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1

POROUS WALL, HOLLOW GLASS MICROSPHERES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hollow Glass Microspheres (HGM) is not a new technology. All one has to do is go to the internet and Google{trademark} HGM. Anyone can buy HGM and they have a wide variety of uses. HGM are usually between 1 to 100 microns in diameter, although their size can range from 100 nanometers to 5 millimeters in diameter. HGM are used as lightweight filler in composite materials such as syntactic foam and lightweight concrete. In 1968 a patent was issued to W. Beck of the 3M{trademark} Company for 'Glass Bubbles Prepared by Reheating Solid Glass Particles'. In 1983 P. Howell was issued a patent for 'Glass Bubbles of Increased Collapse Strength' and in 1988 H. Marshall was issued a patent for 'Glass Microbubbles'. Now Google{trademark}, Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs), the key words here are Porous Wall. Almost every article has its beginning with the research done at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The Savannah River Site (SRS) where SRNL is located has a long and successful history of working with hydrogen and its isotopes for national security, energy, waste management and environmental remediation applications. This includes more than 30 years of experience developing, processing, and implementing special ceramics, including glasses for a variety of Department of Energy (DOE) missions. In the case of glasses, SRS and SRNL have been involved in both the science and engineering of vitreous or glass based systems. As a part of this glass experience and expertise, SRNL has developed a number of niches in the glass arena, one of which is the development of porous glass systems for a variety of applications. These porous glass systems include sol gel glasses, which include both xerogels and aerogels, as well as phase separated glass compositions, that can be subsequently treated to produce another unique type of porosity within the glass forms. The porous glasses can increase the surface area compared to 'normal glasses of a 1 to 2 order of magnitude, which can result in unique properties in areas such as hydrogen storage, gas transport, gas separations and purifications, sensors, global warming applications, new drug delivery systems and so on. One of the most interesting porous glass products that SRNL has developed and patented is Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs) that are being studied for many different applications. The European Patent Office (EPO) just recently notified SRS that the continuation-in-part patent application for the PW-HGMs has been accepted. The original patent, which was granted by the EPO on June 2, 2010, was validated in France, Germany and the United Kingdom. The microspheres produced are generally in the range of 2 to 100 microns, with a 1 to 2 micron wall. What makes the SRNL microspheres unique from all others is that the team in Figure 1 has found a way to induce and control porosity through the thin walls on a scale of 100 to 3000 {angstrom}. This is what makes the SRNL HW-HGMs one-of-a-kind, and is responsible for many of their unique properties and potential for various applications, including those in tritium storage, gas separations, H-storage for vehicles, and even a variety of new medical applications in the areas of drug delivery and MRI contrast agents. SRNL Hollow Glass Microspheres, and subsequent, Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres are fabricated using a flame former apparatus. Figure 2 is a schematic of the apparatus.

Sexton, W.

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

2

ENCAPSULATION OF PALLADIUM IN POROUS WALL HOLLOW GLASS MICROSPHERES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new encapsulation method was investigated in an attempt to develop an improved palladium packing material for hydrogen isotope separation. Porous wall hollow glass microspheres (PWHGMs) were produced by using a flame former, heat treating and acid leaching. The PWHGMs were then filled with palladium salt using a soak-and-dry process. The palladium salt was reduced at high temperature to leave palladium inside the microspheres.

Heung, L; George Wicks, G; Ray Schumacher, R

2008-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

3

Production of hollow aerogel microspheres  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for making hollow aerogel microspheres of 800-1200 .mu. diameter and 100-300 .mu. wall thickness by forming hollow alcogel microspheres during the sol/gel process in a catalytic atmosphere and capturing them on a foam surface containing catalyst. Supercritical drying of the formed hollow alcogel microspheres yields hollow aerogel microspheres which are suitable for ICF targets.

Upadhye, Ravindra S. (Pleasanton, CA); Henning, Sten A. (Dalby, SE)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Production of hollow aerogel microspheres  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for making hollow aerogel microspheres of 800--1200{mu} diameter and 100--300{mu} wall thickness by forming hollow alcogel microspheres during the sol/gel process in a catalytic atmosphere and capturing them on a foam surface containing catalyst. Supercritical drying of the formed hollow alcogel microspheres yields hollow aerogel microspheres which are suitable for ICF targets.

Upadhye, R.S.; Henning, S.A.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

5

A Radically New Method for Hydrogen Storage in Hollow Glass Microspheres  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary goal of this project is to demonstrate that hydrogen gas can be rapidly extracted from hollow glass microspheres (HGMS) using a photo-induced heating effect. The results of the project demonstrate that diffusion of hydrogen is readily induced by exposure to light from an IR lamp in transition metal-doped HGMS filled to as much as 5,000 psi with hydrogen gas, which contain approximately 2.2 wt% hydrogen. Doped HGMS in conjunction with optically induced outgassing provide a solution to the traditional limitation of HGMS – i.e., the slow release of hydrogen from HGMS that are heated using a furnace. This information will also be invaluable in designing process changes for future production of HGMS able to hold higher pressures of hydrogen.

James E. Shelby; Matthew M. Hall; Michael J. Snyder; Peter B. Wachtel

2009-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

6

Method for sizing hollow microspheres  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hollow Microspheres may be effectively sized by placing them beneath a screen stack completely immersed in an ultrasonic bath containing a liquid having a density at which the microspheres float and ultrasonically agitating the bath.

Farnum, E.H.; Fries, R.J.

1975-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

7

IMPACT OF COMPOSITION AND HEAT TREATMENT ON PORE SIZE IN POROUS WALLED HOLLOW GLASS MICROSPHERES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) developed a new geometric form: hollow glass microspheres (HGMs), with unique porous walls. The new geometric form combines the existing technology of HGMs with basic glass science knowledge in the realm of glass-in-glass phase separation. Conceptually, the development of a HGM with porous walls (referred to as a PWHGM) provides a unique system in which various media or filling agents can be incorporated into the PWHGM (via transport through the porous walls) and ultimately has the capacity to serve as a functional delivery system in various industrial applications. Applications of these types of systems could range from hydrogen storage, molecular sieves, drug and bioactive delivery systems, to environmental, chemical and biological indicators, relevant to Energy, Environmental Processing and Homeland Security fields. As a specific example, previous studies at SRNL have introduced materials capable of hydrogen storage (as well as other materials) into the interior of the PWHGMs. The goal of this project was to determine if the microstructure (i.e., pore size and pore size distribution) of a PWHGM could be altered or tailored by varying composition and/or heat treatment (time and/or temperature) conditions. The ability to tailor the microstructure through composition or heat treatments could provide the opportunity to design the PWHGM system to accommodate different additives or fill agents. To meet this objective, HGMs of various alkali borosilicate compositions were fabricated using a flame forming apparatus installed at the Aiken County Technical Laboratory (ACTL). HGMs were treated under various heat treatment conditions to induce and/or enhance glass in glass phase separation. Heat treatment temperatures ranged from 580 C to 620 C, while heat treatment times were either 8 or 24 hours. Of the two primary variables assessed in this study, heat treatment temperature was determined to be most effective in changing the porosity of PWHGMs. Pore diameter in a non-heat treated baseline sample is approximately 100 {angstrom} and with heat treatment at 600 C for 8 hours, the diameter is approximately 1000 {angstrom}; an increase of a factor of 10. The results of this study also indicate significant microstructural differences with only a 20 C difference in heat treatment temperature (580 C and 600 C) for constant times. The microstructural changes observed via electron microscopy as a function of heat treatment temperature were confirmed by mercury porosimetry measurements, where considerable increases in pore volume were measured. Under constant heat treatment conditions, composition may impose a secondary effect on the resulting microstructure as micrographs indicate variations in the degree of porosity. Although microstructural differences were observed among the compositions assessed, the magnitude of the impact (i.e., difference in pore size or pore volume) appears to be smaller than that associated with heat treatment temperature. With respect to heat treatment time, the results suggest that the change in the degree of porosity is minimal for samples heat treated between 8 and 24 hours (it should be noted that the assessment of the impact of time on the resulting microstructure was limited to two compositions). The minimal impact of heat treatment time (on the two glasses evaluated) was confirmed by mercury porosimetry measurements indicating that there was a very slight shift in pore diameter and very little increase in pore volume in the baseline sample. Another important parameter, which will need to be considered under manufacturing or operational conditions, is the yield of the HGM and/or PWHGM and the characteristics of the final product (i.e., not only microstructure characteristics, but perhaps strength of the PWHGM for use under certain applications). In this report, yield is defined as the percentage of feed material converted to HGMs or the percentage of HGMs converted to PWHGMs. The yield of HGM formation was found to be a strong function of composition. As the S

Raszewski, F; Erich Hansen, E; Ray Schumacher, R; David Peeler, D

2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

8

Evaluation of the Thermal Performance for a Wire Mesh/Hollow Glass Microsphere Composite Structure as a Conduction Barrier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental investigation exploring the use of wire mesh/hollow glass microsphere combination for use as thermal insulation was conducted with the aim to conclude whether or not it represents a superior insulation technology to those on the market. Three primary variables, including number of wire mesh layers, filler material, and temperature dependence were studied using an apparatus that was part of L.I.C.H.E.N (LabVIEW Integrated Conduction Heat Experiment Network), a setup whose basic components allow three vertically stacked samples to be thermally and mechanically controlled. Knowing the temperature profile in the upper and lower samples allows for determination of thermal conductivity of the middle material through the use of Fourier?s law. The numbers of layers investigated were two, four, six, and eight, with each separated by a metallic liner. The filler materials included air, s15, s35 and s60HS 3MTM hollow glass microspheres. The experiments were conducted at four temperatures of 300, 330, 366, and 400K with an interface pressure of 20 Psi. The experimental results indicated the ?number of layers? used was the primary factor in determining the effective thermal conductivity value. The addition of hollow glass microspheres as filler material resulted in statistically insignificant changes in effective thermal conductivity. Increasing the number of wire mesh layers resulted in a corresponding increase in effective thermal conductivity of the insulation. Changes in temperature had little to no effect on thermal conductivity. The effective thermal conductivity values for the proposed insulation structure ranged from 0.22 to 0.65 W/m-K, the lowest of which came from the two layer case having air as filler material. The uncertainties associated with the experimental results fell between 10 to 20 percent in all but a few cases. In the best performing cases, when compared with existing insulation technologies, thermal conductivity was approximately 3 to 10 times higher than these methods of insulation. Thus, the proposed insulation scheme with hollow glass-sphere filler material does not represent superior technology, and would be deemed uncompetitive with those readily available in the insulation market.

Mckenna, Sean

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

SRNL POROUS WALL GLASS MICROSPHERES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed a new medium for storage of hydrogen and other gases. This involves fabrication of thin, Porous Walled, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs), with diameters generally in the range of 1 to several hundred microns. What is unique about the glass microballons is that porosity has been induced and controlled within the thin, one micron thick walls, on the scale of 10 to several thousand Angstroms. This porosity results in interesting properties including the ability to use these channels to fill the microballons with special absorbents and other materials, thus providing a contained environment even for reactive species. Gases can now enter the microspheres and be retained on the absorbents, resulting in solid-state and contained storage of even reactive species. Also, the porosity can be altered and controlled in various ways, and even used to filter mixed gas streams within a system. SRNL is involved in about a half dozen different programs involving these PW-HGMs and an overview of some of these activities and results emerging are presented.

Wicks, G; Leung Heung, L; Ray Schumacher, R

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

10

Hydrogen transport and storage in engineered glass microspheres  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

New, high-strength, hollow, glass microspheres filled with pressurized hydrogen exhibit storage densities which make them attractive for bulk hydrogen storage and transport. The hoop stress at failure of our engineered glass microspheres is about 150,000 psi, permitting a three-fold increase in pressure limit and storage capacity above commercial microspheres, which fail at wall stresses of 50,000 psi. For this project, microsphere material and structure will be optimized for storage capacity and charge/discharge kinetics to improve their commercial practicality. Microsphere production scale up will be performed, directed towards large-scale commercial use. Our analysis relating glass microspheres for hydrogen transport with infrastructure and economics` indicate that pressurized microspheres can be economically competitive with other forms of bulk rail and truck transport such as hydride beds, cryocarbons and pressurized tube transports. For microspheres made from advanced materials and processes, analysis will also be performed to identify the appropriate applications of the microspheres considering property variables, and different hydrogen infrastructure, end use, production and market scenarios. This report presents some of the recent modelling results for large beds of glass microspheres in hydrogen storage applications. It includes plans for experiments to identify the properties relevant to large-bed hydrogen transport and storage applications, of the best, currently producible, glass microspheres. This work began in March, 1994. Project successes will be manifest in the matching of cur-rent glass microspheres with a useful application in hydrogen bulk transport and storage, and in developing microsphere materials and processes that increase the storage density and reduce the storage energy requirement.

Rambach, G.D.

1994-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

11

Method for selecting hollow microspheres for use in laser fusion targets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hollow microspheres having thin and very uniform wall thickness are useful as containers for the deuterium and tritium gas mixture used as a fuel in laser fusion targets. Hollow microspheres are commercially available; however, in commercial lots only a very small number meet the rigid requirements for use in laser fusion targets. Those meeting these requirements may be separated from the unsuitable ones by subjecting the commercial lot to size and density separations and then by subjecting those hollow microspheres thus separated to an external pressurization at which those which are aspherical or which have nonuniform walls are broken and separating the sound hollow microspheres from the broken ones.

Farnum, Eugene H. (Los Alamos, NM); Fries, R. Jay (Los Alamos, NM); Havenhill, Jerry W. (Independence, MO); Smith, Maurice Lee (Kansas City, MO); Stoltz, Daniel L. (Blue Springs, MO)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Cobalt oxide hollow microspheres with micro- and nano-scale composite structure: Fabrication and electrochemical performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} hollow microspheres with micro- and nano-scale composite structure self-assembled by nanosheets were successfully fabricated by the template-free wet-chemical approach. This method is simple, facile and effective. The Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} hollow microspheres with good purity and homogeneous size were well characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform IR (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICP). The formation mechanism was deeply studied. The micro- and nano-scale composite structure constructed by the porous nanosheets promotes to improve the electrochemical properties of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} hollow microspheres. The high discharge capacity of 1048 mAh g{sup -1} indicates it to be the potential application in electrode materials of Li-ion battery. - Graphical Abstract: Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} hollow microspheres self-assembled by nanosheets are successfully fabricated by a template-free wet-chemical approach. The hollow microspheres are in good morphology purity and homogeneous size. Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} hollow microspheres constructed by porous nanosheets show the high discharge capacity of 1048 mAh g{sup -1}, indicating it to be the potential electrode material of Li-ion battery.

Tao Feifei [State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry, Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shaoxing University, Shaoxing 312000 (China); Gao Cuiling [State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry, Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Wen Zhenhai; Wang Qiang; Li Jinghong [Department of Chemistry, Qinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Xu Zheng, E-mail: zhengxu@netra.nju.edu.c [State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry, Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

Field application of lightweight, hollow-glass-sphere drilling fluid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new class of underbalanced drilling fluids being developed under US Dept. of Energy (US DOE) sponsorship was recently successfully field tested. The fluid uses hollow glass spheres (HGS`s) to decrease the fluid density to less than that of the base mud while maintaining incompressibility. Concentrations of up to 20 vol% were used to decrease the fluid density to 0.8 lbm/gal less than normally used in the field. Potential benefits of using these fluids include higher penetration rates, decreased formation damage, and lost-circulation mitigation. When used in place of aerated fluid, they can eliminate compressor usage and allow the use of mud-pulse measurement-while-drilling tools. These and other recent advances in technology have spurred interest in underbalanced drilling to the highest level in 30 years. Industry-wide surveys indicate that more than 12% of wells drilled in the US in 1997 will intentionally use underbalanced techniques.

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Formation processes and main properties of hollow aluminosilicate microspheres in fly ash from thermal power stations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main parameters of aluminosilicate microspheres formed at thermal power stations in Russia were studied. These parameters are responsible for the prospective industrial application of these microspheres. A comparative analysis of the properties of mineral coal components, the conditions of coal combustion, and the effects of chemical and phase-mineralogical compositions of mineral impurities in coals from almost all of the main coal deposits on the formation of microspheres was performed. The effects of thermal treatment conditions on gas evolution processes in mineral particles and on the fraction of aluminosilicate microspheres in fly ash were considered. It was found that the yield of microspheres was higher in pulverized coal combustion in furnaces with liquid slag removal, all other factors being equal. The regularities of microsphere formation were analyzed, and the mechanism of microsphere formation in fly ash during the combustion of solid fuels was considered.

