdSe showed a power conversion efficiency of about 1%. The function of OA was to increase QD loading, extend the absorption range and possibly suppress the surface recombination.

  6. Thickness-dependent coherent phonon frequency in ultrathin FeSe/SrTiO3

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    films (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Thickness-dependent coherent phonon frequency in ultrathin FeSe/SrTiO3 films Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Thickness-dependent coherent phonon frequency in ultrathin FeSe/SrTiO3 films Ultrathin FeSe films grown on SrTiO3 substrates are a recent milestone in atomic material engineering due to their important role in understanding unconventional superconductivity in Fe-based materials. By using femtosecond time- and angle-resolved

  7. {sup 39}Ar Detection at the 10{sup -16} Isotopic Abundance Level with Atom Trap Trace Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, W.; Williams, W.; Bailey, K.; O'Connor, T. P.; Mueller, P.; Davis, A. M.; Hu, S.-M.; Sun, Y. R.; Lu, Z.-T.; Purtschert, R.; Sturchio, N. C.

    2011-03-11

    Atom trap trace analysis, a laser-based atom counting method, has been applied to analyze atmospheric {sup 39}Ar (half-life=269 yr), a cosmogenic isotope with an isotopic abundance of 8x10{sup -16}. In addition to the superior selectivity demonstrated in this work, the counting rate and efficiency of atom trap trace analysis have been improved by 2 orders of magnitude over prior results. The significant applications of this new analytical capability lie in radioisotope dating of ice and water samples and in the development of dark matter detectors.

  8. Study of Ion Cooling and Ejection from Two Stage Linear Quadrupole Ion Trap consisted of RFQ ion guides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ion Cooling and Ejection from Two Stage Linear Quadrupole Ion Trap consisted of RFQ ion guides Kozlovskiy V.I., Filatov V. V., Shchepunov (UNIRIB, O.R.A.U. Oak Ridge, TN, USA) V. A., Brusov V. S., Pikhtelev A. R., Zelenov V. V. Introduction The primary objective of this work concerns linear quadrupole ion traps, which are commonly used to interface a continuous ion beam from an external source with a mass analyzer, requiring bunched or pulsed beams. We assume that the ions prepared for mass

  9. Low-temperature ferromagnetic properties in Co-doped Ag{sub 2}Se nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Fengxia E-mail: xia9020@hust.edu.cn; Yu, Gen; Han, Chong; Liu, Tingting; Zhang, Duanming; Xia, Zhengcai E-mail: xia9020@hust.edu.cn

    2014-01-06

    β-Ag{sub 2}Se is a topologically nontrivial insulator. The magnetic properties of Co-doped Ag{sub 2}Se nanoparticles with Co concentrations up to 40% were investigated. The cusp of zero-field-cooling magnetization curves and the low-temperature hysteresis loops were observed. With increasing concentration of Co{sup 2+} ions mainly substituting Ag{sub I} sites in the Ag{sub 2}Se structure, the resistivity, Curie temperature T{sub c}, and magnetization increased. At 10 T, a sharp drop of resistance near T{sub c} was detected due to Co dopants. The ferromagnetic behavior in Co-doped Ag{sub 2}Se might result from the intra-layer ferromagnetic coupling and surface spin. This magnetic semiconductor is a promising candidate in electronics and spintronics.

  10. Thermoelectric properties of polycrystalline In4Se3 and In4Te3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Xun; Cho, Jung Y; Salvador, James R.; Yang, Jihui; Wang, Hsin

    2010-01-01

    High thermoelectric performance of a single crystal layered compound In{sub 4}Se{sub 3} was reported recently. We present here an electrical and thermal transport property study over a wide temperature range for polycrystalline samples of In{sub 4}Se{sub 3} and In{sub 4}Te{sub 3}. Our data demonstrate that these materials are lightly doped semiconductors, leading to large thermopower and resistivity. Very low thermal conductivity, below 1 W/m K, is observed. The power factors for In{sub 4}Se{sub 3} and In{sub 4}Te{sub 3} are much smaller when compared with state-of-the-art thermoelectric materials. This combined with the very low thermal conductivity results in the maximum ZT value of less than 0.6 at 700 K for In{sub 4}Se{sub 3}.

  11. Enhanced spontaneous emission of CdSe quantum dots in monolithic II-VI pillar microcavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lohmeyer, H.; Kruse, C.; Sebald, K.; Gutowski, J.; Hommel, D.

    2006-08-28

    The emission properties of CdSe/ZnSe quantum dots in ZnSe-based pillar microcavities are studied. All-epitaxial cavities made of ZnSSe and MgS/ZnCdSe superlattices with a single quantum-dot sheet embedded have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Pillar structures with diameters down to 500 nm have been realized by focused-ion-beam etching. A pronounced enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate of quantum dots coupling to the fundamental mode of the cavities is found as evidence for the Purcell effect. The enhancement by a factor of up to 3.8 depends systematically on the pillar diameter and thus on the Purcell factor of the individual pillars.

  12. Phonon properties of BaFe?X? (X=S, Se) spin ladder compounds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Popovicq, Z. V.; Petrovic, C.; Scepanovic, M.; Lazarevic, N.; Opacic, M.; Radonjic, M. M.; Tanaskovic, D.; Lei, Hechang

    2015-02-27

    We present the Raman scattering spectra of the S=2 spin ladder compounds BaFe?X? (X=S,Se) in a temperature range between 20 and 400 K. Although the crystal structures of these two compounds are both orthorhombic and very similar, they are not isostructural. The unit cell of BaFe?S? (BaFe?Se?) is base-centered Cmcm (primitive Pnma), giving 18 (36) modes to be observed in the Raman scattering experiment. We have detected almost all Raman active modes, predicted by factor group analysis, which can be observed from the cleavage planes of these compounds. Assignment of the observed Raman modes of BaFe?S(Se)? is supported by themorelattice dynamics calculations. The antiferromagnetic long-range spin ordering in BaFe?Se? below TN=255K leaves a fingerprint both in the A1g and B3g phonon mode linewidth and energy.less

  13. Super-Poissonian Statistics of Photon Emission from Single CdSe...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Statistics of Photon Emission from Single CdSe-CdS Core-Shell Nanocrystals Coupled to Metal Nanostructures Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Super-Poissonian Statistics of ...

  14. Flow of US/SE Program Funding to National Laboratories (FY 2014 Enacted)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This figure illustrates the flow of funding to each of 17 DOE National Laboratories from five of the six US/SE program offices. IE does not directly fund program work at the National Laboratories.

  15. Hydrogen passivation of electron trap in amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O thin-film transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanyu, Yuichiro Domen, Kay; Nomura, Kenji; Hiramatsu, Hidenori; Kamiya, Toshio; Materials Research Center for Element Strategy, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama ; Kumomi, Hideya; Hosono, Hideo; Frontier Research Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama; Materials Research Center for Element Strategy, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama

    2013-11-11

    We report an experimental evidence that some hydrogens passivate electron traps in an amorphous oxide semiconductor, a-In-Ga-Zn-O (a-IGZO). The a-IGZO thin-film transistors (TFTs) annealed at 300?C exhibit good operation characteristics; while those annealed at ?400?C show deteriorated ones. Thermal desorption spectra (TDS) of H{sub 2}O indicate that this threshold annealing temperature corresponds to depletion of H{sub 2}O desorption from the a-IGZO layer. Hydrogen re-doping by wet oxygen annealing recovers the good TFT characteristic. The hydrogens responsible for this passivation have specific binding energies corresponding to the desorption temperatures of 300430?C. A plausible structural model is suggested.

  16. Preparation of a high concentration of lithium-7 atoms in a magneto-optical trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zelener, B. B. Saakyan, S. A.; Sautenkov, V. A.; Manykin, E. A.; Zelener, B. V.; Fortov, V. E.

    2014-11-15

    This study is aimed at obtaining high concentration of optically cooled lithium-7 atoms for preparing strongly interacting ultracold plasma and Rydberg matter. A special setup has been constructed, in which two high-power semiconductor lasers are used to cool lithium-7 atoms in a magneto-optical trap. At an optimum detuning of the cooling laser frequency and a magnetic field gradient of 35 G/cm, the concentration of ultracold lithium-7 atoms reaches about 10{sup 11} cm{sup −3}. Additional independent information about the concentration and number of ultracold lithium-7 atoms on different sublevels of the ground state was obtained by using of an additional probing laser.

  17. Theory of Fine-scale Zonal Flow Generation From Trapped Electron Mode Turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu Wang and T.S. Hahm

    2009-06-11

    Most existing zonal flow generation theory has been developed with a usual assumption of qr?? << 1 (qr is the radial wave number of zonal flow, and ?? is the ion poloidal gyrora- dius). However, recent nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of trapped electron mode (TEM) turbulence exhibit a relatively short radial scale of the zonal flows with qr?? ~ 1 [Z. Lin et al., IAEA-CN/TH/P2-8 (2006); D. Ernst et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 055906 (2009)]. This work reports an extension of zonal flow growth calculation to this short wavelength regime via the wave kinetics approach. A generalized expression for the polarization shielding for arbitrary radial wavelength [Lu Wang and T.S. Hahm, to appear in Phys. Plasmas (2009)] which extends the Rosenbluth-Hinton formula in the long wavelength limit is applied.

  18. Alternative method to control radiative vortex forces in a magneto-optical trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiersnowski, K.; Kawalec, T.; Dohnalik, T.

    2006-06-15

    We present an experimental and theoretical study of controlling the atomic spatial distributions in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). With a diaphragm we can vary the waist and power of one of the cooling laser beams and we can change parameters of large-diameter, parallelogram-shaped atomic orbits. We show that the radiative force generated by the repumping MOT laser has to be taken into consideration. Computer simulations of atomic trajectories explain the observed spatial structures, and we employ these simulations to present potential applications of controlling the diaphragm diameter as a function of time. A potential use of controlled vortex forces seems to have a great significance in recently presented important new methods to investigate cold atom collisions in the MOT, which were recently published.

