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Sample records for hor ace walborn

  1. Roadmap: Horticulture Bachelor of Applied Horticulture [AS-BAH-HOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Horticulture ­ Bachelor of Applied Horticulture [AS-BAH-HOR] College of Arts and Sciences This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study for this major. However, courses is taken twice, in summer 1 and 2 #12;Roadmap: Horticulture ­ Bachelor of Applied Horticulture [AS

  2. Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES) | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    impacts to public health and welfare deer09greenbaum.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES) Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES)...

  3. Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ACES is a cooperative multi-party effort to characterize emissions and possible health effects of new, advanced heavy duty engine and control systems and fuels in the market 2007 - 2010.

  4. The Contender - g- Seven & Ace 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-09-01

    , and this detour hadn't been on the itinerary. By the time she'd done her business and made it back to the front gates, the Doctor was propped up against a wall reading a torn paperback. Upon her arrival, he shoved the book in his pocket and smiled. Ace glared... captured lass or lad bound for the seas. Ace blinked and reassessed the outfit, but it was not a mirage brought on by the overwhelming heat. The final rocker truly was decked out like a Pirates extra. A sharp hacking squawk drew the spectators' eyes up...

  5. ACE Data from the ACE Science Center A.J. Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Andrew J.

    SH.1.4.29 ACE Data from the ACE Science Center A.J. Davis½ , S.J. Hemple½ and S.R. Sears½ ½ ACE Data Center (NSSDC) for archiving. Generally, the data are less than 1 week old by this time Science Center, Caltech, MC 220-22, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA Abstract The purpose of the ACE Science Center

  6. Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenbaum, Daniel; Costantini, Maria; Van Erp, Annemoon; Shaikh, Rashid; Bailey, Brent; Tennant, Chris; Khalek, Imad; Mauderly, Joe; McDonald, Jacob; Zielinska, Barbara; Bemis, Jeffrey; Storey, John; Hallberg, Lance; Clark, Nigel

    2013-12-31

    The objective of the Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES) was to determine before widespread commercial deployment whether or not the new, energy-efficient, heavy duty diesel engines (2007 and 2010 EPA Emissions Standards Compliant) may generate anticipated toxic emissions that could adversely affect the environment and human health. ACES was planned to take place in three phases. In Phase 1, extensive emissions characterization of four production-intent prototype engine and control systems designed to meet 2007 standards for nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) was conducted at an existing emissions characterization facility: Southwest Research Institute (SwRI). One of the tested engines was selected (at random, after careful comparison of results) for health testing in Phase 3. In Phase 2, extensive emission characterization of three production-intent prototype engine and control systems meeting the 2010 standards (including more advanced NOx controls to meet the more stringent 2010 NOx standards) was conducted at the same test facility. In Phase 3, one engine/aftertreatment system selected from Phase 1 was further characterized during health effects studies (at an existing inhalation toxicology laboratory: Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, [LRRI]) to form the basis of the ACES safety assessment. The Department of Energy (DOE) award provided funding for emissions characterization in Phases 1 and 2 as well as exposure characterization in Phase 3. The main health analyses in Phase 3 were funded separately and are not reported here.

  7. Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES) NETL Agreement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NETL Agreement 13919 Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES) NETL Agreement 13919 Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on...

  8. Phase 1 of the Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES)...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 of the Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES): Highlights of Project Finding Phase 1 of the Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES): Highlights of Project Finding...

  9. The Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES):Phase 3 | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (ACES):Phase 3 The Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES):Phase 3 A chronic rat inhalation study with periodic health measurements is conducted on the representative 2007...

  10. Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES): Phase 2 Status...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    : Phase 2 Status Report Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES): Phase 2 Status Report Discusses status of ACES, a cooperative multi-party effort to characterize emissions...

  11. ACES Linking Science, Practice, and Decision Making Conference

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    ACES: A Community on Ecosystem Services represents a dynamic and growing assembly of professionals, researchers, and policy makers involved with ecosystem services. The ACES 2014 Conference brings...

  12. ACE Project Service Command Language Specifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    .S.Air Force and the DefenseAdvanced Research ProjectsAgency under contract no. F30602-00-2-0581 and our development team the freedom to mold the ACE environment as is seen fit. This language, based

  13. Testing General Relativity with the ACES Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Le Poncin-Lafitte; S. Lambert

    2006-10-16

    The new generation of atomic clocks will reach unprecedented uncertainties in frequency of $10^{-18}$. In order to prepare space missions such as ACES, we compute all relativistic frequency shifts detectable during this mission in the case of a clock aboard the International Space Station.

  14. ACES: Evaluation of Tissue Response to Inhaled 2007-Compliant...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Phase 3 of the ACES study produced minimal inflammatory and tissue remodeling in their lungs and no soot accumulation in macrophages. deer12shaikh.pdf More Documents &...

  15. Molecular characterization of the Cysteine2-Histidine2 transcription factor Ace1 in Fusarium verticillioides 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Jacquelyn 1990-

    2012-04-27

    of this study was to test the hypothesis that F. verticillioides FvAce1 shares conserved function with Trichoderma reesei Ace1. To test this hypothesis, we created a construct harboring T. reesei Ace1 gene, and complemented F. verticillioides FvAce1 null mutant...

  16. Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES): Phase 2 Status Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Discusses status of ACES, a cooperative multi-party effort to characterize emissions and possible health effects of new advanced heavy duty engine and control systems and fuels in the market 2007 - 2010

  17. Creation and Testing of the ACES Heavy Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Creation and Testing of the ACES Heavy Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Test Schedule for Representative Measurement of Heavy-Duty Engine Emissions Creation and Testing of the ACES Heavy...

  18. ACE-II: Areas of Conservation Emphasis | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton JumpProgram |RecentSulfonate as aEnergy1ACE-II: Areas of

  19. Pratt & Whtiney: Homogenous Metals,Inc. (HMI) Case Study: A Case STudy of the UTC Ace Operating System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roth, George

    2009-10-06

    Homogenous Metals Incorporated (HMI) is a pioneer in adopting and demonstrating value from United Technology Corporation's (UTC's) ACE operating system. ACE stands for Achieving Competitive Excellence. The first story is ...

  20. Journal Watch From ACE (Alliance for Clinical Education): Annual Review of Medical Education Articles in Emergency Medicine, 2010-2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ko, PY; Bernard, AW; Poznanski, SL; Cooney, R; Khandelwal, S; Lin, M

    2013-01-01

    Journal Watch From ACE (Alliance for Clinical Education):review, sponsored by the Alliance for Clinical Educa- tion,

  1. Economic evaluation of the Annual Cycle Energy System (ACES). Volume II. Detailed results. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The energy effectiveness and the economic viability of the ACES concept are examined. ACES is studied in a variety of different applications and compared to a number of conventional systems. The different applications are studied in two groups: the class of building into which the ACES is incorporated and the climatic region in which the ACES is located. Buildings investigated include single-family and multi-family residences and a commercial office building. The application of ACES to each of these building types is studied in Minneapolis, Atlanta, and Philadelphia. The economic evaluation of the ACES is based on a comparison of the present worth of the ACES to the present worth of conventional systems; namely, electric resistance heating, electric air conditioning, and electric domestic water heating; air-to-air heat pump and electric domestic water heating; oil-fired furnace, electric air conditioning, and electric domestic water heating; and gas-fired furnace, electric air conditioning, and gas domestic water heating.

  2. ACES: Evaluation of Tissue Response to Inhaled 2007-Compliant Diesel Exhaust

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Results of health effects testing on rodents during Phase 3 of the ACES study produced minimal inflammatory and tissue remodeling in their lungs and no soot accumulation in macrophages.

  3. Technical manual for the Augmented Computer Exercise for Inspection Training (ACE-IT) software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobranich, P.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Cooperative Monitoring Center and Regional Security; Horak, K.E.; Hagan, D.; Evanko, D.; Nelson, J.; Ryder, C.; Hedlund, D. [Ogden Environmental and Energy Services, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-09-01

    The on-site inspection provisions in many current and proposed arms control agreements require extensive preparation and training on the part of both the Inspection Teams (inspectors) and Inspected Parties (host). Current training techniques include table-top inspections and practice inspections. The Augmented Computer Exercise for Inspection Training (ACE-IT), an interactive computer training tool, increases the utility of table-top inspections. ACE-IT has been designed to provide training for challenge inspections under the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC); however, this training tool can be modified for other inspection regimes. Although ACE-IT provides training from notification of an inspection through post-inspection activities, the primary emphasis of ACE-IT is in the inspection itself--particularly with the concept of managed access. ACE-IT also demonstrates how inspection provisions impact compliance determination and the protection of sensitive information. This Technical Manual describes many of the technical aspects of the ACE-IT training software.

  4. Aerosol Characterization Data from the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Project (ACE-Asia)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Aerosol Characterization Experiments (ACE) were designed to increase understanding of how atmospheric aerosol particles affect the Earth's climate system. These experiments integrated in-situ measurements, satellite observations, and models to reduce the uncertainty in calculations of the climate forcing due to aerosol particles and improve the ability of models to predict the influences of aerosols on the Earth's radiation balance. ACE-Asia was the fourth in a series of experiments organized by the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry (IGAC) Program (A Core Project of the International Geosphere Biosphere Program). The Intensive Field Phase for ACE-Asia took place during the spring of 2001 (mid-March through early May) off the coast of China, Japan and Korea. ACE-Asia pursued three specific objectives: 1) Determine the physical, chemical, and radiative properties of the major aerosol types in the Eastern Asia and Northwest Pacific region and investigate the relationships among these properties. 2) Quantify the physical and chemical processes controlling the evolution of the major aerosol types and in particular their physical, chemical, and radiative properties. 3) Develop procedures to extrapolate aerosol properties and processes from local to regional and global scales, and assess the regional direct and indirect radiative forcing by aerosols in the Eastern Asia and Northwest Pacific region [Edited and shortened version of summary at http://data.eol.ucar.edu/codiac/projs?ACE-ASIA]. The Ace-Asia collection contains 174 datasets.

  5. Tetmhedmn Letters. Vol. 35, No. 27. pp. 4731-4734,~~ Elsevia S&ace Ltd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paré, Paul W.

    Tetmhedmn Letters. Vol. 35, No. 27. pp. 4731-4734,~~ Elsevia S&ace Ltd Printed in Great Britain oo4

  6. SIGACE Code for Generating High-Temperature ACE Files; Validation and Benchmarking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Amit R. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar-382428, Gujarat (India); Ganesan, S. [Reactor Physics Design Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai-400085 (India); Trkov, A. [Nuclear Data Section, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    2005-05-24

    A code named SIGACE has been developed as a tool for MCNP users within the scope of a research contract awarded by the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) (Ref: 302-F4-IND-11566 B5-IND-29641). A new recipe has been evolved for generating high-temperature ACE files for use with the MCNP code. Under this scheme the low-temperature ACE file is first converted to an ENDF formatted file using the ACELST code and then Doppler broadened, essentially limited to the data in the resolved resonance region, to any desired higher temperature using SIGMA1. The SIGACE code then generates a high-temperature ACE file for use with the MCNP code. A thinning routine has also been introduced in the SIGACE code for reducing the size of the ACE files. The SIGACE code and the recipe for generating ACE files at higher temperatures has been applied to the SEFOR fast reactor benchmark problem (sodium-cooled fast reactor benchmark described in ENDF-202/BNL-19302, 1974 document). The calculated Doppler coefficient is in good agreement with the experimental value. A similar calculation using ACE files generated directly with the NJOY system also agrees with our SIGACE computed results. The SIGACE code and the recipe is further applied to study the numerical benchmark configuration of selected idealized PWR pin cell configurations with five different fuel enrichments as reported by Mosteller and Eisenhart. The SIGACE code that has been tested with several FENDL/MC files will be available, free of cost, upon request, from the Nuclear Data Section of the IAEA.

  7. Turbulence of the Solar Wind Studies of the Solar Wind Using the ACE and Helios Spacecraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    provide enough energy to account for the heating of the solar wind relative to an adiabatic expansion Composition Explorer to compute the cascade rate of the turbulence in the solar wind. We nd the energy cascadeTurbulence of the Solar Wind Studies of the Solar Wind Using the ACE and Helios Spacecraft Bejamin

  8. Lagrangian air-mass tracking with smart balloons during ACE-2 Randy Johnson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Businger, Steven

    Lagrangian air-mass tracking with smart balloons during ACE-2 Randy Johnson National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Air Resources Laboratory, Field Research Division, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83402 Steven Balloon designed at National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Air Resources Laboratory Field

  9. JOINT ULYSSES AND ACE OBSERVATIONS OF A MAGNETIC CLOUD AND THE ASSOCIATED SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanahuja, Blai

    JOINT ULYSSES AND ACE OBSERVATIONS OF A MAGNETIC CLOUD AND THE ASSOCIATED SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE.K. 4Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, U.S.A. Abstract. On day 49 of 1999 a strong hours later by a magnetic cloud (MC). A large solar energetic particle (SEP) event was observed

  10. Mixtures of pollution, dust, sea salt, and volcanic aerosol during ACE-Asia: Radiative properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was dominated by marine, polluted, volcanic, and dust aerosols. Average total light scattering coefficients (sspMixtures of pollution, dust, sea salt, and volcanic aerosol during ACE-Asia: Radiative properties). Aerosol hygroscopicity ranged from deliquescent with hysteresis (marine frequently and polluted variably

  11. Ordering and Product Information: 1-800-223-4524 (856-692-3333) ACE GLASS Sonochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    It Works The ultrasonic power supply (generator) converts 50/60 Hz voltage to high frequency 20 kHz (20 the horn to be held in an Ace-Thred without affecting sonic output and enables easy adaptation processed usually dictate the horn size, i.e. 1/2", 3/4" or 1", and their intensity -- high, medium or low

  12. ACE: A Platform for the Real Time Simulation of Virtual Human Agents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kallmann, Marcelo

    . Keywords: Agents, Virtual Humans, Virtual Environments, Behavioral Animation, Object Interaction, Script. Nowadays many systems are available to animate virtual humans. Such systems encompass several differentACE: A Platform for the Real Time Simulation of Virtual Human Agents Marcelo Kallmann, Jean

  13. Economic evaluation of the annual cycle energy system (ACES). Final report. Volume III, appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    This volume consists of seven appendices related to ACES, the first three of which are concerned with computer programs. The appendices are entitled: (A) ACESIM: Residential Program Listing; (B) Typical Inputs and Outputs of ACESIM; (C) CACESS: Commercial Building Program Listing; (D) Typical Weather-Year Selection Requirements; (E) Building Characteristics; (F) List of Major Variables Used in the Computer Programs; and (G) Bibliography. 79 references.

  14. Audit unto others hor ellipsis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maday, J.H. Jr.

    1992-05-01

    My first encounter with a quality assurance auditor is reminiscent of an old Dodge commercial. You remember The old sheriff, masked in mirrored sunglasses, paunch hanging over his gun belt, prophesying, You're in a heap o' trouble boy '' Well, my auditor could have been kin to the sheriff; they had the same posture, attitude, and mirrored sunglasses. Plus, my auditor wore a black leather vest and sported a Buffalo Bill'' goatee. While certainly memorable, both gentlemen were far from pleasant. I'm fairly certain that the compliance auditor of old deserved this perceived association with his law enforcement counterpart. Both believed in enforcing the letter of the law, or their interpretations of it. Neither seemed capable of exercising interpretive powers, but instead relied on winning through intimidation, possibly with an eye toward claiming some version of a monthly Quota Award. Is the auditor of today any better perceived Because this first encounter of the worst kind'' made a lasting impression on me, I have dedicated considerable time and effort trying to avoid being perceived as another sheriff when I conduct audits. In my auditing career, I am determined to capitalize on each opportunity to turn negative situations, as experienced by the auditee, into meaningful opportunities for improved performance. I want to treat the auditee the way I want to be treated when I am being audited. (author)

  15. The solar wind neon abundance observed with ACE/SWICS and ULYSSES/SWICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shearer, Paul; Raines, Jim M.; Lepri, Susan T.; Thomas, Jonathan W.; Gilbert, Jason A.; Landi, Enrico; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Von Steiger, Rudolf

    2014-07-01

    Using in situ ion spectrometry data from ACE/SWICS, we determine the solar wind Ne/O elemental abundance ratio and examine its dependence on wind speed and evolution with the solar cycle. We find that Ne/O is inversely correlated with wind speed, is nearly constant in the fast wind, and correlates strongly with solar activity in the slow wind. In fast wind streams with speeds above 600 km s{sup –1}, we find Ne/O = 0.10 ± 0.02, in good agreement with the extensive polar observations by Ulysses/SWICS. In slow wind streams with speeds below 400 km s{sup –1}, Ne/O ranges from a low of 0.12 ± 0.02 at solar maximum to a high of 0.17 ± 0.03 at solar minimum. These measurements place new and significant empirical constraints on the fractionation mechanisms governing solar wind composition and have implications for the coronal and photospheric abundances of neon and oxygen. The results are made possible by a new data analysis method that robustly identifies rare elements in the measured ion spectra. The method is also applied to Ulysses/SWICS data, which confirms the ACE observations and extends our view of solar wind neon into the three-dimensional heliosphere.

  16. Coronal sources and in situ properties of the solar winds sampled by ACE during 1999-2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Hui; Li, Xing; Huang, Zhenghua; Mou, Chaozhou; Jiao, Fangran; Xia, Lidong

    2015-01-01

    We identify the coronal sources of the solar winds sampled by the ACE spacecraft during 1999-2008, and examine the in situ solar wind properties as a function of wind sources. The standard two-step mapping technique is adopted to establish the photospheric footpoints of the magnetic flux tubes along which the ACE winds flow. The footpoints are then placed in the context of EIT 284~\\AA\\ images and photospheric magnetograms, allowing us to categorize the sources into four groups: coronal holes (CHs), active regions (ARs), the quiet Sun (QS), and "Undefined". This practice also enables us to establish the response to solar activity of the fractions occupied by each kind of solar winds, and of their speeds and O$^{7+}$/O$^{6+}$ ratios measured in situ. We find that during the maximum phase, the majority of ACE winds originate from ARs. During the declining phase, CHs and ARs are equally important contributors to the ACE solar winds. The QS contribution increases with decreasing solar activity, and maximizes in th...

  17. Aerosols released during large-scale integral MCCI tests in the ACE Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fink, J.K.; Thompson, D.H.; Spencer, B.W.; Sehgal, B.R.

    1992-04-01

    As part of the internationally sponsored Advanced Containment Experiments (ACE) program, seven large-scale experiments on molten core concrete interactions (MCCIs) have been performed at Argonne National Laboratory. One of the objectives of these experiments is to collect and characterize all the aerosols released from the MCCIs. Aerosols released from experiments using four types of concrete (siliceous, limestone/common sand, serpentine, and limestone/limestone) and a range of metal oxidation for both BWR and PWR reactor core material have been collected and characterized. Release fractions were determined for UO{sup 2}, Zr, the fission-products: BaO, SrO, La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CeO{sub 2}, MoO{sub 2}, Te, Ru, and control materials: Ag, In, and B{sub 4}C. Release fractions of UO{sub 2} and the fission products other than Te were small in all tests. However, release of control materials was significant.

  18. Aerosols released during large-scale integral MCCI tests in the ACE Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fink, J.K.; Thompson, D.H.; Spencer, B.W. ); Sehgal, B.R. )

    1992-01-01

    As part of the internationally sponsored Advanced Containment Experiments (ACE) program, seven large-scale experiments on molten core concrete interactions (MCCIs) have been performed at Argonne National Laboratory. One of the objectives of these experiments is to collect and characterize all the aerosols released from the MCCIs. Aerosols released from experiments using four types of concrete (siliceous, limestone/common sand, serpentine, and limestone/limestone) and a range of metal oxidation for both BWR and PWR reactor core material have been collected and characterized. Release fractions were determined for UO{sup 2}, Zr, the fission-products: BaO, SrO, La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CeO{sub 2}, MoO{sub 2}, Te, Ru, and control materials: Ag, In, and B{sub 4}C. Release fractions of UO{sub 2} and the fission products other than Te were small in all tests. However, release of control materials was significant.

  19. Data:144aa124-c294-4a70-ace5-55b104c19684 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    a70-ace5-55b104c19684 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic...

  20. ASC Computational Environment (ACE) requirements version 8.0 final report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larzelere, Alex R. (Exagrid Engineering, Alexandria, VA); Sturtevant, Judith E.

    2006-11-01

    A decision was made early in the Tri-Lab Usage Model process, that the collection of the user requirements be separated from the document describing capabilities of the user environment. The purpose in developing the requirements as a separate document was to allow the requirements to take on a higher-level view of user requirements for ASC platforms in general. In other words, a separate ASC user requirement document could capture requirements in a way that was not focused on ''how'' the requirements would be fulfilled. The intent of doing this was to create a set of user requirements that were not linked to any particular computational platform. The idea was that user requirements would endure from one ASC platform user environment to another. The hope was that capturing the requirements in this way would assist in creating stable user environments even though the particular platforms would be evolving and changing. In order to clearly make the separation, the Tri-lab S&CS program decided to create a new title for the requirements. The user requirements became known as the ASC Computational Environment (ACE) Requirements.

  1. 2-Dimensional Tunnel Devices and Circuits on Graphene: Opportunities and Challenges Introduction: Fig.1(a,c,e)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Introduction: Fig.1(a,c,e) Fig. 1(c) Fig.1(b) [1] Eg [2] Fig. 1 (d,f) SS Eg Fig.2(a) Fig.2(b),3(a,b) ION IOFF IOFF SS ION IOFF Eg ION Eg IOFF Fig.3(d), Fig.4 [4] ION ION IOFF SS VDD ION ION IOFF Fig.5 [5]. Eg SS Devices Figure 1. (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) Figure 2. (a) (b) Eg NW (c,d) (e,f) (g) Figure 3. (a) (b) (c) (d

  2. RF optimization and analysis of the 805-MHz cavity for the MuCool program using ACE3P

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Zenghai; Ge Lixin; Adolphsen, Chris; Li Derun; Bowring, Daniel [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2012-12-21

    An 805 MHz pillbox cavity tested at Fermilab's MTA facility showed significant degradation in gradient when operated in a several Tesla solenoidal magnetic field. We have used the advanced ACE3P simulation codes developed at SLAC to study the cavity dark current and multipacting characteristics to gain more insight into the gradient limitations. We also checked whether there is an optimal cavity length that minimizes the dark current impact energy. Finally, we have improved on the cavity design, significantly lowering the fields outside the beam area. These and other results are presented in this paper.

  3. Kinetics of Adsorption of Selenate and Selonite at the Goethite/Water InterfAce. p.e. ZHANG* and D.L. SPARKS.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Kinetics of Adsorption of Selenate and Selonite at the Goethite/Water InterfAce. p.e. ZHANG* and D.L. SPARKS. Univ. of Delaware. Mechanisms and kinetics of SeO, and Se~ at the goethite/water interface were

  4. Cloud coverage and height during FIRE ACE derived from Patrick Minnis,1 Venkatesan Chakrapani,2 David R. Doelling,2 Louis Nguyen,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    Cloud coverage and height during FIRE ACE derived from AVHRR data Patrick Minnis,1 Venkatesan Robert F. Arduini,4 and Matthew Shupe5 Abstract. Cloud cover and height are derived from NOAA-12 and NOAA excellent temporal coverage during the May­July 1998 First ISCCP Regional Experiment Arctic Clouds

  5. Wedding Reception Menu Hors d' Oeuvres Buffet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    vegetable platters with dips Coffee, decaf coffee, hot tea, iced tea, and ice water Select six items from include mixed field green platters with a choice of dressings, starch, seasonal vegetable, rolls, butter, coffee, decaf coffee, hot tea, iced tea, and ice water. Winter Park Mediterranean Herbed Chicken Sautéed

  6. Audit unto others{hor_ellipsis}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maday, J.H. Jr.

    1992-05-01

    My first encounter with a quality assurance auditor is reminiscent of an old Dodge commercial. You remember? The old sheriff, masked in mirrored sunglasses, paunch hanging over his gun belt, prophesying, ``You`re in a heap o` trouble boy!`` Well, my auditor could have been kin to the sheriff; they had the same posture, attitude, and mirrored sunglasses. Plus, my auditor wore a black leather vest and sported a ``Buffalo Bill`` goatee. While certainly memorable, both gentlemen were far from pleasant. I`m fairly certain that the compliance auditor of old deserved this perceived association with his law enforcement counterpart. Both believed in enforcing the letter of the law, or their interpretations of it. Neither seemed capable of exercising interpretive powers, but instead relied on winning through intimidation, possibly with an eye toward claiming some version of a monthly Quota Award. Is the auditor of today any better perceived? Because this ``first encounter of the worst kind`` made a lasting impression on me, I have dedicated considerable time and effort trying to avoid being perceived as another sheriff when I conduct audits. In my auditing career, I am determined to capitalize on each opportunity to turn negative situations, as experienced by the auditee, into meaningful opportunities for improved performance. I want to treat the auditee the way I want to be treated when I am being audited. (author)

  7. Title V, compliance assurance monitoring (CAM), and the use of any credible evidence (ACE): The effects on compliance and enforcement in the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowery, K.P. [Trinity Consultants Inc., Overland Park, KS (United States); Poffenberger, C.G. [Hogan and Hartson L.L.P., Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Under Title V, facilities are required to determine the compliance status of each air emission source with all applicable requirements. In addition, facilities are required to determine the methods that will be used to demonstrate on-going compliance with these requirements. Under Title V, it is no longer the responsibility of the regulator to determine whether a facility is in compliance; it is the facility`s responsibility to continuously prove they are in compliance. The CAM rule, as drafted, will implement the Enhanced Monitoring (EM) and periodic monitoring requirements of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA). CAM will require facilities subject to Title V to develop CAM plans for specific emission units at the facility. CAM plans will include the methods that will be used to provide reasonable assurance of continuous compliance with applicable requirements. In addition, the EPA is also proposing to finalize portions of the 1993 EM rule that would allow the use of ACE to determine compliance with emission limits. Reference test methods are the only means currently available to determine compliance with emission limits. The EPA has indicated that, under the ACE rule, even data obtained via CAM will be considered credible evidence in determining the compliance status of a facility. CAM and Title V will require sources to submit large amounts of data to the regulatory agency. The data, upon submittal, are public record and can be used to indicate non-compliance under the ACE rule. Therefore, the burden shift associated with CAM and Title V, in conjunction with the use of ACE, will significantly increase the potential liability of industry. This paper discusses the implications Title V, CAM, and the ACE rule will have on industry as well as the possible effects the regulations will have on enforcement in the future. The paper will provide the perspectives of both plant managers and legal counsel.

  8. ACE vs. Six Sigma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutton, Thomas C., 1965-

    2004-01-01

    In the early 1980's and 1990's, companies began to build upon the principles of Total Quality Management and developed there own unique quality systems. The most popular and well known of these systems is Six Sigma that ...

  9. Variations in solar wind fractionation as seen by ACE/SWICS over a solar cycle and the implications for Genesis Mission results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilleri, P; Zurbuchen, T H; Lepri, S T; Shearer, P; Gilbert, J A; von Steiger, R; Wiens, R C

    2015-01-01

    We use ACE/SWICS elemental composition data to compare the variations in solar wind fractionation as measured by SWICS during the last solar maximum (1999-2001), the solar minimum (2006-2009) and the period in which the Genesis spacecraft was collecting solar wind (late 2001 - early 2004). We differentiate our analysis in terms of solar wind regimes (i.e. originating from interstream or coronal hole flows, or coronal mass ejecta). Abundances are normalized to the low-FIP ion magnesium to uncover correlations that are not apparent when normalizing to high-FIP ions. We find that relative to magnesium, the other low-FIP elements are measurably fractionated, but the degree of fractionation does not vary significantly over the solar cycle. For the high-FIP ions, variation in fractionation over the solar cycle is significant: greatest for Ne/Mg and C/Mg, less so for O/Mg, and the least for He/Mg. When abundance ratios are examined as a function of solar wind speed, we find a strong correlation, with the remarkable ...

  10. Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  11. Ace Ethanol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand DaltonSolar Energy LLC Jump to: navigation, searchWindpower

  12. 7, 79077932, 2007 ACE-FTS observation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    range (750­ 4400 cm-1 ), we present in-depth analyses of the chemical composition of this plume10 occultation spectroscopy from satellites. Based on the lifetime of the emitted species, we discuss), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4) plus a se- ries of non methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs), oxygenated

  13. Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES) - Cooperative multi...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - Cooperative multi-party effort to characterize emissions and possible health effects of new advanced heavy duty engine and control systems and fuels in the market 2007 - 2010...

  14. BASIN VER DE GREAT ER ANETH BU G BAR KER DOME HOR SESH OE UTE DOME

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1 Table 1.101 (Million Short6 Macroeconomic88.04WBOE

  15. BASIN VER DE GREAT ER ANETH BU G BAR KER DOME HOR SESH OE UTE DOME

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1 Table 1.101 (Million Short6 Macroeconomic88.04WBOEGas

  16. BASIN VER DE GREAT ER ANETH BU G BAR KER DOME HOR SESH OE UTE DOME

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1 Table 1.101 (Million Short6

  17. The alara center and its information service--ACE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.

    1991-08-01

    In compliance with its congressional mandate to oversee the radiation safety of workers at nuclear power plants, the NRC asked Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to create a center to help monitor efforts that were likely to reduce occupational radiation exposure. The NRC project required the ALARA Center to evaluate dose-reduction research and the ALARA-related programs, and to note any areas where additional effort may be fruitful. The Center also was directed to inform the NRC on promising research and developments related to ALARA that were being carried out abroad, and to examine areas where international collaboration may be valuable. This document discusses the objectives of the ALARA Center.

  18. Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing ToolInternationalReportOfficeAcqguide18pt0Department of EnergyEnergyDepartment

  19. Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing ToolInternationalReportOfficeAcqguide18pt0Department of EnergyEnergyDepartment1

  20. Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing ToolInternationalReportOfficeAcqguide18pt0Department of EnergyEnergyDepartment10

  1. Ace Development Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan)dataSuccessful Smart Grid PilotsAccommodationEnergy

  2. Cielo Computational Environment Usage Model With Mappings to ACE

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing Bacteria (TechnicalTransmission,TextitSciTechinRequirements for the General

  3. Cielo Computational Environment Usage Model With Mappings to ACE

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing Bacteria (TechnicalTransmission,TextitSciTechinRequirements for the GeneralRequirements

  4. The evolution of 1 AU equatorial solar wind and its association with the morphology of the heliospheric current sheet from solar cycles 23 to 24

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, L.; Landi, E.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Fisk, L. A.; Lepri, S. T.

    2014-09-20

    The solar wind can be categorized into three types based on its 'freeze-in' temperature (T {sub freeze-in}) in the coronal source: low T {sub freeze-in} wind mostly from coronal holes, high T {sub freeze-in} wind mostly from regions outside of coronal holes, including streamers (helmet streamer and pseudostreamer), active regions, etc., and transient interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) usually possessing the hottest T {sub freeze-in}. The global distribution of these three types of wind has been investigated by examining the most effective T {sub freeze-in} indicator, the O{sup 7+}/O{sup 6+} ratio, as measured by the Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer on board the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) during 1998-2008 by Zhao et al. In this study, we extend the previous investigation to 2011 June, covering the unusual solar minimum between solar cycles 23 and 24 (2007-2010) and the beginning of solar cycle 24. We find that during the entire solar cycle, from the ascending phase of cycle 23 in 1998 to the ascending phase of cycle 24 in 2011, the average fractions of the low O{sup 7+}/O{sup 6+} ratio (LOR) wind, the high O{sup 7+}/O{sup 6+} ratio (HOR) wind, and ICMEs at 1 AU are 50.3%, 39.4%, and 10.3%, respectively; the contributions of the three types of wind evolve with time in very different ways. In addition, we compare the evolution of the HOR wind with two heliospheric current sheet (HCS) parameters, which indicate the latitudinal standard deviation (SD) and the slope (SL) of the HCS on the synoptic Carrington maps at 2.5 solar radii surface. We find that the fraction of HOR wind correlates with SD and SL very well (slightly better with SL than with SD), especially after 2005. This result verifies the link between the production of HOR wind and the morphology of the HCS, implying that at least one of the major sources of the HOR wind must be associated with the HCS.

  5. sHOrT COMMUniCATiOns 3838 SEX-ROLE REVERSAL IN SONG? FEMALES SING MORE FREQUENTLY THAN MALES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Troy G.

    not be unique. Key words: Bird song, female song, Icterus pustulatus, trop- ical songbird, sexual selection Department of Biology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 6, anada Abstract. Birds in which both sexes female song in other sexu- ally monomorphic or weakly dimorphic species, so such patterns might

  6. I think that I shall never see {hor_ellipsis} a lovely forestry policy: Land use programs for conservation of forests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, S.F.; Richards, K.R.

    1994-01-01

    Forestry programs are frequently invoked as having potential for mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions. Most studies have attempted to quantify the potential impact of forest programs on carbon uptake and the potential costs of such programs. In this paper, we will attempt instead to focus on the institutional issues of the implementation of forestry programs for carbon sequestration. In particular, we explore the challenges for implementing forest programs that are: of increasing technological complexity; and in settings that depart significantly from the idealized conditions of economic models. We start in Section 1 by examining a suite of instruments that are commonly employed to implement a given policy. Section 2 examines a relatively simple case -- a tree-planting program in the US -- and demonstrates that there are significant difficulties involved in implementing a carbon sequestration program, even in a well-developed market economy. Section 3 focuses on other technologies in the US and why the choice of policy instruments and program design is more difficult than for the simple tree-planting case. Section 4 considers implementation of forestry policies in other countries where the economies may bear less resemblance to the ideal market economy than the US. In those settings, the choice of policy instruments may be very sensitive to non-market considerations that are often missed in conventional policy and cost analysis.

  7. ACE in the Hole: Adaptive Contour Estimation Using Collaborating Mobile Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramamritham, Krithi

    Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai - 400076, INDIA sumana, krithi, puru@cse.iitb.ac.in Abstract contour maps based on level sets of interest. The larger the density of the sensors covering the area

  8. BAKAL´A?RSK´A PR´ACE V´?tezslav Kala Jednoduché polookruhy ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-05-30

    Dokonce ani podpolookruhy Q+ dosud nej- sou popsané. V práci dokazujeme tvrzen?, ze kazdý kongruencne jednoduchý polookruh S ? Q+ je p-delitelný pro ...

  9. United Technologies Corporation: Achieving Competitive Excellence (ACE): Operating System Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roth, George

    2010-11-30

    United Technologies Corporation (abbreviated UTC, NYSE ticker symbol UTX) is a large, industrial conglomerate that designs, manufactures, and services a broad range of products, ranging from air conditioners and elevators ...

  10. Understanding Hospital Admissions Close to the End of Life (ACE) Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, Zoë S; Fyfe, Miranda; Momen, Natalie; Hoare, Sarah; Barclay, Stephen

    2013-03-11

    - istrative areas, with different demographic profiles rele- vant to place of death, including access to services. The first area is largely rural, with a university city and larger towns and areas of significant social deprivation and af- fluence. The second... Pulmonary Disease, or cancer who die within 72 hours of admission to of the two hospitals. Patients will be identified retrospectively with help from the hospitals’ Bereavement Services. These Ser- vices receive the hospital notes and organise the death cer...

