Sample records for hood river fisheries

  1. EIS-0241-SA-01: Supplement Analysis for the Hood River Fisheries...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Fisheries Project The project is consistent with the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program, as well as BPA's Hood River Fisheries Project EIS (DOEEIS-0241)...

  2. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hales, D.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project.

  3. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hales, D.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  4. Hood River Production Program Review, Final Report 1991-2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Underwood, Keith; Chapman, Colin; Ackerman, Nicklaus

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a comprehensive review of Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded activities within the Hood River Basin from 1991 to 2001. These activities, known as the Hood River Production Program (HRPP), are intended to mitigate for fish losses related to operation of federal dams in the Columbia River Basin, and to contribute to recovery of endangered and/or threatened salmon and steelhead, as directed by Nation Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration - Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries). The Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the HRPP, which authorized BPA to fund salmon and steelhead enhancement activities in the Hood River Basin, was completed in 1996 (BPA 1996). The EIS specified seven years of monitoring and evaluation (1996-2002) after program implementation to determine if program actions needed modification to meet program objectives. The EIS also called for a program review after 2002, that review is reported here.

  5. Hood River Passive House, Hood River, Oregon (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to "reduce home energy use by 30%-50%" (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  6. EA-1981: Bonneville-Hood River Transmission Line Rebuild, Multnomah and Hood River Counties, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EA to assess potential environmental impacts of a proposal to rebuild its 24-mile long, 115 kilovolt Bonneville-Hood River transmission line. The existing line runs between the Bonneville Powerhouse at Bonneville Dam in Multnomah County, Oregon, and BPA's existing Hood River Substation in Hood River County, Oregon. The project would include replacing structures and conductor wires, improving access roads, and constructing new access roads or trails where needed.

  7. Aquatic Supplement Hood River Subbasin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Oregon and Washington stream temperature data Figure 4 and 5. Herman Creek (Oxbow Hatchery): 7-Day Moving.7 (10 cfs) 50 powerhouse discharge river mile 4.51 (20 cfs) Upper Lenz or Odell cr no info Davis water

  8. Bonneville - Hood River Vegetation Management Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To maintain the reliability of its electrical system, BPA, in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service, needs to expand the range of vegetation management options used to clear unwanted vegetation on about 20 miles of BPA transmission line right-of-way between Bonneville Dam and Hood River; Oregon, within the Columbia Gorge National Scenic Area (NSA). We propose to continue controlling undesirable vegetation using a program of Integrated Vegetation Management (IVM) which includes manual, biological and chemical treatment methods. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1257) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

  9. Hood River Middle School Music and Science Building

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Hood River, OR The Hood River Middle School Music and Science Building is includes music and science classroom, music practice rooms, teacher offices, a greenhouse, an adjacent recycling and storage building, and outdoor spaces including an amphitheater and garden. The building is integrated with the school's progressive sustainability and permaculture curriculum. Students can track and create experiments using data from the buildings net zero energy system and rainwater harvesting system, and learn about the building's innovative and integrated use of materials and systems.

  10. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Hood River Passive House- Hood River, Oregon (Fact Sheet)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Hood River Passive Project incorporates high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless minisplit heat pump.

  11. Revised Master Plan for the Hood River Production Program, Technical Report 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation

    2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hood River Production Program (HRPP) is a Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded program initiated as a mitigation measure for Columbia River hydrosystem effects on anadromous fish. The HRPP began in the early 1990s with the release of spring Chinook and winter steelhead smolts into the basin. Prior to implementation, co-managers, including the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife drafted the Hood River Production Master Plan (O'Toole and ODFW 1991a; O'Toole and ODFW 1991b) and the Pelton Ladder Master Plan (Smith and CTWSR 1991). Both documents were completed in 1991 and subsequently approved by the Council in 1992 and authorized through a BPA-led Environmental Impact Statement in 1996. In 2003, a 10-year programmatic review was conducted for BPA-funded programs in the Hood River (Underwood et al. 2003). The primary objective of the HRPP Review (Review) was to determine if program goals were being met, and if modifications to program activities would be necessary in order to meet or revise program goals. In 2003, an agreement was signed between PacifiCorp and resource managers to remove the Powerdale Dam (RM 10) and associated adult trapping facility by 2010. The HRPP program has been dependant on the adult trap to collect broodstock for the hatchery programs; therefore, upon the dam's removal, some sort of replacement for the trap would be needed to continue the HRPP. At the same time the Hood River Subbasin Plan (Coccoli 2004) was being written and prompted the co-managers to considered future direction of the program. This included revising the numerical adult fish objectives based on the assimilated data and output from several models run on the Hood River system. In response to the Review as well as the Subbasin Plan, and intensive monitoring and evaluation of the current program, the HRPP co-managers determined the spring Chinook program was not achieving the HRPP's defined smolt-to-adult (SAR) survival rate guidelines. The observed low SAR was due to precocity, straying, and incidence of BKD in the spring Chinook program; which ultimately led to the program's inability to achieve the subbasin's overly optimistic biological fish objectives. The summer steelhead hatchery program was not providing the fishery or population benefits anticipated and will be discontinued. The winter steelhead program was performing as planned and no changes are foreseen. This updated Master Plan addresses the several proposed changes to the existing HRPP, which are described.

  12. Hood River County, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel Jump to:Pennsylvania: Energy Resources Jump(Redirected fromHoodRiver

  13. Hood River Fish Habitat Project; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaivoda, Alexis

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the project implementation and monitoring of all habitat activities in the Hood River basin that occurred over the October 1, 2002 to September 30, 2003 period (FY 03). Some of the objectives in the corresponding statement of work for this contract were not completed within FY 03. A description of the progress during FY 03 and reasoning for deviation from the original tasks and timeline are provided. OBJECTIVE 1 - Provide coordination of all activities, administrative oversight and assist in project implementation and monitoring activities. Administrative oversight and coordination of the habitat statement of work, budget, subcontracts, personnel, implementation, and monitoring was provided. OBJECTIVE 2 - Continue to coordinate, implement, and revise, as needed, the Hood River Fish Habitat Protection, Restoration, and Monitoring Plan. The Hood River Fish Habitat Protection, Restoration, and Monitoring Plan was completed in 2000 (Coccoli et al., 2000). This document was utilized for many purposes including: drafting the Watershed Action Plan (Coccoli, 2002), ranking projects for funding, and prioritizing projects to target in the future. This document has been reviewed by many, including stakeholders, agencies, and interested parties. The Hood River Watershed Group Coordinator and author of the Hood River Fish Habitat Protection, Restoration, and Monitoring Plan, Holly Coccoli, has updated and revised the plan. Changes will be reflected in the Hood River Subbasin Plan, and after submission of the Subbasin Plan, a formally revised version of the Monitoring Plan will be put out for review. This will more specifically address changes in the Hood River subbasin since 2000, and reflect changes to fish habitat and needs in the Hood River subbasin regarding monitoring. OBJECTIVE 3 - Evaluate and monitor the habitat, accessibility, and presence of winter steelhead, coho salmon, and resident trout upstream of the Middle Fork Irrigation District water sources on Evans Creek. Through this project, BPA funded the Middle Fork Irrigation District (MFID) a total of $194,000 in FY 03 for the Glacier Ditch- Evans Creek project. BPA funds accounted for approximately 30% of the project while the remaining 70% was cost-shared by the MFID, the US Forest Service, and the Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board. The MFID operated irrigation diversions on Evans Creek (Hutson pond RM 4.0 and the Evans Creek diversion RM 5.5), a tributary to the East Fork Hood River. Both diversions had inadequate upstream fish passage, and utilized Evans Creek to transport Eliot Branch water to distribute irrigation water lower in the basin. This project consisted of: piping a portion of the Glacier ditch to create a pressurized irrigation pipeline system, piping the Hutson extension, removing the culvert on Evans Creek near the Glacier ditch, removing the culvert above the Hutson pond, revegetating the disturbed areas, and providing adequate and approved fish passage on Evans Creek. Prior to any work, Brian Connors with MFID completed a NEPA checklist. Some of the key regulatory points of this project included wetland delineations, a cultural resources survey, and consultations with NOAA Fisheries, U.S. Fish and Wildlife, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. This project will eliminate the overflow of silty water into Evans Creek and West Fork Evans Creek. Upon completion of this project, access to 2.5 miles of winter steelhead, coho salmon, and resident trout habitat will be restored. Elimination of the interbasin transfer of water will discontinue the conveyance of silty Eliot Branch water into clear East Fork tributaries. Additionally, less water taken from Coe Branch, Eliot Branch, and Laurance Lake which will benefit listed steelhead and bull trout. The Glacier Ditch provided irrigation water from the Eliot Branch to upper valley orchards and agriculture for more than 100 years. The Glacier Ditch served approximately 1,438 acres with 18 cfs of water. The Glacier Ditch portion of this project

  14. Hood River Production Program Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) - Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs : Annual Report For Fiscal Year, October 2007 – September 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerstenberger, Ryan [Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation

    2009-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This progress report describes work performed by the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs (CTWSRO) portion of the Hood River Production Program Monitoring and Evaluation Project (HRPP) during the 2008 fiscal year. A total of 64,736 hatchery winter steelhead, 12,108 hatchery summer steelhead, and 68,426 hatchery spring Chinook salmon smolts were acclimated and released in the Hood River basin during the spring. The HRPP exceeded program goals for a release of and 50,000 winter steelhead but fell short of the steelhead release goals of 30,000 summer steelhead and 75,000 spring Chinook in 2008. Passive Integrated Transponders (PIT) tags were implanted in 6,652 hatchery winter steelhead, and 1,196 hatchery summer steelhead, to compare migratory attributes and survival rates of hatchery fish released into the Hood River. Water temperatures were recorded at six locations within the Hood River subbasin to monitor for compliance with Oregon Department of Environmental Quality water quality standards. A preseason spring Chinook salmon adult run forecast was generated, which predicted an abundant return adequate to meet escapement goal and brood stock needs. As a result the tribal and sport fisheries were opened. A tribal creel was conducted from May 22 to July 18 during which an estimated 172 spring Chinook were harvested. One hundred sixteen Spring Chinook salmon redds were observed and 72 carcasses were inspected on 19.4 miles of spawning grounds throughout the Hood River Basin during 2008. Annual salvage operations were completed in two irrigation canals resulting in the liberation of 1,641 fish back to the Hood River.

  15. Hood River and Pelton Ladder Evaluation Studies, Annual Report 2000-2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, Erik

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded the development of two master plans which outline the rationale, and general approach, for implementing a defined group of projects that are an integral part of a comprehensive watershed goal to 'Protect, enhance and restore wild and natural populations of anadromous and resident fish within the Hood River Subbasin'. The Hood River Production Master Plan and the Pelton Ladder Master Plan were completed in 1991 and subsequently approved by the Northwest Power Planning Council in 1992. Action items identified in the two master plans, as well as in a later document entitled 'Hood River/Pelton Ladder Master Agreement' (ODFW and CTWSRO Undated), are designed to achieve two biological fish objectives: (1) to increase production of wild summer and winter steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to levels commensurate with the subbasins current carrying capacity and (2) re-establishing a self-sustaining population of spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). Numerical fish objectives for subbasin escapement, spawner escapement, and subbasin harvest are defined for each of these species in Coccoli (2000). Several projects are presently funded by the BPA to achieve the Hood River subbasin's numerical fish objectives for summer and winter steelhead and spring chinook salmon. They include BPA project numbers 1998-021-00 (Hood River Fish Habitat), 1998-053-03 (Hood River Production Program - CTWSRO: M&E), 1998-053-07 (Parkdale Fish Facility), 1998-053-08 (Powerdale/Oak Springs O&M), and 1998-053-12 (Hood River Steelhead Genetics Study). Collectively, they are implemented under the umbrella of what has come to be defined as the Hood River Production Program (HRPP). The HRPP is jointly implemented by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (CTWSRO). Strategies for achieving the HRPP's biological fish objectives for the Hood River subbasin were initially devised based on various assumptions about (1) subbasin carrying capacity, (2) survival rates for selected life history stages, and (3) historic and current escapements of wild, natural, and hatchery stocks of anadromous salmonids to the Hood River subbasin. The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife began funding a monitoring and evaluation (M&E) project in December 1991 to collect the quantitative biological information needed to (1) more accurately assess the validity of these assumptions and (2) evaluate the proposed hatchery supplementation component of the HRPP. Bonneville Power Administration assumed funding of the M&E project in August 1992. The M&E project was initially confined to sampling anadromous salmonids escaping to an adult trapping facility operated at Powerdale Dam; which is located at River Mile (RM) 4.5 on the mainstem of the Hood River. Stock specific life history and biological data was collected to (1) monitor subbasin spawner escapements and (2) collect pre-implementation data critical to evaluating the newly proposed HRPP's potential biological impact on indigenous populations of resident fish. The scope of the M&E project was expanded in 1994 to collect the data needed to quantify (1) subbasin smolt production and carrying capacity, (2) smolt to adult survival rates, and (3) the spatial distribution of indigenous populations of summer and winter steelhead, spring and fall chinook salmon, and coho salmon. A creel was incorporated into the M&E project in December 1996 to evaluate the HRPP with respect to its defined subbasin and spawner escapement objectives for Hood River stocks of wild and hatchery summer and winter steelhead and for natural and Deschutes stock hatchery spring chinook salmon. In 1996, the M&E project also began monitoring streamflow at various locations in the Hood River subbasin. Streamflow data will be used to correlate subbasin smolt production with summer streamflows. Data collected from 1991-1999 is reported in the following annual progress reports: Olsen et al. (1994), Olsen et al

  16. 6. Hood River Subbasin Management Plan This Chapter presents a vision that describes goals or desired future conditions for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    175 6. Hood River Subbasin Management Plan This Chapter presents a vision that describes goals for this Management Plan is 10-15 years. The Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) model was used in the Hood River and August-October streamflow records; and 2) a habitat-population modeling effort recently completed

  17. Fraser River Hydro and Fisheries Research Project fonds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handy, Todd C.

    Fraser River Hydro and Fisheries Research Project fonds Revised by Erwin Wodarczak (1998 Fraser River Hydro and Fisheries Research Project fonds. ­ 19561961. 13 cm of textual records. Administrative History The Fraser River Hydro and Fisheries Research Project was established in 1956, financed

  18. EFFECTS OF NAVAL ORDNANCE TESTS ON THE PATUXENT RIVER FISHERY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EFFECTS OF NAVAL ORDNANCE TESTS ON THE PATUXENT RIVER FISHERY Marine Biological Laboratory t, T "B and Wildlife Service, John L. Farley, Director EFFECTS OF NAVAL ORDNANCE TESTS ON THE PATUXENT RIVER FISHERY of Medicine, Univ. of Puerto Rico. #12;#12;EFFECTS OF NAVAL ORDNANCE TESTS ON THE PATUXENT RIVER FISHERY

  19. Hood River Passive House, Hood River, Oregon (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Whole-House Solutions for New Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of Blythe Solar PowerCommercialEnergy Star HomePowerHood River Passive House

  20. Hood River Monitoring and Evaluation Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaivoda, Alexis

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hood River Production Program Monitoring and Evaluation Project is co-managed by the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs (CTWSRO) and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. The program is divided up to share responsibilities, provide efficiency, and avoid duplication. From October 2002 to September 2003 (FY 03) project strategies were implemented to monitor, protect, and restore anadromous fish and fish habitat in the Hood River subbasin. A description of the progress during FY 03 is reported here. Additionally an independent review of the entire program was completed in 2003. The purpose of the review was to determine if project goals and actions were achieved, look at critical uncertainties for present and future actions, determine cost effectiveness, and choose remedies that would increase program success. There were some immediate changes to the implementation of the project, but the bulk of the recommendations will be realized in coming years.

  1. Lower Columbia River Terminal Fisheries Research Project : Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This notice announces BPA`S`s decision to fund the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and the Clatsop Economic Development Committee for the Lower Columbia River Terminal Fisheries Research Project (Project). The Project will continue the testing of various species/stocks, rearing regimes, and harvest options for terminal fisheries, as a means to increase lower river sport and commercial harvest of hatchery fish, while providing both greater protection of weaker wild stocks and increasing the return of upriver salmon runs to potential Zone 6 Treaty fisheries. The Project involves relocating hatchery smolts to new, additional pen locations in three bays/sloughs in the lower Columbia River along both the Oregon and Washington sides. The sites are Blind Slough and Tongue Point in Clatsop County, Oregon, and Grays Bay/Deep River, Wahkiakum County, Washington. The smolts will be acclimated for various lengths of time in the net pens and released from these sites. The Project will expand upon an existing terminal fisheries project in Youngs Bay, Oregon. The Project may be expanded to other sites in the future, depending on the results of this initial expansion. BPA`S has determined the project is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required, and BPA`S is issuing this FONSI.

  2. Lower Flathead River Fisheries Study, 1983 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DosSantos, Joseph M.; Darling, James E.; Cross, Paul D.

    1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In January of 1983 a two-phase study of the lower Flathead River was initiated by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes with funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration. The study fulfills program measure 804 (a) (3) of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. During 1983 Phase I of the study was completed resulting in a detailed study plan for the next four years and the methods to be employed during the study. Preliminary observations suggest the present operation of Kerr hydroelectric facility and land use practices within the drainage have combined to significantly reduce spawning success of salmonids and northern pike, and thus recruitment to the fisheries of the main river and tributaries. Main river spawning marshes were observed to be drained frequently during the northern pike spawning season which would result in desiccation of eggs and loss of attached fry. Water level fluctuations also caused trapping of juvenile fish and may be an important source of juvenile mortality.

  3. EIS-0241-SA-01: Supplement Analysis for the Hood River Fisheries Project,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of98-F, Western22,EERE: Record| DepartmentRecord of-SA-01::

  4. EIS-0241-SA-02: Supplement Analysis for the Hood River Fisheries Project |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of98-F, Western22,EERE: Record| DepartmentRecord

  5. Kootenai River Fisheries Investigations: Salmonid Studies Project Progress Report, 2007-2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paragamian, Vaughn L.; Walters, Jody; Maiolie, Melo [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

    2009-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This research report addresses bull trout Salvelinus confluentus and Redband trout Oncorhynchus mykiss redd surveys, population monitoring, trout distribution, and abundance surveys in the Kootenai River drainage of Idaho. The bull trout is one of several sport fish native to the Kootenai River, Idaho that no longer supports a fishery. Because bull trout are listed under the Endangered Species Act, population data will be vital to monitoring status relative to recovery goals. Thirty-three bull trout redds were found in North and South Callahan creeks and Boulder Creek in 2007. This is a decrease from 2006 and 2005 and less than the high count in 2003. However, because redd numbers have only been monitored since 2002, the data series is too short to determine bull trout population trends based on redd counts. Redband trout still provide an important Kootenai River sport fishery, but densities are low, at least partly due to limited recruitment. The redband trout proportional stock density (PSD) in 2007 increased from 2006 for a second year after a two-year decline in 2004 and 2005. This may indicate increased recruitment to or survival in the 201-305 mm length group due to the minimum 406 mm (16 inches) length limit initiated in 2002. We conducted 13 redd surveys and counted 44 redband trout redds from May 7 to June 3, 2007 in a 3.8 km survey reach on Twentymile Creek. We surveyed streams in the Kootenai River valley to look for barriers to trout migration. Man-made barriers, for at least part of the year, were found on Caboose, Debt, Fisher, and Twenty Mile creeks. Removing these barriers would increase spawning and rearing habitat for trout and help to restore trout fisheries in the Kootenai River.

  6. A study of Texas rivers with attention to river access and recreational fisheries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Troy L

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Any angler can legally use a navigable Texas river or stream for recreational fishing. Often, however, the very definition of what navigability means is in question and private property boundaries are unclear. Over 98% of property adjacent to Texas...

  7. CTUIR Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project : A Columbia River Basin Fish Habitat Project 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoverson, Eric D.; Amonette, Alexandra

    2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project (UAFHP) is an ongoing effort to protect, enhance, and restore riparian and instream habitat for the natural production of anadromous salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin, Northeast Oregon. Flow quantity, water temperature, passage, and lack of in-stream channel complexity have been identified as the key limiting factors in the basin. During the 2008 Fiscal Year (FY) reporting period (February 1, 2008-January 31, 2009) primary project activities focused on improving instream and riparian habitat complexity, migrational passage, and restoring natural channel morphology and floodplain function. Eight primary fisheries habitat enhancement projects were implemented on Meacham Creek, Birch Creek, West Birch Creek, McKay Creek, West Fork Spring Hollow, and the Umatilla River. Specific restoration actions included: (1) rectifying one fish passage barrier on West Birch Creek; (2) participating in six projects planting 10,000 trees and seeding 3225 pounds of native grasses; (3) donating 1000 ft of fencing and 1208 fence posts and associated hardware for 3.6 miles of livestock exclusion fencing projects in riparian areas of West Birch and Meacham Creek, and for tree screens to protect against beaver damage on West Fork Spring Hollow Creek; (4) using biological control (insects) to reduce noxious weeds on three treatment areas covering five acres on Meacham Creek; (5) planning activities for a levee setback project on Meacham Creek. We participated in additional secondary projects as opportunities arose. Baseline and ongoing monitoring and evaluation activities were also completed on major project areas such as conducting photo point monitoring strategies activities at the Meacham Creek Large Wood Implementation Project site (FY2006) and at additional easements and planned project sites. Fish surveys and aquatic habitat inventories were conducted at project sites prior to implementation. Proper selection and implementation of the most effective site-specific habitat restoration plan, taking into consideration the unique characteristics of each project site, and conducted in cooperation with landowners and project partners, was of paramount importance to ensure each project's success. An Aquatic Habitat Inventory was conducted from river mile 0-8 on Isquulktpe Creek and the data collected was compared with data collected in 1994. Monitoring plans will continue throughout the duration of each project to oversee progression and inspire timely managerial actions. Twenty-seven conservation easements were maintained with 23 landowners. Permitting applications for planned project activities and biological opinions were written and approved. Project activities were based on a variety of fisheries monitoring techniques and habitat assessments used to determine existing conditions and identify factors limiting anadromous salmonid abundance in accordance with the Umatilla River Subbasin Salmon and Steelhead Production Plan (NPPC 1990) and the Final Umatilla Willow Subbasin Plan (Umatilla/Willow Subbasin Planning Team 2005).

  8. Report on the Predation Index, Predator Control Fisheries, and Program Evaluation for the Columbia River Basin Experimental Northern Pikeminnow Management Program, 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, Russell [Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission].

    2009-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents results for year seventeen in the basin-wide Experimental Northern Pikeminnow Management Program to harvest northern pikeminnow1 (Ptychocheilus oregonensis) in the Columbia and Snake Rivers. This program was started in an effort to reduce predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids during their emigration from natal streams to the ocean. Earlier work in the Columbia River Basin suggested predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids might account for most of the 10-20% mortality juvenile salmonids experience in each of eight Columbia River and Snake River reservoirs. Modeling simulations based on work in John Day Reservoir from 1982 through 1988 indicated that, if predator-size northern pikeminnow were exploited at a 10-20% rate, the resulting restructuring of their population could reduce their predation on juvenile salmonids by 50%. To test this hypothesis, we implemented a sport-reward angling fishery and a commercial longline fishery in the John Day Pool in 1990. We also conducted an angling fishery in areas inaccessible to the public at four dams on the mainstem Columbia River and at Ice Harbor Dam on the Snake River. Based on the success of these limited efforts, we implemented three test fisheries on a system-wide scale in 1991 - a tribal longline fishery above Bonneville Dam, a sport-reward fishery, and a dam-angling fishery. Low catch of target fish and high cost of implementation resulted in discontinuation of the tribal longline fishery. However, the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries were continued in 1992 and 1993. In 1992, we investigated the feasibility of implementing a commercial longline fishery in the Columbia River below Bonneville Dam and found that implementation of this fishery was also infeasible. Estimates of combined annual exploitation rates resulting from the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries remained at the low end of our target range of 10-20%. This suggested the need for additional effective harvest techniques. During 1991 and 1992, we developed and tested a modified (small-sized) Merwin trapnet. We found this floating trapnet to be very effective in catching northern pikeminnow at specific sites. Consequently, in 1993 we examined a system-wide fishery using floating trapnets, but found this fishery to be ineffective at harvesting large numbers of northern pikeminnow on a system-wide scale. In 1994, we investigated the use of trap nets and gillnets at specific locations where concentrations of northern pikeminnow were known or suspected to occur during the spring season (i.e., March through early June). In addition, we initiated a concerted effort to increase public participation in the sport-reward fishery through a series of promotional and incentive activities. In 1995, 1996, and 1997, promotional activities and incentives were further improved based on the favorable response in 1994. Results of these efforts are subjects of this annual report. Evaluation of the success of test fisheries in achieving our target goal of a 10-20% annual exploitation rate on northern pikeminnow is presented in Report C of this report. Overall program success in terms of altering the size and age composition of the northern pikeminnow population and in terms of potential reductions in loss of juvenile salmonids to northern pikeminnow predation is also discussed in Report C. Program cooperators include the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and the U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal Damage Unit as a contractor to test Dam Angling. The PSMFC was responsible for coordination and administration of the program; PSMFC subcontracted various tasks and activities to ODFW and WDFW based on the expertise each brought to the tasks involved in implementing the program and dam angling to the USDA.

  9. Energy efficient laboratory fume hood

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feustel, Helmut E. (Albany, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a low energy consumption fume hood that provides an adequate level of safety while reducing the amount of air exhausted from the hood. A low-flow fume hood in accordance with the present invention works on the principal of providing an air supply, preferably with low turbulence intensity, in the face of the hood. The air flow supplied displaces the volume currently present in the hood's face without significant mixing between the two volumes and with minimum injection of air from either side of the flow. This air flow provides a protective layer of clean air between the contaminated low-flow fume hood work chamber and the laboratory room. Because this protective layer of air will be free of contaminants, even temporary mixing between the air in the face of the fume hood and room air, which may result from short term pressure fluctuations or turbulence in the laboratory, will keep contaminants contained within the hood. Protection of the face of the hood by an air flow with low turbulence intensity in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention largely reduces the need to exhaust large amounts of air from the hood. It has been shown that exhaust air flow reductions of up to 75% are possible without a decrease in the hood's containment performance.

  10. Kootenai River Fisheries Investigation[s]; Stock Status of Burbot, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paragamian, Vaughn L.; Hoyle, Genevieve

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kootenai River Fisheries Investigation Project planned to monitor burbot Lota lota movement in the winter of 2002-2003 and test a hypothesis regarding the relationship of winter flow to upstream spawning migration success. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Bonneville Power Administration were unable to provide the consistent low winter flows needed to meet the experimental design criteria in that monitoring and evaluation plan (approximately 170 m{sup 3}/s from Libby Dam). Although conditions consistent with management for sustained minimum flows persisted throughout the winter, and stable low flows were maintained below Libby Dam from September 1 through November 24, 2002 (158 m{sup 3}/s average) and from January 1, 2003 until May 1 (144 m{sup 3}/s average), flows in the intervening 37 d period from November 25 to December 31 were increased significantly by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. During that important December spawning migration period for burbot, flows were well above those proposed in the monitoring and evaluation plan and peaked at 741 m{sup 3}/s on December 21, 2002. Furthermore, despite the low flow conditions for much of the winter, our capture of 10 burbot was the lowest since this investigation began in 1993, evidence that the stock is extremely depressed and the numbers of burbot are declining. We captured a single burbot in 2002-2003 that provided circumstantial evidence reproduction occurred during the winter of 2000-2001. This burbot of 352 mm TL was among the smallest captured since sampling began in 1993. Seven burbot were monitored with sonic telemetry; two of those were tagged the previous winter. The capture of a female burbot at Ambush Rock during the spawning period supports results of previous findings that low flows during winter enhances burbot migration and spawning. Sampling for larval burbot was conducted, but no larval burbot were captured.

  11. Impacts of the Snake River drawdown experiment on fisheries resources in Little Goose and Lower Granite Reservoirs, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dauble, D D; Geist, D R

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In March 1992, the US Army Corps of Engineers initiated a test to help evaluate physical and environmental impacts resulting from the proposed future drawdown of Snake River reservoirs. Drawdown would reduce water levels in Snake River reservoirs and is being proposed as a solution to decrease the time it takes for salmon and steelhead smolts to migrate to the ocean. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory evaluated impacts to specific fisheries resources during the drawdown experiment by surveying Lower Granite Reservoir to determine if fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) spawning areas and steelhead (0. mykiss) access to tributary creeks were affected. In addition, shoreline areas of Little Goose Reservoir were monitored to evaluate the suitability of these areas for spawning by fall chinook salmon. Relative abundance of fish species in nearshore areas was also determined during the drawdown, and stranded resident fish and other aquatic organisms were observed.

  12. Wind, Klickitat, Hood and Fifteen Mile Habitat Site Visits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind, Klickitat, Hood and Fifteen Mile Habitat Site Visits April 17-19th, 2013 ISRP Review Team (4 at the Sheraton Airport at 7:15 a.m. Site Visits: Depart airport and head east: Wind, Klickitat, White Salmon in this review: 1998-019-00 Wind River Watershed Underwood Conservation District (UCD), US Forest Service (USFS

  13. Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys : Willamette River Basin, 1934-1942, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains summary reports of stream habitat-surveys, conducted in the Willamette River basin, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1934-1942. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead (Rich, 1948). The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, 'to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes'. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946 (Bryant, 1949; Bryant and Parkhurst, 1950; Parkhurst, 1950a-c; Parkhurst et al., 1950). Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin (Fulton, 1968, 1970; Thompson, 1976; NPPC, 1986). Recently, the field notebooks from the BOF surveys were discovered. The data is now archived and stored in the Forest Science DataBank at Oregon State University (Stafford et al., 1984; 1988). These records are the earliest and most comprehensive documentation available of the condition and extent of anadromous fish habitat before hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin. They provide the baseline data for quantifying changes and setting a benchmark for future restoration of anadromous fish habitat throughout the Basin. The summaries contained in this book are exact replicates of the originals. Due to discrepancies between the field data and the summaries, the database should be used to assess pool and substrate conditions. This data is available from the Bonneville Power Administration. The Bureau of Fisheries survey is unique because it is the only long-term data set that quantifies fish habitat in a manner that is replicable over time; no other similar work is known to exist. Other surveys, such as Thompson and Haas (1960), inventoried extensive areas in a manner that was mostly qualitative, subjectively estimating physical characteristics like bank cover and stream shading. Spawning, rearing, and resting habitat were not systematically quantified to allow comparisons over time. Knowledge of past and present quantity and quality of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin is essential to any effort to enhance fish populations. Habitat condition is a key element in monitoring and evaluating progress towards the doubling goal. Integration of this information into the Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Plan can provide the basis to greatly enhance understanding of past, present, and future habitat conditions in the basin to provide for improved management decisions.

  14. Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys : Yakima River Basin, 1934-1942, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains summary reports of stream habitat surveys, conducted in the Yakima River basin, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1934-1942. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead (Rich, 1948). The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, 'to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes'. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946 (Bryant, 1949; Bryant and Parkhurst, 1950; Parkhurst, 1950a-c; Parkhurst et al., 1950). Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin (Fulton, 1968, 1970; Thompson, 1976; NPPC, 1986). Recently, the field notebooks from the BOF surveys were discovered. The data is now archived and stored in the Forest Science DataBank at Oregon State University (Stafford et al., 1984; 1988). These records are the earliest and most comprehensive documentation available of the condition and extent of anadromous fish habitat before hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin. They provide the baseline data for quantifying changes and setting a benchmark for future restoration of anadromous fish habitat throughout the Basin. The summaries in this book are exact replicates of the originals. Due to discrepancies between the field data and the summaries, the database should be used to assess pool and substrate conditions. This data is available from the Bonneville Power Administration. The Bureau of Fisheries survey is unique because it is the only long-term data set that quantifies fish habitat in a manner that is replicable over time; no other similar work is known to exist. Other surveys, such as Thompson and Haas (1960), inventoried extensive areas in a manner that was mostly qualitative, subjectively estimating physical characteristics like bank cover and stream shading. Spawning, rearing, and resting habitat were not systematically quantified to allow comparisons over time. Knowledge of the past and present quantity and quality of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin is essential to any effort to enhance fish populations. Habitat condition is a key element in monitoring and evaluating progress towards the doubling goal. Integration of this information into the Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Plan can provide the baseline information to greatly enhance understanding of past, present, and future habitat conditions in the basin to provide for improved management decisions.

  15. Measuring Benefits from a Marketing Cooperative in the Copper River Fishery Sunny L. Jardinea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

    of inferior-quality fish. Specifically, we use a difference-in-differences estimation strategy to measure, however, is the presence of market failures that lead to the production of inferior- quality fish rights in fisheries, which creates incentives for fishermen to engage in a race to fish and neglect

  16. Yakima River Spring Chinook Enhancement Study, Fisheries Resource Management, Yakima Indian Nation1983 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wasserman, Larry

    1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose was to evaluate enhancement methodologies that can be used to rebuild runs of spring chinook to the Yakima River system. In January, 1983, 100,000 fish raised at Leavenworth National Fish Hatchery were transported to Nile Springs Rearing Ponds on the Naches River. These fish were allowed a volitional release as smolts in April. An additional 100,000 smolts were transported from Leavenworth Hatchery in April and immediately released to the Upper Yakima River. Relative survival of smolts from their points of release to a trap at Prosser (RM48) was 1.69:1 for fish from Nile Springs, versus the trucked smolts. The fish from Nile Springs arrived at Prosser and McNary Dam approximately 1 week earlier than the transported fish. To better determine the magnitude and location of releases, distribution and abundance studies were undertaken. There is a decrease in abundance from upstream areas over time, indicating a general downstream movement. In the Naches System, the lower Naches River is heavily utilized by juvenile spring chinook during the early summer. A preliminary study evaluated physical limitations of production. On a single evening 67 fish were killed on diversion screens at Chandler Canal. This constituted 5.7% of the wild spring chinook entering the canal and 8.2% of the fall chinook. The larger hatchery spring chinook sustained a 2.3% loss. Adult returns resulted in 443 redds in the Yakima System, with 360 in the Yakima River and 83 in the Naches System.

  17. Chemical Fume Hood Commissioning & Annual Inspection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Chemical Fume Hood Commissioning & Annual Inspection Laboratory Ventilation Management Program SOP for commissioning and annual inspection of laboratory fume hoods and is based on testing and specifications found procedures for fume hood commissioning and annual inspections based on testing and specifications found

  18. Columbia River : Select Area Fishery Evaluation project : 1995-96 Annual Reports.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirose, Paul; Miller, Marc; Hill, Jim

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water quality monitoring was conducted from November 1994 through October 1996 at five Oregon and three Washington select area study sites in the lower Columbia River. Physicochemical monitoring and aquatic biomonitoring programs were established to profile baseline parameters at each study site and document differences between study sites. Data collected at study sites where fish rearing operations were initiated indicate a potential negative impact on the surrounding benthic invertebrate communities.

  19. Hood River Electric Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup | Open EnergyInformation HessHirschmannScoringHongyuan

  20. Yakima River Species Interactions Studies; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearsons, Todd N.; Temple, Gabriel M.; Fritts, Anthony L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the thirteenth of a series of progress reports that address species interactions research and supplementation monitoring of fishes in response to supplementation of salmon and steelhead in the upper Yakima River basin (Hindman et al. 1991; McMichael et al. 1992; Pearsons et al. 1993; Pearsons et al. 1994; Pearsons et al. 1996; Pearsons et al. 1998, Pearsons et al. 1999, Pearsons et al. 2001a, Pearsons et al. 2001b, Pearsons et al. 2002, Pearsons et al. 2003, Pearsons et al. 2004). Journal articles and book chapters have also been published from our work (McMichael 1993; Martin et al. 1995; McMichael et al. 1997; McMichael and Pearsons 1998; McMichael et al. 1998; Pearsons and Fritts 1999; McMichael et al. 1999; McMichael et al. 1999; Pearsons and Hopley 1999; Ham and Pearsons 2000; Ham and Pearsons 2001; Amaral et al. 2001; McMichael and Pearsons 2001; Pearsons 2002, Fritts and Pearsons 2004, Pearsons et al. in press, Major et al. in press). This progress report summarizes data collected between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2004. These data were compared to findings from previous years to identify general trends and make preliminary comparisons. Interactions between fish produced as part of the YKFP, termed target species or stocks, and other species or stocks (non-target taxa) may alter the population status of non-target species or stocks. This may occur through a variety of mechanisms, such as competition, predation, and interbreeding (Pearsons et al. 1994; Busack et al. 1997; Pearsons and Hopley 1999). Furthermore, the success of a supplementation program may be limited by strong ecological interactions such as predation or competition (Busack et al. 1997). Our work has adapted to new information needs as the YKFP has evolved. Initially, our work focused on interactions between anadromous steelhead and resident rainbow trout (for explanation see Pearsons et al. 1993), then interactions between spring chinook salmon and rainbow trout, and recently interactions between spring chinook salmon and highly valued non-target taxa (NTT; e.g., bull trout); and interactions between strong interactor taxa (e.g., those that may strongly influence the abundance of spring chinook salmon; e.g., smallmouth bass) and spring chinook salmon. The change in emphasis to spring chinook salmon has largely been influenced by the shift in the target species planned for supplementation (Bonneville Power Administration et al. 1996; Fast and Craig 1997). Originally, steelhead and spring chinook salmon were proposed to be supplemented simultaneously (Clune and Dauble 1991). However, due in part to the uncertainties associated with interactions between steelhead and rainbow trout, spring chinook and coho salmon were supplemented before steelhead. This redirection in the species to be supplemented has prompted us to prioritize interactions between spring chinook and rainbow trout, while beginning to investigate other ecological interactions of concern. Prefacility monitoring of variables such as rainbow trout density, distribution, and size structure was continued and monitoring of other NTT was initiated in 1997. This report is organized into five chapters that represent major topics associated with monitoring stewardship, utilization, and strong interactor taxa. Chapter 1 reports the results of non-target taxa monitoring after the sixth release of hatchery salmon smolts in the upper Yakima River Basin. Chapter 2 reports on the impacts of supplementation and reintroduction of salmon to trout. Chapter 2 was submitted as a manuscript to the North American Journal of Fisheries Management. Chapter 3 is an essay that describes the problems associated

  1. Reproductive Ecology of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knudsen, Curtis M. (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA)

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from Oncorh Consulting to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the second in a series of reports that address reproductive ecological research and monitoring of spring chinook in the Yakima River basin. In addition to within-year comparisons, between-year comparisons will be made to determine if traits of the wild Naches basin control population, the naturally spawning population in the upper Yakima River and the hatchery control population are diverging over time. This annual report summarizes data collected between April 1, 2002 and March 31, 2003. In the future, these data will be compared to previous years to identify general trends and make preliminary comparisons. Supplementation success in the Yakima Klickitat Fishery Project's (YKFP) spring chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) program is defined as increasing natural production and harvest opportunities, while keeping adverse ecological interactions and genetic impacts within acceptable bounds (Busack et al. 1997). Within this context demographics, phenotypic traits, and reproductive ecology have significance because they directly affect natural productivity. In addition, significant changes in locally adapted traits due to hatchery influence, i.e. domestication, would likely be maladaptive resulting in reduced population productivity and fitness (Taylor 1991; Hard 1995). Thus, there is a need to study demographic and phenotypic traits in the YKFP in order to understand hatchery and wild population productivity, reproductive ecology, and the effects of domestication (Busack et al. 1997). Tracking trends in these traits over time is also a critical aspect of domestication monitoring (Busack et al. 2002) to determine whether trait changes have a genetic component and, if so, are they within acceptable limits. Each chapter of this report deals with monitoring phenotypic and demographic traits of Yakima River basin spring chinook comparing hatchery and wild returns in 2002; the second year of adult hatchery returns. The first chapter deals specifically with adult traits of American River, Naches basin (excluding the American River), and upper Yakima River spring chinook, excluding gametes. The second chapter examines the gametic traits and progeny produced by upper Yakima River wild and hatchery origin fish. In the third chapter, we describe work begun initially in 2002 to characterize and compare redds of naturally spawning wild and hatchery fish in the upper Yakima River.

