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  1. Laboratory Fellow Rusty Gray named

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Gray then spent three years conducting research at the Technical University in Hamburg-Harburg, Germany. Gray's involvement in TMS includes service on the programming, titanium, ...

  2. Gray County Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gray County Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Gray County Wind Farm Facility Gray County Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status...

  3. gray-98.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiatively Forced Diurnal Circulations and the Distribution of Tropical Water Vapor W. M. Gray and J. D. Sheaffer Department of Atmospheric Science Colorado State University Fort Collins, Colorado Overview Because the tropical ocean regions are the primary source of available energy for the general circulation, their principal cyclic variations (e.g., factors governing the diurnal convective cycle) must be accurately represented in global climate models (GCMs). The observed morning maximum of

  4. Grays Harbor Demonstration Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Facility Grays Harbor Demonstration Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Offshore Wind Facility Status Proposed Owner Grays Harbor Ocean Energy Company LLC...

  5. Corporate Gray Job Fair | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Corporate Gray Job Fair Corporate Gray Job Fair April 21, 2016 9:00AM to 12:30PM EDT Springfield, VA

  6. Stephen Gray | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stephen Gray Group Leader, Theory & Modeling Ph.D., University of California-Berkeley Research activities include the theory and modeling of dynamical processes in nanosystems with particular emphasis on modeling light interactions with metallic nanostructures via rigorous electrodynamics simulations and the quantum dynamics of molecular systems within nanoscale environments. News Shape-shifting nanorods release heat differently Telephone 630.252.3594 Fax 630.252.4646 E-mail gray@anl.gov

  7. Grays River Watershed Geomorphic Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geist, David R.

    2005-04-30

    This investigation, completed for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), is part of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment commissioned by Bonneville Power Administration under project number 2003-013-00 to assess impacts on salmon habitat in the upper Grays River watershed and present recommendations for habitat improvement. This report presents the findings of the geomorphic assessment and is intended to support the overall PNNL project by evaluating the following: 􀂃 The effects of historical and current land use practices on erosion and sedimentation within the channel network 􀂃 The ways in which these effects have influenced the sediment budget of the upper watershed 􀂃 The resulting responses in the main stem Grays River upstream of State Highway 4 􀂃 The past and future implications for salmon habi

  8. Advanced gray rod control assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Drudy, Keith J; Carlson, William R; Conner, Michael E; Goldenfield, Mark; Hone, Michael J; Long, Jr., Carroll J; Parkinson, Jerod; Pomirleanu, Radu O

    2013-09-17

    An advanced gray rod control assembly (GRCA) for a nuclear reactor. The GRCA provides controlled insertion of gray rod assemblies into the reactor, thereby controlling the rate of power produced by the reactor and providing reactivity control at full power. Each gray rod assembly includes an elongated tubular member, a primary neutron-absorber disposed within the tubular member said neutron-absorber comprising an absorber material, preferably tungsten, having a 2200 m/s neutron absorption microscopic capture cross-section of from 10 to 30 barns. An internal support tube can be positioned between the primary absorber and the tubular member as a secondary absorber to enhance neutron absorption, absorber depletion, assembly weight, and assembly heat transfer characteristics.

  9. QER- Comment of Mike Gray

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The biggest issue with wind energy in ND is the Transmission System. There was a proposal recently by Clean Line Energy This type of forward thinking would allow wind energy to go forward.... The other huge issue is the blockade that the fossil fuel industry has placed on Master Limited Partnerships in 1978!! If the Master Limited Partner Parity Act is passed THAT WOULD BE A GAME CHANGER!! ( this is sponsored bu Senator Coons From DE) Call me directly..... You can also aske Heidi Heitkamp about me.... Mike Gray

  10. Gray, Maine: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gray, Maine: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.885632, -70.3317195 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"g...

  11. Energizing the "K-Gray" Community: Energy Literacy Essential...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energizing the "K-Gray" Community: Energy Literacy Essential Principles and Fundamental Concepts Energizing the "K-Gray" Community: Energy Literacy Essential Principles and ...

  12. George T. "Rusty" Gray named TMS Fellow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gray joined TMS in 1986. He has Served on the Programming, Titanium, and Mechanical Behavior committees Completed two terms on the board of directors Chaired the Board of Key ...

  13. Healthcare Energy: Massachusetts General Hospital Gray Building

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Building Technologies Office conducted a healthcare energy end-use monitoring project in partnership with two hospitals. This page contains highlights from monitoring at the Gray Building at Massachusetts General Hospital.

  14. Grays Harbor County, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Grays Harbor County, Washington Aberdeen Gardens, Washington Aberdeen, Washington Brady, Washington Central Park, Washington Chehalis Village, Washington Cohassett Beach,...

  15. Laboratory Fellow Rusty Gray named president of TMS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rusty Gray named president of TMS Laboratory Fellow Rusty Gray named president of TM George T. "Rusty" Gray III was selected as 2010 president of The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society. February 24, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos

  16. Grays Harbor Ocean Energy Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy, Wind energy Product: Grays Harbor has started a demonstration project for offshore windwave renewable power generation in Washington State and has applied for up...

  17. Grays Harbor PUD- Non-Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Grays Harbor PUD's Non-Residential Rebate Program offers financial incentives to its small and large commercial customers, agricultural customers, industrial customers, and institutional customers...

  18. EERE Success Story-Energizing the "K-Gray" Community: Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energizing the "K-Gray" Community: Energy Literacy Essential Principles and Fundamental Concepts EERE Success Story-Energizing the "K-Gray" Community: Energy Literacy Essential ...

  19. Black and gray Helmholtz-Kerr soliton refraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez-Curto, Julio; Chamorro-Posada, Pedro; McDonald, Graham S.

    2011-01-15

    Refraction of black and gray solitons at boundaries separating different defocusing Kerr media is analyzed within a Helmholtz framework. A universal nonlinear Snell's law is derived that describes gray soliton refraction, in addition to capturing the behavior of bright and black Kerr solitons at interfaces. Key regimes, defined by beam and interface characteristics, are identified, and predictions are verified by full numerical simulations. The existence of a unique total nonrefraction angle for gray solitons is reported; both internal and external refraction at a single interface is shown possible (dependent only on incidence angle). This, in turn, leads to the proposal of positive or negative lensing operations on soliton arrays at planar boundaries.

  20. Gray County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Gray County is a county in Kansas. Its FIPS County Code is 069. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  1. Gray County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Gray County is a county in Texas. Its FIPS County Code is 179. It is classified as ASHRAE...

  2. Grays Prairie, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Grays Prairie is a village in Kaufman County, Texas. It falls under Texas's 5th congressional district.12 References...

  3. Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment Final Report 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Christopher W.; McGrath, Kathleen E.; Geist, David R.; Abbe, Timothy; Barton, Chase

    2008-02-04

    The Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment was funded to address degradation and loss of spawning habitat for chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook salmon (Onchoryhnchus tshawytscha). In 1999, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed lower Columbia River chum salmon as a threatened Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). The Grays River watershed is one of two remaining significant chum salmon spawning locations in this ESU. Runs of Grays River chum and Chinook salmon have declined significantly during the past century, largely because of damage to spawning habitat associated with timber harvest and agriculture in the watershed. In addition, approximately 20-25% of the then-remaining chum salmon spawning habitat was lost during a 1999 channel avulsion that destroyed an important artificial spawning channel operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Although the lack of stable, high-quality spawning habitat is considered the primary physical limitation on Grays River chum salmon production today, few data are available to guide watershed management and channel restoration activities. The objectives of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment project were to (1) perform a comprehensive watershed and biological analysis, including hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological assessments; (2) develop a prioritized list of actions that protect and restore critical chum and Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Grays River based on comprehensive geomorphic, hydrologic, and stream channel assessments; and (3) gain a better understanding of chum and Chinook salmon habitat requirements and survival within the lower Columbia River and the Grays River. The watershed-based approach to river ecosystem restoration relies on a conceptual framework that describes general relationships between natural landscape characteristics, watershed-scale habitat-forming processes, aquatic

  4. Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment, 2006 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Christopher; Geist, David

    2007-04-01

    The Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment was funded to address degradation and loss of spawning habitat for chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook salmon (Onchoryhnchus tshawytscha). In 1999, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed lower Columbia River chum salmon as a threatened Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). The Grays River watershed is one of two remaining significant chum salmon spawning locations in this ESU. Runs of Grays River chum and Chinook salmon have declined significantly during the past century, largely because of damage to spawning habitat associated with timber harvest and agriculture in the watershed. In addition, approximately 20-25% of the then-remaining chum salmon spawning habitat was lost during a 1999 channel avulsion that destroyed an important artificial spawning channel operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Although the lack of stable, high-quality spawning habitat is considered the primary physical limitation on Grays River chum salmon production today, few data are available to guide watershed management and channel restoration activities. The objectives of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment project were to (1) perform a comprehensive watershed and biological analysis, including hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological assessments; (2) develop a prioritized list of actions that protect and restore critical chum and Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Grays River based on comprehensive geomorphic, hydrologic, and stream channel assessments; and (3) gain a better understanding of chum and Chinook salmon habitat requirements and survival within the lower Columbia River and the Grays River. The watershed-based approach to river ecosystem restoration relies on a conceptual framework that describes general relationships between natural landscape characteristics, watershed-scale habitat-forming processes, aquatic

  5. Three-temperature plasma shock solutions with gray radiation diffusion

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Johnson, Bryan M.; Klein, Richard I.

    2016-04-19

    Here we discuss the effects of radiation on the structure of shocks in a fully ionized plasma are investigated by solving the steady-state fluid equations for ions, electrons, and radiation. The electrons and ions are assumed to have the same bulk velocity but separate temperatures, and the radiation is modeled with the gray diffusion approximation. Both electron and ion conduction are included, as well as ion viscosity. When the material is optically thin, three-temperature behavior occurs. When the diffusive flux of radiation is important but radiation pressure is not, two-temperature behavior occurs, with the electrons strongly coupled to the radiation.more » Since the radiation heats the electrons on length scales that are much longer than the electron–ion Coulomb coupling length scale, these solutions resemble radiative shock solutions rather than plasma shock solutions that neglect radiation. When radiation pressure is important, all three components are strongly coupled. Results with constant values for the transport and coupling coefficients are compared to a full numerical simulation with a good match between the two, demonstrating that steady shock solutions constitute a straightforward and comprehensive verification test methodology for multi-physics numerical algorithms.« less

  6. EERE Success Story-Energizing the "K-Gray" Community: Energy Literacy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Essential Principles and Fundamental Concepts | Department of Energy Energizing the "K-Gray" Community: Energy Literacy Essential Principles and Fundamental Concepts EERE Success Story-Energizing the "K-Gray" Community: Energy Literacy Essential Principles and Fundamental Concepts August 21, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis Energy Literacy is a key initiative within Education and Workforce Development in EERE's Office of Strategic Programs. Enhancing U.S. citizens' energy

  7. Joe W. Gray, 1986 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Joe W. Gray, 1986 The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award Lawrence Award Home Nomination & Selection Guidelines Award Laureates 2010's 2000's 1990's 1980's 1970's 1960's Ceremony The Life of Ernest Orlando Lawrence Contact Information The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-2411 E: Email Us 1980's Joe W. Gray, 1986 Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Life Sciences: For his exceptional

  8. Production and Machining of Thin Wall Gray and Ductile Cast Iron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleischman, E.H.; Li, H.; Griffin, R.; Bates, C.E.; Eleftheriou, E.

    2000-11-03

    The University of Alabama at Birmingham, in cooperation with the American Foundry Society, companies across North America, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, is conducting a project to develop an understanding of the factors that control the machinability of cast gray and ductile iron. Differences of as much as 500% have been found in machinability have been observed at the same strength. The most machinable irons were those with a high cell counts and few carbonitride inclusions. Additions of tin and copper can be added to both gray and ductile iron to stabilize the pearlite, but excessive additions (above those required to produce the desired pearlite content) degrade the machinability.

  9. The 21st LH Gray Conference (June 4-6, 2008)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. M. L. West; Martin, C. J.; Sutton, D. G.; Wright, E. G.

    2009-01-12

    The 21st LH Gray Conference, organised by the LH Gray Trust with the Society for Radiological Protection, brought together international experts in radiobiology, epidemiology and risk assessment, and scientists involved in diagnostic and therapeutic radiation exposure. The meeting - held in Edinburgh, Scotland 4-6 June 2008 - aimed to raise awareness, educate and share knowledge of important issues in radiation protection. A distinguished group of speakers discussed topics which included: non-targeted effects of radiation, exposure to high natural background radiation, non-cancer effects in Japanese bomb survivors, lessons learnt from Chernobyl, radiation in the workplace, biokinetic modelling, uncertainties in risk estimation, issues in diagnostic medical exposures, lessons leant from the polonium-210 incidence and how the radiobiology-radiation oncology community is needed to help society prepare for potential future acts of radiation terrorism. The conference highlighted the importance, relevance and topicality of radiobiology today.

  10. Gene by Disease Interaction on Orbitofrontal Gray Matter in Cocaine Addiction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alia-Klein, N.; Alia-Klein, N.; Parvaz, M.A.; Woicik, P.A.; Konova, A.; Maloney, T.; Shumay, E.; Wang, R.; Telang, F.; Biegon, A.; Wang, G.-J.; Fowler, J.S.; Tomasi, D.; Volkow, N.D.; Goldstein, R.Z.

    2010-12-05

    Chronic cocaine use has been associated with structural deficits in brain regions having dopamine receptive neurons. However, the concomitant use of other drugs and common genetic variability in monoamine regulation present additional structural variability. We therefore examined variations in gray matter volume (GMV) as a function of lifetime drug use and the monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) genotype in cocaine use disorders (CUD) and healthy controls.

  11. Exact Bogoliubov-de Gennes solutions for gray-soliton backgrounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walczak, P. B.; Anglin, J. R.

    2011-07-15

    We derive and discuss the complete set of exact solutions to the one-dimensional Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations for small-amplitude excitations around general gray-soliton solutions to the cubic nonlinear Schroedinger equation. Our results extend the previously known case of the motionless dark-soliton background. We derive our nonzero-frequency solutions using a variant of the factorization method for Schroedinger equations with reflectionless potentials. We also discuss the zero-mode solutions at length.

  12. Measurement of the body composition of living gray seals by hydrogen isotope dilution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reilly, J.J.; Fedak, M.A. )

    1990-09-01

    The body composition of living gray seals (Halichoerus grypus) can be accurately predicted from a two-step model that involves measurement of total body water (TBW) by {sup 2}H or {sup 3}H dilution and application of predictive relationships between body components and TBW that were derived empirically by slaughter chemical analysis. TBW was overestimated by both {sup 2}HHO and {sup 3}HHO dilution; mean overestimates were 2.8 +/- 0.9% (SE) with 2H and 4.0 +/- 0.6% with {sup 3}H. The relationships for prediction of total body fat (TBF), protein (TBP), gross energy (TBGE), and ash (TBA) were as follows: %TBF = 105.1 - 1.47 (%TBW); %TBP = 0.42 (%TBW) - 4.75; TBGE (MJ) = 40.8 (mass in kg) - 48.5 (TBW in kg) - 0.4; and TBA (kg) = 0.1 - 0.008 (mass in kg) + 0.05 (TBW in kg). These relationships are applicable to gray seals of both sexes over a wide range of age and body conditions, and they predict the body composition of gray seals more accurately than the predictive equations derived from ringed seals (Pusa hispida) and from the equation of Pace and Rathbun, which has been reported to be generally applicable to mammals.

  13. Testing the effectiveness of an acoustic deterrent for gray whales along the Oregon coast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lagerquist, Barbara; Winsor, Martha; Mate, Bruce

    2012-12-31

    This study was conducted to determine whether a low-powered sound source could be effective at deterring gray whales from areas that may prove harmful to them. With increased interest in the development of marine renewal energy along the Oregon coast the concern that such development may pose a collision or entanglement risk for gray whales. A successful acoustic deterrent could act as a mitigation tool to prevent harm to whales from such risks. In this study, an acoustic device was moored on the seafloor in the pathway of migrating gray whales off Yaquina Head on the central Oregon coast. Shore-based observers tracked whales with a theodolite (surveyor’s tool) to accurately locate whales as they passed the headland. Individual locations of different whales/whale groups as well as tracklines of the same whale/whale groups were obtained and compared between times with the acoustic device was transmitting and when it was off. Observations were conducted on 51 d between January 1 and April 15, 2012. A total of 143 individual whale locations were collected for a total of 243 whales, as well as 57 tracklines for a total of 142 whales. Inclement weather and equipment problems resulted in very small sample sizes, especially during experimental periods, when the device was transmitting. Because of this, the results of this study were inconclusive. We feel that another season of field testing is warranted to successfully test the effectiveness of the deterrent, but recommend increasing the zone of influence to 3 km to ensure the collection of adequate sample sizes. Steps have been taken to acquire the necessary federal research permit modification to authorize the increased zone of influence and to modify the acoustic device for the increased power. With these changes we are confident we will be able to determine whether the deterrent is effective at deflecting gray whales. A successful deterrent device may serve as a valuable mitigation tool to protect gray whales, and

  14. The FBI wavelet/scalar quantization standard for gray-scale fingerprint image compression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, J.N.; Brislawn, C.M. ); Hopper, T. )

    1993-01-01

    The FBI has recently adopted a standard for the compression of digitized 8-bit gray-scale fingerprint images. The standard is based on scalar quantization of a 64-subband discrete wavelet transform decomposition of the images, followed by Huffman coding. Novel features of the algorithm include the use of symmetric boundary conditions for transforming finite-length signals and a subband decomposition tailored for fingerprint images scanned at 500 dpi. The standard is intended for use in conjunction with ANSI/NBS-CLS 1-1993, American National Standard Data Format for the Interchange of Fingerprint Information, and the FBI's Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System.

  15. The FBI wavelet/scalar quantization standard for gray-scale fingerprint image compression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, J.N.; Brislawn, C.M.; Hopper, T.

    1993-05-01

    The FBI has recently adopted a standard for the compression of digitized 8-bit gray-scale fingerprint images. The standard is based on scalar quantization of a 64-subband discrete wavelet transform decomposition of the images, followed by Huffman coding. Novel features of the algorithm include the use of symmetric boundary conditions for transforming finite-length signals and a subband decomposition tailored for fingerprint images scanned at 500 dpi. The standard is intended for use in conjunction with ANSI/NBS-CLS 1-1993, American National Standard Data Format for the Interchange of Fingerprint Information, and the FBI`s Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System.

  16. Gray QB-sing-faced version 2 (SF2) open environment test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plummer, J.; Immel, D.; Bobbitt, J.; Negron, M.

    2015-02-16

    This report details the design upgrades incorporated into the new version of the GrayQbTM SF2 device and the characterization testing of this upgraded device. Results from controlled characterization testing in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) R&D Engineering Imaging and Radiation Lab (IRL) and the Savannah River Site (SRS) Health Physics Instrument Calibration Laboratory (HPICL) is presented, as well as results from the open environment field testing performed in the E-Area Low Level Waste Storage Area. Resultant images presented in this report were generated using the SRNL developed Radiation Analyzer (RAzerTM) software program which overlays the radiation contour images onto the visual image of the location being surveyed.

  17. High-temperature low cycle fatigue behavior of a gray cast iron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, K.L. He, G.Q.; She, M.; Liu, X.S.; Lu, Q.; Yang, Y.; Tian, D.D.; Shen, Y.

    2014-12-15

    The strain controlled low cycle fatigue properties of the studied gray cast iron for engine cylinder blocks were investigated. At the same total strain amplitude, the low cycle fatigue life of the studied material at 523 K was higher than that at 423 K. The fatigue behavior of the studied material was characterized as cyclic softening at any given total strain amplitude (0.12%0.24%), which was attributed to fatigue crack initiation and propagation. Moreover, this material exhibited asymmetric hysteresis loops due to the presence of the graphite lamellas. Transmission electron microscopy analysis suggested that cyclic softening was also caused by the interactions of dislocations at 423 K, such as cell structure in ferrite, whereas cyclic softening was related to subgrain boundaries and dislocation climbing at 523 K. Micro-analysis of specimen fracture appearance was conducted in order to obtain the fracture characteristics and crack paths for different strain amplitudes. It showed that the higher the temperature, the rougher the crack face of the examined gray cast iron at the same total strain amplitude. Additionally, the microcracks were readily blunted during growth inside the pearlite matrix at 423 K, whereas the microcracks could easily pass through pearlite matrix along with deflection at 523 K. The results of fatigue experiments consistently showed that fatigue damage for the studied material at 423 K was lower than that at 523 K under any given total strain amplitude. - Highlights: The low cycle fatigue behavior of the HT250 for engine cylinder blocks was investigated. TEM investigations were conducted to explain the cyclic deformation response. The low cycle fatigue cracks of HT250 GCI were studied by SEM. The fatigue life of the examined material at 523 K is higher than that at 423 K.

  18. An asymptotic preserving unified gas kinetic scheme for gray radiative transfer equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Wenjun; Jiang, Song; Xu, Kun

    2015-03-15

    The solutions of radiative transport equations can cover both optical thin and optical thick regimes due to the large variation of photon's mean-free path and its interaction with the material. In the small mean free path limit, the nonlinear time-dependent radiative transfer equations can converge to an equilibrium diffusion equation due to the intensive interaction between radiation and material. In the optical thin limit, the photon free transport mechanism will emerge. In this paper, we are going to develop an accurate and robust asymptotic preserving unified gas kinetic scheme (AP-UGKS) for the gray radiative transfer equations, where the radiation transport equation is coupled with the material thermal energy equation. The current work is based on the UGKS framework for the rarefied gas dynamics [14], and is an extension of a recent work [12] from a one-dimensional linear radiation transport equation to a nonlinear two-dimensional gray radiative system. The newly developed scheme has the asymptotic preserving (AP) property in the optically thick regime in the capturing of diffusive solution without using a cell size being smaller than the photon's mean free path and time step being less than the photon collision time. Besides the diffusion limit, the scheme can capture the exact solution in the optical thin regime as well. The current scheme is a finite volume method. Due to the direct modeling for the time evolution solution of the interface radiative intensity, a smooth transition of the transport physics from optical thin to optical thick can be accurately recovered. Many numerical examples are included to validate the current approach.

  19. Gray and multigroup radiation transport models for two-dimensional binary stochastic media using effective opacities

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Olson, Gordon L.

    2015-09-24

    One-dimensional models for the transport of radiation through binary stochastic media do not work in multi-dimensions. In addition, authors have attempted to modify or extend the 1D models to work in multidimensions without success. Analytic one-dimensional models are successful in 1D only when assuming greatly simplified physics. State of the art theories for stochastic media radiation transport do not address multi-dimensions and temperature-dependent physics coefficients. Here, the concept of effective opacities and effective heat capacities is found to well represent the ensemble averaged transport solutions in cases with gray or multigroup temperature-dependent opacities and constant or temperature-dependent heat capacities. Inmore » every case analyzed here, effective physics coefficients fit the transport solutions over a useful range of parameter space. The transport equation is solved with the spherical harmonics method with angle orders of n=1 and 5. Although the details depend on what order of solution is used, the general results are similar, independent of angular order.« less

  20. Gray and multigroup radiation transport models for two-dimensional binary stochastic media using effective opacities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, Gordon L.

    2015-09-24

    One-dimensional models for the transport of radiation through binary stochastic media do not work in multi-dimensions. In addition, authors have attempted to modify or extend the 1D models to work in multidimensions without success. Analytic one-dimensional models are successful in 1D only when assuming greatly simplified physics. State of the art theories for stochastic media radiation transport do not address multi-dimensions and temperature-dependent physics coefficients. Here, the concept of effective opacities and effective heat capacities is found to well represent the ensemble averaged transport solutions in cases with gray or multigroup temperature-dependent opacities and constant or temperature-dependent heat capacities. In every case analyzed here, effective physics coefficients fit the transport solutions over a useful range of parameter space. The transport equation is solved with the spherical harmonics method with angle orders of n=1 and 5. Although the details depend on what order of solution is used, the general results are similar, independent of angular order.

  1. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA-86-053-1933, Gray Pprinting Company, Fostoria, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crandall, M.S.; Boiano, J.M.; Fidler, A.T.; Cantor, F.

    1988-10-01

    The Gray Printing Company, located in Fostoria, Ohio was studied for potential employee exposures to solvents used in the offset-printing process at that site. The company produced 30 monthly magazines plus various commercial catalogs and brochures. The employment at the site was 185 persons. Equipment used in the production of printed material included photographic-typesetting and sheet-fed and roll fed offset lithographic printing processes. Over two workdays the sheet fed press operator's isopropanol exposures ranged from 247 to 501 mg/m/sup 3/ with personal breathing zone naphtha concentrations of 0.03 to 8.9 mg/m/sup 3/. The web press operator's naphtha exposures ranged from 0.03 to 7.7 mg/m/sup 3/. These workers were also exposed to low concentrations of isopropanol. The highest short term isopropanol exposure was 726 mg/m/sup 3/. Short term exposures to blanket and roller cleaning solvent were low, less than 10 mg/m/sup 3/. A higher than expected reporting of symptoms related to central nervous system depression, difficulty in concentrating, dizziness, cough, chest pain, and dry skin were noted among workers. The authors conclude that there was an increased prevalence of neurotoxic, respiratory, and skin problems among workers using organic solvents. Due to the prevalence of these symptoms, the authors recommend measures for reducing employee exposure to solvents.

  2. GrayQbTM Single-Faced Version 2 (SF2) Hanford Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF) deployment report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plummer, J. R.; Immel, D. M.; Serrato, M. G.; Dalmaso, M. J.; Shull, D. J.

    2015-11-18

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) in partnership with CH2M Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) deployed the GrayQbTM SF2 radiation imaging device at the Hanford Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF) to assist in the radiological characterization of the canyon. The deployment goal was to locate radiological contamination hot spots in the PRF canyon, where pencil tanks were removed and decontamination/debris removal operations are on-going, to support the CHPRC facility decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) effort. The PRF canyon D&D effort supports completion of the CHPRC Plutonium Finishing Plant Decommissioning Project. The GrayQbTM SF2 (Single Faced Version 2) is a non-destructive examination device developed by SRNL to generate radiation contour maps showing source locations and relative radiological levels present in the area under examination. The Hanford PRF GrayQbTM Deployment was sponsored by CH2M Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) through the DOE Richland Operations Office, Inter-Entity Work Order (IEWO), DOE-RL IEWO- M0SR900210.

  3. Significance of recurrent fault movement at Grays Point quarry, southeast Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diehl, S.F.; Throckmorton, C.K. ); Clendenin, C.W. )

    1993-03-01

    Geologic relationships indicate recurrent movement on a fault exposed at Grays Point, MO. Faulting offsets Middle-Late Ordovician Plattin Group, Decorah Group, Kimmswick Limestone, and Maquoketa Group strata. In plan, the fault is characterized by a relatively narrow zone (30--70 m) of northeast-striking fault slices associated with a northwest-striking zone of right-stepping en echelon fractures. This systematic fracture-fault array identifies right-lateral strike-slip movement. A vertically offset basal Decorah Group contact shows 22 m of down-to-the-southeast dip slip, which indicates a component of oblique slip. Oldest recognizable movement on the fault is evidenced by Maquoketa Group strata that fill a northeast-striking, wedge-shaped synform. Post-Ordovician movement along an adjacent subvertical fault displaces part of this synform 300 m right laterally. In thin section, the northwest-striking fracture set shows a polyphase history of deformation indicated by cataclastic textures and intrusion of carbonate-rich fluids. Three periods of movement occurred: (1) initial fracturing sealed by authigenic mineral cements; (2) renewed fracturing associated with recrystallization of sub-rounded clasts; and (3) subsequent brecciation marked by angular clasts and filling of fractures and vugs. Each successive fluid intrusion is characterized by an increase in grain size of the authigenic cement. The fault is subparallel to the regional, northeast-striking English Hill fault system. Polyphase oblique-slip deformation suggests that the fault, like others in southeastern Missouri, is a reactivated Late Proterozoic-Cambrian zone of weakness. Initial fault reactivation occurred during Middle-Late Ordovician as opposed to Devonian, as commonly interpreted for southeast Missouri. Multiple authigenic mineral cements imply that fluids may have been an important factor influencing the fault's tendency to be reactivated.

  4. Polymorphisms in MIR137HG and microRNA-137-regulated genes influence gray matter structure in schizophrenia

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wright, C.; Gupta, C. N.; Chen, J.; Patel, V.; Calhoun, V. D.; Ehrlich, S.; Wang, L.; Bustillo, J. R.; Perrone-Bizzozero, N. I.; Turner, J. A.

    2016-02-02

    Evidence suggests that microRNA-137 (miR-137) is involved in the genetic basis of schizophrenia. Risk variants within the miR-137 host gene (MIR137HG) influence structural and functional brain-imaging measures, and miR-137 itself is predicted to regulate hundreds of genes. We evaluated the influence of a MIR137HG risk variant (rs1625579) in combination with variants in miR-137- regulated genes TCF4, PTGS2, MAPK1 and MAPK3 on gray matter concentration (GMC). These genes were selected based on our previous work assessing schizophrenia risk within possible miR-137-regulated gene sets using the same cohort of subjects. A genetic risk score (GRS) was determined based on genotypes of thesemore » four schizophrenia risk-associated genes in 221 Caucasian subjects (89 schizophrenia patients and 132 controls). The effects of the rs1625579 genotype with the GRS of miR-137-regulated genes in a three-way interaction with diagnosis on GMC patterns were assessed using a multivariate analysis. We found that schizophrenia subjects homozygous for the MIR137HG risk allele show significant decreases in occipital, parietal and temporal lobe GMC with increasing miR-137-regulated GRS, whereas those carrying the protective minor allele show significant increases in GMC with GRS. No correlations of GMC and GRS were found in control subjects. Variants within or upstream of genes regulated by miR-137 in combination with the MIR137HG risk variant may influence GMC in schizophrenia-related regions in patients. Furthermore, given that the genes evaluated here are involved in protein kinase A signaling, dysregulation of this pathway through alterations in miR-137 biogenesis may underlie the gray matter loss seen in the disease.« less

  5. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 91-254-2186, Ropes and Gray Photocopy Center, Boston, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, C.K.; Crandall, M.S.

    1992-03-01

    In response to a request from a group of employees at the Pitney Bowes Management Services, Ropes and Gray Photocopy Center (SIC-7334), Boston, Massachusetts, an evaluation was undertaken of worker exposures to photocopy emissions. The photocopy center has been in operation for 2 years. Six full time employees worked the day shift operating six photocopiers of various models. Approximately 1 million copies were generated monthly at the site. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of air samples taken for volatile organic carbons revealed trace amounts of 1,1,1-trichloroethane (71556), isooctane (540841), toluene (108883), xylene (1330207), and benzene (71432). Ozone (10028156) concentrations as high as 0.41 parts per million (ppm) were detected at approximately 3 feet from the exhaust of each photocopier. Carbon-dioxide (124389) concentrations ranged from 300 to 825ppm. Respirable dust concentrations ranged from less than 10 to 50 micrograms per cubic meter. Carbon-monoxide (630080) was not detected. The authors conclude that the evaluation did not reveal a hazard to explain the respiratory symptoms experienced by the workers. The finding that the ventilation system moved too small an amount of air in a measured period of time may account for the accumulation of airborne contaminants within the building. Recommendations were made to improve the ventilation.

  6. Women @ Energy: Neda Gray

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    " If we can convince mothers and fathers to treat their daughters and sons equally, to instill in them a sense of value for education, responsibility for their actions and decisions, love for others (not only family members), and a desire for spiritual enlightenment, we can begin to change the world."

  7. Corporate Gray Job Fair

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Location:  Army-Navy Country Club, Arlington, VAContact: Recruitment@doe.govWebsite Link: www.corporategray.com/jobfairs/366

  8. National Metal Casting Research Institute final report. Development of an automated ultrasonic inspection cell for detecting subsurface discontinuities in cast gray iron. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burningham, J.S.

    1995-08-01

    This inspection cell consisted of an ultrasonic flaw detector, transducer, robot, immersion tank, computer, and software. Normal beam pulse-echo ultrasonic nondestructive testing, using the developed automated cell, was performed on 17 bosses on each rough casting. Ultrasonic transducer selection, initial inspection criteria, and ultrasonic flow detector (UFD) setup parameters were developed for the gray iron castings used in this study. The software were developed for control of the robot and UFD in real time. The software performed two main tasks: emulating the manual operation of the UFD, and evaluating the ultrasonic signatures for detecting subsurface discontinuities. A random lot of 105 castings were tested; the 100 castings that passed were returned to the manufacturer for machining into finished parts and then inspection. The other 5 castings had one boss each with ultrasonic signatures consistent with subsurface discontinuities. The cell was successful in quantifying the ultrasonic echo signatures for the existence of signature characteristics consistent with Go/NoGo criteria developed from simulated defects. Manual inspection showed that no defects in the areas inspected by the automated cell avoided detection in the 100 castings machined into finished parts. Of the 5 bosses found to have subsurface discontinuities, two were verified by manual inspection. The cell correctly classified 1782 of the 1785 bosses (99.832%) inspected.

  9. Grays Harbor PUD- Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington's original net-metering law, which applies to all electric utilities, was enacted in 1998 and amended in 2006. Individual systems are limited to 100 kilowatts (kW) in capacity. Net...

  10. QER- Comment of Heather Gray

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    I live in Western Massachusetts and we don't need a pipeline going through us to get to CT or anywhere else -- especially when fracked materials are involved. I am against the pipeline -- let them refine that dangerous stuff up north, if they can't be persuaded to stop entirely. We need cleaner, safer fuels, more effective use of fuel (which probably means smaller, more local power units, not huge ones). We also need to support smarter uses of resources, such as more insulation in houses and apartments, so that less energy is needed to heat and cool them. Let's stimulate the local economy of New England, not just roll over for the rich guys!

  11. Surveillance study of health effects associated with cleanup of a hazardous waste site, Ralph Gray Trucking Company (a/k/a Westminster Tract Number 2633), Westminster, Orange County, California, Region 9: CERCLIS number CAD981995947

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoshiko, S.; Underwood, M.C.; Smith, D.; DeLorenze, G.; Neuhaus, J.

    1999-04-01

    Excavation of a Superfund site, the Ralph Gray Truncking Company located in Westminster Orange County, California was anticipated to release sulfur dioxide and other chemicals. The California Department of Health Services, under cooperative agreement with the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, conducted a surveillance study to assess whether illnesses were associated with cleanup activities. A panel primarily composed of more sensitive persons (n = 36) was selected to report daily respiratory symptoms and odors. Exposures included sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) measurements and daily tonnage of waste removed. Analysis used Conditional Likelihood Regression and Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE) methods. Levels of SO{sub 2} were generally higher than usual ambient air, at times exceeding levels which can cause health effects among asthmatics in laboratory settings. Wheeze and cough were significantly associated with tonnage of waste removed, especially on days when the highest amounts of waste were removed. Upper respiratory symptoms were found to be associated with SO{sub 2}, and weak relationships were found with nausea and burning nose and SO{sub 2}.

  12. Scheduling-Blakely-DeGray-MISO.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Schedules of Key Environmental Impact Statements Schedules of Key Environmental Impact Statements This document graphically displays the milestone dates and projected schedules of key Environmental Impact Statements (updated monthly). This chart represents anticipated activity and is not a commitment for documentation or date. Last Revised: 8/15/2016 Download Document Key EIS Chart - August 2016 (28.5 KB) More Documents & Publications June2010KeyEISChart.pdf Lessons Learned Quarterly Report

  13. NREL: Energy Analysis - Pamela Gray-Hann

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Internet map server applications GIS web page PVWatts Outreach Meeting planning Project support Education and background training University of Minnesota-Duluth GIS technical ...

  14. Gray scale x-ray mask

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morales, Alfredo M.; Gonzales, Marcela

    2006-03-07

    The present invention describes a method for fabricating an embossing tool or an x-ray mask tool, providing microstructures that smoothly vary in height from point-to-point in etched substrates, i.e., structure which can vary in all three dimensions. The process uses a lithographic technique to transfer an image pattern in the surface of a silicon wafer by exposing and developing the resist and then etching the silicon substrate. Importantly, the photoresist is variably exposed so that when developed some of the resist layer remains. The remaining undeveloped resist acts as an etchant barrier to the reactive plasma used to etch the silicon substrate and therefore provides the ability etch structures of variable depths.

  15. PUD No 1 of Grays Harbor Cnty | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    WECC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  16. The genome of black cottonwood, Populus trichocarpa (Torr.&Gray)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuskan, G.A.; DiFazio, S.; Jansson, S.; Bohlmann, J.; Grigoriev,I.; Hellsten, U.; Putnam, N.; Ralph, S.; Rombauts, S.; Salamov, A.; Schein, J.; Sterck, L.; Aerts, A.; Bhalerao, R.R.; Bhalerao, R.P.; Blaudez, D.; Boerjan, W.; Brun, A.; Brunner, A.; Busov, V.; Campbell, M.; Carlson, J.; Chalot, M.; Chapman, J.; Chen, G.-L.; Cooper, D.; Coutinho,P.M.; Couturier, J.; Covert, S.; Cronk, Q.; Cunningham, R.; Davis, J.; Degroeve, S.; Dejardin, A.; dePamphillis, C.; Detter, J.; Dirks, B.; Dubchak, I.; Duplessis, S.; Ehiting, J.; Ellis, B.; Gendler, K.; Goodstein, D.; Gribskov, M.; Grimwood, J.; Groover, A.; Gunter, L.; Hamberger, B.; Heinze, B.; Helariutta, Y.; Henrissat, B.; Holligan, D.; Holt, R.; Huang, W.; Islam-Faridi, N.; Jones, S.; Jones-Rhoades, M.; Jorgensen, R.; Joshi, C.; Kangasjarvi, J.; Karlsson, J.; Kelleher, C.; Kirkpatrick, R.; Kirst, M.; Kohler, A.; Kalluri, U.; Larimer, F.; Leebens-Mack, J.; Leple, J.-C.; Locascio, P.; Lou, Y.; Lucas, S.; Martin,F.; Montanini, B.; Napoli, C.; Nelson, D.R.; Nelson, D.; Nieminen, K.; Nilsson, O.; Peter, G.; Philippe, R.; Pilate, G.; Poliakov, A.; Razumovskaya, J.; Richardson, P.; Rinaldi, C.; Ritland, K.; Rouze, P.; Ryaboy, D.; Schmutz, J.; Schrader, J.; Segerman, B.; Shin, H.; Siddiqui,A.; Sterky, F.; Terry, A.; Tsai, C.; Uberbacher, E.; Unneberg, P.; Vahala, J.; Wall, K.; Wessler, S.; Yang, G.; Yin, T.; Douglas, C.; Marra,M.; Sandberg, G.; Van der Peer, Y.; Rokhsar, D.

    2006-09-01

    We report the draft genome of the black cottonwood tree, Populus trichocarpa. Integration of shotgun sequence assembly with genetic mapping enabled chromosome-scale reconstruction of the genome. Over 45,000 putative protein-coding genes were identified. Analysis of the assembled genome revealed a whole-genome duplication event, with approximately 8,000 pairs of duplicated genes from that event surviving in the Populus genome. A second, older duplication event is indistinguishably coincident with the divergence of the Populus and Arabidopsis lineages. Nucleotide substitution, tandem gene duplication and gross chromosomal rearrangement appear to proceed substantially slower in Populus relative to Arabidopsis. Populus has more protein-coding genes than Arabidopsis, ranging on average between 1.4-1.6 putative Populus homologs for each Arabidopsis gene. However, the relative frequency of protein domains in the two genomes is similar. Overrepresented exceptions in Populus include genes associated with disease resistance, meristem development, metabolite transport and lignocellulosic wall biosynthesis.

  17. Grays Harbor PUD- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Low Income Weatherization assistance is also provided. Specific information regarding various guidelines and applications may be found on the web site.  

  18. MHK Projects/Grays Harbor Ocean Energy and Coastal Protection...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Company LLC Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesTitan Platform Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  19. Text-Alternative Webcast of the Energy Literate Citizenry from K-to-Gray

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Michelle Fox: Hi, good afternoon everyone and welcome to today's webinar on energy literacy. Thank you for joining. I want to thank also the Department of Education for their Green Strides Webinar...

  20. ORISE Video: What are the differences between rad/gray and rem/sievert in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    measuring radiation?

  1. Energizing the "K-Gray" Community: Energy Literacy Essential Principles and Fundamental Concepts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    First nationally recognized framework for teaching energy using an interdisciplinary, systems-based approach (natural sciences, technology, engineering, economics, social sciences, and policy), with focus on improving energy decision-making by all citizens.

  2. Webcast of the Energy Literate Citizenry from K-to-Gray

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Literacy Framework webinar was held on February 6, 2013 at 4 pm EST. It focused on outlining the Energy Literacy Framework, which identifies concepts every citizen should know to be...

  3. White Paper Powering Sustainable Low-Carbon Economies: Some Fact and Figures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilles J. Youinou

    2015-04-01

    In 2011, the world production of electricity was about 22.1 trillion kilowatt-hour1 (kWhe): 9.1 from coal, 4.8 from gas, 2.6 from nuclear, 1.1 from oil, 3.5 from hydropower and 1.0 from other sources (geothermal, solar, wind, biofuels). With a world population of about 7 billion in 2011, it corresponds to an average of 3,160 kWhe/year/capita. While most industrialized countries enjoy a high standard of living with, at least, 8,000 kWhe per year and per person, most developing countries live with less than 3,000 kWhe per year per person. The need for electricity is growing fast, especially in developing countries, and by 2040 the world production of electricity is projected to reach about 40 trillion kWhe.2 Assuming a world population of 10 billion and an average consumption of 6,000 kWhe per year per person in 2100 the world annual production of electricity could reach 60 trillion kWhe.

  4. Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Fields Movie March 19, 2013 | Author(s): Homa Karimabadi, UCSD | Download File: dtf.mpg | mpg | 5.5 MB Time Stepping for Particles Movie March 19, 2013 | Author(s): Homa...

  5. Development of Molten-Salt Heat Trasfer Fluid Technology for...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    molt en-salt HTF CSP plant show an LCOE of below 0.12kWhe (real 2009 ), w it h a 10% ITC Innovat ive Technology Solut ions f or Sustainability ABENGOA SOLAR Phase 1 Conclusions ...

  6. SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jan. 08, 2014 Jan. 09, 2014 Jan. 10, 2014 Jan. 11, 2014 Jan. 12, 2014 DOWNAP AP 3993 A.Gray 3993 A.Gray 3993 A.Gray 3993 A.Gray 3993 A.Gray AP 3993 A.Gray 3993 A.Gray 3993 A.Gray...

  7. November

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and educational aspects of modal analysis technology." - 112112 George T. "Rusty" Gray III George T. "Rusty" Gray named TMS Fellow TMS cited Gray for "innovative science and...

  8. Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8073-Ohldag 8073-Ohldag 8073-Ohldag 8073-Ohldag 6 0 0 Night Shift 18:00 AP 3993-Gray 3993-Gray 3993-Gray 3993-Gray 3993-Gray 3993-Gray 0 0 6 Jan 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 Day...

  9. Present and Future Computational Requirements General Plasma...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Amitava Bhattacharjee, Fatima Ebrahimi, Will Fox, Liwei Lin CICART Space Science Center Dept. of Physics University of New Hampshire March 18, 2013 Kai Germaschewski and Homa ...

  10. Effects of the Exposure to Corrosive Salts on the Frictional Behavior of Gray Cast Iron and a Titanium-Based Metal Matrix Composite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blau, Peter Julian; Truhan, Jr., John J; Kenik, Edward A

    2007-01-01

    The introduction of increasingly aggressive road-deicing chemicals has created significant and costly corrosion problems for the trucking industry. From a tribological perspective, corrosion of the sliding surfaces of brakes after exposure to road salts can create oxide scales on the surfaces that affect friction. This paper describes experiments on the effects of exposure to sodium chloride and magnesium chloride sprays on the transient frictional behavior of cast iron and a titanium-based composite sliding against a commercial brake lining material. Corrosion scales on cast iron initially act as abrasive third-bodies, then they become crushed, spread out, and behave as a solid lubricant. The composition and subsurface microstructures of the corrosion products on the cast iron were analyzed. Owing to its greater corrosion resistance, the titanium composite remained scale-free and its frictional response was markedly different. No corrosion scales were formed on the titanium composite after aggressive exposure to salts; however, a reduction in friction was still observed. Unlike the crystalline sodium chloride deposits that tended to remain dry, hygroscopic magnesium chloride deposits absorbed ambient moisture from the air, liquefied, and retained a persistent lubricating effect on the titanium surfaces.

  11. Webcast of the Energy Literate Citizenry from K-to-Gray: A Webcast on the Department of Energy's Energy Literacy Initiative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Literacy Framework webinar was held on February 6, 2013 at 4 pm EST. The presentation, webcast and resources are available below.

  12. Center for Materials at Irradiation and Mechanical Extremes:...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    George T. (Rusty) Gray III image of George Gray Contact Information Laboratory Fellow Los Alamos National Laboratory Dynamic Materials Properties, Testing, and Modeling Los Alamos,...

  13. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Service Equipment, Vending Machine Controls, Reflective Roofs, LED Lighting Grays Harbor PUD- Non-Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Grays Harbor PUD's Non-Residential...

  14. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Equipment, Other EE, Wind (Small), Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Grays Harbor PUD- Non-Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Grays Harbor PUD's Non-Residential...

  15. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Institutional Savings Category: Lighting, Lighting ControlsSensors Grays Harbor PUD- Non-Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Grays Harbor PUD's Non-Residential...

  16. Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-371 Northern...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Elisha Gray Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-371 Northern Pass Transmission: Comments from Elisha Gray Application from Northern Pass Transmission to construct, ...

  17. Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Lighting and Other Electric Loads...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    See below for a few highlights from monitoring lighting and other electric loads. Lighting and Other Electric Loads at the Gray Building For the Massachusetts General Hospital Gray ...

  18. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Gray, Gordon" Name Name ORCID Search Authors Type: All BookMonograph ConferenceEvent ... Search for: All records CreatorsAuthors contains: "Gray, Gordon" Sort by Relevance ...

  19. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... ; Zuo, Xiaobing ; Huffman, Jamie B. ; Homa, Fred L. ; Rau, Donald ; Evilevitch, Alex DNA in the human Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) capsid is packaged to a tight density. ...