  19. Correlation measurements in nuclear {beta}-decay using traps and polarized low energy beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naviliat-Cuncic, Oscar

    2013-05-06

    Precision measurements in nuclear {beta}-decay provide sensitive means to test discrete symmetries in the weak interaction and to determine some of the fundamental constants in semi-leptonic decays, like the coupling of the lightest quarks to charged weak bosons. The main motivation of such measurements is to find deviations from Standard Model predictions as possible indications of new physics. In this contribution I will focus on two topics related to precision measurements in nuclear {beta}-decay: i) the determination of the V{sub ud} element of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark mixing matrix from nuclear mirror transitions and ii) the search for exotic scalar or tensor contributions from {beta}{nu} angular correlations. The purpose is to underline the role being played by experimental techniques based on the confinement of radioactive species with atom and ion traps as well as the plans to use low energy polarized beams.

  20. Light trapping for emission from a photovoltaic cell under normally incident monochromatic illumination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takeda, Yasuhiko Iizuka, Hideo; Mizuno, Shintaro; Hasegawa, Kazuo; Ichikawa, Tadashi; Ito, Hiroshi; Kajino, Tsutomu; Ichiki, Akihisa; Motohiro, Tomoyoshi

    2014-09-28

    We have theoretically demonstrated a new light-trapping mechanism to reduce emission from a photovoltaic (PV) cell used for a monochromatic light source, which improves limiting conversion efficiency determined by the detailed balance. A multilayered bandpass filter formed on the surface of a PV cell has been found to prevent the light generated inside by radiative recombination from escaping the cell, resulting in a remarkable decrease of the effective solid angle for the emission. We have clarified a guide to design a suitable configuration of the bandpass filter and achieved significant reduction of the emission. The resultant gain in monochromatic conversion efficiency in the radiative limit due to the optimally designed 18-layerd bandpass filters is as high as 6% under normally incident 1064 nm illumination of 10 mW/cm~ 1 kW/cm, compared with the efficiency for the perfect anti-reflection treatment to the surface of a conventional solar cell.

  1. Spectroscopy of Charge Carriers and Traps in Field-Doped Organic Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Xiaoyang; Frisbie, C Daniel

    2012-08-13

    This research project aims to achieve quantitative and molecular level understanding of charge carriers and traps in field-doped organic semiconductors via in situ optical absorption spectroscopy, in conjunction with time-resolved electrical measurements. During the funding period, we have made major progress in three general areas: (1) probed charge injection at the interface between a polymeric semiconductor and a polymer electrolyte dielectric and developed a thermodynamic model to quantitatively describe the transition from electrostatic to electrochemical doping; (2) developed vibrational Stark effect to probe electric field at buried organic semiconductor interfaces; (3) used displacement current measurement (DCM) to study charge transport at organic/dielectric interfaces and charge injection at metal/organic interfaces.

  2. Offshore Extension of Deccan Traps in Kachchh, Central Western India: Implications for Geological Sequestration Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pandey, D. K.; Pandey, A.; Rajan, S.

    2011-03-15

    The Deccan basalts in central western India are believed to occupy large onshore-offshore area. Using geophysical and geological observations, onshore sub-surface structural information has been widely reported. On the contrary, information about offshore structural variations has been inadequate due to scarcity of marine geophysical data and lack of onshore-offshore lithological correlations. Till date, merely a few geophysical studies are reported that gauge about the offshore extent of Deccan Traps and the Mesozoic sediments (pre-Deccan). To fill this gap in knowledge, in this article, we present new geophysical evidences to demonstrate offshore continuation of the Deccan volcanics and the Mesozoic sediments. The offshore multi-channel seismic and onshore-offshore lithological correlations presented here confirm that the Mesozoic sedimentary column in this region is overlain by 0.2-1.2-km-thick basaltic cover. Two separate phases of Mesozoic sedimentation, having very distinctive physical and lithological characteristics, are observed between overlying basaltic rocks and underlying Precambrian basement. Using onshore-offshore seismic and borehole data this study provides new insight into the extent of the Deccan basalts and the sub-basalt structures. This study brings out a much clearer picture than that was hitherto available about the offshore continuation of the Deccan Traps and the Mesozoic sediments of Kachchh. Further, its implications in identifying long-term storage of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} within sub-basalt targets are discussed. The carbon sequestration potential has been explored through the geological assessment in terms of the thickness of the strata as well as lithology.

  3. Spectroscopy of Charge Carriers and Traps in Field-Doped Single Crystal Organic Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Xiaoyang

    2014-12-10

    The proposed research aims to achieve quantitative, molecular level understanding of charge carriers and traps in field-doped crystalline organic semiconductors via in situ linear and nonlinear optical spectroscopy, in conjunction with transport measurements and molecular/crystal engineering. Organic semiconductors are emerging as viable materials for low-cost electronics and optoelectronics, such as organic photovoltaics (OPV), organic field effect transistors (OFETs), and organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). Despite extensive studies spanning many decades, a clear understanding of the nature of charge carriers in organic semiconductors is still lacking. It is generally appreciated that polaron formation and charge carrier trapping are two hallmarks associated with electrical transport in organic semiconductors; the former results from the low dielectric constants and weak intermolecular electronic overlap while the latter can be attributed to the prevalence of structural disorder. These properties have lead to the common observation of low charge carrier mobilities, e.g., in the range of 10-5 - 10-3 cm2/Vs, particularly at low carrier concentrations. However, there is also growing evidence that charge carrier mobility approaching those of inorganic semiconductors and metals can exist in some crystalline organic semiconductors, such as pentacene, tetracene and rubrene. A particularly striking example is single crystal rubrene (Figure 1), in which hole mobilities well above 10 cm2/Vs have been observed in OFETs operating at room temperature. Temperature dependent transport and spectroscopic measurements both revealed evidence of free carriers in rubrene. Outstanding questions are: what are the structural features and physical properties that make rubrene so unique? How do we establish fundamental design principles for the development of other organic semiconductors of high mobility? These questions are critically important but not comprehensive, as the nature of charge carriers is known to evolve as the carrier concentration increases, due to the presence of intrinsic disorder in organic semiconductors. Thus, a complementary question is: how does the nature of charge transport change as a function of carrier concentration?

  4. AeroSys: Noncompliance Determination (2010-SE-0302) | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Noncompliance Determination (2010-SE-0302) AeroSys: Noncompliance Determination (2010-SE-0302) April 13, 2010 DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to AeroSys, Inc. finding that basic model THDC-24SG does not comport with the energy conservation standards. DOE determined the product was noncompliant based on DOE testing. AeroSys must immediately notify each person (or company) to whom AeroSys distributed the noncompliant product that the product does not meet Federal standards. In

  5. Unique Challenges Accompany Thick-Shell CdSe/nCdS (n > 10) Nanocrystal Synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Y; Marchuk, K; Abraham, R; Sampat, S; Abraham, R.; Fang, N; Malko, AV; Vela, J

    2011-12-23

    Thick-shell CdSe/nCdS (n {ge} 10) nanocrystals were recently reported that show remarkably suppressed fluorescence intermittency or 'blinking' at the single-particle level as well as slow rates of Auger decay. Unfortunately, whereas CdSe/nCdS nanocrystal synthesis is well-developed up to n {le} 6 CdS monolayers (MLs), reproducible syntheses for n {ge} 10 MLs are less understood. Known procedures sometimes result in homogeneous CdS nucleation instead of heterogeneous, epitaxial CdS nucleation on CdSe, leading to broad and multimodal particle size distributions. Critically, obtained core/shell sizes are often below those desired. This article describes synthetic conditions specific to thick-shell growth (n {ge} 10 and n {ge} 20 MLs) on both small (sub2 nm) and large (>4.5 nm) CdSe cores. We find added secondary amine and low concentration of CdSe cores and molecular precursors give desired core/shell sizes. Amine-induced, partial etching of CdSe cores results in apparent shell-thicknesses slightly beyond those desired, especially for very-thick shells (n {ge} 20 MLs). Thermal ripening and fast precursor injection lead to undesired homogeneous CdS nucleation and incomplete shell growth. Core/shells derived from small CdSe (1.9 nm) have longer PL lifetimes and more pronounced blinking at single-particle level compared with those derived from large CdSe (4.7 nm). We expect our new synthetic approach will lead to a larger throughput of these materials, increasing their availability for fundamental studies and applications.

  6. Synthesis of CdSe quantum dots for quantum dot sensitized solar cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Neetu Kapoor, Avinashi; Kumar, Vinod; Mehra, R. M.

    2014-04-24

    CdSe Quantum Dots (QDs) of size 0.85 nm were synthesized using chemical route. ZnO based Quantum Dot Sensitized Solar Cell (QDSSC) was fabricated using CdSe QDs as sensitizer. The Pre-synthesized QDs were found to be successfully adsorbed on front ZnO electrode and had potential to replace organic dyes in Dye Sensitized Solar Cells (DSSCs). The efficiency of QDSSC was obtained to be 2.06 % at AM 1.5.

  7. Supercharging a Superconductor: Understanding the Tc enhancement of FeSe |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Supercharging a Superconductor: Understanding the Tc enhancement of FeSe Wednesday, April 13, 2016 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Rob Moore, SIMES Program Description The recent synthesis of interfaces and heterostructures with atomic precision has revealed numerous new and unexpected phenomena. The order of magnitude enhancement of the superconducting properties of FeSe in the ultrathin 2D limit is an example of such a

  8. Super-Poissonian Statistics of Photon Emission from Single CdSe-CdS

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Core-Shell Nanocrystals Coupled to Metal Nanostructures (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Super-Poissonian Statistics of Photon Emission from Single CdSe-CdS Core-Shell Nanocrystals Coupled to Metal Nanostructures Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Super-Poissonian Statistics of Photon Emission from Single CdSe-CdS Core-Shell Nanocrystals Coupled to Metal Nanostructures Authors: Park, Young-Shin ; Ghosh, Yagnaseni ; Chen, Yongfen ; Piryatinski, Andrei ; Xu, Ping ; Mack, Nathan H. ;

  9. Advanced Precursor Reaction Processing for Cu(InGa)(SeS)2 Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafarman, William N.