  2. Fisheries of the Hudson River Karin E. Limburg, Kathryn A. Hattala, Andrew W. Kahnle, and John R. Waldman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limburg, Karin E.

    took the radical steps of (1) instituting a net lift period and (2) artificial propagation, which of various habitats within the system. Here, we concentrate on the fisheries themselves, focusing on key

  3. Hood Commissioning Laboratory Ventilation Management Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Hood Commissioning Laboratory Ventilation Management Program Form In the interest of efficiency and effective use of our limited resources, EHS will not initiate or schedule the commissioning process for any____Other (describe) Hood is:______New _______Relocated_______Reconfigured (Describe ) Requested Commissioning Date (s

  4. Reproductive Ecology of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knudsen, Curtis M. (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA); Schroder, Steven L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Johnston, Mark V. (yakama Nation, Toppenish, WA)

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from Oncorh Consulting to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the fourth in a series of reports that address reproductive ecological research and monitoring of spring chinook populations in the Yakima River basin. This annual report summarizes data collected between April 1, 2004 and March 31, 2005 and includes analyses of historical baseline data, as well. Supplementation success in the Yakima Klickitat Fishery Project's (YKFP) spring chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) program is defined as increasing natural production and harvest opportunities, while keeping adverse ecological interactions and genetic impacts within acceptable bounds (Busack et al. 1997). Within this context demographics, phenotypic traits, and reproductive ecology have significance because they directly affect natural productivity. In addition, significant changes in locally adapted traits due to hatchery influence, i.e. domestication, would likely be maladaptive resulting in reduced population productivity and fitness (Taylor 1991; Hard 1995). Thus, there is a need to study demographic and phenotypic traits in the YKFP in order to understand hatchery and wild population productivity, reproductive ecology, and the effects of domestication (Busack et al. 1997). Tracking trends in these traits over time is also a critical aspect of domestication monitoring (Busack et al. 2004) to determine whether trait changes have a genetic component and, if so, are they within acceptable limits. The first chapter of this report compares first generation hatchery and wild upper Yakima River spring chinook returns over a suite of life-history, phenotypic and demographic traits. The second chapter deals specifically with identification of putative populations of wild spring chinook in the Yakima River basin based on differences in quantitative and genetic traits. The third chapter is a progress report on gametic traits and progeny produced by upper Yakima River wild and hatchery origin fish spawned in 2004 including some comparisons with Little Naches River fish. In the fourth chapter, we present a progress report on comparisons naturally spawning wild and hatchery fish in the upper Yakima River and in an experimental spawning channel at CESRF in 2004. The chapters in this report are in various stages of development. Chapters One and Two will be submitted for peer reviewed publication. Chapters Three and Four should be considered preliminary and additional fieldwork and/or analysis are in progress related to these topics. Readers are cautioned that any preliminary conclusions are subject to future revision as more data and analytical results become available.

  5. Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys : Clearwater, Salmon, Weiser, and Payette River Basins, 1934-1942, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains summary reports of stream habitat surveys, conducted in Idaho, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1938-1942.. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead (Rich, 1948). The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, 'to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes'. The Idaho portion of the survey consisted of extensive surveys of the Clearwater, Salmon, Weiser, and Payette River Subbasins. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946 (Bryant, 1949; Bryant and Parkhurst, 1950; Parkhurst, 1950a-c; Parkhurst et al., 1950). Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin (Fulton, 1968, 1970; Thompson, 1976; NPPC, 1986). Recently, the field notebooks from the BOF surveys were discovered. The data is now archived and stored in the Forest Science DataBank at Oregon State University (Stafford et al., 1984; 1988). These records are the earliest and most comprehensive documentation available of the condition and extent of anadromous fish habitat before hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin. They provide the baseline data for quantifying changes and setting a benchmark for future restoration of anadromous fish habitat throughout the Basin. The summaries contained in this book are exact replicates of the originals. Due to discrepancies between the field data and the summaries, the database should be used to assess pool and substrate conditions. This data is available from the Bonneville Power Administration. The Bureau of Fisheries survey is unique because it is the only long-term data set that quantifies fish habitat in a manner that is replicable over time; no other similar work is known to exist. Other surveys, such as Thompson and Haas (1960), inventoried extensive areas in a manner that was mostly qualitative, subjectively estimating physical characteristics like bank cover and stream shading. Spawning, rearing, and resting habitat were not systematically quantified to allow comparisons over time. Knowledge of the past and present quantity and quality of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin is essential to any effort to enhance fish populations. Habitat condition is a key element in monitoring and evaluating progress towards the doubling goal. Integration of this information into the Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Plan can provide the baseline information to greatly enhance understanding of past, present, and future habitat conditions in the basin to provide for improved management decisions.

  6. fort hood range revegetation Located on the northern edge of the Texas Hill Country, Fort Hood Military

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conservation Service (NRCS) and Fort Hood's Integrated Training Area Management (ITAM) and Directorate

  7. Confederated Tribes Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project : A Columbia River Basin Fish Habitat Project : Annual Report Fiscal Year 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoverson, Eric D.; Amonette, Alexandra

    2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project (UAFHP) is an ongoing effort to protect, enhance, and restore riparian and instream habitat for the natural production of anadromous salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin, Northeast Oregon. Flow quantity, water temperature, passage, and lack of in-stream channel complexity have been identified as the key limiting factors in the basin. During the 2007 Fiscal Year (FY) reporting period (February 1, 2007-January 31, 2008) primary project activities focused on improving instream and riparian habitat complexity, migrational passage, and restoring natural channel morphology and floodplain function. Eight fisheries habitat enhancement projects were implemented on Meacham Creek, Camp Creek, Greasewood Creek, Birch Creek, West Birch Creek, and the Umatilla River. Specific restoration actions included: (1) rectifying five fish passage barriers on four creeks, (2) planting 1,275 saplings and seeding 130 pounds of native grasses, (3) constructing two miles of riparian fencing for livestock exclusion, (4) coordinating activities related to the installation of two off-channel, solar-powered watering areas for livestock, and (5) developing eight water gap access sites to reduce impacts from livestock. Baseline and ongoing monitoring and evaluation activities were also completed on major project areas such as conducting photo point monitoring strategies activities at the Meacham Creek Large Wood Implementation Project site (FY2006) and at all existing easements and planned project sites. Fish surveys and aquatic habitat inventories were conducted at project sites prior to implementation. Monitoring plans will continue throughout the life of each project to oversee progression and inspire timely managerial actions. Twenty-seven conservation easements were maintained with 23 landowners. Permitting applications for planned project activities and biological opinions were written and approved. Project activities were based on a variety of fisheries monitoring techniques and habitat assessments used to determine existing conditions and identify factors limiting anadromous salmonid abundance. Proper selection and implementation of the most effective site-specific habitat restoration plan, taking into consideration the unique characteristics of each project site, and conducted in cooperation with landowners and project partners, was of paramount importance to ensure each project's success.

  8. Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Hood, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solana, Amy E.; Warwick, William M.; Orrell, Alice C.; Russo, Bryan J.; Parker, Kyle R.; Weimar, Mark R.; Horner, Jacob A.; Manning, Anathea

    2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) follow-on renewable energy (RE) assessment of Fort Hood. Fort Hood receives many solicitations from renewable energy vendors who are interested in doing projects on site. Based on specific requests from Fort Hood staff so they can better understand these proposals, and the results of PNNL's 2008 RE assessment of Fort Hood, the following resources were examined in this assessment: (1) Municipal solid waste (MSW) for waste-to-energy (WTE); (2) Wind; (3) Landfill gas; (4) Solar photovoltaics (PV); and (5) Shale gas. This report also examines the regulatory issues, development options, and environmental impacts for the promising RE resources, and includes a review of the RE market in Texas.

  9. Abundance, Distribution and Estimated Consumption (kg fish) of Piscivorous Birds Along the Yakima River, Washington State; Implications for Fisheries Management, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Major, III, Walter; Grassley, James M.; Ryding, Kristen E. (University of Washington, Quantitive Ecology Program, Seattle, WA)

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is divided into two chapters. The abstract for chapter one is--Understanding of the abundance and spatial and temporal distributions of piscivorous birds and their potential consumption of fish is an increasingly important aspect of fisheries management. During 1999-2002, we determined the abundance and distribution and estimated the maximum consumption (kg biomass) of fish-eating birds along the length of the Yakima River in Washington State. Sixteen different species were observed during the 4-yr study, but only half of those were observed during all years. Abundance and estimated consumption of fish within the upper and middle sections of the river were dominated by common mergansers (Mergus merganser) which are known to breed in those reaches. Common mergansers accounted for 78 to 94% of the estimated total fish take for the upper river or approximately 28,383 {+-} 1,041 kg over the 4 yrs. A greater diversity of avian piscivores occurred in the lower river and potential impacts to fish populations was more evenly distributed among the species. In 1999-2000, great blue herons potentially accounted for 29 and 36% of the fish consumed, whereas in 2001-2002 American white pelicans accounted for 53 and 55%. We estimated that approximately 75,878 {+-} 6,616 kg of fish were consumed by piscivorous birds in the lower sections of the river during the study. Bird assemblages differed spatially along the river with a greater abundance of colonial nesting species within the lower sections of the river, especially during spring and the nesting season. The abundance of avian piscivores and consumption estimates are discussed within the context of salmonid supplementation efforts on the river and juvenile out-migration. The abstract for chapter two is--Consumption of fish by piscivorous birds may be a significant constraint on efforts to enhance salmonid populations within tributaries to the Columbia River in Washington State. During 1999-2002, we determined the abundance of fish-eating birds, primarily ring-billed (Larus delawarensis) and California (L. californicus) gulls and monitored their behavior at two man-made structures within the Yakima River in eastern Washington: Horn Rapids Dam, a low-head irrigation dam, and the return pipe for the Chandler Juvenile Fish Handling Facility. Earlier observations of congregations of gulls at these structures suggested an increased likelihood of predation of out-migrating juvenile salmonids. We estimated the number of fish consumed and examined the relationship between river flow and gull numbers and fish taken. Numbers of gulls at the structures varied daily between their arrival in Late March-early April and departure in late June (mean ({+-}SE) - Horn Rapids: 11.7 ({+-}2.0), Chandler: 20.1 ({+-}1.5) ). During the 4-yr study, numbers at Horn Rapids peaked dramatically during the last 2 weeks in May (between 132.9 ({+-}4.2) to 36.6 ({+-}2.2) gulls/day) and appeared to the associated with the release of > 1-mil hatchery juvenile fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) above the 2 study sites. A comparable peak in gull abundance was not observed at Chandler. Diurnal patterns of gull abundance also varied among years and sites. The relationship between foraging efficiency and gull numbers was not consistent among years or sites. Gull numbers were not correlated with river flow when year was considered. However, variations in flow among years appeared to be associated with average gull numbers at each site, but trends were not consistent between sites. Low seasonal flows were associated with increased predation at Chandler, whereas high seasonal flows were associated with increased predation at Horn Rapids. Assuming all fish taken were salmonids, we estimate gulls consumed between 0.1-10.3 % of the juvenile salmonids passing or being released from the Chandler Juvenile Fish Monitoring Facility located above the two structures. Staggered releases of hatchery fish, nocturnal releases of fish entrained in the Chandler facility, changes in the orientation of the outflow from the f

  10. Natural Propagation and Habitat Improvement, Volume I, Oregon, 1984 Final and Annual Reports.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Rod

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains reports on habitat improvement and fisheries enhancement projects conducted in the following subbasins: (1) Clackamas River; (2) Hood River; :(3) Deschutes River; (4) John Day River; (5) Umatilla River; and (6) Grande Ronde River. (ACR)

  11. Dynamic leakage from laboratory safety hoods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Ju-Myon

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Standard Institute) Z 9. 5 Clarification of ANSI/AIHA Z9. 5 Standard "Laboratory Ventilation ". 1999. Page 13, Section 5. 7 80 ? 120 (0. 41 ? 0. 61) NFPA (National Fire Protection Association) NFPA 45 Fire Protection for Laboratories Using... 1910. 1450. Safety and Health Administration) 60- 100 (0. 31 ? 0. 51) SEFA (Scientific Equipment & Furniture Association) Laboratory Fume Hoods Recommended Practices. SEFA 1. 2, 1996. Page 7 75 ? 125 (0. 3 8 ? 0. 64) 2. Turbulence J. O...

  12. Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Hood, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chvala, William D.; Warwick, William M.; Dixon, Douglas R.; Solana, Amy E.; Weimar, Mark R.; States, Jennifer C.; Reilly, Raymond W.

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The document provides an overview of renewable resource potential at Fort Hood based primarily upon analysis of secondary data sources supplemented with limited on-site evaluations. The effort was funded by the U.S. Army Installation Management Command (IMCOM) as follow-on to the 2005 DoD Renewables Assessment. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and also ground source heat pumps for heating and cooling buildings, as directed by IMCOM.

  13. Reproductive Ecology of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild Spring Chinook and Juvenile-to-Adult PIT-tag Retention; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knudsen, Curtis M. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from Oncorh Consulting to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the first in an anticipated series of reports that address reproductive ecological research and monitoring of spring chinook in the Yakima River basin. In addition to within-year comparisons, between-year comparisons will be made to determine if traits of the wild Naches basin control population, the naturally spawning population in the upper Yakima River and the hatchery control population are diverging over time. This annual report summarizes data collected between April 1, 2001 and March 31, 2002. In the future, these data will be compared to previous years to identify general trends and make preliminary comparisons.

  14. Data Polling Routine (PlotHood) to Generate Weekly Inspection Plots for Fort Hood, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saman, N. F.; Reddy, T. A.; Haberl, J. S.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . For this part of the project, a weather station that includes temperature, humidity and solar sensors was installed at the west substation of Ft. Hood as part of Phase I of this project. Weekly inspection plots of electricity use at the main substation of Ft...-Phase II, p. ii TABLE OF CONTENTS General Abstract i Disclaimer iii Acknowledgments iv Provide Data Polling and Inspection Plots Generation Routine (PlotHood) Executive Summary 2 Existing Monitoring System 3 a- ESL Weather Station at the West Substation. 3...

  15. Yakima River Species Interactions Study; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation Report 7 of 7, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearsons, Todd N.; Fritts, Anthony L.; Temple, Gabriel M. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the twelfth of a series of progress reports that address species interactions research and supplementation monitoring of fishes in response to supplementation of salmon and steelhead in the upper Yakima River basin (Hindman et al. 1991; McMichael et al. 1992; Pearsons et al. 1993; Pearsons et al. 1994; Pearsons et al. 1996; Pearsons et al. 1998, Pearsons et al. 1999, Pearsons et al. 2001a, Pearsons et al. 2001b, Pearsons et al. 2002, Pearsons et al. 2003). Journal articles and book chapters have also been published from our work (McMichael 1993; Martin et al. 1995; McMichael et al. 1997; McMichael and Pearsons 1998; McMichael et al. 1998; Pearsons and Fritts 1999; McMichael et al. 1999; McMichael et al. 1999; Pearsons and Hopley 1999; Ham and Pearsons 2000; Ham and Pearsons 2001; Amaral et al. 2001; McMichael and Pearsons 2001; Pearsons 2002, Fritts and Pearsons 2004, Pearsons et al. in press, Major et al. in press). This progress report summarizes data collected between January 1, 2003 and December 31, 2003. These data were compared to findings from previous years to identify general trends and make preliminary comparisons. Interactions between fish produced as part of the YKFP, termed target species or stocks, and other species or stocks (non-target taxa) may alter the population status of non-target species or stocks. This may occur through a variety of mechanisms, such as competition, predation, and interbreeding (Pearsons et al. 1994; Busack et al. 1997; Pearsons and Hopley 1999). Furthermore, the success of a supplementation program may be limited by strong ecological interactions such as predation or competition (Busack et al. 1997). Our work has adapted to new information needs as the YKFP has evolved. Initially, our work focused on interactions between anadromous steelhead and resident rainbow trout (for explanation see Pearsons et al. 1993), then interactions between spring chinook salmon and rainbow trout, and recently interactions between spring chinook salmon and highly valued non-target taxa (NTT; e.g., bull trout); and interactions between strong interactor taxa (e.g., those that may strongly influence the abundance of spring chinook salmon; e.g., smallmouth bass) and spring chinook salmon. The change in emphasis to spring chinook salmon has largely been influenced by the shift in the target species planned for supplementation (Bonneville Power Administration et al. 1996; Fast and Craig 1997). Originally, steelhead and spring chinook salmon were proposed to be supplemented simultaneously (Clune and Dauble 1991). However, due in part to the uncertainties associated with interactions between steelhead and rainbow trout, spring chinook and coho salmon were supplemented before steelhead. This redirection in the species to be supplemented has prompted us to prioritize interactions between spring chinook and rainbow trout, while beginning to investigate other ecological interactions of concern. Prefacility monitoring of variables such as rainbow trout density, distribution, and size structure was continued and monitoring of other NTT was initiated in 1997. This report is organized into three chapters that represent major topics associated with monitoring stewardship, utilization, and strong interactor taxa. Chapter 1 reports the results of non-target taxa monitoring after the fifth release of hatchery salmon smolts in the upper Yakima River basin. Chapter 2 describes our tributary sampling methodology for monitoring the status of tributary NTT. Chapter 3 describes predation on juvenile salmonids by smallmouth bass and channel catfish in the lower Yakima River. The chapters in this report are in various stages of d

  16. FISHERY STATISTICS UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of processed fishery product s, data on freez- ings and cold storage holdings, and on foreign trade in fishery fisheries. There is also information on the pack of canned tuna and industrial prod ucts for Puerto Rico, mollusks, etc . , by countries Processed fishery products . Canned fishery products Industrial fishery

  17. AN ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF THE ST. LAWRENCE RIVER-EASTERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AN ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF THE ST. LAWRENCE RIVER-EASTERN LAKE ONTARIO BASS FISHERY The St. Lawrence information on the economic importance of the bass fishery, considered by many to be one of the best smallmouth bass fisheries in the world. The economic value of this recreational fishery should be taken

  18. GREAT LAKES FISHERY COMMISSION 2008 Project Completion Report1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Whitledge Fisheries and Illinois Aquaculture Center Southern Illinois University Carbondale, IL 62901 River (Fox, Des Plaines and DuPage Rivers) and to determine whether otolith isotopic and elemental in the Fox and Des Plaines Rivers could be distinguished from one another and from fish captured

  19. Savings Report for the Fort Hood Army Base

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, S.; Liu, Z.; Cho, S.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Haberl, J. S.

    Underwood (USACERL), and Bobby Lynn, Danny Shaff and Myron Cook (Ft. Hood Energy Office). Thanks also to Ms. Sherrie Hughes for assistance ordering the ASHRAE reports, preparing the final report and CDROM, and sending the report. Thanks also...

  20. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE BUREAU OF FISHERIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . .. ...... . . . . . . . . . . .......... . Fisheries, by apparatus ............. .. . ................... . ... ... . Wholesale fishery trade.............. . ... . ...... .. ........ . ...... . Wholesale fishery trade... . .. . .. ........................... . ...... . Fishf'ries of Lake ilmon .. ............ .. . .... . .................... . Wholesale fishery trade ... .. .... ... ....... ...... . ..... .. ... ..... . Fisheries of Lake t. ('lair

  1. Centerline velocity profile for plain round exhaust hoods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Kirksey E

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , System 2, . . . 52 Appendix D ? Statistical Analysis Tables . . . . , . . . , . 63 ITA ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o o ~ ~ i ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ V ~ ~ ~ Q I ~ ~ 0 Q ~ ~ ~ 66 LIST OF FIBURES Fi gure 1 Air Flow into Simple Hood Page 2 Compound Hood 3 Duct Air Moni tor.... ' ' ' However, if 2,6, 7,8 Sil verman's model were correct, contaminant control would be maintained with significantly reduced exhaust volumes. Local exhaust system de- sign, based on this reduced volume, cpu]d result in substantial savings in equipment...

  2. FISHERY STATISTICS UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fishery products, free zings and cold storage holdings, and for- eign trade in fishery commodities and caught in international waters ... 0 U, S. landings for human food and industrial use Relative volume., by countries Processed fisher y produc ts. Canned fishery products . . . . . · . Industrial fishery products

  3. Fishery Biology Graduate Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fishery Biology Graduate Programs University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska 997750820 Program/degrees/index.html University of Arizona Tucson, Arizona 95721 Program: Fisheries Conservation and Management http://ag.arizona.edu/srnr/academicprograms/wildlifefisheries/gradstudiesFisheries.html Auburn University Auburn, Alabama 368490001 Programs: Aquaculture, Aquatic Ecology, Fishery Management

  4. FISHERY STATISTICAL PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Cold Storage Bulletins ................. .. .. ... ........ ......... 7 Manufactured Fishery Products

  5. Fume Hoods Standards and Practices Laboratory exhaust ventilation systems designed, constructed, maintained, and used at Cal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Fume Hoods Standards and Practices General Laboratory exhaust ventilation systems designed. New or renovated fume hood systems will be tested using the procedures below. Fume hoods that do to an exhaust system. It can only capture contaminants that are very close to the inlet of the hose, typically

  6. Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences University of Florida

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    ......................................................................................................... 5 Sustainable FisheriesLink................................................................................................................... 12 Libraries

  7. Provide Assistance to Improve Water Quality in Hood County

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce; Mechell, Justin; Clayton, Brent; Gerlich, Ryan

    .............................................................................................................................3 On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems ............................................................................4 Rainwater Harvesting... Section 319. One source of fecal coliform bacteria is on-site wastewater treatment systems. While there are eight permitted wastewater treatment plants in Hood County, a substantial portion of the developed area around Lake Granbury, which lies...

  8. Guidance Document Fume hoods are used when handling toxic or hazardous chemicals. Harmful gases, vapors and fumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guidance Document FumeHoods Fume hoods are used when handling toxic or hazardous chemicals. Harmful the maximum safe mark (provided by Facilities Management during annual test) Use secondary containment (a hood without permission from EHS. Call EHS or Facilities Management if a hood is not functioning

  9. Development of a Network-Based Information Infrastructure for Fisheries and Hydropower Information in the Columbia River Basin : Final Project Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheibe, Timothy D.; Johnson, Gary E.; Perkins, Bill

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project was to help develop technology and a unified structure to access and disseminate information related to the Bonneville Power Administration's fish and wildlife responsibility in the Pacific Northwest. BPA desires to increase access to, and exchange of, information produced by the Environment Fish, and Wildlife Group in concert with regional partners. Historically, data and information have been managed through numerous centralized, controlled information systems. Fisheries information has been fragmented and not widely exchanged. Where exchange has occurred, it often is not timely enough to allow resource managers to effectively use the information to guide planning and decision making. This project (and related projects) have successfully developed and piloted a network-based infrastructure that will serve as a vehicle to transparently connect existing information systems in a manner that makes information exchange efficient and inexpensive. This project was designed to provide a mechanism to help BPA address measures in the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish and Wildlife program: 3.2H Disseminate Research and Monitoring Information and 5.1A.5 manage water supplies in accordance with the Annual Implementation Work Plan. This project also provided resources that can be used to assist monitoring and evaluation of the Program.

  10. Native American fishery issues: Hanford involvement in evaluation of the Zone 6 fishery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abernethy, C.S.; Neitzel, D.A. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Strom, G. (Yakima Indian Nation, Toppenish, WA (United States))

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Native American fishers are concerned about the deteriorating quality of salmon and other fish caught from the Columbia River. They fear salmon are not healthy and that eating the fish could Jeopardize the health of Native Americans. In 1991, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). with the assistance of the Yakima Indian Nation (YIN). monitored the salmon and steelhead fishery in the lower Columbia River (Zone 6 fishery). PNL biologists set up a hot-line'' for Native American fishers to call if they caught fish they suspected were diseased or contaminated. Fish reported to the hot-line were examined by a fish disease pathologist. Additionally. PNL and YIN staff reviewed water-quality data of the lower Columbia River. Water-quality data collected from 1949 through 1990. Results are described.

  11. Statistical Digest No. 70 Fishery Statistics of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fishery products, freezings and cold storage holdings, and foreign trade in fishery commodities. Landings

  12. MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE, FISHERIES AND FOOD DIRECTORATE OF FISHERIES RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;#12;1 MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE, FISHERIES AND FOOD DIRECTORATE OF FISHERIES RESEARCH AQUATIC .................................................................................................... 15 4. British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL

  13. MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE, FISHERIES AND FOOD DIRECTORATE OF FISHERIES RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;#12;1 MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE, FISHERIES AND FOOD DIRECTORATE OF FISHERIES RESEARCH AQUATIC .................................................................................................... 16 4. British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL

  14. Voices from the Fisheries NOAA FISHERIES SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisheries Knowledge,LinkingGenerations,and Improving Environmental Literacy Julie Bartsch Susan Abbott School and Community Trust #12;Julie Bartsch The Rural School and Community Trust 1530 Wilson Boulevard

  15. Yakima Fisheries Project : Final Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Washington (State). Dept. of Fish and Wildlife; Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to fund several fishery-related activities in the Yakima River Basin. These activities, known as the Yakima Fisheries Project (YFP), would be jointly managed by the State of Washington and the Yakima Indian Nation. The YFP is included in the Northwest Power Planning Council`s (Council`s) fish and wildlife program. The Council selected the Yakima River system for attention because fisheries resources are severely reduced from historical levels and because there is a significant potential for enhancement of these resources. BPA`s proposed action is to fund (1) information gathering on the implementation of supplementation techniques and on feasibility of reintroducing coho salmon in an environment where native populations have become extinct; (2) research activities based on continuous assessment, feedback and improvement of research design and activities ({open_quotes}adaptive management{close_quotes}); and (3) die construction, operation, and maintenance of facilities for supplementing populations of upper Yakima spring chinook salmon. Examined in addition to No Action are two alternatives for action: (1) supplementation of depressed natural populations of upper Yakima spring chinook and (2) that same supplementation plus a study to determine the feasibility of reestablishing naturally spawning population and a significant fall fishery for coho in the Yakima Basin. Alternative 2 is the preferred action. A central hatchery would be built for either alternative, as well as three sites with six raceways each for acclimation and release of spring chinook smolts. Major issues examined in the Revised Draft EIS include potential impacts of the project on genetic and ecological resources of existing fish populations, on water quality and quantity, on threatened and endangered species listed under the Endangered Species Act, and on the recreational fishery.

  16. FISHERY STATISTICS UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the production of processed fishery products, data on free zings and cold storage holdings, and on foreign trade fisheries. There is also information on the pack of canned tuna and industrial products for Puerto Rico for human food and industrial use. Relative volume of the landings, by species. Relative value

  17. FISHERY STATISTICS UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1972 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 66 Prepared by STATISTICS;ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The data in this edition of "Fishery Statistics of the United States" were collected in co- operation with the various States and tabulated by the staff of the Statistics and Market News Division

  18. CHARACTERISTICS OF RANGE HOODS IN CALIFORNIA HOMES DATA COLLECTED FROM A REAL ESTATE WEB SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klug, Victoria; Singer, Brett; Bedrosian, Tod; DCruz, Chris

    2011-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Venting range hoods are important residential ventilation components that remove pollutants generated by cooking activities and natural gas cooking burners. To address the lack of data on range hood installations in California, we conducted a survey by examining photographs of homes for sale or rent listed on a popular real estate web site. The survey was conducted in November 2010 and April–May 2011. Posted photos of the homes were reviewed to determine if a hood was installed, the type of hood, and two installation details that can impact performance, namely the height above the cooktop and the degree to which the hood covers the cooktop burners. We additionally collected information about the homes, including asking price for purchase or rent, type of building (e.g. detached house, townhouse or apartment), building age, floor area, and cooktop fuel type. Listings were first sampled to focus on homes built since 2005, then randomly sampled to include varied prices and locations around the state. Data were obtained for 1002 homes built between 1865 and 2011 (median year built 1989). Homes for sale varied in asking price from $16,000 to $16,500,000 (median $353,000) and homes for rent varied from $500 to $25,000 (median $2125) per month. Approximately 74% of the sample had natural gas cooktops. In this sample, natural gas cooktops were more prevalent in more expensive homes than in less expensive homes. Across the entire sample, 7.4 % appeared to have no hood installed, 33% had a short hood, 13% had a deep hood and 47% had a microwave over the range. The percentage of these hoods that vent to the outdoors could not be determined. Hood type was related to coverage of the cooktop. For deep hoods, 76% appeared to cover most or all of the cooktop burners. For short hoods, 70% covered about three quarters of the cooktop. And for microwaves the vast majority (96%) covered the back burners but not the front burners. Hood type was also correlated with asking price or monthly rent, with deep hoods most common in the most expensive homes. Hood type was also correlated with home age, with microwave hoods more common in newer homes. Installation height was related to device type with microwaves installed lower (closer) to the cooktop (median 18 inches), and short hoods (median 28 inches) and deep hoods (median 30 inches) installed higher. Deep range hoods are more common with natural gas cooktops than with electric cooktops, and slightly fewer homes with natural gas cooktops lack a range hood (7%) than homes with electric cooktops (9%). This study provides limited but useful information about the characteristics of range hoods in California homes and demonstrates the potential value of non-traditional forms of data collection.

  19. Hood County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel Jump to:Pennsylvania: Energy Resources Jump(Redirected fromHood

  20. Mount Hood Village, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula,MontereyHill, California:Morse,Wave GroupChase,Hood Village,

  1. FISHERIES ADMINISTRATION Scope and Diversity of Privatized Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Interjurisdictional agency partnerships form the cornerstones of basin- wide management strategies for integrated, compre- hensive management of rivers, lakes, and reservoirs throughout North America. Although fisheries administrators was that wide-scale privatization of management activities is counter to the long

  2. Flathead River Creel Report, 1992-1993. Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanzel, Delano

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A roving creel survey was conducted on the Flathead River system, May 1992 through May 1993, as part of Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation, funded by Bonneville Power Administration. The Flathead River system is a tributary to the Clarks Fork of the Columbia River originating in northwest Montana and southern British Columbia. The river creel survey was conducted in conjunction with a Flathead Lake creel survey. This document summarizes the creel survey on the river system. The purpose of these creel surveys was to quantify fishery status prior to mitigation efforts and provide replicative survey methodology to measure success of future mitigation activities. 4 figs., 21 tabs.

  3. The Kootenai Tribe's Kootenai River Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Kootenai Tribe's Kootenai River Ecosystem Restoration Project 1994-2012 Project # 199404900 · PURPOSE: TO ADDRESS FISHERIES RELATED PROBLEMS AT AN ECOSYSTEM LEVEL AND PROVIDE RESTORATION SOLUTIONS Kootenai River OBJ-2: Restore Ecosystem Productivity OBJ-3: Restore Ecosystem Productivity to Kootenay Lake

  4. California's Russian River: A Conservation Partnership

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Improve weather and river flow forecasting to maximize water captured for reservoirs and fisheries support forecast-based reservoir operations and allow for improved water management. It may also provide's Russian River Habitat Blueprint #12;Restore floodplain habitat through reclamation of abandoned gravel

  5. Publications Foreign Fisheries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S. fishery products to Japan. Part one includes information on Japanese wholesale markets, major Japanese wholesale purchasers, Japa- nese packaging methods, and Japa- nese agents for U.S. exporters. Part two

  6. EIS-0169: Yakima River Basin Fisheries Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS assesses the potential impacts of the Bangor Hydro-electric Tranmission Line and associated infrastructure, including adding an alternative acclimation site, water rights issues and discussion of irrigation water availability, adding more information on recreation impacts, and clarifying agency roles and responsibilities.

  7. Ventilating characteristics of a recirculating air-curtain laboratory exhaust hood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janes, Dale Floyd

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on either side of the hood were energized, it was impossible to obtain any semblance of uniformity in the air-curtain velocity across the hood front. The blastgates in the supply ducts on either side of the hood were adjusted within their operating range... in Project "n~ 30 The recording voltage meter was energized at the beginning of a data run, the hour was indicated on the chart and the meter was allowed to continue recording throughout the day. Continuous moni- toring of the voltage was desired...

  8. Baseline Report for the Fort Hood Army Base: Sept. 1, 2001 To Aug. 31, 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Baltazar, J. C.; Sung, Y. H.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.

    ESL-TR-02/12-02 BASELINE REPORT FOR THE FORT HOOD ARMY BASE: SEPT. 1, 2001 TO AUG. 31, 2002 A Research Project for the U.S. Army C.E.R.L. and the Ft. Hood Energy Office Jeff S. Haberl, Ph.D., P.E. Juan...-Carlos Baltazar Cervantes Yong Hoon Sung David E. Claridge, Ph.D., P.E. W. Dan Turner, Ph.D., P.E. December 2002 ENERGY SYSTEMS LABORATORY Texas Engineering Experiment Station Texas A&M University System FT. HOOD BASELINE...

  9. Fishery Resources of FISHERY LEAFLET 2 3 9

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    limitations to establishing export fisheries 43 Shore facilities 43 Fresh water 43 Ice and cold storage 43 fishery 23 The fishing industry 25 Post-war status 27 Difficulty of establishing trade with Japan . . 27

  10. MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE, FISHERIES AND FOOD DIRECTORATE OF FISHERIES RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;1 MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE, FISHERIES AND FOOD DIRECTORATE OF FISHERIES RESEARCH AQUATIC................................................................................................12 4. British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL .....................................................................................................................37 6. Nuclear power stations operated by the electricity companies

  11. Dry Friction Avalanches: Experiment and Robin Hood model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergey V. Buldyrev; John Ferrante; Fredy R. Zypman

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents experimental evidence and theoretical models supporting that dry friction stick-slip is described by self-organized criticality. We use the data, obtained with a pin-on-disc tribometer set to measure lateral force to examine the variation of the friction force as a function of time. We study nominally flat surfaces of aluminum and steel. The probability distribution of force jumps follows a power law with exponents $\\mu$ in the range 2.2 -- 5.4. The frequency power spectrum follows a $1/{f^\\alpha}$ pattern with $\\alpha$ in the range 1 -- 2.6. In addition, we present an explanation of these power-laws observed in the dry friction experiments based on the Robin Hood model of self organized criticality. We relate the values of the exponents characterizing these power laws to the critical exponents $D$ an $\

  12. Fall Chinook Salmon Survival and Supplementation Studies in the Snake River and Lower Snake River Reservoirs, 1997 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muir, William D.; Connor, William P.; Arnsberg, Billy D.

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1997, the National Marine Fisheries Service, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the Nez Perce Tribe completed the third year of research to investigate migrational characteristics of subyearling fall chinook salmon in the Snake River Basin.

  13. 46 Marine Fisheries Review Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    :1) in tropical-water fisheries (Dredge, 1988; Harris and Poiner, 1990; Andrew and Pepperell, 1992; Pender et al of the fisheries, the high cost of freezing and storing the catch onboard, and the lack of orga- nized markets

  14. Improving the System Life of Basic Oxygen and Electric Arc Furnace Hoods, Roofs, and Side Vents

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This factsheet describes the benefits of a high-performance aluminum bronze alloy to basic oxygen furnace and electric arc furnace components such as hoods, roofs, and side vents.

  15. When Do Variable Flow Fume Hoods Save Energy? Implications for lab design and behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutyra, Lucy R.

    rate when closed using a low position sensor ­ Minimize face velocity to 100 ft/min Photo Credit: www/min ­ Education and monitoring program Photo Credit: oregonstate.edu/vent/bypass #12;Constant Volume Fume Hoods

  16. A new method for infrared imaging of air currents in and around critical hazard fume hoods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mulac, W.A.; McCreary, J.R. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Schmalz, H. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States) Thermal Surveys, Inc., Rockford, IL (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A real time method of measuring and recording the efficacy of vapor containment in and around critical hazard fume hoods is being developed. An infrared camera whose response is restricted to a spectral range that overlaps a strong absorption band in a non-toxic gas is used to render real-time video images of the presence and flow of the gas. The gas, nitrous oxide, is ejected in a continuous stream in and around fume hoods that are to be certified capable of containing hazardous fumes. The principle advantage is that various scenarios of air flow displacement in and outside the hood can be easily investigated; the principle limitation is the necessity of high tracer gas concentration to obtain strong visualizations. We hope that this technique can be found to be an effective and safe method to test hoods in locations that were built before present regulations were promulgated.

  17. A new method for infrared imaging of air currents in and around critical hazard fume hoods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mulac, W.A.; McCreary, J.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Schmalz, H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Thermal Surveys, Inc., Rockford, IL (United States)

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A real time method of measuring and recording the efficacy of vapor containment in and around critical hazard fume hoods is being developed. An infrared camera whose response is restricted to a spectral range that overlaps a strong absorption band in a non-toxic gas is used to render real-time video images of the presence and flow of the gas. The gas, nitrous oxide, is ejected in a continuous stream in and around fume hoods that are to be certified capable of containing hazardous fumes. The principle advantage is that various scenarios of air flow displacement in and outside the hood can be easily investigated; the principle limitation is the necessity of high tracer gas concentration to obtain strong visualizations. We hope that this technique can be found to be an effective and safe method to test hoods in locations that were built before present regulations were promulgated.

