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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "home heating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Reducing home heating and cooling costs  

SciTech Connect

This report is in response to a request from the House Committee on Energy and Commerce that the Energy Information Administration (EIA) undertake a neutral, unbiased analysis of the cost, safety, and health and environmental effects of the three major heating fuels: heating oil, natural gas, and electricity. The Committee also asked EIA to examine the role of conservation in the choice of heating and cooling fuel. To accommodate a wide audience, EIA decided to respond to the Committee`s request in the context of a report on reducing home heating and cooling costs. Accordingly, this report discusses ways to weatherize the home, compares the features of the three major heating and cooling fuels, and comments on the types of heating and cooling systems on the market. The report also includes a worksheet and supporting tables that will help in the selection of a heating and/or cooling system.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Reducing Home Heating and Cooling Costs  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . . . . . . . . . . . 19 B1. Annual Cost of Oil Heat in Various Climates for a Range of Heating Oil Prices and System Efficiencies . . . . . 21 B2. Annual Cost of Gas Heat in...

3

#tipsEnergy: Saving on Home Heating Costs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

tipsEnergy: Saving on Home Heating Costs tipsEnergy: Saving on Home Heating Costs November 23, 2012 - 3:37pm Addthis Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Digital Communications...

4

#tipsEnergy: Saving on Home Heating Costs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Saving on Home Heating Costs Saving on Home Heating Costs #tipsEnergy: Saving on Home Heating Costs November 23, 2012 - 3:37pm Addthis Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs #tipsEnergy: Saving on Home Heating Costs A feature on the Energy Department's Twitter account, #tipsEnergy highlights ways to save energy and money at home. Once a month, we ask you to share your energy-saving tips so the larger energy community can learn from you, and we feature some of the best tips in a Storify. Storified by Energy Department · Fri, Nov 23 2012 12:37:07 As we head into December, the cold weather season is officially upon us, and nowhere is that more evident than on your utility bills. Home heating and cooling uses more energy than any other

5

Our winters of discontent: Addressing the problem of rising home-heating costs1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on fossil fuels by using solar energy, reducing residential energy demand, and promoting district heating. 1ERG/200602 Our winters of discontent: Addressing the problem of rising home-heating costs1 Larry Residential space heating is a necessity in northern countries such as Canada. With over 70 percent

Hughes, Larry

6

Incremental cost of electricity used as backup for passive heated homes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The impact of passive technologies on a north-central US utility has been studied. A method of utility cost and fuel use analysis, developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory, was used to compute the long run incremental costs and incremental fuel use required for supplementary electricity to houses with Trombe walls or with direct gain features. For comparison, a reference house with no passive features and a house with an energy conservation design were also analyzed. The results show that the total long run incremental cost to the utility of providing supplementary power to the passive houses costs no more than the cost to supply electricity to heat the reference house or the conservation house. An analysis of the annual homeowner costs for the various types of heating systems suggests that the Trombe wall technology is not promising for use in this climate. The passive technologies, as modelled in this study reduced the requirements for conventional energy by about 10% (7 to 10 kilojoules/year). For all of the house types studied, the use of electricity for heating, instead of oil or gas, reduced the overall (utility plus residential) use of oil or gas by only about 30 to 40% even out through the 1990's.

Martorella, J; Bright, R; Davitian, H

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil)...

8

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating...

9

Solar home heating in Michigan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This booklet presents the fundamentals of solar heating for both new and existing homes. A variety of systems for space heating and household water heating are explained, and examples are shown of solar homes and installations in Michigan.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Home heating system  

SciTech Connect

A home heating system is disclosed that has a furnace with a combustion chamber for burning fuel and creating heat, and a chimney with a draft therein. An improvement is described that has an exhaust flue connected between the combustion chamber and the chimney for venting heated exhaust products from the furnace, a heat reclaimer connected into the exhaust flue between the combustion chamber and the chimney for reclaiming heat from the heated exhaust product, and an outside air line for supplying air from the outside of the house to the combustion chamber. A first flue portion of the exhaust flue is connected between the combustion chamber and the heat reclaimer, and a second insulated flue portion of the exhaust flue is connected between the heat reclaimer and the chimney. An outside air by-pass or balancing line is connected between the outside air line and the chimney for satisfying the chimney suction at flame-out. A flow sensing and regulating device may be connected into the outside air line for regulating the flow or air so that outside air is supplied to the furnace only when fuel is burned therein.

Bellaff, L.

1980-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

11

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System Heating Oil, PIA Office...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System Heating Oil, PIA Office of Fossil Energy Headquaters Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System Heating Oil, PIA Office of Fossil Energy...

12

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Information on the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve is available from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Petroleum Reserves web site at http://www.fossil.energy.gov/programs/reserves/heatingoil/. Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR) inventories now classified as ultra-low sulfur distillate (15 parts per million) are not considered to be in the commercial sector and therefore are excluded from distillate fuel oil supply and disposition statistics in Energy Information Administration publications, such as the Weekly Petroleum Status Report, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and This Week In Petroleum. Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Terminal Operator Location (Thousand Barrels) Hess Corp. Groton, CT 500*

13

Economic Analysis of Home Heating and Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the last eleven years Houston Lighting & Power has raised utility rates an average of 17% per year. Over the last 3 1/2 years the utility rates have doubled. According to Houston City Magazine, Houstonians can expect future raises of 20-25% annually due to required construction of new utility plants to accommodate Houston's future growth. Utility costs could, and in many cases do, exceed the monthly mortgage payment. This has caused all to become concerned with what can be done to lower the utility bill for homes. In a typical Gulf Coast home approximately 50% of household utility costs are due to the air conditioning system, another 15-20% of utility costs are attributed to hot water heating. The remaining items in the home including lights, toaster, washer, dryer, etc. are relatively minor compared to these two "energy gulpers". Reducing air conditioning and hot water heating costs are therefore the two items on which homeowners should concentrate.

Wagers, H. L.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

PreHeat: controlling home heating using occupancy prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Home heating is a major factor in worldwide energy use. Our system, PreHeat, aims to more efficiently heat homes by using occupancy sensing and occupancy prediction to automatically control home heating. We deployed PreHeat in five homes, three in the ... Keywords: energy, environment, home heating, prediction, sensing

James Scott; A.J. Bernheim Brush; John Krumm; Brian Meyers; Michael Hazas; Stephen Hodges; Nicolas Villar

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Overview: Home Heating Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- 8:17am Addthis Home heating accounts for about 30 percent of the energy used in the home. | Photo courtesy iStockphoto.com Home heating accounts for about 30 percent of the...

16

Evaluating home heating options in Krakow  

SciTech Connect

The city of Krakow, Poland, has poor air quality due, in part, to widespread use of coal for heating. Engineering analyses have been conducted to determine the technical feasibility and capital costs for a number of options for reducing pollution from home heating sources. Capital costs range from $90 per kilowatt (kW) to connect local boiler-houses to the district heating system to $227/kW to upgrade the electrical system and convert coal stoves to electric heat. Air quality analyses have estimated the reduction in pollutant emissions as well as in pollutant concentrations that would result from implementing the options under consideration. Significant reductions can be obtained at a lower cost by using briquettes instead of coal in home stoves than by converting the stoves to electricity or gas. Finally, incentives analyses are examining the cost-effectiveness of the various alternatives and identifying possible incentives that the city could provide to encourage adoption of less-polluting technologies and practices.

Bleda, J.; Nedoma, J.; Bardel, J.; Pierce, B.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve - Guidelines for Release ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heating Oil Reserve Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve - Guidelines for Release Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve - Guidelines for Release Petroleum Reserves Strategic...

18

Economics of the attached solar greenhouse for home heating  

SciTech Connect

For several years, passive solar heating has been considered to be very attractive (economically and otherwise) for home heating in the U.S. Unfortunately passive systems are not as easily analyzed as active systems from an engineering and economic performance point of view. This problem is addressed, and an economic assessment of the solar greenhouse is given. Using simple heat balance analysis, a greenhouse performance model is developed for assessing heat available for home space conditioning from an add-on solar greenhouse. This forms the basis for an engineering-economic model for assessing the economic viability of the add-on solar greenhouse for home heating. Model variables include climatic factors, local costs, alternate fuels and system size. This model is then used to examine several locations in the U.S. for the economic attractiveness of the add-on solar greenhouse for space heating.

Kolstad, C.D.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Energy Saver 101: Home Heating | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Saver 101: Home Heating Energy Saver 101: Home Heating Energy Saver 101: Home Heating Space heating is likely the largest energy expense in your home, accounting for about 45 percent of the average American family's energy bills. That means making smart decisions about your home's heating system can have a big impact on your energy bills. Our Energy Saver 101 infographic lays out everything you need to know about home heating -- from how heating systems work and the different types on the market to what to look for when replacing your system and proper maintenance. Download individual sections of the infographic or a high resolution version now. homeHeating.pdf homeHeating_slide-01.png homeHeating_slide-02.png homeHeating_slide-03.png homeHeating_slide-04.png homeHeating_slide-05.png

20

Energy Saver 101: Home Heating | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Energy Saver 101: Home Heating Energy Saver 101: Home Heating Space heating is likely the largest energy expense in your home, accounting for about 45 percent of the average American family's energy bills. That means making smart decisions about your home's heating system can have a big impact on your energy bills. Our Energy Saver 101 infographic lays out everything you need to know about home heating -- from how heating systems work and the different types on the market to what to look for when replacing your system and proper maintenance. Download individual sections of the infographic or a high resolution version now. homeHeating.pdf homeHeating_slide-01.png homeHeating_slide-02.png homeHeating_slide-03.png homeHeating_slide-04.png homeHeating_slide-05.png

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "home heating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

What solar heating costs  

SciTech Connect

Few people know why solar energy systems cost what they do. Designers and installers know what whole packages cost, but rarely how much goes to piping, how much for labor and how much for the collectors. Yet one stands a better chance of controlling costs if one can compare where the money is going against where it should be going. A detailed Tennessee Valley Authority study of large solar projects shows how much each component contributes to the total bill.

Adams, J.A.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Do Households Smooth Small Consumption Shocks? Evidence from Anticipated and Unanticipated Variation in Home Energy Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural gas, and home heating oil prices averaged over thein 2000 and 2001. Home heating oil prices show a similarstate. Information on home heating oil prices comes from

Cullen, Julie Berry; Friedberg, Leora; Wolfram, Catherine

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Consumer Winter Heating Oil Costs  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: The outlook for heating oil costs this winter, due to high crude oil costs and tight heating oil supplies, breaks down to an expected increase in heating expenditures for a typical oil-heated household of more than $200 this winter, the result of an 18% increase in the average price and an 11% increase in consumption. The consumption increase is due to the colder than normal temperatures experienced so far this winter and our expectations of normal winter weather for the rest of this heating season. Last winter, Northeast heating oil (and diesel fuel) markets experienced an extremely sharp spike in prices when a severe weather situation developed in late January. It is virtually impossible to gauge the probability of a similar (or worse) price shock recurring this winter,

24

Heat Pump Water Heaters and American Homes: A Good Fit?  

SciTech Connect

Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) are over twice as energy-efficient as conventional electric resistance water heaters, with the potential to save substantial amounts of electricity. Drawing on analysis conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy's recently-concluded rulemaking on amended standards for water heaters, this paper evaluates key issues that will determine how well, and to what extent, this technology will fit in American homes. The key issues include: 1) equipment cost of HPWHs; 2) cooling of the indoor environment by HPWHs; 3) size and air flow requirements of HPWHs; 4) performance of HPWH under different climate conditions and varying hot water use patterns; and 5) operating cost savings under different electricity prices and hot water use. The paper presents the results of a life-cycle cost analysis of the adoption of HPWHs in a representative sample of American homes, as well as national impact analysis for different market share scenarios. Assuming equipment costs that would result from high production volume, the results show that HPWHs can be cost effective in all regions for most single family homes, especially when the water heater is not installed in a conditioned space. HPWHs are not cost effective for most manufactured home and multi-family installations, due to lower average hot water use and the water heater in the majority of cases being installed in conditioned space, where cooling of the indoor environment and size and air flow requirements of HPWHs increase installation costs.

Franco, Victor; Lekov, Alex; Meyers, Steve; Letschert, Virginie

2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

25

Home Heating | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

by automatically setting back your thermostat when you are asleep or away. Read more Wood and Pellet Heating Wood and pellets are renewable fuel sources, and modern wood and...

26

New York Home Heating Oil Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 of 15 5 of 15 Notes: The severity of this spot price increase is causing dramatic changes in residential home heating oil prices, although residential price movements are usually a little slower and spread out over time compared to spot prices. Wholesale prices increased over 50 cents from January 17 to January 24, while retail increased 44 cents in New York. Diesel prices are showing a similar pattern to residential home heating oil prices, and are indicating that home heating oil prices may not have peaked yet, although spot prices are dropping. Diesel prices in New England and the Mid-Atlantic increased 30-40 cents January 24 over the prior week, and another 13-15 cents January 31. Spot prices plummeted January 31, closing at 82 cents per gallon, indicating the worst part of the crisis may be over, but it is still a

27

STEO October 2012 - home heating supplies  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural gas, propane, and electricity supplies seen plentiful Natural gas, propane, and electricity supplies seen plentiful this winter for U.S. home heating Supplies of the major heating fuels used by most U.S. households are expected to be plentiful this winter, with the possible exception of heating oil, which is consumed mostly by households in the Northeast. Heating oil stocks are expected to be low in the East Coast and Gulf Coast states. And with New York state requiring heating oil with lower sulfur levels for the first time, the heating oil market is expected to be tighter this winter, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's new winter fuels forecast. However, U.S. inventories of natural gas, the most common primary heating fuel used by households and a key fuel for electricity generation, is expected to reach 3.9 trillion cubic feet by

28

DOE Seeks Commercial Storage for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Seeks Commercial Storage for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve DOE Seeks Commercial Storage for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve March 14, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington,...

29

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve - Guidelines for Release ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Guidelines for Release Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve - Guidelines for Release Petroleum Reserves Strategic Petroleum Reserve Heating Oil Reserve Naval Reserves International...

30

Energy conservation and solar heating for mobile homes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Project activities consisted of retro-fitting six (6) mobile homes with extensive energy-conservation improvements and installing solar-space-heating systems on four (4) of these homes. The intent of the project was to evaluate the potential of mobile homes as a low-cost energy-efficient housing option for low- to moderate income families. Using both hard and soft data, it is estimated that an average fuel reduction in excess of 35% was achieved by the conservation improvements alone. The project lacked the expertise and monitoring instruments to properly evaluate the effectiveness of the four solar installations and had to rely on the personal observations of the four families that received the units.

None

31

Bread Basket: a gaming model for estimating home-energy costs  

SciTech Connect

An instructional manual for answering the twenty variables on COLORADO ENERGY's computerized program estimating home energy costs. The program will generate home-energy cost estimates based on individual household data, such as total square footage, number of windows and doors, number and variety of appliances, heating system design, etc., and will print out detailed costs, showing the percentages of the total household budget that energy costs will amount to over a twenty-year span. Using the program, homeowners and policymakers alike can predict the effects of rising energy prices on total spending by Colorado households.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

DOE to Sell 35,000 Barrels of Oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Sell 35,000 Barrels of Oil from the Northeast Home Heating to Sell 35,000 Barrels of Oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve DOE to Sell 35,000 Barrels of Oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve May 24, 2007 - 4:16pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy announced today that it will sell approximately 35,000 barrels of home heating oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR). The Reserve's current 5-year storage contracts expire on September 30, 2007 and market conditions have caused new storage costs to rise to a level that exceeds available funds. Revenue from the sale will be used to supplement funds for the award of new long-term storage contracts that will begin on October 1, 2007. The Department will work with Congress to resolve these funding issues in order

33

DOE to Sell 35,000 Barrels of Oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sell 35,000 Barrels of Oil from the Northeast Home Heating Sell 35,000 Barrels of Oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve DOE to Sell 35,000 Barrels of Oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve May 24, 2007 - 4:16pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy announced today that it will sell approximately 35,000 barrels of home heating oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR). The Reserve's current 5-year storage contracts expire on September 30, 2007 and market conditions have caused new storage costs to rise to a level that exceeds available funds. Revenue from the sale will be used to supplement funds for the award of new long-term storage contracts that will begin on October 1, 2007. The Department will work with Congress to resolve these funding issues in order to restore the inventory of the Reserve to its full authorized size.

34

DOE Seeks Commercial Storage for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve DOE Seeks Commercial Storage for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve March 14, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Department of Energy, through its agent, DLA Energy, has issued a solicitation for new contracts to store two million barrels of ultra low sulfur distillate for the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve in New York Harbor and New England. Offers are due no later than 9:00 a.m. EDT on March 29, 2011. Of the U.S. households that use heating oil to heat their homes, 69% reside in the Northeast. The Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve was established by the Energy Policy Act of 2000 to provide an emergency buffer that can supplement commercial fuel supplies in the event of an actual or imminent severe supply disruption. The Reserve can provide supplemental supplies for

35

Field Measurements of Heating Efficiency of Electric Forced-Air Furnaces in Six Manufactured Homes.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of field measurements of heating efficiency for six manufactured homes in the Pacific Northwest heated with electric forced-air systems. This is the first in a series of regional and national efforts to measure in detail the heating efficiency of manufactured homes. Only six homes were included in this study because of budgetary constraints; therefore this is not a representative sample. These investigations do provide some useful information on the heating efficiency of these homes. Useful comparisons can be drawn between these study homes and site-built heating efficiencies measured with a similar protocol. The protocol used to test these homes is very similar to another Ecotope protocol used in the study conducted in 1992 and 1993 for the Bonneville Power Administration to test the heating efficiency of 24 homes. This protocol combined real-time power measurements of furnace energy usage with energy usage during co-heat periods. Accessory data such as house and duct tightness measurements and tracer gas measurements were used to describe these homes and their heating system efficiency. Ensuring that manufactured housing is constructed in an energy and resource efficient manner is of increasing concern to manufactured home builders and consumers. No comparable work has been done to measure the heating system efficiency of MCS manufactured homes, although some co-heat tests have been performed on manufactured homes heated with natural gas to validate HUD thermal standards. It is expected that later in 1994 more research of this kind will be conducted, and perhaps a less costly and less time-consuming method for testing efficiencies will be develops.

Davis, Bob; Palmiter, Larry S.; Siegel, Jeff

1994-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

36

BatPaC - Battery Performance and Cost model - Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

> BatPaC Home About BatPaC Download BatPaC Contact Us BatPaC: A Lithium-Ion Battery Performance and Cost Model for Electric-Drive Vehicles The recent penetration of...

37

Heat pumps and manufactured homes: Making the marriage work  

SciTech Connect

Manufactured homes make up over 7% of the US housing stock, including over 15% of the homes in North Carolina. As more of these homes are being equipped with heat pumps, it becomes important to figure out how to make these systems efficient. This article describes a number of ways of increasing the efficiency. The following topics are included: heat pump actual and rated capacity; heat pump sizing; air flow to the coil; indoor thermostat placement; outdoor thermostat; condensate; leaky ducts; pressure boundary breaches; pressure problems; what you should look for in heat pumps; manufactured housing - an evolutionary home.

Conlin, F.; Neal, C.L. [North Carolina Alternative Energy Corp., Raleigh, NC (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

New York Home Heating Oil Prices - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The severity of this spot price increase is causing dramatic changes in residential home heating oil prices, although residential price movements are usually a ...

39

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve now focuses on New England ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NHHOR) will be reduced to one million barrels, half its original size, as the stockpile's holdings are converted to ultra-low ...

40

Energy Saver 101 Infographic: Home Heating | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Saver 101 Infographic: Home Heating Saver 101 Infographic: Home Heating Energy Saver 101 Infographic: Home Heating December 16, 2013 - 10:48am Addthis Our new Energy Saver 101 infographic lays out everything you need to know about home heating -- from how heating systems work and the different types on the market to what to look for when replacing your system and proper maintenance. | Infographic by Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department. Our new Energy Saver 101 infographic lays out everything you need to know about home heating -- from how heating systems work and the different types on the market to what to look for when replacing your system and proper maintenance. | Infographic by Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department. Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "home heating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Question of the Week: How Do You Reduce Your Water Heating Costs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reduce Your Water Heating Costs Reduce Your Water Heating Costs Question of the Week: How Do You Reduce Your Water Heating Costs February 19, 2009 - 1:39pm Addthis Water heating can account for a significant portion of your energy costs. Purchasing a new ENERGY STAR® water heater is just one way to save on your water heating bills. The Energy Savers Tips site lists other strategies you can use to cut your water heating costs. How do you reduce your water heating costs? E-mail your responses to the Energy Saver team at consumer.webmaster@nrel.gov. Addthis Related Articles Question of the Week: How Do You Reduce Your Water Heating Costs Energy Savers Guide: Tips on Saving Money and Energy at Home How Do You Save on Lighting Costs? Question of the Week: How Do You Reduce Your Water Heating Costs

42

Heat Pump Water Heaters and American Homes: A Good Fit?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

can be cost effective in all regionsfor most single family homes, especially when the water heater is not installed in a conditioned space. HPWHs are not cost effective for most...

43

Consumer Winter Heating Oil Costs  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 of 18 Notes: Using the Northeast as an appropriate regional focus for heating oil, the typical oil-heated household consumes about 680 gallons of oil during the winter, assuming...

44

DOE to Purchase Heating Oil for the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Purchase Heating Oil for the Northeast Home Heating Oil Purchase Heating Oil for the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve DOE to Purchase Heating Oil for the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve June 23, 2008 - 1:29pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a solicitation seeking to purchase heating oil for the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR) using $3 million in appropriated funds. The Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve provides an important safety cushion for millions of Americans residing in the Northeast region of the country. Due to the modest volume of heating oil expected to be purchased with the available funds, no impact on market prices is expected. In 2007 a 35,000 barrel sale was conducted to raise funds necessary to award new long-term storage contracts to fill NEHHOR to its authorized

45

Market Share Elasticities for Fuel and Technology Choice in Home Heating and Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Choice in Home Heating and Cooling D.J. Wood, H. Ruderman,IN HOME HEATING AND COOLING* David J. Wood, Henry RudermanIN HOME HEATING AND COOLING David J. Wood, Henry Ruderman,

Wood, D.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

A STUDY OF AGGREGATION BIAS IN ESTIMATING THE MARKET FOR HOME HEATING AND COOLING EQUIPMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Home Heating and Cooling Equipment D.J. Wood, H. Ruderman,on home heating appliance choice are referred to Wood,FOR HOME HEATING AND COOLING EQUIPMENT David J. Wood, Henry

Wood, D.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Heat exchanger Exergoeconomic lifecycle cost optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Considering lifecycle cost analysis during the design phase of thermal systems gives the design effort more worth. Furthermore thermodynamic exergetic optimization is proven to be useful method for determining the most lifecycle cost optimal design of ... Keywords: entropy generation, exergy destruction, heat exchanger, operating cost, optimization, thermodynamics

Liaquat Ali Khan; Ali El-Ghalban

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Consumer Winter Heating Oil Costs  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: Using the Northeast as a regional focus for heating oil, the typical oil-heated household consumes about 680 gallons of oil during the winter, assuming that weather is "normal." The previous three winters were warmer than average and generated below normal consumption rates. Last winter, consumers saw large increases over the very low heating oil prices seen during the winter of 1998-1999 but, outside of the cold period in late January/early February they saw relatively low consumption rates due to generally warm weather. Even without particularly sharp cold weather events this winter, we think consumers are likely to see higher average heating oil prices than were seen last winter. If weather is normal, our projections imply New England heating oil

49

Feasibility of Achieving a Zero-Net-Energy, Zero-Net-Cost Homes  

SciTech Connect

A green building competition, to be known as the Energy Free Home Challenge (EFHC), is scheduled to be opened to teams around the world in 2010. This competition will encourage both design innovation and cost reduction, by requiring design entries to meet 'zero net energy' and 'zero net cost' criteria. For the purposes of this competition, a 'zero net energy' home produces at least as much energy as it purchases over the course of a year, regardless of the time and form of the energy (e.g., electricity, heat, or fuel) consumed or produced. A 'zero net cost' home is no more expensive than a traditional home of comparable size and comfort, when evaluated over the course of a 30-year mortgage. In other words, the 'green premium' must have a payback period less than 30 years, based on the value of energy saved. The overarching goal of the competition is to develop affordable, high-performance homes that can be mass-produced at a large scale, and are able to meet occupant needs in harsh climates (as can be found where the competition will be held in Illinois). This report outlines the goals of the competition, and gauges their feasibility using both modeling results and published data. To ensure that the established rules are challenging, yet reasonable, this report seeks to refine the competition goals after exploring their feasibility through case studies, cost projections, and energy modeling. The authors of this report conducted a survey of the most progressive home energy-efficiency practices expected to appear in competition design submittals. In Appendix A, a summary can be found of recent projects throughout the United States, Canada, Germany, Switzerland, Sweden and Japan, where some of the most progressive technologies have been implemented. As with past energy efficient home projects, EFHC competitors will incorporate a multitude of energy efficiency measures into their home designs. The authors believe that the cost of electricity generated by home generation technologies will continue to exceed the price of US grid electricity in almost all locations. Strategies to minimize whole-house energy demand generally involve some combination of the following measures: optimization of surface (area) to volume ratio; optimization of solar orientation; reduction of envelope loads; systems-based engineering of high efficiency HVAC components, and on-site power generation. A 'Base Case' home energy model was constructed, to enable the team to quantitatively evaluate the merits of various home energy efficiency measures. This Base Case home was designed to have an energy use profile typical of most newly constructed homes in the Champaign-Urbana, Illinois area, where the competition is scheduled to be held. The model was created with the EnergyGauge USA software package, a front-end for the DOE-2 building energy simulation tool; the home is a 2,000 square foot, two-story building with an unconditioned basement, gas heating, a gas hot-water heater, and a family of four. The model specifies the most significant details of a home that can impact its energy use, including location, insulation values, air leakage, heating/cooling systems, lighting, major appliances, hot water use, and other plug loads. EFHC contestants and judges should pay special attention to the Base Case model's defined 'service characteristics' of home amenities such as lighting and appliances. For example, a typical home refrigerator is assumed to have a built-in freezer, automatic (not manual) defrost, and an interior volume of 26 cubic feet. The Base Case home model is described in more detail in Section IV and Appendix B.

Al-Beaini, S.; Borgeson, S.; Coffery, B.; Gregory, D.; Konis, K.; Scown, C.; Simjanovic, J.; Stanley, J.; Strogen, B.; Walker, I.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Feasibility of Achieving a Zero-Net-Energy, Zero-Net-Cost Homes  

SciTech Connect

A green building competition, to be known as the Energy Free Home Challenge (EFHC), is scheduled to be opened to teams around the world in 2010. This competition will encourage both design innovation and cost reduction, by requiring design entries to meet 'zero net energy' and 'zero net cost' criteria. For the purposes of this competition, a 'zero net energy' home produces at least as much energy as it purchases over the course of a year, regardless of the time and form of the energy (e.g., electricity, heat, or fuel) consumed or produced. A 'zero net cost' home is no more expensive than a traditional home of comparable size and comfort, when evaluated over the course of a 30-year mortgage. In other words, the 'green premium' must have a payback period less than 30 years, based on the value of energy saved. The overarching goal of the competition is to develop affordable, high-performance homes that can be mass-produced at a large scale, and are able to meet occupant needs in harsh climates (as can be found where the competition will be held in Illinois). This report outlines the goals of the competition, and gauges their feasibility using both modeling results and published data. To ensure that the established rules are challenging, yet reasonable, this report seeks to refine the competition goals after exploring their feasibility through case studies, cost projections, and energy modeling. The authors of this report conducted a survey of the most progressive home energy-efficiency practices expected to appear in competition design submittals. In Appendix A, a summary can be found of recent projects throughout the United States, Canada, Germany, Switzerland, Sweden and Japan, where some of the most progressive technologies have been implemented. As with past energy efficient home projects, EFHC competitors will incorporate a multitude of energy efficiency measures into their home designs. The authors believe that the cost of electricity generated by home generation technologies will continue to exceed the price of US grid electricity in almost all locations. Strategies to minimize whole-house energy demand generally involve some combination of the following measures: optimization of surface (area) to volume ratio; optimization of solar orientation; reduction of envelope loads; systems-based engineering of high efficiency HVAC components, and on-site power generation. A 'Base Case' home energy model was constructed, to enable the team to quantitatively evaluate the merits of various home energy efficiency measures. This Base Case home was designed to have an energy use profile typical of most newly constructed homes in the Champaign-Urbana, Illinois area, where the competition is scheduled to be held. The model was created with the EnergyGauge USA software package, a front-end for the DOE-2 building energy simulation tool; the home is a 2,000 square foot, two-story building with an unconditioned basement, gas heating, a gas hot-water heater, and a family of four. The model specifies the most significant details of a home that can impact its energy use, including location, insulation values, air leakage, heating/cooling systems, lighting, major appliances, hot water use, and other plug loads. EFHC contestants and judges should pay special attention to the Base Case model's defined 'service characteristics' of home amenities such as lighting and appliances. For example, a typical home refrigerator is assumed to have a built-in freezer, automatic (not manual) defrost, and an interior volume of 26 cubic feet. The Base Case home model is described in more detail in Section IV and Appendix B.

Al-Beaini, S.; Borgeson, S.; Coffery, B.; Gregory, D.; Konis, K.; Scown, C.; Simjanovic, J.; Stanley, J.; Strogen, B.; Walker, I.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Market Share Elasticities for Fuel and Technology Choice in Home Heating and Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Price Cap Cost Gas Heat Cap Cost Oil Heat Electric Share GasPrice Cap Cost Gas Heat Cap Cost Oil Heat 3. Summary of WorkEPRI [this study] Cap Cost Elec Heat Oil Price Income Gas

Wood, D.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Consumer Natural Gas Heating Costs  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 Notes: Mild weather has minimized residential gas consumption over most of the past 3 winters. Unlike heating oil, average increases in natural gas prices last winter were small....

53

Cost Effective Water Heating Solutions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ELECTRIC 0.92 ELECTRIC 0.92 ELECTRIC HPWH(2) HPWH(3) HPWH Standard 0.62 EF WH unless high natural gas costs (>1.50therm), in which case recommendations consistent with new...

54

A Feasibility Study: Mining Daily Traces for Home Heating Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

home time and dynamically controls the HVAC system [8]. In general, automated home heating control Department of Computer Science University of Virginia {hong, whitehouse}@virginia.edu ABSTRACT HVAC systems nationwide. Recent work has been focused on auto- mated control based on occupancy prediction, where some

Whitehouse, Kamin

55

Hillbrook Nursing Home Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hillbrook Nursing Home Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Hillbrook Nursing Home Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hillbrook Nursing Home Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Hillbrook Nursing Home Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Clancy, Montana Coordinates 46.4652096°, -111.9863826° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

56

DOE Awards Storage Contracts for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Awards Storage Contracts for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Awards Storage Contracts for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve DOE Awards Storage Contracts for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve August 18, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that new contracts have been awarded for commercial storage of 650,000 barrels of ultra low sulfur distillate (ULSD) for the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR). Awards were made to two companies for storage in New England--Hess Corporation in Groton, CT for 400,000 barrels, and Global Companies LLC in Revere, MA for 250,000 barrels. The procurement was conducted by the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA Energy), acting as the agent for DOE. Acquisition of storage services for an additional 350,000 barrels is planned to complete the establishment of a

57

Additional Storage Contracts Awarded for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Additional Storage Contracts Awarded for Northeast Home Heating Oil Additional Storage Contracts Awarded for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Additional Storage Contracts Awarded for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve September 30, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has completed the acquisition of commercial storage services for the one million barrel Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR). Two awards totaling 350,000 barrels have been made to companies that had earlier received storage contracts totaling 650,000 barrels. Hess Corporation in Groton, CT has been awarded a second contract for 100,000 barrels, increasing its storage obligation to 500,000 barrels. Global Companies LLC in Revere, MA was awarded a second contract for 250,000 barrels, increasing its obligation to 500,000 barrels.

58

Additional Storage Contracts Awarded for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Additional Storage Contracts Awarded for Northeast Home Heating Oil Additional Storage Contracts Awarded for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Additional Storage Contracts Awarded for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve September 30, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has completed the acquisition of commercial storage services for the one million barrel Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve (NEHHOR). Two awards totaling 350,000 barrels have been made to companies that had earlier received storage contracts totaling 650,000 barrels. Hess Corporation in Groton, CT has been awarded a second contract for 100,000 barrels, increasing its storage obligation to 500,000 barrels. Global Companies LLC in Revere, MA was awarded a second contract for 250,000 barrels, increasing its obligation to 500,000 barrels.