  20. CX-000002: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Gray's River Chum Supplementation ProgramCX(s) Applied: B1.20Date: 10/08/2009Location(s): Gray's River,WashingtonOffice(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  1. NREL: Concentrating Solar Power Research - Research Staff

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    303-384-7470 Judith Gomez, Engineer IV judith.gomez@nrel.gov 303-275-4290 Matthew Gray, Scientist IV matthew.gray@nrel.gov 303-275-3917 Will Huddleston, Undergraduate Intern...

  2. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Chhabildas, Lalit Chandra (1) Davis, Jean-Paul (1) Dingreville, Remi Philippe Michel (1) Gray, George T., III (1) Gray, George T., Jr. (1) Hall, Clint Allen (1) Hixson, Rob (1) ...

  3. Brighter Lights, Safer Streets | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The new lights will also cut greenhouse gas emissions by 719 tons. Mayor Vincent Gray, ... traffic signals with LED bulbs, and Mayor Gray said their new goal is to use the energy ...

  4. Microsoft Word - 1056311word

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... We have also demonstrated near ideal scaling of the gray radiation solver to more than ... solver is similar to that of the gray solver.) In our strong-scaling study with ...

  5. NCO Directory (by program)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) lori.gray@ee.doe.gov Energy Efficiency and ... West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 EERE Lori Gray Golden Field Office Page 1 NEPA Compliance ...

  6. Other State and Local Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    To learn more, click on one of the topic or technology areas below. Energy-Saving Homes, Building, and Manufacturing Resources homes-gray.jpg Homes building-gray.jpg Buildings ...

  7. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Chhabildas, Lalit Chandra (1) Davis, Jean-Paul (1) Dingreville, Remi Philippe Michel (1) Gray, George T., III (1) Gray, George T., Jr. (1) Hall, Clint Allen (1) Hixson, Rob (1) ...

  8. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Filter by Author Gray, K. E. (4) Li, Qing'An (4) Mitchell, J. F. (4) Berger, A. (2) Li, ... effect in layered manganites Li, Qing'An ; Gray, K. E. A numerical method is provided to ...

  9. Building America Research Tools | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    To the right of this building is another large building shaded in gray, and to the left is a smaller structure shaded in gray. Building Energy Optimization Software (BEopt): This ...

  10. Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Reheat and Heating | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Gray Building and 52.0 kBtuft2-yr at the State ... Estimated Breakdown of Reheat and Heating Energy Use At the MGH Gray Building, from ...

  11. QER Public Meeting in Chicago, IL: Rail, Barge, Truck Transportation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... (244.14 KB) John Gray, Senior Vice President for Policy and Economics, the Association of American Railroads (AAR) - Statement (592.32 KB) John Gray, Senior Vice President ...

  12. SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS FOR THE ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT ENTITLED...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... bat species, i.e., gray bat (Myotis grisescens) and Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis). ... roost in trees during the summer, while the gray bat roosts almost exclusively in caves. ...

  13. Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Fans and Pumps | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    At the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Gray Building, supply, returnexhaust, and ... Annual site EUIs for pumps were estimated to be 6.7 kBtuft2-yr at the MGH Gray Building ...

  14. In-Process Characterization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GrayQb(tm) Cluster mounted onto crane platform GrayQb(tm) devices mounted on crane platform in the Hanford PRF Canyon Pencil tank strong back supports - east wall Uniform ...

  15. Computational Nanophotonics: modeling optical interactions and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    This research project was part of a larger research project with the same title led by Stephen Gray at Argonne. A significant amount of our work involved collaborations with Gray,...

  16. Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana Bayou Cane, Louisiana Chauvin, Louisiana Dulac, Louisiana Gray, Louisiana Houma, Louisiana Montegut, Louisiana Schriever, Louisiana Retrieved from...

  17. Crosscutting Success Stories

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Essential Principles and Fundamental Concepts http:energy.goveeresuccess-storiesarticlesenergizing-k-gray-community-energy-literacy-essential-principles-and

  18. Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-371 Northern Pass

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transmission: Comments from Elisha Gray | Department of Energy Elisha Gray Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-371 Northern Pass Transmission: Comments from Elisha Gray Application from Northern Pass Transmission to construct, operate and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S. - Canada Border. ElishaGray_PP-371Comment.pdf (21.01 KB) More Documents & Publications Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-371 Northern Pass Transmission: Comments

  19. Hydrate Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    www.fueleconomy.gov button banner graphic: orange to gray bar Hybrid button hilighted Full Hybrid button Stop/Start button banner graphic: blue bar subbanner graphic: gray bar Overview button highlighted Starting Button Cruising Button Passing Button Braking Button Stopped Button subbanner graphic: gray bar OVERVIEW Hybrid-electric vehicles combine the benefits of gasoline engines and electric motors to provide improved fuel economy. The engine provides most of the vehicle's power, and the

  20. Diurnal Cycle of Convection at the ARM SGP Site: Role of Large...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    over both land and oceans (Gray and Jacobson 1977; Dai 2001; Nesbitt and Zipser 2003). ... has a significant impact on the atmospheric radiation budget and cloud radiative forcing. ...

  1. W&M Student Elected to Represent American Physical Society's...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    W&M Student Elected to Represent American Physical Society's Graduate Student Forum W&M Student Elected to Represent American Physical Society's Graduate Student Forum V Gray ...

  2. Optically Directed Assembly of Continuous Mesoscale Filaments...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Optically Directed Assembly of Continuous Mesoscale Filaments Bahns, J. T.; Sankaranarayanan, S. K. R. S.; Gray, S. K.; Chen, L. Not Available American Physical Society None USDOE...

  3. Center for Materials at Irradiation and Mechanical Extremes:...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quanxi Jia image of George Gray Contact Information Laboratory Fellow Los Alamos National Laboratory Materials Physics and Applications Division Phone: (505) 667-2716...

  4. Laurens County, South Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Clinton, South Carolina Cross Hill, South Carolina Fountain Inn, South Carolina Gray Court, South Carolina Joanna, South Carolina Laurens, South Carolina Mountville, South...

  5. Jones County, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Jones County, Georgia Alterra Bioenergy LLC Places in Jones County, Georgia Gray, Georgia Macon, Georgia Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleJonesCo...

  6. Washington County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    4 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Washington County, Tennessee Fall Branch, Tennessee Gray, Tennessee Johnson City, Tennessee Jonesborough, Tennessee Midway, Tennessee Oak Grove,...

  7. Franklin County, Missouri: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Subtype A. Places in Franklin County, Missouri Berger, Missouri Gerald, Missouri Gray Summit, Missouri Leslie, Missouri Miramiguoa Park, Missouri New Haven, Missouri Oak...

  8. NNSA, IAEA Conduct Emergency Response Training for First Responders...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    News Secretary Moniz awards Hutcheon memorial nonproliferation fellowship to Thomas Gray DOENNSA's Nonproliferation Experts Lead First Workshop on the IAEA Additional Protocol...

  9. Microsoft Word - sensitive-species-table.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Goshawk NMS, FSOC High Lanius ludovicianus Loggerhead Shrike NMS High Vireo vicinior Gray Vireo NMT Moderate Amazilia violiceps Violet-crowned Hummingbird NMT Low Myotis...

  10. Center for Materials at Irradiation and Mechanical Extremes:...

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    Yongqiang Wang image of George Gray Contact Information Los Alamos National Laboratory Ion Beam Materials Laboratory, Team Leader Phone: (505) 665-1596 yqwang@lanl.gov Bio...

  11. Line VISAR and post-shot metallography comparisons for spall...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Line VISAR and post-shot metallography comparisons for spall analysis. No abstract prepared. Authors: Furnish, Michael David ; Bingert, John F. 1 ; Gray, George T., Jr. ...

  12. Measurement of the formation rate of muonic hydrogen molecules...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    K. M. ; Deutsch, J. ; Egger, J. ; Freedman, S. J. ; Ganzha, V. A. ; Gorringe, T. ; Gray, F. E. ; Hertzog, D. W. ; Hildebrandt, M. ; Kammel, P. ; Kiburg, B. ; Knaack, S. ; ...

  13. Measurement of Muon Capture on the Proton to 1% Precision and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    K. M. ; Deutsch, J. ; Egger, J. ; Freedman, S. J. ; Ganzha, V. A. ; Gorringe, T. ; Gray, F. E. ; Hertzog, D. W. ; Hildebrandt, M. ; Kammel, P. ; Kiburg, B. ; Knaack, S. ; ...

  14. Discovery of Type II Inhibitors of TGF[beta]-Activated Kinase...

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    Sara J. ; Sim, Taebo ; Cohen, Philip ; Sapkota, Gopal ; Westover, Kenneth D. ; Gray, Nathanael S. 1 ; DFCI) 2 more ; ActivX) 2 ; UTSMC) 2 ; Harvard-Med) 2 ; ...

  15. Comparison of line-imaging VISAR inferences of spalled sample...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    No abstract prepared. Authors: Furnish, Michael David ; Bingert, John F. ; Gray, George T., III Publication Date: 2010-06-01 OSTI Identifier: 1020531 Report Number(s): ...

  16. Educational Materials | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory Environmenta...

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    Research Snapshots The Savannah River Site National Environmental Research Park The History of Radioecology Research at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory Gray Foxes of the ...

  17. Fellow

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    in Technology Transfer. Gray joined TMS in 1986. He has * Served on the Programming, Titanium, and Mechanical Behavior committees * Completed two terms on the board of directors * ...

  18. The perfect atom sandwich requires an extra layer > Archived...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Titanium atoms (yellow) preferentially bond with oxygen atoms (gray) and sit at the center of a complete octahedron, making it energetically more favorable for titanium to switch ...

  19. CX-011534: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Grays River Confluence Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 11/08/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  20. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building, CustomOthers pending approval, Other EE, Food Service Equipment, Vending Machine Controls, Reflective Roofs, LED Lighting Grays Harbor PUD- Non-Residential Energy...

  1. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN (United States) ... Atomic Chemistry in Turbulent Media I: Effect of Atomic Cooling Gray, W J ; Scannapieco, E ...

  2. SREL Reprint #3351

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with sufficiently robust visitation rates to allow occupancy to be modeled (gray wolf Canis lupus, raccoon dog Nyctereutes procyonoides, Eurasian boar Sus scrofa, and ...

  3. Incomplete protection of the surface Weyl cones of the Kondo...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    G. A. ; Riseborough, P. S. ; Gray, A. X. ; Gulacsi, M. ; Durakiewicz, Tomasz ; Smith, J. L. Publication Date: 2015-08-20 OSTI Identifier: 1212325 GrantContract Number:...

  4. Incomplete protection of the surface Weyl cones of the Kondo...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Kapilevich, G. A. ; Riseborough, P. S. ; Gray, A. X. ; Gulacsi, M. ; Durakiewicz, Tomasz ; Smith, J. L. Publication Date: 2015-08-20 OSTI Identifier: 1212325 Grant...

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    (3) functions (3) heart (3) lithium 6 (3) lungs (3) mammary glands (3) neoplasms (3) ... Contralateral breast, heart, lungs, and thyroid were contoured. Thirty Gray was delivered ...

  6. Nanotubes open new path toward quantum information technologies

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    September 3, 2015 A solitary oxygen dopant (red sphere) covalently attached to the sidewall of the carbon nanotube (gray) can generate single photons (red) at room temperature when ...

  7. Tunable, superconducting, surface-emitting teraherz source (Patent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the grating period using a superimposed magnetic control field. Inventors: Welp, Ulrich 1 ; Koshelev, Alexei E. 2 ; Gray, Kenneth E. 3 ; Kwok, Wai-Kwong 3 ; ...

  8. Tunable, superconducting, surface-emitting teraherz source (Patent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the grating period using a superimposed magnetic control field. Inventors: Welp, Ulrich ; Koshelev, Alexei E. ; Gray, Kenneth E. ; Kwok, Wai-Kwong ; Vlasko-Vlasov, Vitalii ...

  9. Beam Schedule

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    Holiday Purple - MaintenanceStudies Day Gray - Shutdown ... Bulletins: We are currently operating the machine at 1.3 GeV with the Wiggler at 7 Tesla. ...

  10. Application for Presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-371 Northern...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PP-371 Comments from Lee Ann Moulder 082513 Comments from Pamela Martin 082513 Comments from Elisha Gray 082613 Comments from Larry Rappaport 082613 Comments from Michael ...

  11. Power Africa's Beyond the Grid Increasing Access through Small...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Acumen Fund Bamboo Finance BBOXX Capricorn Investment Group CrossBoundary d.light Embark Energy Energiya Global Fenix International Global Off-Grid Lighting Association Gray Ghost ...

  12. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Optical and infrared properties of glancing angle deposited nanostructured tungsten films Ungaro, Craig ; Shah, Ankit ; Kravchenko, Ivan I ; Hensley, Dale K ; Gray, Stephen K. ; ...

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

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    ... IQGAP Proteins Reveal an Atypical Phosphoinositide (aPI) Binding Domain with a Pseudo C2 Domain Fold Dixon, Miles J. ; Gray, Alexander ; Schenning, Martijn ; Agacan, Mark ; Tempel, ...

  14. Designing a Multi-Petabyte Database for LSST (Conference) | SciTech...

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    Authors: Becla, Jacek ; Hanushevsky, Andrew ; Nikolaev, Sergei ; Abdulla, Ghaleb ; Szalay, Alex ; Nieto-Santisteban, Maria ; Thakar, Ani ; Gray, Jim ; SLAC Publication Date: ...

  15. Volttron (TM) Transactive Control Node: Case Study

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Toolkit Framework Agent is the sequential point of control for Transactive Control functions. All other agents are event-based, asynchronous Gray boxes represent existing VOLTTRON ...

  16. Standing-wave excited soft x-ray photoemission microscopy: application...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Gray, Alexander ; Kronast, Florian ; Papp, Christian ; Yang, See-Hun ; Cramm, Stefan ; Krug, Ingo P. ; Salmassi, Farhad ; Gullikson, Eric M. ; Hilken, Dawn L. ; Anderson, ...

  17. Agenda: Rail, Barge, Truck Transportation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sean Craig, Manager - Fuel Supply, Dairyland Power Cooperative John Gray, Senior Vice President for Policy and Economics, the Association of American Railroads (AAR) Dave Wanner, ...

  18. ORSSAB News | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Two ORSSAB members were recognized for service at the board's January 13 meeting. More releases Stay Connected facebooklogofe.jpg YouTube-gray-shade.jpeg Additional Resources ...

  19. Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-371 Northern...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-371 Northern Pass Transmission: Comments from Elisha Gray Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-371 Northern ...

  20. OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Dissertations and theses may be considered "gray literature" since they are not typically published commercially. Theses and dissertations can be searched at SciTech Connect. More ...

  1. Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-371 Northern...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    No. PP-371 Northern Pass Transmission: Comments from Larry Rappaport Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-371 Northern Pass Transmission: Comments from Elisha Gray

  2. Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-371 Northern...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    No. PP-371 Northern Pass Transmission: Comments from Pamela Martin Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-371 Northern Pass Transmission: Comments from Elisha Gray

  3. University of Kansas | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Spencer, Ian Medina, Jennifer Ramos-Ortiz, Sasha Barnett, Alec Calder, David Chang, Eric Johnson, Sam Gray, Glenn Fuller, Khalid Bachkar. Photo from California Maritime Academy. ...

  4. Fenestration Software Tools | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Image: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 6 of 6 Radiance imaging of patterns of transmitted light -- Left: false color left. Right: gray scale. Image: Lawrence Berkeley ...

  5. Native Intern Profile Page

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The intern will work with the executive management teams to solve other problems as they arise. Morgan Gray Tribal A liation: Chickasaw Nation University: Oklahoma State University ...

  6. A White House Climate Action Champions Case Study INDEX Executive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... for residential solar. * San Francisco has many plans and projects to go from "gray-to-green" infrastructure including the SF Carbon Fund, the Green Connectors project, ...

  7. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... ; Lee, Sooheyong ; Walther, Michael ; Schulte-Schrepping, Horst ; Franz, Hermann ; Gray, Amber ; Sikorski, Marcin ; Fuoss, Paul H. ; Stephenson, G.Brian ; Robert, Aymeric ; et ...

  8. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Atomic Chemistry in Turbulent Media I: Effect of Atomic Cooling Gray, W J ; Scannapieco, E ... the Distances subgroup of the Cosmic Frontier Community Planning Study (Snowmass 2013). ...

  9. King County, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ecology Environment Inc EnerG2 Energy Priorities Frybrid General Biodiesel General Biodiesel Incorporated Go Green Save Fuel LLC Grays Harbor Ocean Energy Company GreenFoot...

  10. Cumberland County, Maine: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Maine Freeport, Maine Frye Island, Maine Gorham, Maine Gray, Maine Harpswell, Maine Harrison, Maine Little Falls-South Windham, Maine Long Island, Maine Naples, Maine New...

  11. Tunable catalytic properties of bi-functional mixed oxides in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K. ; Gray, Michel J. ; Job, Heather M. ; Smith, Colin D. ; Wang, Yong Publication Date: 2016-04-10 OSTI Identifier: 1252843 Report Number(s): ...

  12. Spontaneous Formation of Biomimetic, Nanoporous Membrane Channels...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Carbon nanotubes insert into artificial and active cell membranes, reproducing major ... Depiction of carbon nanotube (gray) inserted into a cell membrane, with a single strand of ...

  13. University of Alaska Fairbanks | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Henry Seel, Ramiro Parocua, Gerald Spencer, Ian Medina, Jennifer Ramos-Ortiz, Sasha Barnett, Alec Calder, David Chang, Eric Johnson, Sam Gray, Glenn Fuller, Khalid Bachkar....

  14. Theory & Modeling | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interactions with nanostructures Methods and software development, including multiscale approaches to assembly Group Lead Stephen Gray People Maria K. Y. Chan Larry Curtiss...

  15. DOE/EV-0005/13

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Argonne, IZlinois: 17. A. Wynveen, W. H. Smith, C. J. Mayes, P. C. Gray, D. W. Reilly. - ---ll-. .-l-.-.-l, . - .-.. iii CONTENTS Introduction ......

  16. SREL Reprint #3180

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rest of the eastern United States. Indicators of molecular diversity and tests for demographic expansion confirmed this division and suggested a very recent expansion of gray...

  17. Baseload Nitrate Salt Central Receiver Power Plant Design Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tilley, Drake; Kelly, Bruce; Burkholder, Frank

    2014-12-12

    The objectives of the work were to demonstrate that a 100 MWe central receiver plant, using nitrate salt as the receiver coolant, thermal storage medium, and heat transport fluid in the steam generator, can 1) operate, at full load, for 6,400 hours each year using only solar energy, and 2) satisfy the DOE levelized energy cost goal of $0.09/kWhe (real 2009 $). To achieve these objectives the work incorporated a large range of tasks relating to many different aspects of a molten salt tower plant. The first Phase of the project focused on developing a baseline design for a Molten Salt Tower and validating areas for improvement. Tasks included a market study, receiver design, heat exchanger design, preliminary heliostat design, solar field optimization, baseline system design including PFDs and P&IDs and detailed cost estimate. The baseline plant met the initial goal of less than $0.14/kWhe, and reinforced the need to reduce costs in several key areas to reach the overall $0.09/kWhe goal. The major improvements identified from Phase I were: 1) higher temperature salt to improve cycle efficiency and reduce storage requirements, 2) an improved receiver coating to increase the efficiency of the receiver, 3) a large receiver design to maximize storage and meet the baseload hours objective, and 4) lower cost heliostat field. The second Phase of the project looked at advancing the baseline tower with the identified improvements and included key prototypes. To validate increasing the standard solar salt temperature to 600 °C a dynamic test was conducted at Sandia. The results ultimately proved the hypothesis incorrect and showed high oxide production and corrosion rates. The results lead to further testing of systems to mitigate the oxide production to be able to increase the salt temperature for a commercial plant. Foster Wheeler worked on the receiver design in both Phase I and Phase II looking at both design and lowering costs utilizing commercial fossil boiler

  18. Participants

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Participants Participants Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences Research A DOE Technical Program Review March 19-20, 2013 Front row, from left: C.S. Chang, Zhihong Lin, Stephane Ethier, Paul Bonoli, Homa Karimabadi, Sean Finnegan, Alex Friedman, Alice Koniges, Scott Parker, Jeff Candy, John Mandrekas, Dave Goodwin. Back row, from left: Steven Jardin, Carl Sovinec, Sudip Dosanjh, Kai Germaschewski, Slava Lukin, Brian Wirth, Harvey Wasserman, Frank Tsung, Chuang

  19. Karimabadi-nersc.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    General Plasma Science Through Petascale Particle Simulations 1 Contributors: V. Roytershteyn, SciberQuest Y. Omelchenko, H.X. Vu, UCSD W. Daughton, LANL M. Tatineni and A. Majumdar, SDSC B. Loring, Prabhat, S. Byna, O. Ruebel, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. Homa Karimabadi, UCSD Kai Germaschewski, UNH Large Scale Production Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Science Research March 19-20, 2013, Rockville, MD Research Areas 2 Computer P erformance Name FLOPS yo#aFLOPS 10 24

  20. Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuknecht, Nate; White, David; Hoste, Graeme

    2014-09-11

    The SkyTrough DSP will advance the state-of-the-art in parabolic troughs for utility applications, with a larger aperture, higher operating temperature, and lower cost. The goal of this project was to develop a parabolic trough collector that enables solar electricity generation in the 2020 marketplace for a 216MWe nameplate baseload power plant. This plant requires an LCOE of 9¢/kWhe, given a capacity factor of 75%, a fossil fuel limit of 15%, a fossil fuel cost of $6.75/MMBtu, $25.00/kWht thermal storage cost, and a domestic installation corresponding to Daggett, CA. The result of our optimization was a trough design of larger aperture and operating temperature than has been fielded in large, utility scale parabolic trough applications: 7.6m width x 150m SCA length (1,118m2 aperture), with four 90mm diameter × 4.7m receivers per mirror module and an operating temperature of 500°C. The results from physical modeling in the System Advisory Model indicate that, for a capacity factor of 75%: The LCOE will be 8.87¢/kWhe. SkyFuel examined the design of almost every parabolic trough component from a perspective of load and performance at aperture areas from 500 to 2,900m2. Aperture-dependent design was combined with fixed quotations for similar parts from the commercialized SkyTrough product, and established an installed cost of $130/m2 in 2020. This project was conducted in two phases. Phase I was a preliminary design, culminating in an optimum trough size and further improvement of an advanced polymeric reflective material. This phase was completed in October of 2011. Phase II has been the detailed engineering design and component testing, which culminated in the fabrication and testing of a single mirror module. Phase II is complete, and this document presents a summary of the comprehensive work.

  1. SINGLE-FACED GRAYQB{trademark} - A RADIATION MAPPING DEVICE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayer, J.; Farfan, E.; Immel, D.; Phillips, M.; Bobbitt, J.; Plummer, J.

    2013-12-12

    GrayQb{trademark} is a novel technology that has the potential to characterize radioactively contaminated areas such as hot cells, gloveboxes, small and large rooms, hallways, and waste tanks. The goal of GrayQb{trademark} is to speed the process of decontaminating these areas, which reduces worker exposures and promotes ALARA considerations. The device employs Phosphorous Storage Plate (PSP) technology as its primary detector material. PSPs, commonly used for medical applications and non-destructive testing, can be read using a commercially available scanner. The goal of GrayQb{trademark} technology is to locate, quantify, and identify the sources of contamination. The purpose of the work documented in this report was to better characterize the performance of GrayQb{trademark} in its ability to present overlay images of the PSP image and the associated visual image of the location being surveyed. The results presented in this report are overlay images identifying the location of hot spots in both controlled and field environments. The GrayQb{trademark} technology has been mainly tested in a controlled environment with known distances and source characteristics such as specific known radionuclides, dose rates, and strength. The original concept for the GrayQb{trademark} device involved utilizing the six faces of a cube configuration and was designed to be positioned in the center of a contaminated area for 3D mapping. A smaller single-faced GrayQb{trademark}, dubbed GrayQb SF, was designed for the purpose of conducting the characterization testing documented in this report. This lighter 2D version is ideal for applications where entry ports are too small for a deployment of the original GrayQb™ version or where only a single surface is of interest. The shape, size, and weight of these two designs have been carefully modeled to account for most limitations encountered in hot cells, gloveboxes, and contaminated areas. GrayQb{trademark} and GrayQb{trademark} SF

  2. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Modeling two-fluid-phase flow and species transport in porous media Rybak, I. V. ; Gray, W. G. ; Miller, C. T. February 2015 , Elsevier Thermal and Chemical Evolution of Collapsing ...

  3. CX-005680: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Olympia-South Elma #1 Upgrade (21/10 and 21/11) 2011CX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 04/20/2011Location(s): Grays Harbor County, WashingtonOffice(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  4. Cathodic Arc Plasma Deposition

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... CrC silver- gray 2300 650 corrosion and oxidation resistance; Al and Mg die casting ZrN ... and K. G. Mller, "The anodic vacuum arc and its application to coatings," J. Vac. ...

  5. BPA-2015-00030-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Satsop Business Park, Grays Harbor Due Date Date: Friday, October 03, 2014 11:08:15 A1 Importance: High 11032014 -- Tracking Number: Kim and Wendy, BPA201 5-00030-F Okay....

  6. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Optically Directed Assembly of Continuous Mesoscale Filaments Bahns J T Sankaranarayanan S K R S Gray S K Chen L Not Available American Physical Society None USDOE United States...

  7. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ewart, Paul (1) Filbert, Jr., Robert B. (1) Fish, M. A. (1) Fu, Huiyu (1) Gray, Gordon (1) ... Development of bottom-emitting 1300 nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers. Fish, M. ...

  8. Center for Materials at Irradiation and Mechanical Extremes:...

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    I. J. Beyerlein, F. L. Addessio, B. H. Sencer, C.P. Trujillo, E. K. Cerreta, and G. T. Gray III, "Orientation Dependence of Shock Induced Twinning and Substructures in a Copper...

  9. ARM - Data Announcements Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    time of day from the SASHE at the AMF1 Cape Cod site. The plot shows a cloudy morning (gray symbols) followed by cloud-free conditions (colored symbols in a "rainbow" pattern)...

  10. Audubon County, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Subtype A. Places in Audubon County, Iowa Audubon, Iowa Brayton, Iowa Exira, Iowa Gray, Iowa Kimballton, Iowa Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleAudubonC...

  11. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    released on Tuesday, April 4, 2007, in a report by Philip J. Klotzbach and William M. Gray titled Extended Range Forecast of Atlantic Seasonal Hurricane Activity and U.S....

  12. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Investigation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (CPI) it is now possible to capture ice crystal images with 2.3 m resolution and 256 gray scales of illumination, providing an unprecedented wealth of information to utilize in...

  13. Microsoft Word - Kir.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in yellow merged with KirBac1.1 transmembrane region's backbone and surface in gray. The gate forming tip of the G- loop, amino acids 304-306, is highlighted in red....

  14. BPA-2016-00103-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IN FORMATION ACT PROGRAM In reply refer to: FOIA BPA-2016-00103-F Andrew Zorn DiGioia Gray & Associates 570 Beatty Road Monroeville, P A 15229 Mr. Zorn: We have received your...

  15. Geek-Up[09.03.10] -- Innovative Silicon Wafers, Real-Time Power...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    technique that can put a trillion holes in a silicon wafer the size of a compact disk. These tiny holes make the silver-gray silicon almost pure black and able to absorb nearly ...

  16. Discovery of a BTK/MNK dual inhibitor for lymphoma and leukemia...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    M. ; Adamia, S. ; Stone, R. M. ; Galinsky, I. A. ; Wang, X. ; Yang, G. ; Griffin, J. D. ; Brown, J. R. ; Eck, M. J. ; Liu, J. ; Gray, N. S. ; Liu, Q. 1 ; DFCI) 2 ; Chinese Aca. ...

  17. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Mesaba Energy Project: Clean Coal Power Initiative, Round 2","Stone, Richard; Gray, Gordon; Evans, Robert","2014-07-31T04:00:00Z",1093542,"10.21721093542","None","FC26-06NT423...

  18. The Mesaba Energy Project: Clean Coal Power Initiative, Round...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Mesaba Energy Project: Clean Coal Power Initiative, Round 2 Stone, Richard; Gray, Gordon; Evans, Robert 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS The Mesaba Energy...

  19. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Mesaba Energy Project Clean Coal Power Initiative Round Stone Richard Gray Gordon Evans Robert COAL LIGNITE AND PEAT FOSSIL FUELED POWER PLANTS The Mesaba Energy Project is a...

  20. 2-D image segmentation using minimum spanning trees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Y.; Uberbacher, E.C.

    1995-09-01

    This paper presents a new algorithm for partitioning a gray-level image into connected homogeneous regions. The novelty of this algorithm lies in the fact that by constructing a minimum spanning tree representation of a gray-level image, it reduces a region partitioning problem to a minimum spanning tree partitioning problem, and hence reduces the computational complexity of the region partitioning problem. The tree-partitioning algorithm, in essence, partitions a minimum spanning tree into subtrees, representing different homogeneous regions, by minimizing the sum of variations of gray levels over all subtrees under the constraints that each subtree should have at least a specified number of nodes, and two adjacent subtrees should have significantly different average gray-levels. Two (faster) heuristic implementations are also given for large-scale region partitioning problems. Test results have shown that the segmentation results are satisfactory and insensitive to noise.

  1. Videos | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Motion Google+ STEM Hangout Webcast of the Energy Literate Citizenry from K-to-Gray What's Your Energy Pledge? Conversation on the Future of the Wind Industry Webcast of...

  2. DOE Tour of Zero: The Passive House #1 at Columbia Station by...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    42 homes in a micro-community of ultra-modern, energy-efficient homes built on an urban gray-field site in South Seattle. 6 of 13 The single ultra-efficient ductless heat pump...

  3. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tom Stoffel, Mary Anderberg, Pamela Gray-Hann National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado Conclusions Cloud Free Over Study Area GOES-E Images 2 January 2006 11:15 CST ...

  4. Tal Heilpern | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tal Heilpern Postdoctoral Appointee (Supervisor, Stephen Gray) Telephone 630.252.5884 Fax 630.252.4646 E-mail theilpern@anl.gov CV/Resume PDF icon Heilpern, Tal - Bio

  5. Microsoft Word - goldnano.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (gold atoms depicted as yellow spheres, p-MBA shown as framework and small spheres sulfur in cyan, carbon in gray and oxygen in red). Structure of a Thiol Monolayer-Protected Gold ...

  6. Microsoft PowerPoint - SW Fed Hydro Presentation 2015.ppt [Read...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ouachita River System LAKE OUACHITA LAKE HAMITLON LAKE CATHERINE Blakely Mountain Dam Carpenter Dam Remmel Dam OUACHITA RIVER CITY OF HOT SPRINGS DeGray Lake & Dam 4 Who Controls ...

  7. Microsoft PowerPoint - Entergy-Hydro-Operations_Smethers [Compatibilit...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ouachita River System LAKE OUACHITA CITY OF HOT SPRINGS LAKE CATHERINE Blakely Mountain Dam LAKE HAMITLON Carpenter Dam Remmel Dam 1 OUACHITA RIVER DeGray Lake & Dam Blakely Mtn. ...

  8. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Optically Directed Assembly of Continuous Mesoscale Filaments","Bahns, J. T.; Sankaranarayanan, S. K. R. S.; Gray, S. K.; Chen, L.","2011-02-01T05:00:00Z",1099937,"10.1103...

  9. CX-013790: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Aberdeen Substation (Grays Harbor PUD) Tree Clearing CX(s) Applied: B1.32Date: 06/24/2015 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  10. schedule6_2010.xls

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... 2010 US ERCOT - AC 300-399 3 2013 Gray Tesla 218 OH CTT 100 13TPIT005Planned ... US ERCOT - AC 300-399 9 2013 Silverton Tesla 170 OH CTT 100 13TPIT005Planned ...

  11. ,"Table 6. Proposed High-voltage Transmission Line Additions...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...COT","-","AC","300-399",,,3,2013,"Gray"," Tesla",218,"OH",,,..."CTT",,100,"13TPIT0051",..."-","AC","300-399",,,9,2013,"Silverton"," Tesla",170,"OH",,,..."CTT",,100,"13TPIT0055",...

  12. Packed-Bed Reactor Study of NETL Sample 196c for the Removal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Hoffman, James S. ; Hammache, Sonia ; Gray, McMahan L. ; Fauth Daniel J. ; Pennline, Henry W. Publication Date: 2012-04-24 OSTI Identifier: 1044172 Report Number(s): ...

  13. Parametric study for an immobilized amine sorbent in a regenerative...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Hoffman, James S. ; Hammache, Sonia ; Gray, McMahan L. ; Fauth, Daniel J. ; Pennline, Henry W. Publication Date: 2014-10-01 OSTI Identifier: 1168807 Report Number(s): ...

  14. Layered solid sorbents for carbon dioxide capture (Patent) |...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Li, Bingyun ; Jiang, Bingbing ; Gray, McMahan L ; Fauth, Daniel J ; Pennline, Henry W ; Richards, George A Publication Date: 2014-11-18 OSTI Identifier: 1163996 Report ...

  15. Regenerable sorbent technique for capturing CO.sub.2 using immobilized...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Pennline, Henry W ; Hoffman, James S ; Gray, McMahan L ; Fauth, Daniel J ; Resnik, Kevin P Publication Date: 2013-08-06 OSTI Identifier: 1089416 Report Number(s): ...

  16. Comprehensive Study of the Impact of Steam on Polyethyleneimine...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Hammache, Sonia ; Hoffman, James S. ; Gray, McMahan L. ; Fauth, Daniel J ; Howard, Bret H. ; Pennline, Henry W. Publication Date: 2013-11-01 OSTI Identifier: 1127155 ...

  17. Design Competitions | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    words Logo consisting of the words 'Next Generation Luminaires,' with each word on its own line. 'Next' and 'Generation' are in black and 'Luminaires' is in gray uppercase letters. ...

  18. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Incomplete protection of the surface Weyl cones of the Kondo insulator SmB 6 : Spin exciton scattering Kapilevich, G. A. ; Riseborough, P. S. ; Gray, A. X. ; Gulacsi, M. ; ...

  19. Printing and Mail Managers Exchange Forum Teleconference

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Use of special type fonts that reduce ink use by inserting white dots into the individual characters. Gives the appearance of screened (gray-scale, dot-pattern) letters instead of ...

  20. Fact #672: April 25, 2011 Freight Gateways in the U.S. | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The top 25 places (in terms of freight value) that freight is shipped into and out of the U.S. are listed on the map below. Import values are shown by the gray bar, while export ...

  1. Northern New Mexico Citizens' Advisory Board | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NNMCAB Upcoming Events calendar icon Calendar of Events Stay Connected fb.png googleplusicon.png YouTube-gray-shade.jpeg Northern New Mexico Citizens Advisory Board NNMCAB Logo ...

  2. NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lori Gray, 15013 Denver West Parkway, Golden, CO 80401, by fax to 720-356-1350, or by email to gonepa@ee.doe.gov. In addition, interested persons are invited to attend an ...

  3. Monitoring bat and bird fatalities at the Casselman Wind Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tom Gray (AWEA), Alex Hoar (USFWS), Bob Thresher (NREL), and Merlin Tuttle (BCI) provided oversight for the BWEC the project. We wish to thank the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, ...

  4. Charging Your Plug-in Electric Vehicle at Home | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... which compares the power and energy used to charge a PEV with a Level 2 charger (in red) compared to the total power and energy consumed by other household appliances (in gray). ...

  5. US India Joint Center for Building Energy Research and Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Natural exposure sites (planned) 10 Cool roof test chambers in Bangalore showed 15% AC energy savings in July 2015 gray roof (albedo 0.30) white roof (albedo 0.58) 11 Indian cool ...

  6. January 2013 Most Viewed Documents for National Defense | OSTI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    separations to reconstitution - a short history of Plutonium in the U.S. and Russia Gray, L W Condensation induced water hammer safety Gintner, M.A. Direct calibration of the ...

  7. Secretary Bodman to Lead Presidential Delegation to Baku, Azerbaijan...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and the U.S. delegation - including U.S. Special Envoy for Eurasian Energy C. Boyden Gray and U.S. Ambassador to Baku Anne Derse - will take part in a number of bilateral ...

  8. January 2013 Most Viewed Documents for National Defense | OSTI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    - a short history of Plutonium in the U.S. and Russia Gray, L W Condensation induced water hammer safety Gintner, M.A. Direct calibration of the yield of nuclear explosion ...

  9. A novel technique for the production of cool colored concrete...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The first layer is a titanium dioxide rutile white basecoat that increases the solar reflectance of a gray-cement concrete tile from 0.18 to 0.79, and that of a shingle surfaced ...

  10. fe0013998-UWashington | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Langseth in 2012, the JohnsonSolomon heat flow and fluid flux experiment on the RV Atlantis off Grays Canyon in August 2013, and multiple ocean bottom seismic deployments in ...

  11. Main Title 32pt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ryan Harvey; http:en.wikipedia.orgwikiFile:MaleOliveBaboon2.jpg Gray wolf, canis lupus, courtesy of Chris Muiden. http:en.wikipedia.orgwikiFile:Canislupus265b.jpg Red...

  12. Microsoft Word - L3-RTM.PRT.P5.04.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the helium-filled gap, the gray indicates zircalloy cladding, and the blue indicates water. This is because the MoC mesh relies on the same Cartesian mesh as the S N solution...

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    L" Name Name ORCID Search Authors Type: All BookMonograph ConferenceEvent Journal ... Search for: All records CreatorsAuthors contains: "Gray, W L" Sort by Relevance Sort ...

  14. G. L. Tingey

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    G. L. Tingey E. D. f4cClanahan M. A. Bayne W. J. Gray January 1980 SOLID STATE CONTAINMENT OF NOBLE GASES I f 4 SPUTTER DEPOSITED METALS AND L O W DENSITY GLASSES To be presented a ...

  15. Microsoft PowerPoint - Vicksburg District Federal Power Projects...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rewind Unit 2 l l First Coil Samples DeGray Hydro l l l Replace Voltage Regulators Blakely Mountain Water Blakely Mountain Water * Supply Storage Reallocation - MAWA Supply ...

  16. TRUTeamWorks 05-13-04

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... of the four catego- ries, with WIPP Silver taking home the honors for best overall team. ... Mario Carrasco (WTS) - May 8 Andy Stanley (CTAC) - May 9 John Gray (CTAC) - May 23 Dondee ...

  17. B

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... N. Holmgren Phacelia beatleyae Reveal and Constance Phacelia filiae N.D. Atwood, F.J. Smith and T.A. Knight Phacelia mustelina Coville Phacelia parishii Gray Primary Highway (with ...

  18. Pantex Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    TX Collingsworth County, TX Crosby County, TX Dallam County, TX Dawson County, TX Deaf Smith County, TX Donley County, TX Floyd County, TX Gaines County, TX Garza County, TX Gray ...

  19. Climate Change Adaptation for an At Risk Community – Shaktoolik Alaska

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Norton Sound village of Shaktoolik faces serious threats of erosion and flooding resulting from climate change.  University of Alaska Sea Grant agent Terry Johnson and consultant Glenn Gray...

  20. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Gray, Leonard J (23) Nintcheu Fata, Sylvain (6) Salvadori, Alberto (5) Mantic, Vladislav (4) Paris, Federico (4) Phan, Anh-Vu (4) Abd El Azzim Mohamed, Omar M (3) Garzon, Maria (3) ...

  1. Microsoft Word - S06584StSoil.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... In areas measurements exceeded background, some soils were stained (yellow or yellow-green, and in some cases gray), but some were not. U.S. Department of Energy Radiological ...

  2. Microsoft Word - S0162200_VariationHydraulicConductivity-PRB...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... row 4: ZVI row 5: ZVI U.S. Department of Energy Variation in Hydraulic Conductivity Over ... PRB Wells Redupgradient alluvium (row 1) Greengravel + zvi (row 2 and 3) Gray ZVI (row ...

  3. 1980's | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    James J. Duderstadt Helen T. Edwards Joe W. Gray C. Bradley Moore Gustavus J. Simmons James L. Smith 1985 Anthony P. Malinauskas William H. Miller David R. Nygren Gordon C. Osbourn ...

  4. 9800 South Cass Avenue

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... H. Smith, C. B. Mayes, P. C. Gray, D. W . Reilly. SMALL ANIMAL FACILITY As a .participant in the Department of Energy's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, the Argonne ...

  5. Secretary Moniz awards Hutcheon memorial nonproliferation fellowship to

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Thomas Gray | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Secretary Moniz awards Hutcheon memorial nonproliferation fellowship to Thomas Gray Tuesday, February 9, 2016 - 12:00am NNSA Blog Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz (second from bottom left, clockwise) and Anne Harrington, NNSA deputy administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (sitting next to Moniz), discuss Ian Hutcheon's legacy with his wife Nancy (across from Harrington) and daughter Dana Hutcheon Gordon. Energy Secretary

  6. W&M Student Elected to Represent American Physical Society's Graduate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Student Forum | Jefferson Lab W&M Student Elected to Represent American Physical Society's Graduate Student Forum W&M Student Elected to Represent American Physical Society's Graduate Student Forum V Gray Valerie Gray, a graduate student at The College of William and Mary and a researcher at the Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, was chosen this year by American Physical Society members as chair-elect for the APS Forum on Graduate Student Affairs.

  7. TITLE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    CULTURAL RESOURCES STUDY BACKQROUND RESEARCH REPORT Off-NfS Cukural Rasowcmr Studks: Background Research for Project Shot11 Prepared by Maureen King Alvin R. McLane and William Gray Johnson MAY 1993 DESERT RESEARCH INSTITUTE CULTURAL RESOURCES STUDY BACKGROUND RESEARCH REPORT Off-NTS Cultural Resources Studies: Background Research for Project Shoal Prepared by Maureen King Alvin R. McLane and William Gray Johnson Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Field Office Las Vegas, Nevada

  8. High-Resolution Simulation for Climate Means, Variability, and Extreme |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne Leadership Computing Facility A plot of precipitable water (gray scale) and precipitation rate (colors) in a simulation of the Earth's atmosphere. A plot of precipitable water (gray scale) and precipitation rate (colors) in a simulation of the Earth's atmosphere using The Community Earth System Model version 1.2. The atmosphere component used the spectral element dynamical core running on a cubed-sphere grid with an average horizontal resolution of 1/8 degree (13km). At this

  9. Numerical study of radiation effect on the municipal solid waste combustion characteristics inside an incinerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jingfu Xue, Yanqing; Zhang, Xinxin; Shu, Xinran

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • A 3-D model for the MSW incinerator with preheated air was developed. • Gas radiative properties were obtained from a statistical narrow-band model. • Non-gray body radiation model can provide more accurate simulation results. - Abstract: Due to its advantages of high degree volume reduction, relatively stable residue, and energy reclamation, incineration becomes one of the best choices for Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) disposal. However, detailed measurements of temperature and gas species inside a furnace are difficulty by conventional experimental techniques. Therefore, numerical simulation of MSW incineration in the packed bed and gas flow field was applied. In this work, a three dimensional (3-D) model of incinerator system, including flow, heat transfer, detailed chemical mechanisms, and non-gray gas models, was developed. Radiation from the furnace wall and the flame formed above the bed is of importance for drying and igniting the waste. The preheated air with high temperature is used for the MSW combustion. Under the conditions of high temperature and high pressure, MSW combustion produces a variety of radiating gases. The wavelength-depend radiative properties of flame adopted in non-gray radiation model were obtained from a statistical narrow-band model. The influence of radiative heat transfer on temperature, flow field is researched by adiabatic model (without considering radiation), gray radiation model, and non-gray radiation model. The simulation results show that taking into account the non-gray radiation is essential.

  10. HPCforPIC-10

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A lice K oniges, L awrence B erkeley N ational L aboratory, aekoniges@lbl.gov Consideration o f A synchronous A lgorithms f or P article---Grid S imulations Alice K oniges, 1 J ean---Luc V ay, 1 A lex F riedman, 2 Hartmut K aiser, 3 a nd T homas S terling 4 1 Lawrence B erkeley N ational L aboratory, 2 Lawrence L ivermore N ational Laboratory, 3 Louisiana S tate U niversity, a nd 4 Indiana U niversity Fundamental t o e fficient c omputation a t t he e xascale w ill b e m ethods f or

  11. Development of Molten-Salt Heat Transfer Fluid Technology for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants - Public Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grogan, Dylan C. P.

    2013-08-15

    Executive Summary This Final Report for the "Development of Molten-Salt Heat Transfer Fluid (HTF) Technology for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants” describes the overall project accomplishments, results and conclusions. Phase 1 analyzed the feasibility, cost and performance of a parabolic trough solar power plant with a molten salt heat transfer fluid (HTF); researched and/or developed feasible component options, detailed cost estimates and workable operating procedures; and developed hourly performance models. As a result, a molten salt plant with 6 hours of storage was shown to reduce Thermal Energy Storage (TES) cost by 43.2%, solar field cost by 14.8%, and levelized cost of energy (LCOE) by 9.8% - 14.5% relative to a similar state-of-the-art baseline plant. The LCOE savings range met the project’s Go/No Go criteria of 10% LCOE reduction. Another primary focus of Phase 1 and 2 was risk mitigation. The large risk areas associated with a molten salt parabolic trough plant were addressed in both Phases, such as; HTF freeze prevention and recovery, collector components and piping connections, and complex component interactions. Phase 2 analyzed in more detail the technical and economic feasibility of a 140 MWe,gross molten-salt CSP plant with 6 hours of TES. Phase 2 accomplishments included developing technical solutions to the above mentioned risk areas, such as freeze protection/recovery, corrosion effects of applicable molten salts, collector design improvements for molten salt, and developing plant operating strategies for maximized plant performance and freeze risk mitigation. Phase 2 accomplishments also included developing and thoroughly analyzing a molten salt, Parabolic Trough power plant performance model, in order to achieve the project cost and performance targets. The plant performance model and an extensive basic Engineering, Procurement, and Construction (EPC) quote were used to calculate a real levelized cost of energy (LCOE) of 11.50¢/kWhe

  12. Oxygen-blown gasification combined cycle: Carbon dioxide recovery, transport, and disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doctor, R.D.; Molburg, J.C.; Thimmapuram, P.R.