  11. Variability of aerosol optical properties derived from in situ aircraft measurements during ACE-Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, Antony

    , and Cameron S. McNaughton Department of Oceanography, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA Received 29 and artifacts are characterized using in-flight measurements of particle-free air and measurements dominant components, fine-mode pollution and coarse-mode mineral dust, were observed to vary independently

  12. Spectral absorption of solar radiation by aerosols during ACE-Asia R. W. Bergstrom,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    slightly with wavelength in the visible region. We interpret these results in light of the two absorbing by black carbon mixed with nonabsorbing pollution aerosols. For the 12 April case we attempt to estimate a relatively complicated aerosol mixture of both industrial pollution (including black carbon) and mineral dust

  13. CVICU A.C.E. Pilot Program Nursing Role with CPT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    . Bubbles 3. Deep breathing & coughing 3. Incentive spirometer 4. Positioning 4. Deep breathing & coughing 5't evaluate-- Excessive Thick bronchial secretions swallows ~ough Strong, spontaneous Strong cough with ~eak spontaneous cough Absent cough &lor stimulation only ~th stimulation only mechanical support Weak spontaneous

  14. DEER 2007 ACES Status Report Poster: P-23 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR...

  15. Ace ble Parts t This report contains a list of electronic common parts which

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    . Capacitors 2. Resistors 3. Diodes 4. Transistors 5. Connectors 6. Relays 7. Transformers 8. Integrated a premium product from a well-controlled product line having adequate yields and a well-estatlished market. It has been shown that the market for hi-rel products cannot support a completely distinct production

  16. ACES 2014 Poster Directory First Name Last Name Organization Country Email Conference Theme Abstract Title

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    of Technology, Akure Nigeria Nigeria balogunbolutito@ yahoo.com Ecosystem Service Identification Production-WEST NIGERIA. Pamela Barclay ORISE Fellow EPA United States barclay.pamela@ epa.gov Ecosystem Services Abstract Title Jesse Caputo SUNY ESF United States jcaputo@esf.edu Using Ecosystem Services for Energy

  17. SPATIALLY DEPENDENT HEATING AND IONIZATION IN AN ICME OBSERVED BY BOTH ACE AND ULYSSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lepri, Susan T.; Laming, J. Martin; Rakowski, Cara E.; Von Steiger, Rudolf

    2012-12-01

    The 2005 January 21 interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) observed by multiple spacecraft at L1 was also observed from January 21-February 4 at Ulysses (5.3 AU). Previous studies of this ICME have found evidence suggesting that the flanks of a magnetic cloud like structure associated with this ICME were observed at L1 while a more central cut through the associated magnetic cloud was observed at Ulysses. This event allows us to study spatial variation across the ICME and relate it to the eruption at the Sun. In order to examine the spatial dependence of the heating in this ICME, we present an analysis and comparison of the heavy ion composition observed during the passage of the ICME at L1 and at Ulysses. Using SWICS, we compare the heavy ion composition across the two different observation cuts through the ICME and compare it with predictions for heating during the eruption based on models of the time-dependent ionization balance throughout the event.

  18. SREC-Based Financing Program (ACE, JCP&L, RECO) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAandSummaryDIST OFMEAG, Dalton System:Energy 3 atOffice of72 I N S P E

  19. REFRIGERATED BEVERAGE VENDING MACHINE OUTDOOR LOCATION AND ELEVATED (90 F) OUTDOOR TEMPERATURE ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Max

    2014-01-01

    1 Snack FRIDAY 2nd Floor. 2 Beverage Total BVM CoffeeOutdoor BVM GARINGER Breezeway. 1 Beverage GARRINGER 2ndACE BRAND Canteen Total BVM ACE PEPSI ACE LSIC ACE PEPSI ACE

  20. The Quadrangle Club The Quadrangle Club 1155 E. 57th Street Chicago, IL 60637 773.702.7221

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with Cilantro-Lime Mayo Vegetable Wonton, Hoisin Sauce, Green Onion Crisp Ravioli with Tomato Caponata Menu Hors

  1. Behavioral/Systems/Cognitive Estradiol Selectively Enhances Auditory Function in Avian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubel, Edwin

    for the majority of studies on this topic, express hor- mone receptors (Bernard et al., 1999; Gahr, 2001; Jeong et

  2. Secondary Particle Data Observations Marcus Palm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    runs in "scan valley": · Hor pos: [-18, -11] · Vert pos: [-8, 0] ­ No probe ­ 14 GeV/c · Target out runs in "scan valley": · Hor pos: [-18, -11] · Vert pos: [-8, 0] ­ No probe · No major changes from low intensity ­ All runs in "scan valley": · Hor pos: [-18, -11] · Vert pos: [-8, 0] ­ No probe · Decreasing

  3. United Technologies Corporation: Internal Audit Department (IAD) Case Study: A Case Study of the UTC ACE Operating System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roth, George

    2008-08-11

    This study of United Technologies Corporation's Internal Audit Department (IAD) examines how stability and change are important factors in how this department functions and improves. IAD is a leader in the adoption of ...

  4. Process Improvements in Pratt & Whitney's Deficiency Report Investigation Process: A Case Study of the UTC ACE Operating System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colatat, Phech

    2010-06-17

    This case study describes Pratt & Whitney's process improvement activities on its deficiency report (DR) investigation process for the F100 engine program between 2004 and 2006. The DR investigation process is a customer ...

  5. D. Reidsma, H. Katayose, and A. Nijholt (Eds.): ACE 2013, LNCS 8253, pp. 568571, 2013. Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Putten, Peter van der

    are Raspberry Pi (www.raspberrypi.org), MaKey MaKey (www.makeymakey.com) and, more in the creative coding

  6. Spatial distribution and size evolution of particles in Asian outflow: Significance of primary and secondary aerosols during ACE-Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, Antony

    in the presence of pollution and mineral dust aerosol surface areas as high as 1200 mm2 cmÀ3 . Concentrations­13 nm % 5000 cmÀ3 ) in postfrontal air masses associated with offshore flow during cloud-free conditions Composition and Structure: Pollution--urban and regional (0305); 0368 Atmospheric Composition and Structure

  7. THE MULTIVARIATE A/C/E MODEL AND THE GENETICS OF FIBER ARCHITECTURE Agatha D. Lee1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Paul

    ´e1 , Caroline C. Brun1 , Marina Barysheva1 , Yi-Yu Chou1 , Ming-Chang Chiang1 , Sarah K. Madsen1 ,Katie L. McMahon2 , Greig I. de Zubicaray2 , Margaret J. Wright3 , Arthur W. Toga1 , Paul M. Thompson1 1

  8. An intercomparison of lidar-derived aerosol optical properties with airborne measurements near Tokyo during ACE-Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, Antony

    and 6 km over Sagami Bay southwest of Tokyo. The C-130 observation package included a tracking Sun extinction coefficients (sa $ 0.03 kmÀ1 ) derived from the airborne tracking Sun photometer, in situ optical

  9. A global aerosol model forecast for the ACE-Asia field experiment Mian Chin,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chin, Mian

    layer. We attribute this ``missing'' dust source to desertification regions in the Inner Mongolia forecasting. After incorporating the desertification sources, the model is able to reproduce the observed

  10. Translation And Adaptation Of The Addenbrooke’s Cognitive Examination-Revised (Ace-R) For The Slovak Population 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gondova, Kristina

    2012-11-28

    the ROC curve with obtaining an excellent or good value of the AUC. Two cut-off scores were defined, 80 for MCI (sensitivity= 90%, specificity= 100%) and 77 for dementia (94%, 90%). Furthermore, the performance of the patient group and also...

  11. Acoustic shadow-zone arrivals at long range in the North Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Uffelen, Lora J.

    2009-01-01

    1-GM internal-wave energy (right). The hor- izontal linesinternal-wave energy spectrum (right), and an incoherentinternal-wave energy spectrum (right), and an incoherent

  12. Printed in the United States of America. Available from National Technical Information Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    .1 Foam Form ....................... 26 3.2 Styrofoam forms at ACES house ............. 27 3.3 Looking south at ACES house .............. 28 3.4 Four courses of styrofoam forms in place at ACES house

  13. ARE Update Volume 14, Number 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    Markey American Clean Energy and Security Bill can largelyMarkey American Clean Energy and Security Bill (ACES), whichMarkey American Clean Energy and Security Bill (ACES) ACES

  14. 9.7 Studies of Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds from SHEBA/FIRE/ACE: May 1-10 Case Study , J. Intrieri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuidema, Paquita

    the measured surface infrared flux, especially during the winter months (Intrieri and Shupe, 2002). Other to characterize. Measurements from surface-based remote sensors hold the promise of com- prehensive documentation measurements encourage confidence in the surface sen- sor evaluation. 2. Data and Method 2.1 Data Table 1 and 2

  15. Creation and Testing of the ACES Heavy Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Test Schedule for Representative Measurement of Heavy-Duty Engine Emissions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  16. An AsiAn orchid, Eulophia graminEa (orchidAceAe: cymbidieAe), nAturAlizes in FloridA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koptur, Suzanne

    the most northern to the most southern site, and growing only in woodchip mulch at four of the sites

  17. Column closure studies of lower tropospheric aerosol and water vapor during ACE-Asia using airborne Sun photometer and airborne in situ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun photometer and airborne in situ and ship-based lidar measurements B. Schmid,1 D. A. Hegg,2 J. Wang (closure) between solar beam attenuation by aerosols and water vapor measured by airborne Sun photometry agreement with airborne Sun photometry in the marine boundary layer but is considerably lower in layers

  18. INTIIOI )IUC'ION The Annual Cycle Energy System (ACES) project, sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy, provides a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    provides space heating, air conditioning, and domestic water heating to residences and commercial buildings of the water is frozen and the stored ice provides air conditioning in the summer, or at other times if needed, vcrtil;lting, and air conditioning (IIVAC)I and water healing syslenis are surimmiari/zed. 4 The ACO

  19. Aerosol optical properties measured on board the Ronald H. Brown during ACE-Asia as a function of aerosol chemical composition and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    chemical composition; number size distribution; and light scattering, hemispheric backscattering, pollution, volcanic, and dust sources. Presented here as a function of air mass source region are the mass: Pollution--urban and regional (0305); 0365 Atmospheric Composition and Structure: Troposphere

  20. ACEE Int. J. on Civil and Environmental Engineering, Vol. 2, No. 1,Aug 2013 DOI:01.IJCEE.2.1.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recanati, Catherine

    the atmospheric pollutant concentration. A variety of air quality models are available ranging from simple tool in pollution forecasting, air quality management, traffic management and urban planning of urban development iscausing serious air pollution problems in many cities throughout India. A phenomenal

  1. Evaluation of a chemical transport model for sulfate using ACE-2 observations and attribution of sulfate mixing ratios to source regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    models driven by analyzed meteorological data. At Tenerife, Canary Islands, (minimal proximate sources ratios (MRs, in parts per billion, ppb, equal to nmol per mol air) at Tenerife, Canary Islands

  2. A Novel Approach in Determining Oil Dilution Level on a DPF Equipped...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Documents & Publications The Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES):Phase 3 Biodiesel Impact on Engine Lubricant Oil Dilution Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES)...

  3. Cielo Computational Environment Usage Model With Mappings to...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Environment (ACE) Version 8.0 requirements. The ACE requirements reflect the high performance computing requirements for the Production Readiness Milestone user environment...

  4. The Constructed Landscapes of Horace’s Poetic Autobiography in the Odes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lam, Erin

    2012-01-01

    OF HOR AC E’S P OETIC AUTOBIOGRAPHY IN THE ODES By Erin Lamlegitimize his poetic autobiography, while manipulating thisfor Horace’s poetic autobiography. In this paper, I will

  5. A Commentary on the Satires of Juvenal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Courtney, Edward

    2013-01-01

    11.359 ????????? ??? ?????. AERE MINUTO Sen. Dial. 2.12.2.commenta sunt. NONDUM AERE LAVANTUR The usual price of???? ??????. CRASSO SUB AERE This is alleged of Boeotia Hor.

  6. Dashed lines relationships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2 MAG1 DUN1DIN7 GPG1 RFA2 HOR7 NAB2 TPS1 YOL155C YER079W YHR138C YFR017C YLR297W YBR053C YPR015C YIL

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    Maier, Rudolf Richard

    /04/2015, no horário das 7:00 às 14:00 no seguinte endereço: Faculdade de Economia, Administração e Contabilidade

  8. Hydrogen Oxidation and Evolution Reaction Kinetics on Platinum: Acid vs Alkaline Electrolytes

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    Sheng, Wenchao

    The kinetics of the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) on polycrystalline platinum [Pt(pc)] and high surface area carbon-supported platinum nanoparticles (Pt/C) were studied in 0.1 M ...

  9. Putting Things to REST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilde, Erik

    2007-01-01

    Felix A. K agi. Geographic Registration of HTML Documents.Internet Draft draft-daviel-html-geo-tag-08, October 2007. [Le Hors, and Ian Jacobs. HTML 4.01 Speci?cation. World Wide

  10. Acoustic shadow-zone arrivals at long range in the North Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Uffelen, Lora J.

    2009-01-01

    with 1-GM internal-wave energy (right). The hor- izontal1-GM, and 2-GM internal-wave energy levels. . . . . FigureGarrett-Munk internal-wave energy spectrum at full strength

  11. Acoustic shadow-zone arrivals at long range in the North Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Uffelen, Lora J.

    2009-01-01

    with 1-GM internal-wave energy (right). The hor- izontal1-GM, and 2-GM internal-wave energy levels. . . . . Figurethe Garrett-Munk internal-wave energy spectrum (right), and

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  13. EM-Bound Medical Student Exam Performance on the EM-Advanced Clinical Examination (EM-ACE) and Versions 1 and 2 of the National EM M4 Exams

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    House, J.; Morrissey, T.; Hiller, K.

    2015-01-01

    monthly modules would have increased In-Training Exam scoresmodules per month. Objectives: The primary outcome was improvement of In-TrainingTraining Exam Scores of those who consistently complete the iPad curriculum (defined by completion of >75% of modules)

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zakhor, Avideh

    Model Control Architecture Optimal Performance Energy Saving > 50% #12;Example: SinBerBEST Ancillary service to Grid from Buildings Where: No Ancillary With Ancillary ACE(rms)=1.06 ACE(rms)=0.05 #12;visit

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasimhan, Giri

    with human 15 Kb mitochondrial genome Results in ACeDB 25% of genes in operons Important for HGP: technology

  16. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 11, 1729, 2011 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/11/17/2011/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    carried out during short periods; during ACE-2 (June­ July 1997) and CAPEX and DARPO (May­June 2006) cam

  17. Review of the Recent Frequency Performance of the Eastern, Western and ERCOT Interconnections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lacommare, Kristina S H

    2011-01-01

    used 1-minute averages of SCADA frequency and ACE for 2002changed abruptly. When SCADA 1-minute averages of frequency

  18. Vol. 23 no. 19 2007, pages 26122618 BIOINFORMATICS ORIGINAL PAPER doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btm382

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    Timmer, Jens

    in Matlab and R. It is available from the authors on request. An implementation of ACE, written in Matlab

  19. Before the House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Energy and Environment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Subject: EIA Analysis of Renewable Electricity Standard language in ACES Act By: Howard Gruenspecht, Acting Administrator, Energy Information Administration

  20. Particulate air pollution, ambulatory heart rate variability, and cardiac arrhythmia in retirement community residents with coronary artery disease.

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    Bartell, Scott M; Longhurst, John; Tjoa, Thomas; Sioutas, Constantinos; Delfino, Ralph J

    2013-01-01

    for the man- agement of cough: ACCP evidence-based clinicalof ACE inhibitor–induced cough. Several mechanisms for this

  1. Artif Intell Rev (2007) 28:305342 DOI 10.1007/s10462-009-9105-x

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    2007-01-01

    ACE that examines the CO2 emission trading market. Because some packages or models are proprietary, full

  2. Current as of Dec. 19, 2014 How to Request to Attend an External Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    Current as of Dec. 19, 2014 How to Request to Attend an External Conference Using the Attendance Conference Microsite: http://vaww.ees.lrn.va.gov/Conferences/Guidance/ACES/ACES_Search/ 2. Search the ACES to the Conference Pre- registration page. 4. From the Conference Pre-registration page, click on the "Attendee Pre

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    Junior Intermediate Senior Chiefland Hardware & Farm Supply Williston Ace Hardware Bronson Ace Hardware #12;#12;MAP OF YOUR GARDEN ROWS RUN NORTH TO SOUTH BETWEEN ROW SPACING WITHIN ROW PLANT SPACING, and pesticides for growing a garden 20 feet by 26 feet and is donated by BRONSON, WILLISTON ACE HARDWARE

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for 25 min in a saturated solution (ca. 60 %) of uranyl ace- tate, and for 10 min in lead citrate (Rey

  5. Development of Advanced Diesel Particulate Filtration (DPF) Systems...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (ANLCorningCaterpillar CRADA) Development of Advanced Diesel Particulate Filtration (DPF) Systems (ANLCorningCaterpillar CRADA) ace22lee.pdf More Documents & Publications...

  6. Fuel-Neutral Studies of Particulate Matter Transport Emissions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting ace056stewart2012o.pdf More Documents & Publications...

  7. Fuel-Neutral Studies of Particulate Matter Transport Emissions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  8. Enhanced High Temperature Performance of NOx Storage/Reduction...

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    Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation ace026peden2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications Enhanced High Temperature Performance of NOx StorageReduction (NSR) Materials...

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oh, Paul

    .0,it'slocatedat: IoPE]rCv-RoOTl/data/haarcascades/ haarcascade-frontal f ace-defau1t . xnl where lo

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High Efficiency...

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  13. Stretch Efficiency for Combustion Engines: Exploiting New Combustion...

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    1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation ace015daw2011...

  14. A MultiAir / MultiFuel Approach to Enhancing Engine System Efficiency...

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    D.C. ace046lawson2010o.pdf More Documents & Publications Collaborative Lubricating Oil Study on Emissions (CLOSE Project) Collaborative Lubricating Oil Study on Emissions...

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  20. The Role of Fucose in Early Cancer Detection

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    Heinzman, Jeff; McKenzie, David; Melrose, Scott; Selley, Patrick; Wenke, Jamie

    2009-10-01

    . The colors included in the tricolored care are, from left to right, Honey Pot (ACE), Yellow Brick Road (ACE), and Citrus (Behr). Figure 2. (above) Fucose, 15µL Indicator, 800?M, 1200?M,1600?M left to right, 30 min. 66 volume affected the color change.... The colors included in the tricolored care are, from left to right, Honey Pot (ACE), Yellow Brick Road (ACE), and Citrus (Behr). Figure 2. (above) Fucose, 15µL Indicator, 800?M, 1200?M,1600?M left to right, 30 min. 66 volume affected the color change...

  1. Use of Low Cetane Fuel to Enable Low Temperature Combustion

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    Document:  ace011_ciatti_2013_o.pdfTechnology Area: Advanced Combustion; Combustion and Emissions ControlPresenter: Steve CiattiPresenting Organization: Argonne National Laboratory (ANL...

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    2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting ace066yilmaz2012...

  4. Advanced Combustion Concepts - Enabling Systems and Solutions...

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    1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation ace066yilmaz2011...

  5. Optimization of Direct-Injection H2 Combustion Engine Performance...

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  6. Optimization of Advanced Diesel Engine Combustion Strategies...

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  10. Improving Energy Efficiency by Developing Components for Distributed...

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  11. Deactivation Mechanisms of Base Metal/Zeolite Urea Selective...

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    Energy Savers [EERE]

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  15. Thermoelectrics Partnership: Automotive Thermoelectric Modules...

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  16. Measurement and Characterization of Unregulated Emissions from...

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    Publications Bifunctional Catalysts for the Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO by Hydrocarbons ACES: Evaluation of Tissue Response to Inhaled 2007-Compliant Diesel Exhaust Iowa...

  18. Reprogramming Systems Aesthetics: A Strategic Historiography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shanken, Edward A.

    2009-01-01

    33 (May 1998). and Penny, S. 1999. Systems Aesthetics andand http://ace.uci.edu/penny Cited 15 Aug 2009. [14]Ascott, Burnham, Bijvoet, Penny, Whitelaw, Skrebowsky,

  19. Assessments of biofuel sustainability: air pollution and health impacts

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    Tsao, Chi-Chung

    2012-01-01

    the American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009 (ACES)may provide benefits to energy security, GHG reductions, andin order to enhance energy security, offset the greenhouse

  20. High Glucose Inhibits the AMPK-AKT2-ATF-2-MMP2 Pathway and Endothelial Cell Migration

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    Smith, Lemar Irvin

    2013-01-01

    2(1):7-27. Soufi FG, Chronic resveratrol administration haseg, statins, metformin, resveratrol, ACE inhibitors) forNutriceuticals, eg resveratrol (RSV), ?-carotene, vitamins C

  1. Thermoelectric Conversion of Waste Heat to Electricity in an...

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    10 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. ace049schock2010o...

  2. An integrated approach towards efficient, scalable, and low cost...

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    Maume-Deschamps, Véronique

    1 Bibliothèques de Lyon 1 Présentation des ressources et des services Internes de Médecine Générale 2014-15 Le jeudi 7 octobre 2014 #12;2 LES BIBLIOTHEQUES DE LYON 1 Un réseau de 9 bibliothèques articulé thèses · Vous connecter aux postes informatiques de Lyon 1 et accéder à la documentation en ligne hors

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    Cessi, Paola

    the hor- izontally averaged heat equation vertically from the bot- tom to any level z. If the geothermal. Eddy fluxes balance the diapycnal mixing of heat and thus determine the vertical scale of penetration and weakly by geothermal heating at the bottom. Thus, in statistical steady state, the total heat flux across

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    Arleo, Angelo

    Informations et réservations : ce.pv-holidays.com * Offre valable pour tout séjour de 7 nuits détails sur ce.pv-holidays.com. Offre valable sur l'hébergement seul (hors frais de dossier, prestations cumulable avec votre remise partenaire, toute offre promotionnelle ou réductions. PV-CPDistribution, Société

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moll, Yvonne Dolores

    1988-01-01

    number of other mammals such as pig (Gellin et al. , 1981), sheep (Saidi-Mehtar et al. , 1981 and Saidi-Mehtar and Hors-Cayla, 1981), dog (Meera Khan et al. , 1984), cat (O' Brien and Nash, 1982), American mink (Rubtsov et al. , 1981), kangaroo (Dawson...

  10. CYLINDER BUCKLING: THE MOUNTAIN PASS AS AN ORGANIZING JIRI HORAK, GABRIEL J. LORD, AND MARK A. PELETIER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    CYLINDER BUCKLING: THE MOUNTAIN PASS AS AN ORGANIZING CENTER JIR´I HOR´AK, GABRIEL J. LORD of the sensitivity of the shell to imperfections. Key to obtaining this is the existence of a mountain pass point and then numerically compute example mountain pass solutions. Numerically the mountain pass solution with lowest energy

  11. The effect of an employee educational program on the bacteriological quality of blue crab meat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biediger, Catherine M

    1978-01-01

    with hor'izontal rectangular steamers, or metal vats used with boiling (13). The crabs go into the cooker as rapidly as possible. Crabs are cooked to denature the protein so that it can be easily picked from the shell and to reduce the bacterial load...

  12. Expression Patterns of Corticotropin-Releasing Factor, Arginine Vasopressin, Histidine Decarboxylase,

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    Decarboxylase, Melanin-Concentrating Hormone, and Orexin Genes in the Human Hypothalamus David M. Krolewski,1 956108 ABSTRACT The hypothalamus regulates numerous autonomic responses and behaviors. The neuroactive), melanin-concentrating hor- mone (MCH), and orexin/hypocretins (ORX) produced in the hypothalamus mediate

  13. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 5, 19992018, 2005 www.atmos-chem-phys.org/acp/5/1999/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    . The hor- izontal distribution of biomass smoke is estimated from two sources; i) General Circulation Model (GCM) simulations combined with measurements from the Aerosol Robotic Net- work (AERONET) of Sun annual mean surface temperature, thereby suppressing the warming that is attributed to anthropogenic

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    Landim, Claudio

    supported by the agreement France-Br´esil; by the ACI 168 "Tranport hors ´equilibre" du Minist`ere de l) is the standard space-time white noise. If we start in the stationary state, (t, u) = ¯(u) for all t. In this case

  15. The relationship between atmospheric convective radiative effect and net1 energy transport in the tropical warm pool2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartmann, Dennis

    of the atmospheric cloud radiative effect in determining the magnitude of hor- izontal export of energy, they increase the re- quirement for the atmosphere to export energy from convective regions. Over the warmest that the increased energy export is supplied by the radiative heating from convection. The net cloud radiative effect

  16. The Dual Horospherical Radon Transform as a Limit of Spherical Radon Transforms

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    Pasquale, Angela

    The Dual Horospherical Radon Transform as a Limit of Spherical Radon Transforms J. Hilgert, A of G. The horospherical Radon transform maps functions on X to functions on HorX by integrating over the dual horospherical Radon transform as a limit of dual spherical Radon transforms. 1. Introduction

  17. Cite this: Nanoscale, 2015, 7, 4514 Received 9th December 2014,

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    Goddard III, William A.

    oxidation reaction (HOR) ­ in hydrogen fuel cells2 : Water splitting ðOER; HERÞ: H2O ! 1 2 O2 þ H2 ð1Þ Water February 2015 DOI: 10.1039/c4nr07277d www.rsc.org/nanoscale Optimizing the oxygen evolution reaction. Experimental optimization of these catalysts has proceeded slowly. Quantum Mechanics (QM) calculations have

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mesbah, Mounir

    'avancement Conditions requises Date d'examen des conditions Conditions requises INFIRMIER HORS CLASSE - au moins 1 an d INFIRMIER DE CLASSE SUPERIEURE - au moins 9 ans de services effectifs dans un corps ou cadre d'emplois d'infirmiers de catégorie A ou dans un corps militaire d'infirmiers de niveau équivalent ; - dont 4 années

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arleo, Angelo

    conditions Conditions requises INFIRMIER HORS CLASSE - au moins 1 an d'ancienneté dans le 1er échelon de la classe supérieure. 31.12.2014 Article 17 du décret n°2012-762 du 9 mai 2012 INFIRMIER DE CLASSE SUPERIEURE - au moins 9 ans de services effectifs dans un corps ou cadre d'emplois d'infirmiers de catégorie

  20. REGISTRATION FORM PERSONAL INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finley Jr., Russell L.

    ) EVENT ACTIVITIES Gordon Scott Hall, 540 E. Canfield, Detroit 7:30 - 8:00 a.m. Continental Breakfast of Medicine Quantity Complimentary MGM Grand, 1777 3rd Street, Detroit 5:30 p.m. Cocktail and Hors d 540 E. Canfield, 1369 Scott Hall Detroit, MI 48201 (877) WSU-MED1 alumni@med.wayne.edu Fax (313) 577

  1. P E R S P E C T I V E www.ScienceTranslationalMedicine.org 3 April 2013 Vol 5 Issue 179 179ps7 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Wendell

    advent of biologics--recombinant hor- mones,solublereceptors,andantibody-based drugs--transformed to market. Today, biomedical science stands poised at the threshold of another pharma- ceutical frontier: cell-based therapies. In this Perspective, we discuss the potential power of this new pillar of human

  2. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) under non-equilibrium conditions R. C. Oberthr

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    Boyer, Edmond

    663 Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) under non-equilibrium conditions R. C. Oberthür Institut with the times obtained from quasi- elastic neutron and light scattering, which yield information about neutrons aux petits angles (DNPA) pour l'étude des systèmes hors d'équi- libre thermodynamique est

  3. original article The new england journal of medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoehe, Margret

    .-U.L.); and the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Berlin, Germany (M.R.H.). Address reprint requests to Dr Sedentary life- styles,high-fat,energy and triggers the production of a melanocyte-stimulating hor- mone by means of proopiomelanocortin (POMC

  4. Seasonal abundance and control of the clover head weevil, Hypera meles (Fabr.) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, Roy Lee

    1968-01-01

    natcria] . :. siaall hanr:, ex nill and cli, iper seed c' caner were utilized to clean t:ie seed. T!ie weight of each aced sanple was convor tcd to pounds of seen per ac'-e. Ti " a-. st, - 8 ' . 6 t 1: effectiveness of caranular forxiulations oi...

  5. From HumanFrom Human--Subject Experiments ToSubject Experiments To ComputationalComputational--Agent ExperimentsAgent Experiments

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    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    1 From HumanFrom Human--Subject Experiments ToSubject Experiments To Computational: ACE Electricity Market ACE Human-Subject (HS) Experiments Proof-of-Concept Proposal (GMUComputational--Agent ExperimentsAgent Experiments (And Everything In Between)(And Everything In Between) New Directions, IESA

  6. 2006 Bandung Fe Institute josc3(1)-20060805-013206-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    of aggregate regularities) by means of human subject experiments. Agent-based Computational Economics (ACE regularities) by means of human subject experiments. Agent- based Computational Economics (ACE), on the other to the way EXP does. This has prompted considerations that artificial experiments and human subject

  7. M362K Second Midterm Exam. March 12, 2004 Problem 1. Bridge

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    Voloch, Felipe

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reade, Julian Edgeworth

    1970-07-30

    XXV, pI. 11 ; slight change ). Sargon ' s palace , de t a i l ( alP XL, pI. LXXVI; slight . change ). Sennacher i b ' s Ni neveh pal ace , de t ail (NB, pI. oppos ite p . 67). Sennacherib ' s Ni neveh pal ace , de t a il ( loc. c i...

  9. Economic evaluation of the Annual Cycle Energy System. Volume I. Executive summary. Final report. [In Minneapolis, Atlanta, and Philadelphia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the energy effectiveness and the economic viability of the ACES concept. Three different classes of building are investigated, namely: single-family residence; multi-family residence; and commercial office building. The application of ACES to each of these building types is studied in three different climatic regions: Minneapolis, Atlanta, and Philadelphia. Computer programs - ACESIM for the residences and CACESS for the office building - were used, each comprised of four modules: loads; design; simulation; and economic. For each building type in each geographic location, the economic evaluation of the ACES is based on a comparison of the present worth of the ACES to the present worth of a number of conventional systems. The results of this analysis indicate that the economic viability of the ACES is very sensitive to the assumed value of the property tax, maintenace cost, and fuel-escalation rates, while it is relatively insensitive to the assumed values of other parameters. Fortunately, any conceivable change in the fuel-escalation rates would tend to increase the viability of the ACES concept. An increase in the assumed value of the maintenance cost or property tax would tend to make the ACES concept less viable; a decrease in either would tend to make the ACES concept more viable. The detailed results of this analysis are given in Section 5.4 of Volume II. 2 figures, 21 tables.

  10. Printed in the United States of America. Available from National Technical Information Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    , and passive heat rejection. The house was completed and preliminary operation began in July 1976. Continuous PERFORMANCE REPORT FOR THE ACES DEMONSTRATION HOUSE AUGUST 1976 THROUGH AUGUST 1977 Eugene C. Hise This work REPORT FOR THE ACES DEMONSTRATION HOUSE AUGUST 1976 THROUGH AUGUST 1977 Eugene C. Hise ABSTRACT

  11. Structure of the Sec13?Sec16 edge element, a template for assembly of the COPII vesicle coat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whittle, James R.R.; Schwartz, Thomas U. (MIT)

    2010-09-03

    Ancestral coatomer element 1 (ACE1) proteins assemble latticework coats for COPII vesicles and the nuclear pore complex. The ACE1 protein Sec31 and Sec13 make a 2:2 tetramer that forms the edge element of the COPII outer coat. In this study, we report that the COPII accessory protein Sec16 also contains an ACE1. The 165-kD crystal structure of the central domain of Sec16 in complex with Sec13 was solved at 2.7-{angstrom} resolution. Sec16 and Sec13 also make a 2:2 tetramer, another edge element for the COPII system. Domain swapping at the ACE1-ACE1 interface is observed both in the prior structure of Sec13-Sec31 and in Sec13-Sec16. A Sec31 mutant in which domain swapping is prevented adopts an unprecedented laminated structure, solved at 2.8-{angstrom} resolution. Our in vivo data suggest that the ACE1 element of Sec31 can functionally replace the ACE1 element of Sec16. Our data support Sec16 as a scaffold for the COPII system and a template for the Sec13-Sec31 coat.

  12. A Pre-Gaia Census of Nearby Stellar Groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mamajek, Eric E

    2015-01-01

    The nearest, youngest groups of stars to the Sun provide important samples of age-dated stars for studying circumstellar disk evolution, imaged exoplanets, and brown dwarfs. I briefly comment on the status of the known stellar groups within 100 pc: $\\beta$ Pic, AB Dor, UMa, Car-Near, Tuc-Hor and $\\beta$ Tuc nucleus, Hyades, Col, TW Hya, Car, Coma Ber, 32 Ori, $\\eta$ Cha, and $\\chi^1$ For. I also discuss some poorly characterized groups and "non-groups." Grades for 2015 of Pass, Satisfactory, or Fail are assigned to the groups for the purposes of age-dating stars and brown dwarfs. I speculate that Tuc-Hor could have provided a supernova ~60 pc away ~2.2 Myr ago which showered the Earth with traces of 60Fe-bearing dust.

  13. REAPER: A Reflexive Architecture for Perceptive Agents Bruce A. Maxwell, Lisa A. Meeden, Nii Saka Addo, Paul Dickson, Nathaniel Fairfield, Nikolas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meeden, Lisa A.

    was not a mobile robot, but a computer with a large monitor placed at the waiter's refill station. He had speakers to a person, ask if they wanted an hors d'oeuvre and then lift the tray if they said yes. When his tray was empty, he would make his way back to the refill station. When Santino was happy a face on the LCD screen

  14. Faunal studies of the type Chesteran, Upper Mississippian of southwestern Illinois

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furnish, W. M.; Saunders, W. B.; Burdick, D. W.; Strimple, H. L.

    1971-01-08

    , YOUNGQUIST & NIEL- SEN ( 1952), etc. Additionally, it was reported that the index fossils Goniatites and Eumorphoceras had been found in direct association within the Barnett Shale of central Texas (MILLER & YOUNG- QUIST, 1948, p. 652, 653) and all were... comparable hor- izon in the Fayetteville Shale and upper Barnett Shale as Paracravenoceras (type, P. ozarkense GORDON ) was an important contribution. GORDON (1957) had already recorded a series of am- monoid faunas in Alaska, largely from the Brooks Range...

  15. Project management computer programs: an approach to a better selection and understanding 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acevedo Bohorquez, Jorge Enrique

    1969-01-01

    Qfr SP CCT 45 ocr 4$ OCT 61 0 T CCT de OcT 48 Cr 48 nras NQV is NGV hs IIOV 68 NCV hs vnv 4' I ttoV 4'I hOV tv I Ov vov ae Nov as 'fnv 48 NGV tis NOV 'll NCV de ttGv ah hor . 'Ynv SO htl V QEC dd OEC oh QEC 49 0 C 68 D. C...