59

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve- Guidelines for Release  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Energy Policy and Conservation Act, as amended, sets conditions for the release of the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve. The Secretary of Energy has the authority to sell, exchange, or...

60

Estimating Costs and Efficiency of Storage, Demand, and Heat...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

more efficient system. When considering a water heater model for your home, estimate its energy efficiency and annual operating cost. Then, compare costs with other more andor...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "home heating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve - Online Bidding System | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Petroleum Reserves » Heating Oil Reserve » Northeast Services » Petroleum Reserves » Heating Oil Reserve » Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve - Online Bidding System Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve - Online Bidding System The U.S. Department of Energy has developed an on-line bidding system - an anonymous auction program - for the sale of product from the one million barrel Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve. We invite prospective bidders and other interested parties to try out this system and give us your views. You must register to use the system to practice or to participate in an actual emergency sale. Registration assures that you will receive e-mail alerts of sales or other pertinent news. You will also have the opportunity to establish a user ID and password to submit bids. If you establish a user ID, you will receive a temporary password by

62

Air-to-Water Heat Pumps With Radiant Delivery in Low-Load Homes  

SciTech Connect

Space conditioning represents nearly 50% of average residential household energy consumption, highlighting the need to identify alternative cost-effective, energy-efficient cooling and heating strategies. As homes are better built, there is an increasing need for strategies that are particularly well suited for high performance, low load homes. ARBI researchers worked with two test homes in hot-dry climates to evaluate the in-situ performance of air-to-water heat pump (AWHP) systems, an energy efficient space conditioning solution designed to cost-effectively provide comfort in homes with efficient, safe, and durable operation. Two monitoring projects of test houses in hot-dry climates were initiated in 2010 to test this system. Both systems were fully instrumented and have been monitored over one year to capture complete performance data over the cooling and heating seasons. Results are used to quantify energy savings, cost-effectiveness, and system performance using different operating modes and strategies. A calibrated TRNSYS model was developed and used to evaluate performance in various climate regions. This strategy is most effective in tight, insulated homes with high levels of thermal mass (i.e. exposed slab floors).

Backman, C.; German, A.; Dakin, B.; Springer, D.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

STEO October 2012 - home heating use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Last year's warm U.S. winter temperatures to give way to Last year's warm U.S. winter temperatures to give way to normal, increasing household heating fuel use U.S. households will likely burn more heating fuels to stay warm this winter compared with last year Average household demand for natural gas, the most common primary heating fuel, is expected to be up 14 percent this winter, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's new winter fuels forecast. Demand for electricity will be up 8 percent. And demand for heating oil, used mainly in the Northeast, is expected to be 17 percent higher with propane, used mostly in rural areas, also up 17 percent. The primary reason for the boost in heating fuel demand is weather, which is expected to be 20 to 27 percent colder than last winter's unusually warm temperatures in regions of the country

64

Field Measurements of Heating System Efficiency in Nine Electrically-Heated Manufactured Homes.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of field measurements of heating efficiency performed on nine manufactured homes sited in the Pacific Northwest. The testing procedure collects real-time data on heating system energy use and heating zone temperatures, allowing direct calculation of heating system efficiency.

Davis, Bob; Siegel, J.; Palmiter, L.; Baylon, D.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Feasibility of Achieving a Zero-Net-Energy, Zero-Net-Cost Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feasibility of Achieving a Zero-Net-Energy, Zero-Net-Cost Homes Title Feasibility of Achieving a Zero-Net-Energy, Zero-Net-Cost Homes Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number...

66

Comparison of actual and predicted energy savings in Minnesota gas-heated single-family homes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data available from a recent evaluation of a home energy audit program in Minnesota are sufficient to allow analysis of the actual energy savings achieved in audited homes and of the relationship between actual and predicted savings. The program, operated by Northern States Power in much of the southern half of the state, is part of Minnesota's version of the federal Residential Conservation Service. NSP conducted almost 12 thousand RCS audits between April 1981 (when the progam began) and the end of 1982. The data analyzed here, available for 346 homes that obtained an NSP energy audit, include monthly natural gas bills from October 1980 through April 1983; heating degree day data matched to the gas bills; energy audit reports; and information on household demographics, structure characteristics, and recent conservation actions from mail and telephone surveys. The actual reduction in weather-adjusted natural gas use between years 1 and 3 averaged 19 MBtu across these homes (11% of preprogram consumption); the median value of the saving was 16 MBtu/year. The variation in actual saving is quite large: gas consumption increased in almost 20% of the homes, while gas consumption decreased by more than 50 MBtu/year in more than 10% of the homes. These households reported an average expenditure of almost $1600 for the retrofit measures installed in their homes; the variation in retrofit cost, while large, was not as great as the variation in actual natural gas savings.

Hirst, E.; Goeltz, R.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Industrial Uses of Vegetable OilsChapter 5 Biofuels for Home Heating Oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils Chapter 5 Biofuels for Home Heating Oils Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 5 Biofuels for Home Heating Oils from the book ...

68

LOW COST HEAT PUMP WATER HEATER (HPWH)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water heating accounts for the second largest portion of residential building energy consumption, after space conditioning. Existing HPWH products are a technical success, with demonstrated energy savings of 50% or more compared with standard electric resistance water heaters. However, current HPWHs available on the market cost an average of $1000 or more, which is too expensive for significant market penetration. What is needed is a method to reduce the first cost of HPWHs, so that the payback period will be reduced from 8 years to a period short enough for the market to accept this technology. A second problem with most existing HPWH products is the reliability issue associated with the pump and water loop needed to circulate cool water from the storage tank to the HPWH condenser. Existing integral HPWHs have the condenser wrapped around the water tank and thus avoid the pump and circulation issues but require a relatively complex and expensive manufacturing process. A more straightforward potentially less costly approach to the integral, single package HPWH design is to insert the condenser directly into the storage tank, or immersed direct heat exchanger (IDX). Initial development of an IDX HPWH met technical performance goals, achieving measured efficiencies or energy factors (EF) in excess of 1.79. In comparison conventional electric water heaters (EWH) have EFs of about 0.9. However, the initial approach required a 2.5" hole on top of the tank for insertion of the condenser - much larger than the standard openings typically provided. Interactions with water heater manufacturers indicated that the non standard hole size would likely lead to increased manufacturing costs (at least initially) and largely eliminate any cost advantage of the IDX approach. Recently we have been evaluating an approach to allow use of a standard tank hole size for insertion of the IDX condenser. Laboratory tests of a prototype have yielded an EF of 2.02.

Mei, Vince C [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Solar Hot Water for Your Home  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brochure describing the cost-saving and energy-saving benefits of using solar heated water in your home.

American Solar Energy Society

2001-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

70

Do Households Smooth Small Consumption Shocks? Evidence from Anticipated and Unanticipated Variation in Home Energy Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

home energy costs are electricity bills. 76% of energy coststo be paying their electricity bills directly, for instanceof the fact that electricity bills comprise almost three-

Cullen, Julie Berry; Friedberg, Leora; Wolfram, Catherine

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

NREL evaluates energy savings potential of heat pump water heaters in homes throughout all U.S. climate zones.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NREL evaluates energy savings potential of heat pump water heaters in homes throughout all U.S in the U.S. market--to evaluate the cost of saved energy as a function of climate. The performance of HPWHs laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated

72

Energy Savings and Breakeven Cost for Residential Heat Pump Water...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

volume of 45-60 galday, depending on mains water temperature. For every simulation, a home was also modeled to quantify the interaction between the HPWH and the space heating...

73

Air-To-Water Heat Pumps with Radiant Delivery in Low Load Homes: Tucson, Arizona and Chico, California (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Space conditioning represents nearly 50% of average residential household energy consumption, highlighting the need to identify alternative cost-effective, energy-efficient cooling and heating strategies. As homes are better built, there is an increasing need for strategies that are particularly well suited for high performance, low load homes. ARBI researchers worked with two test homes in hot-dry climates to evaluate the in-situ performance of air-to-water heat pump (AWHP) systems, an energy efficient space conditioning solution designed to cost-effectively provide comfort in homes with efficient, safe, and durable operation. Two monitoring projects of test houses in hot-dry climates were initiated in 2010 to test this system. Both systems were fully instrumented and have been monitored over one year to capture complete performance data over the cooling and heating seasons. Results are used to quantify energy savings, cost-effectiveness, and system performance using different operating modes and strategies. A calibrated TRNSYS model was developed and used to evaluate performance in various climate regions. This strategy is most effective in tight, insulated homes with high levels of thermal mass (i.e. exposed slab floors).

Not Available

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

OpenEI/PageKeyword solar home heating | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search A list of all pages that have property "OpenEIPageKeyword" with value "solar home heating" Gateway:Solar + Property: OpenEIPageKeyword Value: solar home...

75

Demonstration and Performance Monitoring of Foundation Heat Exchangers in Low Load, High Performance Research Homes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demonstration and Performance Monitoring of Foundation Heat Exchangers (FHX) in Low Load, High Performance Research Homes Piljae Im, Ph.D. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Building America Technical Update Meeting April 29 - 30, Denver, Colorado ACKNOWLEDGEMENT * This project was sponsored by the Building Technologies Office of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy 2 PRESENTATION OVERVIEW * INTRODUCTION * FIELD TEST OF THE FOUNDATION HEAT EXCHANGER (FHX) CONCEPT * FOUNDATION HEAT EXCHANGER PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS * ADDITIONAL FINDINGS AND COST COMPARISON * SUMMARY Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy

76

Market share elasticities for fuel and technology choice in home heating and cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new technique for estimating own- and cross-elasticities of market share for fuel and technology choices in home heating and cooling is presented. We simulate changes in economic conditions and estimate elasticities by calculating predicted changes in fuel and technology market shares. Elasticities are found with respect to household income, equipment capital cost, and equipment capital cost, and equipment operating cost (including fuel price). The method is applied to a revised and extended version of a study by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). Data for that study are drawn primarily from the 1975--1979 Annual Housing Surveys. Results are generally similar to previous studies, although our estimates of elasticities are somewhat lower. We feel the superior formulation of consumer choice and the currency of data in EPRI's work produce reliable estimates of market share elasticities. 18 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

Wood, D.J.; Ruderman, H.; McMahon, J.E.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Solar Water Heating with Low-Cost Plastic Systems (Brochure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Newly developed solar water heating technology can help Federal agencies cost effectively meet the EISA requirements for solar water heating in new construction and major renovations. This document provides design considerations, application, economics, and maintenance information and resources.

Not Available

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

New York Home Heating Oil Prices - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The severity of this spot price increase is causing dramatic changes in residential home heating oil prices, although residential price movements are usually a ...

79

Home Energy Solutions for Existing Homes | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Home Energy Solutions for Existing Homes Home Energy Solutions for Existing Homes Home Energy Solutions for Existing Homes < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Manufacturing Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info Funding Source Public Benefits Fund State Oregon Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Air Sealing: $150 Duct Insulation: 50% of cost up to $100 Gas Boiler: $200 Direct Vent Gas Fireplace: $200-$250 Direct Vent Gas Unit Heater: $100 Heat Pumps: $250 - $450, depending on efficiency and previous heating system Heat Pump Test: $150 Heat Pump Advanced Controls: $250 Ductless Heat Pump: $800

80

Low-cost passive solar-retrofit options for mobile homes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Passive solar heating and cooling retrofit options can significantly reduce the energy consumption of new and existing mobile homes. The initial efforts of the Solar Energy Research Institute to explore the solar potential for the existing stock of mobile homes and those in the production stage are described.

Brant, S.; Holtz, M.; Tasker, M.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "home heating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The Costs and Benefits of Home-Based Telecommuting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bulb Microwave Oven Cooling Air Conditioning Heating GasOven Rangetop Burner Electric Rangetop Burner Gas Cooling Fan Cooling Window System Cooling Air Conditioning (3-ton) Portable Heater Heating

Shafizadeh, Kevan R.; Mokhtarian, Patricia L.; Niemeier, Debbie A.; Salomon, Ilan

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Efficient, Low-cost Microchannel Heat Exchanger  

? Buildings (chillers, cooling towers, heat pump water heaters) ... ? Renewable energy (concentrated solar power, residential solar hot water,

83

Design and Development of an Intelligent Energy Controller for Home Energy Saving in Heating/Cooling System .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Energy is consumed every day at home as we perform simple tasks, such as watching television, washing dishes and heating/cooling home spaces during season of (more)

Abaalkhail, Rana

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

DOE Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low Sulfur  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low Sulfur Distillate DOE Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low Sulfur Distillate February 1, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The current inventory of the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve will be converted to cleaner burning ultra low sulfur distillate to comply with new, more stringent fuel standards by some Northeastern states, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) said today. The State of New York and other Northeastern states are implementing more stringent fuel standards that require replacement of high sulfur (2,000 parts per million) heating oil to ultra low sulfur fuel (15 parts per million). As a result, DOE will sell the current inventory of the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve, a total of approximately 2 million barrels, and

85

The Influence of Availability Costs on Optimal Heat Exchanger Size  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimizing heat exchangers based on second law rather than first law considerations ensures that the most efficient use of available energy is being made. Techniques for second-law optimizing heat exchangers have been developed recently that are straightforward and simple. The main difficulty lies in determining the proper cost of irrreversibility that is to be used in the optimization process. This paper demonstrates how this issue can be handled by including the irreversibility cost in a dimensionless parameter that represents the ratio of annual ownership costs to annual operating costs that include irreversibility costs. In this way, each heat exchanger designer can estimate the costs of irreversibilities for his particular system, and use the generalized method for determining the optimal heat exchanger size.

Witte, L. C.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Aquifer thermal energy storage costs with a seasonal heat source.  

SciTech Connect

The cost of energy supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system from a seasonal heat source was investigated. This investigation considers only the storage of energy from a seasonal heat source. Cost estimates are based upon the assumption that all of the energy is stored in the aquifer before delivery to the end user. Costs were estimated for point demand, residential development, and multidistrict city ATES systems using the computer code AQUASTOR which was developed specifically for the economic analysis of ATES systems. In this analysis the cost effect of varying a wide range of technical and economic parameters was examined. Those parameters exhibiting a substantial influence on ATES costs were: cost of purchased thermal energy; cost of capital; source temperature; system size; transmission distance; and aquifer efficiency. ATES-delivered energy costs are compared with the costs of hot water heated by using electric power or fuel-oils. ATES costs are shown as a function of purchased thermal energy. Both the potentially low delivered energy costs available from an ATES system and its strong cost dependence on the cost of purchased thermal energy are shown. Cost components for point demand and multi-district city ATES systems are shown. Capital and thermal energy costs dominate. Capital costs, as a percentage of total costs, increase for the multi-district city due to the addition of a large distribution system. The proportion of total cost attributable to thermal energy would change dramatically if the cost of purchased thermal energy were varied. It is concluded that ATES-delivered energy can be cost competitive with conventional energy sources under a number of economic and technical conditions. This investigation reports the cost of ATES under a wide range of assumptions concerning parameters important to ATES economics. (LCL)

Reilly, R.W.; Brown, D.R.; Huber, H.D.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

DOE Accepts Bids for Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Accepts Bids for Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks Accepts Bids for Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks DOE Accepts Bids for Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks February 3, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today has awarded contracts to three companies who successfully bid for the purchase of 984,253 barrels of heating oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve. Awardee Amount Morgan Stanley 500,000 barrels Shell Trading U.S. Company 250,000 barrels George E. Warren Corporation 234,253 barrels Today's sale was the first held as part of the Department's initiative to convert the current 1,984,253-barrel heating oil reserve to cleaner burning ultra low sulfur distillate. Contracts for the heating oil will be executed upon final payment to DOE; final payment is required no later than

88

Residential space heating cost: geothermal vs conventional systems  

SciTech Connect

The operating characteristics and economies of several representative space heating systems are analyzed. The analysis techniques used may be applied to a larger variety of systems than considered herein, thereby making this document more useful to the residential developer, heating and ventilating contractor, or homeowner considering geothermal space heating. These analyses are based on the use of geothermal water at temperatures as low as 120/sup 0/F in forced air systems and 140/sup 0/F in baseboard convection and radiant floor panel systems. This investigation indicates the baseboard convection system is likely to be the most economical type of geothermal space heating system when geothermal water of at least 140/sup 0/F is available. Heat pumps utilizing water near 70/sup 0/F, with negligible water costs, are economically feasible and they are particularly attractive when space cooling is included in system designs. Generally, procurement and installation costs for similar geothermal and conventional space heating systems are about equal, so geothermal space heating is cost competitive when the unit cost of geothermal energy is less than or equal to the unit cost of conventional energy. Guides are provided for estimating the unit cost of geothermal energy for cases where a geothermal resource is known to exist but has not been developed for use in residential space heating.

Engen, I.A.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Manufacturing cost of flame heated thermionic converters. Topical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The cost of thermionic converters has been estimated in support of the cost calculations for thermionic topping of central station powerplants. These calculations supersede the previous calculations made in 1975 and use a design concept similar to the current configuration of flame-heated converters. The cost of converters was estimated by obtaining quotations from manufactureres whenever possible. The selling cost was found to be $110 per kilowatt.

LaRue, G.; Miskolczy, G.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

DOE Completes Sale of Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Completes Sale of Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks Completes Sale of Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks DOE Completes Sale of Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks February 10, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today has awarded contracts to four companies who successfully bid for the purchase of 1,000,000 barrels of heating oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve storage sites in Groton and New Haven, CT. Hess Groton Terminal, Groton, CT Shell Trading U.S. Company 150,000 barrels Sprague Energy Corp. 100,000 barrels Magellan New Haven Terminal, New Haven, CT Hess Corporation 300,000 barrels Morgan Stanley 450,000 barrels Today's sale was the second held as part of the Department's initiative to convert the 1,984,253 barrel heating oil reserve to cleaner burning

91

Ind Heat WS Code - Cost Comparison Worksheet for Induction Heating, Version 1.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Induction Heating for Melting for Aluminum / Steel Cost Comparison Worksheet is a tool that enables the comparison of induction heating for metals melting with more conventional melting technologies such as gas crucible, electric resistance, and electric arc furnaces. Note that this analysis only considers melting of scrap metal, as this application would appear to be the most practical and cost-effective utilization of the induction heating technology. A cost comparison is provided for the two most ...

2001-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

92

Energy and cost analysis of residential heating systems  

SciTech Connect

Several energy-saving design changes in residential space-heating systems were examined to determine their energy-conservation potential and cost effectiveness. Changes in conventional and advanced systems (such as the gas heat pump) were considered. The energy and cost estimates were developed from current literature, conversations with heating and equipment manufacturers and dealers, and discussions with individuals doing research and testing on residential space-heating equipment. Energy savings as large as 26, 20, 57% were estimated for design changes in conventional gas, oil, and electric space-heating systems, respectively. These changes increased capital cost of the three systems by 27, 16, and 26%, respectively. For advanced gas and electric systems, energy savings up to 45 and 67%, respectively, were calculated. The design changes needed to produce these energy savings increased capital costs 80 and 35%. The energy use and cost relationships developed for the space heating systems were used as input to the ORNL residential energy-use simulation model to evaluate the effect of space-heating improvements on national energy use to the year 2000. Results indicated a large reduction in national energy use if improved conventional and advanced systems were made available to consumers and if consumers minimized life-cycle costs when purchasing these systems.

O' Neal, D.L.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

South Carolina Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

South South Carolina Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2009 IECC South Carolina Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for South Carolina homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, South Carolina homeowners will save $4,366 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should

94

Ohio Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ohio Ohio Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2009 IECC Ohio Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Ohio homeowners. . Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Ohio homeowners will save $5,151 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows

95

New Jersey Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jersey Jersey Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2009 IECC New Jersey Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for New Jersey homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, New Jersey homeowners will save $8,393 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows

96

New Mexico Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mexico Mexico Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2009 IECC New Mexico Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for New Mexico homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, New Mexico homeowners will save $4,015 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction in energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows

97

Connecticut Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Connecticut Connecticut Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2009 IECC Connecticut Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Connecticut homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Connecticut homeowners will save $9,903 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should

98

Iowa Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Iowa Iowa Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2009 IECC Iowa Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Iowa homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Iowa homeowners will save $7,573 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows

99

New Hampshire Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hampshire Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2009 IECC New Hampshire Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for New Hampshire homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, New Hampshire homeowners will save $10,635 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction in energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should

100

Hawaii Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hawaii Hawaii Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2009 IECC Hawaii Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Hawaii homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Hawaii homeowners will save $8,860 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "home heating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Delaware Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Delaware Delaware Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2009 IECC Delaware Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Delaware homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Delaware homeowners will save $10,409 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows

102

Texas Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IECC IECC Texas Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2009 IECC Texas Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Texas homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Texas homeowners will save $3,456 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows

103

Alaska Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alaska Alaska Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2009 IECC Alaska Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Alaska homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Alaska homeowners will save $14,819 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows

104

Kentucky Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kentucky Kentucky Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2009 IECC Kentucky Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Kentucky homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Kentucky homeowners will save $5,321 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows

105

Indiana Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indiana Indiana Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2009 IECC Indiana Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Indiana homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from Chapter 11 of the 2009 International Residential Code (IRC) is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Indiana homeowners will save $4,966 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed

106

Rhode Island Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rhode Island Rhode Island Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2009 IECC Rhode Island Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Rhode Island homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Rhode Island homeowners will save $11,011 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should

107

Oklahoma Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IRC IRC Oklahoma Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IRC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2009 IRC Oklahoma Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IRC The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Oklahoma homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from Chapter 11 of the 2009 International Residential Code (IRC) is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Oklahoma homeowners will save $5,786 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed

108

Nevada Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nevada Nevada Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2009 IECC Nevada Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Nevada homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Nevada homeowners will save $4,736 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows

109

Low Cost Solar Water Heating R&D  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Template Low Cost Solar Water Heating R&D Kate Hudon National Renewable Energy Laboratory Kate.hudon@nrel.gov 303-275-3190 April 3, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office...

110

Low income home energy assistance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program provides eligible households with assistance for home energy costs. Assistance is available to (1) help families pay heating and cooling costs, (2) prevent energy cutoff in crisis situations, and (3) help families make their homes more energy efficient. This report provides background information on the program in preparation for the program's reauthorization in 1990.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

DOE Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low Sulfur  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low DOE Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low Sulfur Distillate DOE Will Convert Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve to Ultra Low Sulfur Distillate February 1, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The current inventory of the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve will be converted to cleaner burning ultra low sulfur distillate to comply with new, more stringent fuel standards by some Northeastern states, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) said today. The State of New York and other Northeastern states are implementing more stringent fuel standards that require replacement of high sulfur (2,000 parts per million) heating oil to ultra low sulfur fuel (15 parts per million). As a result, DOE will sell the current inventory of the Northeast

112

Sensing from the basement: a feasibility study of unobtrusive and low-cost home activity recognition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The home deployment of sensor-based systems offers many opportunities, particularly in the area of using sensor-based systems to support aging in place by monitoring an elders activities of daily living. But existing approaches to home activity recognition are typically expensive, difficult to install, or intrude into the living space. This paper considers the feasibility of a new approach that reaches into the home via the existing infrastructure. Specifically, we deploy a small number of low-cost sensors at critical locations in a homes water distribution infrastructure. Based on water usage patterns, we can then infer activities in the home. To examine the feasibility of this approach, we deployed real sensors into a real home for six weeks. Among other findings, we show that a model built on microphone-based sensors that are placed away from systematic noise sources can identify 100 % of clothes washer usage, 95 % of dishwasher usage, 94 % of showers, 88 % of toilet flushes, 73 % of bathroom sink activity lasting ten seconds or longer, and 81 % of kitchen sink activity lasting ten seconds or longer. While there are clear limits to what activities can be detected when analyzing water usage, our new approach represents a sweet spot in the tradeoff between what information is collected at what cost.

James Fogarty

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

An Automated Home Made Low Cost Vibrating Sample Magnetometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The design and operation of a homemade low cost vibrating sample magnetometer is described here. The sensitivity of this instrument is better than 10-2 emu and found to be very efficient for the measurement of magnetization of most of the ferromagnetic and other magnetic materials as a function of temperature down to 77 K and magnetic field upto 800 Oe. Both M(H) and M(T) data acquisition are fully automated employing computer and Labview software

Kundu, S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Arizona Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arizona Arizona Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2009 AND 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2006 IECC Arizona Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Arizona homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Arizona homeowners will save $3,245 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $6,550 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and

115

North Dakota Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

North North Dakota Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2009 AND 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2006 IECC North Dakota Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for North Dakota homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, North Dakota homeowners will save $2,353 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $8,719 under the 2012 IECC. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed

116

Georgia Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

12 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2009 GEORGIA ENERGY CODE 12 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2009 GEORGIA ENERGY CODE Georgia Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 Georgia Energy Code BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2009 GEORGIA ENERGY CODE Georgia Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 Georgia Energy Code The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Georgia homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the current Georgia Energy Code is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Georgia homeowners will save $3,973 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and

117

Alabama Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alabama Alabama Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2009 AND 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2006 IECC Alabama Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Alabama homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Alabama homeowners will save $2,117 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $6,182 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and

118

Tennessee Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tennessee Tennessee Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2009 AND 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2006 IECC Tennessee Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Tennessee homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Tennessee homeowners will save $1,809 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $6,102 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and

119

Montana Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MONTANA CONSTRUCTION CODE MONTANA CONSTRUCTION CODE Montana Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 Montana Construction Code BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2009 MONTANA CONSTRUCTION CODE Montana Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the DC Energy Conservation Code The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Montana homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the current Montana Construction Code is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Montana homeowners will save $4,105 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and

120

Colorado Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Colorado Colorado Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2009 AND 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2006 IECC Colorado Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Colorado homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Colorado homeowners will save $1,528 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $5,435 under the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "home heating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Kansas Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kansas Kansas Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2009 AND 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2006 IECC Kansas Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Kansas homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Kansas homeowners will save $2,556 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $8,828 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and

122

Mississippi Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mississippi Mississippi Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2009 AND 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2006 IECC Mississippi Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Mississippi homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Mississippi homeowners will save $2,022 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $5,400 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and

123

Low Cost Solar Water Heating R&D  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Template Template Low Cost Solar Water Heating R&D Kate Hudon National Renewable Energy Laboratory Kate.hudon@nrel.gov 303-275-3190 April 3, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: The major market barrier for solar water heaters (SWHs) is installed cost. This project addresses this barrier by working with an industry research partner to evaluate innovative solutions that reduce the installed cost of a SWH by

124

Geothermal greenhouse-heating facilities for the Klamath County Nursing Home, Klamath Falls, Oregon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Klamath County Nursing Home, located in Klamath Falls, Oregon, was constructed in 1976. The building of 55,654 square feet currently houses care facilities for approximately 120 persons. During the initial planning for the Nursing Home, the present site was selected primarily on the basis of its geothermal resource. This resource (approx. 190/sup 0/F) currently provides space and domestic hot water heating for the Nursing Home, Merle West Medical Center and the Oregon Institute of Technology. The feasibility of installing a geothermal heating system in a planned greenhouse for the Nursing Home is explored. The greenhouse system would be tied directly to the existing hot water heating system for the Nursing Home.

Not Available

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Heat Pump Water Heaters and American Homes: A Good Fit?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2001. Residential Heat Pump Water Heater (HPWH) DevelopmentKelso, J. 2003. Incorporating Water Heater Replacement into2005. Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters: Energy Efficiency

Franco, Victor

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Market Share Elasticities for Fuel and Technology Choice in Home Heating and Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Home Heating Anderson [21 Oil Price Electric Share Gas ShareBaughman and Joskow [3] Oil Price Gas Price Lin, Hirst,and Cohn [10] Gas Price Oil Price Hartman and Hollyer [8] (

Wood, D.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

What is the outlook for home heating fuel prices this winter ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

What is the outlook for home heating fuel prices this winter? According to EIA's Short Term Energy Outlook released on August 6, 2013, the projections for U.S ...

128

DOE Seeks Commercial Storage to Complete Fill of Northeast Home Heating Oil  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Complete Fill of Northeast Home to Complete Fill of Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve DOE Seeks Commercial Storage to Complete Fill of Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve August 26, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE), through its agent DLA Energy, has issued a solicitation seeking commercial storage contracts for the remaining 350,000 barrels of ultra low sulfur distillate needed to complete the fill of the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve. Offers are due no later than 9:00 a.m., August 31, 2011. Earlier this year, DOE sold its entire inventory of heating oil stocks with plans to replace it with cleaner burning ultra low sulfur distillate. New storage contracts were awarded in August 2011 for 650,000 barrels, and awards from this solicitation will complete the fill of the one million

129

Measure Guideline: Heat Pump Water Heaters in New and Existing Homes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Building America Measure Guideline is intended for builders, contractors, homeowners, and policy-makers. This document is intended to explore the issues surrounding heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) to ensure that homeowners and contractors have the tools needed to appropriately and efficiently install HPWHs. Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) promise to significantly reduce energy consumption for domestic hot water (DHW) over standard electric resistance water heaters (ERWHs). While ERWHs perform with energy factors (EFs) around 0.9, new HPWHs boast EFs upwards of 2.0. High energy factors in HPWHs are achieved by combining a vapor compression system, which extracts heat from the surrounding air at high efficiencies, with electric resistance element(s), which are better suited to meet large hot water demands. Swapping ERWHs with HPWHs could result in roughly 50% reduction in water heating energy consumption for 35.6% of all U.S. households. This Building America Measure Guideline is intended for builders, contractors, homeowners, and policy-makers. While HPWHs promise to significantly reduce energy use for DHW, proper installation, selection, and maintenance of HPWHs is required to ensure high operating efficiency and reliability. This document is intended to explore the issues surrounding HPWHs to ensure that homeowners and contractors have the tools needed to appropriately and efficiently install HPWHs. Section 1 of this guideline provides a brief description of HPWHs and their operation. Section 2 highlights the cost and energy savings of HPWHs as well as the variables that affect HPWH performance, reliability, and efficiency. Section 3 gives guidelines for proper installation and maintenance of HPWHs, selection criteria for locating HPWHs, and highlights of important differences between ERWH and HPWH installations. Throughout this document, CARB has included results from the evaluation of 14 heat pump water heaters (including three recently released HPWH products) installed in existing homes in the northeast region of the United States.

Shapiro, C.; Puttagunta, S.; Owens, D.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Low-Cost Solar Water Heating Research and Development Roadmap  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low-Cost Solar Water Heating Low-Cost Solar Water Heating Research and Development Roadmap K. Hudon, T. Merrigan, J. Burch and J. Maguire National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-5500-54793 August 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Low-Cost Solar Water Heating Research and Development Roadmap K. Hudon, T. Merrigan, J. Burch and J. Maguire National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task No. SHX1.1001 Technical Report NREL/TP-5500-54793 August 2012

131

Energy Savings and Breakeven Cost for Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) have recently reemerged in the U.S. residential water heating market and have the potential to provide homeowners with significant energy savings. However, there are questions as to the actual performance and energy savings potential of these units, in particular in regards to the heat pump's performance in unconditioned space and the impact of the heat pump on space heating and cooling loads when it is located in conditioned space. To help answer these questions, simulations were performed of a HPWH in both conditioned and unconditioned space at over 900 locations across the continental United States and Hawaii. Simulations included a Building America benchmark home so that any interaction between the HPWH and the home's HVAC equipment could be captured. Comparisons were performed to typical gas and electric water heaters to determine the energy savings potential and cost effectiveness of a HPWH relative to these technologies. HPWHs were found to have a significant source energy savings potential when replacing typical electric water heaters, but only saved source energy relative to gas water heater in the most favorable installation locations in the southern US. When replacing an electric water heater, the HPWH is likely to break even in California, the southern US, and parts of the northeast in most situations. However, the HPWH will only break even when replacing a gas water heater in a few southern states.

Maguire, J.; Burch, J.; Merrigan, T.; Ong, S.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Most homes have central thermostats on heating and cooling ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... solar, wind , geothermal ... Quarterly Coal Report Monthly Energy Review Residential Energy ... main heating equipment is a portable heater, ...

133

Low-Cost Solar Water Heating Research and Development Roadmap  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The market environment for solar water heating technology has changed substantially with the successful introduction of heat pump water heaters (HPWHs). The addition of this energy-efficient technology to the market increases direct competition with solar water heaters (SWHs) for available energy savings. It is therefore essential to understand which segment of the market is best suited for HPWHs and focus the development of innovative, low-cost SWHs in the market segment where the largest opportunities exist. To evaluate cost and performance tradeoffs between high performance hot water heating systems, annual energy simulations were run using the program, TRNSYS, and analysis was performed to compare the energy savings associated with HPWH and SWH technologies to conventional methods of water heating.