    1996-12-31

    This project emphasizes CO2-capture technologies combined with integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power systems, CO2 transportation, and options for the long-term sequestration Of CO2. The intent is to quantify the CO2 budget, or an ``equivalent CO2`` budget, associated with each of the individual energy-cycle steps, in addition to process design capital and operating costs. The base case is a 458-MW (gross generation) IGCC system that uses an oxygen-blown Kellogg-Rust-Westinghouse (KRW) agglomerating fluidized-bed gasifier, bituminous coal feed, and low-pressure glycol sulfur removal, followed by Claus/SCOT treatment, to produce a saleable product. Mining, feed preparation, and conversion result in a net electric power production for the entire energy cycle of 411 MW, with a CO2 release rate of 0.801 kg/kV-Whe. For comparison, in two cases, the gasifier output was taken through water-gas shift and then to low-pressure glycol H2S recovery, followed by either low-pressure glycol or membrane CO2 recovery and then by a combustion turbine being fed a high-hydrogen-content fuel. Two additional cases employed chilled methanol for H2S recovery and a fuel cell as the topping cycle, with no shift stages. From the IGCC plant, a 500-km pipeline takes the CO2 to geological sequestering. For the optimal CO2 recovery case, the net electric power production was reduced by 37.6 MW from the base case, with a CO2 release rate of 0.277 kg/kWhe (when makeup power was considered). In a comparison of air-blown and oxygen-blown CO2-release base cases, the cost of electricity for the air-blown IGCC was 56.86 mills/kWh, while the cost for oxygen-blown IGCC was 58.29 mills/kWh. For the optimal cases employing glycol CO2 recovery, there was no clear advantage; the cost for air-blown IGCC was 95.48 mills/kWh, and the cost for the oxygen-blown IGCC was slightly lower, at 94.55 mills/kWh.

  13. Automatic anatomically selective image enhancement in digital chest radiography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sezan, M.I. ); Minerbo, G.N. ); Schaetzing, R. )

    1989-06-01

    The authors develop a technique for automatic anatomically selective enhancement of digital chest radiographs. Anatomically selective enhancement is motivated by the desire to simultaneously meet the different enhancement requirements of the lung field and the mediastinum. A recent peak detection algorithm and a set of rules are applied to the image histogram to determine automatically a gray-level threshold between the lung field and mediastinum. The gray-level threshold facilitates anatomically selective gray-scale modification and/or unsharp masking. Further, in an attempt to suppress possible white-band or black-band artifacts due to unsharp masking at sharp edges, local-contrast adaptivity is incorporated into anatomically selective unsharp masking by designing an anatomy-sensitive emphasis parameter which varies asymmetrically with positive and negative values of the local image contrast.

  14. ARM - Blog Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 25, 2016 [Blog, Field Notes, HI-SCALE] HI-SCALE Day 1: Calm Before the Storm Bookmark and Share Editor's note: Siegfried Schobesberger, a postdoctoral researcher at University of Washington, sent this update. A large hangar at Bartlesville Municipal Airport is the home of the G-1 aircraft for the next 4 weeks. The gray containers right next to it provide extra office space. A large hangar at Bartlesville Municipal Airport is the home of the G-1 aircraft for the next 4 weeks. The gray

  15. Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Project Title: Program or Program Office:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    A radiation mapping dosimeter will be placed in a shielded cell in 773-A E-wing Shielded Cell Operations (SCO) facility for in-cell exposure to ambient radiation. Either the RadBall or GrayQb technologies will be selected for deployment; details of these two radiation mapping technologies are discussed below. --The RadBall consists of an inner spherical core made of a radiation sensitive polymer and an outer tungsten based collimation sheath. --The GrayQb is a alternate type of radiation mapping

  16. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Metal-Organic Frameworks with Precisely Designed Interior for Carbon Dioxide Capture in the Presence of Water (a) Schematic representation of the IRMOF-74-III pore as functionalized with primary amines (-CH 2 NH 2 ) and its selective CO 2 capture in the presence of water. (b) Breakthrough curves for IRMOF-74-III-CH 3 under dry conditions (gray empty markers) and wet conditions (gray filled markers), and for IRMOF-74-III-CH 2 NH 2 under dry conditions (red empty markers) and in the presence of

  17. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In s itu Visualiza(on w ith t he S ierra Simula(on F ramework U sing ParaView C atalyst Jeff M auldin, T homas O tahal, D avid K arelitz, Alan S coF, W arren H unt, N athan F abian What i s I n s itu Visualiza(on? § A t ypical v isualiza(on w orkflow: § Run s imula(on a nd o utput t he f ull 3 d m esh d ata a t s ome s parse (me i nterval. § ASer s imula(on c ompletes, l oad o utput d ata i nto a v isualiza(on tool s uch a s P araView, E nSight, V isIt, e tc. § In s itu

  18. tfm_BESPowerpoint.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sampling d iffusive d ynamics o n l ong 0 mescales, and s imula0ng t he c oupled dynamics o f e lectrons a nd n uclei Thomas M iller Caltech NERSC BES Requirements for 2017 October 8-9, 2013 Gaithersburg, MD 1. P roject D escrip0on T homas F . M iller / C altech * Summarize y our p roject(s) a nd i ts s cien0fic o bjec0ves through 2 017 * Our p resent f ocus i s: * To u nderstand r eac0ve t unneling i n e nzyme---catalyzed hydrogen---transfer, e lectron---transfer, a nd p roton---coupled

  19. Best Management Practice #14: Alternative Water Sources

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Many federal facilities may have water uses that can be met with non-potable water from alternative water sources. Potentially available alternative water sources for Federal sources include municipal-supplied reclaimed water, treated gray water from on-site sanitary sources, and storm water.

  20. Berkeley Lab Scientist Co-Leads Breast Cancer Dream Team

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, Joe

    2009-01-01

    An $16.5 million, three-year grant to develop new and more effective therapies to fight breast cancer was awarded today to a multi-institutional Dream Team of scientists and clinicians that is co-led by Joe Gray, a renowned cancer researcher with the U.S. Department of Energys Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/

  1. Events Calendar | ANSER Center | Argonne-Northwestern National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Th F Sa 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 Calendar cell color gray: One or more event(s) occur(s) on this day Keyword EVENTS IN February...

  2. Events Calendar | ANSER Center | Argonne-Northwestern National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Calendar cell color gray: One or more event(s) occur(s) on this day Keyword EVENTS IN March 2016 Back to the...

  3. Events Calendar | ANSER Center | Argonne-Northwestern National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Calendar cell color gray: One or more event(s) occur(s) on this day Keyword EVENTS IN December 2015 Back to the...

  4. Events Calendar | ANSER Center | Argonne-Northwestern National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sa 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Calendar cell color gray: One or more event(s) occur(s) on this day Keyword EVENTS IN January...

  5. Events Calendar | ANSER Center | Argonne-Northwestern National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Calendar cell color gray: One or more event(s) occur(s) on this day Keyword EVENTS ON December 3, 2015 Show all...

  6. Events Calendar | ANSER Center | Argonne-Northwestern National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Calendar cell color gray: One or more event(s) occur(s) on this day Keyword EVENTS IN November 2015 Back to the...

  7. Berkeley Lab Scientist Co-Leads Breast Cancer Dream Team

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Gray, Joe

    2013-05-29

    An $16.5 million, three-year grant to develop new and more effective therapies to fight breast cancer was awarded today to a multi-institutional Dream Team of scientists and clinicians that is co-led by Joe Gray, a renowned cancer researcher with the U.S. Department of Energys Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/

  8. CX-003624: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Replacement of Twenty 22-L Structures on the Satsop-Aberdeen Number 2 230-kilovolt Transmission LineCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 08/12/2010Location(s): Gray's Harbor County, WashingtonOffice(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  9. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Atomic scale studies of LaSr ordering in colossal magnetoresistant La2-2xSr1+2xMn2O7 single crystals Roldan Gutierrez, Manuel A ; Oxley, Mark P. ; Li, Q A ; Zheng, H ; Gray, ...

  10. S E\\

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... NO. 202516-3 BLUE (DAP) 111-20854 202516-1 BLACK (PHENOLIC) 204186-5 I 111r20853-1 I GRAY (DAP) 204186-1 BLACK (PHENOLIC) 200833-2 STAINLESS STEEL 203964-5 STAINLESS STEEL ...

  11. Method for uniformly distributing carbon flakes in a positive electrode, the electrode made thereby and compositions. [Patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mrazek, F.C.; Smaga, J.A.; Battles, J.E.

    1981-01-19

    A positive electrode for a secondary electrochemical cell is described wherein an electrically conductive current collector is in electrical contact with a particulate mixture of gray cast iron and an alkali metal sulfide and an electrolyte including alkali metal halides or alkaline earth metal halides. Also present may be a transition metal sulfide and graphite flakes from the conversion of gray cast iron to iron sulfide. Also disclosed is a method of distributing carbon flakes in a cell wherein there is formed an electrochemical cell of a positive electrode structure of the type described and a suitable electrolyte and a second electrode containing a material capable of alloying with alkali metal ions. The cell is connected to a source of electrical potential to electrochemically convert gray cast iron to an iron sulfide and uniformly to distribute carbon flakes formerly in the gray cast iron throughout the positive electrode while forming an alkali metal alloy in the negative electrode. Also disclosed are compositions useful in preparing positive electrodes.

  12. Method for uniformly distributing carbon flakes in a positive electrode, the electrode made thereby and compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mrazek, Franklin C.; Smaga, John A.; Battles, James E.

    1983-01-01

    A positive electrode for a secondary electrochemical cell wherein an electrically conductive current collector is in electrical contact with a particulate mixture of gray cast iron and an alkali metal sulfide and an electrolyte including alkali metal halides or alkaline earth metal halides. Also present may be a transition metal sulfide and graphite flakes from the conversion of gray cast iron to iron sulfide. Also disclosed is a method of distributing carbon flakes in a cell wherein there is formed an electrochemical cell of a positive electrode structure of the type described and a suitable electrolyte and a second electrode containing a material capable of alloying with alkali metal ions. The cell is connected to a source of electrical potential to electrochemically convert gray cast iron to an iron sulfide and uniformly to distribute carbon flakes formerly in the gray cast iron throughout the positive electrode while forming an alkali metal alloy in the negative electrode. Also disclosed are compositions useful in preparing positive electrodes.

  13. The crystal structures of strontium exchanged sodium titanosilicates in relation to selectivity for nuclear waste treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tripathi, Akhilesh; Medvedev, Dmitri G.; Clearfield, Abraham . E-mail: clearfield@mail.chem.tamu.edu

    2005-01-15

    A perspective view of the polyhedral representation in Sr exchanged titanosilicate with sitinakite topology. The eight ring tunnel along c-axis depicts a nine coordinated Sr complex. Dark and light gray spheres in the eight ring channel represent water molecules and Sr{sup 2+} cations respectively.

  14. Duct System Flammability and Air Sealing Fire Separation Assemblies in the International Residential Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, A.; Prahl, D.

    2014-12-01

    IBACOS identified two barriers that limit the ability of builders to cost-effectively achieve higher energy efficiency levels in housing. These are the use of duct system materials that inherently achieve airtightness and are appropriately sized for low-load houses and the ability to air seal fire separation assemblies. The issues identified fall into a gray area of the codes.

  15. Duct System Flammability and Air Sealing Fire Separation Assemblies in the International Residential Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, A.; Prahl, D.

    2014-12-01

    IBACOS identified two barriers that limit the ability of builders to cost-effectively achieve higher energy efficiency levels in housing. These are (1) the use of duct system materials that inherently achieve airtightness and are appropriately sized for low-load houses and (2) the ability to air seal fire separation assemblies. The issues identified fall into a gray area of the codes.

  16. CX-003025: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Maintenance of Access Roads Serving the Satsop-Aberdeen Number 2 and Number 3, and the Aberdeen Tap to South Elma-Cosmopolis Transmission LinesCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 06/30/2010Location(s): Gray's Harbor County, WashingtonOffice(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  17. A Total Cost of Ownership Model for Low Temperature PEM Fuel Cells in Combined Heat and Power and Backup Power Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    University of California, Berkeley; Wei, Max; Lipman, Timothy; Mayyas, Ahmad; Chien, Joshua; Chan, Shuk Han; Gosselin, David; Breunig, Hanna; Stadler, Michael; McKone, Thomas; Beattie, Paul; Chong, Patricia; Colella, Whitney; James, Brian

    2014-06-23

    A total cost of ownership model is described for low temperature proton exchange membrane stationary fuel cell systems for combined heat and power (CHP) applications from 1-250kW and backup power applications from 1-50kW. System designs and functional specifications for these two applications were developed across the range of system power levels. Bottom-up cost estimates were made for balance of plant costs, and detailed direct cost estimates for key fuel cell stack components were derived using design-for-manufacturing-and-assembly techniques. The development of high throughput, automated processes achieving high yield are projected to reduce the cost for fuel cell stacks to the $300/kW level at an annual production volume of 100 MW. Several promising combinations of building types and geographical location in the U.S. were identified for installation of fuel cell CHP systems based on the LBNL modelling tool DER CAM. Life-cycle modelling and externality assessment were done for hotels and hospitals. Reduced electricity demand charges, heating credits and carbon credits can reduce the effective cost of electricity ($/kWhe) by 26-44percent in locations such as Minneapolis, where high carbon intensity electricity from the grid is displaces by a fuel cell system operating on reformate fuel. This project extends the scope of existing cost studies to include externalities and ancillary financial benefits and thus provides a more comprehensive picture of fuel cell system benefits, consistent with a policy and incentive environment that increasingly values these ancillary benefits. The project provides a critical, new modelling capacity and should aid a broad range of policy makers in assessing the integrated costs and benefits of fuel cell systems versus other distributed generation technologies.

  18. Paleoecology of the Devonian-Mississippian black-shale sequence in eastern Kentucky with an atlas of some common fossils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barron, L.S.; Ettensohn, F.R.

    1981-04-01

    The Devonian-Mississippian black-shale sequence of eastern North America is a distinctive stratigraphic interval generally characterized by low clastic influx, high organic production in the water column, anaerobic bottom conditions, and the relative absence of fossil evidence for biologic activity. The laminated black shales which constitute most of the black-shale sequence are broken by two major sequences of interbedded greenish-gray, clayey shales which contain bioturbation and pyritized micromorph invertebrates. The black shales contain abundant evidence of life from upper parts of the water column such as fish fossils, conodonts, algae and other phytoplankton; however, there is a lack of evidence of benthic life. The rare brachiopods, crinoids, and molluscs that occur in the black shales were probably epiplanktic. A significant physical distinction between the environment in which the black sediments were deposited and that in which the greenish-gray sediments were deposited was the level of dissolved oxygen. The laminated black shales point to anaerobic conditions and the bioturbated greenish-gray shales suggest dysaerobic to marginally aerobic-dysaerobic conditions. A paleoenvironmental model in which quasi-estuarine circulation compliments and enhances the effect of a stratified water column can account for both depletion of dissolved oxygen in the bottom environments and the absence of oxygen replenishment during black-shale deposition. Periods of abundant clastic influx from fluvial environments to the east probably account for the abundance of clays in the greenish-gray shale as well as the small amounts of oxygen necessary to support the depauparate, opportunistic, benthic faunas found there. These pulses of greenish-gray clastics were short-lived and eventually were replaced by anaerobic conditions and low rates of clastic sedimentation which characterized most of black-shale deposition.

  19. Groundwater flow, late cementation, and petroleum accumulation the Permian Lyons Sandstone, Denver basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, M.K.; Bethke, C.M. )

    1994-02-01

    The gray diagenetic facies of the Permian Lyons Sandstone, associated with all known petroleum accumulations in the formation, formed late in the history of the Denver basin as an alteration product of the formation's red facies. The red facies that makes up most of the sandstone contains iron oxide coating, quartz overgrowths and calcite cements. The gray facies, which occurs locally in the deep basin, is distinguished by pore-filling dolomite and anhydrite cements and by a lack of iron oxide and calcite. The dolomite and anhydrite cements overlie bitumen that was deposited by migrating oil, and hence formed after oil was first generated in the basin, late in the Cretaceous or early in the Tertiary. The isotopic composition of oxygen in the dolomite ranges to such light values that the cement must have formed deep in the basin in the presence of meteoric water. The gray facies likely formed in a regime of groundwater flow resulting from Laramide uplift of the Front Range during the Tertiary. In our model, saline groundwater flowed eastward through the Pennsylvanian Fountain Formation and then upwelled along the basin axis, where is discharged into the Lyons Sandstone. The saline water mixed with more dilute groundwater in the Lyons, driving a reaction that dissolved calcite and, by a common-ion effect, precipitated dolomite and anhydrite. The facies' gray color resulted from reduction of ferric oxide in the presence of migrating oil or the Fountain brine. Underlying source beds by this time had begun to generate petroleum, which migrated by buoyancy into the Lyons. The association of the gray facies with petroleum accumulations can be explained if the Fountain brines discharged across aquitards along the same fractures that transmitted oil. As petroleum accumulated in the Lyons, the newly formed cements prevented continued migration, as is observed in shallower strata, by sealing oil into the reservoirs from which it is produced today. 77 refs., 16 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Computer simulation of the probability that endangered whales will interact with oil spills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, M.; Jayko, K.; Bowles, A.; Anderson, E.; Leatherwood, S.

    1987-03-01

    A numerical model system was developed to assess quantitatively the probability that endangered bowhead and gray whales will encounter spilled oil in Alaskan waters. Bowhead and gray whale migration and diving-surfacing models, and an oil-spill trajectory model comprise the system. The migration models were developed from conceptual considerations, then calibrated with and tested against observations. The movement of a whale point is governed by a random walk algorithm which stochastically follows a migratory pathway. The oil-spill model, developed under a series of other contracts, accounts for transport and spreading behavior in open water and in the presence of sea ice. Historical wind records and heavy, normal, or light ice cover data sets are selected at random to provide stochastic oil-spill scenarios for whale-oil interaction simulations.

  1. Wavelet/scalar quantization compression standard for fingerprint images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brislawn, C.M.

    1996-06-12

    US Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) has recently formulated a national standard for digitization and compression of gray-scale fingerprint images. Fingerprints are scanned at a spatial resolution of 500 dots per inch, with 8 bits of gray-scale resolution. The compression algorithm for the resulting digital images is based on adaptive uniform scalar quantization of a discrete wavelet transform subband decomposition (wavelet/scalar quantization method). The FBI standard produces archival-quality images at compression ratios of around 15 to 1 and will allow the current database of paper fingerprint cards to be replaced by digital imagery. The compression standard specifies a class of potential encoders and a universal decoder with sufficient generality to reconstruct compressed images produced by any compliant encoder, allowing flexibility for future improvements in encoder technology. A compliance testing program is also being implemented to ensure high standards of image quality and interchangeability of data between different implementations.

  2. Sandia Corporate Ombuds Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CONTRACTORS & CONTRACTOR MANAGERS Sandia Laboratories is committed to mutually beneficial business relationships with contractors (both on- and off-site) and their management companies that work to support the completion of its mission. Issues, concerns and interpersonal conflicts are occasionally part of all business relationships. "Gray areas" may exist and situations develop that may not be easily or clearly handled. Work cultures, interests and needs of Sandia and Sandians can

  3. Section 26

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    On the Fundamental Role of Day Versus Night Radiation Differences in Forcing Nocturnal Convective Maxima and in Assessing Global Warming Prospects W. M. Gray and J. D. Sheaffer Department of Atmospheric Science Colorado State University Fort Collins, Colorado Abstract An analyses of Geostationary Meterological Satellite (GMS) data for the tropical West Pacific yields new perspectives on clear/cloud area radiative forcing of enhanced nocturnal con- vection. Consideration of the tendency for

  4. Section 41

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cloud-Radiative Forcing of the Diurnal Cycle of Intense Convection in the Tropical Pacific W. M. Gray and J. D. Sheaffer Department of Atmospheric Science Colorado State University Fort Collins, Colorado Introduction This U.S. Department of Energy-Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (DOE-ARM) supported research is concerned with better delineating the nature of the diurnal cycle of intense convection over the tropical oceans and a comparative review of these observations with their implications

  5. Nanotubes open new path toward quantum information technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanotubes open new path toward quantum information Nanotubes open new path toward quantum information technologies In optical communication, critical information ranging from a credit card number to national security data is transmitted in streams of laser pulses. September 3, 2015 A solitary oxygen dopant (red sphere) covalently attached to the sidewall of the carbon nanotube (gray) can generate single photons (red) at room temperature when excited by laser pulses (green). A solitary oxygen

  6. Hybrid: Overview

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    button highlighted Starting Button Cruising Button Passing Button Braking Button Stopped Button subbanner graphic: gray bar OVERVIEW Hybrid-electric vehicles combine the benefits of gasoline engines and electric motors to provide improved fuel economy. The engine provides most of the vehicle's power, and the electric motor provides additional power when needed, such as for accelerating and passing. This allows a smaller, more-efficient engine to be used. The electric power for the motor is

  7. secretary of energy | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    energy DOE and NNSA recognize LGBT Pride Month The Department of Energy (DOE) recognized Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender (LGBT) Pride Month with an employee educational event at its headquarters in Washington. The event - Beyond Marriage: The Next Chapter of Equality - addressed efforts to advance LGBT equality a year after... Secretary Moniz awards Hutcheon memorial nonproliferation fellowship to Thomas Gray Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz (second from bottom left, clockwise) and Anne

  8. International Atomic Energy Agency | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration International Atomic Energy Agency Secretary Moniz awards Hutcheon memorial nonproliferation fellowship to Thomas Gray Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz (second from bottom left, clockwise) and Anne Harrington, NNSA deputy administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (sitting next to Moniz), discuss Ian Hutcheon's legacy with his wife Nancy (across from Harrington) and daughter Dana Hutcheon Gordon. Energy... DOE/NNSA's Nonproliferation Experts Lead First Workshop on the

  9. nuclear security | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    security U.S. and China Continue Cooperative Partnership to Advance Safe, Secure Civil Nuclear Energy for Clean Energy Future DOE/NNSA Hosts 11th U.S.-China Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Technology Meeting at Savannah River National Laboratory in Aiken, South Carolina (Aiken, South Carolina) - On May 10-11, 2016 the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the China... Secretary Moniz awards Hutcheon memorial nonproliferation fellowship to Thomas Gray

  10. SREL Reprint #3207

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Prevalence of antibodies to Neospora caninum and Toxoplasma gondii in gray foxes (Urocyon cinereoargenteus) from South Carolina D. S. Lindsay1, J. L. Weston2, and S. E. Little3 1Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology, Center for Molecular Medicine and Infectious Diseases, Virginia–Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Tech, 1410 Prices Fork Road, Blacksburg, VA 24061-0342, USA 2Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, P.O. Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802, USA 3Department

  11. Publications - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Publications At JCESR, we put a high priority on not only making big discoveries, but also sharing them with the scientific community to advance battery research. With more than 180 published scientific papers, our scientists thoroughly document our accomplishments, contributing to our library of fundamental science. Recently Published Papers Etienne Chénard, Andre Sutrisno, Lingyang Zhu, Rajeev S. Assary, Jeffrey A. Kowalski, John L. Barton, Jeffery A. Bertke, Danielle L. Gray, Fikile R.

  12. Particulate Generation in a Tritium System | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    a. Part B 1 Part B - Requirements & Funding Information PART B - Requirements and Funding Information Gray highlights are instructions. Remove the instructions from the interagency agreement. Attachment 3.a. Part B 2 PART B - Requirements & Funding Information B.1. Purpose This is for an assisted acquisition. An assisted acquisition is a type of interagency acquisition where the servicing agency and requesting agency enter into a written interagency agreement pursuant to which the

  13. X:\ARM_19~1\P317-334.WPD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    v Z LCL v v z LCL v z LCL Session Papers 327 Figure 1. Heterogeneous land use, illustrated with the black and gray line segments at the bottom, cause turbulent temperature fluctuations in the surface-layer air, illustrated with air parcels of different shading. These parcels rise to their level of neutral buoyancy, shown by the vertical arrows. Moisture also varies from parcel to parcel, causing corresponding fluctuations in the height of the lifting condensation level (LCL), shown by the black

  14. May

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    May May We are your source for reliable, up-to-date news and information; our scientists and engineers can provide technical insights on our innovations for a secure nation. An example of RNA folded into a tetraloop, in this case the "Z-form duplex" under study that could provide medical treatment opportunities for retroviral diseases such as Zika and Ebola. RNA nucleobases are colored using this key (Gray: Guanosine, Green: Cytosine, White: Adenosine). Hydrogen bonds are shown in

  15. May 2002

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 A newsletter for the employees and friends of the Y-12 National Security Complex May 2002 Editor's note: This is a special edition devoted to exploring issues concerning beryllium. Questions you may have about beryllium will be answered in this publication. Current personal protection equipment and handling techniques also will be discussed, as well as technology for the future handling of beryllium at Y-12. First, some basic facts: What is beryllium? Beryllium is a silver-gray metallic

  16. Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy | Argonne Leadership Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facility a Category 5 hurricane simulated by the CESM at 13 km resolution An example of a Category 5 hurricane simulated by the CESM at 13 km resolution. Precipitable water (gray scale) shows the detailed dynamical structure in the flow. Strong precipitation is overlaid in red. High resolution is necessary to simulate reasonable numbers of tropical cyclones including Category 4 and 5 storms. Credit: Alan Scott and Mark Taylor, Sandia National Laboratories Accelerated Climate Modeling for

  17. Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy | Argonne Leadership Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facility An example of a Category 5 hurricane simulated by the CESM at 13 km resolution An example of a Category 5 hurricane simulated by the CESM at 13 km resolution. Precipitable water (gray scale) shows the detailed dynamical structure in the flow. Strong precipitation is overlaid in red. High resolution is necessary to simulate reasonable numbers of tropical cyclones including Category 4 and 5 storms. Alan Scott and Mark Taylor, Sandia National Laboratories Accelerated Climate Modeling

  18. Genome Science and Personalized Cancer Treatment

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Gray, Joe

    2010-01-08

    August 4, 2009 Berkeley Lab lecture: Results from the Human Genome Project are enabling scientists to understand how individual cancers form and progress. This information, when combined with newly developed drugs, can optimize the treatment of individual cancers. Joe Gray, director of Berkeley Labs Life Sciences Division and Associate Laboratory Director for Life and Environmental Sciences, will focus on this approach, its promise, and its current roadblocks ? particularly with regard to breast cancer.

  19. Genome Science and Personalized Cancer Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, Joe

    2009-08-07

    August 4, 2009 Berkeley Lab lecture: Results from the Human Genome Project are enabling scientists to understand how individual cancers form and progress. This information, when combined with newly developed drugs, can optimize the treatment of individual cancers. Joe Gray, director of Berkeley Labs Life Sciences Division and Associate Laboratory Director for Life and Environmental Sciences, will focus on this approach, its promise, and its current roadblocks particularly with regard to breast cancer.

  20. Genome Science and Personalized Cancer Treatment (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, Joe

    2009-08-04

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: Results from the Human Genome Project are enabling scientists to understand how individual cancers form and progress. This information, when combined with newly developed drugs, can optimize the treatment of individual cancers. Joe Gray, director of Berkeley Labs Life Sciences Division and Associate Laboratory Director for Life and Environmental Sciences, will focus on this approach, its promise, and its current roadblocks particularly with regard to breast cancer.

  1. Genome Science and Personalized Cancer Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, Joe

    2009-08-04

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: Results from the Human Genome Project are enabling scientists to understand how individual cancers form and progress. This information, when combined with newly developed drugs, can optimize the treatment of individual cancers. Joe Gray, director of Berkeley Labs Life Sciences Division and Associate Laboratory Director for Life and Environmental Sciences, will focus on this approach, its promise, and its current roadblocks particularly with regard to breast cancer.

  2. Part B - Requirements & Funding Information PART B - Requirements and Funding Information

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a. Part B 1 Part B - Requirements & Funding Information PART B - Requirements and Funding Information Gray highlights are instructions. Remove the instructions from the interagency agreement. Attachment 3.a. Part B 2 PART B - Requirements & Funding Information B.1. Purpose This is for an assisted acquisition. An assisted acquisition is a type of interagency acquisition where the servicing agency and requesting agency enter into a written interagency agreement pursuant to which the

  3. Part B - Requirements & Funding Information PART B - Requirements and Funding Information

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    b. Part B 1 Part B - Requirements & Funding Information PART B - Requirements and Funding Information Gray highlights are instructions. Remove the instructions from the interagency agreement. Attachment 3.b. Part B 2 PART B - Requirements & Funding Information B.1. Purpose This is an interagency transaction. An interagency transaction is an intra-governmental transaction when the servicing agency uses internal resources to support the requesting agency requirement and is a reimbursable

  4. Device Tosses Out Unusable PV Wafers - News Feature | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Device Tosses Out Unusable PV Wafers January 11, 2013 Photo of a scientist in safety glasses using tweezers to hold a rectangular gray silicon wafer. He is about to load it into a large silver-metallic instrument. Enlarge image NREL postdoctoral scientist Rene Rivero readies a wafer for the Silicon Photovoltaic Wafer Screening System. Credit: Dennis Schroeder Silicon wafers destined to become photovoltaic (PV) cells can take a bruising through assembly lines, as they are oxidized, annealed,

  5. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Near Real-Time Geographic Representation of Solar Radiation Measurement Data for the Southern Great Plains Network Brady, E., Gray-Hann, P., Anderberg, M.H.L., Wilcox, S.M., and Renne, D.S., National Renewable Energy Laboratory Ninth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) will implement a web site showing the geographic representation of solar radiation for the Southern Great Plains, updated six times daily for the previous

  6. Microsoft PowerPoint - Enhancements_Lee

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    NRC Transportation Security (Part 73 SNF Update and Part 37 Category 1 and 2 Materials) Willie J. Lee U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission May 14, 2014 Overview * Part 73 Spent Nuclear Fuel in Transit (Update) * Part 37 Category 1 and 2 Materials * Part 37 Provisions * Transportation Security Requirements * Conclusion 2 Part 73 Update * Amended rule (73.37) affects NRC licensees shipping or transporting SNF > 100 grams (dose > 1 Gray per hour @ 1 meter) * Replaces transportation security

  7. EEG, transmission computed tomography, and positron emission tomography with fluorodeoxyglucose /sup 18/F. Their use in adults with gliomas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newmark, M.E.; Theodore, W.H.; Sato, S.; De La Paz, R.; Patronas, N.; Brooks, R.; Jabbari, B.; Di Chiro, G.

    1983-10-01

    We evaluated the relationship between findings from EEG, transmission computed tomography (CT), and positron emission tomography in 23 adults with gliomas. The cortical metabolic rate was suppressed in patients with and without focal slowing. Focal delta activity was not related to involvement of gray or white matter. Rhythmic delta activity and focal attenuation of background amplitude on EEG, however, were correlated with involvement of the thalamus.

  8. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Gray, Gordon" Name Name ORCID Product Type: All Book/Monograph Conference/Event Journal Article Miscellaneous Patent Program Document Software Manual Technical Report Thesis/Dissertation Subject: Identifier Numbers: Site: All Alaska Power Administration, Juneau, Alaska (United States) Albany Research Center (ARC), Albany, OR (United States) Albuquerque Complex - NNSA Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, NM (United States) Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, Amarillo, TX

  9. STEM Education Opportunities: Teachers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Education Opportunities: Teachers STEM Education Opportunities: Teachers LESSON PLANS AND PROJECTS Energy Literacy: Essential Principles and Fundamental Concepts for Energy Education identifies seven Essential Principles and a set of Fundamental Concepts that, if understood and applied, will help individuals and communities make informed energy decisions. The intended audience is anyone involved in energy education from K-Gray and is meant to inform the improvement and development of energy

  10. SOLAR PANELS ON HUDSON COUNTY FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BARRY, KEVIN

    2014-06-06

    This project involved the installation of an 83 kW grid-connected photovoltaic system tied into the energy management system of Hudson County's new 60,000 square foot Emergency Operations and Command Center and staff offices. Other renewable energy features of the building include a 15 kW wind turbine, geothermal heating and cooling, natural daylighting, natural ventilation, gray water plumbing system and a green roof. The County intends to seek Silver LEED certification for the facility.

  11. Project Profile: Innovative Application of Maintenance-Free Phase-Change

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermal Energy Storage for Dish Systems | Department of Energy Innovative Application of Maintenance-Free Phase-Change Thermal Energy Storage for Dish Systems Project Profile: Innovative Application of Maintenance-Free Phase-Change Thermal Energy Storage for Dish Systems Illustration of a horizontal, gray cylinder with a cut-out to see the center. Infinia, under the Thermal Storage FOA, is developing a thermal energy storage (TES) system that, when combined with Infinia's dish-Stirling

  12. Project Profile: Innovative Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Solution

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Baseload Power | Department of Energy Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Solution for Baseload Power Project Profile: Innovative Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Solution for Baseload Power Infinia logo Infinia, under the Baseload CSP FOA, developed and demonstrated a subscale system for baseload CSP power generation using thermal energy storage (TES) in a unique integration of innovative enhancements that improves performance and reduces cost. Approach Illustration of two gray

  13. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Improving GCM Simulation of Convection Using ARM Observations at the SGP Site G. J. Zhang Center for Atmospheric Sciences Scripps Institution of Oceanography La Jolla, California Introduction Atmospheric convection undergoes strong diurnal variation over both land and oceans (Gray and Jacobson 1977; Dai 2001). This diurnal variation has a large impact on the atmospheric radiation budget. Convection also affects the surface energy budget by modulating the surface sensible and latent heat

  14. LANL researchers develop platform to study subsurface reservoir conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Subsurface reservoir conditions LANL researchers develop platform to study subsurface reservoir conditions This increasing demand for energy around the globe requires a better understanding of subsurface energy resources and their associated environmental issues. March 7, 2016 Shown are time lapse images of supercritical CO2 displacing water in a fracture etched into a shale micromodel. The white, blue and gray colors represent supercritical CO2, water and shale, respectively. Shown are time

  15. Hybrid: Braking

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    button highlighted Stopped Button subbanner graphic: gray bar BRAKING: PART 1 Regenerative braking converts otherwise wasted energy from braking into electricity and stores it in the battery. In regenerative braking, the electric motor is reversed so that, instead of using electricity to turn the wheels, the rotating wheels turn the motor and create electricity. Using energy from the wheels to turn the motor slows the vehicle down. Go to next… stage graphic: vertical blue rule Main stage: See

  16. Hybrid: Braking

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Button Stopped button highlighted subbanner graphic: gray bar STOPPED When the vehicle is stopped, such as at a red light, the gasoline engine and electric motor shut off automatically so that energy is not wasted in idling. The battery continues to power auxillary systems, such as the air conditioning and dashboard displays. stage graphic: vertical blue rule Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, and electric motor visible. The car is stopped at an intersection. Main stage: See

  17. Hybrid: Cruising

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Button Cruising button highlighted Passing Button Braking Button Stopped Button subbanner graphic: gray bar CRUISING The gasoline engine powers the vehicle at cruising speeds and, if needed, provides power to the battery for later use. stage graphic: vertical blue rule Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, and electric motor visible. The car is moving. There are red arrows flowing from the gasoline engine to the front wheels. There are blue arrows flowing from the gasoline engine to

  18. Hybrid: Passing

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    button highlighted Braking Button Stopped Button subbanner graphic: gray bar PASSING During heavy accelerating or when additional power is needed, the gasoline engine and electric motor are both used to propel the vehicle. Additional power from the battery is used to power the electric motor as needed. stage graphic: vertical blue rule Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, and electric motor visible. The car is passing another vehicle. There are red arrows flowing from the gasoline

  19. Hybrid: Starting

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    button highlighted Cruising Button Passing Button Braking Button Stopped Button subbanner graphic: gray bar STARTING When the vehicle is started, the gasoline engine "warms up." If necessary, the electric motor acts as a generator, converting energy from the engine into electricity and storing it in the battery. stage graphic: vertical blue rule Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, and electric motor visible. The car is moving. There are arrows flowing from the gasoline

  20. Hybrid: Braking

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Button Braking button highlighted Stopped Button subbanner graphic: gray bar BRAKING: PART 2 If additional stopping power is needed, conventional friction brakes (e.g., disc brakes) are also applied automatically. Go back… stage graphic: vertical blue rule Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, and electric motor visible. The car is stopped at an intersection. Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, and electric motor visible. The car is stopped at an intersection. Battery:

  1. Stop/Start: Overview

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    Braking button hilighted subbanner graphic: gray bar BRAKING PART 1 Stop/Start vehicles use a combination of regenerative and conventional friction braking to slow the vehicle. In regenerative braking, energy from the wheels turns the electric generator, creating electricity. Using energy from the wheels to turn the generator slows the vehicle. Go to next… stage graphic: vertical blue rule Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, and electric starter/generator visible. The car is

  2. International Cooperation Holiday Cheer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Administration International Atomic Energy Agency Secretary Moniz awards Hutcheon memorial nonproliferation fellowship to Thomas Gray Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz (second from bottom left, clockwise) and Anne Harrington, NNSA deputy administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (sitting next to Moniz), discuss Ian Hutcheon's legacy with his wife Nancy (across from Harrington) and daughter Dana Hutcheon Gordon. Energy... DOE/NNSA's Nonproliferation Experts Lead First Workshop on the

  3. sheaffer-99.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Diurnal Variations of Outgoing Longwave Radiation Over the Tropical Oceans J. D. Sheaffer and W. M. Gray Department of Atmospheric Science Colorado State University Fort Collins, Colorado Introduction Several current problems in atmospheric radiation over the tropical oceans may have at least partial solutions as effects of diurnal variations of outgoing longwave radiation (OLR). At issue are explanations for the following: a) excessively large amplitudes (in relation to theory) of the diurnal

  4. stenchikov-98.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 The Study of Regional Climate and Chemical Processes with Single-Column Models G. Stenchikov, S. Gray, M. Gamazaychikov, and R. Park University of Maryland College Park, Maryland A. Robock. Rutgers University New Brunswick, New Jersey Observations show that the diurnal cycle of surface air temperature changes as climate changes, with the diurnal range becoming smaller as the climate warms. We investi- gated the causes of this behavior using a single-column model (SCM). Our previous results

  5. stenchikov-99.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Test of Midlatitude Cumulus Ensembles and Diurnal Cycle of Advection, Temperature, and Moisture Simulated by Regional and Global Models with ARM Data G. Stenchikov and A. Robock Department of Environmental Sciences Rutgers University New Brunswick, New Jersey E. H. Berbery and W. Chen Department of Meteorology University of Maryland College Park, Maryland S. Gray Appalachian Trail Formerly at Department of Meteorology University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Introduction It is well known

  6. TEC/WG Tribal Topic Group

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    January 29, 2002 - New Orleans, LA Participants: Richard Arnold (Las Vegas Indian Center), Wynona Boyer (Shoshone- Bannock Tribes), Judith Bradbury (PNL), Rob Burnside (CTUIR), Joseph Mark Chavarria (Santa Clara Pueblo), Martha Crosland (DOE/EM), Maxine Ewankow (8-Northern Indian Pueblos Council), Ed Gonzales (ELG), Ken Gray (CTUIR), Judith Holm (DOE/NTPA), Patrice Kent (NTEC), Dan King (Oneida Nation), Bob Lupton (DOE/OCRWM), Wilda Portner (SAIC), Mike Rowswell (Association of State Rail Safety

  7. TEC/WG Tribal Topic Group Conference Call Summary April 6, 1999

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    April 6, 1999 Participants: Kevin Blackwell (DOT), Milton (JR) Bluehouse (DOE/EM), Jozette Booth (DOE/YMPO), Judith Bradbury (PNL), Inez Dommer (Oneida Nation), Margaret Fernandez (DOE/EM-22), Ken Gray (CTUIR), Margaret Hodge (DOE/AL), Judith Holm (DOE/NTPA), Stephanie Martz (NRC), Stanley Paytiamo (Pueblo of Acoma), Wilda Portner (SAIC), Dan Tano (DOE/RL), Elissa Turner (DOE/RW), Catherine Volk (DOE/EM-22), Heather Westra (Prairie Island Indian Community) Major issues discussed during this

  8. Jefferson Lab Researchers Join "Quantum Diaries" Bloggers | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Researchers Join "Quantum Diaries" Bloggers Jefferson Lab Researchers Join "Quantum Diaries" Bloggers March 11, 2005 Newport News, Va. - Two young physicists participating in research at the Department of Energy's Jefferson Lab have joined nearly 30 other scientists in celebrating the World Year of Physics through blogging in "Quantum Diaries." Sarah Phillips, from the United States, and Claire Gray, from South Africa, have just begun their blogging adventures.

  9. Genome Science and Personalized Cancer Treatment (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Gray, Joe

    2011-04-28

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: Results from the Human Genome Project are enabling scientists to understand how individual cancers form and progress. This information, when combined with newly developed drugs, can optimize the treatment of individual cancers. Joe Gray, director of Berkeley Labs Life Sciences Division and Associate Laboratory Director for Life and Environmental Sciences, will focus on this approach, its promise, and its current roadblocks ? particularly with regard to breast cancer.

  10. Natural resources management activities and biodiversity maintenance. Progress report, July 1, 1993--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caudell, M.B.

    1994-05-01

    This progress report briefly outlines activities at the Crackerneck Wildlife Management Area. Thirty-nine days were spent administering hunts with 1524 people participating. Biological data was collected on 89 deer, 6 turkeys, 8 feral hogs, 40 ducks of two species, 24 bobwhite, 3 rabbits, 2 gray squirrels, and 313 fish of 8 species. Public relations, maintenance and hunt preparation activities are summarized as well.

  11. Optically Directed Assembly of Continuous Mesoscale Filaments (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Optically Directed Assembly of Continuous Mesoscale Filaments Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Optically Directed Assembly of Continuous Mesoscale Filaments Authors: Bahns, J. T. ; Sankaranarayanan, S. K. R. S. ; Gray, S. K. ; Chen, L. Publication Date: 2011-02-28 OSTI Identifier: 1099937 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review Letters Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 106; Journal Issue: 9;

  12. Center for Materials at Irradiation and Mechanical Extremes: Los National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alamos Laboratory Pascal Bellon image of George Gray Contact Information Professor University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign Department of Materials Science and Engineering Phone: (217)2675-0284 bellon@uiuc.edu http://www.mse.uiuc.edu/faculty/Bellon.html Bio Education Post-Doctoral Research Associate, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1993-1994 Ph.D., Materials Science, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France, 1989

  13. The wavelet/scalar quantization compression standard for digital fingerprint images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, J.N.; Brislawn, C.M.

    1994-04-01

    A new digital image compression standard has been adopted by the US Federal Bureau of Investigation for use on digitized gray-scale fingerprint images. The algorithm is based on adaptive uniform scalar quantization of a discrete wavelet transform image decomposition and is referred to as the wavelet/scalar quantization standard. The standard produces archival quality images at compression ratios of around 20:1 and will allow the FBI to replace their current database of paper fingerprint cards with digital imagery.

  14. Posters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Posters On the Fundamental Role of Tropospheric Radiative Cooling on the Diurnal Cycle of Intense Tropical Convection W. M. Gray, J. D. Sheaffer, and W. Thorson Department of Atmospheric Science Colorado State University Ft. Collins, Colorado Summary The atmosphere performs a day versus night (DVN) radiation experiment for us each 24 hours; we should attempt to study and learn from this ever-repeating DVN cycle of radiative cooling. The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Cloud and

  15. Solvation Structure and Transport Properties of Alkali Cations in Dimethyl

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sulfoxide Under Exogenous Static Electric Fields - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research June 14, 2015, Research Highlights Solvation Structure and Transport Properties of Alkali Cations in Dimethyl Sulfoxide Under Exogenous Static Electric Fields Top: Snapshots of molecular dynamics simulations of alkali ions in DMSO at 298 K and zero-applied electric field: (left) Li+ and (right) Cs+. Sulfur atoms are shown in yellow, oxygen atoms in red, and methyl groups in gray. Graph: Average

  16. California Maritime Academy 2014 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    California Maritime Academy 2014 California Maritime Academy 2014 Cal Maritime Team: From Left: Tom Nordenholz, Henry Seel, Ramiro Parocua, Gerald Spencer, Ian Medina, Jennifer Ramos-Ortiz, Sasha Barnett, Alec Calder, David Chang, Eric Johnson, Sam Gray, Glenn Fuller, Khalid Bachkar. Photo from California Maritime Academy. Cal Maritime Team: From Left: Tom Nordenholz, Henry Seel, Ramiro Parocua, Gerald Spencer, Ian Medina, Jennifer Ramos-Ortiz, Sasha Barnett, Alec Calder, David Chang, Eric

  17. LD Diesels in U.S. Marketplace - Technical Progress Will Lead to

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cost-Effective Business Cases | Department of Energy LD Diesels in U.S. Marketplace - Technical Progress Will Lead to Cost-Effective Business Cases LD Diesels in U.S. Marketplace - Technical Progress Will Lead to Cost-Effective Business Cases 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters 2005_deer_gray.pdf (790.46 KB) More Documents & Publications Comparison of Conventional Diesel and Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) Combustion in a

  18. Optimization and evaluation of metal injection molding by using X-ray tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Shidi; Zhang, Ruijie; Qu, Xuanhui

    2015-06-15

    6061 aluminum alloy and 316L stainless steel green bodies were obtained by using different injection parameters (injection pressure, speed and temperature). After injection process, the green bodies were scanned by X-ray tomography. The projection and reconstruction images show the different kinds of defects obtained by the improper injection parameters. Then, 3D rendering of the Al alloy green bodies was used to demonstrate the spatial morphology characteristics of the serious defects. Based on the scanned and calculated results, it is convenient to obtain the proper injection parameters for the Al alloy. Then, reasons of the defect formation were discussed. During mold filling, the serious defects mainly formed in the case of low injection temperature and high injection speed. According to the gray value distribution of projection image, a threshold gray value was obtained to evaluate whether the quality of green body can meet the desired standard. The proper injection parameters of 316L stainless steel can be obtained efficiently by using the method of analyzing the Al alloy injection. - Highlights: • Different types of defects in green bodies were scanned by using X-ray tomography. • Reasons of the defect formation were discussed. • Optimization of the injection parameters can be simplified greatly by the way of X-ray tomography. • Evaluation standard of the injection process can be obtained by using the gray value distribution of projection image.