V.S. Drozhzhin; M.Ya. Shpirt; L.D. Danilin; M.D. Kuvaev; I.V. Pikulin; G.A. Potemkin; S.A. Redyushev [Russian Federal Nuclear Center VNIIEF, Nizhegorodskaya oblast (Russia)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

15

SRNL Microspheres Win Top Honors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microspheres Microspheres Win Top Honors AIKEN, S.C. (July 16, 2012) - Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) captured top honors at a symposium spotlighting some of the most innovative research being conducted by the researchers supporting the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) . Dr. George Wicks of SRNL was presented the top "Award of Excellence" for the poster presen- tation on SRNL's porous-walled hollow glass microspheres at the NNSA Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Symposium on Discovery and Innovation for National Security. The poster described how development of the microspheres began with funding from the Savannah River Site Plant-Directed Research and Development (PDRD) program, which funds

16

Two-color mid-infrared thermometer with a hollow glass optical fiber  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed a low-temperature optical-fiber-based two-color infrared thermometer. A single 700-{mu}m-bore hollow glass optical fiber collects and transmits radiation that is then modulated and split into two paths by a reflective optical chopper. Two different thermoelectrically cooled mid-infrared HgCdZnTe photoconductors monitor the chopped signals that are recovered with lock-in amplification. With the two previously obtained blackbody calibration equations, a computer algorithm calculates the true temperature and emissivity of a target in real time, taking into account reflection of the ambient radiation field from the target surface. The small numerical aperture of the hollow glass fiber and the fast response of the detectors, together with the two-color principle, permit high spatial and temporal resolution while allowing the user to dynamically alter the fiber-to-target distance. {copyright} 1998 Optical Society of America

Small, W. IV; Celliers, P.M.; Da Silva, L.B.; Matthews, D.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, L-399, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Soltz, B.A. [Conversion Energy Enterprises, 81 Pinebrook Road, Spring Valley, New York 10977 (United States)

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Tiny Glass Bubbles With Big Potential | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tiny Glass Bubbles With Big Potential Tiny Glass Bubbles With Big Potential Tiny Glass Bubbles With Big Potential August 19, 2011 - 12:32pm Addthis SRNL's Porous Walled Hollow Glass Microspheres (which are about half the width of a human hair in diameter) have a network of interconnected pores that enable them to be filled with, hold and release gases and other materials. | Image courtesy of SRNL SRNL's Porous Walled Hollow Glass Microspheres (which are about half the width of a human hair in diameter) have a network of interconnected pores that enable them to be filled with, hold and release gases and other materials. | Image courtesy of SRNL Liisa O'Neill Liisa O'Neill Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? SRNL's porous walled glass microspheres allow the potential for

18

Absorption spectroscopy in hollow-glass waveguides using infrared laser diodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hollow-glass waveguides may be a viable technology that, in some cases, may supplant heavier multi-pass cells such as White or Herriott cells for performing trace detection using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy. We report here a series of experiments for testing the suitability of waveguides for infrared spectroscopy. The loss characteristics of 1 mm bore diameter waveguides have been measured for straight and coiled lengths. Using direct absorption spectroscopy we have found that the absorption pathlength is approximately equal to the physical length of the waveguide. Broadband FM diode laser spectroscopy produces a comparable signal-to-noise ratio with less than a second of signal averaging. Finally, we have also performed near-infrared spectroscopy of nitrous oxide flowing through a waveguide using a telecommunications diode laser.

Blake, Thomas A.; Kelly, James F.; Stewart, Timothy L.; Hartman, John S.; Sharpe, Steven W.; Sams, Robert L.

2002-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

19

Ferrule and use thereof for cooling a melt spun hollow glass fiber as it emerges from a spinnerette  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement in the process of melt spinning thin walled, hollow fibers from relatively low melting glasses results if cooling of the emerging fiber is accomplished by use of a thin layer of gas to transfer heat from the fiber to a ferrule which fits closely to the spinnerette face and the individual fiber. The ferrule incorporates or is in contact with a heat sink and is slotted or segmented so that it may be brought into position around the moving fiber. Thinner walled, more uniform fibers may be spun when this method of cooling is employed.

Brown, William E. (Walnut Creek, CA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Absorption Spectroscopy in Hollow-Glass Waveguides Using Infrared Diode Lasers[4817-25  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Near- and mid-infrared diode lasers combined with flexible, hollow waveguides hold the promise of light weight, field portable, fast response gas sensors. The advantages of using the waveguides compared to White or Herriott multireflection cells include a small gas volume, a high photon fill factor in the waveguide, which increases molecule-light interactions, and reduction or elimination of optical fringing, which usually sets the practical limit of detectivity in absorption spectroscopy. Though hollow waveguides have been commercially available for several years, relatively few results have been reported in the literature. We present here results from our laboratory where we have injected infrared laser light into straight and coiled lengths of hollow waveguides and performed direct and wavelength modulated absorption spectroscopy on nitrous oxide, ethylene, and nitric oxide. Using a 1 mm bore, 3 meter long coiled waveguide coated for the near infrared, nitrous oxide transitions near 6595 cm-1 were observed under flowing conditions. Signal-to-noise ratios on the order of 1500:1 with RMS noise equal to 2 X 10-5 were measured. In the mid-infrared light from either a 10.1 or 5.3 micron lead salt diode laser was injected into a three meter length of 1 mm bore hollow waveguide coated for the mid-infrared. The waveguide was coiled with one loop at a diameter of 52 cm. Ethylene transitions were observed in the vicinity of 985 cm-1 with a static fill of 0.2 Torr of pure ethylene in the waveguide and nitric oxide transitions were observed in the vicinity of 1906 cm-1 using either a flow or a static fill of 1 ppm NO in nitrogen. In direct absorption the NO transitions are observed to have a signal-to-noise of approximately 5:1 for transitions with absorbances on the order of 10-3. Using wavelength modulated techniques the signal-to-noise ratio improves at least an order of magnitude. These encouraging results indicate that waveguides can be used for in situ gas monitoring.

Blake, Thomas A. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Kelly, James F. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Stewart, Timothy L. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Hartman, John S. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Sharpe, Steven W. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Sams, Robert L. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Alan Fried

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hollow glass microspheres" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Investigation of leaks in fiberglass-reinforced pressure vessels by direct observation of hollow fibers in glass cloth  

SciTech Connect

A simple method of visual observation of hollow fibers within fiberglass cloth has been developed. This visualization can aid in determining the contribution these fibers make toward leaks observed in fiberglass-reinforced epoxy resin pressure or vacuum vessels. Photographs and frequency data of these hollow fibers are provided. 3 figs.

McAdams, J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Hollow spherical shell manufacture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for making a hollow spherical shell of silicate glass composition in which an aqueous suspension of silicate glass particles and an immiscible liquid blowing agent is placed within the hollow spherical cavity of a porous mold. The mold is spun to reduce effective gravity to zero and to center the blowing agent, while being heated so as to vaporize the immiscible liquid and urge the water carrier of the aqueous suspension to migrate into the body of the mold, leaving a green shell compact deposited around the mold cavity. The green shell compact is then removed from the cavity, and is sintered for a time and a temperature sufficient to form a silicate glass shell of substantially homogeneous composition and uniform geometry.

O' Holleran, Thomas P. (Belleville, MI)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Hollow spherical shell manufacture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for making a hollow spherical shell of silicate glass composition in which an aqueous suspension of silicate glass particles and an immiscible liquid blowing agent is placed within the hollow spherical cavity of a porous mold. The mold is spun to reduce effective gravity to zero and to center the blowing agent, while being heated so as to vaporize the immiscible liquid and urge the water carrier of the aqueous suspension to migrate into the body of the mold, leaving a green shell compact deposited around the mold cavity. The green shell compact is then removed from the cavity, and is sintered for a time and a temperature sufficient to form a silicate glass shell of substantially homogeneous composition and uniform geometry. 3 figures.

O' Holleran, T.P.

1991-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

24

Hollow Trees  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hollow Trees Hollow Trees Nature Bulletin No. 335-A March 3, 1969 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation George W. Dunne, President HOLLOW TREES You may have heard the expression: "They couldn't see the forest for the trees". There was a time, especially in Germany, when foresters grew trees as farmers grow cabbages: thousands of acres covered with just one kind planted in long rows that were kept free of all seedlings, underbrush, dead or injured trees and everything but perfect specimens. For a while these plantations produced astonishing yields of lumber and the Germans boasted of them as models of "efficiency". The fact that they supported practically no wildlife -- only a few birds, no food for deer, and so forth -- was contemptuously dismissed.

25

Method for producing small hollow spheres  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method is disclosed for producing small hollow spheres of glass, metal or plastic, wherein the sphere material is mixed with or contains as part of the composition a blowing agent which decomposes at high temperature (T [approx gt] 600 C). As the temperature is quickly raised, the blowing agent decomposes and the resulting gas expands from within, thus forming a hollow sphere of controllable thickness. The thus produced hollow spheres (20 to 10[sup 3] [mu]m) have a variety of application, and are particularly useful in the fabrication of targets for laser implosion such as neutron sources, laser fusion physics studies, and laser initiated fusion power plants. 1 fig.

Hendricks, C.D.

1979-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

26

Method for producing small hollow spheres  

SciTech Connect

Method for producing small hollow spheres of glass, metal or plastic, wherein the sphere material is mixed with or contains as part of the composition a blowing agent which decomposes at high temperature (T .gtorsim. 600.degree. C). As the temperature is quickly raised, the blowing agent decomposes and the resulting gas expands from within, thus forming a hollow sphere of controllable thickness. The thus produced hollow spheres (20 to 10.sup.3 .mu.m) have a variety of application, and are particularly useful in the fabrication of targets for laser implosion such as neutron sources, laser fusion physics studies, and laser initiated fusion power plants.

Hendricks, Charles D. (Livermore, CA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Ca(OH)[sub 2]-treated ceramic microsphere  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Geothermal wells with lost circulation problems are treated with a lightweight, high temperature (i.e. 350 C) cement slurry which incorporates pressure resistant hollow microspheres into the slurry wherein the spheres have been pretreated with an alkali compound such as Ca(OH)[sub 2] for up to 20 hours and at 100--300 C. Preferably, the alkali solution is a saturated aqueous solution and the treatment is for 10 hours. 2 figs.

Sugama, Toshifumi.

1990-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

28

Ca(OH)[sub 2]-treated ceramic microsphere  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Geothermal wells with lost circulation problems are treated with a lightweight, high temperature (i.e. 350 C) cement slurry which incorporates pressure resistant hollow microspheres into the slurry wherein the spheres have been pretreated with an alkali compound such as Ca(OH)[sub 2] for up to 20 hours and at 100--300 C. Preferably, the alkali solution is a saturated aqueous solution and the treatment is for 10 hours. 2 figs.

Sugama, Toshifumi.

1989-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

29

Ca(OH).sub.2 -treated ceramic microsphere  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Geothermal wells with lost circulation problems are treated with a lightweight, high temperature (i.e. 350.degree. C.) cement slurry which incorporates pressure resistant hollow microspheres into the slurry wherein the spheres have been pretreated with an alkali compound such as Ca(OH).sub.2 for up to 20 hours and at 100.degree.-300.degree. C. Preferably, the alkali solution is a saturated aqueous solution and the treatment is for 10 hours.

Sugama, Toshifumi (Mastic Beach, NY)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Ca(OH).sub.2 -treated ceramic microsphere  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Geothermal wells with lost circulation problems are treated with a lightweight, high temperature (i.e. 350.degree. C.) cement slurry which incorporates pressure resistant hollow microspheres into the slurry wherein the spheres have been pretreated with an alkali compound such as Ca(OH).sub.2 for up to 20 hours and at 100.degree.-300.degree. C. Preferably, the alkali solution is a saturated aqueous solution and the treatment is for 10 hours.

Sugama, Toshifumi (Mastic Beach, NY)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Sputter coating of microspherical substrates by levitation  

SciTech Connect

Microspheres are substantially uniformly coated with metals or nonmetals by simultaneously levitating them and sputter coating them at total chamber pressures less than 1 torr. A collimated hole structure 12 comprising a parallel array of upwardly projecting individual gas outlets 16 is machined out to form a dimple 11. Glass microballoons, which are particularly useful in laser fusion applications, can be substantially uniformly coated using the coating method and apparatus.

Lowe, Arthur T. (Tempe, AZ); Hosford, Charles D. (Los Alamos, NM)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

MESOPOROUS METAL OXIDE MICROSPHERE ELECTRODE COMPOSITIONS AND ...  

Compositions and methods of making are provided for mesoporous metal oxide microspheres electrodes. The mesoporous metal oxide microsphere ...

33

Method for manufacturing glass frit  

SciTech Connect

A method of manufacturing a glass frit for use in the manufacture of uniform glass microspheres to serve as containers for laser fusion fuel to be exposed to laser energy which includes the formation of a glass gel which is then dried, pulverized, and very accurately sized to particles in a range of, for example, 125 to 149 micrometers. The particles contain an occluded material such as urea which expands when heated. The sized particles are washed, dried, and subjected to heat to control the moisture content prior to being introduced into a system to form microspheres.

Budrick, Ronald G. (Ann Arbor, MI); King, Frank T. (Hillsboro, OR); Nolen, Jr., Robert L. (Ann Arbor, MI); Solomon, David E. (Ann Arbor, MI)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Organic aerogel microspheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Organic aerogel microspheres are disclosed which can be used in capacitors, batteries, thermal insulation, adsorption/filtration media, and chromatographic packings, having diameters ranging from about 1 micron to about 3 mm. The microspheres can be pyrolyzed to form carbon aerogel microspheres. This method involves stirring the aqueous organic phase in mineral oil at elevated temperature until the dispersed organic phase polymerizes and forms nonstick gel spheres. The size of the microspheres depends on the collision rate of the liquid droplets and the reaction rate of the monomers from which the aqueous solution is formed. The collision rate is governed by the volume ratio of the aqueous solution to the mineral oil and the shear rate, while the reaction rate is governed by the chemical formulation and the curing temperature.

Mayer, S.T.; Kong, F.M.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Method and apparatus for producing small hollow spheres  

SciTech Connect

Method and apparatus for producing small hollow spheres of glass, metal or plastic, wherein the sphere material is mixed with or contains as part of the composition a blowing agent which decomposes at high temperature (T.gtoreq.600.degree. C.). As the temperature is quickly raised, the blowing agent decomposes and the resulting gas expands from within, thus forming a hollow sphere of controllable thickness. The thus produced hollow spheres (20 to 10.sup.3 .mu.m) have a variety of application, and are particularly useful in the fabrication of targets for laser implosion such as neutron sources, laser fusion physics studies, and laser initiated fusion power plants.

Hendricks, Charles D. (Livermore, CA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

008- Formation of Magnetic Glass Microspheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

125- Influence of Gas Flow Rate Ratio on the Structural Properties of a-SiC:H Prepared by ... 145- The Synergy of XRD and XRF in a Shale and Slate Analysis.

37

Open-cell glass crystalline porous material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An open-cell glass crystalline porous material made from hollow microspheres which are cenospheres obtained from fly ash, having an open-cell porosity of up to 90 vol. % is produced. The cenospheres are separated into fractions based on one or more of grain size, density, magnetic or non-magnetic, and perforated or non-perforated. Selected fractions are molded and agglomerated by sintering with a binder at a temperature below the softening temperature, or without a binder at a temperature about, or above, the softening temperature but below the temperature of liquidity. The porous material produced has an apparent density of 0.3-0.6 g/cm.sup.3, a compressive strength in the range of 1.2-3.5 MPa, and two types of openings: through-flow wall pores in the cenospheres of 0.1-30 micrometers, and interglobular voids between the cenospheres of 20-100 micrometers. The porous material of the invention has properties useful as porous matrices for immobilization of liquid radioactive waste, heat-resistant traps and filters, supports for catalysts, adsorbents and ion-exchangers.

Anshits, Alexander G. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Sharonova, Olga M. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Vereshchagina, Tatiana A. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Zykova, Irina D. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Revenko, Yurii A. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Tretyakov, Alexander A. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Aloy, Albert S. (Saint-Petersburg, RU); Lubtsev, Rem I. (Saint-Petersburg, RU); Knecht, Dieter A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Macheret, Yevgeny (Idaho Falls, ID)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Doped zinc oxide microspheres  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new composition and method of making same for a doped zinc oxide microsphere and articles made therefrom for use in an electrical surge arrestor which has increased solid content, uniform grain size and is in the form of a gel. 4 figures.

Arnold, W.D. Jr.; Bond, W.D.; Lauf, R.J.

1993-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

39

Hollow Core Fiber Optics for Mid-Wave and Long-Wave Infrared Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hollow Core Fiber Optics for Mid-Wave and Long-Wave Infrared Spectroscopy Jason M. Kriesel and testing of hollow core glass waveguides (i.e., fiber optics) for use in Mid-Wave Infrared (MWIR) and Long related applications, and fiber optics are a key enabling technology needed to improve the utility

40

Hollow cathode life time modelling.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hollow Cathodes (HCs) are of primary importance in the field of electric space propulsion, being used as electron sources in ion and Hall-effect thrusters. Hence,… (more)

Coletti, Michele

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hollow glass microspheres" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

TECHNICAL PROGRAM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abatement of Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Metallurgical & Materials Process Industry .......... ...... Hollow glass microspheres were produced using natural volcanic ...... Electrochemistry, Ekaterinburg Russia; 3University of Patras and Insti-.

42

Hydrothermal synthesis and electrochemical performance of NiO microspheres with different nanoscale building blocks  

SciTech Connect

NiO microspheres were successfully obtained by calcining the Ni(OH){sub 2} precursor, which were synthesized via the hydrothermal reaction of nickel chloride, glucose and ammonia. The products were characterized by TGA, XRD and SEM. The influences of glucose and reaction temperature on the morphologies of NiO samples were investigated. Moreover, the possible growth mechanism for the spherical morphology was proposed. The charge/discharge test showed that the as-prepared NiO microspheres composed of nanoparticles can serve as an ideal electrode material for supercapacitor due to the spherical hollow structure. -- Graphical Abstract: Fig. 5 is the SEM image of NiO that was prepared in the different hydrothermal reaction temperatures. It showed that reaction temperature played a crucial role for the morphology of products.

Wang Ling; Hao Yanjing; Zhao Yan [College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Lai Qiongyu, E-mail: laiqy5@hotmail.co [College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Xu Xiaoyun [College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

43

Argonne CNM News: Hollow Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Lithium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hollow Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Lithium-Ion Battery Applications Hollow iron oxide nanoparticles Transmission electron micrograph of hollow iron oxide nanoparticles....