  18. Contour Ripping and Composted Dairy Manure for Erosion Control on Fort Hood Military Installation, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prcin, Lisa J.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    erosion. This investigation examined two conservation practices directed at improving and creating sustainable training conditions on Fort Hood training lands, contour ripping and the application of composted dairy manure. The application of composted...

  19. Contour Ripping and Composted Dairy Manure for Erosion Control on Fort Hood Military Installation, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prcin, Lisa J.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    erosion. This investigation examined two conservation practices directed at improving and creating sustainable training conditions on Fort Hood training lands, contour ripping and the application of composted dairy manure. The application of composted...

  20. Quantification of Neuroepithelial Bodies and Their Innervation in Fawn-Hooded and Wistar Rat Lungs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burnstock, Geoffrey

    Quantification of Neuroepithelial Bodies and Their Innervation in Fawn-Hooded and Wistar Rat Lungs neuroendocrine system (DNES) of the lungs, the neuroendocrine cells of which have been shown to express

  1. FISHERY STATISTICS E UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SH 11 .A443X FISH FISHERY STATISTICS E UNITED STATES ^ 1951 &ch 3. \\§^ ^/'· m:^ STATISTICAL DIGEST. Farley, Director Statistical Digest 30 FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1951 BY A. W. ANDERSON;Fishery Statistics of the United States and Alaska are compiled and published annually to make available

  2. 32 Marine Fisheries Review Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fishery expanded rapidly due to an in- creasing demand for shark by-products (i.e. oil, liver, etc the Azores and Madeira (DGPA, 1998). Historically, fisheries have targeted elasmobranchs to supply the liver-oil.) and as the bycatch of an accelerated deep-sea teleost fishery (Nunes et al.1). In 1985, the demand for shark by

  3. Yakima Fisheries Project : Final Environmental Impact Statement : Summary.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Washington (State). Dept. of Fish and Wildlife; Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the Yakima Fisheries Project (YFP) to undertake fishery research and mitigation activities in the Yakima River Basin. The State of Washington and the Yakama Indian Nation (YIN) would jointly direct the project. In cooperation with BPA, the project managers propose to construct, operate and maintain anadromous (e.g. salmon) fish production facilities The goal is to conduct research activities designed to increase knowledge of supplementation techniques. These techniques would be applied to rebuild naturally spawning anadromous fish stocks historically present in the Yakima River Basin and, ultimately, those throughout the Columbia River Basin. Eventually, the YFP might involve the supplementation of all stocks of anadromous fish known to have occurred in the Yakima Basin. However, at this time only two action alternatives have been proposed, in addition to the No Action alternative: Alternative (1) would supplement depressed naturally spawning populations of upper Yakima spring chinook salmon; Alternative (2) (preferred) would include all actions under Alternative 1; it would also add a study to determine the feasibility of re-establishing a naturally spawning population and a significant fall fishery for coho salmon in the Yakima Basin (Coho smolts are currently being imported from another basin under the Columbia River Basin Fish Management Plan; the stock is now virtually eliminated from the Basin.)

  4. An evaluation of four quantitative laboratory fume hood performance test methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodrow, Lisa Michele

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    lnstruraentation 25 26 30 30 34 36 Test Procecture Diffusion Apparatus . Sampling Instrumentation EPA Sulfur Hexafluoride Test ~ 50 50 TAKE OF CCVlKNTS (Continued) Viii Diffusion Apparatus . Sampling Instruraentation Mcdified EPA Sulfur Hexafluoride... of laboratory fume hood containment, and in devel~ of design criteria for future laboratory facilities. As the first stage in this research, a comparison of four laboratory fume hood performance test ~ was completed. Curry testing procedures used...

  5. Identification and prehistoric exploitation of chert from Fort Hood, Bell and Coryell counties, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickens, William Alan

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IDENTIFICATION AND PREHISTORIC EXPLOITATION OF CHERT FROM FORT HOOD, BELL AND CORYELL COUNTIES, TEXAS A Thesis by WILLIAM ALAN DICKENS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS May 1995 Major Subject: Anthropology IDENTIFICATION AND PREHISTORIC EXPLOITATION OF CHERT FROM FORT HOOD, BELL AND CORYELL COUNTIES, TEXAS A Thesis by WILLIAM ALAN DICKENS Submitted to Texas A&M University...

  6. Yakima Fisheries Project : Revised Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to fund several fishery-related activities in the Yakima River Basin. The Yakima Fisheries Project (YFP), included in the Northwest Power Planning Council`s fish and wildlife program, would be jointly managed by the State of Washington and the Yakima Indian Nation. Fisheries resources in the Yakima River are severely reduced from historical levels and there is a significant potential for enhancement of these resources. BPA`s proposed action is to fund (1) information gathering on the implementation of supplementation techniques and on feasibility of reintroducing coho salmon in an environment where native populations have become extinct; (2) research activities based on continuous assessment, feedback and improvement of research design and activities ({open_quotes}adaptive management{close_quotes}); and (3) the construction, operation, and maintenance of facilities for supplementing populations of upper Yakima spring chinook salmon. The project has been considerably revised from the original proposal described in the first draft EIS. Examined in addition to No Action (which would leave present anadromous fisheries resources unchanged in the, Basin) are two alternatives for action: (1) supplementation of depressed natural populations of upper Yakima spring chinook and (2) that same supplementation plus a study to determine the feasibility of re-establishing (via stock imported from another basin) naturally spawning population and a significant fall fishery for coho in the Yakima Basin. Alternative 2 has been identified as the preferred action. Major issues examined in the Revised Draft EIS include potential impacts of the project on genetic and ecological resources of existing fish populations, on water quality and quantity, on threatened and endangered species listed under the Endangered Species Act, and on the recreational fishery.

  7. Natural Propagation and Habitat Improvement, Volume 1, Oregon, 1986 Final and Annual Reports.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuart, Amy

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes activities implemented for fisheries habitat improvement work on priority drainages in the Clackamas and Hood River sub-basins. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the reports on individual projects. (ACR)

  8. Stabilization of residual plutonium in L-9 hood in product removal room of PUREX with polymeric barrier system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiao, T., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines the application of Polymeric Barrier System to stabilize the remaining plutonium inside 1-9 Hood in PR Room, Purex for criticality safety.

  9. RETURN TO THE RIVER -2000 Return to Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    impacts from development of the river's hydroelectric potential. The most recent fishery recovery program from the Columbia River hydroelectric system, contained important provisions regarding mitigation for the impacts of hydroelectric development on fish and wildlife in the basin. The act authorized the states of M

  10. Status Review of the Puntledge River Summer Chinook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , but declined following expansion of hydroelectric development in the early 1950s. By 1965, only a few hundred of hydroelectric development on the river in the early 1950s(Dept. of Fisheries 1958). Enhancement effortswere, the fish must contend with the hydroelectric facilities built on the river, as well as with prevailing

  11. This booklet has been developed to serve as an aid in selecting a laboratory fume hood ventilation system.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    as an aid in selecting a laboratory fume hood ventilation system. The information is intended to be unbiased consider the whole picture -- the laboratory space, the building's ventilation system, the hood's location Ventilation System Components and Accessories Remote Blowers 13 Blower Sizing 14 Air Volume 14 Static Pressure

  12. Energy Impacts of Effective Residential Range Hood Use, LBNL-Page 1 Energy Impacts of Effective Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Impacts of Effective Residential Range Hood Use, LBNL- Page 1 Energy Impacts of Effective 500-05-026 and 500-08-061. LBNL Report Number LBNL-6683E #12;Energy Impacts of Effective Residential Range Hood Use, LBNL- Page 2 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored

  13. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Hood River Passive

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. Department ofJune 2,The BigSiding Retrofitfor a Hot-Humid Production Builder

  14. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Hood River Passive

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof Energy Future ofHydronicBuilding EnclosuresEnterprises, New

  15. EA-1981: Bonneville-Hood River Transmission Line Rebuild, Multnomah and

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S.ContaminationJuly 2011DDelphiFEA-2013.pdfBasedTheCounty, Idaho | Department

  16. MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE, FISHERIES AND FOOD DIRECTORATE OF FISHERIES RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE, FISHERIES AND FOOD DIRECTORATE OF FISHERIES RESEARCH AQUATIC.3 Methods of presentation of measurements 3.4 Method of interpretation 4. British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) 4 Establishment, Winfrith, Dorset 5.3 Dounreay Nuclear Power Development Establishment (DNPDE), Caithness 6

  17. Foreign Fishery Developments Aid Eyed for Italy's Ailing Marine Fishery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    wholesale market prices, exvessel prices, landings, imports, and move- ments of fishery products both in wholesale prices for fresh and frozen fishery products traded in New York merchandising centers. The Boston in selected New England ports, Chicago market receipts, and frozen wholesale prices for the New England

  18. FISHERY PRODUCTS SITUATION Consumption of fishery products is ex-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Per -capita sales likely will be near 11.2 pounds--down from 11.4 pounds in 1970. Consumption had beenFISHERY PRODUCTS SITUATION Consumption of fishery products is ex- pected to be off a little in 1971 to attract more imports in 1971 . Since U.S. fish consumption is about 550/0-de- pendent on imports

  19. Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, 1990 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, Mike

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The annual report contains three individual subproject sections detailing tribal fisheries work completed during the summer and fall of 1990. Subproject I contains summaries of evaluation/monitoring efforts associated with the Bear Valley Creek, Idaho enhancement project. Subproject II contains an evaluation of the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River habitat enhancement project. Subproject III concerns the East Fork of the Salmon River, Idaho.

  20. Numerical simulation of the air flow field in a laboratory fume hood using the CFD-ACE(TM) computational fluid dynamics code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Sousa, Cedric Benedict

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    realized information on the hood entry losses and other design parameters that are of interest to the users, designers and owners of fume hoods. After the specification of the problem and generation of the mesh, the modeled hood was simulated using CFD...

  1. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program : Limnological and Fisheries Monitoring Annual Report 1999.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLellan, Holly; Lee, Chuck; Scofield, Ben; Pavlik, Deanne

    1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Grand Coulee Dam was constructed in 1939 without a fish ladder, which eliminated steelhead (Onchorhynchus mykiss), chinook salmon (O. twshwastica), coho salmon (O. kisutch) and sockeye salmon (O. nerka) from returning to approximately 1,835 km (1,140 miles) of natal streams and tributaries found in the upper Columbia River Drainage in the United States and Canada. The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 gave the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the authority and responsibility to use its legal and financial resources, 'to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries. This is to be done in a manner consistent with the program adopted by the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC), and the purposes of the Act' (NWPPC, 1987). With the phrase 'protect, mitigate and enhance', Congress signaled its intent that the NWPPC's fish and wildlife program should do more than avoid future hydroelectric damage to the basin's fish and wildlife. The program must also counter past damage, work toward rebuilding those fish and wildlife populations that have been harmed by the hydropower system, protect the Columbia Basin's fish and wildlife resources, and mitigate for harm caused by decades of hydroelectric development and operations. By law, this program is limited to measures that deal with impacts created by the development, operation and management of hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. However, off-site enhancement projects are used to address the effects of the hydropower system on fish and wildlife (NWPPC 1987). Resident game fish populations have been established in Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, the reservoir behind Grand Coulee Dam, since the extirpation of anadromous fish species. The resident game fish populations are now responsible for attracting a large percentage of the recreational visits to the region. An increase in popularity has placed Lake Roosevelt fifth amongst the most visited State and Federal parks in Washington. Increased use of the reservoir prompted amplified efforts to enhance the Native American subsistence fishery and the resident sport fishery in 1984 with hatchery supplementation of rainbow trout (O. mykiss) and kokanee salmon (O. nerka). This was followed by the formation of the Spokane Tribal Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Project (LRMP) in 1988 and later by formation of the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project in 1991. The Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project began in July 1991 as part of the BPA, Bureau of Reclamation, and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers System Operation Review process. This process sought to develop an operational scenario for the federal Columbia River hydropower system to maximize the in-reservoir fisheries with minimal impacts to all other stakeholders in the management of the Columbia River. The Lake Roosevelt Monitoring/Data Collection Program (LRMP) is the result of a merger between the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program (BPA No. 8806300) and the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project (BPA No. 9404300). These projects were merged in 1996 forming the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program (LRMP), which continues the work historically completed under the separate projects. The LRMP has two main goals. The first is to develop a biological model for Lake Roosevelt that will predict in-reservoir biological responses to a range of water management operational scenarios, and to develop fisheries and reservoir management strategies accordingly. The model will allow identification of lake operations that minimize impacts on lake biota while addressing the needs of other interests (e.g. flood control, hydropower generation, irrigation, and downstream resident and anadromous fisheries). Major components of the model will include: (1) quantification of entrainment and other impacts to phytoplankton, zooplankton and fish caused by reservoir drawdowns and low water retention times; (2) quantification

  2. 20 Marine Fisheries Review Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - resource exploration and extraction into deep waters of the GOM is evidenced by many active oil and gas with market opportunities for a broader variety of consumer choices due to diverse ethnicity), harvesting expansion of directed fisheries, mineral exploration Fishery-independent Bottom Trawl Surveys for Deep-water

  3. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1964 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 58 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT Bureau of Commercial Fisheries, Donald L. McKernan, Director STATISTICAL DIGEST 58 FISHERY STATISTICS.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 20402 - Price S2.50 (paper cover) #12;Fishery statistics

  4. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1963 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 57 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT of Commercial Fisheries, Donald L. McKernan, Director STATISTICAL DIGEST 57 FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITEDTernment Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 20402 - Price $2.25 (paper c #12;Fishery statistics of the United States

  5. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1962 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 56 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT Fisheries, Donald L. McKernan, Director STATISTICAL DIGEST 56 FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1962.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 20402 - Price $2.25 (paper cover) #12;Fishery statistics

  6. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1966 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 60 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE Bureau of Commercial Fisheries STATISTICAL DIGEST 60 FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1966 BY Charles H. Lyles PUBLISHED BY BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES

  7. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pa%Mv--. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1965 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 59 UNITED STATES, Commissioner Bureau of Commercial Fisheries, H. E. Crowther, Director STATISTICAL DIGEST 59 FISHERY STATISTICS.S. Government Printing Office Washington, D.C. 20402 - Price $4 (Paper Cover) #12;Fishery statistics

  8. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE BUREAU OF FISHERIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . . . .. ....... . .... . ........... . . . .. . ........ .. .... . .. . . Wholesale fresh-fish trade .... . . . .... .. .......... ..... .. . ..... . .. . . . .. . Fishery products... . ... ... . . ............... . . . . ................. . Products by apparatus .............. . ... ...... ... .......... . ......... . Wholesale fresh-fish trade

  9. Guide to the BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , houses a processing laboratory and pilot plant, freezing and cold storage fa cilities, fishery inspection

  10. Statistical Digest No. 71 Fishery Statistics of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , freezings and cold storage holdings, and foreign trade in fishery commodities. Landings data do not include

  11. area fishery evaluation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    66 Present Fishery Industries 67 Enforcement 80 Exploration 80 Technology 81 Fish Culture 81 Potential Fishery Industries 83 Unused Resources 2 JAPANESE FISHERIES BASED...

  12. Pi i d Fi h I t tiPinniped-Fishery Interactions 2010 Effectiveness Evaluation Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be necessary to restore balance to the Columbia River ecosystem where threatened and endangered stocks or more States: 120(b)(1) ­ A State may apply to the Secretary to authorize the intentional lethal taking of salmonid fishery stock which ­ Has been listed as Threatened or Endangered under the ESA; Is approaching

  13. Energy Impacts of Effective Range Hood Use for all U.S. Residential Cooking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logue, Jennifer M; Singer, Brett

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Range hood use during residential cooking is essential to maintaining good indoor air quality. However, widespread use will impact the energy demand of the U.S. housing stock. This paper describes a modeling study to determine site energy, source energy, and consumer costs for comprehensive range hood use. To estimate the energy impacts for all 113 million homes in the U.S., we extrapolated from the simulation of a representative weighted sample of 50,000 virtual homes developed from the 2009 Residential Energy Consumption Survey database. A physics-based simulation model that considered fan energy, energy to condition additional incoming air, and the effect on home heating and cooling due to exhausting the heat from cooking was applied to each home. Hoods performing at a level common to hoods currently in U.S. homes would require 19?33 TWh [69?120 PJ] of site energy, 31?53 TWh [110-190 PJ] of source energy; and would cost consumers $1.2?2.1 billion (U.S.$2010) annually in the U.S. housing stock. The average household would spend less than $15 annually. Reducing required airflow, e.g. with designs that promote better pollutant capture has more energy saving potential, on average, than improving fan efficiency.

  14. ENGINEERING & SCIENCE fall 201014 Left: Looking like a knight in a chain-mail hood,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENGINEERING & SCIENCE fall 201014 Left: Looking like a knight in a chain-mail hood, Koch dons not with a penchant for horror cinema, but with a toothache. "I was teaching a course at the Marine Biological processes is beginning to throw light on how the conscious mind works. #12;fall 2010 ENGINEERING & SCIENCE

  15. A sociobioeconomic fisheries simulation model: the Texas inshore shrimp fishery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krauthamer, Judith T.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A SO CIO BIO EC ONO MIC FISHERIES SIM ULATION MODEL: THE TEXAS INSHORE SHRIMP FISHERY A Thesis JUDITH T ERA UTHA M E R Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A & M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1984 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences SO CIO BIOS COND MIC PISHERIES SIM ULATION MODEL: THE TEXAS INSHO RE SH RIM P FISHER 7 A Thesis by JUDITH T KRAUTHA MER Approved as to style and content by: b'C. ~ Wilham...

  16. Provide Assistance to Improve Water Quality in Hood County Final Report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce; Mechell, Justin; Clayton, Brent; Gerlich, Ryan; Kalisek, Danielle; Harris, B.L.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Service for funding the Providing Assistance to Improve Water Quality in Hood County project. ii? ? Tables & Figures Tables Table 1. Percent of respond e n t s who increas e d thei r understanding of the course topics .............4 Table... 2. Assessme n t of willin g ne s s to adopt prac t i c e s as a result of partic i p a t i o n in the course ................................................................................................................ ....................5...

  17. Baseline Report for the Fort Hood Army Base: September 2003 to October 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Liu, Z.

    2007-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    December 2004 ENERGY SYSTEMS LABORATORY Texas Engineering Experiment Station Texas A&M University System Ft. Hood Baseline Report, p. 1 December 2004 Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A&M University PREFACE This report... building was also initiated in November of 2001 and completed in 2002. The data from Central Thermal Power Plant (87000), III Corp building, Darnall Hospital 1 , Main Substation, West Substation, and North Substation are plotted and reported...

  18. Capture Efficiency of Cooking-Related Fine and Ultrafine Particles by Residential Exhaust Hoods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lunden, Melissa M.; Delp, William W.

    2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective exhaust hoods can mitigate the indoor air quality impacts of pollutant emissions from residential cooking. This study reports capture efficiencies (CE) measured for cooking generated particles for scripted cooking procedures in a 121-m3 chamber with kitchenette. CEs also were measured for burner produced CO2 during cooking and separately for pots and pans containing water. The study used four exhaust hoods previously tested by Delp and Singer (Environ. Sci. Technol., 2012, 46, 6167-6173). For pan-frying a hamburger over medium heat on the back burner, CEs for particles were similar to those for burner produced CO2 and mostly above 80percent. For stir-frying green beans in a wok (high heat, front burner), CEs for burner CO2 during cooking varied by hood and airflow: CEs were 34-38percent for low (51?68 L s-1) and 54?72percent for high (109?138 L s-1) settings. CEs for 0.3?2.0 ?m particles during front burner stir-frying were 3?11percent on low and 16?70percent on high settings. Results indicate that CEs measured for burner CO2 are not predictive of CEs of cooking-generated particles under all conditions, but they may be suitable to identify devices with CEs above 80percent both for burner combustion products and for cooking-related particles.

  19. Marine Fisheries On the cover: A corral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy, Fish Muscle Changes, Aluminum in Fish, and Ludwig Named 21 The Tuna Fisheries of South Africa

  20. Marine Fisheries On the cover: Landing a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (1),1991 A Review ofIndian Ocean Fisheries for Skipjack Tuna, Katsuwonus pelamis, and Yellowfin Tuna, Thunnus

  1. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE BUREAU OF FISHERIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -products________ ___ _________ ______ 238 Menhaden industry_______________________ 238 Cold-storage holdings offrozell fish ____________ 239#12;DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE BUREAU OF FISHERIES HENRY O'MALLEY, Conunissioner FISHERY INDUSTRIES OF THE UNITED STATES 1924 By OSCAR E. SETTE Assistant in Charge, Dioision of Fishery Industries ApPENDI X VII

  2. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE BUREAU OF FISHERIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of these canvasses are embodied in the present report, to- gether with a summary of the cold-storage holdings#12;DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE BUREAU OF FISHERIES HENRY O 'MALLEY, Commissioner FISHERY INDUSTRIES OF THE UNITED STATES REPORT OF THE DIVISION OF FISHERY INDUSTRIES FOR 1921 By LEWIS RADCLIFFE Assistant

  3. Imports and Exports of Fishery Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imports and Exports of Fishery Products Annual Summary, 2001 IMPORTS. U.S. imports of edible of fishery products were imported. EXPORTS. U.S. exports of edible fishery products of domestic origin were 1,139,744 tons valued at $3.1 billion, compared with 948,025 tons at $2.8 billion exported in 2000

  4. Imports and Exports of Fishery Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imports and Exports of Fishery Products Annual Summary, 2000 IMPORTS. U.S. imports of edible.0 billion of fishery products were imported. EXPORTS. U.S. exports of edible fishery products of domestic origin were 948,025 tons valued at $2.8 billion, compared with 864,166 tons at $2.7 billion exported

  5. FISHERY STATISTICS QF THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I FISHERY STATISTICS QF THE UNITED STATES 1942 By A. W, ANDERSON and E. A. POWER STATISTICAL DIGEST Statistical Digest No. 11 FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1942 BY A. W. ANDERSON and E. A. POWER. S. Government Printing Offic Washington 25, D. C. - Price 60 cents #12;Fishery Statistics

  6. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Div,, . FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1961 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 54 UNITED STATES, Donald L. MeKernan, Director STATISTICAL DIGEST 54 FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1961 BY E. A, Washington, D.C. 20402 - Price $2 (paper cover) #12;Fishery statistics of the United States are compiled

  7. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1959 ^mmi STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 51 UNITED STATES DEPARTMl of Commercial Fisheries, Donald L. McKernan, Director jPANlELM COHEN FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE STATISTICAL DIGEST 51 FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1959 BY E. A. POWER PUBLISHED BY BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL

  8. FISHERY STATISTICS )F THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SH 11 .A443X FISH FISHERY STATISTICS )F THE UNITED STATES ^M=^. STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 36 #12. Farley, Director i]EL M. COHEN Statistical Digest 36 FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1953 BY A. W;Fishery Statistics of the I'nited States and Alaska are compiled and published an- nually to make

  9. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1950 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 27 Fish and Wildlife ServiceKay, Secretary FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, John L. Farley, Director Statistical Digest 27 FISHERY STATISTICS 25, DC. - - Price $2.00 (paper) #12;Fishery Statistics of the United States and A] aska are corapi

  10. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SH 11 A443X FISH FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1943 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 14 Sll \\M AND WILDLIFE SERVICE Albert M. Day, Director CAMEL M. COHEN Statistical Digest No. 14 FISHERY STATISTICS. - Price 75 cents #12;Fishery Statistics of the United States and Alaska are compiled and published

  11. Foreign Fishery Developments United States-Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foreign Fishery Developments United States-Spain Fisheries Trade, 1980-85 Introduction The U though Spain was forced to become a net importer of fishery products in 1977. due to the extension of 200-mile Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZ) by coastal coun tries. U.S. exports of edible seafoods to Spain

  12. Fishery Notes EI Nino and Its Impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fishery Notes EI Nino and Its Impact on Ecuadorean Fisheries Ecuadorean scientists report that an unusually powerful EI Nino in the eastern Pacific is adversely affecting Ecuador's pelagic fisheries. EI. The impact can be partic- ularly severe on larval and juvenile fish and, as a result, the effects of EI Nino

  13. Columbia River Channel Improvement Project Rock Removal Blasting: Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.

    2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a monitoring plan to evaluate take as outlined in the National Marine Fisheries Service 2002 Biological Opinion for underwater blasting to remove rock from the navigation channel for the Columbia River Channel Improvement Project. The plan was prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District.

  14. Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Productivity Nez Perce Tribe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Productivity Jay Hesse Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries salmon abundance and productivity have been and continue to be influenced by construction and operation related to productivity; (1) adult abundance, (2) hatchery programs, (3) management actions, and (4

  15. Foreign Fishery Developments Japanese Joint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -215. In 1981,193 joint ventures with the par- ticipation of Japanese capital were operating in 47 nationsForeign Fishery Developments Japanese Joint Fishing Ventures Stabilize Activity Trawling Skipjack tuna harvest Whaling Other harvests Aquaculture Refrigeration operations Fish processing Average $1

  16. LATIN AMERICA ARGENTINA HAS FISHERY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LATIN AMERICA ARGENTINA HAS FISHERY INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITIES Argentina's largely dormant fishing in construction in Argentina with a total fish capacity of 36, 000 metric tons . The Min- istry has also) measure, taxes onforeign vessels fishing in Argentina waters were raised from US$70 per ton to US$200 per

  17. Airflow Characteristics of Direct-Type Kitchen Hood Systems in High-Rise Apartment Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    if the adoption of direct- type systems alone in place of the shared-type would yield the level of capture efficiency close to the hood design specification. 3 4 5 6 Figure 1: Layout of apartment used to analyze airflow 7 (a)?24?hour?temperature?distribution?for?Jan....?1st (from?CONTAM?input) (b)?24?hour?wind?speed?distribution?for?Jan.?1st (CONTAM?input) Figure 2: Example of CONTAM input for the 1st of January 8 (c)?24?hour?wind?direction?distribution?for?Jan.?1st (CONTAM?input) Figure 2: Example of CONTAM...

  18. 24 N Fisheries Vol. 25, No. 6 FISHERIES PROFESSION--PERSPECTIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    the following practical advice to help those entering the fisheries profession to survive and prosper fisheries specialist for the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission, Lincoln, NE 68503-0370. Getting a Job

  19. Evaluate Status of Pacific Lamprey in the Clearwater River and Salmon River Drainages, Idaho, 2009 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochnauer, Tim; Claire, Christopher [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

    2009-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific lamprey Lampetra tridentata have received little attention in fishery science until recently, even though abundance has declined significantly along with other anadromous fish species in Idaho. Pacific lamprey in Idaho have to navigate over eight lower Snake River and Columbia River hydroelectric facilities for migration downstream as juveniles to the Pacific Ocean and again as adults migrating upstream to their freshwater spawning grounds in Idaho. The number of adult Pacific lamprey annually entering the Snake River basin at Ice Harbor Dam has declined from an average of over 18,000 during 1962-1969 to fewer than 600 during 1998-2006. Based on potential accessible streams and adult escapement over Lower Granite Dam on the lower Snake River, we estimate that no more than 200 Pacific lamprey adult spawners annually utilize the Clearwater River drainage in Idaho for spawning. We utilized electrofishing in 2000-2006 to capture, enumerate, and obtain biological information regarding rearing Pacific lamprey ammocoetes and macropthalmia to determine the distribution and status of the species in the Clearwater River drainage, Idaho. Present distribution in the Clearwater River drainage is limited to the lower sections of the Lochsa and Selway rivers, the Middle Fork Clearwater River, the mainstem Clearwater River, the South Fork Clearwater River, and the lower 7.5 km of the Red River. In 2006, younger age classes were absent from the Red River.

  20. Ductless fume hoods are designed to remove hazardous fumes and vapors from the work area by passing the exhaust air through a filter and/or adsorbent, such as an activated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    I. Policy Ductless fume hoods are designed to remove hazardous fumes and vapors from the work area to Hazardous Chemicals in Laboratories); 5154.1 (Ventilation Requirements for Laboratory-Type Hood Operations require use of fume hoods to control exposure to hazardous or odorous chemicals. IV. Definitions Activated

  1. artisanal commercial fisheries: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FISHERIES TECHNOLOGICAL LABORATORY SEATTLE, WASH. UNITED OF THE INTERIOn U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE ERVleE BUEAU OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES Guide to the Bureau of Commercial...

  2. poly hoods.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, ,Development of NovelHigh( ( ( (A R etrospec+ve4' VA

  3. HVAC ENERGY EFFICIENCY CASE STUDY "Melink works well in our kitchen--it saves energy, reduces hood noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    HVAC ENERGY EFFICIENCY CASE STUDY "Melink works well in our kitchen--it saves energy, reduces hood case studies have already been performed using this technology (demand control kitchen ventilation) and the savings are well proven. This study is a summarized compilation of select SPEED case studies

  4. Executive Functions: Eye Movements and Neuropsychiatric A B Sereno, S L Babin, A J Hood, and C B Jeter,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sereno, Anne B.

    Executive Functions: Eye Movements and Neuropsychiatric Disorders A B Sereno, S L Babin, A J Hood, such disruptions occur in many human disorders. Eye Movements and Executive Functions Eye movements are any shift of position of the eye in its orbit. There are many different kinds of eye move- ments, which are defined

  5. Brookhaven National Laboratory/National Synchrotron Light Source Subject: Operation of Nano-material Hood in Room 1-128

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    -material Hood in Room 1-128 Number: LS-ESH-0051 Revision: 1 Effective: 10/01/2007 Page 1 of 1 Keith Klaus John Procedure on Nanomaterial ES&H requires work that could generate dispersible nanoparticles be conducted of this file is the one on-line in the NSLS ESH website. Before using a printed copy, verify

  6. Development of a Monitoring and Verification (M&V) Plan and Baseline for the Fort Hood ESPC Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Liu, Z.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Lynn, B.; Underwood, D.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fort Hood has selected an Energy Services Performance Contract (ESPC) contractor to help achieve its energy reduction goals as mandated by Executive Order. This ESPC is expected to be a $3.8 million, 20 year contract, which includes five primary...

  7. IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF FISHERY PRODUCTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF FISHERY PRODUCTS ANNUAL SUMMARY, 1996 IMPORTS. U.S. imports of edible higher than in 1995, when $12.5 billion of fishery products were imported. EXPORTS. U.S. exports,376 tons at $3.1 billion exported in 1995. Fresh and frozen items were 791,822 tons valued at $2.2 billion

  8. Imports and Exports of Fishery Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imports and Exports of Fishery Products Annual Summary, 1998 IMPORTS. U.S. imports of edible higher than in 1997, when $14.5 billion of fishery products were imported. EXPORTS. U.S. exports,499 tons at $2.6 billion exported in 1997. Fresh and frozen items were 631,627 tons valued at $1.7 billion

  9. Imports and Exports of Fishery Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imports and Exports of Fishery Products Annual Summary, 2002 IMPORTS. U.S. imports of edible. EXPORTS. U.S. exports of edible fishery products of domestic origin were 1,056,306 tons valued at $3.0 billion, compared with 1,139,744 tons at $3.1 billion exported in 2001. Fresh and frozen items were 883

  10. Imports and Exports of Fishery Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imports and Exports of Fishery Products Annual Summary, 2003 IMPORTS. U.S. imports of edible imported. EXPORTS. U.S. exports of edible fishery products of domestic origin were 1,047,706 tons valued at $3.1 billion, compared with 1,056,303 tons at $3.0 billion exported in 2002. Fresh and frozen items

  11. IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF FISHERY PRODUCTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF FISHERY PRODUCTS ANNUAL SUMMARY, 1997 IMPORTS. U.S. imports of edible higher than in 1996, when $13.1 billion of fishery products were imported. EXPORTS. U.S. exports,720 tons at $2.9 billion exported in 1996. Fresh and frozen items were 782,767 tons valued at $2.0 billion

  12. Imports and Exports of Fishery Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imports and Exports of Fishery Products Annual Summary, 1999 IMPORTS. U.S. imports of edible higher than in 1998, when $15.6 billion of fishery products were imported. EXPORTS. U.S. exports,067 tons at $2.2 billion exported in 1998. Fresh and frozen items were 725,050 tons valued at $2.1 billion

  13. FISHERY STATISTICS F THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISHERY STATISTICS »F THE UNITED STATES ^ 1954 ,M^,. 'M' . ' J*"'',-,'i''' ' STATISTICAL DIGEST NO DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, Fred A. Seaton, Secretary FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE PANIELM. COHEN Statistical Digest 39 FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1954 BY A. W. ANDERSON and E. A. POWER UNITED STATES

  14. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES I 1952 .^Ł^ STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 34 Fish and Wildlife McKay, Secretary FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, John L. Farley, Director -iJ^EUW^ .COHEN Statistical Digest 34 FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1952 BY A. W. ANDERSON and E. A. POWER UNITED STATES

  15. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1946 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO, 19 Fish and Wildlike Sekvice L. Chapman, Secretary FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE Albert M. Day, Director Statistical Digest 19 FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1946 BY A. W. ANDERSON and E. A. POWER UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT

  16. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1944 STATISTICAL DIGEST ISO. 16 Fish and Wildlife Sekvh Albert M. Day, Director Statistical Digest No. 16 FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1944 BY A. W Statistics of the United States and Alaska are coiip i I ed and published annually to make available

  17. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES SH 11 A443X FISH 1948 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 22 Fish OF THE INTERIOR, Oscar L. Chapman, Secretary FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, Albert M. Day, Director Statistical Digest 22 FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1948 BY A. W. ANDERSON and E. A. POWER UNITED STATES

  18. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1945 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO, 18 United States Dejtartment. Krug, Secretary FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE Albert M. Day, Director Statistical Digest 18 FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1945 BY A. W. ANDERSON and E. A. POWER UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT PRINTING

  19. FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES I 1947 cf^^v'^ml STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 21 Fish Oscar L. Chapman, Secretary FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE Albert M. Day, Director Statistical Digest 21 PI^j^IELW' , COHEN FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1947 BY A. W. ANDERSON and E. A. POWER UNITED STATES

  20. An insoluble residue analysis of a section of the Glen Rose formation in the vicinity of the type locality, Hood County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fallis, Jasper Newton

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on Farm Road 204, near the town of Paluxy, Hood County, Texaso This seotion is referred to as the Paluxy Bridge ?eotion in this paper. The insoluble residues vers ssreened into sand and silt- olay siss fractions, Heavy mineral separations were sade... of the Hood&omervell County area was oonductsd for the purpose of selecting a section of the Glen Ross for matlon frcm which samples could be obtained, The outcrop ln the vicini ty of Paluxy, Hood County, Texas vas selsoted for tvo reasonss (1) an a1moet...

  1. CURRENT FISHERIES STATISTICS NO. 2006-2 IMPORTS AND EXPORTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CURRENT FISHERIES STATISTICS NO. 2006-2 IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF FISHERY PRODUCTS ANNUAL SUMMARY, $2.6 billion more than in 2005, when $25.1 billion of fishery products were imported. EXPORTS. U.S. exports of edible fishery products of domestic origin were 1,306,706 tons valued at $3.9 billion, compared

  2. Marine Fisheries On the cover: A coho salmon smoll

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fishery Management Council Members Named, Global Acid Rain Found, Chesapeake Bay Stripers Gain, Volcanic

  3. Logue and Singer, HVAC&R, 20(2): 264-275, 2014. Energy Impacts of Effective Residential Range Hood Use, LBNL-6683E Page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Use, LBNL-6683E Page 1 Energy Impacts of Effective Range Hood Use for all U.S. Residential Cooking-92322201-0; and by the California Energy Commission through Contracts 500-05-026 and 500-08-061. LBNL Report Number 6683-E #12;Logue and Singer, HVAC&R, 20(2): 264-275, 2014. Energy Impacts of Effective Residential Range Hood Use, LBNL-6683E

  4. Lower Flathead System Fisheries Study, 1984 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darling, James E.; Pajak, Paul; Wunderlich, Mary P.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was undertaken to assess the effects of Kerr Dam operations on the fisheries of the Lower Flathead System. Supported by Bonneville Power Administration funding, and conducted by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, the study began in December of 1982 and is scheduled for completion in December of 1987. This report covers the 1983-84 field season and includes the status of target fish species populations in the Flathead River and tributaries, and initial work in South Bay of Flathead Lake. Additionally it addresses how Kerr operations may effect the reproduction of salmonids and northern pike. Combined trout population estimates for rainbow, brown, brook, and bull trout, averaged 13 fish/km of the lower Flathead River. The number of bull trout and cutthroat trout captured was so low that estimation of their individual populations was not possible. An interim closure to trout harvest on the lower Flathead River was recommended and approved by the Tribal Council until study results can be further analyzed and management options reviewed. Population estimates for northern pike ranged from six/kilometer in poorer habitat, to one hundred three/km in the best habitat in the main Flathead River. Seven pike were radio tagged and their movements monitored. Movements of over 89 km were recorded. One fish left the Flathead River and moved down the Clark Fork to the Plains area. Fish weirs were constructed on the Jocko River and Mission Creek to assess spawning runs of trout from the main river. Thirty-two adult rainbow passed the Jocko weir and twenty-eight passed the Mission weir during the spring spawning season. Twenty adult brown trout were captured at the Jocko weir and five at Mission weir in the fall. The Jocko weir suffered minor damage due to bed load movement during high flows of spring runoff. The structure of trout populations in the lower Flathead River points to spawning and recruitment problems caused by hydroelectric operations and sedimentation. Among the consequences of the present operational regime are constant, rapid changes in river discharge during spawning and Incubation seasons of trout species present in the lower river. Hamilton and Buell (1976) reported that similar fluctuation might exceed tolerance limits of adults and inhibit spawning behavior, dewater redds, strand fry, and displace juveniles to habitats less suitable for survival. Similar problems are felt to exist on the lower river. Constant fluctuations over backwater vegetation have been linked to major problems in successful northern pike spawning and recruitment by preventing access to spawning sites, and dewatering eggs and attached fry. Phase I of the South Bay investigation was completed this year resulting in a detailed study program for the next three years. Dominant habitat types were mapped, and physical habitat and biological monitoring methods were evaluated and selected. Permanent habitat transects, water quality stations, fish sampling, gillnetting, seining, and trapping sites were established.

  5. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program : Hatchery Element : Annual Progress Report, 2000.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kline, Paul A.; Willard, Catherine

    2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Marine Fisheries Service at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Marine Fisheries Service are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases are also reported under separate cover. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2000 are presented in this report.