  19. Energy System and Thermoeconomic Analysis of Combined Heat and Power High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Systems for Light Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colella, Whitney G.; Pilli, Siva Prasad

    2015-06-01

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE)’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is spearheading a program with industry to deploy and independently monitor five kilowatt-electric (kWe) combined heat and power (CHP) fuel cell systems (FCSs) in light commercial buildings. This publication discusses results from PNNL’s research efforts to independently evaluate manufacturer-stated engineering, economic, and environmental performance of these CHP FCSs at installation sites. The analysis was done by developing parameters for economic comparison of CHP installations. Key thermodynamic terms are first defined, followed by an economic analysis using both a standard accounting approach and a management accounting approach. Key economic and environmental performance parameters are evaluated, including (1) the average per unit cost of the CHP FCSs per unit of power, (2) the average per unit cost of the CHP FCSs per unit of energy, (3) the change in greenhouse gas (GHG) and air pollution emissions with a switch from conventional power plants and furnaces to CHP FCSs; (4) the change in GHG mitigation costs from the switch; and (5) the change in human health costs related to air pollution. From the power perspective, the average per unit cost per unit of electrical power is estimated to span a range from $15–19,000/ kilowatt-electric (kWe) (depending on site-specific changes in installation, fuel, and other costs), while the average per unit cost of electrical and heat recovery power varies between $7,000 and $9,000/kW. From the energy perspective, the average per unit cost per unit of electrical energy ranges from $0.38 to $0.46/kilowatt-hour-electric (kWhe), while the average per unit cost per unit of electrical and heat recovery energy varies from $0.18 to $0.23/kWh. These values are calculated from engineering and economic performance data provided by the manufacturer (not independently measured data). The GHG emissions were estimated to decrease by

  20. Integrated gasification and plasma cleaning for waste treatment: A life cycle perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evangelisti, Sara; Tagliaferri, Carla; Clift, Roland; Lettieri, Paola; Taylor, Richard; Chapman, Chris

    2015-09-15

    considered, mainly due to the avoided burdens associated with the production of electricity from the plant. The plasma convertor, key characteristic of the thermal process investigated, although utilising electricity shows a relatively small contribution to the overall environmental impact of the plant. The results do not significantly vary in the scenario analysis. Accounting for biogenic carbon enhanced the performance of biomass and refuse-derived fuel in terms of global warming potential. The main analysis of this study has been performed from a waste management perspective, using 1 ton of waste as functional unit. A comparison of the results when 1 kWhe of electricity produced is used as functional unit shows similar trends for the environmental impact categories considered.

  1. The Effects of Heterogeneity in Magma Water Concentration on the Development of Flow Banding and Spherulites in Rhyolitic Lava

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seaman, S.; Dyar, D; Marinkovic, N

    2009-01-01

    This study focuses on the origin of flow-banded rhyolites that consist of compositionally similar darker and lighter flow bands of contrasting texture and color. Infrared radiation was used to obtain Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra from which water concentrations were calculated, and to map variations in water concentrations across zones of spherulites and glass from the 23 million year old Sycamore Canyon lava flow of southern Arizona. Lighter-colored, thicker flow bands consist of gray glass, fine-grained quartz, and large (1.0 to 1.5 mm) spherulites. Darker-colored, thinner flow bands consist of orange glass and smaller (0.1 to 0.2 mm) spherulites. The centers of both large and small spherulites are occupied by either (1) a quartz or sanidine crystal, (2) a granophyric intergrowth, or (3) a vesicle. Mapping of water concentration (dominantly OH- in glass and OH- and H2O in sanidine crystals) illustrates fluctuating water availability during quenching of the host melt. Textures of large spherulites in the lighter (gray) bands in some cases indicate complex quenching histories that suggest that local water concentration controlled the generation of glass versus crystals. Small spherulites in darker (orange) bands have only one generation of radiating crystal growth. Both the glass surrounding spherulites, and the crystals in the spherulites contain more water in the gray flow bands than in the orange flow bands. Flow banding in the Sycamore Canyon lava flow may have originated by the stretching of a magma that contained pre-existing zones (vesicles or proto-vesicles) of contrasting water concentration, as the magma flowed in the conduit and on the surface. Variation in the original water concentration in the alternating layers is interpreted to have resulted in differences in undercooling textures in spherulites in the lighter compared to the darker flow bands.

  2. Photosynthetic pigment concentrations, gas exchange and vegetative growth for selected monocots and dicots treated with two contrasting coal fly ashes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yunusa, I.A.M.; Burchett, M.D.; Manoharan, V.; DeSilva, D.L.; Eamus, D.; Skilbeck, C.G.

    2009-07-15

    There is uncertainty as to the rates of coal fly ash needed for optimum physiological processes and growth. In the current study we tested the hyothesis that photosynthetic pigments concentrations and CO{sub 2} assimilation (A) are more sensitive than dry weights in plants grown on media amended with coal fly ash. We applied the Terrestrial Plant Growth Test (Guideline 208) protocols of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to monocots (barley (Hordeum vulgare) and ryegrass (Secale cereale)) and dicots (canola (Brasica napus), radish (Raphanus sativus), field peas (Pisum sativum), and lucerne (Medicago sativa)) on media amended with fly ashes derived from semi-bituminous (gray ash) or lignite (red ash) coals at rates of 0, 2.5, 5.0, 10, or 20 Mg ha(-1). The red ash had higher elemental concentrations and salinity than the gray ash. Fly ash addition had no significant effect on germination by any of the six species. At moderate rates ({<=}10 Mg ha{sup -1}) both ashes increased (P < 0.05) growth rates and concentrations of chlorophylls a and b, but reduced carotenoid concentrations. Addition of either ash increased A in radish and transpiration in barley. Growth rates and final dry weights were reduced for all of the six test species when addition rates exceeded 10 Mg ha{sup -1} for gray ash and 5 Mg ha{sup -1} for red ash. We concluded that plant dry weights, rather than pigment concentrations and/or instantaneous rates of photosynthesis, are more consistent for assessing subsequent growth in plants supplied with fly ash.

  3. Petrographic and reservoir features of Hauterivian (Lower Cretaceous) Shatlyk horizon in the Malay gas field, Amu-Darya basin, east Turkmenia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naz, H.; Ersan, A.

    1996-08-01

    Malay gas field in Amu-Darya basin, eastern Turkmenia, is located on the structural high that is on the Malay-Bagadzha arch north of the Repetek-Kelif structure zone. With 500 km{sup 2} areal coverage, 16 producing wells and 200 billion m{sup 3} estimated reserves, the field was discovered in 1978 and production began in 1987 from 2400-m-deep Hauterivian-age (Early Cretaceous) Shatlyk horizon. The Shatlyk elastic sequence shows various thickness up to 100 m in the Malay structural closure and is studied through E-log, core, petrographic data and reservoir characteristics. The Shatlyk consists of poorly indurated, reddish-brown and gray sandstones, and sandy gray shales. The overall sand-shale ratio increases up and the shales interleave between the sand packages. The reservoir sandstones are very fine to medium grained, moderately sorted, compositionally immature, subarkosic arenites. The framework grains include quartz, feldspar and volcanic lithic fragments. Quartz grains are monocrystalline in type and most are volcanic in origin. Feldspars consist of K- Feldspar and plagioclase. The orthoclases are affected by preferential alteration. The sandstones show high primary intergranular porosity and variations in permeability. Patch-like evaporate cement and the iron-rich grain coatings are reducing effects in permeability. The coats are pervasive in reddish-brown sandstones but are not observed in the gray sandstones. The evaporate cement is present in all the sandstone samples examined and, in places, follows the oxidation coats. The petrographic evidences and the regional facies studies suggest the deposition in intersection area from continental to marine nearshore deltaic environment.

  4. Spall behavior of cast iron with varying microstructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plume, Gifford; Rousseau, Carl-Ernst

    2014-07-21

    The spall strength of cast iron with varying microstructures has been investigated using plate impact at moderate speed. Stress history measurements were made with manganin stress gauges embedded between the back face of the specimen and a low impedance polycarbonate backing. Five separate cast irons were tested. Four of these consisted of gray cast iron with graphite in flake form, with three classified as Type VII A2 and the fourth containing a bimodal distribution of Types VII A4 and VII D8. The fifth casting consisted of ductile cast iron with graphite in nodular form, classified as Type I, size class 5. The spall strength for the Type VII A2 gray cast irons varied between 40 and 370 MPa, and that of the additional gray cast iron, between 410 and 490 MPa. The spall strength of the ductile cast iron fell within the range of 0.94–1.2 GPa. It is shown that the spall strength is linked to the damage level at the spall plane, where an increased level of tensile stress is required to generate higher levels of damage. Post mortem analysis was performed on the recovered samples, revealing the graphite phase to be the primary factor governing the spall fracture of cast irons, where crack nucleation is directly correlated to the debonding of graphite from the metal matrix. The average length of graphite found within a casting is linked to the material's strength, where strength increases as a function of decreasing length. The morphology and mean free path of graphite precipitates further govern the subsequent coalescence of initiated cracks to form a complete fracture plane. In cases where graphite spacing is large, increased energy level is required to complete the fracture process. A secondary factor governing the spall fracture of cast irons has also been linked to the microstructure of the metal matrix, with pearlite yielding higher spall strengths than free ferrite.

  5. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology: Aging of Graphitic Cast Irons and Machinability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Von L. Richards

    2012-09-19

    The objective of this task was to determine whether ductile iron and compacted graphite iron exhibit age strengthening to a statistically significant extent. Further, this effort identified the mechanism by which gray iron age strengthens and the mechanism by which age-strengthening improves the machinability of gray cast iron. These results were then used to determine whether age strengthening improves the machinability of ductile iron and compacted graphite iron alloys in order to develop a predictive model of alloy factor effects on age strengthening. The results of this work will lead to reduced section sizes, and corresponding weight and energy savings. Improved machinability will reduce scrap and enhance casting marketability. Technical Conclusions: ???¢???????¢ Age strengthening was demonstrated to occur in gray iron ductile iron and compacted graphite iron. ???¢???????¢ Machinability was demonstrated to be improved by age strengthening when free ferrite was present in the microstructure, but not in a fully pearlitic microstructure. ???¢???????¢ Age strengthening only occurs when there is residual nitrogen in solid solution in the Ferrite, whether the ferrite is free ferrite or the ferrite lamellae within pearlite. ???¢???????¢ Age strengthening can be accelerated by Mn at about 0.5% in excess of the Mn/S balance Estimated energy savings over ten years is 13.05 trillion BTU, based primarily on yield improvement and size reduction of castings for equivalent service. Also it is estimated that the heavy truck end use of lighter castings for equivalent service requirement will result in a diesel fuel energy savings of 131 trillion BTU over ten years.

  6. Novel Material for Efficient and Low-cost Separation of Gases for Fuels and Plastics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Material for Efficient and Low-Cost Separation of Gases for Fuels and Plastics Work was performed at University of California and supported by the Center for Gas Separations Relevant to Clean Energy Technologies EFRC. Bloch, E. D.; Queen, W. L.; Krishna, R.; Zadrozny, J. M.; Brown, C. M.; Long, J. R. Science 2012, 335, 1606-1610 Left: Crystal structure of Fe 2 (dobdc)-ethylene showing Fe (orange), O(red), C(gray), and D(blue) atoms. The view along the [001] direction shows an ethylene molecule

  7. Fellows' Officers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Officers Fellows' Officers Current officers and listing of coordinators from 1982 to present. Current and past officers, coordinators 2015-2016 Dipen Sinha, Coordinator Chuck Farrar, Deputy Coordinator Brenda Dingus, Secretary Past coordinators 2014-2015: Brad Meyer 2013-2014: Toni Taylor 2012-2013: Pat Colestock 2011-2012: Quanxi Jia 2010-2011: Joyce Guzik 2009-2010: Darryl L. Smith 2008-2009: S. Peter Gary 2007-2008: R. S. Hixson 2006-2007: W. C. Priedhorsky 2005-2006: G. T. Gray III

  8. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    More Like Shades of Gray: the Effects of Black Carbon in Aerosols Submitter: McComiskey, A. C., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Cappa CD, TB Onasch, P Massoli, DR Worsnop, TS Bates, ES Cross, P Davidovits, J Hakala, KL Hayden, BT Jobson, KR Kolesar, DA Lack, BM Lerner, SM Li, D Mellon, I Nuaaman, JS Olfert, T Petaja, PK Quinn, C Song, R Subramanian, EJ Williams, and RA Zaveri. 2012.

  9. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dust in the Wind... and the Clouds... and the Atmosphere Submitter: Sassen, K., University of Alaska, Fairbanks Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Sassen, K., P.J. DeMott, J.M. Propsero, and M.R. Poellot, Saharan Dust Storms and Indirect Aerosol Effects on Clouds: CRYSTAL-FACE Results, Geophys. Res. Ltt., 30(12), 1633, doi:10/1029/2003GL017371, 2003. PDL linear depolarization ratio (color scale on top) and relative returned power (in gray scale) of

  10. Published Papers - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Published Papers Etienne Chénard, Andre Sutrisno, Lingyang Zhu, Rajeev S. Assary, Jeffrey A. Kowalski, John L. Barton, Jeffery A. Bertke, Danielle L. Gray, Fikile R. Brushett, Larry A. Curtiss, Jeffrey S. Moore, "Synthesis of Pyridine- and Pyrazine-BF3 Complexes and Their Characterization in Solution and Solid State", Journal of Physical Chemistry, March 31, 2016, DOI: 10.1021/acs.jpcc.6b00858. View Cao, R., Chen, J., Han, K.S., Xu, W., Mei, D., Bhattacharya, P., Engelhard, M.H.,

  11. Los Alamos National Laboratory The

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The journey from Trinity to Trinity begins with the New Mexico desert night sky turning instantly to day at 05:29 am on July 16, 1945. An eyewitness recalled, "The effects could well be called unprecedented, magnificent, beautiful, stupendous, and terrifying. The lighting effects beggared description. The whole country was lighted by a searing light with the intensity many times that of the midday sun. It was golden, purple, violet, gray, and blue." It was the Trinity Test: the world's

  12. Y-12's Protective Force donates coats to VMC | Y-12 National Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Complex 's Protective Force ... Y-12's Protective Force donates coats to VMC Posted: January 25, 2016 - 1:17pm Veterans and current Y-12 Security Police Officers delivered former uniform coats to the Volunteer Ministry Center. A few years ago, Y-12's Protective Force changed from solid gray uniforms to their current digital camouflage gear. The old uniforms-some of which were actually new, with tags still on-were considered excess and likely headed toward a landfill. Around that same time,

  13. Temperature and melting of laser-shocked iron releasing into an LiF window

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huser, G.; Koenig, M.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Henry, E.; Vinci, T.; Faral, B.; Tomasini, M.; Telaro, B.; Batani, D.

    2005-06-15

    Absolute reflectivity and self-emission diagnostics are used to determine the gray-body equivalent temperature of laser-shocked iron partially releasing into a lithium fluoride window. Pressure and reflectivity are measured simultaneously by means of velocity interferometer system for any reflector interferometers. In the temperature-pressure plane, a temperature plateau in the release is observed which is attributed to iron's melting line. Extrapolation of data leads to a melting temperature at Earth's inner-outer core boundary of 7800{+-}1200 K, in good agreement with previous works based on dynamic compression. Shock temperatures were calculated and found to be in the liquid phase.

  14. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Dwell Development, Seattle, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-09-01

    This Challenge Home is one of 42 homes in a micro-community of ultra-modern, energy-efficient homes built by Dwell Development on an urban gray-field site in South Seattle. Every home will achieve a 5-Star Built Green rating from the regional master builders association and meet the criteria of the Northwest ENERGY STAR program, which is more strict than the national ENERGY STAR criteria. Also, the home won a 2013 Housing Innovation Award in the "systems builder" category.

  15. Biomimetic Model Studies Reveal the Role of the Ca2+ Ion in Photosystem II

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Biomimetic Model Studies Reveal the Role of the Ca2+ Ion in Photosystem II Friday, October 31, 2014 Fig 1 Figure 1. The biomimetic complexes that model the OEC in the final step of water oxidation. In these complexes, a redox-active iron atom (orange) is bound to a TMC ligand (1,4,8,11-tetramethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane, shown in gray and blue) and a peroxide moiety (red), which binds a redox- inactive metal ion (Mn+, green). Mn+ =

  16. South Carolina Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Energy Conference April 7, 2009 (1) Economic prosperity is intimately tied to affordable energy. (2) There is potential for geopolitical conflict due to escalating competition for energy resources. (3)The risk of adverse Climate Change. The Energy Problem Oil Dependency is a Drain on our Economy (Using EIA data) Oil Dependency is a Drain on our Economy FRBSF Economic Letter 11/18/05 Gray bars indicate a recession Percentage price increase US oil became a net oil importer in the 1940s China's Oil

  17. Superconductivity Technology Program for electric power systems: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marriott, K.B.

    1993-09-01

    Twenty-seven presentations are included in viewgraph form for the wire development panel, applications development panel, and thallium workshop. Authors and affiliations are: (wire development panel) Kreoger/Christen (ORNL), Malozemoff (American Superconductor Corp.), Blaugher (National Renewable Energy Lab.), Haldar (Intermagnetics), Gray/Lanagan/Eror (ANL), Bickel/Voigt/Roth (Sandia), Tkaczyk (GE), Suenaga (BNL), Willis/Korzekwa/Maley (Los Alamos); (applications development panel) Peterson/Stewart (Los Alamos), Iwasa (BNL), Hull/Nieman (ANL), Murphy/DeGregoria (ORNL), Hazelton (Intermagnetics), Dykhuizen (Sandia); (thallium workshop) Goodrich (NIST), Blaugher (NREL), Roth (Sandia), Holstein (DuPont), Paranthaman (ORNL), and Willis (Los Alamos).

  18. Component failures that lead to reactor scrams. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, E. T.; Wilson, R. J.; Lim, E. Y.

    1980-04-01

    This report summarizes the operating experience scram data compiled from 35 operating US light water reactors (LWRs) to identify the principal components/systems related to reactor scrams. The data base utilized to identify the scram causes is developed from a EPRI-utility sponsored survey conducted by SAI coupled with recent data from the USNRC Gray Books. The reactor population considered in this evaluation is limited to 23 PWRs and 12 BWRs because of the limited scope of the program. The population includes all the US NSSS vendors. It is judged that this population accurately characterizes the component-related scrams in LWRs over the first 10 years of plant operation.

  19. Microsoft Word - Map and Directions to UV.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Schilletter-University Village (SUV) Iowa State University Ames, IA 50011 Ames Laboratory - Public Affairs 111 TASF Iowa State University Ames, IA 50011-3020 Page 1 515.294.9557 1 Enter Ames from Interstate 35 using the 13 th Street Exit (mile marker 113) 2 Continue west on 13 th Street to Stange Rd 3 Turn right (N) on Stange for approx. ½ mile. Look for the Main Office/Community Center (gray bldg-just before the stop lights). Take a right onto Edenburn Dr. and look for your building number.

  20. Various kinds of spatial solitons associated with photoisomerization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang Jianchu; Cai Zebin; Sun Yunzhou; Xu Siliu; Yi Lin

    2009-01-15

    It is predicted that the fundamental spatial solitons, namely bright, dark, and gray solitons associated with photoisomerization, can be formed stably except for antidark solitons. The soliton solutions and the relative properties of these solitons are given in detail. Incoherently coupled bright-dark soliton pairs are also investigated. Both the cases indicate that although the formation of a spontaneous bright soliton based on photoisomerization is impossible, it is, however, possible to form a bright soliton with the joining of a background light or the coupling of another dark soliton. The results provide possible methods of controlling a light with another light.

  1. Electrochemistry of Magnesium Electrolytes in Ionic Liquids for Secondary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Batteries - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research 23, 2014, Research Highlights Electrochemistry of Magnesium Electrolytes in Ionic Liquids for Secondary Batteries Cyclic voltammograms of neat DEME-BF4 (light gray) and 100 mM Mg(BH4)2 in DEME-BF4 (black). CV scan limits are chosen to represent the electrochemical stability window. Inset: magnified view with voltage range restricted to -1.5 to 1.5 V vs. Mg/Mg2+. Scientific Achievement Ionic liquids (ILs) have wide electrochemical stability

  2. Microsoft Word - Fe-S_Clusters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 2010 Figure 1. Top: overall ribbon and surface representation of the x-ray crystal structure of [FeFe]-hydrogenase HydA ΔEFG . Loop regions important for the cluster insertion process are colored green. Bottom: Ball and stick representation of the active site of HydA ΔEFG at which a [4Fe-4S] cluster is present. Coloring scheme: rust, iron; orange, sulfur; gray, carbon; red, oxygen; blue, nitrogen. Assembly and Evolution of Complex Fe-S Clusters as Revealed by X-ray Crystallography

  3. Flexible Fuel Vehicle Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicles & Fuels » Vehicles » Flexible Fuel Vehicle Basics Flexible Fuel Vehicle Basics August 20, 2013 - 9:05am Addthis Photo of a gray van with 'E85 Ethanol' written on the side. Flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs) have an internal combustion engine and are capable of operating on gasoline, E85 (a high-level blend of gasoline and ethanol), or a mixture of both. There are more than 10.6 million flexible fuel vehicles on U.S. roads today. However, many flexible fuel vehicle owners don't realize

  4. Events Calendar | ANSER Center | Argonne-Northwestern National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Events Calendar Home > News & Events > Events Calendar « SEPTEMBER 2016 » Su M Tu W Th F Sa 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Calendar cell color gray: One or more event(s) occur(s) on this day Keyword NEXT 10 EVENTS ON OR AFTER September 4, 2016 [Show all events in September] No upcoming events

  5. Stop/Start: Overview

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    highlighted Driving button Braking button subbanner graphic: gray bar OVERVIEW Stop/Start hybrids are not true hybrids since electricity from the battery is not used to propel the vehicle. However, the Stop/Start feature is an important, energy-saving building block used in hybrid vehicles. Stop/Start technology conserves energy by shutting off the gasoline engine when the vehicle is at rest, such as at a traffic light, and automatically re-starting it when the driver pushes the gas pedal to go

  6. Stop/Start: Driving

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    highlighted Braking button subbanner graphic: gray bar PULLING OUT & DRIVING PART 1 The gasoline engine does not run when the vehicle is at rest. When pulling out, the electric starter/generator uses electricity from the battery to instantly start the gasoline engine---the sole source of propulsion for the vehicle. Go to next… stage graphic: vertical blue rule Main stage: See through car with battery, engine, and electric starter/generator visible. The car is stopped at an intersection.

  7. Pre-treatment for molybdenum or molybdenum-rich alloy articles to be plated

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, Ralph R.

    1980-01-01

    This invention is a method for etching a molybdenum or molybdenum-rich alloy surface to promote the formation of an adherent bond with a subsequently deposited metallic plating. In a typical application, the method is used as a pre-treatment for surfaces to be electrolessly plated with nickel. The pre-treatment comprises exposing the crystal boundaries of the surface by (a) anodizing the surface in acidic solution to form a continuous film of gray molybdenum oxide thereon and (b) removing the film.

  8. Wind Program R&D Newsletter | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    News » Wind Program R&D Newsletter Wind Program R&D Newsletter This U.S. Department of Energy Wind Program Newsletter provides recent news about the program's R&D projects, its accomplishments, upcoming events, funding opportunities, and recent publications. Letter from the Wind Program Director Energy Department in the News Current R&D Past Issues Articles by Topic Letter from the Wind Program Director Photo of man with short-cropped black hair wearing gray pin-striped suite,

  9. 15.08.07 RH Si Microwire Photoanode - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A High-Performance Si Microwire Photocathode Coupled with Ni-Mo Catalyst Shaner, M. R., McKone, J. R., Gray, H. B. & Lewis, N. S. Functional integration of Ni-Mo electrocatalysts with i microwire array photocathodes to simultaneously achieve high fill factors and light-limited photocurrent densities for solar-driven hydrogen evolution. Energy & Environmental Science, DOI: 10.1039/C5EE01076D (2015). Scientific Achievement We have designed and demonstrated a H2-evolving Si microwire

  10. 2013 Publications | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Publications Journal Papers T. A. Addington, R. W. Mertz, J. B. Siegel, J. M. Thompson, A. J. Fisher, V. Filkov, N. M. Fleischman, A. A. Suen, C. Zhang and M. D. Toney, "Janus: Prediction and Ranking of Mutations Required for Functional Interconversion of Enzymes", J. Mol. Biol. 425, 1378 (2013) doi: 10.1016/j.jmb.2013.01.034 N. B. Aetukuri, A. X. Gray, M. Drouard, M. Cossale, L. Gao, A. H. Reid, R. Kukreja, H. Ohldag, C. A. Jenkins, E. Arenholz, K. P. Roche, H. A. Dürr, M. G.

  11. TEC/WG Tribal Issues Topic Group Conference Call Summary February 24,

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    February 24, 1999 Participants: Milton Bluehouse (DOE/EM-22), Wynona Boyer, (Shoshone-Bannock Tribes), Judith Bradbury (PNL), Pamela DeRensis (DOE/EM-22), Margaret Fernandez (DOE/EM-22), Ken Gray (CTUIR), Janet Hill (Oneida Nation), Margaret Hodge (DOE/AL), Robert Holden (NCAI), Judith Holm (DOE/NTPA), Stephanie Martz (NRC), Stanley Paytiamo (Pueblo of Acoma), Bob Pence (DOE/ID), Wilda Portner (SAIC), Greg Sahd (DOE/WIPP), Elissa Turner (DOE/RW), Catherine Volk (DOE/EM-22), Heather Westra

  12. James McKone > Asst. Professor - University of Pittsburgh > Center Alumni >

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Energy Materials Center at Cornell James McKone Asst. Professor - University of Pittsburgh jrm545@cornell.edu James completed his graduate studies at the California Institute of Technology in the Spring of 2013, working with Harry Gray and Nate Lewis in the field of solar fuels. His postdoc research in the Abruña and DiSalvo groups focused on integrating flow battery chemistry with solar light absorbers. In his free time, James loves reading, binge-watching Netflix, playing music, and

  13. LANL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    journey from Trinity to Trinity begins with the New Mexico desert night sky turning instantly to day at 05:29 am on July 16, 1945. An eyewitness recalled, "The effects could well be called unprecedented, magnificent, beautiful, stupendous, and terrifying. The lighting effects beggared description. The whole country was lighted by a searing light with the intensity many times that of the midday sun. It was golden, purple, violet, gray, and blue." It was the Trinity Test: the world's

  14. Transformations in Lighting: The Fifth Annual Solid-State Lighting R&D

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Workshop | Department of Energy Fifth Annual Solid-State Lighting R&D Workshop Transformations in Lighting: The Fifth Annual Solid-State Lighting R&D Workshop Photo of a man and a woman, standing, smiling at the camera. The woman, on the left, is wearing a colorful blue and gray outfit. The man, on the right, is wearing a suit. More than 300 SSL technology leaders from industry, research organizations, universities, and national laboratories gathered in Atlanta, GA, along with

  15. Population and community ecology of the rare plant amsinckia grandiflora

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlsen, T.M.

    1996-11-01

    Research was conducted between the fall of 1992 and the spring on the population and community ecology of the rare annual plant, Amsinckia glandiflora (Gray) Kleeb. ex Greene (Boraginaceae). The research goal was to investigate the causes of the species rarity, data useful to restorative efforts. The work focused on the examination of competitive suppression by exotic annual grasses; comparisons with common, weedy congener; and the role of litter cover and seed germination and seedling establishment. Annual exotic grasses reduced A. grandiflora reproductive output to a greater extent than did the native perennial bunch grass.

  16. BOSS Measures the Universe to One-Percent Accuracy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BOSS Measures the Universe to One-Percent Accuracy BOSS Measures the Universe to One-Percent Accuracy The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey makes the most precise calibration yet of the universe's "standard ruler" January 8, 2014 Contact: Paul Preuss, Paul_Preuss@lbl.gov , +1 415-272-3253 BOSS-BAOv1.jpg Baryon acoustic oscillations (gray spheres), which descend from waves of increased density in the very early universe, are where galaxies have a tendency to cluster or align -- an

  17. Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Chiller Plants | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chiller Plants Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Chiller Plants The Building Technologies Office conducted a healthcare energy end-use monitoring project in partnership with two hospitals. See below for a few highlights from monitoring chiller plant energy. Image of a chiller plant. Chiller Energy Annual site energy use intensities (EUIs) for chiller energy were estimated to be 27.7 kBtu/ft2-yr for the the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Gray Building and 26.8 kBtu/ft2-yr for the State

  18. Slide 1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Conference April 7, 2009 (1) Economic prosperity is intimately tied to affordable energy. (2) There is potential for geopolitical conflict due to escalating competition for energy resources. (3)The risk of adverse Climate Change. The Energy Problem Oil Dependency is a Drain on our Economy (Using EIA data) Oil Dependency is a Drain on our Economy FRBSF Economic Letter 11/18/05 Gray bars indicate a recession Percentage price increase US oil became a net oil importer in the 1940s China's Oil

  19. Three-dimensional profiling with binary fringes using phase-shifting interferometry algorithms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayubi, Gaston A.; Di Martino, J. Matias; Alonso, Julia R.; Fernandez, Ariel; Perciante, Cesar D.; Ferrari, Jose A.

    2011-01-10

    Three-dimensional shape measurements by sinusoidal fringe projection using phase-shifting interferometry algorithms are distorted by the nonlinear response in intensity of commercial video projectors and digital cameras. To solve the problem, we present a method that consists in projecting and acquiring a temporal sequence of strictly binary patterns, whose (adequately weighted) average leads to a sinusoidal fringe pattern with the required number of bits. Since binary patterns consist of ''ones'' and ''zeros'' - and no half-tones are involved - the nonlinear response of the projector and the camera will not play a role, and a nearly unit contrast gray-level sinusoidal fringe pattern is obtained. Validation experiments are presented.

  20. Nitroxylcob(III)Alamin: Synthesis And X-Ray Structural Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hannibal, L.; Smith, C.A.; Jacobsen, D.W.; Brasch, N.E.

    2009-06-01

    The long-elusive crystal structure of nitrosylcobalamin (NOCbl) reveals that the Co-N-O angle is 117.4-121.4{sup o}; hence, NOCbl is best described as nitroxylcob(III)alamin in the solid state (see picture: Co purple, N blue, O red, P orange, C gray, H white). The length of the Co-N bond trans to the NO ligand is typical of those seen when strong {beta}-axial ligands are positioned trans to the 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole group.

  1. Crystal Structure of an Anthrax Toxin -Host Cell Receptor Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Eugenio Santelli1, Laurie A. Bankston1, Stephen H. Leppla2 & Robert C. Liddington1 1Program on Cell Adhesion, The Burnham Institute, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037, U.S.A. 2Microbial Pathogenesis Section, National Insitute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, U.S.A. Fig. 1a: Mechanism of anthrax toxin entry into host cells. Fig. 1b: Two orthogonal views of the PA-cmg2 complex. Cmg2 is shown in blue. PA domains are colored yellow (I), red (II), gray

  2. January 2013 Most Viewed Documents for National Defense | OSTI, US Dept of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information January 2013 Most Viewed Documents for National Defense Dynamic equation of state and strength properties of unreacted PBXW-128 explosive Chhabildas, L.C.; Grady, D.E.; Reinhart, W.D.; Wilson, L.T. From separations to reconstitution - a short history of Plutonium in the U.S. and Russia Gray, L W Condensation induced water hammer safety Gintner, M.A. Direct calibration of the yield of nuclear explosion Nakanishi, K.; Nikolayev, A. [SYNAPSE

  3. Review of Recent Literature Relevant to the Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Devices Task 2.1.3: Effects on Aquatic Organisms – Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kropp, Roy K.

    2011-09-30

    A literature search was conducted by using the Web of Science® Databases component of the ISI Web of KnowledgeSM to identify recent articles that would be useful to help assess the potential environmental effects of renewable energy development in the ocean, with emphasis on marine mammals, seabirds, and fish. Several relatively recent general review articles that included possible effects of marine renewable energy devices on marine mammals and seabirds were examined to begin the search process (e.g., Boehlert et al. 2008; Thompson et al. 2008; Simas et al. 2009). From these articles, several general topics of potential environmental effects on marine mammals, seabirds, and fish were derived. These topics were used as the primary search factors. Searches were conducted with reference to the potential effects of offshore wind farms and MHK devices on marine mammals, seabirds, and fish. Additional sources were identified by cross-checking the Web of Science databases for articles that cited the review articles. It also became clear that often the potential effects were offered as hypotheses that often were not supported by the presentation of appropriate documentation. Therefore, the search was refined and focused on trying to obtain the necessary information to support or challenge a proposed potential effect to a specific concern. One of the expressed concerns regarding MHK devices is that placing wave parks in coastal waters could compromise the migration patterns of whales. Disruption of the annual migration of the gray whale (Eschrichtius robustus), which swims at least 30,000 km on its round trip from breeding grounds in Baja California to feeding areas in the Bering Sea, is of particular concern. Among the hypothesized effects on the migrating gray whales are increased predation risk by constricting migration corridor to between array and shore or by forcing the whales to swim into deeper waters, increased metabolic energy costs and delays in reaching the

  4. MQ NMR and SPME analysis of nonlinearity in the degradation of a filled silicone elastomer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chinn, S C; Alviso, C T; Berman, E S; Harvey, C A; Maxwell, R S; Wilson, T S; Cohenour, R; Saalwachter, K; Chasse, W

    2008-10-10

    Radiation induced degradation of polymeric materials occurs via numerous, simultaneous, competing chemical reactions. Though degradation is typically found to be linear in adsorbed dose, some silicone materials exhibit non-linear dose dependence due to dose dependent dominant degradation pathways. We have characterized the effects of radiative and thermal degradation on a model filled-PDMS system, Sylgard 184 (commonly used as an electronic encapsulant and in biomedical applications), using traditional mechanical testing, NMR spectroscopy, and sample headspace analysis using Solid Phase Micro-Extraction (SPME) followed by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS). The mechanical data and {sup 1}H spin-echo NMR indicated that radiation exposure leads to predominantly crosslinking over the cumulative dose range studies (0 to 250 kGray) with a rate roughly linear with dose. {sup 1}H Multiple Quantum NMR detected a bimodal distribution in the network structure, as expected by the proposed structure of Sylgard 184. The MQ-NMR further indicated that the radiation induced structural changes were not linear in adsorbed dose and competing chain scission mechanisms contribute more largely to the overall degradation process in the range of 50 -100 kGray (though crosslinking still dominates). The SPME-GC/MS data were analyzed using Principal Component Analysis (PCA), which identified subtle changes in the distributions of degradation products (the cyclic siloxanes and other components of the material) as a function of age that provide insight into the dominant degradation pathways at low and high adsorbed dose.

  5. Characterization of solid state nuclear track detectors of the polyallyl-diglycol-carbonate (CR-39/PM-355) type for light charged particle spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malinowska, A. Jask?a, M.; Korman, A.; Kuk, M.; Szyd?owski, A.

    2014-12-15

    This paper presents a method which uses the characteristics of the etch pits induced in a polyallyl-diglycol-carbonate (PADC) detector of the CR-39/PM-355 type to estimate particle energy. This method is based on the data provided by a semiautomatic system that selects tracks according to two parameters, crater diameters, and mean gray level values. In this paper we used the results of the calibration measurements that were obtained in our laboratory in the period 20002014. Combining the information on the two parameters it is possible to determine unambiguously the incident projectile energy values. The paper presents the results of an attempt to estimate the energy resolution of the method when analyzing the tracks produced in the CR-39/PM-355 detector by energetic ions such as alpha particles, protons, and deuterons. We discuss the energy resolution of the measurement of light charged particle energy which is based on the parameters (crater diameter and mean gray level value) of tracks induced in solid state nuclear track detectors of the PADC type.

  6. Computational Nanophotonics: modeling optical interactions and transport in tailored nanosystem architectures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schatz, George; Ratner, Mark

    2014-02-27

    This report describes research by George Schatz and Mark Ratner that was done over the period 10/03-5/09 at Northwestern University. This research project was part of a larger research project with the same title led by Stephen Gray at Argonne. A significant amount of our work involved collaborations with Gray, and there were many joint publications as summarized later. In addition, a lot of this work involved collaborations with experimental groups at Northwestern, Argonne, and elsewhere. The research was primarily concerned with developing theory and computational methods that can be used to describe the interaction of light with noble metal nanoparticles (especially silver) that are capable of plasmon excitation. Classical electrodynamics provides a powerful approach for performing these studies, so much of this research project involved the development of methods for solving Maxwell’s equations, including both linear and nonlinear effects, and examining a wide range of nanostructures, including particles, particle arrays, metal films, films with holes, and combinations of metal nanostructures with polymers and other dielectrics. In addition, our work broke new ground in the development of quantum mechanical methods to describe plasmonic effects based on the use of time dependent density functional theory, and we developed new theory concerned with the coupling of plasmons to electrical transport in molecular wire structures. Applications of our technology were aimed at the development of plasmonic devices as components of optoelectronic circuits, plasmons for spectroscopy applications, and plasmons for energy-related applications.

  7. Intensity inhomogeneity correction for magnetic resonance imaging of human brain at 7T

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uwano, Ikuko; Yamashita, Fumio; Higuchi, Satomi; Ito, Kenji; Sasaki, Makoto; Kudo, Kohsuke Goodwin, Jonathan; Harada, Taisuke; Ogawa, Akira

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance and efficacy for intensity inhomogeneity correction of various sequences of the human brain in 7T MRI using the extended version of the unified segmentation algorithm. Materials: Ten healthy volunteers were scanned with four different sequences (2D spin echo [SE], 3D fast SE, 2D fast spoiled gradient echo, and 3D time-of-flight) by using a 7T MRI system. Intensity inhomogeneity correction was performed using the “New Segment” module in SPM8 with four different values (120, 90, 60, and 30 mm) of full width at half maximum (FWHM) in Gaussian smoothness. The uniformity in signals in the entire white matter was evaluated using the coefficient of variation (CV); mean signal intensities between the subcortical and deep white matter were compared, and contrast between subcortical white matter and gray matter was measured. The length of the lenticulostriate (LSA) was measured on maximum intensity projection (MIP) images in the original and corrected images. Results: In all sequences, the CV decreased as the FWHM value decreased. The differences of mean signal intensities between subcortical and deep white matter also decreased with smaller FWHM values. The contrast between white and gray matter was maintained at all FWHM values. LSA length was significantly greater in corrected MIP than in the original MIP images. Conclusions: Intensity inhomogeneity in 7T MRI can be successfully corrected using SPM8 for various scan sequences.

  8. Updated Spitzer emission spectroscopy of bright transiting hot Jupiter HD 189733b

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todorov, Kamen O.; Deming, Drake; Burrows, Adam; Grillmair, Carl J.

    2014-12-01

    We analyze all existing secondary eclipse time series spectroscopy of hot Jupiter HD 189733b acquired with the now defunct Spitzer/Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) instrument. We describe the novel approaches we develop to remove the systematic effects and extract accurate secondary eclipse depths as a function of wavelength in order to construct the emission spectrum of the exoplanet. We compare our results with a previous study by Grillmair et al. that did not examine all data sets available to us. We are able to confirm the detection of a water feature near 6 μm claimed by Grillmair et al. We compare the planetary emission spectrum to three model families—based on isothermal atmosphere, gray atmosphere, and two realizations of the complex radiative transfer model by Burrows et al., adopted in Grillmair et al.'s study. While we are able to reject the simple isothermal and gray models based on the data at the 97% level just from the IRS data, these rejections hinge on eclipses measured within a relatively narrow wavelength range, between 5.5 and 7 μm. This underscores the need for observational studies with broad wavelength coverage and high spectral resolution, in order to obtain robust information on exoplanet atmospheres.

  9. Sedimentology and petroleum occurrence, Schoolhouse Member, Maroon Formation (Lower Permian), northwestern Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, S.Y.; Schenk, C.J.; Anders, D.L.; Tuttle, M.L. )

    1990-02-01

    The Lower Permian Schoolhouse Member of the Maroon Formation (formerly considered the Schoolhouse Tongue of the Weber Sandstone) forms a partly exhumed petroleum reservoir in the Eagle basin of northwestern Colorado. The Schoolhouse consists mainly of yellowish gray to gray, low-angle to parallel bedded, very fine to fine-grained sandstone of eolian sand-sheet origin; interbedded fluvial deposits are present in most sections. The sand-sheet deposits of the Schoolhouse Member are sedimentologically and petrologically similar to those in the underlying red beds of the main body of the Maroon Formation, and the Schoolhouse is considered the uppermost sand sheet in the Maroon depositional sequence. The bleached and oil-stained Schoolhouse member is distinguished from the underlying Maroon red beds on the basis of its diagenetic history, which is related to regional hydrocarbon migration and development of secondary porosity. Geological and geochemical data suggest that Schoolhouse Member oils have upper Paleozoic sources, including the intrabasinal Belden Formation. 13 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Reintroduction of Lower Columbia River Chum Salmon into Duncan Creek, 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hillson, Todd D.

    2009-06-12

    The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) listed Lower Columbia River (LCR) chum salmon as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in March, 1999 (64 FR 14508, March 25, 1999). The listing was in response to the reduction in abundance from historical levels of more than one-half million returning adults to fewer than 10,000 present-day spawners. Harvest, habitat degradation, changes in flow regimes, riverbed movement and heavy siltation have been largely responsible for this decline. The timing of seasonal changes in river flow and water temperatures is perhaps the most critical factor in structuring the freshwater life history of this species. This is especially true of the population located directly below Bonneville Dam, where hydropower operations can block access to spawning sites, dewater redds, strand fry, cause scour or fill of redds and increase sedimentation of spawning gravels. Prior to 1997, only two chum salmon populations were recognized as genetically distinct in the Columbia River, although spawning had been documented in many Lower Columbia River tributaries. The first population was in the Grays River (RKm 34), a tributary of the Columbia River, and the second was a group of spawners utilizing the mainstem Columbia River just below Bonneville Dam (RKm 235) adjacent to Ives Island and in Hardy and Hamilton creeks. Using additional DNA samples, Small et al. (2006) grouped chum salmon spawning in the mainstem Columbia River and the Washington State tributaries into three groups: the Coastal, the Cascade and the Gorge. The Coastal group comprises those spawning in the Grays River, Skamokawa Creek and the broodstock used at the Sea Resources facility on the Chinook River. The Cascade group comprises those spawning in the Cowlitz (both summer and fall stocks), Kalama, Lewis, and East Fork Lewis rivers, with most supporting unique populations. The Gorge group comprises those spawning in the mainstem Columbia River from the I-205 Bridge up to

  11. A Novel Charge Recycling Approach to Low-Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulaganathan, Chandradevi; Britton Jr, Charles L; Holleman, Jeremy; Blalock, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    A novel charge-recycling scheme has been designed and implemented to demonstrate the feasibility of operating digital circuits using the charge scavenged from the leakage and dynamic load currents inherent to digital logic. The proposed scheme uses capacitors to efficiently recover the ground-bound charge and to subsequently boost the capacitor voltage to power up the source circuit. This recycling methodology has been implemented on a 12-bit Gray-code counter within a 12-bit multichannel Wilkinson ADC. The circuit has been designed in 0.5 m BiCMOS and in 90nm CMOS processes. SPICE simulation results reveal a 46 53% average reduction in the energy consumption of the counter. The total energy savings including the control generation aggregates to an average of 26 34%.

  12. Schlieren technique applied to the arc temperature measurement in a high energy density cutting torch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prevosto, L.; Mancinelli, B.; Artana, G.; Kelly, H.

    2010-01-15

    Plasma temperature and radial density profiles of the plasma species in a high energy density cutting arc have been obtained by using a quantitative schlieren technique. A Z-type two-mirror schlieren system was used in this research. Due to its great sensibility such technique allows measuring plasma composition and temperature from the arc axis to the surrounding medium by processing the gray-level contrast values of digital schlieren images recorded at the observation plane for a given position of a transverse knife located at the exit focal plane of the system. The technique has provided a good visualization of the plasma flow emerging from the nozzle and its interactions with the surrounding medium and the anode. The obtained temperature values are in good agreement with those values previously obtained by the authors on the same torch using Langmuir probes.

  13. Early F-type stars - refined classification, confrontation with Stromgren photometry, and the effects of rotation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, R.O.; Garrison, R.F.

    1989-02-01

    The classification for early F-type stars in the MK spectral classification system presented by Gray and Garrison (1987) is refined. The effect of rotation on spectral classification and ubvy-beta photometry of early F-type stars is examined. It is found that the classical luminosity criterion, the 4417 A/4481 A ratio gives inconsistent results. It is shown that most of the stars in the Delta Delphini class of metallic-line stars are either normal or are indistinguishable from proto-Am stars. It is suggested that the designation Delta Delphini should be dropped. The classifications are compared with Stromgren photometry. The effects of rotation on the delta-c sub 1 index in the early-F field dwarfs is demonstrated. 55 references.

  14. Spatially addressable design of gradient index structures through spatial light modulator based holographic lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohlinger, Kris; Lutkenhaus, Jeff [Department of Physics, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203 (United States); Arigong, Bayaner; Zhang, Hualiang [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203 (United States); Lin, Yuankun, E-mail: yuankun.lin@unt.edu [Department of Physics, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203 (United States)

    2013-12-07

    In this paper, we present an achievable gradient refractive index in bi-continuous holographic structures that are formed through five-beam interference. We further present a theoretic approach for the realization of gradient index devices by engineering the phases of the interfering beams with a pixelated spatial light modulator. As an example, the design concept of a gradient index Luneburg lens is verified through full-wave electromagnetic simulations. These five beams with desired phases can be generated through programming gray level super-cells in a diffractive spatial light modulator. As a proof-of-concept, gradient index structures are demonstrated using synthesized and gradient phase patterns displayed in the spatial light modulator.

  15. Coal recovery from mine wastes of the historic longwall mining district of north-central illinois. Illinois mineral notes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, L.A.; Berggren, D.J.; Camp, L.R.

    1986-01-01

    Recovery of coal from mine wastes produced by historic longwall mines in northeastern Illinois was studied as part of a project undertaken in 1982 for the Illinois Abandoned Mined Lands Reclamation Council. About 100 of these mines operated in the Wilmington and La Salle Districts of the Illinois Coal Field between about 1870 and 1940; all worked the Colchester (No. 2) Coal Seam, using a manual high-extraction mining method. Large samples of the three major kinds of mine waste - gray mining gob, preparation gob, and preparation slurry - were collected from deposits at nine of the larger mine sites and analyzed to determine their general ranges of sulfur, ash, and heating values. Preparation gob and slurry from six of the sites had significant combustible contents, and were evaluated by a simple procedure in which ash analyses and wet-screening tests were used to determine the washability and yield of combustibles to recovery processes.