    2015-10-12

    This project “Advanced Precursor Reaction Processing for Cu(InGa)(SeS)2 Solar Cells”, completed by the Institute of Energy Conversion (IEC) at the University of Delaware in collaboration with the Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Florida, developed the fundamental understanding and technology to increase module efficiency and improve the manufacturability of Cu(InGa)(SeS)2 films using the precursor reaction approach currently being developed by a number of companies. Key results included: (1) development of a three-step H2Se/Ar/H2S reaction process to control Ga distribution through the film and minimizes back contact MoSe2 formation; (2) Ag-alloying to improve precursor homogeneity by avoiding In phase agglomeration, faster reaction and improved adhesion to allow wider reaction process window; (3) addition of Sb, Bi, and Te interlayers at the Mo/precursor junction to produce more uniform precursor morphology and improve adhesion with reduced void formation in reacted films; (4) a precursor structure containing Se and a reaction process to reduce processing time to 5 minutes and eliminate H2Se usage, thereby increasing throughput and reducing costs. All these results were supported by detailed characterization of the film growth, reaction pathways, thermodynamic assessment and device behavior.

  10. Doping SrTiO3 supported FeSe by excess atoms and oxygen vacancies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shanavas, Kavungal Veedu; Singh, David J.

    2015-07-24

    Photoemission studies of FeSe monolayer films on SrTiO3 substrate have shown electronic structures that deviate from pristine FeSe, consistent with heavy electron doping. With the help of first-principles calculations we studied the effect of excess Fe and Se atoms on the monolayer and oxygen vacancies in the substrate in order to understand the reported Fermi surface in this system. We find that both excess Fe and Se atoms prefer the same adsorption site above the bottom Se atoms on the monolayer. The adsorbed Fe is strongly magnetic and contributes electrons to the monolayer, while excess Se hybridizes with the monolayermore » Fe-d states and partially opens a gap just above the Fermi energy. We also find that the two-dimensional electron gas generated by the oxygen vacancies is partly transferred to the monolayer and can potentially suppress the hole pockets around the Γ point. Furthermore, both O vacancies in the SrTiO3 substrate and excess Fe over the monolayer can provide high levels of electron doping.« less

  11. A comparative transport study of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}/yttrium iron garnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Zilong; Tang, Chi; Shi, Jing; Katmis, Ferhat; Wei, Peng; Moodera, Jagadeesh S.

    2014-06-02

    Bilayers of 20 quintuple layer Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} on 30 nm thick yttrium iron garnet (YIG) have been grown with molecular beam epitaxy in conjunction with pulsed laser deposition. The presence of the ferri-magnetic insulator YIG causes additional scattering to the surface states of the Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} topological insulator layer, as indicated by the temperature dependence of the resistivity. From the two-channel analysis of the Hall data, we find that the surface contribution in the bilayer samples is greatly reduced. Furthermore, the weak antilocalization effect from the surface states is clearly suppressed due to the presence of the YIG layer.

  12. CdSe/ZnSe quantum dot with a single Mn{sup 2+} ionA new system for a single spin manipulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smole?ski, T.

    2015-03-21

    We present a magneto-optical study of individual self-assembled CdSe/ZnSe quantum dots doped with single Mn{sup 2+} ions. Properties of the studied dots are analyzed analogously to more explored system of Mn-doped CdTe/ZnTe dots. Characteristic sixfold splitting of the neutral exciton emission line as well as its evolution in the magnetic field are described using a spin Hamiltonian model. Dynamics of both exciton recombination and Mn{sup 2+} spin relaxation are extracted from a series of time-resolved experiments. Presence of a single dopant is shown not to affect the average excitonic lifetime measured for a number of nonmagnetic and Mn-doped dots. On the other hand, non-resonant pumping is demonstrated to depolarize the Mn{sup 2+} spin in a quantum dot placed in external magnetic field. This effect is utilized to determine the ion spin relaxation time in the dark.

  13. Hidden Superlattice in Tl2(SC6H4S) and Tl2(SeC6H4Se) Solved from Powder X-ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K Stone; D Turner; M Singh; T Vaid; P Stephens

    2011-12-31

    The crystal structures of the isostructural title compounds poly[({mu}-benzene-1,4-dithiolato)dithallium], Tl{sub 2}(SC{sub 6}H{sub 4}S), and poly[({mu}-benzene-1,4-diselenolato)dithallium], Tl{sub 2}(SeC{sub 6}H{sub 4}Se), were solved by simulated annealing from high-resolution synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction. Rietveld refinements of an initial structure with one formula unit per triclinic cell gave satisfactory agreement with the data, but led to a structure with impossibly close non-bonded contacts. A disordered model was proposed to alleviate this problem, but an alternative supercell structure leads to slightly improved agreement with the data. The isostructural superlattice structures were confirmed for both compounds through additional data collection, with substantially better counting statistics, which revealed the presence of very weak superlattice peaks not previously seen. Overall, each structure contains Tl-S or Tl-Se two-dimensional networks, connected by phenylene bridges. The sulfur (or selenium) coordination sphere around each thallium is a highly distorted square pyramid or a 'see-saw' shape, depending upon how many Tl-S or Tl-Se interactions are considered to be bonds. In addition, the two compounds contain pairs of Tl{sup I} ions that interact through a closed-shell 'thallophilic' interaction: in the sulfur compound there are two inequivalent pairs of Tl atoms with Tl-Tl distances of 3.49 and 3.58 {angstrom}, while in the selenium compound those Tl-Tl interactions are at 3.54 and 3.63 {angstrom}.

  14. Non-H{sub 2}Se, ultra-thin CuInSe{sub 2} devices. Annual subcontract report, November 10, 1992--November 9, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delahoy, A.E.; Britt, J.; Faras, F.; Kiss, Z.

    1994-09-01

    This report describes advances made during Phase II (November 10, 1992-November 9, 1993) of a three-phase, cost-shared subcontract whose ultimate goal is the demonstration of thin film CuInSe{sub 2} photovoltaic modules prepared by methods adaptable to safe, high yield, high volume manufacturing. At the end of Phase I, EPV became one of the first groups to clear the 10% efficiency barrier for CIS cells prepared by non-H{sub 2}Se selenization. During Phase II a total area efficiency of 12.5% was achieved for a 1 cm{sup 2} cell. The key achievement of Phase II was the production of square foot CIS modules without the use of H{sub 2}Se. This is seen as a crucial step towards the commercialization of CIS. Using a novel interconnect technology, EPV delivered an 8.0% aperture area efficiency mini-module and a 6.2% aperture area efficiency 720 cm{sub 2} module to NREL. On the processing side, advances were made in precursor formation and the selenization profile, both of which contributed to higher quality CIS. The higher band gap quaternary chalcopyrite material CuIn(S{sub x}, Se{sub 1{minus}X}){sub 2} was prepared and 8% cells were fabricated using this material. Device analysis revealed a correlation between long wavelength quantum efficiency and the CIS Cu/In ratio. Temperature dependent studies highlighted the need for high V{sub OC} devices to minimize the impact of the voltage drop at operating temperature. Numerical modeling of module performance was performed in order to identify the correct ZnO sheet resistance for modules. Efforts in Phase III will focus on increase of module efficiency to 9-10%, initiation of an outdoor testing program, preparation of completely uniform CIS plates using second generation selenization equipment, and exploration of alternative precursors for CIS formation.

  15. Persistent photoconductivity in two-dimensional Mo1-xW xSe2–MoSe2 van der Waals heterojunctions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Puretzky, Alexander A.; Basile, Leonardo; Idrobo, Juan Carlos; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Geohegan, David B.; Xiao, Kai; Li, Xufan; Lin, Ming -Wei; Wang, Kei

    2016-02-16

    Van der Waals (vdW) heterojunctions consisting of vertically-stacked individual or multiple layers of two-dimensional (2D) layered semiconductors, especially the transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), are fascinating new artificial solids just nanometers-thin that promise novel optoelectronic functionalities due to the sensitivity of their electronic and optical properties to strong quantum confinement and interfacial interactions. Here, monolayers of n-type MoSe2 and p-type Mo1-xW xSe2–MoSe2 are grown by vapor transport methods, then transferred and stamped to form artificial vdW heterostructures with different interlayer orientations. Atomic-resolution Z-contrast electron microscopy and electron diffraction are used to characterize both the individual monolayers and the atomic registry betweenmore » layers in the bilayer vdW heterostructures. These measurements are compared with photoluminescence and low-frequency Raman spectroscopy, which indicates strong interlayer coupling in heterostructures. Remarkably, the heterojunctions exhibit an unprecedented photoconductivity effect that persists at room temperature for several days. This persistent photoconductivity is shown to be tunable by applying a gate bias that equilibrates the charge distribution. Furthermore, these measurements indicate that such ultrathin vdW heterojunctions can function as rewritable optoelectronic switches or memory elements under time-dependent photo-illumination, an effect which appears promising for new monolayer TMDs-based optoelectronic devices applications.« less

  16. Low power zinc-oxide based charge trapping memory with embedded silicon nanoparticles via poole-frenkel hole emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Atab, Nazek; Nayfeh, Ammar; Ozcan, Ayse; Alkis, Sabri; Okyay, Ali K.; Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara

    2014-01-06

    A low power zinc-oxide (ZnO) charge trapping memory with embedded silicon (Si) nanoparticles is demonstrated. The charge trapping layer is formed by spin coating 2?nm silicon nanoparticles between Atomic Layer Deposited ZnO steps. The threshold voltage shift (?V{sub t}) vs. programming voltage is studied with and without the silicon nanoparticles. Applying ?1?V for 5?s at the gate of the memory with nanoparticles results in a ?V{sub t} of 3.4?V, and the memory window can be up to 8?V with an excellent retention characteristic (>10 yr). Without nanoparticles, at ?1?V programming voltage, the ?V{sub t} is negligible. In order to get ?V{sub t} of 3.4?V without nanoparticles, programming voltage in excess of 10?V is required. The negative voltage on the gate programs the memory indicating that holes are being trapped in the charge trapping layer. In addition, at 1?V the electric field across the 3.6?nm tunnel oxide is calculated to be 0.36 MV/cm, which is too small for significant tunneling. Moreover, the ?V{sub t} vs. electric field across the tunnel oxide shows square root dependence at low fields (E??2.7 MV/cm). This indicates that Poole-Frenkel Effect is the main mechanism for holes emission at low fields and Phonon Assisted Tunneling at higher fields.