44

Compression molding of aerogel microspheres  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An aerogel composite material produced by compression molding of aerogel microspheres (powders) mixed together with a small percentage of polymer binder to form monolithic shapes in a cost-effective manner. The aerogel composites are formed by mixing aerogel microspheres with a polymer binder, placing the mixture in a mold and heating under pressure, which results in a composite with a density of 50-800 kg/m.sup.3 (0.05-0.80 g/cc). The thermal conductivity of the thus formed aerogel composite is below that of air, but higher than the thermal conductivity of monolithic aerogels. The resulting aerogel composites are attractive for applications such as thermal insulation since fabrication thereof does not require large and expensive processing equipment. In addition to thermal insulation, the aerogel composites may be utilized for filtration, ICF target, double layer capacitors, and capacitive deionization.

Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Hrubesh, Lawrence W. (Pleasanton, CA)

1998-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

45

Compression molding of aerogel microspheres  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An aerogel composite material produced by compression molding of aerogel microspheres (powders) mixed together with a small percentage of polymer binder to form monolithic shapes in a cost-effective manner is disclosed. The aerogel composites are formed by mixing aerogel microspheres with a polymer binder, placing the mixture in a mold and heating under pressure, which results in a composite with a density of 50--800 kg/m{sup 3} (0.05--0.80 g/cc). The thermal conductivity of the thus formed aerogel composite is below that of air, but higher than the thermal conductivity of monolithic aerogels. The resulting aerogel composites are attractive for applications such as thermal insulation since fabrication thereof does not require large and expensive processing equipment. In addition to thermal insulation, the aerogel composites may be utilized for filtration, ICF target, double layer capacitors, and capacitive deionization. 4 figs.

Pekala, R.W.; Hrubesh, L.W.

1998-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

46

Glass Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

40, pp. 162 - 186. Glass Production, Shortland, UEE 2009AINES Short Citation: Shortland 2009, Glass Production. UEE.Andrew, 2009, Glass Production. In Willeke Wendrich (ed. ),

Shortland, Andrew

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Solid evacuated microspheres of hydrogen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for producing solid, evacuated microspheres comprised of hydrogen. The spheres are produced by forming a jet of liquid hydrogen and exciting mechanical waves on the jet of appropriate frequency so that the jet breaks up into drops with a bubble formed in each drop by cavitation. The drops are exposed to a pressure less than the vapor pressure of the liquid hydrogen so that the bubble which is formed within each drop expands. The drops which contain bubbles are exposed to an environment having a pressure just below the triple point of liquid hydrogen and they thereby freeze giving solid, evacuated spheres of hydrogen.

Turnbull, Robert J. (Urbana, IL); Foster, Christopher A. (Champaign, IL); Hendricks, Charles D. (Livermore, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Modelling of heat transfer at glass/mould interface in press and blow forming processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical models may play an important role in the optimization of the quality of hollow-ware glass articles in glass industry. Due to the complexity of the phenomena involved a coupling between thermal and mechanical aspects is crucial. One of the key ... Keywords: Finite elements, Glass forming, Heat conduction, Heat transfer coefficient, Interface element, Press/blow process

Sébastien Grégoire; José M. A. César de Sá; Philippe Moreau; Dominique Lochegnies

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Hollow Plasma in a Solenoid  

SciTech Connect

A ring cathode for a pulsed, high-current, multi-spot cathodic arc discharge was placed inside a pulsed magnetic solenoid. Photography is used to evaluate the plasma distribution. The plasma appears hollow for cathode positions close the center of the solenoid, and it is guided closer to the axis when the cathode is away from the center.

Anders, Andre; Kauffeldt, Marina; Oks, Efim M.; Roy, Prabir K.

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

50

Hollow electrode plasma excitation source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plasma source incorporates a furnace as a hollow anode, while a coaxial cathode is disposed therewithin. The source is located in a housing provided with an ionizable gas such that a glow discharge is produced between anode and cathode. Radiation or ionic emission from the glow discharge characterizes a sample placed within the furnace and heated to elevated temperatures. 5 figs.

Ballou, N.E.

1992-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

51

Hollow electrode plasma excitation source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plasma source incorporates a furnace as a hollow anode, while a coaxial cathode is disposed therewithin. The source is located in a housing provided with an ionizable gas such that a glow discharge is produced between anode and cathode. Radiation or ionic emission from the glow discharge characterizes a sample placed within the furnace and heated to elevated temperatures.

Ballou, Nathan E. (West Richland, WA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Half Hollow Nursery | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hollow Nursery Hollow Nursery Jump to: navigation, search Name Half Hollow Nursery Facility Half Hollow Nursery Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Half Hollow Nursery Energy Purchaser Half Hollow Nursery Location Laurel NY Coordinates 40.79109983°, -73.33895981° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.79109983,"lon":-73.33895981,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

53

Process for making hollow carbon spheres  

SciTech Connect

A hollow carbon sphere having a carbon shell and an inner core is disclosed. The hollow carbon sphere has a total volume that is equal to a volume of the carbon shell plus an inner free volume within the carbon shell. The inner free volume is at least 25% of the total volume. In some instances, a nominal diameter of the hollow carbon sphere is between 10 and 180 nanometers.

Luhrs, Claudia C.; Phillips, Jonathan; Richard, Monique N.; Knapp, Angela Michelle

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

54

A Hollow-Ion Resonance of Unprecedented Strength  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Hollow-Ion Resonance of Unprecedented Strength A Hollow-Ion Resonance of Unprecedented Strength Print Wednesday, 29 June 2005 00:00 A so-called hollow ion is formed when core...

55

Hollow nanocrystals and method of making  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described herein are hollow nanocrystals having various shapes that can be produced by a simple chemical process. The hollow nanocrystals described herein may have a shell as thin as 0.5 nm and outside diameters that can be controlled by the process of making.

Alivisatos, A. Paul (Oakland, CA); Yin, Yadong (Moreno Valley, CA); Erdonmez, Can Kerem (Berkeley, CA)

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

56

Resorcinol-formaldehyde and carbon aerogel microspheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerogels are a unique class of materials possessing an open-cell structure with ultrafine cells/pores (aerogels are ideal candidates for many applications (e.g. transparent window insulation), current processing methods have limited their introduction into the commercial marketplace. Our research focuses on the formation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogel microspheres which offer an attractive alternative to monolith production. An inverse emulsion polymerization is used to produce these spherical gel particles which undergo solvent exchange followed by supercritical drying with carbon dioxide. This process yields aerogel microspheres (10--80{mu} diameter) which can be used as loosely packed powders, compression molded into near-net shapes using a polymer binder, or used as additives in conventional foaming operations to produce new aerogel composites with superior thermal properties. The emulsification procedure, thermal characterization, mechanical properties, and potential applications of RF aerogel microspheres will be discussed.

Alviso, C.T.; Pekela, R.W.; Gross, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Lu, X.; Caps, R.; Fricke, J [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Treated ceramic microsphere-cement lightweight composites for geothermal cementing systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The compressive strength and water permeability of high-temperature light-weight cementing materials containing sillimanite-based hollow microspheres as a filler can be improved by treating the surfaces of the microspheres with a Ca(OH)/sub 2/-saturated solution at temperatures up to 200/sup 0/C. The precipitation of an epitaxial layer formed by an interaction between a hot calcium hydroxide solution and the surface of the sphere plays an essential role in developing favorable bonding characteristics at the interfaces and in promoting the hydration of the cement matrix. The properties of the composites include a slurry density of <1.2 g/cc at 25/sup 0/C, a 300/sup 0/C-24 hour compressive strength of >1015 psi (7.0 MPa), a water permeability of <10/sup -4/ Darcy, and a bulk density of <1.0 g/cc. It was observed that tobermorite-truscottite transformation and anorthite formation during autoclave exposure for 180 days in brine at 300/sup 0/C results in slight strength reductions and increased water permeability.

Sugama, Toshifumi; Kukacka, L.E.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Titania Coated Silica Microspheres for High Efficiency Dye ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These microspheres, if used in DSSCs, can boost the efficiency of solar cell ... In- situ Characterization of Intercalation-induced Damage of High Purity Graphite ...

59

Traditional Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Glass product types and applications...plates, cups, bowls, serving dishes Fiberglass Wool: insulation, filters Textile: plastic or rubber tire reinforcements, fabrics,

60

Glass Fibers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 14   Compositional ranges for insulation-type glasses...from materials melted in a cupola with coke as fuel, all iron oxide

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hollow glass microspheres" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Glass Surfaces and Water in Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 9, 2012 ... Glass and Optical Materials: Glass Surfaces and Water in Glasses Program Organizers: Jincheng Du, University of North Texas; John Kieffer, ...

62

Resorcinol-formaldehyde and carbon aerogel microspheres  

SciTech Connect

Aerogels are a unique class of materials possessing an open-cell structure with ultrafine cells/pores (<100nm), high surface area (400--1100 m{sup 2}/g), and a solid matrix composed of interconnected particles, fibers, or platelets with characteristic dimensions of 10nm. Although monolithic aerogels are ideal candidates for many applications (e.g. transparent window insulation), current processing methods have limited their introduction into the commercial marketplace. Our research focuses on the formation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogel microspheres which offer an attractive alternative to monolith production. An inverse emulsion polymerization is used to produce these spherical gel particles which undergo solvent exchange followed by supercritical drying with carbon dioxide. This process yields aerogel microspheres (10--80{mu} diameter) which can be used as loosely packed powders, compression molded into near-net shapes using a polymer binder, or used as additives in conventional foaming operations to produce new aerogel composites with superior thermal properties. The emulsification procedure, thermal characterization, mechanical properties, and potential applications of RF aerogel microspheres will be discussed.

Alviso, C.T.; Pekela, R.W.; Gross, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Lu, X.; Caps, R.; Fricke, J [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

A Hollow-Ion Resonance of Unprecedented Strength  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Hollow-Ion Resonance of Unprecedented Strength Print A so-called hollow ion is formed when core electrons are removed or excited to higher energy levels, leaving an empty inner...

64

Hollow cylinder dynamic pressurization and radial flow through permeability tests for cementitous materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Saturated permeability is likely a good method for characterizing the susceptibility of portland cement concrete to various forms of degradation; although no widely accepted test exists to measure this property. The hollow cylinder dynamic pressurization test is a potential solution for measuring concrete permeability. The hollow cylinder dynamic pressurization (HDP) test is compared with the radial flow through (RFT) test and the solid cylinder dynamic pressurization (SDP) test to assess the accuracy and reliability of the HDP test. The three test methods, mentioned above, were used to measure the permeability of Vycor glass and portland cement paste and the results of the HDP test were compared with the results from the SDP and RFT tests. When the HDP and RFT test results were compared, the measured difference between the mean values of the two tests was 40% for Vycor glass and 47% for cement paste. When the HDP and SDP tests results were compared, the measured difference with Vycor glass was 53%. The cement paste permeability values could not be compared in the same manner since they were tested at various ages to show the time dependency of permeability in cement paste. The results suggest good correlation between the HDP test and both the SDP and RFT tests. Furthermore, good repeatability was shown with low coefficients of variation in all test permutations. Both of these factors suggest that the new HDP test is a valid tool for measuring the permeability of concrete materials.

Jones, Christopher Andrew

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Growth of hollow nickel fluoride whiskers  

SciTech Connect

Hollow nickel fluoride whiskers have been obtained by condensation from the vapor phase onto a platinum substrate in a flow of hydrogen fluoride. Crystals up to 5 mm in length have a square cross section with a 300 {+-} 30-{mu}m side. The wall thickness is 85 {+-} 20 {mu}m.

Petrov, S. V.; Orekhov, Yu. F. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kapitsa Institute for Physical Problems (Russian Federation); Fedorov, P. P., E-mail: ppf@lst.gpi.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

Glass and Optical Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NMR Insight into Glass Formers and Modifiers · NMR Studies on Biomaterials and Bioactive Glasses · Non-Linear Optical Properties in Glasses.

67

BIOCOMPATIBLE FLUORESCENT MICROSPHERES: SAFE PARTICLES FOR MATERIAL PENETRATION STUDIES  

SciTech Connect

Biocompatible polymers with hydrolyzable chemical bonds have been used to produce safe, non-toxic fluorescent microspheres for material penetration studies. The selection of polymeric materials depends on both biocompatibility and processability, with tailored fluorescent properties depending on specific applications. Microspheres are composed of USFDA-approved biodegradable polymers and non-toxic fluorophores and are therefore suitable for tests where human exposure is possible. Micropheres were produced which contain unique fluorophores to enable discrimination from background aerosol particles. Characteristics that affect dispersion and adhesion can be modified depending on use. Several different microsphere preparation methods are possible, including the use of a vibrating orifice aerosol generator (VOAG), a Sono-Tek atomizer, an emulsion technique, and inkjet printhead. Applications for the fluorescent microspheres include challenges for biodefense system testing, calibrants for biofluorescence sensors, and particles for air dispersion model validation studies.

Farquar, G; Leif, R

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

68

Apparatus for washing particulate material. [Removal of silicone oil from microspheres by trichloroethylene  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Transport of nuclear fuel microspheres through a wash liquid is facilitated by feeding a slurry containing the microspheres into the wash liquid via a column having a vibrating tubular screen located under its lower end.

Rivera, A.L.; Fowler, V.L.; Justice, G.V.

1983-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

69

Evolution of ESR Technology and Equipment for Long Hollow Ingots ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Evolution of ESR Technology and Equipment for Long Hollow Ingots ... Phosphorus Partitioning During EAF Refining of DRI Based Steel.

70

Mixed uranium dicarbide and uranium dioxide microspheres and process of making same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nuclear fuel microspheres are made by sintering microspheres containing uranium dioxide and uncombined carbon in a 1 mole percent carbon monoxide/99 mole percent argon atmosphere at 1550.degree. C. and then sintering the microspheres in a 3 mole percent carbon monoxide/97 mole percent argon atmosphere at the same temperature.

Stinton, David P. (Knoxville, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Hydroxyls and Glass Surface Reactivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field Assisted Viscous Flow and Crystallization in a Sodium Aluminosilicate Glass · Glass Ceramics ... Terahertz Properties of Lithium Iron Phosphate Glasses.

72

Removal of radioactive and other hazardous material from fluid waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hollow glass microspheres obtained from fly ash (cenospheres) are impregnated with extractants/ion-exchangers and used to remove hazardous material from fluid waste. In a preferred embodiment the microsphere material is loaded with ammonium molybdophosphonate (AMP) and used to remove radioactive ions, such as cesium-137, from acidic liquid wastes. In another preferred embodiment, the microsphere material is loaded with octyl(phenyl)-N-N-diisobutyl-carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) and used to remove americium and plutonium from acidic liquid wastes.

Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Knecht, Dieter A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Burchfield, Larry A. (W. Richland, WA); Anshits, Alexander G. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Vereshchagina, Tatiana (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Tretyakov, Alexander A. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Aloy, Albert S. (St. Petersburg, RU); Sapozhnikova, Natalia V. (St. Petersburg, RU)

2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

73

Metallic Glass II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 8, 2013 ... Application of Metallic Glass for High Performance Si Solar Cell: ... of the metallic glasses during heating is dependent on the thermal stability of ...

74

Bulk Metallic Glasses IX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of elements to form metallic-glass alloys] have resulted in the required cooling rate ... Bauschinger Effect in Metallic Glass Nanowires under Cyclic Loading.

75

DOE Glass Publications Portal  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

coated glass products. The Glass IOF is sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) which...

76

Bulk Metallic Glasses XI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 15, 2013 ... A Bulk Metallic Glass with Record-breaking Damage Tolerance ... Oxidation on the Surface Characteristics of Zr-based Bulk Metallic Glasses.

77

Working Principle of the Hollow-Anode Plasma Source Hollow-Anode Plasma  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

36240 36240 Plasma Sources Science and Technology 4 (1995) 571-575. Working Principle of the Hollow-Anode Plasma Source André Anders and Simone Anders Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 ABSTRACT The hollow-anode discharge is a special form of glow discharge. It is shown that a drastically reduced anode area is responsible for a positive anode voltage drop of 30-40 V and an increased anode sheath thickness. This leads to an ignition of a relatively dense plasma in front of the anode hole. Langmuir probe measurements inside a specially designed hollow anode plasma source give an electron density and temperature of n e = 10 9 -10 11 cm -3 and T e = 1 - 3 eV, respectively (nitrogen, current 100 mA, flow rate 5-50 scc/min). Driven by a pressure gradient, the "anode" plasma is blown through the anode hole and forms a bright plasma jet streaming with supersonic velocity (Mach number 1.2). The plasma stream can be used, for instance, in plasma-assisted deposition of thin films

78

Submicrometer-sized hollow nickel spheres synthesized by autocatalytic reduction  

SciTech Connect

A facile method to fabricate submicrometer-sized hollow nickel spheres by autocatalyzing the redox reaction around a sacrificial colloidal particle surface is presented in this paper. The size distribution of these spheres can be controlled by regulating the concentration of the alkali solution. The hollow nickel particles were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray powder diffraction. The hollow spheres produced by this process may have potential applications in many fields, including chemistry, biotechnology and materials science.

Deng Yida [State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 1954, Huashan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China)]. E-mail: denyda@sjtu.edu.cn; Zhao Ling [State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 1954, Huashan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China); Liu Lei [State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 1954, Huashan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China); Shen Bin [State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 1954, Huashan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China); Hu Wenbin [State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 1954, Huashan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China)

2005-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

79

Process for fabricating doped zinc oxide microsphere gel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are a new composition and method of making same for a doped zinc oxide microsphere and articles made therefrom for use in an electrical surge arrestor which has increased solid content, uniform grain size and is in the form of a gel. 4 figures.

Arnold, W.D. Jr.; Bond, W.D.; Lauf, R.J.

