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Sample records for hood river fisheries

  1. EIS-0241: Hood River Fisheries Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates a BPA proposal to protect and improve anadromous salmonid populations in the Hood River Basin. These actions are proposed in an attempt to mitigate the losses of fish and...

  2. EIS-0241-SA-01: Supplement Analysis for the Hood River Fisheries...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Fisheries Project The project is consistent with the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program, as well as BPA's Hood River Fisheries Project EIS (DOEEIS-0241)...

  3. EIS-0241-SA-01: Supplement Analysis for the Hood River Fisheries Project,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|Department of5 Peer ReviewUse2:Decision (April|2:-SA-01:Hood River County,

  4. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hales, D.

    2013-03-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project.

  5. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hales, D.

    2014-01-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  6. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hales, David

    2014-01-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to "reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  7. EIS-0241-SA-02: Supplement Analysis for the Hood River Fisheries Project |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c iGoldendale Energy ProjectreviewedImpact Statement toThisHood

  8. Aquatic Supplement Hood River Subbasin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Table 4. Out-of-subbasin production for three Hood River steelhead populations. Table 5. Life cycle river mile 6 13 Dee ID seepage 13 cold springs 2 city of HR overflow? riverside drive reservoir? 2 stone springs 4 city of HR riverside drive reservoir? 4 middle fork coe branch 15 MFID 15 clear branch 19 MFID

  9. Hood River Production Program Review, Final Report 1991-2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Underwood, Keith; Chapman, Colin; Ackerman, Nicklaus

    2003-12-01

    This document provides a comprehensive review of Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded activities within the Hood River Basin from 1991 to 2001. These activities, known as the Hood River Production Program (HRPP), are intended to mitigate for fish losses related to operation of federal dams in the Columbia River Basin, and to contribute to recovery of endangered and/or threatened salmon and steelhead, as directed by Nation Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration - Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries). The Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the HRPP, which authorized BPA to fund salmon and steelhead enhancement activities in the Hood River Basin, was completed in 1996 (BPA 1996). The EIS specified seven years of monitoring and evaluation (1996-2002) after program implementation to determine if program actions needed modification to meet program objectives. The EIS also called for a program review after 2002, that review is reported here.

  10. Hood River Passive House, Hood River, Oregon (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-02-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to "reduce home energy use by 30%-50%" (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  11. EA-1981: Bonneville-Hood River Transmission Line Rebuild, Multnomah and Hood River Counties, Oregon

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EA to assess potential environmental impacts of a proposal to rebuild its 24-mile long, 115 kilovolt Bonneville-Hood River transmission line. The existing line runs between the Bonneville Powerhouse at Bonneville Dam in Multnomah County, Oregon, and BPA's existing Hood River Substation in Hood River County, Oregon. The project would include replacing structures and conductor wires, improving access roads, and constructing new access roads or trails where needed.

  12. Bonneville - Hood River Vegetation Management Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    1998-08-01

    To maintain the reliability of its electrical system, BPA, in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service, needs to expand the range of vegetation management options used to clear unwanted vegetation on about 20 miles of BPA transmission line right-of-way between Bonneville Dam and Hood River; Oregon, within the Columbia Gorge National Scenic Area (NSA). We propose to continue controlling undesirable vegetation using a program of Integrated Vegetation Management (IVM) which includes manual, biological and chemical treatment methods. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1257) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

  13. Hood River Middle School Music and Science Building

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Hood River, Oregon The Hood River Middle School Music and Science Building is includes music and science classroom, music practice rooms, teacher offices, a greenhouse, an adjacent recycling and storage building, and outdoor spaces including an amphitheater and garden. The building is integrated with the school's progressive sustainability and permaculture curriculum. Students can track and create experiments using data from the buildings net zero energy system and rainwater harvesting system, and learn about the building's innovative and integrated use of materials and systems.

  14. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Hood River Passive House- Hood River, Oregon (Fact Sheet)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Hood River Passive Project incorporates high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless minisplit heat pump.

  15. UPPER SACRAMENTO RIVER SPORT FISHERY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UPPER SACRAMENTO RIVER SPORT FISHERY Marine Biological Laborato«y L I B R. A. R "ST OCT 2 31950 significant changes in the environmental conditions which affect fisheries in Sacramento River have resulted number of sportsmen who are turning to the Upper Sacramento River is indicative of the magnitude

  16. Revised Master Plan for the Hood River Production Program, Technical Report 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation

    2008-04-28

    The Hood River Production Program (HRPP) is a Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded program initiated as a mitigation measure for Columbia River hydrosystem effects on anadromous fish. The HRPP began in the early 1990s with the release of spring Chinook and winter steelhead smolts into the basin. Prior to implementation, co-managers, including the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife drafted the Hood River Production Master Plan (O'Toole and ODFW 1991a; O'Toole and ODFW 1991b) and the Pelton Ladder Master Plan (Smith and CTWSR 1991). Both documents were completed in 1991 and subsequently approved by the Council in 1992 and authorized through a BPA-led Environmental Impact Statement in 1996. In 2003, a 10-year programmatic review was conducted for BPA-funded programs in the Hood River (Underwood et al. 2003). The primary objective of the HRPP Review (Review) was to determine if program goals were being met, and if modifications to program activities would be necessary in order to meet or revise program goals. In 2003, an agreement was signed between PacifiCorp and resource managers to remove the Powerdale Dam (RM 10) and associated adult trapping facility by 2010. The HRPP program has been dependant on the adult trap to collect broodstock for the hatchery programs; therefore, upon the dam's removal, some sort of replacement for the trap would be needed to continue the HRPP. At the same time the Hood River Subbasin Plan (Coccoli 2004) was being written and prompted the co-managers to considered future direction of the program. This included revising the numerical adult fish objectives based on the assimilated data and output from several models run on the Hood River system. In response to the Review as well as the Subbasin Plan, and intensive monitoring and evaluation of the current program, the HRPP co-managers determined the spring Chinook program was not achieving the HRPP's defined smolt-to-adult (SAR) survival rate guidelines. The observed low SAR was due to precocity, straying, and incidence of BKD in the spring Chinook program; which ultimately led to the program's inability to achieve the subbasin's overly optimistic biological fish objectives. The summer steelhead hatchery program was not providing the fishery or population benefits anticipated and will be discontinued. The winter steelhead program was performing as planned and no changes are foreseen. This updated Master Plan addresses the several proposed changes to the existing HRPP, which are described.

  17. Hood River Electric Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA JumpDuimen RiverScoring Tool Jump to: navigation,Hongyuan

  18. Hood River Production Program Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) - Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs : Annual Report For Fiscal Year, October 2007 – September 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerstenberger, Ryan [Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation

    2009-07-27

    This progress report describes work performed by the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs (CTWSRO) portion of the Hood River Production Program Monitoring and Evaluation Project (HRPP) during the 2008 fiscal year. A total of 64,736 hatchery winter steelhead, 12,108 hatchery summer steelhead, and 68,426 hatchery spring Chinook salmon smolts were acclimated and released in the Hood River basin during the spring. The HRPP exceeded program goals for a release of and 50,000 winter steelhead but fell short of the steelhead release goals of 30,000 summer steelhead and 75,000 spring Chinook in 2008. Passive Integrated Transponders (PIT) tags were implanted in 6,652 hatchery winter steelhead, and 1,196 hatchery summer steelhead, to compare migratory attributes and survival rates of hatchery fish released into the Hood River. Water temperatures were recorded at six locations within the Hood River subbasin to monitor for compliance with Oregon Department of Environmental Quality water quality standards. A preseason spring Chinook salmon adult run forecast was generated, which predicted an abundant return adequate to meet escapement goal and brood stock needs. As a result the tribal and sport fisheries were opened. A tribal creel was conducted from May 22 to July 18 during which an estimated 172 spring Chinook were harvested. One hundred sixteen Spring Chinook salmon redds were observed and 72 carcasses were inspected on 19.4 miles of spawning grounds throughout the Hood River Basin during 2008. Annual salvage operations were completed in two irrigation canals resulting in the liberation of 1,641 fish back to the Hood River.

  19. Hood River and Pelton Ladder Evaluation Studies, Annual Report 2000-2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, Erik

    2009-09-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded the development of two master plans which outline the rationale, and general approach, for implementing a defined group of projects that are an integral part of a comprehensive watershed goal to 'Protect, enhance and restore wild and natural populations of anadromous and resident fish within the Hood River Subbasin'. The Hood River Production Master Plan and the Pelton Ladder Master Plan were completed in 1991 and subsequently approved by the Northwest Power Planning Council in 1992. Action items identified in the two master plans, as well as in a later document entitled 'Hood River/Pelton Ladder Master Agreement' (ODFW and CTWSRO Undated), are designed to achieve two biological fish objectives: (1) to increase production of wild summer and winter steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to levels commensurate with the subbasins current carrying capacity and (2) re-establishing a self-sustaining population of spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). Numerical fish objectives for subbasin escapement, spawner escapement, and subbasin harvest are defined for each of these species in Coccoli (2000). Several projects are presently funded by the BPA to achieve the Hood River subbasin's numerical fish objectives for summer and winter steelhead and spring chinook salmon. They include BPA project numbers 1998-021-00 (Hood River Fish Habitat), 1998-053-03 (Hood River Production Program - CTWSRO: M&E), 1998-053-07 (Parkdale Fish Facility), 1998-053-08 (Powerdale/Oak Springs O&M), and 1998-053-12 (Hood River Steelhead Genetics Study). Collectively, they are implemented under the umbrella of what has come to be defined as the Hood River Production Program (HRPP). The HRPP is jointly implemented by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (CTWSRO). Strategies for achieving the HRPP's biological fish objectives for the Hood River subbasin were initially devised based on various assumptions about (1) subbasin carrying capacity, (2) survival rates for selected life history stages, and (3) historic and current escapements of wild, natural, and hatchery stocks of anadromous salmonids to the Hood River subbasin. The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife began funding a monitoring and evaluation (M&E) project in December 1991 to collect the quantitative biological information needed to (1) more accurately assess the validity of these assumptions and (2) evaluate the proposed hatchery supplementation component of the HRPP. Bonneville Power Administration assumed funding of the M&E project in August 1992. The M&E project was initially confined to sampling anadromous salmonids escaping to an adult trapping facility operated at Powerdale Dam; which is located at River Mile (RM) 4.5 on the mainstem of the Hood River. Stock specific life history and biological data was collected to (1) monitor subbasin spawner escapements and (2) collect pre-implementation data critical to evaluating the newly proposed HRPP's potential biological impact on indigenous populations of resident fish. The scope of the M&E project was expanded in 1994 to collect the data needed to quantify (1) subbasin smolt production and carrying capacity, (2) smolt to adult survival rates, and (3) the spatial distribution of indigenous populations of summer and winter steelhead, spring and fall chinook salmon, and coho salmon. A creel was incorporated into the M&E project in December 1996 to evaluate the HRPP with respect to its defined subbasin and spawner escapement objectives for Hood River stocks of wild and hatchery summer and winter steelhead and for natural and Deschutes stock hatchery spring chinook salmon. In 1996, the M&E project also began monitoring streamflow at various locations in the Hood River subbasin. Streamflow data will be used to correlate subbasin smolt production with summer streamflows. Data collected from 1991-1999 is reported in the following annual progress reports: Olsen et al. (1994), Olsen et al

  20. Hood River and Pelton Ladder Evaluation Studies, 2008 Annual Report : October 2007 - September 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reagan, Robert E.; Olsen, Erik A.

    2009-09-28

    This report summarizes the life history and production data collected in the Hood River subbasin during FY 2008. Included is a summary of jack and adult life history data collected at the Powerdale Dam trap on seventeen complete run years of winter steelhead, spring and fall chinook salmon, and coho salmon, and on fifteen complete run years of summer steelhead. Also included are summaries of (1) the hatchery winter steelhead broodstock collection program; (2) hatchery production releases in the Hood River subbasin; (3) subbasin wild summer and winter steelhead smolt production, (4) numbers of hatchery summer and winter steelhead smolts leaving the subbasin; (5) smolt migration timing past Bonneville Dam, (6) wild and hatchery steelhead smolt-to-adult survival rates; (7) wild summer and winter steelhead egg to smolt survival rates; and (8) streamflow at selected locations in the Hood River subbasin. Data will be used in part to (1) evaluate the HRPP relative to its impact on indigenous populations of resident and anadromous salmonids (see Ardren Draft), (2) evaluate the HRPP's progress towards achieving the biological fish objectives defined in the Hood River Subbasin Plan (Coccoli 2004) and the Revised Master Plan for the Hood River Production Program (HDR|FishPro, ODFW, and CTWSRO 2008), (3) refine spawner escapement objectives to more accurately reflect subbasin carrying capacity, and (4) refine estimates of subbasin smolt production capacity to more accurately reflect current and potential subbasin carrying capacity.

  1. 6. Hood River Subbasin Management Plan This Chapter presents a vision that describes goals or desired future conditions for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    175 6. Hood River Subbasin Management Plan This Chapter presents a vision that describes goals for this Management Plan is 10-15 years. The Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) model was used in the Hood River sediment load. The model also found fish passage, juvenile entrainment and flow effects at Powerdale Dam

  2. Hood River County, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNew Jersey: EnergyHollyHomaHometown,(CTI PFAN) |Hood

  3. Fraser River Hydro and Fisheries Research Project fonds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handy, Todd C.

    Fraser River Hydro and Fisheries Research Project fonds Revised by Erwin Wodarczak (1998 Fraser River Hydro and Fisheries Research Project fonds. ­ 19561961. 13 cm of textual records. Administrative History The Fraser River Hydro and Fisheries Research Project was established in 1956, financed

  4. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-02-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to "reduce home energy use by 30%-50%" (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  5. In-River Backwards Run Reconstruction of Fraser River Sockeye Fisheries from 2002 -2009 and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In-River Backwards Run Reconstruction of Fraser River Sockeye Fisheries from 2002 - 2009: Master of Resource Management Title of Research Project: In-River Backwards Run Reconstruction of Fraser managers I develop an in-river backwards run reconstruction to provide Conservation Unit (CU) specific

  6. Columbia River : Terminal Fisheries Research Report : Annual Report 1994.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirose, Paul; Miller, Marc; Hill, Jim

    1996-12-01

    In 1993 the Northwest Power Planning Council recommended in its Strategy for Salmon that terminal fishing sites be identified and developed. The Council called on the Bonneville Power Administration to fund a 10-year study to investigate the feasibility of creating and expanding terminal known stock fisheries in the Columbia River Basin.

  7. Lower Columbia River Terminal Fisheries Research Project : Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-04-01

    This notice announces BPA`S`s decision to fund the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and the Clatsop Economic Development Committee for the Lower Columbia River Terminal Fisheries Research Project (Project). The Project will continue the testing of various species/stocks, rearing regimes, and harvest options for terminal fisheries, as a means to increase lower river sport and commercial harvest of hatchery fish, while providing both greater protection of weaker wild stocks and increasing the return of upriver salmon runs to potential Zone 6 Treaty fisheries. The Project involves relocating hatchery smolts to new, additional pen locations in three bays/sloughs in the lower Columbia River along both the Oregon and Washington sides. The sites are Blind Slough and Tongue Point in Clatsop County, Oregon, and Grays Bay/Deep River, Wahkiakum County, Washington. The smolts will be acclimated for various lengths of time in the net pens and released from these sites. The Project will expand upon an existing terminal fisheries project in Youngs Bay, Oregon. The Project may be expanded to other sites in the future, depending on the results of this initial expansion. BPA`S has determined the project is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required, and BPA`S is issuing this FONSI.

  8. EA-1981: Bonneville-Hood River Transmission Line Rebuild, Multnomah and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|Department of Energy 8:Final78: Sand Creek Winds, McConeSummitHood

  9. Columbia River: Terminal fisheries research project. 1994 Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirose, P.; Miller, M.; Hill, J.

    1996-12-01

    Columbia River terminal fisheries have been conducted in Youngs Bay, Oregon, since the early 1960`s targeting coho salmon produced at the state facility on the North Fork Klaskanine River. In 1977 the Clatsop County Economic Development Council`s (CEDC) Fisheries Project began augmenting the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife production efforts. Together ODFW and CEDC smolt releases totaled 5,060,000 coho and 411,300 spring chinook in 1993 with most of the releases from the net pen acclimation program. During 1980-82 fall commercial terminal fisheries were conducted adjacent to the mouth of Big Creek in Oregon. All past terminal fisheries were successful in harvesting surplus hatchery fish with minimal impact on nonlocal weak stocks. In 1993 the Northwest Power Planning Council recommended in its` Strategy for Salmon that terminal fishing sites be identified and developed. The Council called on the Bonneville Power Administration to fund a 10-year study to investigate the feasibility of creating and expanding terminal known stock fisheries in the Columbia River Basin. The findings of the initial year of the study are included in this report. The geographic area considered for study extends from Bonneville Dam to the river mouth. The initial year`s work is the beginning of a 2-year research stage to investigate potential sites, salmon stocks, and methodologies; a second 3-year stage will focus on expansion in Youngs Bay and experimental releases into sites with greatest potential; and a final 5-year phase establishing programs at full capacity at all acceptable sites. After ranking all possible sites using five harvest and five rearing criteria, four sites in Oregon (Tongue Point, Blind Slough, Clifton Channel and Wallace Slough) and three in Washington (Deep River, Steamboat Slough and Cathlamet Channel) were chosen for study.

  10. Low flow fume hood

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bell, Geoffrey C. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Feustel, Helmut E. (Albany, CA); Dickerhoff, Darryl J. (Berkeley, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A fume hood is provided having an adequate level of safety while reducing the amount of air exhausted from the hood. A displacement flow fume hood works on the principal of a displacement flow which displaces the volume currently present in the hood using a push-pull system. The displacement flow includes a plurality of air supplies which provide fresh air, preferably having laminar flow, to the fume hood. The displacement flow fume hood also includes an air exhaust which pulls air from the work chamber in a minimally turbulent manner. As the displacement flow produces a substantially consistent and minimally turbulent flow in the hood, inconsistent flow patterns associated with contaminant escape from the hood are minimized. The displacement flow fume hood largely reduces the need to exhaust large amounts of air from the hood. It has been shown that exhaust air flow reductions of up to 70% are possible without a decrease in the hood's containment performance. The fume hood also includes a number of structural adaptations which facilitate consistent and minimally turbulent flow within a fume hood.

  11. STATISTICAL REVIEW OF THE ALASKA SALMON FISHERIES PART III: PRINCE WILLIAM SOUND, COPPER RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATISTICAL REVIEW OF THE ALASKA SALMON FISHERIES PART III: PRINCE WILLIAM SOUND, COPPER RIVER Assistant, Alaska Service CONTENTS Introduction_ ~ _~ _ Prince William Sound__ ~ ~ _ Western part _ Knight 217 218 220 221 Prince William Sound-Continued. Eastern part _ Valdez Arm districL _ Port Fidalgo

  12. 1Proposed Snake River Fall Chinook Recovery Plan -Executive Summary | NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service October 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    This recovery plan (plan) serves as a blueprint for the protection and recovery of Snake River fall-run Chinook salmon. NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) first listed Snake River fall-run Chinook salmon of Snake River listed species (NMFS 2011a). At one time the run numbered half a million strong

  13. Kootenai River Fisheries Investigations: Salmonid Studies Project Progress Report, 2007-2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paragamian, Vaughn L.; Walters, Jody; Maiolie, Melo [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

    2009-04-09

    This research report addresses bull trout Salvelinus confluentus and Redband trout Oncorhynchus mykiss redd surveys, population monitoring, trout distribution, and abundance surveys in the Kootenai River drainage of Idaho. The bull trout is one of several sport fish native to the Kootenai River, Idaho that no longer supports a fishery. Because bull trout are listed under the Endangered Species Act, population data will be vital to monitoring status relative to recovery goals. Thirty-three bull trout redds were found in North and South Callahan creeks and Boulder Creek in 2007. This is a decrease from 2006 and 2005 and less than the high count in 2003. However, because redd numbers have only been monitored since 2002, the data series is too short to determine bull trout population trends based on redd counts. Redband trout still provide an important Kootenai River sport fishery, but densities are low, at least partly due to limited recruitment. The redband trout proportional stock density (PSD) in 2007 increased from 2006 for a second year after a two-year decline in 2004 and 2005. This may indicate increased recruitment to or survival in the 201-305 mm length group due to the minimum 406 mm (16 inches) length limit initiated in 2002. We conducted 13 redd surveys and counted 44 redband trout redds from May 7 to June 3, 2007 in a 3.8 km survey reach on Twentymile Creek. We surveyed streams in the Kootenai River valley to look for barriers to trout migration. Man-made barriers, for at least part of the year, were found on Caboose, Debt, Fisher, and Twenty Mile creeks. Removing these barriers would increase spawning and rearing habitat for trout and help to restore trout fisheries in the Kootenai River.

  14. Lower Columbia River Salmon Business Plan for Terminal Fisheries : Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salmon For All

    1996-07-01

    Salmon fishing in the Northwest requires a public-private partnership. The public through its decision-makers, agencies, and laws states it will do all that is necessary to protect and preserve the valuable salmon resource. Yet, the public side of the partnership is broken. The Columbia River salmon fishing industry, with over 140 years of documented history, is at a crossroads. This report explores a variety of issues, concerns, and ideas related to terminal fishery development. In some cases recommendations are made. In addition, options are explored with an understanding that those designated as decision-makers must make decisions following considerable discussion and reflection.

  15. Energy efficient laboratory fume hood

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feustel, Helmut E. (Albany, CA)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a low energy consumption fume hood that provides an adequate level of safety while reducing the amount of air exhausted from the hood. A low-flow fume hood in accordance with the present invention works on the principal of providing an air supply, preferably with low turbulence intensity, in the face of the hood. The air flow supplied displaces the volume currently present in the hood's face without significant mixing between the two volumes and with minimum injection of air from either side of the flow. This air flow provides a protective layer of clean air between the contaminated low-flow fume hood work chamber and the laboratory room. Because this protective layer of air will be free of contaminants, even temporary mixing between the air in the face of the fume hood and room air, which may result from short term pressure fluctuations or turbulence in the laboratory, will keep contaminants contained within the hood. Protection of the face of the hood by an air flow with low turbulence intensity in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention largely reduces the need to exhaust large amounts of air from the hood. It has been shown that exhaust air flow reductions of up to 75% are possible without a decrease in the hood's containment performance.

  16. A study of Texas rivers with attention to river access and recreational fisheries 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Troy L

    2013-02-22

    to anglers related to river and stream access in Texas. A self-administered questionnaire was mailed to a sample of 679 anglers drawn from the 1994 Texas Angler Survey conducted by the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. Anglers were surveyed to evaluate...

  17. Wind, Klickitat, Hood and Fifteen Mile Habitat Site Visits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind, Klickitat, Hood and Fifteen Mile Habitat Site Visits April 17-19th, 2013 ISRP Review Team (4 at the Sheraton Airport at 7:15 a.m. Site Visits: Depart airport and head east: Wind, Klickitat, White Salmon in this review: 1998-019-00 Wind River Watershed Underwood Conservation District (UCD), US Forest Service (USFS

  18. CTUIR Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project : A Columbia River Basin Fish Habitat Project 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoverson, Eric D.; Amonette, Alexandra

    2009-02-09

    The Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project (UAFHP) is an ongoing effort to protect, enhance, and restore riparian and instream habitat for the natural production of anadromous salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin, Northeast Oregon. Flow quantity, water temperature, passage, and lack of in-stream channel complexity have been identified as the key limiting factors in the basin. During the 2008 Fiscal Year (FY) reporting period (February 1, 2008-January 31, 2009) primary project activities focused on improving instream and riparian habitat complexity, migrational passage, and restoring natural channel morphology and floodplain function. Eight primary fisheries habitat enhancement projects were implemented on Meacham Creek, Birch Creek, West Birch Creek, McKay Creek, West Fork Spring Hollow, and the Umatilla River. Specific restoration actions included: (1) rectifying one fish passage barrier on West Birch Creek; (2) participating in six projects planting 10,000 trees and seeding 3225 pounds of native grasses; (3) donating 1000 ft of fencing and 1208 fence posts and associated hardware for 3.6 miles of livestock exclusion fencing projects in riparian areas of West Birch and Meacham Creek, and for tree screens to protect against beaver damage on West Fork Spring Hollow Creek; (4) using biological control (insects) to reduce noxious weeds on three treatment areas covering five acres on Meacham Creek; (5) planning activities for a levee setback project on Meacham Creek. We participated in additional secondary projects as opportunities arose. Baseline and ongoing monitoring and evaluation activities were also completed on major project areas such as conducting photo point monitoring strategies activities at the Meacham Creek Large Wood Implementation Project site (FY2006) and at additional easements and planned project sites. Fish surveys and aquatic habitat inventories were conducted at project sites prior to implementation. Proper selection and implementation of the most effective site-specific habitat restoration plan, taking into consideration the unique characteristics of each project site, and conducted in cooperation with landowners and project partners, was of paramount importance to ensure each project's success. An Aquatic Habitat Inventory was conducted from river mile 0-8 on Isquulktpe Creek and the data collected was compared with data collected in 1994. Monitoring plans will continue throughout the duration of each project to oversee progression and inspire timely managerial actions. Twenty-seven conservation easements were maintained with 23 landowners. Permitting applications for planned project activities and biological opinions were written and approved. Project activities were based on a variety of fisheries monitoring techniques and habitat assessments used to determine existing conditions and identify factors limiting anadromous salmonid abundance in accordance with the Umatilla River Subbasin Salmon and Steelhead Production Plan (NPPC 1990) and the Final Umatilla Willow Subbasin Plan (Umatilla/Willow Subbasin Planning Team 2005).

  19. Report on the Predation Index, Predator Control Fisheries, and Program Evaluation for the Columbia River Basin Experimental Northern Pikeminnow Management Program, 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, Russell .

    2009-09-10

    This report presents results for year seventeen in the basin-wide Experimental Northern Pikeminnow Management Program to harvest northern pikeminnow1 (Ptychocheilus oregonensis) in the Columbia and Snake Rivers. This program was started in an effort to reduce predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids during their emigration from natal streams to the ocean. Earlier work in the Columbia River Basin suggested predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids might account for most of the 10-20% mortality juvenile salmonids experience in each of eight Columbia River and Snake River reservoirs. Modeling simulations based on work in John Day Reservoir from 1982 through 1988 indicated that, if predator-size northern pikeminnow were exploited at a 10-20% rate, the resulting restructuring of their population could reduce their predation on juvenile salmonids by 50%. To test this hypothesis, we implemented a sport-reward angling fishery and a commercial longline fishery in the John Day Pool in 1990. We also conducted an angling fishery in areas inaccessible to the public at four dams on the mainstem Columbia River and at Ice Harbor Dam on the Snake River. Based on the success of these limited efforts, we implemented three test fisheries on a system-wide scale in 1991 - a tribal longline fishery above Bonneville Dam, a sport-reward fishery, and a dam-angling fishery. Low catch of target fish and high cost of implementation resulted in discontinuation of the tribal longline fishery. However, the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries were continued in 1992 and 1993. In 1992, we investigated the feasibility of implementing a commercial longline fishery in the Columbia River below Bonneville Dam and found that implementation of this fishery was also infeasible. Estimates of combined annual exploitation rates resulting from the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries remained at the low end of our target range of 10-20%. This suggested the need for additional effective harvest techniques. During 1991 and 1992, we developed and tested a modified (small-sized) Merwin trapnet. We found this floating trapnet to be very effective in catching northern pikeminnow at specific sites. Consequently, in 1993 we examined a system-wide fishery using floating trapnets, but found this fishery to be ineffective at harvesting large numbers of northern pikeminnow on a system-wide scale. In 1994, we investigated the use of trap nets and gillnets at specific locations where concentrations of northern pikeminnow were known or suspected to occur during the spring season (i.e., March through early June). In addition, we initiated a concerted effort to increase public participation in the sport-reward fishery through a series of promotional and incentive activities. In 1995, 1996, and 1997, promotional activities and incentives were further improved based on the favorable response in 1994. Results of these efforts are subjects of this annual report. Evaluation of the success of test fisheries in achieving our target goal of a 10-20% annual exploitation rate on northern pikeminnow is presented in Report C of this report. Overall program success in terms of altering the size and age composition of the northern pikeminnow population and in terms of potential reductions in loss of juvenile salmonids to northern pikeminnow predation is also discussed in Report C. Program cooperators include the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and the U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal Damage Unit as a contractor to test Dam Angling. The PSMFC was responsible for coordination and administration of the program; PSMFC subcontracted various tasks and activities to ODFW and WDFW based on the expertise each brought to the tasks involved in implementing the program and dam angling to the USDA.

  20. HOMING BEHAVIOR AND CONTRIBUTION TO COLUMBIA RIVER FISHERIES OF MARKED COHO SALMON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Fish Hatchery near Cooks, Wash. The LV-marked group was transported by truck to Youngs Bay, 19 km car- casses has caused considerable friction between commercial fishermen and fishery agencies. Salm

  1. Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys : Willamette River Basin, 1934-1942, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

    1995-01-01

    This document contains summary reports of stream habitat-surveys, conducted in the Willamette River basin, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1934-1942. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead (Rich, 1948). The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, 'to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes'. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946 (Bryant, 1949; Bryant and Parkhurst, 1950; Parkhurst, 1950a-c; Parkhurst et al., 1950). Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin (Fulton, 1968, 1970; Thompson, 1976; NPPC, 1986). Recently, the field notebooks from the BOF surveys were discovered. The data is now archived and stored in the Forest Science DataBank at Oregon State University (Stafford et al., 1984; 1988). These records are the earliest and most comprehensive documentation available of the condition and extent of anadromous fish habitat before hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin. They provide the baseline data for quantifying changes and setting a benchmark for future restoration of anadromous fish habitat throughout the Basin. The summaries contained in this book are exact replicates of the originals. Due to discrepancies between the field data and the summaries, the database should be used to assess pool and substrate conditions. This data is available from the Bonneville Power Administration. The Bureau of Fisheries survey is unique because it is the only long-term data set that quantifies fish habitat in a manner that is replicable over time; no other similar work is known to exist. Other surveys, such as Thompson and Haas (1960), inventoried extensive areas in a manner that was mostly qualitative, subjectively estimating physical characteristics like bank cover and stream shading. Spawning, rearing, and resting habitat were not systematically quantified to allow comparisons over time. Knowledge of past and present quantity and quality of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin is essential to any effort to enhance fish populations. Habitat condition is a key element in monitoring and evaluating progress towards the doubling goal. Integration of this information into the Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Plan can provide the basis to greatly enhance understanding of past, present, and future habitat conditions in the basin to provide for improved management decisions.

  2. Measuring Benefits from a Marketing Cooperative in the Copper River Fishery Sunny L. Jardinea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

    of inferior-quality fish. Specifically, we use a difference-in-differences estimation strategy to measure, however, is the presence of market failures that lead to the production of inferior- quality fish rights in fisheries, which creates incentives for fishermen to engage in a race to fish and neglect

  3. Chemical Fume Hood Guide Design, Construction, Health Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    & Dismantling........................................................................9 · Fume Hood Evaluation In The Field · Procedures Prior to Servicing or Dismantling · Fume Hood Service Procedure V. References guidelines for the design, installation, renovation, maintenance, and dismantling of chemical fume hoods

  4. Chemical Fume Hood Maintenance, Repair and Certification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    in the lab. Removes lockout of hoods, if used. g. Notify EH&S to perform re-certification after repair

  5. AN EVALUATION OF THE FISHERY RESOURCE IN A PORTION OF THE JAMES RIVER, SOUTH DAKOTA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The fish populations of a 193 km (120 mil section of the James River between Tacoma Park and Redfield Tacoma Park and Redfield, South Dakota. The fishes use the area primarily as a spawning ground

  6. 16.-THE SALMON FISHERIES OF THE COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN. By MARSHALL McDONALD,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , of investigations in the Columbia River Basin. The -first of the provision!'! above referred to authorized." The second provision directed an investigation and report respecting the advisa- bility of establishing, or was to be attrib- uted to the extensive fishing operations prosecuted in the Lower Oolumbia, or possibly to other

  7. Commercial Fisheries Biological Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Biological Laboratory Oxford, Maryland #12;Chart of the Tred Avon River, showing the location of the BCF Biological Laboratory and the orientation of this area modern laboratories for chem- ical, histological, microbiological, and physiological re- search

  8. HIGH-SEAS FISHERIES OF THE U.S.S.R.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , in some lake and river fisheries, catches have been declining because of pollution, hydroelectric projects

  9. The effects of PAT on the Savannah River ecosystem, particularly fisheries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick, R.

    1994-03-01

    The main purpose of this study was to determine whether or not the pre-startup activities at K-Reactor, i.e., Power Ascension Testing (PAT), have caused damage because of temperature rises in the Savannah River. Therefore, the biological studies were mainly aimed at providing information as to changes that might cause the damage of the fish population, and to other important organisms in the ecosystem. To determine if deleterious effects had occurred, one had to review the past studies to determine the condition and diversity of aquatic life before these PAT studies started. Therefore old reports were reviewed and a current study made in 1992.