Hudon, K.; Merrigan, T.; Burch, J.; Maguire, J.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

District of Columbia Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DC ENERGY CONSERVATION CODE DC ENERGY CONSERVATION CODE District of Columbia Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the DC Energy Conservation Code BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE DC ENERGY CONSERVATION CODE District of Columbia Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the DC Energy Conservation Code The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for District of Columbia homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the current DC Energy Conservation Code is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, District of Columbia homeowners will save $3,196 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly

135

National Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: A Comparison of the 2006, 2009, and 2012 Editions of the IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 A COMPARISON OF THE 2006, 2009, AND 2012 EDITIONS OF THE IECC National Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: A Comparison of the 2006, 2009, and 2012 Editions of the IECC The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for U.S. homeowners and significant energy savings for the nation. Moving from a baseline of the 2006 IECC to the 2009 IECC reduces average annual energy costs by 10.8%, while moving from the same baseline to the 2012 IECC reduces them by 32.1%. 1 2 2 2 3 3 4 4 5 5 6 6 7 Marine (C) Dry (B) Moist (A)

136

Wisconsin Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WISCONSIN UNIFORM DWELLING CODE WISCONSIN UNIFORM DWELLING CODE Wisconsin Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the Wisconsin Uniform Dwelling Code BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2009 AND 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE WISCONSIN UNIFORM DWELLING CODE Figure 1. Wisconsin Climate Zones Wisconsin Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the Wisconsin Uniform Dwelling Code The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Wisconsin homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the current Wisconsin state code is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Wisconsin homeowners will save $2,484 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $10,733

137

Thermal and cost goal analysis for passive solar heating designs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Economic methodologies developed over the past several years for the design of residential solar systems have been based on life cycle cost (LCC) minimization. Because of uncertainties involving future economic conditions and the varied decision making processes of home designers, builders, and owners, LCC design approaches are not always appropriate. To deal with some of the constraints that enter the design process, and to narrow the number of variables to those that do not depend on future economic conditions, a simplified thermal and cost goal approach for passive designs is presented. Arithmetic and graphical approaches are presented with examples given for each. Goals discussed include simple payback, solar savings fraction, collection area, maximum allowable construction budget, variable cost goals, and Btu savings.

Noll, S.A.; Kirschner, C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Integrated Heat Pump HVAC Systems for Near-Zero-Energy Homes - Business Case Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The long range strategic goal of the Department of Energy's Building Technologies (DOE/BT) Program is to create, by 2020, technologies and design approaches that enable the construction of net-zero energy homes at low incremental cost (DOE/BT 2005). A net zero energy home (NZEH) is a residential building with greatly reduced needs for energy through efficiency gains, with the balance of energy needs supplied by renewable technologies. While initially focused on new construction, these technologies and design approaches are intended to have application to buildings constructed before 2020 as well resulting in substantial reduction in energy use for all building types and ages. DOE/BT's Emerging Technologies (ET) team is working to support this strategic goal by identifying and developing advanced heating, ventilating, air-conditioning, and water heating (HVAC/WH) technology options applicable to NZEHs. Although the energy efficiency of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) equipment has increased substantially in recent years, new approaches are needed to continue this trend. Dramatic efficiency improvements are necessary to enable progress toward the NZEH goals, and will require a radical rethinking of opportunities to improve system performance. The large reductions in HVAC energy consumption necessary to support the NZEH goals require a systems-oriented analysis approach that characterizes each element of energy consumption, identifies alternatives, and determines the most cost-effective combination of options. In particular, HVAC equipment must be developed that addresses the range of special needs of NZEH applications in the areas of reduced HVAC and water heating energy use, humidity control, ventilation, uniform comfort, and ease of zoning. In FY05 ORNL conducted an initial Stage 1 (Applied Research) scoping assessment of HVAC/WH systems options for future NZEHs to help DOE/BT identify and prioritize alternative approaches for further development. Eleven system concepts with central air distribution ducting and nine multi-zone systems were selected and their annual and peak demand performance estimated for five locations: Atlanta (mixed-humid), Houston (hot-humid), Phoenix (hot-dry), San Francisco (marine), and Chicago (cold). Performance was estimated by simulating the systems using the TRNSYS simulation engine (Solar Energy Laboratory et al. 2006) in two 1800-ft{sup 2} houses--a Building America (BA) benchmark house and a prototype NZEH taken from BEopt results at the take-off (or crossover) point (i.e., a house incorporating those design features such that further progress towards ZEH is through the addition of photovoltaic power sources, as determined by current BEopt analyses conducted by NREL). Results were summarized in a project report, 'HVAC Equipment Design options for Near-Zero-Energy Homes--A Stage 2 Scoping Assessment', ORNL/TM-2005/194 (Baxter 2005). The 2005 study report describes the HVAC options considered, the ranking criteria used, and the system rankings by priority. Table 1 summarizes the energy savings potential of the highest scoring options from the 2005 study for all five locations. All system options were scored by the ORNL building equipment research team and by William Goetzler of Navigant Consulting. These scores were reviewed by DOE/BT's Residential Integration program leaders and Building America team members. Based on these results, the two centrally ducted integrated heat pump (IHP) systems (air source and ground source versions) were selected for advancement to Stage 2 (Exploratory Development) business case assessments in FY06. This report describes results of these business case assessments. It is a compilation of three separate reports describing the initial business case study (Baxter 2006a), an update to evaluate the impact of an economizer cooling option (Baxter 2006b), and a second update to evaluate the impact of a winter humidification option (Baxter 2007). In addition it reports some corrections made subsequent to release of the first two reports to correct so

Baxter, Van D [ORNL

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Investigations of novel heat pump systems for low carbon homes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The European standard EN15450 states that the Coefficient of Performance (COP) target range for a Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) installation should lie within the (more)

Mempouo, B.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Homes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) improves home energy performance by developing and demonstrating advanced energy efficiency technologies and practices that make homes in the United States more...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "home heating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Louisiana Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Louisiana Louisiana Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2009 AND 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2006 IECC The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Louisiana homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Louisiana homeowners will save $1,663 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $4,107 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows

142

Missouri Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Missouri Missouri Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2009 AND 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2006 IECC The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Missouri homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Missouri homeowners will save $2,229 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $7,826 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows

143

Home Energy Rebate Option (HERO) - Existing Homes Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Home Energy Rebate Option (HERO) - Existing Homes Program Home Energy Rebate Option (HERO) - Existing Homes Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Other Maximum Rebate $3,000 Program Info Funding Source American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Expiration Date 06/11/2013 State Louisiana Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount 20% of improvement costs Provider Louisiana Department of Natural Resources '''''NOTE: All HERO program funding has been allocated as of December 6, 2012. Important dates related to the closure of the program have been announced. Please see summary below for more information. '''''

144

Solar-assisted heat pump system for cost-effective space heating and cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of heat pumps for the utilization of solar energy is studied. Two requirements for a cost-effective system are identified: (1) a special heat pump whose coefficient of performance continues to rise with source temperature over the entire range appropriate for solar assist, and (2) a low-cost collection and storage subsystem able to supply solar energy to the heat pump efficiently at low temperatures. Programs leading to the development of these components are discussed. A solar assisted heat pump system using these components is simulated via a computer, and the results of the simulation are used as the basis for a cost comparison of the proposed system with other solar and conventional systems.

Andrews, J W; Kush, E A; Metz, P D

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

How Has a Ceiling Fan Affected the Way You Heat and Cool Your Home? |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Has a Ceiling Fan Affected the Way You Heat and Cool Your Home? Has a Ceiling Fan Affected the Way You Heat and Cool Your Home? How Has a Ceiling Fan Affected the Way You Heat and Cool Your Home? September 23, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis On Monday, Chris told you about his new ceiling fan and how it's changed the way he cools his home. In warm weather, ceiling fans cool people (not rooms) by producing a wind-chill effect-which is why you should turn off fans when you leave the room. A ceiling fan allows you to raise the thermostat setting about 4°F with no reduction in comfort. Ceiling fans don't just cool in the summer; you can also reverse the direction in the winter to provide an updraft and force warm air down into the room. How has a ceiling fan affected the way you heat and cool your home? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a question

146

How Has a Ceiling Fan Affected the Way You Heat and Cool Your Home? |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Has a Ceiling Fan Affected the Way You Heat and Cool Your Home? Has a Ceiling Fan Affected the Way You Heat and Cool Your Home? How Has a Ceiling Fan Affected the Way You Heat and Cool Your Home? September 23, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis On Monday, Chris told you about his new ceiling fan and how it's changed the way he cools his home. In warm weather, ceiling fans cool people (not rooms) by producing a wind-chill effect-which is why you should turn off fans when you leave the room. A ceiling fan allows you to raise the thermostat setting about 4°F with no reduction in comfort. Ceiling fans don't just cool in the summer; you can also reverse the direction in the winter to provide an updraft and force warm air down into the room. How has a ceiling fan affected the way you heat and cool your home? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a question

147

Wyoming Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wyoming Wyoming Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2009 AND 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2006 IECC The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Wyoming homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Wyoming homeowners will save $1,809 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $6,441 under the 2012 IECC. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 2 years for the 2009 and 2 years with the 2012 IECC. Average

148

Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Skip Navigation Links Home Newsroom About INL Careers Research Programs Facilities Education Distinctive Signature: ICIS Environment, Safety & Health Research Library Technology...

149

Solar heating and cooling of mobile homes, Phase II. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The specific objectives of the Phase II program were: (1) through system testing, confirm the feasibility of a solar heated and cooled mobile home; (2) update system performance analysis and provide solar heating and cooling computer model verification; (3) evaluate the performance of both an absorption and a Rankine air conditioning system; (4) perform a consumer demand analysis through field survey to ascertain the acceptance of solar energy into the mobile home market; and (5) while at field locations to conduct the consumer demand analysis, gather test data from various U.S. climatic zones. Results are presented and discussed. (WHK)

Jacobsen, A.A.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

HECDOR: a heat exchanger cost and design optimization routine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An update is presented on a series of four computer codes developed by the Bureau of Mines. The programs were developed to evaluate design parameters and cost of heat exchangers. The major differences in three of the programs were concerned with pumping costs; the first (N = 1) used both fluids, the second (N = 2) used tube side fluid, and the third (N = 3) used shell side fluid as a base for prime parameters. All three assumed no change in phase. The fourth program (N = 4) assumed a change of phase on the shell side.

Turner, S.E.; Madsen, W.W.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

A study of aggregation bias in estimating the market for home heating and cooling equipment  

SciTech Connect

Econometricians frequently propose parametric models which are contingent on an underlying assumption of rational economic agents maximizing their utility. Accurate estimation of the parameters of these models depends on using data disaggregated to the level of the actual agents, usually individual consumers or firms. Using data at some other level of aggregation introduces bias into the inferences made from the data. Unfortunately, properly disaggregated data is often unavailable, or at least, much more costly to obtain than aggregate data. Research on consumer choice of home heating equipment has long depended on state-level cross-sectional data. Only recently have investigators been able to build up and successfully use data on consumer attributes and choices at the household level. A study estimated for the Electric Power Research Institute REEPS model is currently one of the best of these. This paper examines the degree of bias that would be introduced in that study if only average data across SMSAs or states were used at several points in the investigation. We examine the market shares and elasticities estimated from that model using only the mean values of the exogenous variables, and find severe errors to be possible. However, if the models were calibrated on only aggregate data originally, we find that proper treatment allows market shares and elasticities to be found with little error relative to the disaggregate models. 22 refs., 4 figs., 10 tabs.

Wood, D.J.; Ruderman, H.; McMahon, J.E.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

BETTER DUCT SYSTEMS FOR HOME HEATING AND COOLING.  

SciTech Connect

This is a series of six guides intended to provide a working knowledge of residential heating and cooling duct systems, an understanding of the major issues concerning efficiency, comfort, health, and safety, and practical tips on installation and repair of duct systems. These guides are intended for use by contractors, system designers, advanced technicians, and other HVAC professionals. The first two guides are also intended to be accessible to the general reader.

ANDREWS,J.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile … High Performance Without Increased Cost: Urbane Homes, Louiseville KY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Urbane's first Urbane's first home, built for $36 per ft 2 in 2008, incorporated both energy efficiency and strategies to reduce building costs. The home won two EnergyValue Housing Awards, and homebuyers began seeking out the builder for energy-efficient, high-quality homes. Building America field projects that demonstrated minimal or cost-neutral impacts for high-performance homes have significantly influenced the housing industry to apply advanced technologies and best practices. In 2006, the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America program set a goal of proving that cost-neutral energy savings of 40% over code were possible at a production scale for new home builders in every U.S. climate zone. Between 2005 and 2010, Building America research partners worked with 34 builders to

154

O&M First! Actions You Can Take to Reduce Heating Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fact Sheet Actions You Can Take to Reduce Heating Costs Heating accounts for a significant energy load and usually presents a number of opportunities to improve performance and...

155

Return temperature influence of a district heating network on the CHP plant production costs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The aim of this Project is to study the influence of high return temperatures in district heating on the costs for heat and power (more)

Sallent, Roger

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile … High-Performance Home Cost Performance Trade-Offs Production Builders  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

projects with production builders have demonstrated projects with production builders have demonstrated that high-performance homes experience significant cost trade-offs that offset other cost increases. This proved transformational, gaining builder traction with related market-based programs like ENERGY STAR for Homes and DOE Challenge Home. "Break points" or cost trade-offs that are identified during the engineering analysis of the residential construction process can yield two types of business savings: 1) reductions in costs of warranty and call-back service; and 2) offsets or "credits" attributed to reductions in other construction costs. The tables below show examples of cost and savings trade-offs experienced by Building America projects in hot-dry and cold climates. Energy-Efficiency

157

EERE: Homes  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

RENEWABLE ENERGY AND BEING ENERGY EFFICIENT AT HOME Incentives Tax Credits, Rebates, and Savings Save Money and Energy at Home Appliances Energy Assessments Water Heating Using...

158

Model of home heating and calculation of rates of return to household energy conservation investment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study attempts to find out if households' investments on energy conservation yield expected returns. It first builds a home-heating regression model, then uses the results of the model to calculate the rates of return for households' investments on the energy conservation. The home heating model includes housing characteristics, economic and demographic variables, appliance related variables, and regional dummy variables. Housing characteristic variables are modeled according to the specific physical relationship between the house and its heating requirement. Data from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) of 1980-1981 is used for the empirical testing of the model. The model is estimated for single-detached family houses separately for three major home-heating fuel types: electricity, natural gas and fuel oil. Four scenarios are used to calculate rates of return for each household. The results show in the Northern areas the rates of return in most of the cases are a lot higher than market interest rates. In the Western and Southern areas, with few exceptions, the rates of return are lower than market interest rates. The variation of heating degree days and energy prices can affect the rates of return up to 20 percentage points.

Hsueh, L.M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Loveland Water & Power - Home Energy Audit Rebate Program (Colorado) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Loveland Water & Power - Home Energy Audit Rebate Program Loveland Water & Power - Home Energy Audit Rebate Program (Colorado) Loveland Water & Power - Home Energy Audit Rebate Program (Colorado) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Manufacturing Heating Heat Pumps Insulation Maximum Rebate $500 Program Info State Colorado Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount 50% of the cost up to $500 Loveland Water and Power (LWP) is providing an incentive for customers living in single-family detached homes or attached townhouses that wish to upgrade the energy efficiency of eligible homes. Customers can schedule a

160

Air Sealing Your Home | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Sealing Your Home Air Sealing Your Home Air Sealing Your Home November 26, 2013 - 6:22pm Addthis Save on heating and cooling costs by checking for air leaks in common trouble spots in your home. Save on heating and cooling costs by checking for air leaks in common trouble spots in your home. What does this mean for me? Save money and energy by air sealing your house. Caulking and weatherstripping are simple, effective ways of sealing air leaks in your home. Reducing the amount of air that leaks in and out of your home is a cost-effective way to cut heating and cooling costs, improve durability, increase comfort, and create a healthier indoor environment. Caulking and weatherstripping are two simple and effective air-sealing techniques that offer quick returns on investment, often one year or less. Caulk is

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "home heating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Air Sealing Your Home | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Your Home Your Home Air Sealing Your Home November 26, 2013 - 6:22pm Addthis Save on heating and cooling costs by checking for air leaks in common trouble spots in your home. Save on heating and cooling costs by checking for air leaks in common trouble spots in your home. What does this mean for me? Save money and energy by air sealing your house. Caulking and weatherstripping are simple, effective ways of sealing air leaks in your home. Reducing the amount of air that leaks in and out of your home is a cost-effective way to cut heating and cooling costs, improve durability, increase comfort, and create a healthier indoor environment. Caulking and weatherstripping are two simple and effective air-sealing techniques that offer quick returns on investment, often one year or less. Caulk is

162

Overall U-values and heating/cooling loads: Manufactured homes  

SciTech Connect

This manual specifies a method for calculating the overall thermal transmittance (also referred to as the overall U-value or U{sub o}), heating load, and cooling load of a manufactured (mobile) home. Rules, examples, and data required by the method are also presented. Compliance with the Department of Housing and Urban Development`s (HUD) U{sub o} and load calculation regulations contained in Sections 3280.506, 3280.510 and 3280.511 of the Manufactured Home Construction and Safety Standards must be demonstrated through the application of the method provided herein.

Conner, C.C.; Taylor, Z.T.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Overall U-values and heating/cooling loads: Manufactured homes  

SciTech Connect

This manual specifies a method for calculating the overall thermal transmittance (also referred to as the overall U-value or U{sub o}), heating load, and cooling load of a manufactured (mobile) home. Rules, examples, and data required by the method are also presented. Compliance with the Department of Housing and Urban Development's (HUD) U{sub o} and load calculation regulations contained in Sections 3280.506, 3280.510 and 3280.511 of the Manufactured Home Construction and Safety Standards must be demonstrated through the application of the method provided herein.

Conner, C.C.; Taylor, Z.T.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Overall U-values and heating/cooling loads: Manufactured homes  

SciTech Connect

This manual specifies a method for calculating the overall thermal transmittance (also referred to as the overall U-value or U{sub o}), heating load, and cooling load of a manufactured (mobile) home. Rules, examples, and data required by the method are also presented. Compliance with the Department of Housing and Urban Development's (HUD) U{sub o} and load calculation regulations contained in Sections 3280.506, 3280.510 and 3280.511 of the Manufactured Home Construction and Safety Standards must be demonstrated through the application of the method provided herein.

Conner, C.C.; Taylor, Z.T.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Financing Energy-Efficient Homes | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

heaters. | Chart credit ENERGY STAR Estimating the Cost and Energy Efficiency of a Solar Water Heater Financing Energy-Efficient Homes Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling...

166

Delmarva Power - Home Performance with Energy Star Incentive Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Delmarva Power - Home Performance with Energy Star Incentive Delmarva Power - Home Performance with Energy Star Incentive Program Delmarva Power - Home Performance with Energy Star Incentive Program < Back Eligibility Installer/Contractor Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Other Sealing Your Home Ventilation Manufacturing Heating Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate Recommended measures resulting from Energy Audit: $2000 Program Info Funding Source Maryland Energy Administration State Maryland Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Home Energy Audit: Cost discounted to $100 HVAC and Envelope upgrades: up to $2000 Provider

167

Local Energy Alliance Program - Home Performance with ENERGY STAR  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Local Energy Alliance Program - Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Local Energy Alliance Program - Home Performance with ENERGY STAR (Virginia) Local Energy Alliance Program - Home Performance with ENERGY STAR (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Appliances & Electronics Ventilation Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate LEAP Program: $500 Rappahannock Electric Cooperative: $600 Program Info Funding Source Local Energy Alliance Program State Virginia Program Type Local Rebate Program Rebate Amount LEAP Program LEAP Home Energy Improvement Program : 20% of cost up to $500 Rappahannock Electric Cooperative Incentives Heat Pump Tune-Up: $75 Duct Sealing: $200

168

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #407: January 16, 2006 Vehicle Fuel Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7: January 16, 7: January 16, 2006 Vehicle Fuel Cost vs. Home Heating Cost: Which Causes More Concern? to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #407: January 16, 2006 Vehicle Fuel Cost vs. Home Heating Cost: Which Causes More Concern? on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #407: January 16, 2006 Vehicle Fuel Cost vs. Home Heating Cost: Which Causes More Concern? on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #407: January 16, 2006 Vehicle Fuel Cost vs. Home Heating Cost: Which Causes More Concern? on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #407: January 16, 2006 Vehicle Fuel Cost vs. Home Heating Cost: Which Causes More Concern? on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #407: January 16, 2006 Vehicle Fuel Cost vs. Home Heating Cost: Which Causes More Concern? on Digg

169

How Housing Busts End: Home Prices, User Cost, and Rigidities During Down Cycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the market for single-family homes. The American EconomicMarket for Single Family Homes in Boston, 1979 1985. NewJ. 1988: The Behavior of Home Buyers in Boom and Post Boom

Case, Karl E.; Quigley, John M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

ArkansasEnergy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Table A.11 shows the estimated annual energy costs, including heating, cooling, water heating, and lighting per home that result from meeting the requirements in the 2006,...

171

Sealing Your Home | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sealing Your Home Sealing Your Home Sealing Your Home Caulking can reduce heating and cooling costs and improve comfort in your home. Caulking can reduce heating and cooling costs and improve comfort in your home. Air leakage, or infiltration, occurs when outside air enters a house uncontrollably through cracks and openings. Properly air sealing can significantly reduce heating and cooling costs, improve building durability, and create a healthier indoor environment. In addition to air sealing, you'll also want to consider adding additional insulation and moisture control and ventilation strategies to ensure your home is comfortable and efficient. Featured Detecting Air Leaks For a thorough and accurate measurement of air leakage in your home, hire a qualified technician to conduct an energy assessment, particularly a blower door test.

172

Assisted Home Performance Grants | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assisted Home Performance Grants Assisted Home Performance Grants Assisted Home Performance Grants < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Manufacturing Commercial Lighting Lighting Cooling Water Heating Maximum Rebate Single-family: $5,000 Multi-family (2-4 units): $10,000 per building Program Info Funding Source Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard (EEPS) State New York Program Type State Grant Program Rebate Amount 50% of costs Provider New York State Energy Research and Development Authority The Assisted Home Performance Program provides grants to low-income home owners in 1-4 family buildings for up to 50% of costs for energy efficient

173

In-Depth Look at Ground Source Heat Pumps and Other Electric Loads in Two GreenMax Homes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

CARB partnered with WPPI Energy to answer key research questions on in-field performance of ground-source heat pumps and LAMELs through extensive field monitoring at two WPPI GreenMax demonstration homes in Wisconsin. These two test home evaluations provided valuable data on the true in-field performance of various building mechanical systems and lighting, appliances, and miscellaneous loads (LAMELs).

Puttagunta, S.; Shapiro, C.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

NREL evaluates energy savings potential of heat pump water heaters in homes throughout all U.S. climate zones.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in homes compared to traditional electric resistance water heaters. Researchers at the National Renewable is a function of surrounding air temperature, humidity, hot water usage, and the logic controlling the heat pump

175

System manual for the University of Pennsylvania retrofitted solar heated Philadelphia row home (SolaRow)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The University of Pennsylvania SolaRow house, an urban row home retrofitted for comfort and domestic hot water heating, was extensively instrumented for performance monitoring and acquisition of weather and solar radiation data. This report describes the heating and instrumentation systems, provides the details for instrumentation, piping and valve identification, and specifies the operation and maintenance of the heating and data acquisition systems. The following are included: (1) system flow diagrams; (2) valve and cable identification tables; (3) wiring diagrams; and (4) start-up, normal operation, shut-down, maintenance and trouble-shooting procedures. It thus provides the necessary technical information to permit system operation and monitoring, overall system performance analysis and optimization, and acquisition of climatological data.

Zinnes, I.; Lior, N.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cleanup Project Cleanup Project Search Login Home News News Inside the ICP articles About Us About Us Our Mission Facility Factsheets History of the Site Safety Working with CWI/Property Sales Working with CWI Subcontracting & Small Business Academic Internship Program Property Sales Outreach Community Outreach Stakeholders Education and Research Transfer Program AR-IR Administration Contact Us Industry leader in safe performance CWI's worker-owned safety culture has been the cornerstone for delivering work at the Idaho Cleanup Project. Since contract inception in May 2005, the CWI team has reduced recordable injuries by more than 70 percent. Video Feature: Waste Management Treatment of sodium-contaminated waste using a distillation process (9:47) Terms Of Use Privacy Statement If you have a disability and need an

177

Home > Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

or the information, products or services contained therein by the DOE Oak Ridge Office. Home Home Contact Infomation Background Reference Documents Pre-Solicitation Notice Final...

178

Advanced, Low-Cost Solar Water Heating Research Project | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced, Low-Cost Solar Water Heating Advanced, Low-Cost Solar Water Heating Research Project Advanced, Low-Cost Solar Water Heating Research Project The U.S. Department of Energy is currently conducting research into advanced low-cost solar water heating. This project will employ innovative techniques to adapt water heating technology to meet U.S. market requirements, including specifications, cost, and performance targets. Project Description This project seeks to identify and resolve technical, performance, and cost barriers to the development of easy-to-install and reliable solar water heating systems for all major U.S. climate regions. The project will also evaluate opportunities for breakthrough system innovations and innovations in advanced system performance ratings. Project Partners

179

A capital cost comparison of commercial ground-source heat pump systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the report is to compare capital costs associated with the three designs of ground source heat pumps. Specifically, the costs considered are those associated with the heat source/heat sink or ground source portion of the system. In order to standardize the heat rejection over the three designs, it was assumed that the heat pump loop would operate at a temperature range of 85{degree} (to the heat pumps) to 95{degree} (from the heat pumps) under peak conditions. The assumption of constant loop temperature conditions for all three permits an apples-to-apples comparison of the alternatives.

Rafferty, K.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

GEOCITY: a computer model for systems analysis of geothermal district heating and cooling costs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

GEOCITY is a computer-simulation model developed to study the economics of district heating/cooling using geothermal energy. GEOCITY calculates the cost of district heating/cooling based on climate, population, resource characteristics, and financing conditions. The basis for our geothermal-energy cost analysis is the unit cost of energy which will recover all the costs of production. The calculation of the unit cost of energy is based on life-cycle costing and discounted-cash-flow analysis. A wide variation can be expected in the range of potential geothermal district heating and cooling costs. The range of costs is determined by the characteristics of the resource, the characteristics of the demand, and the distance separating the resource and the demand. GEOCITY is a useful tool for estimating costs for each of the main parts of the production process and for determining the sensitivity of these costs to several significant parameters under a consistent set of assumptions.

Fassbender, L.L.; Bloomster, C.H.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "home heating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

5 Cool Things about Solar Heating | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 Cool Things about Solar Heating 5 Cool Things about Solar Heating March 26, 2013 - 3:08pm Addthis Solar heating systems can be a cost-effective way to heat your home. | Photo...

182

Cost-Effectiveness of Home Energy Retrofits in Pre-Code Vintage Homes in the United States  

SciTech Connect

This analytical study examines the opportunities for cost-effective energy efficiency and renewable energy retrofits in residential archetypes constructed prior to 1980 (Pre-Code) in fourteen U.S. cities. These fourteen cities are representative of each of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) climate zones in the contiguous U.S. The analysis is conducted using an in-house version of EnergyGauge USA v.2.8.05 named CostOpt that has been programmed to perform iterative, incremental economic optimization on a large list of residential energy efficiency and renewable energy retrofit measures. The principle objectives of the study are as follows: to determine the opportunities for cost effective source energy reductions in this large cohort of existing residential building stock as a function of local climate and energy costs; and to examine how retrofit financing alternatives impact the source energy reductions that are cost effectively achievable.

Fairey, P.; Parker, D.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Non-Space Heating Electrical Consumption in Manufactured Homes: Residential Construction Demonstration Project Cycle II : Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes submeter data of the non-space heating electrical energy use in a sample of manufactured homes. These homes were built to Super Good Cents insulation standards in 1988 and 1989 under the auspices of RCDP Cycle 2 of the Bonneville Power Administration. They were designed to incorporate innovations in insulation and manufacturing techniques developed to encourage energy conservation in this important housing type. Domestic water heating (DWH) and other non-space heat energy consumption, however, were not generally affected by RCDP specifications. The purpose of this study is to establish a baseline for energy conservation in these areas and to present a method for estimating total energy saving benefits associated with these end uses. The information used in this summary was drawn from occupant-read submeters and manufacturersupplied specifications of building shell components, appliances and water heaters. Information was also drawn from a field review of ventilation systems and building characteristics. The occupant survey included a census of appliances and occupant behavior in these manufactured homes. A total of 150 manufactured homes were built under this program by eight manufacturers. An additional 35 homes were recruited as a control group. Of the original 185 houses, approximately 150 had some usable submeter data for domestic hot water and 126 had usable submeter data for all other nonheating consumption. These samples were used as the basis for all consumption analysis. The energy use characteristics of these manufactured homes were compared with that of a similar sample of RCDP site-built homes. In general, the manufactured homes were somewhat smaller and had fewer occupants than the site-built homes. The degree to which seasonal variations were present in non-space heat uses was reviewed.

Onisko, Stephen A.; Roos, Carolyn; Baylon, David

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Feasibility of Achieving a Zero-Net-Energy, Zero-Net-Cost Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

discussionon least?costenergyefficiencystrategiestheupfrontcostsand improvementsinenergyefficiency,bothCostEstimates 16 EnergyEfficiency

Al-Beaini, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Initial Business Case Analysis of Two Integrated Heat Pump HVAC Systems for Near-Zero-Energy Homes  

SciTech Connect

The long range strategic goal of the Department of Energy's Building Technologies (DOE/BT) Program is to create, by 2020, technologies and design approaches that enable the construction of net-zero energy homes at low incremental cost (DOE/BT 2005). A net zero energy home (NZEH) is a residential building with greatly reduced needs for energy through efficiency gains, with the balance of energy needs supplied by renewable technologies. While initially focused on new construction, these technologies and design approaches are intended to have application to buildings constructed before 2020 as well resulting in substantial reduction in energy use for all building types and ages. DOE/BT's Emerging Technologies (ET) team is working to support this strategic goal by identifying and developing advanced heating, ventilating, air-conditioning, and water heating (HVAC/WH) technology options applicable to NZEHs. Although the energy efficiency of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) equipment has increased substantially in recent years, new approaches are needed to continue this trend. Dramatic efficiency improvements are necessary to enable progress toward the NZEH goals, and will require a radical rethinking of opportunities to improve system performance. The large reductions in HVAC energy consumption necessary to support the NZEH goals require a systems-oriented analysis approach that characterizes each element of energy consumption, identifies alternatives, and determines the most cost-effective combination of options. In particular, HVAC equipment must be developed that addresses the range of special needs of NZEH applications in the areas of reduced HVAC and water heating energy use, humidity control, ventilation, uniform comfort, and ease of zoning. In FY05 ORNL conducted an initial Stage 1 (Applied Research) scoping assessment of HVAC/WH systems options for future NZEHs to help DOE/BT identify and prioritize alternative approaches for further development. Eleven system concepts with central air distribution ducting and nine multi-zone systems were selected and their annual and peak demand performance estimated for five locations: Atlanta (mixed-humid), Houston (hot-humid), Phoenix (hot-dry), San Francisco (marine), and Chicago (cold). Performance was estimated by simulating the systems using the TRNSYS simulation engine (Solar Energy Laboratory et al. 2006) in two 1800-ft{sup 2} houses--a Building America (BA) benchmark house and a prototype NZEH taken from BEopt results at the take-off (or crossover) point (i.e., a house incorporating those design features such that further progress towards ZEH is through the addition of photovoltaic power sources, as determined by current BEopt analyses conducted by NREL). Results were summarized in a project report, 'HVAC Equipment Design options for Near-Zero-Energy Homes--A Stage 2 Scoping Assessment,' ORNL/TM-2005/194 (Baxter 2005). The 2005 study report describes the HVAC options considered, the ranking criteria used, and the system rankings by priority. Table 1 summarizes the energy savings potential of the highest scoring options from the 2005 study for all five locations.