1991-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

80

Method for forming microspheres for encapsulation of nuclear waste  

SciTech Connect

Microspheres for nuclear waste storage are formed by gelling droplets containing the waste in a gelation fluid, transferring the gelled droplets to a furnace without the washing step previously used, and heating the unwashed gelled droplets in the furnace under temperature or humidity conditions that result in a substantially linear rate of removal of volatile components therefrom.

Angelini, Peter (Oak Ridge, TN); Caputo, Anthony J. (Knoxville, TN); Hutchens, Richard E. (Knoxville, TN); Lackey, Walter J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Stinton, David P. (Knoxville, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hollow glass microspheres" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Glass Cookware Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glass Cookware Safety Glass Cookware Safety Under the wrong conditions, glass cookware can crack, break or shatter. Glass cookware is tempered (heat resistant). However, there are many steps to follow to ensure safe use of glass cookware. Glass Cookware Steps: If the steps are not followed, glass cookware can shatter unexpectedly. shatters, (it looks as if it has exploded) If glass bakeware is chipped, cracked, or scratched, it's time for it to be retired from service. It is more likely to shatter! Don't take glass bakeware directly from the freezer to the oven, or vice versa. Allow the oven to fully preheat before putting glassware inside. Don't add liquid to glassware that is already hot. Cover the bottom of glass bakeware with liquid before cooking meat or vegetables.

82

Pearl Hollow Landfil Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pearl Hollow Landfil Biomass Facility Pearl Hollow Landfil Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Pearl Hollow Landfil Biomass Facility Facility Pearl Hollow Landfil Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Hardin County, Kentucky Coordinates 37.6565708°, -86.0121573° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.6565708,"lon":-86.0121573,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

83

Axial Compression of a Hollow Cylinder Filled with a Foam  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Axial Compression of a Hollow Cylinder Filled with a Foam: A Porcupine ... Characterization of (Ti,Mg)N Thin Film Coatings Produced Via Physical Vapor Deposition ... Non-Toxic SPD Processed Ti Alloys for Orthopaedics.

84

High Performance Polymer Composite Coated Hollow Fiber Membranes...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coated Hollow Fiber Membranes for Post Combustion CO 2 Capture and Separation From Coal-fired Power Plants Background The mission of the U.S. Department of EnergyNational...

85

Few photon switching with slow light in hollow fiber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cold atoms confined inside a hollow-core photonic-crystal fiber with core diameters of a few photon wavelengths are a promising medium for studying nonlinear optical interactions at extremely low light levels. The high ...

Bajcsy, M.

86

A Hollow-Ion Resonance of Unprecedented Strength  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Hollow-Ion Resonance of A Hollow-Ion Resonance of Unprecedented Strength A Hollow-Ion Resonance of Unprecedented Strength Print Wednesday, 29 June 2005 00:00 A so-called hollow ion is formed when core electrons are removed or excited to higher energy levels, leaving an empty inner shell. Such states can be produced in He-, a fundamental three-electron system and prototypical negative ion. The nuclear Coulomb attraction is efficiently screened in negative ions, greatly enhancing the effects that the electrons have on each other and providing an ideal opportunity to verify and further motivate theoretical models of electron correlation. Our understanding of these basic interactions can elucidate processes of importance in many fields, from the interpretation of cosmic spectra to x-ray lasing efforts using inner-shell ionization and hollow-ion formation. At the Ion-Photon Beamline at the ALS, researchers have detected in negative helium ions a resonant simultaneous double-Auger decay of unprecedented strength, evidence of a triply excited hollow-ion state that has eluded observation for 25 years.

87

Method and apparatus for controlled size distribution of gel microspheres formed from aqueous dispersions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a method and apparatus for making a population of dense, closely size-controlled microspheres by sol-gel procedures wherein said microspheres are characterized by a significant percentage of said population being within a predetermined, relatively narrow size range. Microsphere populations thus provided are useful in vibratory-packed processes for nuclear fuels to be irradiated in LWR- and FBR-type nuclear reactors.

Ryon, Allen D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Haas, Paul A. (Knoxville, TN); Vavruska, John S. (Santa Fe, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Glass Working, Use and Discard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the glass object, be it glass block or glass vessel. Thisglass would have been reheated and cast, probably into blocks

Nicholson, Paul

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Characterization of Thermal Properties of Depleted Uranium Metal Microspheres  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear fuel comes in many forms; oxide fuel is the most commonly used in current reactor systems while metal fuel is a promising fuel type for future reactors due to neutronic performance and increased thermal conductivity. As a key heat transfer parameter, thermal conductivity describes the heat transport properties of a material based upon the density, specific heat, and thermal diffusivity. A material’s ability to transport thermal energy through its structure is a measurable property known as thermal diffusivity; the units for thermal diffusivity are given in area per unit time (e.g., m2/s). Current measurement methods for thermal diffusivity include LASER (or light) Flash Analysis and the hot-wire method. This study examines an approach that combines these previous two methods to characterize the diffusivity of a packed bed of microspheres of depleted uranium (DU) metal, which have a nominal diameter of 250 micrometers. The new apparatus is designated as the Crucible Heater Test Assembly (CHTA), and it induces a radial transient across a packed sample of microspheres then monitors the temperature profile using an array of thermocouples located at different distances from the source of the thermal transient. From the thermocouple data and an accurate time log, the thermal diffusivity of the sample may be calculated. Results indicate that DU microspheres have very low thermal conductivity, relative to solid uranium metal, and rapidly form an oxidation layer. At 500°C, the thermal conductivity of the DU microspheres was 0.431 ± 13% W/m-K compared to approximately 32 W/m-K for solid uranium metal. Characterization of the developed apparatus revealed a method that may be useful for measuring the thermal diffusivity of powders and liquids.

Humrickhouse, Carissa Joy

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

DRAFT Glass.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FAST FACTS FAST FACTS Glass technology provides a versatile method for safely managing a variety of wastes SRNL has studied the behavior in glass of nearly every element in the Periodic Table Overview Converting waste materials into a stable glass form is a highly effective way of treating and disposing of many types of waste, including some hazardous and radioactive wastes. Vitrifi cation - the immobilization of a material in glass - is

91

Analysis of Glass Breakage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of a Bucketwheel Stacker Reclaimer Structural Failure · Analysis of Glass Breakage · Analysis of Sealed, Integrated, Automotive Wheel Bearings.

92

A Hollow-Ion Resonance of Unprecedented Strength  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Hollow-Ion Resonance of Unprecedented Strength Print A Hollow-Ion Resonance of Unprecedented Strength Print A so-called hollow ion is formed when core electrons are removed or excited to higher energy levels, leaving an empty inner shell. Such states can be produced in He-, a fundamental three-electron system and prototypical negative ion. The nuclear Coulomb attraction is efficiently screened in negative ions, greatly enhancing the effects that the electrons have on each other and providing an ideal opportunity to verify and further motivate theoretical models of electron correlation. Our understanding of these basic interactions can elucidate processes of importance in many fields, from the interpretation of cosmic spectra to x-ray lasing efforts using inner-shell ionization and hollow-ion formation. At the Ion-Photon Beamline at the ALS, researchers have detected in negative helium ions a resonant simultaneous double-Auger decay of unprecedented strength, evidence of a triply excited hollow-ion state that has eluded observation for 25 years.

93

A Hollow-Ion Resonance of Unprecedented Strength  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Hollow-Ion Resonance of Unprecedented Strength Print A Hollow-Ion Resonance of Unprecedented Strength Print A so-called hollow ion is formed when core electrons are removed or excited to higher energy levels, leaving an empty inner shell. Such states can be produced in He-, a fundamental three-electron system and prototypical negative ion. The nuclear Coulomb attraction is efficiently screened in negative ions, greatly enhancing the effects that the electrons have on each other and providing an ideal opportunity to verify and further motivate theoretical models of electron correlation. Our understanding of these basic interactions can elucidate processes of importance in many fields, from the interpretation of cosmic spectra to x-ray lasing efforts using inner-shell ionization and hollow-ion formation. At the Ion-Photon Beamline at the ALS, researchers have detected in negative helium ions a resonant simultaneous double-Auger decay of unprecedented strength, evidence of a triply excited hollow-ion state that has eluded observation for 25 years.

94

A Hollow-Ion Resonance of Unprecedented Strength  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Hollow-Ion Resonance of Unprecedented Strength Print A Hollow-Ion Resonance of Unprecedented Strength Print A so-called hollow ion is formed when core electrons are removed or excited to higher energy levels, leaving an empty inner shell. Such states can be produced in He-, a fundamental three-electron system and prototypical negative ion. The nuclear Coulomb attraction is efficiently screened in negative ions, greatly enhancing the effects that the electrons have on each other and providing an ideal opportunity to verify and further motivate theoretical models of electron correlation. Our understanding of these basic interactions can elucidate processes of importance in many fields, from the interpretation of cosmic spectra to x-ray lasing efforts using inner-shell ionization and hollow-ion formation. At the Ion-Photon Beamline at the ALS, researchers have detected in negative helium ions a resonant simultaneous double-Auger decay of unprecedented strength, evidence of a triply excited hollow-ion state that has eluded observation for 25 years.

95

Hollow proppants and a process for their manufacture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hollow, fine-grained ceramic proppants are less expensive and improve fracture control when compared to conventional proppants (dense alumina, mullite, bauxite, zirconia, etc.). Hollow proppants of the present invention have been fabricated by spray drying, followed by sintering in order to obtain a dense case and a hollow core. These proppants generally have high sphericity and roundness (Krumbein sphericity and roundness greater than 0.8), have diameters on average between 2250 and 125 .mu.m, depending on proppant size required, and have strength equal to or greater than that of sand. The hollow core, the size of which can be controlled, permits better fracture control in hydraulic fracturing treatments since the proppant can be transported in lower viscosity fluids. Hollow proppants produced at the same cost/weight as conventional proppants also provide for lower costs, since less weight is required to fill the same volume. The fine-grained (preferably less than 5 .mu.m in diameter) ceramic case provides the strength necessary to withstand closure stresses and prevent crushing.

Jones, Arfon H. (Salt Lake City, UT); Cutler, Raymond A. (Salt Lake City, UT)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Hollow proppants and a process for their manufacture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hollow, fine-grained ceramic proppants are less expensive and improve fracture control when compared to conventional proppants (dense alumina, mullite, bauxite, zirconia, etc.). Hollow proppants of the present invention have been fabricated by spray drying, followed by sintering in order to obtain a dense case and a hollow core. These proppants generally have high sphericity and roundness (Krumbein sphericity and roundness greater than 0.8), have diameters on average between 2,250 and 125 [mu]m, depending on proppant size required, and have strength equal to or greater than that of sand. The hollow core, the size of which can be controlled, permits better fracture control in hydraulic fracturing treatments since the proppant can be transported in lower viscosity fluids. Hollow proppants produced at the same cost/weight as conventional proppants also provide for lower costs, since less weight is required to fill the same volume. The fine-grained (preferably less than 5 [mu]m in diameter) ceramic case provides the strength necessary to withstand closure stresses and prevent crushing. 6 figs.

Jones, A.H.; Cutler, R.A.

1985-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

97

Radiation coloration resistant glass  

SciTech Connect

A radiation coloration resistant glass is disclosed which is used in a radiation environment sufficient to cause coloration in most forms of glass. The coloration resistant glass includes higher proportions by weight of water and has been found to be extremely resistant to color change when exposed to such radiation levels. The coloration resistant glass is free of cerium oxide and has more than about 0.5% by weight water content. Even when exposed to gamma radiation of more than 10.sup.7 rad, the coloration resistant glass does not lose transparency.

Tomozawa, Minoru (Troy, NY); Watson, E. Bruce (Troy, NY); Acocella, John (Troy, NY)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Horse Hollow II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Horse Hollow II Wind Farm Horse Hollow II Wind Farm Facility Horse Hollow II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Market Location Taylor County TX Coordinates 32.243826°, -100.131898° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.243826,"lon":-100.131898,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

99

Horse Hollow III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Horse Hollow III Wind Farm Horse Hollow III Wind Farm Facility Horse Hollow III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Market Location Taylor County TX Coordinates 32.243125°, -100.045245° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.243125,"lon":-100.045245,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

100

Horse Hollow Wind Energy Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Horse Hollow Wind Energy Center Horse Hollow Wind Energy Center Facility Horse Hollow Wind Energy Center Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Location Near Abilene TX Coordinates 32.230566°, -100.047991° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.230566,"lon":-100.047991,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hollow glass microspheres" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Horse Hollow Expansion Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Horse Hollow Expansion Wind Farm Horse Hollow Expansion Wind Farm Facility Horse Hollow Expansion Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Market Location Near Abilene TX Coordinates 32.243193°, -100.265633° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.243193,"lon":-100.265633,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

102

Low temperature aluminum reduction cell using hollow cathode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of producing aluminum in an electrolytic cell containing alumina dissolved in an electrolyte. A plurality of non-consumable anodes are disposed substantially vertically in the electrolyte along with a plurality of monolithic hollow cathodes. Each cathode has a top and bottom and the cathodes are disposed vertically in the electrolyte and the anodes and the cathodes are arranged in alternating relationship. Each of the cathodes is comprised of a first side facing a first opposing anode and a second side facing a second opposing anode. The first and second sides are joined by ends to form a reservoir in the hollow cathode for collecting aluminum therein deposited at the cathode.

Brown, Craig W. (Seattle, WA); Frizzle, Patrick B. (Seattle, WA)

2002-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

103

Potential use of hollow spheres in dual gradient drilling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The increasing number of significant deepwater discoveries has pushed the operator and service oil companies to focus their efforts on developing new technologies to drill in deeper water. Dual gradient drilling (DGD) will allow reaching deeper target depths with greater final hole size, which in turn will permit setting larger tubing strings, and hence allowing for higher production rates. DGD can be accomplished by either lifting the mud returns mechanically or diluting the mud returns at the seafloor level by injecting lightweight components. Recently, a novel concept involving the use of hollow spheres in DGD applications has been introduced. In this research, we have evaluated the technical feasibility of using hollow spheres in DGD. We found that hollow spheres have high potential for such an application. They are stable to the drilling fluid additives and components and decrease the density of the drilling mud. The effect on pressure reduction at the seafloor can be significant even when the concentration of spheres injected is smaller than that required to reduce the mud density to seawater density. If the base mud is the carrier fluid, the hollow spheres DGD systems do not require equipment at the seafloor. Additionally, the injection of spheres does not affect the wellbore hydraulics under dynamic conditions. We have identified the constraints for using hollow spheres in DGD. These include particle size of the spheres, collapse of first spheres to be injected at deeper water depths, achieving high concentrations for systems using the mud base as the carrier fluid, and lack of technology to separate the spheres from the mud. In this research, we have developed a friendly, in-house computer program to model features specific to hollow-spheres DGD systems, such as wellbore hydraulics under static and dynamic conditions and the u-tube phenomenon. The results generated by our model match those produced by a field-tested computer program that performs the same task for a similar application. Our findings can be used for further studies of the constraints on the spheres identified in this research, to field test the advantages we predict that hollow spheres will have, and to develop software to fully model hollow-spheres DGD systems.

Vera Vera, Liliana

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Investigation of transport and mechnical properties for hollow fibers containing ionic liquids for pre-combustion CO2 capture  

SciTech Connect

Currently available techniques for CO{sub 2} separation from flue or fuel gas cannot economically capture CO{sub 2} for sequestration. Membranes offer several advantages in CO{sub 2} separation such as simple operation, low water consumption, and in some cases higher energy efficiency. However, traditional polymer membranes are limited by the separation characteristics of the polymer and often suffer from low permeability and selectivity. Several research groups have attempted to overcome these limitations by using supported ionic liquid membranes (SILMs) in which an ionic liquid (IL) is suspended within the pores of a membrane support and serves as the active gas separation component of the membrane. For industrial applications, hollow fibers are preferred over flat membranes due to their smaller footprint, ease of high efficiency module design and low fabrication cost. In an attempt to investigate and address these issues, polymeric hollow fiber-based ionic liquid membranes were fabricated. Matrimid® and [hmim][Tf{sub 2}N] (1-hexyl-3-methylimidalzolium bis(trifluoromethyl sulfonyl) imide) were selected as the polymeric and ionic liquid materials, and the fibers were fabricated via nonsolvent-induced phase separation/extraction, employing a single layer spinneret extrusion system. The system takes advantage of the fiber morphology to enable more efficient mass transfer than traditional membranes geometries. CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} transport properties will be reported for the Matrimid hollow fibers from 37 to 150 {degrees}C. Also, several mechanical properties such as tensile strength, modulus, and glass transition temperature have been measured for the fiber using dynamic mechanical analysis.

Hopkinson, D., Wickramanayake, S., Myers, C., Sui, L., Nicola, M., Luebke, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Deformation and Void Structure in Glass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field Assisted Viscous Flow and Crystallization in a Sodium Aluminosilicate Glass · Glass Ceramics ... Terahertz Properties of Lithium Iron Phosphate Glasses.

106

Method for making glass  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is discussed for making better quality molten borosilicate glass in a glass melter, the glass having the desired viscosity and, preferably, also the desired resistivity so that the glass melt can be established effectively and the product of the glass melter will have the desired level of quality. The method includes the adjustment of the composition of the glass constituents that are fed into the melter in accordance with certain correlations that reliably predict the viscosity and resistivity from the melter temperature and the melt composition, then heating the ingredients to the melter's operating temperature until they melt and homogenize. The equations include the calculation of a non-bridging oxygen'' term from the numbers of moles of the various ingredients, and then the determination of the viscosity and resistivity from the operating temperature of the melter and the non-bridging oxygen term.