  10. Dynamic leakage from laboratory safety hoods 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Ju-Myon

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantitatively evaluate hood leakage by measuring face velocity and turbulence during a volume generating process designed to simulate a hot process, defined here as any operation producing high temperature gases. A...

  11. Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Hood, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solana, Amy E.; Warwick, William M.; Orrell, Alice C.; Russo, Bryan J.; Parker, Kyle R.; Weimar, Mark R.; Horner, Jacob A.; Manning, Anathea

    2011-11-14

    This report presents the results of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) follow-on renewable energy (RE) assessment of Fort Hood. Fort Hood receives many solicitations from renewable energy vendors who are interested in doing projects on site. Based on specific requests from Fort Hood staff so they can better understand these proposals, and the results of PNNL's 2008 RE assessment of Fort Hood, the following resources were examined in this assessment: (1) Municipal solid waste (MSW) for waste-to-energy (WTE); (2) Wind; (3) Landfill gas; (4) Solar photovoltaics (PV); and (5) Shale gas. This report also examines the regulatory issues, development options, and environmental impacts for the promising RE resources, and includes a review of the RE market in Texas.

  12. Kootenai River Fisheries Investigation : Stock Status of Burbot : Project Progress Report 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paragamian, Valughn L.; Laude Dorothy C.

    2008-12-26

    Objectives of this investigation were to (1) monitor the population status and recruitment of burbot Lota lota in the Kootenai River, Idaho and British Columbia, Canada during the winter of 2006-2007; (2) evaluate the selective withdrawal system in place at Libby Dam to maintain the river temperature near Bonners Ferry between 1-4 C (November-December) to improve burbot migration and spawning activity; and (3) determine if a hatching success of 10% of eyed burbot embryos could be achieved through extensive rearing and produce fingerlings averaging 9.8 cm in six months. Water temperature did not fall below the upper limit (4 C) until mid-January but was usually maintained between 1-4 C January through February and was acceptable. Snowpack was characterized by a 101% of normal January runoff forecast. Adult burbot were sampled with hoop nets and slat traps. Only three burbot were captured in hoop nets, all at Ambush Rock (rkm 244.5). No burbot were caught in either slat traps or juvenile sampling gear, indicating the population is nearly extirpated. Burbot catch per unit effort in hoop nets was 0.003 fish/net d. Extensive rearing was moved to a smaller private pond and will be reported in the 2008-2009 annual report.

  13. BIOLOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF THE FISHERY RESOURCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    characteristics of Trinity River ···· 5 Run-off and flow 5 River temperature* ··«················· 9 ExistingI BIOLOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF THE FISHERY RESOURCES OF TRINITY RIVER, CALIF. Marine Bio!o2>oj»i 1 and sports fisheries* ···*···· 20 Characteristics of the seasonal runs ****** 21 Spawning and development

  14. Historical Shoreline Evolution as a Response to Dam Placement on the Elwha River, Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagid, Bethany Marie

    2015-01-01

    of the Elwha River, Washington- Biological and physicalthe Elwha River, Washington, U.S. , Fisheries Management &on the Elwha River, Washington, USA: River channel and

  15. Chemical Fume Hood Use in Research Laboratories Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    Chemical Fume Hood Use in Research Laboratories Policy Procedure: 6.04 Created: 6/20/2013 Version: 1.0 Revised: NA 1 A. PURPOSE: To establish protocols for the safe use of chemical fume hoods (CFH laboratory personnel using chemical fume hoods in research laboratories at all Columbia University campuses

  16. Reproductive Ecology of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knudsen, Curtis M. (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA); Schroder, Steven L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Johnston, Mark V. (yakama Nation, Toppenish, WA)

    2005-05-01

    This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from Oncorh Consulting to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the fourth in a series of reports that address reproductive ecological research and monitoring of spring chinook populations in the Yakima River basin. This annual report summarizes data collected between April 1, 2004 and March 31, 2005 and includes analyses of historical baseline data, as well. Supplementation success in the Yakima Klickitat Fishery Project's (YKFP) spring chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) program is defined as increasing natural production and harvest opportunities, while keeping adverse ecological interactions and genetic impacts within acceptable bounds (Busack et al. 1997). Within this context demographics, phenotypic traits, and reproductive ecology have significance because they directly affect natural productivity. In addition, significant changes in locally adapted traits due to hatchery influence, i.e. domestication, would likely be maladaptive resulting in reduced population productivity and fitness (Taylor 1991; Hard 1995). Thus, there is a need to study demographic and phenotypic traits in the YKFP in order to understand hatchery and wild population productivity, reproductive ecology, and the effects of domestication (Busack et al. 1997). Tracking trends in these traits over time is also a critical aspect of domestication monitoring (Busack et al. 2004) to determine whether trait changes have a genetic component and, if so, are they within acceptable limits. The first chapter of this report compares first generation hatchery and wild upper Yakima River spring chinook returns over a suite of life-history, phenotypic and demographic traits. The second chapter deals specifically with identification of putative populations of wild spring chinook in the Yakima River basin based on differences in quantitative and genetic traits. The third chapter is a progress report on gametic traits and progeny produced by upper Yakima River wild and hatchery origin fish spawned in 2004 including some comparisons with Little Naches River fish. In the fourth chapter, we present a progress report on comparisons naturally spawning wild and hatchery fish in the upper Yakima River and in an experimental spawning channel at CESRF in 2004. The chapters in this report are in various stages of development. Chapters One and Two will be submitted for peer reviewed publication. Chapters Three and Four should be considered preliminary and additional fieldwork and/or analysis are in progress related to these topics. Readers are cautioned that any preliminary conclusions are subject to future revision as more data and analytical results become available.

  17. Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys : Clearwater, Salmon, Weiser, and Payette River Basins, 1934-1942, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

    1995-01-01

    This document contains summary reports of stream habitat surveys, conducted in Idaho, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1938-1942.. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead (Rich, 1948). The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, 'to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes'. The Idaho portion of the survey consisted of extensive surveys of the Clearwater, Salmon, Weiser, and Payette River Subbasins. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946 (Bryant, 1949; Bryant and Parkhurst, 1950; Parkhurst, 1950a-c; Parkhurst et al., 1950). Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin (Fulton, 1968, 1970; Thompson, 1976; NPPC, 1986). Recently, the field notebooks from the BOF surveys were discovered. The data is now archived and stored in the Forest Science DataBank at Oregon State University (Stafford et al., 1984; 1988). These records are the earliest and most comprehensive documentation available of the condition and extent of anadromous fish habitat before hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin. They provide the baseline data for quantifying changes and setting a benchmark for future restoration of anadromous fish habitat throughout the Basin. The summaries contained in this book are exact replicates of the originals. Due to discrepancies between the field data and the summaries, the database should be used to assess pool and substrate conditions. This data is available from the Bonneville Power Administration. The Bureau of Fisheries survey is unique because it is the only long-term data set that quantifies fish habitat in a manner that is replicable over time; no other similar work is known to exist. Other surveys, such as Thompson and Haas (1960), inventoried extensive areas in a manner that was mostly qualitative, subjectively estimating physical characteristics like bank cover and stream shading. Spawning, rearing, and resting habitat were not systematically quantified to allow comparisons over time. Knowledge of the past and present quantity and quality of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin is essential to any effort to enhance fish populations. Habitat condition is a key element in monitoring and evaluating progress towards the doubling goal. Integration of this information into the Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Plan can provide the baseline information to greatly enhance understanding of past, present, and future habitat conditions in the basin to provide for improved management decisions.

  18. Confederated Tribes Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project : A Columbia River Basin Fish Habitat Project : Annual Report Fiscal Year 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoverson, Eric D.; Amonette, Alexandra

    2008-12-02

    The Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project (UAFHP) is an ongoing effort to protect, enhance, and restore riparian and instream habitat for the natural production of anadromous salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin, Northeast Oregon. Flow quantity, water temperature, passage, and lack of in-stream channel complexity have been identified as the key limiting factors in the basin. During the 2007 Fiscal Year (FY) reporting period (February 1, 2007-January 31, 2008) primary project activities focused on improving instream and riparian habitat complexity, migrational passage, and restoring natural channel morphology and floodplain function. Eight fisheries habitat enhancement projects were implemented on Meacham Creek, Camp Creek, Greasewood Creek, Birch Creek, West Birch Creek, and the Umatilla River. Specific restoration actions included: (1) rectifying five fish passage barriers on four creeks, (2) planting 1,275 saplings and seeding 130 pounds of native grasses, (3) constructing two miles of riparian fencing for livestock exclusion, (4) coordinating activities related to the installation of two off-channel, solar-powered watering areas for livestock, and (5) developing eight water gap access sites to reduce impacts from livestock. Baseline and ongoing monitoring and evaluation activities were also completed on major project areas such as conducting photo point monitoring strategies activities at the Meacham Creek Large Wood Implementation Project site (FY2006) and at all existing easements and planned project sites. Fish surveys and aquatic habitat inventories were conducted at project sites prior to implementation. Monitoring plans will continue throughout the life of each project to oversee progression and inspire timely managerial actions. Twenty-seven conservation easements were maintained with 23 landowners. Permitting applications for planned project activities and biological opinions were written and approved. Project activities were based on a variety of fisheries monitoring techniques and habitat assessments used to determine existing conditions and identify factors limiting anadromous salmonid abundance. Proper selection and implementation of the most effective site-specific habitat restoration plan, taking into consideration the unique characteristics of each project site, and conducted in cooperation with landowners and project partners, was of paramount importance to ensure each project's success.

  19. Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Hood, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chvala, William D.; Warwick, William M.; Dixon, Douglas R.; Solana, Amy E.; Weimar, Mark R.; States, Jennifer C.; Reilly, Raymond W.

    2008-06-30

    The document provides an overview of renewable resource potential at Fort Hood based primarily upon analysis of secondary data sources supplemented with limited on-site evaluations. The effort was funded by the U.S. Army Installation Management Command (IMCOM) as follow-on to the 2005 DoD Renewables Assessment. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and also ground source heat pumps for heating and cooling buildings, as directed by IMCOM.

  20. Fume Hood Sash Stickers Increases Laboratory Safety and Efficiency...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Safety and Efficiency at Minimal Cost Case study describes two University of California campuses that increased laboratory exhaust efficiency and safety by using fume hood...

  1. Centerline velocity profile for plain round exhaust hoods 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Kirksey E

    1977-01-01

    ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Dal laVal le and Hatch S 1 11verman The Probl em. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 The Research Hypothesis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 METHODOLOGY. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I 2 DATA ANALYSIS..., System 2, . . . 52 Appendix D ? Statistical Analysis Tables . . . . , . . . , . 63 ITA ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o o ~ ~ i ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ V ~ ~ ~ Q I ~ ~ 0 Q ~ ~ ~ 66 LIST OF FIBURES Fi gure 1 Air Flow into Simple Hood Page 2 Compound Hood 3 Duct Air Moni tor...

  2. Natural Propagation and Habitat Improvement, Volume I, Oregon, 1984 Final and Annual Reports.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Rod

    1986-02-01

    This volume contains reports on habitat improvement and fisheries enhancement projects conducted in the following subbasins: (1) Clackamas River; (2) Hood River; :(3) Deschutes River; (4) John Day River; (5) Umatilla River; and (6) Grande Ronde River. (ACR)

  3. Water Quality Trends in the Entiat River Subbasin: Final Annual Report to BPA and NOAA Fisheries, 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodsmith, Richard; Bookter, Andy

    2008-03-11

    The Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Project (ISEMP) program monitors the status and trend of water quality elements that may affect restoration project effectiveness in the Entiat subbasin. As part of this effort, the PNW Research Station (PNW) measures, analyzes and interprets temporal trends in natural stream water pH, dissolved oxygen, specific conductance and temperature. The Entiat River is currently on the Clean Water Act 303(d) list for pH exceedence, and there is insufficient information to determine the spatial and temporal extent or potential causes of this exceedence. In the late spring 2007, PNW deployed data-logging, multiparameter probes at four locations in the Entiat subbasin to measure water quality parameters, focusing on pH. Data collection was seasonally interrupted by river ice in early December. Daily average pH did not exceed the water quality standard of 8.5 at any of the measurements sites. However, instantaneous values did exceed this standard near the mouth of the Entiat River during late summer-fall period. This suggested that in the lowest portion of the river peaks in pH may be occurring because of photosynthesis caused by high rates of periphyton productivity in response to increased sunlight, temperature, and possible nutrient enrichment. Conversely, dissolved oxygen reached annual low levels during this same late summer-fall period, in part because of increased water temperatures and increased biochemical oxygen demand.

  4. Hood River Subbasin Plan Lower Oregon Columbia Gorge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Subbasin Effects..............................................................67 Environment and Population............................................................134 Environment and Population Relationships......................................135 Limiting Factors and Clean Water Act Requirements............... . 198 Research, Monitoring and Evaluation

  5. FISHWAY RESEARCH FISHERIES-ENGINEERING RESEARCH LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES CIRCULAR 98 #12;Cover: Bonneville Dam. Reports and publications on laboratory research are listed. #12;FISHWAY RESEARCH AT THE FISHERIES on the Columbia River system where a long series of major dams interrupts the migration of several species

  6. Pollutant Removal Efficiency of Residential Cooking Exhaust Hoods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, Brett C.

    2012-01-01

    to improve CE for front burners. Each configuration wasoven and for three cooktop burner combinations (two back,and C captured back cooktop burner exhaust at >90% and Hood

  7. Foreign Fishery Developments Mexico's Fisheries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foreign Fishery Developments Mexico's Fisheries and Their Development The Mexican Government has Mexico to increase its food imports. The rapidly growing fishing industry has been one of Mexico's few Program (1977- 82) has already resulted in a substantial- ly increased catch of fish and shellfish. Mexico

  8. AN ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF THE ST. LAWRENCE RIVER-EASTERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AN ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF THE ST. LAWRENCE RIVER-EASTERN LAKE ONTARIO BASS FISHERY The St. Lawrence information on the economic importance of the bass fishery, considered by many to be one of the best smallmouth bass fisheries in the world. The economic value of this recreational fishery should be taken

  9. Vulnerability Assessment for Hood County, TX 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldalbahi, Farisal; Cousins, Tiffany; Franks, Kristie; Hamidah, Nur; Herring, Kalen; Kirimli, Ridvan; Rojas, Ricardo Maga; McCharen, Robert; Paiz-Tabash, William; Phillips, Ellen; Thapa, Jeewasmi; Wallick, Andrew; Yan, Wenqian; Zhang, Yixun

    2015-01-01

    Looking forward, we mapped the 100-year and 500-year floodplains in the County. A 100-year floodplain indicates areas that have a 1% chance each year of flooding. The majority of the floodplain follows the Brazos River, as would be expected, and its...

  10. Independent Scientific Advisory Board Review of NOAA Fisheries'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and reservoirs, 3 run- of-river dams that function as re-regulating projects, and 42 revetments located) Modeling of Willamette River Spring Chinook Populations (June 2014 draft) ISAB 2014-4 August 1, 2014 #12 for the Northwest Power and Conservation Council, Columbia River Basin Indian Tribes, and National Marine Fisheries

  11. Columbia River Basin Accords -Narrative Proposal Project Number 200845800 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    development of the Columbia River were largely responsible for the decline of the wild steelhead run (Mullan, lower river commercial fisheries, including tribal fisheries within Zone 6, took about 70% of the run River hydropower system, hatchery steelhead had replaced natural production in the run counts, masking

  12. BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES FISHERY-OCEANOGRAPHY CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES FISHERY- OCEANOGRAPHY CENTER LA JOLLA, CALIFORNIA FISCAL YEAR 1968-FISHERIES- Qcculor 303 #12;Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Fishery-Oceanography Center. La Jolla G. Mattson Cover OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES FISHERY- OCEANOGRAPHY CENTER LA JOLLA, CALIFORNIA FISCAL

  13. NOAA Fisheries Alaska Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resource Management Specialist Krista C Milani Fishery Resource Management Specialist Obren B Davis Fishery Specialist Patsy A Bearden Resource Mgmt Specialist Revised 10/23/2014 Bill Donaldson Fishery Management

  14. CHARACTERISTICS OF RANGE HOODS IN CALIFORNIA HOMES DATA COLLECTED FROM A REAL ESTATE WEB SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klug, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    and natural gas cooking burners. To address the lack of datahood covers the cooktop burners. We additionally collectedor all of the cooktop burners. For short hoods, 70% covered

  15. U.S. Department of Commerce | National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration | National Marine Fisheries Service 2011 Report to Congress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nal MariNe Fisheries service Science, Service, Stewardship #12;II 1989 Sacramento River winter-run Chinook). 1991 Snake River sockeye are listed as endangered. 1994 Sacramento River winter-run Chinook are listed the West Coast. 1992 Snake River spring/ summer-run Chinook and Snake River fall-run Chinook are listed

  16. CHARACTERISTICS OF RANGE HOODS IN CALIFORNIA HOMES DATA COLLECTED FROM A REAL ESTATE WEB SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klug, Victoria; Singer, Brett; Bedrosian, Tod; DCruz, Chris

    2011-09-02

    Venting range hoods are important residential ventilation components that remove pollutants generated by cooking activities and natural gas cooking burners. To address the lack of data on range hood installations in California, we conducted a survey by examining photographs of homes for sale or rent listed on a popular real estate web site. The survey was conducted in November 2010 and April–May 2011. Posted photos of the homes were reviewed to determine if a hood was installed, the type of hood, and two installation details that can impact performance, namely the height above the cooktop and the degree to which the hood covers the cooktop burners. We additionally collected information about the homes, including asking price for purchase or rent, type of building (e.g. detached house, townhouse or apartment), building age, floor area, and cooktop fuel type. Listings were first sampled to focus on homes built since 2005, then randomly sampled to include varied prices and locations around the state. Data were obtained for 1002 homes built between 1865 and 2011 (median year built 1989). Homes for sale varied in asking price from $16,000 to $16,500,000 (median $353,000) and homes for rent varied from $500 to $25,000 (median $2125) per month. Approximately 74% of the sample had natural gas cooktops. In this sample, natural gas cooktops were more prevalent in more expensive homes than in less expensive homes. Across the entire sample, 7.4 % appeared to have no hood installed, 33% had a short hood, 13% had a deep hood and 47% had a microwave over the range. The percentage of these hoods that vent to the outdoors could not be determined. Hood type was related to coverage of the cooktop. For deep hoods, 76% appeared to cover most or all of the cooktop burners. For short hoods, 70% covered about three quarters of the cooktop. And for microwaves the vast majority (96%) covered the back burners but not the front burners. Hood type was also correlated with asking price or monthly rent, with deep hoods most common in the most expensive homes. Hood type was also correlated with home age, with microwave hoods more common in newer homes. Installation height was related to device type with microwaves installed lower (closer) to the cooktop (median 18 inches), and short hoods (median 28 inches) and deep hoods (median 30 inches) installed higher. Deep range hoods are more common with natural gas cooktops than with electric cooktops, and slightly fewer homes with natural gas cooktops lack a range hood (7%) than homes with electric cooktops (9%). This study provides limited but useful information about the characteristics of range hoods in California homes and demonstrates the potential value of non-traditional forms of data collection.

  17. Supplemental Recovery Plan Module for Snake River Salmon and Steelhead

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    River Hydropower Projects June 2014 Prepared by the: National Marine Fisheries Service West Coast Region............................................................................................................................... 3 2. Hydropower System Overview Hydropower Projects (Hydro Module, dated September 24, 2008) for Snake River anadromous fish species listed

  18. Safety Topic Chemical Hood General purpose: prevent exposure to toxic, irritating, or noxious chemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Robert E.

    Safety Topic ­ Chemical Hood General purpose: prevent exposure to toxic, irritating, or noxious chemical vapors and gases. A face velocity of 100 feet per minute (fpm) provides efficient vapor capture the better. (T) (F) A chemical hood can be used for storage of volatile, flammable, or odiferous materials

  19. Hood County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNew Jersey: EnergyHollyHomaHometown,(CTI PFAN) |Hood County,

  20. Mount Hood Village, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: EnergyInformation MontanaOhio:Hill,Morrisville,MountHealthy, Ohio:Hood

  1. HERO Ski Trip to Mt. Hood Meadows February

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Lowï‚— WeUpdateScienceForTrip to Mt. Hood Meadows

  2. Guidance Document Fume hoods are used when handling toxic or hazardous chemicals. Harmful gases, vapors and fumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guidance Document FumeHoods Fume hoods are used when handling toxic or hazardous chemicals. Harmful hood should be used in the following situations: when handling chemicals with inhalation hazards be a hazard in themselves. Excess containers and equipment can impede airflow. If hoses or cords must

  3. Development of a Network-Based Information Infrastructure for Fisheries and Hydropower Information in the Columbia River Basin : Final Project Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheibe, Timothy D.; Johnson, Gary E.; Perkins, Bill

    1997-05-01

    The goal of this project was to help develop technology and a unified structure to access and disseminate information related to the Bonneville Power Administration's fish and wildlife responsibility in the Pacific Northwest. BPA desires to increase access to, and exchange of, information produced by the Environment Fish, and Wildlife Group in concert with regional partners. Historically, data and information have been managed through numerous centralized, controlled information systems. Fisheries information has been fragmented and not widely exchanged. Where exchange has occurred, it often is not timely enough to allow resource managers to effectively use the information to guide planning and decision making. This project (and related projects) have successfully developed and piloted a network-based infrastructure that will serve as a vehicle to transparently connect existing information systems in a manner that makes information exchange efficient and inexpensive. This project was designed to provide a mechanism to help BPA address measures in the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish and Wildlife program: 3.2H Disseminate Research and Monitoring Information and 5.1A.5 manage water supplies in accordance with the Annual Implementation Work Plan. This project also provided resources that can be used to assist monitoring and evaluation of the Program.

  4. Fort Hood solar cogeneration facility conceptual design study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    A study is done on the application of a tower-focus solar cogeneration facility at the US Fort Hood Army Base in Killeen, Texas. Solar-heated molten salt is to provide the steam for electricity and for room heating, room cooling, and domestic hot water. The proposed solar cogeneration system is expected to save the equivalent of approximately 10,500 barrels of fuel oil per year and to involve low development risks. The site and existing plant are described, including the climate and plant performance. The selection of the site-specific configuration is discussed, including: candidate system configurations; technology assessments, including risk assessments of system development, receiver fluids, and receiver configurations; system sizing; and the results of trade studies leading to the selection of the preferred system configuration. (LEW)

  5. space holder Fisheries Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;#12;space holder Fisheries Economics of the United States, 2011 Economics and Social Analysis Citation: National Marine Fisheries Service. 2012. Fisheries Economics of the United States, 2011. U/publication/index.html. A copy of this report may be obtained from: Economics and Social Analysis Division

  6. Energy Impacts of Effective Range Hood Use for all U.S. Residential Cooking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logue, Jennifer M

    2014-01-01

    for the impact on consumer cost. Energy Impacts of EffectiveRange Hood Use, LBNL- Page 22 Figure 4 Site energy,source energy, and consumer cost savings compared to

  7. A Review of Archaeological Investigations in Bosque, Erath, Hood, Johnson, and Somervell Counties, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, William

    2015-06-05

    IN BOSQUE, ERATH, HOOD, JOHNSON, AND SOMERVELL COUNTIES, TEXAS Principal Investigator: William E. Moore, SOPA Brazos Valley Research Associates Project Number 95-03 Prepared for Museum of Paleontology...

  8. Aggregate stability, infiltration, and glomalin in eroded and compacted soils on Fort Hood Military Reservation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Applewhite, James Kenneth

    2008-10-10

    on soil aggregation, infiltration, and levels of glomalin. A field study was done on plots located inside Fort Hood on a Nuff silty clay (fine-silty, carbonatic, thermic Udic Calciustoll). The plots were amended with composted dairy manure, inorganic...

  9. Baseline Report for the Fort Hood Army Base: Sept. 1, 2002 - Aug. 31, 2003 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Liu, Z.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.

    2003-01-01

    .................................................................................................................. 28 2.3.5. West Electrical Substation .................................................................................................................. 32 2.3.6. North Fort Hood Substation.......................................................................................................... 38 3.1.1.4. Chiller monitoring ........................................................................................................................... 38 3.1.1.5. Natural gas monitoring...

  10. Improving the System Life of Basic Oxygen and Electric Arc Furnace Hoods, Roofs, and Side Vents

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This factsheet describes the benefits of a high-performance aluminum bronze alloy to basic oxygen furnace and electric arc furnace components such as hoods, roofs, and side vents.

  11. Quantification of Neuroepithelial Bodies and Their Innervation in Fawn-Hooded and Wistar Rat Lungs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burnstock, Geoffrey

    Quantification of Neuroepithelial Bodies and Their Innervation in Fawn-Hooded and Wistar Rat Lungs neuroendocrine system (DNES) of the lungs, the neuroendocrine cells of which have been shown to express

  12. Population size and contaminant exposure of bats using caves on Fort Hood Military Base 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Land, Tarisha Ann

    2001-01-01

    Seasonal cave usage patterns were determined in an effort to understand the ecology of a bat colony at Shell Mountain Bat Cave in Fort Hood, Texas. Exit counts were conducted one night each month for 13 consecutive months ...

  13. Hood River Passive House, Hood River, Oregon (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Whole-House Solutions for New Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergy HeadquartersFuelB IMSofNewsletterGuidingUpdate Webinar Slides

  14. Combating soil erosion: AgriLife scientist discovering what works for Fort Hood 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01

    of this partnership, Dr. Dennis Hoffman, senior research scientist, and other researchers at Texas AgriLife Research Blackland Research and Extension Center began monitoring water quality. They measured nutrient and sediment losses across many of Fort Hood?s... watersheds. As a result of the monitoring NRCS and ITAM put in more than 30 sediment retention ponds to trap sediment contained in stormwater runoff. ?We then began to monitor watersheds to estimate sediment trapping as a result of the ponds,? Hoffman...

  15. Fish Bulletin No. 114. An Evaluation of Stocking Hatchery-Reared Steelhead Rainbow Trout (Salmo gairdnerii gairdnerii) in the Sacramento River System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hallock, Richard J; Van Woert, William F; Shapovalov, Leo

    1961-01-01

    California F-7-R, "Sacramento-San Joaquin River Salmon andand steelhead in the Sacramento River. Calif. Fish and Game,Stanford H. 1950. Upper Sacramento River sport fishery. U.

  16. Fisheries Oceanography Course Syllabus Winter 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    FISH 437 Fisheries Oceanography Course Syllabus Winter 2014 Fisheries Oceanography investigates how of fisheries oceanography and demonstrate the multidisciplinary nature of fisheries oceanographic research contributions of fisheries oceanography to ecosystem-based resource management. After investigating the history

  17. Yakima Fisheries Project : Final Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Washington (State). Dept. of Fish and Wildlife; Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington.

    1996-01-01

    BPA proposes to fund several fishery-related activities in the Yakima River Basin. These activities, known as the Yakima Fisheries Project (YFP), would be jointly managed by the State of Washington and the Yakima Indian Nation. The YFP is included in the Northwest Power Planning Council`s (Council`s) fish and wildlife program. The Council selected the Yakima River system for attention because fisheries resources are severely reduced from historical levels and because there is a significant potential for enhancement of these resources. BPA`s proposed action is to fund (1) information gathering on the implementation of supplementation techniques and on feasibility of reintroducing coho salmon in an environment where native populations have become extinct; (2) research activities based on continuous assessment, feedback and improvement of research design and activities ({open_quotes}adaptive management{close_quotes}); and (3) die construction, operation, and maintenance of facilities for supplementing populations of upper Yakima spring chinook salmon. Examined in addition to No Action are two alternatives for action: (1) supplementation of depressed natural populations of upper Yakima spring chinook and (2) that same supplementation plus a study to determine the feasibility of reestablishing naturally spawning population and a significant fall fishery for coho in the Yakima Basin. Alternative 2 is the preferred action. A central hatchery would be built for either alternative, as well as three sites with six raceways each for acclimation and release of spring chinook smolts. Major issues examined in the Revised Draft EIS include potential impacts of the project on genetic and ecological resources of existing fish populations, on water quality and quantity, on threatened and endangered species listed under the Endangered Species Act, and on the recreational fishery.

  18. WINTER-RUN CHINOOK SALMON IN THE SACRAMENTO RIVER, CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    461 WINTER-RUN CHINOOK SALMON IN THE SACRAMENTO RIVER, CALIFORNIA WITH NOTES ON WATER TEMPERATURE REPORT-FISHERIES Na 461 #12;#12;WINTER-RUN CHINOOK SALMON IN THE SACRAMENTO RIVER, CALIFORNIA WITH NOTES HAMILTON CITY O Frontispiece.--Upper Sacramento River and Tributaries iv #12;WINTER-RUN CHINOOK SALMON

  19. The Western Pacific Fishery Information Network: A Fisheries Information System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Western Pacific Fishery Information Network: A Fisheries Information System Introduction. This pa per describes the development and status of this fishery information system. DAVID C. HAMM fishery chang ing with them to obtain and utilize the proper data and information needed to monitor and manage

  20. FISHERY STATISTICS UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1972 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 66 Prepared by STATISTICS;ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The data in this edition of "Fishery Statistics of the United States" were collected in co- operation with the various States and tabulated by the staff of the Statistics and Market News Division

  1. EIS-0169: Yakima River Basin Fisheries Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS assesses the potential impacts of the Bangor Hydro-electric Tranmission Line and associated infrastructure, including adding an alternative acclimation site, water rights issues and discussion of irrigation water availability, adding more information on recreation impacts, and clarifying agency roles and responsibilities.

  2. Airflow Characteristics of Direct-Type Kitchen Hood Systems in High-Rise Apartment Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, M.

    2011-01-01

    25 Conclusions (1) In the case of the reference model, when the exhaust hood is not in operation, both infiltration and leakage airflow are observed due to wind pressure and stack effect. When the exhaust hood system is in operation, the exhaust... stream_source_info ESL-IC-11-10-12.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 4866 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name ESL-IC-11-10-12.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Airflow...

  3. Natural Propagation and Habitat Improvement, Volume 1, Oregon, 1986 Final and Annual Reports.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuart, Amy

    1987-01-01

    This report describes activities implemented for fisheries habitat improvement work on priority drainages in the Clackamas and Hood River sub-basins. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the reports on individual projects. (ACR)

  4. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Hood River Passive

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12Power, IncBioPredictingMissed Energy- MixedHouston,CaliforniaHouse

  5. Energy Impacts of Effective Range Hood Use for all U.S. Residential Cooking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logue, Jennifer M; Singer, Brett

    2014-06-01

    Range hood use during residential cooking is essential to maintaining good indoor air quality. However, widespread use will impact the energy demand of the U.S. housing stock. This paper describes a modeling study to determine site energy, source energy, and consumer costs for comprehensive range hood use. To estimate the energy impacts for all 113 million homes in the U.S., we extrapolated from the simulation of a representative weighted sample of 50,000 virtual homes developed from the 2009 Residential Energy Consumption Survey database. A physics-based simulation model that considered fan energy, energy to condition additional incoming air, and the effect on home heating and cooling due to exhausting the heat from cooking was applied to each home. Hoods performing at a level common to hoods currently in U.S. homes would require 19?33 TWh [69?120 PJ] of site energy, 31?53 TWh [110-190 PJ] of source energy; and would cost consumers $1.2?2.1 billion (U.S.$2010) annually in the U.S. housing stock. The average household would spend less than $15 annually. Reducing required airflow, e.g. with designs that promote better pollutant capture has more energy saving potential, on average, than improving fan efficiency.

  6. PublicationFishery Index~ 1920-54

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PublicationFishery Index~ 1920-54 Publications of the Bureau of Fisheries And Fishery Publications in "An Analytical Subject Bibliography of the Publications of the Bureau of Fisheries, 1871

  7. Nitrous oxide as a substitute for sulfur hexafluoride in the ANSI/ASHRAE 110 Method of hood performance evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guffey, Eric J. (Eric Jemison)

    2011-01-01

    The ANSI/ASHRAE 110 Method is the standard test for laboratory hood containment performance. Sulfur hexafluoride is specified as the gas most suitable for this test and is most commonly used. Sulfur hexafluoride use has ...