  16. ~'SH' G INDUSTRY IN BRAZIL (TERES INA.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ~'SH' G INDUSTRY IN BRAZIL FORTALEZA (TERES INA. ~ SALVADOR BELO HOR I ZONTE · ~ VIT6RIA R I O DE··········· ··········· ····················· Y Vice Consul, American Embassyt R10 de Janeiro, Brazil. Report No. 202, June 3, 1948. Page 2 3 4 4 4 5 5 5 6 7 9 12 16 25 26 30 30 30 40 41 41 41 42 P-7 2;2 #12;BACKGrouND Fishing in Brazil is little

  17. The trees, shrubs, vines and ground covers of Austin, Texas: a study of the cultivated plant materials in a central Texas landscape 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, Deborah Elaine

    1976-01-01

    THE TREES, SHRUBS, VINES AND GROUND COVERS OF AUSTIN, TEXAS: A STUDY OF THE CULTIVATED PLANT NATERIALS IN A CENTRAL TEXAS LANDSCAPE A Thesis by DEBORAH ELAINE COLE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ABN University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December, 1976 Najor Subject: Hor ticulture THE TREES, SHRUBS, VINES AND GROUND COVERS OF AUSTIN, TEXAS: A STUDY OF THE CULTIVATED PLANT MATERIALS IN A CENTRAL TEXAS LANDSCAPE A Thesis...

  18. Growth of chrysanthemums in sewage sludge amended media 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlutt, Edward Frederick

    1979-01-01

    GROVTH 0 CHRYSANTHEMUMS IN SEWAGE SLUDGE AMENDED MEDIA A Thesis by EDWARD FREDERICK SCH' UTT, Jr . Submitted to the Graduate College of TEXAS AEM UNIVERSITY in partial fulfillment o the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... DECEMBER 1979 Maj or Sub j ect: Hor ticulture GROWTH OF CHRYSANTHEMUMS IN SENAGE SLUDGE AMENDED MEDIA A Thesis EDNARD FREDERICK SCHLUTT, Jr. Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Committee Membe. -) Member (Head of Department) DECEMBER...

  19. Preliminary development of a constitutive model for metal matrix composites with damage 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nottorf, Eric Walter

    1985-01-01

    . Another class of models incorporates damage such as cracks by various methods. Hor ii and Nemat-Nasser [40] have formulated a model for a linearly elastic initially isotropic brittle solid with microcracks. When the cracks are opened, the material..., Dvor ak, and Hej azi [43] have developed an analytic constitutive model for unidirectional fibrous reinforced composites with slit cr acks . The model is three phase for cracks whose size is of the same order of magnitude as the fiber diameter...

  20. Correlating the hydrogen evolution reaction activity in alkaline electrolytes with the hydrogen binding energy on monometallic surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheng, WC; Myint, M; Chen, JGG; Yan, YS

    2013-05-01

    The slow reaction kinetics of the hydrogen evolution and oxidation reactions (HER/HOR) on platinum in alkaline electrolytes hinders the development of alkaline electrolysers, solar hydrogen cells and alkaline fuel cells. A fundamental understanding of the exchange current density of the HER/HOR in alkaline media is critical for the search and design of highly active electrocatalysts. By studying the HER on a series of monometallic surfaces, we demonstrate that the HER exchange current density in alkaline solutions can be correlated with the calculated hydrogen binding energy (HBE) on the metal surfaces via a volcano type of relationship. The HER activity varies by several orders of magnitude from Pt at the peak of the plot to W and Au located on the bottom of each side of the plot, similar to the observation in acids. Such a correlation suggests that the HBE can be used as a descriptor for identifying electrocatalysts for HER/HOR in alkaline media, and that the HER exchange current density can be tuned by modifying the surface chemical properties.

  1. Learning Algorithms in a Decentralized General Equilibrium Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    by lowering prices. This suggests that agent-based models with decentralized interaction risk untenable The growing body of ACE literature has addressed issues in finance (LeBaron 2000), labour markets (Tesfatsion

  2. Development of Optimal Catalyst Designs and Operating Strategies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evaluation ace029harold2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications Development of Optimal Catalyst Designs and Operating Strategies for Lean NOx Reduction in Coupled LNT-SCR Systems...

  3. Enhanced High Temperature Performance of NOx Storage/Reduction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. ace026peden2010o.pdf More Documents & Publications Mechanisms of Sulfur Poisoning of NOx Adsorber (LNT) Materials...

  4. High Efficiency Engine Systems Development and Evaluation | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation ace017briggs2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications Achieving and...

  5. Computationally Efficient Modeling of High-Efficiency Clean Combustion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation ace012aceves2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications Simulation of...

  6. Academic Affairs Subject Files, 19331967 (bulk 19591967) Inventory by Valerie Gillispie, 10 February 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devoto, Stephen H.

    and State ACE Amherst Cluster College Concept Dartmouth Education and World Affairs Institute Merritt Estate External Affairs Alumni Relations Alumni Relations: Continuing Education Alumni on the Education of Scientists, 19471952 Consultative Finance Committee Committee on Faculty Government, 1966

  7. Boreal forest fire emissions in fresh Canadian smoke plumes: C1-C10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), CO2, CO, NO2, NO, HCN and CH3CN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    ppbv), methanol, ethene, ethane, ethyne, propene, acetone,ethene, ?-pinene, ?-pinene, ethane, benzene, propene, ace-CO), methane (CH 4 ) and ethane (C 2 H 6 ) (Kasis- chke et

  8. aftercastle masted vessel with aftercastle is found on a Spanish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    masted vessel with aftercastle is found on a Spanish ations it would have any idea of crusader ships aces for the new tack as large as the crusader vessels (

  9. Computational Electromagnetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taflove, Allen

    Washington, DC 20330, USA ACES JOURNAL ASSOCIATE EDITORS Giandomenico Amendola John Beggs John Brauer Magda. Zaghloul Apisak Ittipiboon Werner Wiesbeck John H. Beggs Veysel Demir C. J. Reddy David Chen Todd H. Hubing

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: ATP-LD; Cummins...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about ATP-LD; Cummins next generation tier 2 bin 2 diesel engine. ace061ruth2014o.pdf More Documents & Publications ATP-LD; Cummins Next...

  11. Language Attitudes and Linguistic Profiling among Micro-Enterprisers in Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brewer, Rebecca Ann

    2013-05-21

    This study examines the language attitudes of entrepreneurial students enrolled in the Academy for Creating Enterprise (ACE) in Mexico City toward six rural and urban varieties of Mexican Spanish to consider whether their ...

  12. Textiles, Guano and Railroads: The Role of the United States in the Early Development Failures of Peru, 1818-1876

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bollinger, William

    2012-01-01

    P RIDE AND R ACE Guano gave Peru power that was resented inand nation-building. Peru’s naval power – a vital factor inthe context of the rise to power of Peru’s self-described “

  13. A Comparison of Iterative Feedback Tuning and Classical PID Tuning Schemes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gevers, Michel

    Louvain-la-Neuve, BELGIUM Gevers@csam.ucl.ac.be OLIVIER LEQUIN DCRT-ACE/Process Control Optimization - Plastics, Solvay S.A. Rue de Ransbeek, 310, B-1120 Brussels, BELGIUM Olivier.Lequin@solvay.com Abstract

  14. High Efficiency Clean Combustion in Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    D.C. ace17wagner.pdf More Documents & Publications High-Efficiency Clean Combustion in Light-Duty Multi-Cylinder Diesel Engines High Efficiency Clean Combustion in...

  15. Advanced Boost System Development for Diesel HCCI/LTC Application...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation ace037sun2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced Boost...

  16. EROSION MECHANISM IN DUCTILE METALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bellman Jr., Robert

    2013-01-01

    England. Mayvflle, fL A. , "Mechanism of fV1aterial RemovalSubmitted to WEAR EROSION MECHANISM IN DUCTILE METALS Robertmetals. ace and erosion rate mechanism is a signifi- mic in

  17. Hemi Orolingual Angioedema after tPA Administration for Acute Ischemic Stroke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madden, Bryan; Chebl, Ralphe B.

    2015-01-01

    M. Angioedema after administration of ACE inhibition afterAngioedema after tPA Administration Lancet. 2012;379(9834):Angioedema after tPA Administration for Acute Ischemic

  18. The LANL atomic kinetics modeling effort and its application...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Cowan code or Dirac-Fock-Slater code), (2) ACE collisional excitation code (Plane-wave Born, Columb-Born and distorted-wave methods) and (3) GIPPER ionization code...

  19. Real-World Studies of Ambient Ozone Formation as a Function of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    -- Washington D.C. ace29lawson.pdf More Documents & Publications Weekday and Weekend Air Pollutant Levels in Ozone Problem Areas in the U.S. DOE's Studies of WeekdayWeekend...

  20. Large estragole fluxes from oil palms in Borneo 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Misztal, Pawel K; Owen, Susan M; Guenther, Alex B; Rasmussen, R; Geron, C; Harley, P; Phillips, Gavin J; Ryan, A; Edwards, D P; Hewitt, C N; Nemitz, Eiko; Siong, J; Heal, Mathew R; Cape, J Neil

    2010-01-01

    During two field campaigns (OP3 and ACES), which ran in Borneo in 2008, we measured large emissions of estragole (methyl chavicol; IUPAC systematic name 1-allyl-4-methoxybenzene; CAS number 140-67-0) in ambient air above ...

  1. Numerical simulation of borehole acoustic logging in the frequency and time domains with hp-adaptive finite elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    for Computational Engineering and Sciences (ICES), The University of Texas at Austin, 201 East 24th Street, ACES and for the improvement of acoustic logging techniques used by oil- and oil-service companies to detect and quantify

  2. Culture, Poverty and Necessity Entrepreneurship: The Academy for Creating Enterprise in Mexico and the Philippines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brewer, Jeremi

    2012-07-16

    This dissertation demonstrates how ACE has successfully equipped thousands of poor Filipinos with the tools necessary for them to raise themselves out of poverty by offering them a culture-specific curriculum that they can ...

  3. Development of Optimal Catalyst Designs and Operating Strategies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting ace029harold2012o.pdf More Documents & Publications Lean...

  4. Frequency Control Performance Measurement and Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illian, Howard F.

    2011-01-01

    14   2.2.1.4   NERC ANSI Standardsand Abbreviations ACE AGC AIE ANSI AOM BA BAAL BAC BRD CCTFRequirements 2.2.1.4 NERC ANSI Standards Process In 2002,

  5. Stakeholder and Grantee Perceptions of the Kenedy County Agricultural Conservation Education Center 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langford, Anna

    2012-10-19

    federal funds from a Coastal Impact Assistance Program grant. The purpose of this study was to identify grantee and stakeholder perceptions of the Kenedy County ACE Center. The results identified beliefs about the Center's purpose, who its stakeholders...

  6. Development of Enabling Technologies for High Efficiency, Low...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    10 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. ace038fiveland2010o.pdf More Documents &...

  7. Measurement and Characterization of Unregulated Emissions from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    09 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. ace30storey.pdf More Documents &...

  8. Measurement and Characterization of Unregulated Emissions from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    10 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. ace045storey2010o.pdf More Documents &...

  9. Natural Language Generation for Nature Conservation: Automating Feedback to help Volunteers identify

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddharthan, Advaith

    Language Generation, Educational Application, Bumblebee Conser- vation, Citizen Science, Generating, including the use of websites and social media, to increase participation in "citizen science", which Science, University of Aberdeen, U.K. (2) Aberdeen Centre for Environmental Sustainability (ACES

  10. Optimization of Direct-Injection H2 Combustion Engine Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2010 -- Washington D.C. ace009wallner2010o.pdf More Documents & Publications Optimization of Direct-Injection H2 Combustion Engine Performance, Efficiency, and Emissions H2...

  11. Optimization of Advanced Diesel Engine Combustion Strategies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. ace020reitz2010o.pdf More Documents & Publications Optimization of Advanced Diesel Engine Combustion Strategies Optimization of Advanced Diesel...

  12. Drug Repositioning and Pharmacophore Identification in the Discovery of Hookworm MIF Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y Cho; J Vermeire; J Merkel; L Leng; X Du; R Bucala; M Cappello; E Lolis

    2011-12-31

    The screening of bioactive compound libraries can be an effective approach for repositioning FDA-approved drugs or discovering new pharmacophores. Hookworms are blood-feeding, intestinal nematode parasites that infect up to 600 million people worldwide. Vaccination with recombinant Ancylostoma ceylanicum macrophage migration inhibitory factor (rAceMIF) provided partial protection from disease, thus establishing a 'proof-of-concept' for targeting AceMIF to prevent or treat infection. A high-throughput screen (HTS) against rAceMIF identified six AceMIF-specific inhibitors. A nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), sodium meclofenamate, could be tested in an animal model to assess the therapeutic efficacy in treating hookworm disease. Furosemide, an FDA-approved diuretic, exhibited submicromolar inhibition of rAceMIF tautomerase activity. Structure-activity relationships of a pharmacophore based on furosemide included one analog that binds similarly to the active site, yet does not inhibit the Na-K-Cl symporter (NKCC1) responsible for diuretic activity.

  13. Red Storm usage model :Version 1.12.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jefferson, Karen L.; Sturtevant, Judith E.

    2005-12-01

    Red Storm is an Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) funded massively parallel supercomputer located at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The Red Storm Usage Model (RSUM) documents the capabilities and the environment provided for the FY05 Tri-Lab Level II Limited Availability Red Storm User Environment Milestone and the FY05 SNL Level II Limited Availability Red Storm Platform Milestone. This document describes specific capabilities, tools, and procedures to support both local and remote users. The model is focused on the needs of the ASC user working in the secure computing environments at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and SNL. Additionally, the Red Storm Usage Model maps the provided capabilities to the Tri-Lab ASC Computing Environment (ACE) requirements. The ACE requirements reflect the high performance computing requirements for the ASC community and have been updated in FY05 to reflect the community's needs. For each section of the RSUM, Appendix I maps the ACE requirements to the Limited Availability User Environment capabilities and includes a description of ACE requirements met and those requirements that are not met in that particular section. The Red Storm Usage Model, along with the ACE mappings, has been issued and vetted throughout the Tri-Lab community.

  14. The Rapprochement between Bhutan and Tibet under the Enlightened Rule of Sde-srid XIII Shes-rab-dbang-phyug (R.1744-63)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ardussi, John A.

    1999-01-01

    to formally pay tribute, whence they returned in 1735 with imperial patents (gser-yig) and seals of office22. Although one Bhutanese scholar of the time saw in the conclusion of this mission to China “the fulfillment of our hopes,”23 the reality... , Dolanji, H.P., 1974. L5DL = Ngag-dbang-blo-bzang-rgya-mtsho (1617-1682), Za hor gyi ban de ngag dbang blo bzang rgya mtsho’i ’di snang ’khrul pa’i rol rtsed rtogs brjod kyi tshul du bkod pa du kï la’i gos bzang. (Autobiography of the 5th Dalai Lama...

  15. A deformation hypothesis for granular materials subjected to rapid, repetitive loading 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bratton, Jimmie Lloyd

    1965-01-01

    . Barbara Jenklns lor typing the manuscript, Gratitude is also expressed to my wile, Aileen, for hor encour- agemont. and long-sufLering throughout the research program; and to my parents, NIr. and Mrs. I, loyd M, Bratton, Ior their devotion... I I "i. ? (. ' pi?i, 'c ideal S(. ? css-Strain Curve 'I'Epical Rcpct?1. ?ve Trina i al Ft ress-Stra in Curve 2 . . ) SI. ?css-Strain Curves fo?' First Cycle Lo;?ding 2. 4 S(r'css-Strain (urvcs for First a?d Tivo Hun- dredth Cycles (I( em...

  16. Activity ID Activity Name Orig Start Finish BL Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    23Oct13 31Jul13 $40,024.32 32 13055800A Lower TF to hor/transport to wind sta on 3 0% 24Oct13 28Oct13 $0.00 32 13055600 Prepare TF for OH winding 5 0% 29Oct13 04Nov13 06Aug13 $13,341.44 32 13055900 Braze first lead and prepare for winding 5 0% 05Nov13 11Nov13 13Aug13 $16,676.80 32 13056000 Wind 1st

  17. Legend"s End Issue 1 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonds, Martha

    1984-01-01

    to LEGEND'S END. I'm glad It's In youn. hand* at last. This Is a stony that'6 been with me hor a long, long turn. The writing wa* begun several year* ago, though wiXh other committment*, I couldn't begin in earnest until the. hall oh '11. Then health... tyranny and heroism. It i* about the men who created a legend and who rehuse to let It end. Thl* i* volume one oh two ? but don't panic. The *tory you hold In your hand* Is complete between these coven*. Volume II i* In the early planning *tage...

  18. Status and Monitoring of Natural and Supplemented Chinook Salmon in Johnson Creek, Idaho, 2006-2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabe, Craig D.; Nelson, Douglas D.

    2008-11-17

    The Nez Perce Tribe Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation Enhancement Project (JCAPE) has conducted juvenile and adult monitoring and evaluation studies for its 10th consecutive year. Completion of adult and juvenile Chinook salmon studies were conducted for the purpose of evaluating a small-scale production initiative designed to increase the survival of a weak but recoverable spawning aggregate of summer Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha. The JCAPE program evaluates the life cycle of natural origin (NOR) and hatchery origin (HOR) supplementation fish to quantify the key performance measures: abundance, survival-productivity, distribution, genetics, life history, habitat, and in-hatchery metrics. Operation of a picket style weir and intensive multiple spawning ground surveys were completed to monitor adult Chinook salmon and a rotary screw trap was used to monitor migrating juvenile Chinook salmon in Johnson Creek. In 2007, spawning ground surveys were conducted on all available spawning habitat in Johnson Creek and one of its tributaries. A total of 63 redds were observed in the index reach and 11 redds for all other reaches for a combined count of 74 redds. Utilization of carcass recovery surveys and adult captures at an adult picket weir yielded a total estimated adult escapement to Johnson Creek of 438 Chinook salmon. Upon deducting fish removed for broodstock (n=52), weir mortality/ known strays (n=12), and prespawning mortality (n=15), an estimated 359 summer Chinook salmon were available to spawn. Estimated total migration of brood year 2005 NOR juvenile Chinook salmon at the rotary screw trap was calculated for three seasons (summer, fall, and spring). The total estimated migration was 34,194 fish; 26,671 of the NOR migrants left in the summer (July 1 to August 31, 2005) as fry/parr, 5,852 left in the fall (September 1 to November 21, 2005) as presmolt, and only 1,671 NOR fish left in the spring (March 1 to June 30, 2006) as smolt. In addition, there were 120,415 HOR supplementation smolts released into Johnson Creek during the week of March 12, 2007. Life stage-specific juvenile survival from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was calculated for brood year 2005 NOR and HOR supplementation juvenile Chinook salmon. Survival of NOR parr Chinook salmon migrating from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was 28.2% and 16.2%. Survival of NOR presmolt Chinook salmon migrating from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was 28.2% and 22.3%. Survival of NOR smolt Chinook salmon migrating from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was 44.7% and 32.9%. Survival of HOR smolt Chinook salmon migrating from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was 31.9% and 26.2%. Multi-year analysis on smolt to adult return rate's (SAR's) and progeny to parent ratio's (P:P's) were calculated for NOR and HOR supplementation Brood Year 2002 Chinook salmon. SAR's were calculated from Johnson Creek to Johnson Creek (JC to JC), Lower Granite Dam to Lower Granite (LGD to LGD), and Lower Granite Dam to Johnson Creek (LGD to JC); for NOR fish SAR's were 0.16%, 1.16% and 1.12%, while HOR supplementation SAR's from JC to JC, LGD to LGD and LGD to JC were 0.04%, 0.19% and 0.13%. P:P's for all returning NOR and HOR supplemented adults were under replacement levels at 0.13 and 0.65, respectively. Recruit per spawner estimates (R/S) for Brood Year 2005 adult Chinook salmon were also calculated for NOR and HOR supplemented Chinook salmon at JC and LGD. R/S estimates for NOR and HOR supplemented fish at JC were 231 and 1,745, while R/S estimates at LGD were 67 and 557. Management recommendations address (1) effectiveness of data collection methods, (2) sufficiency of data quality (statistical power) to enable management recommendations, (3) removal of uncertainty and subsequent cessation of M&E activities, and (4) sufficiency of findings for program modifications prior to five-year review.

  19. Field tests of a small instrumented pile 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korb, Kenneth Wayne

    1969-01-01

    vari. cty of field soils. The soils at the test site;-, inc! udc clays of high and low p! anti c- ity, clayey sands, and silty sar. :ds. The model pile is instrun ?need in such a way that separate r&easurements of skin friction and poirt bearing arc...' Iant damping value for friction. S&tggestions are made regarding the practical use of te"t res lt in piljng behavior studies. Acknow I edgement. , The aut hor wishes to take this opportunity to thank the following persons for their. contributions...

  20. Ultralow charge-transfer resistance with ultralow Pt loading for hydrogen evolution and oxidation using Ru@Pt core-shell nanocatalysts

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Jia X.; Zhang, Yu; Capuano, Christopher B.; Ayers, Katherine E.

    2015-07-15

    We evaluated the activities of well-defined Ru@Pt core-shell nanocatalysts for hydrogen evolution and oxidation reactions (HER-HOR) using hanging strips of gas diffusion electrode (GDE) in solution cells. With gas transport limitation alleviated by micro-porous channels in the GDEs, the charge transfer resistances (CTRs) at the hydrogen reversible potential were conveniently determined from linear fit of ohmic-loss-corrected polarization curves. In 1M HClO? at 23°C, a CTR as low as 0.04 ? cm² was obtained with only 20 ?g cm?² Pt and 11 ?g cm?² Ru using the carbon-supported Ru@Pt with 1:1 Ru:Pt atomic ratio. Derived from temperature-dependent CTRs, the activation barriermore »of the Ru@Pt catalyst for the HER-HOR in acids is 0.2 eV or 19 kJ mol?¹. Using the Ru@Pt catalyst with total metal loadings « less

  1. FLOOD PROTECTION STRUCTURE ACCREDITATION TASK FORCE More than 21,000 communities across the U.S. and its territories voluntarily participate in the NFIP by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    FLOOD PROTECTION STRUCTURE ACCREDITATION TASK FORCE BACKGROUND More than 21,000 communities across management ordinances to reduce future flood damage. In exchange, the NFIP makes federally-backed flood is expected to perform during the 1% ACE event or 100- year flood (this is defined as the "base flood" in NFIP

  2. A Data Transformation System for Biological Data Sources \\Lambda P. Buneman, S.B. Davidson, K. Hart, C. Overton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Limsoon

    Introduction The goal of the Human Genome Project (HGP) is to sequence the 24 distinct chromosomes comprising the human genome. Much of the information associated with the HGP resides not in conventional databases for a variety of platforms. For example, ACE is an extremely popular data format within the HGP, and has been

  3. The Ambient Computational Environments Architecture for Reliable, Secure,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    challenge. The ACE - Ambient Computational Environments - architecture aims at high- scale and seamlessThe Ambient Computational Environments Architecture for Reliable, Secure, and Pervasive Computing The University of Kansas #12;Abstract During the past few years, the technology world has become more and more

  4. From HumanFrom Human--Subject Experiments ToSubject Experiments To ComputationalComputational--Agent ExperimentsAgent Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    1 From HumanFrom Human--Subject Experiments ToSubject Experiments To Computational Experiments - 100% human 100% computational agents What is Agent-based Comp Econ (ACE)? - 100% computational://www.econ.iastate.edu/tesfatsi/aexper.htm #12;3 Spectrum of Possible Experiments 100% human Humans with computer access Human

  5. On Alan Turing and the Origins of Digital Computers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newcastle upon Tyne, University of

    1 On Alan Turing and the Origins of Digital Computers B. Randell Computing Laboratory University of Newcastle upon Tyne Abstract This paper documents an investigation into the role that the late Alan Turing by the late Alan Turing. I knew that he was credited with much of the design of the ACE computer

  6. NATURE PHYSICS | VOL 8 | DECEMBER 2012 | www.nature.com/naturephysics 855 books & arts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    , philosopher and computing pioneer Alan Turing, one hundred years after his birth. The pride of the collection that would change the world, so the Pilot ACE, as shaped by the mind of Alan Turing, represents that of others: I see the character of Alan Turing -- as portrayed in the film -- as a sentient re

  7. BUPMC -UPD Nouvelles acquisitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hélein, Frédéric - Institut de Mathématiques de Jussieu, Université Paris 7

    , ... Hilary W. Putnam, ... [et al.] Chevaleret 01.8 TUR 05 Alan Turing's electronic brain : the struggle 05 A Alan Turing's electronic brain : the struggle to build the ACE, the world's fastest computer Alan Turing's systems of logic : the Princeton thesis / edited and introduced by Andrew W. Appel

  8. UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN S T R AT E G I C P L A N 2 0 1 3 -1 6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liberzon, Daniel

    , Professsor Department of Physics Robert Hauser, Dean College of ACES Stig Lanesskog, Associate Provost OfficeUNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN S T R AT E G I C P L A N 2 0 1 3 - 1 6 #12;Strategic Vice Provost - Office of the Provost Kenneth Ballom, Dean Office of the Dean of Students Jeffrey Brown

  9. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 12, 10831100, 2012 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/12/1083/2012/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    the importance of this region as a source of reactive or- ganic gases and aerosols from natural forests, biomass aircraft was deployed over northern Malaysian Borneo as part of the ACES/OP3 measurement campaign. During formation we find that the free troposphere is influenced by biomass burning aerosol transported from

  10. Structural Evidence for a Dehydrated Intermediate in Green Fluorescent Protein Chromophore Biosynthesis*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biosynthesis* Received for publication,December 6, 2009, and in revised form, February 23, 2010 Published, JBC- zolone and phenolic rings, has been attributed to one of the intermediate states in the GFP chromophore biosynthesis. The UV irradiation ( 250­300 nm) of aceGFP-G222E drives the chromophore maturation further

  11. Goldschmidt Conference Abstracts 2008A1108 Geochemical characteristics of REE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zreda, Marek

    Institute of Yunnan Province Tested with ICP-MS method, samples include fault tectonites, ore-hosted rocks - strongly depleted Ce ­ enriched Eu and heavy REE means the superposed ore- forming process of biotite-917) and the Major Discipline for KUST (2008). The theoretical basis for ACE, an age calculation engine

  12. On Improving the Effectiveness of Open Learning Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conati, Cristina

    specific student difficulties. ACE provides students with a highly-graphical, exploratory learning that support the exploratory behaviour of those students who would otherwise have trouble learning of tutor-controlled environments that monitor and structure the learning process through focused activities

  13. Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining (KDDM) survey report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Laurence R.; Jordan, Danyelle N.; Bauer, Travis L.; Elmore, Mark T.; Treadwell, Jim N.; Homan, Rossitza A.; Chapman, Leon Darrel; Spires, Shannon V.

    2005-02-01

    The large number of government and industry activities supporting the Unit of Action (UA), with attendant documents, reports and briefings, can overwhelm decision-makers with an overabundance of information that hampers the ability to make quick decisions often resulting in a form of gridlock. In particular, the large and rapidly increasing amounts of data and data formats stored on UA Advanced Collaborative Environment (ACE) servers has led to the realization that it has become impractical and even impossible to perform manual analysis leading to timely decisions. UA Program Management (PM UA) has recognized the need to implement a Decision Support System (DSS) on UA ACE. The objective of this document is to research the commercial Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining (KDDM) market and publish the results in a survey. Furthermore, a ranking mechanism based on UA ACE-specific criteria has been developed and applied to a representative set of commercially available KDDM solutions. In addition, an overview of four R&D areas identified as critical to the implementation of DSS on ACE is provided. Finally, a comprehensive database containing detailed information on surveyed KDDM tools has been developed and is available upon customer request.

  14. The Astrophysical Journal, 769:43 (13pp), 2013 May 20 doi:10.1088/0004-637X/769/1/43 C 2013. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeForest, Craig

    in the low solar corona over a four-day passage to impact with spacecraft located near Earth. Combining observed by ACE and Wind with specific features in the solar corona (a segment of a long flux rope); (2 the corona, and solar wind entrained by the front of the CME); (4) measure mass accretion of the system via

  15. Email: forrest@climatemodeling.org One Bethel Valley Road Phone: 865-576-7680 P.O. Box 2008, MS-6301

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - with a highly efficient computational approach. The resulting upgrades to the Community Earth System Model (CESM://www.scidac.gov/bioenv/bioenv.html Project Description The ACES4BGC Project seeks to advance the predictive capabilities of Earth System Models (ESMs) by reducing two of the largest sources of uncertainty - aerosols and biospheric feedbacks

  16. THE RATIONAL COHOMOLOGY OF A p-LOCAL COMPACT GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Bob

    . Classifying space, p-completion, p-local compact group* *s, fusion. C. Broto is partially supported THE RATIONAL COHOMOLOGY OF A p-LOCAL COMPACT GROUP* *aces of compact Lie groups and p-compact groups, and generalises the earlier concept* * of p

  17. TOEFL TUTORIAL now ONLINE with East Tennessee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsai, Istvan

    to ETSU is NOT required. The course is being offered as a five-week ses- sion three times: Jan. 17 ­ Feb for the reading, QUESTIONS? EMAIL the instructor at mcgarry@etsu.edu or visit the web site at: http://www.etsu.edu/ professionaldevelopment ETSU On-line Registration: http://etsuaw.etsu.edu/wconnect/ace/home.htm #12;

  18. 2015NatureAmerica,Inc.Allrightsreserved. 528 | VOL.10 NO.3 | 2015 | nature protocols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toste, Dean

    with traditional jet and diesel fuels, specifically energy density and volatility. In addition, both ethanol and diesel fuel14. We adopted a two-step approach wherein sugars were first catabolized to ace- tone, butanol feedstock at the time was molasses, which spiked in price because of animal feed demand. These two factors

  19. Chemotherapy of Second stage Human african Trypanosomiasis: Comparison between the Parenteral Diamidine DB829 and Its Oral Prodrug DB868 in Vervet Monkeys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thuita, John K.; Wolf, Kristina K.; Murilla, Grace A.; Bridges, Arlene S.; Boykin, David W.; Mutuku, James N.; Liu, Qiang; Jones, Susan K.; Gem, Charles O.; Ching, Shelley; Tidwell, Richard R.; Wang, Michael Z.; Piane, Mary F.; Brun, Reto

    2015-02-05

    Diseases | DOI:10.1371/journal.pntd.0003409 February 5, 2015 3 / 22 #SP117-ACE-P5; FW = 451.648) was synthesised by Solvias AG (Basel, Switzerland), by first dissociating the hydrochloride molecule from the Scynexis Inc. compound batch...

  20. Syntrophic interactions drive the hydrogen production from glucose at low temperature in microbial electrolysis cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) using ace- tate, making this technology a promising method for biohydrogen production even in very coldSyntrophic interactions drive the hydrogen production from glucose at low temperature in microbial, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA h i g h l i g h t s " H2 production from glucose

  1. FORECAST OF ATLANTIC SEASONAL HURRICANE ACTIVITY AND LANDFALL STRIKE PROBABILITY FOR 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connors, Daniel A.

    Hurricanes (MH) (2.0) 4 4 0 3 3 Major Hurricane Days (MHD) (3.9) 9 9 0 7 7 Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE Coast Including Peninsula Florida - 40% (full-season average for last century is 31%) 3) Gulf Coast from%) New Jersey 2% (1%) New York 10% (8%) 4% (3%) Connecticut 10% (7%) 3% (2%) Rhode

  2. Conjugate imaging of substorms N. stgaard, S. B. Mende, H. U. Frey, J. B. Sigwarth, A. Aasnes, and J. M. Weygand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergen, Universitetet i

    magnetospheric model the IMF is assumed to be an important controlling factor of solar wind, Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA J. M. Weygand. Inst. of Geophys. and Plan. Physics, U.C., Los Angeles-average of the IMF data from Wind and ACE time-shifted to X = -10RE assuming planar propagation of the solar wind

  3. SUMMARY OF 2013 ATLANTIC TROPICAL CYCLONE ACTIVITY AND VERIFICATION OF AUTHORS' SEASONAL AND TWO-WEEK FORECASTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connors, Daniel A.

    -WEEK FORECASTS The 2013 Atlantic hurricane season was much quieter than predicted in our seasonal outlooks. While as past forecasts and verifications are available via the World Wide Web at http Cyclone Energy (ACE) (92) 165 165 142 30 32% Net Tropical Cyclone Activity (NTC) (103%) 175 175 150 43 42

  4. InsideIllinoisF o r F a c u l t y a n d S t a f f , U n i v e r s i t y o f I l l i n o i s a t U r b a n a -C h a m p a i g n Oct. 18, 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bashir, Rashid

    that is being implemented universitywide. PAGE 7 A lot of info The new ACES Library, Information and Alumni said. "And with rapid population growth, land is scarce and expensive, particu- larlyinbigcities, and is not going to melt easily."While steel con- struction may still be more economical and concrete morelaborin

  5. A comparison of similar aerosol measurements made on the NASA P3-B, DC-8, and NSF C-130 aircraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, Antony

    experiments studied emissions from the Asian continent (biomass burning, urban/industrial pollution, and dust and Yokota Air Force Base, Japan, and involved two aircraft: the NASA DC-8 and the NASA P3-B. ACE-Asia focused on aerosol and radiation during April/May and was based in Iwakuni Marine Corps Air Station, Japan

  6. Math 30003 Wolmer V. Vasconcelos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasconcelos, Wolmer

    will be the football champs this season. RU will be the football champs this season! Will RU be the football champs this season? RU has a 10% chance to be the football champs this season. Half the class will ace the course

  7. Airborne measurement of inorganic ionic components of fine aerosol particles using the particle-into-liquid sampler coupled to ion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    many important roles in the environment, including visibility, Earth radiation budget and human health on board the NCAR C130 and NASA P-3B aircraft during the 2001 Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE)-Asia and the Transport and Chemical Evolution over the Pacific (TRACE-P) experiments, respectively. Concentrations of NH4

  8. ABE@IllinoisAgricultural and Biological Engineering Alumni Newsletter. Spring 2009 Rausch Travels to Brazil with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Tonghun

    Rausch Travels to Brazil with ACES Academy for Global Engagement Kent Rausch, Ph.D. '93 AgE, an associate, an overarching theme in the College has been biofuels," said Rausch. "So our class chose to go to Brazil, since of Rausch Travels to Brazil ...Continued http://abe.illinois.edu Page 2 Mato Grosso. "Mato Grosso could

  9. MEDICAL SCHOOL DEAN'S OFFICE (C607) 6-4949 Brooks Jackson, Dean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    , Curriculum, & Evaluation (ACE)/5-3622 5-6382 Majka Woods, Assistant Dean (B630) 6-6067 Sue Mowbray, Project (B615) 5-8284 Adam Maier, LMS Manager (B605) 5-2620 Brian Woods, Lead Course Manager (B685) 5, Program Specialist (B683) Financial Aid 4-7675 Kristin Basballe, Exec Stud Pers Wkr (B686) 4-0692 Sheryl

  10. INSTITUTE OF SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC RESEARCH Last year the Alaska Legislature made a controversial change in the oil production tax, the state's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pantaleone, Jim

    change in the oil production tax, the state's largest source of oil revenue. The old tax, known as ACES much money the production tax brings in is a big issue: oil revenues pay for most state government will stimulate North Slope oil investment, leading to more oil production--and so to higher oil revenues and new

  11. 8 July 2005 PREFACE TO THE HANDBOOK1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    8 July 2005 PREFACE TO THE HANDBOOK1 Purpose The explosive growth in computer power over the past several decades offers new tools and opportunities for economists. Volume 1 of the Handbook handbook at this time also serves an important pedagogical purpose. The ACE approach to economic problems

  12. ccsd00001007 APS/123-QED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gusev d , J.C Portal a;c;e a GHML, MPI-FKF/CNRS, BP 166, F-38042, Grenoble Cedex 9, France b Institute of Semiconductor Physics, 630090 Novosibirsk, Russia c INSA 135, Avenue de Rangueil 31 077 Toulouse Cedex 4, France

  13. Women Leaders in Academic Health Institutional Transformation Required

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    ... · That the lack of women leaders in any field would fix itself when the pipeline was full · That if women just as risk factors · Wing et al NEJM 348:583-92 2003 ­ ACE vs diuretic for HT in elderly outpatients

  14. Multiple-spacecraft study of an extended magnetic structure in the solar wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegelmann, Thomas

    ] studied a small-scale flux rope in the solar wind, which is in close proximity to a heat flux dropoutMultiple-spacecraft study of an extended magnetic structure in the solar wind P. Ruan,1 A. Korth,1. [1] An extended magnetic structure was observed consecutively by five spacecraft (ACE, WIND, STEREO

  15. THE ADVANCED COURSE IN ENGINEERING ON CYBER A Learning Community for Developing Cyber-Security Leaders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE ADVANCED COURSE IN ENGINEERING ON CYBER SECURITY A Learning Community for Developing Cyber-Security: The Advanced Course in Engineering on Cyber Security (ACE-CS) is a public-private partnership to develop top ROTC cadets into the next generation of cyber security leaders. Modeled after the General Electric

  16. THE ADVANCED COURSE IN ENGINEERING ON CYBER A Learning Community for Developing Cyber-Security Leaders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Older, Susan

    THE ADVANCED COURSE IN ENGINEERING ON CYBER SECURITY A Learning Community for Developing Cyber-Security in Engineering on Cyber Security (ACE-CS) is a public- private partnership to develop top ROTC cadets into the next generation of cyber security leaders. Modeled after the General Electric Advanced Course

  17. The Role of Cys2-His2 Zinc Finger Transcription Factors in Polyol Metabolism, Asexual Development and Fumonisin Biosynthesis in Fusarium verticillioides 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malapi-Wight, Martha Maria

    2013-04-12

    demonstrated that F. verticillioides SDA1 and Trichoderma reesei ACE1 are functionally conserved. FvFLBC acts as a regulator of asexual development but not FB1 biosynthesis. I also discovered that the FvFlbC N-terminus is critical for conidia production. CHT1...