  17. Mining secreted proteins that function in pepper fruit development and ripening using a yeast secretion trap (YST)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Je Min; Lee, Sang-Jik; Rose, Jocelyn K.C.; Yeam, Inhwa; Kim, Byung-Dong

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: Yeast secretion trap (YST) is a valuable tool for mining secretome. A total of 80 secreted proteins are newly identified via YST in pepper fruits. The secreted proteins are differentially regulated during pepper development and ripening. Transient GFP-fusion assay and in planta secretion trap can effectively validate the secretion of proteins. - Abstract: Plant cells secrete diverse sets of constitutively- and conditionally-expressed proteins under various environmental and developmental states. Secreted protein populations, or secretomes have multiple functions, including defense responses, signaling, metabolic processes, and developmental regulation. To identify genes encoding secreted proteins that function in fruit development and ripening, a yeast secretion trap (YST) screen was employed using pepper (Capsicum annuum) fruit cDNAs. The YST screen revealed 80 pepper fruit-related genes (CaPFRs) encoding secreted proteins including cell wall proteins, several of which have not been previously described. Transient GFP-fusion assay and an in planta secretion trap were used to validate the secretion of proteins encoded by selected YST clones. In addition, RNA gel blot analyses provided further insights into their expression and regulation during fruit development and ripening. Integrating our data, we conclude that the YST provides a valuable functional genomics tool for the identification of substantial numbers of novel secreted plant proteins that are associated with biological processes, including fruit development and ripening.

  18. Enumeration of Juvenile Salmonids in the Okanogan Basin Using Rotary Screw Traps, Performance Period: March 15, 2006 - July 15, 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Peter N.; Rayton, Michael D.

    2007-05-01

    The Colville Tribes identified the need for collecting baseline census data on the timing and abundance of juvenile salmonids in the Okanogan River basin for the purpose of documenting local fish populations, augmenting existing fishery data and assessing natural production trends of salmonids. This report documents and assesses the pilot year of rotary trap capture of salmonid smolts on the Okanogan River. The project is a component of the Colville Tribes Okanogan Basin Monitoring and Evaluation Program (OBMEP) which began in 2004. Trapping for outmigrating fish began on 14 March 2006 and continued through 11 July 2006. Anadromous forms of Oncorhynchus, including summer steelhead (O. mykiss), Chinook (O. tshawytscha), and sockeye (O. nerka), were targeted for this study; all have verified, natural production in the Okanogan basin. Both 8-ft and 5-ft rotary screw traps were deployed on the Okanogan River from the Highway 20 Bridge and typically fished during evening hours or 24 hours per day, depending upon trap position and discharge conditions. Juvenile Chinook salmon were the most abundant species trapped in 2006 (10,682 fry and 2,024 smolts), followed by sockeye (205 parr and 3,291 smolts) and steelhead (1 fry and 333 smolts). Of the trapped Chinook, all fry were wild origin and all but five of the smolts were hatchery-reared. All trapped sockeye were wild origin and 88% of the steelhead smolts were hatchery-reared. Mark-recapture experiments were conducted using Chinook fry and hatchery-reared steelhead smolts (sockeye were not used in 2006 because the peak of the juvenile migration occurred prior to the onset of the mark-recapture experiments). A total of 930 chinook fry were marked and released across eight separate release dates (numbers of marked Chinook fry released per day ranged from 34 to 290 fish). A total of 11 chinook fry were recaptured for an overall trap efficiency of 1.18%. A total of 710 hatchery-reared steelhead were marked and released across three separate release dates (numbers of steelhead released per day ranged from 100 to 500 fish). A total of 12 steelhead were recaptured for an overall trap efficiency of 1.69%. A pooled Peterson estimator with a Chapman modification was used to produce population estimates for wild Chinook fry and hatchery-reared steelhead based on the results of the mark-recapture experiments. The 2006 populations for Chinook and steelhead were estimated to be 381,554 (95% confidence intervals: 175,731-587,377) and 14,164 (6,999-21,330), respectively. The population estimates were based on the periods in which mark-recapture experiments were initialized through the end of the trapping season (10 May for steelhead and 1 June for Chinook).

  19. Recrystallization method to selenization of thin-film Cu(In,Ga)Se.sub.2 for semiconductor device applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Albin, David S.; Carapella, Jeffrey J.; Tuttle, John R.; Contreras, Miguel A.; Gabor, Andrew M.; Noufi, Rommel; Tennant, Andrew L.

    1995-07-25

    A process for fabricating slightly Cu-poor thin-films of Cu(In,Ga)Se.sub.2 on a substrate for semiconductor device applications includes the steps of forming initially a slightly Cu-rich, phase separated, mixture of Cu(In,Ga)Se.sub.2 :Cu.sub.x Se on the substrate in solid form followed by exposure of the Cu(In,Ga)Se.sub.2 :Cu.sub.x Se solid mixture to an overpressure of Se vapor and (In,Ga) vapor for deposition on the Cu(In,Ga)Se.sub.2 :Cu.sub.x Se solid mixture while simultaneously increasing the temperature of the solid mixture toward a recrystallization temperature (about 550.degree. C.) at which Cu(In,Ga)Se.sub.2 is solid and Cu.sub.x Se is liquid. The (In,Ga) flux is terminated while the Se overpressure flux and the recrystallization temperature are maintained to recrystallize the Cu.sub.x Se with the (In, Ga) that was deposited during the temperature transition and with the Se vapor to form the thin-film of slightly Cu-poor Cu.sub.x (In,Ga).sub.y Se.sub.z. The initial Cu-rich, phase separated large grain mixture of Cu(In,Ga)Se.sub.2 :Cu.sub.x Se can be made by sequentially depositing or co-depositing the metal precursors, Cu and (In, Ga), on the substrate at room temperature, ramping up the thin-film temperature in the presence of Se overpressure to a moderate anneal temperature (about 450.degree. C.) and holding that temperature and the Se overpressure for an annealing period. A nonselenizing, low temperature anneal at about 100.degree. C. can also be used to homogenize the precursors on the substrates before the selenizing, moderate temperature anneal.

  20. Novel Approaches to Wide Bandgap CuInSe2 Based Absorbers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William N. Shafarman

    2011-04-28

    This project targeted the development of high performance wide bandgap solar cells based on thin film alloys of CuInSe2 to relax constraints on module design and enable tandem solar cell structures. This addressed goals of the Solar Energy Technologies Program for Next Generation PV to develop technology needed for higher thin film module efficiency as a means to reduce costs. Specific objectives of the research project were: 1) to develop the processes and materials required to improve the performance of wide bandgap thin film solar cells based on alloys of CuInSe2, and 2) to provide the fundamental science and engineering basis for the material, electronic, and device properties required to effectively apply these processes and materials to commercial manufacture. CuInSe2-based photovoltaics have established the highest efficiencies of the thin film materials at both the cell and module scales and are actively being scaled up to commercialization. In the highest efficiency cells and modules, the optical bandgap, a function of the CuInSe2-based alloy composition, is relatively low compared to the optimum match to the solar spectrum. Wider bandgap alloys of CuInSe2 produce higher cell voltages which can improve module performance and enable the development of tandem solar cells to boost the overall efficiency. A focus for the project was alloying with silver to form (AgCu)(InGa)Se2 pentenary thin films deposited by elemental co-evaporation which gives the broadest range of control of composition and material properties. This alloy has a lower melting temperature than Ag-free, Cu-based chalcopyrite compounds, which may enable films to be formed with lower defect densities and the (AgCu)(InGa)Se2 films give improved material properties and better device performance with increasing bandgap. A comprehensive characterization of optical, structural, and electronic properties of (AgCu)(InGa)Se2 was completed over the complete compositional range 0 ≤ Ga/(In+Ga) ≤ 1 and 0 ≤ Ag/(Ag+Cu) ≤ 1. Evidence of improved material quality includes reduced sub-bandgap optical absorption, sharper bandtails, and increased grain size with Ag addition. The Ag alloying was shown to increase the range of bandgaps over which solar cells can be fabricated without any drop-off in performance. With bandgap greater than 1.6 eV, in the range needed for tandem solar cells, (AgCu)(InGa)Se2 gave higher efficiency than other CuInSe2-based alloys. Using a simple single-stage co-evaporation process, a solar cell with 17.6% efficiency using a film with bandgap = 1.3 eV was achieved, demonstrating the viability of (AgCu)(InGa)Se2 for high efficiency devices. With a three-stage co-evaporation process for (AgCu)(InGa)Se2 deposition a device with efficiency = 13.0 % and VOC = 890 mV with JSC = 20.5 mA/cm2, FF = 71.3% was achieved. This surpasses the performance of other wide bandgap CuInSe2-based solar cells. Detailed characterization of the electronic properties of the materials and devices including the application of advanced admittance-based easements was completed.

  1. Superconductivity in strong spin orbital coupling compound Sb2Se3

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kong, P. P.; Sun, F.; Xing, L. Y.; Zhu, J.; Zhang, S. J.; Li, W. M.; Liu, Q. Q.; Wang, X. C.; Feng, S. M.; Yu, X. H.; et al

    2014-10-20

    Recently, A2B3 type strong spin orbital coupling compounds such as Bi2Te3, Bi2Se3 and Sb2Te3 were theoretically predicated to be topological insulators and demonstrated through experimental efforts. The counterpart compound Sb2Se3 on the other hand was found to be topological trivial, but theoretical studies indicated that the pressure might induce Sb2Se3 into a topological nontrivial state. We report on the discovery of superconductivity in Sb2Se3 single crystal induced via pressure. Our experiments indicated that Sb2Se3 became superconductive at high pressures above 10 GPa proceeded by a pressure induced insulator to metal like transition at ~3 GPa which should be related tomore » the topological quantum transition. The superconducting transition temperature (TC) increased to around 8.0 K with pressure up to 40 GPa while it keeps ambient structure. As a result, high pressure Raman revealed that new modes appeared around 10 GPa and 20 GPa, respectively, which correspond to occurrence of superconductivity and to the change of TC slop as the function of high pressure in conjunction with the evolutions of structural parameters at high pressures.« less

  2. Electronic structure, irreversibility line and magnetoresistance of Cu0.3Bi2Se3 superconductor

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hemian, Yi; Gu, Genda; Chen, Chao -Yu; Sun, Xuan; Xie, Zhuo -Jin; Feng, Ya; Liang, Ai -Ji; Peng, Ying -Ying; He, Shao -Long; Zhao, Lin; et al

    2015-06-01

    CuxBi2Se3 is a superconductor that is a potential candidate for topological superconductors. We report our laser-based angle-resolved photoemission measurement on the electronic structure of the CuxBi2Se3 superconductor, and a detailed magneto-resistance measurement in both normal and superconducting states. We find that the topological surface state of the pristine Bi2Se3 topological insulator remains robust after the Cu-intercalation, while the Dirac cone location moves downward due to electron doping. Detailed measurements on the magnetic field-dependence of the resistance in the superconducting state establishes an irreversibility line and gives a value of the upper critical field at zero temperature of ~4000 Oe formore » the Cu0.3Bi2Se3 superconductor with a middle point Tc of 1.9K. The relation between the upper critical field Hc2 and temperature T is different from the usual scaling relation found in cuprates and in other kinds of superconductors. Small positive magneto-resistance is observed in Cu0.3Bi2Se3 superconductors up to room temperature. As a result, these observations provide useful information for further study of this possible candidate for topological superconductors.« less

  3. In-situ surface composition measurements of CuGaSe{sub 2} thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fons, P.; Yamada, A.; Niki, S.; Oyanagi, H.