  8. FISHERY STATISTICS E UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SH 11 .A443X FISH FISHERY STATISTICS E UNITED STATES ^ 1951 &ch 3. \\§^ ^/'· m:^ STATISTICAL DIGEST. Farley, Director Statistical Digest 30 FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1951 BY A. W. ANDERSON;Fishery Statistics of the United States and Alaska are compiled and published annually to make available

  9. THE PEARL FISHERY OF VENEZUELA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE PEARL FISHERY OF VENEZUELA Marine Biological Lafi'ir-toiy X.I B K. A. R TT JUN 2 41950 WOODS Albert M. Day, Director Special Scientific Report - Fisheries Ho. 26 THE PEARL FISHERY OF VENEZUELA Paul to Venezuela, made travel arrangements, arranged for the cooperation of Venecuelan agencies, and otheri

  10. Yakima Fisheries Project : Revised Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-05-01

    BPA proposes to fund several fishery-related activities in the Yakima River Basin. The Yakima Fisheries Project (YFP), included in the Northwest Power Planning Council`s fish and wildlife program, would be jointly managed by the State of Washington and the Yakima Indian Nation. Fisheries resources in the Yakima River are severely reduced from historical levels and there is a significant potential for enhancement of these resources. BPA`s proposed action is to fund (1) information gathering on the implementation of supplementation techniques and on feasibility of reintroducing coho salmon in an environment where native populations have become extinct; (2) research activities based on continuous assessment, feedback and improvement of research design and activities ({open_quotes}adaptive management{close_quotes}); and (3) the construction, operation, and maintenance of facilities for supplementing populations of upper Yakima spring chinook salmon. The project has been considerably revised from the original proposal described in the first draft EIS. Examined in addition to No Action (which would leave present anadromous fisheries resources unchanged in the, Basin) are two alternatives for action: (1) supplementation of depressed natural populations of upper Yakima spring chinook and (2) that same supplementation plus a study to determine the feasibility of re-establishing (via stock imported from another basin) naturally spawning population and a significant fall fishery for coho in the Yakima Basin. Alternative 2 has been identified as the preferred action. Major issues examined in the Revised Draft EIS include potential impacts of the project on genetic and ecological resources of existing fish populations, on water quality and quantity, on threatened and endangered species listed under the Endangered Species Act, and on the recreational fishery.

  11. RETURN TO THE RIVER -2000 Return to Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    impacts from development of the river's hydroelectric potential. The most recent fishery recovery program from the Columbia River hydroelectric system, contained important provisions regarding mitigation for the impacts of hydroelectric development on fish and wildlife in the basin. The act authorized the states of M

  12. WATER QUALITY STUDY OF WENATCHEE AND MIDDLE COLUMBIA RIVERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WATER QUALITY STUDY OF WENATCHEE AND MIDDLE COLUMBIA RIVERS BEFORE DAM CONSTRUCTION SPECIAL. Suomela, Commissioner WATER QUALITY STUDY OF WENATCHEE AND MIDDLE COLUMBIA RIVERS BEFORE DAM CONSTRUCTION Report--Fisheries No. 290 Washington, D. C. March 1959 #12;Library of Congress catalog card for the Fish

  13. Capture Efficiency of Cooking-Related Fine and Ultrafine Particles by Residential Exhaust Hoods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lunden, Melissa M.; Delp, William W.

    2014-06-05

    Effective exhaust hoods can mitigate the indoor air quality impacts of pollutant emissions from residential cooking. This study reports capture efficiencies (CE) measured for cooking generated particles for scripted cooking procedures in a 121-m3 chamber with kitchenette. CEs also were measured for burner produced CO2 during cooking and separately for pots and pans containing water. The study used four exhaust hoods previously tested by Delp and Singer (Environ. Sci. Technol., 2012, 46, 6167-6173). For pan-frying a hamburger over medium heat on the back burner, CEs for particles were similar to those for burner produced CO2 and mostly above 80percent. For stir-frying green beans in a wok (high heat, front burner), CEs for burner CO2 during cooking varied by hood and airflow: CEs were 34-38percent for low (51?68 L s-1) and 54?72percent for high (109?138 L s-1) settings. CEs for 0.3?2.0 ?m particles during front burner stir-frying were 3?11percent on low and 16?70percent on high settings. Results indicate that CEs measured for burner CO2 are not predictive of CEs of cooking-generated particles under all conditions, but they may be suitable to identify devices with CEs above 80percent both for burner combustion products and for cooking-related particles.

  14. Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, 1990 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, Mike

    1991-12-01

    The annual report contains three individual subproject sections detailing tribal fisheries work completed during the summer and fall of 1990. Subproject I contains summaries of evaluation/monitoring efforts associated with the Bear Valley Creek, Idaho enhancement project. Subproject II contains an evaluation of the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River habitat enhancement project. Subproject III concerns the East Fork of the Salmon River, Idaho.

  15. Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center Ecosystems and Oceanography Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center Ecosystems and Oceanography Division Pelagic Fisheries Ecosystems and Oceanography Division Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries and Oceanography Division Pelagic Fisheries Research Program Motivation · Juvenile & subadult bigeye aggregates

  16. Pacific Island Fisheries Science Center Ecosystems and Oceanography Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Pacific Island Fisheries Science Center Ecosystems and Oceanography Division Pelagic Fisheries Fisheries Science Center, NMFS, NOAA #12;Pacific Island Fisheries Science Center Ecosystems and Oceanography Science Center Ecosystems and Oceanography Division Pelagic Fisheries Research Program Materials

  17. THE BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY OXFORD, MARYLAND: PROGRAMS OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY OXFORD, MARYLAND: PROGRAMS AND PERSPECTIVES Circular 200 Washington, D.C. October 1964 #12;Cover Photo: The Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Biological Laboratory

  18. The Marine Ecology of Juvenile Columbia River Basin Salmonids: A Synthesis of Research 1998-2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Marine Ecology of Juvenile Columbia River Basin Salmonids: A Synthesis of Research 1998 Wainwright, Laurie Weitkamp, Jeannette Zamon and Kurt Fresh Report of the U.S. National Marine Fisheries by the National Marine Fisheries Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA), which began in 1998

  19. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program : Limnological and Fisheries Monitoring Annual Report 1999.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLellan, Holly; Lee, Chuck; Scofield, Ben; Pavlik, Deanne

    1999-08-01

    The Grand Coulee Dam was constructed in 1939 without a fish ladder, which eliminated steelhead (Onchorhynchus mykiss), chinook salmon (O. twshwastica), coho salmon (O. kisutch) and sockeye salmon (O. nerka) from returning to approximately 1,835 km (1,140 miles) of natal streams and tributaries found in the upper Columbia River Drainage in the United States and Canada. The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 gave the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the authority and responsibility to use its legal and financial resources, 'to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries. This is to be done in a manner consistent with the program adopted by the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC), and the purposes of the Act' (NWPPC, 1987). With the phrase 'protect, mitigate and enhance', Congress signaled its intent that the NWPPC's fish and wildlife program should do more than avoid future hydroelectric damage to the basin's fish and wildlife. The program must also counter past damage, work toward rebuilding those fish and wildlife populations that have been harmed by the hydropower system, protect the Columbia Basin's fish and wildlife resources, and mitigate for harm caused by decades of hydroelectric development and operations. By law, this program is limited to measures that deal with impacts created by the development, operation and management of hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. However, off-site enhancement projects are used to address the effects of the hydropower system on fish and wildlife (NWPPC 1987). Resident game fish populations have been established in Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, the reservoir behind Grand Coulee Dam, since the extirpation of anadromous fish species. The resident game fish populations are now responsible for attracting a large percentage of the recreational visits to the region. An increase in popularity has placed Lake Roosevelt fifth amongst the most visited State and Federal parks in Washington. Increased use of the reservoir prompted amplified efforts to enhance the Native American subsistence fishery and the resident sport fishery in 1984 with hatchery supplementation of rainbow trout (O. mykiss) and kokanee salmon (O. nerka). This was followed by the formation of the Spokane Tribal Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Project (LRMP) in 1988 and later by formation of the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project in 1991. The Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project began in July 1991 as part of the BPA, Bureau of Reclamation, and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers System Operation Review process. This process sought to develop an operational scenario for the federal Columbia River hydropower system to maximize the in-reservoir fisheries with minimal impacts to all other stakeholders in the management of the Columbia River. The Lake Roosevelt Monitoring/Data Collection Program (LRMP) is the result of a merger between the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program (BPA No. 8806300) and the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project (BPA No. 9404300). These projects were merged in 1996 forming the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program (LRMP), which continues the work historically completed under the separate projects. The LRMP has two main goals. The first is to develop a biological model for Lake Roosevelt that will predict in-reservoir biological responses to a range of water management operational scenarios, and to develop fisheries and reservoir management strategies accordingly. The model will allow identification of lake operations that minimize impacts on lake biota while addressing the needs of other interests (e.g. flood control, hydropower generation, irrigation, and downstream resident and anadromous fisheries). Major components of the model will include: (1) quantification of entrainment and other impacts to phytoplankton, zooplankton and fish caused by reservoir drawdowns and low water retention times; (2) quantification

  20. Lower Flathead System Fisheries Study, 1986 Interim Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradshaw, William H.; DosSantos, Joseph M.; Darling, James M.

    1986-08-01

    We believe our results have clearly shown Kerr hydroelectric operations and operational constraints have negatively affected Flathead River trout and northern pike populations and the aquatic habitat which support them. Even so, it is possible to mitigate many of these impacts and develop a very important fishery. Trout abundance in the lower Flathead averaged only 19 fish per kilometer, the lowest abundance of trout for a river of this size in Montana. Little main channel spawning by trout was observed and most spawning probably occurs in tributaries. Lower river tributaries support resident populations of brook, rainbow, brown, and cutthroat trout; and a small resident population of bull trout is present in the South Fork of the Jocko River. Using weirs, spawning runs of rainbow and brown trout from the main river were monitored entering the Jocko River and the Post/Mission Creek system. Utilization of Crow Creek by main river trout stocks of trout was limited to the 6 km segment below Crow Dam. Evaluations of tributary spawning gravels showed high levels of silt which would suggest poor survival of trout eggs. Excessive harvest in the tributaries was indicated by analysis of age class structure and abundance of trout greater than 200 mm.

  1. Ductless fume hoods are designed to remove hazardous fumes and vapors from the work area by passing the exhaust air through a filter and/or adsorbent, such as an activated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    I. Policy Ductless fume hoods are designed to remove hazardous fumes and vapors from the work area to Hazardous Chemicals in Laboratories); 5154.1 (Ventilation Requirements for Laboratory-Type Hood Operations require use of fume hoods to control exposure to hazardous or odorous chemicals. IV. Definitions Activated

  2. Fisheries Research 121122 (2012) 4350 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Spencer

    2012-01-01

    Fisheries Research 121­122 (2012) 43­50 Contents lists available at SciVerse Science t On their seaward migration, juvenile salmonids commonly pass hydroelectric dams. Fish passing by the turbine blade in the Columbia River Basin (CRB), it is common for juvenile salmonids to pass hydroelectric dams. There are three

  3. STATISTICAL REVIEW OF THE ALASKA SALMON FISHERIES PART IV: SOUTHEASTERN ALASKA1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Ph. D., Professor of Zoology, Stanford University, and EDWARD M. BALL, Assistant, Alaska Service .}11 River _ 440 West coast of Prince of Wales Island dis- 449 trict _ 474 Cordova Bay district _ 484. Rich and Edward M. Ball. Bulletin, U.S. Bureau of Fisheries, vol. XLIV, 1928 (1929), pp. ~1-95, 20 figs

  4. 48 Marine Fisheries Review Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    48 Marine Fisheries Review Introduction The State of Kerala (Fig. 1) leads India in the production, Villorita cyprinoides, Fishery in the State of Kerala, India N. SUJA and K. S. MOHAMED N. Suja and K. S.O. Box 1603, Kochi, Kerala, India 682018 (e-mail: nsuja_r@yahoo. co.uk). Views or opinions expressed

  5. FISHERY MANAGEMENT COUNCILS, THEIR JURISDICTIONS, AND FISHERY MANAGEMENT PL ANS appendix 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    333 FISHERY MANAGEMENT COUNCILS, THEIR JURISDICTIONS, AND FISHERY MANAGEMENT PL ANS APPENDIX 2 appendix 2: fishery management Councils, Their Jurisdictions, and fishery management plans NEW ENGLAND FISHERY MANAGEMENT COUNCIL 50 Water Street, Mill 2 Newburyport, MA 01950 Voice (978) 465-0492 Fax (978

  6. FISHERIES LOAN FUND fiscal year 1958

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and historical information regarding the Fund can be found in the Annual Report of Fisheries Loan Fund, FiscalFISHERIES LOAN FUND fiscal year 1958 FISH AND WILDLIFE CIRCULAR 106 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF FISHERIES LOAN FUND FISCAL YEAR 1958 The Fisheries Loan Fund was au- thorized by Section 4 of the Fish

  7. NMFS Strategic Plan for Fisheries Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NMFS Strategic Plan for Fisheries Research August 2007 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Marine Fisheries Service #12;#12;NMFS Strategic Plan for Fisheries as: NMFS.2007.NMFS strategic plan for fisheries research.U.S.Dep.Commer.,NOAA Tech.Memo.NMFS F/SPO-79

  8. The Philippines Squid Fishery: A Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Philippines Squid Fishery: A Review ANICETO M. HERNANDO, Jr. and EFREN ED. C. FLORES Aniceto M of Fisheries, University of the Philip- pines, Diliman, Quezon City, Philippines 3004. Efren Ed. C. Flores is Chairman, Department of Marine Fisheries, College of Fisheries, Uni- versity of the Philippines, Diliman

  9. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1962 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 56 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT Fisheries, Donald L. McKernan, Director STATISTICAL DIGEST 56 FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1962.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 20402 - Price $2.25 (paper cover) #12;Fishery statistics

  10. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pa%Mv--. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1965 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 59 UNITED STATES, Commissioner Bureau of Commercial Fisheries, H. E. Crowther, Director STATISTICAL DIGEST 59 FISHERY STATISTICS.S. Government Printing Office Washington, D.C. 20402 - Price $4 (Paper Cover) #12;Fishery statistics

  11. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1964 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 58 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT Bureau of Commercial Fisheries, Donald L. McKernan, Director STATISTICAL DIGEST 58 FISHERY STATISTICS.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 20402 - Price S2.50 (paper cover) #12;Fishery statistics

  12. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1966 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 60 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE Bureau of Commercial Fisheries STATISTICAL DIGEST 60 FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1966 BY Charles H. Lyles PUBLISHED BY BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES

  13. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1963 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 57 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT of Commercial Fisheries, Donald L. McKernan, Director STATISTICAL DIGEST 57 FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITEDTernment Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 20402 - Price $2.25 (paper c #12;Fishery statistics of the United States

  14. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE BUREAU OF FISHERIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to submit herewith "An Analytical Subject Bibli- ography of the Publications of the Bureau of Fisheries

  15. ISSN 1198-6727 Fisheries Centre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauly, Daniel

    , Canada Palomares MLD and Pauly D. (2014) Philippine Marine Fisheries Catches: A Bottom-up Reconstruction by Maria Lourdes D. Palomares and Daniel Pauly Fisheries Centre Research Reports 22(1) 171 pages to 2010. M.L.D. Palomares and D. Pauly (editors) Fisheries Centre Research Reports 22(1) Fisheries Centre

  16. Guidance Document Fume hoods are used when handling toxic or hazardous chemicals. Harmful gases, vapors and fumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    completely. When working in the hood, position the sash as low as possible to minimize risk of exposure with high vapor pressure when releasing chemical vapors which could ignite when working with compounds with offensive odors Good work practices include: Check the airflow rate on the monitor/alarm to ensure

  17. Executive Functions: Eye Movements and Neuropsychiatric A B Sereno, S L Babin, A J Hood, and C B Jeter,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sereno, Anne B.

    Executive Functions: Eye Movements and Neuropsychiatric Disorders A B Sereno, S L Babin, A J Hood functions. Executive functions influence social, emo- tional, intellectual, and organizational aspects, such disruptions occur in many human disorders. Eye Movements and Executive Functions Eye movements are any shift

  18. poly hoods.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6 0 4 2 r m m m m port m fm fpolicy | National

  19. 44 Marine Fisheries Review Introduction

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    Ocean, Hawaii is striv- ing to redevelop a viable regional food system in the face of rising fuel prices44 Marine Fisheries Review Introduction As an isolated chain of islands in the central Pacific

  20. the average weight of Connecticut River fish was considerably less (Table 1). The difference in average

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the average weight of Connecticut River fish was considerably less (Table 1). The difference in the Connecticut River basin. Fisheries (Bethesda) 7(6): 2-11. POTTER. I. C.· F. W. H. BEAMISH, AND B. G. H. Freshwater fishes of Connecticut. State Geol. Nat. Hist. Servo Conn.· Dep. Environ. Prot., Bull. 101, 134 p

  1. Evaluate Status of Pacific Lamprey in the Clearwater River and Salmon River Drainages, Idaho, 2009 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochnauer, Tim; Claire, Christopher [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

    2009-05-07

    Pacific lamprey Lampetra tridentata have received little attention in fishery science until recently, even though abundance has declined significantly along with other anadromous fish species in Idaho. Pacific lamprey in Idaho have to navigate over eight lower Snake River and Columbia River hydroelectric facilities for migration downstream as juveniles to the Pacific Ocean and again as adults migrating upstream to their freshwater spawning grounds in Idaho. The number of adult Pacific lamprey annually entering the Snake River basin at Ice Harbor Dam has declined from an average of over 18,000 during 1962-1969 to fewer than 600 during 1998-2006. Based on potential accessible streams and adult escapement over Lower Granite Dam on the lower Snake River, we estimate that no more than 200 Pacific lamprey adult spawners annually utilize the Clearwater River drainage in Idaho for spawning. We utilized electrofishing in 2000-2006 to capture, enumerate, and obtain biological information regarding rearing Pacific lamprey ammocoetes and macropthalmia to determine the distribution and status of the species in the Clearwater River drainage, Idaho. Present distribution in the Clearwater River drainage is limited to the lower sections of the Lochsa and Selway rivers, the Middle Fork Clearwater River, the mainstem Clearwater River, the South Fork Clearwater River, and the lower 7.5 km of the Red River. In 2006, younger age classes were absent from the Red River.

  2. THE BIG PICTURE: A "FISHERY SYSTEM APPROACH"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles, Anthony

    THE BIG PICTURE: A "FISHERY SYSTEM APPROACH" LINKS FISHERY MANAGEMENT AND BIODIVERSITY Anthony economy and coastal communities. Accordingly, there is a need to move toward a "big picture" perspective

  3. Marine Fisheries W. L. Hobart, Editor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Marine Fisheries Service Penelope D. Dalton, Assistant Administrator for Fisheries The Marine that the publication of this periodical is necessary for the transaction of public busi ness required by law

  4. Columbia River Channel Improvement Project Rock Removal Blasting: Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.

    2010-01-29

    This document provides a monitoring plan to evaluate take as outlined in the National Marine Fisheries Service 2002 Biological Opinion for underwater blasting to remove rock from the navigation channel for the Columbia River Channel Improvement Project. The plan was prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District.

  5. 40 Marine Fisheries Review List of Papers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    black clam, Villorita cyprinoides, fishery in the State of Kerala, India," by N. Suja and K. S. Mohamed

  6. 36 Marine Fisheries Review Authors, Titles, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    black clam, Villorita cyprinoides, fishery in the State of Kerala, India," by N. Suja and K. S. Mohamed

  7. ANNUAL REPORT BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of a cooperative project of the Bureau of Conunercial Fisheries and the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. #12;UNITED

  8. Marine Fisheries On the cover: Landing a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (1),1991 A Review ofIndian Ocean Fisheries for Skipjack Tuna, Katsuwonus pelamis, and Yellowfin Tuna, Thunnus

  9. FISHERIES LOAN FUND fiscal year 1959

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and historical information regarding the Fund can be found in the "Annual Report of Fish- eries Loan Fund, FiscalFISHERIES LOAN FUND fiscal year 1959 FISH AND WILDLIFE CIRCULAR 113 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF FISHERIES LOAN FUND FISCAL YEAR 1959 The Fisheries Loan Fund was au- thorized by Section 4 of the Fish

  10. FISHERY STATISTICS QF THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I FISHERY STATISTICS QF THE UNITED STATES 1942 By A. W, ANDERSON and E. A. POWER STATISTICAL DIGEST Statistical Digest No. 11 FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1942 BY A. W. ANDERSON and E. A. POWER. S. Government Printing Offic Washington 25, D. C. - Price 60 cents #12;Fishery Statistics

  11. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1950 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 27 Fish and Wildlife ServiceKay, Secretary FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, John L. Farley, Director Statistical Digest 27 FISHERY STATISTICS 25, DC. - - Price $2.00 (paper) #12;Fishery Statistics of the United States and A] aska are corapi

  12. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1959 ^mmi STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 51 UNITED STATES DEPARTMl of Commercial Fisheries, Donald L. McKernan, Director jPANlELM COHEN FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE STATISTICAL DIGEST 51 FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1959 BY E. A. POWER PUBLISHED BY BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL

  13. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Div,, . FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1961 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 54 UNITED STATES, Donald L. MeKernan, Director STATISTICAL DIGEST 54 FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1961 BY E. A, Washington, D.C. 20402 - Price $2 (paper cover) #12;Fishery statistics of the United States are compiled

  14. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SH 11 A443X FISH FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1943 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 14 Sll \\M AND WILDLIFE SERVICE Albert M. Day, Director CAMEL M. COHEN Statistical Digest No. 14 FISHERY STATISTICS. - Price 75 cents #12;Fishery Statistics of the United States and Alaska are compiled and published

  15. FISHERY STATISTICS )F THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SH 11 .A443X FISH FISHERY STATISTICS )F THE UNITED STATES ^M=^. STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 36 #12. Farley, Director i]EL M. COHEN Statistical Digest 36 FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1953 BY A. W;Fishery Statistics of the I'nited States and Alaska are compiled and published an- nually to make

  16. Foreign Fishery Developments Mexico Launches Extensive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foreign Fishery Developments Mexico Launches Extensive Marine Fisheries Research Program-82 National Fisheries De- velopment Program carried out by the Lopez Portillo Administration, Mexico has added Economica Exclusiva de Mexico (PNPIRPZEE). The new program is without prece- dent in Mexican research, both

  17. Imports and Exports of Fishery Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imports and Exports of Fishery Products Annual Summary, 2001 IMPORTS. U.S. imports of edible of fishery products were imported. EXPORTS. U.S. exports of edible fishery products of domestic origin were 1,139,744 tons valued at $3.1 billion, compared with 948,025 tons at $2.8 billion exported in 2000

  18. Imports and Exports of Fishery Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imports and Exports of Fishery Products Annual Summary, 2000 IMPORTS. U.S. imports of edible.0 billion of fishery products were imported. EXPORTS. U.S. exports of edible fishery products of domestic origin were 948,025 tons valued at $2.8 billion, compared with 864,166 tons at $2.7 billion exported

  19. Fisheries Economics of the United States, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;#12;Fisheries Economics of the United States, 2008 Economics and Social Analysis Division;ii Suggested citation: National Marine Fisheries Service. 2010. Fisheries Economics of the United://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/st5/publication/index.html. A copy of this report may be obtained from: Economics and Social Analysis

  20. Fisheries Economics of the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisheries Economics of the United States 2007 Economics and Sociocultural Status and Trends Series Fisheries Service NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS-F/SPO-104 January 2010 #12;#12;Fisheries Economics of the United States, 2007 Economics and Social Analysis Division Office of Science and Technology National

  1. Fisheries Management: The Kuwaiti Experience Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of shrimp fisheries management in Kuwait. Impact of Wars on Kuwait's Fisheries The Iraq-Iran war, which of the Iraq-Iran war in 1988, and the govemment managed the penaeid fishery, often tak ing scientific advice were suspended (Carpenter, 1992; Mathews et aI., In press). Many fishing boats were moved to Iraq

  2. Fisheries Science & Management: a Brief History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limburg, Karin E.

    decline in commercial fisheries ­ natural resources no longer viewed as inexhaustible #12;Fisheries sci ·Fields of ecology, fisheries science & management develop during early 1900s ·Scientists gather info in 3 1900s ·Scientists gather info in 3 areas critical for management: ·Inventory & describe fishes

  3. IIFET 2006 Portsmouth Proceedings COMMUNITY FISHERY RIGHTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles, Anthony

    of local ecological knowledge, for greater acceptance of fishery management rules, for better resolution to be involved in managing the fishery) implemented at a local, community level. While by no means a new to the increasingly- popular approach of community-based co-management, in which local fishery participants

  4. Contact lens wear with the USAF protective integrated hood/mask chemical defense ensemble

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis, R.J.; Miller, R.E. II; Peterson, R.D.; Jackson, W.G. Jr. (USAF, Armstrong Laboratory, Brooks AFB, TX (United States))

    1992-07-01

    The Protective Integrated Hood/Mask (PIHM) chemical defense aircrew ensemble blows air from the mask's plenum across the visor at a rate of approximately 15 L/min in order to prevent fogging of the visor and to cool the aircrew member's face. This study was designed to determine the effect of the PIHM airflow on soft contact lens (SCL) dehydration, contact lens comfort, and corneal integrity. There were 26 subjects who participated in this study: 15 SCL wearers, six rigid gas-permeable (RGP) wearers, and five nonspectacle wearing controls. Contrast acuity with the three Regan charts, subjective comfort, and relative humidity (RH) and temperature readings under the PIHM mask were monitored every 0.5 h during 6-h laboratory rides. Slit-lamp examinations and SCL water content measurements with a hand-held Abbe refractometer were made before and after the rides. High RH under the mask may have accounted for the moderate SCL dehydration (8.3 percent), no decrease in contrast acuity for any group, and lack of corneal stress. Although all groups experienced some inferior, epithelial, punctate keratopathy, RGP wearers had the most significant effects. SCLs performed relatively well in the PIHM mask environment. Testing with other parameter designs is necessary before recommending RGPs with the PIHM system. 19 refs.

  5. Validation of Daily Growth Increment Formation in the Otoliths of Juvenile Cyprinid Fishes from the Brazos River, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilde, Gene

    the Brazos River, Texas BART W. DURHAM* AND GENE R. WILDE Department of Biological Sciences, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409-3131, USA Abstract.--Age data are commonly used by fisheries biologists the Brazos River, Texas, two of which are of conservation concern. We immersed juvenile sharpnose shiners

  6. LATIN AMERICA ARGENTINA HAS FISHERY

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    LATIN AMERICA ARGENTINA HAS FISHERY INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITIES Argentina's largely dormant fishing in construction in Argentina with a total fish capacity of 36, 000 metric tons . The Min- istry has also) measure, taxes onforeign vessels fishing in Argentina waters were raised from US$70 per ton to US$200 per

  7. 32 Marine Fisheries Review Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -products peaked (oil prices reached US$4.00 ~ US$5.00 per liter) and then declined from 1987 to 1999 (oil prices the Azores and Madeira (DGPA, 1998). Historically, fisheries have targeted elasmobranchs to supply the liver-oil generally decreased over time, with a corresponding increase in price per kilo- gram. The most important

  8. Foreign Fishery Developments Japanese Joint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at a reduced price, which is one-tenth of the standard price of fuel in the coun- tries of Latin America in Venezuela for the catching and processing of shrimp. (The vessels of this joint venture can purchase fuel listed in millions of dollars. Total 25 19 10 26 31 20 60 193 20 Marine Fisheries Review #12;Latin

  9. 20 Marine Fisheries Review Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with market opportunities for a broader variety of consumer choices due to diverse ethnicity), harvesting demands, and the scenario that offshore GOM fisheries could eventually be impacted by a variety with bottom trawls. Potential sources of survey bias (as related to survey design and gear type

  10. POND CULTURE fishery leaflet 311

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TEXTBOOK OF POND CULTURE fishery leaflet 311 Ifish and wildlife service UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR #12;#12;TEXTBOOK OF POND CULTURE REARING AND KEEPING OF CARP , TROUT AND ALLIED FISHES by Vr'- at the Elsersvfalde Forestry Acadeny and in the Department for Fish Diseases and Pond Management of the Prussian State

  11. Marine Fisheries On the cover

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    Marine Fisheries ~@WD@W On the cover: The red snapper, Lutjanus campechanus (NMFS photograph). Articles 56(2), 1994 Sea Turtle Observations at Explosive Removals of Energy Structures Gregg R. Gitschlag AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION D. James Baker, Under Secretary for Oceans and Atmosphere National Marine

  12. NOAA TECHNICAL REPORTS National Marine Fisheries Service, Special Scientific Report-Fisheries Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deal with applied fishery problems. The series is also used as a medium for the publication of bibli02

  13. An evaluation of a prototype laboratory fume hood for use in a variable air volume, face velocity reducing system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vickery, Cynthia Schoonmaker

    1992-01-01

    18000 Pressure Transmitter (Type 020), an EFT-5000-1 square rooting circuit, a PIC-1000 proportional integral controller, and a Honeywell E to P transducer. During the initial hood set-up phase, the Accu-Aire controls were connected to a sash sensor.... (Model GVT46015). Redd-i, Inc. Variable-Air-Volume Box (Model MV10, serial number 41511) Accu-Aire Systems, Inc. control panel with: MOD 18000 Pressure Transmitter (Type 020, serial number 9E10803), EFT-5000-1 square rooting circuit PIC-1000...

  14. Fishery Bulletin Index Volume 102(14), 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) in the Gulf of California, Mexico, by Francisco J. García- Rodríguez and David Auarioles-Gamboa. 63, Greg Mackey, Eric LaHood, Harriet Huber, and Linda Park 221 Diel vertical migration of the bigeye

  15. Fisheries Utilization Research-50 Years in Retrospect, Part I: Fishery Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisheries Utilization Research-50 Years in Retrospect, Part I: Fishery Development JOHN A. DASSOW introduction to fisheries utilization research and to methodsfor determining the freshness and spoilage offish the labor atory designations. The term "utilization research" is used currently to designate the divisions

  16. NOAA Fisheries Protocols For Hydro-dynamic Dredge Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Fisheries Protocols For Hydro-dynamic Dredge Surveys: Surf Clams and Ocean Quahogs December 19..................................................................................................................................... 1 NOAA Fisheries Hydro-dynamic Clam Dredge Survey Protocols

  17. Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences University of Florida

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    School of Forest Resources and Conservation GRADUATE STUDENT HANDBOOK Revised June 2014 William J......................................................................................................... 5 Sustainable Fisheries ................................................................................................. 6 Conservation & Management of Natural Aquatic Environments .................................. 6 FAS

  18. Pallet insertion glovebox/hood control ladder diagram. Final project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Issaian, V.

    1995-12-01

    The pallet insertion glovebox/hood (G/H) is a special confinement space that will be designed to allow for insertion of pallets into the Stacker/Retriever (S/R) area. The S/R a large vault that is kept at negative 1 inches w.c. relative to the atmosphere and is used for the safe storage of special nuclear material. The S/R system uses a vehicle to move the special nuclear material that are placed on the pallets from the storage bins to input/output (I/O) stations and vice versa. As the name suggest the I/O stations are used to place the material into the S/R vault or to remove material from the S/R vault. The pallets are specially designed structures that will hold certain numbers of the material containers in a safe configuration. To store additional material containers, there is a need to insert additional pallets in the SIR vault. Due to the presence of radioactive contamination and the fact that the vault must be kept at a negative pressure at all times, one of the several I/O stations will be modified so that pallets could be inserted into the S/R vault. The ventilation system for the S/R area is a dedicated system that recirculates nitrogen with less than 5% oxygen by volume throughout the area while exhausting small option of the nitrogen to keep the S/R at negative 1 inches w.c. relative to the atmosphere. The rooms surrounding the G/H and the S/R area are maintained at negative of 0.3 inches w.c. relative to the outside atmosphere. Both the G/H and the control system for the G/H will be designed such that the confinement requirements of the S/R and the G/H system will not be jeopardized. A ladder diagram will be developed to illustrate the control system.