Baxter, Van D [ORNL

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

GEOCITY: a computer code for calculating costs of district heating using geothermal resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

GEOCITY is a computer simulation model developed to study the economics of district heating using geothermal energy. GEOCITY calculates the cost of district heating based on climate, population, resource characteristics, and financing conditions. The principal input variables are minimum temperature, heating degree days, population size and density, resource temperature and distance from load center, and the interest rate. From this input data the model designs the transmission and district heating systems. From this design, GEOCITY calculates the capital and operating costs for the entire system, including the production and disposal of the geothermal water. GEOCITY consists of two major submodels: the geothermal reservoir model and the distribution system model. The distribution system model calculates the cost of heat by simulating the design and the operation of the district heating system. The reservoir model calculates the cost of energy by simulating the discovery, development and operation of a geothermal resource and the transmission of this energy to a distribution center.

McDonald, C.L.; Bloomster, C.H.; Schulte, S.C.

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Space heating systems in the Northwest: energy usage and cost analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The question of energy usage and cost of providing space heat in the Northwest is discussed. Though space heating needs represents only 18% of the U.S.'s total energy consumption, it nevertheless appears to offer the greatest potential for conservation and near term applications of alternate energy sources. Efficiency and economic feasibility factors are considered in providing for space heating demands. These criteria are presented to establish energy usage, cost effectiveness and beneficial conservation practices for space heating of residential, commercial, and industrial buildings. Four Northwestern cities have been chosen whose wide range of climate conditions are used to formulate the seasonal fuel and capital cost and hence the annual heating cost covering a broad spectrum of heating applications, both the traditional methods, the newer alternate forms of energy, and various methods to achieve more efficient utilization of all types.

Keller, J.G.; Kunze, J.F.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Space heating systems in the Northwest: energy usage and cost analysis  

SciTech Connect

The question of energy usage and cost of providing space heat in the Northwest is discussed. Though space heating needs represents only 18% of the U.S.'s total energy consumption, it nevertheless appears to offer the greatest potential for conservation and near term applications of alternate energy sources. Efficiency and economic feasibility factors are considered in providing for space heating demands. These criteria are presented to establish energy usage, cost effectiveness and beneficial conservation practices for space heating of residential, commercial, and industrial buildings. Four Northwestern cities have been chosen whose wide range of climate conditions are used to formulate the seasonal fuel and capital cost and hence the annual heating cost covering a broad spectrum of heating applications, both the traditional methods, the newer alternate forms of energy, and various methods to achieve more efficient utilization of all types.

Keller, J.G.; Kunze, J.F.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Empire District Electric - Low Income New Homes Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Empire District Electric - Low Income New Homes Program Empire District Electric - Low Income New Homes Program Empire District Electric - Low Income New Homes Program < Back Eligibility Construction Low-Income Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Total: $1,100 Program Info State Missouri Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Insulation: full incremental cost above the appropriate baseline Heat Pumps: $400 Central AC: $400 Refrigerator: $200 Lighting: $100 Provider Empire District Electric Empire District Electric offers rebates for the utilization of energy efficient measures and appliances in new, low-income homes. Rebates are

190

Georgia Power - Energy Efficiency Home Improvement Rebates | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Georgia Power - Energy Efficiency Home Improvement Rebates Georgia Power - Energy Efficiency Home Improvement Rebates Georgia Power - Energy Efficiency Home Improvement Rebates < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Manufacturing Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate All Incentives: 50% of cost Whole House Improvements: $2,200 Individual Improvements: $700 Program Info Start Date 1/1/2011 Expiration Date 12/31/2012 State Georgia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Programmable Thermostat: $100 BPI Assessment: $200 Whole House Improvements: 50% Air Sealing: $400 Attic Insulation: $300

191

The Cost of Heat Exchanger Fouling in the U. S. Industries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fouling of heat exchangers costs the U.S. industries hundreds of millions of dollars every year in increased equipment costs, maintenance costs, energy losses and losses in production. The designer of heat exchangers usually allows for fouling by using a fouling factor in the design which results in additional capital cost of the heat exchanger. As fouling deposits build up in a heat exchanger, its performance will start to deteriorate and less energy will be transferred through the unit. A plot is provided that gives the percent decrease in heat flux, for a constant driving temperature difference, as a function of the clean overall heat transfer coefficient and the fouling factor. Another plot gives the increase in surface area due to fouling for the same heat transfer rate and driving temperature difference, as a function of the clean overall heat transfer coefficient and the fouling factor. The overall heat transfer market was divided into four sectors: the chemical, petroleum, electric utility and other industries. The 1982 U.S. sales of all industrial heat exchangers, excepting boilers and automotive radiators, was about 285,000 units amounting to about $1.6 billion. The total heat duty of all the heat exchangers in industrial operation, including electric utilities, was estimated at 11.7 Quads. If this represented the amount of heat transferred through clean heat exchangers, the decrease in energy transferred due to fouling or the cost of fouling in terms of energy lost was estimated at 2.9 Quads annually. The cost of fouling, in providing for additional surface area to compensate for a decrease in heat transfer, was conservatively estimated at $180 million in 1982.

Rebello, W. J.; Richlen, S. L.; Childs, F.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

User manual for GEOCITY: a computer model for geothermal district heating cost analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A computer model called GEOCITY has been developed to systematically calculate the potential cost of district heating using hydrothermal geothermal resources. GEOCITY combines climate, demographic factors, and heat demand of the city, resource conditions, well drilling costs, design of the distribution system, tax rates, and financial factors into one systematic model. The GEOCITY program provides the flexibility to individually or collectively evaluate the impact of different economic and technical parameters, assumptions, and uncertainties on the cost of providing district heat from a geothermal resource. Both the geothermal reservoir and distribution system are simulated to model the complete district heating system. GEOCITY consists of two major parts: the geothermal reservoir submodel and the distribution submodel. The reservoir submodel calculates the unit cost of energy by simulating the exploration, development, and operation of a geothermal reservoir and the transmission of this energy to a distribution center. The distribution submodel calculates the unit cost of heat by simulating the design and operation of a district heating distribution system. GEOCITY calculates the unit cost of energy and the unit cost of heat for the district heating system based on the principle that the present worth of the revenues will be equal to the present worth of the expenses including investment return over the economic life of the distribution system.

Huber, H.D.; McDonald, C.L.; Bloomster, C.H.; Schulte, S.C.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Coal home heating and environmental tobacco smoke in relation to lower respiratory illness in Czech children, from birth to 3 years of age  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Czech setting, where coal is still com- monly used inwe found exposure to coal home heating and ETS increasewell studied, residential coal combustion in economically

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Feasibility of Achieving a Zero-Net-Energy, Zero-Net-Cost Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

location, aninnovativesolarheatingsystem(OM)wasresistanceheating,900W,inthesupplyair. Solarsolarcollectorsperperson(4peopleper house). Anelectricresistanceheating

Al-Beaini, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Feasibility of Achieving a Zero-Net-Energy, Zero-Net-Cost Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

across?flowplateheatexchangerandahotwater tankcrossflow/counterflowheatexchangerandDHWstoragetank. crossflow/counterflowheat exchanger,whichtransfersthe

Al-Beaini, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Feasibility of Achieving a Zero-Net-Energy, Zero-Net-Cost Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

withacompactcounterflowheatexchangerunitsuppliedbyheatexchangerandahotwater tankwithanelectricheatingrod,isintegratedinonecompact

Al-Beaini, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Factors affecting the adoption of home-heating energy-conservation measures: a behavioral approach  

SciTech Connect

The basic aim of this research is to better understand homeowners' adoption of home-heating energy-conservation measures by analyzing a number of factors that are thought to be underlying determinants of adoption behavior. The basic approach is behavioral drawing on the knowledge built up in behavioral geography through studies on natural hazards and innovation diffusion, and borrowing from psychological theories of attitude formation and decision making. In particular, six factors (information, environmental personality, socio-economic and demographic factors, dwelling unit characteristics, psychological variables, and past experience) are shown to directly and indirectly affect adoption behavior. By this means, differences between adopters and nonadopters in the underlying cognitive structures and in the situational factors that affect their decisions are identified. The study focuses on the adoption of three measures: reducing winter night-time thermostat settings, changing or cleaning furnace filters, and installing an automatic setback thermostat. Personal interviews with a random sample of 159 homeowners in Decatur, Illinois serve as the main data base. Results indicate that adoption behavior is determined more by past experience, than by intention. Beliefs, attitudes, and social influences affect behavior indirectly through intention. These psychological variables also act as mediators between information, knowledge, environmental personality, situational variables and behavior. In particular, respondent's age, previous home ownership, and length of residence act indirectly on adoption behavior. Each of these reflects the amount of past experience the respondent is likely to have.

Macey, S.M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

#tipsEnergy: Ways to Save on Water Heating Costs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Heating Costs Water Heating Costs #tipsEnergy: Ways to Save on Water Heating Costs February 20, 2013 - 5:09pm Addthis Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs #tipsEnergy: Ways to Save on Water Heating Costs Every month we ask the larger energy community to share their energy-saving tips, and we feature some of our favorite tips in a Storify. For this month's #tipsEnergy, we wanted to know how you save energy and money on water heating. Storified by Energy Department · Wed, Feb 20 2013 14:12:00 Hot water is essential to most of our lives: We use it to shower, run the dishwasher and wash clothes. Quite frequently, we use more hot water than we think -- the average rate hot water flows out of the kitchen faucet is 2 gallons per minute, and an eight-minute shower

199

Feasibility of Achieving a Zero-Net-Energy, Zero-Net-Cost Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DOE). 12Sep2005. "EEREConsumer'sGuide:SizingandRenewableEnergy(EERE),whichmadethefollowinggenerationcosts. Figure16:EEREForecastedCostofPV

Al-Beaini, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Heating and cooling no longer majority of U.S. home energy use ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency. Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "home heating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Estimating Costs and Efficiency of Storage, Demand, and Heat...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

| Chart credit ENERGY STAR Estimating the Cost and Energy Efficiency of a Solar Water Heater Diagram of a tankless water heater. Tankless or Demand-Type Water Heaters Water...

202

Feasibility of Achieving a Zero-Net-Energy, Zero-Net-Cost Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

itwasfoundthatairsealingofthehome,andthe useoftankwrap,ductsealing,andairsealingtoachieve0.5airimprovedinsulationorair sealingcanhaveonoverall

Al-Beaini, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Life Cycle cost Analysis of Waste Heat Operated Absorption Cooling Systems for Building HVAC Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) of waste heat operated vapour absorption air conditioning system (VARS) incorporated in a building cogeneration system is presented and discussed. The life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) based on present worth cost (PWC) method, which covers the initial costs, operating costs, maintenance costs, replacement costs and salvage values is the useful tool to merit various cooling and power generation systems for building applications. A life cycle of 23 years was used to calculate the PWC of the system for annual operating hours of 8760 and the same is compared with the electric based vapour compression chiller (VCRS) of same capacity. The life cycle cost (LCC) of waste heat operated absorption chiller is estimated to be US $ 1.5 million which is about 71.5 % low compared to electric powered conventional vapour compression chiller. From the analysis it was found that the initial cost of VARS system was 125 % higher than that of VCRS, while the PWC of operating cost of VARS was 78.2 % lower compared to VCRS. The result shows that the waste heat operated VARS would be preferable from the view point of operating cost and green house gas emission reduction.

Saravanan, R.; Murugavel, V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Modeling of Performance, Cost, and Financing of Concentrating Solar, Photovoltaic, and Solar Heat Systems (Poster)  

SciTech Connect

This poster, submitted for the CU Energy Initiative/NREL Symposium on October 3, 2006 in Boulder, Colorado, discusses the modeling, performance, cost, and financing of concentrating solar, photovoltaic, and solar heat systems.

Blair, N.; Mehos, M.; Christiansen, C.

2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

205

Low Cost High Performance Generator Technology Program. Volume 5. Heat Pipe Topical  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research progress towards the development of a heat pipe for use in the Low Cost High Performance Thermoelectric Generator Program is reported for the period May 15, 1975 through June 1975. (TFD)

Not Available

1975-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Tips: Heat Pumps | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heat Pumps Heat Pumps Tips: Heat Pumps June 24, 2013 - 5:48pm Addthis Heat pumps can be a cost-effective choice in moderate climates, especially if you heat your home with electricity. Heat pumps can be a cost-effective choice in moderate climates, especially if you heat your home with electricity. Heat pumps are the most efficient form of electric heating in moderate climates. Because they move heat rather than generate heat, heat pumps can provide equivalent space conditioning at as little as one quarter of the cost of operating conventional heating or cooling appliances. A heat pump does double duty as a central air conditioner by collecting the heat inside your house and pumping it outside. There are three types of heat pumps: air-to-air, water source, and geothermal. They collect heat from the air, water, or ground outside your

207

Energy Cost Calculator for Commercial Heat Pumps (5.4 >=< 20 Tons) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heat Pumps (5.4 >=< 20 Tons) Heat Pumps (5.4 >=< 20 Tons) Energy Cost Calculator for Commercial Heat Pumps (5.4 >=< 20 Tons) October 8, 2013 - 2:22pm Addthis Vary equipment size, energy cost, hours of operation, and /or efficiency level. INPUT SECTION Input the following data (if any parameter is missing, calculator will set to default value). Defaults Project Type New Installation Replacement New Installation Condenser Type Air Source Water Source Air Source Existing Capacity * ton - Existing Cooling Efficiency * EER - Existing Heating Efficiency * COP - Existing IPLV Efficiency * IPLV - New Capacity ton 10 tons New Cooling Efficiency EER 10.1 EER New Heating Efficiency COP 3.2 COP New IPLV Efficiency IPLV 10.4 IPLV Energy Cost $ per kWh $0.06 per kWh

208

Cost Estimates of Electricity from a TPV Residential Heating System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A thermophotovoltaic (TPV) system was built using a 12 to 20 kWth methane burner which should be integrated into a conventional residential heating system. The TPV system is cylindrical in shape and consists of a selective Yb2O3 emitter

Gnther Palfinger; Bernd Bitnar; Wilhelm Durisch; Jean?Claude Mayor; Detlev Grtzmacher; Jens Gobrecht

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Energy Efficient Home Improvements Loan Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficient Home Improvements Loan Program Energy Efficient Home Improvements Loan Program Energy Efficient Home Improvements Loan Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Cooling Other Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Loans: Up to $20,000 for 100% of cost as long as 85% of work is for qualifying home improvements Homeowner Energy Efficient Rebates (in lieu of loans): 20% of qualifying improvements up to $2,000 Program Info State Kentucky Program Type State Loan Program Rebate Amount 100% of costs up to $20,000 '''''Note: This program is currently unavailable. Check the program web site for more information regarding future funding.'''''

210

Feasibility of Achieving a Zero-Net-Energy, Zero-Net-Cost Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thereisawoodstovebackupheating:80%efficiency,11remainingheatingrequirementiscoveredbya woodstoveheating13.3kWh/ma(calculatedsit eenergy) Energysourceelectricity,wood

Al-Beaini, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Residential solar heating at no cost to the homeowner  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a method making solar heating economically desireable by choosing the types of systems and levels of fuel savings that permit a well-designed simple system to be installed with no cash outlay on the part of the homeowner and no increase in the cash flow experienced. In some cases, the cash flow may actually be reduced. The method assists installers in determining where efforts can most profitably be placed and suggests that they are a part of the overall financing scheme, since they can frequently locate the proper lending agency to finance the projects. Limited experience has already shown the methods herein described to be useful. Solar heating should increase in importance as more installers employ the suggested methods of selecting installations and of financing them.

Newton, A.B.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

GHPs Save Heating Cost and Improve Air Quality in Poultry Farm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: 40-50' wide, 400-500' length § Bird density: 1 square foot/bird, 20,000 birds1 GHPs Save Heating Cost and Improve Air Quality in Poultry Farm per house § Heating and cooling required § Intensive ventilation to maintain air

213

Low-cost site-assembled solar collector designs for use with heat pumps  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Four low cost solar collector designs have been produced for use in solar assisted heat pump systems. Three principles guided the design: the use of air as the heat transfer medium, the use of on-site easy-to-install construction rather than modularized prefabricated construction, and the collection of solar energy at reduced temperatures.

Andrews, J W; Wilhelm, W

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Be SMART Home Efficiency Rebate Program (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rebate Program (Maryland) Rebate Program (Maryland) Be SMART Home Efficiency Rebate Program (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heating Heat Pumps Water Heating Maximum Rebate Total: $4,250 Building Envelope Improvements: $2,000 Program Info State Maryland Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Audit: $300 (paid to contractor) Building Envelope Improvements: 50% of cost HVAC Equipment: varies by measure, $25 - $500 Water Heating: varies by measure, $25 - $350 Appliances: varies by measure, $75 - $150 Provider Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development '''''Note: This program is expiring. Homeowner rebate applications and

215

Estimating Costs and Efficiency of Storage, Demand, and Heat Pump Water  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Estimating Costs and Efficiency of Storage, Demand, and Heat Pump Estimating Costs and Efficiency of Storage, Demand, and Heat Pump Water Heaters Estimating Costs and Efficiency of Storage, Demand, and Heat Pump Water Heaters June 14, 2012 - 7:38pm Addthis A water heater's energy efficiency is determined by the energy factor (EF), which is based on the amount of hot water produced per unit of fuel consumed over a typical day. The higher the energy factor, the more efficient the water heater. A water heater's energy efficiency is determined by the energy factor (EF), which is based on the amount of hot water produced per unit of fuel consumed over a typical day. The higher the energy factor, the more efficient the water heater. What does this mean for me? Estimate the annual operating costs and compare several water heaters to determine whether it is worth investing in a more efficient

216

Solar-assisted electric clothes dryer using a home attic as a heat source  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was undertaken to determine the suitability of using a southeastern home attic as a means of reducing the energy consumption of an electric clothes dryer. An inexpensive duct (duplicable for $25) was constructed to collect hot attic air from the peak of a south facing roof and introduce it into the dryer inlet. Instrumentation was added to measure inlet temperatures and operating time/energy consumption of the dryer. Standardized test loads, in addition to normal laundry, were observed over the period of one year. The heat-on time of the dryer tested was shown to be reduced .16 to .35 minutes per /sup 0/C rise in inlet temperature. Inlet temperatures produced by the attic duct peaked at 56/sup 0/C(133/sup 9/F) in May/June and 40/sup 0/C(104/sup 0/F) in February. Based on peak temperatures available between 2 and 4 pm each month, a potential 20% yearly average savings could be realized. Economic viability of the system, dependant primarily on dryer usage, can be computed using a formula derived from the test results and included in the report.

Stana, J.M.

217

Feasibility of Achieving a Zero-Net-Energy, Zero-Net-Cost Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CostCalculator"[fordishwashers] Excelworksheet. index.cfm? c=dishwash.pr_dishwashers>. File isdishwasher; clotheswasher

Al-Beaini, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Comparing maintenance costs of geothermal heat pump systems with other HVAC systems: Preventive maintenance actions and total maintenance costs  

SciTech Connect

Total annual heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) maintenance costs were determined for 20 schools in the Lincoln, Nebraska, Public School District. Each school examined provides cooling to over 70% of its total floor area and relies on one of the following heating and cooling systems to provide the majority of space conditioning: vertical-bore, geothermal heat pumps (GHPs), air-cooled chiller with gas-fired hot water boiler (ACC/GHWB), or water-cooled chiller with gas-fired steam boiler (WCC/GSB). A precursor to this study examined annual costs associated with repair, service, and corrective maintenance activities tracked in a work order database. This follow-up study examines costs associated with preventive maintenance (PM) activities conducted by the district. Annual PM costs were 5.87 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (63.14 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for ACC/GHWB schools, followed by 7.14 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (76.86 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for GHP, 9.82 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (105.39 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for WCC/ GSB, and 12.65 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (136.30 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for WCC/GHWB. The results of the two analyses are combined to produce an estimate of total annual maintenance costs, by system type, for the 20 schools. Total annual maintenance costs were 8.75 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (94.20 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for ACC/GHWB schools, followed by 9.27 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (99.76 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for GHP, 13.54 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (145.49 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for WCC/GSB, and 18.71 {cents}/yr-ft{sup 2} (201.61 {cents}/yr-m{sup 2}) for WCC/GHWB. It should be noted that these costs represent only the trends seen in the maintenance database of the Lincoln School District. Because of differences in the number of schools using each system type, varying equipment age, and the small total number of schools included in the study, the maintenance costs presented here may not be representative of the maintenance costs seen for similar equipment in other locations.

Martin, M.A.; Madgett, M.G.; Hughes, P.J.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

State Home Oil Weatherization (SHOW) Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Home Oil Weatherization (SHOW) Program Home Oil Weatherization (SHOW) Program State Home Oil Weatherization (SHOW) Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Manufacturing Maximum Rebate $500/household Program Info State Oregon Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Blower-door test - 100% of the cost up to $100. All other technologies are 25% of the total cost, up to $150 or $500, depending on the upgrade. Provider Oregon Department of Energy Oregon homeowners and renters who heat with oil, wood, propane, kerosene, or butane are eligible for home weatherization rebates of up to $500. A

220

Sensitivity analysis of mobile home space conditioning energy requirements to selection of U-values in twelve climates and cost/benefit analysis of U-values proposed for the federal manufactured housing construction (FMHC) and safety standards (SS)  

SciTech Connect

This study determines the sensitivity of four suggested and existing building thermal performance standards to mobile home heating and cooling loads and to the seasonal energy consumption of the equipment meeting these loads. It also evaluates the net costs and benefits of an Office of Mobile Home Standards proposal to increase the level of stringency of the present regulation. Three mobile homes, each representing typical single - wide and double - wide homes, were selected to be simulated for 12 cities. The thermal resistance of the wall, roof, floor, door, and window components of the thermal envelope were chosen to reflect both common or potential construction methods and to obtain the overall U - value levels required by each standard level. The ''Hot House'' program was selected to determine seasonal energy consumption. Results indicate that seasonal loads decrease with decreasing U - values, although in some cases a decrease U - value resulted in a slight increase in the seasonal cooling load. The best standards for thermal performance and U - values are noted, as are sults of the cost - benefit analysis. Tables, eight references, and a ''Hot House'' program listing are included.

1981-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "home heating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Home Energy Saver  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

conference, and provides training and information on cost-effectively implementing home energy savings. American Society of Home Inspectors (ASHI) - some homeinspectors have...

222

Feasibility of Achieving a Zero-Net-Energy, Zero-Net-Cost Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production(abovetheutilityratefor electricitysoldlocalenergycostsandutilityrate structures. NetZero1:BaseCaseInputs Theutilityratesusedshouldalsobe

Al-Beaini, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Feasibility of Achieving a Zero-Net-Energy, Zero-Net-Cost Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GenerationIncentiveProgram:SolarPVCostsandIncentivegreentrianglesandthesolarPVbytheyellowcircles. ItisexpectedthatsolarPVwillmakeupforenergy

Al-Beaini, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Home Performance with Energy Star High Efficiency Measure Incentive (HEMI)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Home Performance with Energy Star High Efficiency Measure Incentive Home Performance with Energy Star High Efficiency Measure Incentive (HEMI) Home Performance with Energy Star High Efficiency Measure Incentive (HEMI) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Manufacturing Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate $3,000 Program Info State New York Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount 10% of project costs Provider New York State Energy Research and Development Authority The New York State Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) offers an incentive for homeowners of 1-4 homes that participate in the Home Performance with Energy Star program. The program entitles the participant

225

Selected cost considerations for geothermal district heating in existing single-family residential areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the past, district heating (geothermal or conventionally fueled) has not been widely applied to the single-family residential sector. Low-heat load density is the commonly cited reason for this. Although it`s true that load density in these areas is much lower than for downtown business districts, other frequently overlooked factors may compensate for load density. In particular, costs for distribution system installation can be substantially lower in some residential areas due to a variety of factors. This reduced development cost may partially compensate for the reduced revenue resulting from low-load density. This report examines cost associated with the overall design of the system (direct or indirect system design), distribution piping installation, and customer branch lines. It concludes with a comparison of the costs for system development and the revenue from an example residential area.

Rafferty, K.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Demonstration and Performance Monitoring of Foundation Heat Exchangers (FHX) in Ultra-High Energy Efficient Research Homes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The more widespread use of Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) systems has been hindered by their high first cost, which is mainly driven by the cost of the drilling and excavation for installation of ground heat exchangers (GHXs). A new foundation heat exchanger (FHX) technology was proposed to reduce first cost by placing the heat exchanger into the excavations made during the course of construction (e.g., the overcut for the basement and/or foundation and run-outs for water supply and the septic field). Since they reduce or eliminate the need for additional drilling or excavation, foundation heat exchangers have the potential to significantly reduce or eliminate the first cost premium associated with GSHPs. Since December 2009, this FHX technology has been demonstrated in two ultra-high energy efficient new research houses in the Tennessee Valley, and the performance data has been closely monitored as well. This paper introduces the FHX technology with the design, construction and demonstration of the FHX and presents performance monitoring results of the FHX after one year of monitoring. The performance monitoring includes hourly maximum and minimum entering water temperature (EWT) in the FHX compared with the typical design range, temperature difference (i.e., T) across the FHX, and hourly heat transfer rate to/from the surrounding soil.

Im, Piljae [ORNL; Hughes, Patrick [ORNL; Liu, Xiaobing [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Anaheim Public Utilities - Residential Home Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Home Efficiency Rebate Residential Home Efficiency Rebate Program Anaheim Public Utilities - Residential Home Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Manufacturing Commercial Lighting Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Air Duct Repair: $300 Ceiling Fan: 3 fans Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Refrigerator: $50 Refrigerator Recycling: $50 Dishwasher: $50 Room A/C: $50 Central A/C: $100/ton High Performance windows: $1/sq ft Air Duct Repair: 50% of repair cost Ceiling Fan: $20 Whole House Fan: $100

228

Design, cost, and performance comparisons of several solar thermal systems for process heat. Volume III. Receivers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The receiver subsystem converts reflected solar radiation into thermal power by heating a working fluid. The objective of the task described was to estimate the cost and performance of the receiver subsystem for parabolic troughs, parabolic dishes, and central receivers over a wide range of temperatures and power levels for thermal power applications. This volume presents the fundamental design philosophy employed, the constraints identified, the tradeoffs performed and the cost and performance results obtained for each receiver in the study matrix.

Woodard, J.B. Jr.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Consumer thermal energy storage costs for residential hot water, space heating and space cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The cost of household thermal energy storage (TES) in four utility service areas that are representative for hot water, space heating, and space cooling systems in the United States is presented. There are two major sections of the report: Section 2.0 is a technology characterization of commercially available and developmental/conceptual TES systems; Section 3.0 is an evaluation of the consumer cost of the three TES systems based on typical designs in four utility service areas.

None

1976-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

230

Monitored energy use of homes with geothermal heat pumps: A compilation and analysis of performance. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The performance of residential geothermal heat pumps (GHPs) was assessed by comparing heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system and whole house energy use of GHP houses and control houses. Actual energy savings were calculated and compared to expected savings (based on ARI ratings and literature) and predicted savings (based on coefficient of performance - COP - measurements). Differences between GHP and control houses were normalized for heating degree days and floor area or total insulation value. Predicted savings were consistently slightly below expected savings but within the range of performance cited by the industry. Average rated COP was 3.4. Average measured COP was 3.1. Actual savings were inconsistent and sometimes significantly below predicted savings. No correlation was found between actual savings and actual energy use. This suggests that factors such as insulation and occupant behavior probably have greater impact on energy use than type of HVAC equipment. There was also no clear correlation between climate and actual savings or between climate and actual energy use. There was a trend between GHP installation date and savings. Newer units appear to have lower savings than some of the older units which is opposite of what one would expect given the increase in rated efficiencies of GHPs. There are a number of explanations for why actual savings are repeatedly below rated savings or predicted savings. Poor ground loop sizing or installation procedures could be an issue. Given that performance is good compared to ASHPs but poor compared to electric resistance homes, the shortfall in savings could be due to duct leakage. The takeback effect could also be a reason for lower than expected savings. Occupants of heat pump homes are likely to heat more rooms and to use more air-conditioning than occupants of electric resistance homes. 10 refs., 17 figs., 10 tabs.

Stein, J.R.; Meier, A.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Baltimore Gas and Electric Company - Home Performance with Energy Star  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Baltimore Gas and Electric Company - Home Performance with Energy Baltimore Gas and Electric Company - Home Performance with Energy Star Rebates Baltimore Gas and Electric Company - Home Performance with Energy Star Rebates < Back Eligibility Installer/Contractor Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Manufacturing Heating Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate HVAC (Equipment Installation/Duct Sealing/Tune-up): $1,150 Air Sealing/Insulation/Gas Tankless Water Heater: $2,000 Total: $3,150 Program Info Funding Source Maryland Energy Administration State Maryland Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Comprehensive Home Energy Audit: Reduced cost of $100

232

Energy Efficient Home Improvements Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficient Home Improvements Program Energy Efficient Home Improvements Program Energy Efficient Home Improvements Program < Back Eligibility Installer/Contractor Low-Income Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Cooling Other Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Kentucky Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Homeowner energy efficient improvements (in lieu of loans): 20% of qualifying costs up to $2,000 Whole-house evaluation: $150 for the first 1000 customers '''''Note: This program is currently unavailable. Check the program web site for more information regarding future funding.''''' Kentucky offers ENERGY STAR Home Performance rebates and loans for

233

Market Share Elasticities for Fuel and Technology Choice in Home Heating and Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Own-Elasticities for Space Conditioning Equipment Equipmentthe choice of a space heat/air conditioning combination. Theutility from air conditioning and space heating alternative

Wood, D.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

How do I compare heating fuels? - FAQ - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How do I compare heating fuels? When choosing a heating system for a new home or replacing an existing system, consumers often want to compare the cost of heating fuels.

235

Investigation of heat exchanger flow arrangement on performance and cost in a geothermal binary cycle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance of an idealized geothermal binary-fluid-cycle energy conversion system is shown to be a function of the temperatures of brine and working fluid leaving the heat exchanger. System power output, heat exchanger area required and initial well and heat exchanger costs are determined for counterflow, single and multi-pass parallel-counterflow exchangers. Results are presented graphically as functions of the brine and working fluid exit temperatures from the exchanger. Use of the system analysis developed is illustrated by showing quantitatively the advantage of the counterflow over the other flow arrangements considered.

Giedt, W.H.

1976-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

A STUDY OF AGGREGATION BIAS IN ESTIMATING THE MARKET FOR HOME HEATING AND COOLING EQUIPMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pump central cooling exogenous variable price of gas priceof gas priceof gas price of gas own capital cost own capital cost

Wood, D.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Independence Power and Light - New Homes Rebate Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independence Power and Light - New Homes Rebate Program Independence Power and Light - New Homes Rebate Program Independence Power and Light - New Homes Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Construction Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Missouri Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Star Certification Cost: $500 Central air conditioner: $300 Central heat pump (fossil fuel back-up): $600 Central heat pump system (electric back-up): $700 Central heat pump system (fossil fuel back-up); electric water heater: $700 Central heat pump system (electric back-up); electric water heater: $800 Provider Independence Power and Light

238

Heating & Cooling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cooling Cooling Heating & Cooling Heating and cooling account for about 56% of the energy use in a typical U.S. home, making it the largest energy expense for most homes. Learn more about the principles of heating and cooling. Heating and cooling account for about 56% of the energy use in a typical U.S. home, making it the largest energy expense for most homes. Learn more about the principles of heating and cooling. Did you know that heating and cooling accounts for more than half of the energy use in a typical U.S. home, making it the largest energy expense for most homes? Energy Saver shares tips and advice on ways you can reduce your heating and cooling costs, putting more money in your wallet.

239

Analysis of Residential System Strategies Targeting Least-Cost Solutions Leading to Net Zero Energy Homes  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy's Building America residential systems research project uses an analysis-based systems research approach to identify research priorities, identify technology gaps and opportunities, establish a consistent basis to track research progress, and identify system solutions that are most likely to succeed as the initial targets for residential system research projects. This report describes the analytical approach used by the program to determine the most cost-effective pathways to achieve whole-house energy-saving goals. This report also provides an overview of design/technology strategies leading to net zero energy buildings as the basis for analysis of future residential system performance.

Anderson, R.; Christensen, C.; Horowitz, S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Home Energy Saver  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heater Heat Pumps Replacing Your Electric Furnace and CAC with a Heat Pump Sealing Home Air Leaks LPG Furnaces Efficient LPG-fired Water Heaters Oil Furnaces Efficient...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "home heating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

The Pacific Northwest residential consumer: Perceptions and preferences of home heating fuels, major appliances, and appliance fuels  

SciTech Connect

In 1983 the Bonneville Power Administration contracted with the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to conduct an analysis of the marketing environment for Bonneville's conservation activities. Since this baseline residential study, PNL has conducted two follow up market research projects: Phase 2 in 1985, and Phase 3, in 1988. In this report the respondents' perceptions, preferences, and fuel switching possibilities of fuels for home heating and major appliances are examined. To aid in effective target marketing, the report identifies market segments according to consumers' demographics, life-cycle, attitudes, and opinions.