    1998-12-31

    Two CuGaSe{sub 2} films were grown by molecular beam epitaxy onto GaAs (001) substrates with varying Cu/Ga flux ratios under Se overpressure conditions. Growth was interrupted at predetermined times and the surface composition was measured using Auger electron spectroscopy after which growth was continued. After growth, the film composition was analyzed using voltage dependent electron microprobe spectroscopy. Film structure and morphology were also analyzed using x-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy. The film with a Cu/Ga ratio larger than unity showed evidence of surface segregation of a second Cu-rich phase with a Cu/Se composition ratio slightly greater than unity. A second CuGaSe{sub 2} film with a Cu/Ga ratio of less than unity showed no change in surface composition with time and was also consistent with bulk composition measurements. Diffraction measurements indicated a high concentration of twins as well as the presence of domains with mixed c and a axes in the Ga-rich film. The Cu-rich films by contrast were single domain and had a narrower mosaics. High sensitivity scans along the [001] reciprocal axis did not exhibit any new peaks not attributable to either the substrate or the CuGaSe{sub 2} thin film.

  4. Method of fabricating high-efficiency Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S){sub 2} thin films for solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Noufi, R.; Gabor, A.M.; Tuttle, J.R.; Tennant, A.L.; Contreras, M.A.; Albin, D.S.; Carapella, J.J.

    1995-08-15

    A process for producing a slightly Cu-poor thin film of Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S){sub 2} comprises depositing a first layer of (In,Ga){sub x} (Se,S){sub y} followed by depositing just enough Cu+(Se,S) or Cu{sub x} (Se,S) to produce the desired slightly Cu-poor material. In a variation, most, but not all, (about 90 to 99%) of the (In,Ga){sub x} (Se,S){sub y} is deposited first, followed by deposition of all the Cu+(Se,S) or Cu{sub x} (Se,S) to go near stoichiometric, possibly or even preferably slightly Cu-rich, and then in turn followed by deposition of the remainder (about 1 to 10%) of the (In,Ga){sub x} (Se,S){sub y} to end with a slightly Cu-poor composition. In yet another variation, a small portion (about 1 to 10%) of the (In,Ga){sub x} (Se,S){sub y} is first deposited as a seed layer, followed by deposition of all of the Cu+(Se,S) or Cu{sub x} (Se,S) to make a very Cu-rich mixture, and then followed deposition of the remainder of the (In,Ga){sub x} (Se,S){sub y} to go slightly Cu-poor in the final Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S){sub 2} thin film. 5 figs.

  5. Method of fabricating high-efficiency Cu(In,Ga)(SeS).sub.2 thin films for solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Noufi, Rommel; Gabor, Andrew M.; Tuttle, John R.; Tennant, Andrew L.; Contreras, Miguel A.; Albin, David S.; Carapella, Jeffrey J.

    1995-01-01

    A process for producing a slightly Cu-poor thin film of Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S).sub.2 comprises depositing a first layer of (In,Ga).sub.x (Se,S).sub.y followed by depositing just enough Cu+(Se,S) or Cu.sub.x (Se,S) to produce the desired slightly Cu-poor material. In a variation, most, but not all, (about 90 to 99%) of the (In,Ga).sub.x (Se,S).sub.y is deposited first, followed by deposition of all the Cu+(Se,S) or Cu.sub.x (Se,S) to go near stoichiometric, possibly or even preferably slightly Cu-rich, and then in turn followed by deposition of the remainder (about 1 to 10%) of the (In,Ga).sub.x (Se,S).sub.y to end with a slightly Cu-poor composition. In yet another variation, a small portion (about 1 to 10%) of the (In,Ga).sub.x (Se,S).sub.y is first deposited as a seed layer, followed by deposition of all of the Cu+(Se,S) or Cu.sub.x (Se,S) to make a very Cu-rich mixture, and then followed deposition of the remainder of the (In,Ga).sub.x (Se,S).sub.y to go slightly Cu-poor in the final Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S).sub.2 thin film.

  6. Charge-transfer dynamics in multilayered PbS and PbSe quantum dot architectures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, F.; Ma, X.; Haughn, C. R.; Doty, M. F.; Cloutier, S. G.

    2014-02-03

    We demonstrate control of the charge transfer process in PbS and PbSe quantum dot assemblies. We first demonstrate efficient charge transfer from donor quantum dots to acceptor quantum dots in a multi-layer PbSe cascade structure. Then, we assemble type-I and type-II heterostructures using both PbS and PbSe quantum dots via careful control of the band alignment. In type-I structures, photo-generated carriers are transferred and localized in the smaller bandgap (acceptor) quantum dots, resulting in a significant luminescence enhancement. In contrast, a significant luminescence quenching and shorter emission lifetime confirms an efficient separation of photo-generated carriers in the type-II architecture.

  7. Luminescence of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots infiltrated into an opal matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruzintsev, A. N. Emelchenko, G. A.; Masalov, V. M.; Yakimov, E. E.; Barthou, C.; Maitre, A.

    2009-02-15

    The effect of the photonic band gap in the photonic crystal, the synthesized SiO{sub 2} opal with embedded CdSe/ZnS quantum dots, on its luminescence in the visible spectral region is studied. It is shown that the position of the photonic band gap in the luminescence and reflectance spectra for the infiltrated opal depends on the diameter of the constituent nanospheres and on the angle of recording the signal. The optimal conditions for embedding the CdSe/ZnS quantum dots from the solution into the opal matrix are determined. It is found that, for the opal-CdSe/ZnS nanocomposites, the emission intensity decreases and the luminescence decay time increases in the spatial directions, in which the spectral positions of the photonic band gap and the luminescence peak of the quantum dots coincide.

  8. Role of polycrystallinity in CdTe and CuInSe sub 2 photovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sites, J.R. )

    1991-01-01

    The polycrystalline nature of thin-film CdTe and CuInSe{sub 2} solar cells continues to be a major factor in several individual losses that limit overall cell efficiency. This report describes progress in the quantitative separation of these losses, including both measurement and analysis procedures. It also applies these techniques to several individual cells to help document the overall progress with CdTe and CuInSe{sub 2} cells. Notably, CdTe cells from Photon Energy have reduced window photocurrent losses to 1 mA/Cm{sup 2}; those from the University of South Florida have achieved a maximum power voltage of 693 mV; and CuInSe{sub 2} cells from International Solar Electric Technology have shown a hole density as high as 7 {times} 10{sup 16} cm{sup {minus}3}, implying a significant reduction in compensation. 9 refs.

  9. A Novel and Functional Single Layer Sheet of ZnSe

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhou, Jia; Sumpter, Bobby G; Kent, Paul R; Huang, Jingsong

    2015-01-01

    In this Communication, we report a novel singlelayer sheet of ZnSe, with a three-atomic thickness, which demonstrates a strong quantum confinement effect by exhibiting a large blue shift of 2.0 eV in its absorption edge relative to the zinc blende (ZB) bulk phase. Theoretical optical absorbance shows that the largest absorption of this ultrathin single-layer sheet of ZnSe occurs at a wavelength similar to its four-atom-thick doublelayer counterpart but with higher photoabsorption efficiency, suggesting a superior behavior on incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency for solar water splitting, among other potential applications. The results presented herein for ZnSe may be generalized tomore » other group II-VI analogues.« less

  10. Two-step growth of two-dimensional WSe2/MoSe2 heterostructures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gong, Yongji; Lei, Sidong; Lou, Jun; Liu, Zheng; Vajtai, Robert; Zhou, Wu; Ajayan, Pullikel M.

    2015-08-03

    Two dimensional (2D) materials have attracted great attention due to their unique properties and atomic thickness. Although various 2D materials have been successfully synthesized with different optical and electrical properties, a strategy for fabricating 2D heterostructures must be developed in order to construct more complicated devices for practical applications. Here we demonstrate for the first time a two-step chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method for growing transition-metal dichalcogenide (TMD) heterostructures, where MoSe2 was synthesized first and followed by an epitaxial growth of WSe2 on the edge and on the top surface of MoSe2. Compared to previously reported one-step growth methods, thismore » two-step growth has the capability of spatial and size control of each 2D component, leading to much larger (up to 169 μm) heterostructure size, and cross-contamination can be effectively minimized. Furthermore, this two-step growth produces well-defined 2H and 3R stacking in the WSe2/MoSe2 bilayer regions and much sharper in-plane interfaces than the previously reported MoSe2/WSe2 heterojunctions obtained from one-step growth methods. The resultant heterostructures with WSe2/MoSe2 bilayer and the exposed MoSe2 monolayer display rectification characteristics of a p-n junction, as revealed by optoelectronic tests, and an internal quantum efficiency of 91% when functioning as a photodetector. As a result, a photovoltaic effect without any external gates was observed, showing incident photon to converted electron (IPCE) efficiencies of approximately 0.12%, providing application potential in electronics and energy harvesting.« less

  11. Direct Observation of Energy-Gap Scaling Law in CdSe Quantum Dots with Positrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denison, Arthur Blanchard; Weber, M. H.; Lynn, K. G.; Barbiellini, B.; Sterne, P. A.