  18. Science Park Science Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koolen, Marijn

    Science Park Science Park Science Park Science Park Science Park Kruislaan Kruislaan Science Park SURFsara NLeSC Polder Anna Hoeve Telecity Matrix Innovation Center AUC AMOLF ARCNL UvA Faculty of Science Equinix Universum CWI UvA Oerknal Meet & Eat Maslow Spar ACE Venture Lab IXA ILCA NS Amsterdam Science

  19. VAPOR COMPRESSION HEAT PUMP SYSTEM FIELD TESTS AT THE TECH COMPLEX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    323 CHAPTER 17 VAPOR COMPRESSION HEAT PUMP SYSTEM FIELD TESTS AT THE TECH COMPLEX \\B E Van D for several novel and conventional heat pump systems for space conditioning and water heating. Systems tested include the Annual Cycle Energy System (ACES), solar assisted heat pumps (SAHP) both parallel and series

  20. of California, General Catalog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Academic Excellence (ACE) Program 43 Multicultural Engineering Program (MEP) 43 Services for Transfer call (831) 459-4446 for referral. About the Catalog This catalog contains the basic information about are described in detail on pages 120­466. The listings are alphabetical, with appropriate cross

  1. 10A.7 CLUSTER ANALYSIS OF WESTERN NORTH PACIFIC TROPICAL CYCLONE TRACKS Suzana J. Camargo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smyth, Padhraic

    -scale circulation and ENSO. The clustering technique consists of building a mixture of polynomial regression models, 1999). This technique is an exten- sion of the standard multivariate finite mixture model to al- low and density, ACE (accu- mulated cyclone energy) (Bell et al., 2000), and lifetime. Figure 1: Mean regression

  2. TABLE 1: TOTAL LEAD Content in Drinking Water Client: St. Francis Xavier University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall - 4th Floor ACE43 Sink 1,800 7.5 1,000 3.0 S25 Central Heating Plant - Main Level Washroom Sink 22/Camden/Marguerite - Basement Art Room Sink 14 Floor Men's Washroom Sink 5,500 14 100 10 S3 Lane Hall - Basement Washroom Sink 73 1.3 8.4 Floor

  3. Gear coupling effects on rotordynamics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Robert Warren

    1988-01-01

    The forces on the rotor gear shown in Figure 5, will be equal but opposite those on the spacer. Therefore the forces on a tooth of the rotor located at 8, in spacer reference frame are: sp ace r FN rotor Ey Z. torque Y. Y, f Fig. 5. Forces on one...

  4. Oceanic eddy formation and propagation southwest of Taiwan Feng Nan,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maine, University of

    Oceanic eddy formation and propagation southwest of Taiwan Feng Nan,1,2 Huijie Xue,2 Peng Xiu,2 Fei October 2011; published 31 December 2011. [1] Oceanic eddies are active and energetic southwest of Taiwan, the Kuroshio Current Loop (KCL) appears southwest of Taiwan more frequently than in other seasons, and ACEs

  5. Precision Timing Via Cerenkov Radiation, S.E. Vahsen, C. Lu and K.T. McDonald

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    (TAC) 10 ns delay Stop Start Multi Channel Analyzer (MCA) beam splitter EG&G Ortec 9306 EG&G Ortec 9306 EG&G Ortec 9307 EG&G Ortec 9307 "Pico Timing" Discriminators Canberra Model 2145Spectrum ACE Computer Channel Analyzer (MCA) beam splitter EG&G Ortec 9306 1 GHz Preamplifier Semiconductor Photo Diode EG

  6. Page 1 of 140 An Analytical Framework for Long Term Policy for Commercial Deployment and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Security Act (ACES Act) of 2009, and a continuation of the DOE Clean Coal Power Initiative program in Carbon Capture and Sequestration Technology in the United States By Michael Roberts Hamilton B.S., Mechanical Engineering Georgia Institute of Technology (2007) Submitted to the Engineering Systems Division

  7. Summary of Status: A Unified Architecture for SensorNet with Multiple

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    ). 2.0 Status on Technology Proof of Concept and Integration of the SmartPort Trade Data Exchange will be demonstrated through field tests on a deployed rail testbed. (For background and definition of terms see [1] V upon the original ideas of ACE but utilizing current technology and widely accepted open Web Service

  8. The Free and Cued Selective Reminding Test: Pictures vs. Words 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pettit, Annabel

    2013-07-02

    and performed the ACE-R, TOPF and FCSRT. Stimulus items for the FCSRT consisted of either 16 line drawings (in the picture form) or 16 written words (in the word form). The design was completely-between subjects and the form of test was fully counterbalanced...

  9. Model-Based Testing of Community-Driven Open-Source GUI Applications Qing Xie and Atif M. Memon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Memon, Atif M.

    to the unprecedented code churn rates enabled by the WWW, developers may not have time to determine whether-the-clock evolution has led to unprecedented OSS code churn rates. For example, the OSS ACE+TAO [1] developers average 200+ CVS commits per week [8]. While successful at increasing code churn rates, web- based community

  10. A Heterogeneous Animated Platform for Educational Participatory Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomlinson, Bill

    by populations of 3D animated virtual creatures. When a human participant brings one of the mobile devices (a as an educational tool. Keywords: Human-Computer Interaction, Handheld/Mobile Devices, Virtual/3D EnvironmentsA Heterogeneous Animated Platform for Educational Participatory Simulations Bill Tomlinson ACE

  11. Brief Communication Effect of asymmetric radiant heating on monodisperse acetone/ethanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Richard S.

    Brief Communication Effect of asymmetric radiant heating on monodisperse acetone/ethanol, exploring bi-component droplets of ace- tone/ethanol and acetone/2-propanol mixtures. The ethanol and 2-component droplets composed of acetone/ethanol and acetone/ 2-propanol mixtures (1:1 volume ratio). Fig. 1 shows

  12. urricane activity in the Atlantic basin increased

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with levels in the 1970s and 1980s. For example, the accumulated cyclone energy (ACE) index in the Atlantic of disturbances. Bottom: annual number (Aug­Oct) of North Atlantic basin hurricanes (1980­2005). See figures 2, is a crucial question for the future outlook of hurricane activity in the basin. It is difficult to distinguish

  13. Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological LaboratoryMay-June 2009 Volume13,Number3 AOML is an environmental research laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of hurricane forecasters, who released their annual hurricane seasonal outlook on May 21st. The outlook. The outlook predicts a 70% probability for the following ranges of activity during the six-month long Atlantic hurricanes and two becoming major hurricanes. The accumulated cycle energy (ACE), a measure of the total

  14. Fusion Engineering and Design 100 (2015) 8186 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    Engineering and Design journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/fusengdes Nuclear data for fusion: Validation nuclear data from ENDF to ACE format. · We consider the differences between fission and fusion angular. The progression towards nuclear fusion as a commercially viable power source demands a closer look to be taken

  15. Proceedings of ICRC 2001: 1 cCopernicus Gesellschaft 2001 The Evolution of Galactic Cosmic Ray Element Spectra from Solar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Andrew J.

    behind 5 gcm ¾ of shielding at solar minimum (data from Wilson et al., 1997). mission lasting a year of solar modulation. Depending on the applicable radiation limits, these uncertainties in the radiation Cosmic Ray Element Spectra from Solar Minimum to Solar Maximum: ACE Measurements A. J. Davis1 , R. A

  16. A comparison of the determinism of Mark Twain and Theodore Dreiser 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Startzman, Patricia Karen

    1968-01-01

    ~5 horeefter cited in the teaGt co CO. BJ. cis ~'~Br'G Pl;cain llni ii+3 iG'0 Qcan1 Iiowolla ~ ~aelcctcjj JBZar" ciGI ' s ~bjr' " "' '8 ~ ' &813nczau' 0 pc' J. h' 20113Gnalp press cf 7&a-vur4 . Univero~ty Prese, 7~CVp, p iy' ? hor8. 1=ter oktcl as LBB... as bonitos StLbssgluent, Citation!8 frOIR TWGinhs WorZBh With the 8%Co@Cion Qf Nhat XB h anl, and Xt&tters noh' t'aie, h 8 "th ~ ~'8 s--ota 'ht:. a!t7la~. again in I I3/Q or IQGG (XIIair X1 I 52) Xf this ig true ~ it is apXIarent that Twain'B XIeggimd...

  17. Kinematic Peculiarities of Gould Belt Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vadim V. Bobylev

    2005-12-22

    We analyzed the space velocities of Gould Belt stars younger than 125 Myr located at heliocentric distances Belt by assuming the existence of a single kinematic center whose direction was found to be the following: $l_\\circ=128^\\circ$ and $R_\\circ=150$ pc. The linear velocities reach their maximum at a distance of $\\approx300$ pc from the center and are -6 km s$^{-1}$ for the rotation (whose direction coincides with the Galactic rotation) and +4 km s$^{-1}$ for the expansion. The stellar rotation model used here is shown to give a more faithful description of the observed velocity field than the linear model based on the Oort constants $A_G$ and $B_G$. We present evidence that the young clusters $\\beta$ Pic, Tuc/HorA, and TWA belong to the Gould Belt structure.

  18. Simplified tritium permeation model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Longhurst, G.R.

    1993-09-17

    In this model I seek to provide a simplified approach to solving permeation problems addressed by TMAP4. I will assume that there are m one-dimensional segments with thickness L{sub i}, i = 1, 2, {hor_ellipsis}, m, joined in series with an implantation flux, J{sub i}, implanting at the single depth, {delta}, in the first segment. From material properties and heat transfer considerations, I calculate temperatures at each face of each segment, and from those temperatures I find local diffusivities and solubilities. I assume recombination coefficients K{sub r}{sub 1} and K{sub r}{sub 2} are known at the upstream and downstream faces, respectively, but the model will generate Baskes recombination coefficient values on demand. Here I first develop the steady-state concentration equations and then show how trapping considerations can lead to good estimates of permeation transient times.

  19. Predicting Steam Turbine Performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harriz, J. T.

    1985-01-01

    t pressure .!: !6JS~G;7;"'LO~F:.-.1_c?,t G .? - i' ?1 1" (1125.90 Btu/lb). .: ;7400 HFj 10000; RPM I I : c. The difference (f).h ~ 235.86) ,00000 IE)(PECTr,;,O PEJ~FO :t"'At'J#-~E ! I I j" represents the theoretical i ". ~~,I?~ INtlNITE i...SS.;~E OS: G ?,:Xl. 0 !E"'~[RA"uQE -r 720. (I f}+(?r~ :'..cj : i S',' .>:L" &T J! .[:Ll61. 75 ~ ~~-~-Q_~ ~::_~~.:?::-; ~-._:.-=-~.._._._. ----j- S\\"C>" 3~U;LB~ 1. 594 .'.. 0. ,.: fOOO : 2000 'lOO 4Q(X) :.j. I I "HOR5E..P,::)vvER;?? : FIGURE 4...

  20. Decreased Risk of Radiation Pneumonitis With Incidental Concurrent Use of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors and Thoracic Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kharofa, Jordan; Cohen, Eric P.; Tomic, Rade; Xiang Qun; Gore, Elizabeth

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have been shown to mitigate radiation-induced lung injury in preclinical models. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether ACE inhibitors decrease the risk of radiation pneumonitis in lung cancer patients receiving thoracic irradiation. Methods and Materials: Patients with Stage I through III small-cell and non-small-cell lung cancer treated definitively with radiation from 2004-2009 at the Clement J. Zablocki Veterans Affairs Medical Center were retrospectively reviewed. Acute pulmonary toxicity was quantified within 6 months of completion of treatment according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4. The use of ACE inhibitors, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, inhaled glucocorticosteroids, statins, and angiotensin receptor blockers; dose-volume histogram parameters; and patient factors were assessed for association with Grade 2 or higher pneumonitis. Results: A total of 162 patients met the criteria for inclusion. The majority of patients had Stage III disease (64%) and received concurrent chemotherapy (61%). Sixty-two patients were identified as ACE inhibitor users (38%). All patients had acceptable radiation plans based on dose-volume histogram constraints (V20 [volume of lung receiving at least 20 Gy] {<=}37% and mean lung dose {<=}20 Gy) with the exception of 2 patients who did not meet both criteria. Grade 2 or higher pulmonary toxicity occurred in 12 patients (7.4%). The rate of Grade 2 or higher pneumonitis was lower in ACE inhibitor users vs. nonusers (2% vs. 11%, p = 0.032). Rates of Grade 2 or higher pneumonitis were significantly increased in patients aged greater than 70 years (16% vs. 2%, p = 0.005) or in whom V5 (volume of lung receiving at least 5 Gy) was 50% or greater (13% vs. 4%, p = 0.04). V10 (volume of lung receiving at least 10 Gy), V20, V30 (volume of lung receiving at least 30 Gy), and mean lung dose were not independently associated with Grade 2 or higher pneumonitis. Conclusion: ACE inhibitors may decrease the incidence of radiation pneumonitis in patients receiving thoracic radiation for lung cancer. These findings are consistent with preclinical evidence and should be prospectively evaluated.

  1. Dynamics of hydrogen atom abstraction in the O{sup {minus}}+CH{sub 4} reaction: Product energy disposal and angular distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, M.A.; Farrar, J.M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Energy and angular distributions for the hydrogen abstraction reaction O{sup {minus}}+CH{sub 4}{r_arrow}OH{sup {minus}}+CH{sub 3}, exothermic by 0.26 eV, and a prototype ionic pathway for methane oxidation in hydrocarbon flames have been studied in a crossed molecular beam experiment at collision energies of 0.34, 0.44, and 0.64 eV. At the two lower collision energies, two mechanisms contribute to the differential cross section: In the first, low impact parameter rebound collisions form sharply backward-scattered products, while in the second, larger impact parameter collisions produce a broad distribution of forward scattered products. We suggest that the first group of products is formed by collisions with hydrogen atoms oriented essentially along the relative velocity vector and proceeding through a near-collinear O{hor_ellipsis}H{hor_ellipsis}CH{sub 3} geometry, while the second group corresponds to collisions with one of the three off-axis hydrogens. The products are formed on average with 65{percent} of the total available energy in product internal excitation. The product kinetic energy distribution shows structure that correlates with excitation of the {nu}{sub 2} umbrella bending mode of CH{sub 3}. At the highest collision energy, the product angular distribution shifts entirely to the forward direction, suggesting that the low impact parameter collisions are no longer important in the reactive process. At this energy, the average product internal excitation corresponds to 59{percent} of the total available energy. The data suggest that the majority of product internal excitation resides in the {nu}{sub 2} umbrella bending mode of CH{sub 3}, with OH in its ground vibrational state. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Synthesis, Improved Antisense Activity and Structural Rationale for the Divergent RNA Affinities of 3;#8242;-Fluoro Hexitol Nucleic Acid (FHNA and Ara-FHNA) Modified Oligonucleotides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egli, Martin; Pallan, Pradeep S.; Allerson, Charles R.; Prakash, Thazha P.; Berdeja, Andres; Yu, Jinghua; Lee, Sam; Watt, Andrew; Gaus, Hans; Bhat, Balkrishen; Swayze, Eric E.; Seth, Punit P.

    2012-03-16

    The synthesis, biophysical, structural, and biological properties of both isomers of 3'-fluoro hexitol nucleic acid (FHNA and Ara-FHNA) modified oligonucleotides are reported. Synthesis of the FHNA and Ara-FHNA thymine phosphoramidites was efficiently accomplished starting from known sugar precursors. Optimal RNA affinities were observed with a 3'-fluorine atom and nucleobase in a trans-diaxial orientation. The Ara-FHNA analog with an equatorial fluorine was found to be destabilizing. However, the magnitude of destabilization was sequence-dependent. Thus, the loss of stability is sharply reduced when Ara-FHNA residues were inserted at pyrimidine-purine (Py-Pu) steps compared to placement within a stretch of pyrimidines (Py-Py). Crystal structures of A-type DNA duplexes modified with either monomer provide a rationalization for the opposing stability effects and point to a steric origin of the destabilization caused by the Ara-FHNA analog. The sequence dependent effect can be explained by the formation of an internucleotide C-F {hor_ellipsis} H-C pseudo hydrogen bond between F3' of Ara-FHNA and C8-H of the nucleobase from the 3'-adjacent adenosine that is absent at Py-Py steps. In animal experiments, FHNA-modified antisense oligonucleotides formulated in saline showed a potent downregulation of gene expression in liver tissue without producing hepatotoxicity. Our data establish FHNA as a useful modification for antisense therapeutics and also confirm the stabilizing influence of F(Py) {hor_ellipsis} H-C(Pu) pseudo hydrogen bonds in nucleic acid structures.

  3. Anion Binding in Metal-Organic Frameworks Functionalized with Urea Hydrogen-Bonding Groups

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Custelcean, Radu; Moyer, Bruce A; Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S.; Hay, Benjamin P.

    2006-01-01

    A series of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) functionalized with urea hydrogen-bonding groups has been synthesized and structurally analyzed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction to evaluate the efficacy of anion coordination by urea within the structural constraints of the MOFs. We found that urea-based functionalities may be used for anion binding within metal-organic frameworks when the tendency for urea{hor_ellipsis}urea self-association is decreased by strengthening the intramolecular CH{hor_ellipsis}O hydrogen bonding of N-phenyl substituents to the carbonyl oxygen atom. Theoretical calculations indicate that N,N'-bis(m-pyridyl)urea (BPU) and N,N'-bis(m-cyanophenyl)urea (BCPU) should have enhanced hydrogen-bonding donor abilities toward anions and decreased tendencies to self-associate into hydrogen-bonded tapes compared to other disubstituted ureas. Accordingly, BPU and BCPU were incorporated in MOFs as linkers through coordination of various Zn, Cu, and Ag transition metal salts, including Zn(ClO{sub 4}){sub 2}, ZnSO{sub 4}, Cu(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}, Cu(CF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}){sub 2}, AgNO{sub 3}, and AgSO{sub 3}CH{sub 3}. Structural analysis by single-crystal X-ray diffraction showed that these linkers are versatile anion binders, capable of chelate hydrogen bonding to all of the oxoanions explored. Anion coordination by the urea functionalities was found to successfully compete with urea self-association in all cases except for that of charge-diffuse perchlorate.

  4. Infrared investigations of the alkylation of toluene with methanol by alkali-modified zeolites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mielczarski, E.; Davis, M.E. (Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (US))

    1991-08-01

    This paper reports on the infrared spectra of zeolite NaX, ion-exchanged CsNaX, and cesium acetate impregnated CsNaY (CsAce/CsNaY) exposed to methanol and toluene at batch and continuous flow conditions over the temperature range 200-420{degrees} C that have been recorded in situ in order to investigate the types of adsorbed species that may exist on these catalysts during side-chain alkylation of toluene with methanol to form styrene. The results from all three materials indicate that methanol and toluene adsorb at different sites within the zeolite. Zeolites with no acidity (CsAce/CsNaY) do not show the presence of formaldehyde. These data and those from the authors' previous catalytic experiments on side-chain alkylation are used to speculate on new catalyst designs necessary for further rate/selectivity enhancements over existing technology.

  5. Design, Implementation and Evaluation of a Configurable NoC for AcENoCs FPGA Accelerated Emulation Platform 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lotlikar, Swapnil Subhash

    2011-10-21

    ENoCs emulation framework. The XUPV5 board houses the Virtex-5 (VLX110T) FPGA. It also contains other peripherals, including an RS-232 serial communication port, DDR2 RAM, System ACE compact ash interface and the JTAG programming interface. Ac... RAM (BRAM) stores the program for the software running on the processor. Alternately, external DDR2 RAM can also be used for this purpose, but at the cost of reduced emulation speed due to increased memory access latencies. The hardware...

  6. Transposable elements Updated March 29, 2012 4 (none) Tpm kan (Tn903) Tn903 pkan none none --K CDE Epicentre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Elhanan

    - - L2 CDI [6] T14 mTn5*-lacZ1 -em pLG51 Tpm (P) erm ? lacZ TS none - - L2 CDI [6] T15 ISR6K-em 7 pLG52a, pLG53, pLG55a Tpm (P) erm ? none none - ori R6K E ACE [6] T16 ISR6K-kan 8 pLG56a Tpm (P) kan ? none

  7. A revision of the generic classification of the family Echinoceratidae (Cephalopoda, Ammonoidea) (Lower Jurassic)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Getty, T. A.

    1973-06-15

    PALEONTOLOGICAL CONTRIBUTIONS June 15, 1973 Paper 63 A REVISION OF THE GENERIC CLASSIFICATION OF THE FAMILY ECHIOCERATIDAE (CEPHALOPODA, AMMONOIDEA) (LOWER JURASSIC) T. A. GErry Cumberland House Museum, Portsmouth, England (formerly University College, London... specimens, however, were collected from spoil tips, but the other ammonites from these tips included O. oxynotum (Quenstedt), Cheltonia ace/pit/is (J. Buckman), Eoderoceras (?) ignotum (Trueman & Williams), Paracym bites dennyi (Simpson) and Anguhuiceras sp...

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF A TAMPER RESISTANT/INDICATING AEROSOL COLLECTION SYSTEM FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLING AT BULK HANDLING FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sexton, L.

    2012-06-06

    Environmental sampling has become a key component of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards approaches since its approval for use in 1996. Environmental sampling supports the IAEA's mission of drawing conclusions concerning the absence of undeclared nuclear material or nuclear activities in a Nation State. Swipe sampling is the most commonly used method for the collection of environmental samples from bulk handling facilities. However, augmenting swipe samples with an air monitoring system, which could continuously draw samples from the environment of bulk handling facilities, could improve the possibility of the detection of undeclared activities. Continuous sampling offers the opportunity to collect airborne materials before they settle onto surfaces which can be decontaminated, taken into existing duct work, filtered by plant ventilation, or escape via alternate pathways (i.e. drains, doors). Researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been working to further develop an aerosol collection technology that could be installed at IAEA safeguarded bulk handling facilities. The addition of this technology may reduce the number of IAEA inspector visits required to effectively collect samples. The principal sample collection device is a patented Aerosol Contaminant Extractor (ACE) which utilizes electrostatic precipitation principles to deposit particulates onto selected substrates. Recent work has focused on comparing traditional swipe sampling to samples collected via an ACE system, and incorporating tamper resistant and tamper indicating (TRI) technologies into the ACE system. Development of a TRI-ACE system would allow collection of samples at uranium/plutonium bulk handling facilities in a manner that ensures sample integrity and could be an important addition to the international nuclear safeguards inspector's toolkit. This work was supported by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NIS), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA).

  9. Les Cahiers du GERAD ISSN: 07112440 Measuring the interactions between

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    possible gr^ace au soutien de HEC Montr´eal, Polytechnique Montr´eal, Universit´e McGill, Universit´e du Qu´ebec `a Montr´eal, ainsi que du Fonds de recherche du Qu´ebec ­ Nature et technologies. D´ep^ot l´egal ­ Biblioth`eque et Archives nationales du Qu´ebec, 2014. The authors are exclusively responsible

  10. The study of organic crystals by atomic force microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chow, Ernest Ho Hin

    2014-07-01

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 2.16 2-D and 3-D height images of a chocolate sample obtained at various storage times. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 2.17 AFM images of the {110} face of paracetamol crystals. . . . . . 26 2.18 AFM images of glycine crystals... BFDH growth morphology of ASA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 3.4 AFM 3-D images of ASA (001) surface under dissolution. . . . . 42 3.5 AFM Deflection images of ASA (100) face etched by water, ace- tone, and ethyl...

  11. 1324 McCormick Road, W. Lafayette, 47907 ~ Phone 765-494-3600 www.purduetennis.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittendrigh, Barry

    :00 - 5:30pm Members: $147. Non-M: $178. Tournament I Players This program is for high school varsity:00 - 3:00pm Members: $70. Non-M: $85 Hot Shots (ages 7 ­ 8) Sundays 2:00 - 3:00pm Members: $70. Non-M: $85 Aces (ages 9 ­ 10) Sundays 3:00 - 4:00pm Members: $70. Non-M: $85 Sport Players This program

  12. Nome Issue 11 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    1988-01-01

    '. . enzo' c acid (PARA)s 20 mgI inositol~ 1000 mgJ methionine~ 7. 5 gmJ gIycine~ 4. 0 gmJ Delstorol (vitauIn D3 ~ 7. 5 gmJ alpha tocopheryl ace ate~ 6 mg J vitamin A (P~rnadry)~ 10s 000 units/gm, ( 1 gm I vitamin P 12~ 30 gamma I cho lire s 2000 mg I...

  13. Sensor-based machine olfaction with neuromorphic models of the olfactory system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raman, Baranidharan

    2007-04-25

    ). 9 Fig. 5: Combinatorial coding by ORNs. Columns indicate odors; rows indicate receptor cells identified by a serial number given in the leftmost column. ACE – acetophenone, ANI – anisole, BUT – n-butanol, CAM – DL-camphor, CDN – cyclodecanone..., CIN – 1,8-cineole, CYM – p-cymene, DCI – D-critonellol, HEP– n-heptanol, ISO – isoamylacetate, IVA – isophenol, PHO – thiophenol, PYR – pyridine, THY – thymol, XOL – cyclohexanol, XON – cyclohexanone. The spot size is roughly proportional to spike...

  14. The Impact of Adverse Childhood Events on Temporal Summation of Second Pain 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    You, Dokyoung Sophia

    2012-10-19

    ACE Adverse Childhood Experience AUC Area Under the Curve BNST Bed Nucleus of the Stria Terminalis CES-D Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale ETISR-SR Early Trauma Inventory Self Report-Short Form FPQ Fear of Pain... indicates more negative affect. The scale was administered to measure affect at the moment of the experiment. The Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) is widely used to assess depressive symptomatology during the past week.95...

  15. The longitudinal dependence of heavy-ion composition in the 2013 April 11 solar energetic particle event

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, C. M. S.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Mason, G. M.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2014-09-20

    On 2013 April 11 active region 11719 was centered just west of the central meridian; at 06:55 UT, it erupted with an M6.5 X-ray flare and a moderately fast (?800 km s{sup –1}) coronal mass ejection. This solar activity resulted in the acceleration of energetic ions to produce a solar energetic particle (SEP) event that was subsequently observed in energetic protons by both ACE and the two STEREO spacecraft. Heavy ions at energies ?10 MeV nucleon{sup –1} were well measured by SEP sensors on ACE and STEREO-B, allowing the longitudinal dependence of the event composition to be studied. Both spacecraft observed significant enhancements in the Fe/O ratio at 12-33 MeV nucleon{sup –1}, with the STEREO-B abundance ratio (Fe/O = 0.69) being similar to that of the large, Fe-rich SEP events observed in solar cycle 23. The footpoint of the magnetic field line connected to the ACE spacecraft was longitudinally farther from the flare site (77° versus 58°), and the measured Fe/O ratio at ACE was 0.48, 44% lower than at STEREO-B but still enhanced by more than a factor of 3.5 over average SEP abundances. Only upper limits were obtained for the {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He abundance ratio at both spacecraft. Low upper limits of 0.07% and 1% were obtained from the ACE sensors at 0.5-2 and 6.5-11.3 MeV nucleon{sup –1}, respectively, whereas the STEREO-B sensor provided an upper limit of 4%. These characteristics of high, but longitudinally variable, Fe/O ratios and low {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios are not expected from either the direct flare contribution scenario or the remnant flare suprathermal material theory put forth to explain the Fe-rich SEP events of cycle 23.

  16. Strong H...F hydrogen bonds as synthons in polymeric quantum magnets: structural, magnetic, and theoretical characterization of [Cu(HF)(pyrazine)]SbF, [CuF(HF)(FH)(pyrazine)].(SbF), and [CuAg(HF)(pyrazine)](SbF).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manson, J. L.; Schlueter, J. A.; Funk, K. A.; Southerland, H. I.; Twamley, B.; Lancaster, T.; Blundell, S. J.; Baker, P. J.; Pratt, F. L.; Singleton, J.; McDonald, R. D.; Goddard, P. A.; Sengupta, P.; Batista, C. D.; Ding, L.; Lee, C.; Whangbo, M.-H.; Franke, I.; Cox, S.; Baines, C.; Trail, D.; Eastern Washington Univ.; Univ. of Idaho; Oxford Univ.; Rutherford Appleton Lab.; LANL; Univ. of Southern California; North Carolina State Univ.; Paul Scherrer Inst.

    2009-01-01

    Three Cu{sup 2+}-containing coordination polymers were synthesized and characterized by experimental (X-ray diffraction, magnetic susceptibility, pulsed-field magnetization, heat capacity, and muon-spin relaxation) and electronic structure studies (quantum Monte Carlo simulations and density functional theory calculations). [Cu(HF{sub 2})(pyz){sub 2}]SbF{sub 6} (pyz = pyrazine) (1a), [Cu{sub 2}F(HF)(HF{sub 2})(pyz){sub 4}](SbF{sub 6}){sub 2} (1b), and [CuAg(H{sub 3}F{sub 4})(pyz){sub 5}](SbF{sub 6}){sub 2} (2) crystallize in either tetragonal or orthorhombic space groups; their structures consist of 2D square layers of [M(pyz){sub 2}]{sup n+} that are linked in the third dimension by either HF{sub 2}{sup -} (1a and 1b) or H{sub 3}F{sub 4}{sup -} (2). The resulting 3D frameworks contain charge-balancing SbF{sub 6}{sup -} anions in every void. Compound 1b is a defective polymorph of 1a, with the difference being that 50% of the HF{sub 2}{sup -} links are broken in the former, which leads to a cooperative Jahn-Teller distortion and d{sub x{sup 2}-y{sup 2}} orbital ordering. Magnetic data for 1a and 1b reveal broad maxima in x at 12.5 and 2.6 K and long-range magnetic order below 4.3 and 1.7 K, respectively, while 2 displays negligible spin interactions owing to long and disrupted superexchange pathways. The isothermal magnetization, M(B), for 1a and 1b measured at 0.5 K reveals contrasting behaviors: 1a exhibits a concave shape as B increases to a saturation field, B{sub c}, of 37.6 T, whereas 1b presents an unusual two-step saturation in which M(B) is convex until it reaches a step near 10.8 T and then becomes concave until saturation is reached at 15.8 T. The step occurs at two-thirds of M{sub sat}, suggesting the presence of a ferrimagnetic structure. Compound 2 shows unusual hysteresis in M(B) at low temperature, although x vs T does not reveal the presence of a magnetic phase transition. Quantum Monte Carlo simulations based on an anisotropic cubic lattice were applied to the magnetic data of 1a to afford g = 2.14, J = ?13.4 K (Cu-pyz-Cu), and J = ?0.20 K (Cu?F {hor_ellipsis} H {hor_ellipsis} F?Cu), while x vs T for 1b could be well reproduced by a spin-1/2 Heisenberg uniform chain model for g = 2.127(1), J{sub 1} = ?3.81(1), and zJ{sub 2} = ?0.48(1) K, where J{sub 1} and J{sub 2} are the intra- and interchain exchange couplings, respectively, which considers the number of magnetic nearest-neighbors (z). The M(B) data for 1b could not be satisfactorily explained by the chain model, suggesting a more complex magnetic structure in the ordered state and the need for additional terms in the spin Hamiltonian. The observed variation in magnetic behaviors is driven by differences in the H {hor_ellipsis} F hydrogen-bonding motifs.

  17. Reduced ternary molybdenum and tungsten sulfides and hydroprocessing catalysis therewith

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hilsenbeck, S.J.; McCarley, R.E.; Schrader, G.L.; Xie, X.B.

    1999-02-16

    New amorphous molybdenum/tungsten sulfides with the general formula M{sup n+}{sub 2x/n}(L{sub 6}S{sub 8})S{sub x}, where L is molybdenum or tungsten and M is a ternary metal, has been developed. Characterization of these amorphous materials by chemical and spectroscopic methods (IR, Raman, PES) shows that the (M{sub 6}S{sub 8}){sup 0} cluster units are present. Vacuum thermolysis of the amorphous Na{sub 2x}(Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8})S{sub x}{hor_ellipsis}yMeOH first produces poorly crystalline NaMo{sub 6}S{sub 8} by disproportionation at 800 C and well-crystallized NaMo{sub 6}S{sub 8} at {>=} 900 C. Ion-exchange of the sodium material in methanol with soluble M{sup 2+} and M{sup 3+} salts (M=Sn, Co, Ni, Pb, La, Ho) produces the M{sup n+}{sub 2x/n}(Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8})S{sub x}{hor_ellipsis}yMeOH compounds. Additionally, the new reduced ternary molybdenum sulfides with the general formula M{sup n+}{sub 2x/n}Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8+x}(MeOH){sub y}[MMOS] (M=Sn, Co, Ni) is an effective hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalyst both as-prepared and after a variety of pretreatment conditions. Under specified pretreatment conditions with flowing hydrogen gas, the SnMoS type catalyst can be stabilized, and while still amorphous, can be considered as ``Chevrel phase-like`` in that both contain Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8} cluster units. Furthermore, the small cation NiMoS and CoMoS type pretreated catalyst is shown to be very active HDS catalysts with rates that exceeded the model unpromoted and cobalt-promoted MoS{sub 2} catalysts. 9 figs.