Harkreader, S.A.; Hattrup, M.P.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Home Energy Saver  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Profitability of Energy Efficiency Upgrades Profitability of Energy Efficiency Upgrades Application of these 10 energy efficiency measures in a typical home yields nearly $600 in annual bill savings, and an impressive 16% overall return on investment. Diagram providing a representative view of the high profitability of energy efficiency upgrades This diagram provides a representative view of the high profitability of energy efficiency upgrades. Note that the home evaluated here is located in an average U.S. climate and has a heat pump, electric water heater, clothes washer, clothes dryer, and dishwasher. The example cost-effectively surpasses the 30% savings target for existing homes under PATH (The Partnership for Advancing Technology in Housing). In fact, all of these measures yield a higher return on investment than an

243

Update on maintenance and service costs of commercial building ground-source heat pump systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An earlier paper showed that commercial ground-source heat pump systems have significantly lower service and maintenance costs than alternative HVAC systems. This paper expands on those results by adding 13 more buildings to the original 25 sites and by comparing the results to the latest ASHRAE survey of HVAC maintenance costs. Data from the 38 sites are presented here including total (scheduled and unscheduled) maintenance costs in cents per square foot per year for base cost, in-house, and contractor-provided maintenance. Because some of the new sites had maintenance costs that were much higher than the industry norm, the resulting data are not normally distributed. Analysis (O'Hara Hines 1998) indicated that a log-normal distribution is a better fit; thus, the data are analyzed and presented here as log-normal. The log-mean annual total maintenance costs for the most recent year of the survey ranged from 6.07 cents per square foot to 8.37 cents per square foot for base cost and contractor-provided maintenance, respectively.

Cane, D.; Garnet, J.M.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Residential heating costs: a comparison of geothermal, solar and conventional resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The costs of residential heating throughout the United States using conventional, solar, and geothermal energy were determined under current and projected conditions. These costs are very sensitive to location - being dependent on the local prices of conventional energy supplies, local solar insolation, cimate, and the proximity and temperature of potential geothermal resources. The sharp price increases in imported fuels during 1979 and the planned decontrol of domestic oil and natural gas prices have set the stage for geothermal and solar market penetration in the 1980's.

Bloomster, C.H.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Fassbender, L.L.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Assessment of National Benefits from Retrofitting Existing Single-Family Homes with Ground Source Heat Pump Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report assesses the potential national benefits of retrofitting U.S. single-family homes with state-of-the-art GSHP systems at various penetration rates. The benefits considered include energy savings, reduced summer electrical peak demand, consumer utility bill savings, and reduced carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. The assessment relies heavily on energy consumption and other data obtained from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy s Energy Information Administration. It also considers relative differences in energy consumption between a state-of-the-art GSHP system and existing residential space-heating, space-cooling, and water-heating (SH SC WH) systems, which were determined with a well-established energy analysis program for residential SH SC WH systems. The impacts of various climate and geological conditions, as well as the efficiency and market share of existing residential SH SC WH systems, have been taken into account in the assessment.

Liu, Xiaobing [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Market Share Elasticities for Fuel and Technology Choice in Home Heating and Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of space heating to air conditioning choice; 3) explicitthe presence of central air conditioning, it seems unwise tonot to have central air conditioning. Statistical evidence

Wood, D.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Heating and cooling no longer majority of U.S. home energy use ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

For decades, space heating and cooling (space conditioning) accounted for more than half of all residential energy consumption. Estimates from the ...

248

What is the outlook for home heating fuel prices this winter ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

249

Heating and cooling no longer majority of U.S. home energy use ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Tools; Glossary All Reports ... Non-weather related energy use for appliances, electronics, water heating, and lighting now accounts for 52% of total consumption, ...

250

Home Performance with Energy Star | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Home Performance with Energy Star Home Performance with Energy Star Home Performance with Energy Star < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Other Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info Funding Source Focus On Energy Program State Wisconsin Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Air Sealing, Attic Insulation, Exterior Wall Insulation, Sill Box Insulation, Interior Foundation Insulation: 33.3% of improvement costs up to $1,500 Bonus for 15% Energy Savings: $200 Bonus for 25% Energy Savings: $700 Free installation of CFLs, faucet aerators, shower heads, and pipe wraps

251

Home Performance with Energy Star Financing | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Home Performance with Energy Star Financing Home Performance with Energy Star Financing Home Performance with Energy Star Financing < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Appliances & Electronics Other Sealing Your Home Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Manufacturing Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Bioenergy Solar Program Info Funding Source Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard (EEPS)/Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) State New York Program Type State Loan Program Rebate Amount Up to 100% of costs; loans from $3,000 - $25,000 (minimum loan of $1,500 for income qualified customers); loan limit is $13,000 for projects with a

252

Heating Water with Solar Energy Costs Less at the Phoenix Federal Correctional Institution  

SciTech Connect

A large solar thermal system installed at the Phoenix Federal Correctional Institution (FCI) in 1998 heats water for the prison and costs less than buying electricity to heat that water. This renewable energy system provides 70% of the facility's annual hot water needs. The Federal Bureau of Prisons did not incur the up-front cost of this system because it was financed through an Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC). The ESPC payments are 10% less than the energy savings so that the prison saves an average of$6,700 per year, providing an immediate payback. The solar hot water system produces up to 50,000 gallons of hot water daily, enough to meet the needs of 1,250 inmates and staff who use the kitchen, shower, and laundry facilities.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Heating Water with Solar Energy Costs Less at the Phoenix Federal Correctional Institution  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A large solar thermal system installed at the Phoenix Federal Correctional Institution (FCI) in 1998 heats water for the prison and costs less than buying electricity to heat that water. This renewable energy system provides 70% of the facility's annual hot water needs. The Federal Bureau of Prisons did not incur the up-front cost of this system because it was financed through an Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC). The ESPC payments are 10% less than the energy savings so that the prison saves an average of$6,700 per year, providing an immediate payback. The solar hot water system produces up to 50,000 gallons of hot water daily, enough to meet the needs of 1,250 inmates and staff who use the kitchen, shower, and laundry facilities.

Not Available

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Home systems research house: Gas heat pump cooling characterization test results. Topical report, July-September 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cooling performance characterization tests were performed at the GRI Home Systems Research House located in the NAHB Research Home Park in Prince George's County, Maryland. Test protocols followed guidelines set forth in GRI's Research House Utilization Plan (RHUP). A combination of minute-by-minute and hourly average data consisting of weather, comfort, and energy parameters was collected by using an automated data acquisition system. The tests were performed from July 1991 through September 1991. The gas heat pump (GHP) had an average daily gas coefficient of performance (COP) value of 1.49 at an outdoor temperature of 72.8 F and 0.84 at an outdoor temperature of 83.9 F. The average test period gas COP was 1.13. The GHP peak cooling capacity achieved was approximately 34,000 Btuh. The GHP provided good overall thermal comfort control on the first-floor and moderate thermal comfort control on the second floor. Reduced second floor performance was primarily due to thermostat location and the stack effect. Good latent heat removal existed throughout the test period. Unit modulation kept room air stratification to a minimum. Thermostat setback saved energy at high average daily outdoor temperatures and used more energy at lower average daily outdoor temperatures, compared to a constant thermostat setpoint control, due to changes in unit gas COP values from low-speed to high-speed operation.

Reigel, H.D.; Kenney, T.M.; Liller, T.C.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Simplified Optimum Sizing and Cost Analysis for Compact heat Exchanger in VHTR  

SciTech Connect

In this study, the optimum size of the compact heat exchanger has been developed based on its weight and pumping power for the reference design of 600 MWt very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) system. Alloy 617 was selected as a construction material. The optimum size and a number of configurations for the reference design of the VHTR with an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) were investigated and our initial calculations indicated that it has an unrealistically too large aspect ratio of the length and height due to its small-sized channels, which might cause manifolding problems and a large number of parallel modules with high thermal stress. The flow area and channel diameter were then adjusted to achieve a smaller aspect ratio in this paper. Achievement of this aspect ratio resulted in higher cost, but the cost increase was less than would have occurred by simply reducing the flow area by itself. The appropriate channel diameter is estimated to be less than 5.00 mm for the reference system. The effect of channel waviness enhanced the compactness and heat transfer performance, but unfavorably increased the aspect ratio. Therefore, the waviness should be carefully determined based on performance and economics. In this study, the waviness of the IHX is recommended to be selected between 1.0 and 2.5. Calculations show that reducing the duty dramatically decreases the aspect ratio, indicating that the compact heat exchanger is easy to be optimally designed for low duty, but many modules are required for high duty operation proportional to the operating power. Finally, the effect of working fluids was investigated, and it reveals that using carbon dioxide instead of helium in the secondary side reduces the size and cost by about 20% due to the lower pumping power in spite of its lower heat transfer capability by a factor of 4.

Chang Oh; E. S. Kim; S. Sherman

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Home Energy Saver  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lowest-Hanging Fruit Lowest-Hanging Fruit Get the Weekly Energy Saving Tip widget and many other great free widgets at Widgetbox! Not seeing a widget? (More info) The analysis you've done in the Home Energy Saver is a great beginning, but not the end of your quest. You now know where you stand and how much you can improve. Time to get started. In the following links you will find dozens of no-cost tips for things you can do to start saving energy immediately, many of which can be done without even opening your wallet! Air Leaks Home office electronics Lighting Heating & cooling Water heating Windows Making it Happen Roadmap to Results Seasons of Life The Lowest-Hanging Fruit Investing for Profit and Comfort Creating Successful Projects Financial Incentives Watt About Water? Choosing a Good Contractor

257

Israeli manufacturer introduces solar heating for home use in Greece and Turkey  

SciTech Connect

Miromit Ltd. of Tel Aviv, Israel's principal developer and producer of solar heating equipment, said to be the world's large manufacturer in the field, recently announced the completion of a marketing agreement with major heating companies in Greece and Turkey which are introducing solar energy for hot water heating in their countries. Both of these countries will benefit from continuous Miromit research and development in new Sun heating applications, including central hot water installations for apartment buildings and solar-heating systems for swimming pools, sport halls, and agricultural and industrial buildings. Israeli solar equipment has been installed in a research model apartment building at the Goddard Space Flight Center of NASA in Green Belt, Md. (MCW)

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

5 Cool Things about Solar Heating | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 Cool Things about Solar Heating 5 Cool Things about Solar Heating 5 Cool Things about Solar Heating March 26, 2013 - 3:08pm Addthis Solar heating systems can be a cost-effective way to heat your home. | Photo courtesy of Solar Design Associates, Inc. Solar heating systems can be a cost-effective way to heat your home. | Photo courtesy of Solar Design Associates, Inc. Erin Connealy Communications Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy How can I participate? Read Energy Saver's article on solar heating systems to see whether see whether active solar heating is a good option for you. Most people are familiar with solar photovoltaic panels, but far fewer know about using solar as a source of heat in their homes. Active solar heating uses solar energy to heat fluid or air, which then transfers the solar heat

259

City of Chicago - Green Permit and Green Homes Programs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

City of Chicago - Green Permit and Green Homes Programs City of Chicago - Green Permit and Green Homes Programs City of Chicago - Green Permit and Green Homes Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Residential Schools Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State Illinois Program Type Green Building Incentive Provider City of Chicago The City of Chicago encourages building design, construction and renovation in a manner that provides healthier environments, reduces operating costs and conserves energy and resources through their Green Permit Program. The

260

Home and Building Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Home and Building Technologies Home and Building Technologies Homes and other buildings use energy every day for space heating and cooling, for lighting and hot water, and for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "home heating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Materials Development Program, Ceramic Technology Project addendum to program plan: Cost effective ceramics for heat engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is a new thrust in the Ceramic Technology project. This effort represents an expansion of the program and an extension through FY 1997. Moderate temperature applications in conventional automobile and truck engines will be included along with high-temp. gas turbine and low heat rejection diesel engines. The reliability goals are expected to be met on schedule by end of FY 1993. Ceramic turbine rotors have been run (in DOE`s ATTAP program) for 1000 h at 1370C and full speed. However, the cost of ceramic components is a deterrrent to near-term commercialization. A systematic approach to reducing this cost includes the following elements: economic cost modeling, ceramic machining, powder synthesis, alternative forming and densification processes, yield improvement, system design studies, standards development, and testing and data base development. A draft funding plan is outlined. 6 figs, 1 tab.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Materials Development Program, Ceramic Technology Project addendum to program plan: Cost effective ceramics for heat engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is a new thrust in the Ceramic Technology project. This effort represents an expansion of the program and an extension through FY 1997. Moderate temperature applications in conventional automobile and truck engines will be included along with high-temp. gas turbine and low heat rejection diesel engines. The reliability goals are expected to be met on schedule by end of FY 1993. Ceramic turbine rotors have been run (in DOE's ATTAP program) for 1000 h at 1370C and full speed. However, the cost of ceramic components is a deterrrent to near-term commercialization. A systematic approach to reducing this cost includes the following elements: economic cost modeling, ceramic machining, powder synthesis, alternative forming and densification processes, yield improvement, system design studies, standards development, and testing and data base development. A draft funding plan is outlined. 6 figs, 1 tab.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

The evaluation of a 4000-home geothermal heat pump retrofit at Fort Polk, Louisiana: Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This report documents an independent evaluation of an energy retrofit of 4,003 family housing units at Fort Polk, Louisiana, under an energy savings performance contract (ESPC). Replacement of the heating, cooling, and water heating systems in these housing units with geothermal heat pumps (GHPs) anchored the retrofit; low-flow shower heads and compact fluorescent lighting were also installed, as well as attic insulation where needed. Statistically valid findings indicate that the project will save 25.8 million kWh, or 32.5% of the pre-retrofit whole-community electrical consumption, and 100% of the whole-community natural gas previously used for space conditioning and water heating (260,000 therms) in a typical meteorological year. At the end-use level, the GHPs were found to save about 42% of the pre-retrofit electrical consumption for heating, cooling, and water heating in housing units that were all-electric in the pre-retrofit period. This report also demonstrates an improved method of predicting energy savings. Using an engineering model calibrated to pre-retrofit energy use data collected in the field, the method predicted actual energy savings on one of the electric feeders at Fort Polk with a very high degree of accuracy. The accuracy of this model was in turn dependent on data-calibrated models of the geothermal heat pump and ground heat exchanger that are described in this report. In addition this report documents the status of vertical borehole ground heat exchanger (BHEx) design methods at the time this project was designed, and demonstrates methods of using data collected from operating GHP systems to benchmark BHEx design methods against a detailed engineering model calibrated to date. The authors also discuss the ESPC`s structure and implementation and how the experience gained here can contribute to the success of future ESPCs.

Hughes, P.J.; Shonder, J.A.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Development of a Low Cost Heat Pump Water Heater - Second Prototype  

SciTech Connect

Since the 1980s various attempts have been made to apply the efficiency of heat pumps to water heating. The products generated in the 80s and 90s were not successful, due in part to a lack of reliability and difficulties with installation and servicing. At the turn of the century, EnvironMaster International (EMI) produced a heat pump water heater (HPWH) based on a design developed by Arthur D. Little (ADL), with subsequent developmental assistance from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and ADL. This design was a drop-in replacement for conventional electric water heaters. In field and durability testing conducted by ORNL, it proved to be reliable and saved on average more than 50% of the energy used by the best conventional electric water heater. However, the retail price set by EMI was very high, and it failed in the market. ORNL was tasked to examine commercially available HPWH product technology and manufacturing processes for cost saving opportunities. Several cost saving opportunities were found. To verify the feasibility of these cost saving measures, ORNL completed a conceptual design for an HPWH based on an immersed condenser coil that could be directly inserted into a standard water tank through a sleeve affixed to one of the standard penetrations at the top of the tank. After some experimentation, a prototype unit was built with a double-wall coil inserted into the tank. When tested it achieved an energy factor (EF) of 2.12 to 2.2 using DOE-specified test procedures. A.O. Smith contacted ORNL in May 2006 expressing their interest in the ORNL design. The prototype unit was shipped to A.O. Smith to be tested in their laboratory. After they completed their test, ORNL analyzed the raw test data provided by A.O. Smith and calculated the EF to be approximately 1.92. The electric resistance heating elements of a conventional electric water heater are typically retained in a heat pump water heater to provide auxiliary heating capacity in periods of high demand. A.O. Smith informed us that when they applied electric resistance backup heating, using the criterion that resistance heat would be applied whenever the upper thermostat saw water temperatures below the heater s nominal setpoint of 135oF, they found that the EF dropped to approximately 1.5. This is an extremely conservative criterion for backup resistance heating. In a field test of the previously mentioned EMI heat pump water heater, residential consumers found satisfactory performance when the criterion for use of electric resistance backup heating was the upper temperature dropping below the set point minus 27 degrees. Applying this less conservative criterion to the raw data from the original A.O. Smith EF tests indicates that electric resistance heating would never have come on during the test, and thus the EF would have remained in the vicinity of 1.9. A.O. Smith expressed concern about having an EF below 2, as that value triggers certain tax advantages and would assist in their marketing of the product. We believe that insertion of additional length of tubing plus a less conservative set point for electric resistance backup heating would remedy this concern. However, as of this writing, A.O. Smith has not decided to proceed with a commercial product.

Mei, V. C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Retired); Craddick, William G [ORNL

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Combi Systems for Low Load homes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

text styles text styles Combi Systems for Low Load Homes Center for Energy and Environment, NorthernSTAR, Ben Schoenbauer * Low load homes are more common than ever. * Typical space heating and DHW equipment have capacities larger than necessary * A single heating plant could provide high efficiency heat at lower costs, increased durability and improved combustion safety Context Technical Approach * A condensing water heater and hydronic air handler will used to provide space and water heating loads in almost 300 weatherized homes. * System specifications, sizing, and installation optimization guidelines were all developed. * Contractor capability was developed in MN market, but may not be developed in all local. 4 Recommended Guidance * Determine peak load on system: - Space heating design load (ie 40,000 Btu/hr)

266

Market Share Elasticities for Fuel and Technology Choice in Home Heating and Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

level, the choice alternatives are cooling and no cooling.to zero in central cooling alternative Income ($1000) in airalternatives are conventional air conditioning and heat pump, given the cooling

Wood, D.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Home Heating Systems Design using PHP and MySQL Databases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the use of a computer application based on a MySQL database, managed by PHP programs, allowing the selection of a heating device using coefficient-based calculus.

Karnyanszky, Tiberiu Marius

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Analysis of Energy, Environmental and Life Cycle Cost Reduction Potential of Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) in Hot and Humid Climate  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It has been widely recognized that the energy saving benefits of GSHP systems are best realized in the northern and central regions where heating needs are dominant or both heating and cooling loads are comparable. For hot and humid climate such as in the states of FL, LA, TX, southern AL, MS, GA, NC and SC, buildings have much larger cooling needs than heating needs. The Hybrid GSHP (HGSHP) systems therefore have been developed and installed in some locations of those states, which use additional heat sinks (such as cooling tower, domestic water heating systems) to reject excess heat. Despite the development of HGSHP the comprehensive analysis of their benefits and barriers for wide application has been limited and often yields non-conclusive results. In general, GSHP/HGSHP systems often have higher initial costs than conventional systems making short-term economics unattractive. Addressing these technical and financial barriers call for additional evaluation of innovative utility programs, incentives and delivery approaches. From scientific and technical point of view, the potential for wide applications of GSHP especially HGSHP in hot and humid climate is significant, especially towards building zero energy homes where the combined energy efficient GSHP and abundant solar energy production in hot climate can be an optimal solution. To address these challenges, this report presents gathering and analyzing data on the costs and benefits of GSHP/HGSHP systems utilized in southern states using a representative sample of building applications. The report outlines the detailed analysis to conclude that the application of GSHP in Florida (and hot and humid climate in general) shows a good potential.

Yong X. Tao; Yimin Zhu

2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

269

Passive solar potential of a conventional home. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A conventional home not designed for passive solar heating was found to use an average of 61% less natural gas for space heating when compared to four similarly used control homes of identical design during the 1979-1980 heating season in Fort Collins, Colorado. The significant savings are attributed to: (1) passive solar gain through conventional windows; (2) optimum orientation of the home placing windows and doors away from prevailing winds; (3) the use of low-cost insulating window shutters; (4) conventional winterization; and (5) energy-conscious life-styles of the occupants. The payback period for the minor investment made by the owners of the demonstration home was estimated to be approximately two years. The results demonstrate that passive solar has a much greater potential in a conventional home than is currently believed and suggest that all future homes be oriented and constructed for maximum solar exposure.

Waterman, E.L.

1981-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

270

Clark Public Utilities - Residential Heat Pump Loan Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heat Pump Loan Program Heat Pump Loan Program Clark Public Utilities - Residential Heat Pump Loan Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Maximum Rebate Air-Source Heat Pumps: $20,000 Geothermal Heat Pumps: $30,000 Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Loan Program Rebate Amount Air-Source Heat Pump: up to $20,000 Geothermal Heat Pumps: up to $30,000 Provider Clark Public Utilities Clark Public Utilities offers loans of up to $20,000 for air-source heat pumps and $30,000 for geothermal heat pumps. Loans will help customers cover the up-front cost of installing a highly efficient heat pump in a residence. All electrically heated homes, including manufactured homes, are eligible for the heat pump financing program, as long as the home has been

271

EERE: Energy-Saving Homes, Buildings, and Manufacturing - Homes  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Homes Energy-Saving Homes, Buildings, and Manufacturing EERE leads a robust network of researchers and other partners to continually develop cost-effective energy-saving solutions...

272

Techno-economic analysis of using corn stover to supply heat and power to a corn ethanol plant - Part 2: Cost of heat and power generation systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a techno-economic analysis of corn stover fired process heating (PH) and the combined heat and power (CHP) generation systems for a typical corn ethanol plant (ethanol production capacity of 170 dam3). Discounted cash flow method was used to estimate both the capital and operating costs of each system and compared with the existing natural gas fired heating system. Environmental impact assessment of using corn stover, coal and natural gas in the heat and/or power generation systems was also evaluated. Coal fired process heating (PH) system had the lowest annual operating cost due to the low fuel cost, but had the highest environmental and human toxicity impacts. The proposed combined heat and power (CHP) generation system required about 137 Gg of corn stover to generate 9.5 MW of electricity and 52.3 MW of process heat with an overall CHP efficiency of 83.3%. Stover fired CHP system would generate an annual savings of 3.6 M$ with an payback period of 6 y. Economics of the coal fired CHP system was very attractive compared to the stover fired CHP system due to lower fuel cost. But the greenhouse gas emissions per Mg of fuel for the coal fired CHP system was 32 times higher than that of stover fired CHP system. Corn stover fired heat and power generation system for a corn ethanol plant can improve the net energy balance and add environmental benefits to the corn to ethanol biorefinery.

Mani, Sudhagar [University of Georgia; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Togore, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Cost-effective solar collectors using heat pipes. Interim progress report No. 3, October 1978-June 1979  

SciTech Connect

The heat pipe collector system design was re-evaluated as a new system, as compared to previous evaluation where the heat pipe was an interchangeable component in the standard TC-101 system. Collector hardware components were finalized, including production costs. Heat pipe fluid-vessel testing continued indoors and outdoors in the solar panel. A prototpe production processing station has been designed which shows that the labor content of processing individual heat pipes can be reduced to 15 seconds with a total cost of $1.50.

Ernst, D.M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Results of a field test of heating system efficiency and thermal distribution system efficiency in a manufactured home  

SciTech Connect

A two-day test using electric coheating was performed on a manufactured home in Watertown, New York. The main objective of the test was to evaluate planned procedures for measuring thermal distribution system efficiency. (Thermal distribution systems are the ductwork or piping used to transport heat or cooling effect from the equipment that produces it to the building spaces in which it is used.) These procedures are under consideration for a standard method of test now being prepared by a special committee of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers. The ability of a coheating test to give a credible and repeatable value for the overall heating system efficiency was supported by the test data. Distribution efficiency is derived from system efficiency by correcting for energy losses from the equipment. Alternative means for achieving this were tested and assessed. The best value for system efficiency in the Watertown house was 0.53, while the best value for distribution efficiency was 0.72.

Andrews, J.W.; Krajewski, R.F.; Strasser, J.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Kinney, L.; Lewis, G. [Synertech Systems Corp., Syracuse, NY (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Energy Basics: Home and Building Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Cooling Water Heating Home and Building Technologies Homes and other buildings use energy every day for space heating and cooling, for lighting and hot water, and for...

276

Home Energy Yardstick : ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Home Improvement > Home Energy Yardstick Home > Home Improvement > Home Energy Yardstick Home Energy Yardstick Assess the energy efficiency of your home and see how it measures up: EPA's Home Energy Yardstick provides a simple assessment of your home's annual energy use compared to similar homes. By answering a few basic questions about your home, you can get: Your home's Home Energy Yardstick score (on a scale of 1 to 10); Insights into how much of your home's energy use is related to heating and cooling versus other everyday uses like appliances, lighting, and hot water; Links to guidance from ENERGY STAR on how to increase your home's score, improve comfort, and lower utility bills; and An estimate of your home's annual carbon emissions. Learn more about how the Home Energy Yardstick works.

277

Initial Business Case Analysis of Two Integrated Heat Pump HVAC Systems for Near-Zero-Energy Homes -- Update to Include Analyses of an Economizer Option and Alternative Winter Water Heating Control Option  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The long range strategic goal of the Department of Energy's Building Technologies (DOE/BT) Program is to create, by 2020, technologies and design approaches that enable the construction of net-zero energy homes at low incremental cost (DOE/BT 2005). A net zero energy home (NZEH) is a residential building with greatly reduced needs for energy through efficiency gains, with the balance of energy needs supplied by renewable technologies. While initially focused on new construction, these technologies and design approaches are intended to have application to buildings constructed before 2020 as well resulting in substantial reduction in energy use for all building types and ages. DOE/BT's Emerging Technologies (ET) team is working to support this strategic goal by identifying and developing advanced heating, ventilating, air-conditioning, and water heating (HVAC/WH) technology options applicable to NZEHs. Although the energy efficiency of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) equipment has increased substantially in recent years, new approaches are needed to continue this trend. Dramatic efficiency improvements are necessary to enable progress toward the NZEH goals, and will require a radical rethinking of opportunities to improve system performance. The large reductions in HVAC energy consumption necessary to support the NZEH goals require a systems-oriented analysis approach that characterizes each element of energy consumption, identifies alternatives, and determines the most cost-effective combination of options. In particular, HVAC equipment must be developed that addresses the range of special needs of NZEH applications in the areas of reduced HVAC and water heating energy use, humidity control, ventilation, uniform comfort, and ease of zoning. In FY05 ORNL conducted an initial Stage 1 (Applied Research) scoping assessment of HVAC/WH systems options for future NZEHs to help DOE/BT identify and prioritize alternative approaches for further development. Eleven system concepts with central air distribution ducting and nine multi-zone systems were selected and their annual and peak demand performance estimated for five locations: Atlanta (mixed-humid), Houston (hot-humid), Phoenix (hot-dry), San Francisco (marine), and Chicago (cold). Performance was estimated by simulating the systems using the TRNSYS simulation engine (Solar Energy Laboratory et al. 2006) in two 1800-ft{sup 2} houses--a Building America (BA) benchmark house and a prototype NZEH taken from BEopt results at the take-off (or crossover) point (i.e., a house incorporating those design features such that further progress towards ZEH is through the addition of photovoltaic power sources, as determined by current BEopt analyses conducted by NREL). Results were summarized in a project report, HVAC Equipment Design options for Near-Zero-Energy Homes--A Stage 2 Scoping Assessment, ORNL/TM-2005/194 (Baxter 2005). The 2005 study report describes the HVAC options considered, the ranking criteria used, and the system rankings by priority. In 2006, the two top-ranked options from the 2005 study, air-source and ground-source versions of an integrated heat pump (IHP) system, were subjected to an initial business case study. The IHPs were subjected to a more rigorous hourly-based assessment of their performance potential compared to a baseline suite of equipment of legally minimum efficiency that provided the same heating, cooling, water heating, demand dehumidification, and ventilation services as the IHPs. Results were summarized in a project report, Initial Business Case Analysis of Two Integrated Heat Pump HVAC Systems for Near-Zero-Energy Homes, ORNL/TM-2006/130 (Baxter 2006). The present report is an update to that document. Its primary purpose is to summarize results of an analysis of the potential of adding an outdoor air economizer operating mode to the IHPs to take advantage of free cooling (using outdoor air to cool the house) whenever possible. In addition it provides some additional detail for an alternative winter water heating/space heating (WH/S

Baxter, Van D [ORNL

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Residential heating and cooling energy cost implications associated with window type: Revision  

SciTech Connect

We present a comparative study in which residential heating and cooling energy costs are analyzed as a function of window glazing type, with a particular emphasis on the performance of windows having low-emittance coatings. The DOE-2.1B energy analysis simulation program was used to generate a data base of the heating and cooling energy requirements of a prototypical single-family ranch-style house. Algebraic expressions derived by multiple regression techniques permitted a direct comparison of those parameters that characterize window performance: orientation, size, conductance, and solar transmission properties. We use these equations to discuss the energy implications of conventional double- and triple-pane window designs and newer designs in which number and type of substrate, low-emittance coating type and location and gas fill are varied. Results are presented for the heating-dominated climate of Madison, WI, and cooling-dominated locations of Lake Charles, LA, and Phoenix, AZ. The analysis shows the potential for substantial savings but suggests that both heating and cooling energy should be examined when evaluating the performance of different fenestration systems. Coating and substrate properties and the location of the coating in the glazing system are shown to have moderate effects as a function of orientation and climate. In addition, with the low-conductance glazing units, the window frame becomes a contributor to overall residential energy efficiency. 4 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

Sullivan, R.; Selkowitz, S.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Residential heating and cooling energy cost implications associated with window type  

SciTech Connect

A comparative study is presented in which residential heating and cooling energy costs are analyzed as a function of window glazing type, with a particular emphasis on the performance of windows having low-emittance coatings. The DOE-2.1B energy analysis simulation program was used to generate a data base of the heating and cooling energy requirements of a prototypical single-family ranch-style house. Algebraic expressions derived by multiple regression techniques permitted a direct comparison of those parameters that characterize window performance: orientation, size, conductance, and solar transmission properties. These equations are used to discuss the energy implications of conventional double- and triple-pane window designs and newer designs in which number and type of substrate, low-emittance coating type and location and gas fill are varied. Results are presented for the heating-dominated climate of Madison, WI, and cooling-dominated locations of Lake Charles, LA, and Phoenix, AZ. The analysis shows the potential for substantial savings but suggests that both heating and cooling energy should be examined when evaluating the performance of different fenestration systems. Coating and substrate properties and the location of the coating in the glazing system are shown to have moderate effects as a function of orientation and climate. In addition, with the low-conductance glazing units, the window frame becomes a contributor to overall residential energy efficiency.

Sullivan, R.; Selkowitz, S.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Effects of a shortened depreciation schedule on the investment costs for combined heat and power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate and compare several generic depreciation methods to assess the effectiveness of possible policy measures with respect to the depreciation schedules for investments in combined heat and power plants in the United States. We assess the different depreciation methods for CHP projects of various sizes (ranging from 1 MW to 100 MW). We evaluate the impact of different depreciation schedules on the tax shield, and the resulting tax savings to potential investors. We show that a shorter depreciation cycle could have a substantial impact on the cost of producing power, making cogeneration more attractive. The savings amount to approximately 6-7 percent of capital and fixed operation and maintenance costs, when changing from the current system to a 7 year depreciation scheme with switchover from declining balance to straight line depreciation. Suggestions for further research to improve the analysis are given.