  6. Foreign Fishery Developments The Polish Fishing Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . There is also a shortage of pro- cessing equipment such as ice factories and cold storage facilities.Foreign Fishery Developments The Polish Fishing Industry Polish fishennen caught about 700

  7. Marine Fisheries On the cover: A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coast Surf Clam Fishery, 1965-1974 Stabilization of the Flavor of Frozen Minced Whiting: I. Effect Salmon, Norway- EEC Herring Agreement, Japan's 1981 Surimi Production, and Norwegian Fishing Fleet Growth

  8. Fisheries management and flags of convenience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papaioannou, Maria Andriana

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The over-exploitation of the world's fish resources and the depletion of many fish stocks have brought into focus the need for effective fisheries management and conservation measures. Many states have adopted international ...

  9. Migration and bioenergetics of juvenile Snake River fall Chinook salmon Daniel Widener

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Migration and bioenergetics of juvenile Snake River fall Chinook salmon Daniel Widener A thesis: Aquatic and Fishery Sciences #12;#12;University of Washington Abstract Migration and Bioenergetics are still poorly understood. This thesis describes a complex of individually-based bioenergetic

  10. AUSTRALIAN FISHERY EXPORTS SET RECORD Australian fishery exports were a record

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AUSTRALIAN FISHERY EXPORTS SET RECORD Australian fishery exports were a record US$87.3 million in FY 1971-72 (twelve months ending in June) . Rock lobster tail exports were 10.3 million pounds worth quantity was exported to the United States. Prawn exports set records for both volume and value - -17

  11. Table 1.-Statlsllcal dala on Argentina's major fishery slacks, 1980. Foreign Fishery Developments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Table 1.-Statlsllcal dala on Argentina's major fishery slacks, 1980. Foreign Fishery Developments Argentina Revises Marine Resources Forecast squid one of the country's major fish- eries. INIDEP indicated- ly. Argentina signed a cooperative research agreement in 1980 with the Soviet Union to study

  12. Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rivers included in the Scenic Rivers System will be classified, designated and administered as Wild, Scenic, Pastoral, Recreational and Modified Recreational Rivers (Sections 4; (a) (1) of the...

  13. NOAA Fisheries Protocols For Hydro-dynamic Dredge Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Fisheries Protocols For Hydro-dynamic Dredge Surveys: Surf Clams and Ocean Quahogs December 19..................................................................................................................................... 1 NOAA Fisheries Hydro-dynamic Clam Dredge Survey Protocols........................................................................... 5 Clam Dredge Construction and Repair

  14. NOAA Fisheries Protocols For Sea Scallop Dredge Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Fisheries Protocols For Sea Scallop Dredge Surveys January 7, 2004 Prepared by: Members..................................................................................................................................... 5 NOAA Fisheries Sea Scallop Dredge Survey Protocols............................................................................................................................. 10 Changes to Regional Scallop Dredge Protocols

  15. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; 1988-1989 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peone, Tim L.; Scholz, Allan T.; Griffith, James R.

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1987 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1987), the Council directed the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to construct two kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) hatcheries as partial mitigation for the loss of anadromous salmon and steelhead incurred by construction of Grand Coulee Dam [Section 903 (g)(l)(C)]. The hatcheries will produce kokanee salmon for outplanting into Lake Roosevelt as well as rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the Lake Roosevelt net-pen program. In section 903 (g)(l)(E), the Council also directed BPA to fund a monitoring program to evaluate the effectiveness of the kokanee hatcheries. The monitoring program included the following components: (1) a year-round, reservoir-wide, creel survey to determine angler use, catch rates and composition, and growth and condition of fish; (2) assessment of kokanee, rainbow, and walleye (Stizostedion vitreum) feeding habits and densities of their preferred prey, and; (3) a mark and recapture study designed to assess the effectiveness of different locations where hatchery-raised kokanee and net pen reared rainbow trout are released. The above measures were adopted by the Council based on a management plan, developed by the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center, Spokane Indian Tribe, Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington Department of Wildlife, and National Park Service, that examined the feasibility of restoring and enhancing Lake Roosevelt fisheries (Scholz et al. 1986). In July 1988, BPA entered into a contract with the Spokane Indian Tribe to initiate the monitoring program. The projected duration of the monitoring program is through 1995. This report contains the results of the monitoring program from August 1988 to December 1989.

  16. artisanal shrimp fishery: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or competitive usages?. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??In Indonesia, coastal villages traditionally depend on artisanal fisheries. Increasing population...

  17. artisanal parrotfish fisheries: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or competitive usages?. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??In Indonesia, coastal villages traditionally depend on artisanal fisheries. Increasing population...

  18. CURRENT FISHERIES STATISTICS NO. 2008-2 IMPORTS AND EXPORTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CURRENT FISHERIES STATISTICS NO. 2008-2 IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF FISHERY PRODUCTS ANNUAL SUMMARY and nonedible fishery imports was $28.5 billion in 2008, $0.3 billion less than in 2007. EXPORTS. U.S. exports with 1,263,778 tons at $4.01 billion exported in 2007. Exports of fresh and frozen items were 1

  19. CURRENT FISHERIES STATISTICS NO. 2007-2 IMPORTS AND EXPORTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CURRENT FISHERIES STATISTICS NO. 2007-2 IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF FISHERY PRODUCTS ANNUAL SUMMARY. EXPORTS. U.S. exports of edible fishery products of domestic origin in 2007 were 1,263,778 tons valued at $4.0 billion, compared with 1,306,706 tons at $4.0 billion exported in 2006. Exports of fresh

  20. CURRENT FISHERIES STATISTICS NO. 2009-2 IMPORTS AND EXPORTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CURRENT FISHERIES STATISTICS NO. 2009-2 IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF FISHERY PRODUCTS ANNUAL SUMMARY imports was $21.8 billion in 2009, $6.6 billion less than in 2008. EXPORTS. U.S. exports of edible fishery,161,843 tons at $3.99 billion exported in 2008. Exports of fresh and frozen items were 987,330 tons valued

  1. CURRENT FISHERIES STATISTICS NO. 2010-2 IMPORTS AND EXPORTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CURRENT FISHERIES STATISTICS NO. 2010-2 IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF FISHERY PRODUCTS ANNUAL SUMMARY imports was $27.4 billion in 2010, $3.8 billion more than in 2009. EXPORTS. U.S. exports of edible fishery,119,732 tons at $3.74 billion exported in 2009. Exports of fresh and frozen items were 1,077,310 tons valued

  2. CURRENT FISHERIES STATISTICS NO. 2005-2 IMPORTS AND EXPORTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CURRENT FISHERIES STATISTICS NO. 2005-2 IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF FISHERY PRODUCTS ANNUAL SUMMARY.2 billion more than in 2004, when $22.9 billion of fishery products were imported. EXPORTS. U.S. exports,275,765 tons at $3.5 billion exported in 2004. Fresh and frozen items were 1,098,799 tons valued at $2

  3. CURRENT FISHERIES STATISTICS NO. 2004-2 IMPORTS AND EXPORTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CURRENT FISHERIES STATISTICS NO. 2004-2 IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF FISHERY PRODUCTS ANNUAL SUMMARY.7 billion more than in 2003, when $21.3 billion of fishery products were imported. EXPORTS. U.S. exports,048,052 tons at $3.1 billion exported in 2003. Fresh and frozen items were 1,091,057 tons valued at $2

  4. CURRENT FISHERIES STATISTICS NO. 2011-2 IMPORTS AND EXPORTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CURRENT FISHERIES STATISTICS NO. 2011-2 IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF FISHERY PRODUCTS ANNUAL SUMMARY, $3.4 billion more than in 2010. EXPORTS. U.S. exports of edible fishery products of domestic origin exported in 2010. Exports of fresh and frozen items were 1,292,684 tons valued at $4.3 billion, an increase

  5. FISHERY STATISTICS I OF THE UNITED STATESmmmMM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ^^ FISHERY STATISTICS I OF THE UNITED STATESmmmMM 'f^ gjIP^Ws^WI'l STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 25 Fish Statistical Digest 25 FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1949 BY A. W. ANDERSON and C. E. PETERSON UNITED. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C. - - - Price $1.25 (paper) #12;Fishery Statistics

  6. Cefas contract report: -SLEA2 Oil and Gas Fisheries Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cefas contract report: - SLEA2 Oil and Gas Fisheries Risk Assessment Advice Updated Cefas: Oil and Gas Fisheries Risk Assessment Advice Submitted to: Department of Energy and Climate Change Recommendations for Spawning Finfish ­ English & Welsh Blocks Oil and Gas Fisheries Risk Assessment Advice Updated

  7. The Fisheries of Norway UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Fisheries of Norway UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE BUREAU 11 12 15 16 16 16 17 17 17 18 19 19 #12;The Fisheries of Norway By SID 'EY SHAPIRO Foreign Fisheries about 1.3 million tons annually between 1960 and 1964. Thes e landings make Norway the foremost fishing

  8. William Francis Thompson (18881965): a Preeminent Fishery Biologist of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William Francis Thompson (1888­1965): a Preeminent Fishery Biologist of the Early and Mid Twentieth Century William Francis Thompson (Fig. 1) was a major figure in fisheries research on the west coast--William Francis Thompson (1888­1965) was a preeminent fishery sci entist of the early to mid twentieth century

  9. Foreign Fishery Developments The U.S.-Canadian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .4 million and per capita consumption of edible fishery products is only 6.4 kg. The Government is actively 7-8 per- cent of the world fisheries trade. Over half of Canada's fishery exports are shipped promoting increased fish consumption and has designated November as the "Fish and Seafood Month." In January

  10. Assessing Efficiency and Capacity in Fisheries James E. Kirkley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assessing Efficiency and Capacity in Fisheries James E. Kirkley College of William and Mary.M.Ward@noaa.gov ____________________ Prepared for the National Marine Fisheries Service Workshop of "Assessing Technical Efficiency and Capacity in Fisheries (Silver Spring, Maryland; September 29 - October 1, 1999). #12;Efficiency and Capacity iv Table

  11. COMMERCIAL FISHERY FOR CHUBS (CISCOES) IN LAKE MICHIGAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COMMERCIAL FISHERY FOR CHUBS (CISCOES) IN LAKE MICHIGAN THROUGH 1953 Marine Biological Laboratory COMMERCIAL FISHERY FOR CHUBS (CISCOES) IN LAKE MICHIGAN THROUGH 1953 By Ralph Hile and Howard J . Buettner #12;ABSTRACT The chub fishery of Lake Michigan is based on 7 deep-water species of coregonines . Small

  12. In-River Backwards Run Reconstruction of Fraser River Sockeye Fisheries from 2002 -2009 and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to within +/- 2.5 days for 90% of CUs at the 50th percentile, while FRSMM harvests can differ by up to +/-30

  13. Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, 1989 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, Mike

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The annual report contains three individual subproject papers detailing tribal fisheries work completed during the summer and fall of 1989. Subproject 1 contains summaries of evaluation/monitoring efforts associated with the Bear Valley Creek, Idaho enhancement project. Subproject 2 contains an evaluation of the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River habitat enhancement project. This report has been sub-divided into two parts: Part 1; stream evaluation and Part 2; pond series evaluation. Subproject 3 concerns the East Fork of the Salmon River, Idaho. This report summarizes the evaluation of the project to date including the 1989 pre-construction evaluation conducted within the East Fork drainage. Dredge mining has degraded spawning and rearing habitat for chinook salmon and steelhead trout in the Yankee Fork drainage of the Salmon River and in Bear Valley Creek. Mining, agricultural, and grazing practices degraded habitat in the East Fork of the Salmon River. Biological monitoring of the success of habitat enhancement for Bear Valley Creek and Yankee Fork are presented in this report. Physical and biological inventories prior to habitat enhancement in East Fork were also conducted. Four series of off-channel ponds of the Yankee Fork are shown to provide effective rearing habitat for chinook salmon. 45 refs., 49 figs., 24 tabs.

  14. Yakima River Basin Phase II Fish Screen Evaluations, 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vucelick, Jessica A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Chamness, Mickie A.

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2003, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the Nation Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2003, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve juvenile fish passage conditions. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites.

  15. Kootenai River Resident Fish Assessment, FY2008 KTOI Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holderman, Charles

    2009-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The overarching goal of project 1994-049-00 is to recover a productive, healthy and biologically diverse Kootenai River ecosystem, with emphasis on native fish species rehabilitation. It is especially designed to aid the recovery of important fish stocks, i.e. white sturgeon, burbot, bull trout, kokanee and several other salmonids important to the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho and regional sport-fisheries. The objectives of the project have been to address factors limiting key fish species within an ecosystem perspective. Major objectives include: establishment of a comprehensive and thorough biomonitoring program, investigate ecosystem--level in-river productivity, test the feasibility of a large-scale Kootenai River nutrient addition experiment (completed), to evaluate and rehabilitate key Kootenai River tributaries important to the health of the lower Kootenai River ecosystem, to provide funding for Canadian implementation of nutrient addition and monitoring in the Kootenai River ecosystem (Kootenay Lake) due to lost system productivity created by construction and operation of Libby Dam, mitigate the cost of monitoring nutrient additions in Arrow Lakes due to lost system productivity created by the Libby-Arrow water swap, provide written summaries of all research and activities of the project, and, hold a yearly workshop to convene with other agencies and institutions to discuss management, research, and monitoring strategies for this project and to provide a forum to coordinate and disseminate data with other projects involved in the Kootenai River basin.

  16. NOAA Fisheries Service National Cooperative Research Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COOPERATIVE RESEARCH 12 Project Title: Personnel and Associated Management Costs 12 Project Title: Development Title: Equipment and Operating Costs to Support Cooperative Research Projects 17 NORTHEAST REGIONAL of Trawling & Dredging on Sea Floor Habitat (2002), and Cooperative Research in the National Marine Fisheries

  17. Foreign Fishery Developments Abalone Culture in Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foreign Fishery Developments Abalone Culture in Japan Adam G. C. Body Introduction Abalone, known as awabe in Japan, is a popular and traditional food maintain ing a good, consistent market value. Up transplanted from areas of high spatfall, aquaculture research centers were set up in each of Japan's 37

  18. Foreign Fishery Developments Soviet Union and Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foreign Fishery Developments Soviet Union and Japan Agree on 1978 Quotas The Soviet Union and Japan year in Moscow. Japan's total 1978 allocation in the Soviet zone was set at 850,000 metric tons (t ex- trapolation of the 1977 quotas, which were 700,000 t for Japan during March-December and 335

  19. Foreign Fishery Developments Nigeria Plans Large

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foreign Fishery Developments Nigeria Plans Large Fishing Fleet Expansion Table 1.-Nigerian fishing reported deliveries. Development Program Nigeria's oil exports have enabled its Government to fInance Africa's most ambitious development program. Nigeria has the largest population of any country in Africa

  20. INTRODUCTION Salmon for New England Fisheries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . kef(l , from the west coast would be the best approach to generatin g such an inshore fishery. Pri on the hi gh seas off southwest G reenl and and in the Norwegian Sea has become a hi ghl y controver ial coast as a whole in any fo re- seeable future." H e re erved his most favo rable arguments

  1. Foreign Fishery Developments Australia Reports Growth in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ." Later studies have also shown both per capita fish and seafood consump- tion and fish prices-76, the last year of the survey. Apparent consumption per person rose another 6 percent in 1976-77 and trendsForeign Fishery Developments Australia Reports Growth in Fish Consumption and Prices Australians

  2. Foreign Fishery Developments The Belgian Market for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , 1978," and based on live weight equivalents of fish con- sumed. Actual per capita consumption would capita consumption' of fishery products in Belgium is esti- mated at about 18 kg, near the west European yearly per capita average of 19 kg, but higher than the 15 kg per person in the United States. According

  3. Foreign Fishery Developments New Latin American

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to be delivered. Libya has announced the formation of several joint fishery ventures with Af- rican countries/58.) Taiwan and Libya have both recently forn1ed joint venture fishing companies in Latin America. Taiwan Trawling Venture Libya and Guyana have agreed to set up a $5 million joint fishing company in which Guyana

  4. Marine Fisheries On the cover, top to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marine Fisheries ~@WD@W On the cover, top to bollom: Yelloweye rock fish, Sebastes ruberrimus Maturity and Fecundity in the Rockfishes, Sebastes spp., a Review Joy Clark, Wade Griffin, Jerry Clark.25 foreign. Publication of material from sources outside the NMFS is not an endorsement and the NMFS

  5. Habitats keep commercial and recreational fisheries strong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and sea level rise. So what can we do? Protect and restore habitat Investments by private groups not only for our fisheries but for the communities--and economies--that rely on them. San Francisco Bay Bay gone, but the dam or poorly designed culvert remains, still preventing fish from getting to habitat

  6. Moses Lake Fishery Restoration Project : FY 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None given

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Moses Lake Project consists of 3 phases. Phase 1 is the assessment of all currently available physical and biological information, the collection of baseline biological data, the formulation of testable hypotheses, and the development of a detailed study plan to test the hypotheses. Phase 2 is dedicated to the implementation of the study plan including data collection, hypotheses testing, and the formulation of a management plan. Phase 3 of the project is the implementation of the management plan, monitoring and evaluation of the implemented recommendations. The project intends to restore the failed recreational fishery for panfish species (black crappie, bluegill and yellow perch) in Moses Lake as off site mitigation for lost recreational fishing opportunities for anadromous species in the upper Columbia River. This report summarizes the results of Phase 1 investigations and presents the study plan directed at initiating Phase 2 of the project. Phase 1of the project culminates with the formulation of testable hypotheses directed at investigating possible limiting factors to the production of panfish in Moses Lake. The limiting factors to be investigated will include water quality, habitat quantity and quality, food limitations, competition, recruitment, predation, over harvest, environmental requirements, and the physical and chemical limitations of the system in relation to the fishes.

  7. Provide Assistance to Improve Water Quality in Hood County Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce; Mechell, Justin; Clayton, Brent; Gerlich, Ryan; Kalisek, Danielle; Harris, B.L.

    and potent i a l water qualit y threat s relate d to on-going non-point sour ce (NPS) water pollut i o n within the Lake Granbury Watershe d . The Te xas Water Resour c e s Instit u t e (TWRI) and Texas AgriLi f e Extens i o n Servic e assi st e d the Br... azos River Authori t y (BRA) and Texas Commiss i o n on Enviro nme n t a l Quali t y (TCEQ ) to develo p a Waters h e d Prote ct i o n Plan (WPP) aime d to improv e and protec t water qualit y within the Brazos River Basin. Educati o n a l informa...

  8. Submission of 2012-2013 U.S. Fishery Statistics for the Western and Central Pacific Ocean and Other Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The principal U.S. fisheries for HMS are the purse seine fishery that targets skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis

  9. Red River Compact (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Red River Compact Commission administers the Red River Compact to ensure that Texas receives its equitable share of quality water from the Red River and its tributaries as apportioned by the...

  10. Finite-size errors in quantum many-body simulations of extended systems P. R. C. Kent, Randolph Q. Hood, A. J. Williamson,* and R. J. Needs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kent, Paul

    . Hood, A. J. Williamson,* and R. J. Needs Cavendish Laboratory, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE recently introduced model periodic Coulomb interaction A. J. Williamson et al., Phys. Rev. B 55, R4851 1997 can be applied consistently to all Coulomb interactions in the system. The model periodic Coulomb

  11. River Basin Commissions (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation establishes river basin commissions, for the Kankakee, Maumee, St. Joseph, and Upper Wabash Rivers. The commissions facilitate and foster cooperative planning and coordinated...

  12. Maine Rivers Policy (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Maine Rivers Policy accompanies the Maine Waterway Development and Conservation Act and provides additional protection for some river and stream segments, which are designated as “outstanding...

  13. Wabash River Heritage Corridor (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Wabash River Heritage Corridor, consisting of the Wabash River, the Little River, and the portage between the Little River and the Maumee River, is considered a protected area, where...

  14. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: Potential Environmental Impacts and Fisheries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: Potential Environmental Impacts and Fisheries Christina M Comfort Institute #12;Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) · Renewable energy ­ ocean thermal gradient · Large

  15. Using DUSTRAN to Simulate Fog-Oil Dispersion and Its Impacts on Local Insect Populations at Ft. Hood: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rishel, Jeremy P.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Rutz, Frederick C.; Allwine, K Jerry

    2006-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Smokes and obscurants (S&O) are important screening agents used during military training exercises on many military installations. Although the use of S&O is subject to environmental laws, the fate and effects of S&O on natural habitats are not well documented. One particular concern is the impact S&O may have on local insect populations, which can be important components of terrestrial food chains of endangered species. Fog-oil (FO) is an S&O that is of particular concern. An important part of assessing potential ecosystem impacts is the ability to predict downwind FO concentrations. This report documents the use of the comprehensive atmospheric dispersion modeling system DUST TRANsport (DUSTRAN) to simulate the downwind transport and diffusion of a hypothetical FO release on the U.S. Army installation at Ft. Hood, TX.

  16. Wind River Watershed Restoration: 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, Patrick J.

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document represents work conducted as part of the Wind River Watershed Restoration Project during its first year of funding through the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The project is a comprehensive effort involving public and private entities seeking to restore water quality and fishery resources in the basin through cooperative actions. Project elements include coordination, watershed assessment, restoration, monitoring, and education. Entities involved with implementing project components are the Underwood Conservation District (UCD), USDA Forest Service (USFS), U.S. Geological Survey--Columbia River Research Lab (USGS-CRRL), and WA Department of Fish & Wildlife (WDFW). Following categories given in the FY1999 Statement of Work, the broad categories, the related objectives, and the entities associated with each objective (lead entity in boldface) were as follows: Coordination--Objective 1: Coordinate the Wind River watershed Action Committee (AC) and Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) to develop a prioritized list of watershed enhancement projects. Monitoring--Objective 2: Monitor natural production of juvenile, smolt, and adult steelhead in the Wind River subbasin. Objective 3: Evaluate physical habitat conditions in the Wind River subbasin. Assessment--Objective 4: Assess watershed health using an ecosystem-based diagnostic model that will provide the technical basis to prioritize out-year restoration projects. Restoration--Objective 5: Reduce road related sediment sources by reducing road densities to less than 2 miles per square mile. Objective 6: Rehabilitate riparian corridors, flood plains, and channel morphology to reduce maximum water temperatures to less than 61 F, to increase bank stability to greater than 90%, to reduce bankfull width to depth ratios to less than 30, and to provide natural levels of pools and cover for fish. Objective 7: Maintain and evaluate passage for adult and juvenile steelhead at artificial barriers. Education--Objective 8: Promote watershed stewardship among students, the community, private landowners, and local governments. Progress towards six of eight of these objectives is described within nine separate reports included in a four-volume document.

  17. Foreign Fishery Developments The Norwegian Fishing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -EEC fisheries agreement, which prevented Norwegian purse seiners from fishing North Sea brisling during the peak,200 t of meal (up 0.6 percent) and 164,600 t of oil (down 9.1 per- cent). Arctic Cod Quotas Quotas for Arctic.3 Fish oil 79,400 180.5 107,300 241.4 Cod liver oil 12,700 63.1 10,900 51.3 Canned fish 14,100 233.8 15

  18. Spawning and abundance of fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River, 1948--1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dauble, D.D.; Watson, D.G.

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Reach of the Columbia River provides the only major spawning habitat for the upriver bright (URB) race of fall chinook salmon in the mainstem Columbia River. Hanford Site biologists have conducted aerial surveys of spawning salmon in the Hanford Reach since 1948. This report summarizes data on fall chinook salmon spawning in the Hanford Reach and presents a discussion of factors that may affect population trends. Most data are limited to fisheries agency reports and other working documents. Fisheries management practices in the Columbia River system have changed rapidly over the last decade, particularly under requirements of the Pacific Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980. New information has been generated and included in this report. 75 refs., 17 figs., 11 tabs.

  19. MArine science School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Chris

    government management agencies such as the Alaska Department of Fish and Game and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife--Marine Field Experience (Independent Study) ....... 1 ­ 2 Fisheries FISH F288/BIOL F288--Fish and Fisheries of Alaska........................3 FISH F301--Biology of Fishes

  20. Review of U.S. West Coast Commercial Shark Fisheries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    long periods. These fisheries generally produced minimum ex-vessel prices and fluctuating yields are extremely slow. and as a result there is a close relationship between stock size and recruitment. Because of this relationship. only a small amount of that stock is avail able to support a sustained fishery. The increased

  1. Foreign Fishery Developments Mediterranean Bluefin Tuna Airlifted to Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foreign Fishery Developments Mediterranean Bluefin Tuna Airlifted to Japan Japan-Soviet Fishery dealt a seri- ous blow by the various new restric- tions introduced in the S-year Japan- Soviet in Japan has revived a once-abandoned airlift of fresh bluefin tuna from the Mediterranean. Two earlier

  2. Biology, ecology, and fisheries for K. Limburg lecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limburg, Karin E.

    . Fisheries Oceanography 6(2) #12;3 Photos: K. Limburg Herring periods sustained Swedish West Coast villages of camouflage from predators both above and below (counter-shading) Photo: © GLENN VANSTRUM OFF THE COAST in upwelling areas along coasts - Form the basis of much of the world's commercial fisheries Smithsonian

  3. FISHERY REGULATION VIA OPTIMAL CONTROL THEORY1 WILLIAM J. PALM'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISHERY REGULATION VIA OPTIMAL CONTROL THEORY1 WILLIAM J. PALM' ABSTRACT This paper attempts such a feedback scheme for fishery regulation. A single-variable logistic model is used to introduce the basic regulation. The Linear-Quadratic Optimal Control Problem, which has been widely applied in engineering

  4. Urban Fisheries Project Principal Investigator: Dr. Joseph E. Morris

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koford, Rolf R.

    overall potential as a sustainable fishery for the widest range of users. Using historical data from built, in part, by historical data. Each site was then ranked and delineated into priority groups Heritage Pond, Altoona. While the matrix is structured to efficiently capture metrics used in fisheries

  5. Multi-Scale Action Effectiveness Research in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.; Storch, Adam; Johnson, Jeff; Skalski, J. R.; Teel, D. J.; Brewer, Taylor; Bryson, Amanda J.; Dawley, Earl M.; Kuligowski, D. R.; Whitesel, T.; Mallette, Christine

    2013-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The study reported herein was conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE) by researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), University of Washington (UW), and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). The goal of the study was to evaluate the ecological benefits of restoration actions for juvenile salmon in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE; rkm 0–234).

  6. Secure & Restore Critical Fisheries Habitat, Flathead Subbasin, FY2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DuCharme, Lynn [Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes; Tohtz, Joel [Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks

    2008-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The construction of Hungry Horse Dam inundated 125 km of adfluvial trout habitat in the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries, impacting natural fish reproduction and rearing. Rapid residential and commercial growth in the Flathead Watershed now threaten the best remaining habitats and restrict our opportunities to offset natural resource losses. Hydropower development and other land disturbances caused severe declines in the range and abundance of our focal resident fish species, bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout. Bull trout were listed as threatened in 1998 under the Endangered Species Act and westslope cutthroat were petitioned for listing under ESA. Westslope cutthroat are a species of special concern in Montana and a species of special consideration by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. The Secure & Protect Fisheries Habitat project follows the logical progression towards habitat restoration outlined in the Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan approved by the NWPPC in 1993. This project is also consistent with the 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program and the Flathead River Subbasin Plan that identifies the protection of habitats for these populations as one of the most critical needs in the subbasin and directs actions to offset habitat losses. The Flathead basin is one of the fastest growing human population centers in Montana. Riparian habitats are being rapidly developed and subdivided, causing habitat degradation and altering ecosystem functions. Remaining critical habitats in the Flathead Watershed need to be purchased or protected with conservation easements if westslope cutthroat and bull trout are to persist and expand within the subbasin. In addition, habitats degraded by past land uses need to be restored to maximize the value of remaining habitats and offset losses caused by the construction of Hungry Horse Dam. Securing and restoring remaining riparian habitat will benefit fish by shading and moderating water temperatures, stabilizing banks and protecting the integrity of channel dimension, improving woody debris recruitment for in-channel habitat features, producing terrestrial insects and leaf litter for recruitment to the stream, and helping to accommodate and attenuate flood flows. The purpose of this project is to work with willing landowners to protect the best remaining habitats in the Flathead subbasin as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan. The target areas for land protection activities follow the priorities established in the Flathead subbasin plan and include: (1) Class 1 waters as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan; (2) Class 2 watersheds as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan; and (3) 'Offsite mitigation' defined as those Class 1 and Class 2 watersheds that lack connectivity to the mainstem Flathead River or Flathead Lake. This program focuses on conserving the highest quality or most important riparian or fisheries habitat areas consistent with program criteria. The success of our efforts is subject to a property's actual availability and individual landowner negotiations. The program is guided using biological and project-based criteria that reflect not only the priority needs established in the Flathead subbasin plan, but also such factors as cost, credits, threats, and partners. The implementation of this project requires both an expense and a capital budget to allow work to be completed. This report addresses accomplishments under both budgets during FY08 as the two budgets are interrelated. The expense budget provided pre-acquisition funding to conduct activities such as surveys, appraisals, staff support, etc. The capital budget was used to purchase the interest in each parcel including closing costs. Both the pre-acquisition contract funds and the capital funds used to purchase fee title or conservation easements were spent in accordance with the terms negotiated within the FY08 through FY09 MOA between the Tribes, State, and BPA. In FY08, the focus of this project was to pursue all possible properties

  7. IS S N 0142-2499 MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE FISHERIES AND FOOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IS S N 0142-2499 MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE FISHERIES AND FOOD DIRECTORATE OF FISHERIES RESEARCH Isles, 1986 Lowestoft 1987 #12;MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE, FISHERIES AND FOOD DIRECTORATEOF FISHERIES of presentation of measurements 3.4 Methods of interpretation 4. British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) 4.1 Sellafield

  8. I S S N 0142-2499 MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE FISHERIES AND FOOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I S S N 0142-2499 MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE FISHERIES AND FOOD DIRECTORATE OF FISHERIES RESEARCH;MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE, FISHERIES AND FOOD DIRECTORATE OF FISHERIES RESEARCH AQUATIC ENVIRONMENT of presentation of measurements 3.4 Method of interpretation of results 4. British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) 4

  9. Terms of Reference for NOAA Southeast Fisheries Science Center Fiscal Year 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to fishery stock assessment modeling? What is the suitability of the stock assessment models employed, taking1 Terms of Reference for NOAA Southeast Fisheries Science Center Fiscal Year 2014 Stock Assessment of this review is to examine and evaluate the Southeast Fisheries Science Center's (SEFSC) fishery stock

  10. EcoGIS GIS Tools for Ecosystem Approaches to Fisheries Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EcoGIS ­ GIS Tools for Ecosystem Approaches to Fisheries Management May 2009 NOAA TechnicalGIS ­ GIS Tools for Ecosystem Approaches to Fisheries Management. NOAA Technical Memorandum NOS NCCOS 75. 38 Fisheries Science Centers, NOAA Fisheries Regional Offices, NatureServe's EBM Tools Network, and other

  11. Foreign Fishery Developments Data on 1985-86 exports are given in FishmealThe Fisheries of Chile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foreign Fishery Developments Data on 1985-86 exports are given in Table 2. FishmealThe Fisheries with the same period of 1986. Export shipments, however, in creased over 35 percent by value during that same period. Frozen and fresh fish ery products were the most rapidly grow ing exports. Fishmeal remained

  12. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 23:10151019, 2003 Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1015 North American Journal of Fisheries Management 23:1015­1019, 2003 Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2003 Mortality and Long-Term Retention of Passive Integrated Transponder Tags by Spring Chinook Salmon MATTHEW R. DARE*1 Biomark, Incorporated, 149 South Adkins Way, Suite 104, Meridian, Idaho

  13. Quantification of Libby Reservoir Levels Needed to Maintain or Enhance Reservoir Fisheries, 1983-1987 Methods and Data Summary.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chisholm, Ian

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Libby Reservoir was created under an International Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada for cooperative water development of the Columbia River Basin. The authorized purpose of the dam is to provide power, flood control, and navigation and other benefits. Research began in May 1983 to determine how operations of Libby dam impact the reservoir fishery and to suggest ways to lessen these impacts. This study is unique in that it was designed to accomplish its goal through detailed information gathering on every trophic level in the reservoir system and integration of this information into a quantitative computer model. The specific study objectives are to: quantify available reservoir habitat, determine abundance, growth and distribution of fish within the reservoir and potential recruitment of salmonids from Libby Reservoir tributaries within the United States, determine abundance and availability of food organisms for fish in the reservoir, quantify fish use of available food items, develop relationships between reservoir drawdown and reservoir habitat for fish and fish food organisms, and estimate impacts of reservoir operation on the reservoir fishery. 115 refs., 22 figs., 51 tabs.

  14. Yakima River Spring Chinook Enhancement Study, 1984 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wasserman, Larry

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study develops data to present management alternatives for Yakima River spring chinook. The first objective is to determine the distribution, abundance and survival of wild Yakima River spring chinook. Naturally produced populations will be studied to determine if these runs can be sustained in the face of present harvest and environmental conditions. This information will be gathered through spawning ground surveys, counting of adults at Prosser and Roza fish ladders, and through monitoring the tribal dipnet fishery. Concurrent studies will examine potential habitat limitations within the basin. Presently, survival to emergence studies, in conjunction with substrate quality analysis is being undertaken. Water temperature is monitored throughout the basin, and seining takes place monthly to evaluate distribution and abundance. The outcome of this phase of the investigation is to determine an effective manner for introducing hatchery stocks that minimize the impacts on the wild population. The second objective of this study is to determine relative effectiveness of different methods of hatchery supplementation.

  15. Effects of Mitigative Measures on Productivity of White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia River Downstream from McNary Dam; Determine Status and Habitat Requirements of White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from McNary Dam, 1995-1996 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rien, Thomas A.; Beiningen, Kirk T. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project began in July 1986 and is a cooperative effort of federal, state, and tribal fisheries entities to determine (1) the status and habitat requirements, and (2) effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the lower Colombia and Snake rivers.

  16. Pecos River Compact (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation authorizes the state's entrance into the Pecos River Compact, a joint agreement between the states of New Mexico and Texas. The compact is administered by the Pecos River Compact...

  17. Canadian River Compact (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Canadian River Commission administers the Canadian River Compact which includes the states of New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. Signed in 1950 by the member states, the Compact was subsequently...

  18. Identifying Lagrangian fronts with favourable fishery conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. V. Prants; M. V. Budyansky; M. Yu. Uleysky

    2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Lagrangian fronts (LF) in the ocean delineate boundaries between surface waters with different Lagrangian properties. They can be accurately detected in a given velocity field by computing synoptic maps of the drift of synthetic tracers and other Lagrangian indicators. Using Russian ship's catch and location data for a number of commercial fishery seasons in the region of the northwest Pacific with one of the richest fishery in the world, it is shown statistically that the saury fishing grounds with maximal catches are not randomly distributed over the region but located mainly along those LFs where productive cold waters of the Oyashio Current, warmer waters of the southern branch of the Soya Current, and waters of warm-core Kuroshio rings converge. Computation of those fronts with the altimetric geostrophic velocity fields both in the years with the First and Second Oyashio Intrusions shows that in spite of different oceanographic conditions the LF locations may serve good indicators of potential fishing grounds. Possible reasons for saury aggregation near LFs are discussed. We propose a mechanism of effective export of nutrient rich waters based on stretching of material lines in the vicinity of hyperbolic objects in the ocean. The developed method, based on identifying LFs in any velocity fields, is quite general and may be applied to forecast potential fishing grounds for the other pelagic fishes in different seas and the oceans.

  19. Platte River Cooperative Agreement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Agreement Skip Navigation Links Transmission Functions Infrastructure projects Interconnection OASIS OATT Platte River Cooperative Agreement PEIS, NE, WY, CO, DOE...

  20. Aluminum Bronze Alloys to Improve the System Life of Basic Oxygen and Electric Arc Furnace Hoods, Roofs and Side Vents.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence C. Boyd Jr.; Dr. Vinod K. Sikka

    2006-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Industries of Ohio was the lead organization for a consortium that examined the current situation involving the service life of electric arc and basic oxygen furnace hoods, roofs and side vents. Republic Engineered Products (REP), one of the project partners, installed a full-scale Al-Bronze “skirt” in their BOF at their Lorain OH facility, believed to be the first such installation of this alloy in this service. In 24 months of operation, the Al-Bronze skirt has processed a total of 4,563 heats, requiring only 2 shutdowns for maintenance, both related to physical damage to the skirt from operational mishaps. Yearly energy savings related to the REP facility are projected to be ~ 10 billion Btu's with significant additional environmental and productivity benefits. In recognition of the excellent results, this project was selected as the winner of the Ohio’s 2006 Governor’s Award for Excellence in Energy, the state’s award for outstanding achievements in energy efficiency.

  1. Evaluation of Life History Diversity, Habitat Connectivity, and Survival Benefits Associated with Habitat Restoration Actions in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, Annual Report 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.; Skalski, John R.; Dawley, Earl M.; Coleman, Andre M.

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the 2009 research conducted under the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE or Corps) project EST-09-P-01, titled “Evaluation of Life History Diversity, Habitat Connectivity, and Survival Benefits Associated with Habitat Restoration Actions in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary.” The research was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Marine Science Laboratory and Hydrology Group, in partnership with the University of Washington, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, Columbia Basin Research, and Earl Dawley (NOAA Fisheries, retired). This Columbia River Fish Mitigation Program project, referred to as “Salmonid Benefits,” was started in FY 2009 to evaluate the state-of-the science regarding the ability to quantify the benefits to listed salmonids1 of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary.