    2002-07-01

    CdSe quantum dot samples with sizes in the range of 1.8~6 nm in diameter were examined by positron annihilation spectroscopy. The results were compared to data obtained for single-crystal bulk CdSe. Evidence is provided that the positrons annihilate within the nanospheres. The annihilation line shape shows a smearing at the boundary of the Jones zone proportional to the widening of the band gap due to a reduction in the size of the quantum dots. The data confirm that the change in the band gap is inversely proportional to the square of the quantum dot diameter.

  12. Tuning thermoelectricity in a Bi2Se3 topological insulator via varied film thickness

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Guo, Minghua; Wang, Zhenyu; Xu, Yong; Huang, Huaqing; Zang, Yunyi; Liu, Chang; Duan, Wenhui; Gan, Zhongxue; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; He, Ke; et al

    2016-01-12

    We report thermoelectric transport studies on Bi2Se3 topological insulator thin films with varied thickness grown by molecular beam epitaxy. We find that the Seebeck coefficient and thermoelectric power factor decrease systematically with the reduction of film thickness. These experimental observations can be explained quantitatively by theoretical calculations based on realistic electronic band structure of the Bi2Se3 thin films. Lastly, this work illustrates the crucial role played by the topological surface states on the thermoelectric transport of topological insulators, and sheds new light on further improvement of their thermoelectric performance.

  13. Thickness-dependent coherent phonon frequency in ultrathin FeSe/SrTiO3

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    films (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Thickness-dependent coherent phonon frequency in ultrathin FeSe/SrTiO3 films Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Thickness-dependent coherent phonon frequency in ultrathin FeSe/SrTiO3 films × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information

  14. Ordering mechanism of stacked CdSe/ZnS{sub x}Se{sub 1-x} quantum dots: A combined reciprocal-space and real-space approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, Th.; Roventa, E.; Clausen, T.; Flege, J. I.; Alexe, G.; Rosenauer, A.; Hommel, D.; Falta, J.; Bernstorff, S.; Kuebel, C.

    2005-11-15

    The vertical and lateral ordering of stacked CdSe quantum dot layers embedded in ZnS{sub x}Se{sub 1-x} has been investigated by means of grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Different growth parameters have been varied in order to elucidate the mechanisms leading to quantum dot correlation. From the results obtained for different numbers of quantum dot layers, we conclude on a self-organized process which leads to increasing ordering for progressive stacking. The dependence on the spacer layer thickness indicates that strain induced by lattice mismatch drives the ordering process, which starts to break down for too thick spacer layers in a thickness range from 45 to 80 A. Typical quantum dot distances in a range from about 110 to 160 A have been found. A pronounced anisotropy of the quantum dot correlation has been observed, with the strongest ordering along the [110] direction. Since an increased ordering is found with increasing growth temperature, the formation of stacking faults as an additional mechanism for quantum dot alignment can be ruled out.

  15. Characterization of Cs vapor cell coated with octadecyltrichlorosilane using coherent population trapping spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hafiz, Moustafa Abdel; Maurice, Vincent; Chutani, Ravinder; Passilly, Nicolas; Gorecki, Christophe; Boudot, Rodolphe; Guérandel, Stéphane; Clercq, Emeric de

    2015-05-14

    We report the realization and characterization using coherent population trapping (CPT) spectroscopy of an octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS)-coated centimeter-scale Cs vapor cell. The dual-structure of the resonance lineshape, with presence of a narrow structure line at the top of a Doppler-broadened structure, is clearly observed. The linewidth of the narrow resonance is compared to the linewidth of an evacuated Cs cell and of a buffer gas Cs cell of similar size. The Cs-OTS adsorption energy is measured to be (0.42 ± 0.03) eV, leading to a clock frequency shift rate of 2.7 × 10{sup −9}/K in fractional unit. A hyperfine population lifetime, T{sub 1}, and a microwave coherence lifetime, T{sub 2}, of 1.6 and 0.5 ms are reported, corresponding to about 37 and 12 useful bounces, respectively. Atomic-motion induced Ramsey narrowing of dark resonances is observed in Cs-OTS cells by reducing the optical beam diameter. Ramsey CPT fringes are detected using a pulsed CPT interrogation scheme. Potential applications of the Cs-OTS cell to the development of a vapor cell atomic clock are discussed.

  16. Coherent population trapping resonances at lower atomic levels of Doppler broadened optical lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ?ahin, E; Hamid, R; elik, M; zen, G; Izmailov, A Ch

    2014-11-30

    We have detected and analysed narrow high-contrast coherent population trapping (CPT) resonances, which are induced in absorption of a weak monochromatic probe light beam by counterpropagating two-frequency pump radiation in a cell with rarefied caesium vapour. The experimental investigations have been performed by the example of nonclosed three level ?-systems formed by spectral components of the D{sub 2} line of caesium atoms. The applied method allows one to analyse features of the CPT phenomenon directly at a given low long-lived level of the selected ?-system even in sufficiently complicated spectra of atomic gases with large Doppler broadening. We have established that CPT resonances in transmission of the probe beam exhibit not only a higher contrast but also a much lesser width in comparison with well- known CPT resonances in transmission of the corresponding two-frequency pump radiation. The results obtained can be used in selective photophysics, photochemistry and ultra-high resolution atomic (molecular) spectroscopy. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  17. Synergies of PCCI-Type Combustion and Lean NOx Trap Catalysis for Diesel Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parks, II, James E; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y; Kass, Michael D; Huff, Shean P

    2008-01-01

    It is widely recognized that future NOx and PM emission targets for diesel engines cannot be met solely via advanced combustion over the full engine drive cycle. Therefore some combination of advanced combustion methodology with an aftertreatment technology will be required. In this study, NOx reduction, fuel efficiency, and regeneration performance of lean NOx trap (LNT) were evaluated for four operating conditions. The combustion approaches included baseline engine operation with and without EGR, two exhaust enrichment methods (post injection and delayed injection), and one advanced combustion mode to enable high efficiency clean combustion (HECC). A 1.7 liter 4-cylinder diesel engine was operated under five conditions, which represent key interest points for light-duty diesel operation. At the low load setting the exhaust temperature was too low to enable LNT regeneration and oxidation; however, HECC (low NOx) was achievable. HECC was also reached under more moderate loads and the exhaust temperatures were high enough to enable even further NOx reductions by the LNT. At high loads HECC becomes difficult but the LNT performance improves and acceptable regeneration can be met with enrichment methodologies.

  18. Charge trapping of Ge-nanocrystals embedded in TaZrO{sub x} dielectric films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehninger, D. Seidel, P.; Geyer, M.; Schneider, F.; Heitmann, J.; Klemm, V.; Rafaja, D.; Borany, J. von

    2015-01-12

    Ge-nanocrystals (NCs) were synthesized in amorphous TaZrO{sub x} by thermal annealing of co-sputtered Ge-TaZrO{sub x} layers. Formation of spherical shaped Ge-NCs with small variation of size, areal density, and depth distribution was confirmed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The charge storage characteristics of the Ge-NCs were investigated by capacitance-voltage and constant-capacity measurements using metal-insulator-semiconductor structures. Samples with Ge-NCs exhibit a maximum memory window of 5 V by sweeping the bias voltage from −7 V to 7 V and back. Below this maximum, the width of the memory window can be controlled by the bias voltage. The fitted slope of the memory window versus bias voltage characteristics is very close to 1 for samples with one layer Ge-NCs. A second layer Ge-NCs does not result in a second flat stair in the memory window characteristics. Constant-capacity measurements indicate charge storage in trapping centers at the interfaces between the Ge-NCs and the surrounding materials (amorphous matrix/tunneling oxide). Charge loss occurs by thermal detrapping and subsequent band-to-band tunneling. Reference samples without Ge-NCs do not show any memory window.

  19. Gallium hole traps in irradiated KTiOPO{sub 4}:Ga crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grachev, V.; Meyer, M.; Malovichko, G.; Hunt, A. W.

    2014-12-07

    Nominally pure and gallium doped single crystals of potassium titanyl phosphate (KTiOPO{sub 4}) have been studied by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance at low temperatures before and after irradiation. Irradiation with 20?MeV electrons performed at room temperature and liquid nitrogen temperature caused an appearance of electrons and holes. Gallium impurities act as hole traps in KTiOPO{sub 4} creating Ga{sup 4+} centers. Two different Ga{sup 4+} centers were observed, Ga1 and Ga2. The Ga1 centers are dominant in Ga-doped samples. For the Ga1 center, a superhyperfine structure with one nucleus with nuclear spin was registered and attributed to the interaction of gallium electrons with a phosphorus nucleus or proton in its surrounding. In both Ga1 and Ga2 centers, Ga{sup 4+} ions substitute for Ti{sup 4+} ions, but with a preference to one of two electrically distinct crystallographic positions (site selective substitution). The Ga doping eliminates one of the shortcomings of KTP crystalsionic conductivity of bulk crystals. However, this does not improve significantly the resistance of the crystals to electron and ?-radiation.

  20. Magnetic field mapping of the UCNTau magneto-gravitational trap: design study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Libersky, Matthew Murray

    2014-09-04

    The beta decay lifetime of the free neutron is an important input to the Standard Model of particle physics, but values measured using different methods have exhibited substantial disagreement. The UCN r experiment in development at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) plans to explore better methods of measuring the neutron lifetime using ultracold neutrons (UCNs). In this experiment, UCNs are confined in a magneto-gravitational trap formed by a curved, asymmetric Halbach array placed inside a vacuum vessel and surrounded by holding field coils. If any defects present in the Halbach array are sufficient to reduce the local field near the surface below that needed to repel the desired energy level UCNs, loss by material interaction can occur at a rate similar to the loss by beta decay. A map of the magnetic field near the surface of the array is necessary to identify any such defects, but the array's curved geometry and placement in a vacuum vessel make conventional field mapping methods difficult. A system consisting of computer vision-based tracking and a rover holding a Hall probe has been designed to map the field near the surface of the array, and construction of an initial prototype has begun at LANL. The design of the system and initial results will be described here.

  1. Capture and X-ray diffraction studies of protein microcrystals in a microfluidic trap array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Murray, Thomas D.; Koehl, Antoine; Araci, Ismail Emre; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Zeldin, Oliver B.; Cohen, Aina E.; Soltis, S. Michael; Baxter, Elizabeth L.; Brewster, Aaron S.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Brunger, Axel T.; Berger, James M.