Kranz, Nicole; Worrell, Ernst

2001-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "home heating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Solar Water Heating with Low-Cost Plastic Systems (Brochure), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

buildings consumed over 392,000 billion Btu of site- buildings consumed over 392,000 billion Btu of site- delivered energy for buildings during FY 2007 at a total cost of $6.5 billion. [1] Earlier data indicate that about 10% of this is used to heat water. [2] Targeting energy consumption in Federal buildings, the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) requires new Federal buildings and major renovations to meet 30% of their hot water demand with solar energy, provided it is cost-effective over the life of the system. In October 2009, President Obama expanded the energy reduction and performance requirements of EISA and its subsequent regulations with his Executive Order 13514. Federal facilities having financial difficulty meeting the EISA mandate and executive order (e.g., facilities with natural

282

Cost-effective control systems for solar heating and cooling applications. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A methodology has been defined to arrive at control recommendations for a variety of climate control system designs, applications and regions, and the results are presented in two parts. Part I consists of a literature and market-place survey, involving control strategies, functions, sensors, actuators, and the controllers themselves. Part II represents the bulk of the study effort - an attempt to simulate and evaluate system performance for several representative residential and commercial heating and cooling designs and thus to derive improved performance techniques within cost-effective control systems. (MHR)

Pejsa, J. H.; Bassett, W. W.; Wenzler, S. A.; Nguyen, K. H.; Olson, T. J.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Insulation for New Home Construction | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Insulation for New Home Construction Insulation for New Home Construction Insulation for New Home Construction June 20, 2012 - 7:59pm Addthis Planning carefully for insulation results in reduced utility bills and superior comfort during the life of the home. In this house, raised heel trusses accommodate R-60 insulation. | Credit: Paul Norton, NREL. Planning carefully for insulation results in reduced utility bills and superior comfort during the life of the home. In this house, raised heel trusses accommodate R-60 insulation. | Credit: Paul Norton, NREL. What does this mean for me? Adding extra insulation in a new home is more cost-effective than retrofitting insulation after the home is completed. Insulation is a key component of the systems that work together to create a comfortable, energy-efficient home that is affordable to heat and

284

Using the sun and waste wood to heat a central Ohio home. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The description of a house in Ohio built on a south facing slope with two levels above ground on the north, east, and west sides and three levels exposed to the southern winter Sun is presented. The floor plan, a general history of the project, the operation of the system, the backup heat source (wood), the collection of data, and the procedure for determining actual heat loss are described. Additionally, the calculation of the solar contribution percentage and the amount of mass to be included in the greenhouse and problems with an indirect gain wall are discussed. The location of the wood stove in the system is noted. The east wall temperature data are given. Soil temperature, air infiltration, thermal comfort, and energy usage are discussed. (MCW).

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Tips: Heating and Cooling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tips: Heating and Cooling Tips: Heating and Cooling Tips: Heating and Cooling May 30, 2012 - 7:38pm Addthis Household Heating Systems: Although several different types of fuels are available to heat our homes, more than half of us use natural gas. | Source: Buildings Energy Data Book 2010, 2.1.1 Residential Primary Energy Consumption, by Year and Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu and Percent of Total). Household Heating Systems: Although several different types of fuels are available to heat our homes, more than half of us use natural gas. | Source: Buildings Energy Data Book 2010, 2.1.1 Residential Primary Energy Consumption, by Year and Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu and Percent of Total). Heating and cooling your home uses more energy and costs more money than any other system in your home -- typically making up about 54% of your

286

Methodology for the evaluation of a 4000-home geothermal heat pump retrofit at Fort Polk, Louisiana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Army and a private energy service company are developing a comprehensive energy efficiency project to upgrade the family housing at Fort Polk, Louisiana. The project includes converting the space conditioning systems of more than 4,000 housing units to geothermal (or ground-source) heat pumps (GHPs). This interim report describes the methodology of the evaluation associated with this project, including the field monitoring that has been conducted at the base.

Hughes, P.J.; Shonder, J.A.; White, D.L.; Huang, H.L.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Coal, Smoke, and Death: Bituminous Coal and American Home Heating, 1920-1959  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air pollution was severe in many parts of the United States in the first half of the twentieth century. Much of the air pollution was attributable to bituminous coal. This paper uses newly digitized state-month mortality data to estimate the effects of bituminous coal consumption for heating on mortality rates in the U.S. between 1920 and 1959. The use of coal for heating was high until the mid-1940s, and then declined sharply. The switch to cleaner fuels was driven by plausibly exogenous changes in the availability of natural gas, the end of war-related supply restrictions, and a series of coal strikes from 1946-1950. The identification strategy leverages the fact that coal consumption for heating increases during cold weather. Specifically, the mortality effects are identified from differences in the temperature-mortality response functions in state-years with greater coal consumption. Cold weather spells in high coal state-years saw greater increases in the mortality rates than cold weather spells in low coal state-years. Our estimates suggest that reductions in the use of bituminous coal for heating between 1945 and 1959 decreased average annual mortality by 2.2-3.5 percent, January mortality by 3.2-5.1 percent, average annual infant mortality by 1.6-2.8 percent, and January infant mortality by 3.1-4.6 percent. Our estimates are likely to be a lower-bound, since they only capture short-run relationships between coal and mortality. We thank Leila Abu-Orf, Paula Levin, and Katherine Rudolph for excellent research assistance. We are grateful to

Alan Barreca

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Effects of a shortened depreciation schedule on the investment costs for combined heat and power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combustion Turbines Steam Turbine Generators Heat Recoveryi.e. combustion turbine, steam turbine (if applicable), heat

Kranz, Nicole; Worrell, Ernst

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

TVA Partner Utilities - In-Home Energy Evaluation Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Program TVA Partner Utilities - In-Home Energy Evaluation Program < Back Eligibility Installer/Contractor Residential Utility Savings Category Home Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Weatherization Ventilation Manufacturing Heat Pumps Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate 50% cost up to $500 Program Info State Virginia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Windows: $500 Duct Repair, Replacement, and Sealing: $500 Minor Repair Work: $250 Replace HVAC: $250 Insulation: $500 Electric Water Heater and Pipe Insulation: $50 Air Sealing/Weatherstrip/Caulk: $500 Central HVAC Tune-up: $150 Provider Tennessee Valley Authority The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) energy right In-Home Energy Evaluation

290

Home Performance with Energy Star (WPS Customers Only) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Performance with Energy Star (WPS Customers Only) Performance with Energy Star (WPS Customers Only) Home Performance with Energy Star (WPS Customers Only) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Other Sealing Your Home Ventilation Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount WPS doubles the existing Air Sealing, Attic Insulation, Exterior Wall Insulation, Sill Box Insulation, Interior Foundation Insulation: 33.3% of improvement costs up to $1,500 through Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Total: 66% of improvement costs of up to $3,000 Assisted Home Performance Bonus: Additional 15% off, for a total of 90% off

291

EPA_T1542_SECTOR_ResHomeImprv  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Improvement: An Overview of Home Improvement: An Overview of Energy Use and Energy Efficiency Opportunities Energy Use in Residential Home Improvement American homes account for 21 percent of the nation's energy use; in fact, the average home releases twice as much harmful greenhouse gas into the atmosphere as the average vehicle. The residential sector contributes 335 million metric tons of carbon to the atmosphere each year. A typical household spends $1,900 per year on energy bills, half of which are heating and cooling costs. Fortunately, there are many cost-effective opportunities to reduce energy use in homes. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates that homeowners can save up to 30 percent on energy bills with ENERGY STAR. Energy Efficiency Opportunities

292

Water Heating: Energy-efficient strategies for supplying hot water in the home (BTS Technology Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Fact sheet for homeowners and contractors on how to supply hot water in the home while saving energy.

NAHB Research Center; Southface Energy Institute; U.S. Department of Energy' s Oak Ridge Laboratory; U.S. Department of Energy' s National Renewable Energy Laboratory

2001-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

293

Columbia Gas of Ohio - Home Performance Solutions Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Columbia Gas of Ohio - Home Performance Solutions Program Columbia Gas of Ohio - Home Performance Solutions Program Columbia Gas of Ohio - Home Performance Solutions Program < Back Eligibility Installer/Contractor Low-Income Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Maximum Rebate 70% Program Info State Ohio Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Audit: $50 cost Attic Insulation: $0.30-$0.50/sq. ft. Wall Insulation: $0.40/sq. ft. Air sealing: $40/air sealing hour Furnace: $200 Boiler: $200 Bonus Incentives: Varies by equipment-type Provider Columbia Gas of Ohio Columbia Gas of Ohio (CGO) offers a number of rebates on energy efficient equipment and measures to residential customers. Rebates may be available

294

Heating Water with Solar Energy Costs Less at the Phoenix Federal Correctional Institution; Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Achieving Results with Renewable Energy in the Federal Government (Brochure)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heating Water with Solar Energy Costs Less Heating Water with Solar Energy Costs Less at the Phoenix Federal Correctional Institution A large solar thermal system installed at the Phoenix Federal Correctional Institution (FCI) in 1998 heats water for the prison and costs less than buying electricity to heat that water. This renewable energy system provides 70% of the facility's annual hot water needs. The Federal Bureau of Prisons did not incur the up-front

295

Heat Pumps | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heat Pumps Heat Pumps Heat Pumps Geothermal heat pumps are expensive to install but pay for themselves over time in reduced heating and cooling costs. Learn more about how geothermal heat pumps heat and cool buildings by concentrating the naturally existing heat contained within the earth -- a clean, reliable, and renewable source of energy. In moderate climates, heat pumps can be an energy-efficient alternative to furnaces and air conditioners. Several types of heat pumps are available, including air-source; geothermal; ductless, mini-split; and absorption heat pumps. Learn more about the different options and how to use your heat pump efficiently to save money and energy at home. Featured Heat Pump Systems A heat pump can provide an alternative to using your air conditioner. | Photo courtesy of iStockPhoto/LordRunar.

296

Initial Business Case Analysis of Two Integrated Heat Pump HVAC Systems for Near-Zero-Energy Homes - Update to Include Evaluation of Impact of Including a Humidifier Option  

SciTech Connect

The long range strategic goal of the Department of Energy's Building Technologies (DOE/BT) Program is to create, by 2020, technologies and design approaches that enable the construction of net-zero energy homes at low incremental cost (DOE/BT 2005). A net zero energy home (NZEH) is a residential building with greatly reduced needs for energy through efficiency gains, with the balance of energy needs supplied by renewable technologies. While initially focused on new construction, these technologies and design approaches are intended to have application to buildings constructed before 2020 as well resulting in substantial reduction in energy use for all building types and ages. DOE/BT's Emerging Technologies (ET) team is working to support this strategic goal by identifying and developing advanced heating, ventilating, air-conditioning, and water heating (HVAC/WH) technology options applicable to NZEHs. In FY05 ORNL conducted an initial Stage 1 (Applied Research) scoping assessment of HVAC/WH systems options for future NZEHs to help DOE/BT identify and prioritize alternative approaches for further development. Eleven system concepts with central air distribution ducting and nine multi-zone systems were selected and their annual and peak demand performance estimated for five locations: Atlanta (mixed-humid), Houston (hot-humid), Phoenix (hot-dry), San Francisco (marine), and Chicago (cold). Performance was estimated by simulating the systems using the TRNSYS simulation engine (Solar Energy Laboratory et al. 2006) in two 1800-ft{sup 2} houses--a Building America (BA) benchmark house and a prototype NZEH taken from BEopt results at the take-off (or crossover) point (i.e., a house incorporating those design features such that further progress towards ZEH is through the addition of photovoltaic power sources, as determined by current BEopt analyses conducted by NREL). Results were summarized in a project report, HVAC Equipment Design options for Near-Zero-Energy Homes--A Stage 2 Scoping Assessment, ORNL/TM-2005/194 (Baxter 2005). The 2005 study report describes the HVAC options considered, the ranking criteria used, and the system rankings by priority. In 2006, the two top-ranked options from the 2005 study, air-source and ground-source versions of a centrally ducted integrated heat pump (IHP) system, were subjected to an initial business case study. The IHPs were subjected to a more rigorous hourly-based assessment of their performance potential compared to a baseline suite of equipment of legally minimum efficiency that provided the same heating, cooling, water heating, demand dehumidification, and ventilation services as the IHPs. Results were summarized in a project report, Initial Business Case Analysis of Two Integrated Heat Pump HVAC Systems for Near-Zero-Energy Homes, ORNL/TM-2006/130 (Baxter 2006a). The present report is an update to that document which summarizes results of an analysis of the impact of adding a humidifier to the HVAC system to maintain minimum levels of space relative humidity (RH) in winter. The space RH in winter has direct impact on occupant comfort and on control of dust mites, many types of disease bacteria, and 'dry air' electric shocks. Chapter 8 in ASHRAE's 2005 Handbook of Fundamentals (HOF) suggests a 30% lower limit on RH for indoor temperatures in the range of {approx}68-69F based on comfort (ASHRAE 2005). Table 3 in chapter 9 of the same reference suggests a 30-55% RH range for winter as established by a Canadian study of exposure limits for residential indoor environments (EHD 1987). Harriman, et al (2001) note that for RH levels of 35% or higher, electrostatic shocks are minimized and that dust mites cannot live at RH levels below 40%. They also indicate that many disease bacteria life spans are minimized when space RH is held within a 30-60% range. From the foregoing it is reasonable to assume that a winter space RH range of 30-40% would be an acceptable compromise between comfort considerations and limitation of growth rates for dust mites and many bacteria. In addition it reports som

Baxter, Van D [ORNL

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Heating Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A variety of heating technologies are available today. In addition to heat pumps, which are discussed separately, many homes and buildings use the following approaches:

298

Mississippi Power - EarthCents New Home Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mississippi Power - EarthCents New Home Program Mississippi Power - EarthCents New Home Program Mississippi Power - EarthCents New Home Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Construction Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Gold Level: $1,000 Silver Level: $500 Bronze Level: certification Provider Efficiency Programs Mississippi Power offers incentives to its residential customers to help offset the cost of installing energy efficient measures in new homes. A three-level program is offered to encourage the adoption of these energy

299

Nevada Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Nevada homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Nevada homeowners will save $4,736 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 2 years for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $360 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

300

Idaho Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC  

SciTech Connect

The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Idaho homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Idaho homeowners will save $4,057 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $285 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "home heating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Pennsylvania Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IRC  

SciTech Connect

The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Pennsylvania homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from Chapter 11 of the 2009 International Residential Code (IRC) is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Pennsylvania homeowners will save $8,632 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $515 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

302

Ohio Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Ohio homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Ohio homeowners will save $5,151 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $330 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

303

Break-Even Cost for Residential Solar Water Heating in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines the break-even cost for residential rooftop solar water heating (SWH) technology, defined as the point where the cost of the energy saved with a SWH system equals the cost of a conventional heating fuel purchased from the grid (either electricity or natural gas). We examine the break-even cost for the largest 1,000 electric and natural gas utilities serving residential customers in the United States as of 2008. Currently, the break-even cost of SWH in the United States varies by more than a factor of five for both electricity and natural gas, despite a much smaller variation in the amount of energy saved by the systems (a factor of approximately one and a half). The break-even price for natural gas is lower than that for electricity due to a lower fuel cost. We also consider the relationship between SWH price and solar fraction and examine the key drivers behind break-even costs. Overall, the key drivers of the break-even cost of SWH are a combination of fuel price, local incentives, and technical factors including the solar resource location, system size, and hot water draw.

Cassard, H.; Denholm, P.; Ong, S.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

RDI's Wisdom Way Solar Village Final Report: Includes Utility Bill Analysis of Occupied Homes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

7. 2-4 bedrooms, 1,100-1,700 ft2. The design heating loads in the homes were so small that each home is heated with a single, sealed-combustion, natural gas room heater. The cost savings from the simple HVAC systems made possible the tremendous investments in the homes' envelopes. The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) monitored temperatures and comfort in several homes during the winter of 2009-2010. In the Spring of 2011, CARB obtained utility bill information from 13 occupied homes. Because of efficient lights, appliances, and conscientious home occupants, the energy generated by the solar electric systems exceeded the electric energy used in most homes. Most homes, in fact, had a net credit from the electric utility over the course of a year. On the natural gas side, total gas costs averaged $377 per year (for heating, water heating, cooking, and clothes drying). Total energy costs were even less - $337 per year, including all utility fees. The highest annual energy bill for any home evaluated was $458; the lowest was $171.

Robb Aldrich, Steven Winter Associates

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Low Cost High Performance Generator Technology Program. Volume 5. Heat pipe topical, appendices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work performed by Dynatherm Corporation for Teledyne Isotopes during a program entitled ''Heat Pipe Fabrication, Associated Technical Support and Reporting'' is reported. The program was initiated on November 29, 1972; the main objectives were accomplished with the delivery of the heat pipes for the HPG. Life testing of selected heat pipe specimens is continuing to and beyond the present date. The program consisted of the following tasks: Heat Pipe Development of Process Definition; Prototype Heat Pipes for Fin Segment Test; HPG Heat Pipe Fabrication and Testing; Controlled Heat Pipe Life Test; and Heat Pipe Film Coefficient Determination. (TFD)

Not Available

1975-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Effects of a shortened depreciation schedule on the investment costs for combined heat and power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recovery Steam Generators Water Treatment System Electricalapplicable), heat recovery steam generators, water treatmentMW Combustion Turbines Steam Turbine Generators Heat

Kranz, Nicole; Worrell, Ernst

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Low Cost High Performance Generator Technology Program. Volume 5. Heat pipe topical, appendices  

SciTech Connect

Work performed by Dynatherm Corporation for Teledyne Isotopes during a program entitled ''Heat Pipe Fabrication, Associated Technical Support and Reporting'' is reported. The program was initiated on November 29, 1972; the main objectives were accomplished with the delivery of the heat pipes for the HPG. Life testing of selected heat pipe specimens is continuing to and beyond the present date. The program consisted of the following tasks: Heat Pipe Development of Process Definition; Prototype Heat Pipes for Fin Segment Test; HPG Heat Pipe Fabrication and Testing; Controlled Heat Pipe Life Test; and Heat Pipe Film Coefficient Determination. (TFD)

1975-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

The End-Use Technology Assessment Project: A Load-Shape Analysis of Ground Source Heat Pumps and Good Cents Homes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interest is growing in end-use technology applications that promote overall energy efficiency through increased electricity use. This study will help utilities understand the impacts of such applications by providing load-shape information on ground source heat pumps as well as energy-efficient appliances promoted through Good Cents Homes programs. This report is available only to funders of Program 101A or 101.001. Funders may download this report at http://my.primen.com/Applications/DE/Community/index...

1995-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

309

Effects of a shortened depreciation schedule on the investment costs for combined heat and power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

included. Therefore, the cost per kWh should not necessarilyproduction, i.e. the cost per kWh only relates to theof the tax shield and cost per kWh of power produced for

Kranz, Nicole; Worrell, Ernst

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Electric co-heating in the ASHRAE standard method of test for thermal distribution efficiency: Test results on two New York State homes  

SciTech Connect

Electric co-heating tests on two single-family homes with forced-air heating systems were carried out in March 1995. The goal of these tests was to evaluate procedures being considered for incorporation in a Standard Method of Test for thermal distribution system efficiency now being developed by ASHRAE. Thermal distribution systems are the ductwork, piping, or other means used to transport heat or cooling effect from the building equipment that produces this thermal energy to the spaces in which it is used. Furthering the project goal, the first objective of the tests was to evaluate electric co-heating as a means of measuring system efficiency. The second objective was to investigate procedures for obtaining the distribution efficiency, using system efficiency as a base. Distribution efficiencies of 0.63 and 0.70 were obtained for the two houses.

Andrews, J.W.; Krajewski, R.F.; Strasser, J.J.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Cost-effective solar collectors using heat pipes. Interim progress report No. 1, September 1977-March 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is the demonstration of high performance, cost effective non-concentrating solar collectors using heat pipes. The end products will be directly applicable for efficient use with absorption and Rankine cycle chillers. Evacuated tubular solar collectors were selected as the only economical non-concentrating approach capable of efficient operation of chillers. The General Electric TC family of collectors was chosen because of their superior performance and compatibility with heat pipe integration. The system was designed and specified. This work included the integration of the heat pipe with the evacuated tubular solar collector and the pumped loop heat removal mechanism. To date, two heat pipe fluid-envelope combinations look attractive: water-aluminum bearing steel and ethanol-low carbon steel. The jury is still out on the ability for the water-aluminum bearing steel to survive freezing cycles and for ethanol-low carbon steel to withstand predicted 400/sup 0/C stagnation temperatures. Full scale cost analysis was not completed for either case. Two 4' x 4' panels, each with ten tubular collectors fitted with heat pipes, were erected at Thermacore to test various aspects of the heat pipe and its integration into the collector-pumped loop system.

Ernst, D.M.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

EPA_T1542_SECTOR_ResHomeImprv  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to improve energy efficiency at home: > ENERGY STAR's Home Energy Yardstick > The DIY Guide to ENERGY STAR Home Sealing > ENERGY STAR's Guide to Energy-Efficient Heating and...

313

Energy-Efficient Home Design | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

more light and absorb less heat from sunlight, which keeps homes cooler during hot weather. Passive Solar Home Design Passive solar home design takes advantage of climatic...

314

Columbia Water & Light - New Home Energy Star Rebate | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Home Energy Star Rebate Columbia Water & Light - New Home Energy Star Rebate Eligibility Construction Residential Savings For Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction...

315

Home and Building Technology Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Home and Building Technology Basics Home and Building Technology Basics Homes and other buildings use energy every day for space heating and cooling, for lighting and hot water,...

316

Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling April 24, 2012 - 4:18pm Addthis Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling Using passive solar design to heat and cool your home can be both environmentally friendly and cost effective. In many cases, your heating costs can be reduced to less than half the cost of heating a typical home. Passive solar design can also help lower your cooling costs. Passive solar cooling techniques include carefully designed overhangs and using reflective coatings on windows, exterior walls, and roofs. Newer techniques include placing large, insulated windows on south-facing walls and putting thermal mass, such as a concrete slab floor or a heat-absorbing wall, close to the windows. A passive solar house requires careful design and siting, which vary by

317

Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Passive Solar Heating and Cooling Passive Solar Heating and Cooling Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling April 24, 2012 - 4:18pm Addthis Tips: Passive Solar Heating and Cooling Using passive solar design to heat and cool your home can be both environmentally friendly and cost effective. In many cases, your heating costs can be reduced to less than half the cost of heating a typical home. Passive solar design can also help lower your cooling costs. Passive solar cooling techniques include carefully designed overhangs and using reflective coatings on windows, exterior walls, and roofs. Newer techniques include placing large, insulated windows on south-facing walls and putting thermal mass, such as a concrete slab floor or a heat-absorbing wall, close to the windows. A passive solar house requires careful design and siting, which vary by

318

Oklahoma Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IRC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Oklahoma homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from Chapter 11 of the 2009 International Residential Code (IRC) is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Oklahoma homeowners will save $5,786 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $408 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

319

Rhode Island Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC  

SciTech Connect

The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Rhode Island homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Rhode Island homeowners will save $11,011 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $629 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Iowa Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC  

SciTech Connect

The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Iowa homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Iowa homeowners will save $7,573 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $454 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "home heating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Massachusetts Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Massachusetts homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Massachusetts homeowners will save $10,848 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $621 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Delaware Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Delaware homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Delaware homeowners will save $10,409 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $616 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Texas Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IECC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Texas homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the 2009 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Texas homeowners will save $3,456 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 2 years for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $259 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

324

Break-Even Cost for Residential Solar Water Heating in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Break-even Cost for Residential Break-even Cost for Residential Solar Water Heating in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities Hannah Cassard, Paul Denholm, and Sean Ong Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-48986 February 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Break-even Cost for Residential Solar Water Heating in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities Hannah Cassard, Paul Denholm, and Sean Ong Prepared under Task No. SS10.2110 Technical Report

325

Multifamily Individual Heating and Ventilation Systems, Lawrence, Massachusetts (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Efficient Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Multifamily Individual Heating Multifamily Individual Heating and Ventilation Systems Lawrence, Massachusetts PROJECT INFORMATION Construction: Retrofit Type: Multifamily, affordable Builder: Merrimack Valley Habitat for Humanity (MVHfH) www.merrimackvalleyhabitat.org Size: 840 to 1,170 ft 2 units Price Range: $125,000-$130,000 Date completed: Slated for 2014 Climate Zone: Cold (5A) PERFORMANCE DATA HERS Index Range: 48 to 63 Projected annual energy cost savings: $1,797 Incremental cost of energy efficiency measures: $3,747 Incremental annual mortgage: $346 Annual cash flow: $1,451 Billing data: Not available The conversion of an older Massachusetts building into condominiums illustrates a safe, durable, and cost-effective solution for heating and ventilation systems that can potentially benefit millions of multifamily buildings. Merrimack Valley

326

Energy Basics: Home and Building Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Home and Building Technologies Homes and other buildings use energy every day for space heating and cooling, for lighting and hot water, and for appliances and electronics. Today's...

327

Cost benefits from applying advanced heat rejection concepts to a wet/dry-cooled binary geothermal plant  

SciTech Connect

Optimized ammonia heat rejection system designs were carried out for three water allocations equivalent to 9, 20, and 31% of that of a 100% wet-cooled plant. The Holt/Procon design of a 50-MWe binary geothermal plant for the Heber site was used as a design basis. The optimization process took into account the penalties for replacement power, gas turbine capital, and lost capacity due to increased heat rejection temperature, as well as added base plant capacity and fuel to provide fan and pump power to the heat rejection system. Descriptions of the three plant designs are presented. For comparison, a wet tower loop was costed out for a 100% wet-cooled plant using the parameters of the Holt/Procon design. Wet/dry cooling was found to increase the cost of electricity by 28% above that of a 100% wet-cooled plant for all three of the water allocations studied (9, 20, and 31%). The application selected for a preconceptual evaluation of the BCT (binary cooling tower) system was the use of agricultural waste water from the New River, located in California's Imperial Valley, to cool a 50-MWe binary geothermal plant. Technical and cost evaluations at the preconceptual level indicated that performance estimates provided by Tower Systems Incorporated (TSI) were reasonable and that TSI's tower cost, although 2 to 19% lower than PNL estimates, was also reasonable. Electrical cost comparisonswere made among the BCT system, a conventional 100% wet system, and a 9% wet/dry ammonia system, all using agricultural waste water with solar pond disposal. The BCT system cost the least, yielding a cost of electricity only 13% above that of a conventional wet system using high quality water and 14% less than either the conventional 100% wet or the 9% wet/dry ammonia system.

Faletti, D.W.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Cost benefits from applying advanced heat rejection concepts to a wet/dry-cooled binary geothermal plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Optimized ammonia heat rejection system designs were carried out for three water allocations equivalent to 9, 20, and 31% of that of a 100% wet-cooled plant. The Holt/Procon design of a 50-MWe binary geothermal plant for the Heber site was used as a design basis. The optimization process took into account the penalties for replacement power, gas turbine capital, and lost capacity due to increased heat rejection temperature, as well as added base plant capacity and fuel to provide fan and pump power to the heat rejection system. Descriptions of the three plant designs are presented. For comparison, a wet tower loop was costed out for a 100% wet-cooled plant using the parameters of the Holt/Procon design. Wet/dry cooling was found to increase the cost of electricity by 28% above that of a 100% wet-cooled plant for all three of the water allocations studied (9, 20, and 31%). The application selected for a preconceptual evaluation of the BCT (binary cooling tower) system was the use of agricultural waste water from the New River, located in California's Imperial Valley, to cool a 50-MWe binary geothermal plant. Technical and cost evaluations at the preconceptual level indicated that performance estimates provided by Tower Systems Incorporated (TSI) were reasonable and that TSI's tower cost, although 2 to 19% lower than PNL estimates, was also reasonable. Electrical cost comparisonswere made among the BCT system, a conventional 100% wet system, and a 9% wet/dry ammonia system, all using agricultural waste water with solar pond disposal. The BCT system cost the least, yielding a cost of electricity only 13% above that of a conventional wet system using high quality water and 14% less than either the conventional 100% wet or the 9% wet/dry ammonia system.

Faletti, D.W.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

DOE Seeks Commercial Storage to Complete Fill of Northeast Home...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Seeks Commercial Storage to Complete Fill of Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve DOE Seeks Commercial Storage to Complete Fill of Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve August 26,...

330

Passive Solar Design for the Home  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet provides homeowners with an introduction to passive solar design, which is also called climatic design. It explains how they can use windows, walls, and floors to collect, store, and distribute solar energy to heat their homes in the winter, as well as reject solar heat in the summer. It includes information on heat-movement physics; basic solar design techniques--direct gain, indirect gain (Trombe walls), isolated gain (sunspaces), and design for summer comfort; window options for passive solar; and design cost.

Krigger, J. [Saturn Resource Management (US); Waggoner, T. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (US)

2001-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

331

Xcel Energy (Electric and Gas) - Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Rebates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Xcel Energy (Electric and Gas) - Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Xcel Energy (Electric and Gas) - Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Rebates Xcel Energy (Electric and Gas) - Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Rebates < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Appliances & Electronics Construction Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate $1,200 Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount See Xcel's web site for current levels This program is available only to Minnesota residents who take both electric and natural gas service from Xcel Energy. Customers must undertake a low-cost energy audit ($60) before implementing energy-efficiency

332

Geothermal Heat Pump Systems in Schools: Construction, Maintenance and Operating Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geothermal heat pumping and cooling systems are still not widely used to heat and cool buildings. They are an unknown to most architects and engineers. The electric utility industry has recognized them as being a very energy-efficient way to heat and cool buildings using electricity. The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has assisted in design and installation of many geothermal systems, particularly in school buildings. With a number of geothermal heat pump systems in schools in operation in the TVA regi...

2000-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

333

Towards Occupancy-Driven Heating and Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

$100­$200 per home in hardware, and less than $0.10 per square foot in office buildings. It will also a 28% reduction per household in the energy required for heating and cooling, at the cost of only $25. This energy savings is a low hanging fruit: a large amount of energy can be saved at a very low cost

Whitehouse, Kamin

334

Homes | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Homes Homes Homes EERE leads a robust network of researchers and other partners to continually develop cost-effective energy-saving solutions that help make our country run better through increased efficiency — promoting better plants, manufacturing processes, and products; more efficient new homes and improved older homes; and other solutions to enhance the buildings in which we work, shop, and lead our everyday lives. EERE leads a robust network of researchers and other partners to continually develop cost-effective energy-saving solutions that help make our country run better through increased efficiency - promoting better plants, manufacturing processes, and products; more efficient new homes and improved older homes; and other solutions to enhance the buildings in which

335

Home Energy Saver  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

No-Regrets Remodeling No-Regrets Remodeling Excerpts from No-Regrets Remodeling by the people at Home Energy magazine. Note: This book was published in 1997. While most of the information is timeless, some items may be out-dated. Your Kitchen Cooking Appliances Electric or Gas Kitchen Ranges? Refrigerators Your Home Office Home Office Equipment Power Ratings of Office Equipment Your Heating Heating: General Home Performance Contractors Oil System Upgrades Combined (Indirect) Hot Water & Heating Systems Combined (Integrated) Space & Water Heating The Thermostat is in Control Time for an Energy Switch? Your Cooling Tips for Buying a New Air Conditioner Cool Roofs for Hot Climates Evaporative Cooler Tips Ventilation, Ducts, Moisture, and Air Leakage Common Air Leakage Sites in the Home

336

RDI's Wisdom Way Solar Village Final Report: Includes Utility Bill Analysis of Occupied Homes  

SciTech Connect

In 2010, Rural Development, Inc. (RDI) completed construction of Wisdom Way Solar Village (WWSV), a community of ten duplexes (20 homes) in Greenfield, MA. RDI was committed to very low energy use from the beginning of the design process throughout construction. Key features include: 1. Careful site plan so that all homes have solar access (for active and passive); 2. Cellulose insulation providing R-40 walls, R-50 ceiling, and R-40 floors; 3. Triple-pane windows; 4. Airtight construction (~0.1 CFM50/ft2 enclosure area); 5. Solar water heating systems with tankless, gas, auxiliary heaters; 6. PV systems (2.8 or 3.4kWSTC); 7. 2-4 bedrooms, 1,100-1,700 ft2. The design heating loads in the homes were so small that each home is heated with a single, sealed-combustion, natural gas room heater. The cost savings from the simple HVAC systems made possible the tremendous investments in the homes' envelopes. The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) monitored temperatures and comfort in several homes during the winter of 2009-2010. In the Spring of 2011, CARB obtained utility bill information from 13 occupied homes. Because of efficient lights, appliances, and conscientious home occupants, the energy generated by the solar electric systems exceeded the electric energy used in most homes. Most homes, in fact, had a net credit from the electric utility over the course of a year. On the natural gas side, total gas costs averaged $377 per year (for heating, water heating, cooking, and clothes drying). Total energy costs were even less - $337 per year, including all utility fees. The highest annual energy bill for any home evaluated was $458; the lowest was $171.

Robb Aldrich, Steven Winter Associates

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Energy Basics: Radiant Heating  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

low heat capacity and have the quickest response time of any heating technology. More Information Visit the Energy Saver website for more information about radiant heating in homes...