  18. LOW IONIZATION STATE PLASMA IN CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Jin-Yi [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, Gyeonggi 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Raymond, John C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2012-10-20

    The Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory often observes low ionization state coronal mass ejection (CME) plasma at ultraviolet wavelengths. The CME plasmas are often detected in O VI (3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} K), C III (8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} K), Ly{alpha}, and Ly{beta}, with the low ionization plasma confined to bright filaments or blobs that appear in small segments of the UVCS slit. On the other hand, in situ observations by the Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer on board Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) have shown mostly high ionization state plasmas in the magnetic clouds in interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) events, while low ionization states are rarely seen. In this analysis, we investigate whether the low ionization state CME plasmas observed by UVCS occupy small enough fractions of the CME to be consistent with the small fraction of ACE ICMEs that show low ionization plasma, or whether the CME plasma must be further ionized after passing the UVCS slit. To do this, we determine the covering factors of low ionization state plasma for 10 CME events. We find that the low ionization state plasmas in CMEs observed by UVCS show average covering factors below 10%. This indicates that the lack of low ionization state ICME plasmas observed by the ACE results from a small probability that the spacecraft passes through a region of low ionization plasma. We also find that the low ionization state plasma covering factors in faster CMEs are smaller than in slower CMEs.

  19. Higher Order Modes HOM___s in Coupled Cavities of the Flash Module ACC39

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinton, I.R.R.; /Manchester U. /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.; Jones, R.M.; /Manchester U. /DESY; Li, Z.; /SLAC; Zhang, P.; /Manchester U. /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /DESY

    2012-09-14

    We analyse the higher order modes (HOM's) in the 3.9GHz bunch shaping cavities installed in the FLASH facility at DESY. A suite of finite element computer codes (including HFSS and ACE3P) and globalised scattering matrix calculations (GSM) are used to investigate the modes in these cavities. This study is primarily focused on the dipole component of the multiband expansion of the wakefield, with the emphasis being on the development of a HOM-based BPM system for ACC39. Coupled inter-cavity modes are simulated together with a limited band of trapped modes.

  20. The interrelations of mineral colloids and sodium chloride as measured by pH, conductivity, and water-soluble cations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crozier, Baalis B

    1952-01-01

    is iegebteg to tbe fallortsg for assis'tasse awl gaigance ia tbe yroyaratioa of this thesis. To Dr. E. E. Eseytoa~ Professor of kgr~ aag Ore&eats kgrisor, aod Dr+ J. De Page, Professor of kgrsssaeP for ssyervisioa throaghoat ths staging to Dr. L. C. gay...'~ Professor of AgroaosP~ for belyfal saggasti~j to Professor C D OogbePp Eeaclp De+arts%at of Qeaeticsp for assist ~ ace ia oabiog the statistical emesis ?f resaltsi to Dr. J. E. kha3ss~ Read, Deyartaeat of kgroooay~ for soggesteg iwyrow...

  1. An economic study of the experimental response of fertilizer to East Texas Upland native pasture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, Warren Ray

    1956-01-01

    the Icgaafaatiee aef ~Mes of %ill thea& 8eatitata & alee eageeeeal to f y Li F jehae ICAL Sea k ~ S Csldvell f DoglaHIE4RA af Igeogl~y fee ace~~ SR the ~is of the 44ta f~ thee etage, lehaeele4g~ alee ie sate ta ihe Iatloual Heat tee0 huAitata fee ffeaaeh4... Capitol Ny' See This Fenotioa f5 SaawF ~ ??? ~ ~ ~ ? ~ \\ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ? ~ ??? ~ ~ ~ ? ~ ? ~ ? j0 Litetatw Sita@ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ? ~ ~ ~ ?? ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ? ~ ?? 1 Raopeaeo af Ooeatal NSR%%4greea Nap to Nitrogoa Na4sr ISHNa tioa 4 ~ 0 4 ~ ~ ~ 0 4...

  2. Concrete Tilt-up Construction on the Farm. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hobgood, Price; Kunze, Otto R.

    1957-01-01

    with satisfactory results contained a minimum of five sacks of cement per cubic yard of mix. Clean, hard and well-graded aggregate was used. Reinforcing steel was placed in every panel to insure adequate strength and stability. The tilting bolts at the top... to the panel. Nuts were placed on the bolts. After the tilting frame was removed, the metal stra~s were wired to the lower tilting bolts to make panel more secure. , per 'aces 10\\I'S STABILIZING THE WALL PANELS ! the The panels were plumbed and aligned...

  3. The effect of the age of a hen on fertility and hatchability of eggs and on livability and growth of chicks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crossland, Aubrey Lee

    1935-01-01

    ' %arran {19~A) nods a detailed study of tbs opinJ one of poul~ 1 Pearl and Surf'aces Fertility and Ha+~g of Eggs Lemon and Kinghoxnex PracticaL Poultry Production 5 Warroxx Ths Influence of Some Factors on the Hatchability of the Hens There cuc... with ogo eben identical matiugs are used The mean hatching record of tbe second ye?I' is else scbstantt?Qy higher than that of tbe first yoga Ream mort?lity rates in case of the ir1mtical a?tinge ou tso mxccessive years differ so widely...

  4. Submarine geomorphology of Eastern Ross Sea and Sulzberger Bay, Antarctica 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lepley, Larry Kent

    1964-01-01

    in order to ozzplain the origin of ths oubmariae topography of this The fatbozzeter aced fcr tho ourvey cas czz ~Ed AN/U@J-XB ac~sunder. The author collected, pzcceosed, aud ~ecd fathogrems (sonio depth recordings) repz'coasting 1, $00 nautical miles... is shown cn figure 3, The contours Craning the continental elope xn the upper r&~t hand corner of figvu. 'e 3 are dashed because of tho paucity of soundings in Chat ares. The dashed, enclosed contours in that same exes vmre drawn cn the basis of cbx...

  5. Geology of the Hilda-Southwest area, Mason County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammer, Bobby Rex

    1959-01-01

    antts. 'ka the yalloelsh byoen, aiasadvely bedded:: sccndetona bf tha walwe "mailbox & vhds '-'aoeieeybnde&. dn. '~al, to. an'sbgayt ~ Xn -taiwatat4on, and toyowtnyhy cehlob shoes'-:dlstgootly; on', ace'lal yhotogw@yhs. Thy'wanga ia~g'' Iy a' ws..., ~' +. "'. i" a" e'', e', ?, 'w 'i'', ". i"''y, 'ii:"'i'; +':w', "y, i', 4'"'i' '', '65. l; ZCN(KC . 6KKCST' g"'i" g -. 'a. , '?' 'y, "'j 'l a', , ~ . o, , +, I' 'e" ~ e 'i- c' ?, . 'w e BERARNCZQ. ' e s . w 'a ~, q a e +, w a ~ r, ~ ~ e ~ e r + y y, g...

  6. Land surface temperature estimation over the Northern Great Plains using passive microwave data from Nimbus 7 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lambert, Vicki Michelle

    1987-01-01

    and the the upper boundary of 1, 000 pm can be arbitrarily divided into three spectral catagories. Generally the near infrared region lies betlveen 0. 72 and 1. 3 psn; the nnddle infrared region lies between 1. 3 and 3 pm; and the far infrared lies betlveen 7. 5... the day. The wavelength region from 3. 0 to 5. 0 pnx is the transitiou region where solar irradiance is relatively sxnall and thermal ennssion froxn terrestrial surf'aces is not, easily detectable. The third band, 7. 5-13. 5 pnx. as slxown in Figure...

  7. Hysteresis prediction inside magnetic shields and application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mori?, Igor [Observatoire de Paris, SYRTE, Avenue Denfert 77, 75014 Paris (France); CNES, Edouard Belin 18, 31400 Toulouse (France); De Graeve, Charles-Marie [SOGETI High Tech, chemin Laporte 3, 31300 Toulouse (France); Grosjean, Olivier [CNES, Edouard Belin 18, 31400 Toulouse (France); Laurent, Philippe [Observatoire de Paris, SYRTE, Avenue Denfert 77, 75014 Paris (France)

    2014-07-15

    We have developed a simple model that is able to describe and predict hysteresis behavior inside Mumetal magnetic shields, when the shields are submitted to ultra-low frequency (<0.01 Hz) magnetic perturbations with amplitudes lower than 60??T. This predictive model has been implemented in a software to perform an active compensation system. With this compensation the attenuation of longitudinal magnetic fields is increased by two orders of magnitude. The system is now integrated in the cold atom space clock called PHARAO. The clock will fly onboard the International Space Station in the frame of the ACES space mission.

  8. The influence of freight rates on the competitive position of vegetable growers of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkinson, Luther Jay

    1936-01-01

    ALASAMk~ 1880 18841 lier Ma Salihsee Seehea Chiea8e CiaeiaaaM Cleeelaa4 Deaeel' See Meiaaa nehreii Kaaeae Cion Mtaaeayeli e See Yetk Phila4elyhia She Loaie 1~488 1~48' 1~414 ni~a~ er ~ha ~ V~eah ~, S. S. Sm a oS ~ieme~l Xeaaemiee. POTATO... eerlos4 shfyasats by rsil ace sssaiaeless Texas uafoeds sere m&rs thea 80 psr sent nt tho total ualosds trsa the three states ia Dos Bofase ~ Mfaussyol 1 s? Krucses 0 1 ty Mfesourf ? 8 t Louis? Detroit t ? Chieado Xa aoue ot the ~bets 414 ualosds...

  9. The World of Dark Shadows Issue 10 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    1977-01-01

    hole c ppe~red to rewdTd t hei r efforts . Julia cous hed , choking on the ce@ent dU 5 ~. A ch i p had glanced of f her cheek , but she was UnB"!,,re of tte 6 . tiny tri ckle of blood fl owing down ber f ace . An~ e li que t brust a candle i nto... bring her arm down and plunge the sharp aplinter into the prone Barnabas Collins' cheat . The vampires body buckled and ',oI1'ithed, and even the senseless wolfman Io'as muted by the unearthly moan which escaped Barnabas' blood-spewing mouth. Finally...

  10. Rigid pile response to ice plate and current loads 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nolte, John George

    1986-01-01

    Using Light Ice-Breaking Recording Vessel, " Proceedinxls, Qffsbore Technolo Confer~ace, OTC Paper No. 2225, lloOl~J~ PP. McLeod, W. R. , Adamo, L. C. , and Hamilton, R. C. , "A Unique Strategy for Obtaining Wave and Wind Data in the Gulf of Alaska... stream_source_info 1986 Thesis N798.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 88765 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name 1986 Thesis N798.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 RIGID PILE...

  11. In the Womb of the Earth: Sex in the Maya Cave Setting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saffa, Sarah Nicole

    2009-08-28

    pyramid, which is the largest complex at the ancient Maya site of Dos Pilas, was constructed on a heavily modified hil, the highest hil in the area (Brady, et al. 24 The Maya term ch?en refers to ?a hole...:357). The common appropriation of the great natural caves by public and elite architecture, like the El Duende pyramid, at Dos Pilas also demonstrated ?the state?s claim to direct and unequaled aces to the sources of supernatural power? (Brady, et al. 1997...

  12. The Logic of Parametric Probability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norman, Joseph W

    2012-01-01

    The computational method of parametric probability analysis is introduced. It is demonstrated how to embed logical formulas from the propositional calculus into parametric probability networks, thereby enabling sound reasoning about the probabilities of logical propositions. An alternative direct probability encoding scheme is presented, which allows statements of implication and quantification to be modeled directly as constraints on conditional probabilities. Several example problems are solved, from Johnson-Laird's aces to Smullyan's zombies. Many apparently challenging problems in logic turn out to be simple problems in algebra and computer science; often just systems of polynomial equations or linear optimization problems. This work extends the mathematical logic and parametric probability methods invented by George Boole.

  13. Neutral hydrogen observations of spiral and irregular galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reakes, Michael

    1980-05-01

    ACE The observations described in this dissertation were made at t.he Mullard Radio Astronomy Observatory, and the data reduce~ and analysed at the Cavendish l,aboratory. The work was carried out between October 1975 and November 1978. P-l Most... , Dr John Shake shaft , and also Mr Peter Warner and Dr John Baldwin for their guidance throughout the three years .. P-2 Except where specifically stated in the text the work presented in this dissertation is my own, and has not been carried out...

  14. An investigation of the relationships between rainfall in northeast Brazil and sea surface temperatures of the equatorial regions of the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cochrane, Marvin Arthur

    1977-01-01

    N RA INFALL IiN NORTHEAST DPA: IL AND SLiA SUR!'ACE TEMPLRATUiRIiS Ol' THE EQUATORIAL RFU!ONS JF THE PACIFIC AND ATl. ANTIC OCFANS A Thesrs by iKKRVTN ARTHUR COCHRAiNE Approved as to style and coiitent by: (Cha i r;iian o F !;e mnittce) (i.... TABLE OF CONTENTS ABSTRACT Page ACKNOWI, EDGI'. MFNTS I. IST OF TABLES LIST OF FIGURLS 1V V11 , V11 1 1. INTRODUCTION a. General b. Ol&jcctivcs 2. LITEIIATURL' REVIEW a. Iforf. beast Brazi I rainfall ? equatorial Pacific SST b . Ilortheast...

  15. ARM - Field Campaign - Aerosol and Cloud Experiments in the Eastern North

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01) (See22, 2012IIIAtlantic (ACE-ENA) govCampaignsAerosol and

  16. ARM - Field Campaign - Aircraft Carbon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01) (See22, 2012IIIAtlantic (ACE-ENA) govCampaignsAerosol

  17. ARM - Field Campaign - Aircraft Integration and Flight Testing of 4STAR

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01) (See22, 2012IIIAtlantic (ACE-ENA)

  18. ARM - Field Campaign - Application of the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) to

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01) (See22, 2012IIIAtlantic (ACE-ENA)Study the Aerosol

  19. ARM - Field Campaign - Arctic Cloud Infrared Imaging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01) (See22, 2012IIIAtlantic (ACE-ENA)Study the

  20. ARM - Field Campaign - Arctic Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01) (See22, 2012IIIAtlantic (ACE-ENA)Study

  1. ARM - Field Campaign - Arctic Winter Water Vapor IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01) (See22, 2012IIIAtlantic (ACE-ENA)StudygovCampaignsArctic

  2. Overview of DOE Advanced Combustion Engine R&D | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills andOrder 422.1, CONDUCT OFER-B-00-02 AUDIT10ace00a_singh_2012_o.pdf

  3. ACEEE Energy Efficiency Scorecard | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton JumpProgram |RecentSulfonate as aEnergy1ACE-II: Areas ofACEEE

  4. ACHP - Consultation with Indian Tribes in the Section 106 Review Process: a

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton JumpProgram |RecentSulfonate as aEnergy1ACE-II: Areas

  5. ACHP - Meeting the "Reasonable and Good Faith" Identification Standard in

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton JumpProgram |RecentSulfonate as aEnergy1ACE-II: AreasSection

  6. ACHP - Nationwide Programmatic Agreements | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton JumpProgram |RecentSulfonate as aEnergy1ACE-II:

  7. ACHP - Relationship of Section 106 to Other Laws | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton JumpProgram |RecentSulfonate as aEnergy1ACE-II:ACHP -

  8. ACHP - Section 106 Applicant Toolkit | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton JumpProgram |RecentSulfonate as aEnergy1ACE-II:ACHP -Section

  9. ACHP's Recommended Approach for Consultation on Recovery of Significant

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton JumpProgram |RecentSulfonate as aEnergy1ACE-II:ACHP

  10. ACORE | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton JumpProgram |RecentSulfonate as aEnergy1ACE-II:ACHPACORE Jump

  11. ACS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton JumpProgram |RecentSulfonate as aEnergy1ACE-II:ACHPACORE

  12. A self-consistent, absolute isochronal age scale for young moving groups in the solar neighbourhood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Cameron P M; Naylor, Tim

    2015-01-01

    We present a self-consistent, absolute isochronal age scale for young (solar neighbourhood based on homogeneous fitting of semi-empirical pre-main-sequence model isochrones using the tau^2 maximum-likelihood fitting statistic of Naylor & Jeffries in the M_V, V-J colour-magnitude diagram. The final adopted ages for the groups are: 149+51-19 Myr for the AB Dor moving group, 24+/-3 Myr for the {\\beta} Pic moving group (BPMG), 45+11-7 Myr for the Carina association, 42+6-4 Myr for the Columba association, 11+/-3 Myr for the {\\eta} Cha cluster, 45+/-4 Myr for the Tucana-Horologium moving group (Tuc-Hor), 10+/-3 Myr for the TW Hya association, and 22+4-3 Myr for the 32 Ori group. At this stage we are uncomfortable assigning a final, unambiguous age to the Argus association as our membership list for the association appears to suffer from a high level of contamination, and therefore it remains unclear whether these stars represent a single population of co...

  13. Quinary metallic glass alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, X.; Johnson, W.L.

    1998-04-07

    At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10{sup 3}K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf){sub a}(Al,Zn){sub b}(Ti,Nb){sub c}(Cu{sub x}Fe{sub y}(Ni,Co){sub z}){sub d} wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d{hor_ellipsis}y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

  14. Dry Gas Zone, Elk Hills Field, Kern County, California: General reservoir study: Geologic text and tables: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-06-29

    The Dry Gas Zone was defined by US Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 Engineering Committee (1957) as ''/hor ellipsis/all sands bearing dry gas above the top of the Lower Scalez marker bed. The term is used to include the stratigraphic interval between the Scalez Sand Zone and the Tulare Formation - the Mya Sand Zone. The reservoirs in this upper zone are thin, lenticular, loosely cemented sandstones with relatively high permeabilities.'' Other than the limited Tulare production in the western part of the field, the Dry Gas Zone is the shallowest productive zone in the Elk Hills Reserve and is not included in the Shallow Oil Zone. It is Pliocene in age and makes up approximately eighty percent of the San Joaquin Formation as is summarized in Exhibit TL-1. The lithologic character of the zone is one of interbedded shales and siltstones with intermittent beds of various thickness sands. The stratigraphic thickness of the Dry Gas Zone ranges from 950 to 1150 feet with a general thickening along the flanks and thinning over the crests of the anticlines. The productive part of the Dry Gas Zone covers portions of 30 sections in an area roughly 10 miles long by 4 miles wide. 4 refs.

  15. Crystal structure of enterococcus faecalis sly A-like transcriptional factor.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, R.; Zhang, R.; Zagnitko, O.; Dementieva, I.; Maltsev, N.; Watson, J. D.; Laskowski, R.; Gornicki, P.; Joachimiak, A.; Univ. of Chicago; European Bioinformatics Inst.

    2003-05-30

    The crystal structure of a SlyA transcriptional regulator at 1.6 {angstrom} resolution is presented, and structural relationships between members of the MarR/SlyA family are discussed. The SlyA family, which includes SlyA, Rap, Hor, and RovA proteins, is widely distributed in bacterial and archaeal genomes. Current evidence suggests that SlyA-like factors act as repressors, activators, and modulators of gene transcription. These proteins have been shown to up-regulate the expression of molecular chaperones, acid-resistance proteins, and cytolysin, and down-regulate several biosynthetic enzymes. The structure of SlyA from Enterococcus faecalis, determined as a part of an ongoing structural genomics initiative (www.mcsg.anl.gov), revealed the same winged helix DNA-binding motif that was recently found in the MarR repressor from Escherichia coli and the MexR repressor from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a sequence homologue of MarR. Phylogenetic analysis of the MarR/SlyA family suggests that Sly is placed between the SlyA and MarR subfamilies and shows significant sequence similarity to members of both subfamilies.

  16. A RhxSy/C Catalyst for the Hydrogen Oxidation and Hydrogen Evolution Reactions in HBr

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Masud, Jahangir [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States); Nguyena, Trung V. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States); Singh, Nirala [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); McFarland, Eric [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Ikenberry, Myles [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States); Hohn, Keith [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States); Pan, Chun-Jern [National Taiwan University of Science & Technology, Tapei (Taiwan); Hwang, Bing-Joe [National Taiwan University of Science & Technology, Tapei (Taiwan)

    2015-01-01

    Rhodium sulfide (Rh2S3) on carbon support was synthesized by refluxing rhodium chloride with ammonium thiosulfate. Thermal treatment of Rh2S3 at high temperatures (600°C to 850°C) in presence of argon resulted in the transformation of Rh2S3 into Rh3S4, Rh17S15 and Rh which were characterized by TGA/DTA, XRD, EDX, and deconvolved XPS analyses. The catalyst particle size distribution ranged from 3 to 12 nm. Cyclic voltammetry and rotating disk electrode measurements were used to evaluate the catalytic activity for hydrogen oxidation and evolution reactions in H2SO4 and HBr solutions. The thermally treated catalysts show high activity for the hydrogen reactions. The exchange current densities (io) of the synthesized RhxSy catalysts in H2-saturated 1M H2SO4 and 1M HBr for HER and HOR were 0.9 mA/cm2 to 1.0 mA/cm2 and 0.8 to 0.9 mA/cm2, respectively. The lower io values obtained in 1M HBr solution compared to in H2SO4 might be due to the adsorption of Br- on the active surface. Stable electrochemical active surface area (ECSA) of RhxSy catalyst was obtained for CV scan limits between 0 V and 0.65 V vs. RHE. Scans with upper voltage limit beyond 0.65 V led to decreased and unreproducible ECSA measurements.

  17. Simulation and sequential dynamical systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mortveit, H.S.; Reidys, C.M.

    1999-06-01

    Computer simulations have a generic structure. Motivated by this the authors present a new class of discrete dynamical systems that captures this structure in a mathematically precise way. This class of systems consists of (1) a loopfree graph {Upsilon} with vertex set {l_brace}1,2,{hor_ellipsis},n{r_brace} where each vertex has a binary state, (2) a vertex labeled set of functions (F{sub i,{Upsilon}}:F{sub 2}{sup n} {yields} F{sub 2}{sup n}){sub i} and (3) a permutation {pi} {element_of} S{sub n}. The function F{sub i,{Upsilon}} updates the state of vertex i as a function of the states of vertex i and its {Upsilon}-neighbors and leaves the states of all other vertices fixed. The permutation {pi} represents the update ordering, i.e., the order in which the functions F{sub i,{Upsilon}} are applied. By composing the functions F{sub i,{Upsilon}} in the order given by {pi} one obtains the dynamical system (equation given in paper), which the authors refer to as a sequential dynamical system, or SDS for short. The authors will present bounds for the number of functionally different systems and for the number of nonisomorphic digraphs {Gamma}[F{sub {Upsilon}},{pi}] that can be obtained by varying the update order and applications of these to specific graphs and graph classes.

  18. An experiment to determine the effect of the growth hormone of the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland on swine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giles, Dorris David

    1940-01-01

    and con? centrated such a large number of the hormones. Anatovidal Jesdriutions o1 all o1 t9e J4dtless 0lanJsp ecdeut t9e uarat9yroiJsp are to me 1o4nJ in t9e earliest o1 veJidal literat4re: T9e uit4itary has naveJ anJ JesdrimeJ my Yesali4s in bfgf: He... toox t9e nave 1rov uit4ita qLatinj veanin0 v4do4s Jisd9ar0e. meda4se 9e melie2eJ t9at t9is 0lanJ 9aJ sove donnedtion hit9 t9e nasal v4do4s Jisd9ar0e: Sovverin0 0a2e it t9e nave 9yuou9ysis deremri in b553 1rov t9e Greex horJs veanin0 an 4nJer0...

  19. Magnetic field gradients in solar wind plasma and geophysics periods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bershadskii

    2006-11-16

    Using recent data obtained by Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) the pumping scale of the magnetic field gradients of the solar wind plasma has been calculated. This pumping scale is found to be equal to 24h $\\pm$ 2h. The ACE spacecraft orbits at the L1 libration point which is a point of Earth-Sun gravitational equilibrium about 1.5 million km from Earth. Since the Earth's magnetosphere extends into the vacuum of space from approximately 80 to 60,000 kilometers on the side toward the Sun the pumping scale cannot be a consequence of the 24h-period of the Earth's rotation. Vise versa, a speculation is suggested that for the very long time of the coexistence of Earth and of the solar wind the weak interaction between the solar wind and Earth could lead to stochastic synchronization between the Earth's rotation and the pumping scale of the solar wind magnetic field gradients. This synchronization could transform an original period of the Earth's rotation to the period close to the pumping scale of the solar wind magnetic field gradients.

  20. LES SOFTWARE FOR THE DESIGN OF LOW EMISSION COMBUSTION SYSTEMS FOR VISION 21 PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Cannon; Baifang Zuo; Virgil Adumitroaie; Keith McDaniel; Cliff Smith

    2002-01-01

    Further development of a combustion Large Eddy Simulation (LES) code for the design of advanced gaseous combustion systems is described in this fifth quarterly report. CFD Research Corporation (CFDRC) is developing the LES module within the parallel, unstructured solver included in the commercial CFD-ACE+ software. In this quarter, in-situ adaptive tabulation (ISAT) for efficient chemical rate storage and retrieval was further tested in the LES code. The use of multiple trees and periodic tree dumping was investigated. Implementation of the Linear Eddy Model (LEM) for subgrid chemistry was finished for serial applications. Validation of the model on a backstep reacting case was performed. Initial calculations of the SimVal experiment were performed for various barrel lengths, equivalence ratio, combustor shapes, and turbulence models. The effects of these variables on combustion instability was studied. Georgia Tech continues the effort to parameterize the LEM over composition space so that a neural net can be used efficiently in the combustion LES code. Next quarter, the 2nd consortium meeting will be held at CFDRC. LES software development and testing will continue. Alpha testing of the code will be performed on cases of interest to the industrial consortium. Optimization of subgrid models will be pursued, particularly with the ISAT approach. Also next quarter, the demonstration of the neural net approach, for chemical kinetics speed-up in CFD-ACE+, should be accomplished.

  1. TRACKING CORONAL FEATURES FROM THE LOW CORONA TO EARTH: A QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE 2008 DECEMBER 12 CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeForest, C. E.; Howard, T. A.; McComas, D. J.

    2013-05-20

    We have tracked a slow magnetic cloud associated coronal mass ejection (CME) continuously from its origin as a flux rope structure in the low solar corona over a four-day passage to impact with spacecraft located near Earth. Combining measurements from the STEREO, ACE, and Wind space missions, we are able to follow major elements with enough specificity to relate pre-CME coronal structure in the low corona to the corresponding elements seen in the near-Earth in situ data. Combining extreme ultraviolet imaging, quantitative Thomson scattering data throughout the flight of the CME, and ''ground-truth'' in situ measurements, we: (1) identify the plasma observed by ACE and Wind with specific features in the solar corona (a segment of a long flux rope); (2) determine the onset mechanism of the CME (destabilization of a filament channel following flare reconnection, coupled with the mass draining instability) and demonstrate that it is consistent with the in situ measurements; (3) identify the origin of different layers of the sheath material around the central magnetic cloud (closed field lifted from the base of the corona, closed field entrained during passage through the corona, and solar wind entrained by the front of the CME); (4) measure mass accretion of the system via snowplow effects in the solar wind as the CME crossed the solar system; and (5) quantify the kinetic energy budget of the system in interplanetary space, and determine that it is consistent with no long-term driving force on the CME.

  2. Application of Gaussian Process Modeling to Analysis of Functional Unreliability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Youngblood

    2014-06-01

    This paper applies Gaussian Process (GP) modeling to analysis of the functional unreliability of a “passive system.” GPs have been used widely in many ways [1]. The present application uses a GP for emulation of a system simulation code. Such an emulator can be applied in several distinct ways, discussed below. All applications illustrated in this paper have precedents in the literature; the present paper is an application of GP technology to a problem that was originally analyzed [2] using neural networks (NN), and later [3, 4] by a method called “Alternating Conditional Expectations” (ACE). This exercise enables a multifaceted comparison of both the processes and the results. Given knowledge of the range of possible values of key system variables, one could, in principle, quantify functional unreliability by sampling from their joint probability distribution, and performing a system simulation for each sample to determine whether the function succeeded for that particular setting of the variables. Using previously available system simulation codes, such an approach is generally impractical for a plant-scale problem. It has long been recognized, however, that a well-trained code emulator or surrogate could be used in a sampling process to quantify certain performance metrics, even for plant-scale problems. “Response surfaces” were used for this many years ago. But response surfaces are at their best for smoothly varying functions; in regions of parameter space where key system performance metrics may behave in complex ways, or even exhibit discontinuities, response surfaces are not the best available tool. This consideration was one of several that drove the work in [2]. In the present paper, (1) the original quantification of functional unreliability using NN [2], and later ACE [3], is reprised using GP; (2) additional information provided by the GP about uncertainty in the limit surface, generally unavailable in other representations, is discussed; (3) a simple forensic exercise is performed, analogous to the inverse problem of code calibration, but with an accident management spin: given an observation about containment pressure, what can we say about the system variables? References 1. For an introduction to GPs, see (for example) Gaussian Processes for Machine Learning, C. E. Rasmussen and C. K. I. Williams (MIT, 2006). 2. Reliability Quantification of Advanced Reactor Passive Safety Systems, J. J. Vandenkieboom, PhD Thesis (University of Michigan, 1996). 3. Z. Cui, J. C. Lee, J. J. Vandenkieboom, and R. W. Youngblood, “Unreliability Quantification of a Containment Cooling System through ACE and ANN Algorithms,” Trans. Am. Nucl. Soc. 85, 178 (2001). 4. Risk and Safety Analysis of Nuclear Systems, J. C. Lee and N. J. McCormick (Wiley, 2011). See especially §11.2.4.

  3. VERY WIDE BINARIES AND OTHER COMOVING STELLAR COMPANIONS: A BAYESIAN ANALYSIS OF THE HIPPARCOS CATALOGUE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaya, Ed J.; Olling, Rob P.

    2011-01-15

    We develop Bayesian statistical methods for discovering and assigning probabilities to non-random (e.g., physical) stellar companions. These companions are either presently bound or were previously bound. The probabilities depend on similarities in corrected proper motion parallel and perpendicular to the brighter component's motion, parallax, and the local phase-space density of field stars. Control experiments are conducted to understand the behavior of false positives. The technique is applied to the Hipparcos Catalogue within 100 pc. This is the first all-sky survey to locate escaped companions still drifting along with each other. In the <100 pc distance range, {approx}220 high probability companions with separations between 0.01 and 1 pc are found. The first evidence for a population ({approx}300) of companions separated by 1-8 pc is found. We find these previously unnoticed naked-eye companions (both with V < 6th mag): Capella and 50 Per, {delta} Vel and HIP 43797, Alioth ({epsilon} UMa), Megrez ({delta} UMa) and Alcor, {gamma} and {tau} Cen, {phi} Eri and {eta} Hor, 62 and 63 Cnc, {gamma} and {tau} Per, {zeta} and {delta} Hya, {beta}{sup 01}, {beta}{sup 02} and {beta}{sup 03} Tuc, N Vel and HIP 47479, HIP 98174 and HIP 97646, and s Eri and HIP 14913. High probability fainter companions (>6th mag) of primaries with V < 4 are found for: Fomalhaut ({alpha} PsA), {gamma} UMa, {alpha} Lib, Alvahet ({iota} Cephi), {delta} Ara, {beta} Ser, {iota} Peg, {beta} Pic, {kappa} Phe, and {gamma} Tuc.

  4. Global plutonium management: A security option

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sylvester, K.W.B.

    1998-12-31

    The US surplus plutonium disposition program was created to reduce the proliferation risk posed by the fissile material from thousands of retired nuclear weapons. The Department of Energy has decided to process its Put into a form as secure as Pu in civilian spent fuel. While implementation issues have been considered, a major one (Russian reciprocity) remains unresolved. Russia has made disposition action conditional on extracting the fuel value of its Pu but lacks the infrastructure to do so. Assistance in the construction of the required facilities would conflict with official US policy opposing the development of a Pu fuel cycle. The resulting stagnation provides impetus for a reevaluation of US nonproliferation objectives and Pu disposition options. A strategy for satisfying Russian fuel value concerns and reducing the proliferation risk posed by surplus weapons-grade plutonium (WGPu) is proposed. The effectiveness of material alteration (e.g., isotopic, chemical, etc.{hor_ellipsis}) at reducing the desire, ability and opportunity for proliferation is assessed. Virtually all the security benefits attainable by material processing can be obtained by immobilizing Pu in large unit size/mass monoliths without a radiation barrier. Russia would be allowed to extract the Pu at a future date for use as fuel in a verifiable manner. Remote tracking capability, if proven feasible, would further improve safeguarding capability. As an alternate approach, the US could compensate Russia for its Pu, allowing it to be disposed of or processed elsewhere. A market based method for pricing Pu is proposed. Surplus Pu could represent access to nuclear fuel at a fixed price at a future date. This position can be replicated in the uranium market and priced using derivative theory. The proposed strategy attempts to meet nonproliferation objectives by recognizing technical limitations and satisfying political constraints.

  5. Competitive threshold collision-induced dissociation: Gas-phase acidities and bond dissociation energies for a series of alcohols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeTuri, V.F.; Ervin, K.M.

    1999-09-02

    Energy-resolved competitive collision-induced dissociation methods are used to measure the gas-phase acidities of a series of alcohols (methanol, ethanol, 2-propanol, and 2-methyl-2-propanol). The competitive dissociation reactions of fluoride-alcohol, [F{sup {minus}}{center{underscore}dot}HOR], alkoxide-water, [RO{sup {minus}}{center{underscore}dot}HOH], and alkoxide-methanol [RO{+-}{center{underscore}dot}HOCH{sub 3}] proton-bound complexes are studied using a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer. The reaction cross sections and product branching fractions to the two proton transfer channels are measured as a function of collision energy. The enthalpy difference between the two product channels is found by modeling the reaction cross sections near threshold using RRKM theory to account for the energy-dependent product branching ratio and kinetic shift. From the enthalpy difference, the alcohol gas-phase acidities are determined relative to the well-known values of HF and H{sub 2}O. The measured gas-phase acidities are {Delta}{sub acid}H{sub 298}(CH{sub 3}OH) = 1599 {+-} 3 kJ/mol, {Delta}{sub acid}H{sub 298}(CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OH) = 1586 {+-} 5 kJ/mol, {Delta}{sub acid}H{sub 298}((CH{sub 3}){sub 2}CHOH) = 1576 {+-} 4 kJ/mol, and {Delta}{sub acid}H{sub 298}((CH{sub 3}){sub 3}COH) = 1573 {+-} 3 kJ/mol.

  6. Cerenkov ring imaging and spectroscopy of charged KSTAR interactions at 11 GeV/c

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, P.F.

    1988-11-01

    The physics and technology of this new Cerenkov detector are discussed, including materials studies, construction techniques, and resolution measurements. Sources of resolution error are individually identified and measured where possible. The results of all studied indicate that the measurement resolution is understood. This work has led to the adoption of a large scale ring imaging detector as part of a new high energy physics spectrometer, the SLD, at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Results from an amplitude analysis of strange meson final states in K/sup /minus//p ..-->.. /ovr K/sub 0//..pi../sup /minus//p interactions are presented. The data derive from a 4 event/nb exposure of the LASS (large Aperture Superconducting Solenoid) spectrometer to an 11 GeV/c K/sup /minus// beam. The data sample consists of /approximately/100,000 vents distributed over the Dalitz plot of the channel. The process is observed to be dominated by the production and decay of natural spin-parity (J/sup P/ = 1/sup /minus//,2/sup +/,3/sup /minus//,/hor ellipsis/) strange meson states. The data can be understood in terms of a simple model in which the resonant /ovr K*/sup -// are produced predominantly via natural parity exchange in the t channel. The leading K*(890), K/sub 2/*(1430), and K*(1780) resonances are clearly observed and measured, and the underlying spectroscopy is also extracted. Indications of higher mass resonance production are also shown. The observed properties of these states are used to confront current models of quark spectroscopy in strange meson systems. 94 refs., 96 figs., 23 tabs.