  2. Columbia River Hatchery Reform System-Wide Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Dan [Hatchery Scientific Review Group

    2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Congress funded the Puget Sound and Coastal Washington Hatchery Reform Project via annual appropriations to the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) beginning in fiscal year 2000. Congress established the project because it recognized that while hatcheries have a necessary role to play in meeting harvest and conservation goals for Pacific Northwest salmonids, the hatchery system was in need of comprehensive reform. Most hatcheries were producing fish for harvest primarily to mitigate for past habitat loss (rather than for conservation of at-risk populations) and were not taking into account the effects of their programs on naturally spawning populations. With numerous species listed as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), conservation of salmon in the Puget Sound area was a high priority. Genetic resources in the region were at risk and many hatchery programs as currently operated were contributing to those risks. Central to the project was the creation of a nine-member independent scientific review panel called the Hatchery Scientific Review Group (HSRG). The HSRG was charged by Congress with reviewing all state, tribal and federal hatchery programs in Puget Sound and Coastal Washington as part of a comprehensive hatchery reform effort to: conserve indigenous salmonid genetic resources; assist with the recovery of naturally spawning salmonid populations; provide sustainable fisheries; and improve the quality and cost-effectiveness of hatchery programs. The HSRG worked closely with the state, tribal and federal managers of the hatchery system, with facilitation provided by the non-profit organization Long Live the Kings and the law firm Gordon, Thomas, Honeywell, to successfully complete reviews of over 200 hatchery programs at more than 100 hatcheries across western Washington. That phase of the project culminated in 2004 with the publication of reports containing the HSRG's principles for hatchery reform and recommendations for Puget Sound/Coastal Washington hatchery programs, followed by the development in 2005 of a suite of analytical tools to support application of the principles (all reports and tools are available at www.hatcheryreform.us). In 2005, Congress directed the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries) to replicate the Puget Sound and Coastal Washington Hatchery Reform Project in the Columbia River Basin. The HSRG was expanded to 14 members to include individuals with specific knowledge about the Columbia River salmon and steelhead populations. This second phase was initially envisioned as a one-year review, with emphasis on the Lower Columbia River hatchery programs. It became clear however, that the Columbia River Basin needed to be viewed as an inter-connected ecosystem in order for the review to be useful. The project scope was subsequently expanded to include the entire Basin, with funding for a second year provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) Fish and Wildlife Program. The objective of the HSRG's Columbia River Basin review was to change the focus of the Columbia River hatchery system. In the past, these hatchery programs have been aimed at supplying adequate numbers of fish for harvest as mitigation primarily for hydropower development in the Basin. A new, ecosystem-based approach is founded on the idea that harvest goals are sustainable only if they are compatible with conservation goals. The challenge before the HSRG was to determine whether or not conservation and harvest goals could be met by fishery managers and, if so, how. The HSRG determined that in order to address these twin goals, both hatchery and harvest reforms are necessary. The HSRG approach represents an important change of direction in managing hatcheries in the region. It provides a clear demonstration that current hatchery programs can indeed be redirected to better meet both conservation and harvest goals. For each Columbia River Basin Environmentally Significant Unit

  3. Inventory of NMFS Fishery-Independent Surveys and Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Inventory of NMFS Fishery-Independent Surveys and Observations Phase 1: A One-year Snapshot of Appendixes Appendix I. Inventory working group .............................................................. 22 Appendix II. Glossary for terms used in the inventory

  4. african pelagic fishery: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    maximus) and porbeagle (Lamna nasus) were well established in northern areas (e.g. off Norway) in the early 20th century. Although targeted fisheries for basking shark have now...

  5. PARASITES OF SKIPJACK TUNA, KATSUWONUS PELAMIS: FISHERY IMPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PARASITES OF SKIPJACK TUNA, KATSUWONUS PELAMIS: FISHERY IMPLICATIONS R. J. G. LESTER,' A. BARNES of the many examples see MacKenzie (1983). The skipjack tuna, Katsuwonus pelamis, is one of the most valuable

  6. American Fisheries Society Symposium 45:557585, 2005 2005 by the American Fisheries Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bart Jr., Henry L. "Hank"

    * Corresponding author: mary_freeman@usgs.gov Status and Conservation of the Fish Fauna of the Alabama River System MARY C. FREEMAN* U.S. Geological Survey, Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, University of Georgia Chasse, Louisiana 70037, USA Abstract.--The Alabama River system, comprising the Alabama, Coosa

  7. Do Chinese Environmental Laws Work? A Study of Litigation as a Response to the Problem of Fishery Pollution in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMullin, Joseph

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE PROBLEM OF FISHERY POLLUTION IN CHINA Joseph McMullinlFishery Pollution in China II. Water Pollution in China: Its Overall Effects on

  8. Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima River Basin, 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vucelick, J.; McMichael, G.; Chamness, M. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2003, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service [NMFS]) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2003, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the NOAA Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve juvenile fish passage conditions. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites.

  9. BIOLOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF THE FISHERY RESOURCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steelhead trout · 40 Pacific lamprey .· 45 Salmon spawning bed surveys .. ...... 49 Nest measurements to a constant change in availability of gravel at various river flows* . · * · 55 12* Recommended fixed flow in that stream* ··**·····*·* 59 13* The effect of a fixed flow schedule for fish at Lewiston on the discharge

  10. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Habitat and Limnological Research; 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohler, Andre E.; Taki, Doug (Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, Fort Hall, ID); Griswold, Robert G. (Biolines, Stanley, ID)

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In March 1990, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes petitioned the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) to list the Snake River sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) as endangered. As a result of that petition the Snake River sockeye salmon was officially listed as endangered in November 1991 under the Endangered Species Act (56 FR 58619). In 1991, the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Habitat and Limnological Research Program was implemented (Project Number 91-71, Intergovernmental Contract Number DE-BI79-91bp22548). This project is part of an interagency effort to prevent the extinction of the Redfish Lake stock of O. nerka. The Shoshone-Bannock Tribal goal for this project is two tiered: The immediate goal is to increase the population of Snake River sockeye salmon while preserving the unique genetic characteristics of the Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU). The Tribes long term goal is to maintain a viable population that warrants delisting and provides Tribal harvest opportunities. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provides funding for this interagency recovery program through the Northwest Power Planning Council Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPCFWP). Collaborators in the recovery effort include the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG), the University of Idaho (UI), U.S. Forest Service (USFS), and the Shoshone-Bannock Tribe (SBT). This report summarizes activities conducted by Shoshone-Bannock Tribal Fisheries Department personnel during the 2002 calendar year. Project objectives include: (1) monitor over-winter survival and emigration of juvenile anadromous O. nerka stocked from the captive rearing program; (2) fertilize Redfish Lake (3) conduct kokanee salmon (non-anadromous O. nerka) population surveys; (4) monitor spawning kokanee escapement and estimate fry recruitment on Fishhook, Alturas Lake, and Stanley Lake creeks; (5) evaluate potential competition and predation between stocked juvenile O. nerka and a variety of fish species in Redfish, Pettit, and Alturas lakes; and (6) monitor limnological parameters of Sawtooth Valley lakes to assess lake productivity.

  11. Reintroduction of Lower Columbia River Chum Salmon into Duncan Creek, 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hillson, Todd D. [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2009-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) listed Lower Columbia River (LCR) chum salmon as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in March, 1999 (64 FR 14508, March 25, 1999). The listing was in response to the reduction in abundance from historical levels of more than one-half million returning adults to fewer than 10,000 present-day spawners. Harvest, habitat degradation, changes in flow regimes, riverbed movement and heavy siltation have been largely responsible for this decline. The timing of seasonal changes in river flow and water temperatures is perhaps the most critical factor in structuring the freshwater life history of this species. This is especially true of the population located directly below Bonneville Dam, where hydropower operations can block access to spawning sites, dewater redds, strand fry, cause scour or fill of redds and increase sedimentation of spawning gravels. Prior to 1997, only two chum salmon populations were recognized as genetically distinct in the Columbia River, although spawning had been documented in many Lower Columbia River tributaries. The first population was in the Grays River (RKm 34), a tributary of the Columbia River, and the second was a group of spawners utilizing the mainstem Columbia River just below Bonneville Dam (RKm 235) adjacent to Ives Island and in Hardy and Hamilton creeks. Using additional DNA samples, Small et al. (2006) grouped chum salmon spawning in the mainstem Columbia River and the Washington State tributaries into three groups: the Coastal, the Cascade and the Gorge. The Coastal group comprises those spawning in the Grays River, Skamokawa Creek and the broodstock used at the Sea Resources facility on the Chinook River. The Cascade group comprises those spawning in the Cowlitz (both summer and fall stocks), Kalama, Lewis, and East Fork Lewis rivers, with most supporting unique populations. The Gorge group comprises those spawning in the mainstem Columbia River from the I-205 Bridge up to Bonneville Dam and those spawning in Hamilton and Hardy creeks. Response to the federal ESA listing has been primarily through direct-recovery actions: reducing harvest, hatchery supplementation using local broodstock for populations at catastrophic risk, habitat restoration (including construction of spawning channels) and flow agreements to protect spawning and rearing areas. Both state and federal agencies have built controlled spawning areas. In 1998, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) began a chum salmon supplementation program using native stock on the Grays River. This program was expanded during 1999 - 2001 to include reintroduction into the Chinook River using eggs from the Grays River Supplementation Program. These eggs are incubated at the Grays River Hatchery, reared to release size at the Sea Resources Hatchery on the Chinook River, and the fry are released at the mouth of the Chinook River. Native steelhead, chum, and coho salmon are present in Duncan Creek, and are recognized as subpopulations of the Lower Gorge population, and are focal species in the Lower Columbia Fish Recovery Board (LCFRB) plan. Steelhead, chum and coho salmon that spawn in Duncan Creek are listed as Threatened under the ESA. Duncan Creek is classified by the LCFRB plan as a watershed for intensive monitoring (LCFRB 2004). This project was identified in the 2004 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) revised Biological Opinion (revised BiOp) to increase survival of chum salmon, 'BPA will continue to fund the program to re-introduce Columbia River chum salmon into Duncan Creek as long as NOAA Fisheries determines it to be an essential and effective contribution to reducing the risk of extinction for this ESU'. (USACE et al. 2004, page 85-86). The Governors Forum on Monitoring and Salmon Recovery and Watershed Health recommends one major population from each ESU have adult and juvenile monitoring. Duncan Creek chum salmon are identified in this plan to be intensively monitored. Planners recommended that a combination of natural and hatchery production

  12. A Model of Fishery Harvests with a Voluntary Co-op

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deacon, Robert T; Costello, Christopher J; Parker, Dominic P

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Chignik Salmon Co-op. ” Mimeo, UCSB Department ofHarvest Rights to Fishery Co-operatives: Evidence fromFishery Harvests with a Voluntary Co-op Robert T. Deacon *

  13. Lake Chelan Fishery Management Plan Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ........................................................... Monitoring changes in cutthroat and rainbow trout management........ Creel survey methods1 Appendix D Lake Chelan Fishery Management Plan Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife 2002 #12;2 LAKE CHELAN FISHERY MANAGEMENT PLAN TABLE OF CONTENTS ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

  14. Adaptation Options for Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries. A Report to the UNFCCC Secretariat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    Climate change effects on agriculture, forestry, and fisheries...................................12 3 adaptation employed to offset climate change effects in an agricultural, forest and fisheries (AFF 4 Basic forms of Climate change adaptation

  15. Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project - Klickitat Monitoring and Evaluation, 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zendt, Joe; Babcock, Mike [Yakama Nation Fisheries Resource Management

    2006-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results of monitoring and evaluation (M&E) activities for salmonid fish populations and habitat in the Klickitat River subbasin in south-central Washington. The M&E activities described here were conducted as a part of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA)-funded Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) and were designed by consensus of the scientists with the Yakama Nation (YN) Fisheries Program. YKFP is a joint project between YN and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Overall YKFP goals are to increase natural production of and opportunity to harvest salmon and steelhead in the Yakima and Klickitat subbasins using hatchery supplementation, harvest augmentation and habitat improvements. Klickitat subbasin M&E activities have been subjected to scientific and technical review by members of the YKFP Science/Technical Advisory Committee (STAC) as part of the YKFP's overall M&E proposal. Yakama Nation YKFP biologists have transformed the conceptual design into the tasks described. YKFP biologists have also been involved with the Collaborative Systemwide Monitoring and Evaluation Project (CSMEP - a project aimed at improving the quality, consistency, and focus of fish population and habitat data to answer key M&E questions relevant to major decisions in the Columbia Basin) and are working towards keeping Klickitat M&E activities consistent with CSMEP recommendations. This report summarizes progress and results for the following major categories of YN-managed tasks under this contract: (1) Monitoring and Evaluation - to gather baseline information in order to characterize habitat and salmonid populations pre- and post-habitat restoration and pre-supplementation. (2) Ecological Interactions - to determine presence of pathogens in wild and naturally produced salmonids in the Klickitat Basin and develop supplementation strategies using this information. (3) Genetics - to develop YKFP supplementation broodstock collection protocols for the preservation of genetic variability, by refining methods of detecting within-stock genetic variability and between-stock genetic variability.

  16. Saving a Dwindling River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    information on this research is available by downloading TWRI Technical Report 291, ?Reconnaissance Survey of Salt Sources and Loading into the Pecos River,? at http://twri.tamu.edu/reports.php. The research team has also compared flow and salinity data from... Water Act, Section 319 from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. ?The river?s importance?historically, biologically, hydrologically and economically?to the future of the entire Pecos River Basin and the Rio Grande is huge,? said Will Hatler, project...

  17. Sabine River Compact (Multiple States)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Sabine River Compact Commission administers the Sabine River Compact to ensure that Texas receives its equitable share of quality water from the Sabine River and its tributaries as apportioned...

  18. IS SN 0142-2499 MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE FISHERIES AND FOOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IS SN 0142-2499 MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE FISHERIES AND FOOD DIRECTORATE OF FISHERIES RESEARCH OF THE BRITISH ISLES, 1984 G..HUNT LOWESTOFT 1 9 8 5 #12;MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE,FISHERIES AND FOOD DIRECTORATE 3.4 Methodsof interpretation 4. British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) 4.1 Sellafield,Cumbria 4

  19. Fishery systems and linkages: from clockworks to soft watches Serge M. Garcia and Anthony T. Charles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles, Anthony

    Fishery systems and linkages: from clockworks to soft watches Serge M. Garcia and Anthony T. Charles Garcia, S. M., and Charles, A. T. 2007. Fishery systems and linkages: from clockworks to soft watches. ­ ICES Journal of Marine Science, 64: 580­587. The complex systemic nature of fisheries has been

  20. Fisheries Utilization Research-50 Years in Retrospect, Part II: The Enduring Research Themes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -produced fish. Finally, the fishery products used in pet foods are important as they relate to the health of millions of pets. In past years, I reviewed many reports of the fisheries chemists of the 1930's and 1940's not be said of botulism and several other unpleasant diseases related to fishery consumption

  1. The Development and Decline of Hawaii's Skipjack Tuna Fishery CHRISTOFER H. BOGGS and BERT S. KIKKAWA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pelamis, was the largest commercial fishery in Hawaii. Annual pole-and-line landings of skipjack tuna, I Bert S. Kikkawa. An update of the skipjack tuna, Katsuwonus pelamis, baitboat fishery in Hawaii-2396, unpub!. manuscr. ABSTRACT-The pole-and-line fishery for skipjack tuna, Katsuwonus pelamis

  2. River Edge Redevelopment Zone (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the River Edge Redevelopment Program is to revive and redevelop environmentally challenged properties adjacent to rivers in Illinois.

  3. Valuation and the consequences of multiple sources of environmental deterioration: The case of the New York striped bass fishery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahn, J.R. (Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)); Buerger, R.B. (Univ. of North Carolina, Wilmington, NC (United States))

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines two sources of environmental degradation in the New York striped bass fishery. The first is the decline in environmental quality in the Chesapeake Bay, the spawning ground for the majority of fish in New York waters. The second is the PCB contamination of striped bass from the Hudson River, the other primary spawning ground for striped bass in New York waters. The paper develops methodologies for examining loss in economic value, when the loss stems from two sources. The estimates resulting from the application of these methodologies suggest that the general deterioration of the Chesapeake Bay generated 2[center dot]3 to 7[center dot]7 million dollars in annual losses to the New York striped bass fishery, and that the annual losses from PCB contamination of the Hudson striped bass are between 0[center dot]745 and 3[center dot]7 million dollars. The paper also discusses how the dual sources of degradation generate barriers to the formation of effective management policy, and develops policy recommendations based on the estimated losses. 9 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs.

  4. Proceedings of the 65th Gulf and Caribbean Fisheries Institute November 5 9, 2012 Santa Marta, Colombia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauly, Daniel

    Proceedings of the 65th Gulf and Caribbean Fisheries Institute November 5 ­ 9, 2012 Santa Marta, Colombia Reconstructed Total Catches by the Marine Fisheries of Small Island States in the Wider Caribbean and thus under-reporting of fisheries catches occurs worldwide. Caribbean fisheries are typically small

  5. Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Policy/Technical Involvement and Planning, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Easterbrooks, John A.; Pearsons, Todd N. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is a supplementation project sponsored by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program 1994, Measure 7.4K). The objectives of the YKFP are: (1) to test the hypothesis that new supplementation techniques can be used in the Yakima River Basin to increase natural production and to improve harvest opportunities while maintaining the long-term genetic fitness of the wild and native salmonid populations and keeping adverse ecological interactions within acceptable limits (Yakima Fisheries Project Final Environment Impact Statement, 1996); (2) provide knowledge about the use of supplementation, so that it may be used to mitigate effects on anadromous fisheries throughout the Columbia River Basin; (3) to maintain and improve the quantity and productivity of salmon and steelhead habitat, including those areas made accessible by habitat improvements; (4) to ensure that Project implementation remains consistent with the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program; and (5) to implement the Project in a prudent and environmentally sound manner. Current YKFP operations have been designed to test the principles of supplementation (Busack et al. 1997). The Project's experimental design has focused on the following critical uncertainties affecting supplementation: (1) The survival and reproductive success of hatchery fish after release from the hatchery; (2) The impacts of hatchery fish as they interact with non-target species and stocks; and, (3) The effects of supplementation on the long-term genetic fitness of fish stocks. The YKFP endorses an adaptive management policy applied through a project management framework as described in the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Planning Status Report (1995), Fast and Craig (1997), Clune and Dauble 1991. The project is managed by a Policy Group consisting of a representative of the Yakama Nation (YN, lead agency) and a representative of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). The functions of the parties are described in an MOU between the YN and the WDFW. A Scientific and Technical Advisory Committee (STAC) consisting of one representative from each management entity reports to the Policy Group and provides technical input on policy and other issues. Additional committee's, such as the Monitoring Implementation and Planning Team (MIPT), serve as the discretion of STAC. The Policy Group and STAC meet periodically (usually monthly) to conduct the business of the YKFP. Although the YKFP is an all stocks initiative (BPA 1996), most effort to date has been directed at spring chinook salmon and coho salmon. This report is a compilation of the year's activities between August 1, 2001 and July 31, 2002. All findings should be considered preliminary until data collection is completed or the information is published in a peer-reviewed journal.

  6. Lower Columbia River and Estuary Habitat Monitoring Study, 2011 - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borde, Amy B.; Kaufmann, Ronald M.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Thom, Ronald M.; Wright, Cynthia L.

    2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecosystem Monitoring Program is a collaborative effort between the Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership (LCREP), University of Washington, Wetland Ecosystem Team (UW), US Geological Survey, Water Science Center (USGS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA-Fisheries, hereafter NOAA), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Marine Sciences Laboratory (PNNL). The goal of the program is to conduct emergent wetland monitoring aimed at characterizing salmonid habitats in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) from the mouth of the estuary to Bonneville Dam (Figure 1). This is an ecosystem based monitoring program focused on evaluating status and trends in habitat and reducing uncertainties regarding these ecosystems to ultimately improve the survival of juvenile salmonids through the LCRE. This project comprehensively assesses habitat, fish, food web, and abiotic conditions in the lower river, focusing on shallow water and vegetated habitats used by juvenile salmonids for feeding, rearing and refugia. The information is intended to be used to guide management actions associated with species recovery, particularly that of threatened and endangered salmonids. PNNL’s role in this multi-year study is to monitor the habitat structure (e.g., vegetation, topography, channel morphology, and sediment type) as well as hydrologic patterns.

  7. Seasonal Juvenile Salmonid Presence and Migratory Behavior in the Lower Columbia River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, Jessica A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Welch, Ian D.; Harnish, Ryan A.; Bellgraph, Brian J.

    2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    To facilitate preparing Biological Assessments of proposed channel maintenance projects, the Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers contracted the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to consolidate and synthesize available information about the use of the lower Columbia River and estuary by juvenile anadromous salmonids. The information to be synthesized included existing published documents as well as data from five years (2004-2008) of acoustic telemetry studies conducted in the Columbia River estuary using the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System. For this synthesis, the Columbia River estuary includes the section of the Columbia River from Bonneville Dam at river kilometer (Rkm) 235 downstream to the mouth where it enters the Pacific Ocean. In this report, we summarize the seasonal salmonid presence and migration patterns in the Columbia River estuary based on information from published studies as well as relevant data from acoustic telemetry studies conducted by NOAA Fisheries and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) between 2004 and 2008. Recent acoustic telemetry studies, conducted using the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS; developed by the Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers), provided information on the migratory behavior of juvenile steelhead (O. mykiss) and Chinook salmon in the Columbia River from Bonneville Dam to the Pacific Ocean. In this report, Section 2 provides a summary of information from published literature on the seasonal presence and migratory behavior of juvenile salmonids in the Columbia River estuary and plume. Section 3 presents a detailed synthesis of juvenile Chinook salmon and steelhead migratory behavior based on use of the JSATS between 2004 and 2008. Section 4 provides a discussion of the information summarized in the report as well as information drawn from literature reviews on potential effects of channel maintenance activities to juvenile salmonids rearing in or migrating through the Columbia River estuary and plume.

  8. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Habitat and Limnological Research; 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohler, Andre E.; Taki, Doug (Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, Fort Hall, ID); Griswold, Robert G. (Biolines, Stanley, ID)

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In March 1990, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes petitioned the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) to list the Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered. As a result of that petition the Snake River sockeye salmon was officially listed as endangered in November 1991 under the Endangered Species Act (56 FR 58619). In 1991, the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Habitat and Limnological Research Program was implemented (Project Number 91-71, Intergovernmental Contract Number DE-BI79-91bp22548). This project is part of an interagency effort to prevent the extinction of the Redfish Lake stock of O. nerka. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provides funding for this interagency recovery program through the Northwest Power Planning Council Fish and Wildlife Program (Council). Collaborators in the recovery effort include the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG), the University of Idaho (UI), U.S. Forest Service (USFS), and the Shoshone-Bannock Tribe (SBT). This report summarizes activities conducted by Shoshone-Bannock Tribal Fisheries Department personnel during the 2001 calendar year. Project objectives include: (1) monitor over-winter survival and emigration of juvenile anadromous O. nerka stocked from the captive rearing program; (2) fertilize Redfish Lake, fertilization of Pettit and Alturas lakes was suspended for this year; (3) conduct kokanee (non-anadromous O. nerka) population surveys; (4) monitor spawning kokanee escapement and estimate fry recruitment on Fishhook, Alturas Lake, and Stanley Lake creeks; (5) evaluate potential competition and predation interactions between stocked juvenile O. nerka and a variety of fish species in Redfish, Pettit, and Alturas lakes; (6) monitor limnological parameters of Sawtooth Valley lakes to assess lake productivity.

  9. Title: AJAE Appendix for Measuring Benefits from a Marketing Cooperative in the Copper River Fishery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

    -paced salmon fishing industry. At the end of the fiscal year (exact date unknown), members received that separated fish by quality category. Quality standards were set at each stage in the supply chain. At the first stage of production, the CRFC required fishermen to bleed their fish, package fish in bags

  10. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Habitat and Limnological Research : 2008 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohler, Andre E. [Shoshone-Bannock Tribes; Griswold, Robert G. [Biolines Environmental Consulting; Taki, Doug [Shoshone-Bannock Tribes

    2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In March 1990, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes petitioned the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) to list Snake River sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) as endangered. Snake River sockeye salmon were officially listed as endangered in November 1991 under the Endangered Species Act (56 FR 58619). In 1991, the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Habitat and Limnological Research Project was implemented. This project is part of an interagency effort to prevent the extinction of the Redfish Lake stock of Snake River sockeye salmon. The Shoshone-Bannock Tribal goal for this project is two tiered: the immediate goal is to increase the population of Snake River sockeye salmon while preserving the unique genetic characteristics of the evolutionarily significant unit (ESU). The Tribes long term goal is to maintain a viable population that warrants delisting and provides Tribal harvest opportunities. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provides funding for this interagency Recovery effort. Collaborators in the recovery effort include the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG), the University of Idaho (UI), and the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes (SBT). This report summarizes activities conducted by Shoshone-Bannock Tribal Fisheries Department personnel during the 2008 calendar year. Project tasks include: (1) monitor limnological parameters of the Sawtooth Valley lakes to assess lake productivity; (2) conduct lake fertilization in Pettit and Alturas lakes; (3) reduce the number of mature kokanee salmon spawning in Alturas Lake Creek; (4) monitor, enumerate, and evaluate sockeye salmon smolt migration from Pettit and Alturas lakes; (5) monitor spawning kokanee salmon escapement and estimate fry recruitment in Fishhook and Alturas Lake creeks; (6) conduct sockeye and kokanee salmon population surveys; (7) evaluate potential competition and predation between stocked juvenile sockeye salmon and a variety of fish species in Redfish, Pettit, and Alturas lakes; and (8) assist IDFG with captive broodstock production activities.

  11. On tropospheric rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Yuanlong, 1964-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, we investigate atmospheric water vapor transport through a distinct synoptic phenomenon, namely, the Tropospheric River (TR), which is a local filamentary structure on a daily map of vertically integrated ...

  12. agriculture fisheries forestry: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    agriculture fisheries forestry First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Adaptation Options for...

  13. FISHERY MARKET DEVELOPMENT SERIES NO. 17 Dr. Bruce R. Stillings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .~5 M/7 t'SLAFSSBB ANB I1LALTI1 FISHERY MARKET DEVELOPMENT SERIES NO. 17 by Dr. Bruce R. Stillings shown that ingestion of oil containing large amounts of polyunsaluraled fatty acids will tend to sup, will want to consume oil directly for its polyunsaturated properties. A mlIch more palatable method !s

  14. Fishery Leaflet 374 Washington 2 i Do Co May

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ary Fishery Leaflet 374 Washington 2 i Do Co May FREEZING AND CANNING KING CRAB By John Ao Dassow in maintaining the quality of the canned or frozen product 0 King crab meat must be prooessed with utmost care orab, butohering i oooking i oooling, remo'9'..ing the meat" and oleaning o Reoom- mendations are based

  15. UNITED ST ATES: The Mari ne Fisheries Review, by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Is Dead 'Artificial Ocean' Will Test Oil-Spill Cleanup Methods NOAA Simplifies Ways to Calculate Tidal's Fisheries Offer Investment Opportunitie s South Korean Fishing Industry Grows Remarkably Taiwan: 400 Tuna Transplants Salmon Successfully in Atlantic South Pacific: Australia: Investment Prospects in Australia U. S

  16. GULF AND SOUTH ATLANTIC FISHERIES John P . Wise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , a new element has e ntered the picture - -indus- trial fisheries for reducti on a nd pet food, in of Mexico could be increased by increasing the average size of the shrimp caught. Spiny lobster fisher- ies of the fishing industry there. Foreign competition is minor: Mexico takes about 40 million pounds of shrimp a ye

  17. MFR PAPER 1165 Japan's tuna fishery faces a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MFR PAPER 1165 Japan's tuna fishery faces a major depression as catch rates decline, oil prices of the more obvious reasons for the present state are these: I. Tripling of oil prices in the last year. 2 market are not also having their prob- lems at this time. The increased oil prices, having gone from $40

  18. Atlantic Striped Bass: Stock Status and the Recreational Fishery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    seaboard." ABSTRACT-The sTriped bass. Morone saxatilis. has 10nR been a prized SpOrT fish for anRlers alonAtlantic Striped Bass: Stock Status and the Recreational Fishery R. ANNE RICHARDS and DAVID G. DEUEL Introduction The striped bass, Marone saxatilis, is one of the premier sportfishes along the U

  19. A Preliminary Analysis of the Tilefish, Lopholatilus chamaeleonticeps, Fishery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . This species was first discovered in 1879 (Goode and Bean, 1880) but suffered a mass mortality, estimated was developing in a fishery for it. It was theorized that the warmer water of the continental sheIf edge in which they resided was displaced by cold continental shelf water (Verrill, 1882) thus causing the mortality

  20. NOAA/NMFS Developments Fishery Outlook Brightest in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mining Law Could Protect Marine Life, Allow Mineral Extraction The Fishery Conservation and Man- agement the Administration's support of deep seabed mineral legislation, and out- lined additional measures that would make" by the mid- 1990's taking up significant quantities of raw minerals from the ocean bottom and providing' 'a

  1. SALT-flSH INPUSTRIES FISHERY LEAFLET 240

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SALT-flSH INPUSTRIES FISHERY LEAFLET 240 FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT, Albert M. Day, Director #12;THE VENEZUKLAN SALT-FISH INDUSTRIES CONTE^fTS Part II Potential Productive and Craft 29 Development of Unused or Underutilized Species 29 Development of New Areas 35 Salt 35 Studies

  2. The Social Networks of Hawaii's Longline Fishery a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    The Social Networks of Hawaii's Longline Fishery ­ a preliminary assessment Michele Barnes, Shawn Future Outlook #12;Introduction Project Goal Examine the role of Social Networks on vessel economic) Vietnamese-American (57) source: panoramio.com #12;Methodology 1. Social Network Analysis Structured survey

  3. Market Design for Fishery IFQ Programs John O. Ledyard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ledyard, John O.

    Fishing Quotas, Term Quotas, Auc- tions This paper was prepared with the financial support of the Natural and Social Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Mail Code 228-77, Pasadena, California, USA 91125 to fishermen, who care about the economic viability of the fishery, and to environmentalists, who care about

  4. RIFLE GAP RESERVOIR FISHERY INVESTIGATION Photo: Willow Hibbs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Lake Management Plan for RGR. To assist with this process, Colorado State University offered to perform, conflicting views over NPK management, and dissatisfaction with the YPE fishery have prompted CDOW to revise A survey of the fish populations at RGR was conducted by CDOW biologist Lori Martin during June, September

  5. Socioeconomic Perspectives on Marine Fisheries in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and poor management are dissipating value in today's fisheries, costing tens of thousands of jobs, harming the economies of our coastal communities, and placing a valuable natural and cultural heritage at risk populations are rebuilt. Increasing annual catches to long-term sustainable levels could add at least $1

  6. Foreign Fishery Developments Inter-American Development Bank Lends To

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foreign Fishery Developments Inter-American Development Bank Lends To EI Salvadore and Haiti in Haiti . The tech- nical cooperation, granted to the Re- public of Haiti, will be used by the Ministry to provide reliable information on the potential of Haiti's fish resources. If their existence and viab ility

  7. Environmental Sciences, Fisheries, Forestry & Wildlife Biology Organizations Hiring Students in Environmental Sciences, Fisheries, Forestry & Wildlife Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Inc Rocky Mountain Research Station Savannah River Site December 2012 / May 2013 Schlumberger of Health Public Lab Minnesota Dept of Ag Missouri Department of Conservation Missouri Solar Applications Nantucket Conservation Foundation National Park Service Nebraska Game and Parks Commission NICHES Land Trust

  8. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 25:251255, 2005 [Article]Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    walleye mortality (Hoff- man et al. 1996; Flammang 1998). Other factors (e.g., wind and wave conditions]Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2005 DOI: 10.1577/M04-106.1 Delayed Mortality of Tournament-Caught Walleyes.--We quantified the delayed mortality of walleyes Sander vitreus during three tourna- ments (April­June 2003

  9. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 133:11501162, 2004 Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisheries Society 2004 Development and Evaluation of a Western Mosquitofish Bioenergetics Model STEVEN R.--We developed a bioenergetics model for the western mosquitofish Gambusia affinis by combining data rates were observed at 32 C. Bioenergetics estimates of food consumption agreed well with laboratory mea

  10. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 135:6175, 2006 [Article]Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ]Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2006 DOI: 10.1577/T04-215.1 Evaluation of a Lake Whitefish Bioenergetics Model Arbor, Michigan 48105, USA Abstract.--We evaluated the Wisconsin bioenergetics model for lake whitefish on a comparison of bioenergetics model predictions of lake whitefish food consumption and growth with observed

  11. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 11:43-49, 1991 @ Copyright by the AmericanFisheries Society 1991

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -P) largemouth bass (RSD-P = percentage of stock-length fish that are also preferred length). Yellow perch growth size, and big large- mouth bass at the expense of bluegill size. Fish- eries biologists commonlyattemptFisheries Society 1991 Evaluation of Largemouth Bass-Yellow Perch Communitiesin Small South Dakota Impoundments

  12. CITING MATERIALS FROM THE VOICES FROM THE FISHERIES DATABASE When citing materials from the Voices from the Fisheries Database, use these citation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CITING MATERIALS FROM THE VOICES FROM THE FISHERIES DATABASE When citing materials from the Voices from the Fisheries Database, use these citation conventions: · materials as a whole: Tony X. Everyman. Accessed at www.voices.nmfs.noaa.gov. · manuscript material: Tony X. Everyman (VFF 2004/001/xxxx

  13. Northeast Region BulletinNational Marine Fisheries Service, Northeast Regional Office, 55 Great Republic Drive, Gloucester, MA 01930 SUMMER FLOUNDER, SCUP, AND BLACK SEA BASS FISHERIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and fishing season rules for the summer flounder (fluke), scup (porgies), and black sea bass (sea bass. For the 2013 black sea bass recreational fishery, we have implemented a minimum fish size of 12.5 inches Recreational Measures for Scup and Black Sea Bass Fishery Minimum Size (Inches) Possession Limit Fishing Season

  14. Walla Walla River Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volkman, Jed (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Pendleton, OR)

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2002 and 2003, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Fisheries Habitat Program implemented stream habitat restoration and protection efforts on private properties in the Walla Walla River Basin with funding from Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The objective of this effort is to protect and restore habitat critical to the recovery of weak or reintroduced populations of salmonid fish. The CTUIR has currently enrolled nine properties into this program: two on Couse Creek, two adjacent properties on Blue Creek, one on Patit Creek, and four properties on the mainstem Walla Walla River. Major accomplishments during the reporting period include the following: (1) Secured approximately $229,000 in project cost share; (2) Purchase of 46 acres on the mainstem Walla Walla River to be protected perpetually for native fish and wildlife; (3) Developed three new 15 year conservation easements with private landowners; (4) Installed 3000 feet of weed barrier tarp with new plantings within project area on the mainstem Walla Walla River; (5) Expanded easement area on Couse Creek to include an additional 0.5 miles of stream corridor and 32 acres of upland habitat; (6) Restored 12 acres on the mainstem Walla Walla River and 32 acres on Couse Creek to native perennial grasses; and (7) Installed 50,000+ new native plants/cuttings within project areas.

  15. Assessment of bycatch associated with the inshore shrimp fishery in Matagorda Bay, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Debbie Laura

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ASSESSMENT OF BYCATCH ASSOCIATED WITH THE INSHORE SHRIMP FISHERY IN MATAGORDA BAY, TEXAS A Thesis by DEBBIE LAURA SPARKS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2000 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences ASSESSMENT OF BYCATCH ASSOCIATED WITH THE INSHORE SHRIMP FISHERY IN MATAGORDA BAY, TEXAS A Thesis by DEBBIE LAURA SPARKS Submitted to Texas ARM University...

  16. Biology and Management of the American Shad and Status of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Maryland 54 Potomac River 56 Patuxent River 58 Susquehanna River 59 Pocomoke River 59 Wicomico River 59 fisheries 15 Shad fisheries of Florida 17 Fisheries by water area 18 St. Johns River 18 St. Marys River 20 Trends in production 22 Shad fisheries of Georgia 22 Fisheries by water area 23 Satilla River 23 Altamaha

  17. Rivanna River Basin Commission (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rivanna River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the Rivanna River...

  18. Yellowstone River Compact (North Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Yellowstone River Compact, agreed to by the States of Montana, North Dakota, and Wyoming, provides for an equitable division and apportionment of the waters of the Yellowstone River, as well as...

  19. P. Julien S. Ikeda River Engineering and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    1 P. Julien S. Ikeda River Engineering and Stream Restoration Pierre Y. Julien Hong Kong - December 2004 River Engineering and Stream Restoration I - Stream Restoration Objectives Brief overview of River Engineering and Stream Restoration with focus on : 1. River Equilibrium; 2. River Dynamics; 3. River

  20. Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima River Basin, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vucelick, Jessica; McMichael, Geoffrey; Chamness, Mickie [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2004, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 25 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2004, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by NOAA Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well-greased and operative. (4) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites. (5) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve passage conditions for juvenile fish. For example, Taylor has had problems meeting bypass flow and submergence operating criteria since the main river channel shifted away from the site 2 years ago, and Fruitvale consistently has had problems meeting bypass flow criteria when the water is low. (6) Continued problems at Gleed point to design flaws. This site should be considered for redesign or replacement.

  1. DOE/EIS-0169-SA-03: Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    - KEWN-4 Proposed Action: Yakima Fisheries Project - Use of Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife's Yakima Hatchery and Acclimation and Research Activities PL-6: F3204...

  2. A Review of Indian Ocean Fisheries for Skipjack Tuna, Katsuwonus pelamis, and Yellowfin Tuna, Thunnus albacares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Review of Indian Ocean Fisheries for Skipjack Tuna, Katsuwonus pelamis, and Yellowfin Tuna, Thunnus albacares Introduction Skipjack tuna, Katsuwonus pelamis, and yellowfin tuna, Thunnus albacares

  3. Managing Data-Poor Fisheries Workshop: Case Studies, Models and Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Starr, Richard M.; Culver, Carolynn S.; Pomeroy, Caroline

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fisheries Statistical Survey Management Strategy Evaluationuse inexpensive surveys to expand for regional management. ?use inexpensive surveys to expand for regional management. ?

  4. FISHERY INDUSTRIES IN THE UNITED STATES, 1926 I By OSCAR E. SETTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    :lll" ._. ____ . ____ ... __ ._._. 451 Fisheries of \\[ar)'llnd and \\,ir)!inin. In:, . '. 41;3 Farher I'uld il-:111(1n

  5. Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, A.; Hart, C.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TR- 272 2004 Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project C. Hart A. McDonald Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University - 146 - 2003 Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project... Charles R. Hart, Extension Range Specialist, Fort Stockton Alyson McDonald, Extension Assistant – Hydrology, Fort Stockton SUMMARY The Pecos River Ecosystem Project is attempting to minimize the negative impacts of saltcedar on the river ecosystem...