  19. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES I 1947 cf^^v'^ml STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 21 Fish Oscar L. Chapman, Secretary FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE Albert M. Day, Director Statistical Digest 21 PI^j^IELW' , COHEN FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1947 BY A. W. ANDERSON and E. A. POWER UNITED STATES

  20. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES SH 11 A443X FISH 1948 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 22 Fish OF THE INTERIOR, Oscar L. Chapman, Secretary FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, Albert M. Day, Director Statistical Digest 22 FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1948 BY A. W. ANDERSON and E. A. POWER UNITED STATES

  1. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1946 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO, 19 Fish and Wildlike Sekvice L. Chapman, Secretary FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE Albert M. Day, Director Statistical Digest 19 FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1946 BY A. W. ANDERSON and E. A. POWER UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT

  2. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1944 STATISTICAL DIGEST ISO. 16 Fish and Wildlife Sekvh Albert M. Day, Director Statistical Digest No. 16 FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1944 BY A. W Statistics of the United States and Alaska are coiip i I ed and published annually to make available

  3. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1945 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO, 18 United States Dejtartment. Krug, Secretary FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE Albert M. Day, Director Statistical Digest 18 FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1945 BY A. W. ANDERSON and E. A. POWER UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT PRINTING

  4. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES I 1952 .^£^ STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 34 Fish and Wildlife McKay, Secretary FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, John L. Farley, Director -iJ^EUW^ .COHEN Statistical Digest 34 FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1952 BY A. W. ANDERSON and E. A. POWER UNITED STATES

  5. FISHERY STATISTICS F THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISHERY STATISTICS »F THE UNITED STATES ^ 1954 ,M^,. 'M' . ' J*"'',-,'i''' ' STATISTICAL DIGEST NO DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, Fred A. Seaton, Secretary FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE PANIELM. COHEN Statistical Digest 39 FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1954 BY A. W. ANDERSON and E. A. POWER UNITED STATES

  6. IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF FISHERY PRODUCTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF FISHERY PRODUCTS ANNUAL SUMMARY, 1996 IMPORTS. U.S. imports of edible higher than in 1995, when $12.5 billion of fishery products were imported. EXPORTS. U.S. exports,376 tons at $3.1 billion exported in 1995. Fresh and frozen items were 791,822 tons valued at $2.2 billion

  7. Imports and Exports of Fishery Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imports and Exports of Fishery Products Annual Summary, 1998 IMPORTS. U.S. imports of edible higher than in 1997, when $14.5 billion of fishery products were imported. EXPORTS. U.S. exports,499 tons at $2.6 billion exported in 1997. Fresh and frozen items were 631,627 tons valued at $1.7 billion

  8. Imports and Exports of Fishery Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imports and Exports of Fishery Products Annual Summary, 2002 IMPORTS. U.S. imports of edible. EXPORTS. U.S. exports of edible fishery products of domestic origin were 1,056,306 tons valued at $3.0 billion, compared with 1,139,744 tons at $3.1 billion exported in 2001. Fresh and frozen items were 883

  9. Imports and Exports of Fishery Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imports and Exports of Fishery Products Annual Summary, 2003 IMPORTS. U.S. imports of edible imported. EXPORTS. U.S. exports of edible fishery products of domestic origin were 1,047,706 tons valued at $3.1 billion, compared with 1,056,303 tons at $3.0 billion exported in 2002. Fresh and frozen items

  10. IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF FISHERY PRODUCTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF FISHERY PRODUCTS ANNUAL SUMMARY, 1997 IMPORTS. U.S. imports of edible higher than in 1996, when $13.1 billion of fishery products were imported. EXPORTS. U.S. exports,720 tons at $2.9 billion exported in 1996. Fresh and frozen items were 782,767 tons valued at $2.0 billion

  11. Imports and Exports of Fishery Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imports and Exports of Fishery Products Annual Summary, 1999 IMPORTS. U.S. imports of edible higher than in 1998, when $15.6 billion of fishery products were imported. EXPORTS. U.S. exports,067 tons at $2.2 billion exported in 1998. Fresh and frozen items were 725,050 tons valued at $2.1 billion

  12. MFR PAPER 1231 Fisheries Development in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MFR PAPER 1231 Fisheries Development in New England-A Perspective W. F. RATHJEN INTRODUCTION Since information and inter- pretations by industry. academic. and February 1977 State and Federal fisherie partici- pants. The original concept involved the following primary ingredients: 1) Industry input and review

  13. The Marine Biodiversity and Fisheries Catches of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauly, Daniel

    The Marine Biodiversity and Fisheries Catches of the Pitcairn Island Group Palomares, M.L.D., D;#12;THE MARINE BIODIVERSITY AND FISHERIES CATCHES OF THE PITCAIRN ISLAND GROUP M.L.D. Palomares, D ..................................................................................... 10 Maria Lourdes D. Palomares, Patricia M. Sorongon, Marianne Pan, Jennifer C. Espedido, Lealde U

  14. Government of Malawi Department of Fisheries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bay Fisheries Bulletin No. 51 Department of Fisheries P.O. Box 593 Lilongwe 2001 #12;1 Table. .........................................15 #12;2 Introduction Lake Chiuta is a permanent lake (Tweddle, 1983) covering a mean area of 199km2 , oscillating between a minimum area of 93km2 and a maximum of 304km2 according to season and rainfall

  15. HURRICANE PREPAREDNESS PLAN NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 HURRICANE PREPAREDNESS PLAN NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE SOUTHEAST FISHERIES SCIENCE CENTER in the event of an evacuation. June 2015 #12;2 HURRICANE PREPAREDNESS PLAN - GALVESTON LABORATORY I. GENERAL INFORMATION A. Purpose This plan identifies actions to be carried out during various phases of the hurricane

  16. CURRENT FISHERIES STATISTICS NO. 2006-2 IMPORTS AND EXPORTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CURRENT FISHERIES STATISTICS NO. 2006-2 IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF FISHERY PRODUCTS ANNUAL SUMMARY, $2.6 billion more than in 2005, when $25.1 billion of fishery products were imported. EXPORTS. U.S. exports of edible fishery products of domestic origin were 1,306,706 tons valued at $3.9 billion, compared

  17. Fisheries Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable Urban Transport Jump to: navigation,FirstGeoTherm GmbHFisher HotFisheries

  18. Migration and bioenergetics of juvenile Snake River fall Chinook salmon Daniel Widener

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Migration and bioenergetics of juvenile Snake River fall Chinook salmon Daniel Widener A thesis: Aquatic and Fishery Sciences #12;#12;University of Washington Abstract Migration and Bioenergetics are still poorly understood. This thesis describes a complex of individually-based bioenergetic

  19. Migration and bioenergetics of juvenile Snake River fall Chinook salmon Daniel Widener

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    was the primary cause of the reversal of modeled migration triggers; for this reason, we then assert that the coolMigration and bioenergetics of juvenile Snake River fall Chinook salmon Daniel Widener A thesis: Aquatic and Fishery Sciences #12;#12;University of Washington Abstract Migration and Bioenergetics

  20. Using DUSTRAN to Simulate Fog-Oil Dispersion and Its Impacts on Local Insect Populations at Ft. Hood: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rishel, Jeremy P.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Rutz, Frederick C.; Allwine, K Jerry

    2006-12-29

    Smokes and obscurants (S&O) are important screening agents used during military training exercises on many military installations. Although the use of S&O is subject to environmental laws, the fate and effects of S&O on natural habitats are not well documented. One particular concern is the impact S&O may have on local insect populations, which can be important components of terrestrial food chains of endangered species. Fog-oil (FO) is an S&O that is of particular concern. An important part of assessing potential ecosystem impacts is the ability to predict downwind FO concentrations. This report documents the use of the comprehensive atmospheric dispersion modeling system DUST TRANsport (DUSTRAN) to simulate the downwind transport and diffusion of a hypothetical FO release on the U.S. Army installation at Ft. Hood, TX.

  1. Marine Fisheries Review Vol. 39, No. 10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fishery Developments 39 Publications Moss Landing Power Plant. (Photo councsy of Pacific Gas and Electric of Fishes by Power Plant Cooling-Water In- takes: An Overview Charles H. Hanson, James R. White, and Hiram W

  2. Fisheries management and flags of convenience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papaioannou, Maria Andriana

    2004-01-01

    The over-exploitation of the world's fish resources and the depletion of many fish stocks have brought into focus the need for effective fisheries management and conservation measures. Many states have adopted international ...

  3. Towards increasing fisheries' contribution to food security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauly, Daniel

    .L.D. Palomares, A. McCrea- Strub, L. van der Meer and D. Zeller. 2012. Towards increasing fisheries' contribution Freire, Krista Greer, Claire Hornby, Vicky Lam, Maria Lourdes Palomares, Ashley McCrea Strub, Liesbeth

  4. Marine Fisheries W. L. Hobart, Editor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Under Secretary for Oceans and Atmosphere ational Marine Fisheries Service Penelope D. Dalton publication of lhis periodical is neces- sary for lhe Iran aClion of public busine. s required by law

  5. MARINE PROTECTED AREAS Fisheries Science and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limburg, Karin E.

    1 MARINE PROTECTED AREAS Fisheries Science and Management Rita OLIVEIRA MONTEIRO Cover photo of a mpa (coast and underwater) MARINE PROTECTED AREAS OBJECTIVES FOR TODAY: · definitions · historical · habitat degradation · invasive species · harmful algal blooms · marine epidemics · mass mortalities

  6. Hurricane Preparedness Plan National Marine Fisheries Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Hurricane Preparedness Plan National Marine Fisheries and Office June 2015 #12;2 2014 Hurricane Preparedness Plan (revised 4/15) TO: All Staff, Lafayette Laboratory Facility FROM: John Foret, Facility Administrator SUBJECT: Hurricane Procedures for Buildings

  7. Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, 1989 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, Mike

    1989-04-01

    This project was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The annual report contains three individual subproject papers detailing tribal fisheries work completed during the summer and fall of 1989. Subproject 1 contains summaries of evaluation/monitoring efforts associated with the Bear Valley Creek, Idaho enhancement project. Subproject 2 contains an evaluation of the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River habitat enhancement project. This report has been sub-divided into two parts: Part 1; stream evaluation and Part 2; pond series evaluation. Subproject 3 concerns the East Fork of the Salmon River, Idaho. This report summarizes the evaluation of the project to date including the 1989 pre-construction evaluation conducted within the East Fork drainage. Dredge mining has degraded spawning and rearing habitat for chinook salmon and steelhead trout in the Yankee Fork drainage of the Salmon River and in Bear Valley Creek. Mining, agricultural, and grazing practices degraded habitat in the East Fork of the Salmon River. Biological monitoring of the success of habitat enhancement for Bear Valley Creek and Yankee Fork are presented in this report. Physical and biological inventories prior to habitat enhancement in East Fork were also conducted. Four series of off-channel ponds of the Yankee Fork are shown to provide effective rearing habitat for chinook salmon. 45 refs., 49 figs., 24 tabs.

  8. Table 1.-Statlsllcal dala on Argentina's major fishery slacks, 1980. Foreign Fishery Developments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Table 1.-Statlsllcal dala on Argentina's major fishery slacks, 1980. Foreign Fishery Developments Argentina Revises Marine Resources Forecast squid one of the country's major fish- eries. INIDEP indicated- ly. Argentina signed a cooperative research agreement in 1980 with the Soviet Union to study

  9. AGENT-BASED FISHERY MANAGEMENT MODEL OF HAWAII'S LONGLINE FISHERIES (FMMHLF)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    #12;AGENT-BASED FISHERY MANAGEMENT MODEL OF HAWAII'S LONGLINE FISHERIES (FMMHLF): MODEL DESCRIPTION AND SOFTWARE GUIDE Run Yu Dept. of Natural Resources and Environmental Management University of Hawaii at Manoa Management University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 SOEST 13-01 JIMAR Contribution 13-383 #12;ii #12

  10. Categories of Personal Fisheries Experience -Western Pacific Fishery Management Council (WPFMC) Name of Nominee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groundfish Fishery Commercial 9Bandit gear, 9Buoy gear, 9Handline, 9Hook and line, 9Rod and reel, 9Hand harvest, 9Longline, 9Trawl, 9Trap, 9Powerhead, 9Gillnet, 9Spear, 9Other Recreational 9Bandit gear, 9Buoy gun, 9Other 9Western Pacific Pelagics Fishery Commercial 9Bandit gear, 9Buoy gear, 9Dip net, 9Handline

  11. AUSTRALIAN FISHERY EXPORTS SET RECORD Australian fishery exports were a record

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AUSTRALIAN FISHERY EXPORTS SET RECORD Australian fishery exports were a record US$87.3 million in FY 1971-72 (twelve months ending in June) . Rock lobster tail exports were 10.3 million pounds worth quantity was exported to the United States. Prawn exports set records for both volume and value - -17

  12. National Marine Fisheries ServiceNational Marine Fisheries Service Southeast RegionSoutheast Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Marine Fisheries ServiceNational Marine Fisheries Service Southeast RegionSoutheast Region-340-773-5774 Puerto Rico: 1-787-399-8432 Report Harassment of Marine Mammals to NMFS Enforcement at: 1-800-863-1964 How Can I Get More Involved in the Southeast Marine Mammal Stranding Network? Anyone can volunteer

  13. Kootenai River Resident Fish Assessment, FY2008 KTOI Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holderman, Charles

    2009-06-26

    The overarching goal of project 1994-049-00 is to recover a productive, healthy and biologically diverse Kootenai River ecosystem, with emphasis on native fish species rehabilitation. It is especially designed to aid the recovery of important fish stocks, i.e. white sturgeon, burbot, bull trout, kokanee and several other salmonids important to the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho and regional sport-fisheries. The objectives of the project have been to address factors limiting key fish species within an ecosystem perspective. Major objectives include: establishment of a comprehensive and thorough biomonitoring program, investigate ecosystem--level in-river productivity, test the feasibility of a large-scale Kootenai River nutrient addition experiment (completed), to evaluate and rehabilitate key Kootenai River tributaries important to the health of the lower Kootenai River ecosystem, to provide funding for Canadian implementation of nutrient addition and monitoring in the Kootenai River ecosystem (Kootenay Lake) due to lost system productivity created by construction and operation of Libby Dam, mitigate the cost of monitoring nutrient additions in Arrow Lakes due to lost system productivity created by the Libby-Arrow water swap, provide written summaries of all research and activities of the project, and, hold a yearly workshop to convene with other agencies and institutions to discuss management, research, and monitoring strategies for this project and to provide a forum to coordinate and disseminate data with other projects involved in the Kootenai River basin.

  14. River Basin Commissions (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation establishes river basin commissions, for the Kankakee, Maumee, St. Joseph, and Upper Wabash Rivers. The commissions facilitate and foster cooperative planning and coordinated...

  15. OMB Control No. 0648-0213 NOAA Fisheries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Transfer PRODUCT TRANSFER REPORT PRODUCTS SHIPPING Is this a TOTAL OFFLOAD or a PARTIAL OFFLOAD Mothership, Sustainable Fisheries Division, NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service, P.O. Box 21668, Juneau, AK 99802

  16. West Africa & the New European Common Fisheries Policy: Impacts & Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seto, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    West Africa & the New European Common Fisheries Policy:affected fisheries in West Africa, and how recently enactedWorld War II. 6 West Africa’s close proximity to Europe, its

  17. Cefas contract report: -SLEA2 Oil and Gas Fisheries Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cefas contract report: - SLEA2 Oil and Gas Fisheries Risk Assessment Advice Updated Cefas: Oil and Gas Fisheries Risk Assessment Advice Submitted to: Department of Energy and Climate Change Recommendations for Spawning Finfish ­ English & Welsh Blocks Oil and Gas Fisheries Risk Assessment Advice Updated

  18. A Night Handline Fishery for Tunas in Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Night Handline Fishery for Tunas in Hawaii HEENY S. H. YUEN Introduction Modern commercial and gear. In contrast, the rapidly growing night handline fishery for tunas near the island of Hawaii. The fishery for tunas by this method in Hila, Hawaii, experienced a rapid growth when high prices on the fresh

  19. FISHERY STATISTICS I OF THE UNITED STATESmmmMM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ^^ FISHERY STATISTICS I OF THE UNITED STATESmmmMM 'f^ gjIP^Ws^WI'l STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 25 Fish Statistical Digest 25 FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1949 BY A. W. ANDERSON and C. E. PETERSON UNITED. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C. - - - Price $1.25 (paper) #12;Fishery Statistics

  20. The Fisheries of Norway UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Fisheries of Norway UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE BUREAU 11 12 15 16 16 16 17 17 17 18 19 19 #12;The Fisheries of Norway By SID 'EY SHAPIRO Foreign Fisheries about 1.3 million tons annually between 1960 and 1964. Thes e landings make Norway the foremost fishing

  1. SACRAMENTO -SAN JOAQUIN DELTA FISHERY RESOURCES: Effects of Tracy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SACRAMENTO - SAN JOAQUIN DELTA FISHERY RESOURCES: Effects of Tracy Pumping Plant and Delta Cross AND WILDLIFE SERVICE #12;#12;SACRAMENTO - SAN JOAQUIN DELTA FISHERY RESOURCES: Effects of Tracy Pumping Plant Service, Albert M. Day, Director Special Scientific Reoort - Fisheries No. $6 SACRAMENTO - SAN JOAQUIN

  2. CURRENT FISHERIES STATISTICS NO. 2008-2 IMPORTS AND EXPORTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CURRENT FISHERIES STATISTICS NO. 2008-2 IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF FISHERY PRODUCTS ANNUAL SUMMARY and nonedible fishery imports was $28.5 billion in 2008, $0.3 billion less than in 2007. EXPORTS. U.S. exports with 1,263,778 tons at $4.01 billion exported in 2007. Exports of fresh and frozen items were 1

  3. CURRENT FISHERIES STATISTICS NO. 2007-2 IMPORTS AND EXPORTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CURRENT FISHERIES STATISTICS NO. 2007-2 IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF FISHERY PRODUCTS ANNUAL SUMMARY. EXPORTS. U.S. exports of edible fishery products of domestic origin in 2007 were 1,263,778 tons valued at $4.0 billion, compared with 1,306,706 tons at $4.0 billion exported in 2006. Exports of fresh

  4. CURRENT FISHERIES STATISTICS NO. 2009-2 IMPORTS AND EXPORTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CURRENT FISHERIES STATISTICS NO. 2009-2 IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF FISHERY PRODUCTS ANNUAL SUMMARY imports was $21.8 billion in 2009, $6.6 billion less than in 2008. EXPORTS. U.S. exports of edible fishery,161,843 tons at $3.99 billion exported in 2008. Exports of fresh and frozen items were 987,330 tons valued

  5. CURRENT FISHERIES STATISTICS NO. 2010-2 IMPORTS AND EXPORTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CURRENT FISHERIES STATISTICS NO. 2010-2 IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF FISHERY PRODUCTS ANNUAL SUMMARY imports was $27.4 billion in 2010, $3.8 billion more than in 2009. EXPORTS. U.S. exports of edible fishery,119,732 tons at $3.74 billion exported in 2009. Exports of fresh and frozen items were 1,077,310 tons valued

  6. CURRENT FISHERIES STATISTICS NO. 2005-2 IMPORTS AND EXPORTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CURRENT FISHERIES STATISTICS NO. 2005-2 IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF FISHERY PRODUCTS ANNUAL SUMMARY.2 billion more than in 2004, when $22.9 billion of fishery products were imported. EXPORTS. U.S. exports,275,765 tons at $3.5 billion exported in 2004. Fresh and frozen items were 1,098,799 tons valued at $2

  7. CURRENT FISHERIES STATISTICS NO. 2004-2 IMPORTS AND EXPORTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CURRENT FISHERIES STATISTICS NO. 2004-2 IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF FISHERY PRODUCTS ANNUAL SUMMARY.7 billion more than in 2003, when $21.3 billion of fishery products were imported. EXPORTS. U.S. exports,048,052 tons at $3.1 billion exported in 2003. Fresh and frozen items were 1,091,057 tons valued at $2

  8. CURRENT FISHERIES STATISTICS NO. 2011-2 IMPORTS AND EXPORTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CURRENT FISHERIES STATISTICS NO. 2011-2 IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF FISHERY PRODUCTS ANNUAL SUMMARY, $3.4 billion more than in 2010. EXPORTS. U.S. exports of edible fishery products of domestic origin exported in 2010. Exports of fresh and frozen items were 1,292,684 tons valued at $4.3 billion, an increase

  9. UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION OF FISHERY SCIENTISTS! WILLIAM F. ROYCE'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be job categories: (1) pond and lake management; (2) hatchery management; (3) fishery technology of fishes and in fishery management. It was recognized generally, however, that most of the training being chal- lenged from many directions. The problems of public fishery management are only part

  10. Aluminum Bronze Alloys to Improve the System Life of Basic Oxygen and Electric Arc Furnace Hoods, Roofs and Side Vents.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence C. Boyd Jr.; Dr. Vinod K. Sikka

    2006-12-29

    Energy Industries of Ohio was the lead organization for a consortium that examined the current situation involving the service life of electric arc and basic oxygen furnace hoods, roofs and side vents. Republic Engineered Products (REP), one of the project partners, installed a full-scale Al-Bronze “skirt” in their BOF at their Lorain OH facility, believed to be the first such installation of this alloy in this service. In 24 months of operation, the Al-Bronze skirt has processed a total of 4,563 heats, requiring only 2 shutdowns for maintenance, both related to physical damage to the skirt from operational mishaps. Yearly energy savings related to the REP facility are projected to be ~ 10 billion Btu's with significant additional environmental and productivity benefits. In recognition of the excellent results, this project was selected as the winner of the Ohio’s 2006 Governor’s Award for Excellence in Energy, the state’s award for outstanding achievements in energy efficiency.

  11. Reconstructing Philippine marine fisheries catches, Palomares, MLD and Pauly, D Reconstructing Philippine marine fisheries catches: a rationale and a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauly, Daniel

    Reconstructing Philippine marine fisheries catches, Palomares, MLD and Pauly, D 14 Reconstructing Philippine marine fisheries catches: a rationale and a methodology20 M.L.D. Palomares and D. Pauly Sea Around Us, Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, 2202 Main Mall, Vancouver BC, V6T 1Z4; Email: m.palomares

  12. Coastal Zone and Estuarine Studies Division Northwest Fisheries Science Center. National Marine Fisheries Service. NOAA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Indigenous chinook salmon from the Klamath River and spring- and summer-run chinook salmon from the Snake populations from the Snake River and two fall- and one spring-run population from the Klamath River. Utter et al. (1989) also sampled fall-run fish from the Snake River, but this population is genetically quite

  13. Wind River Watershed Restoration: 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, Patrick J.

    2001-09-01

    This document represents work conducted as part of the Wind River Watershed Restoration Project during its first year of funding through the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The project is a comprehensive effort involving public and private entities seeking to restore water quality and fishery resources in the basin through cooperative actions. Project elements include coordination, watershed assessment, restoration, monitoring, and education. Entities involved with implementing project components are the Underwood Conservation District (UCD), USDA Forest Service (USFS), U.S. Geological Survey--Columbia River Research Lab (USGS-CRRL), and WA Department of Fish & Wildlife (WDFW). Following categories given in the FY1999 Statement of Work, the broad categories, the related objectives, and the entities associated with each objective (lead entity in boldface) were as follows: Coordination--Objective 1: Coordinate the Wind River watershed Action Committee (AC) and Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) to develop a prioritized list of watershed enhancement projects. Monitoring--Objective 2: Monitor natural production of juvenile, smolt, and adult steelhead in the Wind River subbasin. Objective 3: Evaluate physical habitat conditions in the Wind River subbasin. Assessment--Objective 4: Assess watershed health using an ecosystem-based diagnostic model that will provide the technical basis to prioritize out-year restoration projects. Restoration--Objective 5: Reduce road related sediment sources by reducing road densities to less than 2 miles per square mile. Objective 6: Rehabilitate riparian corridors, flood plains, and channel morphology to reduce maximum water temperatures to less than 61 F, to increase bank stability to greater than 90%, to reduce bankfull width to depth ratios to less than 30, and to provide natural levels of pools and cover for fish. Objective 7: Maintain and evaluate passage for adult and juvenile steelhead at artificial barriers. Education--Objective 8: Promote watershed stewardship among students, the community, private landowners, and local governments. Progress towards six of eight of these objectives is described within nine separate reports included in a four-volume document.

  14. CCCommunity Fishery Rightsommunity Fishery Rightsommunity Fishery Rights in Canada's Atlantic Regionin Canada's Atlantic Regionin Canada's Atlantic Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles, Anthony

    of local ecological knowledge, can lead to better acceptance of management rules, can resolve conflicts measures jointly by government, resource users, fishing communities and the public; · Local resource users & sustainability. · CBM can be seen as a framework for organizing management of fisheries at the local level

  15. Sarah Hinckley Alaska Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries Service. NOAA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the North Pacific rim to central California. This species supports important commer- cial fisheries Pacific gadoid; and a preliminary as- sessment of the effect of egg size on larval size was made

  16. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 124 :285-296 . 1995 American Fisheries Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - dition to the growing list of salmonid fishes con- sidered under the Endangered Species Act (Office by fishing, or dams and diversions that influence migratory cor- ridors . Fishery managers are attempting

  17. WORLD FISHERIES WORLD IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF SEVEN FISHERY COMMODITY GROUPS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WORLD FISHERIES WORLD IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF SEVEN FISHERY COMMODITY GROUPS, BY LEADING COUNTRIES,452,831 5,199,449 Total............. 39,587,088 43,489,444 45,241,463 44,628,429 51,548,000 EXPORTS Thailand,264,615 Russia................ - - 826,299 1,471,446 1,191,192 United Kingdom........ 961,982 1,121,885 1

  18. WORLD FISHERIES WORLD IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF SEVEN FISHERY COMMODITY GROUPS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WORLD FISHERIES WORLD IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF SEVEN FISHERY COMMODITY GROUPS, BY LEADING COUNTRIES,391,889 6,034,407 Total............. 43,489,444 45,254,671 44,570,312 51,063,519 55,840,131 EXPORTS Thailand,124,679 1,303,974 1,704,260 Indonesia............. 1,186,062 1,178,552 1,419,492 1,583,416 1,666,752 Russia

  19. Marine Fisheries 50th Anniversary Issue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laboratory Robert L. Edwards 13 The MBL and the Fisheries-A Century of Cooperation in Woods Hole Paul R Address II Thomas A. Fulham 61 Rededication Address III William G. Gordon 62 Rededication Address IV Baird and the Foundations of American Marine Science Dean C. Allard Its Plan of Work and Accomplished

  20. Economics and Hawaii's Marine Fisheries Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economics and Hawaii's Marine Fisheries Introduction Fishing and seafood consumption permeate society in Hawaii, although neither the total volume of seafood har vesting nor the market value of sea is an integral aspect of Hawaii's culture, from traditional Polynesian uses of nearshore and reef species

  1. Stephani Zador NOAA Alaska Fishery Sciences Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Sept Sept, Nov Dec Public input Ecosystem information added at each level #12;From Council minutes, DecemberStephani Zador NOAA Alaska Fishery Sciences Center Ecosystem-based management in Alaska: The role of seabirds as indicators of ecosystem change Seabirds Forage fish Zooplankton Climate #12;#12;Goals

  2. WESTERN PACIFIC INVERTEBR ATE FISHERIES western pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of in- teractions with the Hawaiian monk seal (Amend- ments 2 and 4), protect spiny and slipper lobster agencies in the region. The now-closed Northwestern Hawaiian Is- lands (NWHI; Figure 16-1) lobster trap-scale, primarily rec- reational, fishery for different species of lobster ex- ists in the Main Hawaiian Islands

  3. Fishery Notes EI Nino and Its Impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that an unusually powerful EI Nino in the eastern Pacific is adversely affecting Ecuador's pelagic fisheries. EI Nino may be one of the most power- ful ever recorded. The area most severely affected lies off the coast of northern Peru. Surface water temper- atures off northern Peru were a sub- stantial 4°C above

  4. BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES TECHNOLOGICAL LABORATORY,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ~~ BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES TECHNOLOGICAL LABORATORY, SEATTLE, WASHINGTON, FOR FISCAL YEAR Laboratory, Seattle, Washington, for Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1967 MAYNARD A. STEINBERG, Laboratory Director JOHN A. DASSOW, As sistant Laboratory Director Circular 326 Washington, D.C. Decem.ber 1969 #12

  5. ISSN 1198-6727 Fisheries Centre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauly, Daniel

    : THE MARINE BIODIVERSITY OF BELIZE Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, Canada Palomares, M;TOO PRECIOUS TO DRILL: THE MARINE BIODIVERSITY OF BELIZE edited by Maria Lourdes D. Palomares by Maria Lourdes D. Palomares and Daniel Pauly CONTENTS PAGE DIRECTOR`S FOREWORD 1 EDITOR`S PREFACE 2

  6. Marine Fisheries Mackerel Cove, Maine, photo-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mining Rules, Outstanding NMFS Papers Selected, McManus Is Named, and Florida Coast Program 22 090-080) is pulr lished monthly by the Scientific Publications Office, National Marine Fisheries subscriptions are sold by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402

  7. Spawning and abundance of fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River, 1948--1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dauble, D.D.; Watson, D.G.

    1990-03-01

    The Hanford Reach of the Columbia River provides the only major spawning habitat for the upriver bright (URB) race of fall chinook salmon in the mainstem Columbia River. Hanford Site biologists have conducted aerial surveys of spawning salmon in the Hanford Reach since 1948. This report summarizes data on fall chinook salmon spawning in the Hanford Reach and presents a discussion of factors that may affect population trends. Most data are limited to fisheries agency reports and other working documents. Fisheries management practices in the Columbia River system have changed rapidly over the last decade, particularly under requirements of the Pacific Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980. New information has been generated and included in this report. 75 refs., 17 figs., 11 tabs.

  8. Interim survey report, Wailua River hydropower, Kauai, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-09-01

    Installation of hydroelectric facilities on the South Fork Wailua River three and five miles upstream of Wailua Falls on the Island of Kauai, Hawaii is proposed. The hydroelectric facilities would provide an additional source of energy for the island, effectively utilizing available waters. Addition of hydropower to the island's power system, which is primarily reliant on fuel and diesel oils, would diversify the system's base. Hydropower diversion would reduce flows downstream of the structures, affecting fishery, recreational, and aesthetic resources. Construction activities would disturb approximately 2.7 acres of cropland and create temporary turbidity downstream of the sites.

  9. FISHERIES-OCEANOGRAPHY COORDINATED INVESTIGATIONS (ECOFOCI) STANDARD OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS (SOI) FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISHERIES-OCEANOGRAPHY COORDINATED INVESTIGATIONS (ECOFOCI) STANDARD OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS (SOI & FISHERIES-OCEANOGRAPHY COORDINATED INVESTIGATIONS (EcoFOCI) STANDARD OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS (SOI) FOR NOAA & Fisheries-Oceanography Coordinated Investigations (EcoFOCI) field operations aboard NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN

  10. Multi-Scale Action Effectiveness Research in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.; Storch, Adam; Johnson, Jeff; Skalski, J. R.; Teel, D. J.; Brewer, Taylor; Bryson, Amanda J.; Dawley, Earl M.; Kuligowski, D. R.; Whitesel, T.; Mallette, Christine

    2013-11-30

    The study reported herein was conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE) by researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), University of Washington (UW), and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). The goal of the study was to evaluate the ecological benefits of restoration actions for juvenile salmon in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE; rkm 0–234).

  11. River Corridor Achievements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington Closure Hanford and previous contractors have completed much of the cleanup work in the River Corridor, shown here.

  12. Philippine Marine Fisheries Catches: A Bottom-up Reconstruction, 1950-2010, Palomares, MLD and Pauly, D (eds.) Reconstructed marine fisheries catches of the Philippines, 1950-2010101

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauly, Daniel

    Philippine Marine Fisheries Catches: A Bottom-up Reconstruction, 1950-2010, Palomares, MLD.L.D. Palomares and D. Pauly Sea Around Us, Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, 2202 Main Mall, Vancouver BC, V6T 1Z4; Email: m.palomares@fisheries.ubc.ca; d.pauly@fisheries.ubc.ca Abstract

  13. Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan for Fiscal Year 1988.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Northwest Power Planning Council; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority

    1987-10-01

    The FY 1988 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan (Work Plan) presents Bonneville Power Administration's plans for implementing the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) in FY 1988. The Work Plan focuses on individual Action Items found in the amended Program for which Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has determined it has authority and responsibility to implement. The FY 1988 Work Plan emphasizes continuation of 95 ongoing projects, most of which involve protection, mitigation, or enhancement of anadromous fishery resources. These continuing activities are summarized briefly by Program area: (1) mainstem passage; (2) artificial propagation; (3) natural propagation; (4) resident fish and wildlife; and (5) planning activities.