  7. Probabilistic fatigue methodology and wind turbine reliability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lange, C.H. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Wind turbines subjected to highly irregular loadings due to wind, gravity, and gyroscopic effects are especially vulnerable to fatigue damage. The objective of this study is to develop and illustrate methods for the probabilistic analysis and design of fatigue-sensitive wind turbine components. A computer program (CYCLES) that estimates fatigue reliability of structural and mechanical components has been developed. A FORM/SORM analysis is used to compute failure probabilities and importance factors of the random variables. The limit state equation includes uncertainty in environmental loading, gross structural response, and local fatigue properties. Several techniques are shown to better study fatigue loads data. Common one-parameter models, such as the Rayleigh and exponential models are shown to produce dramatically different estimates of load distributions and fatigue damage. Improved fits may be achieved with the two-parameter Weibull model. High b values require better modeling of relatively large stress ranges; this is effectively done by matching at least two moments (Weibull) and better by matching still higher moments. For this purpose, a new, four-moment {open_quotes}generalized Weibull{close_quotes} model is introduced. Load and resistance factor design (LRFD) methodology for design against fatigue is proposed and demonstrated using data from two horizontal-axis wind turbines. To estimate fatigue damage, wind turbine blade loads have been represented by their first three statistical moments across a range of wind conditions. Based on the moments {mu}{sub 1}{hor_ellipsis}{mu}{sub 3}, new {open_quotes}quadratic Weibull{close_quotes} load distribution models are introduced. The fatigue reliability is found to be notably affected by the choice of load distribution model.

  8. On sequential dynamical systems and simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrett, C.L.; Mortveit, H.S.; Reidys, C.M.

    1999-06-01

    The generic structure of computer simulations motivates a new class of discrete dynamical systems that captures this structure in a mathematically precise way. This class of systems consists of (1) a loopfree graph {Upsilon} with vertex set {l_brace}1,2,{hor_ellipsis},n{r_brace} where each vertex has a binary state, (2) a vertex labeled set of functions (F{sub i,{Upsilon}}:F{sub 2}{sup n} {r_arrow} F{sub 2}{sup n}){sub i} and (3) a permutation {pi} {element_of} S{sub n}. The function F{sub i,{Upsilon}} updates the state of vertex i as a function of the states of vertex i and its {Upsilon}-neighbors and leaves the states of all other vertices fixed. The permutation {pi} represents the update ordering, i.e., the order in which the functions F{sub i,{Upsilon}} are applied. By composing the functions F{sub i,{Upsilon}} in the order given by {pi} one obtains the dynamical system (equation given in paper) which the authors refer to as a sequential dynamical system, or SDS for short. The authors will present bounds for the number of functionally different systems and for the number of nonisomorphic digraphs {Gamma}[F{sub {Upsilon}},{pi}] that can be obtained by varying the update order and applications of these to specific graphs and graph classes. This will be done using both combinatorial/algebraic techniques and probabilistic techniques. Finally the authors give results on dynamical system properties for some special systems.

  9. A RhxSy/C Catalyst for the Hydrogen Oxidation and Hydrogen Evolution Reactions in HBr

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Masud, Jahangir; Nguyena, Trung V.; Singh, Nirala; McFarland, Eric; Ikenberry, Myles; Hohn, Keith; Pan, Chun-Jern; Hwang, Bing-Joe

    2015-02-01

    Rhodium sulfide (Rh2S3) on carbon support was synthesized by refluxing rhodium chloride with ammonium thiosulfate. Thermal treatment of Rh2S3 at high temperatures (600°C to 850°C) in presence of argon resulted in the transformation of Rh2S3 into Rh3S4, Rh17S15 and Rh which were characterized by TGA/DTA, XRD, EDX, and deconvolved XPS analyses. The catalyst particle size distribution ranged from 3 to 12 nm. Cyclic voltammetry and rotating disk electrode measurements were used to evaluate the catalytic activity for hydrogen oxidation and evolution reactions in H2SO4 and HBr solutions. The thermally treated catalysts show high activity for the hydrogen reactions. The exchangemore »current densities (io) of the synthesized RhxSy catalysts in H2-saturated 1M H2SO4 and 1M HBr for HER and HOR were 0.9 mA/cm2 to 1.0 mA/cm2 and 0.8 to 0.9 mA/cm2, respectively. The lower io values obtained in 1M HBr solution compared to in H2SO4 might be due to the adsorption of Br- on the active surface. Stable electrochemical active surface area (ECSA) of RhxSy catalyst was obtained for CV scan limits between 0 V and 0.65 V vs. RHE. Scans with upper voltage limit beyond 0.65 V led to decreased and unreproducible ECSA measurements.« less

  10. The turbulent cascade and proton heating in the solar wind during solar minimum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coburn, Jesse T.; Smith, Charles W.; Vasquez, Bernard J.; Stawarz, Joshua E.; Forman, Miriam A.

    2013-06-13

    Solar wind measurements at 1 AU during the recent solar minimum and previous studies of solar maximum provide an opportunity to study the effects of the changing solar cycle on in situ heating. Our interest is to compare the levels of activity associated with turbulence and proton heating. Large-scale shears in the flow caused by transient activity are a source that drives turbulence that heats the solar wind, but as the solar cycle progresses the dynamics that drive the turbulence and heat the medium are likely to change. The application of third-moment theory to Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) data gives the turbulent energy cascade rate which is not seen to vary with the solar cycle. Likewise, an empirical heating rate shows no significan changes in proton heating over the cycle.

  11. Ancillary-service details: regulation, load following, and generator response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirst, E.; Kirby, B.

    1996-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to examine empirically these intrahour and interhour load changes and the responses of a utility`s generating resources to those load changes. We analyze data, primarily from one control area, to see how it maintains ACE close to zero in an effort to meet the A1 and A2 criteria. Overall, we estimate that load following costs US electric utilities over one billion dollars a year. We first test alternative ways to identify trends over multihour periods using both regression analysis and rolling averages. Then, we consider several metrics for intrahour load following. Next we examine characteristics of load following for different time-averaging periods and compare the dynamics of loads and load following generation across these time periods. Finally, we consider the contribution of each load to the total load following requirements of the control area.

  12. Java XMGR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. George L. Mesina; Steven P. Miller

    2004-08-01

    The XMGR5 graphing package [1] for drawing RELAP5 [2] plots is being re-written in Java [3]. Java is a robust programming language that is available at no cost for most computer platforms from Sun Microsystems, Inc. XMGR5 is an extension of an XY plotting tool called ACE/gr extended to plot data from several US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) applications. It is also the most popular graphing package worldwide for making RELAP5 plots. In Section 1, a short review of XMGR5 is given, followed by a brief overview of Java. In Section 2, shortcomings of both tkXMGR [4] and XMGR5 are discussed and the value of converting to Java is given. Details of the conversion to Java are given in Section 3. The progress to date, some conclusions and future work are given in Section 4. Some screen shots of the Java version are shown.

  13. Procedures in statistical design and analysis of variance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGarrah, James Eugene

    1957-01-01

    tececcsee the mcasstcd~ ke Cbe ~tccs et tceatesset e18scNe, If tbece je csep dcsssht ee te the cceL(tscss4+ ef Chse sseehwaec a ccektahwe teecsaAcsaeeQcsss M the ?ssrhAhse scLII hc xeqsChw4i The fe&garJg ~cecW4one haec heee fee@ ccyyltealde Ss the eae4... stecclyeLat ef ths ecetislcLcclae) ks me of eeyhAo cecclceclsatioc4, The cc~xiosgisas ef ths teeehewct(s) ace ssetts?eL eeoc a Icccge esca. ke8 hghkarc tbie io tbo seat CCCLL?faotsef CCCCh?CL gf Cheee ie CeC ysrtieAg ceases foe Nme Cote of grcscggcg...

  14. Shoot dynamics of 'Alamo' switchgrass as influenced by defoliation and fertilization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Copeland, Tommy Dale

    1981-01-01

    . 4b 0. 0c 0. 0b O. lab 0. 21 0. 6ab 1. 4a 1. 4a 0. 16 0. 01 O. gab I. la 0. 26 0. 2b I. Cs 0. 6b O. lb 0. 2b 0. 4b 0. th 0. 26 0. 21 0. 0b 0. 01 0. 0b 0. 0b 0. 06 0. 06 O. gs I. Oa 0. 0 0. 2a 0. 8a 0. 4a I. la 0. 9a 0. 2a 0. 6a... 0. 2 0. 4a 0. 0 0. 0 0. 0a 0 Oa 0. 0a 0. 0a Neaae vlthln o I mn fullo ed by th? e letter ace not siy iflcantly diff rent ac rhe . 90 le el s dl g t Dune n's ultlpl? raage test. Table 2. A erage n ?bec of e o dary nonroot 4 shonta per pl c occ...

  15. Three-Stage Production Cost Modeling Approach for Evaluating the Benefits of Intra-Hour Scheduling between Balancing Authorities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samaan, Nader A.; Milligan, Michael; Hunsaker, Matthew; Guo, Tao

    2015-07-30

    This paper introduces a Production Cost Modeling (PCM) approach to evaluate the benefits of intra-hour scheduling between Balancing Authorities (BAs). The system operation is modeled in a three-stage sequential manner: day ahead (DA)-hour ahead (HA)-real time (RT). In addition to contingency reserve, each BA will need to carry out “up” and “down” load following and regulation reserve capacity requirements in the DA and HA time frames. In the real-time simulation, only contingency and regulation reserves are carried out as load following is deployed. To model current real-time operation with hourly schedules, a new constraint was introduced to force each BA net exchange schedule deviation from HA schedules to be within NERC ACE limits. Case studies that investigate the benefits of moving from hourly exchange schedules between WECC BAs into 10-min exchange schedules under two different levels of wind and solar penetration (11% and 33%) are presented.

  16. PV output smoothing with energy storage.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellis, Abraham; Schoenwald, David Alan

    2012-03-01

    This report describes an algorithm, implemented in Matlab/Simulink, designed to reduce the variability of photovoltaic (PV) power output by using a battery. The purpose of the battery is to add power to the PV output (or subtract) to smooth out the high frequency components of the PV power that that occur during periods with transient cloud shadows on the PV array. The control system is challenged with the task of reducing short-term PV output variability while avoiding overworking the battery both in terms of capacity and ramp capability. The algorithm proposed by Sandia is purposely very simple to facilitate implementation in a real-time controller. The control structure has two additional inputs to which the battery can respond. For example, the battery could respond to PV variability, load variability or area control error (ACE) or a combination of the three.

  17. Joint environmental assessment for Chevron USA, Inc. and Santa Fe Energy Resources, Inc.: Midway Valley 3D seismic project, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-10-01

    The proposed Midway Valley 3D Geophysical Exploration Project covers approximately 31,444 aces of private lands, 6,880 acres of Department of Energy (DOE) Lands within Naval Petroleum Reserve 2 (NPR2) and 3,840 acres of lands administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), in western Kern County, California. This environmental assessment (EA) presents an overview of the affected environment within the project area using results of a literature review of biological field surveys previously conducted within or adjacent to a proposed 3D seismic project. The purpose is to provide background information to identify potential and known locations of sensitive wildlife and special status plant species within the proposed seismic project area. Biological field surveys, following agency approved survey protocols, will be conducted during October through November 1996 to acquire current resources data to provide avoidance as the project is being implemented in the field.

  18. Final Report: Super Instruction Architecture for Scalable Parallel Computations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanders, Beverly Ann; Bartlett, Rodney; Deumens, Erik

    2013-12-23

    The most advanced methods for reliable and accurate computation of the electronic structure of molecular and nano systems are the coupled-cluster techniques. These high-accuracy methods help us to understand, for example, how biological enzymes operate and contribute to the design of new organic explosives. The ACES III software provides a modern, high-performance implementation of these methods optimized for high performance parallel computer systems, ranging from small clusters typical in individual research groups, through larger clusters available in campus and regional computer centers, all the way to high-end petascale systems at national labs, including exploiting GPUs if available. This project enhanced the ACESIII software package and used it to study interesting scientific problems.

  19. Invited Article: Characterization of background sources in space-based time-of-flight mass spectrometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbert, J. A.; Gershman, D. J.; Gloeckler, G.; Lundgren, R. A.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Orlando, T. M.; McLain, J.; Steiger, R. von

    2014-09-15

    For instruments that use time-of-flight techniques to measure space plasma, there are common sources of background signals that evidence themselves in the data. The background from these sources may increase the complexity of data analysis and reduce the signal-to-noise response of the instrument, thereby diminishing the science value or usefulness of the data. This paper reviews several sources of background commonly found in time-of-flight mass spectrometers and illustrates their effect in actual data using examples from ACE-SWICS and MESSENGER-FIPS. Sources include penetrating particles and radiation, UV photons, energy straggling and angular scattering, electron stimulated desorption of ions, ion-induced electron emission, accidental coincidence events, and noise signatures from instrument electronics. Data signatures of these sources are shown, as well as mitigation strategies and design considerations for future instruments.

  20. Occupational dose reduction at nuclear power plants: Annotated bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, T.A.; Vulin, D.S.; Lane, S.G.; Baum, J.W. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1991-10-01

    In the continuing effort to collect and disseminate information on radiation dose reduction at nuclear power plants, the ALARA Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory publishes a series of bibliographies of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA. This is the sixth report in that series. The abstracts in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings and conferences, journals, research reports, and searches of information databases of the US Department of Energy. The subject material of these abstracts relates to radiation protection and dose reduction, and ranges from the use of robotics, to operational health physics, to water chemistry. Also included is material on the design, planning, and management of nuclear power stations, as well as on decommissioning and safe storage efforts. This report contains 266 abstracts along with subject and author indices. The author index is exclusively for this volume. The subject index contains headings for this volume in bold face, as well as reference to previous volumes. All information in this and previous volumes of the series is also available through our on-line information system called ACE (ALARA Center Exchange). ACE is accessible through fax machines or personal computers interfaced with modems. The bibliography database and other databases are kept current with new abstracts, information on research projects, and recent news of international events related to ALARA at nuclear power plants. Access to the system is provided freely to the ALARA community. For password certification, manuals, and other information about our system, please contact the ALARA CENTER, Building 703M, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973, or call (516) 282-3228.

  1. FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF H2 AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George Rizeq; Janice West; Arnaldo Frydman; Raul Subia; Vladimir Zamansky; Tomasz Wiltowski; Tom Miles; Bruce Springsteen

    2002-04-30

    Further development of a combustion Large Eddy Simulation (LES) code for the design of advanced gaseous combustion systems is described in this sixth quarterly report. CFD Research Corporation (CFDRC) is developing the LES module within the parallel, unstructured solver included in the commercial CFD-ACE+ software. In this quarter, in-situ adaptive tabulation (ISAT) for efficient chemical rate storage and retrieval was implemented and tested within the Linear Eddy Model (LEM). ISAT type 3 is being tested so that extrapolation can be performed and further improve the retrieval rate. Further testing of the LEM for subgrid chemistry was performed for parallel applications and for multi-step chemistry. Validation of the software on backstep and bluff-body reacting cases were performed. Initial calculations of the SimVal experiment at Georgia Tech using their LES code were performed. Georgia Tech continues the effort to parameterize the LEM over composition space so that a neural net can be used efficiently in the combustion LES code. A new and improved Artificial Neural Network (ANN), with log-transformed output, for the 1-step chemistry was implemented in CFDRC's LES code and gave reasonable results. This quarter, the 2nd consortium meeting was held at CFDRC. Next quarter, LES software development and testing will continue. Alpha testing of the code will continue to be performed on cases of interest to the industrial consortium. Optimization of subgrid models will be pursued, particularly with the ISAT approach. Also next quarter, the demonstration of the neural net approach, for multi-step chemical kinetics speed-up in CFD-ACE+, will be accomplished.

  2. LES SOFTWARE FOR THE DESIGN OF LOW EMISSION COMBUSTION SYSTEMS FOR VISION 21 PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven Cannon; Baifang Zuo; Virgil Adumitroaie; Keith McDaniel; Clifford Smith

    2002-04-30

    Further development of a combustion Large Eddy Simulation (LES) code for the design of advanced gaseous combustion systems is described in this sixth quarterly report. CFD Research Corporation (CFDRC) is developing the LES module within the parallel, unstructured solver included in the commercial CFD-ACE+ software. In this quarter, in-situ adaptive tabulation (ISAT) for efficient chemical rate storage and retrieval was implemented and tested within the Linear Eddy Model (LEM). ISAT type 3 is being tested so that extrapolation can be performed and further improve the retrieval rate. Further testing of the LEM for subgrid chemistry was performed for parallel applications and for multi-step chemistry. Validation of the software on backstep and bluff-body reacting cases were performed. Initial calculations of the SimVal experiment at Georgia Tech using their LES code were performed. Georgia Tech continues the effort to parameterize the LEM over composition space so that a neural net can be used efficiently in the combustion LES code. A new and improved Artificial Neural Network (ANN), with log-transformed output, for the 1-step chemistry was implemented in CFDRC's LES code and gave reasonable results. This quarter, the 2nd consortium meeting was held at CFDRC. Next quarter, LES software development and testing will continue. Alpha testing of the code will continue to be performed on cases of interest to the industrial consortium. Optimization of subgrid models will be pursued, particularly with the ISAT approach. Also next quarter, the demonstration of the neural net approach, for multi-step chemical kinetics speed-up in CFD-ACE+, will be accomplished.

  3. LES SOFTWARE FOR THE DESIGN OF LOW EMISSION COMBUSTION SYSTEMS FOR VISION 21 PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Cannon; Virgil Adumitroaie; Keith McDaniel; Cliff Smith

    2001-05-01

    Further development of a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) code for the design of advanced gaseous combustion systems is described in this second quarterly report. CFD Research Corporation (CFDRC) is developing the LES module within the parallel, unstructured solver included in the commercial CFD-ACE+ software. CFDRC has implemented and tested Smagorinsky and localized dynamic subgrid turbulence models on a 2.1 million cell DOE-NETL combustor case and a 400,000 cell nonreacting backstep case. Both cases showed good agreement between predicted and experimental results. The large DOE-NETL case results provided better agreement with the measured oscillation frequency than previous attempts because massive parallel computing (on a cluster of 24 pcs) allowed the entire computational domain, including the swirler vanes and fuel spokes, to be modeled. Subgrid chemistry models, including the conditional moment closure (CMC) and linear eddy model (LEM), are being tested and implemented. Reduced chemical mechanisms have been developed for emissions, ignition delay, extinction, and flame propagation using a computer automated reduction method (CARM). A 19-species natural gas mechanism, based on GRI2.11 and Miller-NO{sub x}, was shown to predict rich NO{sub x} emissions better than any previously published mechanisms. The ability to handle this mechanism in CFD-ACE+ was demonstrated by implementing operator splitting and a stiff ODE solver (DVODE). Efficient tabulation methods, including in situ adaptation and artificial neural nets, are being studied and will be implemented in the LES code. The LES combustion code development and testing is on schedule. Next quarter, initial results (including the DOE-NETL unstable combustor) with the CMC and LEM subgrid chemistry models will be completed and summarized.

  4. A RhxSy/C Catalyst for the Hydrogen Oxidation and Hydrogen Evolution Reactions in HBr

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masud, Jahangir; Nguyena, Trung V.; Singh, Nirala; McFarland, Eric; Ikenberry, Myles; Hohn, Keith; Pan, Chun-Jern; Hwang, Bing-Joe

    2015-01-01

    Rhodium sulfide (Rh2S3) on carbon support was synthesized by refluxing rhodium chloride with ammonium thiosulfate. Thermal treatment of Rh2S3 at high temperatures (600°C to 850°C) in presence of argon resulted in the transformation of Rh2S3 into Rh3S4, Rh17S15 and Rh which were characterized by TGA/DTA, XRD, EDX, and deconvolved XPS analyses. The catalyst particle size distribution ranged from 3 to 12 nm. Cyclic voltammetry and rotating disk electrode measurements were used to evaluate the catalytic activity for hydrogen oxidation and evolution reactions in H2SO4 and HBr solutions. The thermally treated catalysts show high activity for the hydrogen reactions. The exchange current densities (io) of the synthesized RhxSy catalysts in H2-saturated 1M H2SO4 and 1M HBr for HER and HOR were 0.9 mA/cm2 to 1.0 mA/cm2 and 0.8 to 0.9 mA/cm2, respectively. The lower io values obtained in 1M HBr solution compared to in H2SO4 might be due to the adsorption of Br- on the active surface. Stable electrochemical active surface area (ECSA) of RhxSy catalyst was obtained for CV scan limits between 0 V and 0.65 V vs. RHE. Scans with upper voltage limit beyond 0.65 V led to decreased and unreproducible ECSA measurements.

  5. Implementation of On-the-Fly Doppler Broadening in MCNP5 for Multiphysics Simulation of Nuclear Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Martin

    2012-11-16

    A new method to obtain Doppler broadened cross sections has been implemented into MCNP, removing the need to generate cross sections for isotopes at problem temperatures. Previous work had established the scientific feasibility of obtaining Doppler-broadened cross sections "on-the-fly" (OTF) during the random walk of the neutron. Thus, when a neutron of energy E enters a material region that is at some temperature T, the cross sections for that material at the exact temperature T are immediately obtained by interpolation using a high order functional expansion for the temperature dependence of the Doppler-broadened cross section for that isotope at the neutron energy E. A standalone Fortran code has been developed that generates the OTF library for any isotope that can be processed by NJOY. The OTF cross sections agree with the NJOY-based cross sections for all neutron energies and all temperatures in the range specified by the user, e.g., 250K - 3200K. The OTF methodology has been successfully implemented into the MCNP Monte Carlo code and has been tested on several test problems by comparing MCNP with conventional ACE cross sections versus MCNP with OTF cross sections. The test problems include the Doppler defect reactivity benchmark suite and two full-core VHTR configurations, including one with multiphysics coupling using RELAP5-3D/ATHENA for the thermal-hydraulic analysis. The comparison has been excellent, verifying that the OTF libraries can be used in place of the conventional ACE libraries generated at problem temperatures. In addition, it has been found that using OTF cross sections greatly reduces the complexity of the input for MCNP, especially for full-core temperature feedback calculations with many temperature regions. This results in an order of magnitude decrease in the number of input lines for full-core configurations, thus simplifying input preparation and reducing the potential for input errors. Finally, for full-core problems with multiphysics feedback, the memory required to store the cross section data is considerably reduced with OTF cross sections and the additional computational effort to use OTF cross sections is negligible. This is a joint project with the University of Michigan, Argonne National Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  6. Clusters, groups, and filaments in the Chandra deep field-south up to redshift 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dehghan, S.; Johnston-Hollitt, M., E-mail: siamak.dehghan@vuw.ac.nz [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, P.O. Box 600, Wellington 6140 (New Zealand)

    2014-03-01

    We present a comprehensive structure detection analysis of the 0.3 deg{sup 2} area of the MUSYC-ACES field, which covers the Chandra Deep Field-South (CDFS). Using a density-based clustering algorithm on the MUSYC and ACES photometric and spectroscopic catalogs, we find 62 overdense regions up to redshifts of 1, including clusters, groups, and filaments. We also present the detection of a relatively small void of ?10 Mpc{sup 2} at z ? 0.53. All structures are confirmed using the DBSCAN method, including the detection of nine structures previously reported in the literature. We present a catalog of all structures present, including their central position, mean redshift, velocity dispersions, and classification based on their morphological and spectroscopic distributions. In particular, we find 13 galaxy clusters and 6 large groups/small clusters. Comparison of these massive structures with published XMM-Newton imaging (where available) shows that 80% of these structures are associated with diffuse, soft-band (0.4-1 keV) X-ray emission, including 90% of all objects classified as clusters. The presence of soft-band X-ray emission in these massive structures (M {sub 200} ? 4.9 × 10{sup 13} M {sub ?}) provides a strong independent confirmation of our methodology and classification scheme. In the closest two clusters identified (z < 0.13) high-quality optical imaging from the Deep2c field of the Garching-Bonn Deep Survey reveals the cD galaxies and demonstrates that they sit at the center of the detected X-ray emission. Nearly 60% of the clusters, groups, and filaments are detected in the known enhanced density regions of the CDFS at z ? 0.13, 0.52, 0.68, and 0.73. Additionally, all of the clusters, bar the most distant, are found in these overdense redshift regions. Many of the clusters and groups exhibit signs of ongoing formation seen in their velocity distributions, position within the detected cosmic web, and in one case through the presence of tidally disrupted central galaxies exhibiting trails of stars. These results all provide strong support for hierarchical structure formation up to redshifts of 1.

  7. ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLING USING LOCATION SPECIFIC AIR MONITORING IN BULK HANDLING FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sexton, L.; Hanks, D.; Degange, J.; Brant, H.; Hall, G.; Cable-Dunlap, P.; Anderson, B.

    2011-06-07

    Since the introduction of safeguards strengthening measures approved by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Board of Governors (1992-1997), international nuclear safeguards inspectors have been able to utilize environmental sampling (ES) (e.g. deposited particulates, air, water, vegetation, sediments, soil and biota) in their safeguarding approaches at bulk uranium/plutonium handling facilities. Enhancements of environmental sampling techniques used by the IAEA in drawing conclusions concerning the absence of undeclared nuclear materials or activities will soon be able to take advantage of a recent step change improvement in the gathering and analysis of air samples at these facilities. Location specific air monitoring feasibility tests have been performed with excellent results in determining attribute and isotopic composition of chemical elements present in an actual test-bed sample. Isotopic analysis of collected particles from an Aerosol Contaminant Extractor (ACE) collection, was performed with the standard bulk sampling protocol used throughout the IAEA network of analytical laboratories (NWAL). The results yielded bulk isotopic values expected for the operations. Advanced designs of air monitoring instruments such as the ACE may be used in gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEP) to detect the production of highly enriched uranium (HEU) or enrichments not declared by a State. Researchers at Savannah River National Laboratory in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory are developing the next generation of ES equipment for air grab and constant samples that could become an important addition to the international nuclear safeguards inspector's toolkit. Location specific air monitoring to be used to establish a baseline environmental signature of a particular facility employed for comparison of consistencies in declared operations will be described in this paper. Implementation of air monitoring will be contrasted against the use of smear ES when used during unannounced inspections, design information verification, limited frequency unannounced access, and complementary access visits at bulk handling facilities. Analysis of technical features required for tamper indication and resistance will demonstrate the viability of successful application of the system in taking ES within a bulk handling location. Further exploration of putting this technology into practice is planned to include mapping uranium enrichment facilities for the identification of optimal for installation of air monitoring devices.

  8. Hypoxic remodelling of Ca{sup 2+} stores does not alter human cardiac myofibroblast invasion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riches, K.; Hettiarachchi, N.T.; Porter, K.E.; Peers, C.

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} Bradykinin promotes migration and proliferation of myofibroblasts. {yields} Such activity is Ca{sup 2+}-dependent and occurs under hypoxic conditions. {yields} Hypoxia increased myofibroblast Ca{sup 2+} stores but not influx evoked by bradykinin. {yields} Myofibroblast migration and proliferation was unaffected by hypoxia. -- Abstract: Cardiac fibroblasts are the most abundant cell type in the heart, and play a key role in the maintenance and repair of the myocardium following damage such as myocardial infarction by transforming into a cardiac myofibroblast (CMF) phenotype. Repair occurs through controlled proliferation and migration, which are Ca{sup 2+} dependent processes, and often requires the cells to operate within a hypoxic environment. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors reduce infarct size through the promotion of bradykinin (BK) stability. Although CMF express BK receptors, their activity under the reduced O{sub 2} conditions that occur following infarct are entirely unexplored. Using Fura-2 microfluorimetry on primary human CMF, we found that hypoxia significantly increased the mobilisation of Ca{sup 2+} from intracellular stores in response to BK whilst capacitative Ca{sup 2+} entry (CCE) remained unchanged. The enhanced store mobilisation was due to a striking increase in CMF intracellular Ca{sup 2+}-store content under hypoxic conditions. However, BK-induced CMF migration or proliferation was not affected following hypoxic exposure, suggesting that Ca{sup 2+} influx rather than mobilisation is of primary importance in CMF migration and proliferation.

  9. Modeling of Radiation Pneumonitis after Lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy: A Bayesian Network Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Sangkyu; Jeyaseelan, Krishinima; Faria, Sergio; Kopek, Neil; Brisebois, Pascale; Vu, Toni; Filion, Edith; Campeau, Marie-Pierre; Lambert, Louise; Del Vecchio, Pierre; Trudel, Diane; El-Sokhn, Nidale; Roach, Michael; Robinson, Clifford; Naqa, Issam El

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung cancer accompanies a non-negligible risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP). This study presents a Bayesian network (BN) model that connects biological, dosimetric, and clinical RP risk factors. Material and Methods: 43 non-small-cell lung cancer patients treated with SBRT with 5 fractions or less were studied. Candidate RP risk factors included dose-volume parameters, previously reported clinical RP factors, 6 protein biomarkers at baseline and 6 weeks post-treatment. A BN ensemble model was built from a subset of the variables in a training cohort (N=32), and further tested in an independent validation cohort (N=11). Results: Key factors identified in the BN ensemble for predicting RP risk were ipsilateral V5, lung volume receiving more than 105% of prescription, and decrease in angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) from baseline to 6 weeks. External validation of the BN ensemble model yielded an area under the curve of 0.8. Conclusions: The BN...

  10. LES SOFTWARE FOR THE DESIGN OF LOW EMISSION COMBUSTION SYSTEMS FOR VISION 21 PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven Cannon; Clifford Smith

    2003-04-01

    Application and testing of the new combustion Large Eddy Simulation (LES) code for the design of advanced gaseous combustion systems is described in this 10th quarterly report. CFD Research Corporation has developed the LES module within the parallel, unstructured solver included in the commercial CFD-ACE+ software. In this quarter, validation and testing of the combustion LES code was performed for the DOE-Simval combustor. Also, Beta testing by consortium members was performed for various burner and combustor configurations. In the two quarters ahead, CFDRC will validate the code on the new DOE SimVal experiments. Experimental data from DOE should be available in June 2003, though LES calculations are currently being performed. This will ensure a truly predictive test of the software. CFDRC will also provide help to the consortium members on running their cases, and incorporate improvements to the software suggested by the beta testers. The beta testers will compare their predictions with experimental measurements and other numerical calculations. At the end of this project (October, 2003), a final released version of the software will be available for licensing to the general public.

  11. Environmental Cost Analysis System (ECAS) Status and Compliance Requirements for EM Consolidated Business Center Contracts - 13204

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanford, P.C.; Moe, M.A.; Hombach, W.G.; Urdangaray, R.

    2013-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) has developed a web-accessible database to collect actual cost data from completed EM projects to support cost estimating and analysis. This Environmental Cost Analysis System (ECAS) database was initially deployed in early 2009 containing the cost and parametric data from 77 decommissioning, restoration, and waste management projects completed under the Rocky Flats Closure Project. In subsequent years we have added many more projects to ECAS and now have a total of 280 projects from 8 major DOE sites. This data is now accessible to DOE users through a web-based reporting tool that allows users to tailor report outputs to meet their specific needs. We are using it as a principal resource supporting the EM Consolidated Business Center (EMCBC) and the EM Applied Cost Engineering (ACE) team cost estimating and analysis efforts across the country. The database has received Government Accountability Office review as supporting its recommended improvements in DOE's cost estimating process, as well as review from the DOE Office of Acquisition and Project Management (APM). Moving forward, the EMCBC has developed a Special Contract Requirement clause or 'H-Clause' to be included in all current and future EMCBC procurements identifying the process that contractors will follow to provide DOE their historical project data in a format compatible with ECAS. Changes to DOE O 413.3B implementation are also in progress to capture historical costs as part of the Critical Decision project closeout process. (authors)

  12. Research on Field Emission and Dark Current in ILC Cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Kexin; Li, Yongming; Palczewski, Ari; Geng, Rongli

    2013-09-01

    Field emission and dark current are issues of concern for SRF cavity performance and SRF linac operation. Complete understanding and reliable control of the issue are still needed, especially in full-scale multi-cell cavities. Our work aims at developing a generic procedure for finding an active field emitter in a multi-cell cavity and benchmarking the procedure through cavity vertical test. Our ultimate goal is to provide feedback to cavity preparation and cavity string assembly in order to reduce or eliminate filed emission in SRF cavities. Systematic analysis of behaviors of field emitted electrons is obtained by ACE3P developed by SLAC. Experimental benchmark of the procedure was carried out in a 9-cell cavity vertical test at JLab. The energy spectrum of Bremsstrahlung X-rays is measured using a NaI(Tl) detector. The end-point energy in the X-ray energy spectrum is taken as the highest kinetic electron energy to predict longitudinal position of the active field emitter. Angular location of the field emitter is determined by an array of silicon diodes around irises of the cavity. High-resolution optical inspection was conducted at the predicted field emitter location.

  13. Effects of interplanetary shock inclinations on auroral power intensity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliveira, D M; Tsurutani, B T; Gjerloev, J W

    2015-01-01

    We derive fast forward interplanetary (IP) shock speeds and impact angles to study the geoeffectivness of 461 IP shocks that occurred from January 1995 to December 2013 using ACE and WIND spacecraft data. The geomagnetic activity is inferred from the SuperMAG project data. SuperMAG is a large chain which employs more than 300 ground stations to compute enhanced versions of the traditional geomagnetic indices. The SuperMAG auroral electroject SME index, an enhanced version of the traditional AE index, is used as an auroral power (AP) indicator. AP intensity jumps triggered by shock impacts are correlated with both shock speed and impact angle. It is found that high AP intensity events typically occur when high speed IP shocks impact the Earths magnetosphere with the shock normal almost parallel to the Sun-Earth line. This result suggests that symmetric and strong magnetospheric compression leads to favorable conditions for intense auroral power release, as shown previously by simulations and observations. Some...

  14. How are Forbush decreases related with interplanetary magnetic field enhancements ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arunbabu, K P; Dugad, S R; Gupta, S K; Hayashi, Y; Kawakami, S; Mohanty, P K; Oshima, A; Subramanian, P

    2015-01-01

    Aims. Forbush decrease (FD) is a transient decrease followed by a gradual recovery in the observed galactic cosmic ray intensity. We seek to understand the relationship between the FDs and near-Earth interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) enhancements associated with solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Methods. We use muon data at cutoff rigidities ranging from 14 to 24 GV from the GRAPES-3 tracking muon telescope to identify FD events. We select those FD events that have a reasonably clean profile, and magnitude > 0.25%. We use IMF data from ACE/WIND spacecrafts. We look for correlations between the FD profile and that of the one hour averaged IMF. We ask if the diffusion of high energy protons into the large scale magnetic field is the cause of the lag observed between the FD and the IMF. Results. The enhancement of the IMF associated with FDs occurs mainly in the shock-sheath region, and the turbulence level in the magnetic field is also enhanced in this region. The observed FD profiles look remarkably simil...

  15. Impact Angle Control of Interplanetary Shock Geoeffectiveness: A Statistical Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliveira, D M

    2015-01-01

    We present a survey of interplanetary (IP) shocks using WIND and ACE satellite data from January 1995 to December 2013 to study how IP shock geoeffectiveness is controlled by IP shock impact angles. A shock list covering one and a half solar cycle is compiled. The yearly number of IP shocks is found to correlate well with the monthly sunspot number. We use data from SuperMAG, a large chain with more than 300 geomagnetic stations, to study geoeffectiveness triggered by IP shocks. The SuperMAG SML index, an enhanced version of the familiar AL index, is used in our statistical analysis. The jumps of the SML index triggered by IP shock impacts on the Earth's magnetosphere is investigated in terms of IP shock orientation and speed. We find that, in general, strong (high speed) and almost frontal (small impact angle) shocks are more geoeffective than inclined shocks with low speed. The strongest correlation (correlation coefficient R = 0.70) occurs for fixed IP shock speed and varying the IP shock impact angle. We ...