  6. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Hatchery Element, 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, Dan J,; Heindel, Jeff A.; Kline, Paul A. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Marine Fisheries Service at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Marine Fisheries Service are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases are also reported under separate cover. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 1999 are presented in this report. In 1999, seven anadromous sockeye salmon returned to the Sawtooth Valley and were captured at the adult weir located on the upper Salmon River. Four anadromous adults were incorporated in the captive broodstock program spawning design for year 1999. The remaining three adults were released to Redfish Lake for natural spawning. All seven adults were adipose and left ventral fin-clipped, indicating hatchery origin. One sockeye salmon female from the anadromous group and 81 females from the captive broodstock group were spawned at the Eagle Fish Hatchery in 1999. Spawn pairings produced approximately 63,147 eyed-eggs with egg survival to eyed-stage of development averaging 38.97%. Eyed-eggs (20,311), presmolts (40,271), smolts (9,718), and adults (21) were planted or released into Sawtooth Valley waters in 1999. Supplementation strategies involved releases to Redfish Lake, Redfish Lake Creek, upper Salmon River (below the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery weir), Alturas Lake, and Pettit Lake. During this reporting period, four broodstocks and three production groups were in culture at the Eagle Fish Hatchery. Two of the four broodstocks were incorporated into the 1999 spawning design and one broodstock was terminated following the completion of spawning.

  7. Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment Final Report 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Christopher W.; McGrath, Kathleen E.; Geist, David R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Abbe, Timothy; Barton, Chase [Herrera Environmental Consultants, Inc.

    2008-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment was funded to address degradation and loss of spawning habitat for chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook salmon (Onchoryhnchus tshawytscha). In 1999, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed lower Columbia River chum salmon as a threatened Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). The Grays River watershed is one of two remaining significant chum salmon spawning locations in this ESU. Runs of Grays River chum and Chinook salmon have declined significantly during the past century, largely because of damage to spawning habitat associated with timber harvest and agriculture in the watershed. In addition, approximately 20-25% of the then-remaining chum salmon spawning habitat was lost during a 1999 channel avulsion that destroyed an important artificial spawning channel operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Although the lack of stable, high-quality spawning habitat is considered the primary physical limitation on Grays River chum salmon production today, few data are available to guide watershed management and channel restoration activities. The objectives of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment project were to (1) perform a comprehensive watershed and biological analysis, including hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological assessments; (2) develop a prioritized list of actions that protect and restore critical chum and Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Grays River based on comprehensive geomorphic, hydrologic, and stream channel assessments; and (3) gain a better understanding of chum and Chinook salmon habitat requirements and survival within the lower Columbia River and the Grays River. The watershed-based approach to river ecosystem restoration relies on a conceptual framework that describes general relationships between natural landscape characteristics, watershed-scale habitat-forming processes, aquatic habitat conditions, and biological integrity. In addition, human land-use impacts are factored into the conceptual model because they can alter habitat quality and can disrupt natural habitat-forming processes. In this model (Figure S.1), aquatic habitat--both instream and riparian--is viewed as the link between watershed conditions and biologic responses. Based on this conceptual model, assessment of habitat loss and the resultant declines in salmonid populations can be conducted by relating current and historical (e.g., natural) habitat conditions to salmonid utilization, diversity, and abundance. In addition, assessing disrupted ecosystem functions and processes within the watershed can aid in identifying the causes of habitat change and the associated decline in biological integrity. In this same way, restoration, enhancement, and conservation projects can be identified and prioritized. A watershed assessment is primarily a landscape-scale evaluation of current watershed conditions and the associated hydrogeomorphic riverine processes. The watershed assessment conducted for this project focused on watershed processes that form and maintain salmonid habitat. Landscape metrics describing the level of human alteration of natural ecosystem attributes were used as indicators of water quality, hydrology, channel geomorphology, instream habitat, and biotic integrity. Ecological (watershed) processes are related to and can be predicted based on specific aspects of spatial pattern. This study evaluated the hydrologic regime, sediment delivery regime, and riparian condition of the sub-watersheds that comprise the upper Grays River watershed relative to their natural range of conditions. Analyses relied primarily on available geographic information system (GIS) data describing landscape characteristics such as climate, vegetation type and maturity, geology and soils, topography, land use, and road density. In addition to watershed-scale landscape characteristics, the study area was also evaluated on the riparian scale, with appropriate landscape variables analyzed within

  8. Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment, 2006 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Christopher; Geist, David [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment was funded to address degradation and loss of spawning habitat for chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook salmon (Onchoryhnchus tshawytscha). In 1999, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed lower Columbia River chum salmon as a threatened Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). The Grays River watershed is one of two remaining significant chum salmon spawning locations in this ESU. Runs of Grays River chum and Chinook salmon have declined significantly during the past century, largely because of damage to spawning habitat associated with timber harvest and agriculture in the watershed. In addition, approximately 20-25% of the then-remaining chum salmon spawning habitat was lost during a 1999 channel avulsion that destroyed an important artificial spawning channel operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Although the lack of stable, high-quality spawning habitat is considered the primary physical limitation on Grays River chum salmon production today, few data are available to guide watershed management and channel restoration activities. The objectives of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment project were to (1) perform a comprehensive watershed and biological analysis, including hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological assessments; (2) develop a prioritized list of actions that protect and restore critical chum and Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Grays River based on comprehensive geomorphic, hydrologic, and stream channel assessments; and (3) gain a better understanding of chum and Chinook salmon habitat requirements and survival within the lower Columbia River and the Grays River. The watershed-based approach to river ecosystem restoration relies on a conceptual framework that describes general relationships between natural landscape characteristics, watershed-scale habitat-forming processes, aquatic habitat conditions, and biological integrity. In addition, human land-use impacts are factored into the conceptual model because they can alter habitat quality and can disrupt natural habitat forming processes. In this model (Figure S.1), aquatic habitat--both instream and riparian--is viewed as the link between watershed conditions and biologic responses. Based on this conceptual model, assessment of habitat loss and the resultant declines in salmonid populations can be conducted by relating current and historical (e.g., natural) habitat conditions to salmonid utilization, diversity, and abundance. In addition, assessing disrupted ecosystem functions and processes within the watershed can aid in identifying the causes of habitat change and the associated decline in biological integrity. In this same way, restoration, enhancement, and conservation projects can be identified and prioritized. A watershed assessment is primarily a landscape-scale evaluation of current watershed conditions and the associated hydrogeomorphic riverine processes. The watershed assessment conducted for this project focused on watershed processes that form and maintain salmonid habitat. Landscape metrics describing the level of human alteration of natural ecosystem attributes were used as indicators of water quality, hydrology, channel geomorphology, instream habitat, and biotic integrity. Ecological (watershed) processes are related to and can be predicted based on specific aspects of spatial pattern. This study evaluated the hydrologic regime, sediment delivery regime, and riparian condition of the sub-watersheds that comprise the upper Grays River watershed relative to their natural range of conditions. Analyses relied primarily on available geographic information system (GIS) data describing landscape characteristics such as climate, vegetation type and maturity, geology and soils, topography, land use, and road density. In addition to watershed-scale landscape characteristics, the study area was also evaluated on the riparian scale, with appropriate landscape variables analyzed within

  9. Rio Grande River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hills Photo Shop

    2011-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    FORKS BIRDBEAR-NISKU JEFFERSON GROUP DUPEROW O (IJ o BEAVER HILL LAKE GR UP ELK POINT GROUP SOURIS RIVER Ist. RED BED DAWSON BAY 2ll(IRED BED PRAIRIE EVAP WI NI ASHERN INTERLAKE STONY MOUNTAIN RED RIVER WINN IP EG Figure 3... and is bounded by the Sioux Arch, the Black Hills Uplift, the Miles City Arch, and the Bowdoin Dome. The structural trends within the basin parallel the major structural trends of the Rocky Mountain Belt. The Williston Basin is characterized by gently...

  10. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Hatchery Element, 1997 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kline, Paul A.; Heindel, Jeff A.; Willard, Catherine (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Marine Fisheries Service at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Marine Fisheries Service are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases (annual report to the Bonneville Power Administration for the research element of the program) are also reported under separate cover. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 1997 and December 31, 1997 are presented in this report. One hundred twenty-six female sockeye salmon from one captive broodstock group were spawned at the Eagle Fish Hatchery in 1997. Successful spawn pairings produced approximately 148,781 eyed-eggs with a cumulative mean survival to eyed-egg rate of 57.3%. Approximately 361,600 sockeye salmon were released to Sawtooth basin waters in 1997. Reintroduction strategies included eyed-eggs (brood year 1997), presmolts (brood year 1996), and prespawn adults for volitional spawning (brood year 1994). Release locations included Redfish Lake, Alturas Lake, and Pettit Lake. During this reporting period, four broodstocks and two unique production groups were in culture at the Eagle Fish Hatchery. Two of the four broodstocks were incorporated into the 1997 spawning design, and one broodstock was terminated following the completion of spawning.

  11. Muddy River Restoration Project Begins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Muddy River Restoration Project Begins Page 5 #12;2 YANKEE ENGINEER February 2013 Yankee Voices of the Muddy River Restoration project. Inset photo: Flooding at the Muddy River. Materials provided by Mike Project Manager, on the passing of his father in law, Francis James (Jim) Murray, Jan. 9. ... to Laura

  12. FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM JOHNSTONE RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    Warning Centre in Brisbane. The system provides early warning of heavy rainfall and river risesFLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the JOHNSTONE RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system ALERT System Flood Warnings and Bulletins Interpreting Flood Warnings and River Height Bulletins Flood

  13. FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM NERANG RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    ALERT System The Nerang River ALERT flood warning system was completed in the early 1990's as a coFLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the NERANG RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system operated Nerang ALERT System Flood Warnings and Bulletins Interpreting Flood Warnings and River Height Bulletins

  14. Savannah River Site Robotics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Meet Sandmantis and Frankie, two advanced robotic devices that are key to cleanup at Savannah River Site. Sandmantis cleans hard, residual waste off huge underground storage tanks. Frankie is equipped with unique satellite capabilities and sensing abilties that can determine what chemicals still reside in the tanks in a cost effective manner.

  15. Savannah River Site Robotics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Meet Sandmantis and Frankie, two advanced robotic devices that are key to cleanup at Savannah River Site. Sandmantis cleans hard, residual waste off huge underground storage tanks. Frankie is equipped with unique satellite capabilities and sensing abilties that can determine what chemicals still reside in the tanks in a cost effective manner.

  16. Rainfall-River Forecasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ;2Rainfall-River Forecasting Joint Summit II NOAA Integrated Water Forecasting Program · Minimize losses due management and enhance America's coastal assets · Expand information for managing America's Water Resources, Precipitation and Water Quality Observations · USACE Reservoir Operation Information, Streamflow, Snowpack

  17. Contribution, Linkages and Impacts of the Fisheries Sector to Hawaii's Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    : A Social Accounting Matrix Analysis Shawn Arita Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research details to reflect the income distribution process of the economy. Hawaii's fisheries operate in a complex environment that is constantly changing due to the varied interest involved with the fishery. The legal issues

  18. I S S N 0142-2499 MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE FISHERIES AND FOOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I S S N 0142-2499 MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE FISHERIES AND FOOD DIRECTORATE OF FISHERIES RESEARCH.4 Methodsof interpretation 4. British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) 4.1 Sellafield,Cumbria 4.1.1 The fish Nuclear Power Development Establishment, Caithness 6. Nuclear power stations operated

  19. I S S N 0142-2499 MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE FISHERIES AND FOOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I S S N 0142-2499 MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE FISHERIES AND FOOD DIRECTORATE OF FISHERIES RESEARCH methods 3.3 Methods of presentation of measurements 3.4 Methods of interpretation 4. British Nuclear.2 Dounreay Nuclear Power Development Establishment (DNPDE),Caithness 6. Nuclear power stations operated

  20. FORESTRY, WILDLIFE AND FISHERIES ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF Forest/Natural Resources Biometrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    FORESTRY, WILDLIFE AND FISHERIES ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF Forest/Natural Resources Biometrics The Department of Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville invites applications have at least one degree in Forestry from an SAF-accredited program. Demonstrated experience in field

  1. A THEORETICAL EXAMINATION OF SOME ASPECTS OF THE INTERACTION BETWEEN LONGLINE AND SURFACE FISHERIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on younger fish. relative to a fishery exploiting the full range ofthe stocks orto one taking primarily older takes larger (older) fish. Exploitation of a tuna stock by the two types of gear presents management of fishing by one gear on yield to the other gear and the effect of the fishery on stock fecundity is shown

  2. It's intuitively obvious that habitat is important to fishes and the fisheries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    It's intuitively obvious that habitat is important to fishes and the fisheries they support to account for it in fisheries management. This is especially true for marine fishes like gag grouper fisherman worth his or her salt has a closely-guarded collection of GPS coordinates and an electronic fish

  3. William Francis Thompson (18881965) and the Dawn of Marine Fisheries Research in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William Francis Thompson (1888­1965) and the Dawn of Marine Fisheries Research in California Columbia terminat ed fisheries research in 1917. William Francis Thompson (1888­1965), with the aid sagax, as well as studies on other economically important marine organisms. Thompson built up a staff

  4. Guianas-Brazil Shrimp Fishery and Related U.S. Research Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guianas-Brazil Shrimp Fishery and Related U.S. Research Activity Alexander Dragovich-free fishery began to crumble in 1970, as Brazil declared a 200-mile economic zone. To fish in Brazilian waters in the series of 2- and I-year agreements was signed on 9 May 1972 between the United States and Brazil

  5. u.s. FISHERIES: A View of Their Status & Potential John P. Wis e

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - April 1972.) Per -Capita Consumption & Use Increased utilization and importation of fishery products is perhaps best reflected in consumption and utilization per capita (Figure 2, Table 3) . Annual per-capita consumption of fishery products since 1951 has been relatively constant at about 5 kilo- grams. Per-capita

  6. Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Reauthorization Act Environmental Review Procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Management Councils (Councils), and involve the public in the development of the revised procedures. The MSRA. To inform the development of the new procedures, NOAA Fisheries is soliciting public commentMagnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Reauthorization Act Environmental Review

  7. Fisheries Research 107 (2011) 131136 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauly, Daniel

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in revised form 18 October 2010 Accepted 18 October 2010 Keywords: Fisheries management Fishing energy use), was roughly constant from 1950 to 1970, and then steadily increased up to the present. Europe dominated global, stagnating or declining fish prices, and fisheries subsidies that support unprof- itable fishing

  8. Dungeness Crab Dredging Entrainment Studies in the Lower Columbia River, 2002 – 2004: Loss Projections, Salinity Model, and Scenario Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearson, Walter H.; Williams, Greg D.; Skalski, John R.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dungeness crab studies conducted in 2002 for the Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) constituted a major step forward in quantifying crab entrainment through statistical projections of adult equivalent loss (AEL) and loss to the fishery (LF) from proposed construction and maintenance dredging in the Columbia River navigation channel (Pearson et al. 2002, 2003). These studies also examined the influence of bottom salinity on crab abundance and entrainment rates. Additional sampling was conducted in 2004 to tighten loss projections, further develop the crab salinity model, and apply the model to assess correlations of entrainment rates and projected losses with seasonal salinity changes.

  9. Assessment of Charter Boat and Head Boat Angler Perception of Fishery Regulations and Stock Health in the Recreational Red Snapper (Lutjanus campechanus) Fishery in the Upper Texas Coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norman, Sarah A.

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    quota by 1.7 million pounds. The lack of consistency between state and federal regulations and the drastic changes in management schemes have affected anglers' confidence in management, and limited the ability of the fishery to successfully adapt...

  10. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program; Limnological and Fisheries Monitoring, Annual Report 2000.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Chuck; Scofield, Ben; Pavlik, Deanne

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A slightly dryer than normal year yielded flows in Lake Roosevelt that were essentially equal to the past ten year average. Annual mean inflow and outflow were 3,160.3 m3/s and 3,063.4 m3/s respectively. Mean reservoir elevation was 387.2 m above sea level at the Grand Coulee Dam forebay. The forebay elevation was below the mean elevation for a total of 168 days. During the first half of the 2000 forebay elevation changed at a rate of 0.121 m/d and during the last half changed at a rate of 0.208 m/d. The higher rate of elevation change earlier in the year is due to the drawdown to accommodate spring runoff. Mean annual water retention time was 40 days. Annual mean total dissolved gas was 108%. Total dissolved gas was greatest at upriver locations (110% = US/Canada Border annual mean) and decreased moving toward Grand Coulee Dam (106% = Grand Coulee Dam Forebay annual mean). Total dissolved gas was greatest in May (122% reservoir wide monthly mean). Gas bubble trauma was observed in 16 fish primarily largescale suckers and was low in severity. Reservoir wide mean temperatures were greatest in August (19.5 C) and lowest in January (5.5 C). The Spokane River and Sanpoil River Arms experienced higher temperatures than the mainstem reservoir. Brief stratification was observed at the Sanpoil River shore location in July. Warm water temperatures in the Spokane Arm contributed to low dissolved oxygen concentrations in August (2.6 mg/L at 33 m). However, decomposition of summer algal biomass was likely the main cause of depressed dissolved oxygen concentrations. Otherwise, dissolved oxygen profiles were relatively uniform throughout the water column across other sampling locations. Annual mean Secchi depth throughout the reservoir was 5.7 m. Nutrient concentrations were generally low, however, annual mean total phosphorus (0.016 mg/L) was in the mesotrophic range. Annual mean total nitrogen was in the meso-oligotrophic range. Total nitrogen to total phosphorus ratios were large (31:1 annual mean) likely indicating phosphorus limitations to phytoplankton.

  11. ECONOMIC SURVEY OF THE U.S. FISHERIES IN THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the east side of Moose Island, while the low pool con- sists of Cobscook Bay and the shores and waters the western sides of the St. Croix River estuary and Passamaquoddy Bay, to- gether with the shores and waters

  12. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Hatchery Element, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kline, Paul A.; Willard, Catherine; Baker, Dan J. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Marine Fisheries Service at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Marine Fisheries Service are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases (annual report to the Bonneville Power Administration for the research element of the program) are also reported separately. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 2001 and December 31, 2001 for the hatchery element of the program are presented in this report. In 2001, 26 anadromous sockeye salmon returned to the Sawtooth Basin. Twenty-three of these adults were captured at adult weirs located on the upper Salmon River and on Redfish Lake Creek. Three of the anadromous sockeye salmon that returned were observed below the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery weir and allowed to migrate upstream volitionally (following the dismantling of the weir on October 12, 2001). Nine anadromous adults were incorporated into the captive broodstock program spawning design in 2001. The remaining adults were released to Redfish Lake for natural spawning. Based on their marks, returning adult sockeye salmon originated from a variety of release options. Two sockeye salmon females from the anadromous group and 152 females from the brood year 1998 captive broodstock group were spawned at the Eagle Hatchery in 2001. Spawn pairings produced approximately 118,121 eyed-eggs with egg survival to eyed stage of development averaging 42.0%. Presmolts (106,166), smolts (13,915), and adults (79) were planted or released into Stanley Basin waters in 2001. Supplementation strategies involved releases to Redfish Lake, Redfish Lake Creek, Alturas Lake, and Pettit Lake. During this reporting period, five broodstocks and two unique production groups were in culture at Idaho Department of Fish and Game facilities (Eagle Fish Hatchery and Sawtooth Fish Hatchery). Two of the five broodstocks were incorporated into the 2001 spawning design, and one broodstock was terminated following the completion of spawning.

  13. Louisiana Nuclear Profile - River Bend

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    River Bend" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  14. Florida Nuclear Profile - Crystal River

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Crystal River1" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  15. Rappahannock River Basin Commission (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rappahannock River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the...

  16. Susquehanna River Basin Compact (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation enables the state's entrance into the Susquehanna River Basin Compact, which provides for the conservation, development, and administration of the water resources of the...

  17. South Carolina Scenic Rivers Act (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The goal of the Scenic Rivers Act is to protect selected rivers or river segments of the State with outstanding scenic, recreational, geologic, botanical, fish, wildlife, historic, or cultural...

  18. Ohio River Greenway Development Commission (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Ohio River Greenway Development Commission administers the Ohio River Greenway Project, which is a park along a 7-mile stretch of the Ohio River. The Commission developed a master plan for the...

  19. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 21:135146, 2001 Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on fish passage models that use data collected many years ago with outdated tech- niques and under tshawytscha and steelhead O. mykiss that enter the powerhouse turbine intakes at Snake River dams are guided

  20. Multi-Scale Action Effectiveness Research in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2011 - FINAL ANNUAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sather, Nichole K.; Storch, Adam; Johnson, Gary E.; Teel, D. J.; Skalski, J. R.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Kaufmann, Ronald M.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Blaine, Jennifer; Kuligowski, D. R.; Kropp, Roy K.; Dawley, Earl M.

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The study reported here was conducted by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), the University of Washington (UW), and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE). This research project was initiated in 2007 by the Bonneville Power Administration to investigate critical uncertainties regarding juvenile salmon ecology in shallow tidal freshwater habitats of the lower Columbia River. However, as part of the Washington Memorandum of Agreement, the project was transferred to the USACE in 2010. In transferring from BPA to the USACE, the focus of the tidal freshwater research project shifted from fundamental ecology toward the effectiveness of restoration in the Lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE). The research is conducted within the Action Agencies Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP). Data reported herein spans the time period May 2010 to September 2011.

  1. Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sather, Nichole K.; Johnson, Gary E.; Storch, Adam; Teel, David; Skalski, John R.; Jones, Tucker A.; Dawley, Earl M.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Borde, Amy B.; Mallette, Christine; Farr, R.

    2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The tidal freshwater monitoring (TFM) project reported herein is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers [USACE], and the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act (ESA) as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System. The project is being performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council’s Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Project No. 2005-001-00). The research is a collaborative effort among the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the National Marine Fisheries Service, and the University of Washington.

  2. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 21:971975, 2001 Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sulfide (H2S) and affect distributions of fish. We assessed the effects of H2S, relative to discharge river in northwestern Wyo- ming. Concentrations of H2S as low as 0.13 mg/L pre- vented upstream passage and habitation by trout over a 4.2-km reach of the river. The location of the down- stream terminus of the H2S

  3. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Environmental Sciences...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Environmental Sciences and Biotechnology Support of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL)...

  4. Independent Activity Report, Washington River Protection Solutions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC - October 2011 October 2011 Industrial Hygiene Surveillance of the Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC Industrial Hygiene...

  5. Enforcement Letter, Westinghouse Savannah River Company - November...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Savannah River Site On November 14, 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued a nuclear safety Enforcement Letter to Westinghouse Savannah River Company related to...

  6. Independent Oversight Activity Report, Savannah River Site -...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Activity Report, Savannah River Site - February 2014 February 2014 Operational Awareness Visit of the Savannah River Site HIAR-SRS-2014-02-25 This Independent Activity...

  7. Independent Oversight Inspection, Savannah River Site - January...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2010 More Documents & Publications Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities - December 2012 Enterprise Assessments Review, Savannah River Site 2014...

  8. Great River (1973)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental AssessmentsGeoffrey(SC)Graphite Reactor 'In the- EnergyGreat-River

  9. Potential alteration of fjordal circulation due to a large floating structure—Numerical investigation with application to Hood Canal basin in Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khangaonkar, Tarang; Wang, Taiping

    2013-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Circulation in typical fjords is characterized by a shallow brackish layer at the surface over a deep long and narrow saltwater column. This surface layer is responsible for the outflow of water from the fjord, is easily disrupted by external forces, such as wind, and is influenced by freshwater inflow. In this paper, we postulate that the stability of fjordal circulation may also be vulnerable to impacts from anthropogenic alterations, such as floating structures, that could constrict the mixing and transport in the upper layers of the water column. The potential for alteration of circulation in Hood Canal, a silled-fjord located inside Puget Sound, Washington, has been examined. Using classical analytical treatments along the lines formulated by Hansen and Rattray [1965], Rattray [1967], Dyer [1973] and more recently, MacCready [2004], we develop a solution applicable to a range of estuary classifications varying from a partially mixed estuary regime to classical fjord conditions. Both estuary types exist in the Puget Sound system, and we compare our analytical solution with observed data. The analysis is based on an exponential variation of eddy viscosity with depth, and it has been extended further with modifications of the free surface boundary conditions to develop a solution representing the presence of a floating bridge at the estuary/fjord entrance. The model results show that tidally averaged mean circulation under the influence of such a constraint could reduce by as much as 30 to 50 percent. The overall water quality of fjords and narrow estuaries is dependent on net circulation and flushing. A potential decrease in residual flow or a corresponding increase in residence time of this magnitude merits further study.

  10. FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM HAUGHTON RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    . The system provides early warning of heavy rainfall and river rises in the catchment and enables moreFLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the HAUGHTON RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system Flooding Flood Forecasting Local Information Haughton ALERT System Flood Warnings and Bulletins

  11. FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM BURDEKIN RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    . The system provides early warning of heavy rainfall and river rises in the catchment below the DamFLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the BURDEKIN RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system Local Information Burdekin ALERT System Flood Warnings and Bulletins Interpreting Flood Warnings

  12. List of Appendices of the Subbasin Management Plan for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Figures 160 A and B showing Fulton Canyon and Spanish Hollow along with the Hood River Basin (in separate

  13. Driving Demand for Home Energy Improvements: Motivating residential customers to invest in comprehensive upgrades that eliminate energy waste, avoid high utility bills, and spur the economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuller, Merrian C.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Feedback Contact Concessions Baltimore Neighborhood Energy Challenge Energy Smackdown Hood River Conservation Project (HRCP) Houston’s Residential

  14. Yakima River Basin Phase II Fish Screen Evaluations, 2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, J.A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Chamness, M.A.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the summer and fall of 2001 the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year study for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. Data were collected to determine if velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met current National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage and whether bypass outfall conditions allowed fish to safely return to the river. Based on our studies in 2001, we concluded that: in general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set forth by the NMFS; most facilities efficiently protected juvenile fish from entrainment, impingement, or migration delay; automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were well greased and operative; and removal of sediment build-up and accumulated leafy and woody debris are areas that continue to improve. Continued periodic screen evaluations will increase the effectiveness of screen operation and maintenance practices by confirming the effectiveness (or ineffectiveness) of screen operating procedures at individual sites. Where procedures are being followed and problems still occur, evaluation results can be used to suggest means to better protect fish at screening facilities. There has been a progressive improvement in the maintenance and effectiveness of fish screen facilities in the Yakima River Basin during the last several years, in part, as a result of regular screen evaluations and the rapid feedback of information necessary to improve operations and design of these important fish protection devices. Continued periodic screen evaluations will increase the effectiveness of screen operation and maintenance practices by confirming the effectiveness (or ineffectiveness) of screen operating procedures at individual sites. Where procedures are being followed and problems still occur, evaluation results can be used to suggest means to better protect fish at screening facilities. There has been a progressive improvement in the maintenance and effectiveness of fish screen facilities in the Yakima River Basin during the last several years, in part, as a result of regular screen evaluations and the rapid feedback of information necessary to improve operations and design of these important fish protection devices.

  15. Yakima River Spring Chinook Enhancement Study, 1987 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fast, David E.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The smelt outmigration was monitored at wapatox on the Naches River and Prosser on the lower Yakima. The spring outmigration at Wapatox was estimated to be 16,141 smolts. The 1987 spring outmigration of wild spring chinook from the Yakima Basin was estimated to be 251,975 smolts at Prosser. The survival from egg to smelt was calculated using the 1985 redd counts and the 1987 smolt outmigration at Prosser. The estimated survival was 4.16%, which gives a mean egg to smolt survival over four years of 6.32%. In 1987 a total of 3,683 adult and 335 jack spring chinook salmon returning to the Yakima River were counted at Prosser fish ladder. This gives a total of 4,018 salmon returning to Prosser Dam. The median dates of passage were May 12 and May 16 for adults and jacks respectively. An additional 372 fish were estimated to have been caught in the Yakima River subsistence dipnet fishery below Horn Rapids and Prosser Dams. Therefore, total return to the Yakima system was 4,390 spring chinook salmon. Spring chinook were counted at Roza Dam from May 1 to September 30, 1987. Passage at Roza Dam was 1,610 adult and 67 jack spring chinook for a total of 1,677 wild fish. The median dates of passage at Roza Dam were May 29 and May 26 for spring chinook adults and jacks respectively. The smolt to adult (S{sub sa}) survival was calculated based on the 1983 smelt outmigration estimated at Prosser and the 1984 return of jacks (3 year old fish) the 1985 return of four year old adults, and the 1986 return of five year old fish to the Yakima River. It was estimated that 6,012 wild three, four, and five year old fish returned from an estimated smolt outmigration of 135,548 fish in 1983. This gives an estimated survival from smolt to adult of 4.4%. The smolt to adult survival for the 1984 smolt outmigration was 5.3% with 423 jacks returning in 1985, 5,163 four year old adults returning in 1986, and 983 five year old fish returning in 1987 fran an estimated 123,732 smolts in 1984. Spring chinook adults from fourteen different hatchery release groups were recovered in 1987. A total of 211 coded wire tags were recovered and these were expanded to an estimated 253 returning hatchery fish in 1987. Nine of these fish were jacks.

  16. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Putman, Douglas A.; Roegner, G. C.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John; Whiting, Allan H.

    2007-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the third annual report of a six-year project to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration action in the Columbia River Estuary (CRE). The project is being conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) by the Marine Sciences Laboratory of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Pt. Adams Biological Field Station of the National Marine Fisheries Service, and the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce. Measurement of the cumulative effects of ecological restoration projects in the Columbia River estuary is a formidable task because of the size and complexity of the estuarine landscape and the meta-populations of salmonids in the Columbia River basin. Despite the challenges presented by this system, developing and implementing appropriate indicators and methods to measure cumulative effects is the best way to enable estuary managers to track the overall effectiveness of investments in estuarine restoration projects. This project is developing methods to quantify the cumulative effects of multiple restoration activities in the CRE. The overall objectives of the 2006 study were to continue to develop techniques to assess cumulative effects, refine the standard monitoring protocols, and initiate development of an adaptive management system for Corps of Engineers’ habitat restoration monitoring efforts in the CRE. (The adaptive management effort will be reported at a later date.) Field studies during 2006 were conducted in tidal freshwater at Kandoll Farm on the lower Grays River and tidal brackish water at Vera Slough on Youngs Bay. Within each of area, we sampled one natural reference site and one restoration site. We addressed the overall objectives with field work in 2006 that, coupled with previous field data, had specific objectives and resulted in some important findings that are summarized here by chapter in this report. Each chapter of the report contains data on particular monitored variables for pre- and post-restoration conditions at both the Kandoll and Vera study areas.

  17. Linking habitat use of Hudson River striped bass to accumulation of polychlorinated biphenyl congeners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, J.T.F.; Secor, D.H.; Zlokovitz, E.; Wales, S.Q.; Baker, J.E.

    2000-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1976, the commercial striped bass fishery in the Hudson River (NY) has been closed due to total polychlorinated biphenyl (t-PCB) concentrations that exceed the US Food and Drug Administration's advisory level of 2 {micro}g/g-wet weight. Extensive monitoring of Hudson River striped bass demonstrated much more variability in t-PCB levels among individual striped bass than could be explained by their age, sex, or lipid contents. To investigate the possible role of differential habitat use among subpopulations of striped bass in controlling their PCB exposures, 70 fish collected throughout the Hudson River estuary and Long Island Sound in 1994--1995 were analyzed for PCB congeners, and their lifetime migration behaviors were estimated by otolith microchemistry. The mean salinity encountered during the fish's last growth season prior to capture was inversely correlated with the t-PCB body burden. Striped bass permanently residing in fresh and oligohaline portions of the estuary adjacent to known PCB sources had elevated t-PCB levels and congeneric patterns with higher proportions of di-, tri-, and tetrachlorobiphenyls. Conversely, fish spending the majority of their life in more saline waters of the estuary or migrating frequently throughout the salinity gradient contained lower PCB levels composed of more highly chlorinated congeners. The approach used in this study allows habitat use to be incorporated into exposure assessments for anadromous fish species such as striped bass.

  18. Different kettle of fish : turning around how computer modelling counts for (fisheries) policy-making 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Hoz del Hoyo, Diego

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis examines how computer modelling matters for policy-making by looking at two case studies of European fisheries management. Based on documentary analysis and ethnographic interviews and observations, the main ...

  19. The traps used in lobster and crab fisheries are a versatile fishing gear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , 1990; Everson et al., 1992; Arana and Ziller, 1994; Rosa-Pacheco and Ramirez-Rodriguez, 1996; Treble et (Arana and Ziller, 1994; Treble et al. 1998). In fisheries management, size selec- tivity curves

  20. FISH and FISHERIES , 2004, 5, 153167 The behavioural dynamics of fishers: management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 FISH and FISHERIES , 2004, 5, 153 by his/her own goals or constraints. Despite this reality, the complex dynamics of fishing has and behavioural dynamics of fishing to provide insight into fisher behaviour and its implications

  1. The Tragedy of Enclosure: Fish, Fisheries Science, and U.S. Foreign Policy, 1920-1960

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finley, Mary C.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Resources of the North Pacific Ocean." Vancouver, B.C. :Fisheries in the North Pacific Ocean and the Law of the Seaon the Longevity of Pacific Ocean Perch (Sebastes Alutus)."

  2. Reducing Uncertainty in Fisheries Management: The Time for Fishers' Ecological Knowledge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carr, Liam

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation work presents a novel method for addressing system uncertainty to improve management of a small-scale fishery in St. Croix, United States Virgin Islands. Using fishers' ecological knowledge (FEK), this research examines existing...

  3. REEVALUATION OF FISHING EFFORT AND APPARENT ABUNDANCE IN THE HAWAIIAN FISHERY FOR SKIPJACK TUNA,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , KATSUWONUS PELAMIS, 1948-70 RICHARD N. UCHIDA1 ABSTRACT Catch per effective trip, used in 1948-64 as an index in the Hawaiian pole-and-line fishery for skipjack tuna, Katsuwonus pelamis, defined fishing effort

  4. Shifts in the estuarine demersal fish community after a fishery closure in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as ports for shipping, support commer- cial and recreational fisheries, and are used as recreational areas these issues, much of the area 1 Ruckelshaus, M. H., and M. M. McClure. 2007. Sound science: synthesizing eco

  5. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE A PUIIUCATION OF THE SAVANNAII RIVER ECOI"OGY LAIIORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgia, University of

    OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE A PUIIUCATION OF THE SAVANNAII RIVER ECOI"OGY LAIIORATORY NATIONAL of the Savannah River Site National Environmental Research Park Program Publication number: SRO-NERP-2S Printed OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE BY CHARLES E. DAVIS AND LAURA L. JANECEK A PUBLICATION OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

  6. The Pecos River Ecosystem Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, C.

    planting saltcedar for stream bank erosion control along such rivers as the Pecos River in New Mexico. The plant has spread down the Pecos River into Texas and is now known to occur along the river south of Interstate 10. More recently the plant has become...

  7. Deep Water Mixing Prevents Harmful Algal Bloom Formation: Implications for Managed Fisheries Refugia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Natanya Jeanne

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    DEEP WATER MIXING PREVENTS HARMFUL ALGAL BLOOM FORMATION: IMPLICATIONS FOR MANAGED FISHERIES REFUGIA A Thesis by NATANYA JEANNE HAYDEN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... Refugia Copyright 2011 Natanya Jeanne Hayden DEEP WATER MIXING PREVENTS HARMFUL ALGAL BLOOM FORMATION: IMPLICATIONS FOR MANAGED FISHERIES REFUGIA A Thesis by NATANYA JEANNE HAYDEN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A...

  8. Determining Columbia and Snake River Project Tailrace and Forebay Zones of Hydraulic Influence using MASS2 Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Perkins, William A.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although fisheries biology studies are frequently performed at US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) projects along the Columbia and Snake Rivers, there is currently no consistent definition of the ``forebay'' and ``tailrace'' regions for these studies. At this time, each study may use somewhat arbitrary lines (e.g., the Boat Restriction Zone) to define the upstream and downstream limits of the study, which may be significantly different at each project. Fisheries researchers are interested in establishing a consistent definition of project forebay and tailrace regions for the hydroelectric projects on the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. The Hydraulic Extent of a project was defined by USACE (Brad Eppard, USACE-CENWP) as follows: The river reach directly upstream (forebay) and downstream (tailrace) of a project that is influenced by the normal range of dam operations. Outside this reach, for a particular river discharge, changes in dam operations cannot be detected by hydraulic measurement. The purpose of this study was to, in consultation with USACE and regional representatives, develop and apply a consistent set of criteria for determining the hydraulic extent of each of the projects in the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. A 2D depth-averaged river model, MASS2, was applied to the Snake and Columbia Rivers. New computational meshes were developed most reaches and the underlying bathymetric data updated to the most current survey data. The computational meshes resolved each spillway bay and turbine unit at each project and extended from project to project. MASS2 was run for a range of total river flows and each flow for a range of project operations at each project. The modeled flow was analyzed to determine the range of velocity magnitude differences and the range of flow direction differences at each location in the computational mesh for each total river flow. Maps of the differences in flow direction and velocity magnitude were created. USACE fishery biologists requested data analysis to determine the project hydraulic extent based on the following criteria: 1) For areas where the mean velocities are less than 4 ft/s, the water velocity differences between operations are not greater than 0.5 ft/sec and /or the differences in water flow direction are not greater than 10 degrees, 2) If mean water velocity is 4.0 ft/second or greater the boundary is determined using the differences in water flow direction (i.e., not greater than 10 degrees). Based on these criteria, and excluding areas with a mean velocity of less than 0.1 ft/s (within the error of the model), a final set of graphics were developed that included data from all flows and all operations. Although each hydroelectric project has a different physical setting, there were some common results. The downstream hydraulic extent tended to be greater than the hydraulic extent in the forebay. The hydraulic extent of the projects tended to be larger at the mid-range flows. At higher flows, the channel geometry tends to reduce the impact of project operations.

  9. Electrofishing survey of the Great Miami River, September 1992. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, M.C.; Bixby, R.; Engman, J.; Ross, L.; Stocker, L. [Cincinnati Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the end of summer in 1992 the fishery of the Great Miami River took an unexpected deviation from the stasis of past years as an intense suspended algal bloom decreased the compositional diversity found at the lower GMR stations. Daytime supersaturation of oxygen and elevated pHs, reaching 9 by midday during the month of August, undoubtedly caused severe deficits of oxygen at night. Despite the aeration at every riffle, the intensities of the biological processes in the water were sufficient to cause very high positive and negative excursions of oxygen over the day and night cycle. This report documents a fish harvest that was conducted as part of the oxygen excess/deficit study.