  14. Foreign Fishery Developments The Norwegian Fishing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -EEC fisheries agreement, which prevented Norwegian purse seiners from fishing North Sea brisling during the peak,200 t of meal (up 0.6 percent) and 164,600 t of oil (down 9.1 per- cent). Arctic Cod Quotas Quotas for Arctic.3 Fish oil 79,400 180.5 107,300 241.4 Cod liver oil 12,700 63.1 10,900 51.3 Canned fish 14,100 233.8 15

  15. Secure & Restore Critical Fisheries Habitat, Flathead Subbasin, FY2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DuCharme, Lynn; Tohtz, Joel

    2008-11-12

    The construction of Hungry Horse Dam inundated 125 km of adfluvial trout habitat in the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries, impacting natural fish reproduction and rearing. Rapid residential and commercial growth in the Flathead Watershed now threaten the best remaining habitats and restrict our opportunities to offset natural resource losses. Hydropower development and other land disturbances caused severe declines in the range and abundance of our focal resident fish species, bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout. Bull trout were listed as threatened in 1998 under the Endangered Species Act and westslope cutthroat were petitioned for listing under ESA. Westslope cutthroat are a species of special concern in Montana and a species of special consideration by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. The Secure & Protect Fisheries Habitat project follows the logical progression towards habitat restoration outlined in the Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan approved by the NWPPC in 1993. This project is also consistent with the 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program and the Flathead River Subbasin Plan that identifies the protection of habitats for these populations as one of the most critical needs in the subbasin and directs actions to offset habitat losses. The Flathead basin is one of the fastest growing human population centers in Montana. Riparian habitats are being rapidly developed and subdivided, causing habitat degradation and altering ecosystem functions. Remaining critical habitats in the Flathead Watershed need to be purchased or protected with conservation easements if westslope cutthroat and bull trout are to persist and expand within the subbasin. In addition, habitats degraded by past land uses need to be restored to maximize the value of remaining habitats and offset losses caused by the construction of Hungry Horse Dam. Securing and restoring remaining riparian habitat will benefit fish by shading and moderating water temperatures, stabilizing banks and protecting the integrity of channel dimension, improving woody debris recruitment for in-channel habitat features, producing terrestrial insects and leaf litter for recruitment to the stream, and helping to accommodate and attenuate flood flows. The purpose of this project is to work with willing landowners to protect the best remaining habitats in the Flathead subbasin as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan. The target areas for land protection activities follow the priorities established in the Flathead subbasin plan and include: (1) Class 1 waters as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan; (2) Class 2 watersheds as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan; and (3) 'Offsite mitigation' defined as those Class 1 and Class 2 watersheds that lack connectivity to the mainstem Flathead River or Flathead Lake. This program focuses on conserving the highest quality or most important riparian or fisheries habitat areas consistent with program criteria. The success of our efforts is subject to a property's actual availability and individual landowner negotiations. The program is guided using biological and project-based criteria that reflect not only the priority needs established in the Flathead subbasin plan, but also such factors as cost, credits, threats, and partners. The implementation of this project requires both an expense and a capital budget to allow work to be completed. This report addresses accomplishments under both budgets during FY08 as the two budgets are interrelated. The expense budget provided pre-acquisition funding to conduct activities such as surveys, appraisals, staff support, etc. The capital budget was used to purchase the interest in each parcel including closing costs. Both the pre-acquisition contract funds and the capital funds used to purchase fee title or conservation easements were spent in accordance with the terms negotiated within the FY08 through FY09 MOA between the Tribes, State, and BPA. In FY08, the focus of this project was to pursue all possible properties

  16. Effects of Mitigative Measures on Productivity of White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia River Downstream from McNary Dam; Determine Status and Habitat Requirements of White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from McNary Dam, 1995-1996 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rien, Thomas A.; Beiningen, Kirk T.

    1997-07-01

    This project began in July 1986 and is a cooperative effort of federal, state, and tribal fisheries entities to determine (1) the status and habitat requirements, and (2) effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the lower Colombia and Snake rivers.

  17. FOCI RESEARCH BENEFITS FISHERIES MANAGEMENT 1993 Recruitment Forecast -Average

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) advises the North Pacific Fisheries Management Council using a "stock data but addresses the autocorrelation of recruitment. In addition, it directly predicts recruitment to average 1991 year class, and a strong 1992 year class. In 1993 the transfer function model predicted

  18. Hawaii's Pelagic Fisheries CHRISTOFER H. BOGGS and RUSSELL Y. ITO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawaii's Pelagic Fisheries CHRISTOFER H. BOGGS and RUSSELL Y. ITO Introduction Hawaii's pelagic Marine Fisher ies Service, NOAA, 2570 Dole Street, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822-2396. Mention of trade names or commercial forms does not imply endorsement by the National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA. ABSTRACT-Hawaii

  19. Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center Ecosystems and Oceanography Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center Ecosystems and Oceanography Division Characterization Research Program Réka Domokos #12;Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center Ecosystems and Oceanography Science Center Ecosystems and Oceanography Division -80 -77 -74 -71 -68 -65 -62 -59 -56 -53 -50 -47 -44 Sv

  20. FISHERY REGULATION VIA OPTIMAL CONTROL THEORY1 WILLIAM J. PALM'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISHERY REGULATION VIA OPTIMAL CONTROL THEORY1 WILLIAM J. PALM' ABSTRACT This paper attempts to show how control theory can be used to formulate a regulatory scheme for fisheries. The regulatory, is one method within the larger framework of op- timal control theory. Other optimal control methods have

  1. MArine science School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Chris

    government management agencies such as the Alaska Department of Fish and Game and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife--Marine Field Experience (Independent Study) ....... 1 ­ 2 Fisheries FISH F288/BIOL F288--Fish and Fisheries of Alaska........................3 FISH F301--Biology of Fishes

  2. A Review of Interactions Between Hawaii's Fisheries and Protected Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    lose bait and catch to bottlenose dolphins, rough-toothed dol phins, and Hawaiian monk seals. Trollfish fisheries. 55(2),1993 gered species involved in fishery in teractions are the Hawaiian monk seal, Monachus turtles, seabirds, and monk seals take bait and are known to become hooked, and false killer whales may

  3. TAIWAN'S USE OF FISHERY RESOURCES Yung C. Shang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TAIWAN'S USE OF FISHERY RESOURCES Yung C. Shang The fishing industry is among Taiwan's most vital g e production growthrate is about 11.6%. This article ex- amines the industry's place in Taiwan. Fisheries in Taiwan's Economy Fish production affects income, foreign markets, employment, and food intake

  4. A Management Model of the Northwest African Cephalopod Fishery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Management Model of the Northwest African Cephalopod Fishery W. E. GRANT, W. L. GRIFFIN, and J. P MAURITANIA Nouakchott SENEGAL t::;--~--+-GA M BIA oCanary Islands t? ",(/ and Fisheries Sciences and W. L. Griffin and J. P. Warren are with the Department of Agricul- tural Economics

  5. ORGANIZATION AND SESSIONAL BUSINESS OF THE FOURTH INTERNATIONAL FISHERY CONGRESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the Brazilian Embassy at Washington. EDWARD E. PRINCE, Commissioner of Fisheries of the Dominion of Canada of The Evening Star. WILLIAM LOEB, jr., Secretary to the President of the United States. EDWARD McLEAN, Secretary Commissioner of Fisheries. EDWARD J. STELLWAGEN, President of Union Trust Company. RICHARD SYLVESTER

  6. Columbia River Hatchery Reform System-Wide Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Dan

    2009-04-16

    The US Congress funded the Puget Sound and Coastal Washington Hatchery Reform Project via annual appropriations to the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) beginning in fiscal year 2000. Congress established the project because it recognized that while hatcheries have a necessary role to play in meeting harvest and conservation goals for Pacific Northwest salmonids, the hatchery system was in need of comprehensive reform. Most hatcheries were producing fish for harvest primarily to mitigate for past habitat loss (rather than for conservation of at-risk populations) and were not taking into account the effects of their programs on naturally spawning populations. With numerous species listed as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), conservation of salmon in the Puget Sound area was a high priority. Genetic resources in the region were at risk and many hatchery programs as currently operated were contributing to those risks. Central to the project was the creation of a nine-member independent scientific review panel called the Hatchery Scientific Review Group (HSRG). The HSRG was charged by Congress with reviewing all state, tribal and federal hatchery programs in Puget Sound and Coastal Washington as part of a comprehensive hatchery reform effort to: conserve indigenous salmonid genetic resources; assist with the recovery of naturally spawning salmonid populations; provide sustainable fisheries; and improve the quality and cost-effectiveness of hatchery programs. The HSRG worked closely with the state, tribal and federal managers of the hatchery system, with facilitation provided by the non-profit organization Long Live the Kings and the law firm Gordon, Thomas, Honeywell, to successfully complete reviews of over 200 hatchery programs at more than 100 hatcheries across western Washington. That phase of the project culminated in 2004 with the publication of reports containing the HSRG's principles for hatchery reform and recommendations for Puget Sound/Coastal Washington hatchery programs, followed by the development in 2005 of a suite of analytical tools to support application of the principles (all reports and tools are available at www.hatcheryreform.us). In 2005, Congress directed the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries) to replicate the Puget Sound and Coastal Washington Hatchery Reform Project in the Columbia River Basin. The HSRG was expanded to 14 members to include individuals with specific knowledge about the Columbia River salmon and steelhead populations. This second phase was initially envisioned as a one-year review, with emphasis on the Lower Columbia River hatchery programs. It became clear however, that the Columbia River Basin needed to be viewed as an inter-connected ecosystem in order for the review to be useful. The project scope was subsequently expanded to include the entire Basin, with funding for a second year provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) Fish and Wildlife Program. The objective of the HSRG's Columbia River Basin review was to change the focus of the Columbia River hatchery system. In the past, these hatchery programs have been aimed at supplying adequate numbers of fish for harvest as mitigation primarily for hydropower development in the Basin. A new, ecosystem-based approach is founded on the idea that harvest goals are sustainable only if they are compatible with conservation goals. The challenge before the HSRG was to determine whether or not conservation and harvest goals could be met by fishery managers and, if so, how. The HSRG determined that in order to address these twin goals, both hatchery and harvest reforms are necessary. The HSRG approach represents an important change of direction in managing hatcheries in the region. It provides a clear demonstration that current hatchery programs can indeed be redirected to better meet both conservation and harvest goals. For each Columbia River Basin Environmentally Significant Unit

  7. d Onion River Review d river run by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Adam Lee

    d Onion River Review d 2009 d river run by Eireann Aspell Jamie Gorton Heidi Lynch Matt Serron #12 lives. #12;BLANK Editors' Note There were portents hinting at the Onion River Review's future as early

  8. Evaluation of Life History Diversity, Habitat Connectivity, and Survival Benefits Associated with Habitat Restoration Actions in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, Annual Report 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.; Skalski, John R.; Dawley, Earl M.; Coleman, Andre M.

    2010-08-01

    This report describes the 2009 research conducted under the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE or Corps) project EST-09-P-01, titled “Evaluation of Life History Diversity, Habitat Connectivity, and Survival Benefits Associated with Habitat Restoration Actions in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary.” The research was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Marine Science Laboratory and Hydrology Group, in partnership with the University of Washington, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, Columbia Basin Research, and Earl Dawley (NOAA Fisheries, retired). This Columbia River Fish Mitigation Program project, referred to as “Salmonid Benefits,” was started in FY 2009 to evaluate the state-of-the science regarding the ability to quantify the benefits to listed salmonids1 of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary.

  9. Fisheries Vol 38 No 1 January 2013 www.fisheries.org 43 The Four Fs of Fish: Communicating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .4% of global fishery production is reduced to fish meal and fish oil (FAO 2009), which is subsequently, and prosperity for much of the world. As fisheries professionals, we are all passionate about fish. This personal fisher- ies are the last large-scale wild food resource in the world and aquaculture is a quickly growing

  10. Foreign Fishery Developments Data on 1985-86 exports are given in FishmealThe Fisheries of Chile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foreign Fishery Developments Data on 1985-86 exports are given in Table 2. FishmealThe Fisheries with the same period of 1986. Export shipments, however, in creased over 35 percent by value during that same period. Frozen and fresh fish ery products were the most rapidly grow ing exports. Fishmeal remained

  11. Fishery systems and linkages: from clockworks to soft watches Serge M. Garcia and Anthony T. Charles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles, Anthony

    of fisheries governance and the research needed to support it. Special reference is made to the changes needed process. The conclusion addresses the evolution of the global fishery system and briefly reviews the challenges faced by science, governance, and society. Keywords: complexity, fisheries, fishery governance

  12. A Review of the Offshore Shrimp Fishery and the 1981 Texas Closure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Review of the Offshore Shrimp Fishery and the 1981 Texas Closure EDWARD F. KLIMA, KENNETH N- view the Texas and Louisiana offshore shrimp fisheries and describe the catch, relative abundance, and recruitment to the offshore fishery from June through August 1981 and compare the 1981 fishery

  13. TVA's Integrated River System

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and controlling floods. So far as may be consistent with such purposes, ...for the generation of electric energy... TVA Power Service Area TVA'S INTEGRATED RIVER SYSTEM | 3...

  14. Large River Floodplains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunne, T; Aalto, RE

    2013-01-01

    River, California. Sedimentology 57, 389–407. http://J. (Eds. ), Fluvial Sedimentology VI. Special PublicationsAnatomy of an avulsion. Sedimentology 36, 1–24. Stallard,

  15. National Marine Fisheries Service | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII Jump to: navigation,National Marine Fisheries Service Jump to: navigation,

  16. Reintroduction of Lower Columbia River Chum Salmon into Duncan Creek, 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hillson, Todd D.

    2009-06-12

    The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) listed Lower Columbia River (LCR) chum salmon as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in March, 1999 (64 FR 14508, March 25, 1999). The listing was in response to the reduction in abundance from historical levels of more than one-half million returning adults to fewer than 10,000 present-day spawners. Harvest, habitat degradation, changes in flow regimes, riverbed movement and heavy siltation have been largely responsible for this decline. The timing of seasonal changes in river flow and water temperatures is perhaps the most critical factor in structuring the freshwater life history of this species. This is especially true of the population located directly below Bonneville Dam, where hydropower operations can block access to spawning sites, dewater redds, strand fry, cause scour or fill of redds and increase sedimentation of spawning gravels. Prior to 1997, only two chum salmon populations were recognized as genetically distinct in the Columbia River, although spawning had been documented in many Lower Columbia River tributaries. The first population was in the Grays River (RKm 34), a tributary of the Columbia River, and the second was a group of spawners utilizing the mainstem Columbia River just below Bonneville Dam (RKm 235) adjacent to Ives Island and in Hardy and Hamilton creeks. Using additional DNA samples, Small et al. (2006) grouped chum salmon spawning in the mainstem Columbia River and the Washington State tributaries into three groups: the Coastal, the Cascade and the Gorge. The Coastal group comprises those spawning in the Grays River, Skamokawa Creek and the broodstock used at the Sea Resources facility on the Chinook River. The Cascade group comprises those spawning in the Cowlitz (both summer and fall stocks), Kalama, Lewis, and East Fork Lewis rivers, with most supporting unique populations. The Gorge group comprises those spawning in the mainstem Columbia River from the I-205 Bridge up to Bonneville Dam and those spawning in Hamilton and Hardy creeks. Response to the federal ESA listing has been primarily through direct-recovery actions: reducing harvest, hatchery supplementation using local broodstock for populations at catastrophic risk, habitat restoration (including construction of spawning channels) and flow agreements to protect spawning and rearing areas. Both state and federal agencies have built controlled spawning areas. In 1998, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) began a chum salmon supplementation program using native stock on the Grays River. This program was expanded during 1999 - 2001 to include reintroduction into the Chinook River using eggs from the Grays River Supplementation Program. These eggs are incubated at the Grays River Hatchery, reared to release size at the Sea Resources Hatchery on the Chinook River, and the fry are released at the mouth of the Chinook River. Native steelhead, chum, and coho salmon are present in Duncan Creek, and are recognized as subpopulations of the Lower Gorge population, and are focal species in the Lower Columbia Fish Recovery Board (LCFRB) plan. Steelhead, chum and coho salmon that spawn in Duncan Creek are listed as Threatened under the ESA. Duncan Creek is classified by the LCFRB plan as a watershed for intensive monitoring (LCFRB 2004). This project was identified in the 2004 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) revised Biological Opinion (revised BiOp) to increase survival of chum salmon, 'BPA will continue to fund the program to re-introduce Columbia River chum salmon into Duncan Creek as long as NOAA Fisheries determines it to be an essential and effective contribution to reducing the risk of extinction for this ESU'. (USACE et al. 2004, page 85-86). The Governors Forum on Monitoring and Salmon Recovery and Watershed Health recommends one major population from each ESU have adult and juvenile monitoring. Duncan Creek chum salmon are identified in this plan to be intensively monitored. Planners recommended that a combination of natural and hatchery production

  17. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Habitat and Limnological Research; 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohler, Andre E.; Taki, Doug (Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, Fort Hall, ID); Griswold, Robert G. (Biolines, Stanley, ID)

    2004-08-01

    In March 1990, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes petitioned the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) to list the Snake River sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) as endangered. As a result of that petition the Snake River sockeye salmon was officially listed as endangered in November 1991 under the Endangered Species Act (56 FR 58619). In 1991, the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Habitat and Limnological Research Program was implemented (Project Number 91-71, Intergovernmental Contract Number DE-BI79-91bp22548). This project is part of an interagency effort to prevent the extinction of the Redfish Lake stock of O. nerka. The Shoshone-Bannock Tribal goal for this project is two tiered: The immediate goal is to increase the population of Snake River sockeye salmon while preserving the unique genetic characteristics of the Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU). The Tribes long term goal is to maintain a viable population that warrants delisting and provides Tribal harvest opportunities. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provides funding for this interagency recovery program through the Northwest Power Planning Council Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPCFWP). Collaborators in the recovery effort include the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG), the University of Idaho (UI), U.S. Forest Service (USFS), and the Shoshone-Bannock Tribe (SBT). This report summarizes activities conducted by Shoshone-Bannock Tribal Fisheries Department personnel during the 2002 calendar year. Project objectives include: (1) monitor over-winter survival and emigration of juvenile anadromous O. nerka stocked from the captive rearing program; (2) fertilize Redfish Lake (3) conduct kokanee salmon (non-anadromous O. nerka) population surveys; (4) monitor spawning kokanee escapement and estimate fry recruitment on Fishhook, Alturas Lake, and Stanley Lake creeks; (5) evaluate potential competition and predation between stocked juvenile O. nerka and a variety of fish species in Redfish, Pettit, and Alturas lakes; and (6) monitor limnological parameters of Sawtooth Valley lakes to assess lake productivity.

  18. Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program : Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d’Alene Reservation : 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firehammer, Jon A.; Vitale, Angelo J.; Hallock, Stephanie A.

    2009-09-08

    Historically, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe depended on runs of anadromous salmon and steelhead along the Spokane River and Hangman Creek, as well as resident and adfluvial forms of trout and char in Coeur d'Alene Lake, for survival. Dams constructed in the early 1900s on the Spokane River in the City of Spokane and at Little Falls (further downstream) were the first dams that initially cut-off the anadromous fish runs from the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. These fisheries were further removed following the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams on the Columbia River. Together, these actions forced the Tribe to rely solely on the resident fish resources of Coeur d'Alene Lake for their subsistence needs. The Coeur d'Alene Tribe is estimated to have historically harvested around 42,000 westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) per year (Scholz et al. 1985). In 1967, Mallet (1969) reported that 3,329 cutthroat trout were harvested from the St. Joe River, and a catch of 887 was reported from Coeur d'Alene Lake. This catch is far less than the 42,000 fish per year the tribe harvested historically. Today, only limited opportunities exist to harvest cutthroat trout in the Coeur d'Alene Basin. It appears that a suite of factors have contributed to the decline of cutthroat trout stocks within Coeur d'Alene Lake and its tributaries (Mallet 1969; Scholz et al. 1985; Lillengreen et al. 1993). These factors included the construction of Post Falls Dam in 1906, major changes in land cover types, impacts from agricultural activities, and introduction of exotic fish species. The decline in native cutthroat trout populations in the Coeur d'Alene basin has been a primary focus of study by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's Fisheries and Water Resources programs since 1990. The overarching goals for recovery have been to restore the cutthroat trout populations to levels that allow for subsistence harvest, maintain genetic diversity, and increase the probability of persistence in the face of anthropogenic influences and prospective climate change. This included recovering the lacustrine-adfluvial life history form that was historically prevalent and had served to provide both resilience and resistance to the structure of cutthroat trout populations in the Coeur d'Alene basin. To this end, the Coeur d'Alene Tribe closed Lake Creek and Benewah Creek to fishing in 1993 to initiate recovery of westslope cutthroat trout to historical levels. However, achieving sustainable cutthroat trout populations also required addressing biotic factors and habitat features in the basin that were limiting recovery. Early in the 1990s, BPA-funded surveys and inventories identified limiting factors in Tribal watersheds that would need to be remedied to restore westslope cutthroat trout populations. The limiting factors included: low-quality, low-complexity mainstem stream habitat and riparian zones; high stream temperatures in mainstem habitats; negative interactions with nonnative brook trout in tributaries; and potential survival bottlenecks in Coeur d'Alene Lake. In 1994, the Northwest Power Planning Council adopted the recommendations set forth by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe to improve the Reservation fishery (NWPPC Program Measures 10.8B.20). These recommended actions included: (1) Implement habitat restoration and enhancement measures in Alder, Benewah, Evans, and Lake Creeks; (2) Purchase critical watershed areas for protection of fisheries habitat; (3) Conduct an educational/outreach program for the general public within the Coeur d'Alene Reservation to facilitate a 'holistic' watershed protection process; (4) Develop an interim fishery for tribal and non-tribal members of the reservation through construction, operation and maintenance of five trout ponds; (5) Design, construct, operate and maintain a trout production facility; and (6) Implement a monitoring program to evaluate the effectiveness of the hatchery and habitat improvement projects. These activities provide partial mitigation for the extirpation of anadromous fish resources from usual and

  19. Onion River OnionRiverReview2011dd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Adam Lee

    2011 d river run by Lauren Fish Heather Lessard Jenna McCarthy Philip Noonan Erica Sabelawski #12;TheOnion River Review OnionRiverReview2011dd 2011 Our Lives in Dance Alex Dugas We were born with bare. Then we tap-danced on our graves, and back through the womb again, shoeless. #12;d Onion River Review d

  20. d Onion River Review d river run by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Adam Lee

    d Onion River Review d 2013 d river run by Alex Dugas Sarah Fraser Bryan Hickey Nick Lemon Diana Marchessault Mickey O'Neill Amy Wilson #12;#12;Editors' Note For this edition of the Onion River Review, we are finally able to present to you this year's edition of the Onion River Review: our love child, our shining

  1. American Fisheries Society Symposium 79:185203, 2012 2012 by the American Fisheries Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Townsend, David W.

    of Oceanography Post Office Box 1006, 1 Challenger Drive, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia B2Y 4A2, Canada Neal r. Pettigrew of Oceanography Post Office Box 1006, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia B2Y 4A2, Canada DaviD w. towNSeND School of Marine Sciences, University of Maine Orono, Maine 04469, USA guoqi haN Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Center Post

  2. Philippine Marine Fisheries Catches: A Bottom-up Reconstruction, 1950-2010, Palomares, MLD and Pauly, D (eds.) Philippine marine fisheries 1011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauly, Daniel

    Philippine Marine Fisheries Catches: A Bottom-up Reconstruction, 1950-2010, Palomares, MLD and Pauly, D (eds.) 1 Philippine marine fisheries 1011 M.L.D. Palomares1 , V.A. Parducho2 , M. Bimbao2 , E, Vancouver BC, V6T 1Z4; Email: m.palomares@fisheries.ubc.ca 2 FishBase Information and Research Group, Inc

  3. Marine Fisheries On the cover: Transmission electron micro-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marine Fisheries ~@WD@~ On the cover: Transmission electron micro- graph of a myxosporidian. Kudoa by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington. DC 20402. Prices are: Single copy. $3. Washington. DC 20260. #12;

  4. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: Potential Environmental Impacts and Fisheries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: Potential Environmental Impacts and Fisheries Christina M Comfort Institute #12;Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) · Renewable energy ­ ocean thermal gradient · Large will unavoidably affect pelagic fish... ­ Noise and water pollution ­ FAD effects ­ Entrainment and Impingement

  5. Marine Fisheries On the cover: An adult male

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marine Fisheries ~@\\YJD@W On the cover: An adult male northern fur seal, Callorhinus ursinus., in San Francisco Bay Impact of U.S. Wholesale Demand for Canned Sardines on Market Accessibility

  6. PARASITES OF SKIPJACK TUNA, KATSUWONUS PELAMIS: FISHERY IMPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PARASITES OF SKIPJACK TUNA, KATSUWONUS PELAMIS: FISHERY IMPLICATIONS R. J. G. LESTER,' A. BARNES of the many examples see MacKenzie (1983). The skipjack tuna, Katsuwonus pelamis, is one of the most valuable

  7. LIST OF FISHERY COOPERATIVES IN THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be oetained free from the Branch of Foreign Trade and Economic Services, Bureau of Commercial Fisheries, 1801, 1967 -68 by Leslie D. McMullin, Acting Chief Branch of Foreign Trade and Economic Services Bureau

  8. Allocating Harvests Between Competing Users in Fishery Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allocating Harvests Between Competing Users in Fishery Management Decisions: Appropriate Economic Measures for Valuation. Discussion JAMES L. ANDERSON The evaluation of appropriate eco nomic measures of anecdotal observations complemented with some economic intuition which con clude that more careful economic

  9. Rules of the River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anonymous,

    1980-01-01

    't overexert. Be careful of sunburn, heat exhaustion and heat stroke. ? Leave car keys hidden at launch point or take-out (with shuttle cars), or firmly attach them to an article of clothing on your person with a strong safety pin. Don't leave valuables... are organized into four parts: ? Planning Your River Trip ? Selecting Your Equipment ? Rules of Safety ? Rules of Conduct When put into practice, these "Rules of the River" may turn an uncomfortable river trip into a lasting and special experience. Read...

  10. On tropospheric rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Yuanlong, 1964-

    2002-01-01

    In this thesis, we investigate atmospheric water vapor transport through a distinct synoptic phenomenon, namely, the Tropospheric River (TR), which is a local filamentary structure on a daily map of vertically integrated ...

  11. Savannah River Site Waste Disposition Project

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Terrel J. Spears Assistant Manager Waste Disposition Project DOE Savannah River Operations Office Savannah River Site Savannah River Site Waste Disposition Project Waste...

  12. Do Chinese Environmental Laws Work? A Study of Litigation as a Response to the Problem of Fishery Pollution in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMullin, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    THE PROBLEM OF FISHERY POLLUTION IN CHINA Joseph McMullinlFishery Pollution in China II. Water Pollution in China: Its Overall Effects on

  13. Lower Columbia River and Estuary Habitat Monitoring Study, 2011 - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borde, Amy B.; Kaufmann, Ronald M.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Thom, Ronald M.; Wright, Cynthia L.

    2012-03-22

    The Ecosystem Monitoring Program is a collaborative effort between the Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership (LCREP), University of Washington, Wetland Ecosystem Team (UW), US Geological Survey, Water Science Center (USGS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA-Fisheries, hereafter NOAA), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Marine Sciences Laboratory (PNNL). The goal of the program is to conduct emergent wetland monitoring aimed at characterizing salmonid habitats in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) from the mouth of the estuary to Bonneville Dam (Figure 1). This is an ecosystem based monitoring program focused on evaluating status and trends in habitat and reducing uncertainties regarding these ecosystems to ultimately improve the survival of juvenile salmonids through the LCRE. This project comprehensively assesses habitat, fish, food web, and abiotic conditions in the lower river, focusing on shallow water and vegetated habitats used by juvenile salmonids for feeding, rearing and refugia. The information is intended to be used to guide management actions associated with species recovery, particularly that of threatened and endangered salmonids. PNNL’s role in this multi-year study is to monitor the habitat structure (e.g., vegetation, topography, channel morphology, and sediment type) as well as hydrologic patterns.

  14. Ecology of the river dolphin, Inia geoffrensis, in the Cinaruco River, Venezuela 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGuire, Tamara Lee

    1995-01-01

    The Cinaruco River is a tributary of the Orinoco River, and forms the southern boundary of Venezuela's newest national park, Santos Luzardo. Like other rivers of this region, the Cinaruco River undergoes an extreme seasonal flood cycle. River...

  15. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Habitat and Limnological Research : 2008 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohler, Andre E. [Shoshone-Bannock Tribes; Griswold, Robert G. [Biolines Environmental Consulting; Taki, Doug [Shoshone-Bannock Tribes

    2009-07-31

    In March 1990, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes petitioned the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) to list Snake River sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) as endangered. Snake River sockeye salmon were officially listed as endangered in November 1991 under the Endangered Species Act (56 FR 58619). In 1991, the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Habitat and Limnological Research Project was implemented. This project is part of an interagency effort to prevent the extinction of the Redfish Lake stock of Snake River sockeye salmon. The Shoshone-Bannock Tribal goal for this project is two tiered: the immediate goal is to increase the population of Snake River sockeye salmon while preserving the unique genetic characteristics of the evolutionarily significant unit (ESU). The Tribes long term goal is to maintain a viable population that warrants delisting and provides Tribal harvest opportunities. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provides funding for this interagency Recovery effort. Collaborators in the recovery effort include the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG), the University of Idaho (UI), and the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes (SBT). This report summarizes activities conducted by Shoshone-Bannock Tribal Fisheries Department personnel during the 2008 calendar year. Project tasks include: (1) monitor limnological parameters of the Sawtooth Valley lakes to assess lake productivity; (2) conduct lake fertilization in Pettit and Alturas lakes; (3) reduce the number of mature kokanee salmon spawning in Alturas Lake Creek; (4) monitor, enumerate, and evaluate sockeye salmon smolt migration from Pettit and Alturas lakes; (5) monitor spawning kokanee salmon escapement and estimate fry recruitment in Fishhook and Alturas Lake creeks; (6) conduct sockeye and kokanee salmon population surveys; (7) evaluate potential competition and predation between stocked juvenile sockeye salmon and a variety of fish species in Redfish, Pettit, and Alturas lakes; and (8) assist IDFG with captive broodstock production activities.

  16. Microsoft Word - WY_Draft EA_2014_12_16.docx

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    manmade impassable barriers from the Columbia River and its tributaries upstream of the Wind and Hood rivers (exclusive) to and including the Yakima River, excluding fish...

  17. Montana Rivers Information System : Edit/Entry Program User's Manual.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks

    1992-07-01

    The Montana Rivers Information System (MRIS) was initiated to assess the state`s fish, wildlife, and recreation value; and natural cultural, and geologic features. The MRIS is now a set of data bases containing part of the information in the Natural Heritage Program natural features and threatened and endangered species data bases and comprises of the Montana Interagency Stream Fisheries Database; the MDFWP Recreation Database; and the MDFWP Wildlife Geographic Information System. The purpose of this User`s Manual is to describe to the user how to maintain the MRIS database of their choice by updating, changing, deleting, and adding records using the edit/entry programs; and to provide to the user all information and instructions necessary to complete data entry into the MRIS databases.

  18. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Habitat and Limnological Research; 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohler, Andre E.; Taki, Doug (Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, Fort Hall, ID); Griswold, Robert G. (Biolines, Stanley, ID)

    2004-08-01

    In March 1990, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes petitioned the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) to list the Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered. As a result of that petition the Snake River sockeye salmon was officially listed as endangered in November 1991 under the Endangered Species Act (56 FR 58619). In 1991, the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Habitat and Limnological Research Program was implemented (Project Number 91-71, Intergovernmental Contract Number DE-BI79-91bp22548). This project is part of an interagency effort to prevent the extinction of the Redfish Lake stock of O. nerka. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provides funding for this interagency recovery program through the Northwest Power Planning Council Fish and Wildlife Program (Council). Collaborators in the recovery effort include the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG), the University of Idaho (UI), U.S. Forest Service (USFS), and the Shoshone-Bannock Tribe (SBT). This report summarizes activities conducted by Shoshone-Bannock Tribal Fisheries Department personnel during the 2001 calendar year. Project objectives include: (1) monitor over-winter survival and emigration of juvenile anadromous O. nerka stocked from the captive rearing program; (2) fertilize Redfish Lake, fertilization of Pettit and Alturas lakes was suspended for this year; (3) conduct kokanee (non-anadromous O. nerka) population surveys; (4) monitor spawning kokanee escapement and estimate fry recruitment on Fishhook, Alturas Lake, and Stanley Lake creeks; (5) evaluate potential competition and predation interactions between stocked juvenile O. nerka and a variety of fish species in Redfish, Pettit, and Alturas lakes; (6) monitor limnological parameters of Sawtooth Valley lakes to assess lake productivity.