    2015-03-27

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) promise to enable the collection of interpretable diffraction data from samples that are refractory to data collection at synchrotron sources. At present, however, more efficient sample-delivery methods that minimize the consumption of microcrystalline material are needed to allow the application of XFEL sources to a wide range of challenging structural targets of biological importance. Here, a microfluidic chip is presented in which microcrystals can be captured at fixed, addressable points in a trap array from a small volume (<10 µl) of a pre-existing slurry grown off-chip. The device can be mounted on a standard goniostat for conducting diffraction experiments at room temperature without the need for flash-cooling. Proof-of-principle tests with a model system (hen egg-white lysozyme) demonstrated the high efficiency of the microfluidic approach for crystal harvesting, permitting the collection of sufficient data from only 265 single-crystal still images to permit determination and refinement of the structure of the protein. This work shows that microfluidic capture devices can be readily used to facilitate data collection from protein microcrystals grown in traditional laboratory formats, enabling analysis when cryopreservation is problematic or when only small numbers of crystals are available. Such microfluidic capture devices may also be useful for data collection at synchrotron sources.

  2. Simulation of lean NOx trap performance with microkinetic chemistry and without mass transfer.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, Rich; Daw, C. Stuart; Pihl, Josh A.; Chakravarthy, V. Kalyana

    2011-08-01

    A microkinetic chemical reaction mechanism capable of describing both the storage and regeneration processes in a fully formulated lean NO{sub x} trap (LNT) is presented. The mechanism includes steps occurring on the precious metal, barium oxide (NO{sub x} storage), and cerium oxide (oxygen storage) sites of the catalyst. The complete reaction set is used in conjunction with a transient plug flow reactor code to simulate not only conventional storage/regeneration cycles with a CO/H{sub 2} reductant, but also steady flow temperature sweep experiments that were previously analyzed with just a precious metal mechanism and a steady state code. The results show that NO{sub x} storage is not negligible during some of the temperature ramps, necessitating a re-evaluation of the precious metal kinetic parameters. The parameters for the entire mechanism are inferred by finding the best overall fit to the complete set of experiments. Rigorous thermodynamic consistency is enforced for parallel reaction pathways and with respect to known data for all of the gas phase species involved. It is found that, with a few minor exceptions, all of the basic experimental observations can be reproduced with these purely kinetic simulations, i.e., without including mass-transfer limitations. In addition to accounting for normal cycling behavior, the final mechanism should provide a starting point for the description of further LNT phenomena such as desulfation and the role of alternative reductants.

  3. Capture and X-ray diffraction studies of protein microcrystals in a microfluidic trap array

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Murray, Thomas D.; Koehl, Antoine; Araci, Ismail Emre; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Zeldin, Oliver B.; Cohen, Aina E.; Soltis, S. Michael; Baxter, Elizabeth L.; Brewster, Aaron S.; et al

    2015-03-27

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) promise to enable the collection of interpretable diffraction data from samples that are refractory to data collection at synchrotron sources. At present, however, more efficient sample-delivery methods that minimize the consumption of microcrystalline material are needed to allow the application of XFEL sources to a wide range of challenging structural targets of biological importance. Here, a microfluidic chip is presented in which microcrystals can be captured at fixed, addressable points in a trap array from a small volume (<10 µl) of a pre-existing slurry grown off-chip. The device can be mounted on a standard goniostat formore » conducting diffraction experiments at room temperature without the need for flash-cooling. Proof-of-principle tests with a model system (hen egg-white lysozyme) demonstrated the high efficiency of the microfluidic approach for crystal harvesting, permitting the collection of sufficient data from only 265 single-crystal still images to permit determination and refinement of the structure of the protein. This work shows that microfluidic capture devices can be readily used to facilitate data collection from protein microcrystals grown in traditional laboratory formats, enabling analysis when cryopreservation is problematic or when only small numbers of crystals are available. Such microfluidic capture devices may also be useful for data collection at synchrotron sources.« less

  4. DROPOUTS IN SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLES: ASSOCIATED WITH LOCAL TRAPPING BOUNDARIES OR CURRENT SHEETS?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seripienlert, A.; Ruffolo, D.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Chuychai, P. E-mail: scdjr@mahidol.ac.t E-mail: piyanate@gmail.co

    2010-03-10

    In recent observations by the Advanced Composition Explorer, the intensity of solar energetic particles exhibits sudden, large changes known as dropouts. These have been explained in terms of turbulence or a flux tube structure in the solar wind. Dropouts are believed to indicate filamentary magnetic connection to a localized particle source near the solar surface, and computer simulations of a random-phase model of magnetic turbulence have indicated a spatial association between dropout features and local trapping boundaries (LTBs) defined for a two-dimensional (2D) + slab model of turbulence. Previous observations have shown that dropout features are not well associated with sharp magnetic field changes, as might be expected in the flux tube model. Random-phase turbulence models do not properly treat sharp changes in the magnetic field, such as current sheets, and thus cannot be tested in this way. Here, we explore the properties of a more realistic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence model (2D MHD), in which current sheets develop and the current and magnetic field have characteristic non-Gaussian statistical properties. For this model, computer simulations that trace field lines to determine magnetic connection from a localized particle source indicate that sharp particle gradients should frequently be associated with LTBs, sometimes with strong 2D magnetic fluctuations, and infrequently with current sheets. Thus, the 2D MHD + slab model of turbulent fluctuations includes some realistic features of the flux tube view and is consistent with the lack of an observed association between dropouts and intense magnetic fields or currents.

  5. Stability and tunneling dynamics of a dark-bright soliton pair in a harmonic trap

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Karamatskos, E. T.; Stockhofe, J.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Schmelcher, P.

    2015-04-30

    In this study, we consider a binary repulsive Bose-Einstein condensate in a harmonic trap in one spatial dimension and investigate particular solutions consisting of two dark-bright solitons. There are two different stationary solutions characterized by the phase difference in the bright component, in-phase and out-of-phase states. We show that above a critical particle number in the bright component, a symmetry-breaking bifurcation of the pitchfork type occurs that leads to a new asymmetric solution whereas the parental branch, i.e., the out-of-phase state, becomes unstable. These three different states support different small amplitude oscillations, characterized by an almost stationary density of themore » dark component and a tunneling of the bright component between the two dark solitons. Within a suitable effective double-well picture, these can be understood as the characteristic features of a bosonic Josephson junction (BJJ), and we show within a two-mode approach that all characteristic features of the BJJ phase space are recovered. For larger deviations from the stationary states, the simplifying double-well description breaks down due to the feedback of the bright component onto the dark one, causing the solitons to move. In this regime we observe intricate anharmonic and aperiodic dynamics, exhibiting remnants of the BJJ phase space.« less

  6. Exploring Ramsey-coherent population trapping atomic clock realized with pulsed microwave modulated laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Jing; Yun, Peter [Key Laboratory of Atomic Frequency Standards, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Tian, Yuan; Tan, Bozhong [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Gu, Sihong, E-mail: shgu@wipm.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Atomic Frequency Standards, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-03-07

    A scheme for a Ramsey-coherent population trapping (CPT) atomic clock that eliminates the acousto-optic modulator (AOM) is proposed and experimentally studied. Driven by a periodically microwave modulated current, the vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser emits a continuous beam that switches between monochromatic and multichromatic modes. Ramsey-CPT interference has been studied with this mode-switching beam. In eliminating the AOM, which is used to generate pulsed laser in conventional Ramsey-CPT atomic clock, the physics package of the proposed scheme is virtually the same as that of a conventional compact CPT atomic clock, although the resource budget for the electronics will slightly increase as a microwave switch should be added. By evaluating and comparing experimentally recorded signals from the two Ramsey-CPT schemes, the short-term frequency stability of the proposed scheme was found to be 46% better than the scheme with AOM. The experimental results suggest that the implementation of a compact Ramsey-CPT atomic clock promises better frequency stability.

  7. Optical Ramsey spectroscopy of a single trapped {sup 88}Sr{sup +} ion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letchumanan, V. [National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, Middlesex TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2BW (United Kingdom); Gill, P.; Sinclair, A.G. [National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, Middlesex TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Riis, E. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

    2004-09-01

    Coherent optical spectroscopy has been performed on the narrow 5s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2}-4d {sup 2}D{sub 5/2} quadrupole transition in a single Doppler-cooled and trapped {sup 88}Sr{sup +} ion. High-contrast optical Ramsey spectra have been observed with fringe visibilities up to {approx}90%. The visibility decreased as the free precession period was increased, and was limited by the interrogation laser's coherence. The effect of varying the relative phase of the second Ramsey pulse was investigated. By measuring the difference in excitation probability on reversing a 90 deg. relative phase shift between the two Ramsey pulses, we have demonstrated Ramsey's anti-symmetric line shape in the optical domain. A significant advantage of this line shape is the zero crossing at line center and the independence of this center frequency on drifts in signal amplitude. This optical Ramsey line shape is suitable for stabilizing a local oscillator to an atomic reference transition in an optical frequency standard. All observed optical Ramsey signals are well described by a model using the optical Bloch equations.

  8. Light-trapped, interconnected, Silicon-Film{trademark} modules. Final technical status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, R.B.; Rand, J.A.; Ford, D.H.; Ingram, A.E.

    1998-04-01

    AstroPower has continued its development of an advanced thin-silicon-based photovoltaic module product. This module combines the performance advantages of thin light-trapped silicon layers with the capability of integration into a low-cost, monolithically interconnected module. This report summarized work carried out over a 3-year, cost-shared contract. Key results accomplished during this phase include an NREL-verified conversion efficiency of 12.5% on a 0.47-cm{sup 2} device. The device structure used an insulating substrate and an active layer less than 100 {micro}m thick. A new metalization scheme was designed using insulating crossovers. This technology was demonstrated on a 36-segment, 321-cm{sup 2}, interconnected module. That module was tested at NREL with an efficiency of 9.79%. Further advances in metalization have led to an advanced single back-contact design that will offer low cost through ease of processing and higher performance through reduced shading.