338

Kansas City Power and Light - Cool Homes Residential Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kansas City Power and Light - Cool Homes Residential Rebate Program Kansas City Power and Light - Cool Homes Residential Rebate Program Kansas City Power and Light - Cool Homes Residential Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Program Info State Missouri Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount SEER 14/15: $650 SEER 16/Greater: $850 Provider Kansas City Power and Light Kansas City Power and Light (KCP&L) offers rebates to residential customers to help offset the cost of replacing inefficient central AC and heat pump systems with newer, more efficient models. In order to qualify for a rebate, the system being replaced must have an EER of 8.0 or less, as tested by a CheckMe!-trained HVAC contractor. The replacement of "dead"

339

Manufactured Home Energy Audit user`s manual  

SciTech Connect

The Manufactured Home Energy Audit (MHEA) is a software tool that predicts manufactured home energy consumption and recommends weatherization retrofit measures. It was developed to assist local weatherization agencies working with the US Department of Energy (DOE) Weatherization Assistance Program. Whether new or experienced, employed within or outside the Weatherization Assistance Program, all users can benefit from incorporating MHEA into their manufactured home weatherization programs. DOE anticipates that the state weatherization assistance programs that incorporate MHEA into their programs will find significant growth in the energy and cost savings achieved from manufactured home weatherization. The easy-to-use MHEA displays a colorful, graphical interface for entering simple inputs and provides understandable, usable results. The user enters information about the manufactured home construction, heating equipment, cooling equipment, and weather site. MHEA then calculates annual energy consumption using a simplified building energy analysis technique. MHEA stands apart from other building energy analysis tools in many ways. Calculations incorporated into the computer code specifically address manufactured home heating and cooling load trends. The retrofit measures evaluated by MHEA are all applicable to manufactured homes. Help messages describe common manufactured home weatherization practices as well as provide hints on how to install retrofit measures. These and other features help make MHEA easy to use when evaluating energy consumption and the effects of weatherization retrofit measures for manufactured homes.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Insulated Concrete Homes Increase Durability and Energy Efficiency  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

New houses designed by Mercedes Homes in Melbourne, Florida, with technical support from the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America Program, save their homeowners money by using energy efficient features such as a high performance heat pump and solar control glazing to reduce cooling costs.

Building America; Hendron, B.; Poole, L.

2001-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "home heating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Insulated Concrete Homes Increase Durability and Energy Efficiency  

SciTech Connect

New houses designed by Mercedes Homes in Melbourne, Florida, with technical support from the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America Program, save their homeowners money by using energy efficient features such as a high performance heat pump and solar control glazing to reduce cooling costs.

Building America; Hendron, B.; Poole, L.

2001-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

342

Cost-efficient monitoring of water quality in district heating systems This article examines the monitoring strategy for water quality in a large Danish district  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost-efficient monitoring of water quality in district heating systems This article examines the monitoring strategy for water quality in a large Danish district heating system ­ and makes a proposal for a technical and economic improvement. Monitoring of water quality in district heating systems is necessary

343

Heating costs for most households are forecast to rise from last ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

344

Analysis of Residential System Strategies Targeting Least-Cost Solutions Leading to Net Zero Energy Homes: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U. S. Department of Energy's Building America residential systems research project uses an analysis-based system research approach to identify research priorities, identify technology gaps and opportunities, establish a consistent basis to track research progress, and identify system solutions that are most likely to succeed as the initial targets for residential system research projects. This report describes the analysis approach used by the program to determine the most cost-effective pathways to achieve whole-house energy-savings goals. This report also provides an overview of design/technology strategies leading to net zero energy buildings as the basis for analysis of future residential system performance.

Anderson, R.; Christensen, C.; Horowitz, S.

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Passive Solar Home Design | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Passive Solar Home Design Passive Solar Home Design June 24, 2013 - 7:18pm Addthis This North Carolina home gets most of its space heating from the passive solar design, but the...

346

Heating Water with Solar Energy Costs Less at the Phoenix Federal...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water with Solar Energy Costs Less at the Phoenix Federal Correctional Institution A large solar thermal system installed at the Phoenix Federal Correctional Institution (FCI) in...

347

User manual for GEOCITY: a computer model for cost analysis of geothermal district-heating-and-cooling systems. Volume I. Main text  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this model is to calculate the costs of residential space heating, space cooling, and sanitary water heating or process heating (cooling) using geothermal energy from a hydrothermal reservoir. The model can calculate geothermal heating and cooling costs for residential developments, a multi-district city, or a point demand such as an industrial factory or commercial building. GEOCITY simulates the complete geothermal heating and cooling system, which consists of two principal parts: the reservoir and fluid transmission system and the distribution system. The reservoir and fluid transmission submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of thermal energy supplied to the distribution system by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the exploration, development, and operation of the reservoir and fluid transmission system. The distribution system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of heat (chill) delivered by the distribution system to the end-users by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the construction and operation of the distribution system. Geothermal space heating is assumed to be provided by circulating hot water through radiators, convectors, fan-coil units, or other in-house heating systems. Geothermal process heating is provided by directly using the hot water or by circulating it through a process heat exchanger. Geothermal space or process cooling is simulated by circulating hot water through lithium bromide/water absorption chillers located at each building. Retrofit costs for both heating and cooling applications can be input by the user. The life-cycle cost of thermal energy from the reservoir and fluid transmission system to the distribution system and the life-cycle cost of heat (chill) to the end-users are calculated using discounted cash flow analysis.

Huber, H.D.; Fassbender, L.L.; Bloomster, C.H.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Home Energy Loan Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Home Energy Loan Program Home Energy Loan Program Home Energy Loan Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Appliances & Electronics Other Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate $6,000 from LA DNR Program Info State Louisiana Program Type State Loan Program Rebate Amount 50% of loan amount subsidized by LA DNR Provider Louisiana Department of Natural Resources The Home Energy Loan Program (HELP), administered by the Louisiana Department of Natural Resources (DNR), allows homeowners to get a five-year loan to improve the energy efficiency of their existing home. DNR

349

Home Energy Saver  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hidden Cost of Home Energy Use Hidden Cost of Home Energy Use By improving your home's energy efficiency, you can profit in three ways: save money, improve your life, and help the earth, and making your home safer and more comfortable. Annual Carbon Dioxide Emissions from the Average House vs. the Average Car: Each year the average house releases over twice as much greenhouse gases as the typical car. House: 22,000 lbs/CO2 Car: 10,000 lbs/CO2 Many people believe that their car is the largest single source of air pollution for which they are personally responsible. But in fact, the average home causes the emission of more than twice as much carbon dioxide-the principal greenhouse gas-as the average car. This is because most of the energy consumed in our homes is produced by burning fossil fuels like coal, oil, and natural gas. This pollution is actually a

350

TVA Partner Utilities - In-Home Energy Evaluation Pilot Program (Georgia) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TVA Partner Utilities - In-Home Energy Evaluation Pilot Program TVA Partner Utilities - In-Home Energy Evaluation Pilot Program (Georgia) TVA Partner Utilities - In-Home Energy Evaluation Pilot Program (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Installer/Contractor Residential Utility Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Manufacturing Heat Pumps Maximum Rebate 50% cost up to $500 Program Info State Georgia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Windows: $500 Duct Repair, Replacement, and Sealing: $500 Minor Repair Work: $250 Replace HVAC: $250 Insulation: $500 Electric Water Heater and Pipe Insulation: $50 Air Sealing: $500 Caulking, Weatherstripping, and other Self Installed Improvements: $250

351

Design Approach and Performance Analysis of a Small Integrated Heat Pump (IHP) for Net Zero Energy Homes (ZEH)  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the design and performance analysis of a variable-capacity heat pump system developed for a small [1800ft2 (167 m2)] prototype net ZEH with an average design cooling load of 1.25 tons (4.4 kW) in five selected US climates. The heat pump integrates space heating and cooling, water heating, ventilation, and humidity control (humidification and dehumidification) functions into a single integrated heat pump (IHP) unit. The design approach uses one small variable-capacity compressor to meet all the above functions in an energy efficient manner. Modal performance comparisons to an earlier IHP product are shown relative to the proposed new design for net ZEH application. The annual performance analysis approach using TRNSYS in conjunction with the ORNL Heat Pump Design Model is discussed. Annual performance projections for a range of locations are compared to those of a base system consisting of separate pieces of equipment to perform the same functions. The ZEH IHP is projected to reduce energy use for space heating & cooling, water heating, dehumidification, and ventilation for a net ZEH by about 50% compared to that of the base system.

Rice, C Keith [ORNL; Murphy, Richard W [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Performance of Home Smoke Alarms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 72 Figure 86. Heating ignition source with cooking oil . ... Estimated particle size from cooking oil fire scenario . . ... Performance of Home Smoke Alarms ...

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile … Affordable High Performance in Production Homes: Artistic Homes, Albuquerque, NM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

help from Building America, Artistic help from Building America, Artistic Homes built affordable, high-performance homes in New Mexico and Colorado with HERS scores of 0 to 60. Many builders remain resistant to adopting high-performance innovations based on misconceptions about high cost and design challenges. Thus, Building America projects such as Artistic Homes have had an extraordinary impact, demonstrating the mainstream builder's business case for adopting proven innovations such as efficient thermal enclosures and ducts inside the conditioned space, even in entry-level homes. The U.S. Department of Energy's Building America program has helped develop best practices for creating efficient thermal enclosures and locating HVAC ducts inside the conditioned space. These measures cost-effectively reduce heating and

354

Water Heating | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Heating Water Heating Water Heating Infographic: Water Heaters 101 Everything you need to know about saving money on water heating costs Read more Selecting a New Water Heater Tankless? Storage? Solar? Save money on your water heating bill by choosing the right type of energy-efficient water heater for your needs. Read more Sizing a New Water Heater When buying a new water heater, bigger is not always better. Learn how to buy the right size of water heater. Read more You can reduce your monthly water heating bills by selecting the appropriate water heater for your home or pool and by using some energy-efficient water heating strategies. Some simple do-it-yourself projects, like insulating hot water pipes and lowering your water heating temperature, can also help you save money and energy on your water heating.

355

GREEN HOMES LONG ISLAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

developed a program that enables residents to make improvements that will decrease their home energy usage energy bill, reduce your carbon footprint... at little or no cost to you. #12;A Message From Supervisor energy-efficient and reduce our community's carbon footprint. Why do we call it Long Island Green Homes

Kammen, Daniel M.

356

Home Energy Saver  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What kind of energy improvements have you done on your home? Zero-cost changes (e.g., turning off lights) Efficient lighting Install more-efficient appliances More efficient...

357

Interactions between fuel choice and energy-efficiency in new homes in the Pacific Northwest  

SciTech Connect

In recent years the Bonneville Power Administration has instituted programs to prompt the implementation of the residential Model Conservation Standards (MCS) issued by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) in 1983. These standards provide alternative methods for designing and constructing homes to cost effectively reduce residential energy consumption. Authority exists to apply them only to new, electrically heated homes. Because they apply to electrically heated homes, concerns have arisen about how the standards might affect buyers' decisions to purchase a new home, in particular, their choice of a heating fuel. Early data suggested that electricity started losing market share in Tacoma about when the MCS went into effect in 1984, and recent data have shown that about half of electricity's share of the new home market has shifted to natural gas. This decline in electric heating was consistent with concerns about the possible detrimental effect of the cost of MCS on sales of electrically heated homes. A desire to understand the causes of the perceived decline in electricity's market share was part of the impetus for this study. Multiple techniques and data sources are used in this study to examine the relationship between residential energy-efficiency and fuel choice in the major metropolitan areas in Washington: Spokane, Clark, Pierce, and King Counties. Recent regional surveys have shown that electricity is the predominant space heating fuel in the Pacific Northwest, but it appears to be losing its dominance in some markets such as Tacoma.

Lee, A.D.; Englin, J.E.; Bruneau, C.L.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Interactions between fuel choice and energy-efficiency in new homes in the Pacific Northwest  

SciTech Connect

In recent years the Bonneville Power Administration has instituted programs to prompt the implementation of the residential Model Conservation Standards (MCS) issued by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) in 1983. These standards provide alternative methods for designing and constructing homes to cost effectively reduce residential energy consumption. Authority exists to apply them only to new, electrically heated homes. Because they apply to electrically heated homes, concerns have arisen about how the standards might affect buyers' decisions to purchase a new home, in particular, their choice of a heating fuel. Early data suggested that electricity started losing market share in Tacoma about when the MCS went into effect in 1984, and recent data have shown that about half of electricity's share of the new home market has shifted to natural gas. This decline in electric heating was consistent with concerns about the possible detrimental effect of the cost of MCS on sales of electrically heated homes. A desire to understand the causes of the perceived decline in electricity's market share was part of the impetus for this study. Multiple techniques and data sources are used in this study to examine the relationship between residential energy-efficiency and fuel choice in the major metropolitan areas in Washington: Spokane, Clark, Pierce, and King Counties. Recent regional surveys have shown that electricity is the predominant space heating fuel in the Pacific Northwest, but it appears to be losing its dominance in some markets such as Tacoma.

Lee, A.D.; Englin, J.E.; Bruneau, C.L.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Field Study and Energy-Plus Benchmarks for Energy Saver Homes having Different Envelope Designs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An alliance to maximize energy efficiency and cost-effective residential construction (ZEBRAlliance) built and field tested four homes that are 50 percent more energy efficient than a code compliant home. The homes are unoccupied for the duration of a two-year field study, thereby eliminating the confounding issue of occupancy habits. All homes have about the same consistent and scheduled internal load. Each home showcases a unique envelope strategy: 1) structural insulated panel (SIP), 2) optimal value wall framing (OVF), 3) advanced framing featuring the benefits of insulations mixed with phase change materials (PCM), and 4) an exterior insulation and finish system (EIFS). All homes have different weather resistive barriers (WRBs) and/or air barriers to limit air and moisture infiltration. Three homes provide space conditioning and water heating via a ground loop heat exchanger, while the fourth home uses a high efficiency air-to-air heat pump and heat pump water heater. Field performance and results of EnergyPlus V7.0 benchmarks were made for roof and attics as compared to cathedral design and for wall heat flows to validate models. The moisture content of the wall sheathing is shown to prove the protecting effectiveness of WRBs. Temperature distributions through insulations in the wall and ceiling with and without PCMs are described to characterize the performance of the PCM building envelopes.

Shrestha, Som S [ORNL; Childs, Kenneth W [ORNL; Stannard, Eric E [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Fuel Cell Power Model Elucidates Life-Cycle Costs for Fuel Cell-Based Combined Heat, Hydrogen, and Power (CHHP) Production Systems (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in accurately modeling costs for fuel cell-based combined heat, hydrogen, and power systems. Work was performed by NREL's Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

Not Available

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "home heating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Candidate alloys for cost-effective, high-efficiency, high-temperature compact/foil heat-exchangers  

SciTech Connect

Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) systems operate at high temperatures (up to 1000 C and 650 C, respectively), which makes them especially attractive sources for combined heat and power (CHP) cogeneration. However, improvements in the efficiency of heat exchange in these fuel cells require both development and careful processing of advanced cost-effective alloys for use in such high-temperature service conditions. The high-temperature properties of both sheet and foil forms of several alloys being considered for use in compact heat-exchangers (recuperators) have been characterized. Mechanical and creep-rupture testing, oxidation studies, and microstructural studies have been performed on commercially available sheet and foil forms of alloy 347, alloys 625, HR230, HR120, and the new AL20-25+Nb. These studies have led to a mechanistic understanding of the responses of these alloys to anticipated service conditions, and suggest that these alloys developed for gas- and micro-turbine recuperator applications are also suitable for use in fuel cell heat-exchangers. Additional work is still required to achieve foil forms with creep life comparable to thicker-section wrought product forms of the same alloys.

Evans, Neal D [ORNL; Maziasz, Philip J [ORNL; Shingledecker, John P [ORNL; Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; Yamamoto, Yukinori [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Wiregrass Electric Cooperative - Touchstone Energy Home Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wiregrass Electric Cooperative - Touchstone Energy Home Program Wiregrass Electric Cooperative - Touchstone Energy Home Program Wiregrass Electric Cooperative - Touchstone Energy Home Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Alabama Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Free Water Heater Provider Wiregrass Electric Cooperative, Inc. Wiregrass Electric Cooperative is a consumer-owned electric utility serving over 20,000 consumers in the "Wiregrass" area of southeast Alabama. Through the H2O plus program, qualified Wiregrass customers are eligible to receive a free high-efficiency water heater. In order to participate in this program, the applicant must agree to have a Load Management Device installed on the water heater (at no cost to the member). The application

363

Geothermal Heat Pumps as a Cost Saving and Capital Renewal Too!  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An independent evaluation of the Fort Polk, Louisiana energy savings performance contract (ESPC) has verified the financial value of geothermal heat pump (GHP)-centered ESPCS to the federal government. The Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) has responded by issuing an RFP for the "National GHP-Technology-Specific Super ESPC Procurement." Federal agency sites anywhere in the nation will be able to implement GHP-centered ESPC projects as delivery orders against the awarded contracts.

Hughes, P.J.

1998-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

364

Drain Water Heat Recovery | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Drain Water Heat Recovery Drain Water Heat Recovery Drain Water Heat Recovery June 15, 2012 - 6:20pm Addthis Diagram of a drain water heat recovery system. Diagram of a drain water heat recovery system. How does it work? Use heat from water you've already used to preheat more hot water, reducing your water heating costs. Any hot water that goes down the drain carries away energy with it. That's typically 80%-90% of the energy used to heat water in a home. Drain-water (or greywater) heat recovery systems capture this energy from water you've already used (for example, to shower, wash dishes, or wash clothing) to preheat cold water entering the water heater or going to other water fixtures. This reduces the amount of energy needed for water heating. How It Works Drain-water heat recovery technology works well with all types of water

365

Drain Water Heat Recovery | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Drain Water Heat Recovery Drain Water Heat Recovery Drain Water Heat Recovery June 15, 2012 - 6:20pm Addthis Diagram of a drain water heat recovery system. Diagram of a drain water heat recovery system. How does it work? Use heat from water you've already used to preheat more hot water, reducing your water heating costs. Any hot water that goes down the drain carries away energy with it. That's typically 80%-90% of the energy used to heat water in a home. Drain-water (or greywater) heat recovery systems capture this energy from water you've already used (for example, to shower, wash dishes, or wash clothing) to preheat cold water entering the water heater or going to other water fixtures. This reduces the amount of energy needed for water heating. How It Works Drain-water heat recovery technology works well with all types of water

366

User manual for GEOCITY: a computer model for cost analysis of geothermal district-heating-and-cooling systems. Volume II. Appendices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this model is to calculate the costs of residential space heating, space cooling, and sanitary water heating or process heating (cooling) using geothermal energy from a hydrothermal reservoir. The model can calculate geothermal heating and cooling costs for residential developments, a multi-district city, or a point demand such as an industrial factory or commercial building. Volume II contains all the appendices, including cost equations and models for the reservoir and fluid transmission system and the distribution system, descriptions of predefined residential district types for the distribution system, key equations for the cooling degree hour methodology, and a listing of the sample case output. Both volumes include the complete table of contents and lists of figures and tables. In addition, both volumes include the indices for the input parameters and subroutines defined in the user manual.

Huber, H.D.; Fassbender, L.L.; Bloomster, C.H.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

BCP Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Boulder Canyon Project Remarketing Effort HOME Home Page Image WELCOME Boulder Canyon Information Module Federal Register Notices Public Forums Correspondence and Presentations...

368

Building America Best Practices Series, Volume 6: High-Performance Home Technologies: Solar Thermal & Photovoltaic Systems  

SciTech Connect

This guide is was written by PNNL for the US Department of Energy's Building America program to provide information for residential production builders interested in building near zero energy homes. The guide provides indepth descriptions of various roof-top photovoltaic power generating systems for homes. The guide also provides extensive information on various designs of solar thermal water heating systems for homes. The guide also provides construction company owners and managers with an understanding of how solar technologies can be added to their homes in a way that is cost effective, practical, and marketable. Twelve case studies provide examples of production builders across the United States who are building energy-efficient homes with photovoltaic or solar water heating systems.

Baechler, Michael C.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Ruiz, Kathleen A.; Steward, Heidi E.; Love, Pat M.

2007-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

369

Building America Best Practices Series, Volume 6: High-Performance Home Technologies: Solar Thermal & Photovoltaic Systems  

SciTech Connect

This guide is was written by PNNL for the US Department of Energy's Building America program to provide information for residential production builders interested in building near zero energy homes. The guide provides indepth descriptions of various roof-top photovoltaic power generating systems for homes. The guide also provides extensive information on various designs of solar thermal water heating systems for homes. The guide also provides construction company owners and managers with an understanding of how solar technologies can be added to their homes in a way that is cost effective, practical, and marketable. Twelve case studies provide examples of production builders across the United States who are building energy-efficient homes with photovoltaic or solar water heating systems.

Baechler, Michael C.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Ruiz, Kathleen A.; Steward, Heidi E.; Love, Pat M.

2007-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

370

Saving Energy and Money at Home while on Vacation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Money at Home while on Vacation Money at Home while on Vacation Saving Energy and Money at Home while on Vacation May 9, 2011 - 12:27pm Addthis Chris Stewart Senior Communicator at DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory Earth Day, Daylight Saving Time, and the upcoming Memorial Day holiday have me already looking forward to my annual summer "big trip." Before leaving town for extended periods of time, I always take some basic, small steps to save money and energy at home, including: Turning down my water heater to "vacation mode." Because water heating can account for 14%-25% of the energy consumed in your home and a large percentage of the cost of running a water heater is due to the "stand by" losses, this is probably the easiest and most cost effective money- and

371

Home Energy Saver for Consumers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Energy Saver for Consumers Home Energy Saver for Consumers The Home Energy Saver(tm) (HES) empowers homeowners and renters to save money, live better, and help the earth by reducing energy use in their homes. HES recommends energy-saving upgrades that are appropriate to the home and make sense for the home's climate and local energy prices. The money invested in these upgrades commonly earns "interest" in the form of energy bill savings, at an annual rate of 20% or more. Depending on the type of improvement made, the home can achieve better comfort (warmer in winter, cooler in summer), fewer drafts, lower maintenance costs, and improved security and fire safety-all of which improve life and increase the home's value. HES computes a home's energy use on-line in a matter of seconds based on

372

Rocky Mountain Power - New Homes Program for Builders | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rocky Mountain Power - New Homes Program for Builders Rocky Mountain Power - New Homes Program for Builders Rocky Mountain Power - New Homes Program for Builders < Back Eligibility Construction Installer/Contractor Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Other Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Utah Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount '''New Construction Whole Home Options''' Home Performance ENERGY STAR Version 3 Certified Home: $500 (Single Family); $200 (Multifamily) ENERGY STAR Version 3 Certified Home: $250 (Single Family); $150 (Multifamily)

373

Cullman Electric Cooperative - Energy Efficient Homes Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cullman Electric Cooperative - Energy Efficient Homes Program Cullman Electric Cooperative - Energy Efficient Homes Program Cullman Electric Cooperative - Energy Efficient Homes Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Alabama Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Efficient Home: $200 Energy Efficient Water Heater: $100 Cullman Electric Cooperative offers rebates to residential customers that make certain energy efficiency improvements to newly constructed, all electric homes. Up to $200 is available per home. Qualifying homes must have electric water heatng, clothes drying, cooking, and a heat pump. A

374

Technology Solutions for New Manufactured Homes: Idaho, Oregon, and Washington Manufactured Home Builders (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

The Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), and Northwest Energy Works (NEW), the current Northwest Energy Efficient Manufactured Housing Program (NEEM) administrator, have been collaborating to conduct research on new specifications that would improve on the energy requirements of a NEEM home. In its role as administrator, NEW administers the technical specs, performs research and engineering analysis, implements ongoing construction quality management procedures, and maintains a central database with home tracking. This project prototyped and assessed the performances of cost-effective high performance building assemblies and mechanical systems that are not commonly deployed in the manufacturing setting. The package of measures is able to reduce energy used for space conditioning, water heating and lighting by 50 percent over typical manufactured homes produced in the northwest.

Not Available

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Cost-Effective Fabrication Routes for the Production of Quantum Well Structures and Recovery of Waste Heat from Heavy Duty Trucks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objectives of Phase I were: (a) carry out cost, performance and system level models, (b) quantify the cost benefits of cathodic arc and heterogeneous nanocomposites over sputtered material, (c) evaluate the expected power output of the proposed thermoelectric materials and predict the efficiency and power output of an integrated TE module, (d) define market acceptance criteria by engaging Caterpillar's truck OEMs, potential customers and dealers and identify high-level criteria for a waste heat thermoelectric generator (TEG), (e) identify potential TEG concepts, and (f) establish cost/kWatt targets as well as a breakdown of subsystem component cost targets for the commercially viable TEG.

Willigan, Rhonda

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

376

Side-by-Side Field Evaluation of Highly Insulating Windows in the PNNL Lab Homes  

SciTech Connect

To examine the energy, air leakage, and thermal performance of highly insulating windows, a field evaluation was undertaken in a matched pair of all-electric, factory-built Lab Homes located on the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) campus in Richland, Washington. The baseline Lab Home B was retrofitted with standard double-pane clear aluminum-frame slider windows and patio doors, while the experimental Lab Home A was retrofitted with Jeld-Wen triple-pane vinyl-frame slider windows and patio doors with a U-factor of 0.2 and solar heat gain coefficient of 0.19. To assess the window, the building shell air leakage, energy use, and interior temperatures of each home were compared during the 2012 winter heating and summer cooling seasons. The measured energy savings in Lab Home B averaged 5,821 watt-hours per day (Wh/day) during the heating season and 6,518 Wh/day during the cooling season. The overall whole-house energy savings of Lab Home B compared to Lab Home A are 11.6% 1.53% for the heating season and 18.4 2.06% for the cooling season for identical occupancy conditions with no window coverings deployed. Extrapolating these energy savings numbers based on typical average heating degree days and cooling degree days per year yields an estimated annual energy savings of 12.2%, or 1,784 kWh/yr. The data suggest that highly insulating windows are an effective energy-saving measure that should be considered for high-performance new homes and in existing retrofits. However, the cost effectiveness of the measure, as determined by the simple payback period, suggests that highly insulating window costs continue to make windows difficult to justify on a cost basis alone. Additional reductions in costs via improvements in manufacturing and/or market penetration that continue to drive down costs will make highly insulating windows much more viable as a cost-effective energy efficiency measure. This study also illustrates that highly insulating windows have important impacts on peak load, occupant comfort, and condensation potential, which are not captured in the energy savings calculation. More consistent and uniform interior temperature distributions suggest that highly insulated windows, as part of a high performance building envelope, may enable more centralized duct design and downsized HVAC systems. Shorter, more centralized duct systems and smaller HVAC systems to yield additional cost savings, making highly insulating windows more cost effective as part of a package of new construction or retrofit measures which achieve significant reductions in home energy use.

Widder, Sarah H.; Parker, Graham B.; Baechler, Michael C.; Bauman, Nathan N.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Manufactured Home Energy Audit (MHEA)Users Manual (Version 7)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Manufactured Home Energy Audit (MHEA) is a software tool that predicts manufactured home energy consumption and recommends weatherization retrofit measures. It was developed to assist local weatherization agencies working with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Weatherization Assistance Program. Whether new or experienced, employed within or outside the Weatherization Assistance Program, all users can benefit from incorporating MHEA into their manufactured home weatherization programs. DOE anticipates that the state weatherization assistance programs that incorporate MHEA into their programs will find significant growth in the energy and cost savings achieved from manufactured home weatherization. The easy-to-use MHEA uses a relatively standard Windows graphical interface for entering simple inputs and provides understandable, usable results. The user enters information about the manufactured home construction, heating equipment, cooling equipment appliances, and weather site. MHEA then calculates annual energy consumption using a simplified building energy analysis technique. Weatherization retrofit measures are evaluated based on the predicted energy savings after installation of the measure, the measure cost, and the measure life. Finally, MHEA recommends retrofit measures that are energy and cost effective for the particular home being evaluated. MHEA evaluates each manufactured home individually and takes into account local weather conditions, retrofit measure costs, and fuel costs. The recommended package of weatherization retrofit measures is tailored to the home being evaluated. More traditional techniques apply the same package of retrofit measures to all manufactured homes, often the same set of measures that are installed into site-built homes. Effective manufactured home weatherization can be achieved only by installing measures developed specifically for manufactured homes. The unique manufactured home construction characteristics require that each of these measures is evaluated separately in order to devise a package of measures that will result in high energy and dollar savings. MHEA stands apart from other building energy analysis tools in many ways. Calculations incorporated into the computer code specifically address manufactured home heating and cooling load trends. The retrofit measures evaluated by MHEA are all applicable to manufactured homes. Help messages describe common manufactured home weatherization practices as well as provide hints on how to install retrofit measures. These and other features help make MHEA easy to use when evaluating energy consumption and the effects of weatherization retrofit measures for manufactured homes. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory originally developed MHEA for the U.S. Department of Energy Weatherization Assistance Program. Conversion to a Windows-based program with additional modifications has been performed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Many energy consumption and economic calculations resemble those found in the Computerized Instrumented Residential Audit written by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the National Energy Audit written by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The calculations are similar in structure but have been altered to more accurately represent a manufactured home's unique energy use characteristics. Most importantly, MHEA helps meet the DOE Weatherization Assistance Program goals to increase client comfort and use federal dollars wisely.

Gettings, M.B.

2003-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

378

User manual for AQUASTOR: a computer model for cost analysis of aquifer thermal energy storage coupled with district heating or cooling systems. Volume I. Main text  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A computer model called AQUASTOR was developed for calculating the cost of district heating (cooling) using thermal energy supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system. The AQUASTOR model can simulate ATES district heating systems using stored hot water or ATES district cooling systems using stored chilled water. AQUASTOR simulates the complete ATES district heating (cooling) system, which consists of two principal parts: the ATES supply system and the district heating (cooling) distribution system. The supply system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of thermal energy supplied to the distribution system by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the exploration, development, and operation of the ATES supply system. The distribution system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of heat (chill) delivered by the distribution system to the end-users by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the construction and operation of the distribution system. The model combines the technical characteristics of the supply system and the technical characteristics of the distribution system with financial and tax conditions for the entities operating the two systems into one techno-economic model. This provides the flexibility to individually or collectively evaluate the impact of different economic and technical parameters, assumptions, and uncertainties on the cost of providing district heating (cooling) with an ATES system. This volume contains the main text, including introduction, program description, input data instruction, a description of the output, and Appendix H, which contains the indices for supply input parameters, distribution input parameters, and AQUASTOR subroutines.

Huber, H.D.; Brown, D.R.; Reilly, R.W.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Cascade Natural Gas - Conservation Incentives for New Homes | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cascade Natural Gas - Conservation Incentives for New Homes Cascade Natural Gas - Conservation Incentives for New Homes Cascade Natural Gas - Conservation Incentives for New Homes < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heating Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount High Efficiency Natural Gas Furnace: $150 High Efficiency Natural Gas Hearth: $70 Conventional Natural Gas Water Heater: $40 Condensing Tankless Water Heater: $200 Combined Domestic Water/Hydronic Space Heating System (usingTankless Water Heater): $800 Energy Star Certified Home: $350 Energy Star Certified Plus Home: $750

380

Estimating market penetration of new district heating and cooling systems using a combination of economic cost and diffusion models  

SciTech Connect

The economic-cost model and the diffusion model are among the many market-penetration forecasting approaches that are available. These approaches have been used separately in many applications. In this paper, the authors briefly review these two approaches and then describe a methodology for forecasting market penetration using both approaches sequentially. This methodology is illustrated with the example of market-penetration forecasting of new district heating and cooling (DHC) systems in the Argonne DHC Market Penetration Model, which was developed and used over the period 1979--1983. This paper discusses how this combination approach, which incorporates the strengths of the economic-cost and diffusion models, has been superior to any one approach for market forecasts of DHC systems. Also discussed are the required modifications for revising and updating the model in order to generate new market-penetration forecasts for DHC systems. These modifications are required as a result of changes in DHC engineering, economic, and market data from 1983 to 1990. 13 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Teotia, A.P.S.; Karvelas, D.E.