  16. Optical Clock and Drag-Free Requirements for a Shapiro Time-Delay Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neil Ashby; Peter L. Bender

    2011-06-10

    In the next decade or two, extremely accurate tests of general relativity under extreme conditions are expected from gravitational wave observations of binary black hole mergers with a wide range of mass ratios. In addition, major improvements are planned in both strong and weak equivalence principle tests; clock measurements based on the ACES program on the ISS; more accurate light-bending measurements; and other new types of tests. However, whether these tests are all consistent with general relativity or not, it still appears desirable to proceed with a much improved measurement of the Shapiro time delay. A suggested approach is based on using a high-quality optical clock in a drag-free spacecraft near the sun-earth L1 point and a smaller drag-free transponder spacecraft in a two-year period solar orbit. Laser phase travel-time measurements would be made between the two spacecraft over a period of 10 or 20 days around the time when the line of sight passes through the Sun. The requirements on the optical clock stability and on the drag-free systems will be discussed. The accuracy achievable for the time-delay appears to be better than 1 part in 100 million.

  17. Data base on dose reduction research projects for nuclear power plants. Volume 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, T.A.; Yu, C.K.; Roecklein, A.K.

    1994-05-01

    This is the fifth volume in a series of reports that provide information on dose reduction research and health physics technology or nuclear power plants. The information is taken from two of several databases maintained by Brookhaven National Laboratory`s ALARA Center for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The research section of the report covers dose reduction projects that are in the experimental or developmental phase. It includes topics such as steam generator degradation, decontamination, robotics, improvements in reactor materials, and inspection techniques. The section on health physics technology discusses dose reduction efforts that are in place or in the process of being implemented at nuclear power plants. A total of 105 new or updated projects are described. All project abstracts from this report are available to nuclear industry professionals with access to a fax machine through the ACEFAX system or a computer with a modem and the proper communications software through the ACE system. Detailed descriptions of how to access all the databases electronically are in the appendices of the report.

  18. Beam Pipe HOM Absorber for 750 MHz RF Cavity Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Rolland; Neubauer, Michael

    2014-10-29

    This joint project of Muons, Inc., Cornell University and SLAC was supported by a Phase I and Phase II grant monitored by the SBIR Office of Science of the DOE. Beam line HOM absorbers are a critical part of future linear colliders. The use of lossy materials at cryogenic temperatures has been incorporated in several systems. The design in beam pipes requires cylinders of lossy material mechanically confined in such a way as to absorb the microwave energy from the higher-order modes and remove the heat generated in the lossy material. Furthermore, the potential for charge build-up on the surface of the lossy material requires the conductivity of the material to remain consistent from room temperature to cryogenic temperatures. In this program a mechanical design was developed that solved several design constraints: a) fitting into the existing Cornell load vacuum component, b) allowing the use of different material compositions, c) a thermal design that relied upon the compression of the lossy ceramic material without adding stress. Coating experiments were performed that indicated the design constraints needed to fully implement this approach for solving the charge build-up problem inherent in using lossy ceramics. In addition, the ACE3P program, used to calculate the performance of lossy cylinders in beam pipes in general, was supported by this project. Code development and documentation to allow for the more wide spread use of the program was a direct result of this project was well.

  19. Study on generating of thermal neutron scattering cross sections for LiH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, L.; Jiang, X.; Zhao, Z.; Chen, L. [Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China)

    2013-07-01

    LiH is designated as a promising moderator and shielding material because of its low density, high melting point and large fraction of H atoms. However, lack of the thermal neutron cross sections of LiH makes numerical calculation deviate from experimental data to some extent. As a result, it is necessary to study LiH thermal kernel effect. The phonon property of LiH has been investigated by first-principles calculations using the plane-wave pseudo potential method with CASTEP code. The scattering law and the thermal neutron scattering cross sections for Li and H have been generated using this distribution. The results have been compared with zirconium hydride data. The GASKET and NJOY/LEAPR codes have been used in the calculation of scattering law, whose results have been compared with the reference; the discrepancy mainly comes from phonon spectrums and its expansion. LEAPR had the capability to compute scattering through larger energy and momentum transfers than GASKET did. By studying LiH phonon spectrum and constructing the model of LiH thermal kernel and scattering matrix, the ACE format LiH thermal neutron cross sections for MCNP software could be made and used for reactor Neutronics calculation. (authors)

  20. Evidence of the Solar EUV hot channel as a magnetic flux rope from remote-sensing and in-situ observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Hongqiang; Zhang, Jie; Cheng, Xin; Wang, Bing; Hu, Qiang; Li, Gang; Wang, Yuming

    2015-01-01

    Hot channels (HCs), high temperature erupting structures in the lower corona of the Sun, have been proposed as a proxy of magnetic flux ropes (MFRs) since their initial discovery. However, it is difficult to make definitive proof given the fact that there is no direct measurement of magnetic field in the corona. An alternative way is to use the magnetic field measurement in the solar wind from in-situ instruments. On 2012 July 12, an HC was observed prior to and during a coronal mass ejection (CME) by the AIA high-temperature images. The HC is invisible in the EUVI low-temperature images, which only show the cooler leading front (LF). However, both the LF and an ejecta can be observed in the coronagraphic images. These are consistent with the high temperature and high density of the HC and support that the ejecta is the erupted HC. In the meanwhile, the associated CME shock was identified ahead of the ejecta and the sheath through the COR2 images, and the corresponding ICME was detected by \\textit{ACE}, showi...

  1. Comparative Simulation Studies of Multipacting in Higher-Order-Mode Couplers of Superconducting RF Cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Y. M. [Peking University, Beijing (China); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Liu, Kexin [Peking University, Beijing (China); Geng, Rongli [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Multipacting (MP) in higher-order-mode (HOM) couplers of the International Linear Collider (ILC) baseline cavity and the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) 12 GeV upgrade cavity is studied by using the ACE3P suites, developed by the Advanced Computations Department at SLAC. For the ILC cavity HOM coupler, the simulation results show that resonant trajectories exist in three zones, corresponding to an accelerating gradient range of 0.6?1.6 MV/m, 21?34 MV/m, 32?35 MV/m, and > 40MV/m, respectively. For the CEBAF 12 GeV upgrade cavity HOM coupler, resonant trajectories exist in one zone, corresponding to an accelerating gradient range of 6?13 MV/m. Potential implications of these MP barriers are discussed in the context of future high energy pulsed as well as medium energy continuous wave (CW) accelerators based on superconducting radio frequency cavities. Frequency scaling of MP?s predicted in HOM couplers of the ILC, CBEAF upgrade, SNS and FLASH third harmonic cavity is given and found to be in good agreement with the analytical result based on the parallel plate model.

  2. Development of a strontium optical lattice clock for the SOC mission on the ISS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Bongs; Y. Singh; L. Smith; W. He; O. Kock; D. Swierad; J. Hughes; S. Schiller; S. Alighanbari; S. Origlia; S. Vogt; U. Sterr; Ch. Lisdat; R. Le Targat; J. Lodewyck; D. Holleville; B. Venon; S. Bize; G. P. Barwood; P. Gill; I. R. Hill; Y. B. Ovchinnikov; N. Poli; G. M. Tino; J. Stuhler; W. Kaenders; the SOC2 team

    2015-03-29

    Ultra-precise optical clocks in space will allow new studies in fundamental physics and astronomy. Within an European Space Agency (ESA) program, the Space Optical Clocks (SOC) project aims to install and to operate an optical lattice clock on the International Space Station (ISS) towards the end of this decade. It would be a natural follow-on to the ACES mission, improving its performance by at least one order of magnitude. The payload is planned to include an optical lattice clock, as well as a frequency comb, a microwave link, and an optical link for comparisons of the ISS clock with ground clocks located in several countries and continents. Within the EU-FP7-SPACE-2010-1 project no. 263500, during the years 2011-2015 a compact, modular and robust strontium lattice optical clock demonstrator has been developed. Goal performance is a fractional frequency instability below 1x10^{-15}, tau^{-1/2} and a fractional inaccuracy below 5x10^{-17}. Here we describe the current status of the apparatus' development, including the laser subsystems. Robust preparation of cold {88}^Sr atoms in a second stage magneto-optical trap (MOT) is achieved.

  3. Benefits from flywheel energy storage for area regulation in California - demonstration results : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eyer, James M. (Distributed Utility Associates, Livermore, CA)

    2009-10-01

    This report documents a high-level analysis of the benefit and cost for flywheel energy storage used to provide area regulation for the electricity supply and transmission system in California. Area regulation is an 'ancillary service' needed for a reliable and stable regional electricity grid. The analysis was based on results from a demonstration, in California, of flywheel energy storage developed by Beacon Power Corporation (the system's manufacturer). Demonstrated was flywheel storage systems ability to provide 'rapid-response' regulation. Flywheel storage output can be varied much more rapidly than the output from conventional regulation sources, making flywheels more attractive than conventional regulation resources. The performance of the flywheel storage system demonstrated was generally consistent with requirements for a possible new class of regulation resources - 'rapid-response' energy-storage-based regulation - in California. In short, it was demonstrated that Beacon Power Corporation's flywheel system follows a rapidly changing control signal (the ACE, which changes every four seconds). Based on the results and on expected plant cost and performance, the Beacon Power flywheel storage system has a good chance of being a financially viable regulation resource. Results indicate a benefit/cost ratio of 1.5 to 1.8 using what may be somewhat conservative assumptions. A benefit/cost ratio of one indicates that, based on the financial assumptions used, the investment's financial returns just meet the investors target.

  4. The Mild Space Weather in Solar Cycle 24

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gopalswamy, Nat; Yashiro, Seiji; Xie, Hong; Makela, Pertti; Michalek, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    The space weather is extremely mild during solar cycle 24: the number of major geomagnetic storms and high-energy solar energetic particle events are at the lowest since the dawn of the space age. Solar wind measurements at 1 AU using Wind and ACE instruments have shown that there is a significant drop in the density, magnetic field, total pressure, and Alfven speed in the inner heliosphere as a result of the low solar activity. The drop in large space weather events is disproportionately high because the number of energetic coronal mass ejections that cause these events has not decreased significantly. For example, the rate of halo CMEs, which is a good indicator of energetic CMEs, is similar to that in cycle 23, even though the sunspot number has declined by about 40%. The mild space weather seems to be a consequence of the anomalous expansion of CMEs due to the low ambient pressure in the heliosphere. The anomalous expansion results in the dilution of the magnetic contents of CMEs, so the geomagnetic storm...

  5. Combining Total Monte Carlo and Benchmarks for nuclear data uncertainty propagation on an LFRs safety parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alhassan, Erwin; Duan, Junfeng; Gustavsson, Cecilia; Koning, Arjan; Pomp, Stephan; Rochman, Dimitri; Österlund, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Analyses are carried out to assess the impact of nuclear data uncertainties on keff for the European Lead Cooled Training Reactor (ELECTRA) using the Total Monte Carlo method. A large number of Pu-239 random ENDF-formated libraries generated using the TALYS based system were processed into ACE format with NJOY99.336 code and used as input into the Serpent Monte Carlo neutron transport code to obtain distribution in keff. The keff distribution obtained was compared with the latest major nuclear data libraries - JEFF-3.1.2, ENDF/B-VII.1 and JENDL-4.0. A method is proposed for the selection of benchmarks for specific applications using the Total Monte Carlo approach. Finally, an accept/reject criterion was investigated based on chi square values obtained using the Pu-239 Jezebel criticality benchmark. It was observed that nuclear data uncertainties in keff were reduced considerably from 748 to 443 pcm by applying a more rigid acceptance criteria for accepting random files.

  6. Combining Total Monte Carlo and Benchmarks for nuclear data uncertainty propagation on an LFRs safety parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erwin Alhassan; Henrik Sjöstrand; Junfeng Duan; Cecilia Gustavsson; Arjan Koning; Stephan Pomp; Dimitri Rochman; Michael Österlund

    2013-04-04

    Analyses are carried out to assess the impact of nuclear data uncertainties on keff for the European Lead Cooled Training Reactor (ELECTRA) using the Total Monte Carlo method. A large number of Pu-239 random ENDF-formated libraries generated using the TALYS based system were processed into ACE format with NJOY99.336 code and used as input into the Serpent Monte Carlo neutron transport code to obtain distribution in keff. The keff distribution obtained was compared with the latest major nuclear data libraries - JEFF-3.1.2, ENDF/B-VII.1 and JENDL-4.0. A method is proposed for the selection of benchmarks for specific applications using the Total Monte Carlo approach. Finally, an accept/reject criterion was investigated based on chi square values obtained using the Pu-239 Jezebel criticality benchmark. It was observed that nuclear data uncertainties in keff were reduced considerably from 748 to 443 pcm by applying a more rigid acceptance criteria for accepting random files.

  7. Transformation of Resources to Reserves: Next Generation Heavy-Oil Recovery Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanford University; Department of Energy Resources Engineering Green Earth Sciences

    2007-09-30

    This final report and technical progress report describes work performed from October 1, 2004 through September 30, 2007 for the project 'Transformation of Resources to Reserves: Next Generation Heavy Oil Recovery Techniques', DE-FC26-04NT15526. Critical year 3 activities of this project were not undertaken because of reduced funding to the DOE Oil Program despite timely submission of a continuation package and progress on year 1 and 2 subtasks. A small amount of carried-over funds were used during June-August 2007 to complete some work in the area of foamed-gas mobility control. Completion of Year 3 activities and tasks would have led to a more thorough completion of the project and attainment of project goals. This progress report serves as a summary of activities and accomplishments for years 1 and 2. Experiments, theory development, and numerical modeling were employed to elucidate heavy-oil production mechanisms that provide the technical foundations for producing efficiently the abundant, discovered heavy-oil resources of the U.S. that are not accessible with current technology and recovery techniques. Work fell into two task areas: cold production of heavy oils and thermal recovery. Despite the emerging critical importance of the waterflooding of viscous oil in cold environments, work in this area was never sanctioned under this project. It is envisioned that heavy oil production is impacted by development of an understanding of the reservoir and reservoir fluid conditions leading to so-called foamy oil behavior, i.e, heavy-oil solution gas drive. This understanding should allow primary, cold production of heavy and viscous oils to be optimized. Accordingly, we evaluated the oil-phase chemistry of crude oil samples from Venezuela that give effective production by the heavy-oil solution gas drive mechanism. Laboratory-scale experiments show that recovery correlates with asphaltene contents as well as the so-called acid number (AN) and base number (BN) of the crude oil. A significant number of laboratory-scale tests were made to evaluate the solution gas drive potential of West Sak (AK) viscous oil. The West Sak sample has a low acid number, low asphaltene content, and does not appear foamy under laboratory conditions. Tests show primary recovery of about 22% of the original oil in place under a variety of conditions. The acid number of other Alaskan North Slope samples tests is greater, indicating a greater potential for recovery by heavy-oil solution gas drive. Effective cold production leads to reservoir pressure depletion that eases the implementation of thermal recovery processes. When viewed from a reservoir perspective, thermal recovery is the enhanced recovery method of choice for viscous and heavy oils because of the significant viscosity reduction that accompanies the heating of oil. One significant issue accompanying thermal recovery in cold environments is wellbore heat losses. Initial work on thermal recovery found that a technology base for delivering steam, other hot fluids, and electrical heat through cold subsurface environments, such as permafrost, was in place. No commercially available technologies are available, however. Nevertheless, the enabling technology of superinsulated wells appears to be realized. Thermal subtasks focused on a suite of enhanced recovery options tailored to various reservoir conditions. Generally, electrothermal, conventional steam-based, and thermal gravity drainage enhanced oil recovery techniques appear to be applicable to 'prime' Ugnu reservoir conditions to the extent that reservoir architecture and fluid conditions are modeled faithfully here. The extent of reservoir layering, vertical communication, and subsurface steam distribution are important factors affecting recovery. Distribution of steam throughout reservoir volume is a significant issue facing thermal recovery. Various activities addressed aspects of steam emplacement. Notably, hydraulic fracturing of horizontal steam injection wells and implementation of steam trap control that limits steam entry into hor

  8. A Historical Evaluation of the U12n Tunnel, Nevada national Security Site, Nye County, Nevada Part 2 of 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drollinger, Harold; Jones, Robert C; Bullard, Thomas F; Ashbaugh, Laurence J; Griffin, Wayne R

    2011-06-01

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12n Tunnel on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12n Tunnel was one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests in Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. A total of 22 nuclear tests were conducted in the U12n Tunnel from 1967 to 1992. These tests include Midi Mist, Hudson Seal, Diana Mist, Misty North, Husky Ace, Ming Blade, Hybla Fair, Mighty Epic, Diablo Hawk, Miners Iron, Huron Landing, Diamond Ace, Mini Jade, Tomme/Midnight Zephyr, Misty Rain, Mill Yard, Diamond Beech, Middle Note, Misty Echo, Mineral Quarry, Randsburg, and Hunters Trophy. DTRA sponsored all tests except Tomme and Randsburg which were sponsored by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Midnight Zephyr, sponsored by DTRA, was an add on experiment to the Tomme test. Eleven high explosive tests were also conducted in the tunnel and included a Stemming Plan Test, the Pre-Mill Yard test, the two seismic Non-Proliferation Experiment tests, and seven Dipole Hail tests. The U12n Tunnel complex is composed of the portal and mesa areas, encompassing a total area of approximately 600 acres (240 hectares). Major modifications to the landscape have resulted from four principal activities. These are road construction and maintenance, mining activities related to development of the tunnel complex, site preparation for activities related to testing, and construction of retention ponds. A total of 202 cultural features were recorded for the portal and mesa areas. At the portal area, features relate to the mining, construction, testing, and general everyday operational support activities within the tunnel. These include concrete foundations for buildings, ventilation equipment, air compressors, communications equipment, mining equipment, rail lines, retention ponds to impound tunnel effluent, and storage containers. Features on the mesa above the tunnel generally relate to tunnel ventilation and cooling, borehole drilling, and data recording facilities. Feature types include concrete foundations, instrument cable holes, drill holes, equipment pads, ventilation shafts, and ventilation equipment. The U12n Tunnel complex is eligible to the National Register of Historic Places under criteria a and c, consideration g of 36 CFR Part 60.4 as a historic landscape. Scientific research conducted at the tunnel has made significant contributions to the broad patterns of our history, particularly in regard to the Cold War era that was characterized by competing social, economic, and political ideologies between the former Soviet Union and the United States. The tunnel also possesses distinctive construction and engineering methods for conducting underground nuclear tests. The Desert Research Institute recommends that the U12n Tunnel area be left in place in its current condition and that the U12n Tunnel historic landscape be included in the NNSS monitoring program and monitored for disturbances or alterations on a regular basis.

  9. LES SOFTWARE FOR THE DESIGN OF LOW EMISSION COMBUSTION SYSTEMS FOR VISION 21 PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clifford E. Smith; Steven M. Cannon; Virgil Adumitroaie; David L. Black; Karl V. Meredith

    2005-01-01

    In this project, an advanced computational software tool was developed for the design of low emission combustion systems required for Vision 21 clean energy plants. Vision 21 combustion systems, such as combustors for gas turbines, combustors for indirect fired cycles, furnaces and sequestrian-ready combustion systems, will require innovative low emission designs and low development costs if Vision 21 goals are to be realized. The simulation tool will greatly reduce the number of experimental tests; this is especially desirable for gas turbine combustor design since the cost of the high pressure testing is extremely costly. In addition, the software will stimulate new ideas, will provide the capability of assessing and adapting low-emission combustors to alternate fuels, and will greatly reduce the development time cycle of combustion systems. The revolutionary combustion simulation software is able to accurately simulate the highly transient nature of gaseous-fueled (e.g. natural gas, low BTU syngas, hydrogen, biogas etc.) turbulent combustion and assess innovative concepts needed for Vision 21 plants. In addition, the software is capable of analyzing liquid-fueled combustion systems since that capability was developed under a concurrent Air Force Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) program. The complex physics of the reacting flow field are captured using 3D Large Eddy Simulation (LES) methods, in which large scale transient motion is resolved by time-accurate numerics, while the small scale motion is modeled using advanced subgrid turbulence and chemistry closures. In this way, LES combustion simulations can model many physical aspects that, until now, were impossible to predict with 3D steady-state Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) analysis, i.e. very low NOx emissions, combustion instability (coupling of unsteady heat and acoustics), lean blowout, flashback, autoignition, etc. LES methods are becoming more and more practical by linking together tens to hundreds of PCs and performing parallel computations with fine grids (millions of cells). Such simulations, performed in a few weeks or less, provide a very cost-effective complement to experimental testing. In 5 years, these same calculations can be performed in 24 hours or less due to the expected increase of computing power and improved numerical techniques. This project was a four-year program. During the first year, the project included the development and implementation of improved chemistry (reduced GRI mechanism), subgrid turbulence (localized dynamic), and subgrid combustion-turbulence interaction (Linear Eddy) models into the CFD-ACE+ code. University expertise (Georgia Tech and University of California, Berkeley) was utilized to help develop and implement these advanced submodels into the unstructured, parallel CFD flow solver, CFD-ACE+. Efficient numerical algorithms that rely on in situ look-up tables or artificial neural networks were implemented for chemistry calculations. In the second year, the combustion LES software was evaluated and validated using experimental data from lab-scale and industrial test configurations. This code testing (i.e., alpha testing) was performed by CFD Research Corporation's engineers. During the third year, six industrial and academic partners used the combustion LES code and exercised it on problems of their choice (i.e., beta testing). Final feedback and optimizations were then implemented into the final release (licensed) version of the combustion LES software to the general public. An additional one-year task was added for the fourth year of this program entitled, ''LES Simulations of SIMVAL Results''. For this task, CFDRC performed LES calculations of selected DoE SIMVAL cases, and compared predictions with measurements from NETL. In addition to comparisons with NOx and CO exit measurements, comparisons were made to measured pressure oscillations. Potential areas of improvement for combustion and turbulence models were identified. In conclusion, this program advanced the state-of-the-art in combustion LES an

  10. A Historical Evaluation of the U12n Tunnel, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drollinger, Harold; Jones, Robert C; Bullard, Thomas F; Ashbaugh, Laurence J; Griffin, Wayne R

    2011-06-01

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12n Tunnel on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12n Tunnel was one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests in Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. A total of 22 nuclear tests were conducted in the U12n Tunnel from 1967 to 1992. These tests include Midi Mist, Hudson Seal, Diana Mist, Misty North, Husky Ace, Ming Blade, Hybla Fair, Mighty Epic, Diablo Hawk, Miners Iron, Huron Landing, Diamond Ace, Mini Jade, Tomme/Midnight Zephyr, Misty Rain, Mill Yard, Diamond Beech, Middle Note, Misty Echo, Mineral Quarry, Randsburg, and Hunters Trophy. DTRA sponsored all tests except Tomme and Randsburg which were sponsored by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Midnight Zephyr, sponsored by DTRA, was an add on experiment to the Tomme test. Eleven high explosive tests were also conducted in the tunnel and included a Stemming Plan Test, the Pre-Mill Yard test, the two seismic Non-Proliferation Experiment tests, and seven Dipole Hail tests. The U12n Tunnel complex is composed of the portal and mesa areas, encompassing a total area of approximately 600 acres (240 hectares). Major modifications to the landscape have resulted from four principal activities. These are road construction and maintenance, mining activities related to development of the tunnel complex, site preparation for activities related to testing, and construction of retention ponds. A total of 202 cultural features were recorded for the portal and mesa areas. At the portal area, features relate to the mining, construction, testing, and general everyday operational support activities within the tunnel. These include concrete foundations for buildings, ventilation equipment, air compressors, communications equipment, mining equipment, rail lines, retention ponds to impound tunnel effluent, and storage containers. Features on the mesa above the tunnel generally relate to tunnel ventilation and cooling, borehole drilling, and data recording facilities. Feature types include concrete foundations, instrument cable holes, drill holes, equipment pads, ventilation shafts, and ventilation equipment. The U12n Tunnel complex is eligible to the National Register of Historic Places under criteria a and c, consideration g of 36 CFR Part 60.4 as a historic landscape. Scientific research conducted at the tunnel has made significant contributions to the broad patterns of our history, particularly in regard to the Cold War era that was characterized by competing social, economic, and political ideologies between the former Soviet Union and the United States. The tunnel also possesses distinctive construction and engineering methods for conducting underground nuclear tests. The Desert Research Institute recommends that the U12n Tunnel area be left in place in its current condition and that the U12n Tunnel historic landscape be included in the NNSS monitoring program and monitored for disturbances or alterations on a regular basis.

  11. Engineering Ralstonia eutropha for Production of Isobutanol (IBT) Motor Fuel from Carbon Dioxide, Hydrogen, and Oxygen Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinskey, Anthony J.; Worden, Robert Mark; Brigham, Christopher; Lu, Jingnan; Quimby, John Westlake; Gai, Claudia; Speth, Daan; Elliott, Sean; Fei, John Qiang; Bernardi, Amanda; Li, Sophia; Grunwald, Stephan; Grousseau, Estelle; Maiti, Soumen; Liu, Chole

    2013-12-16

    This research project is a collaboration between the Sinskey laboratory at MIT and the Worden laboratory at Michigan State University. The goal of the project is to produce Isobutanol (IBT), a branched-chain alcohol that can serve as a drop-in transportation fuel, through the engineered microbial biosynthesis of Carbon Dioxide, Hydrogen, and Oxygen using a novel bioreactor. This final technical report presents the findings of both the biological engineering work at MIT that extended the native branched-chain amino acid pathway of the wild type Ralstonia eutropha H16 to perform this biosynthesis, as well as the unique design, modeling, and construction of a bioreactor for incompatible gasses at Michigan State that enabled the operational testing of the complete system. This 105 page technical report summarizing the three years of research includes 72 figures and 11 tables of findings. Ralstonia eutropha (also known as Cupriavidus necator) is a Gram-negative, facultatively chemolithoautotrophic bacteria. It has been the principle organism used for the study of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) polymer biosynthesis. The wild-type Ralstonia eutropha H16 produces PHB as an intracellular carbon storage material while under nutrient stress in the presence of excess carbon. Under this stress, it can accumulate approximately 80 % of its cell dry weight (CDW) as this intracellular polymer. With the restoration of the required nutrients, the cells are then able to catabolize this polymer. If extracted from the cell, this PHB polymer can be processed into biodegradable and biocompatible plastics, however for this research, it is the efficient metabolic pathway channeling the captured carbon that is of interest. R. eutropha is further unique in that it contains two carbon-fixation Calvin–Benson–Bassham cycle operons, two oxygen-tolerant hydrogenases, and several formate dehydrogenases. It has also been much studied for its ability in the presence of oxygen, to fix carbon dioxide into complex cellular molecules using the energy from hydrogen. In this research project, engineered strains of R. eutropha redirected the excess carbon from PHB storage into the production of isobutanol and 3-methyl-1-butanol (branched-chain higher alcohols). These branched-chain higher alcohols can be used directly as substitutes for fossil-based fuels and are seen as alternative biofuels to ethanol and biodiesel. Importantly, these alcohols have approximately 98 % of the energy content of gasoline, 17 % higher than the current gasoline additive ethanol, without impacting corn market production for feed or food. Unlike ethanol, these branched-chain alcohols have low vapor pressure, hygroscopicity, and water solubility, which make them readily compatible with the existing pipelines, gasoline pumps, and engines in our transportation infrastructure. While the use of alternative energies from solar, wind, geothermal, and hydroelectric has spread for stationary power applications, these energy sources cannot be effectively or efficiently employed in current or future transportation systems. With the ongoing concerns of fossil fuel availability and price stability over the long term, alternative biofuels like branched-chain higher alcohols hold promise as a suitable transportation fuel in the future. We showed in our research that various mutant strains of R. eutropha with isobutyraldehyde dehydrogenase activity, in combination with the overexpression of plasmid-borne, native branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis pathway genes and the overexpression of heterologous ketoisovalerate decarboxylase gene, would produce isobutanol and 3-methyl-1-butanol when initiated during nitrogen or phosphorus limitation. Early on, we isolated one mutant R. eutropha strain which produced over 180 mg/L branched-chain alcohols in flask culture while being more tolerant of isobutanol toxicity. After the targeted elimination of genes encoding several potential carbon sinks (ilvE, bkdAB, and aceE), the production titer of the improved to 270 mg/L isobutanol and 40 mg/L 3-methyl-1-butanol.

  12. Solar wind suprathermal electron Stahl widths across high-speed stream structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skoug, Ruth M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Steinberg, John T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goodrich, Katherine A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Anderson, Brett R [DARTMUTH UNIV.

    2011-01-03

    Suprathermal electrons (100-1500 eV) observed in the solar wind typically show a strahl distribution, that is, a beam directed away from the Sun along the magnetic field direction. The strahl width observed at 1 AU is highly variable, ranging from 10-70 degrees. The obsenred finite width of the strahl results from the competition between beam focusing as the interplanetary magnetic field strength drops with distance from the Sun, and pitch-angle scattering as the beam interacts with the solar wind plasma in transit from the sun. Here we examine strahl width, observed with ACE SWEPAM across high-speed stream structures to investigate variations in electron scattering as a function of local plasma characteristics. We find that narrow strahls (less than 20 degrees wide), indicating reduced scattering, are observed within high-speed streams. Narrow strahls are also observed in both very low temperature solar wind, in association with ICMEs. Case studies of high-speed streams typically show the strahl narrowing at the leading edge of the stream. In some cases, the strahl narrows at the reverse shock or pressure wave, in other cases at the stream interface. The narrowing can either occur discontinuously or gradually over a period of hours. Within the high-speed wind, the strahl remains narrow for a period of hours to days, and then gradually broadens. The strahl width is roughly constant at all energies across these structures. For some fraction of high-speed streams, counterstreaming is associated with passage of the corotating interaction region. In these cases, we find the widths of the two counterstreaming beams frequently differ by more than 40 degrees. This dramatic difference in strahl width contrasts with observations in the solar wind as a whole, in which counterstreaming strahls typically differ in width by less than 20 degrees.

  13. Observation and modeling of geocoronal charge exchange X-ray emission during solar wind gusts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wargelin, B. J.; Kornbleuth, M.; Juda, M.; Martin, P. L.

    2014-11-20

    Solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) X-rays are emitted when highly charged solar wind ions such as O{sup 7{sup +}} collide with neutral gas, including the Earth's tenuous outer atmosphere (exosphere or geocorona) and hydrogen and helium from the local interstellar medium drifting through the heliosphere. This geocoronal and heliospheric emission comprises a significant and varying fraction of the soft X-ray background (SXRB) and is seen in every X-ray observation, with the intensity dependent on solar wind conditions and observation geometry. Under the right conditions, geocoronal emission can increase the apparent SXRB by roughly an order of magnitude for an hour or more. In this work, we study a dozen occasions when the near-Earth solar wind flux was exceptionally high. These gusts of wind lead to abrupt changes in SWCX X-ray emission around Earth, which may or may not be seen by X-ray observatories depending on their line of sight. Using detailed three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations of the solar wind's interaction with the Earth's magnetosphere, and element abundances and ionization states measured by ACE, we model the time-dependent brightness of major geocoronal SWCX emission lines during those gusts and compare with changes in the X-ray background measured by the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We find reasonably good agreement between model and observation, with measured geocoronal line brightnesses averaged over 1 hr of up to 136 photons s{sup –1} cm{sup –2} sr{sup –1} in the O VII K? triplet around 564 eV.

  14. ENHANCEMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLING THROUGH AN IMPROVED AIR MONITORING TECHNIQUE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanks, D.

    2010-06-07

    Environmental sampling (ES) is a key component of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguarding approaches throughout the world. Performance of ES (e.g. air, water, vegetation, sediments, soil and biota) supports the IAEAs mission of drawing conclusions concerning the absence of undeclared nuclear material or nuclear activities in a State and has been available since the introduction of safeguards strengthening measures approved by the IAEA Board of Governors (1992-1997). A recent step-change improvement in the gathering and analysis of air samples at uranium/plutonium bulk handling facilities is an important addition to the international nuclear safeguards inspector's toolkit. Utilizing commonly used equipment throughout the IAEA network of analytical laboratories for particle analysis, researchers are developing the next generation of ES equipment for air grab and constant samples. Isotopic analysis of collected particles from an Aerosol Contaminant Extractor (ACE) silicon substrate has been performed with excellent results in determining attribute and isotopic composition of chemical elements present in an actual test-bed sample. The new collection equipment will allow IAEA nuclear safeguards inspectors to develop enhanced safeguarding approaches for complicated facilities. This paper will explore the use of air monitoring to establish a baseline environmental signature of a particular facility that could be used for comparison of consistencies in declared operations. The implementation of air monitoring will be contrasted against the use of smear ES when used during unannounced inspections, design information verification, limited frequency unannounced access, and complementary access visits at bulk handling facilities. Technical aspects of the air monitoring device and the analysis of its environmental samples will demonstrate the essential parameters required for successful application of the system.

  15. A New On-the-Fly Sampling Method for Incoherent Inelastic Thermal Neutron Scattering Data in MCNP6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pavlou, Andrew Theodore; Brown, Forrest B.; Ji, Wei

    2014-09-02

    At thermal energies, the scattering of neutrons in a system is complicated by the comparable velocities of the neutron and target, resulting in competing upscattering and downscattering events. The neutron wavelength is also similar in size to the target's interatomic spacing making the scattering process a quantum mechanical problem. Because of the complicated nature of scattering at low energies, the thermal data files in ACE format used in continuous-energy Monte Carlo codes are quite large { on the order of megabytes for a single temperature and material. In this paper, a new storage and sampling method is introduced that is orders of magnitude less in size and is used to sample scattering parameters at any temperature on-the-fly. In addition to the reduction in storage, the need to pre-generate thermal scattering data tables at fine temperatures has been eliminated. This is advantageous for multiphysics simulations which may involve temperatures not known in advance. A new module was written for MCNP6 that bypasses the current S(?,?) table lookup in favor of the new format. The new on-the-fly sampling method was tested for graphite for two benchmark problems at ten temperatures: 1) an eigenvalue test with a fuel compact of uranium oxycarbide fuel homogenized into a graphite matrix, 2) a surface current test with a \\broomstick" problem with a monoenergetic point source. The largest eigenvalue difference was 152pcm for T= 1200K. For the temperatures and incident energies chosen for the broomstick problem, the secondary neutron spectrum showed good agreement with the traditional S(?,?) sampling method. These preliminary results show that sampling thermal scattering data on-the-fly is a viable option to eliminate both the storage burden of keeping thermal data at discrete temperatures and the need to know temperatures before simulation runtime.