  10. Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    but would not open. It is unfortunate that the link given did not work properly, as the original comments to the ftp site containing the original comments and a map for the Maines Estate Land Parcel. 1. Open Windows portions of the American and Crooked #12;2 River watersheds. This EIS was a multi-faceted project

  11. Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Genetic Studies; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2005-2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busack, Craig A.; Fritts, Anthony L.; Kassler, Todd (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers one of many topics under the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project's Monitoring and Evaluation Program (YKFPME). The YKFPME is funded under two BPA contracts, one for the Yakama Nation and the other for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (Contract number 22370, Project Number 1995-063-25). A comprehensive summary report for all of the monitoring and evaluation topics will be submitted after all of the topical reports are completed. This approach to reporting enhances the ability of people to get the information they want, enhances timely reporting of results, and provides a condensed synthesis of the whole YKFPME. The current report was completed by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

  12. Massachusetts Rivers Protection Act (Massachusetts)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The law creates a 200-foot riverfront area that extends on both sides of rivers and streams. The riverfront area is 25 feet in the following municipalities: Boston, Brockton, Cambridge, Chelsea,...

  13. Case Studies in River Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    of the Middle Rio Grande --Discharge Analysis --Reservoir Level Analysis Site Description and Background --History of the Middle Rio Grande --Discharge Analysis --Reservoir Level Analysis Aggradation of Abandoned Channels Cheongmi Stream and Mangyeong River Cheongmi Stream South Korea In Collaboration

  14. Niobrara Scenic River Act (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act establishes the Niobrara Council, to assist in all aspects of the management of the Niobrara scenic river corridor and promulgate rules and regulations related to the preservation of the...

  15. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Main Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.); United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. North Pacific Division; United States. Bureau of Reclamation. Pacific Northwest Region.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The System Operation Review (SOR) Final EIS addresses four actions: (a) need to develop coordinated strategy for managing the multiple uses of the Federal Columbia River system (System Operating Strategy [SOS]); (b) need to provide interested parties other than management agencies with a long-term role in system planning (Forum); (c) need to renew or change current Canadian Entitlement Allocation Agreements (CEAA); and (d) need to renegotiate and renew the Pacific Northwest Coordination Agreement (PNCA). SOS alternatives analyzed are: (1) operation prior to Endangered Species Act listings of salmon stocks; (2) current operations (no action); (3) stable storage project operation; (4) natural river operation; (5) fixed drawdown; (6) operating strategies proposed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Marine Fisheries Service, State fisheries agencies, Native American tribes, and Federal operating agencies; and (7) Preferred Alternative. The seven Forum alternatives analyzed are: (1) decisionmaking by the SOR lead agencies (preferred alternative); (2) decisionmaking by SOR lead agencies and recommendations by an existing regional entity; (3) decisionmaking by SOR lead agencies and recommendations by a new regional entity; (4) decisionmaking by a Federal consultation forum; (5) decisionmaking by a new entity; (6) decisionmaking by one Federal operating agency; (7) decisionmaking by a Federal agency other than an operating agency. PNCA alternatives analyzed are: (1) no replacement contract; (2) contract to maximize regional power benefits; (3) roll over existing PNCA; (4) current PNCA with modified operating procedures (preferred alternative); (5) current PNCA with nonpower modifications. CEAA alternatives include: (1) no action (no replacement of current allocation agreements); (2) entitlement allocation: 55 percent Federal; 45 percent non-Federal; (3) entitlement allocation: 70 percent Federal, 30 percent non-Federal (preferred alternative); (4) no agreement.

  16. Dayao County Yupao River BasDayao County Yupao River Basin Hydro...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dayao County Yupao River BasDayao County Yupao River Basin Hydro electricity Development Co Ltd in Jump to: navigation, search Name: Dayao County Yupao River BasDayao County Yupao...

  17. EA-1692: Red River Environmental Products, LLC Activated Carbon...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2: Red River Environmental Products, LLC Activated Carbon Manufacturing Facility, Red River Parish, LA EA-1692: Red River Environmental Products, LLC Activated Carbon Manufacturing...

  18. Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Policy/Technical Involvement and Planning, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearsons, Todd N.; Easterbrooks, John A. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is a supplementation project sponsored by the Northwest Power Planning Council and funded by the Bonneville Power Administration. The YKFP has adopted the definition of supplementation described by Regional Assessment of Supplementation Program (1992), which is ''the use of artificial propagation in an attempt to maintain or increase natural production while maintaining the long-term fitness of the target population, and keeping the ecological and genetic impacts on nontarget populations within specified biological limits''. Recent scientific reviews of hatchery supplementation continue to highlight the experimental nature and risk of supplementation (Independent Scientific Group 1996; National Research Council 1996; Lichatowich 1999; Independent Multidisciplinary Science Team 2000; Independent Scientific Advisory Board 2003; Hatchery Scientific Review Group 2003). In addition, many of these reviews included recommendations about the best ways to operate a supplementation program. Most of these recommendations were already being done or have been incorporated into the YKFP. The objectives of the YKFP are: (1) to test the hypothesis that new supplementation techniques can be used in the Yakima River Basin to increase natural production and to improve harvest opportunities while maintaining the long-term genetic fitness of the wild and native salmonid populations and keeping adverse ecological interactions within acceptable limits (Yakima Fisheries Project Final Environment Impact Statement, 1996); (2) provide knowledge about the use of supplementation, so that it may be used to mitigate effects on anadromous fisheries throughout the Columbia River Basin; (3) to maintain and improve the quantity and productivity of salmon and steelhead habitat, including those areas made accessible by habitat improvements; (4) to ensure that Project implementation remains consistent with the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program; and (5) to implement the Project in a prudent and environmentally sound manner. Current YKFP operations have been designed to test the principles of supplementation (Busack et al. 1997). The Project's experimental design has focused on the following critical uncertainties affecting supplementation: (1) The survival and reproductive success of hatchery fish after release from the hatchery; (2) The impacts of hatchery fish as they interact with non-target species and stocks; and, (3) The effects of supplementation on the long-term genetic fitness of fish stocks. The YKFP endorses an adaptive management policy applied through a project management framework as described in the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Planning Status Report (1995), Fast and Craig (1997), and Clune and Dauble 1991. The project is managed by a Policy Group consisting of a representative of the Yakama Nation (YN, lead agency) and a representative of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). The functions of the parties are described in an MOU between the YN and the WDFW. A Scientific and Technical Advisory Committee (STAC) consisting of one representative from each management entity reports to the Policy Group and provides technical input on policy and other issues. Additional committee's, such as the Monitoring Implementation and Planning Team (MIPT), serve at the discretion of STAC. The Policy Group and STAC meet periodically (usually monthly) to conduct the business of the YKFP. Although the YKFP is an all stocks initiative (BPA 1996), most effort to date has been directed at spring chinook salmon and coho salmon. This report is a compilation of the year's activities between August 1, 2002 and July 31, 2003. The Yakama Nation's portion of the YKFP is presented in another report. All findings should be considered preliminary until data collection is completed or the information is published in a peer-reviewed journal. Pearsons and Easterbrooks (2003) described last year's activities.

  19. Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Deep drilling data, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Raft River geothermal exploration well...

  20. Sediment transport and topographic evolution of a coupled river and river plume system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sediment transport and topographic evolution of a coupled river and river plume system inundation from storms, hurricanes, and tsunamis [Tornqvist et al., 2007; Blum and Roberts, 2009; Jerolmack

  1. Design and implementation of an emergency environmental responsesystem to protect migrating salmon in the lower San Joaquin River,California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Jacobs, Karl C.

    2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past decade tens of millions of dollars have beenspent by water resource agencies in California to restore the nativesalmon fishery in the San Joaquin River and its major tributaries. Anexcavated deep water ship channel (DWSC), through which the river runs onits way to the Bay/Delta and Pacific Ocean, experiences episodes of lowdissolved oxygen which acts as a barrier to anadromous fish migration anda threat to the long-term survival of the salmon run. An emergencyresponse management system is under development to forecast theseepisodes of low dissolved oxygen and to deploy measures that will raisedissolved oxygen concentrations to prevent damage to the fisheryresource. The emergency response management system has been designed tointeract with a real-time water quality monitoring network and is servedby a comprehensive data management and forecasting model toolbox. TheBay/Delta and Tributaries (BDAT) Cooperative Data Management System is adistributed, web accessible database that contains terabytes ofinformation on all aspects of the ecology of the Bay/Delta and upperwatersheds. The complexity of the problem dictates data integration froma variety of monitoring programs. A unique data templating system hasbeen constructed to serve the needs of cooperating scientists who wish toshare their data and to simplify and streamline data uploading into themaster database. In this paper we demonstrate the utility of such asystem in providing decision support for management of the San JoaquinRiver fishery. We discuss how the system might be expanded to havefurther utility in coping with other emergencies and threats to watersupply system serving California's costal communities.

  2. Walla Walla River Basin Fish Screens Evaluations, 2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chamness, Mickie; Abernethy, Scott; Tunnicliffe, Cherylyn [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated Gardena Farms, Little Walla Walla, and Garden City/Lowden II Phase II fish screen facilities and provided underwater videography beneath a leaking rubber dam in the Walla Walla River basin in 2006. Evaluations of the fish screen facilities took place in early May 2006, when juvenile salmonids are generally outmigrating. At the Gardena Farms site, extended high river levels caused accumulations of debris and sediment in the forebay. This debris covered parts of the bottom drum seals, which could lead to early deterioration of the seals and drum screen. Approach velocities were excessive at the upstream corners of most of the drums, leading to 14% of the total approach velocities exceeding 0.4 feet per second (ft/s). Consequently, the approach velocities did not meet National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) design criteria guidelines for juvenile fish screens. The Little Walla Walla site was found to be in good condition, with all approach, sweep, and bypass velocities within NMFS criteria. Sediment buildup was minor and did not affect the effectiveness of the screens. At Garden City/Lowden II, 94% of approach velocities met NMFS criteria of 0.4 ft/s at any time. Sweep velocities increased toward the fish ladder. The air-burst mechanism appears to keep large debris off the screens, although it does not prevent algae and periphyton from growing on the screen face, especially near the bottom of the screens. In August 2006, the Gardena Farm Irrigation District personnel requested that we look for a leak beneath the inflatable rubber dam at the Garden City/Lowden II site that was preventing water movement through the fish ladder. Using our underwater video equipment, we were able to find a gap in the sheet piling beneath the dam. Erosion of the riverbed was occurring around this gap, allowing water and cobbles to move beneath the dam. The construction engineers and irrigation district staff were able to use the video footage to resolve the problem within a couple weeks. We had hoped to also evaluate the effectiveness of modifications to louvers behind the Nursery Bridge screens when flows were higher than 350 cubic feet per second, (cfs) but were unable to do so. Based on the one measurement made in early 2006 after the modified louvers were set, it appears the modified louvers may help reduce approach velocities. The auxiliary supply water system gates also control water through the screens. Evaluating the effect of different combinations of gate and louver positions on approach velocities through the screens may help identify optimum settings for both at different river discharges.

  3. Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Captive Broodstock Rearing and Research, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McAuley, W. Carlin; Maynard, Desmond J. (National Marine Fishereis Service, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA)

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1995, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), in cooperation with the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG), the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), and the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) established captive broodstock programs to aid in the recovery of Snake River spring/summer chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) listed as endangered under the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA). These programs were intended to provide safety nets for Salmon and Grande Ronde River Basins spring/summer chinook salmon stocks. They also provide a basis of examining the efficacy of captive rearing and captive breeding programs as tools for recovering listed salmonid populations. In years when no or few naturally produced fish return from the sea, captive fish and their progeny can be used to maintain populations in these two Snake River Basin tributaries. The NMFS facility at Manchester, WA, provides the crucial seawater environment needed to culture anadromous salmonids during the marine phase of their life cycle. At the Manchester Research Station, the fish are cultured in 6.1m diameter circular tanks housed in a fully enclosed and secure building. The tanks are supplied with seawater that has been processed to eliminate most marine pathogens. The fish are fed a commercially prepared diet and held at densities and loading rates designed to maximize fish quality. When fish begin to mature, they are transferred to ODFW or IDFG freshwater facilities in Oregon and Idaho for final maturation. The states then release the mature fish (Idaho) or their progeny (Oregon) back into their native Snake River tributary waters in restoration efforts. In FY 2002, NMFS cultured 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, and 2000 broodyear fish at its Manchester Facility. This report addresses program activities from September 1, 2001 to August 31, 2002.

  4. Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Captive Broodstock Rearing and Research, 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maynard, Desmond J.; McAuley, W. Carlin (National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Resource Enhancement and Utilization, Seattle, WA)

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1995, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), in cooperation with the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG), the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), and the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) established captive broodstock programs to aid in the recovery of Snake River spring/summer chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) listed as endangered under the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA). These programs are intended to provide safety nets for Salmon and Grande Ronde River Basins spring/summer chinook salmon stocks. They also provide a basis of examining the efficacy of captive rearing and captive breeding programs as tools for recovering listed salmonid populations. In years when no or few naturally produced fish return from the sea, captive fish and their progeny can be used to maintain populations in these two Snake River Basin tributaries. The NMFS facility at Manchester, WA provides the crucial seawater environment needed to culture anadromous salmonids during the marine phase of their life cycle. At the Manchester Research Station, the fish are cultured in 6.1m diameter circular tanks housed in a fully enclosed and secure building. The tanks are supplied with seawater that has been processed to eliminate most marine pathogens. The fish are fed a commercially prepared diet and held at densities and loading rates intended to maximize fish quality. When fish begin to mature, they are transferred to ODFW or IDFG freshwater facilities in Oregon and Idaho for final maturation. The states then release the mature fish (Idaho) or their progeny (Oregon) back into their native Snake River tributary waters in restoration efforts. In FY 2003, NMFS cultured 1998, 1999, 2000, and 2001 broodyear fish at its Manchester Facility. This report addresses program activities from September 1, 2002 to August 31, 2003.

  5. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Roegner, G. C.; Whiting, Allan H.; Johnson, Gary E.; Dawley, Earl; Skalski, John R.; Vavrinec, John; Ebberts, Blaine D.

    2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the second annual report of a six-year project to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration projects in the Columbia River Estuary, conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Marine Sciences Laboratory, NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service Pt. Adams Biological Field Station, and the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce for the US Army Corps of Engineers. In 2005, baseline data were collected on two restoration sites and two associated reference sites in the Columbia River estuary. The sites represent two habitat types of the estuary--brackish marsh and freshwater swamp--that have sustained substantial losses in area and that may play important roles for salmonids. Baseline data collected included vegetation and elevation surveys, above and below-ground biomass, water depth and temperature, nutrient flux, fish species composition, and channel geometry. Following baseline data collection, three kinds of restoration actions for hydrological reconnection were implemented in several locations on the sites: tidegate replacements (2) at Vera Slough, near the city of Astoria in Oregon State, and culvert replacements (2) and dike breaches (3) at Kandoll Farm in the Grays River watershed in Washington State. Limited post-restoration data were collected: photo points, nutrient flux, water depth and temperature, and channel cross-sections. In subsequent work, this and additional post-restoration data will be used in conjunction with data from other sites to estimate net effects of hydrological reconnection restoration projects throughout the estuary. This project is establishing methods for evaluating the effectiveness of individual projects and a framework for assessing estuary-wide cumulative effects including a protocol manual for monitoring restoration and reference sites.

  6. Passage Distribution and Federal Columbia River Power System Survival for Steelhead Kelts Tagged Above and at Lower Granite Dam, Year 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colotelo, Alison HA; Harnish, Ryan A.; Jones, Bryan W.; Hanson, Amanda C.; Trott, Donna M.; Greiner, Michael J.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Ham, Kenneth D.; Deng, Zhiqun; Brown, Richard S.; Weiland, Mark A.; Li, X.; Fu, Tao

    2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations have declined throughout their range in the last century and many populations, including those of the Snake River Basin are listed under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. The reasons for their decline are many and complex, but include habitat loss and degradation, overharvesting, and dam construction. The 2008 Biological Opinion calls for an increase in the abundance of female steelhead through an increase in iteroparity (i.e., repeat spawning) and this can be realized through a combination of reconditioning and in-river survival of migrating kelts. The goal of this study is to provide the data necessary to inform fisheries managers and dam operators of Snake River kelt migration patterns, survival, and routes of dam passage. Steelhead kelts (n = 487) were captured and implanted with acoustic transmitters and passive integrated transponder (PIT)-tags at the Lower Granite Dam (LGR) Juvenile Fish Facility and at weirs located in tributaries of the Snake and Clearwater rivers upstream of LGR. Kelts were monitored as they moved downstream through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) by 15 autonomous and 3 cabled acoustic receiver arrays. Cabled receiver arrays deployed on the dam faces allowed for three-dimensional tracking of fish as they approached the dam face and were used to determine the route of dam passage. Overall, 27.3% of the kelts tagged in this study successfully migrated to Martin Bluff (rkm 126, as measured from the mouth of the Columbia River), which is located downstream of all FCRPS dams. Within individual river reaches, survival per kilometer estimates ranged from 0.958 to 0.999; the lowest estimates were observed in the immediate forebay of FCRPS dams. Steelhead kelts tagged in this study passed over the spillway routes (spillway weirs, traditional spill bays) in greater proportions and survived at higher rates compared to the few fish passed through powerhouse routes (turbines and juvenile bypass systems). The results of this study provide information about the route of passage and subsequent survival of steelhead kelts that migrated through the Snake and Columbia rivers from LGR to Bonneville Dam in 2013. These data may be used by fisheries managers and dam operators to identify potential ways to increase the survival of kelts during their seaward migrations.

  7. BULLETIN OF THE UNITED STATES FISH COMMISSION. 467 The shad jishery.-The river fisheries of commercial.importance are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLARK. For very many years in Eussia and in other cold countries fish and meats have been frozen for market by exposure in the open air or by freezing them m masse in ice. In Thibet as early as l8OG of preserving fishor other articlesin a closechamberby means of a freezing mixture having no contact

  8. Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sather, NK; Johnson, GE; Storch, AJ [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2009-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The tidal freshwater monitoring (TFM) project reported herein is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers [USACE], and the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act (ESA) as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System. The project is being performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Project No. 2005-001-00). The research is a collaborative effort among the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the National Marine Fisheries Service, and the University of Washington. The overarching goal of the TFM project is to bridge the gap in knowledge between tidal freshwater habitats and the early life history attributes of migrating salmon. The research questions include: In what types of habitats within the tidal freshwater area of the Columbia River are juvenile salmon found, when are they present, and under what environmental conditions? What is the ecological contribution of shallow (0-5 m) tidal freshwater habitats to the recovery of ESA-listed salmon in the Columbia River basin? Field data collection for the TFM project commenced in June 2007 and since then has continued monthly at six to nine sites in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta (river kilometer 192-208). While this report includes summary data spanning the 19-month period of study from June 2007 through December 2008, it highlights sampling conducted during calendar year 2008. Detailed data for calendar year 2007 were reported previously. The 2008 research objectives were as follows: (1) Characterize the vegetation composition and percent cover, conventional water quality, water surface elevation, substrate composition, bathymetry, and beach slope at the study sites within the vicinity of the Sandy River delta. (2) Characterize the fish community and juvenile salmon migration, including species composition, length-frequency distribution, density (number/m{sup 2}), and temporal and spatial distributions in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE). (3) Determine the stock of origin for juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) captured at sampling sites through genetic identification. (4) Characterize the diets of juvenile Chinook and coho (O. kisutch) salmon captured within the study area. (5) Estimate run timing, residence times, and migration pathways for acoustic-tagged fish in the study area. (6) Conduct a baseline evaluation of the potential restoration to reconnect the old Sandy River channel with the delta. (7) Apply fish density data to initiate a design for a juvenile salmon monitoring program for beach habitats within the tidal freshwater segment of the LCRE (river kilometer 56-234).

  9. Effects of Domestication on Predation Mortality and Competitive Dominance; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearsons, Todd N.; Fritts, Anthony L.; Scott, Jennifer L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the second of a series of progress reports that address the effects of hatchery domestication on predation mortality and competitive dominance in the upper Yakima River basin (Pearsons et al. 2004). This progress report summarizes data collected between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2004. Raising fish in hatcheries can cause unintended behavioral, physiological, or morphological changes in chinook salmon due to domestication selection. Domestication selection is defined by Busack and Currens 1995 as, ''changes in quantity, variety, or combination of alleles within a captive population or between a captive population and its source population in the wild as a result of selection in an artificial environment''. Selection in artificial environments could be due to intentional or artificial selection, biased sampling during some stage of culture, or unintentional selection (Busack and Currens 1995). Genetic changes can result in lowered survival in the natural environment (Reisenbichler and Rubin 1999). The goal of supplementation or conservation hatcheries is to produce fish that will integrate into natural populations. Conservation hatcheries attempt to minimize intentional or biased sampling so that the hatchery fish are similar to naturally produced fish. However, the selective pressures in hatcheries are dramatically different than in the wild, which can result in genetic differences between hatchery and wild fish. The selective pressures may be particularly prominent during the freshwater rearing stage where most mortality of wild fish occurs. The Yakima Fisheries Project is studying the effects of domestication on a variety of adult and juvenile traits of spring chinook salmon (Busack et al. 2003). The overall experimental design is to compare a variety of traits, across generations, from three lines of Yakima basin chinook, a hatchery control, supplementation line, and a wild control. The hatchery line was derived from wild upper Yakima broodstock and is only allowed to spawn in the hatchery. The supplementation line is upper Yakima stock that spawns in the upper Yakima River. This stock is an integration of wild and hatchery supplementation fish. Starting in 2005, we plan to use a wild control line of fish that will be the offspring of wild broodstock collected in the Naches River system, a tributary to the Yakima River. The Naches River is not stocked with hatchery fish, and there is minimal stray from Upper Yakima supplementation, so we believe that these will serve as a control to compare any genotypic changes in the hatchery and the supplementation line. As generations of fish are tested, we believe we will be able to analyze the data using an analysis of covariance to test the hypothesis that the hatchery line will exhibit greater domestication over generations, the wild line will remain at baseline levels, and the supplementation line will be somewhere in between. In this report, we have used the terms ''hatchery'' or ''supplementation'' to refer to upper Yakima fish that are progeny of fish that spent one generation in the hatchery, and ''wild'' to refer to fish that have had no exposure to the hatchery other than the matings for this experiment. The terms are relative to the parents that produced the fish for these experiments. All progeny of these fish were mated and reared under the same laboratory conditions. This report addresses two juvenile traits: predation mortality, and competitive dominance. Other traits will be presented in other project reports. It is anticipated that it will take at least two to five generations to detect measurable responses in many domestication response variables (Busack et

  10. Redd Site Selection and Spawning Habitat Use by Fall Chinook Salmon, Hanford Reach, Columbia River : Final Report 1995 - 1998.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geist, David R.

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes results of research activities conducted from 1995 through 1998 on identifying the spawning habitat requirements of fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. The project investigated whether traditional spawning habitat models could be improved in order to make better predictions of available habitat for fall chinook salmon in the Snake River. Results suggest models could be improved if they used spawning area-specific, rather than river-specific, spawning characteristics; incorporated hyporheic discharge measurements; and gave further consideration to the geomorphic features that are present in the unconstrained segments of large alluvial rivers. Ultimately the recovery of endangered fall chinook salmon will depend on how well we are able to recreate the characteristics once common in alluvial floodplains of large rivers. The results from this research can be used to better define the relationship between these physical habitat characteristics and fall chinook salmon spawning site selection, and provide more efficient use of limited recovery resources. This report is divided into four chapters which were presented in the author's doctoral dissertation which he completed through the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at Oregon State University. Each of the chapters has been published in peer reviewed journals or is currently under review. Chapter one is a conceptual spawning habitat model that describes how geomorphic features of river channels create hydraulic processes, including hyporheic flows, that influence where salmon spawn in unconstrained reaches of large mainstem alluvial rivers. Chapter two describes the comparison of the physical factors associated with fall chinook salmon redd clusters located at two sites within the Reach. Spatial point pattern analysis of redds showed that redd clusters averaged approximately 10 hectares in area and their locations were consistent from year to year. The tendency to spawn in clusters suggests fall chinook salmon's use of spawning habitat is highly selective. Hydraulic characteristics of the redd clusters were significantly different than the habitat surrounding them. Velocity and lateral slope of the river bottom were the most important habitat variables in predicting redd site selection. While these variables explained a large proportion of the variance in redd site selection (86 to 96%), some unmeasured factors still accounted for a small percentage of actual spawning site selection. Chapter three describes the results from an investigation into the hyporheic characteristics of the two spawning areas studied in chapter two. This investigation showed that the magnitude and chemical characteristics of hyporheic discharge were different between and within two spawning areas. Apparently, fall chinook salmon used chemical and physical cues from the discharge to locate spawning areas. Finally, chapter four describes a unique method that was developed to install piezometers into the cobble bed of the Columbia River.

  11. Enterprise Assessments Review, Savannah River Site 2014 Site...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Independent Oversight Inspection, Savannah River Site - January 2010 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities - December...

  12. Elm Fork of the Trinity River Floodplain Management Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tickle, Greg; Clary, Melinda

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ELM FORK OF THE TRINITY RIVER FLOODPLAIN MANAGEMENT STUDYof the Elm Fork of the Trinity River, Dallas County, Dallas,

  13. Ecosystem Approaches for Fisheries Management 609 Alaska Sea Grant College Program AK-SG-99-01, 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ecosystem Approaches for Fisheries Management 609 Alaska Sea Grant College Program · AK-SG-99-01, 1999 Ecosystem Considerations and the Limitations of Ecosystem Models in Fisheries Management: Insights for the implementation of ecosystem approaches. The major criticism of single- species models is that they cannot predict

  14. Cetaceans of the Mediterranean and Black Seas: State of Knowledge and Conservation Strategies Interactions between Cetaceans and Fisheries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in France about the effect of dolphins on fisheries (Smith 1995). Eighteenth century re- ports describe, weapons, modifications of fishing techniques and schedules, and large-mesh nets surrounding the fishing for sev- eral fisheries, and the combined effect of inten- tional killings, bycatch, reduction of prey re

  15. Red Snapper Ecology and Fisheries in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico. Based on a symposium held in San

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguirre, Windsor E.

    Red Snapper Ecology and Fisheries in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico. Based on a symposium held in San working on diverse aspects of the ecology and fishery management of the species. There are 22 chapters life history and ecology spanning all ontogenetic stages, including larval behavior and distribution

  16. Larviculture of native white shrimp, Penaeus setiferus, and exotic white shrimp, P. vannanmei at Continental Fisheries, Limited, Panama City, Florida

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aranyakananda, Porcham

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LARVICULTURE OF NATIVE WHITE SHRIMP, Penaeus setiferus, AND EXOTIC WHITE SHRIMP, P. vannamei, AT CONTINENTAL FISHERIES. LIMITED. PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA Internship Report by PORCHAM ARANYAKANANDA Submitted to the Department of Wildlife..., AT CONTINENTAL FISHERIES, LIMITED, PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA Internship Report by PORCHAM ARANYAKANANDA Approved as to style and content by ( Chairman of Committee ) ( Member ) ( Member ) ABSTRACT Larviculture of native wnite snrimp, penaeus setiferus...

  17. Proposed Text for Amendment 42 to the Fishery Management Plan for Bering Sea/Aleutian Islands King and Tanner Crabs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fisheries to submit an economic data report (EDR) on an annual basis. The purpose of the EDR is to collect The EDR is administered by NMFS through contracts with Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC must fill out the appropriate EDR form annually. #12;The data collected is specific to the crab

  18. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries and Limnological Research : 1996 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cichosz, Thomas A.; Underwood, Keith D.; Shields, John; Scholz, Allan; Tilson, Mary Beth

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lake Roosevelt Monitoring/Data Collection Program resulted from a merger between the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program and the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project. This project will model biological responses to reservoir operations, evaluate the effects of releasing hatchery origin kokanee salmon and rainbow trout on the fishery, and evaluate the success of various stocking strategies. In 1996, limnological, reservoir operation, zooplankton, and tagging data were collected. Mean reservoir elevation, storage volume and water retention time were reduced in 1996 relative to the last five years. In 1996, Lake Roosevelt reached a yearly low of 1,227 feet above mean sea level in April, a yearly high of 1,289 feet in July, and a mean yearly reservoir elevation of 1,271.4 feet. Mean monthly water retention times in Lake Roosevelt during 1996 ranged from 15.7 days in May to 49.2 days in October. Average zooplankton densities and biomass were lower in 1996 than 1995. Daphnia spp. and total zooplankton densities peaked during the summer, whereas minimum densities occurred during the spring. Approximately 300,000 kokanee salmon and 400,000 rainbow trout were released into Lake Roosevelt in 1996. The authors estimated 195,628 angler trips to Lake Roosevelt during 1996 with an economic value of $7,629,492.

  19. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Westinghouse Savannah River...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    March 19, 2002 Issued to Westinghouse Savannah River Company related to Safety Basis and Radiation Protection Violations at the Savannah River Site, On March 19, 2002, the U.S....

  20. Lakes and Rivers Improvement Act (Ontario, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Lakes and Rivers Improvement Act proscribes the management, protection, preservation and use of the waters of the lakes and rivers of Ontario and the land under them. The Act also details...

  1. An Inside Look at River Corridor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In the seventh chapter of The Handford Story, the Energy Department takes a look at the River Corridor -- a 50-mile stretch of the Columbia River that flows through the Hanford site in southeast...

  2. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Westinghouse Savannah River...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    December 5, 1997 Issued to Westinghouse Savannah River Company, related to an Unplanned Radioactive Material Intake at the Savannah River Site, (EA-97-12) On December 5, 1997, the...

  3. Belle Fourche River Compact (South Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Belle Fourche River Compact, agreed to by South Dakota and Wyoming, seeks to provide for the most efficient use of the waters of the Belle Fourche River Basin for multiple purposes, and to...

  4. Youghiogheny Wild and Scenic River (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Portions of the Youghiogheny River are protected under the Scenic and Wild Rivers Act, and development on or near these areas is restricted. COMAR section 08.15.02 addresses permitted uses and...

  5. River System Hydrology in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, R.; Zhang, Y.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ,700 86,700 Proctor Leon River USACE 1963 59,400 54,702 310,100 Belton Leon River USACE 1954 457,600 432,978 640,000 Stillhouse Hollow Lampasas River USACE 1968 235,700 224,279 390,660 Georgetown San Gabriel R USACE 1980 37,100 36,980 87,600 Granger... San Gabriel R USACE 1980 65,500 50,540 162,200 Somerville Yequa Creek USACE 1967 160,110 154,254 337,700 Hubbard Creek Hubbard Creek WCTMWD 1962 317,750 317,750 í Post NF Double Mt WRMWD proposed 57,420 í í Alan Henry SF Double Mt Lubbock 1993 115...

  6. Grays River Watershed Geomorphic Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geist, David R.

    2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This investigation, completed for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), is part of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment commissioned by Bonneville Power Administration under project number 2003-013-00 to assess impacts on salmon habitat in the upper Grays River watershed and present recommendations for habitat improvement. This report presents the findings of the geomorphic assessment and is intended to support the overall PNNL project by evaluating the following: 􀂃 The effects of historical and current land use practices on erosion and sedimentation within the channel network 􀂃 The ways in which these effects have influenced the sediment budget of the upper watershed 􀂃 The resulting responses in the main stem Grays River upstream of State Highway 4 􀂃 The past and future implications for salmon habi

  7. South Platte River Compact and U.S. Supreme Court Decree for North Platte River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    1 South Platte River Compact and U.S. Supreme Court Decree for North Platte River J. Michael Jess Platte, and Arkansas rivers, for example, have been resolved through litigation brought before the U and Kansas are examples. In the Platte River watershed the State of Nebraska has experience allocating water

  8. Prepared in cooperation with the Platte River Recovery Implementation Program River Channel Topographic Surveys Collected Prior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prepared in cooperation with the Platte River Recovery Implementation Program River Channel Topographic Surveys Collected Prior to and Following Elevated Flows in the Central Platte River, Spring 2008 Flows in the Central Platte River, Nebraska, Spring 2008 By Paul J. Kinzel Prepared in cooperation

  9. Effect of spill on adult salmon passage delay at Columbia River and Snake River dams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Effect of spill on adult salmon passage delay at Columbia River and Snake River dams W. Nicholas dams in the Columbia/Snake River hydrosystem may delay the upstream passage of the adults. To evaluate-to-day variations of spill and upstream fish passage at the eight dams of the Columbia/Snake river hydrosystem

  10. Historical Ecology of the lower santa clara river, Ventura river, and oxnard Plain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Historical Ecology of the lower santa clara river, Ventura river, and oxnard Plain: an analysis. Historical ecology of the lower Santa Clara River,Ventura River, and Oxnard Plain: an analysis of terrestrial layers are available on SFEI's website, at www.sfei.org/projects/VenturaHE. Permissions rights for images

  11. Evaluation of Management of Water Release for Painted Rocks Reservoir, Bitterroot River, Montana, 1984 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lere, Mark E. (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Missoula, MT)

    1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Baseline fisheries and habitat data were gathered during 1983 and 1984 to evaluate the effectiveness of supplemental water releases from Painted Rocks Reservoir in improving the fisheries resource in the Bitterroot River. Discharge relationships among main stem gaging stations varied annually and seasonally. Flow relationships in the river were dependent upon rainfall events and the timing and duration of the irrigation season. Daily discharge monitored during the summers of 1983 and 1984 was greater than median values derived at the U.S.G.S. station near Darby. Supplemental water released from Painted Rocks Reservoir totaled 14,476 acre feet in 1983 and 13,958 acre feet in 1984. Approximately 63% of a 5.66 m{sup 3}/sec test release of supplemental water conducted during April, 1984 was lost to irrigation withdrawals and natural phenomena before passing Bell Crossing. A similar loss occurred during a 5.66 m{sup 3}/sec test release conducted in August, 1984. Daily maximum temperature monitored during 1984 in the Bitterroot River averaged 11.0, 12.5, 13.9 and 13.6 C at the Darby, Hamilton, Bell and McClay stations, respectively. Chemical parameters measured in the Bitterroot River were favorable to aquatic life. Population estimates conducted in the Fall, 1983 indicated densities of I+ and older rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) were significantly greater in a control section than in a dewatered section (p < 0.20). Numbers of I+ and older brown trout (Salmo trutta) were not significantly different between the control and dewatered sections (p > 0.20). Population and biomass estimates for trout in the control section were 631/km and 154.4 kg/km. In the dewatered section, population and biomass estimates for trout were 253/km and 122.8 kg/km. The growth increments of back-calculated length for rainbow trout averaged 75.6 mm in the control section and 66.9mm in the dewatered section. The growth increments of back-calculated length for brown trout averaged 79.5 mm in the control section and 82.3mm in the dewatered section. Population estimates conducted in the Spring, 1984 indicated densities of mountain whitefish (Prosopium williamsoni) greater than 254 mm in total length were not significantly different between the control and dewatered sections (p > 0.20). Young of the year rainbow trout and brown trout per 10m of river edge electrofished during 1984 were more abundant in the control section than the dewatered section and were more abundant in side channel habitat than main channel habitat. Minimum flow recommendations obtained from wetted perimeter-discharge relationships averaged 8.5m{sup 3}/sec in the control section and 10.6m{sup 3}/sec in the dewatered section of the Bitterroot River. The quantity of supplemental water from Painted Rocks Reservoir needed to maintain minimum flow recommendations is discussed in the Draft Water Management Plan for the Proposed Purchase of Supplemental Water from Painted Rocks Reservoir, Bitterroot River, Montana (Lere 1984).

  12. Bayer Material Science (TRL 1 2 3 System)- River Devices to Recover Energy with Advanced Materials(River DREAM)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bayer Material Science (TRL 1 2 3 System) - River Devices to Recover Energy with Advanced Materials(River DREAM)

  13. The river model of black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew J. S. Hamilton; Jason P. Lisle

    2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an under-appreciated way to conceptualize stationary black holes, which we call the river model. The river model is mathematically sound, yet simple enough that the basic picture can be understood by non-experts. %that can by understood by non-experts. In the river model, space itself flows like a river through a flat background, while objects move through the river according to the rules of special relativity. In a spherical black hole, the river of space falls into the black hole at the Newtonian escape velocity, hitting the speed of light at the horizon. Inside the horizon, the river flows inward faster than light, carrying everything with it. We show that the river model works also for rotating (Kerr-Newman) black holes, though with a surprising twist. As in the spherical case, the river of space can be regarded as moving through a flat background. However, the river does not spiral inward, as one might have anticipated, but rather falls inward with no azimuthal swirl at all. Instead, the river has at each point not only a velocity but also a rotation, or twist. That is, the river has a Lorentz structure, characterized by six numbers (velocity and rotation), not just three (velocity). As an object moves through the river, it changes its velocity and rotation in response to tidal changes in the velocity and twist of the river along its path. An explicit expression is given for the river field, a six-component bivector field that encodes the velocity and twist of the river at each point, and that encapsulates all the properties of a stationary rotating black hole.

  14. Columbia River Component Data Evaluation Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.S. Cearlock

    2006-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Columbia River Component Data Compilation and Evaluation task was to compile, review, and evaluate existing information for constituents that may have been released to the Columbia River due to Hanford Site operations. Through this effort an extensive compilation of information pertaining to Hanford Site-related contaminants released to the Columbia River has been completed for almost 965 km of the river.

  15. The Columbia River Estuary the Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    River estuary was a high-energy environment dominated by physical forces, with extensive sand Riddell November 28, 2000 ISAB 2000-5 #12;ISAB 2000-5 Estuary Report i EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Northwest to an informed response to the Council. Consequently, this report has been prepared as a preliminary reply

  16. FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM LOGAN & ALBERT RIVERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    . The system provides early warning of heavy rainfalls and river rises throughout the catchment and enablesFLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the LOGAN & ALBERT RIVERS This brochure describes the flood warning system of Meteorology operates a flood warning system for the Logan and Albert River catchments based on a rainfall

  17. SRO -NERP-1 THE SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgia, University of

    AND TREATMENT by Whit Gibbons Savannah River Ecology Laboratory Aiken , South Carolina A PUBLICATION OF EROA 'S SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH PARK -SEPTEMBER 1977 COPIES MAY BE OBTAINEO FROM SAVANNAHSRO -NERP-1 SNAKES OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT WITH INFORMATION ABOUT SNAKEBITE PREVENTION

  18. Change in Land Cover along the Lower Columbia River Estuary as Determined from Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) Imagery, Technical Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garono, Ralph; Anderson, Becci; Robinson, Rob

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lower Columbia River Estuary Management Plan (Jerrick, 1991) recognizes the positive relationship between the conservation of fish and wildlife habitat, and sustaining their populations. An important component of fish and wildlife conservation and management is the identification of habitats, trends in habitat change, and delineation of habitat for preservation, restoration or enhancement. Alterations to the environment, such as hydropower generation, dredging, forestry, agriculture, channel alteration, diking, bank stabilization and floodplain development, have dramatically altered both the type and distribution of habitats along the Columbia River Estuary (CRE) and its floodplain. Along the Columbia River, tidally influenced habitats occur from the river mouth to the Bonneville Dam, a distance of 230 km. If we are to effectively manage the natural resources of the Columbia River ecosystem, there is a need to understand how habitats have changed because fish and wildlife populations are known to respond to changes in habitat quality and distribution. The goal of this study was to measure the amount and type of change of CRE land cover from 1992 to 2000. We performed a change analysis on two spatial data sets describing land cover along the lower portion of the estuary (Fig. 1). The 1992 data set was created by the NOAA Coastal Remote Sensing, Coastal Change Analysis Program (C-CAP) in cooperation with Columbia River Estuary Study Task Force (CREST), the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) Point Adams Field Station, and State of Washington Department of Natural Resources (DNR). The 2000 data set was produced by Earth Design Consultants, Inc. (EDC) and the Wetland Ecosystem Team (WET: University of Washington) as part of a larger Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership (Estuary Partnership) habitat mapping study. Although the image classification methodologies used to create the data sets differed, both data sets were produced by classifying Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) satellite imagery, making it feasible to assess land cover changes between 1992 and 2000.