Jantzen, C.M.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Method and means for producing solid evacuated microspheres of hydrogen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for producing solid, evacuated microspheres comprised of hydrogen. The spheres are produced by forming a jet of liquid hydrogen and exciting mechanical waves on the jet of appropriate frequency so that the jet breaks up into drops with a bubble formed in each drop by cavitation. The drops are exposed to a pressure less than the vapor pressure of the liquid hydrogen so that the bubble which is formed within each drop expands. The drops which contain bubbles are exposed to an environment having a pressure just below the triple point of liquid hydrogen and they thereby freeze giving solid, evacuated spheres of hydrogen.

Turnbull, Robert J. (Urbana, IL); Foster, Christopher A. (Champaign, IL); Hendricks, Charles D. (Livermore, CA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

GlassMelt&Sealing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glass Melting and Sealing Glass Melting and Sealing Manufacturing Technologies The Manufacturing Science & Technology Center performs process development of glass and glass-ceramic-to-metal seals. Small batches of specialty glass can be melted from reagent grade oxide powders. Glass and glass-ceramic-to-metal seals are made in microprocessor controlled inert atmospheres and are checked for her- meticity after sealing. Sandia's extensive properties database of low melting solder glasses is used to aid in material and processing decisions when making glass-to-glass, ceramic-to-ceramic, and glass-to-ceramic seals. These seals are typically done in air at much lower tem- peratures than glass and glass-to-ceramic seals. Capabilities * Interface with designers and vendors to assure that the most appropriate materi-

109

Mechanical Properties of Glass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... moduli and Vicker's hardness, as well as high transparency in the UV/visible region, ... Ion Exchanged Mixed Glass Cullet Proppants for Stimulation of Oil and  ...

110

About - Glass Publications Portal  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

from the repository at OSTI. The Glass Publications Portal is sponsored by the DOE Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Industrial Technologies Program. In...

111

Method and apparatus for controlled size distribution of gel microspheres formed from aqueous dispersions. [Patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a method and apparatus for making a population of dense, closely size-controlled microspheres by sol-gel procedures wherein said microspheres are characterized by a significant percentage of said population being within a predetermined, relatively narrow size range. This is accomplished by subjecting aqueous dispersions of a sol, within a water-immiscible organic liquid to a turbulent flow. Microsphere populations thus provided are useful in vibratory-packed processes for nuclear fuels to be irradiated in LWR- and FBR-type nuclear reactors.

Ryon, A.D.; Haas, P.A.; Vavruska, J.S.

1982-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

112

Graded Bioactive Glass and Glass/Ceramic Coatings for ...  

For Industry; For Researchers; Success Stories; About Us; Available Technologies. ... Graded Bioactive Glass and Glass/Ceramic Coatings for Metal Bone ...

113

JOINT-INDUSTRY PARTNERSHIP TO DEVELOP A HOLLOW SPHERE DUAL-GRADIENT DRILLING SYSTEM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Maurer Technology Inc. (MTI) formed a joint-industry partnership to fund the development of a hollow sphere dual-gradient drilling (DGD) system. Phase I consisted of collecting, compiling, analyzing, and distributing information and data regarding a new DGD system for use by the oil and gas industry. Near the end of Phase I, DOE provided funding to the project that was used to conduct a series of critical follow-on tests investigating sphere separation in weighted waterbase and oilbase muds. Drilling costs in deep water are high because seawater pressure on the ocean floor creates a situation where many strings of casing are required due to the relatively close spacing between fracture and pore pressure curves. Approximately $100 million have been spent during the past five years on DGD systems that place pumps on the seafloor to reduce these drilling problems by reducing the annulus fluid pressure at the bottom of the riser. BP estimates that a DGD system can save $9 million per well in the Thunderhorse Field and Conoco estimates it can save $5 to $15 million per well in its deepwater operations. Unfortunately, previous DGD development projects have been unsuccessful due to the high costs ($20 to $50 million) and reliability problems with seafloor pump systems. MTI has been developing a simple DGD system concept that would pump hollow glass spheres into the bottom of the riser to reduce density of the mud in the riser. This eliminates the requirement for seafloor pumps and replaces them with low cost mud pumps, shale shakers, and other oilfield equipment that can be operated on the rig by conventional crews. A $1.8 million Phase I joint-industry project funded by five service companies and three operators showed that hollow spheres could be pumped well, but difficulties were encountered in separating the spheres from a polymer mud supplied by Halliburton due to the high viscosity of this mud at the low shear rates encountered on oilfield shale shaker screens. As a result, an excessive amount of this polymer mud flowed across the screen with the beads instead of through the screen. At the completion of the Phase I project, it was concluded that the hollow sphere system would not work effectively with the polymer mud tested. ExxonMobil and Shell engineers proposed that additional sphere separation tests needed to be conducted with weighted oilfield waterbase and oilbase muds to determine if the DGD system would work with these muds. The DOE agreed to provide a $200,000 grant for these tests. The DOE-funded tests, described in this report, showed that the spheres could be pumped with conventional oilfield centrifugal and triplex mud pumps and separated effectively from both oilfield waterbase and oilbase muds using conventional oilfield shale shakers and hydrocyclones. As a result of the success of these DOE tests, this DGD system is ready for full-scale field testing, first on land wells and later in the offshore environment. Maurer Technology Inc. is currently proposing a Phase II project to oil companies to further develop this DGD concept. This project would be funded by four to eight operators. If Phase II tests are successful, Noble plans to commercialize this system with a service company partner that will market and operate the DGD system on Noble's and other drilling contractors' rigs.

William C. Maurer; Colin Ruan; Greg Deskins

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Importance of glass and brass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The importance of scientific instruments in the scientific revolution, especially brass and glass. Precise lenses and lens grinding, glass vessels for chemical experiments, the advances in astronomy, microscopy and many other areas due to glass...

Dugan, David

2004-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

115

Sol-GelGlasses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sol-Gel Glasses Sol-Gel Glasses Manufacturing Technologies The Manufacturing Science & Technology Center conducts process development and scale-up of ceramic and glass materials prepared by the sol- gel process. Sol-gel processing uses solutions prepared at low temperature rather than high temperature powder processing to make materi- als with controlled properties. A precursor sol-gel solution (sol) is either poured into a mold and allowed to gel or is diluted and applied to a sub- strate by spinning, dipping, spraying, elec- trophoresis, inkjet printing or roll coating. Controlled drying of the wet gel results in either a ceramic or glass bulk part or a thin film on a glass, plastic, ceramic or metal substrate. Sol-gel derived materials have diverse applications in optics, electronics, energy, space, sensors and

116

MST: Organizations: Ceramic and Glass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

formation and machining, to complete component fabrication and testing. Our Mission Our ceramic, glass, and glass-ceramic products meet customer needs in defense, energy,...

117

Fabrication of Cerium Oxide and Uranium Oxide Microspheres for Space Nuclear Power Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cerium oxide and uranium oxide microspheres are being produced via an internal gelation sol-gel method to investigate alternative fabrication routes for space nuclear fuels. Depleted uranium and non-radioactive cerium are being utilized as surrogates for plutonium-238 (Pu-238) used in radioisotope thermoelectric generators and for enriched uranium required by nuclear thermal rockets. While current methods used to produce Pu-238 fuels at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) involve the generation of fine powders that pose a respiratory hazard and have a propensity to contaminate glove boxes, the sol-gel route allows for the generation of oxide microsphere fuels through an aqueous route. The sol-gel method does not generate fine powders and may require fewer processing steps than the LANL method with less operator handling. High-quality cerium dioxide microspheres have been fabricated in the desired size range and equipment is being prepared to establish a uranium dioxide microsphere production capability.

Jeffrey A. Katalenich; Michael R. Hartman; Robert C. O'Brien

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Interaction of a Contact Resonance of Microspheres with Surface Acoustic Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the interaction of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) with a contact-based vibrational resonance of 1???m silica microspheres forming a two-dimensional granular crystal adhered to a substrate. The laser-induced transient ...

Boechler, Nicholas

119

Negative ion source with hollow cathode discharge plasma  

SciTech Connect

A negative ion source of the type where negative ions are formed by bombarding a low-work-function surface with positive ions and neutral particles from a plasma, wherein a highly ionized plasma is injected into an anode space containing the low-work-function surface. The plasma is formed by hollow cathode discharge and injected into the anode space along the magnetic field lines. Preferably, the negative ion source is of the magnetron type.

Hershcovitch, Ady (Mt. Sinai, NY); Prelec, Krsto (Setauket, NY)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Negative ion source with hollow cathode discharge plasma  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A negative ion source of the type where negative ions are formed by bombarding a low-work-function surface with positive ions and neutral particles from a plasma, wherein a highly ionized plasma is injected into an anode space containing the low-work-function surface is described. The plasma is formed by hollow cathode discharge and injected into the anode space along the magnetic field lines. Preferably, the negative ion source is of the magnetron type.

Hershcovitch, A.; Prelec, K.

1980-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hollow glass microspheres" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Glass electrolyte composition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ionically conductive glass is disclosed for use as electrolyte in a high temperature electrochemical cell, particularly a cell with sodium anode and sulfur cathode. The glass includes the constituents Na/sub 2/O, ZrO/sub 2/, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and SiO/sub 2/ in selected proportions to be a single phase solid solution substantially free of crystalline regions and undissolved constituents. Other advantageous properties are an ionic conductivity in excess of 2 x 10/sup -3/ (ohm-cm)/sup -1/ at 300/sup 0/C and a glass transition temperature in excess of 500/sup 0/C.

Kucera, G.H.; Roche, M.F.

1985-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

122

Properties of Amorphous Carbon Microspheres Synthesised by Palm Oil-CVD Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amorphous carbon microspheres were synthesized using a dual-furnace chemical vapour deposition method at 800-1000 deg. C. Palm oil-based cooking oil (PO) and zinc nitrate solution was used as a carbon source and catalyst precursor, respectively with PO to zinc nitrate ratio of 30:20 (v/v) and a silicon wafer as the sample target. Regular microsphere shape of the amorphous carbons was obtained and a uniform microsphere structure improved as the carbonization temperature increased from 800 to 1000 deg. C. At 800 deg. C, no regular microspheres were formed but more uniform structure is observed at 900 deg. C. Generally the microspheres size is uniform when the heating temperature was increased to 1000 deg. C, but the presence of mixed sizes can still be observed. X-ray diffraction patterns show the presence of oxide of carbon, ZnO phase together with Zn oxalate phase. Raman spectra show two broad peaks characteristic to amorphous carbon at 1344 and 1582 cm{sup -1} for the D and G bands, respectively. These bands become more prominent as the preparation temperature increased from 800 to 1000 deg. C. This is in agreement with the formation of amorphous carbon microspheres as shown by the FESEM study and other Zn-based phases as a result of the oxidation process of the palm oil as the carbon source and the zinc nitrate as the catalyst precursor, respectively.

Zobir, S. A. M. [Faculty of Applied Sciences, (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Nano-SciTech Centre, (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Zainal, Z. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400UPM, Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Sarijo, S. H. [Faculty of Applied Sciences, (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Institute of Science, Universiti Teknologi MARA Malaysia, (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Rusop, M. [Nano-SciTech Centre, (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Institute of Science, Universiti Teknologi MARA Malaysia, (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia)

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

123

Waste glass weathering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The weathering of glass is reviewed by examining processes that affect the reaction of commercial, historical, natural, and nuclear waste glass under conditions of contact with humid air and slowly dripping water, which may lead to immersion in nearly static solution. Radionuclide release data from weathered glass under conditions that may exist in an unsaturated environment are presented and compared to release under standard leaching conditions. While the comparison between the release under weathering and leaching conditions is not exact, due to variability of reaction in humid air, evidence is presented of radionuclide release under a variety of conditions. These results suggest that both the amount and form of radionuclide release can be affected by the weathering of glass.

Bates, J.K.; Buck, E.C.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

124

Terahertz Properties of Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A review of advances in THz-TDS spectroscopy of selected glass families ... Field Assisted Viscous Flow and Crystallization in a Sodium Aluminosilicate ... Molecular Mechanisms of the Conversion Reaction in FeF2 Cathodes Exposed to Li in ...

125

Bulk Metallic Glasses X  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 31, 2012 ... Aerospace and Spacecraft Applications for Bulk Metallic Glasses and Matrix Composites · Air Oxidation of a Binary Cu64.5Zr35.5 Bulk Metallic ...

126

Bulk Metallic Glasses VII  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sponsorship, The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society ... Air-Oxidation of a ( Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5)98Er2 Bulk Metallic Glass at 350-500oc · Anelastic ...

127

Baseline LAW Glass Formulation Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The major objective of the baseline glass formulation work was to develop and select glass formulations that are compliant with contractual and processing requirements for each of the LAW waste streams. Other objectives of the work included preparation and characterization of glasses with respect to the properties of interest, optimization of sulfate loading in the glasses, evaluation of ability to achieve waste loading limits, testing to demonstrate compatibility of glass melts with melter materials of construction, development of glass formulations to support ILAW qualification activities, and identification of glass formulation issues with respect to contract specifications and processing requirements.

Kruger, Albert A. [USDOE Office of River Protection, Richland, WA (United States); Mooers, Cavin [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Bazemore, Gina [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Hight, Kenneth [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Lai, Shan Tao [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Buechele, Andrew [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Rielley, Elizabeth [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Gan, Hao [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Muller, Isabelle S. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Cecil, Richard [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab

2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

128

DWPF GLASS BEADS AND GLASS FRIT TRANSPORT DEMONSTRATION  

SciTech Connect

DWPF is considering replacing irregularly shaped glass frit with spherical glass beads in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) process to decrease the yield stress of the melter feed (a non-Newtonian Bingham Plastic). Pilot-scale testing was conducted on spherical glass beads and glass frit to determine how well the glass beads would transfer when compared to the glass frit. Process Engineering Development designed and constructed the test apparatus to aid in the understanding and impacts that spherical glass beads may have on the existing DWPF Frit Transfer System. Testing was conducted to determine if the lines would plug with the glass beads and the glass frit slurry and what is required to unplug the lines. The flow loop consisted of vertical and horizontal runs of clear PVC piping, similar in geometry to the existing system. Two different batches of glass slurry were tested: a batch of 50 wt% spherical glass beads and a batch of 50 wt% glass frit in process water. No chemicals such as formic acid was used in slurry, only water and glass formers. The glass beads used for this testing were commercially available borosilicate glass of mesh size -100+200. The glass frit was Frit 418 obtained from DWPF and is nominally -45+200 mesh. The spherical glass beads did not have a negative impact on the frit transfer system. The transferring of the spherical glass beads was much easier than the glass frit. It was difficult to create a plug with glass bead slurry in the pilot transfer system. When a small plug occurred from setting overnight with the spherical glass beads, the plug was easy to displace using only the pump. In the case of creating a man made plug in a vertical line, by filling the line with spherical glass beads and allowing the slurry to settle for days, the plug was easy to remove by using flush water. The glass frit proved to be much more difficult to transfer when compared to the spherical glass beads. The glass frit impacted the transfer system to the point that the test apparatus had to be disassembled to dislodge the plugs created in the system.

Adamson, D; Bradley Pickenheim, B

2008-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

129

Argonne Software Licensing: Glass Furnace Model (GFM)  

The Glass Furnace Model (GFM) The Glass Furnace Model (GFM) Version 4.0, a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) glass furnace simulation code was developed at Argonne ...

130

Glass-water Interactions - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Glass and Optical Materials: Glass-water Interactions ... Corrosion of Photomultiplier Tube Glasses in High Purity Water : Ruhil Dongol1; S. K. Sundaram1; Milind ...

131

HLW Glass Waste Loadings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HLW HLW Glass Waste Loadings Ian L. Pegg Vitreous State Laboratory The Catholic University of America Washington, DC Overview Overview  Vitrification - general background  Joule heated ceramic melter (JHCM) technology  Factors affecting waste loadings  Waste loading requirements and projections  WTP DWPF  DWPF  Yucca Mountain License Application requirements on waste loading  Summary Vitrification  Immobilization of waste by conversion into a glass  Internationally accepted treatment for HLW  Why glass?  Amorphous material - able to incorporate a wide spectrum of elements over wide ranges of composition; resistant to radiation damage  Long-term durability - natural analogs Relatively simple process - amenable to nuclearization at large  Relatively simple process - amenable to nuclearization at large scale  There

132

High-current electron beam generation by a pulsed hollow cathode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the parameters of a hollow-cathode electron source and the generatedelectron beam are presented. A gas puff valve is used to provide a sharp pressure gradient between the cathode cavity and the accelerating gap. To produce the plasma inside the hollow cathode we used a pulse forming network (10 kV

J. Z. Gleizer; A. Krokhmal; Ya. E. Krasik; J. Felsteiner

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Nitrogen atom energy distributions in a hollow-cathode planar sputtering magnetron Zhehui Wanga  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Nitrogen atom energy distributions in a hollow-cathode planar sputtering magnetron Zhehui Wanga.O. Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08543 May 31, 1999 Abstract Energy distributions of N atoms in a hollow, University of Illinois c Varian Associates, Inc. #12;2 atom energy distributions for atomic ions

134

Hermatically sealed motor blower unit with stator inside hollow armature  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

13. A hermetically sealed motor blower unit comprising, in combination, a sealed housing having a thrust plate mounted therein and having a re-entrant wall forming a central cavity in said housing, a rotor within said housing, said rotor comprising an impeller, a hollow shaft embracing said cavity and a thrust collar adapted to cooperate with said thrust plate to support the axial thrust of said shaft, one or more journal bearings within said housing for supporting the radial load of said shaft and electric motor means for rotating said rotor, said motor means comprising a motor-stator located within said cavity and adapted to cooperate through a portion of said re-entrant wall with a motor-rotor mounted within said hollow shaft, the portion of said re-entrant wall located between said motor-stator and said motor-rotor being made relatively thin to reduce electrical losses, the bearing surfaces of said thrust plate, thrust collar and journal bearings being in communication with the discharge of said impeller, whereby fluid pumped by said impeller can flow directly to said bearing surfaces to lubricate them.