  16. Data Testing for ENDF/B-VII.1beta2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacFarlane, Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-01

    Calculations have been performed for 390 critical assemblies from the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments using the beta2 release of ENDF/B-VII.1. The results are compared to previous results for ENDF/B-VII. Cases that changed between the two versions are highlighted, and the results are discussed. The Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) is working on a new release of the ENDF/B-VII library of evaluated nuclear data, and the 'beta2' set of files was recently made available by the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC). A set of about 850 input files for the MCNP Monte Carlo code to run critical assemblies from the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments was available from our previous data testing work for ENDF/B-VII.0. We have now run 390 of those cases using data based on the beta2 files, and those results will be presented below. The ENDF files were downloaded from the NNDC to a Mac workstation. They were then processed using NJOY10 into ACE format files for use in the MCNP Monte Carlo code. The processing was limited to materials needed for the data testing work at this point. The existing MCNP input decks were used. No checking was done to see if any of the benchmarks had been updated since the ENDF/B-VII testing was finished. Most runs used 50 million histories in order to get Monte Carlo statistical uncertainties down the 0.01% range.

  17. Acute ethanol intake induces superoxide anion generation and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation in rat aorta: A role for angiotensin type 1 receptor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yogi, Alvaro; Callera, Glaucia E.; Mecawi, André S.; Batalhão, Marcelo E.; Carnio, Evelin C.; Antunes-Rodrigues, José; Queiroz, Regina H.; Touyz, Rhian M.; Tirapelli, Carlos R.

    2012-11-01

    Ethanol intake is associated with increase in blood pressure, through unknown mechanisms. We hypothesized that acute ethanol intake enhances vascular oxidative stress and induces vascular dysfunction through renin–angiotensin system (RAS) activation. Ethanol (1 g/kg; p.o. gavage) effects were assessed within 30 min in male Wistar rats. The transient decrease in blood pressure induced by ethanol was not affected by the previous administration of losartan (10 mg/kg; p.o. gavage), a selective AT{sub 1} receptor antagonist. Acute ethanol intake increased plasma renin activity (PRA), angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) activity, plasma angiotensin I (ANG I) and angiotensin II (ANG II) levels. Ethanol induced systemic and vascular oxidative stress, evidenced by increased plasma thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances (TBARS) levels, NAD(P)H oxidase?mediated vascular generation of superoxide anion and p47phox translocation (cytosol to membrane). These effects were prevented by losartan. Isolated aortas from ethanol-treated rats displayed increased p38MAPK and SAPK/JNK phosphorylation. Losartan inhibited ethanol-induced increase in the phosphorylation of these kinases. Ethanol intake decreased acetylcholine-induced relaxation and increased phenylephrine-induced contraction in endothelium-intact aortas. Ethanol significantly decreased plasma and aortic nitrate levels. These changes in vascular reactivity and in the end product of endogenous nitric oxide metabolism were not affected by losartan. Our study provides novel evidence that acute ethanol intake stimulates RAS activity and induces vascular oxidative stress and redox-signaling activation through AT{sub 1}-dependent mechanisms. These findings highlight the importance of RAS in acute ethanol-induced oxidative damage. -- Highlights: ? Acute ethanol intake stimulates RAS activity and vascular oxidative stress. ? RAS plays a role in acute ethanol-induced oxidative damage via AT{sub 1} receptor activation. ? Translocation of p47phox and MAPKs phosphorylation are downstream effectors. ? Acute ethanol consumption increases the risk for acute vascular injury.

  18. Generation and distribution of PAHs in the process of medical waste incineration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Ying; Zhao, Rongzhi; Xue, Jun; Li, Jinhui

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ? PAHs generation and distribution features of medical waste incineration are studied. ? More PAHs were found in fly ash than that in bottom ash. ? The highest proportion of PAHs consisted of the seven most carcinogenic ones. ? Increase of free oxygen molecule and burning temperature promote PAHs degradation. ? There is a moderate positive correlation between total PCDD/Fs and total PAHs. - Abstract: After the deadly earthquake on May 12, 2008 in Wenchuan county of China, several different incineration approaches were used for medical waste disposal. This paper investigates the generation properties of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) during the incineration. Samples were collected from the bottom ash in an open burning slash site, surface soil at the open burning site, bottom ash from a simple incinerator, bottom ash generated from the municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerator used for medical waste disposal, and bottom ash and fly ash from an incinerator exclusively used for medical waste. The species of PAHs were analyzed, and the toxicity equivalency quantities (TEQs) of samples calculated. Analysis results indicate that the content of total PAHs in fly ash was 1.8 × 10{sup 3} times higher than that in bottom ash, and that the strongly carcinogenic PAHs with four or more rings accumulated sensitively in fly ash. The test results of samples gathered from open burning site demonstrate that Acenaphthylene (ACY), Acenaphthene (ACE), Fluorene (FLU), Phenanthrene (PHE), Anthracene (ANT) and other PAHs were inclined to migrate into surrounding environment along air and surface watershed corridors, while 4- to 6-ring PAHs accumulated more likely in soil. Being consistent with other studies, it has also been confirmed that increases in both free oxygen molecules and combustion temperatures could promote the decomposition of polycyclic PAHs. In addition, without the influence of combustion conditions, there is a positive correlation between total PCDD/Fs and total PAHs, although no such relationship has been found for TEQ.

  19. Coherent structure in solar wind C{sup 6+}/C{sup 4+} ionic composition data during the quiet-sun conditions of 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edmondson, J. K.; Lepri, S. T.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Lynch, B. J.

    2013-11-20

    This analysis offers evidence of characteristic scale sizes in solar wind charge state data measured in situ for 13 quiet-Sun Carrington rotations in 2008. Using a previously established novel methodology, we analyze the wavelet power spectrum of the charge state ratio C{sup 6+}/C{sup 4+} measured in situ by ACE/SWICS for 2 hr and 12 minute cadence. We construct a statistical significance level in the wavelet power spectrum to quantify the interference effects arising from filling missing data in the time series, allowing extraction of significant power from the measured data to a resolution of 24 minutes. We analyze each wavelet power spectrum for transient coherency and global periodicities resulting from the superposition of repeating coherent structures. From the significant wavelet power spectra, we find evidence for a general upper limit on individual transient coherency of ?10 days. We find evidence for a set of global periodicities between 4-5 hr and 35-45 days. We find evidence for the distribution of individual transient coherency scales consisting of two distinct populations. Below the ?2 day timescale, the distribution is reasonably approximated by an inverse power law, whereas for scales ?2 days, the distribution levels off, showing discrete peaks at common coherency scales. In addition, by organizing the transient coherency scale distributions by wind type, we find that these larger, common coherency scales are more prevalent and well defined in coronal hole wind. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results for current theories of solar wind generation and describe future work for determining the relationship between the coherent structures in our ionic composition data and the structure of the coronal magnetic field.

  20. Inner heliospheric evolution of a 'STEALTH' CME derived from multi-view imaging and multipoint in situ observations. I. Propagation to 1 AU

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieves-Chinchilla, T.; Vourlidas, A.; Stenborg, G.; Savani, N. P.; Koval, A.; Szabo, A.; Jian, L. K.

    2013-12-10

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the main driver of space weather. Therefore, a precise forecasting of their likely geo-effectiveness relies on an accurate tracking of their morphological and kinematical evolution throughout the interplanetary medium. However, single viewpoint observations require many assumptions to model the development of the features of CMEs. The most common hypotheses were those of radial propagation and self-similar expansion. The use of different viewpoints shows that, at least for some cases, those assumptions are no longer valid. From radial propagation, typical attributes that can now be confirmed to exist are over-expansion and/or rotation along the propagation axis. Understanding the 3D development and evolution of the CME features will help to establish the connection between remote and in situ observations, and hence help forecast space weather. We present an analysis of the morphological and kinematical evolution of a STEREO-B-directed CME on 2009 August 25-27. By means of a comprehensive analysis of remote imaging observations provided by the SOHO, STEREO, and SDO missions, and in situ measurements recorded by Wind, ACE, and MESSENGER, we prove in this paper that the event exhibits signatures of deflection, which are usually associated with changes in the direction of propagation and/or also with rotation. The interaction with other magnetic obstacles could act as a catalyst of deflection or rotation effects. We also propose a method to investigate the change of the CME tilt from the analysis of height-time direct measurements. If this method is validated in further work, it may have important implications for space weather studies because it will allow for inference of the interplanetary counterpart of the CME's orientation.

  1. The Space Optical Clocks Project: Development of high-performance transportable and breadboard optical clocks and advanced subsystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Schiller; A. Görlitz; A. Nevsky; S. Alighanbari; S. Vasilyev; C. Abou-Jaoudeh; G. Mura; T. Franzen; U. Sterr; S. Falke; Ch. Lisdat; E. Rasel; A. Kulosa; S. Bize; J. Lodewyck; G. M. Tino; N. Poli; M. Schioppo; K. Bongs; Y. Singh; P. Gill; G. Barwood; Y. Ovchinnikov; J. Stuhler; W. Kaenders; C. Braxmaier; R. Holzwarth; A. Donati; S. Lecomte; D. Calonico; F. Levi

    2012-06-17

    The use of ultra-precise optical clocks in space ("master clocks") will allow for a range of new applications in the fields of fundamental physics (tests of Einstein's theory of General Relativity, time and frequency metrology by means of the comparison of distant terrestrial clocks), geophysics (mapping of the gravitational potential of Earth), and astronomy (providing local oscillators for radio ranging and interferometry in space). Within the ELIPS-3 program of ESA, the "Space Optical Clocks" (SOC) project aims to install and to operate an optical lattice clock on the ISS towards the end of this decade, as a natural follow-on to the ACES mission, improving its performance by at least one order of magnitude. The payload is planned to include an optical lattice clock, as well as a frequency comb, a microwave link, and an optical link for comparisons of the ISS clock with ground clocks located in several countries and continents. Undertaking a necessary step towards optical clocks in space, the EU-FP7-SPACE-2010-1 project no. 263500 (SOC2) (2011-2015) aims at two "engineering confidence", accurate transportable lattice optical clock demonstrators having relative frequency instability below 1\\times10^-15 at 1 s integration time and relative inaccuracy below 5\\times10^-17. This goal performance is about 2 and 1 orders better in instability and inaccuracy, respectively, than today's best transportable clocks. The devices will be based on trapped neutral ytterbium and strontium atoms. One device will be a breadboard. The two systems will be validated in laboratory environments and their performance will be established by comparison with laboratory optical clocks and primary frequency standards. In this paper we present the project and the results achieved during the first year.

  2. Analysis Methodology for Balancing Authority Cooperation in High Penetration of Variable Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makarov, Yuri V.; Etingov, Pavel V.; Zhou, Ning; Ma, Jian; Samaan, Nader A.; Diao, Ruisheng; Malhara, Sunita V.; Guttromson, Ross T.; Du, Pengwei; Sastry, Chellury

    2010-02-01

    With the rapidly growing penetration level of wind and solar generation, the challenges of managing variability and the uncertainty of intermittent renewable generation become more and more significant. The problem of power variability and uncertainty gets exacerbated when each balancing authority (BA) works locally and separately to balance its own subsystem. The virtual BA concept means various forms of collaboration between individual BAs must manage power variability and uncertainty. The virtual BA will have a wide area control capability in managing its operational balancing requirements in different time frames. This coordination results in the improvement of efficiency and reliability of power system operation while facilitating the high level integration of green, intermittent energy resources. Several strategies for virtual BA implementation, such as ACE diversity interchange (ADI), wind only BA, BA consolidation, dynamic scheduling, regulation and load following sharing, extreme event impact study are discussed in this report. The objective of such strategies is to allow individual BAs within a large power grid to help each other deal with power variability. Innovative methods have been developed to simulate the balancing operation of BAs. These methods evaluate the BA operation through a number of metrics — such as capacity, ramp rate, ramp duration, energy and cycling requirements — to evaluate the performances of different virtual BA strategies. The report builds a systematic framework for evaluating BA consolidation and coordination. Results for case studies show that significant economic and reliability benefits can be gained. The merits and limitation of each virtual BA strategy are investigated. The report provides guidelines for the power industry to evaluate the coordination or consolidation method. The application of the developed strategies in cooperation with several regional BAs is in progress for several off-spring projects.

  3. MEETING: Chlamydomonas Annotation Jamboree - October 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grossman, Arthur R

    2007-04-13

    Shotgun sequencing of the nuclear genome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Chlamydomonas throughout) was performed at an approximate 10X coverage by JGI. Roughly half of the genome is now contained on 26 scaffolds, all of which are at least 1.6 Mb, and the coverage of the genome is ~95%. There are now over 200,000 cDNA sequence reads that we have generated as part of the Chlamydomonas genome project (Grossman, 2003; Shrager et al., 2003; Grossman et al. 2007; Merchant et al., 2007); other sequences have also been generated by the Kasuza sequence group (Asamizu et al., 1999; Asamizu et al., 2000) or individual laboratories that have focused on specific genes. Shrager et al. (2003) placed the reads into distinct contigs (an assemblage of reads with overlapping nucleotide sequences), and contigs that group together as part of the same genes have been designated ACEs (assembly of contigs generated from EST information). All of the reads have also been mapped to the Chlamydomonas nuclear genome and the cDNAs and their corresponding genomic sequences have been reassembled, and the resulting assemblage is called an ACEG (an Assembly of contiguous EST sequences supported by genomic sequence) (Jain et al., 2007). Most of the unique genes or ACEGs are also represented by gene models that have been generated by the Joint Genome Institute (JGI, Walnut Creek, CA). These gene models have been placed onto the DNA scaffolds and are presented as a track on the Chlamydomonas genome browser associated with the genome portal (http://genome.jgi-psf.org/Chlre3/Chlre3.home.html). Ultimately, the meeting grant awarded by DOE has helped enormously in the development of an annotation pipeline (a set of guidelines used in the annotation of genes) and resulted in high quality annotation of over 4,000 genes; the annotators were from both Europe and the USA. Some of the people who led the annotation initiative were Arthur Grossman, Olivier Vallon, and Sabeeha Merchant (with many individual annotators from Europe and the USA). Olivier Vallon has been most active in continued input of annotation information.

  4. A report documenting the completion of the Los Alamos National Laboratory portion of the ASC level II milestone ""Visualization on the supercomputing platform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahrens, James P; Patchett, John M; Lo, Li - Ta; Mitchell, Christopher; Mr Marle, David; Brownlee, Carson

    2011-01-24

    This report provides documentation for the completion of the Los Alamos portion of the ASC Level II 'Visualization on the Supercomputing Platform' milestone. This ASC Level II milestone is a joint milestone between Sandia National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory. The milestone text is shown in Figure 1 with the Los Alamos portions highlighted in boldfaced text. Visualization and analysis of petascale data is limited by several factors which must be addressed as ACES delivers the Cielo platform. Two primary difficulties are: (1) Performance of interactive rendering, which is the most computationally intensive portion of the visualization process. For terascale platforms, commodity clusters with graphics processors (GPUs) have been used for interactive rendering. For petascale platforms, visualization and rendering may be able to run efficiently on the supercomputer platform itself. (2) I/O bandwidth, which limits how much information can be written to disk. If we simply analyze the sparse information that is saved to disk we miss the opportunity to analyze the rich information produced every timestep by the simulation. For the first issue, we are pursuing in-situ analysis, in which simulations are coupled directly with analysis libraries at runtime. This milestone will evaluate the visualization and rendering performance of current and next generation supercomputers in contrast to GPU-based visualization clusters, and evaluate the perfromance of common analysis libraries coupled with the simulation that analyze and write data to disk during a running simulation. This milestone will explore, evaluate and advance the maturity level of these technologies and their applicability to problems of interest to the ASC program. In conclusion, we improved CPU-based rendering performance by a a factor of 2-10 times on our tests. In addition, we evaluated CPU and CPU-based rendering performance. We encourage production visualization experts to consider using CPU-based rendering solutions when it is appropriate. For example, on remote supercomputers CPU-based rendering can offer a means of viewing data without having to offload the data or geometry onto a CPU-based visualization system. In terms of comparative performance of the CPU and CPU we believe that further optimizations of the performance of both CPU or CPU-based rendering are possible. The simulation community is currently confronting this reality as they work to port their simulations to different hardware architectures. What is interesting about CPU rendering of massive datasets is that for part two decades CPU performance has significantly outperformed CPU-based systems. Based on our advancements, evaluations and explorations we believe that CPU-based rendering has returned as one viable option for the visualization of massive datasets.

  5. Fergusonite-type CeNbO{sub 4+?}: Single crystal growth, symmetry revision and conductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayliss, Ryan D. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2BP (United Kingdom); Pramana, Stevin S.; An, Tao; Wei, Fengxia; Kloc, Christian L. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Nanyang Technological University, 639798 (Singapore); White, Andrew J.P. [Chemical Crystallography Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Skinner, Stephen J. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2BP (United Kingdom); White, Timothy J. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Nanyang Technological University, 639798 (Singapore); Baikie, Tom, E-mail: tbaikie@ntu.edu.sg [School of Materials Science and Engineering, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Nanyang Technological University, 639798 (Singapore)

    2013-08-15

    Large fergusonite-type (ABO{sub 4}, A=Ce, B=Nb) oxide crystals, a prototype electrolyte composition for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), were prepared for the first time in a floating zone mirror furnace under air or argon atmospheres. While CeNbO{sub 4} grown in air contained CeNbO{sub 4.08} as a minor impurity that compromised structural analysis, the argon atmosphere yielded a single phase crystal of monoclinic CeNbO{sub 4}, as confirmed by selected area electron diffraction, powder and single crystal X-ray diffraction. The structure was determined in the standard space group setting C12/c1 (No. 15), rather than the commonly adopted I12/a1. AC impedance spectroscopy conducted under argon found that stoichiometric CeNbO{sub 4} single crystals showed lower conductivity compared to CeNbO{sub 4+?} confirming interstitial oxygen can penetrate through fergusonite and is responsible for the higher conductivity associated with these oxides. - Graphical abstract: Large fergusonite-type CeNbO{sub 4} crystals were prepared for the first time in a floating zone mirror furnace. Crystal growth in an argon atmosphere yielded a single phase monoclinic CeNbO4, as confirmed by selected area electron diffraction, powder and single crystal X-ray diffraction. The structure was determined in the standard space group setting C12/c1 (No. 15), rather than the commonly adopted I12/a1. AC impedance spectroscopy found CeNbO{sub 4} single crystals showed lower conductivity compared to CeNbO{sub 4+?} confirming interstitial oxygen can penetrate through fergusonite and is responsible for the higher conductivity associated with these oxides. Highlights: • Preparation of single crystals of CeNbO{sub 4} using a floating zone mirror furnace. • Correction to the crystal symmetry of the monoclinic form of CeNbO{sub 4}. • Report the conductivity of a single crystal of CeNbO{sub 4}.

  6. The Genesis Mission: Solar Wind Conditions, and Implications for the FIP Fractionation of the Solar Wind.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reisenfeld, D. B.; Wiens, R. C.; Barraclough, B. L.; Steinberg, J. T; Dekoning, C. A.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Burnett, D. S.

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Genesis mission collected solar wind on ultrapure materials between November 30, 2001 and April 1, 2004. The samples were returned to Earth September 8, 2004. Despite the hard landing that resulted from a failure of the avionics to deploy the parachute, many samples were returned in a condition that will permit analyses. Sample analyses of these samples should give a far better understanding of the solar elemental and isotopic composition (Burnett et al. 2003). Further, the photospheric composition is thought to be representative of the solar nebula, so that the Genesis mission will provide a new baseline for the average solar nebula composition with which to compare present-day compositions of planets, meteorites, and asteroids. Sample analysis is currently underway. The Genesis samples must be placed in the context of the solar and solar wind conditions under which they were collected. Solar wind is fractionated from the photosphere by the forces that accelerate the ions off of the Sun. This fractionation appears to be ordered by the first ionization potential (FIP) of the elements, with the tendency for low-FIP elements to be over-abundant in the solar wind relative to the photosphere, and high-FIP elements to be under-abundant (e.g. Geiss, 1982; von Steiger et al., 2000). In addition, the extent of elemental fractionation differs across different solarwind regimes. Therefore, Genesis collected solar wind samples sorted into three regimes: 'fast wind' or 'coronal hole' (CH), 'slow wind' or 'interstream' (IS), and 'coronal mass ejection' (CME). To carry this out, plasma ion and electron spectrometers (Barraclough et al., 2003) continuously monitored the solar wind proton density, velocity, temperature, the alpha/proton ratio, and angular distribution of suprathermal electrons, and those parameters were in turn used in a rule-based algorithm that assigned the most probable solar wind regime (Neugebauer et al., 2003). At any given time, only one of three regime-specific collectors (CH, IS, or CME) was exposed to the solar wind. Here we report on the regime-specific solar wind conditions from in-situ instruments over the course of the collection period. Further, we use composition data from the SWICS (Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer) instrument on ACE (McComas et al., 1998) to examine the FIP fractionation between solar wind regimes, and make a preliminary comparison of these to the FIP analysis of Ulysses/SWICS composition data (von Steiger et al. 2000). Our elemental fractionation study includes a reevaluation of the Ulysses FIP analysis in light of newly reported photospheric abundance data (Asplund, Grevesse & Sauval, 2005). The new abundance data indicate a metallicity (Z/X) for the Sun almost a factor of two lower than that reported in the widely used compilation of Anders & Grevesse (1989). The new photospheric abundances suggest a lower degree of solar wind fractionation than previously reported by von Steiger et al. (2000) for the first Ulysses polar orbit (1991-1998).

  7. Final Project Report "Advanced Concept Exploration For Fast Ignition Science Program"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STEPHENS, Richard B.; McLEAN, Harry M.; THEOBALD, Wolfgang; AKLI, Kramer; BEG, Farhat N.; SENTOKU, Yasuiko; SCHUMACHER, Douglas; WEI, Mingsheng S.

    2014-01-31

    The Fast Ignition (FI) Concept for Inertial Confinement Fusion has the potential to provide a significant advance in the technical attractiveness of Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) reactors. FI differs from conventional “central hot spot” (CHS) target ignition by decoupling compression from heating: using the laser (or heavy ion beam or Z pinch) drive pulse (10’s of ns) to create a dense fuel and a second, much shorter (~10 ps) high intensity pulse to ignite a small region of it. There are two major physics issues concerning this concept; controlling the laser-induced generation of large electron currents and their propagation through high density plasmas. This project has addressed these two significant scientific issues in Relativistic High Energy Density (RHED) physics. Learning to control relativistic laser matter interaction (and the limits and potential thereof) will enable a wide range of applications. While these physics issues are of specific interest to inertial fusion energy science, they are also important for a wide range of other HED phenomena, including high energy ion beam generation, isochoric heating of materials, and the development of high brightness x-ray sources. Generating, controlling, and understanding the extreme conditions needed to advance this science has proved to be challenging: Our studies have pushed the boundaries of physics understanding and are at the very limits of experimental, diagnostic, and simulation capabilities in high energy density laboratory physics (HEDLP). Our research strategy has been based on pursuing the fundamental physics underlying the Fast Ignition (FI) concept. We have performed comprehensive study of electron generation and transport in fast-ignition targets with experiments, theory, and numerical modeling. A major issue is that the electrons produced in these experiments cannot be measured directly—only effects due to their transport. We focused mainly on x-ray continuum photons from bremsstrahlung and x-ray line radiation from K-shell fluorescence. Integrated experiments, which combine target compression with short-pulse laser heating, yield additional information on target heating efficiency. This indirect way of studying the underlying behavior of the electrons must be validated with computational modeling to understand the physics and improve the design. This program execution required a large, well-organized team and it was managed by a joint Collaboration between General Atomics (GA), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). The Collaboration was formed 8 years ago to understand the physics issues of the Fast Ignition concept, building on the strengths of each partner. GA fulfills its responsibilities jointly with the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), The Ohio State University (OSU) and the University of Nevada at Reno (UNR). Since RHED physics is pursued vigorously in many countries, international researchers have been an important part of our efforts to make progress. The division of responsibility was as follows: (1) LLE had primary leadership for channeling studies and the integrated energy transfer, (2) LLNL led the development of measurement methods, analysis, and deployment of diagnostics, and (3) GA together with UCSD, OSU and UNR studied the detailed energy-transfer physics. The experimental program was carried out using the Titan laser at the Jupiter Laser Facility at LLNL, the OMEGA and OMEGA EP lasers at LLE and the Texas Petawatt laser (TPW) at UT Austin. Modeling has been pursued on large computing facilities at LLNL, OSU, and UCSD using codes developed (by us and others) within the HEDLP program, commercial codes, and by leveraging existing supercomputer codes developed by the NNSA ICF program. This Consortium brought together all the components—resources, facilities, and personnel—necessary to accomplish its aggressive goals. The ACE Program has been strongly collaborative, taking advantage of the expertise of the participating institutions to provide a research effort

  8. Qualification of the First ICS-3000 ION Chromatograph for use at the Defense Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, T; Mahannah, R.

    2011-07-05

    The ICS-3000 Ion Chromatography (IC) system installed in 221-S M-13 has been qualified for use. The qualification was a head to head comparison of the ICS-3000 with the currently used DX-500 IC system. The crosscheck work included standards for instrument calibration and calibration verifications and standards for individual anion analysis, where the standards were traceable back to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). In addition the crosscheck work included the analysis of simulated Sludge Receipt Adjustment Tank (SRAT) Receipt, SRAT Product, and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) samples, along with radioactive Sludge Batch 5 material from the SRAT and SME tanks. Based upon the successful qualification of the ICS-3000 in M-13, it is recommended that this task proceed in developing the data to qualify, by a head to head comparison of the two ICS-3000 instruments, a second ICS-3000 to be installed in M-14. The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) requires the analysis of specific anions at various stages of its processing of high level waste (HLW). The anions of interest to the DWPF are fluoride, formate, chloride, nitrite, nitrate, sulfate, oxalate, and phosphate. The anion analysis is used to evaluate process chemistry including formic acid/nitric acid additions to establish optimum conditions for mercury stripping, reduction-oxidation (REDOX) chemistry for the melter, nitrite destruction, organic acid constituents, etc. The DWPF Laboratory (Lab) has been using Dionex DX-500 ion chromatography (IC) systems since 1998. The vendor informed DWPF in 2006 that the instruments would no longer be supported by service contracts after 2008. DWPF purchased three new ICS-3000 systems in September of 2006. The ICS-3000 instruments are (a) designed to be more stable using an eluent generator to make eluent, (b) require virtually no daily chemical handling by the analysts, (c) require less line breaks in the hood, and (d) generally require less maintenance due to the pump configuration only using water versus the current system where the pump uses various hydroxide concentrations. The ICS-3000 instruments also allow the DWPF to maintain current service contracts, which support routine preventive maintenance and emergency support for larger problems such as component failure. One of the three new systems was set up in the DWPF Lab trailers in January of 2007 to be used for the development of methods and procedures. This system will continue to be used for training, new method development and potential improvements to current methods. The qualification of the other two ICS-3000 instruments is to be a phased effort. This effort is to be supported by the Applied Computational Engineering and Statistical (ACES) group of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) as authorized by the Technical Task Request (TTR) and as directed by the corresponding Task Technical and Quality Assurance (TT&QA) plan. The installation of the first 'rad' system into the M-13 Lab module required modifications to both the Lab module and to the radiohood. The installation was completed in July 2008. The testing of this system was conducted as directed by the TT&QA plan. The purpose of this technical report is to provide a review of the data generated by these tests that will lead to the recommendation for the qualification of the M-13 ICS-3000 instrument. With the successful qualification of this first ICS-3000, plans will be developed for the installation of the second 'rad' system in the M-14 Lab module later in fiscal year 2009. When the second 'rad' ICS-3000 system is installed, the DX-500 systems will be removed and retired from service.

  9. A REVIEW OF RECENT IMPURITY MEASUREMENTS OF LANL MATERIAL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, T.

    2012-07-12

    The Applied Computational Engineering and Statistics (ACES) group of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was asked to review recent measurements performed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) on material from that facility that is being considered for processing through the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). There are specification limits for impurities in the feed to the MOX facility: a maximum limit and an exceptional limit. The limits for an impurity apply to the population of concentration values for that impurity for a class of material that is to be processed through MOX. For the purposes of this report, these limits were defined as follows. The concentration of an elemental impurity, expressed as micrograms of the element per gram of plutonium ({micro}g/g Pu), is to be no more than the maximum limit for that element for 98% of the material coming through MOX; that is, 98% of the material processed at MOX is to have a concentration of the given element less than the maximum limit. In addition, the concentration for a given element is to be no more than the exceptional limit for that element for 99.9% of the material processed through MOX. The measurements evaluated as part of this study included LANL blend lots 1 through 29 and cover carbon (C), chlorine (Cl), fluorine (F), nitrogen (N), phosphorous (P), and sulfur (S). Note that all of the measurements for each impurity were below their respective maximum (and obviously, therefore, their exceptional) limits. Thus, there is no immediate concern regarding the LANL material being suitable for processing through MOX. Two approaches were used to investigate the quantiles of the impurity populations. The first approach used was a nonparametric approach. While the results from this approach did not indicate any problems for any of the impurities, there was too little data available to lead to confident statements about satisfying the maximum and exceptional limits. Impurity data from additional random samples of the LANL material would be needed to increase the confidence level associated with the results from a nonparametric approach for investigating the population quantiles of interest. For S, F, and Cl, only a nonparametric approach was used. A second approach, a parametric approach, was attempted for C, P, and N. However, the results for the P and N measurements indicated that each of their respective populations was not well modeled by a normal or by a lognormal distribution. Thus, the conclusions for the P and N populations were those provided by the nonparametric approach. From the parametric approach, the results for C indicated no issue in the LANL material meeting the maximum limit for this element assuming that the measurements for this element follow a lognormal distribution.

  10. A Concept Exploration Program in Fast Ignition Inertial Fusion — Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephens, Richarad Burnite; Freeman, Richard R.; Van Woekom, L. D.; Key, M.; MacKinnon, Andrew J.; Wei, Mingsheng

    2014-02-27

    The Fast Ignition (FI) approach to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) holds particular promise for fusion energy because the independently generated compression and ignition pulses allow ignition with less compression, resulting in (potentially) higher gain. Exploiting this concept effectively requires an understanding of the transport of electrons in prototypical geometries and at relevant densities and temperatures. Our consortium, which included General Atomics (GA), The Ohio State University (OSU), the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), University of California, Davis (UC-Davis), and Princeton University under this grant (~$850K/yr) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) under a companion grant, won awards in 2000, renewed in 2005, to investigate the physics of electron injection and transport relevant to the FI concept, which is crucial to understand electron transport in integral FI targets. In the last two years we have also been preparing diagnostics and starting to extend the work to electron transport into hot targets. A complementary effort, the Advanced Concept Exploration (ACE) program for Fast Ignition, was funded starting in 2006 to integrate this understanding into ignition schemes specifically suitable for the initial fast ignition attempts on OMEGA and National Ignition Facility (NIF), and during that time these two programs have been managed as a coordinated effort. This result of our 7+ years of effort has been substantial. Utilizing collaborations to access the most capable laser facilities around the world, we have developed an understanding that was summarized in a Fusion Science & Technology 2006, Special Issue on Fast Ignition. The author lists in the 20 articles in that issue are dominated by our group (we are first authors in four of them). Our group has published, or submitted 67 articles, including 1 in Nature, 2 Nature Physics, 10 Physical Review Letters, 8 Review of Scientific Instruments, and has been invited to give numerous talks at national and international conferences (including APS-DPP, IAEA, FIW). The advent of PW capabilities – at Rutherford Appleton Lab (UK) and then at Titan (LLNL) (2005 and 2006, respectively), was a major step toward experiments in ultra-high intensity high-energy FI relevant regime. The next step comes with the activation of OMEGA EP at LLE, followed shortly by NIF-ARC at LLNL. These capabilities allow production of hot dense material for electron transport studies. In this transitional period, considerable effort has been spent in developing the necessary tools and experiments for electron transport in hot and dense plasmas. In addition, substantial new data on electron generation and transport in metallic targets has been produced and analyzed. Progress in FI detailed in §2 is related to the Concept Exploration Program (CEP) objectives; this section is a summary of the publications and presentations listed in §5. This work has benefited from the synergy with work on related Department of Energy (DOE) grants, the Fusion Science Center and the Fast Ignition Advanced Concept Exploration grant, and from our interactions with overseas colleagues, primarily at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK, and the Institute for Laser Engineering in Japan.

  11. Advanced Concept Exploration for Fast Ignition Science Program, Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephens, Richard Burnite [General Atomics; McLean, Harry M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Theobald, Wolfgang [Laboratory for Laser Energetics; Akli, Kramer U. [The Ohio State University; Beg, Farhat N. [University of California, San Diego; Sentoku, Yasuhiko [University of Nevada, Reno; Schumacher, Douglass W. [The Ohio State University; Wei, Mingsheng [General Atomics

    2013-09-04

    The Fast Ignition (FI) Concept for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) has the potential to provide a significant advance in the technical attractiveness of Inertial Fusion Energy reactors. FI differs from conventional “central hot spot” (CHS) target ignition by decoupling compression from heating: using a laser (or heavy ion beam or Z pinch) drive pulse (10’s of nanoseconds) to create a dense fuel and a second, much shorter (~10 picoseconds) high intensity pulse to ignite a small volume within the dense fuel. The physics of fast ignition process was the focus of our Advanced Concept Exploration (ACE) program. Ignition depends critically on two major issues involving Relativistic High Energy Density (RHED) physics: The laser-induced creation of fast electrons and their propagation in high-density plasmas. Our program has developed new experimental platforms, diagnostic packages, computer modeling analyses, and taken advantage of the increasing energy available at laser facilities to advance understanding of the fundamental physics underlying these issues. Our program had three thrust areas: • Understand the production and characteristics of fast electrons resulting from FI relevant laser-plasma interactions and their dependence on laser prepulse and laser pulse length. • Investigate the subsequent fast electron transport in solid and through hot (FI-relevant) plasmas. • Conduct and understand integrated core-heating experiments by comparison to simulations. Over the whole period of this project (three years for this contract), we have greatly advanced our fundamental understanding of the underlying properties in all three areas: • Comprehensive studies on fast electron source characteristics have shown that they are controlled by the laser intensity distribution and the topology and plasma density gradient. Laser pre-pulse induced pre-plasma in front of a solid surface results in increased stand-off distances from the electron origin to the high density target as well as large and erratic spread of the electron beam with increasing short pulse duration. We have demonstrated, using newly available higher contrast lasers, an improved energy coupling, painting a promising picture for FI feasibility. • Our detailed experiments and analyses of fast electron transport dependence on target material have shown that it is feasible to collimate fast electron beam by self-generated resistive magnetic fields in engineered targets with a rather simple geometry. Stable and collimated electron beam with spot size as small as 50-?m after >100-?m propagation distance (an angular divergence angle of 20°!) in solid density plasma targets has been demonstrated with FI-relevant (10-ps, >1-kJ) laser pulses Such collimated beam would meet the required heating beam size for FI. • Our new experimental platforms developed for the OMEGA laser (i.e., i) high resolution 8 keV backlighter platform for cone-in-shell implosion and ii) the 8 keV imaging with Cu-doped shell targets for detailed transport characterization) have enabled us to experimentally confirm fuel assembly from cone-in-shell implosion with record-high areal density. We have also made the first direct measurement of fast electron transport and spatial energy deposition in integrated FI experiments enabling the first experiment-based benchmarking of integrated simulation codes. Executing this program required a large team. It was managed as a collaboration between General Atomics (GA), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). GA fulfills its responsibilities jointly with the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), The Ohio State University (OSU) and the University of Nevada at Reno (UNR). The division of responsibility was as follows: (1) LLE had primary leadership for channeling studies and the integrated energy transfer, (2) LLNL led the development of measurement methods, analysis, and deployment of diagnostics, and (3) GA together with UCSD, OSU and UNR studied the detailed energy-transfer physics. Th