  16. Monitoring of Olympic National Park Beaches to determine fate and effects of spilled bunker C fuel oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strand, J.A.; Cullinan, V.I.; Crecelius, E.A.; Fortman, T.J.; Citterman, R.J.; Fleischmann, M.L.

    1990-10-01

    On December 23, 1988, the barge Nestucca was accidentally struck by its tow, a Souse Brothers Towing Company tug, releasing approximately 230,000 gallons of Bunker C fuel oil and fouling beaches from Grays Harbor north to Vancouver Island. Affected beaches in Washington included a 40-mile-long strip that has been recently added to Olympic National Park. The purpose of the monitoring program documented in this report was to determine the fate of spilled Bunker C fuel oil on selected Washington coastal beaches. We sought to determine (1) how much oil remained in intertidal and shallow subtidal habitats following clean-up and weathering, (2) to what extent intertidal and/or shallow subtidal biotic assemblages have been contaminated, and (3) how rapidly the oil has left the ecosystem. 45 refs., 18 figs., 8 tabs.

  17. Continuous production of strip by Rheocasting. Final report, August 16, 1978-September 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flemings, M.C.

    1981-01-01

    The report presents results of the mathematical and experimental modeling study undertaken, and also (1) describes the basic mechanism and process of Rheocasting (shaping in semisolid state), (2) outlines work done to date, and (3) attempts to delineate areas of potential engineering applications of the process. Two such areas appear most fruitful for further work. One is that of forming shapes, where processes such as die casting or forging are used today. Pilot projects in industry indicate this process is well advanced for the nonferrous alloys of aluminum and magnesium, but important potential applications also exist for copper, gray iron, and steel. The second is in continuous casting, especially of strip. Significant technical and economic advantages could result from Rheocasting strip of aluminum, magnesium, and steel alloys. Potential technical advantages include improved surface, greater freedom from cracking and segregation, ability to strip cast alloys not now castable, and increased productivity.

  18. Absorption chillers: Part of the solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Occhionero, A.J. ); Hughes, P.J. ); Reid, E.A. )

    1991-01-01

    Acid rain, ozone depletion, global warming, and implementation economics are considered as they relate to the advisability of expanding the application of absorption chillers. Introductory and background information are provided to put the discussion in the proper context. Then all four issues are discussed separately as they relate to absorption chillers. Acid rain and ozone depletion concerns, and implementation economics, are found to support the expanded use of absorption chillers. The global warming concern is found to be more of a gray area, but the areas of benefit correspond well with the conditions of greatest economic advantage. All things considered, absorption chillers are believed to be part of the environmental and economic solution. It is further believed that integrated resource planning (IRP) processes that consider electric and gas technologies on an equal footing would come to the same conclusion for many regions of the United States. 9 refs., 3 tabs.

  19. Compilation of air-pollutant emission factors. Volume 1. Stationary-point and area sources, Fourth Edition. Supplement A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joyner, W.M.

    1986-10-01

    In the supplement to the Fourth Edition of AP-42, new or revised emissions data are presented for Bituminous and subbituminous coal combustion; Anthracite coal combustion; Fuel oil combustion; Natural gas combustion; Wood waste combustion in boilers; Lignite combustion; Sodium carbonate; Primary aluminum production; Coke production; Primary copper smelting; Ferroalloy production; Iron and steel production; Primary lead smelting; Zinc smelting; Secondary aluminum operations; Gray iron foundries; Secondary lead smelting; Asphaltic concrete plants; Bricks and related clay products; Portland cement manufacturing; Concrete batching; Glass manufacturing; Lime manufacturing; Construction aggregate processing; Taconite ore processing; Western surface coal mining; Chemical wood pulping; Appendix C.1, Particle-size distribution data and sized emission factors for selected sources; and Appendix C.2, Generalized particle size distributions.

  20. Using Focused Regression for Accurate Time-Constrained Scaling of Scientific Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, B; Garren, J; Lowenthal, D; Reeves, J; de Supinski, B; Schulz, M; Rountree, B

    2010-01-28

    Many large-scale clusters now have hundreds of thousands of processors, and processor counts will be over one million within a few years. Computational scientists must scale their applications to exploit these new clusters. Time-constrained scaling, which is often used, tries to hold total execution time constant while increasing the problem size along with the processor count. However, complex interactions between parameters, the processor count, and execution time complicate determining the input parameters that achieve this goal. In this paper we develop a novel gray-box, focused median prediction errors are less than 13%. regression-based approach that assists the computational scientist with maintaining constant run time on increasing processor counts. Combining application-level information from a small set of training runs, our approach allows prediction of the input parameters that result in similar per-processor execution time at larger scales. Our experimental validation across seven applications showed that median prediction errors are less than 13%.

  1. Multicolored Vertical Silicon Nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seo, Kwanyong; Wober, Munib; Steinvurzel, P.; Schonbrun, E.; Dan, Yaping; Ellenbogen, T.; Crozier, K. B.

    2011-04-13

    We demonstrate that vertical silicon nanowires take on a surprising variety of colors covering the entire visible spectrum, in marked contrast to the gray color of bulk silicon. This effect is readily observable by bright-field microscopy, or even to the naked eye. The reflection spectra of the nanowires each show a dip whose position depends on the nanowire radii. We compare the experimental data to the results of finite difference time domain simulations to elucidate the physical mechanisms behind the phenomena we observe. The nanowires are fabricated as arrays, but the vivid colors arise not from scattering or diffractive effects of the array, but from the guided mode properties of the individual nanowires. Each nanowire can thus define its own color, allowing for complex spatial patterning. We anticipate that the color filter effect we demonstrate could be employed in nanoscale image sensor devices.

  2. Genes and the Microenvironment: Two Faces of Breast Cancer (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Gray, Joe; Love, Susan M.; Bissell, Min; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2011-10-04

    In this April 21, 2008 Berkeley Lab event, a dynamic panel of Berkeley Lab scientists highlight breast cancer research advances related to susceptibility, early detection, prevention, and therapy - a biological systems approach to tackling the disease from the molecular and cellular levels, to tissues and organs, and ultimately the whole individual. Joe Gray, Berkeley Lab Life Sciences Division Director, explores how chromosomal abnormalities contribute to cancer and respond to gene-targeted therapies. Mina Bissell, former Life Sciences Division Director, approaches the challenge of breast cancer from the breast's three dimensional tissue microenvironment and how the intracellular ''conversation'' triggers malignancies. Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff, Deputy Director, Life Sciences Division, identifies what exposure to ionizing radiation can tell us about how normal tissues suppress carcinogenesis. The panel is moderated by Susan M. Love, breast cancer research pioneer, author, President and Medical Director of the Dr. Susan Love Research Foundation.

  3. The Telephone: An Invention with Many Fathers

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Brenni, Paolo [CNR-FST-IMSS, Florence, Italy

    2010-01-08

    The names of A.G. Bell, A. Meucci, P.Reis, E. Gray, just to mention the most important ones, are all connected with the invention of the telephone. Today, the Italian inventor A. Meucci is recognized as being the first to propose a working prototype of the electric telephone. However, for a series of reasons his strenuous efforts were not rewarded. I will not repeat here the endless and complex disputes about the ?real father? of the telephone. From an historical point of view it is more interesting to understand why so many individuals from different backgrounds conceived of a similar apparatus and why most of these devices were simply forgotten or just remained laboratory curiosities. The case of the development of the telephone is an emblematic and useful example for better understanding the intricate factors which are involved in the birth of an invention and reasons for its success and failure.

  4. Multiphasic survival curves for cells of human tumor cell lines: Induced repair or hypersensitive subpopulation?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambin, P. ||; Fertil, B.; Malaise, E.P.; Joiner, M.C.

    1994-04-01

    Survival of the cells of three human tumor cell lines of differing radiosensitivity was measured after irradiation with single doses of X rays (0.05-5 Gy). At doses below 1 Gy, cells were more radiosensitive than predicted by back-extrapolating the high-dose response. This difference was more marked for cells of the radioresistant cell lines than the radiosensitive cell line so that the {open_quotes}true{close_quotes} initial slopes of the survival curves, at very low doses, were similar for the cells of the three cell lines. This phenomenon could reflect an induced radioresistance so that low doses of X rays are more effective per gray than higher doses, because only at higher doses is there sufficient damage to trigger repair systems or other radioprotective mechanisms which can then act during the time course for repair of DNA injury. 35 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.1 Building Materials/Insulation

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    5 Properties of Cool Roofing Materials (1) Asphalt Shingles Shasta White 0.26 0.91 Generic White 0.25 0.91 Generic Grey 0.22 0.91 Light Brown 0.19 0.91 Medium Brown 0.12 0.91 Generic Black 0.05 0.91 White Coatings White Coating (1 coat, 8 mil) 0.80 0.91 White Coating (2 coats, 20 mil) 0.85 0.91 Aluminum Coatings Aluminum 0.61 0.25 Fibered on Black 0.40 0.56 Membranes Gray EPDM (4) 0.23 0.87 White EPDM (4) 0.69 0.87 T-EPDM (4) 0.81 0.92 Light Gravel on Built-Up Roof 0.34 0.90 Metal Roof New, Bare

  6. Calculating nonlocal optical properties of structures with arbitrary shape.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMahon, J. M.; Gray, S. K.; Schatz, G. C.; Northwestern Univ.

    2010-07-16

    In a recent Letter [J. M. McMahon, S. K. Gray, and G. C. Schatz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 097403 (2009)], we outlined a computational method to calculate the optical properties of structures with a spatially nonlocal dielectric function. In this paper, we detail the full method and verify it against analytical results for cylindrical nanowires. Then, as examples of our method, we calculate the optical properties of Au nanostructures in one, two, and three dimensions. We first calculate the transmission, reflection, and absorption spectra of thin films. Because of their simplicity, these systems demonstrate clearly the longitudinal (or volume) plasmons characteristic of nonlocal effects, which result in anomalous absorption and plasmon blueshifting. We then study the optical properties of spherical nanoparticles, which also exhibit such nonlocal effects. Finally, we compare the maximum and average electric field enhancements around nanowires of various shapes to local theory predictions. We demonstrate that when nonlocal effects are included, significant decreases in such properties can occur.

  7. SU-E-E-16: The Application of Texture Analysis for Differentiation of Central Cancer From Atelectasis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, M; Fan, T; Duan, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Prospectively assess the potential utility of texture analysis for differentiation of central cancer from atelectasis. Methods: 0 consecutive central lung cancer patients who were referred for CT imaging and PET-CT were enrolled. Radiotherapy doctor delineate the tumor and atelectasis according to the fusion imaging based on CT image and PET-CT image. The texture parameters (such as energy, correlation, sum average, difference average, difference entropy), were obtained respectively to quantitatively discriminate tumor and atelectasis based on gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) Results: The texture analysis results showed that the parameters of correlation and sum average had an obviously statistical significance(P<0.05). Conclusion: the results of this study indicate that texture analysis may be useful for the differentiation of central lung cancer and atelectasis.

  8. The FBI compression standard for digitized fingerprint images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brislawn, C.M.; Bradley, J.N.; Onyshczak, R.J.; Hopper, T.

    1996-10-01

    The FBI has formulated national standards for digitization and compression of gray-scale fingerprint images. The compression algorithm for the digitized images is based on adaptive uniform scalar quantization of a discrete wavelet transform subband decomposition, a technique referred to as the wavelet/scalar quantization method. The algorithm produces archival-quality images at compression ratios of around 15 to 1 and will allow the current database of paper fingerprint cards to be replaced by digital imagery. A compliance testing program is also being implemented to ensure high standards of image quality and interchangeability of data between different implementations. We will review the current status of the FBI standard, including the compliance testing process and the details of the first-generation encoder.

  9. Evaluation of Neutron Elastic Scatter (NES) technique for detection of graphitic corrosion in gas cast iron pipe. Final report, March 1996-April 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charatis, G.; Hugg, E.; McEllistrem, M.

    1997-04-01

    PENETRON, Inc., in two phases, demonstrated the effectiveness of its Neutron elastic Scatter (NES) techniques in detecting the change in the carbon weight percentage (CWt%) as a measure of corrosion in gray cast iron pipe. In Phase I, experiments were performed with synthetic standards supplied by IIT Research Institute (IITRI) to test the applicability of the NES techniques. Irradiation experiments performed at the University of Kentucky showed that CWt% could be detected, ranging from 1.6% to 13%, within an uncertainty of around 4%. In Phase II, experiments were performed on seven (7) corroded pipe sections supplied by MichCon. Tests were made on pipe sliced lengthwise into quarter sections, and in re-assembled whole pipe sections. X-ray films of the quarter sections indicated probable areas of corrosion for each quarter section.

  10. Corrosion and hydriding performance evaluation of three zircaloy-2 clad fuel assemblies after continuous exposure in PWR cores 1 and 2, at Shippingport, PA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hillner, E.

    1980-01-01

    Three original Zircaloy-2 clad blanket fuel bundles from the pressurized water reactor (PWR) at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station were discharged after continuous exposure during Cores 1 and 2. Detailed visual examination of these components after approx. 6300 calendar days of operation (51,140 EFPH) revealed only the anticipated uniform light gray (post-transition) corrosion products with no evidence of unexpected corrosion deterioration, fuel rod warpage, or other damage. All corrosion films were found to be tightly adherent to the underlying cladding. An extensive destructive examination of a selected fuel rod from each of three fuel bundles produced appreciably greater end-of-life rod average oxide film thickness when compared with corresponding values produced from a set of empirical equations generated from the out-of-pile (autoclave) testing of Zircaloy coupons.

  11. Comparing Shape and Texture Features for Pattern Recognition in Simulation Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newsam, S; Kamath, C

    2004-12-10

    Shape and texture features have been used for some time for pattern recognition in datasets such as remote sensed imagery, medical imagery, photographs, etc. In this paper, we investigate shape and texture features for pattern recognition in simulation data. In particular, we explore which features are suitable for characterizing regions of interest in images resulting from fluid mixing simulations. Three texture features--gray level co-occurrence matrices, wavelets, and Gabor filters--and two shape features--geometric moments and the angular radial transform--are compared. The features are evaluated using a similarity retrieval framework. Our preliminary results indicate that Gabor filters perform the best among the texture features and the angular radial transform performs the best among the shape features. The feature which performs the best overall is dependent on how the groundtruth dataset is created.

  12. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Moab Quadrangle, Colorado and Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, J.A.; Franczyk, K.J.; Lupe, R.D.; Peterson, F.

    1982-09-01

    Portions of the Salt Wash Member of the Morrison, the Chinle, the Rico, the Cutler, and the Entrada Formations are favorable for uranium deposits that meet the minimum size and grade requirements of the US Department of Energy within the Moab 1' x 2' Quadrangle, Utah and Colorado. Nine areas are judged favorable for the Late Jurassic Salt Wash Member. The criteria used to evaluate these areas as favorable include the presence of (1) fluvial sandstone beds deposited by low-energy streams; (2) actively moving major and minor structures such as the Paradox basin and the many folds within it; (3) paleostream transport directions approximately perpendicular to the trend of many of the paleofolds; (4) presence of favorable gray lacustrine mudstone beds; and (5) known uranium occurrences associated with the favorable gray mudstones. Three favorable areas have been outlined for the Late Triassic Chinle Formation. The criteria used to evaluate these areas are the sandstone-to-shale ratios for the Chinle Formation and the distribution of the Petrified Forest Member of the Chinle, which is considered the source for the uranium. Two favorable areas have been delineated for the Permian Cutler Formation, and one for the Permian Rico Formation. The criteria used to outline favorable areas are the distribution of favorable facies within each formation. Favorable facies are those that are a result of deposition in environments that are transitional between fluvial and marine. One favorable area is outlined in the Jurassic Entrada Sandstone in the southeastern corner of the quadrangle in the Placerville district. Boundaries for this area were established by geologic mapping.

  13. Evaluation of MRI and cannabinoid type 1 receptor PET templates constructed using DARTEL for spatial normalization of rat brains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kronfeld, Andrea; Müller-Forell, Wibke; Buchholz, Hans-Georg; Maus, Stephan; Reuss, Stefan; Schreckenberger, Mathias; Miederer, Isabelle; Lutz, Beat

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: Image registration is one prerequisite for the analysis of brain regions in magnetic-resonance-imaging (MRI) or positron-emission-tomography (PET) studies. Diffeomorphic anatomical registration through exponentiated Lie algebra (DARTEL) is a nonlinear, diffeomorphic algorithm for image registration and construction of image templates. The goal of this small animal study was (1) the evaluation of a MRI and calculation of several cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor PET templates constructed using DARTEL and (2) the analysis of the image registration accuracy of MR and PET images to their DARTEL templates with reference to analytical and iterative PET reconstruction algorithms. Methods: Five male Sprague Dawley rats were investigated for template construction using MRI and [{sup 18}F]MK-9470 PET for CB1 receptor representation. PET images were reconstructed using the algorithms filtered back-projection, ordered subset expectation maximization in 2D, and maximum a posteriori in 3D. Landmarks were defined on each MR image, and templates were constructed under different settings, i.e., based on different tissue class images [gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), and GM + WM] and regularization forms (“linear elastic energy,” “membrane energy,” and “bending energy”). Registration accuracy for MRI and PET templates was evaluated by means of the distance between landmark coordinates. Results: The best MRI template was constructed based on gray and white matter images and the regularization form linear elastic energy. In this case, most distances between landmark coordinates were <1 mm. Accordingly, MRI-based spatial normalization was most accurate, but results of the PET-based spatial normalization were quite comparable. Conclusions: Image registration using DARTEL provides a standardized and automatic framework for small animal brain data analysis. The authors were able to show that this method works with high reliability and validity. Using DARTEL

  14. Petroleum potential of lower and middle Paleozoic rocks in Nebraska portion of Mid-Continent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, M.P. )

    1989-08-01

    Central North America during the Paleozoic was characterized by northern (Williston) and southern (Anadarko) depositional regimes separated by a stable Transcontinental arch. Nebraska lies on the southern flank of this arch and contains the northern zero edges of the lower and middle Paleozoic rocks of the southern regime. Most of these rocks are secondary dolomites with zones of excellent intercrystalline porosity. The Reagan-LaMotte Sandstones and the overlying Arbuckle dolomites are overlapped by Middle Ordovician rocks toward the Transcontinental arch. Rocks equivalent to the Simpson consist of a basal sand (St. Peter) and overlying interbedded gray-green shales and dolomitic limestones. An uppermost shale facies is present in the Upper Ordovician (Viola-Maquoketa) eastward and southward across Nebraska. The dolomite facies extends northward into the Williston basin. The Silurian dolomites, originally more widely deposited, are overlapped by Devonian dolomites in southeastern Nebraska. Upper Devonian rocks exhibit a regional facies change from carbonate to green-gray shale to black shale southeastward across the Mid-Continent. Mississippian carbonates overlap the Devonian westward and northward across the Transcontinental arch. Pennsylvanian uplift and erosion were widespread, producing numerous stratigraphic traps. Sands related to the basal Pennsylvanian unconformity produce along the Cambridge arch. Arbuckle, Simpson, Viola, and Hunton production is present in the Forest City basin and along the Central Kansas uplift. Although source rocks are scarce and the maturation is marginal, current theories of long-distance oil migration encourage exploration in the extensive lower and middle Paleozoic reservoirs in this portion of the Mid-Continent.

  15. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Cortez quadrangle, Colorado and Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, J A

    1982-09-01

    Six stratigraphic units are recognized as favorable for the occurrence of uranium deposits that meet the minimum size and grade requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy in the Cortez 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ Quadrangle, Utah and Colorado. These units include the Jurassic Salt Wash, Recapture, and Brushy Basin Members of the Morrison Formation and the Entrada Sandstone, the Late Triassic Chinle Formation, and the Permian Cutler Formation. Four areas are judged favorable for the Morrison members which include the Slick Rock, Montezuma Canyon, Cottonwood Wash and Hatch districts. The criteria used to determine favorability include the presence of the following (1) fluvial sandstone beds deposited by low-energy streams; (2) actively moving major and minor structures such as the Paradox Basin and the many folds within it; (3) paleostream transport directions approximately perpendicular to the trend of many of the paleofolds; (4) presence of favorable gray lacustrine mudstone beds; and (5) known uranium occurrences associated with the favorable gray mudstones. Two areas of favorability are recognized for the Chinle Formation. These areas include the Abajo Mountain and Aneth-Ute Mountain areas. The criteria used to determine favorability include the sandstone-to-mudstone ratio for the Chinle Formation and the geographic distribution of the Petrified Forest Member of the Chinle Formation. Two favorable areas are recognized for the Cutler Formation. Both of these areas are along the northern border of the quadrangle between the Abajo Mountains and the Dolores River Canyon area. Two areas are judged favorable for the Entrada Sandstone. One area is in the northeast corner of the quadrangle in the Placerville district and the second is along the eastern border of the quadrangle on the southeast flank of the La Plata Mountains.

  16. SU-E-I-77: A Noise Reduction Technique for Energy-Resolved Photon-Counting Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lam Ng, A; Ding, H; Cho, H; Molloi, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Finding the optimal energy threshold setting for an energy-resolved photon-counting detector has an important impact on the maximization of contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR). We introduce a noise reduction method to enhance CNR by reducing the noise in each energy bin without altering the average gray levels in the projection and image domains. Methods: We simulated a four bin energy-resolved photon-counting detector based on Si with a 10 mm depth of interaction. TASMIP algorithm was used to simulate a spectrum of 65 kVp with 2.7 mm Al filter. A 13 mm PMMA phantom with hydroxyapatite and iodine at different concentrations (100, 200 and 300 mg/ml for HA, and 2, 4, and 8 mg/ml for Iodine) was used. Projection-based and Image-based energy weighting methods were used to generate weighted images. A reference low noise image was used for noise reduction purposes. A Gaussian-like weighting function which computes the similarity between pixels of interest was calculated from the reference image and implemented on a pixel by pixel basis for the noisy images. Results: CNR improvement compared to different methods (Charge-Integrated, Photon-Counting and Energy-Weighting) and after noise reduction was highly task-dependent. The CNR improvement with respect to the Charge-Integrated CNR for hydroxyapatite and iodine were 1.8 and 1.5, respectively. In each of the energy bins, the noise was reduced by approximately factor of two without altering their respective average gray levels. Conclusion: The proposed noise reduction technique for energy-resolved photon-counting detectors can significantly reduce image noise. This technique can be used as a compliment to the current energy-weighting methods in CNR optimization.

  17. Measurements in large pool fires with an actively cooled calorimeter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koski, J.A.; Wix, S.D.

    1995-12-31

    The pool fire thermal test described in Safety Series 6 published by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) or Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71 (10CFR71) in the United States is one of the most difficult tests that a container for larger ``Type B`` quantities of nuclear materials must pass. If retests of a container are required, costly redesign and project delays can result. Accurate measurements and modeling of the pool fire environment will ultimately lower container costs by assuring that containers past the pool fire test on the first attempt. Experiments indicate that the object size or surface temperature of the container can play a role in determining local heat fluxes that are beyond the effects predicted from the simple radiative heat transfer laws. An analytical model described by Nicolette and Larson 1990 can be used to understand many of these effects. In this model a gray gas represents soot particles present in the flame structure. Close to the container surface, these soot particles are convectively and radiatively cooled and interact with incident energy from the surrounding fire. This cooler soot cloud effectively prevents some thermal radiation from reaching the container surface, reducing the surface heat flux below the value predicted by a transparent medium model. With some empirical constants, the model suggested by Nicolette and Larson can be used to more accurately simulate the pool fire environment. Properly formulated, the gray gas approaches also fast enough to be used with standard commercial computer codes to analyze shipping containers. To calibrate this type of model, accurate experimental measurements of radiative absorption coefficients, flame temperatures, and other parameters are necessary. A goal of the calorimeter measurements described here is to obtain such parameters so that a fast, useful design tool for large pool fires can be constructed.

  18. F3D Image Processing and Analysis for Many - and Multi-core Platforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-10-01

    F3D is written in OpenCL, so it achieve[sic] platform-portable parallelism on modern mutli-core CPUs and many-core GPUs. The interface and mechanims to access F3D core are written in Java as a plugin for Fiji/ImageJ to deliver several key image-processing algorithms necessary to remove artifacts from micro-tomography data. The algorithms consist of data parallel aware filters that can efficiently utilizes[sic] resources and can work on out of core datasets and scale efficiently across multiple accelerators. Optimizing for data parallel filters, streaming out of core datasets, and efficient resource and memory and data managements over complex execution sequence of filters greatly expedites any scientific workflow with image processing requirements. F3D performs several different types of 3D image processing operations, such as non-linear filtering using bilateral filtering and/or median filtering and/or morphological operators (MM). F3D gray-level MM operators are one-pass constant time methods that can perform morphological transformations with a line-structuring element oriented in discrete directions. Additionally, MM operators can be applied to gray-scale images, and consist of two parts: (a) a reference shape or structuring element, which is translated over the image, and (b) a mechanism, or operation, that defines the comparisons to be performed between the image and the structuring element. This tool provides a critical component within many complex pipelines such as those for performing automated segmentation of image stacks. F3D is also called a "descendent" of Quant-CT, another software we developed in the past. These two modules are to be integrated in a next version. Further details were reported in: D.M. Ushizima, T. Perciano, H. Krishnan, B. Loring, H. Bale, D. Parkinson, and J. Sethian. Structure recognition from high-resolution images of ceramic composites. IEEE International Conference on Big Data, October 2014.

  19. Population-Based Study of Cardiovascular Mortality Among Patients With Prostate Cancer Treated With Radical External Beam Radiation Therapy With and Without Adjuvant Androgen Deprivation Therapy at the British Columbia Cancer Agency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Julian; Vaid, Moninder; Tyldesley, Scott; Woods, Ryan; Pickles, Tom

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: There are conflicting studies of the impact of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) on cardiovascular (CV) mortality among prostate cancer patients receiving curative intent external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). We assessed the impact of ADT on CV mortality in patients treated in British Columbia. Methods and Materials: Provincial pharmacy and radiotherapy databases were linked to the provincial cancer registry, and defined a cohort of patients treated with curative intent EBRT between 1998 and 2005. We determined the duration of ADT and the cumulative incidence of CV death. We compared death from CV disease with and without ADT, and by duration of ADT using competing risk analysis and Fine and Gray multivariant analysis. A total of 600 randomly selected patients were reviewed to determine baseline CV disease, CV risk factors, and Charlson Index. Results: Of 5,948 prostate cancer patients treated with radical intent EBRT, of whom 1,933 were treated without ADT, 674 received ADT for {<=}6 months and 3,341 received > 6 months of ADT. The cumulative CV mortality at 7 years was 2.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.9-3.5%), 2.1% (95% CI = 1.2-3.5%), and 1.4 (95% CI = 1.0-2.0%) for patients with no ADT, {<=}6 months of ADT, and >6 months of ADT, respectively (Gray's p = 0.002). Baseline CV disease and risk factors were more prevalent in the no-ADT group compared with the >6-month ADT group. Conclusions: This study demonstrated a lower CV mortality rate among patients treated with longer durations of ADT than those treated without ADT. These differences likely relate to selection of patients for ADT rather than effect of ADT itself.

  20. Semiautomatic segmentation and follow-up of multicomponent low-grade tumors in longitudinal brain MRI studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weizman, Lior; Sira, Liat Ben; Joskowicz, Leo; Rubin, Daniel L.; Yeom, Kristen W.; Constantini, Shlomi; Shofty, Ben; Bashat, Dafna Ben

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Tracking the progression of low grade tumors (LGTs) is a challenging task, due to their slow growth rate and associated complex internal tumor components, such as heterogeneous enhancement, hemorrhage, and cysts. In this paper, the authors show a semiautomatic method to reliably track the volume of LGTs and the evolution of their internal components in longitudinal MRI scans. Methods: The authors' method utilizes a spatiotemporal evolution modeling of the tumor and its internal components. Tumor components gray level parameters are estimated from the follow-up scan itself, obviating temporal normalization of gray levels. The tumor delineation procedure effectively incorporates internal classification of the baseline scan in the time-series as prior data to segment and classify a series of follow-up scans. The authors applied their method to 40 MRI scans of ten patients, acquired at two different institutions. Two types of LGTs were included: Optic pathway gliomas and thalamic astrocytomas. For each scan, a “gold standard” was obtained manually by experienced radiologists. The method is evaluated versus the gold standard with three measures: gross total volume error, total surface distance, and reliability of tracking tumor components evolution. Results: Compared to the gold standard the authors' method exhibits a mean Dice similarity volumetric measure of 86.58% and a mean surface distance error of 0.25 mm. In terms of its reliability in tracking the evolution of the internal components, the method exhibits strong positive correlation with the gold standard. Conclusions: The authors' method provides accurate and repeatable delineation of the tumor and its internal components, which is essential for therapy assessment of LGTs. Reliable tracking of internal tumor components over time is novel and potentially will be useful to streamline and improve follow-up of brain tumors, with indolent growth and behavior.

  1. Low-Speed Fingerprint Image Capture System User`s Guide, June 1, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitus, B.R.; Goddard, J.S.; Jatko, W.B.; Manges, W.W.; Treece, D.A.

    1993-06-01

    The Low-Speed Fingerprint Image Capture System (LS-FICS) uses a Sun workstation controlling a Lenzar ElectroOptics Opacity 1000 imaging system to digitize fingerprint card images to support the Federal Bureau of Investigation`s (FBI`s) Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS) program. The system also supports the operations performed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory- (ORNL-) developed Image Transmission Network (ITN) prototype card scanning system. The input to the system is a single FBI fingerprint card of the agreed-upon standard format and a user-specified identification number. The output is a file formatted to be compatible with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) draft standard for fingerprint data exchange dated June 10, 1992. These NIST compatible files contain the required print and text images. The LS-FICS is designed to provide the FBI with the capability of scanning fingerprint cards into a digital format. The FBI will replicate the system to generate a data base of test images. The Host Workstation contains the image data paths and the compression algorithm. A local area network interface, disk storage, and tape drive are used for the image storage and retrieval, and the Lenzar Opacity 1000 scanner is used to acquire the image. The scanner is capable of resolving 500 pixels/in. in both x and y directions. The print images are maintained in full 8-bit gray scale and compressed with an FBI-approved wavelet-based compression algorithm. The text fields are downsampled to 250 pixels/in. and 2-bit gray scale. The text images are then compressed using a lossless Huffman coding scheme. The text fields retrieved from the output files are easily interpreted when displayed on the screen. Detailed procedures are provided for system calibration and operation. Software tools are provided to verify proper system operation.

  2. Genetic Structure of Chum Salmon (Oncorhynchus Keta) Populations in the Lower Columbia River: Are Chum Salmon in Cascade Tributaries Remnant Populations?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Small, Maureen P.; Pichahchy, A.E.; Von Bargen, J.F.; Young, S.F.

    2004-09-01

    Prior to the 1950's, the lower Columbia River drainage supported a run of over a million chum salmon composed of at least 16 populations. By the late 1950's, over-fishing and habitat destruction had decreased the run to as little as a few hundred fish. With the exception of Grays River in the coastal region of the Columbia River and an aggregation of chum salmon spawning in creeks and the mainstem near Bonneville Dam in the Columbia Gorge region, most populations were considered extinct. However, over the years, WDFW biologists detected chum salmon spawning in tributaries originating in the Cascade Range: the Cowlitz, Lewis, and Washougal rivers. Further, chum salmon in the Cowlitz River appeared to have summer and fall run-timings. To assess whether Cascade spawners were strays from Grays River and Gorge regions or remnants of former populations, chum salmon from the Coastal, Cascade and Gorge regions were characterized genetically at 17 microsatellite loci. With the exception of Washougal River chum salmon, which grouped strongly with the Gorge genetic group, significant heterogeneity in genotype distributions were detected between regions and genotype distributions overlapped among collections within regions. In a neighbor-joining consensus tree, regional groups occupied branches with over 77% bootstrap support. In assignment tests, over 63% of individuals were correctly assigned back to region of origin although an average of 29% assigned to river of origin. Genetic distinction of Cascade region chum salmon was similar to distinction of Coastal and Gorge chum salmon and the Cascade region chum salmon had twice the number of private regional alleles. Further, the Cowlitz River supports the only summer chum salmon run in the Columbia River drainage. We propose that chum salmon in the Cascade region are remnants of original populations. We attribute the strong divergence between regional groups to diverse ecological conditions in each region, which promoted

  3. Shelf margin bioherms and associated facies in the Lower Permian Hueco Group (Late Wolfcampian), Hueco Mountains, West Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahlman, G.P.; Tasker, D.R.; St. John, J.W.; Werle, K.J. )

    1992-01-01

    Late Wolfcampian phylloid algal/Tubiphytes biohermal complexes are exposed in three erosional oilers lying about 3 miles west of and parallel to the main Hueco Mountains in far West Texas. The biohermal complexes are located paleogeographically along the shelf margin between the Diablo Platform and Orogrande Basin. Based on fusulinids the shelf margin buildups correlate with well-bedded shelf carbonates of the type Hueco Group in the main Hueco Mountains. The phylloid algal/Tubiphytes shelf margin bioherms contain an upward shallowing facies succession, which, in ascending order, consists of: (1) phylloid algal wackestone-bafflestone, (2) phylloid algal-fusulinid bafflestone-packstone, and (3) Tubiphytes boundstone and Tubiphytes-fusulinid-phylloid algal packstone-grainstone. The crest of the southernmost outlier has a different type of bioherm that consists of nodular boundstones composed of calcisponges, encrusting bryozoans and laminar red algae. The shelf margin complexes prograded over slope facies of dark-gray cherty limestones, which generally lack skeletal fossils, but contain common ichnofossils in upper slope beds. Overlapping tongues and channels of lithoclastic-skeletal packstones and grainstones extend seaward from the phylloid algal/Tubiphytes bioherms into the dark-gray slope facies. Proximal backreef facies consist of mainly skeletal-peloidal packstones and wackestones. The Hueco Mountains outlier exposures are important because: (1) they confirm a Late Wolfcampian shelf margin with distinct topographic relief in the southern Orogrande Basin, and (2) they provide an easily accessible field laboratory where Wolfcampian shelf-to-basin facies relationships and shelf margin bioherms can be studied. Wolfcampian bioherms represent a significant stage in the evolutionary history of Late Paleozoic reef communities and form important petroleum reservoirs in the adjacent Permian Basin.

  4. A Multigroup diffusion solver using pseudo transient continuation for a radiation-hydrodynamic code with patch-based AMR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shestakov, A I; Offner, S R

    2006-09-21

    We present a scheme to solve the nonlinear multigroup radiation diffusion (MGD) equations. The method is incorporated into a massively parallel, multidimensional, Eulerian radiation-hydrodynamic code with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). The patch-based AMR algorithm refines in both space and time creating a hierarchy of levels, coarsest to finest. The physics modules are time-advanced using operator splitting. On each level, separate 'level-solve' packages advance the modules. Our multigroup level-solve adapts an implicit procedure which leads to a two-step iterative scheme that alternates between elliptic solves for each group with intra-cell group coupling. For robustness, we introduce pseudo transient continuation ({Psi}tc). We analyze the magnitude of the {Psi}tc parameter to ensure positivity of the resulting linear system, diagonal dominance and convergence of the two-step scheme. For AMR, a level defines a subdomain for refinement. For diffusive processes such as MGD, the refined level uses Dirichet boundary data at the coarse-fine interface and the data is derived from the coarse level solution. After advancing on the fine level, an additional procedure, the sync-solve (SS), is required in order to enforce conservation. The MGD SS reduces to an elliptic solve on a combined grid for a system of G equations, where G is the number of groups. We adapt the 'partial temperature' scheme for the SS; hence, we reuse the infrastructure developed for scalar equations. Results are presented. We consider a multigroup test problem with a known analytic solution. We demonstrate utility of {Psi}tc by running with increasingly larger timesteps. Lastly, we simulate the sudden release of energy Y inside an Al sphere (r = 15 cm) suspended in air at STP. For Y = 11 kT, we find that gray radiation diffusion and MGD produce similar results. However, if Y = 1 MT, the two packages yield different results. Our large Y simulation contradicts a long-standing theory and demonstrates

  5. A Multigroup diffusion Solver Using Pseudo Transient Continuation for a Radiaiton-Hydrodynamic Code with Patch-Based AMR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shestakov, A I; Offner, S R

    2007-03-02

    We present a scheme to solve the nonlinear multigroup radiation diffusion (MGD) equations. The method is incorporated into a massively parallel, multidimensional, Eulerian radiation-hydrodynamic code with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). The patch-based AMR algorithm refines in both space and time creating a hierarchy of levels, coarsest to finest. The physics modules are time-advanced using operator splitting. On each level, separate 'level-solve' packages advance the modules. Our multigroup level-solve adapts an implicit procedure which leads to a two-step iterative scheme that alternates between elliptic solves for each group with intra-cell group coupling. For robustness, we introduce pseudo transient continuation ({Psi}tc). We analyze the magnitude of the {Psi}tc parameter to ensure positivity of the resulting linear system, diagonal dominance and convergence of the two-step scheme. For AMR, a level defines a subdomain for refinement. For diffusive processes such as MGD, the refined level uses Dirichet boundary data at the coarse-fine interface and the data is derived from the coarse level solution. After advancing on the fine level, an additional procedure, the sync-solve (SS), is required in order to enforce conservation. The MGD SS reduces to an elliptic solve on a combined grid for a system of G equations, where G is the number of groups. We adapt the 'partial temperature' scheme for the SS; hence, we reuse the infrastructure developed for scalar equations. Results are presented. We consider a multigroup test problem with a known analytic solution. We demonstrate utility of {Psi}tc by running with increasingly larger timesteps. Lastly, we simulate the sudden release of energy Y inside an Al sphere (r = 15 cm) suspended in air at STP. For Y = 11 kT, we find that gray radiation diffusion and MGD produce similar results. However, if Y = 1 MT, the two packages yield different results. Our large Y simulation contradicts a long-standing theory and demonstrates

  6. Geochemical indicators of depositional environment and soruce-rock potential for the Upper Ordovician Maquoketa Group, Illinois basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guthrie, J.M.; Pratt, L.M. )

    1994-05-01

    Two depositional cycles are recognized within the Upper Ordovician Maquoketa Group of the Illinois basin in a core from the New Jersey Zinc 1 Parrish well of Fulton County, Illinois. Organic carbon (C[sub org]), total sulfur, [sup 13]C content of the organic carbon ([delta][sup 13]C[sub org]), hydrogen and oxygen indices (HI and OI) from Rock-Eval pyrolysis and yields of extractable organic matter (EOM) vary through the cycles. Dark-brown to black, laminated shales are present in the lower portion of each cycle and have high values of C[sub org] (1.0-3.0%), HI (500-1000 mg hydrocarbon [HC]/g total organic carbon[TOC]), and EOM (500-2500 ppm), and more negative [delta][sup 13]C[sub org] values ([delta][sup 13]C[sub org] = -30 to -30.5%). Gray to greenish-gray, bioturbated shales are present in the upper portion of each cycle and have low values of C[sub org] (<1.0%), HI (<500 mg HC/g TOC), and EOM (<500 ppm), and more positive [delta][sup 13]C[sub org] values (-28.5 to 29.5%) compared to the laminated shales. Although thermally immature or marginally mature in this core, the laminated shales represent potential source rock s for petroleum because they contain good to excellent quantities of oil-prone organic matter and are more deeply buried in other areas of the basin. Kerogen elemental data and Rock-Eval data suggest that the source of organic matter in the Maquoketa was uniform, with the notable exception of graptolite-rich layers. Distributions of saturated hydrocarbons for Maquoketa samples resemble those derived from amorphous organic matter. Variations in bulk geochemical data and carbon isotopic compositions within the Maquoketa Group indicate substantial reworking and degradation of organic matter associated with bioturbation and oxygenated depositional conditions. 64 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Propensity Score-based Comparison of Long-term Outcomes With 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy vs Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Steven H., E-mail: SHLin@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wang Lu [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Myles, Bevan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Thall, Peter F. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Swisher, Stephen G. [Department of Thoracic Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Thoracic Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Ajani, Jaffer A. [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: Although 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) is the worldwide standard for the treatment of esophageal cancer, intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) improves dose conformality and reduces the radiation exposure to normal tissues. We hypothesized that the dosimetric advantages of IMRT should translate to substantive benefits in clinical outcomes compared with 3D-CRT. Methods and Materials: An analysis was performed of 676 nonrandomized patients (3D-CRT, n=413; IMRT, n=263) with stage Ib-IVa (American Joint Committee on Cancer 2002) esophageal cancers treated with chemoradiotherapy at a single institution from 1998-2008. An inverse probability of treatment weighting and inclusion of propensity score (treatment probability) as a covariate were used to compare overall survival time, interval to local failure, and interval to distant metastasis, while accounting for the effects of other clinically relevant covariates. The propensity scores were estimated using logistic regression analysis. Results: A fitted multivariate inverse probability weighted-adjusted Cox model showed that the overall survival time was significantly associated with several well-known prognostic factors, along with the treatment modality (IMRT vs 3D-CRT, hazard ratio 0.72, P<.001). Compared with IMRT, 3D-CRT patients had a significantly greater risk of dying (72.6% vs 52.9%, inverse probability of treatment weighting, log-rank test, P<.0001) and of locoregional recurrence (P=.0038). No difference was seen in cancer-specific mortality (Gray's test, P=.86) or distant metastasis (P=.99) between the 2 groups. An increased cumulative incidence of cardiac death was seen in the 3D-CRT group (P=.049), but most deaths were undocumented (5-year estimate, 11.7% in 3D-CRT vs 5.4% in IMRT group, Gray's test, P=.0029). Conclusions: Overall survival, locoregional control, and noncancer-related death were significantly better after IMRT than after 3D-CRT. Although these results need

  8. SYSTEM CONSIDERATIONS FOR MASKLESS LITHOGRAPHY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karnowski, Thomas Paul; Joy, David; Allard Jr, Lawrence Frederick; Clonts, Lloyd G

    2004-01-01

    Lithographic processes for printing device structures on integrated circuits (ICs) are the fundamental technology behind Moore's law. Next-generation techniques like maskless lithography or ML2 have the advantage that the long, tedious and expensive process of fabricating a unique mask for the manufactured chip is not necessary. However, there are some rather daunting problems with establishing ML2 as a viable commercial technology. The data rate necessary for ML2 to be competitive in manufacturing is not feasible with technology in the near future. There is also doubt that the competing technologies for the writing mechanisms and corresponding photoresist (or analogous medium) will be able to accurately produce the desired patterns necessary to produce multi-layer semiconductor devices. In this work, we model the maskless printing system from a signal processing point of view, utilizing image processing algorithms and concepts to study the effects of various real-world constraints and their implications for a ML2 system. The ML2 elements are discrete devices, and it is doubtful that their motion can be controlled to the level where a one-for-one element to exposed pixel relationship is allowable. Some level of sub-element resolution can be achieved with gray scale levels, but with the highly integrated manufacturing practices required to achieve massive parallelism, the most effective elements will be simple on-off switches that fire a fixed level of energy at the target medium. Consequently gray-scale level devices are likely not an option. Another problem with highly integrated manufacturing methods is device uniformity. Consequently, we analyze the redundant scanning array concept (RSA) conceived by Berglund et al. which can defeat many of these problems. We determine some basic equations governing its application and we focus on applying the technique to an array of low-energy electron emitters. Using the results of Monte Carlo simulations on electron beam

  9. F3D Image Processing and Analysis for Many - and Multi-core Platforms

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-10-01

    F3D is written in OpenCL, so it achieve[sic] platform-portable parallelism on modern mutli-core CPUs and many-core GPUs. The interface and mechanims to access F3D core are written in Java as a plugin for Fiji/ImageJ to deliver several key image-processing algorithms necessary to remove artifacts from micro-tomography data. The algorithms consist of data parallel aware filters that can efficiently utilizes[sic] resources and can work on out of core datasets and scale efficiently across multiple accelerators. Optimizingmore » for data parallel filters, streaming out of core datasets, and efficient resource and memory and data managements over complex execution sequence of filters greatly expedites any scientific workflow with image processing requirements. F3D performs several different types of 3D image processing operations, such as non-linear filtering using bilateral filtering and/or median filtering and/or morphological operators (MM). F3D gray-level MM operators are one-pass constant time methods that can perform morphological transformations with a line-structuring element oriented in discrete directions. Additionally, MM operators can be applied to gray-scale images, and consist of two parts: (a) a reference shape or structuring element, which is translated over the image, and (b) a mechanism, or operation, that defines the comparisons to be performed between the image and the structuring element. This tool provides a critical component within many complex pipelines such as those for performing automated segmentation of image stacks. F3D is also called a "descendent" of Quant-CT, another software we developed in the past. These two modules are to be integrated in a next version. Further details were reported in: D.M. Ushizima, T. Perciano, H. Krishnan, B. Loring, H. Bale, D. Parkinson, and J. Sethian. Structure recognition from high-resolution images of ceramic composites. IEEE International Conference on Big Data, October 2014.« less

  10. Fission gas bubble identification using MATLAB's image processing toolbox

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Collette, R.; King, J.; Keiser, Jr., D.; Miller, B.; Madden, J.; Schulthess, J.