Donelian, Khatchik O. (New York, NY)

1976-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

135

Sodium Ion Insertion in Hollow Carbon Nanowires for Battery Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hollow Carbon Nanowires (HCNWs) were prepared through pyrolyzation of hollow polyaniline nanowires precursor. The HCNWs used as anode material for Na-ion batteries delivers a high reversible capacity of 251 mAh g{sup -1} and 82.2% capacity retention over 400 charge/discharge cycles between 1.2 and 0.01 V (vs. Na{sup +}/Na) at a constant current of 50 mA g{sup -1} (0.2 C). Excellent cycling stability is also observed at even higher charge-discharge rate. A high reversible capacity of 149 mAh g{sup -1} also can be obtained at a current rate of 500 mA g{sup -1} (2C). The good Na ion insertion property is attributed to the short diffusion distance in the HCNWs, and the large interlayer distance (0.37 nm) between the graphitic sheets, which agrees with the interlayered distance predicted by theoretical calculation to enable Na ion insertion in carbon materials.

Cao, Yuliang; Xiao, Lifen; Sushko, Maria L.; Wang, Wei; Schwenzer, Birgit; Xiao, Jie; Nie, Zimin; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Yang, Zhenguo; Liu, Jun

2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

136

Atomlike, Hollow-Core–Bound Molecular Orbitals of C??  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The atomic electron orbitals that underlie molecular bonding originate from the central Coulomb potential of the atomic core. We used scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory to explore the relation between the nearly spherical shape and unoccupied electronic structure of buckminsterfullerene (C60) molecules adsorbed on copper surfaces. Besides the known p* antibonding molecular orbitals of the carbon-atom framework, above 3.5 electron volts we found atomlike orbitals bound to the core of the hollow C60 cage. These “superatom” states hybridize like the s and p orbitals of hydrogen and alkali atoms into diatomic molecule-like dimers and free-electron bands of one-dimensional wires and two-dimensional quantum wells in C60 aggregates. We attribute the superatom states to the central potential binding an electron to its screening charge, a property expected for hollow-shell molecules derived from layered materials.

Feng, Min; Zhao, Jin; Petek, Hrvoje

2008-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

137

Flagging vigilance: the post-Vietnam "Hollow Army"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is an evaluation of the United States Army as it existed in the years following its evacuation from Southeast Asia and its transition from a predominantly conscript army to the all-volunteer concept in 1973. The post-Vietnam army's reputation has been pierced through with derision as time has passed and this study seeks to ascertain the merit of that derision. Not least among the dispersions cast against the army in question were those expressed by Army Chief of Staff Edward C. "Shy" Meyer in his 1980 White Paper. In his assessment, Meyer raised several questions regarding the post-Vietnam army's ability to meet its missions of deterrence and preparedness for war due to several maladies afflicting the force at the time. Ultimately, Meyer charged that the army was not, in fact, attaining its desired goals, coining the term "Hollow Army" in describing its status. Using Meyer's White Paper as a genesis, this study will examine several aspects of the post-Vietnam army in an effort to ascertain the validity of Meyer's assessment. The areas discussed include manpower and recruiting troubles, retention difficulties, the quality of life provided to the soldiers of the All-Volunteer Force, the caliber of soldiers serving during the period in question, and the nature of soldier behavior and conduct. In due course, this thesis will demonstrate that Meyer's negative assessment of the post-Vietnam army's status was quite accurate (if not comprehensive) and that America's guardian was, in fact, hollow.

Lee, Robert Matthew

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Versa Glass | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zip 43220 Product Versa is manufacturing a new technology privacy glass in Ohio that is LEED and has cleantech properties References Versa Glass1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase...

139

Superhydrophobic Transparent Glass Thin Films  

Glass used in building materials (curtain walls), windshields, goggles, glasses,optical lenses, and similar applications must be durable and transparent. To meetthis challenge, ORNL researchers have invented a method to produce ...

140

Terahertz Properties of Lithium Iron Phosphate Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Terahertz Properties of Lithium Iron Phosphate Glasses ... Field Assisted Viscous Flow and Crystallization in a Sodium Aluminosilicate Glass.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hollow glass microspheres" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Magnetizable intravascular stents for sequestration of systemically circulating magnetic nano- and microspheres.  

SciTech Connect

A 2-D theoretical model was established and used to evaluate the sequestration of blood borne magnetic nano- and microspheres by a magnetizable intravascular stent system. Furthermore, an in vitro flow model system examined the efficiency of a prototype magnetizable intravascular stent to sequestrate the nano- and microspheres from arterial and/or venous blood flow. Comparisons of experimental and corresponding modeling data verified theoretical predictions. The results suggest that the magnetizable intravascular stents can be developed as an effective magnetic drug-targeting tool with potential medical applications.

Chen, H.; Kaminski, M. D.; Ebner, A. D.; Ritter, J. A.; Rosengart, A. J.; Chemical Engineering; Univ. of Chicago; Univ. of South Carolina; Illinois Inst. of Tech.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Enhancement of the predicted drug hepatotoxicity in gel entrapped hepatocytes within polysulfone-g-poly (ethylene glycol) modified hollow fiber  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Collagen gel-based 3D cultures of hepatocytes have been proposed for evaluation of drug hepatotoxicity because of their more reliability than traditional monolayer culture. The collagen gel entrapment of hepatocytes in hollow fibers has been proven to well reflect the drug hepatotoxicity in vivo but was limited by adsorption of hydrophobic drugs onto hollow fibers. This study aimed to investigate the impact of hollow fibers on hepatocyte performance and drug hepatotoxicity. Polysulfone-g-poly (ethylene glycol) (PSf-g-PEG) hollow fiber was fabricated and applied for the first time to suppress the drug adsorption. Then, the impact of hollow fibers was evaluated by detecting the hepatotoxicity of eight selected drugs to gel entrapped hepatocytes within PSf and PSf-g-PEG hollow fibers, or without hollow fibers. The hepatocytes in PSf-g-PEG hollow fiber showed the highest sensitivity to drug hepatotoxicity, while those in PSf hollow fiber and cylindrical gel without hollow fiber underestimated the hepatotoxicity due to either drug adsorption or low hepatic functions. Therefore, the 3D culture of gel entrapped hepatocytes within PSf-g-PEG hollow fiber would be a promising tool for investigation of drug hepatotoxicity in vitro.

Shen Chong [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027 (China); Zhang Guoliang [Institute of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Zhejiang 310012 (China); Meng Qin, E-mail: mengq@zju.edu.c [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027 (China)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Deformation and tribology of multi-walled hollow nanoparticles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multi-walled hollow nanoparticles made from tungsten disulphide (WS$_2$) show exceptional tribological performance as additives to liquid lubricants due to effective transfer of low shear strength material onto the sliding surfaces. Using a scaling approach based on continuum elasticity theory for shells and pairwise summation of van der Waals interactions, we show that van der Waals interactions cause strong adhesion to the substrate which favors release of delaminated layers onto the surfaces. For large and thin nanoparticles, van der Waals adhesion can cause considerable deformation and subsequent delamination. For the thick WS$_2$ nanoparticles, deformation due to van der Waals interactions remains small and the main mechanism for delamination is pressure which in fact leads to collapse beyond a critical value. We also discuss the effect of shear flow on deformation and rolling on the substrate.

U. S. Schwarz; S. Komura; S. A. Safran

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Encoded Fiber-Optic Microsphere Arrays for Probing ProteinCarbohydrate Interactions**  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biosensors Encoded Fiber-Optic Microsphere Arrays for Probing Protein­Carbohydrate Interactions, such as robotic printing and fluorescence scanning devices. In the past year, several systems were described that present both natural and synthetically derived carbohydrate structures in array formats.[3] These systems

Ratner, Daniel M.

145

Glass Plates under Micro-indentation” Incorporation in Glass Ionomer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effects of nanocrystalline calcium de?cient hydroxyapatite gnCDHAl incorporation in glass ..... K., Nishino, M., 2003. Toughness, bonding and ?uoride release.

146

Working Principle of the Hollow-Anode Plasma Source André Anders and Simone Anders  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working Principle of the Hollow-Anode Plasma Source Working Principle of the Hollow-Anode Plasma Source André Anders and Simone Anders Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 Abstract The hollow-anode discharge is a special form of glow discharge. It is shown that a drastically reduced anode area is responsible for a positive anode voltage drop of 30-40 V and an increased anode sheath thickness. This leads to an ignition of a relatively dense plasma in front of the anode hole. Langmuir probe measurements inside a specially designed hollow anode plasma source give an electron density and temperature of n e = 10 9 - 10 11 cm -3 and T e = 1 - 3 eV, respectively (nitrogen, current 100 mA, flow rate 5-50 scc/min). Driven by a pressure gradient, the "anode" plasma is blown through

147

New applications of hollow-core components in housing, administrative and public housing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standard prestressed hollow-core slabs have many advantages as construction members while being relatively very low in cost. The principal advantages include the ease of mass production, a small cross-sectional area, light ...

Beroukhim, Farnaz A

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

WINDOW 5 Glass Library Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WINDOW 6 or 7 Glass Library Update WINDOW 6 or 7 Glass Library Update Last update:12/09/13 07:26 PM Automatic IGDB Update Feature in WINDOW 6 and 7 The latest versions of WINDOW 6 and 7 have an automatic IGDB database update function in the Glass Library. When you first open the program, it checks to see if there is an IGDB version later than what you already have installed, and will notify you if there is an update. Then you can download and install the IGDB database, and click on the Update IGDB button in the Glass Library in order to start the automatic update. For older versions of WINDOW 6 and 7 without the automatic IGDB update function bullet How to Check the Current WINDOW5 IGDB Version bullet Updating the Glass Library bullet Problem Updating the Glass Library bullet Discontinued Records or Reused NFRC IDs

149

Prospects for Integrating a Hollow Electron Lens into the LHC Collimation System  

SciTech Connect

It has been proposed to use a hollow electron lens with the LHC beam collimation system [1]. The hollow electron beam would be used as a beam scraper and positioned at a closer sigma than the primary collimators to increase the halo particle diffusion rate striking the primaries. In this paper we use multi-turn beam tracking simulations to analyze the effectiveness of such a lens when integrated into the LHC collimation system.

Smith, Jeffrey Claiborne; /SLAC; Assmann, Ralph; Previtali, Valentina; Shiltsev, Vladimir; Valishev, Alexander; /CERN /Fermilab

2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

150

NETL: Bench-Scale High-Performance Thin Film Composite Hollow Fiber  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bench-Scale High-Performance Thin Film Composite Hollow Fiber Membranes for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture Bench-Scale High-Performance Thin Film Composite Hollow Fiber Membranes for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture Project No.: DE-FE0007514 GE Global Research is developing high performance thin film polymer composite hollow fiber membranes and advanced processes for economical post-combustion carbon dioxide (CO2) capture from pulverized coal flue gas at temperatures typical of existing flue gas cleanup processes. The project will optimize the novel membranes at the bench scale, including tuning the properties of a novel phosphazene polymer in a coating solution and fabricating highly engineered porous hollow fiber supports. The project will also define the processes for coating the fiber support to manufacture ultrathin, defect-free composite hollow fiber membranes. Physical, chemical, and mechanical stability of the materials (individual and composite) towards coal flue gas components will be evaluated using exposure and performance tests. Membrane fouling and cleanability studies will define long term performance. Technical and economic feasibility analyses will be conducted to evaluate the overall performance and impact of the process on the cost of electricity (COE). Membranes based on coupling this novel selective material (phosphazene-based polymer) with an engineered hollow fiber support have the potential to meet DOE cost and performance goals.

151

Glass rupture disk  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A frangible rupture disk and mounting apparatus for use in blocking fluid flow, generally in a fluid conducting conduit such as a well casing, a well tubing string or other conduits within subterranean boreholes. The disk can also be utilized in above-surface pipes or tanks where temporary and controllable fluid blockage is required. The frangible rupture disk is made from a pre-stressed glass with controllable rupture properties wherein the strength distribution has a standard deviation less than approximately 5% from the mean strength. The frangible rupture disk has controllable operating pressures and rupture pressures.

Glass, S. Jill (Albuquerque, NM); Nicolaysen, Scott D. (Albuquerque, NM); Beauchamp, Edwin K. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Method for heating a glass sheet  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for heating a glass sheet includes the steps of heating a glass sheet to a first predetermined temperature and applying microwave energy to the glass sheet to heat the glass sheet to at least a second predetermined temperature to allow the glass sheet to be formed.

Boaz, Premakaran Tucker (Livonia, MI)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Method for heating a glass sheet  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for heating a glass sheet includes the steps of heating a glass sheet to a first predetermined temperature and applying microwave energy to the glass sheet to heat the glass sheet to at least a second predetermined temperature to allow the glass sheet to be formed. 5 figs.

Boaz, P.T.

1998-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

154

Compositional threshold for Nuclear Waste Glass Durability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within the composition space of glasses, a distinct threshold appears to exist that separates "good" glasses, i.e., those which are sufficiently durable, from "bad" glasses of a low durability. The objective of our research is to clarify the origin of this threshold by exploring the relationship between glass composition, glass structure and chemical durability around the threshold region.

Kruger, Albert A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Farooqi, Rahmatullah [Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology, (Korea, Republic of); Hrma, Pavel R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States), Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology, (Korea, Republic of)

2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

155

Quinary metallic glass alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10.sup.3 K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf).sub.a (Al,Zn).sub.b (Ti,Nb).sub.c (Cu.sub.x Fe.sub.y (Ni,Co).sub.z).sub.d wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d.multidot.y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

Lin, Xianghong (Pasadena, CA); Johnson, William L. (Pasadena, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Quinary metallic glass alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10{sup 3}K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf){sub a}(Al,Zn){sub b}(Ti,Nb){sub c}(Cu{sub x}Fe{sub y}(Ni,Co){sub z}){sub d} wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d{hor_ellipsis}y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

Lin, X.; Johnson, W.L.

1998-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

157

Method of determining glass durability  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, {Delta}G{sub p}, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, {Delta}G{sub a}, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup WA}, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup SB} associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, {Delta}G{sub f}. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log{sub 10}(N C{sub i}(g/L))=a{sub i} + b{sub i}{Delta}G{sub f}. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained. 4 figs.

Jantzen, C.M.; Pickett, J.B.; Brown, K.G.; Edwards, T.B.

1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

158

Holder for rotating glass body  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is provided for holding and centering a rotating glass body such as a rod or tube. The device includes a tubular tip holder which may be held in a lathe chuck. The device can utilize a variety of centering tips each adapted for a particular configuration, such as a glass O-ring joint or semi-ball joint.

Kolleck, Floyd W. (Clarendon Hills, IL)

1978-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

159

Method of determining glass durability  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, .DELTA.G.sub.p, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, .DELTA.G.sub.a, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.WA, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.SB associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, .DELTA.G.sub.f. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log.sub.10 (N C.sub.i (g/L))=a.sub.i +b.sub.i .DELTA.G.sub.f. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained.

Jantzen, Carol Maryanne (Aiken, SC); Pickett, John Butler (Aiken, SC); Brown, Kevin George (Augusta, GA); Edwards, Thomas Barry (Aiken, SC)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Refractory Glass Seals for SOFC  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the critical challenges facing planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology is the need for reliable sealing technology. Seals must exhibit long-term stability and mechanical integrity in the high temperature SOFC environment during normal and transient operation. Several different approaches for sealing SOFC stacks are under development, including glass or glass-ceramic seals, metallic brazes, and compressive seals. Among glass seals, rigid glass-ceramics, self-healing glass, and composite glass approaches have been investigated under the SECA Core Technology Program. The U.S. Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed the refractory glass approach in light of the fact that higher sealing temperatures (e.g., 930-1000 degrees C) may enhance the ultimate in-service bulk strength and electrical conductivity of contact materials, as well as the bonding strength between contact materials and adjacent SOFC components, such as interconnect coatings and electrodes. This report summarizes the thermal, chemical, mechanical, and electrical properties of the refractory sealing glass.

Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hollow glass microspheres" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Database and Interim Glass Property Models for Hanford HLW Glasses  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide a methodology for an increase in the efficiency and a decrease in the cost of vitrifying high-level waste (HLW) by optimizing HLW glass formulation. This methodology consists in collecting and generating a database of glass properties that determine HLW glass processability and acceptability and relating these properties to glass composition. The report explains how the property-composition models are developed, fitted to data, used for glass formulation optimization, and continuously updated in response to changes in HLW composition estimates and changes in glass processing technology. Further, the report reviews the glass property-composition literature data and presents their preliminary critical evaluation and screening. Finally the report provides interim property-composition models for melt viscosity, for liquidus temperature (with spinel and zircon primary crystalline phases), and for the product consistency test normalized releases of B, Na, and Li. Models were fitted to a subset of the screened database deemed most relevant for the current HLW composition region.

Hrma, Pavel R.; Piepel, Gregory F.; Vienna, John D.; Cooley, Scott K.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Russell, Renee L.

2001-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

162

Glass and Optical Materials - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ion Exchanged Mixed Glass Cullet Proppants for Stimulation of Oil and Natural Gas Bearing Shales · Modeling the Electrical Conductivity in Glass Melts.

163

Lead phosphate glass compositions for optical components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lead phosphate glass to which has been added indium oxide or scandium oe to improve chemical durability and provide a lead phosphate glass with good optical properties.

Sales, Brian C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Boatner, Lynn A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Compositional Study of Neutron Detecting Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current study involves the production and characterization of glass with high concentrations of Gd2O3 in various oxide glass formers, and containing one of ...