  19. Progress in 1964-65 at the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , a nuclear-powered submarine dedicated to research. 4. Analysis of the emerging tuna fishery of the South to the evaluation of the use of a submarine for research in fisheries and ocean()gra|)hy. Publications issued

  20. PRELUDE TO SUSTAINABILIT Y: ENDING OVERFISHING IN U.S. FISHERIES FEATURE ARTICLE 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to Sustainability: Ending Overfishing in u.S. fisheries Feature Article 1 GALEN R. TROMBLE DEBRA M. LAMBERT LEE R

  1. Charles A. Tracy Columbia River Fisheries Laboratory. Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    were landed (Craig and Hacker, 1940). After 1892, catches declined, and by 1899 the annual catch was less than 33,250 kg. Annual catches during the early 1900's were less than 104,930 kg (Craig and Hacker

  2. Title: AJAE Appendix for Measuring Benefits from a Marketing Cooperative in the Copper River Fishery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

    -paced salmon fishing industry. At the end of the fiscal year (exact date unknown), members received that separated fish by quality category. Quality standards were set at each stage in the supply chain. At the first stage of production, the CRFC required fishermen to bleed their fish, package fish in bags

  3. THE HISTORY AND DEVELOPMENT OF THE FISHERIES OF THE COLUMBIA RIVER 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -head structure, the primary function of which is hydroelectric power production. It is 396 m. wide on the top

  4. d Onion River Review d river run by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Adam Lee

    d Onion River Review d 2012 d river run by Alex Dugas Lauren Fish Heather Lessard Jenna Mc jokes. Together these things helped shape the 2012 edition of the Onion River Review. A worthwhile departing on an adventure, you simply have no idea what will happen or who you will meet. You may run

  5. In our study, we estimated depth dis-tributions and fishery selectivities for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fishes in the deep- water fishery depend on length and age because of ontogenetic migration (move- ment distributions and ontogenetic migration are impor- tant because they affect many aspects of the deep-water fishery, including se- lectivity of commercial bottom trawls, which are the primary fishing gear. Fishery

  6. The Development and Decline of Hawaii's Skipjack Tuna Fishery CHRISTOFER H. BOGGS and BERT S. KIKKAWA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Development and Decline of Hawaii's Skipjack Tuna Fishery CHRISTOFER H. BOGGS and BERT S pelamis, was the largest commercial fishery in Hawaii. Annual pole-and-line landings of skipjack tuna 1991, when the Hawaii longline fishery landed 8,000 t (all spe cies combined). Even so, at its largest

  7. WOKLD'S FISHERIES CONGRESS. 1.-REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE GENERAL COMMITTEE.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WOKLD'S FISHERIES CONGRESS. 1.-REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE GENERAL COMMITTEE. Eon. MARSHALL MUDONALD, U. S. Commissioner of Fisk and .Fisheries: SIR: The World's Congress Auxiliary of the World the opportunity thus presented by establishing a Fisheries Congress. The preliiniiiary meeting was held in Chicago

  8. Fisheries Utilization Research-50 Years in Retrospect, Part II: The Enduring Research Themes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisheries Utilization Research-50 Years in Retrospect, Part II: The Enduring Research Themes JOHN A. DASSOW Introduction The enduring themes of fisheries util ization research are neither surprising, the quality, nutrition, and safe ty of fishery products comprise the triad of past and future utilization

  9. Fisheries Utilization Research-50 Years in Retrospect, Part III: Processing and Engineering Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisheries Utilization Research-50 Years in Retrospect, Part III: Processing and Engineering Research JOHN A. DASSOW Introduction Fishery utilization research by defini tion is primarily applied with the Utilization Research Division, Northwest and Alaska Fisheries Re search Center, NMFS, NOAA, Seattle, WA 98112

  10. Satellite remote sensing for an ecosystem approach to fisheries E. Chassot1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    of information for ecosystem modelling, a key tool for implementing an ecosystem approach to fisheries managementSatellite remote sensing for an ecosystem approach to fisheries management E. Chassot1 *, S and it is a promising tool for conservation issues. In the context of an ecosystem approach to fisheries management

  11. REQUIREMENTS FOR MINOR IN FISHERY BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT OF FISH, WILDLIFE, AND CONSERVATION BIOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    REQUIREMENTS FOR MINOR IN FISHERY BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT OF FISH, WILDLIFE, AND CONSERVATION BIOLOGY for minor= 26 - 28 Aquatic and Fishery Electives for Fishery Biology Minor (Additional course work may 301/307, MATH 141/155/160) BZ 332 Phycology (F) FW 402 Fish Culture (S; FW 300) BZ 471 Stream Biology

  12. DEALING WITH DATA-POOR FISHERIES: A CASE STUDY OF THE BIG SKATE (RAJA BINOCULATA) IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DEALING WITH DATA-POOR FISHERIES: A CASE STUDY OF THE BIG SKATE (RAJA BINOCULATA) IN BRITISH: Master of Resource Management Project No.: 522 Title of Thesis: Dealing with data-poor fisheries: A case study of the big skate (Raja binoculata) in British Columbia's groundfish fishery Examining Committee

  13. THE FISHERIES AND THE GUANO INDUSTRY OF PERU By Robert E. Coker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE FISHERIES AND THE GUANO INDUSTRY OF PERU .;1. By Robert E. Coker Lately Fishery Expert to the Government 0/ Peru Paper presented before the Fourth International Fishery Congress held at Washington, U. S - - - u u _ 354 II. The guano industry. - - - - - u - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - _ _ - - _ u

  14. port of the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries ological Laboratory, Beaufort, N.C.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6 Operation of Hadley Falls Dam fish lift- -1 9 66. 6 Collection of shad eggs above Hadley Falls Dam menhaden fishery Catch sampling: Gulf menhaden fishery ··. Analysis of 1965 menhaden fishery statistics ......... ....... . ............... ..........Administration and Maintenance Meetings and training programs .......................... Publications

  15. Marine Recreational Boat Fishery of the New York Bight Apex in 1971

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marine Recreational Boat Fishery of the New York Bight Apex in 1971 CHESTER C. BUCHANAN, RICHARD and industrialized New York New Jersey metropolitan area (the New York Bight apex) support one of the most on this fishery is re quired because of multiple use issues in the New York Bight waters including fishery

  16. Independent Scientific Advisory Board Review of NOAA Fisheries'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ....................................................................................14 3.1: SNAKE RIVER BASIN FALL CHINOOK SALMON RUN RECONSTRUCTION AS A BASIS FOR MULTISTAGE STOCK Populations in the Interior Columbia River Basin (June 28, 2013 draft) ISAB 2013-5 October 18, 2013 #12;Independent Scientific Advisory Board for the Northwest Power and Conservation Council, Columbia River Basin

  17. Rivanna River Basin Commission (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rivanna River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the Rivanna River...

  18. Rio Grande River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hills Photo Shop

    2011-09-05

    FORKS BIRDBEAR-NISKU JEFFERSON GROUP DUPEROW O (IJ o BEAVER HILL LAKE GR UP ELK POINT GROUP SOURIS RIVER Ist. RED BED DAWSON BAY 2ll(IRED BED PRAIRIE EVAP WI NI ASHERN INTERLAKE STONY MOUNTAIN RED RIVER WINN IP EG Figure 3... and is bounded by the Sioux Arch, the Black Hills Uplift, the Miles City Arch, and the Bowdoin Dome. The structural trends within the basin parallel the major structural trends of the Rocky Mountain Belt. The Williston Basin is characterized by gently...

  19. VOLUNTEER-BASED SALMON RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Institute Environment Canada VOLUNTEER-BASED MONITORING PROGRAM FOR THE SALMON RIVER BASIN: USING BENTHICVOLUNTEER-BASED MONITORING PROGRAM FOR THE SALMON RIVER BASIN: USING BENTHIC INDICATORS TO ASSESS INDICATORS TO ASSESS STREAM ECOSYSTEM HEALTH #12;Volunteer-Based Monitoring Program for the Salmon River

  20. Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment, 2006 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Christopher; Geist, David

    2007-04-01

    The Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment was funded to address degradation and loss of spawning habitat for chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook salmon (Onchoryhnchus tshawytscha). In 1999, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed lower Columbia River chum salmon as a threatened Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). The Grays River watershed is one of two remaining significant chum salmon spawning locations in this ESU. Runs of Grays River chum and Chinook salmon have declined significantly during the past century, largely because of damage to spawning habitat associated with timber harvest and agriculture in the watershed. In addition, approximately 20-25% of the then-remaining chum salmon spawning habitat was lost during a 1999 channel avulsion that destroyed an important artificial spawning channel operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Although the lack of stable, high-quality spawning habitat is considered the primary physical limitation on Grays River chum salmon production today, few data are available to guide watershed management and channel restoration activities. The objectives of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment project were to (1) perform a comprehensive watershed and biological analysis, including hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological assessments; (2) develop a prioritized list of actions that protect and restore critical chum and Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Grays River based on comprehensive geomorphic, hydrologic, and stream channel assessments; and (3) gain a better understanding of chum and Chinook salmon habitat requirements and survival within the lower Columbia River and the Grays River. The watershed-based approach to river ecosystem restoration relies on a conceptual framework that describes general relationships between natural landscape characteristics, watershed-scale habitat-forming processes, aquatic habitat conditions, and biological integrity. In addition, human land-use impacts are factored into the conceptual model because they can alter habitat quality and can disrupt natural habitat forming processes. In this model (Figure S.1), aquatic habitat--both instream and riparian--is viewed as the link between watershed conditions and biologic responses. Based on this conceptual model, assessment of habitat loss and the resultant declines in salmonid populations can be conducted by relating current and historical (e.g., natural) habitat conditions to salmonid utilization, diversity, and abundance. In addition, assessing disrupted ecosystem functions and processes within the watershed can aid in identifying the causes of habitat change and the associated decline in biological integrity. In this same way, restoration, enhancement, and conservation projects can be identified and prioritized. A watershed assessment is primarily a landscape-scale evaluation of current watershed conditions and the associated hydrogeomorphic riverine processes. The watershed assessment conducted for this project focused on watershed processes that form and maintain salmonid habitat. Landscape metrics describing the level of human alteration of natural ecosystem attributes were used as indicators of water quality, hydrology, channel geomorphology, instream habitat, and biotic integrity. Ecological (watershed) processes are related to and can be predicted based on specific aspects of spatial pattern. This study evaluated the hydrologic regime, sediment delivery regime, and riparian condition of the sub-watersheds that comprise the upper Grays River watershed relative to their natural range of conditions. Analyses relied primarily on available geographic information system (GIS) data describing landscape characteristics such as climate, vegetation type and maturity, geology and soils, topography, land use, and road density. In addition to watershed-scale landscape characteristics, the study area was also evaluated on the riparian scale, with appropriate landscape variables analyzed within

  1. Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment Final Report 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Christopher W.; McGrath, Kathleen E.; Geist, David R.; Abbe, Timothy; Barton, Chase

    2008-02-04

    The Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment was funded to address degradation and loss of spawning habitat for chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook salmon (Onchoryhnchus tshawytscha). In 1999, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed lower Columbia River chum salmon as a threatened Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). The Grays River watershed is one of two remaining significant chum salmon spawning locations in this ESU. Runs of Grays River chum and Chinook salmon have declined significantly during the past century, largely because of damage to spawning habitat associated with timber harvest and agriculture in the watershed. In addition, approximately 20-25% of the then-remaining chum salmon spawning habitat was lost during a 1999 channel avulsion that destroyed an important artificial spawning channel operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Although the lack of stable, high-quality spawning habitat is considered the primary physical limitation on Grays River chum salmon production today, few data are available to guide watershed management and channel restoration activities. The objectives of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment project were to (1) perform a comprehensive watershed and biological analysis, including hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological assessments; (2) develop a prioritized list of actions that protect and restore critical chum and Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Grays River based on comprehensive geomorphic, hydrologic, and stream channel assessments; and (3) gain a better understanding of chum and Chinook salmon habitat requirements and survival within the lower Columbia River and the Grays River. The watershed-based approach to river ecosystem restoration relies on a conceptual framework that describes general relationships between natural landscape characteristics, watershed-scale habitat-forming processes, aquatic habitat conditions, and biological integrity. In addition, human land-use impacts are factored into the conceptual model because they can alter habitat quality and can disrupt natural habitat-forming processes. In this model (Figure S.1), aquatic habitat--both instream and riparian--is viewed as the link between watershed conditions and biologic responses. Based on this conceptual model, assessment of habitat loss and the resultant declines in salmonid populations can be conducted by relating current and historical (e.g., natural) habitat conditions to salmonid utilization, diversity, and abundance. In addition, assessing disrupted ecosystem functions and processes within the watershed can aid in identifying the causes of habitat change and the associated decline in biological integrity. In this same way, restoration, enhancement, and conservation projects can be identified and prioritized. A watershed assessment is primarily a landscape-scale evaluation of current watershed conditions and the associated hydrogeomorphic riverine processes. The watershed assessment conducted for this project focused on watershed processes that form and maintain salmonid habitat. Landscape metrics describing the level of human alteration of natural ecosystem attributes were used as indicators of water quality, hydrology, channel geomorphology, instream habitat, and biotic integrity. Ecological (watershed) processes are related to and can be predicted based on specific aspects of spatial pattern. This study evaluated the hydrologic regime, sediment delivery regime, and riparian condition of the sub-watersheds that comprise the upper Grays River watershed relative to their natural range of conditions. Analyses relied primarily on available geographic information system (GIS) data describing landscape characteristics such as climate, vegetation type and maturity, geology and soils, topography, land use, and road density. In addition to watershed-scale landscape characteristics, the study area was also evaluated on the riparian scale, with appropriate landscape variables analyzed within

  2. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program; Meadow Creek vs. Lake Whatcom Stock Kokanee Salmon Investigations in Lake Roosevelt, Annual Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLellan, Holly

    2003-03-01

    Lake Whatcom, Washington kokanee have been stocked in Lake Roosevelt since 1987 with the primary objective of creating a self-sustaining fishery. Success has been limited by low recruitment to the fishery, low adult returns to hatcheries, and a skewed sex ratio. It was hypothesized that a stock native to the upper Columbia River might perform better than the coastal Lake Whatcom stock. Kokanee from Meadow Creek, a tributary of Kootenay Lake, British Columbia were selected as an alternative stock. Post smolts from each stock were released from Sherman Creek Hatchery in late June 2000 and repeated in 2001. Stock performance was evaluated using three measures; (1) number of returns to Sherman Creek, the primary egg collection facility, (2) the number of returns to 86 tributaries sampled and, (3) the number of returns to the creel. In two repeated experiments, neither Meadow Creek or Lake Whatcom kokanee appeared to be capable of providing a run of three-year old spawners to sustain stocking efforts. Less than 10 three-years olds from either stock were collected during the study period. Chi-square analysis indicated age two Meadow Creek kokanee returned to Sherman Creek and to other tributaries in significantly higher numbers when compared to the Lake Whatcom stock in both 2000 and 2001. However, preliminary data from the Spokane Tribe of Indians indicated that a large number of both stocks were precocial before they were stocked. The small number of hatchery three-year olds collected indicated that the current hatchery rearing and stocking methods will continue to produce a limited jacking run largely composed of precocious males and a small number of three-year olds. No kokanee from the study were collected during standard lake wide creel surveys. Supplemental creel data, including fishing derbies, test fisheries, and angler diaries, indicated anglers harvested two-year-old hatchery kokanee a month after release. The majority of the two-year old kokanee harvested were from a direct stock at the Fort Spokane boat launch. Only Lake Whatcom kokanee were stocked from the boat launch, therefore stock performance was not evaluated, however the high success of the stocking location will likely increase harvest of hatchery kokanee in the future. Despite low numbers of the targeted three-year olds, Meadow Creek kokanee should be stocked when possible to promote fish native to the upper Columbia River.

  3. Savannah River Site Robotics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2012-06-14

    Meet Sandmantis and Frankie, two advanced robotic devices that are key to cleanup at Savannah River Site. Sandmantis cleans hard, residual waste off huge underground storage tanks. Frankie is equipped with unique satellite capabilities and sensing abilties that can determine what chemicals still reside in the tanks in a cost effective manner.

  4. Potential alteration of fjordal circulation due to a large floating structure—Numerical investigation with application to Hood Canal basin in Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khangaonkar, Tarang; Wang, Taiping

    2013-01-02

    Circulation in typical fjords is characterized by a shallow brackish layer at the surface over a deep long and narrow saltwater column. This surface layer is responsible for the outflow of water from the fjord, is easily disrupted by external forces, such as wind, and is influenced by freshwater inflow. In this paper, we postulate that the stability of fjordal circulation may also be vulnerable to impacts from anthropogenic alterations, such as floating structures, that could constrict the mixing and transport in the upper layers of the water column. The potential for alteration of circulation in Hood Canal, a silled-fjord located inside Puget Sound, Washington, has been examined. Using classical analytical treatments along the lines formulated by Hansen and Rattray [1965], Rattray [1967], Dyer [1973] and more recently, MacCready [2004], we develop a solution applicable to a range of estuary classifications varying from a partially mixed estuary regime to classical fjord conditions. Both estuary types exist in the Puget Sound system, and we compare our analytical solution with observed data. The analysis is based on an exponential variation of eddy viscosity with depth, and it has been extended further with modifications of the free surface boundary conditions to develop a solution representing the presence of a floating bridge at the estuary/fjord entrance. The model results show that tidally averaged mean circulation under the influence of such a constraint could reduce by as much as 30 to 50 percent. The overall water quality of fjords and narrow estuaries is dependent on net circulation and flushing. A potential decrease in residual flow or a corresponding increase in residence time of this magnitude merits further study.

  5. An Analysis of Texas Waterways: A Report on the Physical Characteristics of Rivers, Streams, and Bayous in Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belisle, Harold J.; Josselet, Ron

    1977-01-01

    Cree k San Jacinto River, East Fork Spring Creek Taylor Bayou Turkey Creek V. CENTRAL TEXAS WATE RWAYS A. Major Waterways Blanco River Bosque River Brazos River Colorado River Concho River . Frio River Guadalupe River Lampasas River... MAJOR CENTRAL TEXAS WATERWAYS 13. Blanco River 14. Bosque River 15. Brazos River 16. Colorado River 17. Concho River 18. Frio River 19. Guadal upe River 20. Lampasas River 21. Lavaca River 22. Leon River 23. Little River 24. Llano River 25...

  6. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program Hatchery Element : Project Progress Report 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, Dan J.; Heindel, Jeff A.; Green, Daniel G.; Kline, Paul A.

    2008-12-17

    Numbers of Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka have declined dramatically in recent years. In Idaho, only the lakes of the upper Salmon River (Sawtooth Valley) remain as potential sources of production (Figure 1). Historically, five Sawtooth Valley lakes (Redfish, Alturas, Pettit, Stanley, and Yellowbelly) supported sockeye salmon (Bjornn et al. 1968; Chapman et al. 1990). Currently, only Redfish Lake receives a remnant anadromous run. On April 2, 1990, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries Service (NOAA - formerly National Marine Fisheries Service) received a petition from the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes (SBT) to list Snake River sockeye salmon as endangered under the United States Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973. On November 20, 1991, NOAA declared Snake River sockeye salmon endangered. In 1991, the SBT, along with the Idaho Department of Fish & Game (IDFG), initiated the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Sawtooth Valley Project (Sawtooth Valley Project) with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The goal of this program is to conserve genetic resources and to rebuild Snake River sockeye salmon populations in Idaho. Coordination of this effort is carried out under the guidance of the Stanley Basin Sockeye Technical Oversight Committee (SBSTOC), a team of biologists representing the agencies involved in the recovery and management of Snake River sockeye salmon. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries Service ESA Permit Nos. 1120, 1124, and 1481 authorize IDFG to conduct scientific research on listed Snake River sockeye salmon. Initial steps to recover the species involved the establishment of captive broodstocks at the Eagle Fish Hatchery in Idaho and at NOAA facilities in Washington State (for a review, see Flagg 1993; Johnson 1993; Flagg and McAuley 1994; Kline 1994; Johnson and Pravecek 1995; Kline and Younk 1995; Flagg et al. 1996; Johnson and Pravecek 1996; Kline and Lamansky 1997; Pravecek and Johnson 1997; Pravecek and Kline 1998; Kline and Heindel 1999; Hebdon et al. 2000; Flagg et al. 2001; Kline and Willard 2001; Frost et al. 2002; Hebdon et al. 2002; Hebdon et al. 2003; Kline et al. 2003a; Kline et al. 2003b; Willard et al. 2003a; Willard et al. 2003b; Baker et al. 2004; Baker et al. 2005; Willard et al. 2005; Baker et al. 2006; Plaster et al. 2006; Baker et al. 2007). The immediate goal of the program is to utilize captive broodstock technology to conserve the population's unique genetics. Long-term goals include increasing the number of individuals in the population to address delisting criteria and to provide sport and treaty harvest opportunity. (1) Develop captive broodstocks from Redfish Lake sockeye salmon, culture broodstocks and produce progeny for reintroduction. (2) Determine the contribution hatchery-produced sockeye salmon make toward avoiding population extinction and increasing population abundance. (3) Describe O. nerka population characteristics for Sawtooth Valley lakes in relation to carrying capacity and broodstock program reintroduction efforts. (4) Utilize genetic analysis to discern the origin of wild and broodstock sockeye salmon to provide maximum effectiveness in their utilization within the broodstock program. (5) Transfer technology through participation in the technical oversight committee process, provide written activity reports, and participate in essential program management and planning activities. Idaho Department of Fish and Game's participation in the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program includes two areas of effort: (1) sockeye salmon captive broodstock culture, and (2) sockeye salmon research and evaluations. Although objectives and tasks from both components overlap and contribute to achieving the same goals, work directly related to sockeye salmon captive broodstock research and enhancement will appear under a separate cover. Research and enhancement activities associated with Snake River sockeye salmon are permitted under NOAA permit numbers 1120, 1124, and 1481. This report details fish

  7. NOAA TECHNICAL REPORTS National Marine Fisheries Service, Circulars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    otherwise noted) from D83, Technical Information Division, Environmental Science Information Center, NOAA Station, Gulf Breeze, Fla.. fiscal year 1969. By the Laboratory staff. August 1970, iii + 33 p., 29 figs Fisheries, fiscal year 1969. By Division of Economic Research, April 1970, iii + 29 p., 12 figs., 7 tables

  8. NOAA TECHNICAL REPORTS National Marine Fisheries Service, Circulars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    otherwise noted) from D83, Technical Information Division, Environmental Science Information Center, NOAA Breeze, Fla., fiscal year 1969. By the Laboratory staff. August 1970, iii + 33 p., 29 figs., 12 tables p., 13 figs. 337. Program of Division of Economic Research, Bureau of Commercial Fisheries, fiscal

  9. NOAA TECHNICAL REPORTS National Marine Fisheries Service, Circulars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    otherwise noted) from 083, Technical Information Division, Environmental Science Information Center, NOAA Station, Gulf Breeze, Fla.. fiscal year 1969. By the Laboratory staff. August 1970, iii + 33 p.. 29 figs Fisheries. fiscal year 1969. By Division of Economic Research, April 1970. iii + 29 p., 12 figs.. 7 tables

  10. UBECHE-DE-MER" FISHERY FOR TRUK? Alan J. Beardsley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Sachithananthan of FAO and the South Pacific Islands Fisheries Development Agency visited Truk to demon- strate-month tour of duty in Micronesia at the request of the U.S. Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands gov days to remove moisture from animals. Mangrove wood pro\\lded the heat. Fig. 6 - Com plelely dl) ammals

  11. POWER PLANT IMPACT ASSESSMENT: A SIMPLE FISHERY PRODUCTION MODEL APPROACH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    POWER PLANT IMPACT ASSESSMENT: A SIMPLE FISHERY PRODUCTION MODEL APPROACH ALECD. MACCALL,' KEITHR power plant entrainment mortality as a fraction (Rc) of the abundance ofthat cohort in the absence of power plant impact can be calculated by Rc = exp (-Ejtj) wheretj is the duration oflife stagei, and

  12. MFR PAPER 1165 Japan's tuna fishery faces a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MFR PAPER 1165 Japan's tuna fishery faces a major depression as catch rates decline, oil prices of the more obvious reasons for the present state are these: I. Tripling of oil prices in the last year. 2 market are not also having their prob- lems at this time. The increased oil prices, having gone from $40

  13. Regulatory Impact Analysis for Pelagic Fishery Management in Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Regulatory Impact Analysis for Pelagic Fishery Management in Hawaii: A Spatially Disaggregated of Hawaii Honolulu, Hawaii SOEST 05-01 JIMAR Contribution 04-353 #12;ACKNOWLEDGMENT This project was funded. The author also thanks Samuel Herrick, NMFS, La Jolla; Amy Gough, JIMAR, University of Hawaii; and

  14. SALT-flSH INPUSTRIES FISHERY LEAFLET 240

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SALT-flSH INPUSTRIES FISHERY LEAFLET 240 FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT, Albert M. Day, Director #12;THE VENEZUKLAN SALT-FISH INDUSTRIES CONTE^fTS Part II Potential Productive and Craft 29 Development of Unused or Underutilized Species 29 Development of New Areas 35 Salt 35 Studies

  15. Fishery Leaflet 374 Washington 2 i Do Co May

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ary Fishery Leaflet 374 Washington 2 i Do Co May FREEZING AND CANNING KING CRAB By John Ao Dassow in maintaining the quality of the canned or frozen product 0 King crab meat must be prooessed with utmost care orab, butohering i oooking i oooling, remo'9'..ing the meat" and oleaning o Reoom- mendations are based

  16. Fishery Bulletin Index Volume 103(14), 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    743 Fishery Bulletin Index Volume 103(1­4), 2005 List ot subjects Abundance Argentine hake 445 efficiency 438 Catch per unit of effort 438, 469, 501, 620, 670, 685 Central California Valley Index (CVI Southern Oscillation 685 Endangered Species Act 270 Energetic cost 63 Energy consumption 71 Enhydra lutris

  17. Foreign Fishery Developments 3.000 CJ NOMINAL VALUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the Venezuelan Gov Brazil, and Cuba) export more than $0.1 (Figure 1, Table 1). Chile's export earn ernment in a variety of other Argentina reported an export increase (tuna), Argentina (hake), Brazil (shrimp fisheries ican export earnings increased by near groundfish in Europe and the United ings in 1987, even though

  18. The Fisheries of Chile UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to those of Peru, the world's leading fishing nation in quantity of catch. Although on a lesser scale, developments in Chile have been paralleling those in Peru, where the anchovy fish meal sector of the fishing purchas.ng power of many people limits purchases. Con- sumption of fishery products IS highest lr1

  19. Market Design for Fishery IFQ Programs John O. Ledyard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ledyard, John O.

    Tradable Quotas (IFQs) is an efficient and cost-effective method for managing a fishery. Once IFQs. There are many choices that must be made when a new IFQ program is initiated. Two of these fall under the purview of the fishermen (effort, gear choice, entry or exit, etc.) are the same in all variations. (2) The structure

  20. UNITED ST ATES: The Mari ne Fisheries Review, by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Is Dead 'Artificial Ocean' Will Test Oil-Spill Cleanup Methods NOAA Simplifies Ways to Calculate Tidal's Fisheries Offer Investment Opportunitie s South Korean Fishing Industry Grows Remarkably Taiwan: 400 Tuna Transplants Salmon Successfully in Atlantic South Pacific: Australia: Investment Prospects in Australia U. S

  1. National Marine Fisheries Service National Gravel Extraction Guidance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . E. McGlynn NOAA Fisheries ­ Office of Habitat Conservation NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS-F/SPO-70 of this report may be obtained from: Office of Habitat Conservation NMFS, NOAA 1315 East-West Highway, F/HC2; and loss or degradation of riparian habitat. The impacts can extend far beyond the mining site, and stream

  2. Sukwoo Chang Sandy Hook Laboratory. Northeast Fisheries Science Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Service. NOAA Highlands. New Jersey 07732 Analysis of fishery resources: potential risk from sewage sludge applied to bot- tom trawl survey data in tests of hy- potheses about potential effects of sewage sludge the disposal of contaminant- laden sewage sludge at the deep- water 106-MDS. There was also a decline

  3. National Marine Fisheries Service Alaska Region Protected Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Marine Fisheries Service Alaska Region Protected Resources Juneau, Alaska Fishermen may incidentally (unintentionally) take marine mammals in the course of commer- cial fishing operations, provided they have been issued the appropriate exemptions. However, the intentional lethal take of any marine mam

  4. CONFLICTS IN RIVER MANAGEMENT: A CONSERVATIONIST'S PERSPECTIVE ON SACRAMENTO RIVER RIPARIAN HABITATS--

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONFLICTS IN RIVER MANAGEMENT: A CONSERVATIONIST'S PERSPECTIVE ON SACRAMENTO RIVER RIPARIAN, Defenders of Wildlife, Sacramento, California. Abstract: The Sacramento River's historic riparian habi- tats on this conference's plenary session panel, I will provide a conservationist perspective on Sacramento River riparian

  5. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 133:11501162, 2004 Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisheries Society 2004 Development and Evaluation of a Western Mosquitofish Bioenergetics Model STEVEN R.--We developed a bioenergetics model for the western mosquitofish Gambusia affinis by combining data rates were observed at 32 C. Bioenergetics estimates of food consumption agreed well with laboratory mea

  6. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 135:6175, 2006 [Article]Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ]Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2006 DOI: 10.1577/T04-215.1 Evaluation of a Lake Whitefish Bioenergetics Model Arbor, Michigan 48105, USA Abstract.--We evaluated the Wisconsin bioenergetics model for lake whitefish on a comparison of bioenergetics model predictions of lake whitefish food consumption and growth with observed

  7. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 23:779786, 2003 Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilde, Gene

    * AND KEVIN L. POPE Wildlife and Fisheries Management Institute, Mail Stop 2125, Texas Tech University Stizostedion vitreum and sau- ger S. canadense (e.g., Goeman 1991; Fielder and Johnson 1994; Hoffman et al in popularity of tournament angling (Shupp 1979; Duttweiler 1985; Schramm et al. 1991) and concerns

  8. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program, Part A; Fisheries Creel Survey and Population Status Analysis, 1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spotts, Jim; Shields, John; Underwood, Keith

    2002-05-01

    The Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program is the result of a merger between two projects, the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program (BPA No. 8806300) and the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project (BPA No. 9404300). These projects were merged in 1996 to continue work historically completed under the separate projects, and is now referred to as the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program. Creel and angler surveys estimated that anglers made 196,775 trips to Lake Roosevelt during 1998, with an economic value of $8.0 million dollars, based on the Consumer Price Index (CPI). In 1998 it was estimated that 9,980 kokanee salmon, 226,809 rainbow trout, 119,346 walleye, and over 14,000 smallmouth bass and other species were harvested. Creel data indicates that hatchery reared rainbow trout contribute substantially to the Lake Roosevelt fishery. The contribution of kokanee salmon to the creel has not met the expectations of fishery managers to date, and is limited by entrainment from the reservoir, predation, and possible fish culture obstacles. The 1998 Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Creel and Population Analysis Annual Report includes analyses of the relative abundance of fish species, and reservoir habitat relationships (1990-1998). Fisheries surveys (1990-1998) indicate that walleye and burbot populations appear to be increasing, while yellow perch, a preferred walleye prey species, and other prey species are decreasing in abundance. The long term decreasing abundance of yellow perch and other prey species are suspected to be the result of the lack of suitable multiple reservoir elevation spawning and rearing refugia for spring spawning reservoir prey species, resulting from seasonal spring-early summer reservoir elevation manipulations, and walleye predation. Reservoir water management is both directly, and indirectly influencing the success of mitigation hatchery production of kokanee salmon and rainbow trout. Tag return data suggested excessive entrainment occurred in 1997, with 97 percent of tag recoveries from rainbow trout coming from below Grand Coulee Dam. High water years appear to have substantial entrainment impacts on salmonids. The 1998 salmonid harvest has improved from the previous two years, due to the relatively water friendly year of 1998, from the harvest observed in the 1996-1997 high water years, which were particularly detrimental to the reservoir salmonid fisheries. Impacts from those water years are still evident in the reservoir fish populations. Analysis of historical relative species abundance, tagging data and hydroacoustical studies, indicate that hydro-operations have a substantial influence on the annual standing crop of reservoir salmonid populations due to entrainment losses, and limited prey species recruitment, due to reservoir elevation level fluctuation, and corresponding reproductive success.