    2016-06-08

    Automated image processing routines have the potential to aid in the fuel performance evaluation process by eliminating bias in human judgment that may vary from person-to-person or sample-to-sample. In addition, this study presents several MATLAB based image analysis routines designed for fission gas void identification in post-irradiation examination of uranium molybdenum (U–Mo) monolithic-type plate fuels. Frequency domain filtration, enlisted as a pre-processing technique, can eliminate artifacts from the image without compromising the critical features of interest. This process is coupled with a bilateral filter, an edge-preserving noise removal technique aimed at preparing the image for optimal segmentation. Adaptive thresholding provedmore » to be the most consistent gray-level feature segmentation technique for U–Mo fuel microstructures. The Sauvola adaptive threshold technique segments the image based on histogram weighting factors in stable contrast regions and local statistics in variable contrast regions. Once all processing is complete, the algorithm outputs the total fission gas void count, the mean void size, and the average porosity. The final results demonstrate an ability to extract fission gas void morphological data faster, more consistently, and at least as accurately as manual segmentation methods.« less

  11. Lower Columbia River Terminal Fisheries Research Project : Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-04-01

    This notice announces BPA`S`s decision to fund the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and the Clatsop Economic Development Committee for the Lower Columbia River Terminal Fisheries Research Project (Project). The Project will continue the testing of various species/stocks, rearing regimes, and harvest options for terminal fisheries, as a means to increase lower river sport and commercial harvest of hatchery fish, while providing both greater protection of weaker wild stocks and increasing the return of upriver salmon runs to potential Zone 6 Treaty fisheries. The Project involves relocating hatchery smolts to new, additional pen locations in three bays/sloughs in the lower Columbia River along both the Oregon and Washington sides. The sites are Blind Slough and Tongue Point in Clatsop County, Oregon, and Grays Bay/Deep River, Wahkiakum County, Washington. The smolts will be acclimated for various lengths of time in the net pens and released from these sites. The Project will expand upon an existing terminal fisheries project in Youngs Bay, Oregon. The Project may be expanded to other sites in the future, depending on the results of this initial expansion. BPA`S has determined the project is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required, and BPA`S is issuing this FONSI.

  12. Inorganic geochemistry of Devonian shales in southern West Virginia: geographic and stratigraphic trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hohn, M.E.; Neal, D.W.; Renton, J.J.

    1980-04-01

    Samples of cuttings from twenty-one wells and a core from a single well in southern West Virginia were analyzed for major and minor elements: silicon, aluminum, iron, magnesium, calcium, sodium, titanium, phosphorus, manganese, sulfur, zinc, and strontium. Stratigraphic and geographic controls on elemental abundances were studied through canonical correlations, factor analyses, and trend surface analyses. The most abundant elements, silicon and aluminum, show gradual trends through the stratigraphic column of most wells, with silicon increasing and aluminum decreasing up-section. Other elements such as calcium, sulfur, and titanium change abruptly in abundance at certain stratigraphic boundaries. Important geographic trends run east-west: for instance, one can see an increase in sulfur and a decrease in titanium to the west; and a decrease in silicon from the east to the central part of the study area, then an increase further west. Although observed vertical trends in detrital minerals and geographic patterns in elemental abundances agree with the accepted view of a prograding delta complex during Late Devonian time, geographically-local, time restricted depositional processes influenced elemental percentages in subsets of the wells and the stratigraphic intervals studied. The black shales of lower Huron age do not represent simply a return of depositional conditions present in the earlier Rhinestreet time; nor do the gray shales of the Ohio Shale represent the same environmental conditions as the Big White Slate.

  13. A novel approach to correct the coded aperture misalignment for fast neutron imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, F. N.; Hu, H. S. Wang, D. M.; Jia, J.; Zhang, T. K.; Jia, Q. G.

    2015-12-15

    Aperture alignment is crucial for the diagnosis of neutron imaging because it has significant impact on the coding imaging and the understanding of the neutron source. In our previous studies on the neutron imaging system with coded aperture for large field of view, “residual watermark,” certain extra information that overlies reconstructed image and has nothing to do with the source is discovered if the peak normalization is employed in genetic algorithms (GA) to reconstruct the source image. Some studies on basic properties of residual watermark indicate that the residual watermark can characterize coded aperture and can thus be used to determine the location of coded aperture relative to the system axis. In this paper, we have further analyzed the essential conditions for the existence of residual watermark and the requirements of the reconstruction algorithm for the emergence of residual watermark. A gamma coded imaging experiment has been performed to verify the existence of residual watermark. Based on the residual watermark, a correction method for the aperture misalignment has been studied. A multiple linear regression model of the position of coded aperture axis, the position of residual watermark center, and the gray barycenter of neutron source with twenty training samples has been set up. Using the regression model and verification samples, we have found the position of the coded aperture axis relative to the system axis with an accuracy of approximately 20 μm. Conclusively, a novel approach has been established to correct the coded aperture misalignment for fast neutron coded imaging.

  14. FULL SCALE BIOREACTOR LANDFILL FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND GREENHOUSE EMISSION CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramin Yazdani; Jeff Kieffer; Heather Akau

    2003-08-01

    The Yolo County Department of Planning and Public Works is constructing a full-scale bioreactor landfill as a part of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Project XL program to develop innovative approaches for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. The overall objective is to manage landfill solid waste for rapid waste decomposition and maximum landfill gas generation and capture for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. Waste decomposition is accelerated by improving conditions for either the aerobic or anaerobic biological processes and involves circulating controlled quantities of liquid (leachate, groundwater, gray water, etc.), and, in the aerobic process, large volumes of air. The first phase of the project entails the construction of a 12-acre module that contains a 6-acre anaerobic cell, a 3.5-acre anaerobic cell, and a 2.5-acre aerobic cell at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California. The cells are highly instrumented to monitor bioreactor performance. Liquid addition has commenced in the 3.5-acre anaerobic cell and the 6-acre anaerobic cell. Construction of the 2.5-acre aerobic cell is nearly complete with only the biofilter remaining and is scheduled to be complete by the end of August 2003. The current project status and preliminary monitoring results are summarized in this report.

  15. FULL SCALE BIOREACTOR LANDFILL FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND GREENHOUSE EMISSION CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramin Yazdani; Jeff Kieffer; Heather Akau

    2003-05-01

    The Yolo County Department of Planning and Public Works is constructing a full-scale bioreactor landfill as a part of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Project XL program to develop innovative approaches for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. The overall objective is to manage landfill solid waste for rapid waste decomposition and maximum landfill gas generation and capture for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. Waste decomposition is accelerated by improving conditions for either the aerobic or anaerobic biological processes and involves circulating controlled quantities of liquid (leachate, groundwater, gray water, etc.), and, in the aerobic process, large volumes of air. The first phase of the project entails the construction of a 12-acre module that contains a 6-acre anaerobic cell, a 3.5-acre anaerobic cell, and a 2.5-acre aerobic cell at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California. The cells are highly instrumented to monitor bioreactor performance. Construction is complete on the 3.5-acre anaerobic cell and liquid addition has commenced. Construction of the 2.5-acre aerobic cell is nearly complete with only the biofilter remaining and construction of the west-side 6-acre anaerobic cell is nearly complete with only the liquid addition system remaining. The current project status and preliminary monitoring results are summarized in this report.

  16. FULL SCALE BIOREACTOR LANDFILL FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND GREENHOUSE EMISSION CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramin Yazdani; Jeff Kieffer; Heather Akau

    2003-12-01

    The Yolo County Department of Planning and Public Works is constructing a full-scale bioreactor landfill as a part of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Project XL program to develop innovative approaches for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. The overall objective is to manage landfill solid waste for rapid waste decomposition and maximum landfill gas generation and capture for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. Waste decomposition is accelerated by improving conditions for either the aerobic or anaerobic biological processes and involves circulating controlled quantities of liquid (leachate, groundwater, gray water, etc.), and, in the aerobic process, large volumes of air. The first phase of the project entails the construction of a 12-acre module that contains a 6-acre anaerobic cell, a 3.5-acre anaerobic cell, and a 2.5-acre aerobic cell at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California. The cells are highly instrumented to monitor bioreactor performance. Liquid addition has commenced in the 3.5-acre anaerobic cell and the 6-acre anaerobic cell. Construction of the 2.5-acre aerobic cell and biofilter has been completed. The remaining task to be completed is to test the biofilter prior to operation, which is currently anticipated to begin in January 2004. The current project status and preliminary monitoring results are summarized in this report.

  17. Carcinoma of the anal canal: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) versus three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sale, Charlotte; Moloney, Phillip; Mathlum, Maitham

    2013-12-15

    Patients with anal canal carcinoma treated with standard conformal radiotherapy frequently experience severe acute and late toxicity reactions to the treatment area. Roohipour et al. (Dis Colon Rectum 2008; 51: 14753) stated a patient's tolerance of chemoradiation to be an important prediction of treatment success. A new intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique for anal carcinoma cases has been developed at the Andrew Love Cancer Centre aimed at reducing radiation to surrounding healthy tissue. A same-subject repeated measures design was used for this study, where five anal carcinoma cases at the Andrew Love Cancer Centre were selected. Conformal and IMRT plans were generated and dosimetric evaluations were performed. Each plan was prescribed a total of 54 Gray (Gy) over a course of 30 fractions to the primary site. The IMRT plans resulted in improved dosimetry to the planning target volume (PTV) and reduction in radiation to the critical structures (bladder, external genitalia and femoral heads). Statistically there was no difference between the IMRT and conformal plans in the dose to the small and large bowel; however, the bowel IMRT dosevolume histogram (DVH) doses were consistently lower. The IMRT plans were superior to the conformal plans with improved dose conformity and reduced radiation to the surrounding healthy tissue. Anecdotally it was found that patients tolerated the IMRT treatment better than the three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiation therapy. This study describes and compares the planning techniques.

  18. Comparison of IUPAC k0 Values and Neutron Cross Sections to Determine a Self-consistent Set of Data for Neutron Activation Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firestone, Richard B; Revay, Zsolt

    2009-12-01

    Independent databases of nuclear constants for Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) have been independently maintained by the physics and chemistry communities for many year. They contain thermal neturon cross sections s0, standardization values k0, and transition probabilities Pg. Chemistry databases tend to rely upon direct measurements of the nuclear constants k0 and Pg which are often published in chemistry journals while the physics databases typically include evaluated s0 and Pg data from a variety of experiments published mainly in physics journals. The IAEA/LBNL Evaluated Gamma-ray Activation File (EGAF) also contains prompt and delayed g-ray cross sections sg from Prompt Gamma-ray Activation Analysis (PGAA) measurements that can also be used to determine k0 and s0 values. As a result several independent databases of fundamental constants for NAA have evolved containing slightly different and sometimes discrepant results. An IAEA CRP for a Reference Database for Neutron Activation Analysis was established to compare these databases and investigate the possibilitiy of producing a self-consistent set of s0, k0, sg, and Pg values for NAA and other applications. Preliminary results of this IAEA CRP comparison are given in this paper.

  19. The wave energy flux of high frequency diffracting beams in complex geometrical optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maj, Omar; Poli, Emanuele; Mariani, Alberto; Farina, Daniela

    2013-04-15

    We consider the construction of asymptotic solutions of Maxwell's equations for a diffracting wave beam in the high frequency limit and address the description of the wave energy flux transported by the beam. With this aim, the complex eikonal method is applied. That is a generalization of the standard geometrical optics method in which the phase function is assumed to be complex valued, with the non-negative imaginary part accounting for the finite width of the beam cross section. In this framework, we propose an argument which simplifies significantly the analysis of the transport equation for the wave field amplitude and allows us to derive the wave energy flux. The theoretical analysis is illustrated numerically for the case of electron cyclotron beams in tokamak plasmas by using the GRAY code [D. Farina, Fusion Sci. Technol. 52, 154 (2007)], which is based upon the complex eikonal theory. The results are compared to those of the paraxial beam tracing code TORBEAM [E. Poli et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 136, 90 (2001)], which provides an independent calculation of the energy flow.

  20. AOI 1— COMPUTATIONAL ENERGY SCIENCES:MULTIPHASE FLOW RESEARCH High-fidelity multi-phase radiation module for modern coal combustion systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Modest, Michael

    2013-11-15

    The effects of radiation in particle-laden flows were the object of the present research. The presence of particles increases optical thickness substantially, making the use of the “optically thin” approximation in most cases a very poor assumption. However, since radiation fluxes peak at intermediate optical thicknesses, overall radiative effects may not necessarily be stronger than in gas combustion. Also, the spectral behavior of particle radiation properties is much more benign, making spectral models simpler (and making the assumption of a gray radiator halfway acceptable, at least for fluidized beds when gas radiation is not large). On the other hand, particles scatter radiation, making the radiative transfer equation (RTE) much more di fficult to solve. The research carried out in this project encompassed three general areas: (i) assessment of relevant radiation properties of particle clouds encountered in fluidized bed and pulverized coal combustors, (ii) development of proper spectral models for gas–particulate mixtures for various types of two-phase combustion flows, and (iii) development of a Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE) solution module for such applications. The resulting models were validated against artificial cases since open literature experimental data were not available. The final models are in modular form tailored toward maximum portability, and were incorporated into two research codes: (i) the open-source CFD code OpenFOAM, which we have extensively used in our previous work, and (ii) the open-source multi-phase flow code MFIX, which is maintained by NETL.

  1. Determining the radiative properties of pulverized-coal particles from experiments. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menguec, M.P.

    1992-02-01

    A comprehensive coupled experimental-theoretical study has been performed to determine the effective radiative properties of pulverized-coal/char particles. The results obtained show that the ``effective`` scattering phase function of coal particles are highly forward scattering and show less sensitivity to the size than predicted from the Lorenz-Mie theory. The main reason for this is the presence of smaller size particles associated with each larger particle. Also, the coal/char particle clouds display more side scattering than predicted for the same size range spheres, indicating the irregular shape of the particles and fragmentation. In addition to these, it was observed that in the visible wavelength range the coal absorption is not gray, and slightly vary with the wavelength. These two experimental approaches followed in this study are unique in a sense that the physics of the problem are not approximated. The properties determined include all uncertainties related to the particle shape, size distribution, inhomogeneity and spectral complex index of refraction data. In order to obtain radiative property data over a wider wavelength spectrum, additional ex-situ experiments have been carried out using a Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectrometer. The spectral measurements were performed over the wavelength range of 2 to 22 {mu}m. These results were interpreted to obtain the ``effective`` efficiency factors of coal particles and the corresponding refractive index values. The results clearly show that the coal/char radiative properties display significant wavelength dependency in the infrared spectrum.

  2. Sustainable Building in China -- A Green Leap Forward?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diamond, Richard; Ye, Qing; Feng, Wei; Yan, Tao; Mao, Hongwei; Li, Yutong; Guo, Yongcong; Wang, Jialiang

    2013-09-01

    China is constructing new commercial buildings at an enormous rate -- roughly 2 billion square meters per year, with considerable interest and activity in green design and construction. We review the context of commercial building design and construction in China, and look at a specific project as an example of a high performance, sustainable design, the Shenzhen Institute of Building Research (IBR). The IBR building incorporates over 40 sustainable technologies and strategies, including daylighting, natural ventilation, gray-water recycling, solar-energy generation, and highly efficient Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) systems. We present measured data on the performance of the building, including detailed analysis by energy end use, water use, and occupant comfort and satisfaction. Total building energy consumption in 2011 was 1151 MWh, with an Energy Use Intensity (EUI) of 63 kWh/m2 (20 kBtu/ft2), which is 61% of the mean EUI value of 103 kWh/m2 (33 kBtu/ft2) for similar buildings in the region. We also comment on the unique design process, which incorporated passive strategies throughout the building, and has led to high occupant satisfaction with the natural ventilation, daylighting, and green patio work areas. Lastly we present thoughts on how the design philosophy of the IBR building can be a guide for low-energy design in different climate regions throughout China and elsewhere.

  3. Full Scale Bioreactor Landfill for Carbon Sequestration and Greenhouse Emission Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramin Yazdani; Jeff Kieffer; Kathy Sananikone; Don Augenstein

    2005-03-30

    The Yolo County Department of Planning and Public Works constructed a full-scale bioreactor landfill as a part of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Project XL program to develop innovative approaches for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. The overall objective was to manage landfill solid waste for rapid waste decomposition and maximum landfill gas generation and capture for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. Waste decomposition is accelerated by improving conditions for either the aerobic or anaerobic biological processes and involves circulating controlled quantities of liquid (leachate, groundwater, gray water, etc.), and, in the aerobic process, large volumes of air. The first phase of the project entailed the construction of a 12-acre module that contained a 6-acre anaerobic cell, a 3.5-acre anaerobic cell, and a 2.5-acre aerobic cell at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California. The cells were highly instrumented to monitor bioreactor performance. Liquid addition commenced in the 3.5-acre anaerobic cell and the 6-acre anaerobic cell. Construction of the 2.5-acre aerobic cell and biofilter has been completed. The current project status and preliminary monitoring results are summarized in this report.

  4. Effects of radiative heat transfer on the turbulence structure in inert and reacting mixing layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghosh, Somnath; Friedrich, Rainer

    2015-05-15

    We use large-eddy simulation to study the interaction between turbulence and radiative heat transfer in low-speed inert and reacting plane temporal mixing layers. An explicit filtering scheme based on approximate deconvolution is applied to treat the closure problem arising from quadratic nonlinearities of the filtered transport equations. In the reacting case, the working fluid is a mixture of ideal gases where the low-speed stream consists of hydrogen and nitrogen and the high-speed stream consists of oxygen and nitrogen. Both streams are premixed in a way that the free-stream densities are the same and the stoichiometric mixture fraction is 0.3. The filtered heat release term is modelled using equilibrium chemistry. In the inert case, the low-speed stream consists of nitrogen at a temperature of 1000 K and the highspeed stream is pure water vapour of 2000 K, when radiation is turned off. Simulations assuming the gas mixtures as gray gases with artificially increased Planck mean absorption coefficients are performed in which the large-eddy simulation code and the radiation code PRISSMA are fully coupled. In both cases, radiative heat transfer is found to clearly affect fluctuations of thermodynamic variables, Reynolds stresses, and Reynolds stress budget terms like pressure-strain correlations. Source terms in the transport equation for the variance of temperature are used to explain the decrease of this variance in the reacting case and its increase in the inert case.

  5. Session: Wind industry project development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, Tom; Enfield, Sam

    2004-09-01

    This first session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations followed by a question and answer period. The session was intended to provide a general overview of wind energy product development, from the industry's perspective. Tom Gray of AWEA presented a paper titled ''State of the Wind Energy Industry in 2004'', highlighting improved performance and lower cost, efforts to address avian impacts, a status of wind energy in comparison to other energy-producing sources, and ending on expectations for the near future. Sam Enfield of Atlantic Renewable Energy Corporation presented a paper titled ''Key Factors for Consideration in Wind Plant Siting'', highlighting factors that wind facility developers must consider when choosing a site to build wind turbines and associated structures. Factors covered include wind resources available, ownership and land use patterns, access to transmission lines, accessibility and environmental impacts. The question and answer sum mary included topics related to risk taking, research and development, regulatory requirements, and dealing with utilities.

  6. PDS SHRINK. PDS SHRINK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillion, D.

    1991-12-15

    This code enables one to display, take line-outs on, and perform various transformations on an image created by an array of integer*2 data. Uncompressed eight-bit TIFF files created on either the Macintosh or the IBM PC may also be read in and converted to a 16 bit signed integer image. This code is designed to handle all the formats used for PDS (photo-densitometer) files at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These formats are all explained by the application code. The image may be zoomed infinitely and the gray scale mapping can be easily changed. Line-outs may be horizontal or vertical with arbitrary width, angled with arbitrary end points, or taken along any path. This code is usually used to examine spectrograph data. Spectral lines may be identified and a polynomial fit from position to wavelength may be found. The image array can be remapped so that the pixels all have the same change of lambda width. It is not necessary to do this, however. Lineouts may be printed, saved as Cricket tab-delimited files, or saved as PICT2 files. The plots may be linear, semilog, or logarithmic with nice values and proper scientific notation. Typically, spectral lines are curved.

  7. X-ray computed tomography of wood-adhesive bondlines: Attenuation and phase-contrast effects

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Paris, Jesse L.; Kamke, Frederick A.; Xiao, Xianghui

    2015-07-29

    Microscale X-ray computed tomography (XCT) is discussed as a technique for identifying 3D adhesive distribution in wood-adhesive bondlines. Visualization and material segmentation of the adhesives from the surrounding cellular structures require sufficient gray-scale contrast in the reconstructed XCT data. Commercial wood-adhesive polymers have similar chemical characteristics and density to wood cell wall polymers and therefore do not provide good XCT attenuation contrast in their native form. Here, three different adhesive types, namely phenol formaldehyde, polymeric diphenylmethane diisocyanate, and a hybrid polyvinyl acetate, are tagged with iodine such that they yield sufficient X-ray attenuation contrast. However, phase-contrast effects at material edgesmore » complicate image quality and segmentation in XCT data reconstructed with conventional filtered backprojection absorption contrast algorithms. A quantitative phase retrieval algorithm, which isolates and removes the phase-contrast effect, was demonstrated. The paper discusses and illustrates the balance between material X-ray attenuation and phase-contrast effects in all quantitative XCT analyses of wood-adhesive bondlines.« less

  8. Optical method and apparatus for detection of defects and microstructural changes in ceramics and ceramic coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ellingson, William A.; Todd, Judith A.; Sun, Jiangang

    2001-01-01

    Apparatus detects defects and microstructural changes in hard translucent materials such as ceramic bulk compositions and ceramic coatings such as after use under load conditions. The beam from a tunable laser is directed onto the sample under study and light reflected by the sample is directed to two detectors, with light scattered with a small scatter angle directed to a first detector and light scattered with a larger scatter angle directed to a second detector for monitoring the scattering surface. The sum and ratio of the two detector outputs respectively provide a gray-scale, or "sum" image, and an indication of the lateral spread of the subsurface scatter, or "ratio" image. This two detector system allows for very high speed crack detection for on-line, real-time inspection of damage in ceramic components. Statistical image processing using a digital image processing approach allows for the quantative discrimination of the presence and distribution of small flaws in a sample while improving detection reliability. The tunable laser allows for the penetration of the sample to detect defects from the sample's surface to the laser's maximum depth of penetration. A layered optical fiber directs the incoming laser beam to the sample and transmits each scattered signal to a respective one of the two detectors.

  9. Weapons proliferation and organized crime: The Russian military and security force dimension

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turbiville, G.H.

    1996-06-01

    One dimension of international security of the post-Cold War era that has not received enough attention is how organized crime facilitates weapons proliferation worldwide. The former Soviet Union (FSU) has emerged as the world`s greatest counterproliferation challenge. It contains the best developed links among organized crime, military and security organizations, and weapons proliferation. Furthermore, Russian military and security forces are the principle source of arms becoming available to organized crime groups, participants in regional conflict, and corrupt state officials engaged in the black, gray, and legal arms markets in their various dimensions. The flourishing illegal trade in conventional weapons is the clearest and most tangible manifestation of the close links between Russian power ministries and criminal organizations. The magnitude of the WMD proliferation problem from the FSU is less clear and less tangible. There have been many open reports of small-scale fissile material smuggling out of the FSU. The situation with regard to the proliferation of chemical weapon usually receives less attention but may be more serious. With an acknowledged stockpile of 40,000 metric tons of chemical agents, the potential for proliferation is enormous.

  10. Joint spatio-spectral based edge detection for multispectral infrared imagery.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishna, Sanjay; Hayat, Majeed M.; Bender, Steven C.; Sharma, Yagya D.; Jang, Woo-Yong; Paskalva, Biliana S.

    2010-06-01

    Image segmentation is one of the most important and difficult tasks in digital image processing. It represents a key stage of automated image analysis and interpretation. Segmentation algorithms for gray-scale images utilize basic properties of intensity values such as discontinuity and similarity. However, it is possible to enhance edge-detection capability by means of using spectral information provided by multispectral (MS) or hyperspectral (HS) imagery. In this paper we consider image segmentation algorithms for multispectral images with particular emphasis on detection of multi-color or multispectral edges. More specifically, we report on an algorithm for joint spatio-spectral (JSS) edge detection. By joint we mean simultaneous utilization of spatial and spectral characteristics of a given MS or HS image. The JSS-based edge-detection approach, termed Spectral Ratio Contrast (SRC) edge-detection algorithm, utilizes the novel concept of matching edge signatures. The edge signature represents a combination of spectral ratios calculated using bands that enhance the spectral contrast between the two materials. In conjunction with a spatial mask, the edge signature give rise to a multispectral operator that can be viewed as a three-dimensional extension of the mask. In the extended mask, the third (spectral) dimension of each hyper-pixel can be chosen independently. The SRC is verified using MS and HS imagery from a quantum-dot in a well infrared (IR) focal plane array, and the Airborne Hyperspectral Imager.

  11. Radiation-Induced Alterations in Mouse Brain Development Characterized by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gazdzinski, Lisa M.; Cormier, Kyle; Lu, Fred G.; Lerch, Jason P.; Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto ; Wong, C. Shun; Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto ; Nieman, Brian J.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify regions of altered development in the mouse brain after cranial irradiation using longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: Female C57Bl/6 mice received a whole-brain radiation dose of 7 Gy at an infant-equivalent age of 2.5 weeks. MRI was performed before irradiation and at 3 time points following irradiation. Deformation-based morphometry was used to quantify volume and growth rate changes following irradiation. Results: Widespread developmental deficits were observed in both white and gray matter regions following irradiation. Most of the affected brain regions suffered an initial volume deficit followed by growth at a normal rate, remaining smaller in irradiated brains compared with controls at all time points examined. The one exception was the olfactory bulb, which in addition to an early volume deficit, grew at a slower rate thereafter, resulting in a progressive volume deficit relative to controls. Immunohistochemical assessment revealed demyelination in white matter and loss of neural progenitor cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and subventricular zone. Conclusions: MRI can detect regional differences in neuroanatomy and brain growth after whole-brain irradiation in the developing mouse. Developmental deficits in neuroanatomy persist, or even progress, and may serve as useful markers of late effects in mouse models. The high-throughput evaluation of brain development enabled by these methods may allow testing of strategies to mitigate late effects after pediatric cranial irradiation.

  12. Three-dimensional reconstruction and morphologic characteristics of porous metal fiber sintered sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Qinghui; Huang, Xiang; Zhou, Wei; Li, Jingrong

    2013-12-15

    This paper presents an approach to achieve morphological characterizing for complex porous materials based on micro X-ray tomography images, with an example of a novel porous metal fiber sheet produced through solid-state sintering method. The geometrical reconstruction was performed after selection of volume of interest and image processing of anisotropic diffusion smooth. The reconstructed gray level images were then transferred into binary images by adjusting binarization threshold according to the actual porosity. Taking into account the tubular structural feature of the fibers, skeleton extraction algorithm based on the distance transform function was applied and further improved by the scale axis transform method. The skeleton was later pruned and segmented according to the contact points to perform morphological characterizing. Compared with actual manufacturing parameters, the style, length, radius, orientation and tortuosity of fiber segments were discussed. The results show that our proposed method can well describe the actual geometrical and morphological characteristics, which will provide a promising method for the structural description of fibrous networks. - Highlights: • Micro-CT technology was used to achieve the 3D geometrical reconstruction. • Skeleton extraction algorithm was modified to get the medial skeleton. • Skeleton filter operation was adopted to deal with the segmented skeleton. • Useful morphological statistics was obtained through skeleton segments. • Relationship between structure and manufacturing processes was discussed.

  13. Computer program for the sensitivity calculation of a CR-39 detector in a diffusion chamber for radon measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikezic, D. Stajic, J. M.; Yu, K. N.

    2014-02-15

    Computer software for calculation of the sensitivity of a CR-39 detector closed in a diffusion chamber to radon is described in this work. The software consists of two programs, both written in the standard Fortran 90 programming language. The physical background and a numerical example are given. Presented software is intended for numerous researches in radon measurement community. Previously published computer programs TRACK-TEST.F90 and TRACK-VISION.F90 [D. Nikezic and K. N. Yu, Comput. Phys. Commun. 174, 160 (2006); D. Nikezic and K. N. Yu, Comput. Phys. Commun. 178, 591 (2008)] are used here as subroutines to calculate the track parameters and to determine whether the track is visible or not, based on the incident angle, impact energy, etching conditions, gray level, and visibility criterion. The results obtained by the software, using five different V functions, were compared with the experimental data found in the literature. Application of two functions in this software reproduced experimental data very well, while other three gave lower sensitivity than experiment.

  14. Distribution system stability, reliability and protective relaying due to incorporation of dispersed energy sources. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    This thesis discusses impacts and issues brought about by the enactment of the Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act of 1978. The United States power grid has a history of safe, economical, reliable service that, some feel, is threatened by the encroachment of small Dispersed Energy Sources, with possible inexperienced developers. The quality of electrical power from such sources is in question, as is power grid stability and reliability. Safety is another factor where methodry is subject to the incentives of the party whose viewpoint is sought. Much controversy is caused by the Act leaving methods of implementation to the individual States. The settlement, in one State, of some question in dispute forms no basis for extrapolation into other States. This leaves a potential developer with some uncertainty as to his options and advantages in assessing the incentives for investing in a Dispersed Energy Source. And such incentives form the thrust of the Act. This thesis brings these issues to the force and examines them for significance and possible resolution. It evaluates the outlook for significance and possible resolution. It evaluates the outlook of the Utility, the Dispersed Energy Source, and the Public for motivation and attempts to strike a balance between their opinions in reaching conclusions. Gray areas are addressed and possible remedies are offered.

  15. Enigmatic uppermost Permian-lowermost Triassic stratigraphic relations in the northern Bighorn basin of Wyoming and Montana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paull, R.A.; Paull, R.K. )

    1991-06-01

    Eighteen measured sections in the northern Bighorn basin of Wyoming and Montana provide the basis for an analysis of Permian-Triassic stratigraphic relations. This boundary is well defined to the south where gray calcareous siltstones of the Lower Triassic Dinwoody disconformably overlie the Upper Permian Ervay Member of the Park City Formation with little physical evidence of a significant hiatus. The Dinwoody is gradationally overlain by red beds of the Red Peak Formation. The Dinwoody this to zero near the state line. Northward, the erathem boundary is enigmatic because fossils are absent and there is no evidence of an unconformity. Poor and discontinuous exposures contribute to the problem. Up to 20 m of Permian or Triassic rocks or both overlie the Pennsylvanian Tensleep Sandstone in the westernmost surface exposures on the eastern flank of the Bighorn basin with physical evidence of an unconformity. East of the exposed Tensleep, Ervay-like carbonates are overlain by about 15 m of Dinwoody-like siltstones interbedded with red beds and thin dolomitic limestone. In both areas, they are overlain by the Red Peak Formation. Thin carbonates within the Dinwoody are silty, coarse algal laminates with associated peloidal micrite. Carbonates north of the Dinwoody termination and above probably Ervay are peloidal algal laminates with fenestral fabric and sparse coated shell fragments with pisoids. These rocks may be Dinwoody equivalents or they may be of younger Permian age than the Ervay. Regardless, revision of stratigraphic nomenclature in this area may bed required.

  16. Basic Data Report for Drillhole SNL-5 (C-3002)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis W. Powers; Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

    2005-01-18

    SNL-5 (permitted by the New Mexico State Engineer as C-3002) was drilled to provide geological data and hydrological testing of the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Permian Rustler Formation in an area north of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site where data are sparse and where a pumping or monitoring well for the northern pumping test is needed. SNL-5 is located in the southeast quarter of section 6, T22S, R31E, in eastern Eddy County, New Mexico. SNL-5 was drilled to a total depth of 687 ft below ground level (bgl), based on driller's measurements. Below the caliche pad, SNL-5 encountered the Mescalero caliche, Gatu?a, Dewey Lake, and Rustler Formations. Two intervals of the Rustler were cored: (1) from the lower Forty-niner Member through the Magenta Dolomite and into the upper Tamarisk Member; and (2) from the lower Tamarisk Member through the Culebra Dolomite and into the upper Los Meda?os Members. Geophysical logs were acquired from the open hole to a depth of ~672 ft. No water was observed to flow into the open drillhole until the Culebra was penetrated. includes horizontal beds and laminae near the base, and the uppermost part shows some inclined bedding. The mudstone unit shows mostly reddish brown claystone and siltstone with some gray mottling. Clasts or intraclasts are also included in the unit. The upper Tamarisk sulfate is somewhat brecciated near the base.

  17. Some notes on the application of discrete wavelet transform in image processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caria, Egydio C. S.; Costa A, Trajano A. de; Rebello, Joao Marcos A.

    2011-06-23

    Mathematical transforms are used in signal processing in order to extract what is known as 'hidden' information. One of these mathematical tools is the Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT), which has been increasingly employed in non-destructive testing and, more specifically, in image processing. The main concern in the present work is to employ DWT to suppress noise without losing relevant image features. However, some aspects must be taken into consideration when applying DWT in image processing, mainly in the case of weld radiographs, in order to achieve consistent results. Three topics were selected as representative of these difficulties, as follows: 1) How can image matrix be filled to fit the 2{sup n} lines and 2{sup n} rows requirement? 2) How can the most suitable decomposition level of the DWT function and the correct choice of their coefficient suppression be selected? 3) Is there any influence of the scanning direction and the weld radiograph image, e.g., longitudinal or transversal, on the final processing image? It is known that some artifacts may be present in weld radiograph images. Indeed, the weld surface is frequently rough and rippled, what can be seen as gray level variation on the radiograph, being sometimes mistaken as defective areas. Depending on the position of these artifacts, longitudinal or transversal to the weld bead, they may have different influences on the image processing procedure. This influence is clearly seen in the distribution of the DWT Function coefficients. In the present work, examples of two weld radiographs of quite different image quality were given in order to exemplify it.

  18. EC assisted start-up experiments reproduction in FTU and AUG for simulations of the ITER case

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Granucci, G.; Ricci, D.; Farina, D.; Figini, L.; Cavinato, M.; Stober, J.; Tudisco, O.

    2014-02-12

    The breakdown and plasma start-up in ITER are well known issues studied in the last few years in many tokamaks with the aid of calculation based on simplified modeling. The thickness of ITER metallic wall and the voltage limits of the Central Solenoid Power Supply strongly limit the maximum toroidal electric field achievable (0.3 V/m), well below the level used in the present generation of tokamaks. In order to have a safe and robust breakdown, the use of Electron Cyclotron Power to assist plasma formation and current rump up has been foreseen. This has raised attention on plasma formation phase in presence of EC wave, especially in order to predict the required power for a robust breakdown in ITER. Few detailed theory studies have been performed up to nowadays, due to the complexity of the problems. A simplified approach, extended from that proposed in ref[1] has been developed including a impurity multispecies distribution and an EC wave propagation and absorption based on GRAY code. This integrated model (BK0D) has been benchmarked on ohmic and EC assisted experiments on FTU and AUG, finding the key aspects for a good reproduction of data. On the basis of this, the simulation has been devoted to understand the best configuration for ITER case. The dependency of impurity distribution content and neutral gas pressure limits has been considered. As results of the analysis a reasonable amount of power (1 - 2 MW) seems to be enough to extend in a significant way the breakdown and current start up capability of ITER. The work reports the FTU data reproduction and the ITER case simulations.

  19. Cardiovascular Comorbidity and Mortality in Men With Prostate Cancer Treated With Brachytherapy-Based Radiation With or Without Hormonal Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nanda, Akash; Chen, Ming-Hui; Moran, Brian J.; Braccioforte, Michelle H.; D'Amico, Anthony V.

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of coronary artery disease (CAD) risk factors and sequelae on the risk of all-cause mortality (ACM) in men treated for prostate cancer (PC). Methods and Materials: The study cohort comprised 5077 men with PC consecutively treated with curative intent between 1997 and 2006 at the Chicago Prostate Cancer Center. Cox and Fine and Gray's competing risks regression multivariable analyses were performed, assessing whether cardiovascular comorbidity impacted the risk of ACM and PC-specific mortality, respectively, adjusting for CAD risk factors (diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, or hypertension) and sequelae (congestive heart failure or myocardial infarction), age, year and type of treatment, and known PC prognostic factors. Results: When compared with men with no comorbidity there was a significantly increased risk of ACM in men with congestive heart failure or myocardial infarction (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] 1.96, P<.001) and in men with diabetes mellitus (AHR 1.60, P=.03) and hypertension (AHR 1.25, P=.04). In contrast, men with hypercholesterolemia had a similar risk of ACM (AHR 0.68, P=.17) when compared with men with no comorbidity. Other factors associated with a significantly increased risk of ACM included age (AHR 1.09, P<.001), prostate-specific antigen level (AHR 1.25, P=.008), and Gleason score 8-10 disease (AHR 1.71, P=.003). Cardiovascular comorbidity did not impact the risk of PC-specific mortality. Conclusions: In addition to age and unfavorable PC prognostic factors, select CAD risk factors and sequelae are associated with an increased risk of ACM in men treated for PC. These comorbidity prognostic factors predict time courses of mortality from competing causes, which may be factored into the decision-making process when considering management options for PC in a given individual.

  20. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Roegner, G. C.; Whiting, Allan H.; Johnson, Gary E.; Dawley, Earl; Skalski, John R.; Vavrinec, John; Ebberts, Blaine D.

    2006-12-20

    This report is the second annual report of a six-year project to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration projects in the Columbia River Estuary, conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Marine Sciences Laboratory, NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service Pt. Adams Biological Field Station, and the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce for the US Army Corps of Engineers. In 2005, baseline data were collected on two restoration sites and two associated reference sites in the Columbia River estuary. The sites represent two habitat types of the estuary--brackish marsh and freshwater swamp--that have sustained substantial losses in area and that may play important roles for salmonids. Baseline data collected included vegetation and elevation surveys, above and below-ground biomass, water depth and temperature, nutrient flux, fish species composition, and channel geometry. Following baseline data collection, three kinds of restoration actions for hydrological reconnection were implemented in several locations on the sites: tidegate replacements (2) at Vera Slough, near the city of Astoria in Oregon State, and culvert replacements (2) and dike breaches (3) at Kandoll Farm in the Grays River watershed in Washington State. Limited post-restoration data were collected: photo points, nutrient flux, water depth and temperature, and channel cross-sections. In subsequent work, this and additional post-restoration data will be used in conjunction with data from other sites to estimate net effects of hydrological reconnection restoration projects throughout the estuary. This project is establishing methods for evaluating the effectiveness of individual projects and a framework for assessing estuary-wide cumulative effects including a protocol manual for monitoring restoration and reference sites.

  1. Radium-226 and low pH in groundwater due to oxidation of authigenic pyrite; Savannah River Site, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KUBILIUS, WALTER

    2005-12-21

    The origin of elevated radium-226 in groundwater beneath a sanitary landfill at the Savannah River Site (SRS) was investigated. Nearly one hundred monitoring wells are developed in the Steed Pond Aquifer (SPA), which consists of 100-150 ft of Coastal Plain sand, iron oxides, and minor clay. Wells screened in the upper and middle portions of the aquifer have average Ra-226 between 0.5 and 2.5 pCi/L, and average pHs above 4.7. However, wells screened near the base of the aquifer exhibit higher average Ra-226 concentrations of 2.5 to 4.6 pCi/L, with some measurements exceeding the MCL of 5 pCi/L, and show average pHs of 4.1 to 4.7. These wells are not downgradient of the landfill, and are not impacted by landfill leachate. The Crouch Branch Confining Unit (CBCU) underlies the aquifer, and is composed partly of reduced gray/brown clay with lignite and authigenic pyrite. Gamma ray logs show that the SPA has low gamma counts, but the CBCU is consistently elevated. Groundwater with high radium/low pH also contains elevated sulfate concentrations. pH calculations indicate that sulfate is in the form of sulfuric acid. A model for the origin of elevated Ra-226 levels in deeper SPA wells envisions infiltration of oxygenated SPA groundwater into reduced pyritic CBCU sediments, with consequent oxidative pyrite dissolution, and acidification of groundwater. Then, naturally occurring CBCU radium dissolves, and mixes into the Steed Pond Aquifer.

  2. Experimentally Determined Interfacial Area Between Immiscible Fluids in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crandall, Dustin; Niessner, J; Hassanizadeh, S.M; Smith, Duane

    2008-01-01

    When multiple fluids flow through a porous medium, the interaction between the fluid interfaces can be of great importance. While this is widely recognized in practical applications, numerical models often disregard interactios between discrete fluid phases due to the computational complexity. And rightly so, for this level of detail is well beyond most extended Darcy Law relationships. A new model of two-phase flow including the interfacial area has been proposed by Hassarizadeh and Gray based upon thermodynamic principles. A version of this general equation set has been implemented by Nessner and Hassarizadeh. Many of the interfacial parameters required by this equation set have never been determined from experiments. The work presented here is a description of how the interfacial area, capillary pressure, interfacial velocity and interfacial permeability from two-phase flow experiments in porous media experiments can be used to determine the required parameters. This work, while on-going, has shown the possibility of digitizing images within translucent porous media and identifying the location and behavior of interfaces under dynamic conditions. Using the described methods experimentally derived interfacial functions to be used in larger scale simulations are currently being developed. In summary, the following conclusions can be drawn: (1) by mapping a pore-throat geometry onto an image of immiscible fluid flow, the saturation of fluids and the individual interfaces between the fluids can be identified; (2) the resulting saturation profiles of the low velocity drainage flows used in this study are well described by an invasion percolation fractal scaling; (3) the interfacial area between fluids has been observed to increase in a linear fashion during the initial invasion of the non-wetting fluid; and (4) the average capillary pressure within the entire cell and representative elemental volumes were observed to plateau after a small portion of the volume was

  3. Estuarine Habitats for Juvenile Salmon in the Tidally-Influenced Lower Columbia River and Estuary : Reporting Period September 15, 2008 through May 31, 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baptista, António M.

    2009-08-02

    This work focuses on the numerical modeling of Columbia River estuarine circulation and associated modeling-supported analyses conducted as an integral part of a multi-disciplinary and multi-institutional effort led by NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center. The overall effort is aimed at: (1) retrospective analyses to reconstruct historic bathymetric features and assess effects of climate and river flow on the extent and distribution of shallow water, wetland and tidal-floodplain habitats; (2) computer simulations using a 3-dimensional numerical model to evaluate the sensitivity of salmon rearing opportunities to various historical modifications affecting the estuary (including channel changes, flow regulation, and diking of tidal wetlands and floodplains); (3) observational studies of present and historic food web sources supporting selected life histories of juvenile salmon as determined by stable isotope, microchemistry, and parasitology techniques; and (4) experimental studies in Grays River in collaboration with Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce (CREST) and the Columbia Land Trust (CLT) to assess effects of multiple tidal wetland restoration projects on various life histories of juvenile salmon and to compare responses to observed habitat-use patterns in the mainstem estuary. From the above observations, experiments, and additional modeling simulations, the effort will also (5) examine effects of alternative flow-management and habitat-restoration scenarios on habitat opportunity and the estuary's productive capacity for juvenile salmon. The underlying modeling system is part of the SATURN1coastal-margin observatory [1]. SATURN relies on 3D numerical models [2, 3] to systematically simulate and understand baroclinic circulation in the Columbia River estuary-plume-shelf system [4-7] (Fig. 1). Multi-year simulation databases of circulation are produced as an integral part of SATURN, and have multiple applications in understanding estuary

  4. Cambrian pisolites as paleoenvironment and paleotectonic stress indicators, Rattlesnake Mountain, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neese, D.G.; Vernon, J.H.

    1987-05-01

    Pisolitic-rich carbonates occur within the uppermost 0.5 m of the Meagher Limestone member of the lower Gros Ventre formation in exposures near Cody, Wyoming. The Meagher Limestone is overlain by 51 m, and underlain by 63 m of dark gray Gros Ventre shale. Pisolites range in size from 2.0 to 18 mm in diameter and occur in lime grainstones associated with trilobite fragments, peloids, glauconite, fine-grained subangular quartz, and minor oolites. Girvanella grainstones 15-20 cm thick directly underlie the pisolite strata and have contributed to some of the carbonate material within pisolite nuclei. Dolomite and ankerite may occur within pisolitic rocks as finely crystalline irregular patches. Pisoliths commonly show an oblate ellipsoid shape, with maximum flattening perpendicular to bedding. Long-axis to short-axis ratios of these grains in fracture planes perpendicular to bedding average between 2.5 to 3.5, with the long axis parallel or subparallel to bedding. Grains observed in bedding planes have ratios averaging between 1.5 to 2.0. A paleostress state has produced a strain ellipsoid with long-axis ratios ranging from 1.7 to over 3.0. There appears to be little or no tectonic strain on the bedding plane, so the strain can be described as uniaxial, with maximum compression perpendicular to bedding. The majority of carbonate rocks in the Meagher Limestone were deposited in a normal marine subtidal setting, while ooid and pisolitic grain types are suggestive of subtidal-peritidal conditions. Because of the strain deformed pisoliths, a subaqueous versus subaerial environment of pisolite genesis is difficult to assess. A siliciclastic sandstone, 0.6 m thick with low-angle tabular crossbedding, is present immediately beneath the Meagher Limestone. The sandstone is composed of 94% fine to medium sand-size subangular quartz grains and is associated with glauconite, minor biotite, zircon, and ilmenite.

  5. Enhancing atlas based segmentation with multiclass linear classifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sdika, Michaël

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: To present a method to enrich atlases for atlas based segmentation. Such enriched atlases can then be used as a single atlas or within a multiatlas framework. Methods: In this paper, machine learning techniques have been used to enhance the atlas based segmentation approach. The enhanced atlas defined in this work is a pair composed of a gray level image alongside an image of multiclass classifiers with one classifier per voxel. Each classifier embeds local information from the whole training dataset that allows for the correction of some systematic errors in the segmentation and accounts for the possible local registration errors. The authors also propose to use these images of classifiers within a multiatlas framework: results produced by a set of such local classifier atlases can be combined using a label fusion method. Results: Experiments have been made on the in vivo images of the IBSR dataset and a comparison has been made with several state-of-the-art methods such as FreeSurfer and the multiatlas nonlocal patch based method of Coupé or Rousseau. These experiments show that their method is competitive with state-of-the-art methods while having a low computational cost. Further enhancement has also been obtained with a multiatlas version of their method. It is also shown that, in this case, nonlocal fusion is unnecessary. The multiatlas fusion can therefore be done efficiently. Conclusions: The single atlas version has similar quality as state-of-the-arts multiatlas methods but with the computational cost of a naive single atlas segmentation. The multiatlas version offers a improvement in quality and can be done efficiently without a nonlocal strategy.