165

Laboratory Equipment - Ace Glass UV Photochemistry Safety ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Specifications / Capabilities: UV Photchemistry Safety Cabinet Ace Glass Cat. Number 7836-20. ... Power Supply Ace Glass Cat. Number 7830-60. ...

2013-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

166

Unusually Stable Glasses May Benefit Drugs, Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... glass is more apt to convert to a low-energy crystalline order ... to study how molecules diffuse during subsequent annealing of the two types of glass ...

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Chemical Strengthening of Soda Lime Silicate Glass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ion Exchanged Mixed Glass Cullet Proppants for Stimulation of Oil and Natural Gas Bearing Shales · Modeling the Electrical Conductivity in Glass Melts.

168

Glass science tutorial: Lecture No. 7, Waste glass technology for Hanford  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the details of the waste glass tutorial session that was held to promote knowledge of waste glass technology and how this can be used at the Hanford Reservation. Topics discussed include: glass properties; statistical approach to glass development; processing properties of nuclear waste glass; glass composition and the effects of composition on durability; model comparisons of free energy of hydration; LLW glass structure; glass crystallization; amorphous phase separation; corrosion of refractories and electrodes in waste glass melters; and glass formulation for maximum waste loading.

Kruger, A.A.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Method for forming microspheres for encapsulation of nuclear waste. [Patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Microspheres for nuclear waste storage are formed by gelling droplets containing the waste in a gelation fluid, transferring the gelled droplets to a furnace without the washing step previously used, and heating the unwashed gelled droplets in the furnace under temperature or humidity conditions that result in a substantially linear rate of removal of volatile components therefrom. Fuel particles were also produced using this method.

Angelini, P.; Caputo, A.J.; Hutchens, R.E.; Lackey, W.J.; Stinton, D.P.

1982-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

170

GLASS COMPOSITION-TCLP RESPONSE MODEL FOR WASTE GLASSES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A first-order property model for normalized Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) release as a function of glass composition was developed using data collected from various studies. The normalized boron release is used to estimate the release of toxic elements based on the observation that the boron release represents the conservative release for those constituents of interest. The current TCLP model has two targeted application areas: (1) delisting of waste-glass product as radioactive (not mixed) waste and (2) designating the glass wastes generated from waste-glass research activities as hazardous or non-hazardous. This paper describes the data collection and model development for TCLP releases and discusses the issues related to the application of the model.

Kim, Dong-Sang; Vienna, John D.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Hollow fiber adsorbents for CO{sub 2} removal from flue gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nation's pulverized coal infrastructure is aging, and implementation of current retrofit postcombustion capture methods is extremely expensive. This paper describes a technology based on hollow polymeric fibers with sorbent particles embedded in the porous fiber wall to enable postcombustion CO{sub 2} capture via a rapid temperature swing adsorption (RTSA) system. The system takes advantage of the hollow fiber morphology by passing cooling water through the bores during sorption to maximize sorption capacities and steam through the bores during desorption to desorb CO{sub 2} efficiently. The thin-walled hollow fibers offer the advantage of rapid heat and mass transport. To avoid mass transfer between the core and the fiber sheath, a dense lumen layer is used on the interior of the fiber wall. This system has advantages over competing technologies. Specifically, the fiber sorbent contactor minimizes flue gas pressure drop across the bed, while maximizing sorption efficiencies via rapid thermal cycles and low regenerative thermal requirements.

Lively, R.P.; Chance, R.R.; Kelley, B.T.; Deckman, H.W.; Drese, J.H.; Jones, C.W.; Koros, W.J. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

172

Glass in 21st Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 19, 2011 ... This presentation is an overview of the findings from the June 21-22, 2010 American Ceramic Society Leadership Summit ... Borosilicate Glasses: Steve W. Martin1; Randi Christensen1; Garrett Olson1; 1Iowa State University

173

Fast Crystals and Strong Glasses  

SciTech Connect

This talk describes new results on model colloid systems that provide insight into the behavior of fundamental problems in colloid physics, and more generally, for other materials as well. By visualizing the nucleation and growth of colloid crystals, we find that the incipient crystallites are much more disordered than expected, leading to a larger diversity of crystal morphologies. When the entropic contribution of these diverse morphologies is included in the free energy, we are able to describe the behavior very well, and can predict the nucleation rate surprisingly accurately. The talk also describes the glass transition in deformable colloidal particles, and will show that when the internal elasticity of the particles is included, the colloidal glass transition mimics that of molecular glass formers much more completely. These results also suggest that the elasticity at the scale of the fundamental unit, either colloid particle or molecule, determines the nature of the glass transition, as described by the "fragility."

Weitz, David [Harvard

2009-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

174

Thermal insulation of window glass  

SciTech Connect

The thermal insulation of window glass can be increased by a factor of two using spray-on semiconductive SnO/sub 2/: Sb or IN/sub 2/O/sub 3/: Sn coatings. (auth)

Sievers, A.J.

1973-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Removal of CO2 from gas mixture using hollow fiber membrane contactors fabricated from PVDF/triacetin/glycerol cast solution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hollow fiber membranes were prepared via thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) method and applied for CO2 absorption from gas mixture stream as gas-liquid membrane contactors. The percent removal of CO2 from gas mixture stream ... Keywords: PVDF, hollow fibers, thermally induced phase separation

N. Ghasem; M. Al-Marzouqi; R. Al-Marzouqi; A. Dowaidar; M. Vialatte

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Magnetic separation of micro-spheres from viscous biological fluids.  

SciTech Connect

A magnetically based detoxification system is being developed as a therapeutic tool for selective and rapid removal of biohazards, i.e. chemicals and radioactive substances, from human blood. One of the key components of this system is a portable magnetic separator capable of separating polymer-based magnetic nano/micro-spheres from arterial blood flow in an ex vivo unit. The magnetic separator consists of an array of alternating and parallel capillary tubing and magnetizable wires, which is exposed to an applied magnetic field created by two parallel permanent magnets such that the magnetic field is perpendicular to both the wires and the fluid flow. In this paper, the performance of this separator was evaluated via preliminary in vitro flow experiments using a separator unit consisting of single capillary glass tubing and two metal wires. Pure water, ethylene glycol-water solution (v:v = 39:61 and v:v = 49:51) and human whole blood were used as the fluids. The results showed that when the viscosity increased from 1.0 cp to 3.0 cp, the capture efficiency (CE) decreased from 90% to 56%. However, it is still feasible to obtain >90% CE in blood flow if the separator design is optimized to create higher magnetic gradients and magnetic fields in the separation area.

Chen, H.; Kaminski, M. D.; Xianqiao, L.; Caviness, P.; Torno, M.; Rosengart, A. J.; Dhar, P.; Chemical Engineering; Univ. of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine; Illinois Inst. of Tech.

2007-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

177

BNFL Report Glass Formers Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this task was to obtain powder property data on candidate glass former materials, sufficient to guide conceptual design and estimate the cost of glass former handling facilities as requested under Part B1 of BNFL Technical and Development Support. Twenty-nine glass forming materials were selected and obtained from vendors for the characterization of their physical properties, durability in caustic solution, and powder flow characteristics. A glass former was selected based on the characterization for each of the ten oxide classes required for Envelope A, B, and C mixtures. Three blends (A, B, and C) were prepared based on formulations provided by Vitreous State Laboratory and evaluated with the same methods employed for the glass formers. The properties obtained are presented in a series of attached Tables. It was determined that five of the ten glass formers, (kyanite, iron oxide, titania, zircon, and zinc oxide) have the potential to cause some level of solids f low problems. In addition, all of the blends may require consideration for their handling. A number of engineering considerations and recommendations were prepared based on the experimental findings, experience, and other process considerations. Recommendations for future testing are included. In conjunction with future work, it is recommended that a professional consultant be engaged to guide and assist with testing and design input.

Schumacher, R.F.

2000-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

178

BNFL Report Glass Formers Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this task was to obtain powder property data on candidate glass former materials, sufficient to guide conceptual design and estimate the cost of glass former handling facilities as requested under Part B1 of BNFL Technical and Development Support. Twenty-nine glass forming materials were selected and obtained from vendors for the characterization of their physical properties, durability in caustic solution, and powder flow characteristics. A glass former was selected based on the characterization for each of the ten oxide classes required for Envelope A, B, and C mixtures. Three blends (A, B, and C) were prepared based on formulations provided by Vitreous State Laboratory and evaluated with the same methods employed for the glass formers. The properties obtained are presented in a series of attached Tables. It was determined that five of the ten glass formers, (kyanite, iron oxide, titania, zircon, and zinc oxide) have the potential to cause some level of solids f low problems. The problems might include arching or ratholing in the silo/hopper. In addition, all of the blends may require consideration for their handling.

Schumacher, R.F.

2000-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

179

Droplets Behavior of Hollow-Cone Spray in a Non-Condensable Environment  

SciTech Connect

The characteristics of droplets in a water hollow-cone spray from nozzles 1.1 mm and 3.6 mm in diameter in an air environment have been investigated experimentally. The dual phase Doppler anemometry (PDA) system was used to measure the size and two velocity components of individual spherical particles. The liquid spray geometry, including spray breakup length and spray angle were also obtained experimentally. The mechanism and the influence of these parameters on a hollow cone spray flow were described. (authors)

Minoru Takahashi; Shin-ichi Kitagawa [Tokyo Institute of Technology, O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152 (Japan); Suizheng Qiu [Xi' an Jiaotong University, No.28, Xianning West Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi, 710049 (China)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Simulation of Hollow Electron Beam Collimation in the Fermilab Tevatron Collider  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concept of augmenting the conventional collimation system of high-energy storage rings with a hollow electron beam was successfully demonstrated in experiments at the Tevatron. A reliable numerical model is required for understanding particle dynamics in the presence of a hollow beam collimator. Several models were developed to describe imperfections of the electron beam profile and alignment. The features of the imperfections are estimated from electron beam profile measurements. Numerical simulations of halo removal rates are compared with experimental data taken at the Tevatron.

Morozov, I.A.; Stancari, G.; Valishev, A.; /Fermilab; Shatilov, D.N.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hollow glass microspheres" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Sweeping Gas Membrane Desalination Using Commercial Hydrophobic Hollow Fiber Membranes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water shortages affect 88 developing countries that are home to half of the world's population. In these places, 80-90% of all diseases and 30% of all deaths result from poor water quality. Furthermore, over the next 25 years, the number of people affected by severe water shortages is expected to increase fourfold. Low cost methods of purifying freshwater, and desalting seawater are required to contend with this destabilizing trend. Membrane distillation (MD) is an emerging technology for separations that are traditionally accomplished via conventional distillation or reverse osmosis. As applied to desalination, MD involves the transport of water vapor from a saline solution through the pores of a hydrophobic membrane. In sweeping gas MD, a flowing gas stream is used to flush the water vapor from the permeate side of the membrane, thereby maintaining the vapor pressure gradient necessary for mass transfer. Since liquid does not penetrate the hydrophobic membrane, dissolved ions are completely rejected by the membrane. MD has a number of potential advantages over conventional desalination including low temperature and pressure operation, reduced membrane strength requirements, compact size, and 100% rejection of non-volatiles. The present work evaluated the suitability of commercially available technology for sweeping gas membrane desalination. Evaluations were conducted with Celgard Liqui-Cel{reg_sign} Extra-Flow 2.5X8 membrane contactors with X-30 and X-40 hydrophobic hollow fiber membranes. Our results show that sweeping gas membrane desalination systems are capable of producing low total dissolved solids (TDS) water, typically 10 ppm or less, from seawater, using low grade heat. However, there are several barriers that currently prevent sweeping gas MD from being a viable desalination technology. The primary problem is that large air flows are required to achieve significant water yields, and the costs associated with transporting this air are prohibitive. To overcome this barrier, at least two improvements are required. First, new and different contactor geometries are necessary to achieve efficient contact with an extremely low pressure drop. Second, the temperature limits of the membranes must be increased. In the absence of these improvements, sweeping gas MD will not be economically competitive. However, the membranes may still find use in hybrid desalination systems.

EVANS, LINDSEY; MILLER, JAMES E.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Natural analogues of nuclear waste glass corrosion.  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews and summarizes studies performed to characterize the products and processes involved in the corrosion of natural glasses. Studies are also reviewed and evaluated on how well the corrosion of natural glasses in natural environments serves as an analogue for the corrosion of high-level radioactive waste glasses in an engineered geologic disposal system. A wide range of natural and experimental corrosion studies has been performed on three major groups of natural glasses: tektite, obsidian, and basalt. Studies of the corrosion of natural glass attempt to characterize both the nature of alteration products and the reaction kinetics. Information available on natural glass was then compared to corresponding information on the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses, specifically to resolve two key questions: (1) whether one or more natural glasses behave similarly to nuclear waste glasses in laboratory tests, and (2) how these similarities can be used to support projections of the long-term corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The corrosion behavior of basaltic glasses was most similar to that of nuclear waste glasses, but the corrosion of tektite and obsidian glasses involves certain processes that also occur during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The reactions and processes that control basalt glass dissolution are similar to those that are important in nuclear waste glass dissolution. The key reaction of the overall corrosion mechanism is network hydrolysis, which eventually breaks down the glass network structure that remains after the initial ion-exchange and diffusion processes. This review also highlights some unresolved issues related to the application of an analogue approach to predicting long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass corrosion, such as discrepancies between experimental and field-based estimates of kinetic parameters for basaltic glasses.

Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.

1999-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

183

Ellipsoidal and parabolic glass capillaries as condensers for x-ray microscopes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Single-bounce ellipsoidal and paraboloidal glass capillary focusing optics have been fabricated for use as condenser lenses for both synchrotron and tabletop x-ray microscopes in the x-ray energy range of 2.5-18 keV. The condenser numerical apertures (NAs) of these devices are designed to match the NA of x-ray zone plate objectives, which gives them a great advantage over zone plate condensers in laboratory microscopes. The fabricated condensers have slope errors as low as 20 {mu}rad rms. These capillaries provide a uniform hollow-cone illumination with almost full focusing efficiency, which is much higher than what is available with zone plate condensers. Sub-50 nm resolution at 8 keV x-ray energy was achieved by utilizing this high-efficiency condenser in a laboratory microscope based on a rotating anode generator.

Zeng Xianghui; Duewer, Fred; Feser, Michael; Huang, Carson; Lyon, Alan; Tkachuk, Andrei; Yun Wenbing

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Ultrasonic/surfactant assisted of CdS nano hollow sphere synthesis and characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CdS hollow nanospheres with diameters ranging from 40 to 150 nm have been synthesized by a surfactant-assisted sonochemical route. The successful vesicle templating indicates that the outer leaflet of the bilayer is the receptive surface in the controlled growth of CdS nanoparticles which provide the unique reactor for the nucleation and mineralization growth of CdS nanoparticles. The CdS nanostructures obtained were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy. Structural characterization of hollow CdS nanospheres indicates that these products packed with square subunits having sizes between 5 and 7 nm in diameter. The formation of the hollow nanostructure was explained by a vesicle template mechanism, in which sonication and surfactant play important roles. The band-edge emission and surface luminescence of the CdS nanoparticles were observed. -Research Highlights: {yields} CdS hollow nanospheres with diameters of 40-150 nm were synthesized. {yields} Nanoparticles were characterized by UV/Vis and photoluminescence. {yields} Nanospheres are composed of smaller nanocrystals with the average size of 6.8 nm. {yields} The band gap energy of the CdS nanoparticles is higher than its bulk value.

Rafati, Amir Abbas, E-mail: aa_rafati@basu.ac.ir [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Bu-Ali Sina University, P.O. Box 65174, Hamedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Borujeni, Ahmad Reza Afraz [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Bu-Ali Sina University, P.O. Box 65174, Hamedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Najafi, Mojgan [Department of Materials Engineering, Hamedan University of Technology (HUT), Hamedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bagheri, Ahmad [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Bu-Ali Sina University, P.O. Box 65174, Hamedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

185

Synthesis and Utilization of Monodisperse Hollow Polymeric Particles in Photonic Crystals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Hass.19,20 Their approach involved making a core particle from a car- boxylated polymer and covering polymerization. The hollow spheres were produced by removal of the hydro- carbon in a vacuum. Wong et al.11 used nanoparticles were used to bind to the cysteine hydro- phobic blocks to form submicron aggregates

Asher, Sanford A.

186

Hollow waveguides for the transmission of quantum cascade laser (QCL) energy for spectroscopic applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Keywords: Infrared fiber optics, hollow waveguides, infrared spectroscopy, long-wave infrared (LWIR-445-0754, irfibers.rutgers.edu Optical Fibers, Sensors, and Devices for Biomedical Diagnostics and Treatment XI some of the tests described in this paper. REFERENCES [1] Harrington, J., Infrared Fiber Optics

187

Laser-cooled atoms inside a hollow-core photonic-crystal fiber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe the loading of laser-cooled rubidium atoms into a single-mode hollow-core photonic-crystal fiber. Inside the fiber, the atoms are confined by a far-detuned optical trap and probed by a weak resonant beam. We ...

Bajcsy, M.

188

HLW Glass Studies: Development of Crystal-Tolerant HLW Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In our study, a series of lab-scale crucible tests were performed on designed glasses of different compositions to further investigate and simulate the effect of Cr, Ni, Fe, Al, Li, and RuO2 on the accumulation rate of spinel crystals in the glass discharge riser of the HLW melter. The experimental data were used to expand the compositional region covered by an empirical model developed previously (Matyᚠet al. 2010b), improving its predictive performance. We also investigated the mechanism for agglomeration of particles and impact of agglomerates on accumulation rate. In addition, the TL was measured as a function of temperature and composition.