  19. Report on an internship at the International Development and Services Division of the National Marine Fisheries Service, Washington, D.C.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vergara, Victor Manuel

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) "Fishing News International" 6-1981. (8) Shortwave radio. Paris AFp in Spanish 7-24-1982. (9 "Kaigai Suisan News" (Korea). , vol 6, () 10, 10-1982. -31- 1981-4 1983 $1. 25 mill. ~ Fishexies. $3. 0 mill. Fishing gear. (1) "A Senary of Fisheries... at current (1984) values. 3 Fisheries assistance in continental Latin America at 1978 values. 24 4 Fisheries aid ? Central America, 1978-84. . 25 5 Fisheries aid ? South America (Pacific), 1978-84. 6 Fisheries aid ? South America (Atlantic), 1978...

  20. Estimated Entrainment of Dungeness Crab During Dredging For The Columbia River Channel Improvement Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearson, Walter H.; Williams, Greg D.; Skalski, John R.

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The studies reported here focus on issues regarding the entrainment of Dungeness crab related to the proposed Columbia River Channel Improvement Project and provided direct measurements of crab entrainment rates at three locations (Desdomona Shoals, Upper Sands, and Miller Sands) from RM4 to RM24 during summer 2002. Entrainment rates for all age classes of crabs ranged from zero at Miller Sands to 0.224 crabs per cy at Desdemona Shoals in June 2002. The overall entrainment rate at Desdomona Shoals in September was 0.120 crabs per cy. A modified Dredge Impact Model (DIM) used the summer 2002 entrainment rates to project crab entrainment and adult equivalent loss and loss to the fishery for the Channel Improvement Project. To improve the projections, entrainment data from Flavel Bar is needed. The literature, analyses of salinity intrusion scenarios, and the summer 2002 site-specific data on entrainment and salinity all indicate that bottom salinity influences crab distribution and entrainment, especially at lower salinities. It is now clear from field measurements of entrainment rates and salinity during a period of low river flow (90-150 Kcfs) and high salinity intrusion that entrainment rates are zero where bottom salinity is less than 16 o/oo most of the time. Further, entrainment rates of 2+ and older crab fall with decreasing salinity in a clear and consistent manner. More elaboration of the crab distribution- salinity model, especially concerning salinity and the movements of 1+ crab, is needed.

  1. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Cameron, April; Coleman, Andre M.; Corbett, C.; Dawley, Earl M.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Kauffman, Ronald; Roegner, G. Curtis; Russell, Micah T.; Silva, April; Skalski, John R.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John; Woodruff, Dana L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

    2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the sixth annual report of a seven-year project (2004 through 2010) to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE). The project, called the Cumulative Effects Study, is being conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District (USACE) by the Marine Sciences Laboratory of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the Pt. Adams Biological Field Station of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce (CREST), and the University of Washington. The goal of the Cumulative Effects Study is to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of multiple habitat restoration projects intended to benefit ecosystems supporting juvenile salmonids in the 235-km-long LCRE. Literature review in 2004 revealed no existing methods for such an evaluation and suggested that cumulative effects could be additive or synergistic. From 2005 through 2009, annual field research involved intensive, comparative studies paired by habitat type (tidal swamp versus marsh), trajectory (restoration versus reference site), and restoration action (tidegate replacement vs. culvert replacement vs. dike breach).

  2. Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Outmigration and Survival in the Lower Umatilla River Basin, Annual Report 2003-2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Tara

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes activities conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's Juvenile Outmigration and Survival M&E project in the Umatilla River subbasin between 2004-2006. Information is used to make informed decisions on hatchery effectiveness, natural production success, passage improvement and flow enhancement strategies. Data collected includes annual estimates of smolt abundance, migration timing, and survival, life history characteristics and productivity status and trends for spring and fall Chinook salmon, coho salmon and summer steelhead. Productivity data provided is the key subbasin scale measure of the effectiveness of salmon and steelhead restoration actions in the Umatilla River. Information is also used for regional planning and recovery efforts of Mid-Columbia River (MCR) ESA-listed summer steelhead. Monitoring is conducted via smolt trapping and PIT-tag interrogation at Three Mile Falls Dam. The Umatilla Juvenile Outmigration and Survival Project was established in 1994 to evaluate the success of management actions and fisheries restoration efforts in the Umatilla River Basin. Project objectives for the 2004-2006 period were to: (1) operate the PIT tag detection system at Three Mile Falls Dam (TMFD), (2) enhance provisional PIT-tag interrogation equipment at the east bank adult fish ladder, (3) monitor the migration timing, abundance and survival of naturally-produced juvenile salmonids and trends in natural production, (4) determine migration parameters and survival of hatchery-produced fish representing various rearing, acclimation and release strategies, (5) evaluate the relative survival between transported and non-transported fish, (6) monitor juvenile life history characteristics and evaluate trends over time, (7) investigate the effects of river, canal, fishway operations and environmental conditions on smolt migration and survival, (8) document the temporal distribution and diversity of resident fish species, and (9) participate in planning and coordination activities within the basin and dissemination of results.

  3. Identification of the Spawning, Rearing, and Migratory Requirements of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River Basin, Annual Report 1994.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rondorf, Dennis W.; Tiffan, Kenneth F.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spawning ground surveys were conducted in 1994 as part of a five year study of Snake River chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawyacha begun in 1991. Observations of fall chinook salmon spawning in the Snake River were limited to infrequent aerial red counts in the years prior to 1987. From 1987-1990, red counts were made on a limited basis by an interagency team and reported by the Washington Department of Fisheries. Starting in 1991, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and other cooperating agencies and organizations, expanded the scope of spawning ground surveys to include: (1) additional aerial surveys to improve red counts and provide data on the timing of spawning; (2) the validation (ground truthing) of red counts from aerial surveys to improve count accuracy; (3) underwater searches to locate reds in water too deep to allow detection from the air; and (4) bathymetric mapping of spawning sites for characterizing spawning habitat. This document is the 1994 annual progress report for selected studies of fall chinook salmon. The studies were undertaken because of the growing concern about the declining salmon population in the Snake River basin.

  4. Survival Estimates for the Passage of Spring-Migrating Juvenile Salmonids through Snake and Columbia River Dams and Reservoirs, 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulkner, James R.; Smith, Steven G.; Muir, William D. [Northwest Fisheries Science Center

    2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2008, the National Marine Fisheries Service completed the sixteenth year of a study to estimate survival and travel time of juvenile salmonids Oncorhynchus spp. passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. All estimates were derived from detections of fish tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags. We PIT tagged and released a total of 18,565 hatchery steelhead O. mykiss, 15,991 wild steelhead, and 9,714 wild yearling Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha at Lower Granite Dam in the Snake River. In addition, we utilized fish PIT tagged by other agencies at traps and hatcheries upstream from the hydropower system and at sites within the hydropower system in both the Snake and Columbia Rivers. These included 122,061 yearling Chinook salmon tagged at Lower Granite Dam for evaluation of latent mortality related to passage through Snake River dams. PIT-tagged smolts were detected at interrogation facilities at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, Ice Harbor, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams and in the PIT-tag detector trawl operated in the Columbia River estuary. Survival estimates were calculated using a statistical model for tag-recapture data from single release groups (the single-release model). Primary research objectives in 2008 were to: (1) estimate reach survival and travel time in the Snake and Columbia Rivers throughout the migration period of yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead, (2) evaluate relationships between survival estimates and migration conditions, and (3) evaluate the survival estimation models under prevailing conditions. This report provides reach survival and travel time estimates for 2008 for PIT-tagged yearling Chinook salmon (hatchery and wild), hatchery sockeye salmon O. nerka, hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch, and steelhead (hatchery and wild) in the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Additional details on the methodology and statistical models used are provided in previous reports cited here. Survival and detection probabilities were estimated precisely for most of the 2008 yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead migrations. Hatchery and wild fish were combined in some of the analyses. For yearling Chinook salmon, overall percentages for combined release groups used in survival analyses in the Snake River were 80% hatchery-reared and 20% wild. For steelhead, the overall percentages were 65% hatchery-reared and 35% wild. Estimated survival from the tailrace of Lower Granite Dam to the tailrace of Little Goose Dam averaged 0.939 for yearling Chinook salmon and 0.935 for steelhead.

  5. HANFORD SITE RIVER CORRIDOR CLEANUP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BAZZELL, K.D.

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2005, the US Department of Energy (DOE) launched the third generation of closure contracts, including the River Corridor Closure (RCC) Contract at Hanford. Over the past decade, significant progress has been made on cleaning up the river shore that bordes Hanford. However, the most important cleanup challenges lie ahead. In March 2005, DOE awarded the Hanford River Corridor Closure Contract to Washington Closure Hanford (WCH), a limited liability company owned by Washington Group International, Bechtel National and CH2M HILL. It is a single-purpose company whose goal is to safely and efficiently accelerate cleanup in the 544 km{sup 2} Hanford river corridor and reduce or eliminate future obligations to DOE for maintaining long-term stewardship over the site. The RCC Contract is a cost-plus-incentive-fee closure contract, which incentivizes the contractor to reduce cost and accelerate the schedule. At $1.9 billion and seven years, WCH has accelerated cleaning up Hanford's river corridor significantly compared to the $3.2 billion and 10 years originally estimated by the US Army Corps of Engineers. Predictable funding is one of the key features of the new contract, with funding set by contract at $183 million in fiscal year (FY) 2006 and peaking at $387 million in FY2012. Another feature of the contract allows for Washington Closure to perform up to 40% of the value of the contract and subcontract the balance. One of the major challenges in the next few years will be to identify and qualify sufficient subcontractors to meet the goal.

  6. Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, Final Report For the Performance Period May 1, 2008 through April 30, 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sampson, Melvin R. [The Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation

    2009-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yakima-Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is a joint project of the Yakama Nation (lead entity) and the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and is sponsored in large part by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) with oversight and guidance from the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC). It is among the largest and most complex fisheries management projects in the Columbia Basin in terms of data collection and management, physical facilities, habitat enhancement and management, and experimental design and research on fisheries resources. Using principles of adaptive management, the YKFP is attempting to evaluate all stocks historically present in the Yakima subbasin and apply a combination of habitat restoration and hatchery supplementation or reintroduction, to restore the Yakima Subbasin ecosystem with sustainable and harvestable populations of salmon, steelhead and other at-risk species. The original impetus for the YKFP resulted from the landmark fishing disputes of the 1970s, the ensuing legal decisions in United States versus Washington and United States versus Oregon, and the region's realization that lost natural production needed to be mitigated in upriver areas where these losses primarily occurred. The YKFP was first identified in the NPCC's 1982 Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) and supported in the U.S. v Oregon 1988 Columbia River Fish Management Plan (CRFMP). A draft Master Plan was presented to the NPCC in 1987 and the Preliminary Design Report was presented in 1990. In both circumstances, the NPCC instructed the Yakama Nation, WDFW and BPA to carry out planning functions that addressed uncertainties in regard to the adequacy of hatchery supplementation for meeting production objectives and limiting adverse ecological and genetic impacts. At the same time, the NPCC underscored the importance of using adaptive management principles to manage the direction of the Project. The 1994 FWP reiterated the importance of proceeding with the YKFP because of the added production and learning potential the project would provide. The YKFP is unique in having been designed to rigorously test the efficacy of hatchery supplementation. Given the current dire situation of many salmon and steelhead stocks, and the heavy reliance on artificial propagation as a recovery tool, YKFP monitoring results will have great region-wide significance. Supplementation is envisioned as a means to enhance and sustain the abundance of wild and naturally-spawning populations at levels exceeding the cumulative mortality burden imposed on those populations by habitat degradation and by natural cycles in environmental conditions. A supplementation hatchery is properly operated as an adjunct to the natural production system in a watershed. By fully integrating the hatchery with a naturally-producing population, high survival rates for the component of the population in the hatchery can raise the average abundance of the total population (hatchery component + naturally-producing component) to a level that compensates for the high mortalities imposed by human development activities and fully seeds the natural environment. The objectives of the YKFP are to: use Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) and other modeling tools to facilitate planning for project activities, enhance existing stocks, re-introduce extirpated stocks, protect and restore habitat in the Yakima Subbasin, and operate using a scientifically rigorous process that will foster application of the knowledge gained about hatchery supplementation and habitat restoration throughout the Columbia River Basin. The YKFP is still in the early stages of evaluation, and as such the data and findings presented in this report should be considered preliminary until results are published in the peer-reviewed literature. The following is a brief summary of current YKFP activities by species.

  7. Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Program, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bronson, James P. (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR); Duke, Bill B. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Pendleton, OR)

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the late 1990s, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with many other agencies, began implementing fisheries restoration activities in the Walla Walla Basin. An integral part of these efforts is to alleviate the inadequate fish migration conditions in the basin. The migration concerns are being addressed by removing diversion structures, constructing fish passage facilities, implementing minimum instream flow requirements, and providing trap and haul efforts when needed. The objective of the Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project is to increase the survival of migrating adult and juvenile salmonids in the Walla Walla River basin. The project is responsible for coordinating operation and maintenance of ladders, screen sites, bypasses, trap facilities, and transportation equipment. In addition, the project provides technical input on passage criteria and passage and trapping facility design and operation. Operation of the various passage facilities and passage criteria guidelines are outlined in an annual operations plan that the project develops. During the 2004-2005 project year, there were 590 adult summer steelhead, 31 summer steelhead kelts (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 70 adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus); 80 adult and 1 jack spring Chinook (O. tshawytscha) enumerated at the Nursery Bridge Dam fishway video counting window between December 13, 2004, and June 16, 2005. Summer steelhead and spring chinook were observed moving upstream while bull trout were observed moving both upstream and downstream of the facility. In addition, the old ladder trap was operated by ODFW in order to enumerate fish passage. Of the total, 143 adult summer steelhead and 15 summer steelhead kelts were enumerated at the west ladder at Nursery Bridge Dam during the video efforts between February 4 and May 23, 2005. Operation of the Little Walla Walla River juvenile trap for trap and haul purposes was not necessary this year.

  8. Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Program, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bronson, James P. (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR); Duke, Bill B. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Pendleton, OR)

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the late 1990's, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with many other agencies, began implementing fisheries restoration activities in the Walla Walla Basin. An integral part of these efforts is to alleviate the inadequate fish migration conditions in the basin. The migration concerns are being addressed by removing diversion structures, constructing fish passage facilities, implementing minimum instream flow requirements, and initiating trap and haul efforts. The objective of the Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project is to increase the survival of migrating adult and juvenile salmonids in the Walla Walla River basin. The project is responsible for coordinating operation and maintenance of ladders, screen sites, bypasses, trap facilities, and transportation equipment. In addition, the project provides technical input on passage criteria and passage and trapping facility design and operation. Operation of the various passage facilities and passage criteria guidelines are outlined in an annual operations plan that the project develops. During the 2002-2003 project year, there were 545 adult summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 29 adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus); 1 adult and 1 jack spring chinook (O. tshawytscha) enumerated at the Nursery Bridge Dam fishway adult trap between January 1 and June 23, 2003. Summer steelhead and spring chinook were observed moving upstream while bull trout were observed moving both upstream and downstream of the facility. Operation of the Little Walla Walla River juvenile trap for trap and haul purposes was not necessary this year. The project transported 21 adult spring chinook from Ringold Springs Hatchery and 281 from Threemile Dam to the South Fork Walla Walla Brood Holding Facility. Of these, 290 were outplanted in August for natural spawning in the basin.

  9. Portugal, Canada Discuss Marine Fisheries Results of the first full year of joint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portugal, Canada Discuss Marine Fisheries Results of the first full year of joint research may be used to obtain deferment of taxes on certain income derived from commercial fishing operations in the Federal Register the week of 22 Sep- tember 1975. Di rector Named for NOAA oes Environment Program Rudolf

  10. Environmental Assessment/Regulatory Impact Review AMENDMENT 45 TO THE FISHERY MANAGEMENT PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Assessment/Regulatory Impact Review FOR AMENDMENT 45 TO THE FISHERY MANAGEMENT PLAN it would conflict with the Bering Sea non-roe season. At its January 1996 meeting, the Council considered/C Regulatory Areas must be made. Amendment 19 to the FMP, implemented as a measure to prevent roe stripping

  11. NOM's National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) is working to reduce these threats to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    human actˇvˇtˇes, such as dredging in the marˇne envˇronment 0r the ˇntakes of power plants, may ˇnc power plants often take in sea water to cool the reactors. Sea turtles may be trapped against intakeNOM's National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) is working to reduce these threats to help conserve

  12. FISHERY WASTE EFFLUENTS: A METHOD TO DETERMINE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN CHEMICAL OXYGEN DEMAND AND RESIDUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISHERY WASTE EFFLUENTS: A METHOD TO DETERMINE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN CHEMICAL OXYGEN DEMAND effluents, especially for total suspended and settleable solids, and oil and grease. The relationship between chemical oxygen demand and residue was determined on a limited number of samples from four types

  13. APRIL 3 10:3011:30am Rm 102 Status and Future of Recreational Fisheries in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Richard

    Anderson, Director, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) APRIL 8 5:00­6:00pm Rm 107 Evolution of Saltwater Recreational Fisheries in Washington State Tony Floor, Director, Fishing Affairs, NW Marine Trade APRIL 17 10:30am­12:20pm Rm 102 A) Involving Youth in Recreational Fishing B) Management and Status

  14. Fish Oil Research, 1920-87, in the National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fish Oil Research, 1920-87, in the National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA MAURICE E. STANSBY fatty acids (which occur almost exclusively in the oil of fish) may have beneficial effects in re ducing research has also been carried out by laboratories of this agency on other aspects of fish oils which have

  15. Reviews in Fisheries Science, 19(3):305315, 2011 Copyright C Taylor and Francis Group, LLC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olden, Julian D.

    . More recently, smallmouth bass have become a large component of the fish community in many streams bass and largemouth bass (M. salmoides). The black bass fishery supports millions of angler fishing: 1064-1262 print / 1547-6553 online DOI: 10.1080/10641262.2011.598584 Smallmouth Bass in the Pacific

  16. ORIGINAL PAPER Arctic fisheries catches in Russia, USA, and Canada: baselines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauly, Daniel

    years due to climate change. The Arctic is one of the last and most extensive ocean wilderness areas climate change pressures, is considerable. The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization's (FAOORIGINAL PAPER Arctic fisheries catches in Russia, USA, and Canada: baselines for neglected

  17. Annual Status of the Fisheries Report 2-1 2. BULL KELP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Annual Status of the Fisheries Report 2-1 2. BULL KELP Overview of Use and Harvest Bull kelp-consumptive users such as scuba divers. Because of the multiple uses of bull kelp, management concerns are much more complex than for most species. Until the late 1980s, there was little targeted harvest of bull kelp

  18. Dynamics of a fishery on two fishing zones with fish stock dependent migrations: aggregation and control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bravo de la Parra, Rafael

    Dynamics of a fishery on two fishing zones with fish stock dependent migrations: aggregation a specific stock-effort dynamic model. The stock corresponds to two fish populations growing and moving between two fishing zones, on which they are harvested by two different fleets. The effort represents

  19. Vulnerability of national economies to the impacts of climate change on fisheries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, John D.

    economies and diets, and limited societal capacity to adapt to potential impacts and opportunities. Many the world's poorest and twice as reliant on fish, which provides 27% of dietary protein compared to 13 but lack the capacity to adapt. Keywords Adaptation, climate change, fisheries, poverty, vulnerability

  20. PRODUCTIVITY GAINS IN U.S. FISHERIES . FREDERICK W. BELL AND RICHARD K. KINOSHITA I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PRODUCTIVITY GAINS IN U.S. FISHERIES . FREDERICK W. BELL AND RICHARD K. KINOSHITA I ABSTRACT Changes in productivity or annual landings per fisherman help to determine the economic welfare of the fishing industry. Although a study of productivity gains in various U.S. fishing fleets over the last 20

  1. Irish Fisheries Investigations No. 17 F-PRESS: A Stochastic Simulation Tool for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Codling, Edward A.

    to fit in with the ICES conceptual framework for software development. F-PRESS can be used to developIrish Fisheries Investigations No. 17 F-PRESS: A Stochastic Simulation Tool for Developing ........................................................................................................................... 32 Appendix I - Summary of F-PRESS key points

  2. OVERLAP OF PREDICTED COLD-WATER CORAL HABITAT AND BOTTOM-CONTACT FISHERIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OVERLAP OF PREDICTED COLD-WATER CORAL HABITAT AND BOTTOM-CONTACT FISHERIES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA of Resource Management Title of Thesis: Overlap of predicted cold-water coral habitat and bottom- contact-contact fishing on cold-water corals (class Anthozoa) due to the role corals play in providing biogenic habitat

  3. A potpourri of emerging issues that Fisheries Science will have to deal with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limburg, Karin E.

    absorbed approximately 525 billion tons of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, or about one third of the anthropogenic carbon emissions released... "...the ocean's uptake of carbon dioxide is having negative impacts and fisheries · Properties of water · Quantities of water · Water where it is, and where it will be (sea

  4. A potpourri of emerging issues that Fisheries Science will have to deal with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limburg, Karin E.

    oceans have absorbed approximately 525 billion tons of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, or about one third of the anthropogenic carbon emissions released... "...the ocean's uptake of carbon dioxide fisheries · Properties of water · Quantities of water · Water where it is, and where it will be (sea

  5. LETTER doi:10.1038/nature12156 Signature of ocean warming in global fisheries catch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauly, Daniel

    LETTER doi:10.1038/nature12156 Signature of ocean warming in global fisheries catch William W. L changes in sea surface temperature5 . This study shows that ocean warming has already affected global. Cheung1 , Reg Watson2 & Daniel Pauly3 Marine fishes and invertebrates respond to ocean warming through

  6. SOCIO-CULTURAL BARRIERS TO APPLYING FISHERS' KNOWLEDGE IN FISHERIES MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SOCIO-CULTURAL BARRIERS TO APPLYING FISHERS' KNOWLEDGE IN FISHERIES MANAGEMENT: AN EVALUATION In the School of Resource and Environmental Management © Cristina Graciela Soto 2006 SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY written permission. Multimedia materials, if any: No separate DVD or CD-ROM material is included

  7. Savannah River Plant/Savannah River Laboratory radiation exposure report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, C.D.; Hyman, S.D.; Keisler, L.L. (Du Pont de Nemours (E.I.) and Co., Aiken, SC (USA). Savannah River Plant); Reeder, D.F.; Jolly, L.; Spoerner, M.T.; Schramm, G.R. (Du Pont de Nemours (E.I.) and Co., Aiken, SC (USA). Savannah River Lab.)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The protection of worker health and safety is of paramount concern at the Savannah River Site. Since the site is one of the largest nuclear sites in the nation, radiation safety is a key element in the protection program. This report is a compendium of the results in 1988 of the programs at the Savannah River Plant and the Savannah River Laboratory to protect the radiological health of employees. By any measure, the radiation protection performance at this site in 1988 was the best since the beginning of operations. This accomplishment was made possible by the commitment and support at all levels of the organizations to reduce radiation exposures to ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable). The report provides detailed information about the radiation doses received by departments and work groups within these organizations. It also includes exposure data for recent years to allow Plant and Laboratory units to track the effectiveness of their ALARA efforts. Many of the successful practices and methods that reduced radiation exposure are described. A new goal for personnel contamination cases has been established for 1989. Only through continual and innovative efforts to minimize exposures can the goals be met. The radiation protection goals for 1989 and previous years are included in the report. 27 figs., 58 tabs.

  8. Captive Rearing Program for Salmon River Chinook Salmon, 2000 Project Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venditti, David A.

    2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 2000, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) continued to develop techniques to rear chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha to sexual maturity in captivity and to monitor their reproductive performance under natural conditions. Eyed-eggs were collected to establish captive cohorts from three study streams and included 503 eyed-eggs from East Fork Salmon River (EFSR), 250 from the Yankee Fork Salmon River, and 304 from the West Fork Yankee Fork Salmon River (WFYF). After collection, the eyed-eggs were immediately transferred to the Eagle Fish Hatchery, where they were incubated and reared by family group. Juveniles collected the previous summer were PIT and elastomer tagged and vaccinated against vibrio Vibrio spp. and bacterial kidney disease before the majority (approximately 75%) were transferred to the National Marine Fisheries Service, Manchester Marine Experimental Station for saltwater rearing through sexual maturity. Smolt transfers included 158 individuals from the Lemhi River (LEM), 193 from the WFYF, and 372 from the EFSR. Maturing fish transfers from the Manchester facility to the Eagle Fish Hatchery included 77 individuals from the LEM, 45 from the WFYF, and 11 from the EFSR. Two mature females from the WFYF were spawned in captivity with four males in 2000. Only one of the females produced viable eggs (N = 1,266), which were placed in in-stream incubators by personnel from the Shoshone-Bannock Tribe. Mature adults (N = 70) from the Lemhi River were released into Big Springs Creek to evaluate their reproductive performance. After release, fish distributed themselves throughout the study section and displayed a progression of habitat associations and behavior consistent with progressing maturation and the onset of spawning. Fifteen of the 17 suspected redds spawned by captive-reared parents in Big Springs Creek were hydraulically sampled to assess survival to the eyed stage of development. Eyed-eggs were collected from 13 of these, and survival ranged from 0% to 96%, although there was evidence that some eggs had died after reaching the eyed stage. Six redds were capped in an attempt to document fry emergence, but none were collected. A final hydraulic sampling of the capped redds yielded nothing from five of the six, but 75 dead eggs and one dead fry were found in the sixth. Smothering by fine sediment is the suspected cause of the observed mortality between the eyed stage and fry emergence.

  9. Survival Estimates for the Passage of Spring-Migrating Juvenile Salmonids through Snake and Columbia River Dams and Reservoirs, 2005-2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven G.; Muir, William D.; Marsh, Douglas M. (National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Fish Ecology Division, Seattle, WA)

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2005, the National Marine Fisheries Service and the University of Washington completed the thirteenth year of a study to estimate survival and travel time of juvenile salmonids Oncorhynchus spp. passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. All estimates were derived from detections of fish tagged with passive integrated transponder tags (PIT tags). We PIT tagged and released a total of 18,439 hatchery steelhead, 5,315 wild steelhead, and 6,964 wild yearling Chinook salmon at Lower Granite Dam in the Snake River. In addition, we utilized fish PIT tagged by other agencies at traps and hatcheries upstream from the hydropower system and at sites within the hydropower system in both the Snake and Columbia Rivers. PIT-tagged smolts were detected at interrogation facilities at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, Ice Harbor, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams and in the PIT-tag detector trawl operated in the Columbia River estuary. Survival estimates were calculated using a statistical model for tag-recapture data from single release groups (the ''single-release model''). Primary research objectives in 2005 were: (1) Estimate reach survival and travel time in the Snake and Columbia Rivers throughout the migration period of yearling Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha and steelhead O. mykiss. (2) Evaluate relationships between survival estimates and migration conditions. (3) Evaluate the survival estimation models under prevailing conditions. This report provides reach survival and travel time estimates for 2005 for PIT-tagged yearling Chinook salmon (hatchery and wild), hatchery sockeye salmon O. nerka, hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch, and steelhead (hatchery and wild) in the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Additional details on the methodology and statistical models used are provided in previous reports cited here.

  10. The River Runs Dry: Examining Water Shortages in the Yellow River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zusman, Eric

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Runs Dry: Examining Water Shortages in the Yellow Riverof the severity of water shortages in the river’s basin. Ina median level of runoff water shortages in the basin would

  11. StreamNet; Northwest Aquatic Resource Information Network - Status of Salmon and Steelhead in the Columbia River Basin, 1995 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Duane A.; Beamesderfer, Raymond C. [Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, Enterprise, OR (United States); Woodard, Bob [Washington Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA (United States)

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information on fish populations, fisheries, and fish habitat is crucial to the success of ongoing program to protect, recover, enhance, and manage fish resources in the Columbia River Basin. However, pertinent data are often difficult to locate because it is scattered among many agencies and is often unpublished. The goal of this annual report is to bring many diverse data types and sources into a single comprehensive report on the status of anadromous fish runs in the Columbia River Basin and the environmental conditions that may affect that status. Brief summaries are provided to identify the type and scope of available information. This synopsis is intended to complement other more detailed reports to which readers are referred for comprehensive treatment of specific subjects. This first report focuses mainly on anadromous salmon and steelhead (primarily through 1994) but the authors intend to expand the scope of future issues to include resident species. This is the first of what the authors intend to be an annual report. They welcome constructive suggestions for improvements. This report is a product of the StreamNet (formerly Coordinated Information System and Northwest Environmental Data Base) project which is a part of the Bonneville Power Administration`s program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. The project is called for in the Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power Planning Council. The project`s objective is to promote exchange and dissemination of information in a standardized electronic format throughout the basin. This project is administered by the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission with active participation by tribal, state, and federal fish and wildlife agencies.

  12. Population dynamics and movements of skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) in the Maldivian fishery: analysis of tagging data from an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Population dynamics and movements of skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) in the Maldivian fishery du listao (Katsuwonus pelamis) dans la pêcherie des Maldives : analyse des données de marquage au

  13. New Columbia River Estuary purchases benefit salmon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the mouth of the Columbia River to permanently protect riverside habitat for Northwest fish and wildlife, including threatened and endangered salmon and steelhead. The...

  14. Project Management Institute Highlights Savannah River Nuclear...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    employee Matthew Gay uses critical electronic rounds to take a reading at the Savannah River National Laboratory. In one Continuous Improvement initiative, SRNS switched to...

  15. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, July 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M. [comp.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation; tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  16. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, July 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M. (comp.)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation; tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  17. PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Electronic Safeguards...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    System (E3S) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Electronic Safeguards Security System (E3S) More Documents & Publications PIA - 10th International Nuclear Graphite...

  18. Lumbee River EMC- Residential Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lumbee River EMC (LREMC) offers rebates to its residential customers who purchase and install qualified energy efficient products or services. Rebates are available for water heaters, refrigerator...

  19. The Columbia River System Inside Story

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Columbia River is one of the greatest natural resources in the western United States. The river and its tributaries touch the lives of nearly every resident of the Pacific Northwest—from fostering world-famous Pacific salmon to supplying clean natural fuel for 50 to 65 percent of the region’s electrical generation. Since early in the 20th century, public and private agencies have labored to capture the benefits of this dynamic river. Today, dozens of major water resource projects throughout the region are fed by the waters of the Columbia Basin river system.

  20. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, August 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M. [comp.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  1. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, August 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M. (comp.)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  2. South River EMC- Energy Efficient Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    South River EMC offers a variety of rebates encouragings its members to invest in energy efficient appliances, equipment, and home upgrades. Incentives are available for clothes washers,...

  3. Wild and Scenic Rivers Act (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is state policy to protect the outstanding scenic, geologic, ecologic, historic, recreational, agricultural, fish, wildlife, cultural, and other similar values of certain rivers and adjacent...

  4. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, September 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M. (comp.)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  5. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, September 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, J.M. [comp.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  6. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Westinghouse Savannah River...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Notice of Violation, Westinghouse Savannah River Company - EA-2000-08 Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the September 1, 1999, Plutonium Intakes at the...

  7. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Westinghouse Savannah River...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Westinghouse Savannah River Company - EA-2000-08 More Documents & Publications Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the September 1, 1999, Plutonium Intakes at the...

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: river current energy converters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    marine hydrokinetic (MHK) reference models (RMs) for wave energy converters and tidal, ocean, and river current energy converters. The RMP team includes a partnership between...

  9. Comparative Evaluation of Generalized River/Reservoir System Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph A.

    This report reviews user-oriented generalized reservoir/river system models. The terms reservoir/river system, reservoir system, reservoir operation, or river basin management "model" or "modeling system" are used synonymously to refer to computer...

  10. Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polacek, Matt; Knuttgen, Kamia; Shipley, Rochelle

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife implemented the Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Project (BLFEP) in September 2001 with funds from the Bonneville Power Administration. Fiscal Year (FY) 2001 of the BLFEP was used to gather historic information, establish methods and protocols, collect limnology data, and conduct the first seasonal fish surveys. FY 2002 was used to continue seasonal fish and lakewide creel surveys and adjust methods and protocols as needed. Water quality parameters were collected monthly from February to May and bi-monthly from June to August. Banks Lake water temperatures began to increase in April and stratification was apparent by June at all 3 limnology collection sites. By late August, the thermocline had dropped to nearly 20 meters deep, with 16-17 C temperatures throughout the epilimnion. Dissolved oxygen levels were generally above 10 mg/L until August when dissolved oxygen dropped near or below 5 mg/L below 20-meters deep. Secchi depths ranged from 2.5-8 meters and varied by location and date. Nearshore and offshore fish surveys were conducted in October 2002 and May and July 2003 using boat electrofishing, fyke net, gill net, and hydroacoustic surveys. Yellow Perch Perca flavescens (32 %) and cottid spp. (22 %) dominated the nearshore species composition in October; however, by May yellow perch (12 %) were the third most common species followed by smallmouth bass Micropterous dolomieui (34 %) and lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis (14 %). Lake whitefish dominated the offshore catch during October (78 %) and May (81 %). Fish diet analysis indicated that juvenile fishes consumed primarily insects and zooplankton, while adult piscivores consumed cottids spp. and yellow perch most frequently. For FY 2002, the following creel statistics are comprehensive through August 31, 2003. The highest angling pressure occurred in June 2003, when anglers were primarily targeting walleye and smallmouth bass. Boat anglers utilized Steamboat State Park more frequently than any other boat ramp on Banks Lake. Shore anglers used the rock jetty at Coulee City Park 76 % of the time, with highest use occurring from November through April. An estimated total of 11,915 ({+-}140 SD) smallmouth bass, 6,412 ({+-}59 SD) walleye, 5,470 ({+-}260 SD) rainbow trout, and 1,949 ({+-}118 SD) yellow perch were harvested from Banks Lake in FY 2002. Only 3 kokanee were reported in the catch during the FY 2002 creel survey. In the future, data from the seasonal surveys and creel will be used to identify potential factors that may limit the production and harvest of kokanee, rainbow trout, and various spiny-rayed fishes in Banks Lake. The limiting factors that will be examined consist of: abiotic factors including water temperature, dissolved oxygen levels, habitat, exploitation and entrainment; and biotic factors including food limitation and predation. The BLFEP will also evaluate the success of several rearing and stocking strategies for hatchery kokanee in Banks Lake.

  11. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Hatchery Element, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willard, Catherine; Baker, Dan J.; Heindel, Jeff A. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases (annual report to the Bonneville Power Administration for the research element of the program) are also reported separately. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2002 for the hatchery element of the program are presented in this report. n 2002, 22 anadromous sockeye salmon returned to the Sawtooth Valley. Fifteen of these adults were captured at adult weirs located on the upper Salmon River and on Redfish Lake Creek. Seven of the anadromous sockeye salmon that returned were observed below the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery weir and allowed to migrate upstream volitionally (following the dismantling of the weir on September 30, 2002). All adult returns were released to Redfish Lake for natural spawning. Based on their marks, returning adult sockeye salmon originated from a variety of release options. Sixty-six females from brood year 1999 and 28 females from brood year 2000 captive broodstock groups were spawned at the Eagle Hatchery in 2002. Spawn pairings produced approximately 65,838 eyed-eggs with egg survival to eyed stage of development averaging 55.1%. Presmolts (140,410), smolts (38,672), and adults (190) were planted or released into Sawtooth Valley waters in 2002. Reintroduction strategies involved releases to Redfish Lake, Redfish Lake Creek, Alturas Lake, and Pettit Lake. During this reporting period, five broodstocks and three unique production groups were in culture at Idaho Department of Fish and Game facilities (Eagle Fish Hatchery and Sawtooth Fish Hatchery). Three of the five broodstocks were incorporated into the 2002 spawning design, and one broodstock was terminated following the completion of spawning.

  12. Lesson Learned by Savannah River Site Activity-level Work Planning and Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slide Presentation by Bonnie Barnes, Savannah River Remediation. Work Planning and Control at Savannah River Remediation.

  13. Savannah River Field Office | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics Savannah River Field Office Savannah River Field Office FY15 Semi Annual Report...

  14. CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A...

  15. alligator rivers region: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by meandering rivers Geosciences Websites Summary: Numerical simulations of bedrock valley evolution by meandering rivers with variable bank material of many landscapes, and...

  16. aliakmon river greece: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by meandering rivers Geosciences Websites Summary: Numerical simulations of bedrock valley evolution by meandering rivers with variable bank material of many landscapes, and...

  17. allegheny river: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by meandering rivers Geosciences Websites Summary: Numerical simulations of bedrock valley evolution by meandering rivers with variable bank material of many landscapes, and...

  18. almendares river havana: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by meandering rivers Geosciences Websites Summary: Numerical simulations of bedrock valley evolution by meandering rivers with variable bank material of many landscapes, and...

  19. amu dar river: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by meandering rivers Geosciences Websites Summary: Numerical simulations of bedrock valley evolution by meandering rivers with variable bank material of many landscapes, and...

  20. amazon river system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Land Use in indigenous and Colonist Communities of the Palcazu Basin, Peruvian Amazon McClain, Michael 159 Charlotte, Manatee River, Sarasota, Hardee, and Peace River Soil Biology...