1991-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "home heating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Diverse Power - Energy Efficient Existing Homes Rebate Program (Georgia) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Existing Homes Rebate Program Existing Homes Rebate Program (Georgia) Diverse Power - Energy Efficient Existing Homes Rebate Program (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Heat Pumps Heating Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Georgia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Electric Heat Pump: $100/system Gas to Electric Heat Pump Switch: $300 Dual Fuel Heat Pump: $250/system Geothermal Heat Pump: $250/ton Electric Water Heaters: $75 - $150/unit Gas to Electric Water Heater Switch: $300 - $500 Waste Heat Recovery Unit: $250/house Provider Diverse Power Diverse Power is a member-owned electric cooperative that provides electric

382

Home Energy Score Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Energy Score Program Home Energy Score Program Peer Review April 3, 2013 Joan Glickman, US DOE Norm Bourassa, LBNL joan.glickman@ee.doe.gov, 202-586-5607 njbourassa@lbl.gov, 510-495-2677 BTO Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: * Significant underinvestment in energy efficiency in residential sector * High costs of traditional energy audits and ratings * No standard method for understanding and comparing the energy efficiency

383

Home Energy Score Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Home Energy Score Program Home Energy Score Program Peer Review April 3, 2013 Joan Glickman, US DOE Norm Bourassa, LBNL joan.glickman@ee.doe.gov, 202-586-5607 njbourassa@lbl.gov, 510-495-2677 BTO Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: * Significant underinvestment in energy efficiency in residential sector * High costs of traditional energy audits and ratings * No standard method for understanding and comparing the energy efficiency

384

Engineering-economic analysis of mobile home thermal performance  

SciTech Connect

Various levels of investment in energy-efficient designs are studied for new mobile homes. The purpose is to define relationships between annual energy use for space heating and cooling and additional initial investment in the structure shell for a range of climates in the United States. Climate, fuel price, and other economic factors are used to determine which energy-conserving designs are cost-effective. Maximum life-cycle savings configurations for a typical 14' x 68' mobile home are developed for nine different locations in the U.S.

Hutchins, P.F. Jr.; Hirst, E.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

SOLAR HEATING OF TANK BOTTOMS Application of Solar Heating to Asphaltic and Parrafinic Oils Reducing Fuel Costs and Greenhouse Gases Due to Use of Natural Gas and Propane  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The sale of crude oil requires that the crude meet product specifications for BS&W, temperature, pour point and API gravity. The physical characteristics of the crude such as pour point and viscosity effect the efficient loading, transport, and unloading of the crude oil. In many cases, the crude oil has either a very high paraffin content or asphalt content which will require either hot oiling or the addition of diluents to the crude oil to reduce the viscosity and the pour point of the oil allowing the crude oil to be readily loaded on to the transport. Marginal wells are significantly impacted by the cost of preheating the oil to an appropriate temperature to allow for ease of transport. Highly paraffinic and asphaltic oils exist throughout the D-J basin and generally require pretreatment during cold months prior to sales. The current study addresses the use of solar energy to heat tank bottoms and improves the overall efficiency and operational reliability of stripper wells.

Eugene A. Fritzler

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Consumer life-cycle cost impacts of energy-efficiency standards for residential-type central air conditioners and heat pumps  

SciTech Connect

In support of the federal government's efforts to raise the minimum energy-efficiency standards for residential-type central air conditioners and heat pumps, a consumer life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis was conducted to demonstrate the economic impacts on individual consumers from revisions to the standards. LCC is the consumer's cost of purchasing and installing an air conditioner or heat pump and operating the unit over its lifetime. The LCC analysis is conducted on a nationally representative sample of air conditioner and heat pump consumers resulting in a distribution of LCC impacts showing the percentage of consumers that are either benefiting or being burdened by increased standards. Relative to the existing minimum efficiency standard of 10 SEER, the results show that a majority of split system air conditioner and heat pump consumers will either benefit or be insignificantly impacted by increased efficiency standards of up to 13 SEER.

Rosenquist, Gregory; Chan, Peter; Lekov, Alex; McMahon, James; Van Buskirk, Robert

2001-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

387

Passive Solar Home Design | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Passive Solar Home Design Passive Solar Home Design Passive Solar Home Design June 24, 2013 - 7:18pm Addthis This North Carolina home gets most of its space heating from the passive solar design, but the solar thermal system (top of roof) supplies both domestic hot water and a secondary radiant floor heating system. | Photo courtesy of Jim Schmid Photography. This North Carolina home gets most of its space heating from the passive solar design, but the solar thermal system (top of roof) supplies both domestic hot water and a secondary radiant floor heating system. | Photo courtesy of Jim Schmid Photography. What does this mean for me? A passive solar home means a comfortable home that gets at least part of its heating, cooling, and lighting energy from the sun. How does it work?

388

Fresh Way to Cut Combustion, Crop and Air Heating Costs Avoids Million BTU Purchases: Inventions and Innovation Combustion Success Story  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Success story written for the Inventions and Innovation Program about a new space heating method that uses solar energy to heat incoming combustion, crop, and ventilation air.

Wogsland, J.

2001-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

389

Transferring PACE Assessments Upon Home Sale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

renewable energy and energy efficiency project to exceed the costcosts of homes with varying levels of efficiency improvements or a renewable energyrenewable energy and comprehensive energy efficiency improvements to homes across the country is the initial capital cost.

Coughlin, Jason

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

User manual for AQUASTOR: a computer model for cost analysis of aquifer thermal-energy storage oupled with district-heating or cooling systems. Volume II. Appendices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A computer model called AQUASTOR was developed for calculating the cost of district heating (cooling) using thermal energy supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system. the AQUASTOR Model can simulate ATES district heating systems using stored hot water or ATES district cooling systems using stored chilled water. AQUASTOR simulates the complete ATES district heating (cooling) system, which consists of two prinicpal parts: the ATES supply system and the district heating (cooling) distribution system. The supply system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of thermal energy supplied to the distribution system by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the exploration, development, and operation of the ATES supply system. The distribution system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of heat (chill) delivered by the distribution system to the end-users by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the construction and operation of the distribution system. The model combines the technical characteristics of the supply system and the technical characteristics of the distribution system with financial and tax conditions for the entities operating the two systems into one techno-economic model. This provides the flexibility to individually or collectively evaluate the impact of different economic and technical parameters, assumptions, and uncertainties on the cost of providing district heating (cooling) with an ATES system. This volume contains all the appendices, including supply and distribution system cost equations and models, descriptions of predefined residential districts, key equations for the cooling degree-hour methodology, a listing of the sample case output, and appendix H, which contains the indices for supply input parameters, distribution input parameters, and AQUASTOR subroutines.

Huber, H.D.; Brown, D.R.; Reilly, R.W.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Multifamily Home Energy Solutions Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Multifamily Home Energy Solutions Program Multifamily Home Energy Solutions Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Manufacturing Water Heating Program Info Funding Source Public Benefit Fund State Oregon Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Windows: $2-$3/sq ft, depending on U-value, glazing and type of heating Heat Pumps: $200 - $600, varies by efficiency and original heating type High-Efficiency Gas Boiler: $200 Gas Furnace: $150 Insulation: $0.30-$4 per square foot Exterior Doors: $25

392

Cleco Power - Power Miser New Home Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cleco Power - Power Miser New Home Program Cleco Power - Power Miser New Home Program Cleco Power - Power Miser New Home Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Construction Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Heating Heat Pumps Water Heating Program Info State Louisiana Program Type Utility Rate Discount Rebate Amount Discount: 10% discount on energy from November through April for the first five years that the customer lives in participating house. Heat Pump Bonus: Up to $1,000 for eligible heat pump installations Provider Cleco Power Louisiana's Cleco Power offers energy efficiency incentives to eligible

393

Progress Energy Florida - Home Energy Check Audit and Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Progress Energy Florida - Home Energy Check Audit and Rebate Program Progress Energy Florida - Home Energy Check Audit and Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Insulation Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Duct Test: $$150 Duct Repair: $100 per unit Reflective Roof: $150 Wall Insulation: $300 Replacement Windows - $250 Window Films/Screens - $100 Program Info State Florida Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Heat Pump (Heat Pump Replacement): $100 - $150 Heat Pump (Strip Heat Replacement): $250 - $350

394

Berkeley Electric Cooperative -HomeAdvantage Efficiency Loan Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Berkeley Electric Cooperative -HomeAdvantage Efficiency Loan Berkeley Electric Cooperative -HomeAdvantage Efficiency Loan Program Berkeley Electric Cooperative -HomeAdvantage Efficiency Loan Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Other Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Manufacturing Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Water Heating Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Utility Loan Program Rebate Amount HomeAdvantage Loans: $15,000 Provider Berkeley Electric Cooperative Berkeley Electric Cooperative provides HomeAdvantage Loans to qualifying homeowners for energy efficiency upgrades to residences. Measures typically

395

State-of-the-Art Building Concepts Lower Energy Bills: Pulte Homes -- Las Vegas, Nevada: Building America Project Summary, Hot/Dry Climates  

SciTech Connect

Houses built by Pulte Homes as part of DOE's Building America program in Las Vegas, Nevada, save money for the homeowners by reducing electric air conditioning costs and gas heating costs with little or no additional investment. And, the houses have better indoor air quality than typical new construction.

Hendron, B.

2000-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

396

Protocol for plug and play in Bluetooth based home networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Home networks, interlinking devices like fridges, air conditioners, home theatres, security devices, lighting systems are about to realize the concept of a smart home. Among the competing technologies, Bluetooth, with its low cost, low power consumption ...

N. Sriskanthan; D. Tandon; K. K. Lee

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Challenge Home  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Challenge Home DOE Challenge Home Sam Rashkin Building Technologies Office samuel.rashkin@ee.doe.gov/202-2897-1994 April 3, 2013 DOE Challenge Home: Leveraging Our Nation's Investment in High-Performance Home Innovations 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: The U.S. Housing industry is extremely slow to adopt proven innovations from DOE's Building America program that provide compelling benefits to

398

Behavioral Perspectives on Home Energy Audits: The Role of Auditors, Labels, Reports, and Audit Tools on Homeowner Decision Making  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

data for homes using oil for heating was not oil, gas, and electricity as primary sources of heating my home. of homes that used fuel oil as a primary heating

Ingle, Aaron

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Newer U.S. homes are 30% larger but consume about as much energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

*Note: Averages for space heating and air conditioning reflect only those households that heated or cooled their homes in 2009.

400

Techno-economic analysis of using corn stover to supply heat and power to a corn ethanol plant - Part 1: Cost of feedstock supply logistics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Supply of corn stover to produce heat and power for a typical 170 dam3 dry mill ethanol plant is proposed. The corn ethanol plant requires 5.6 MW of electricity and 52.3 MW of process heat, which creates the annual stover demand of as much as 140 Gg. The corn stover supply system consists of collection, preprocessing, transportation and on-site fuel storage and preparation to produce heat and power for the ethanol plant. Economics of the entire supply system was conducted using the Integrated Biomass Supply Analysis and Logistics (IBSAL) simulation model. Corn stover was delivered in three formats (square bales, dry chops and pellets) to the combined heat and power plant. Delivered cost of biomass ready to be burned was calculated at 73 $ Mg-1 for bales, 86 $ Mg-1 for pellets and 84 $ Mg-1 for field chopped biomass. Among the three formats of stover supply systems, delivered cost of pelleted biomass was the highest due to high pelleting cost. Bulk transport of biomass in the form of chops and pellets can provide a promising future biomass supply logistic system in the US, if the costs of pelleting and transport are minimized.

Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Mani, Sudhagar [University of Georgia; Togore, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "home heating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Michigan Saves - Home Energy Loan Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Michigan Saves - Home Energy Loan Program Michigan Saves - Home Energy Loan Program Michigan Saves - Home Energy Loan Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Cooling Appliances & Electronics Other Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Heat Pumps Insulation Water Heating Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Michigan Program Type State Loan Program Rebate Amount $1,000-$20,000 Provider Michigan Saves Michigan Saves is a non-profit that offers financing options for energy efficiency improvements throughout Michigan. The Home Energy Loan Program was started with seed funding from the Michigan Public Service Commission.

402

Cooling your home naturally  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes some alternatives to air conditioning which are common sense suggestions and low-cost retrofit options to cool a house. It first describes how to reflect heat away from roofs, walls, and windows. Blocking heat by using insulation or shading are described. The publication then discusses removing built-up heat, reducing heat-generating sources, and saving energy by selecting energy efficient retrofit appliances. A resource list is provided for further information.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Home Energy Saver  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tools of the Trade Tools of the Trade Clockwise: IR thermograph, IR camera, Air flow measurement, Blower door, Combustion test for water heater A hammer and a saw used to be the key tools for home contractors. Today, the best-in-breed also use high-tech equipment while performing a professional energy audit or verifying that construction has been done correctly. Infrared cameras can "see" heat loss and find hidden energy savings opportunities. PFT tests or blower door tests measure a homes air leakage and tell you when sealing has been successful. Combustion monitoring equipment and indoor-air pollution detectors ensure that a heating system is not only efficient but also not dumping dangerous pollutants into the home. All of these practices should be conducted with a

404

TVA Partner Utilities - Energy Right New Homes Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Right New Homes Program Right New Homes Program TVA Partner Utilities - Energy Right New Homes Program < Back Eligibility Construction Installer/Contractor Multi-Family Residential Residential Utility Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Other Heat Pumps Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Site Built New Homes Plan: $100-$800 depending on local power company and home efficiency Manufactured Home Heat Pump: $500 Provider Tennessee Valley Authority The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) ''energy right'' New Homes Plan provides incentives for all-electric, energy-efficient new homes by offering graduated rebates for new homes. Homes built at least 7% better

405

TVA Partner Utilities - Energy Right New Homes Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TVA Partner Utilities - Energy Right New Homes Program TVA Partner Utilities - Energy Right New Homes Program TVA Partner Utilities - Energy Right New Homes Program < Back Eligibility Construction Installer/Contractor Multi-Family Residential Residential Utility Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Other Heat Pumps Program Info State Georgia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Site Built New Homes Plan: $100-$800 depending on local power company and home efficiency Manufactured Home Heat Pump: Up to $500 The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) energy right New Homes Plan provides incentives for all-electric, energy-efficient new homes by offering graduated rebates for new homes. Homes built at least 7% better than code

406

TVA Partner Utilities - Energy Right' New Homes Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Right' New Homes Program Right&#039; New Homes Program TVA Partner Utilities - Energy Right' New Homes Program < Back Eligibility Construction Installer/Contractor Multi-Family Residential Residential Utility Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Other Heat Pumps Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Site Built New Homes Plan: $100-$800 depending on local power company and home efficiency Manufactured Home Heat Pump: Up to $500 Provider Tennessee Valley Authority The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) ''energy right'' New Homes Plan provides incentives for all-electric, energy-efficient new homes by offering graduated rebates for new homes. Homes built at least 7% better

407

DEMCO- Touchstone Energy Home Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DEMCO, a Touchstone Energy Cooperative, provides residential customers who have a qualified Touchstone Energy Home, a rebate of up to $0.10 per square foot of living area for electric heat pumps...

408

Building Technologies Office: Home Energy Score  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Score Energy Score The Home Energy Score is similar to a vehicle's mile-per-gallon rating. The Home Energy Score allows homeowners to compare the energy performance of their homes to other homes nationwide. It also provides homeowners with suggestions for improving their homes' efficiency. The process starts with a Home Energy Score Qualified Assessor collecting energy information during a brief home walk-through. Using the Home Energy Scoring Tool, developed by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the Qualified Assessor then scores the home on a scale of 1 to 10. A score of 10 indicates that the home has excellent energy performance. A score of 1 indicates the home needs extensive energy improvements. In addition to providing the Score, the Qualified Assessor provides the homeowner with a list of recommended energy improvements and the associated cost savings estimates.

409

Home Energy Saver  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seasons of Life Seasons of Life Changes in life mean changes in energy use, and opportunities to use that energy more efficiently. Looking for a rental: Just because you don't own a home doesn't mean you can't expect it to be efficient. Ask your prospective landlord what the energy costs are, and find out which forms of energy you pay for. Ask if any energy-efficiency upgrades are planned. A "free" appliance provided by your landlord may not be such a good deal if energy use is high. Use the appliances wisely: Manage your thermostat well Pay attention to dishwasher, clothes washer, and water heater settings.Meanwhile, lights, computers, televisions, and other devices you own and bring into the home are important energy users - shop wisely when you buy them. Home purchase: For most of us, buying a home is our greatest investment,

410

Michigan Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the Michigan Uniform Energy Code  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Michigan homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the Michigan Uniform Energy Code is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Michigan homeowners will save $10,081 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $604 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

411

Heating  

SciTech Connect

According to The Hydronics Institute, the surge in gas-fired boiler shipments brought about 3 years ago by high oil prices and the availability of natural gas after years of curtailment has almost competely subsided. Gas prices continue to escalate and the threat of decontrol by 1985 continues. Likewise, the Gas Appliance Manufacturers Association reports that shipments of gas-fired unit heaters, duct furnaces, and wall furnaces have also dropped as homeowners adopt a wait-and-see attitude toward conversion. However, the market for high- and ultra-high-efficiency furnaces appears to hold potential for expansion. Because of the rebounding home market, a steady replacement market, and increased sales for reasons of efficiency, GAMA expects the total (gas, oil, and electric) central furnace market to increase by 16% in 1983.

1983-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

412

Energy Savers Tips on Saving Energy& Money at Home  

SciTech Connect

Provides consumers with home energy and money savings tips such as insulation, weatherization, heating, cooling, water heating, energy efficient windows, landscaping, lighting, and energy efficient appliances

Not Available

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Home cogeneration system can augment peak power requirements  

SciTech Connect

The use of internal combustion engines to supplement peak power generation to homeowners is suggested. As in a car heater, internal combustion engines would recover heat from the radiators to heat the house. The IC, inlet and outlet lines, thermostat, muffler (''critical''), induction generator, and reverse power delay are schematicized. Synchronous generators are not recommended. Disadvantages include the potential pollution, high capital cost, and the resistance of homeowners ''acquainted with the problems of owning a car.'' A simple method to determine the economics of home cogeneration is given. Special consideration is paid to the induction generator, and the engine starter.

Krishnan, K.R.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

DOE Challenge Home Case Study, e2Homes, Winterpark, FL, Custom Homes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

fi fi rst certifi ed DOE Challenge Home in the United States-the Wilson Residence in Winter Park, Florida-produces more energy than it uses with construction costs one-third less than originally proposed. Completed in May 2012, this 4,305-ft 2 custom home (with four bedrooms and baths) screams "BIG" until you hear the "small footprint" in the energy- and water-effi ciency details. Without solar power, the home scores a HERS 57, which is well below the HERS 100 for a standard home built to code. With its photovoltaic system, the home produces better than zero net-energy performance, with a score of HERS -7. This translates into no electric utility bills and even $123 annually in the homeowner's pocket from the utility. When the homeowner, Mr. Wilson, hired e2 Homes to build his dream home, he

415

Heat Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow, Heat Transfer And Lithosphere Rheology In Geothermal Areas- Features And Examples Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Heat Flow,...

416

Comparing Maintenance Costs of Geothermal Heat Pump Systems with other HVAC Systems in Lincoln Public Schools: Repair, Service, and Corrective Actions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Lincoln Public School District, in Lincoln, Nebraska, recently installed vertical-bore geothermal heat pump systems in four, new, elementary schools. Because the district has consistent maintenance records and procedures, it was possible to study repair, service and corrective maintenance requests for 20 schools in the district. Each school studied provides cooling to over 70% of its total floor area and uses one of the following heating and cooling systems: vertical-bore geothermal heat pumps (GHPs), air-cooled chiller with gas-fired hot water boiler (ACUGHWB), water-cooled chiller with gas-fired hot water boiler (WCCYGHWB), or water-cooled chiller with gas-fired steam boiler (WCUGSB). Preventative maintenance and capital renewal activities were not included in the available database. GHP schools reported average total costs at 2.13 cents/ft{sup 2}-yr, followed by ACC/GHWB schools at 2.88 cents/ft{sup 2}-yr, WCC/GSB schools at 3.73 cents/ft{sup 2}-yr, and WCC/GHWB schools at 6.07 cents/ft{sup 2}-yr. Because of tax-exemptions on material purchases, a reliance on in-house labor, and the absence of preventative maintenance records in the database, these costs are lower than those reported in previous studies. A strong relationship (R{sup 2}=O.52) was found between costs examined and cooling system age: the newer the cooling equipment, the less it costs to maintain.

Martin, M.A.; Durfee, D.J.; Hughes, P.J.

1999-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

417

Coal home heating and environmental tobacco smoke in relation to lower respiratory illness in Czech children, from birth to 3 years of age  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The coefficient for wood as a heating source was elevated,distant heating) Natural gas Electricity Coal Wood Unknown/distant heating and use of natural gas, electricity, or wood

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Super Energy Efficiency Design (S.E.E.D.) Home Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results of evaluation by the Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI) Building America team of the 'Super Energy Efficient Design' (S.E.E.D) home, a 1,935 sq. ft., single-story spec home located in Tucson, AZ. This prototype design was developed with the goal of providing an exceptionally energy efficient yet affordable home and includes numerous aggressive energy features intended to significantly reduce heating and cooling loads such as structural insulated panel (SIP) walls and roof, high performance windows, an ERV, an air-to-water heat pump with mixed-mode radiant and forced air delivery, solar water heating, and rooftop PV. Source energy savings are estimated at 45% over the Building America B10 Benchmark. System commissioning, short term testing, long term monitoring and detailed analysis of results was conducted to identify the performance attributes and cost effectiveness of the whole house measure package.

German, A.; Dakin, B.; Backman, C.; Weitzel, E.; Springer, D.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Cold-Climate Solar Domestic Water Heating Systems: Life-Cycle Analyses and Opportunities for Cost Reduction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Conference paper regarding research in potential cost-savings measures for cold-climate solar domestic water hearing systems.

Burch, J.; Salasovich, J.; Hillman, T.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Life-cycle cost analysis of energy efficiency design options for residential furnaces and boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

equipment = furnace Heating fuel = oil Home type = single orequipment = boiler Heating fuel = oil Home type = single orHOME HEATING FUEL CON 3 NATURAL GAS FROM UNDERGROUND PIPES = 1 BOTTLED GAS (LPG OR PROPANE) = 2 FUEL OIL

Lutz, James; Lekov, Alex; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Chan, Peter; Meyers, Steve; McMahon, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "home heating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Energy Basics: Solar Air Heating  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Homes & Buildings Printable Version Share this resource Lighting & Daylighting Passive Solar Design Space Heating & Cooling Cooling Systems Heating Systems Furnaces & Boilers Wood...

422

Energy Basics: Solar Liquid Heating  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Homes & Buildings Printable Version Share this resource Lighting & Daylighting Passive Solar Design Space Heating & Cooling Cooling Systems Heating Systems Furnaces & Boilers Wood...

423

Cost-effective solar collectors using heat pipes. Interim progress report No. 2, April 1978-September 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Heat pipe fluid-vessel combinations continued to be life tested at design and stagnation conditions for time periods exceeding 14,000 hours. Additional testing was carried out at the lower end of the environment temperature range by freeze-thaw testing of several water heat pipes. Additional fluids search work resulted in developing a procedure to purify trimethylborate. Eight trimethylborate heat pipes were fabricated and installed in a modified GE TC-100 solar panel. Solar performance tests were performed on the heat pipe collector and a standard TC-100 collector. Heat pipe collector performance exceeded 90% of the TC-100. A source of water compatible steel, NP454, was identified as was an experimental tubing manufacturer. The current availability of NP454 and the successful demonstration of antifreeze mechanisms lays the ground work for testing a heat pipe collector using water heat pipes.

Ernst, D.M.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Challenge Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Innovations 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: The U.S. Housing industry is extremely slow to adopt...

425

Virginia Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 Virginia Construction Code  

SciTech Connect

The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Virginia homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the current Virginia Construction Code is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Virginia homeowners will save $5,836 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $388 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

426

National Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: A Comparison of the 2006, 2009, and 2012 Editions of the IECC  

SciTech Connect

The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yield positive benefits for U.S. homeowners and significant energy savings for the nation. Moving from a baseline of the 2006 IECC to the 2009 IECC reduces average annual energy costs by 10.8%, while moving from the same baseline to the 2012 IECC reduces them by 32.1%. These reductions amount to annual energy cost savings of $168 and $497, respectively. The 2012 IECC saves $329 in energy costs compared to the 2009 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Energy Efficiency Fund (Electric) - Home Energy Solutions and Performance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric) - Home Energy Solutions and Electric) - Home Energy Solutions and Performance Programs Energy Efficiency Fund (Electric) - Home Energy Solutions and Performance Programs < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Other Ventilation Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info Funding Source Energy Efficiency Fund State Connecticut Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Varies Provider Customer Service The Energy Efficiency Fund, funded by Connecticut's public benefits charge, provides home energy efficiency rebate programs to customers of The

428

Questar Gas - Home Builder Gas Appliance Rebate Program (Idaho) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Questar Gas - Home Builder Gas Appliance Rebate Program (Idaho) Questar Gas - Home Builder Gas Appliance Rebate Program (Idaho) Questar Gas - Home Builder Gas Appliance Rebate Program (Idaho) < Back Eligibility Construction Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Idaho Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount New Construction Home Options Builder Option Package 1: $50 (single family), $50 (multifamily) Builder Option Package 2: $100 (single family), $100 (multifamily) Energy Star 3.0: $300 (single family), $200 (multifamily) High Performance Home: $500 (single family), $300 (multifamily)

429

Singing River Electric Power Association - Comfort Advantage Home Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Singing River Electric Power Association - Comfort Advantage Home Singing River Electric Power Association - Comfort Advantage Home Program Singing River Electric Power Association - Comfort Advantage Home Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Heat Pumps Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Contact Singing River Electric Power Association Provider Singing River Electric Power Association Singing River Electric Power Association provides rebates on energy efficiency measures in new homes and heat pumps that meet [http://www.comfortadvantage.com/Comfort%20Advantage%20brochure.pdf Comfort Advantage] weatherization standards. To qualify for this rebate the home

430

Colorado Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Colorado homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Colorado homeowners will save $1,528 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $5,435 under the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 2 years for the 2009 and 2 years with the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $119 for the 2009 IECC and $392 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

431

Multi-professional clinical medication reviews in care homes for the elderly: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial with cost effectiveness analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(1):12-7. Desborough et al. Trials 2011, 12:218 http://www.trialsjournal.com/content/12/1/218 Page 8 of 9 3. Davies T, Dalley G, Unsworth L, Waller M, Drysdale C: The management of medication in care services 2002-03 TSO; 2004. 4. Barber ND, Alldred DP, Raynor DK... (7486):293-7. 24. Roberts MS, Stokes JA, King MA, Lynne TA, Purdie DM, Glasziou PP, Wilson DAJ, McCarthy ST, Brooks GE, de Looze FJ, Del Mar CJ: Outcomes of a randomized controlled trial of a clinical pharmacy intervention in 52 nursing homes. Br J Clin Pharmacol...

Desborough, James; Houghton, Julie; Wood, John; Wright, David; Holland, Richard; Sach, Tracey; Ashwell, Sue; Shaw, Valerie

2011-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

432

Going Ductless with Heat Pumps | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Going Ductless with Heat Pumps Going Ductless with Heat Pumps Going Ductless with Heat Pumps November 2, 2009 - 9:06am Addthis John Lippert My home, unlike most homes in the United States, has no ducts. My wife and I bought the house nearly 20 years ago. Window air conditioners provided air conditioning during the hot muggy Washington, D.C., summers. Baseboard electric heaters provided heating in winter. Before a lot of you post your sympathies in the comments, let me say this: my house is well insulated and very air tight, as a whole house energy audit demonstrated about 15 years ago. Yet, even though electric baseboard heating is about 100% efficient, it is a costly way of heating a house. And as I got older, each year I enjoyed installing and removing the window air conditioners less and less.

433

Efficient Phase-Change Materials: Development of a Low-Cost Thermal Energy Storage System Using Phase-Change Materials with Enhanced Radiation Heat Transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HEATS Project: USF is developing low-cost, high-temperature phase-change materials (PCMs) for use in thermal energy storage systems. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at nightwhen the sun is not outto drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. Most PCMs do not conduct heat very well. Using an innovative, electroless encapsulation technique, USF is enhancing the heat transfer capability of its PCMs. The inner walls of the capsules will be lined with a corrosion-resistant, high-infrared emissivity coating, and the absorptivity of the PCM will be controlled with the addition of nano-sized particles. USFs PCMs remain stable at temperatures from 600 to 1,000C and can be used for solar thermal power storage, nuclear thermal power storage, and other applications.

None

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

434

Western Riverside Council of Governments - Home Energy Renovation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Home Energy Renovation Home Energy Renovation Opportunity (HERO) Financing Program (California) Western Riverside Council of Governments - Home Energy Renovation Opportunity (HERO) Financing Program (California) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Sealing Your Home Cooling Other Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Commercial Weatherization Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Solar Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Wind Program Info State California Program Type PACE Financing Provider WRCOG HERO Financing Program (Residential) Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG) is offering homeowners in WRCOG participating jurisdictions an opportunity to finance energy and

435

Arkansas Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC  

SciTech Connect

The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Arkansas homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Arkansas homeowners will save $1,948 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $6,679 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 2 years for the 2009 and 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $147 for the 2009 IECC and $466 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

436

Wisconsin Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the Wisconsin Uniform Dwelling Code  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Wisconsin homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the current Wisconsin state code is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Wisconsin homeowners will save $2,484 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $10,733 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for both the 2009 and 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $149 for the 2009 IECC and $672 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Tennessee Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Tennessee homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Tennessee homeowners will save $1,809 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $6,102 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for both the 2009 and 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $123 for the 2009 IECC and $415 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

438

Louisiana Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC  

SciTech Connect

The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Louisiana homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Louisiana homeowners will save $1,663 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $4,107 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 2 years for both the 2009 and 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $149 for the 2009 IECC and $358 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

439

Kansas Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC  

SciTech Connect

The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Kansas homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Kansas homeowners will save $2,556 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $8,828 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for both the 2009 and 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $155 for the 2009 IECC and $543 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

440

West Virginia Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC  

SciTech Connect

The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for West Virginia homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, West Virginia homeowners will save $1,996 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $7,301 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for both the 2009 and 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $135 for the 2009 IECC and $480 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "home heating costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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441

Missouri Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC  

SciTech Connect

The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Missouri homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Missouri homeowners will save $2,229 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $7,826 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for both the 2009 and 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $143 for the 2009 IECC and $507 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

442

Mississippi Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Mississippi homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Mississippi homeowners will save $2,022 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $5,400 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 2 years for both the 2009 and 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $164 for the 2009 IECC and $422 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

443

Alabama Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC  

SciTech Connect

The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Alabama homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Alabama homeowners will save $2,117 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $6,182 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 2 years for both the 2009 and 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $168 for the 2009 IECC and $462 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

444

Minnesota Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the Minnesota Residential Energy Code  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Minnesota homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the current Minnesota Residential Energy Code is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Minnesota homeowners will save $1,277 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $9,873 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceed cumulative cash outlays) in 3 years for the 2009 IECC and 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $122 for the 2009 IECC and $669 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Arizona Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC  

SciTech Connect

The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Arizona homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Arizona homeowners will save $3,245 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $6,550 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for the 2009 and 2 years with the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $231 for the 2009 IECC and $486 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Energy-Efficient Home Design | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Home Design Home Design Energy-Efficient Home Design April 13, 2012 - 11:39am Addthis The Home Energy Score is a national rating system developed by the U.S. Department of Energy. The Score reflects the energy efficiency of a home based on the home's structure and heating, cooling, and hot water systems. The Home Facts provide details about the current structure and systems. Recommendations show how to improve the energy efficiency of the home to achieve a higher score and save money. The Home Energy Score is a national rating system developed by the U.S. Department of Energy. The Score reflects the energy efficiency of a home based on the home's structure and heating, cooling, and hot water systems. The Home Facts provide details about the current structure and systems.

447

Energy-Efficient Home Design | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Home Design Home Design Energy-Efficient Home Design April 13, 2012 - 11:39am Addthis The Home Energy Score is a national rating system developed by the U.S. Department of Energy. The Score reflects the energy efficiency of a home based on the home's structure and heating, cooling, and hot water systems. The Home Facts provide details about the current structure and systems. Recommendations show how to improve the energy efficiency of the home to achieve a higher score and save money. The Home Energy Score is a national rating system developed by the U.S. Department of Energy. The Score reflects the energy efficiency of a home based on the home's structure and heating, cooling, and hot water systems. The Home Facts provide details about the current structure and systems.

448

Faced with rising fuel costs, building and home owners are looking for energy-efficient solutions. Improving the building envelope (roof or attic system, walls,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

efficiency. · ORNL established test facilities to measure essential property values needed by WUFI, enabling Instationär), the model has been validated with data from natural exposure field test facilities in Germany of envelope assemblies. These facilities enable researchers to measure heat, air, and moisture penetration

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

449