  9. d Onion River Review d OnionRiverReview2010dd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Adam Lee

    ://www.smcvt.edu/onionriver/. #12;d Onion River Review d 2010 d river run by Eireann Aspell Lauren Fish Jamie Gorton Heidi Lynchd Onion River Review d 2010 d OnionRiverReview2010dd #12;The Onion River Review is the literary Matt Serron #12;BLANK Editors' Note The only certainty of the Onion River Review is the editors' un

  10. Selected Area Fishery Evaluation Project Economic Analysis Study Final Report, Final Draft Revision 4: November 10, 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonneville Power Administration; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife; Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2006-11-01

    The purpose of this Study is to provide an economic review of current and proposed changes to the Select Area Fishery Evaluation Project (SAFE or Project). The Study results are the information requested in comments made on the Project by a joint review dated March 2005 by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC) Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) and Independent Economic Analysis Board (IEAB). North et al. (2006) addressed technical questions about operations and plans, and this report contains the response information for comments concerning Project economics. This report can be considered an economic feasibility review meeting guidelines for cost-effective analysis developed by the IEAB (2003). It also contains other economic measurement descriptions to illustrate the economic effects of SAFE. The SAFE is an expansion of a hatchery project (locally called the Clatsop Economic Development Council Fisheries Project or CEDC) started in 1977 that released an early run coho (COH) stock into the Youngs River. The Youngs River entrance to the Columbia River at River Mile 12 is called Youngs Bay, which is located near Astoria, Oregon. The purpose of the hatchery project was to provide increased fishing opportunities for the in-river commercial fishing gillnet fleet. Instead of just releasing fish at the hatchery, a small scale net pen acclimation project in Youngs Bay was tried in 1987. Hirose et al. (1998) found that 1991-1992 COH broodstock over-wintered at the net pens had double the smolt-to-adult return rate (SAR) of traditional hatchery release, less than one percent stray rates, and 99 percent fishery harvests. It was surmised that smolts from other Columbia River hatcheries could be hauled to the net pens for acclimation and release to take advantage of the SAR's and fishing rates. Proposals were tendered to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and other agencies to fund the expansion for using other hatcheries smolts and other off-channel release sites. The BPA, who had been providing funds to the Project since 1982, greatly increased their financial participation for the experimental expansion of the net pen operations in 1993. Instead of just being a funding partner in CEDC operations, the BPA became a major financing source for other hatchery production operations. The BPA has viewed the 10 plus years of funding since then as an explorative project with two phases: a 'research' phase ending in 1993, and a 'development' phase ending in 2006. The next phase is referred to in proposals to BPA for continued funding as an 'establishment' phase to be started in 2007. There are three components of SAFE: (1) The CEDC owns and operates the net pens in the Columbia River estuary on the Oregon side. The CEDC also owns and operates a hatchery on the South Fork Klaskanine River. (2) There are many other hatcheries contributing smolts to the net pen operations. The present suite of hatcheries are operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW). The WDFW owns and operates the net pens at Deep River on the Washington side of the Columbia River. (3) The monitoring and evaluation (M&E) responsibilities are performed by employees of WDFW and ODFW. BPA provides funding for all three components as part of NPCC Project No. 199306000. The CEDC and other contributing hatcheries have other sources of funds that also support the SAFE. BPA's minor share (less than 10 percent) of CEDC funding in 1982 grew to about 55 percent in 1993 with the beginning of the development phase of the Project. The balance of the CEDC budget over the years has been from other federal, state, and local government programs. It has also included a 10 percent fee assessment (five percent of ex-vessel value received by harvesters plus five percent of purchase value made by processors) on harvests that take place in off-channel locations near the release sites. The CEDC total annual budget in the last several years has been in the $600 to $700 thousand range. The Project over

  11. RiverHeath Appleton, WI

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The goal of the project is to produce a closed loop neighborhood-wide geothermal exchange system using the river as the source of heat exchange.

  12. Florida Nuclear Profile - Crystal River

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Crystal River1" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  13. Louisiana Nuclear Profile - River Bend

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    River Bend" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  14. Rappahannock River Basin Commission (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rappahannock River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the...

  15. Susquehanna River Basin Compact (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation enables the state's entrance into the Susquehanna River Basin Compact, which provides for the conservation, development, and administration of the water resources of the...

  16. Spatial design principles for sustainable hydropower development in river basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jager, Henriette I.

    : Freshwater reserve design Hydroelectric power Network theory Optimization Regulated rivers River portfolio

  17. Open-access databases as unprecedented resources and drivers of cultural change in fisheries science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL; Utz, Ryan [National Ecological Observatory Network

    2014-01-01

    Open-access databases with utility in fisheries science have grown exponentially in quantity and scope over the past decade, with profound impacts to our discipline. The management, distillation, and sharing of an exponentially growing stream of open-access data represents several fundamental challenges in fisheries science. Many of the currently available open-access resources may not be universally known among fisheries scientists. We therefore introduce many national- and global-scale open-access databases with applications in fisheries science and provide an example of how they can be harnessed to perform valuable analyses without additional field efforts. We also discuss how the development, maintenance, and utilization of open-access data are likely to pose technical, financial, and educational challenges to fisheries scientists. Such cultural implications that will coincide with the rapidly increasing availability of free data should compel the American Fisheries Society to actively address these problems now to help ease the forthcoming cultural transition.

  18. National Marine Fisheries Service September 24, 2008 Recovery Plan Module

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydropower Projects 1.0 Purpose This module summarizes the general effects of Columbia River mainstem hydropower projects on all 13 Endangered Species Act (ESA)-listed anadromous salmonids in the Columbia basin Plan Module Mainstem Columbia River Hydropower Projects 1

  19. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Westinghouse Savannah River...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    March 6, 2000 Issued to Westinghouse Savannah River Company, related to Procurement Quality Assurance and Quality Improvement Deficiencies at the Savannah River Site. On March 6,...

  20. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Westinghouse Savannah River...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EA 98-09 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Westinghouse Savannah River Company - EA 98-09 September 21, 1998 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Westinghouse Savannah River...

  1. PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Electronic Safeguards...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electronic Safeguards Security System (E3S) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Electronic Safeguards Security System (E3S) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Electronic...

  2. Project Management Institute Highlights Savannah River Nuclear...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Management Institute Highlights Savannah River Nuclear Solutions in Publication Project Management Institute Highlights Savannah River Nuclear Solutions in Publication February 6,...

  3. Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Operations Office...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Savannah River Operations Office - July 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Operations Office - July 2013 July 2013 Review of the Employee Concerns Program at the...

  4. Flambeau River Biofuels Demonstration-Scale Biorefinery

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Wisconsin (NewPage Corporation in Wisconsin Rapids and Flambeau River Papers, LLC in Park Falls). NewPage and Flambeau River have demonstrated successful collaboration on...

  5. River Corridor - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultiday ProductionDesigningResourcesfeed-image Digg:RisingRiver

  6. Empirical evaluation of regional scale marine reserves and the groundfish trawl fishery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalton, Michael; Ralston, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Project Data and Geographical Information System Dynamic GISfishery with geographical information systems, analysis ofinto a geographical information system (GIS). Fisheries data

  7. DOE/EIS-0169-SA-03: Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - KEWN-4 Proposed Action: Yakima Fisheries Project - Use of Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife's Yakima Hatchery and Acclimation and Research Activities PL-6: F3204...

  8. A Review of Indian Ocean Fisheries for Skipjack Tuna, Katsuwonus pelamis, and Yellowfin Tuna, Thunnus albacares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Review of Indian Ocean Fisheries for Skipjack Tuna, Katsuwonus pelamis, and Yellowfin Tuna, Thunnus albacares Introduction Skipjack tuna, Katsuwonus pelamis, and yellowfin tuna, Thunnus albacares

  9. GOLF COURSES FRASER RIVER BASIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Fraser Pollution Abatement Office Fraser River Action Plan Environment Canada North Vancouver, B judgement in light of the knowledge and information available to UMA at the time of preparation. UMA denies by Environment Canada under the Fraser River Action Plan through the Fraser Pollution Abatement Office. The views

  10. Acknowledgment of reviewers The editorial staff of Fishery Bulletin would like to thank the following referees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dr. William Coles Dr. Graeme Hays Dr. Dean L. Courtney Dr. Edward J. Heist Dr. Robert Cowen Dr Dr. G.J. Holt Dr. Edward E. DeMartini Mr. Peter B. Hood Dr. M.C. DeVries Dr. Kevin Hovel Dr. Heidi(4) Dr. Clay E. Porch Dr. James H. Power Dr. Eric D. Prince Dr. John A. Quinlan Dr. Paul Rago Dr

  11. Qualitative assessment of the impacts of proposed system operating strategies to resident fish within selected Columbia River Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shreffler, D.K.; Geist, D.R.; Mavros, W.V.

    1994-01-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), and US Army Corps of Engineers (COE) are presently conducting the System Operation Review (SOR) for the Columbia River basin. The SOR began in 1990 and is expected to provide an operating strategy that will take into consideration multiple uses of the Columbia River system including navigation, flood control, irrigation, power generation, fish migration, fish and wildlife habitat, recreation, water supply, and water quality. This report provides descriptions of each of the non-modeled reservoirs and other specified river reaches. The descriptions focus on the distinct management goals for resident fish: biodiversity, species-specific concerns, and sport fisheries. In addition, this report provides a qualitative assessment of impacts to the resident fish within these reservoirs and river reaches from the 7 alternative system operating strategies. In addition to this introduction, the report contains four more sections. Section 2.0 provides the methods that were used. Reservoir descriptions appear in Section 3.0, which is a synthesis of our literature review and interviews with resident fish experts. Section 4.0 contains a discussion of potential impacts to fish within each of these reservoirs and river reaches from the 7 proposed system operating strategies. The references cited are listed in Section 5.0.

  12. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 131:492497, 2002 Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonar, Scott A.

    of cold, swift water from Colorado River dams on flannelmouth sucker populations. We conducted fatigue of hydroelectric dams have transformed the Colorado River from a warm, turbid, and highly dynamic stream into a system dominated by large reservoirs and cold tail- waters. These changes have dramatically affected

  13. The Mutton Snapper (Lutjanus analis) Spawning Aggregation Fishery at Gladden Spit, Belize: Inter-annual and Within-season Dynamics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granados-Dieseldorff, Pablo

    2013-11-07

    Artisanal fisheries constitute a considerable source of employment, income, and protein for many coastal communities in the Caribbean. One of the region’s most valuable fisheries is for mutton snapper (Lutjanus analis), a coral-reef fish that uses...

  14. Multi-Scale Action Effectiveness Research in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2011 - FINAL ANNUAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sather, Nichole K.; Storch, Adam; Johnson, Gary E.; Teel, D. J.; Skalski, J. R.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Kaufmann, Ronald M.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Blaine, Jennifer; Kuligowski, D. R.; Kropp, Roy K.; Dawley, Earl M.

    2012-05-31

    The study reported here was conducted by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), the University of Washington (UW), and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE). This research project was initiated in 2007 by the Bonneville Power Administration to investigate critical uncertainties regarding juvenile salmon ecology in shallow tidal freshwater habitats of the lower Columbia River. However, as part of the Washington Memorandum of Agreement, the project was transferred to the USACE in 2010. In transferring from BPA to the USACE, the focus of the tidal freshwater research project shifted from fundamental ecology toward the effectiveness of restoration in the Lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE). The research is conducted within the Action Agencies Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP). Data reported herein spans the time period May 2010 to September 2011.

  15. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program; Limnological and Fisheries Monitoring, Annual Report 2000.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Chuck; Scofield, Ben; Pavlik, Deanne

    2003-03-01

    A slightly dryer than normal year yielded flows in Lake Roosevelt that were essentially equal to the past ten year average. Annual mean inflow and outflow were 3,160.3 m3/s and 3,063.4 m3/s respectively. Mean reservoir elevation was 387.2 m above sea level at the Grand Coulee Dam forebay. The forebay elevation was below the mean elevation for a total of 168 days. During the first half of the 2000 forebay elevation changed at a rate of 0.121 m/d and during the last half changed at a rate of 0.208 m/d. The higher rate of elevation change earlier in the year is due to the drawdown to accommodate spring runoff. Mean annual water retention time was 40 days. Annual mean total dissolved gas was 108%. Total dissolved gas was greatest at upriver locations (110% = US/Canada Border annual mean) and decreased moving toward Grand Coulee Dam (106% = Grand Coulee Dam Forebay annual mean). Total dissolved gas was greatest in May (122% reservoir wide monthly mean). Gas bubble trauma was observed in 16 fish primarily largescale suckers and was low in severity. Reservoir wide mean temperatures were greatest in August (19.5 C) and lowest in January (5.5 C). The Spokane River and Sanpoil River Arms experienced higher temperatures than the mainstem reservoir. Brief stratification was observed at the Sanpoil River shore location in July. Warm water temperatures in the Spokane Arm contributed to low dissolved oxygen concentrations in August (2.6 mg/L at 33 m). However, decomposition of summer algal biomass was likely the main cause of depressed dissolved oxygen concentrations. Otherwise, dissolved oxygen profiles were relatively uniform throughout the water column across other sampling locations. Annual mean Secchi depth throughout the reservoir was 5.7 m. Nutrient concentrations were generally low, however, annual mean total phosphorus (0.016 mg/L) was in the mesotrophic range. Annual mean total nitrogen was in the meso-oligotrophic range. Total nitrogen to total phosphorus ratios were large (31:1 annual mean) likely indicating phosphorus limitations to phytoplankton.

  16. Savannah River Site Environmental Data for 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnett, M.

    1999-06-09

    This document presents data from Savannah River Site routine effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance programs.

  17. Wood River Levee Reconstruction, Madison County, IL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Wood River Levee Reconstruction, Madison County, IL 25 October 2006 Abstract: The recommended plan provides for flood damage reduction and restores the original degree of protection of the Wood River Levee-federal sponsor is the Wood River Drainage and Levee District. The Wood River Levee System was authorized

  18. Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sather, Nichole K.; Johnson, Gary E.; Storch, Adam; Teel, David; Skalski, John R.; Jones, Tucker A.; Dawley, Earl M.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Borde, Amy B.; Mallette, Christine; Farr, R.

    2009-05-29

    The tidal freshwater monitoring (TFM) project reported herein is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers [USACE], and the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act (ESA) as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System. The project is being performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council’s Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Project No. 2005-001-00). The research is a collaborative effort among the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the National Marine Fisheries Service, and the University of Washington.

  19. Olaf Langness, WDFW Fisheries hit low numbers during mid 1990s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the mainstem Columbia River index site. Run Year Number of Spawners As a % of Columbia R. 2011 8,200 0 creeks) #12;· Why should we look outside the Columbia River? · Can compare how runs to these rivers relate to the Columbia River run · Do they act as a sink for when the Columbia River conditions

  20. The Columbia River Estuary the Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    " fish and wildlife in the Columbia River as affected by development and operation of the hydroelectric modified in terms of physical and biological processes. The development and operation of the hydroelectric

  1. Plan Amendment Language for the Moratorium of Vessels Entering The Groundfish Fisheries in the Gulf of Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plan Amendment Language for the Moratorium of Vessels Entering The Groundfish Fisheries in the Gulf of Alaska A new Section 4.4.1.2 titled "Moratorium on Vessels Entering the Fisheries" would be added and would read as follows: 4.4.1.2 Moratorium on Vessels Entering the Fisheries Beginning on (insert

  2. GREAT LAKES FISHERY COMMISSION 2008 Project Completion Report1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanitary and Ship Canal or be transferred via bait buckets between these formerly isolated drainages in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal, which connects the upper Illinois River with Lake Michigan; a second

  3. Linkage of Fisheries Sectors to Hawaii's Economy and Economic Impacts of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Linkage of Fisheries Sectors to Hawaii's Economy and Economic Impacts of Longline Fishing-355 #12;1 Linkage of Fisheries Sectors to Hawaii's Economy and Economic Impacts of Longline Fishing, University of Hawaii at Manoa PingSun Leung College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources University

  4. Contribution, Linkages and Impacts of the Fisheries Sector to Hawaii's Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    #12;Contribution, Linkages and Impacts of the Fisheries Sector to Hawaii's Economy: A Social Contribution 11-373 #12;#12;1 Contribution, Linkages and Impacts of the Fisheries Sector to Hawaii's Economy and Dept. of Natural Resources and Environmental Management University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822

  5. Hawaii's Marine Fisheries: Some History, Long-term Trends, and Recent Developments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawaii's Marine Fisheries: Some History, Long-term Trends, and Recent Developments Introduction Recently Hawaii's commercial ma rine fishery has experienced a period of rapid growth and structural change Dole Street, Honolulu, HI 96822-2396. ABSTRACT - This paper provides an overview ofHawaii

  6. Fisheries and Marine Resources of Hawaii and the U.S.-associated Pacific Islands: An Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisheries and Marine Resources of Hawaii and the U.S.-associated Pacific Islands: An Introduction Introduction Fisheries of Hawaii and the U.S. in sular Pacific are quite different from typical industrial, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822. Mention of trade names or commercial firms does not imply

  7. Measuring Fishing Capacity and Utilization with Commonly Available Data: An Application to Alaska Fisheries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and do not necessarily reflect the position of the National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA. ABSTRACT species to catch (i.e. costs of fuel, bait, and labor; opportunity costs of participating in other fisheries; and ex-vessel prices). Ideally, one could compute capac- ity measures that reflect the maximum

  8. Reviews in Fisheries Science, 8(l): l-44 (2000) Relative Weight (Wr) Status and Current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2000-01-01

    for estimating fish body composition, as a measure of fish health, and to assess prey abundance, fish stockingsReviews in Fisheries Science, 8(l): l-44 (2000) Relative Weight (Wr) Status and Current Use in Fisheries Assessment and Management Brian G. B/a&well,* Michael L. Brown, and David W. Willis Department

  9. A SOCIAL RELATIONAL APPROACH TO THE CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT OF FISHERIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A SOCIAL RELATIONAL APPROACH TO THE CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT OF FISHERIES: THE RURAL COMMUNITIES Relational Approach to the Conservation and Management of Fisheries: The Rural Communities of the Loreto Bay under which resource users from seven rural coastal communities cooperate to access fish resources

  10. Tourism-related drivers of support for protection of fisheries resources on Andros Island, The Bahamas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langerhans, Brian

    to create a poverty trap by providing a minimum income thereby removing incentive to invest in education or take risks necessary to escape poverty (Delacote, 2009). Protecting fisheries resources can ensure the poverty trap effect caused by overreliance on extraction. Fisheries protection measures (e.g., protected

  11. Guianas-Brazil Shrimp Fishery and Related U.S. Research Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guianas-Brazil Shrimp Fishery and Related U.S. Research Activity Alexander Dragovich-free fishery began to crumble in 1970, as Brazil declared a 200-mile economic zone. To fish in Brazilian waters in the series of 2- and I-year agreements was signed on 9 May 1972 between the United States and Brazil

  12. It's intuitively obvious that habitat is important to fishes and the fisheries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    It's intuitively obvious that habitat is important to fishes and the fisheries they support to account for it in fisheries management. This is especially true for marine fishes like gag grouper fisherman worth his or her salt has a closely-guarded collection of GPS coordinates and an electronic fish

  13. haden in the South Atlantic summer fishery alone was 34,435 metric tons.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . CHEEK National Marine Fisheries Service Atlantic Estuolrine Fisheries Center Beaufort, NC 28516 four were available. Specimens ranged from 12 to 580 mm standard length (SL). Specimens smaller than about 60 mm SL were x-rayed with a soft-ray machine and larger specimens with a hard-ray machine. Counts

  14. Figure I.-Offshore bases in Mexico's Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ). Foreign Fishery Developments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Figure I.-Offshore bases in Mexico's Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ). Foreign Fishery Developments Mexico's Marine Fisheries Enforcement Gulf Coast Enforcement The Gulf of Mexico is especially rich in shrimp resources. Mexico has had major problems with illegal foreign fishing on the Campeche Bank, espe

  15. Impacts on Shrimp Yields of the 1981 Fishery Conservation Zone Closure off Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Impacts on Shrimp Yields of the 1981 Fishery Conservation Zone Closure off Texas scan NICHOLS Zone (FCZ) off the Texas coast. The FCZ was closed to implement part of the "Fishery Management Plan aztecus (Ives) to grow larger before harvesting. Since 1959, Texas state waters (the Territorial Sea, 0

  16. Review of the Marine Mammal Unusual Mortality Event Response Program of the National Marine Fisheries Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Review of the Marine Mammal Unusual Mortality Event Response Program of the National Marine and Atmospheric Administration National Marine Fisheries Service NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS-OPR-33 September National Marine Fisheries Service Office of Protected Resources 1315 East-West Highway Silver Spring

  17. Dayao County Yupao River BasDayao County Yupao River Basin Hydro...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dayao County Yupao River BasDayao County Yupao River Basin Hydro electricity Development Co Ltd in Jump to: navigation, search Name: Dayao County Yupao River BasDayao County Yupao...

  18. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Mary FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Forecasting · Local Information · Flood Warnings and Bulletins · Interpreting Flood Warnings and River Height Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood RiskBureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Mary FLOOD

  19. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Nerang FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Forecasting · Local Height Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Nerang River catchment is locatedBureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Nerang FLOOD

  20. The River Runs Dry: Examining Water Shortages in the Yellow River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zusman, Eric

    2000-01-01

    in Transition Zusman/The River Runs Dry Wang Liurong.YRCC’sin Transition Zusman/The River Runs Dry not just importantin Transition Zusman/The River Runs Dry emerging market

  1. Raft River Idaho Magnetotelluric Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Gregory Nash

    2015-05-13

    Raw magnetotelluric (MT) data covering the geothermal system at Raft River, Idaho. The data was acquired by Quantec Geoscience. This is a zipped file containing .edi raw MT data files.

  2. Exhibit D: Mirant Potomac River Schedule of Unit Operations:...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Operating Plan of Mirant Potomac River, LLC Exhibit D: Mirant Potomac River Schedule of Unit Operations More Documents & Publications Exhibit D: Mirant Potomac River Schedule of...

  3. Sacramento River Steelhead: Hatchery vs. Natural Smolt Outmigration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandstrom, Phil

    2012-01-01

    DELTA SCIENCE PROGRAM Sacramento River Steelhead: HatcheryUC Davis BACKGROUND The Sacramento River steelhead trout (a tributary of the upper Sacramento River. Smolts are young,

  4. EA-1692: Red River Environmental Products, LLC Activated Carbon...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2: Red River Environmental Products, LLC Activated Carbon Manufacturing Facility, Red River Parish, LA EA-1692: Red River Environmental Products, LLC Activated Carbon Manufacturing...

  5. Fish Bulletin No. 17. Sacramento-San Joaquin Salmon (Oncorhynchus tschawytscha) Fishery of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, G H

    1929-01-01

    of Salmon by Stations on Sacramento River Fig. 31 Fig. 32Commissioners' Reports. Sacramento, California. Publishedon the Egg Yield of Sacramento River King Salmon. California

  6. Determining Columbia and Snake River Project Tailrace and Forebay Zones of Hydraulic Influence using MASS2 Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Perkins, William A.

    2010-12-01

    Although fisheries biology studies are frequently performed at US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) projects along the Columbia and Snake Rivers, there is currently no consistent definition of the ``forebay'' and ``tailrace'' regions for these studies. At this time, each study may use somewhat arbitrary lines (e.g., the Boat Restriction Zone) to define the upstream and downstream limits of the study, which may be significantly different at each project. Fisheries researchers are interested in establishing a consistent definition of project forebay and tailrace regions for the hydroelectric projects on the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. The Hydraulic Extent of a project was defined by USACE (Brad Eppard, USACE-CENWP) as follows: The river reach directly upstream (forebay) and downstream (tailrace) of a project that is influenced by the normal range of dam operations. Outside this reach, for a particular river discharge, changes in dam operations cannot be detected by hydraulic measurement. The purpose of this study was to, in consultation with USACE and regional representatives, develop and apply a consistent set of criteria for determining the hydraulic extent of each of the projects in the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. A 2D depth-averaged river model, MASS2, was applied to the Snake and Columbia Rivers. New computational meshes were developed most reaches and the underlying bathymetric data updated to the most current survey data. The computational meshes resolved each spillway bay and turbine unit at each project and extended from project to project. MASS2 was run for a range of total river flows and each flow for a range of project operations at each project. The modeled flow was analyzed to determine the range of velocity magnitude differences and the range of flow direction differences at each location in the computational mesh for each total river flow. Maps of the differences in flow direction and velocity magnitude were created. USACE fishery biologists requested data analysis to determine the project hydraulic extent based on the following criteria: 1) For areas where the mean velocities are less than 4 ft/s, the water velocity differences between operations are not greater than 0.5 ft/sec and /or the differences in water flow direction are not greater than 10 degrees, 2) If mean water velocity is 4.0 ft/second or greater the boundary is determined using the differences in water flow direction (i.e., not greater than 10 degrees). Based on these criteria, and excluding areas with a mean velocity of less than 0.1 ft/s (within the error of the model), a final set of graphics were developed that included data from all flows and all operations. Although each hydroelectric project has a different physical setting, there were some common results. The downstream hydraulic extent tended to be greater than the hydraulic extent in the forebay. The hydraulic extent of the projects tended to be larger at the mid-range flows. At higher flows, the channel geometry tends to reduce the impact of project operations.

  7. Electrofishing survey of the Great Miami River, September 1992. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, M.C.; Bixby, R.; Engman, J.; Ross, L.; Stocker, L. [Cincinnati Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences

    1993-03-01

    At the end of summer in 1992 the fishery of the Great Miami River took an unexpected deviation from the stasis of past years as an intense suspended algal bloom decreased the compositional diversity found at the lower GMR stations. Daytime supersaturation of oxygen and elevated pHs, reaching 9 by midday during the month of August, undoubtedly caused severe deficits of oxygen at night. Despite the aeration at every riffle, the intensities of the biological processes in the water were sufficient to cause very high positive and negative excursions of oxygen over the day and night cycle. This report documents a fish harvest that was conducted as part of the oxygen excess/deficit study.

  8. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Main Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operation Review; United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. North Pacific Division; United States. Bureau of Reclamation. Pacific Northwest Region.

    1995-11-01

    The System Operation Review (SOR) Final EIS addresses four actions: (a) need to develop coordinated strategy for managing the multiple uses of the Federal Columbia River system (System Operating Strategy [SOS]); (b) need to provide interested parties other than management agencies with a long-term role in system planning (Forum); (c) need to renew or change current Canadian Entitlement Allocation Agreements (CEAA); and (d) need to renegotiate and renew the Pacific Northwest Coordination Agreement (PNCA). SOS alternatives analyzed are: (1) operation prior to Endangered Species Act listings of salmon stocks; (2) current operations (no action); (3) stable storage project operation; (4) natural river operation; (5) fixed drawdown; (6) operating strategies proposed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Marine Fisheries Service, State fisheries agencies, Native American tribes, and Federal operating agencies; and (7) Preferred Alternative. The seven Forum alternatives analyzed are: (1) decisionmaking by the SOR lead agencies (preferred alternative); (2) decisionmaking by SOR lead agencies and recommendations by an existing regional entity; (3) decisionmaking by SOR lead agencies and recommendations by a new regional entity; (4) decisionmaking by a Federal consultation forum; (5) decisionmaking by a new entity; (6) decisionmaking by one Federal operating agency; (7) decisionmaking by a Federal agency other than an operating agency. PNCA alternatives analyzed are: (1) no replacement contract; (2) contract to maximize regional power benefits; (3) roll over existing PNCA; (4) current PNCA with modified operating procedures (preferred alternative); (5) current PNCA with nonpower modifications. CEAA alternatives include: (1) no action (no replacement of current allocation agreements); (2) entitlement allocation: 55 percent Federal; 45 percent non-Federal; (3) entitlement allocation: 70 percent Federal, 30 percent non-Federal (preferred alternative); (4) no agreement.

  9. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Westinghouse Savannah River...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    8, 2000 Issued to Westinghouse Savannah River Company, related to Unplanned Exposures and Radioactive Material Intakes at the Savannah River Site (EA-2000-08) On July 18, 2000, the...

  10. BITTERROOT RIVER SUBBASIN INVENTORY FOR FISH AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the Columbia River hydropower system. Nothing in this Plan, or the participation in its development, or related to, the development and operation of the Columbia River hydropower system. Nothing in this Plan

  11. BITTERROOT RIVER SUBBASIN MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR FISH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    from the development and operation of the Columbia River hydropower system. Nothing in this Plan and exclusively resulting from, or related to, the development and operation of the Columbia River hydropower

  12. WAMweisman art museum 333 east river road

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    WAMweisman art museum press release 333 east river road minneapolis, MN 55455 www government that allowed tax-supported institutions (like the University of Minnesota) to acquire these works: The Weisman is located at 333 E. River Road in

  13. INTEGRATED RIVER QUALITY MANAGEMENT USING INTERNET TECHNOLOGIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED RIVER QUALITY MANAGEMENT USING INTERNET TECHNOLOGIES P. Cianchi*, S. Marsili such a computing architecture can be implemented using current internet technologies. Based on the "intelligent a normal web browser. KEYWORDS River water quality, Environmental management, Internet computing, Systems

  14. Bureau Home > Australia> Queensland> Rainfall& River Conditions > River Brochures> Barron FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    in this document is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Warning and River Height Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Barron River has a catchmentBureau Home > Australia> Queensland> Rainfall& River Conditions > River Brochures> Barron FLOOD

  15. Effect of spill on adult salmon passage delay at Columbia River and Snake River dams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Effect of spill on adult salmon passage delay at Columbia River and Snake River dams W. Nicholas dams in the Columbia/Snake River hydrosystem may delay the upstream passage of the adults. To evaluate-to-day variations of spill and upstream fish passage at the eight dams of the Columbia/Snake river hydrosystem

  16. Hydropower production and river rehabilitation: A case study on an alpine river

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Introduction For centuries, man has modified running waters [51]. In alpine rivers, production of hydropower of power plants are commonly in use: (1) run-of-river power plants that continuously pro- cessHydropower production and river rehabilitation: A case study on an alpine river M. Fette & C. Weber

  17. ILLUSTRATIONS. HERRING FISHERIES OF ENGLAND, SCOTLAND, AND HOLI,AND: Facing page

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of salmon. (2) Sacramento River at Duns- muir. (3) Pit River Fails : ,....................................................... 67 11. (1) Sacramento River neor Sims, "1'001 B," referred to on page 102. (2) Sacramento River Vallejo to Sacramento, 1898 124 15. (A) Female that had spawned all but about 500 ova, showing

  18. Grays River Watershed Geomorphic Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geist, David R.

    2005-04-30

    This investigation, completed for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), is part of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment commissioned by Bonneville Power Administration under project number 2003-013-00 to assess impacts on salmon habitat in the upper Grays River watershed and present recommendations for habitat improvement. This report presents the findings of the geomorphic assessment and is intended to support the overall PNNL project by evaluating the following: 􀂃 The effects of historical and current land use practices on erosion and sedimentation within the channel network 􀂃 The ways in which these effects have influenced the sediment budget of the upper watershed 􀂃 The resulting responses in the main stem Grays River upstream of State Highway 4 􀂃 The past and future implications for salmon habi

  19. Bayer Material Science (TRL 1 2 3 System)- River Devices to Recover Energy with Advanced Materials(River DREAM)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bayer Material Science (TRL 1 2 3 System) - River Devices to Recover Energy with Advanced Materials(River DREAM)

  20. Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sather, NK; Johnson, GE; Storch, AJ [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2009-07-06

    The tidal freshwater monitoring (TFM) project reported herein is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers [USACE], and the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act (ESA) as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System. The project is being performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Project No. 2005-001-00). The research is a collaborative effort among the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the National Marine Fisheries Service, and the University of Washington. The overarching goal of the TFM project is to bridge the gap in knowledge between tidal freshwater habitats and the early life history attributes of migrating salmon. The research questions include: In what types of habitats within the tidal freshwater area of the Columbia River are juvenile salmon found, when are they present, and under what environmental conditions? What is the ecological contribution of shallow (0-5 m) tidal freshwater habitats to the recovery of ESA-listed salmon in the Columbia River basin? Field data collection for the TFM project commenced in June 2007 and since then has continued monthly at six to nine sites in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta (river kilometer 192-208). While this report includes summary data spanning the 19-month period of study from June 2007 through December 2008, it highlights sampling conducted during calendar year 2008. Detailed data for calendar year 2007 were reported previously. The 2008 research objectives were as follows: (1) Characterize the vegetation composition and percent cover, conventional water quality, water surface elevation, substrate composition, bathymetry, and beach slope at the study sites within the vicinity of the Sandy River delta. (2) Characterize the fish community and juvenile salmon migration, including species composition, length-frequency distribution, density (number/m{sup 2}), and temporal and spatial distributions in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE). (3) Determine the stock of origin for juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) captured at sampling sites through genetic identification. (4) Characterize the diets of juvenile Chinook and coho (O. kisutch) salmon captured within the study area. (5) Estimate run timing, residence times, and migration pathways for acoustic-tagged fish in the study area. (6) Conduct a baseline evaluation of the potential restoration to reconnect the old Sandy River channel with the delta. (7) Apply fish density data to initiate a design for a juvenile salmon monitoring program for beach habitats within the tidal freshwater segment of the LCRE (river kilometer 56-234).

  1. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Roegner, G. C.; Whiting, Allan H.; Johnson, Gary E.; Dawley, Earl; Skalski, John R.; Vavrinec, John; Ebberts, Blaine D.

    2006-12-20

    This report is the second annual report of a six-year project to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration projects in the Columbia River Estuary, conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Marine Sciences Laboratory, NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service Pt. Adams Biological Field Station, and the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce for the US Army Corps of Engineers. In 2005, baseline data were collected on two restoration sites and two associated reference sites in the Columbia River estuary. The sites represent two habitat types of the estuary--brackish marsh and freshwater swamp--that have sustained substantial losses in area and that may play important roles for salmonids. Baseline data collected included vegetation and elevation surveys, above and below-ground biomass, water depth and temperature, nutrient flux, fish species composition, and channel geometry. Following baseline data collection, three kinds of restoration actions for hydrological reconnection were implemented in several locations on the sites: tidegate replacements (2) at Vera Slough, near the city of Astoria in Oregon State, and culvert replacements (2) and dike breaches (3) at Kandoll Farm in the Grays River watershed in Washington State. Limited post-restoration data were collected: photo points, nutrient flux, water depth and temperature, and channel cross-sections. In subsequent work, this and additional post-restoration data will be used in conjunction with data from other sites to estimate net effects of hydrological reconnection restoration projects throughout the estuary. This project is establishing methods for evaluating the effectiveness of individual projects and a framework for assessing estuary-wide cumulative effects including a protocol manual for monitoring restoration and reference sites.