  6. Phase II Study of High-Dose Photon/Proton Radiotherapy in the Management of Spine Sarcomas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeLaney, Thomas F. Liebsch, Norbert J.; Pedlow, Francis X.; Adams, Judith; Dean, Susan; Yeap, Beow Y.; McManus, Patricia; Rosenberg, Andrew E.; Nielsen, G. Petur; Harmon, David C.; Spiro, Ira J.; Raskin, Kevin A.; Suit, Herman D.; Yoon, Sam S.; Hornicek, Francis J.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (XRT) for spine sarcomas is constrained by spinal cord, nerve, and viscera tolerance. Negative surgical margins are uncommon; hence, doses of {>=}66 Gy are recommended. A Phase II clinical trial evaluated high-dose photon/proton XRT for spine sarcomas. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had nonmetastatic, thoracic, lumbar, and/or sacral spine/paraspinal sarcomas. Treatment included pre- and/or postoperative photon/proton XRT with or without radical resection; patients with osteosarcoma and Ewing's sarcoma received chemotherapy. Shrinking fields delivered 50.4 cobalt Gray equivalent (Gy RBE) to subclinical disease, 70.2 Gy RBE to microscopic disease in the tumor bed, and 77.4 Gy RBE to gross disease at 1.8 Gy RBE qd. Doses were reduced for radiosensitive histologies, concurrent chemoradiation, or when diabetes or autoimmune disease present. Spinal cord dose was limited to 63/54 Gy RBE to surface/center. Intraoperative boost doses of 7.5 to 10 Gy could be given by dural plaque. Results: A total of 50 patients (29 chordoma, 14 chondrosarcoma, 7 other) underwent gross total (n = 25) or subtotal (n = 12) resection or biopsy (n = 13). With 48 month median follow-up, 5-year actuarial local control, recurrence-free survival, and overall survival are: 78%, 63%, and 87% respectively. Two of 36 (5.6%) patients treated for primary versus 7/14 (50%) for recurrent tumor developed local recurrence (p < 0.001). Five patients developed late radiation-associated complications; no myelopathy developed but three sacral neuropathies appeared after 77.12 to 77.4 Gy RBE. Conclusions: Local control with this treatment is high in patients radiated at the time of primary presentation. Spinal cord dose constraints appear to be safe. Sacral nerves receiving 77.12-77.4 Gy RBE are at risk for late toxicity.

  7. Measurement of relative output factors for the 8 and 4 mm collimators of Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion by film dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novotny, Josef Jr.; Bhatnagar, Jagdish P.; Quader, Mubina A.; Bednarz, Greg; Lunsford, L. Dade; Huq, M. Saiful

    2009-05-15

    Three types of films, Kodak EDR2, Gafchromic EBT, and Gafchromic MD-V2-55, were used to measure relative output factors of 4 and 8 mm collimators of the Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion. The optical density to dose calibration curve for each of the film types was obtained by exposing the films to a range of known doses. Ten data points were acquired for each of the calibration curves in the dose ranges from 0 to 4 Gy, 0 to 8 Gy, and 0 to 80 Gy for Kodak EDR2, Gafchromic EBT, and Gafchromic MD-V2-55 films, respectively. For the measurement of relative output factors, five films of each film type were exposed to a known dose. All films were scanned using EPSON EXPRESSION 10000 XL scanner with 200 dpi resolution in 16 bit gray scale for EDR2 film and 48 bit color scale for Gafchromic films. The scanned images were imported in the red channel for both Gafchromic films. The background corrections from an unexposed film were applied to all films. The output factors obtained from film measurements were in a close agreement both with the Monte Carlo calculated values of 0.924 and 0.805 for 8 and 4 mm collimators, respectively. These values are provided by the vendor and used as default values in the vendor's treatment planning system. The largest differences were noted for the Kodak EDR 2 films (-2.1% and -4.5% for 8 and 4 mm collimators, respectively). The best agreement observed was for EBT Gafchromic film (-0.8% and +0.6% differences for 8 and 4 mm collimators, respectively). Based on the present values, no changes in the default relative output factor values were made in the treatment planning system.

  8. MID-INFRARED EXTINCTION AND ITS VARIATION WITH GALACTIC LONGITUDE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao Jian; Jiang, B. W.; Li Aigen E-mail: bjiang@bnu.edu.c

    2009-12-10

    Based on the data obtained from the Spitzer/Galactic Legacy Infrared Midplane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIPMSE) Legacy Program and the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) project, we derive the extinction in the four IRAC bands, [3.6], [4.5], [5.8], and [8.0] mum, relative to the 2MASS K{sub s} band (at 2.16 mum) for 131 GLIPMSE fields along the Galactic plane within |l| <= 65 deg., using red giants and red clump giants as tracers. As a whole, the mean extinction in the IRAC bands (normalized to the 2MASS K{sub s} band), A{sub [3.6]}/A{sub K{sub s}}approx0.63+-0.01, A{sub [4.5]}/A{sub K{sub s}}approx0.57+-0.03, A{sub [5.8]}/A{sub K{sub s}}approx0.49+-0.03, A{sub [8.0]}/A{sub K{sub s}}approx0.55+-0.03, exhibits little variation with wavelength (i.e., the extinction is somewhat flat or gray). This is consistent with previous studies and agrees with that predicted from the standard interstellar grain model for R{sub V} = 5.5 by Weingartner and Draine. As far as individual sightline is concerned, however, the wavelength dependence of the mid-infrared interstellar extinction A{sub l}ambda/A{sub K{sub s}} varies from one sightline to another, suggesting that there may not exist a 'universal' IR extinction law. We, for the first time, demonstrate the existence of systematic variations of extinction with Galactic longitude which appears to correlate with the locations of spiral arms as well as with the variation of the far-infrared luminosity of interstellar dust.

  9. Localized Ocular Adnexal Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma Treated With Radiation Therapy: A Long-Term Outcome in 86 Patients With 104 Treated Eyes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harada, Ken; Murakami, Naoya; Kitaguchi, Mayuka; Sekii, Shuhei; Takahashi, Kana; Yoshio, Kotaro; Inaba, Koji; Morota, Madoka; Ito, Yoshinori; Sumi, Minako; Suzuki, Shigenobu; Tobinai, Kensei; Uno, Takashi; Itami, Jun

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the natural history, behavior of progression, prognostic factors, and treatment-related adverse effects of primary ocular adnexal mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma (POAML). Methods and Materials: Eighty-six patients with histologically proven stage I POAML treated with radiation therapy at National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo between 1990 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. The median age was 56years (range, 18-85years). The median dose administered was 30Gy (range, 30-46Gy). Seventy-seven patients (90%) were treated by radiation therapy alone. Results: The median follow-up duration was 9years (range, 0.9-22years). The 5- and 10-year overall survival (OS) rates were 97.6% and 93.5%, respectively, and no patients died of lymphoma. Patients with tumor sizes ?4cm showed a greater risk of contralateral relapse (P=.012). Six patients with contralateral relapse were seen and treated by radiation therapy alone, and all the lesions were controlled well, with follow-up times of 3 to 12years. There was 1 case of local relapse after radiation therapy alone, and 3 cases of relapse occurred in a distant site. Cataracts developed in 36 of the 65 eyes treated without lens shielding and in 12 of the 39 patients with lens shielding (P=.037). Conclusions: The majority of patients with POAML showed behavior consistent with that of localized, indolent diseases. Thirty gray of local irradiation seems to be quite effective. The initial bilateral involvement and contralateral orbital relapses can be also controlled with radiation therapy alone. Lens shielding reduces the risk of cataract.

  10. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Putman, Douglas A.; Roegner, G. C.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John; Whiting, Allan H.

    2007-12-06

    This report is the third annual report of a six-year project to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration action in the Columbia River Estuary (CRE). The project is being conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) by the Marine Sciences Laboratory of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Pt. Adams Biological Field Station of the National Marine Fisheries Service, and the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce. Measurement of the cumulative effects of ecological restoration projects in the Columbia River estuary is a formidable task because of the size and complexity of the estuarine landscape and the meta-populations of salmonids in the Columbia River basin. Despite the challenges presented by this system, developing and implementing appropriate indicators and methods to measure cumulative effects is the best way to enable estuary managers to track the overall effectiveness of investments in estuarine restoration projects. This project is developing methods to quantify the cumulative effects of multiple restoration activities in the CRE. The overall objectives of the 2006 study were to continue to develop techniques to assess cumulative effects, refine the standard monitoring protocols, and initiate development of an adaptive management system for Corps of Engineers’ habitat restoration monitoring efforts in the CRE. (The adaptive management effort will be reported at a later date.) Field studies during 2006 were conducted in tidal freshwater at Kandoll Farm on the lower Grays River and tidal brackish water at Vera Slough on Youngs Bay. Within each of area, we sampled one natural reference site and one restoration site. We addressed the overall objectives with field work in 2006 that, coupled with previous field data, had specific objectives and resulted in some important findings that are summarized here by chapter in this report. Each chapter of the report contains data on particular monitored variables for pre- and post

  11. Regional geology and petroleum potential of Bakken Formation, southwestern Manitoba

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martiniuk, C.D.

    1988-07-01

    The Bakken Formation has been documented as an excellent petroleum source rock within the Williston basin and has, in some localities, been established as a producing zone. Recent exploration in the Daly field of southwestern Manitoba has led to the discovery and subsequent development of several oil pools within the middle member of the Bakken. The 21 active wells within these pools have produced 20,773.8 m/sup 3/ (130,667.2 bbl) of oil (40.2/degrees/ API) as of December 31, 1987. Through much of the Williston basin, the Bakken typically consists of three members: a lower, highly radioactive, black shale member; a middle siltstone member; and an upper black shale member (identical to the lower member). In southwestern Manitoba, the lower member is absent in most areas due to nondeposition and overstep of the overlying middle member. In these areas, the middle member unconformably overlies eroded red dolomitic shales of the Devonian Lyleton (Three Forks) Formation. The middle member is a relatively uniform blanket deposit averaging 4 m (13 ft) thick. It consists of interbedded tan to greenish-gray, very fine to medium-grained, well-sorted dolomitic sandstone and siltstone with angular to subrounded grains. Oil accumulation in the middle member is largely the result of stratigraphic trapping and appears, in part, to be localized where a basal sandstone (associated with middle member thickening) is concentrated in minor erosional lows on the Lyleton surface. The black shales of the upper member form a thin (2 m or 6.6 ft average), uniform cap throughout the map area and are overlain by the carbonates of the Mississippian Lodgepole Formation (Souris Valley Beds). Maximum thickness of the Bakken reaches 32 m (105 ft) in the Waskada field area, where the lower shale member is locally present.

  12. Design and implementation of a CO{sub 2} flood utilizing advanced reservoir characterization and horizontal injection wells in a shallow shelf carbonate approaching waterflood depletion. Annual Report, July 1, 1995--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chimahusky, J.S.; Hallenbeck, L.D.; Harpole, K.J.; Dollens, K.B.

    1997-05-01

    The work reported herein covers select tasks remaining in Budget Phase I and many of the tasks of Budget Phase II. The principal Tasks in Budget Phase I included in this report are Reservoir Analysis and Characterization; Advanced Technical Studies; and Technology Transfer, Reporting and Project Management Activities for Budget Phase I. The principle Task in Budget Phase II included in this report is Field Demonstration. Completion of these tasks has enabled an optimum carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood project to be designed, economically evaluated, and implemented in the field. Field implementation of the project commenced during late 1995, with actual CO{sub 2} injection scheduled for start-up in mid-July, 1996. The current project has focused on reducing initial investment cost by utilizing horizontal injection wells and concentrating the project in the best productivity area of the field. An innovative CO{sub 2} purchase agreement (no take-or-pay provisions, CO{sub 2} purchase price tied to West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil price) and gas recycle agreements (expensing costs as opposed to a large upfront capital investment for compression) were negotiated to further improve the project economics. The Grayburg-San Andres section had previously been divided into multiple zones based on the core study and gamma ray markers that correlate wells within the Unit. Each zone was mapped as continuous across the field. Previous core studies concluded that the reservoir quality in the South Cowden Unit (SCU) is controlled primarily by the distribution of a bioturbated and diagenetically-altered rock type with a distinctive {open_quotes}chaotic{close_quotes} texture. The {open_quotes}chaotic{close_quotes} modifier is derived from the visual effect of pervasive, small-scale intermixing of tan oil-stained reservoir rock with tight gray non-reservoir rock.

  13. Structure and time of deformation in the central Pancake Range, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, W.J.; Grow, J.A. )

    1993-04-01

    In east-central Nevada, the Portuguese Mountain area of the central Pancake Range directly west of Railroad Valley contains mapped thrust' faults that form part of the basis of the central Nevada thrust-belt oil play. The authors have mapped and field checked the structure of this area to determine if thrust-style hydrocarbon traps are likely. In this region, previously mapped thrusts have been found to be (1) normal faults, dipping more than 60[degree], (2) landslide masses of both Oligocene igneous rocks and Paleozoic carbonate rocks, and (3) low-angle attenuation faults that omit rather than duplicate stratigraphic section. Locally, the first two types (mapped Portuguese Mountain thrust') involve Oligocene igneous rocks and are therefore younger. The third is represented by a low-angle detachment system northeast of Portuguese Mountain that was first differentially eroded and then overlapped by thin limestone-clast conglomerate and red clays (terra rosa) of the Sheep Pass( ) Formation and overlying volcanic rocks. The possible Sheep Pass correlation would imply that the detachment system is Paleogene or older. Farther north, near McClure Spring, a similar terra rosa and subjacent thin limestone-clast conglomerate sequence is underlain paraconformably by gray claystone containing dinosaur bone fragments, similar to the type Newark Canyon Formation (Cretaceous) to the north. Sheep Pass( ) terra rosa of the upper part of this sequence rest with profound unconformity (nearly 90[degree]) on mid-Pennsylvanian limestone of the east limb of the McClure Spring syncline, a major recumbent syncline cored by Permian to Triassic( ) synorogenic conglomerates. These rocks contain outcrop-scale synorogenic angular unconformities of as much as 15[degree] suggesting that folding began in Permian time. These preliminary results suggest that contractional deformation of the McClure Spring syncline may be pre-Sevier and possibly of Permian-Triassic age.

  14. Second Solid Cancers After Radiation Therapy: A Systematic Review of the Epidemiologic Studies of the Radiation Dose-Response Relationship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berrington de Gonzalez, Amy; Gilbert, Ethel; Curtis, Rochelle; Inskip, Peter; Kleinerman, Ruth; Morton, Lindsay; Rajaraman, Preetha; Little, Mark P.

    2013-06-01

    Rapid innovations in radiation therapy techniques have resulted in an urgent need for risk projection models for second cancer risks from high-dose radiation exposure, because direct observation of the late effects of newer treatments will require patient follow-up for a decade or more. However, the patterns of cancer risk after fractionated high-dose radiation are much less well understood than those after lower-dose exposures (0.1-5 Gy). In particular, there is uncertainty about the shape of the dose-response curve at high doses and about the magnitude of the second cancer risk per unit dose. We reviewed the available evidence from epidemiologic studies of second solid cancers in organs that received high-dose exposure (>5 Gy) from radiation therapy where dose-response curves were estimated from individual organ-specific doses. We included 28 eligible studies with 3434 second cancer patients across 11 second solid cancers. Overall, there was little evidence that the dose-response curve was nonlinear in the direction of a downturn in risk, even at organ doses of ≥60 Gy. Thyroid cancer was the only exception, with evidence of a downturn after 20 Gy. Generally the excess relative risk per Gray, taking account of age and sex, was 5 to 10 times lower than the risk from acute exposures of <2 Gy among the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. However, the magnitude of the reduction in risk varied according to the second cancer. The results of our review provide insights into radiation carcinogenesis from fractionated high-dose exposures and are generally consistent with current theoretical models. The results can be used to refine the development of second solid cancer risk projection models for novel radiation therapy techniques.

  15. SU-F-BRE-12: Optical Resonator Water Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham, J; DeMarco, J; Low, D

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Water calorimetry based on resistance thermometry has matured as a primary standard. Developing an optical technique hold the promise to push the boundaries of what is currently achievable with dosimetry. We will present a feasibility study and the current progress of construction of a Fabry-Perot resonator for dose to water measurement. Additionally, estimations of the theoretical limits resonator sensitivity and potential sources of noise for the system are described. Methods: A temperature change from the dose to water would be measured by the change in the index of refraction from the water in the cavity. Calculations are presented of the expected signal from the resonator for dose to water. The Fabry-Perot resonator constructed from optical quality narrowband mirrors is described. A water cell will be inserted into the cavity gap to provide the medium swept cavity length technique is explored as a specific implementation of this technique. Results: Calculations indicate that a dose to water on the order of a Gray is measureable with a reasonably implementable system. A resonator is currently under construction and progress towards a proof of principle measurement will be presented. The primary sources of noise, in order of importance, are expected to be; optical absorption by the medium, mechanical perturbations of the cavity length and thermal expansion of the optical mounts. Estimations of these noise sources and mitigation techniques will be discussed. Conclusion: A Fabry-Perot resonator is a promising technique for measuring the absorbed dose to water from a radiotherapy beam. This technique has the potential to serve as a check on the current primary standard for dose to water measurements. As well, i0074 may be the foundation for a new class of optical property based dosimetry measurement.

  16. Hydraulic Geometry and Microtopography of Tidal Freshwater Forested Wetlands and Implications for Restoration, Columbia River, U.S.A.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Coleman, Andre M.; Borde, Amy B.; Sinks, Ian A.

    2008-01-01

    The hydrologic reconnection of tidal channels, riverine floodplains, and main stem channels are among responses by ecological restoration practitioners to the increasing fragmentation and land conversion occurring in coastal and riparian zones. Design standards and monitoring of such ecological restoration depend upon the characterization of reference sites that vary within and among regions. Few locales, such as the 235 km tidal portion of the Columbia River on the West Coast U.S.A., remain in which the reference conditions and restoration responses of tidal freshwater forested wetlands on temperate zone large river floodplains can be compared. This study developed hydraulic geometry relationships for Picea sitchensis (Sitka spruce) dominated tidal forests (swamps) in the vicinity of Grays Bay on the Columbia River some 37 km from the Pacific Coast using field surveys and Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data. Scaling relationships between catchment area and the parameters of channel cross-sectional area at outlet and total channel length were comparable to tidally influenced systems of San Francisco Bay and the United Kingdom. Dike breaching, culvert replacement, and tide gate replacement all affected channel cross-sectional geometry through changes in the frequency of over-marsh flows. Radiocarbon dating of buried wood provided evidence of changes in sedimentation rates associated with diking, and restoration trajectories may be confounded by historical subsidence behind dikes rendering topographical relationships with water level incomparable to reference conditions. At the same time, buried wood is influencing the development of channel morphology toward characteristics resembling reference conditions. Ecological restoration goals and practices in tidal forested wetland regions of large river floodplains should reflect the interactions of these controlling factors.

  17. Heating 7.2 user`s manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, K.W.

    1993-02-01

    HEATING is a general-purpose conduction heat transfer program written in Fortran 77. HEATING can solve steady-state and/or transient heat conduction problems in one-, two-, or three-dimensional Cartesian, cylindrical, or spherical coordinates. A model may include multiple materials, and the thermal conductivity, density, and specific heat of each material may be both time- and temperature-dependent. The thermal conductivity may also be anisotropic. Materials may undergo change of phase. Thermal properties of materials may be input or may be extracted from a material properties library. Heat-generation rates may be dependent on time, temperature, and position, and boundary temperatures may be time- and position-dependent. The boundary conditions, which may be surface-to-environment or surface-to-surface, may be specified temperatures or any combination of prescribed heat flux, forced convection, natural convection, and radiation. The boundary condition parameters may be time- and/or temperature-dependent. General gray-body radiation problems may be modeled with user-defined factors for radiant exchange. The mesh spacing may be variable along each axis. HEATING uses a runtime memory allocation scheme to avoid having to recompile to match memory requirements for each specific problem. HEATING utilizes free-form input. Three steady-state solution techniques are available: point-successive-overrelaxation iterative method with extrapolation, direct-solution, and conjugate gradient. Transient problems may be solved using any one of several finite-difference schemes: Crank-Nicolson implicit, Classical Implicit Procedure (CIP), Classical Explicit Procedure (CEP), or Levy explicit method. The solution of the system of equations arising from the implicit techniques is accomplished by point-successive-overrelaxation iteration and includes procedures to estimate the optimum acceleration parameter.

  18. Heating 7. 2 user's manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, K.W.

    1993-02-01

    HEATING is a general-purpose conduction heat transfer program written in Fortran 77. HEATING can solve steady-state and/or transient heat conduction problems in one-, two-, or three-dimensional Cartesian, cylindrical, or spherical coordinates. A model may include multiple materials, and the thermal conductivity, density, and specific heat of each material may be both time- and temperature-dependent. The thermal conductivity may also be anisotropic. Materials may undergo change of phase. Thermal properties of materials may be input or may be extracted from a material properties library. Heat-generation rates may be dependent on time, temperature, and position, and boundary temperatures may be time- and position-dependent. The boundary conditions, which may be surface-to-environment or surface-to-surface, may be specified temperatures or any combination of prescribed heat flux, forced convection, natural convection, and radiation. The boundary condition parameters may be time- and/or temperature-dependent. General gray-body radiation problems may be modeled with user-defined factors for radiant exchange. The mesh spacing may be variable along each axis. HEATING uses a runtime memory allocation scheme to avoid having to recompile to match memory requirements for each specific problem. HEATING utilizes free-form input. Three steady-state solution techniques are available: point-successive-overrelaxation iterative method with extrapolation, direct-solution, and conjugate gradient. Transient problems may be solved using any one of several finite-difference schemes: Crank-Nicolson implicit, Classical Implicit Procedure (CIP), Classical Explicit Procedure (CEP), or Levy explicit method. The solution of the system of equations arising from the implicit techniques is accomplished by point-successive-overrelaxation iteration and includes procedures to estimate the optimum acceleration parameter.

  19. Pulmonary nodule detection in CT images based on shape constraint CV model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Bing; Tian, Xuedong; Wang, Qian; Yang, Ying; Xie, Hongzhi E-mail: xiehongzhi@medmail.com.cn; Zhang, Shuyang; Gu, Lixu E-mail: xiehongzhi@medmail.com.cn

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Accurate detection of pulmonary nodules remains a technical challenge in computer-aided diagnosis systems because some nodules may adhere to the blood vessels or the lung wall, which have low contrast compared to the surrounding tissues. In this paper, the analysis of typical shape features of candidate nodules based on a shape constraint Chan–Vese (CV) model combined with calculation of the number of blood branches adhered to nodule candidates is proposed to reduce false positive (FP) nodules from candidate nodules. Methods: The proposed scheme consists of three major stages: (1) Segmentation of lung parenchyma from computed tomography images. (2) Extraction of candidate nodules. (3) Reduction of FP nodules. A gray level enhancement combined with a spherical shape enhancement filter is introduced to extract the candidate nodules and their sphere-like contour regions. FPs are removed by analysis of the typical shape features of nodule candidates based on the CV model using spherical constraint and by investigating the number of blood branches adhered to the candidate nodules. The constrained shapes of CV model are automatically achieved from the extracted candidate nodules. Results: The detection performance was evaluated on 127 nodules of 103 cases including three types of challenging nodules, which are juxta-pleural nodules, juxta-vascular nodules, and ground glass opacity nodules. The free-receiver operating characteristic (FROC) curve shows that the proposed method is able to detect 88% of all the nodules in the data set with 4 FPs per case. Conclusions: Evaluation shows that the authors’ method is feasible and effective for detection of three types of nodules in this study.

  20. Sensing system for detection and control of deposition on pendant tubes in recovery and power boilers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kychakoff, George; Afromowitz, Martin A.; Hogle, Richard E.

    2008-10-14

    A system for detection and control of deposition on pendant tubes in recovery and power boilers includes one or more deposit monitoring sensors operating in infrared regions of about 4 or 8.7 microns and directly producing images of the interior of the boiler, or producing feeding signals to a data processing system for information to enable a distributed control system by which the boilers are operated to operate said boilers more efficiently. The data processing system includes an image pre-processing circuit in which a 2-D image formed by the video data input is captured, and includes a low pass filter for performing noise filtering of said video input. It also includes an image compensation system for array compensation to correct for pixel variation and dead cells, etc., and for correcting geometric distortion. An image segmentation module receives a cleaned image from the image pre-processing circuit for separating the image of the recovery boiler interior into background, pendant tubes, and deposition. It also accomplishes thresholding/clustering on gray scale/texture and makes morphological transforms to smooth regions, and identifies regions by connected components. An image-understanding unit receives a segmented image sent from the image segmentation module and matches derived regions to a 3-D model of said boiler. It derives a 3-D structure the deposition on pendant tubes in the boiler and provides the information about deposits to the plant distributed control system for more efficient operation of the plant pendant tube cleaning and operating systems.

  1. Geomechanical Fracturing with Flow and Heat

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-01-01

    The GeoFracFH model is a particle-based discrete element model (DEM) that has been coupled with fluid flow and heat conduction/convection. In this model, the rock matrix material is represented by a network of DEM particles connected by mechanical bonds (elastic beams in this case, see Figure 1, gray particles connected by beams). During the simulation process, the mechanical bonds that have been stretched or bent beyond a critical strain (both tensile and shear failures aremore » simulated) are broken and removed from the network in a progressive manner. Bonds can be removed from the network with rates or probabilities that depend on their stress or strain, or the properties of the discrete elements and bonds can be varied continuously to represent phenomena such as creep, strain hardening, and chemical degradation. The coupling of a DEM geomechanical model with models for Darcy flow and heat transport is also illustrated in Figure 1. Darcy flow and heat transport equations are solved on an underlying fixed finite difference grid with evolving porosity and permeability for each grid cell that depends on the local structure of the discrete element network (such as the DEM particle density). The fluid pressure gradient exerts forces on individual elements of the DEM network, which then deforms and fractures the rock matrix. The deformation/fracturing in turn changes the permeability which again changes the evolution of fluid pressure, coupling the two phenomena. The intimate coupling between fracturing, fluid flow, and thermal transport makes the GeoFracFH model, rather than conventional continuum mechanical models, necessary for coupled hydro-thermal-mechanical problems in the subsurface.« less

  2. Improved laboratory assays of Pu and U for SRP purification and finishing processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holland, M K; Dorsett, R S

    1986-01-01

    Significant improvements have been made in routine assay techniques for uranium and plutonium as part of an effort to improve accountability at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). Emphasis was placed on input/output accountability points and key physical inventory tanks associated with purification and finishing processes. Improvements were made in existing assay methods; new methods were implemented; and the application of these methods was greatly expanded. Prior to assays, samples were validated via density measurements. Digital density meters precise to four, five, and six decimal places were used to meet specific requirements. Improved plutonium assay techniques are now in routine use: controlled-potential coulometry, ion-exchange coulometry, and Pu(III) diode-array spectrophotometry. A new state-of-the-art coulometer was fabricated and used to ensure maximum accuracy in verifying standards and in measuring plutonium in product streams. The diode-array spectrophotometer for Pu(III) measurements was modified with fiber optics to facilitate remote measurements; rapid, precise measurements made the technique ideally suited for high-throughput assays. For uranium assays, the isotope-dilution mass spectrometric (IDMS) method was converted to a gravimetric basis. The IDMS method and the existing Davies-Gray titration (gravimetric basis) have met accountability requirements for uranium. More recently, a Pu(VI) diode-array spectrophotometric method was used on a test basis to measure plutonium in shielded-cell input accountability samples. In addition, tests to measure uranium via diode-array spectrophotometry were initiated. This rapid, precise method will replace IDMS for certain key sample points.

  3. SU-D-BRA-05: Toward Understanding the Robustness of Radiomics Features in CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackin, D; Zhang, L; Yang, J; Jones, A; Court, L; Fave, X; Fried, D; Taylor, B; Rodriguez-Rivera, E; Dodge, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To gauge the impact of inter-scanner variability on radiomics features in computed tomography (CT). Methods: We compared the radiomics features calculated for 17 scans of the specially designed Credence Cartridge Radiomics (CCR) phantom with those calculated for 20 scans of non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors. The scans were acquired at four medical centers using General Electric, Philips, Siemens, and Toshiba CT scanners. Each center used its own routine thoracic imaging protocol. To produce a large dynamic range of radiomics feature values, the CCR phantom has 10 cartridges comprising different materials. The features studied were derived from the neighborhood gray-tone difference matrix or image intensity histogram. To quantify the significance of the inter-scanner variability, we introduced the metric “feature noise”, which compares the ratio of inter-scanner variability and inter-patient variability in decibels, positive values indicating substantial noise. We performed hierarchical clustering based to look for dependence of the features on the scan acquisition parameters. Results: For 5 of the 10 features studied, the inter-scanner variability was larger than the inter-patient variability. Of the 10 materials in the phantom, shredded rubber seemed to produce feature values most similar to those of the NSCLC tumors. The feature busyness had the greatest feature noise (14.3 dB), whereas texture strength had the least (−14.6 dB). Hierarchical clustering indicated that the features depended in part on the scanner manufacturer, image slice thickness, and pixel size. Conclusion: The variability in the values of radiomics features calculated for CT images of a radiomics phantom can be substantial relative to the variability in the values of these features calculated for CT images of NSCLC tumors. These inter-scanner differences and their effects should be carefully considered in future radiomics studies.

  4. Pore-scale dynamics of salt transport and distribution in drying porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shokri, Nima

    2014-01-15

    Understanding the physics of water evaporation from saline porous media is important in many natural and engineering applications such as durability of building materials and preservation of monuments, water quality, and mineral-fluid interactions. We applied synchrotron x-ray micro-tomography to investigate the pore-scale dynamics of dissolved salt distribution in a three dimensional drying saline porous media using a cylindrical plastic column (15 mm in height and 8 mm in diameter) packed with sand particles saturated with CaI{sub 2} solution (5% concentration by mass) with a spatial and temporal resolution of 12 ?m and 30 min, respectively. Every time the drying sand column was set to be imaged, two different images were recorded using distinct synchrotron x-rays energies immediately above and below the K-edge value of Iodine. Taking the difference between pixel gray values enabled us to delineate the spatial and temporal distribution of CaI{sub 2} concentration at pore scale. Results indicate that during early stages of evaporation, air preferentially invades large pores at the surface while finer pores remain saturated and connected to the wet zone at bottom via capillary-induced liquid flow acting as evaporating spots. Consequently, the salt concentration increases preferentially in finer pores where evaporation occurs. Higher salt concentration was observed close to the evaporating surface indicating a convection-driven process. The obtained salt profiles were used to evaluate the numerical solution of the convection-diffusion equation (CDE). Results show that the macro-scale CDE could capture the overall trend of the measured salt profiles but fail to produce the exact slope of the profiles. Our results shed new insight on the physics of salt transport and its complex dynamics in drying porous media and establish synchrotron x-ray tomography as an effective tool to investigate the dynamics of salt transport in porous media at high spatial and temporal

  5. REDUCING PRODUCED WATER WITH DENSITY AND CONDUCTIVITY METERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jason T. Smith

    2004-08-01

    The work performed was an attempt to reduce the amount of produced water by using the well bore as an oil-water separator. The use of a flow meter, density meter and/or conductivity meter controlling a pumping unit would be used to achieve this goal. The natural physical differences between oil and water are easily detected inside the production stream with proper equipment. A coriolis mass meter, conductivity meter, data recorder, timer and relays were purchased and housed in a purpose-built field cabinet. The metering unit was hooked to four wells over the course of the project, Spencer No.8, Applegate Gray Unit No.1 (AGU No.1), Vollmer No.4 and Mohr No.1. All are located in the Illinois Basin, three with artificial lift pumps and one flowing well. Depth of producing formations ranges from a maximum of 846.13 m (2776 ft) to minimum of 316.69 m (1039 ft). All wells were completed in one formation of Mississippian or Pennsylvanian age. The data recorded were analyzed to determine what events could be detected. Events included pure oil or higher oil-cut fluid reaching the pump or reaching the metering equipment, the pump operating under capacity, and the well ''pumped down''. Based on how much oil and water is present in a fluid column, the pressure the fluid column imparts on a formation can be calculated. By knowing the amount of oil and water in a well bore and the maximum height water can reach, production equipment can be configured to only produce oil. However, the configuration may not be profitable. It became apparent during the course of this research the wells tested do not have an oil-water contact deep enough so traditional pumping equipment can be configured to recover oil by the proposed method. This method may work more successfully in deeper basins. Other interesting anomalies were also detected in the data.

  6. Proposed first-generation WSQ bit allocation procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, J.N.; Brislawn, C.M.

    1993-09-08

    The Wavelet/Scalar Quantization (WSQ) gray-scale fingerprint image compression algorithm involves a symmetric wavelet transform (SWT) image decomposition followed by uniform scalar quantization of each subband. The algorithm is adaptive insofar as the bin widths for the scalar quantizers are image-specific and are included in the compressed image format. Since the decoder requires only the actual bin width values -- but not the method by which they were computed -- the standard allows for future refinements of the WSQ algorithm by improving the method used to select the scalar quantizer bin widths. This report proposes a bit allocation procedure for use with the first-generation WSQ encoder. In previous work a specific formula is provided for the relative sizes of the scalar quantizer bin widths in terms of the variances of the SWT subbands. An explicit specification for the constant of proportionality, q, that determines the absolute bin widths was not given. The actual compression ratio produced by the WSQ algorithm will generally vary from image to image depending on the amount of coding gain obtained by the run-length and Huffman coding, stages of the algorithm, but testing performed by the FBI established that WSQ compression produces archival quality images at compression ratios of around 20 to 1. The bit allocation procedure described in this report possesses a control parameter, r, that can be set by the user to achieve a predetermined amount of lossy compression, effectively giving the user control over the amount of distortion introduced by quantization noise. The variability observed in final compression ratios is thus due only to differences in lossless coding gain from image to image, chiefly a result of the varying amounts of blank background surrounding the print area in the images. Experimental results are presented that demonstrate the proposed method`s effectiveness.

  7. Lyalpha RADIATIVE TRANSFER WITH DUST: ESCAPE FRACTIONS FROM SIMULATED HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laursen, Peter; Sommer-Larsen, Jesper; Andersen, Anja C. E-mail: jslarsen@astro.ku.d

    2009-10-20

    The Lyalpha emission line is an essential diagnostic tool for probing galaxy formation and evolution. Not only is it commonly the strongest observable line from high-redshift galaxies, but from its shape detailed information about its host galaxy can be revealed. However, due to the scattering nature of Lyalpha photons increasing their path length in a nontrivial way, if dust is present in the galaxy, the line may be severely suppressed and its shape altered. In order to interpret observations correctly, it is thus of crucial significance to know how much of the emitted light actually escapes the galaxy. In the present work, using a combination of high-resolution cosmological hydrosimulations and an adaptively refinable Monte Carlo Lyalpha radiative transfer code including an environment dependent model of dust, the escape fractions f {sub esc} of Lyalpha radiation from high-redshift (z = 3.6) galaxies are calculated. In addition to the average escape fraction, the variation of f {sub esc} in different directions and from different parts of the galaxies is investigated, as well as the effect on the emergent spectrum. Escape fractions from a sample of simulated galaxies of representative physical properties are found to decrease for increasing galaxy virial mass M {sub vir}, from f {sub esc} approaching unity for M {sub vir} approx 10{sup 9} M {sub sun} to f {sub esc} less than 10% for M {sub vir} approx 10{sup 12} M {sub sun}. In spite of dust being almost gray, it is found that the emergent spectrum is affected nonuniformly, with the escape fraction of photons close to the line center being much higher than of those in the wings, thus effectively narrowing the Lyalpha line.

  8. Retrospective Evaluation Reveals That Long-term Androgen Deprivation Therapy Improves Cause-Specific and Overall Survival in the Setting of Dose-Escalated Radiation for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Felix Y.; Blas, Kevin; Olson, Karin; Stenmark, Matthew; Sandler, Howard; Hamstra, Daniel A.

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and duration for high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with dose-escalated radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with dose-escalated RT (minimum 75 Gy) with or without ADT was performed. The relationship between ADT use and duration with biochemical failure (BF), metastatic failure (MF), prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM), non-prostate cancer death (NPCD), and overall survival (OS) was assessed as a function of pretreatment characteristics, comorbid medical illness, and treatment using Fine and Gray's cumulative incidence methodology. Results: The median follow-up time was 64 months. In men with National Comprehensive Cancer Network defined high-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated RT, on univariate analysis, both metastasis (P<.0001; hazard ratio 0.34; 95% confidence interval 0.18-0.67; cumulative incidence at 60 months 13% vs 35%) and PCSM (P=.015; hazard ratio 0.41; 95% confidence interval 0.2-1.0; cumulative incidence at 60 months 6% vs 11%) were improved with the use of ADT. On multivariate analysis for all high-risk patients, Gleason score was the strongest negative prognostic factor, and long-term ADT (LTAD) improved MF (P=.002), PCSM (P=.034), and OS (P=.001). In men with prostate cancer and Gleason scores 8 to 10, on multivariate analysis after adjustment for other risk features, there was a duration-dependent improvement in BF, metastasis, PCSM, and OS, all favoring LTAD in comparison with STAD or RT alone. Conclusion: For men with high-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated EBRT, this retrospective study suggests that the combination of LTAD and RT provided a significant improvement in clinical outcome, which was especially true for those with Gleason scores of 8 to 10.

  9. SU-E-J-143: Short- and Near-Term Effects of Proton Therapy On Cerebral White Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uh, J; Merchant, T; Ogg, R; Sabin, N; Hua, C; Indelicato, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess early effects of proton therapy on the structural integrity of cerebral white matter in relation to the subsequent near-term development of such effects. Methods: Sixteen children (aged 2–19 years) with craniopharyngioma underwent proton therapy of 54 Cobalt Gray Equivalent (CGE) in a prospective therapeutic trial. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was performed at baseline before proton therapy and every 3 months thereafter. Tract-based spatial statics analysis of DTI data was performed to derive the fractional anisotropy (FA) and radial diffusivity (RD) in 26 volumes of interest (VOIs). The dose distributions were spatially normalized to identify VOIs prone to high doses. The longitudinal percentage changes of the FA and RD in these VOIs at 3 and 12 months from the baseline were calculated, and their relationships were evaluated. Results: The average dose was highest to the cerebral peduncle (CP), corticospinal tract (CST) in the pons, pontine crossing tract (PCT), anterior/posterior limbs of the internal capsule (ALIC/PLIC), and genu of the corpus callosum (GCC). It ranged from 33.3 GCE (GCC) to 49.7 GCE (CP). A mild but statistically significant (P<0.05) decline of FA was observed 3 months after proton therapy in all VOIs except the PLIC and ranged from −1.7% (ALIC) to −2.8% (PCT). A significant increase of RD was found in the CP (3.5%) and ALIC (2.1%). The average longitudinal change from the baseline was reduced at 12 months for most VOIs. However, the standard deviation increased, indicating that the temporal pattern varied individually. The follow-up measurements at 3 and 12 months correlated for the CP, CST, PCT, and GCC (P < 0.04). Conclusion: DTI data suggest early (3 months) effects of proton therapy on microstructures in the white matter. The subsequent follow-up indicated individual variation of the changes, which was partly implied by the early effects.

  10. Mechanical and substructural response of incipiently spalled 316L stainless steel.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, G. T. , III; Bourne, N. K.

    2004-01-01

    316L SS samples were shock prestrained to a peak stress of 6.6 GPa using a 0.75 {mu}sec pulse duration square-topped shock profile and 'soft' recovered while a second sample was similarly shock loaded, without spall momentum trapping, leading to incipient spall damage. Shock prestraining and 'soft' shock recovery to 6.6 GPa led to an increase in the post-shock flow strength of 316L SS by {approx}100 MPa over the starting material while the reload yield strength of the incipiently spall damaged sample increased by {approx}200 MPa. In this paper the sequential processes of defect generation and damage operative during the shock prestraining, spallation, and reloading of incipiently spalled 316L SS is presented. The influence of shock prestraining, using both triangular-wave loading, via both direct HE and triangular-wave pulses on a gas launcher, as well as 'square-topped' shock prestaining via conventional flyer-plate impact, is crucial to understanding the shock hardening and spallation responses of materials(Gray III, et al. [2003]). The development of predictive constitutive models to describe the mechanical response of incipiently damaged metals and alloys requires an understanding of the defect generation and storage due to shock hardening as well as the additional plasticity and damage evolution during spallation. In this paper the influence of shock-wave prestraining on the process of shock hardening and thereafterthe hardeningand damage evolution accompanying incipient spallation in 316L stainless steel (316L SS) on post-shock constitutive behavior is examined using 'soft' recovery techniques and mechanical behavior measurements.

  11. SU-E-J-253: The Radiomics Toolbox in the Computational Environment for Radiological Research (CERR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apte, A; Veeraraghavan, H; Oh, J; Kijewski, P; Deasy, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To present an open source and free platform to facilitate radiomics research — The “Radiomics toolbox” in CERR. Method: There is scarcity of open source tools that support end-to-end modeling of image features to predict patient outcomes. The “Radiomics toolbox” strives to fill the need for such a software platform. The platform supports (1) import of various kinds of image modalities like CT, PET, MR, SPECT, US. (2) Contouring tools to delineate structures of interest. (3) Extraction and storage of image based features like 1st order statistics, gray-scale co-occurrence and zonesize matrix based texture features and shape features and (4) Statistical Analysis. Statistical analysis of the extracted features is supported with basic functionality that includes univariate correlations, Kaplan-Meir curves and advanced functionality that includes feature reduction and multivariate modeling. The graphical user interface and the data management are performed with Matlab for the ease of development and readability of code and features for wide audience. Open-source software developed with other programming languages is integrated to enhance various components of this toolbox. For example: Java-based DCM4CHE for import of DICOM, R for statistical analysis. Results: The Radiomics toolbox will be distributed as an open source, GNU copyrighted software. The toolbox was prototyped for modeling Oropharyngeal PET dataset at MSKCC. The analysis will be presented in a separate paper. Conclusion: The Radiomics Toolbox provides an extensible platform for extracting and modeling image features. To emphasize new uses of CERR for radiomics and image-based research, we have changed the name from the “Computational Environment for Radiotherapy Research” to the “Computational Environment for Radiological Research”.

  12. Stratigraphy of Pennsylvanian detrital reservoirs, Permian basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Der Loop, M. )

    1992-04-01

    Significant oil reserves have been found to date in stratigraphic traps in Pennsylvanian detrital reservoirs on the Central Basin platform and Reagan uplift of the Permian basin. The 32 MMBOEG Arenoso field area, discovered in 1966, is the largest producing field. Along a 75 mi northwest-southeast trend, 23 other smaller fields will produce an average 850 MBOEG each, for a total estimated ultimate recovery to date in the trend of 52 MMBOEG. These stratigraphic traps are elusive and complex. However, reservoir quality is excellent, and because of the poorly understood trap types, significant reserves remain to be found in the trend. The Pennsylvanian detrital consists of chert cobble conglomerates, coarse sands, red shales, and gray limestones deposited in an environment that grades seaward from alluvial fan to braided stream to shallow marine. The chert cobble conglomerates of the alluvial fan facies and the coarse sands of the braided stream facies are the highest quality pay zones. Porosities range from 5 to 20%, with permeability ranging up to 26 d. The total unit is seldom more than 400 ft thick; reservoir rock thicknesses within the unit range up to 100 ft. Because of the complex nature of the alluvial fan and braided stream deposits, dry development wells can be expected within fields. These Strawn deposits are located adjacent to and overlying the eroded lower Paleozoic uplifts of the southern Central Basin platform. The major source of the chert cobbles is erosion of the Devonian tripolitic chert. Renewed structural uplift combined with sea level drop in the middle Wolfcampian locally truncated some Pennsylvanian detrital alluvial fan deposits, and complicated or destroyed a potential trap by depositing Wolfcamp chert conglomerates on top of the Pennsylvanian conglomerates.

  13. Dosimetric verification of stereotactic radiosurgery/stereotactic radiotherapy dose distributions using Gafchromic EBT3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cusumano, Davide; Fumagalli, Maria L.; Marchetti, Marcello; Fariselli, Laura; De Martin, Elena

    2015-10-01

    Aim of this study is to examine the feasibility of using the new Gafchromic EBT3 film in a high-dose stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy quality assurance procedure. Owing to the reduced dimensions of the involved lesions, the feasibility of scanning plan verification films on the scanner plate area with the best uniformity rather than using a correction mask was evaluated. For this purpose, signal values dispersion and reproducibility of film scans were investigated. Uniformity was then quantified in the selected area and was found to be within 1.5% for doses up to 8 Gy. A high-dose threshold level for analyses using this procedure was established evaluating the sensitivity of the irradiated films. Sensitivity was found to be of the order of centiGray for doses up to 6.2 Gy and decreasing for higher doses. The obtained results were used to implement a procedure comparing dose distributions delivered with a CyberKnife system to planned ones. The procedure was validated through single beam irradiation on a Gafchromic film. The agreement between dose distributions was then evaluated for 13 patients (brain lesions, 5 Gy/die prescription isodose ~80%) using gamma analysis. Results obtained using Gamma test criteria of 5%/1 mm show a pass rate of 94.3%. Gamma frequency parameters calculation for EBT3 films showed to strongly depend on subtraction of unexposed film pixel values from irradiated ones. In the framework of the described dosimetric procedure, EBT3 films proved to be effective in the verification of high doses delivered to lesions with complex shapes and adjacent to organs at risk.

  14. Using multispectral videography to distinguish the pattern of zonation and plant species composition in brackish water marshes of the Rio Grande Delta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judd, F.W.; Lonard, R.I.; Everitt, J.H. [Univ. of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg, TX (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    Cyclical flooding of the Rio Grande and movement of floodwater into distributary channels formerly constituted significant freshwater input into the marshes of the Rio Grande Delta, but dams and flood control projects have eliminated this source of freshwater. The marshes are now dependent on rainfall alone for freshwater input and may be experiencing significant change in species of vegetation, abundance and patterns of distribution. Unfortunately, little is known of the ecology of these marshes. As a first step in providing needed information, multispectral videography was used to distinguish species composition and patterns of zonation in a brackish water marsh at Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge, Cameron County, Texas. The line intercept method of vegetation analysis provided ground truth and quantified species distribution and abundance. The vegetation of a typical brackish water marsh is organized into three zones along an elevation gradient. At the lowest elevations there is a distinct zone dominated by maritime saltwort, Batis maritime. At the lowest elevations in this zone where rainwater remains the longest, stands of California bulrush, Scirpus californicus, occur. An intermediate zone supports shoregrass, Monanthochloe littoralis, as the dominant species. A third (highest) zone is dominated by Gulf cordgrass, Spartina spartinae. The upper margin of this zone grades gradually into a shrub-grassland community that occurs on lomas (clay dunes). Each of the zones is distinguished by a distinctive signature in the multispectral videography. The Batis maritime community has a bright pink to red image response. Monanthochloe littoralis has a dark brown color and Spartina spartinae has a light gray to pinkish-tan color. Brackish water marshes may be distinguished from saltwater marshes by the relative positions of the Monanthochloe littoralis and Spartina spartinae communities, but additional data are needed before this possibility is confirmed.