  9. Percolation mechanism through trapping/de-trapping process at defect states for resistive switching devices with structure of Ag/Si{sub x}C{sub 1?x}/p-Si

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yanhong; Gao, Ping; Li, La; Peng, Wei [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, No. 2 Linggong Road, Ganjingzi District, Dalian 116024 (China); Jiang, Xuening; Zhang, Jialiang [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, Ministry of Education, Dalian University of Technology, No. 2 Linggong Road, Ganjingzi District, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2014-08-14

    Pure Si{sub x}C{sub 1?x} (x?>?0.5) and B-containing Si{sub x}C{sub 1?x} (x?>?0.5) based resistive switching devices (RSD) with the structure of Ag/Si{sub x}C{sub 1?x}/p-Si were fabricated and their switching characteristics and mechanism were investigated systematically. Percolation mechanism through trapping/ de-trapping at defect states was suggested for the switching process. Through the introduction of B atoms into Si{sub x}C{sub 1?x}, the density of defect states was reduced, then, the SET and RESET voltages were also decreased. Based on the percolation theory, the dependence of SET/RESET voltage on the density of defect states was analyzed. These results supply a deep understanding for the SiC-based RSD, which have a potential application in extreme ambient conditions.

  10. Identification of nitrogen- and host-related deep-level traps in n-type GaNAs and their evolution upon annealing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelczuk, ?.; Henini, M.

    2014-07-07

    Deep level traps in as-grown and annealed n-GaNAs layers (doped with Si) of various nitrogen concentrations (N=0.2%, 0.4%, 0.8%, and 1.2%) were investigated by deep level transient spectroscopy. In addition, optical properties of GaNAs layers were studied by photoluminescence and contactless electroreflectance. The identification of N- and host-related traps has been performed on the basis of band gap diagram [Kudrawiec, Appl. Phys. Lett. 101, 082109 (2012)], which assumes that the activation energy of electron traps of the same microscopic nature decreases with the rise of nitrogen concentration in accordance with the N-related shift of the conduction band towards trap levels. The application of this diagram has allowed to investigate the evolution of donor traps in GaNAs upon annealing. In general, it was observed that the concentration of N- and host-related traps decreases after annealing and PL improves very significantly. However, it was also observed that some traps are generated due to annealing. It explains why the annealing conditions have to be carefully optimized for this material system.

  11. T-641: Oracle Java SE Critical Patch Update Advisory- June 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Critical Patch Update contains 17 new security fixes for Oracle Java SE - 5 apply to client and server deployments of Java SE, 11 apply to client deployments of Java SE only, and 1 applies to server deployments of Java SE only. All of these vulnerabilities may be remotely exploitable without authentication, i.e., may be exploited over a network without the need for a username and password. Oracle CVSS scores assume that a user running a Java applet or Java Web Start application has administrator privileges (typical on Windows). Where the user does not run with administrator privileges (typical on Solaris and Linux), the corresponding CVSS impact scores for Confidentiality, Integrity, and Availability are "Partial" instead of "Complete", and the corresponding CVSS Base score is 7.5 instead of 10 respectively. For issues in Deployment, fixes are only made available for JDK and JRE 6. Users should use the Java Web Start in JRE 6 and the new Java Plug-in introduced in 6 Update 10. CVE-2011-0862, CVE-2011-0873, CVE-2011-0815, CVE-2011-0817, CVE-2011-0863, CVE-2011-0864, CVE-2011-0802, CVE-2011-0814, CVE-2011-0871, CVE-2011-0786, CVE-2011-0788, CVE-2011-0866, CVE-2011-0868, CVE-2011-0872, CVE-2011-0867, CVE-2011-0869, and CVE-2011-0865

  12. Low-temperature photoluminescence analysis of CdTeSe crystals for radiation-detector applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    YANG G.; Roy, U. N.; Bolotnikov, A. E.; Cui, Y.; Camarda, G.S.; Hossain, A.; and James, R. B.

    2015-10-05

    Goal: Understanding the changes of material defects in CdTeSe following annealing. Experimental results and discussions: Infrared (IR) transmission microscopy; current-voltage measurements (Highlight: Improvement of resistivity of un-doped crystals after annealing); low-temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectrum of as-grown and annealed samples.

  13. Molecular beam epitaxial growth of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} nanowires and nanoflakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knebl, G. M. Gessler, J. R.; Kamp, M.; Höfling, S.

    2014-09-29

    Topological Insulators are in focus of immense research efforts and rapid scientific progress is obtained in that field. Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} has proven to be a topological insulator material that provides a large band gap and a band structure with a single Dirac cone at the Γ-point. This makes Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} one of the most promising three dimensional topological insulator materials. While Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} nanowires and nanoflakes so far were fabricated with different methods and for different purposes, we here present the first Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} nanowires as well as nanoflakes grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The nanostructures were nucleated on pretreated, silicon (100) wafers. Altering the growth conditions nanoflakes could be fabricated instead of nanowires; both with high crystalline quality, confirmed by scanning electron microscopy as well as transmission electron microscopy. These nanostructures have promise for spintronic devices and Majorana fermion observation in contact to superconductor materials.

  14. Stability of S and Se induced reconstructions on GaP(001)(21) surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li , D. F.; Guo, Zhi C.; Xiao, Hai Yan; Zu, Xiaotao T.; Gao, Fei

    2010-10-15

    The structural and electronic properties of S- and Se- passivated GaP(001)(21) surfaces were studied using first-principles simulations. Our calculations showed that the most stable structure consists of a single chalcogen atom (S or Se) in the first crystal layer, which is bonded to two Ga atoms of the second layer, and the third P layer replaced by chalcogen atoms, similar to the passivation of GaAs(001)(21) surface by chalcogen atoms. The structural parameters were determined and the surface band characters and the local density of states were also analyzed. The results showed that the preferable structure has no surface states in the bulk band gap, but the energy band gaps of the S- and Se-adsorbed GaP(001) surfaces are 1.83eV and 1.63eV, respectively. The passivation effects for the S- and Se-adsorbed surfaces are similar to each other.

  15. T-558: Oracle Java SE and Java for Business Critical Patch Update Advisory- February 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Critical Patch Update contains 21 new security fixes for Oracle Java SE and Java for Business. 19 of these vulnerabilities may be remotely exploitable without authentication, i.e., may be exploited over a network without the need for a username and password.

  16. Extremely scaled high-k/In?.??Ga?.??As gate stacks with low leakage and low interface trap densities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chobpattana, Varistha; Mikheev, Evgeny; Zhang, Jack Y.; Mates, Thomas E.; Stemmer, Susanne

    2014-09-28

    Highly scaled gate dielectric stacks with low leakage and low interface trap densities are required for complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology with III-V semiconductor channels. Here, we show that a novel pre-deposition technique, consisting of alternating cycles of nitrogen plasma and tetrakis(dimethylamino)titanium, allows for HfO? and ZrO? gate stacks with extremely high accumulation capacitance densities of more than 5 ?F/cm? at 1 MHz, low leakage current, low frequency dispersion, and low midgap interface trap densities (10cm?eV?range). Using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we show that the interface contains TiO? and small quantities of In?O?, but no detectable Ga- or As-oxides, or As-As bonding. The results allow for insights into the microscopic mechanisms that control leakage and frequency dispersion in high-k/III-V gate stacks.

  17. Frequency non-degenerate sequential excitation of the impurity trapped exciton in strontium fluoride crystals doped with ytterbium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senanayake, Pubudu S.; Hughes-Currie, Rosa B.; Wells, Jon-Paul R.; Reid, Michael F.; Berden, Giel; Reeves, Roger J.; Meijerink, Andries

    2015-04-07

    We model the dynamic behaviour observed for impurity-trapped excitons in SrF{sub 2}:Yb{sup 2+} using transient photoluminescence enhancement induced via a two-frequency, sequential excitation process employing an UV optical parametric amplifier synchronized to an IR free electron laser (FEL). We observe sharp transitions interpreted as a change of state of the localized hole and broad bands interpreted as a change of state of the delocalized electron. Our modeling indicates that the 4f crystal-field interaction is 25% smaller than in CaF{sub 2}. The photoluminescence enhancement transients are analyzed across a range of excitation frequencies using a system of rate equations. The temporal behavior is explained in terms of intra-excitonic relaxation, local lattice heating by the FEL, and liberation of electrons from trap states.

  18. Hole Trapping at Surfaces of m?ZrO2 and m?HfO2 Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolf, Matthew J.; Mckenna, Keith P.; Shlyuger, Alexander L.

    2012-12-03

    We investigate hole trapping at the most prevalent facets of monoclinic zirconia (m-ZrO2) and hafnia (m-HfO2) nanocrystals using first-principles methods. The localization of holes at surface oxygen ions is more favorable than in the bulk crystal by up to ?1 eV. This is caused mainly by the reduction of the absolute value of the electrostatic potential at the surface ions with respect to the bulk and by the significant surface distortion caused by the hole localization. The mobility of holes at surfaces is much lower than that found in the bulk and is fairly isotropic. Unlike in cubic oxides, such as MgO and CaO, we do not find a significant driving force for preferential trapping of holes at steps on the m-ZrO2 surface. These fundamental results are relevant to mechanisms of water oxidation, photocatalysis, contact charging, and photodesorption.

  19. Manufacturable CuIn(Ga)Se{sub 2}-based solar cells via development of co-sputtered CuInSe{sub 2} absorber layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Ingrid Eisgruber

    1999-03-20

    Yield and reproducibility remain issues in CuIn(Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) photovoltaic module fabrication. While small-area cells (<1 cm{sup 2}) over 18% efficient have been reported, the best large-area manufactured devices (>1 ft{sup 2}) are 11% efficient with about 60% yield. If improvements in large-area manufacturing can accomplish 15% efficiency and 90% yield, the result is a doubling in throughput leading to a reduction in cost per watt of over 50%. The challenge now facing the photovoltaics industry is to bring the efficiencies of small-area cells and large-area industrial modules closer together and to raise manufacturing yields.

  20. Marginally trapped submanifolds in Lorentzian space forms and in the Lorentzian product of a space form by the real line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anciaux, Henri; Godoy, Yamile

    2015-02-15

    We give local, explicit representation formulas for n-dimensional spacelike submanifolds which are marginally trapped in the Minkowski space ℝ{sub 1}{sup n+2}, the de Sitter space dS{sup n+2}, the anti-de Sitter space AdS{sup n+2} and the Lorentzian products S{sup n+1} × ℝ and ℍ{sup n+1} × ℝ of the sphere and the hyperbolic space by the real line.