  2. Food Habits of Fall Migrating Least Sandpipers in the Tennessee River Valley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    Wirwa Forestry Wildlife and Fisheries Graduate Seminar Series Introduction Transcontinental Migrations

  3. Columbia River Component Data Evaluation Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.S. Cearlock

    2006-08-02

    The purpose of the Columbia River Component Data Compilation and Evaluation task was to compile, review, and evaluate existing information for constituents that may have been released to the Columbia River due to Hanford Site operations. Through this effort an extensive compilation of information pertaining to Hanford Site-related contaminants released to the Columbia River has been completed for almost 965 km of the river.

  4. Design and implementation of an emergency environmental responsesystem to protect migrating salmon in the lower San Joaquin River,California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Jacobs, Karl C.

    2006-01-30

    In the past decade tens of millions of dollars have beenspent by water resource agencies in California to restore the nativesalmon fishery in the San Joaquin River and its major tributaries. Anexcavated deep water ship channel (DWSC), through which the river runs onits way to the Bay/Delta and Pacific Ocean, experiences episodes of lowdissolved oxygen which acts as a barrier to anadromous fish migration anda threat to the long-term survival of the salmon run. An emergencyresponse management system is under development to forecast theseepisodes of low dissolved oxygen and to deploy measures that will raisedissolved oxygen concentrations to prevent damage to the fisheryresource. The emergency response management system has been designed tointeract with a real-time water quality monitoring network and is servedby a comprehensive data management and forecasting model toolbox. TheBay/Delta and Tributaries (BDAT) Cooperative Data Management System is adistributed, web accessible database that contains terabytes ofinformation on all aspects of the ecology of the Bay/Delta and upperwatersheds. The complexity of the problem dictates data integration froma variety of monitoring programs. A unique data templating system hasbeen constructed to serve the needs of cooperating scientists who wish toshare their data and to simplify and streamline data uploading into themaster database. In this paper we demonstrate the utility of such asystem in providing decision support for management of the San JoaquinRiver fishery. We discuss how the system might be expanded to havefurther utility in coping with other emergencies and threats to watersupply system serving California's costal communities.

  5. Diets of the Arkansas River Shiner and Peppered Chub in the Canadian River, New Mexico and Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilde, Gene

    Diets of the Arkansas River Shiner and Peppered Chub in the Canadian River, New Mexico and Texas)collectedfrom the Canadian River in New Mexico andTexasfrom September1996to August 1998. Both the Ark~n~~ River streamsand rivers of the Arkansas River drainage systemof Arkansas,Colorado, Kansas,New Mexico, Kansas

  6. Passage Distribution and Federal Columbia River Power System Survival for Steelhead Kelts Tagged Above and at Lower Granite Dam, Year 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colotelo, Alison HA; Harnish, Ryan A.; Jones, Bryan W.; Hanson, Amanda C.; Trott, Donna M.; Greiner, Michael J.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Ham, Kenneth D.; Deng, Zhiqun; Brown, Richard S.; Weiland, Mark A.; Li, X.; Fu, Tao

    2014-03-28

    Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations have declined throughout their range in the last century and many populations, including those of the Snake River Basin are listed under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. The reasons for their decline are many and complex, but include habitat loss and degradation, overharvesting, and dam construction. The 2008 Biological Opinion calls for an increase in the abundance of female steelhead through an increase in iteroparity (i.e., repeat spawning) and this can be realized through a combination of reconditioning and in-river survival of migrating kelts. The goal of this study is to provide the data necessary to inform fisheries managers and dam operators of Snake River kelt migration patterns, survival, and routes of dam passage. Steelhead kelts (n = 487) were captured and implanted with acoustic transmitters and passive integrated transponder (PIT)-tags at the Lower Granite Dam (LGR) Juvenile Fish Facility and at weirs located in tributaries of the Snake and Clearwater rivers upstream of LGR. Kelts were monitored as they moved downstream through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) by 15 autonomous and 3 cabled acoustic receiver arrays. Cabled receiver arrays deployed on the dam faces allowed for three-dimensional tracking of fish as they approached the dam face and were used to determine the route of dam passage. Overall, 27.3% of the kelts tagged in this study successfully migrated to Martin Bluff (rkm 126, as measured from the mouth of the Columbia River), which is located downstream of all FCRPS dams. Within individual river reaches, survival per kilometer estimates ranged from 0.958 to 0.999; the lowest estimates were observed in the immediate forebay of FCRPS dams. Steelhead kelts tagged in this study passed over the spillway routes (spillway weirs, traditional spill bays) in greater proportions and survived at higher rates compared to the few fish passed through powerhouse routes (turbines and juvenile bypass systems). The results of this study provide information about the route of passage and subsequent survival of steelhead kelts that migrated through the Snake and Columbia rivers from LGR to Bonneville Dam in 2013. These data may be used by fisheries managers and dam operators to identify potential ways to increase the survival of kelts during their seaward migrations.

  7. Passage Distribution and Federal Columbia River Power System Survival for Steelhead Kelts Tagged Above and at Lower Granite Dam, Year 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colotelo, Alison H.A.; Harnish, Ryan A.; Jones, Bryan W.; Hanson, Amanda C.; Trott, Donna M.; Greiner, Michael J.; Mcmichael, Geoffrey A.; Ham, Kenneth D.; Deng, Zhiqun; Brown, Richard S.; Weiland, Mark A.; Li, Xinya; Fu, Tao

    2014-12-15

    Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations have declined throughout their range in the last century and many populations, including those of the Snake River Basin are listed under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. The reasons for their decline are many and complex, but include habitat loss and degradation, overharvesting, and dam construction. The 2008 Biological Opinion calls for an increase in the abundance of female steelhead through an increase in iteroparity (i.e., repeat spawning) and this can be realized through a combination of reconditioning and in-river survival of migrating kelts. The goal of this study is to provide the data necessary to inform fisheries managers and dam operators of Snake River kelt migration patterns, survival, and routes of dam passage. Steelhead kelts (n = 487) were captured and implanted with acoustic transmitters and passive integrated transponder (PIT)-tags at the Lower Granite Dam (LGR) Juvenile Fish Facility and at weirs located in tributaries of the Snake and Clearwater rivers upstream of LGR. Kelts were monitored as they moved downstream through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) by 15 autonomous and 3 cabled acoustic receiver arrays. Cabled receiver arrays deployed on the dam faces allowed for three-dimensional tracking of fish as they approached the dam face and were used to determine the route of dam passage. Overall, 27.3% of the kelts tagged in this study successfully migrated to Martin Bluff (rkm 126, as measured from the mouth of the Columbia River), which is located downstream of all FCRPS dams. Within individual river reaches, survival per kilometer estimates ranged from 0.958 to 0.999; the lowest estimates were observed in the immediate forebay of FCRPS dams. Steelhead kelts tagged in this study passed over the spillway routes (spillway weirs, traditional spill bays) in greater proportions and survived at higher rates compared to the few fish passed through powerhouse routes (turbines and juvenile bypass systems). The results of this study provide information about the route of passage and subsequent survival of steelhead kelts that migrated through the Snake and Columbia rivers from LGR to Bonneville Dam in 2013. These data may be used by fisheries managers and dam operators to identify potential ways to increase the survival of kelts during their seaward migrations.

  8. Estuarine and coastal marine fisheries in New York State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limburg, Karin E.

    important Quassaick Creek, a Hudson tributary. Photo: K.Limburg #12;5 Can measure biomass of plants to get River National Estuarine Research Reserve #12;6 The Hudson, like most estuaries, is critical ( C ) · Black sea bass (C, S) Photo: Mark Malchoff; data: NMFS #12;7 Weakfish (Cynoscion regalis

  9. The Tragedy of Enclosure: Fish, Fisheries Science, and U.S. Foreign Policy, 1920-1960

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finley, Mary C.

    2007-01-01

    Resources of the North Pacific Ocean." Vancouver, B.C. :Fisheries in the North Pacific Ocean and the Law of the Seaon the Longevity of Pacific Ocean Perch (Sebastes Alutus)."

  10. Reducing Uncertainty in Fisheries Management: The Time for Fishers' Ecological Knowledge 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carr, Liam

    2012-07-16

    This dissertation work presents a novel method for addressing system uncertainty to improve management of a small-scale fishery in St. Croix, United States Virgin Islands. Using fishers' ecological knowledge (FEK), this research examines existing...

  11. Succulent and spiny : the Bahamas' quest for a sustainable lobster fishery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rood, Jennifer E., S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01

    The Caribbean spiny lobster fishery is one of the most important industries in the economy of the Bahamas, and in turn it is one of the largest lobster industries in the world. The natural geography of the Bahamas makes ...

  12. FISH and FISHERIES , 2004, 5, 153167 The behavioural dynamics of fishers: management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 FISH and FISHERIES , 2004, 5, 153 by his/her own goals or constraints. Despite this reality, the complex dynamics of fishing has and behavioural dynamics of fishing to provide insight into fisher behaviour and its implications

  13. Abstract--The U.S. East Coast pe-lagic longline fishery has a history

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and 2004 Lance P. Garrison Email address: Lance.Garrison@noaa.gov National Marine Fisheries Service, 1997), and longline fish- eries (e.g., Garrison, 2005; Kock et al., 2006). The U.S. East Coast pelagic

  14. Foreign Fishery Developments GROUNDS Table 2.-Gamblan lobst8l' fishing data for selected years.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    increase in the number of canoes in the lobster fishery between 1962 and 1974 has been ac- companied supplying the Senegalese fishermen with food, gasoline, and netting materials. the subject of study

  15. River System Hydrology in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, R.; Zhang, Y.

    2014-01-01

    and databases maintained by the Texas Water Development Board and the U.S. Geological Survey. River basin volume budgets and trend and frequency metrics for simulated naturalized and regulated stream flows and reservoir storage are developed using the WAM System...

  16. BULLETIN OF THE UNITED STATES FISH COMMISSION. 467 The shad jishery.-The river fisheries of commercial.importance are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLARK. For very many years in Eussia and in other cold countries fish and meats have been frozen for market by exposure in the open air or by freezing them m masse in ice. In Thibet as early as l8OG of preserving fishor other articlesin a closechamberby means of a freezing mixture having no contact

  17. Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Outmigration and Survival in the Lower Umatilla River Basin, Annual Report 2003-2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Tara

    2007-02-01

    This report summarizes activities conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's Juvenile Outmigration and Survival M&E project in the Umatilla River subbasin between 2004-2006. Information is used to make informed decisions on hatchery effectiveness, natural production success, passage improvement and flow enhancement strategies. Data collected includes annual estimates of smolt abundance, migration timing, and survival, life history characteristics and productivity status and trends for spring and fall Chinook salmon, coho salmon and summer steelhead. Productivity data provided is the key subbasin scale measure of the effectiveness of salmon and steelhead restoration actions in the Umatilla River. Information is also used for regional planning and recovery efforts of Mid-Columbia River (MCR) ESA-listed summer steelhead. Monitoring is conducted via smolt trapping and PIT-tag interrogation at Three Mile Falls Dam. The Umatilla Juvenile Outmigration and Survival Project was established in 1994 to evaluate the success of management actions and fisheries restoration efforts in the Umatilla River Basin. Project objectives for the 2004-2006 period were to: (1) operate the PIT tag detection system at Three Mile Falls Dam (TMFD), (2) enhance provisional PIT-tag interrogation equipment at the east bank adult fish ladder, (3) monitor the migration timing, abundance and survival of naturally-produced juvenile salmonids and trends in natural production, (4) determine migration parameters and survival of hatchery-produced fish representing various rearing, acclimation and release strategies, (5) evaluate the relative survival between transported and non-transported fish, (6) monitor juvenile life history characteristics and evaluate trends over time, (7) investigate the effects of river, canal, fishway operations and environmental conditions on smolt migration and survival, (8) document the temporal distribution and diversity of resident fish species, and (9) participate in planning and coordination activities within the basin and dissemination of results.

  18. Population dynamics and movements of skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) in the Maldivian fishery: analysis of tagging data from an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Population dynamics and movements of skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) in the Maldivian fishery du listao (Katsuwonus pelamis) dans la pêcherie des Maldives : analyse des données de marquage au

  19. Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project : Annual Progress Report October 2007 - September 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bronson, James P.; Duke, Bill; Loffink, Ken

    2008-12-30

    In the late 1990s, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with many other agencies, began implementing fisheries restoration activities in the Walla Walla Basin. An integral part of these efforts is to alleviate the inadequate fish migration conditions in the basin. Migration concerns are being addressed by removing diversion structures, constructing fish passage facilities, implementing minimum instream flow requirements, and providing trap and haul efforts when needed. The objective of the Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project is to increase the survival of migrating adult and juvenile salmonids in the Walla Walla River basin. The project is responsible for coordinating operation and maintenance of ladders, screen sites, bypasses, trap facilities, and transportation equipment. In addition, the project provides technical input on passage and trapping facility design, operation, and criteria. Operation of the various passage facilities and passage criteria guidelines are outlined in an annual operations plan that the project develops. Beginning in March of 2007, two work elements from the Walla Walla Fish Passage Operations Project were transferred to other projects. The work element Enumeration of Adult Migration at Nursery Bridge Dam is now conducted under the Walla Walla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project and the work element Provide Transportation Assistance is conducted under the Umatilla Satellite Facilities Operation and Maintenance Project. Details of these activities can be found in those project's respective annual reports.

  20. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Cameron, April; Coleman, Andre M.; Corbett, C.; Dawley, Earl M.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Kauffman, Ronald; Roegner, G. Curtis; Russell, Micah T.; Silva, April; Skalski, John R.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John; Woodruff, Dana L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

    2010-10-26

    This is the sixth annual report of a seven-year project (2004 through 2010) to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE). The project, called the Cumulative Effects Study, is being conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District (USACE) by the Marine Sciences Laboratory of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the Pt. Adams Biological Field Station of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce (CREST), and the University of Washington. The goal of the Cumulative Effects Study is to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of multiple habitat restoration projects intended to benefit ecosystems supporting juvenile salmonids in the 235-km-long LCRE. Literature review in 2004 revealed no existing methods for such an evaluation and suggested that cumulative effects could be additive or synergistic. From 2005 through 2009, annual field research involved intensive, comparative studies paired by habitat type (tidal swamp versus marsh), trajectory (restoration versus reference site), and restoration action (tidegate replacement vs. culvert replacement vs. dike breach).

  1. Savannah River Plant/Savannah River Laboratory radiation exposure report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, C.D.; Hyman, S.D.; Keisler, L.L. and Co., Aiken, SC . Savannah River Plant); Reeder, D.F.; Jolly, L.; Spoerner, M.T.; Schramm, G.R. and Co., Aiken, SC . Savannah River Lab.)

    1989-01-01

    The protection of worker health and safety is of paramount concern at the Savannah River Site. Since the site is one of the largest nuclear sites in the nation, radiation safety is a key element in the protection program. This report is a compendium of the results in 1988 of the programs at the Savannah River Plant and the Savannah River Laboratory to protect the radiological health of employees. By any measure, the radiation protection performance at this site in 1988 was the best since the beginning of operations. This accomplishment was made possible by the commitment and support at all levels of the organizations to reduce radiation exposures to ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable). The report provides detailed information about the radiation doses received by departments and work groups within these organizations. It also includes exposure data for recent years to allow Plant and Laboratory units to track the effectiveness of their ALARA efforts. Many of the successful practices and methods that reduced radiation exposure are described. A new goal for personnel contamination cases has been established for 1989. Only through continual and innovative efforts to minimize exposures can the goals be met. The radiation protection goals for 1989 and previous years are included in the report. 27 figs., 58 tabs.

  2. Savannah River Laboratory Decontamination Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rankin, W.N.

    1991-01-01

    Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) has had a Decontamination and Decommissioning (D D) Technology program since 1981. The objective of this program is to provide state-of-the-art technology for use in D D operations that will enable our customers to minimize waste generated and personal exposure, increase productivity and safety, and to minimize the potential for release and uptake of radioactive material. The program identifies and evaluates existing technology, develops new technology, and provides technical assistance to implement its use onsite. This program has impacted not only the Savannah River Site (SRS), but the entire Department of Energy (DOE) complex. To document and communicate the technology generated by this program, 28 papers have been presented at National and International meetings in the United States and Foreign Countries.

  3. Savannah River Laboratory Decontamination Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rankin, W.N.

    1991-12-31

    Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) has had a Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Technology program since 1981. The objective of this program is to provide state-of-the-art technology for use in D&D operations that will enable our customers to minimize waste generated and personal exposure, increase productivity and safety, and to minimize the potential for release and uptake of radioactive material. The program identifies and evaluates existing technology, develops new technology, and provides technical assistance to implement its use onsite. This program has impacted not only the Savannah River Site (SRS), but the entire Department of Energy (DOE) complex. To document and communicate the technology generated by this program, 28 papers have been presented at National and International meetings in the United States and Foreign Countries.

  4. FLUCTUATIONS IN ABUNDANCE OF COLUMBIA RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LIBRARY 0CT1 S1957 WOODS HOLE, MASS. SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC REPORT-FISHERIES No. 189 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT estimates based on the periods before and after construction of the dam show mixed trends. The spring reveals no change in trend before and after dam construction and the mixed trends of spring, summer

  5. Two-dimensional river modeling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, James Cameron

    1988-01-01

    heavily vegetated flood plain. It is found that the two-dimensional model can determine the flow more completely and more accurately than a corresponding one- dimensional model. Two-dimensional models are best applied where the flow conditions... committee, W. P. James, R. A. Wurbs, and R. 0. Reid, for their support and interest in this research. Dr. James, in particular, has shown great foresight in supporting broader use of two-dimensional river modeling. Dave Froehlich deserves much...

  6. Savannah River | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterestedReplacement-2-AA-1 SECTION JSTEM-ing theSummarySavannah River Site

  7. This leaflet lists the commercial fishery motion pictures produced and d istri-buted by the U. S. Fish and wildlife Se r vice , Bureau of Commercial Fisheries .

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;This leaflet lists the commercial fishery motion pictures produced and d istri- buted by the U , t e l evision use , and co- operation with industry in producing motion pictur es may also be obtained f r om the above address. Requests for fo r eign use of the s e motion pictures should be made

  8. Raft River geoscience case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolenc, M.R.; Hull, L.C.; Mizell, S.A.; Russell, B.F.; Skiba, P.A.; Strawn, J.A.; Tullis, J.A.

    1981-11-01

    The Raft River Geothermal Site has been evaluated over the past eight years by the United States Geological Survey and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory as a moderate-temperature geothermal resource. The geoscience data gathered in the drilling and testing of seven geothermal wells suggest that the Raft River thermal reservoir is: (a) produced from fractures found at the contact metamorphic zone, apparently the base of detached normal faulting from the Bridge and Horse Well Fault zones of the Jim Sage Mountains; (b) anisotropic, with the major axis of hydraulic conductivity coincident to the Bridge Fault Zone; (c) hydraulically connected to the shallow thermal fluid of the Crook and BLM wells based upon both geochemistry and pressure response; (d) controlled by a mixture of diluted meteoric water recharging from the northwest and a saline sodium chloride water entering from the southwest. Although the hydrogeologic environment of the Raft River geothermal area is very complex and unique, it is typical of many Basin and Range systems.

  9. Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal exploration well sidetrack-C Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report:...

  10. The Columbia River System : the Inside Story.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1991-09-01

    The Columbia Ricer is one of the greatest natural resources in the western United States. The river and its tributaries touch the lives of nearly every resident of the Northwest-from providing the world-famous Pacific salmon to supplying the clean natural fuel for over 75 percent of the region's electrical generation. Since early in the century, public and private agencies have labored to capture the benefits of this dynamic river. Today, dozens of major water resource projects throughout the region are fed by the waters of the Columbia Basin river system. And through cooperative efforts, the floods that periodically threaten developments near the river can be controlled. This publication presents a detailed explanation of the planning and operation of the multiple-use dams and reservoirs of the Columbia River system. It describes the river system, those who operate and use it, the agreements and policies that guide system operation, and annual planning for multiple-use operation.

  11. Green River Locks and Dams 3, 4, 5, 6 and Barren River Lock and Dam 1 Disposition, Kentucky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Green River Locks and Dams 3, 4, 5, 6 and Barren River Lock and Dam 1 Disposition, Kentucky 16 September 2014 ABSTRACT: Green River Locks and Dams 3 through 6 and Barren River Lock and Dam 1 were. The Green River Locks and Dams 5 and 6 ceased operations in 1951 due to a marked decline in navigation

  12. North University Dr. Indian River Street

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marques, Oge

    ) around campus and running path on Indian River Street. Participants MUST run WITH tra c on all roads 39 4 31B 31A 7636 8W 6 80 46 89 92 31E 31 31D 31C 81 49 North University Dr. Indian River Street B-04.LucieAve.South Indian River St. BrevardCt. BrevardCt. Lot 23 Lot 22 Lot 11 Lot 7 Lot 6 Lot 21 LakeFPL Substation Lot 9

  13. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries and Limnological Research : 1996 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cichosz, Thomas A.; Underwood, Keith D.; Shields, John; Scholz, Allan; Tilson, Mary Beth

    1997-05-01

    The Lake Roosevelt Monitoring/Data Collection Program resulted from a merger between the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program and the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project. This project will model biological responses to reservoir operations, evaluate the effects of releasing hatchery origin kokanee salmon and rainbow trout on the fishery, and evaluate the success of various stocking strategies. In 1996, limnological, reservoir operation, zooplankton, and tagging data were collected. Mean reservoir elevation, storage volume and water retention time were reduced in 1996 relative to the last five years. In 1996, Lake Roosevelt reached a yearly low of 1,227 feet above mean sea level in April, a yearly high of 1,289 feet in July, and a mean yearly reservoir elevation of 1,271.4 feet. Mean monthly water retention times in Lake Roosevelt during 1996 ranged from 15.7 days in May to 49.2 days in October. Average zooplankton densities and biomass were lower in 1996 than 1995. Daphnia spp. and total zooplankton densities peaked during the summer, whereas minimum densities occurred during the spring. Approximately 300,000 kokanee salmon and 400,000 rainbow trout were released into Lake Roosevelt in 1996. The authors estimated 195,628 angler trips to Lake Roosevelt during 1996 with an economic value of $7,629,492.

  14. The Columbia River System Inside Story

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2001-04-01

    The Columbia River is one of the greatest natural resources in the western United States. The river and its tributaries touch the lives of nearly every resident of the Pacific Northwest—from fostering world-famous Pacific salmon to supplying clean natural fuel for 50 to 65 percent of the region’s electrical generation. Since early in the 20th century, public and private agencies have labored to capture the benefits of this dynamic river. Today, dozens of major water resource projects throughout the region are fed by the waters of the Columbia Basin river system.

  15. New Columbia River Estuary purchases benefit salmon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the mouth of the Columbia River to permanently protect riverside habitat for Northwest fish and wildlife, including threatened and endangered salmon and steelhead. The...

  16. Microsoft Word - CROOKED RIVER VALLEY REHABILITATION PROJECT...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Power Act). Among other things, this Act directs BPA to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of the Federal Columbia River...

  17. River Falls Municipal Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Name Utility Administrator River Falls Municipal Utilities Website http:www.rfmu.orgindex.aspx?nid681 Funding Source Wisconsin Focus on Energy State Wisconsin Program Type...

  18. Lumbee River EMC- Residential Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lumbee River EMC (LREMC) offers rebates to its residential customers who purchase and install qualified energy efficient products or services. Rebates are available for water heaters, refrigerator...

  19. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Washington River...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    February 13, 2014 Evaluation to determine whether Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Hanford is performing at a level deserving DOE-VPP Star recognition. Voluntary...

  20. Cuivre River Electric- Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cuivre River Electric Cooperative, through the Take Control & Save program, offers rebates for cooperative members who purchase efficient geothermal and dual fuel heat pumps, and electric water...

  1. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, October 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separations operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  2. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, October 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1991-12-31

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separations operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  3. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Environmental Sciences...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    (SRNL) Environmental Sciences and Biotechnology Support of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Environmental Sciences and Biotechnology...

  4. Gila River Indian Community- 2012 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Gila River Indian Community (GRIC) will conduct feasibility studies of potential renewable energy projects on its lands in south central Arizona.

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT; ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    5 audit of SRP radioactive waste Ashley, C. 05 NUCLEAR FUELS; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT; ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS; RADIOACTIVE EFFLUENTS; EMISSION; HIGH-LEVEL...

  6. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, November 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1991-12-31

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation; tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  7. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, November 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation; tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  8. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, September 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  9. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, September 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1991-12-31

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  10. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, July 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation; tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  11. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, July 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1991-12-31

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation; tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  12. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, August 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1991-12-31

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  13. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, August 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  14. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Kolan FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Forecasting · Local Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Kolan River catchment is located in south east Queensland and coversBureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Kolan FLOOD

  15. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Bulloo FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    in this document is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Bulloo River catchment is located in southBureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Bulloo FLOOD

  16. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Noosa FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Forecasting · Local Height Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Noosa River has a catchment areaBureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Noosa FLOOD

  17. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Burrum and Cherwell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    River at Howard Contained in this document is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Other Links Flood Risk The Burrum River catchment covers an area of about 935 square kilometres which and Cherwell FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the BURRUM AND CHERWELL RIVERS This brochure describes the flood warning

  18. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    Contained in this document is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding and River Height Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Leichhardt River catchment FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the LEICHHARDT RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system operated

  19. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Paroo FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    is information about : (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Forecasting · Local Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Paroo River catchment is located in south west Queensland and coversBureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Paroo FLOOD

  20. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Lower FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Forecasting · Local Information · Brisbane River ALERT Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Brisbane River catchment covers an area of approximately 15 Brisbane FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the BRISBANE RIVER BELOW WIVENHOE DAM TO BRISBANE CITY This brochure

  1. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Moonie FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    is information about : (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Forecasting · Local Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Moonie River basin is located in southwest Queensland and drainsBureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Moonie FLOOD

  2. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Daintree FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    Post Contained in this document is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Warnings and River Height Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Daintree River FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the DAINTREE RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system operated

  3. Bureau Home > Australia> Queensland> Rainfall& River Conditions > River Brochures> Gilbert FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    in this document is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Gilbert River catchment is located in northBureau Home > Australia> Queensland> Rainfall& River Conditions > River Brochures> Gilbert FLOOD

  4. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Haughton FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    in this document is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding · Flood Warnings and River Height Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The Haughton River FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the HAUGHTON RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system operated

  5. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Bremer FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    Contained in this document is information about: (Last updated June 2015) · Flood Risk · Previous Flooding Flood Warnings and River Height Bulletins · Flood Classifications · Other Links Flood Risk The BremerBureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Bremer FLOOD

  6. Bureau Home > Australia > Queensland > Rainfall & River Conditions > River Brochures > Pine and FLOOD SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    and Caboolture FLOOD SYSTEM for the PINE & CABOOLTURE RIVERS This brochure describes the flood system operated information which will be useful for understanding River Height Bulletins issued by the Bureau's Flood Warning Centre during periods of high rainfall and flooding. Pine River at Murrumba Downs Contained

  7. MFR Paper 1226. From Marine Fisheries Review, Vol. 38, No. 12, December 1976. Copies of this paper, in limited numbers, are available

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . MFR PAPER 1227 Foreign Direct Investment in the U.S. Commercial Fisheries Industry ROBERT A. SIEGELMFR Paper 1226. From Marine Fisheries Review, Vol. 38, No. 12, December 1976. Copies of this paper fisheries industry. The principal data source is the Survey of Foreign Direct Investment in the United

  8. This leaflet lists the commercial fishery motion pictures produced and, distributed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Commercial Fish-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISHERY U E #12;This leaflet lists the commercial fishery motion pictures produced and, distributed, and cooperation with industry in producing motion pictures may be obtained from: Bureau of Commercial Fisheries use of these motion pictures should be made through the nearest United States Embassy Office. #12;HOW

  9. Independent Scientific Advisory Board Review of NOAA Fisheries' Life-Cycle Models of Salmonid Populations in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .......................................................................................................31 3.1: Snake River basin fall Chinook salmon run reconstruction as a basis for multistage stock Populations in the Interior Columbia River Basin (June 28, 2013 draft) Appendix - Answers to Questions ............................................................................7 2.2: ISEMP Watershed Model for spring/summer Chinook salmon and steelhead in the Salmon River

  10. Microbial risk assessment for recreational use of the Malden River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacques, Margaret (Margaret Rose)

    2015-01-01

    The Malden River is located in the Greater Boston area of Massachusetts. The River has a long history of abuse and neglect stemming from urbanization and industrial activity along the River and in the surrounding areas. ...

  11. Captive Rearing Program for Salmon River Chinook Salmon, 2000 Project Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venditti, David A.

    2002-04-01

    During 2000, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) continued to develop techniques to rear chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha to sexual maturity in captivity and to monitor their reproductive performance under natural conditions. Eyed-eggs were collected to establish captive cohorts from three study streams and included 503 eyed-eggs from East Fork Salmon River (EFSR), 250 from the Yankee Fork Salmon River, and 304 from the West Fork Yankee Fork Salmon River (WFYF). After collection, the eyed-eggs were immediately transferred to the Eagle Fish Hatchery, where they were incubated and reared by family group. Juveniles collected the previous summer were PIT and elastomer tagged and vaccinated against vibrio Vibrio spp. and bacterial kidney disease before the majority (approximately 75%) were transferred to the National Marine Fisheries Service, Manchester Marine Experimental Station for saltwater rearing through sexual maturity. Smolt transfers included 158 individuals from the Lemhi River (LEM), 193 from the WFYF, and 372 from the EFSR. Maturing fish transfers from the Manchester facility to the Eagle Fish Hatchery included 77 individuals from the LEM, 45 from the WFYF, and 11 from the EFSR. Two mature females from the WFYF were spawned in captivity with four males in 2000. Only one of the females produced viable eggs (N = 1,266), which were placed in in-stream incubators by personnel from the Shoshone-Bannock Tribe. Mature adults (N = 70) from the Lemhi River were released into Big Springs Creek to evaluate their reproductive performance. After release, fish distributed themselves throughout the study section and displayed a progression of habitat associations and behavior consistent with progressing maturation and the onset of spawning. Fifteen of the 17 suspected redds spawned by captive-reared parents in Big Springs Creek were hydraulically sampled to assess survival to the eyed stage of development. Eyed-eggs were collected from 13 of these, and survival ranged from 0% to 96%, although there was evidence that some eggs had died after reaching the eyed stage. Six redds were capped in an attempt to document fry emergence, but none were collected. A final hydraulic sampling of the capped redds yielded nothing from five of the six, but 75 dead eggs and one dead fry were found in the sixth. Smothering by fine sediment is the suspected cause of the observed mortality between the eyed stage and fry emergence.

  12. Some trends in hatchery effects So e t e ds atc e y e ects Northwest Fisheries Science Center,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Some trends in hatchery effects So e t e ds atc e y e ects science Northwest Fisheries Science, declines more recently Source: Naish et al 2007Source: UW Image Library Source: Naish et al. 2007Source: UW Image Library #12;Purposes · Mitigation for· Mitigation for habitat loss · Fishery enhancement

  13. The Decline of the Sea Urchin, Tripneustes ventricosus, Fishery of Barbados: A Survey of Fishermen and Consumers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Decline of the Sea Urchin, Tripneustes ventricosus, Fishery of Barbados: A Survey of Fishermen. The depopulation of T. ventricosus oc curred along the south and southeast coasts of Barbados in the late 1970's- In Barbados, West Indies, a local but economically important fishery for the sea urchin Tripneustes

  14. Dashun Fisheries Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstruments Inc JumpIowa: EnergyDark River,Energy InformationEnergy

  15. Lesson Learned by Savannah River Site Activity-level Work Planning and Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slide Presentation by Bonnie Barnes, Savannah River Remediation. Work Planning and Control at Savannah River Remediation.

  16. CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A...

  17. Letter from Commonwealth to Mirant Potomac River Concerning Serious...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to Mirant Potomac River Concerning Serious Violations of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Sulfur Dioxide Letter from Commonwealth to Mirant Potomac River Concerning...

  18. Savannah River Site - Mixed Waste Management Facility Northwest...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    state determination for entire site. Addthis Related Articles Savannah River Site - Mixed Waste Management Facility Northeast Plume Savannah River Site - D-Area Oil Seepage Basin...

  19. Savannah River Site - Mixed Waste Management Facility Northeast...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    state determination for entire site. Addthis Related Articles Savannah River Site - Mixed Waste Management Facility Northwest Plume Savannah River Site - D-Area Oil Seepage Basin...

  20. Columbia River Treaty Review #2 - April 2009.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Columbia River Treaty has provided signifi cant benefi ts to the United States and Canada through coordinated river management by the two countries. It remains the standard...