  15. Playa basin development, southern High Plains, Texas and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavson, T.C. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)); Holliday, V.T. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States))

    1992-01-01

    More than 20,000 playa basins have formed on fine-grained eolian sediments of the Quaternary Blackwater Draw and Tertiary Ogallala Formations on the High Plains of TX and NM. Numerous hypotheses have been proposed for the development of playa basins: (1) subsidence due to dissolution of underlying Permian bedded salt, (2) dissolution of soil carbonate and piping of clastic sediment into the subsurface, (3) animal activity, and (4) deflation. Evidence of eolian processes includes lee dunes and straightened shorelines on the eastern and southern margins of many playas. Lee dunes, which occur on the eastern side of ca 15% of playa basins and contain sediment deflated from adjacent playas, are cresentic to oval in plain view and typically account for 15--40% of the volume of the playa basin. Quaternary fossil biotas and buried calcic soils indicate that grasslands and semi-arid to aid climatic conditions prevailed as these basins formed. Evidence of fluviolacustrine processes in playa basins includes centripetal drainage leading to fan deltas at playa margins and preserved deltaic and lacustrine sediments. Playa basins expanded as fluvial processes eroded basin slopes and carried sediment to the basin floor where, during periods of minimal vegetation cover, loose sediment was removed by deflation. Other processes that played secondary roles in the development of certain playa basins include subsidence induced by dissolution of deeply buried Permian salt, dissolution of soil carbonate and piping, and animal activity. Two small lake basins in Gray County, TX, occur above strata affected by dissolution-induced subsidence. Dissolution of soil carbonate was observed in exposures and cores of strata underlying playa basins. Cattle, and in the past vast numbers of migrating buffalo, destroy soil crusts in dry playas, making these sediments more susceptible to deflation, and carry sediment out of flooded playas on their hooves.

  16. SU-E-J-258: Prediction of Cervical Cancer Treatment Response Using Radiomics Features Based On F18-FDG Uptake in PET Images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altazi, B; Fernandez, D; Zhang, G; Biagioli, M; Moros, E; Moffitt, H. Lee

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Radiomics have shown potential for predicting treatment outcomes in several body sites. This study investigated the correlation between PET Radiomics features and treatment response of cervical cancer outcomes. Methods: our dataset consisted of a cohort of 79 patients diagnosed with cervical cancer, FIGO stage IB-IVA, age range 25–86 years, (median age at diagnosis: 50 years) all treated between: 2009–14 with external beam radiation therapy to a dose range between: 45–50.4 Gy (median= 45 Gy), concurrent cisplatin chemotherapy and MRI-based brachytherapy to a dose of 20–30 Gy (median= 28 Gy). Metabolic Tumor Volume (MTV) in patient’s primary site was delineated on pretreatment PET/CT by two board certified Radiation Oncologists. The features extracted from each patient’s volume were: 26 Co-occurrence matrix (COM) Feature, 11 Run-Length Matrix (RLM), 11 Gray Level Size Zone Matrix (GLSZM) and 33 Intensity-based features (IBF). The treatment outcome was divided based on the last follow up status into three classes: No Evidence of Disease (NED), Alive with Disease (AWD) and Dead of Disease (DOD). The ability for the radiomics features to differentiate between the 3 treatments outcome categories were assessed by One-Way ANOVA test with p-value < 0.05 was to be statistically significant. The results from the analysis were compared with the ones obtained previously for standard Uptake Value (SUV). Results: Based on patients last clinical follow-up; 52 showed NED, 17 AWD and 10 DOD. Radiomics Features were able to classify the patients based on their treatment response. A parallel analysis was done for SUV measurements for comparison. Conclusion: Radiomics features were able to differentiate between the three different classes of treatment outcomes. However, most of the features were only able to differentiate between NED and DOD class. Also, The ability or radiomics features to differentiate types of response were more significant than SUV.

  17. Direct synthesis of Al-SBA-15 containing aluminosilicate species plugs in an acid-free medium and structural adjustment by hydrothermal post-treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Lei; Xu, Yan; Zhang, Na; Lin, Sen; Li, Xiangping; Guo, Peng; Li, Xuebing

    2013-07-15

    A series of Al-SBA-15 with controllable aluminosilicate plug structures inside straight mesopores has been hydrothermally synthesized in a one-step synthesis in an environmentally friendly acid-free medium, using triblock copolymer Pluronic P123 as a structure-directing agent, water as solvent, tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and aluminum nitrate (Al(NO){sub 3}·9H{sub 2}O) as silica and aluminum sources, respectively. The effects of the P123/Si molar ratio in the initial solution and aging temperature on the structural properties of the resulting materials were investigated by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption–desorption at 77 K, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric (TG), FT-IR spectra and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analyses. The nature of the Al species and the acidity of the resultant samples were studied by solid state {sup 27}Al MAS NMR and pyridine adsorption measurements. The specific surface area (935–755 m{sup 2}g{sup −1}), pore volume (1.03–0.56 cm{sup 3}g{sup −1}) and especially the concentration and distribution of open type mesopores (0–68% to the total pores) of the synthesized Al-SBA-15 can be controlled by a simple adjustment of the P123/Si molar ratio in the initial solution. Moreover, increasing the aging temperature higher than 363 K can remarkably decrease the formation of plug structures to obtain “open” form mesopores. The observation by TEM of alternate defined gray and white areas inside the mesopores gives the strong evidence of isolated microporous aluminosilicate plugs inside the channels. In addition, a moderate hydrothermal post-treatment can finely modify the mesostructures through the partial or complete dissolution of the aluminosilicate plugs. - Graphical abstract: The plugs-containing structures can be interpreted as the distribution of individual isolated plugs along the mesoporous channel. - Highlights: • Al-SBA-15 with controllable

  18. Quantitative ultrasound characterization of locally advanced breast cancer by estimation of its scatterer properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tadayyon, Hadi; Department of Medical Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 ; Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Czarnota, Gregory; Department of Medical Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9; Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5; Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5T 1P5 ; Wirtzfeld, Lauren; Wright, Frances C.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Tumor grading is an important part of breast cancer diagnosis and currently requires biopsy as its standard. Here, the authors investigate quantitative ultrasound parameters in locally advanced breast cancers that can potentially separate tumors from normal breast tissue and differentiate tumor grades. Methods: Ultrasound images and radiofrequency data from 42 locally advanced breast cancer patients were acquired and analyzed. Parameters related to the linear regression of the power spectrummidband fit, slope, and 0-MHz-interceptwere determined from breast tumors and normal breast tissues. Mean scatterer spacing was estimated from the spectral autocorrelation, and the effective scatterer diameter and effective acoustic concentration were estimated from the Gaussian form factor. Parametric maps of each quantitative ultrasound parameter were constructed from the gated radiofrequency segments in tumor and normal tissue regions of interest. In addition to the mean values of the parametric maps, higher order statistical features, computed from gray-level co-occurrence matrices were also determined and used for characterization. Finally, linear and quadratic discriminant analyses were performed using combinations of quantitative ultrasound parameters to classify breast tissues. Results: Quantitative ultrasound parameters were found to be statistically different between tumor and normal tissue (p < 0.05). The combination of effective acoustic concentration and mean scatterer spacing could separate tumor from normal tissue with 82% accuracy, while the addition of effective scatterer diameter to the combination did not provide significant improvement (83% accuracy). Furthermore, the two advanced parameters, including effective scatterer diameter and mean scatterer spacing, were found to be statistically differentiating among grade I, II, and III tumors (p = 0.014 for scatterer spacing, p = 0.035 for effective scatterer diameter). The separation of the tumor

  19. SU-E-I-58: Detecting Tumors with Extremely Low Contrast in CT Images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheng, K; Gou, S; Kupelian, P; Steiberg, M; Low, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Tumors such as the prostate focal lesions and the brain metastases have extremely low CT contrast and MRI is usually used for target delineation. The target contours are propagated to the CT for treatment planning and patient positioning. We have employed an advanced denoising method eliminating the noise and allow magnification of subtle contrast of these focal lesions on CT. Methods: Five prostate and two brain metastasis patients with MRI T2, diffusion or dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) images confirmed focal lesions were included. One brain patients had 5 metastases. A block matching 3D (BM3D) algorithm was adapted to reduce the noise of kVCT images used for treatment planning. The gray-level range of the resultant images was narrowed to magnify the tumor-normal tissue contrast. Results: For the prostate patients, denoised kVCT images showed focal regions at 5, 8,11-1, 2, and 8–10 oclock for the 5 patients, this is highly consistent to the radiologist confirmed focal lesions based on MRI at 5, 7, 11-1, 2 and 8–10 oclock in the axial plane. These CT focal regions matched well with the MRI focal lesions in the cranio-caudal position. The average increase in density compared to background prostate glands was 0.86%, which corresponds to ∼50% increase in cellularity and is lower than the average CT noise level of 2.4%. For the brain patients, denoised kVCT showed 5/6 metastases. The high CT-density region of a metastasis is 2-mm off from its corresponding elevated MRI perfusion center. Overall the detecting sensitivity was 91%. Conclusion: It has been preliminarily demonstrated that the higher tumor cellularity can be detected using kVCT. The low contrast-to-noise information requires advanced denoising to reveal. The finding is significant to radiotherapy by providing an additional tool to locate focal lesions for confirming MRI-CT registration and providing a highly accessible outcome assessment tool.

  20. High spatial resolution brain functional MRI using submillimeter balanced steady-state free precession acquisition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Pei-Hsin; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Tsai, Ping-Huei; Wu, Ming-Long; Chuang, Tzu-Chao; Shih, Yi-Yu; Huang, Teng-Yi

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: One of the technical advantages of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is its precise localization of changes from neuronal activities. While current practice of fMRI acquisition at voxel size around 3 × 3 × 3 mm{sup 3} achieves satisfactory results in studies of basic brain functions, higher spatial resolution is required in order to resolve finer cortical structures. This study investigated spatial resolution effects on brain fMRI experiments using balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) imaging with 0.37 mm{sup 3} voxel volume at 3.0 T. Methods: In fMRI experiments, full and unilateral visual field 5 Hz flashing checkerboard stimulations were given to healthy subjects. The bSSFP imaging experiments were performed at three different frequency offsets to widen the coverage, with functional activations in the primary visual cortex analyzed using the general linear model. Variations of the spatial resolution were achieved by removing outerk-space data components. Results: Results show that a reduction in voxel volume from 3.44 × 3.44 × 2 mm{sup 3} to 0.43 × 0.43 × 2 mm{sup 3} has resulted in an increase of the functional activation signals from (7.7 ± 1.7)% to (20.9 ± 2.0)% at 3.0 T, despite of the threefold SNR decreases in the original images, leading to nearly invariant functional contrast-to-noise ratios (fCNR) even at high spatial resolution. Activation signals aligning nicely with gray matter sulci at high spatial resolution would, on the other hand, have possibly been mistaken as noise at low spatial resolution. Conclusions: It is concluded that the bSSFP sequence is a plausible technique for fMRI investigations at submillimeter voxel widths without compromising fCNR. The reduction of partial volume averaging with nonactivated brain tissues to retain fCNR is uniquely suitable for high spatial resolution applications such as the resolving of columnar organization in the brain.

  1. Two-Phase Flow Simulations In a Natural Rock Fracture using the VOF Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H., Bromhal, Grant

    2010-01-01

    Standard models of two-phase flow in porous media have been shown to exhibit several shortcomings that might be partially overcome with a recently developed model based on thermodynamic principles (Hassanizadeh and Gray, 1990). This alternative two-phase flow model contains a set of new and non-standard parameters, including specific interfacial area. By incorporating interfacial area production, destruction, and propagation into functional relationships that describe the capillary pressure and saturation, a more physical model has been developed. Niessner and Hassanizadeh (2008) have examined this model numerically and have shown that the model captures saturation hysteresis with drainage/imbibition cycles. Several static experimental studies have been performed to examine the validity of this new thermodynamically based approach; these allow the determination of static parameters of the model. To date, no experimental studies have obtained information about the dynamic parameters required for the model. A new experimental porous flow cell has been constructed using stereolithography to study two-phase flow phenomena (Crandall et al. 2008). A novel image analysis tool was developed for an examination of the evolution of flow patterns during displacement experiments (Crandall et al. 2009). This analysis tool enables the direct quantification of interfacial area between fluids by matching known geometrical properties of the constructed flow cell with locations identified as interfaces from images of flowing fluids. Numerous images were obtained from two-phase experiments within the flow cell. The dynamic evolution of the fluid distribution and the fluid-fluid interface locations were determined by analyzing these images. In this paper, we give a brief introduction to the thermodynamically based two-phase flow model, review the properties of the stereolithography flow cell, and show how the image analysis procedure has been used to obtain dynamic parameters for the

  2. Direct, Dynamic Measurement of Interfacial Area within Porous Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H.; Bromhal, Grant

    2010-01-01

    Standard models of two-phase flow in porous media have been shown to exhibit several shortcomings that might be partially overcome with a recently developed model based on thermodynamic principles (Hassanizadeh and Gray, 1990). This alternative two-phase flow model contains a set of new and non-standard parameters, including specific interfacial area. By incorporating interfacial area production, destruction, and propagation into functional relationships that describe the capillary pressure and saturation, a more physical model has been developed. Niessner and Hassanizadeh (2008) have examined this model numerically and have shown that the model captures saturation hysteresis with drainage/imbibition cycles. Several static experimental studies have been performed to examine the validity of this new thermodynamically based approach; these allow the determination of static parameters of the model. To date, no experimental studies have obtained information about the dynamic parameters required for the model. A new experimental porous flow cell has been constructed using stereolithography to study two-phase flow phenomena (Crandall et al. 2008). A novel image analysis tool was developed for an examination of the evolution of flow patterns during displacement experiments (Crandall et al. 2009). This analysis tool enables the direct quantification of interfacial area between fluids by matching known geometrical properties of the constructed flow cell with locations identified as interfaces from images of flowing fluids. Numerous images were obtained from two-phase experiments within the flow cell. The dynamic evolution of the fluid distribution and the fluid-fluid interface locations were determined by analyzing these images. In this paper, we give a brief introduction to the thermodynamically based two-phase flow model, review the properties of the stereolithography flow cell, and show how the image analysis procedure has been used to obtain dynamic parameters for the

  3. SU-E-I-07: Response Characteristics and Signal Conversion Modeling of KV Flat-Panel Detector in Cone Beam CT System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yu; Cao, Ruifen; Pei, Xi; Wang, Hui; Hu, Liqin

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The flat-panel detector response characteristics are investigated to optimize the scanning parameter considering the image quality and less radiation dose. The signal conversion model is also established to predict the tumor shape and physical thickness changes. Methods: With the ELEKTA XVI system, the planar images of 10cm water phantom were obtained under different image acquisition conditions, including tube voltage, electric current, exposure time and frames. The averaged responses of square area in center were analyzed using Origin8.0. The response characteristics for each scanning parameter were depicted by different fitting types. The transmission measured for 10cm water was compared to Monte Carlo simulation. Using the quadratic calibration method, a series of variable-thickness water phantoms images were acquired to derive the signal conversion model. A 20cm wedge water phantom with 2cm step thickness was used to verify the model. At last, the stability and reproducibility of the model were explored during a four week period. Results: The gray values of image center all decreased with the increase of different image acquisition parameter presets. The fitting types adopted were linear fitting, quadratic polynomial fitting, Gauss fitting and logarithmic fitting with the fitting R-Square 0.992, 0.995, 0.997 and 0.996 respectively. For 10cm water phantom, the transmission measured showed better uniformity than Monte Carlo simulation. The wedge phantom experiment show that the radiological thickness changes prediction error was in the range of (-4mm, 5mm). The signal conversion model remained consistent over a period of four weeks. Conclusion: The flat-panel response decrease with the increase of different scanning parameters. The preferred scanning parameter combination was 100kV, 10mA, 10ms, 15frames. It is suggested that the signal conversion model could effectively be used for tumor shape change and radiological thickness prediction. Supported by

  4. Higher Biologically Effective Dose of Radiotherapy Is Associated With Improved Outcomes for Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma Treated With Chemoradiation: An Analysis of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Machtay, Mitchell; Movsas, Benjamin; Paulus, Rebecca; Gore, Elizabeth M.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Albain, Kathy; Sause, William T.; Curran, Walter J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Patients treated with chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced non-small-cell lung carcinoma (LA-NSCLC) were analyzed for local-regional failure (LRF) and overall survival (OS) with respect to radiotherapy dose intensity. Methods and Materials: This study combined data from seven Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials in which chemoradiotherapy was used for LA-NSCLC: RTOG 88-08 (chemoradiation arm only), 90-15, 91-06, 92-04, 93-09 (nonoperative arm only), 94-10, and 98-01. The radiotherapeutic biologically effective dose (BED) received by each individual patient was calculated, as was the overall treatment time-adjusted BED (tBED) using standard formulae. Heterogeneity testing was done with chi-squared statistics, and weighted pooled hazard ratio estimates were used. Cox and Fine and Gray's proportional hazard models were used for OS and LRF, respectively, to test the associations between BED and tBED adjusted for other covariates. Results: A total of 1,356 patients were analyzed for BED (1,348 for tBED). The 2-year and 5-year OS rates were 38% and 15%, respectively. The 2-year and 5-year LRF rates were 46% and 52%, respectively. The BED (and tBED) were highly significantly associated with both OS and LRF, with or without adjustment for other covariates on multivariate analysis (p < 0.0001). A 1-Gy BED increase in radiotherapy dose intensity was statistically significantly associated with approximately 4% relative improvement in survival; this is another way of expressing the finding that the pool-adjusted hazard ratio for survival as a function of BED was 0.96. Similarly, a 1-Gy tBED increase in radiotherapy dose intensity was statistically significantly associated with approximately 3% relative improvement in local-regional control; this is another way of expressing the finding that the pool-adjusted hazard ratio as a function of tBED was 0.97. Conclusions: Higher radiotherapy dose intensity is associated with improved local-regional control and

  5. Relative output factor and beam profile measurements of small radiation fields with an L-alanine/K-Band EPR minidosimeter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Abrego, Felipe; Calcina, Carmen Sandra Guzman; Almeida, Adelaide de; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo de; Baffa, Oswaldo

    2007-05-15

    The performance of an L-alanine dosimeter with millimeter dimensions was evaluated for dosimetry in small radiation fields. Relative output factor (ROF) measurements were made for 0.5x0.5, 1x1, 3x3, 5x5, 10x10 cm{sup 2} square fields and for 5-, 10-, 20-, 40-mm-diam circular fields. In beam profile (BP) measurements, only 1x1, 3x3, 5x5 cm{sup 2} square fields and 10-, 20-, 40-mm-diam circular fields were used. For square and circular field irradiations, Varian/Clinac 2100, and a Siemens/Mevatron 6 MV linear accelerators were used, respectively. For a batch of 800 L-alanine minidosimeters (miniALAs) the average mass was 4.3{+-}0.5 (1{sigma}) mg, the diameter was 1.22{+-}0.07 (1{sigma}) mm, and the length was 3.5{+-}0.2 (1{sigma}) mm. A K-Band (24 GHz) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer was used for recording the spectrum of irradiated and nonirradiated miniALAs. To evaluate the performance of the miniALAs, their ROF and BP results were compared with those of other types of detectors, such as an ionization chamber (PTW 0.125 cc), a miniTLD (LiF: Mg,Cu,P), and Kodak/X-Omat V radiographic film. Compared to other dosimeters, the ROF results for miniALA show differences of up to 3% for the smallest fields and 7% for the largest ones. These differences were within the miniALA experimental uncertainty ({approx}5-6% at 1{sigma}). For BP measurements, the maximum penumbra width difference observed between miniALA and film (10%-90% width) was less than 1 mm for square fields and within 1-2 mm for circular fields. These penumbra width results indicate that the spatial resolution of the miniALA is comparable to that of radiographic film and its dimensions are adequate for the field sizes used in this experiment. The K-Band EPR spectrometer provided adequate sensitivity for assessment of miniALAs with doses of the order of tens of Grays, making this dosimetry system (K-Band/miniALA) a potential candidate for use in radiosurgery dosimetry.

  6. THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY REVERBERATION MAPPING PROJECT: TECHNICAL OVERVIEW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Yue; Brandt, W. N.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Hall, Patrick B.; McGreer, Ian D.; Fan, Xiaohui; Anderson, Scott F.; Chen, Yuguang; Denney, Kelly D.; Eftekharzadeh, Sarah; Gao, Yang; Green, Paul J.; Greene, Jenny E.; Ho, Luis C.; Horne, Keith; Kelly, Brandon C.; and others

    2015-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping (SDSS-RM) project is a dedicated multi-object RM experiment that has spectroscopically monitored a sample of 849 broad-line quasars in a single 7deg{sup 2} field with the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey spectrograph. The RM quasar sample is flux-limited to i {sub psf} = 21.7 mag, and covers a redshift range of 0.1 < z < 4.5 without any other cuts on quasar properties. Optical spectroscopy was performed during 2014 January-July dark/gray time, with an average cadence of ?4 days, totaling more than 30 epochs. Supporting photometric monitoring in the g and i bands was conducted at multiple facilities including the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) and the Steward Observatory Bok telescope in 2014, with a cadence of ?2 days and covering all lunar phases. The RM field (R.A., decl. = 14:14:49.00, +53:05:00.0) lies within the CFHT-LS W3 field, and coincides with the Pan-STARRS 1 (PS1) Medium Deep Field MD07, with three prior years of multi-band PS1 light curves. The SDSS-RM six month baseline program aims to detect time lags between the quasar continuum and broad line region (BLR) variability on timescales of up to several months (in the observed frame) for ?10% of the sample, and to anchor the time baseline for continued monitoring in the future to detect lags on longer timescales and at higher redshift. SDSS-RM is the first major program to systematically explore the potential of RM for broad-line quasars at z > 0.3, and will investigate the prospects of RM with all major broad lines covered in optical spectroscopy. SDSS-RM will provide guidance on future multi-object RM campaigns on larger scales, and is aiming to deliver more than tens of BLR lag detections for a homogeneous sample of quasars. We describe the motivation, design, and implementation of this program, and outline the science impact expected from the resulting data for RM and general quasar science.

  7. The galactic census of high- and medium-mass protostars. II. Luminosities and evolutionary states of a complete sample of dense gas clumps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Bo; Tan, Jonathan C.; Barnes, Peter J.

    2013-12-10

    The Census of High- and Medium-mass Protostars (CHaMP) is the first large-scale (280° < l < 300°, –4° < b < 2°), unbiased, subparsec resolution survey of Galactic molecular clumps and their embedded stars. Barnes et al. presented the source catalog of ∼300 clumps based on HCO{sup +}(1-0) emission, used to estimate masses M. Here we use archival midinfrared-to-millimeter continuum data to construct spectral energy distributions. Fitting two-temperature gray-body models, we derive bolometric luminosities, L. We find that the clumps have 10 ≲ L/L {sub ☉} ≲ 10{sup 6.5} and 0.1 ≲ L/M/[L {sub ☉}/M {sub ☉}] ≲ 10{sup 3}, consistent with a clump population spanning a range of instantaneous star-formation efficiencies from 0 to ∼50%. We thus expect L/M to be a useful, strongly varying indicator of clump evolution during the star cluster formation process. We find correlations of the ratio of warm-to-cold component fluxes and of cold component temperature with L/M. We also find a near-linear relation between L/M and Spitzer-IRAC specific intensity (surface brightness); thus, this relation may also be useful as a star-formation efficiency indicator. The lower bound of the clump L/M distribution suggests that the star-formation efficiency per free-fall time is ε{sub ff} < 0.2. We do not find strong correlations of L/M with mass surface density, velocity dispersion, or virial parameter. We find a linear relation between L and L{sub HCO{sup +}(1--0)}, although with large scatter for any given individual clump. Fitting together with extragalactic systems, the linear relation still holds, extending over 10 orders of magnitude in luminosity. The complete nature of the CHaMP survey over a several kiloparsec-scale region allows us to derive a measurement at an intermediate scale, bridging those of individual clumps and whole galaxies.

  8. Evolution of porosity and geochemistry in Marcellus Formation black shale during weathering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Lixin; Ryan, Mathur; Rother, Gernot; Cole, David; Bazilevskaya, Ekaterina; Williams, Jennifer; Alex, Carone; Brantley, S. L.

    2013-01-01

    Soils developed on the Oatka Creek member of the Marcellus Formation in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania were analyzed to understand the evolution of black shale matrix porosity and the associated changes in elemental and mineralogical composition during infiltration of water into organic-rich shale. Making the reasonable assumption that soil erosion rates are the same as those measured in a nearby location on a less organic-rich shale, we suggest that soil production rates have on average been faster for this black shale compared to the gray shale in similar climate settings. This difference is attributed to differences in composition: both shales are dominantly quartz, illite, and chlorite, but the Oatka Creek member at this location has more organic matter (1.25 wt.% organic carbon in rock fragments recovered from the bottom of the auger cores and nearby outcrops) and accessory pyrite. During weathering, the extremely low-porosity bedrock slowly disaggregates into shale chips with intergranular pores and fractures. Some of these pores are eitherfilled with organic matter or air-filled but remain unconnected, and thus inaccessible to water. Based on weathering bedrock/soil profiles, disintegration is initiated with oxidation of pyrite and organic matter, which increases the overall porosity and most importantly allows water penetration. Water infiltration exposes fresh surface area and thus promotes dissolution of plagioclase and clays. As these dissolution reactions proceed, the porosity in the deepest shale chips recovered from the soil decrease from 9 to 7% while kaolinite and Fe oxyhydroxides precipitate. Eventually, near the land surface, mineral precipitation is outcompeted by dissolution or particle loss of illite and chlorite and porosity in shale chips increases to 20%. As imaged by computed tomographic analysis, weathering causes i) greater porosity, ii) greater average length of connected pores, and iii) a more branched pore network compared to the unweathered

  9. Evolution of porosity and geochemistry in Marcellus Formation black shale during weathering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Lixin; Mathur, Ryan; Rother, Gernot; Cole, David; Bazilevskaya, Ekaterina; Williams, Jennifer; Carone, Alex; Brantley, Susan L

    2013-01-01

    Soils developed on the Oatka Creek member of the Marcellus Formation in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania were analyzed to understand the evolution of black shale matrix porosity and the associated changes in elemental and mineralogical composition during infiltration of water into organic-rich shale. Making the reasonable assumption that soil erosion rates are the same as those measured in a nearby location on a less organic-rich shale, we suggest that soil production rates have on average been faster for this black shale compared to the gray shale in similar climate settings. This difference is attributed to differences in composition: both shales are dominantly quartz, illite, and chlorite, but the Oatka Creek member at this location has more organic matter (1.25 wt% organic carbon in rock fragments recovered from the bottom of the auger cores and nearby outcrops) and accessory pyrite. During weathering, the extremely low-porosity bedrock slowly disaggregates into shale chips with intergranular pores and fractures. Some of these pores are either filled with organic matter or air-filled but remain unconnected, and thus inaccessible to water. Based on weathering bedrock/soil profiles, disintegration is initiated with oxidation of pyrite and organic matter, which increases the overall porosity and most importantly allows water penetration. Water infiltration exposes fresh surface area and thus promotes dissolution of plagioclase and clays. As these dissolution reactions proceed, the porosity in the deepest shale chips recovered from the soil decrease from 9 to 7 % while kaolinite and Fe oxyhydroxides precipitate. Eventually, near the land surface, mineral precipitation is outcompeted by dissolution or particle loss of illite and chlorite and porosity in shale chips increases to 20%. As imaged by computed tomographic analysis, weathering causes i) greater porosity, ii) greater average length of connected pores, and iii) a more branched pore network compared to the

  10. Barium uranyl diphosphonates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Anna-Gay D.; Alekseev, Evgeny V.; Ewing, Rodney C.; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2012-08-15

    Three Ba{sup 2+}/UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} methylenediphosphonates have been prepared from mild hydrothermal treatment of uranium trioxide, methylendiphosphonic acid (C1P2) with barium hydroxide octahydrate, barium iodate monohydrate, and small aliquots of HF at 200 Degree-Sign C. These compounds, Ba[UO{sub 2}[CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{center_dot}1.4H{sub 2}O (Ba-1), Ba{sub 3}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}(CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}){sub 2}F{sub 6}]{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O (Ba-2), and Ba{sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2})F{sub 4}]{center_dot}5.75H{sub 2}O (Ba-3) all adopt layered structures based upon linear uranyl groups and disphosphonate molecules. Ba-2 and Ba-3 are similar in that they both have UO{sub 5}F{sub 2} pentagonal bipyramids that are bridged and chelated by the diphosphonate moiety into a two-dimensional zigzag anionic sheet (Ba-2) and a one-dimensional ribbon anionic chain (Ba-3). Ba-1, has a single crystallographically unique uranium metal center where the C1P2 ligand solely bridges to form [UO{sub 2}[CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sup 2-} sheets. The interlayer space of the structures is occupied by Ba{sup 2+}, which, along with the fluoride ion, mediates the structure formed and maintains overall charge balance. - Graphical abstract: Illustration of the stacking of the layers in Ba{sub 3}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}(CH{sub 2}(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}){sub 2})F{sub 6}]{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O viewed along the c-axis. The structure is constructed from UO{sub 7} pentagonal bipyramidal units, U(1)O{sub 7}=gray, U(2)O{sub 7}=yellow, barium=blue, phosphorus=magenta, fluorine=green, oxygen=red, carbon=black, and hydrogen=light peach. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The polymerization of the UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} sites to form uranyl dimers leads to structural variations in compounds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Barium cations stitch uranyl diphosphonate anionic layers together, and help mediate structure formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HF acts as both a

  11. Forward osmosis :a new approach to water purification and desalination.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, James Edward; Evans, Lindsey R.

    2006-07-01

    Fresh, potable water is an essential human need and thus looming water shortages threaten the world's peace and prosperity. Waste water, brackish water, and seawater have great potential to fill the coming requirements. Unfortunately, the ability to exploit these resources is currently limited in many parts of the world by both the cost of the energy and the investment in equipment required for purification/desalination. Forward (or direct) osmosis is an emerging process for dewatering aqueous streams that might one day help resolve this problem. In FO, water from one solution selectively passes through a membrane to a second solution based solely on the difference in the chemical potential (concentration) of the two solutions. The process is spontaneous, and can be accomplished with very little energy expenditure. Thus, FO can be used, in effect, to exchange one solute for a different solute, specifically chosen for its chemical or physical properties. For desalination applications, the salts in the feed stream could be exchanged for an osmotic agent specifically chosen for its ease of removal, e.g. by precipitation. This report summarizes work performed at Sandia National Laboratories in the area of FO and reviews the status of the technology for desalination applications. At its current state of development, FO will not replace reverse osmosis (RO) as the most favored desalination technology, particularly for routine waters. However, a future role for FO is not out of the question. The ability to treat waters with high solids content or fouling potential is particularly attractive. Although our analysis indicates that FO is not cost effective as a pretreatment for conventional BWRO, water scarcity will likely drive societies to recover potable water from increasingly marginal resources, for example gray water and then sewage. In this context, FO may be an attractive pretreatment alternative. To move the technology forward, continued improvement and optimization

  12. Design and Implementation of a CO(2) Flood Utilizing Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Horizontal Injection Wells in Shallow Shelf Carbonate Approaching Waterflood Depletion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-31

    The work reported herein covers select tasks in Budget Phase 11. The principle Task in Budget Phase 11 included in this report is Field Demonstration. Completion of many of the Field Demonstration tasks during the last report period enabled an optimum carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood project to be designed, economically evaluated, and implemented in the field. Field implementation of the project commenced during late 1995, with actual C0{sub 2} injection commencing in mid-July, 1996. This report summarizes activities incurred following initial project start-up, towards the goal of optimizing project performance. The current project has focused on reducing initial investment cost by utilizing horizontal injection wells and concentrating the project in the best productivity area of the field. An innovative C0{sub 2} purchase agreement (no take-or-pay provisions, C0{sub 2} purchase price tied to West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil price) and gas recycle agreement (expensing costs as opposed to a large upfront capital investment for compression) were negotiated to further improve the project economics. The Grayburg-San Andres section had previously been divided into multiple zones based on the core study and gamma ray markers that correlate wells within the Unit. Each zone was mapped as continuous across the field. Previous core studies concluded that the reservoir quality in the South Cowden Unit (SCU) is controlled primarily by the distribution of a bioturbated and diagenetically-altered rock type with a distinctive chaotic texture. The chaotic modifier is derived from the visual effect of pervasive, small-scale intermixing of tan oil-stained reservoir rock with tight gray non- reservoir rock. The chaotic reservoir rock extends from Zone C (4780`-4800`) to the lower part of Zone F (4640`-4680`). Zones D (4755`-4780`) and E (4680`-4755`) are considered the main floodable zones, though Zone F is also productive and Zone C is productive above the oil- water contact

  13. Impact of Pretreatment Tumor Growth Rate on Outcome of Early-Stage Lung Cancer Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atallah, Soha; Cho, B.C. John; Allibhai, Zishan; Taremi, Mojgan; Giuliani, Meredith; Le, Lisa W.; Brade, Anthony; Sun, Alexander; Bezjak, Andrea; Hope, Andrew J.

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To determine the influence of pretreatment tumor growth rate on outcomes in patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: A review was conducted on 160 patients with T1-T2N0M0 NSCLC treated with SBRT at single institution. The patient's demographic and clinical data, time interval (t) between diagnostic and planning computed tomography (CT), vital status, disease status, and cause of death were extracted from a prospectively kept database. Differences in gross tumor volume between diagnostic CT (GTV1) and planning CT (GTV2) were recorded, and growth rate was calculated by use of specific growth rate (SGR). Kaplan-Meier curves were constructed for overall survival (OS). Differences between groups were compared with a log-rank test. Multivariate analyses were performed by use of the Cox proportional hazard model with SGR and other relevant clinical factors. Cumulative incidence was calculated for local, regional, and distant failures by use of the competing risk approach and was compared with Gray's test. Results: The median time interval between diagnostic and planning CT was 82 days. The patients were divided into 2 groups, and the median SGR was used as a cut-off. The median survival times were 38.6 and 27.7 months for the low and high SGR groups, respectively (P=.03). Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (P=.01), sex (P=.04), SGR (P=.03), and GTV2 (P=.002) were predictive for OS in multivariable Cox regression analysis and, except sex, were similarly predictive for failure-free survival (FFS). The 3-year cumulative incidences of regional failure were 19.2% and 6.0% for the high and low SGR groups, respectively (P=.047). Conclusion: High SGR was correlated with both poorer OS and FFS in patients with early-stage NSCLC treated with SBRT. If validated, this measurement may be useful in identifying patients most likely to benefit from adjuvant

  14. MO-E-17A-08: Attenuation-Based Size Adjusted, Scanner-Independent Organ Dose Estimates for Head CT Exams: TG 204 for Head CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMillan, K; Bostani, M; Cagnon, C; McNitt-Gray, M; Zankl, M; DeMarco, J

    2014-06-15

    Support: Siemens-UCLA Radiology Master Research Agreement; Disclosures - Michael McNitt-Gray: Institutional Research Agreement, Siemens AG; Research Support, Siemens AG; Consultant, Flaherty Sensabaugh Bonasso PLLC; Consultant, Fulbright and Jaworski.

  15. MO-E-17A-01: BEST IN PHYSICS (IMAGING) - Calculating SSDE From CT Exams Using Size Data Available in the DICOM Header of CT Localizer Radiographs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMillan, K; Bostani, M; McNitt-Gray, M; McCollough, C

    2014-06-15

    . The topogrambased method has the advantage that WED data are already provided and therefore available without additional post-processing of the image data. Funding Support: NIH Grant R01-EB017095; Disclosures - Michael McNitt-Gray: Institutional Research Agreement, Siemens AG; Research Support, Siemens AG; Consultant, Flaherty Sensabaugh Bonasso PLLC; Consultant, Fulbright and Jaworski; Disclosures - Cynthia McCollough: Research Grant, Siemens Healthcare.

  16. EVIDENCE AGAINST AN EDGE-ON DISK AROUND THE EXTRASOLAR PLANET, 2MASS 1207 b AND A NEW THICK-CLOUD EXPLANATION FOR ITS UNDERLUMINOSITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skemer, Andrew J.; Close, Laird M.; Szucs, Laszlo; Apai, Daniel; Pascucci, Ilaria; Biller, Beth A.

    2011-05-10

    Since the discovery of the first directly imaged, planetary-mass object, 2MASS 1207 b, several works have sought to explain a disparity between its observed temperature and luminosity. Given its known age, distance, and spectral type, 2MASS 1207 b is underluminous by a factor of {approx}10 ({approx}2.5 mag) when compared to standard models of brown-dwarf/giant-planet evolution. In this paper, we study three possible sources of 2MASS 1207 b's underluminosity. First, we investigate Mohanty et al.'s hypothesis that a near edge-on disk, comprising large, gray-extincting grains, might be responsible for 2MASS 1207 b's underluminosity. After radiative transfer modeling, we conclude that the hypothesis is unlikely due to the lack of variability seen in multi-epoch photometry and unnecessary due to the increasing sample of underluminous brown dwarfs/giant exoplanets that cannot be explained by an edge-on disk. Next, we test the analogous possibility that a spherical shell of dust could explain 2MASS 1207 b's underluminosity. Models containing enough dust to create {approx}2.5 mag of extinction, placed at reasonable radii, are ruled out by our new Gemini/T-ReCS 8.7 {mu}m photometric upper limit for 2MASS 1207 b. Finally, we investigate the possibility that 2MASS 1207 b is intrinsically cooler than the commonly used AMES-DUSTY fits to its spectrum, and thus it is not, in fact, underluminous. New, thick-cloud model grids by Madhusudhan et al. fit 2MASS 1207 b's 1-10 {mu}m spectral energy distribution well, but they do not quite fit its near-infrared spectrum. However, we suggest that with some 'tuning', they might be capable of simultaneously reproducing 2MASS 1207 b's spectral shape and luminosity. In this case, the whole class of young, underluminous brown dwarfs/giant exoplanets might be explained by atmospheres that are able to suspend thick, dusty clouds in their photospheres at temperatures lower than field brown dwarfs.

  17. THE GALACTIC CENTER IN THE FAR-INFRARED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Etxaluze, M.; Smith, Howard A.; Tolls, V.; Stark, A. A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Gonzalez-Alfonso, E., E-mail: metxaluz@cfa.harvard.edu [CfA and Universidad de Alcala, Alcala de Henares 28801 (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    We analyze the far-infrared dust emission from the Galactic center region, including the circumnuclear disk (CND) and other structures, using Herschel PACS and SPIRE photometric observations. These Herschel data are complemented by unpublished observations by the Infrared Space Observatory Long Wavelength Spectrometer (ISO-LWS), which used parallel mode scans to obtain photometric images of the region with a larger beam than Herschel but with a complementary wavelength coverage and more frequent sampling with 10 detectors observing at 10 different wavelengths in the range from 46 {mu}m to 180 {mu}m, where the emission peaks. We also include data from the Midcourse Space Experiment at 21.3 {mu}m for completeness. We model the combined ISO-LWS continuum plus Herschel PACS and SPIRE photometric data toward the central 2 pc in Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), a region that includes the CND. We find that the far-infrared spectral energy distribution is best represented by a continuum that is the sum of three gray body curves from dust at temperatures of 90, 44.5, and 23 K. We obtain temperature and molecular hydrogen column density maps of the region. We estimate the mass of the inner part of the CND to be {approx}5.0 x 10{sup 4} M{sub sun}, with luminosities: L{sub cavity} {approx} 2.2 x 10{sup 6} L{sub sun} and L{sub CND} {approx} 1.5 x 10{sup 6} L{sub sun} in the central 2 pc radius around Sgr A*. We find from the Herschel and ISO data that the cold component of the dust dominates the total dust mass, with a contribution of {approx}3.2 x 10{sup 4} M{sub sun}; this important cold material had escaped the notice of earlier studies that relied on shorter wavelength observations. The hotter component disagrees with some earlier estimates, but is consistent with measured gas temperatures and with models that imply shock heating or turbulent effects are at work. We find that the dust grain sizes apparently change widely across the region, perhaps in response to the temperature

  18. Biologically Effective Dose (BED) Correlation With Biochemical Control After Low-Dose Rate Prostate Brachytherapy for Clinically Low-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miles, Edward F.; Nelson, John W.; Alkaissi, Ali K.; Das, Shiva; Clough, Robert W.; Broadwater, Gloria; Anscher, Mitchell S.; Chino, Junzo P.; Oleson, James R.

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: To assess the correlation of postimplant dosimetric quantifiers with biochemical control of prostate cancer after low-dose rate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: The biologically effective dose (BED), dose in Gray (Gy) to 90% of prostate (D{sub 90}), and percent volume of the prostate receiving 100% of the prescription dose (V{sub 100}) were calculated from the postimplant dose-volume histogram for 140 patients undergoing low-dose rate prostate brachytherapy from 1997 to 2003 at Durham Regional Hospital and the Durham VA Medical Center (Durham, NC). Results: The median follow-up was 50 months. There was a 7% biochemical failure rate (10 of 140), and 91% of patients (127 of 140) were alive at last clinical follow-up. The median BED was 148 Gy (range, 46-218 Gy). The median D{sub 90} was 139 Gy (range, 45-203 Gy). The median V{sub 100} was 85% (range, 44-100%). The overall 5-year biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS) rate was 90.1%. On univariate Cox proportional hazards modeling, no pretreatment characteristic (Gleason score sum, age, baseline prostate-specific antigen, or clinical stage) was predictive of bRFS. The BED, D{sub 90}, and V{sub 100} were all highly correlated (Pearson coefficients >92%), and all were strongly correlated with bRFS. Using the Youden method, we identified the following cut points for predicting freedom from biochemical failure: D{sub 90} >= 110 Gy, V{sub 100} >= 74%, and BED >= 115 Gy. None of the covariates significantly predicted overall survival. Conclusions: We observed significant correlation between BED, D{sub 90}, and V{sub 100} with bRFS. The BED is at least as predictive of bRFS as D{sub 90} or V{sub 100}. Dosimetric quantifiers that account for heterogeneity in tumor location and dose distribution, tumor repopulation, and survival probability of tumor clonogens should be investigated.

  19. SOME RECENT TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENTS FROM THE UK'S NATIONAL NUCLEAR LABORATORY TO ENABLE HAZARD CHARACTERISATION FOR NUCLEAR DECOMMISSIONING APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farfan, E.; Foley, T.

    2010-02-11

    Under its programme of self investment Internal Research and Development (IR&D), the UK's National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) is addressing the requirement for development in technology to enable hazard characterisation for nuclear decommissioning applications. Three such examples are described here: (1) RadBall developed by the NNL (patent pending) is a deployable baseball-sized radiation mapping device which can, from a single location, locate and quantify radiation hazards. RadBall offers a means to collect information regarding the magnitude and distribution of radiation in a given cell, glovebox or room to support the development of a safe, cost effective decontamination strategy. RadBall requires no electrical supplies and is relatively small, making it easy to be deployed and used to map radiation hazards in hard to reach areas. Recent work conducted in partnership with the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is presented. (2) HiRAD (patent pending) has been developed by the NNL in partnership with Tracerco Ltd (UK). HiRAD is a real-time, remotely deployed, radiation detection device designed to operate in elevated levels of radiation (i.e. thousands and tens of thousands of Gray) as seen in parts of the nuclear industry. Like the RadBall technology, the HiRAD system does not require any electrical components, the small dimensions and flexibility of the device allow it to be positioned in difficult to access areas (such as pipe work). HiRAD can be deployed as a single detector, a chain, or as an array giving the ability to monitor large process areas. Results during the development and deployment of the technology are presented. (3) Wireless Sensor Network is a NNL supported development project led by the University of Manchester (UK) in partnership with Oxford University (UK). The project is concerned with the development of wireless sensor network technology to enable the underwater deployment and communication of miniaturised probes allowing pond

  20. Local Recurrence in Women With Stage I Breast Cancer: Declining Rates Over Time in a Large, Population-Based Cohort

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canavan, Joycelin; Truong, Pauline T.; Smith, Sally L.; Lu, Linghong; Lesperance, Mary; Olivotto, Ivo A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether local recurrence (LR) risk has changed over time among women with stage I breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy. Methods and Materials: Subjects were 5974 women aged ≥50 years diagnosis with pT1N0 breast cancer from 1989 to 2006, treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiation therapy. Clinicopathologic characteristics, treatment, and LR outcomes were compared among 4 cohorts stratified by year of diagnosis: 1989 to 1993 (n=1077), 1994 to 1998 (n=1633), 1999 to 2002 (n=1622), and 2003 to 2006 (n=1642). Multivariable analysis was performed, with year of diagnosis as a continuous variable. Results: Median follow-up time was 8.6 years. Among patients diagnosed in 1989 to 1993, 1994 to 1998, 1999 to 2002, and 2003 to 2006, the proportions of grade 1 tumors increased (16% vs 29% vs 40% vs 39%, respectively, P<.001). Surgical margin clearance rates increased from 82% to 93% to 95% and 88%, respectively (P<.001). Over time, the proportions of unknown estrogen receptor (ER) status decreased (29% vs 10% vs 1.2% vs 0.5%, respectively, P<.001), whereas ER-positive tumors increased (56% vs 77% vs 86% vs 86%, respectively, P<.001). Hormone therapy use increased (23% vs 23% vs 62% vs 73%, respectively, P<.001), and chemotherapy use increased (2% vs 5% vs 10% vs 13%, respectively, P<.001). The 5-year cumulative incidence rates of LR over the 4 time periods were 2.8% vs 1.7% vs 0.9% vs 0.8%, respectively (Gray's test, P<.001). On competing risk multivariable analysis, year of diagnosis was significantly associated with decreased LR (hazard ratio, 0.92 per year, P=.0003). Relative to grade 1 histology, grades 2, 3, and unknown were associated with increased LR. Hormone therapy use was associated with reduced LR. Conclusion: Significant changes in the multimodality management of stage I breast cancer have occurred over the past 2 decades. More favorable-risk tumors were diagnosed, and margin clearance and systemic therapy use