Matyas, Josef; Huckleberry, Adam R.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Lang, Jesse B.; Owen, Antionette T.; Kruger, Albert A.

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

189

Determination of Ideal Broth Formulations Needed to Prepare Hydrous Aluminum Oxide Microspheres via the Internal Gelation Process  

SciTech Connect

A simple test-tube methodology was used to determine optimum process parameters for preparing hydrous aluminum oxide microspheres by the internal gelation process. Broth formulations of aluminum, hexamethylenetetramine, and urea were found that can be used to prepare hydrous aluminum oxide gel spheres in the temperature range of 60-90 C. A few gel-forming runs were made in which microspheres were prepared with some of these formulations in order to equate the test-tube gelation times with actual gelation times. These preparations confirmed that the test-tube methodology is reliable for determining the ideal broths.

Collins, Jack Lee [ORNL; Pye, S. L. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Determination of Ideal Broth Formulations Needed to Prepare Hydrous Hafnium Oxide Microspheres via the Internal Gelation Process  

SciTech Connect

A simple test-tube methodology was used to determine optimum process parameters for preparing hydrous hafnium oxide microspheres by the internal gelation process. Broth formulations of hafnyl chloride [HfOCl{sub 2}], hexamethylenetetramine, and urea were found that can be used to prepare hydrous hafnium oxide gel spheres in the temperature range of 70-90 C. A few gel-forming runs were made in which microspheres were prepared with some of these formulations in order to equate the test-tube gelation times with actual gelation times. These preparations confirmed that the test-tube methodology is reliable for determining the ideal broths.

Collins, Jack Lee [ORNL; Hunt, Rodney Dale [ORNL; Simmerman, S. G. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Application and modeling of frequency-domain lifetime spectroscopy for microsphere-based optical glucose sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new glucose affinity sensor based on a homogeneous fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay system was developed to monitor the competitive binding between concanavalin A (ConA) and dextran. The FRET quenching kinetics of the donor were analyzed from frequency-domain (FD) measurements as functions of both glucose and acceptor-protein concentrations using a Förster-type decay kinetics model. The results showed that the FD measurements and donor decay kinetics can indicate quantitative changes in the presence of glucose at concentrations ranging from 0 to 224 mg/dL. The second set of experiments proved the feasibility of performing analyte sensing with FD lifetime spectroscopy using microsphere-based sensors in multiple scattering solutions. A well characterized pH-sensitive fluorophore was entrapped in poly(ethylene glycol) microspheres. The particles were then immersed in a buffered polystyrene solution of various pH. Measurements of phase shift and modulation of the generated and multiply scattered fluorescent light were acquired as the modulation frequency of the incident excitation light varied from 10 to 120 MHz. After the measured data were analyzed with the coupled diffusion equations, the obtained lifetimes from the scattering measurements matched values from non-scattering measurements. Lastly, a new two-speed Monte Carlo (MC) simulation was developed to predict light propagation through the sensors and thus was used to evaluate these sensors and to design these sensors for implantation. The model used random packing structure and considered geometric optics and two light propagation speeds. Experimental measurements of phase-shift and modulation of excitation light were made on a cubic phantom with non-fluorescent resin microspheres of 74 µm diameter, and compared to those computed from the MC simulation. The results showed that the mean phase shift (PS) deviation was 0.736° and the mean amplitude deviation was 42%. Quantitative changes in detected fluorescence phase-shift and modulation were investigated for microsphere diameter, volume fraction, refractive index, and fluorophore lifetime. We also found that even though the sensitivity of PS change in the presence of scattering was the same as the value without scattering, the values of PS were magnified due to the scattering effects.

Liang, Feng

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Radiative Heat Transfer in Enhanced Hydrogen Outgassing of Glass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

V.I. Glebov, “Hydrogen storage in capillary arrays”, EnergyHydrogen Storage in Microspheres - Final Report”, EnergyHydrogen Production and Storage - R&D Priorities and Gaps”, International Energy

Kitamura, Rei; Pilon, Laurent

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Structure glass technology : systems and applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Glass cannot compete with steel in terms of strength or durability, but it is the only structural material that offers the highly sought after qualities of translucency and transparency. The use of glass has evolved from ...

Leitch, Katherine K. (Katherine Kristen)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Graphene Reinforced Glass and Ceramic Matrix Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2013. Symposium, Ceramic Matrix Composites. Presentation Title, Graphene Reinforced Glass ...

195

PHYSICAL AGING OF PLASTICIZED POLYMER GLASS. WH ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PHYSICAL AGING OF PLASTICIZED POLYMER GLASS. WH Han and GB McKenna, Polymers Division, Building 224, Room ...

196

Laboratory Waste Disposal HAZARDOUS GLASS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory Waste Disposal HAZARDOUS GLASS Items that could cut or puncture skin or trash- can liners. This waste stream must be boxed to protect custodial staff. It goes directly to the landfill lined cardboard box. Tape seams with heavy duty tape to contain waste. Limit weight to 20 lbs. Or

Sheridan, Jennifer

197

High-Temperature Viscosity of Commercial Glasses  

SciTech Connect

Arrhenius models were developed for glass viscosity within the processing temperature of six types of commercial glasses: low-expansion-borosilicate glasses, E glasses, fiberglass wool glasses, TV panel glasses, container glasses, and float glasses. Both local models (for each of the six glass types) and a global model (for the composition region of commercial glasses, i.e., the six glass types taken together) are presented. The models are based on viscosity data previously obtained with rotating spindle viscometers within the temperature range between 900 C and 1550 C; the viscosity varied from 1 Pa?s to 750 Pa?s. First-order models were applied to relate Arrhenius coefficients to the mass fractions of 15 components: SiO2, TiO2, ZrO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3, B2O3, MgO, CaO, SrO, BaO, PbO, ZnO, Li2O, Na2O, K2O. The R2 is 0.98 for the global model and ranges from .097 to 0.99 for the six local models. The models are recommended for glasses containing 42 to 84 mass% SiO2 to estimate viscosities or temperatures at a constant viscosity for melts within both the temperature range from 1100 C to 1550 C and viscosity range from 5 to 400 Pa?s.

Hrma, Pavel R.

2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

198

DURABLE GLASS FOR THOUSANDS OF YEARS  

SciTech Connect

The durability of natural glasses on geological time scales and ancient glasses for thousands of years is well documented. The necessity to predict the durability of high level nuclear waste (HLW) glasses on extended time scales has led to various thermodynamic and kinetic approaches. Advances in the measurement of medium range order (MRO) in glasses has led to the understanding that the molecular structure of a glass, and thus the glass composition, controls the glass durability by establishing the distribution of ion exchange sites, hydrolysis sites, and the access of water to those sites. During the early stages of glass dissolution, a 'gel' layer resembling a membrane forms through which ions exchange between the glass and the leachant. The hydrated gel layer exhibits acid/base properties which are manifested as the pH dependence of the thickness and nature of the gel layer. The gel layer ages into clay or zeolite minerals by Ostwald ripening. Zeolite mineral assemblages (higher pH and Al{sup 3+} rich glasses) may cause the dissolution rate to increase which is undesirable for long-term performance of glass in the environment. Thermodynamic and structural approaches to the prediction of glass durability are compared versus Ostwald ripening.

Jantzen, C.

2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

199

Structural properties of Zn-ZnO core-shell microspheres grown by hot-filament CVD technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) growth of Zn-ZnO core-shell microspheres in the temperature range of 350-650°C only using ZnO pellets as raw material. The samples were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), ...

R. López; T. Díaz; G. García; R. Galeazzi; E. Rosendo; A. Coyopol; M. Pacio; H. Juárez; A. I. Oliva

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Enhanced chemiluminescent detection scheme for trace vapor sensing in pneumatically-tuned hollow core photonic bandgap fibers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate an in-fiber gas phase chemical detection architecture in which a chemiluminescent (CL) reaction is spatially and spectrally matched to the core modes of hollow photonic bandgap (PBG) fibers in order to enhance ...

Stolyarov, Alexander Mark

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hollow glass microspheres" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Understanding the dynamics of photoionization-induced nonlinear effects and solitons in gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the details of our previously formulated model [Saleh et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 203902 (2011)] that governs pulse propagation in hollow-core photonic crystal fibers filled by an ionizable gas. By using perturbative methods, we find that the photoionization process induces the opposite phenomenon of the well-known Raman self-frequency redshift of solitons in solid-core glass fibers, as was recently experimentally demonstrated [Hoelzer et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 203901 (2011)]. This process is only limited by ionization losses, and leads to a constant acceleration of solitons in the time domain with a continuous blueshift in the frequency domain. By applying the Gagnon-Belanger gauge transformation, multipeak ''inverted gravitylike'' solitary waves are predicted. We also demonstrate that the pulse dynamics shows the ejection of solitons during propagation in such fibers, analogous to what happens in conventional solid-core fibers. Moreover, unconventional long-range nonlocal interactions between temporally distant solitons, unique of gas plasma systems, are predicted and studied. Finally, the effects of higher-order dispersion coefficients and the shock operator on the pulse dynamics are investigated, showing that the conversion efficiency of resonant radiation into the deep UV can be improved via plasma formation.

Saleh, Mohammed F.; Biancalana, Fabio [Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Guenther-Scharowsky Str. 1, DE-91058 Erlangen (Germany)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

202

Standard Guide for Dry Lead Glass and Oil-Filled Lead Glass Radiation Shielding Window Components for Remotely Operated Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standard Guide for Dry Lead Glass and Oil-Filled Lead Glass Radiation Shielding Window Components for Remotely Operated Facilities

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Method of fabricating nested shells and resulting product  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multiple shell structure and a method of manufacturing such structure wherein a hollow glass microsphere is surface treated in an organosilane solution so as to render the shell outer surface hydrophobic. The surface treated glass shell is then suspended in the oil phase of an oil-aqueous phase dispersion. The oil phase includes an organic film-forming monomer, a polymerization initiator and a blowing agent. A polymeric film forms at each phase boundary of the dispersion and is then expanded in a blowing operation so as to form an outer homogeneously integral monocellular substantially spherical thermoplastic shell encapsulating an inner glass shell of lesser diameter.

Henderson, Timothy M. (Ann Arbor, MI); Kool, Lawrence B. (Ann Arbor, MI)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Preston-Potter Hollow, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Preston-Potter Hollow, New York: Energy Resources Preston-Potter Hollow, New York: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.4354808°, -74.2296713° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.4354808,"lon":-74.2296713,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

205

Recirculation bubbler for glass melter apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas bubbler device provides enhanced recirculation of molten glass within a glass melter apparatus. The bubbler device includes a tube member disposed within a pool of molten glass contained in the melter. The tube member includes a lower opening through which the molten glass enters and upper slots disposed close to (above or below) the upper surface of the pool of molten glass and from which the glass exits. A gas (air) line is disposed within the tube member and extends longitudinally thereof. A gas bubble distribution device, which is located adjacent to the lower end of the tube member and is connected to the lower end of the gas line, releases gas through openings therein so as to produce gas bubbles of a desired size in the molten glass and in a distributed pattern across the tube member.

Guerrero, Hector (Evans, GA); Bickford, Dennis (Folly Beach, SC)

2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

206

Hollow Core-Shell Structured Porous Si-C Nanocomposites for Li-Ion Battery Anodes  

SciTech Connect

Hollow core-shell structured porous Si-C nanocomposites with void space up to tens of nanometers are designed to accommodate the volume expansion during lithiation for high-performance Li-ion battery anodes. An initial capacity of {approx}760 mAh/g after formation cycles (based on the entire electrode weight) with {approx}86% capacity retention over 100 cycles is achieved at a current density of 1 A/g. Good rate performance is also demonstrated.

Li, Xiaolin; Meduri, Praveen; Chen, Xilin; Qi, Wen N.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Xu, Wu; Ding, Fei; Xiao, Jie; Wang, Wei; Wang, Chong M.; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun

2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

207

Development of hollow-fiber catalytic-membrane reactors for high-temperature gas cleanup  

SciTech Connect

The project consist of the following main activities: (1) Design of catalytic hollow fiber membrane reactors. Single and multiple hollow-fiber membranes were studied in reactor/permeation cells made from stainless steel or quartz tubes. Modification of the hollow fiber membrane with catalysts was performed by aqueous impregnation, vapor deposition, and utilization of packed-bed reactors. (2) Investigation of gas separations and catalytic reactions in membrane reactors. Permeation of pure gases and gas mixtures was studied as a function of temperature. Pure component catalytic studies on the decomposition of H{sub 2}S was typically studied using 10% H{sub 2}S diluted in He. The H{sub 2}S and H{sub 2} concentrations were measured in both the tube and shell sides of the membrane reactor to determine the degree of chemical equilibrium shift. (3) Process development of the cleanup system using a simulated gas stream with a composition similar to that from an IGCC system. Catalytic studies using the IGCC gas composition will be performed according to the procedure used in the H{sub 2}S experiments. The conditions for optimum conversion in a gas mixture will be investigated.

Ma, Yi H.; Moser, M.R.; Pien, S.M.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Development of hollow-fiber catalytic-membrane reactors for high-temperature gas cleanup  

SciTech Connect

The project consist of the following main activities: (1) Design of catalytic hollow fiber membrane reactors. Single and multiple hollow-fiber membranes were studied in reactor/permeation cells made from stainless steel or quartz tubes. Modification of the hollow fiber membrane with catalysts was performed by aqueous impregnation, vapor deposition, and utilization of packed-bed reactors. (2) Investigation of gas separations and catalytic reactions in membrane reactors. Permeation of pure gases and gas mixtures was studied as a function of temperature. Pure component catalytic studies on the decomposition of H[sub 2]S was typically studied using 10% H[sub 2]S diluted in He. The H[sub 2]S and H[sub 2] concentrations were measured in both the tube and shell sides of the membrane reactor to determine the degree of chemical equilibrium shift. (3) Process development of the cleanup system using a simulated gas stream with a composition similar to that from an IGCC system. Catalytic studies using the IGCC gas composition will be performed according to the procedure used in the H[sub 2]S experiments. The conditions for optimum conversion in a gas mixture will be investigated.

Ma, Yi H.; Moser, M.R.; Pien, S.M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Lid heater for glass melter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A glass melter having a lid electrode for heating the glass melt radiantly. The electrode comprises a series of INCONEL 690 tubes running above the melt across the melter interior and through the melter walls and having nickel cores inside the tubes beginning where the tubes leave the melter interior and nickel connectors to connect the tubes electrically in series. An applied voltage causes the tubes to generate heat of electrical resistance for melting frit injected onto the melt. The cores limit heat generated as the current passes through the walls of the melter. Nickel bus connection to the electrical power supply minimizes heat transfer away from the melter that would occur if standard copper or water-cooled copper connections were used between the supply and the INCONEL 690 heating tubes. 3 figures.

Phillips, T.D.

1993-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

210

Lid heater for glass melter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a glass melter having a lid electrode for heating the glass melt radiantly. The electrode comprises a series of INCONEL 690 tubes running above the melt across the melter interior and through the melter walls and having nickel cores inside the tubes beginning where the tubes leave the melter interior and nickel connectors to connect the tubes electrically in series. An applied voltage causes the tubes to generate heat of electrical resistance for melting frit injected onto the melt. The cores limit heat generated as the current passes through the walls of the melter. Nickel bus connection to the electrical power supply minimizes heat transfer away from the melter that would occur if standard copper or water-cooled copper connections were used between the supply and the INCONEL 690 heating tubes.

Phillips, T.D.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

211

"S" Glass Manufacturing Technology Transfer  

SciTech Connect

A glass-ceramic-to metal sealing technology patented by Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (SNLA) was developed by MRC-Mound for use in the manufacture of weapon components. Successful implementation attracted increasingly widespread weapon use of this technology. "S-glass" manufacturing technology was transferred to commercial vendors to ensure that weapons production schedules would be met in the coming years. Such transfer also provided sources of this fledgling technology for the Department of Defense (DOD), aerospace and other commercial uses. The steps involved in the technology transfer are described, from the initial cooperative development work of Sandia and Mound scientists and technologists to the final phase of qualifying commercial vendors for component manufacture.

Buckner, Dean, A.; McCollister, Howard, L.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Melter Glass Removal and Dismantlement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been using vitrification processes to convert high-level radioactive waste forms into a stable glass for disposal in waste repositories. Vitrification facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) are converting liquid high-level waste (HLW) by combining it with a glass-forming media to form a borosilicate glass, which will ensure safe long-term storage. Large, slurry fed melters, which are used for this process, were anticipated to have a finite life (on the order of two to three years) at which time they would have to be replaced using remote methods because of the high radiation fields. In actuality the melters useable life spans have, to date, exceeded original life-span estimates. Initial plans called for the removal of failed melters by placing the melter assembly into a container and storing the assembly in a concrete vault on the vitrification plant site pending size-reduction, segregation, containerization, and shipment to appropriate storage facilities. Separate facilities for the processing of the failed melters currently do not exist. Options for handling these melters include (1) locating a facility to conduct the size-reduction, characterization, and containerization as originally planned; (2) long-term storing or disposing of the complete melter assembly; and (3) attempting to refurbish the melter and to reuse the melter assembly. The focus of this report is to look at methods and issues pertinent to size-reduction and/or melter refurbishment in particular, removing the glass as a part of a refurbishment or to reduce contamination levels (thus allowing for disposal of a greater proportion of the melter as low level waste).

Richardson, BS

2000-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

213

Template-free synthesis of CdS hollow nanospheres based on an ionic liquid assisted hydrothermal process and their application in photocatalysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polycrystalline CdS hollow nanospheres with diameter of about 130 nm have been successfully synthesized in high yield by an ionic liquid (IL) assisted template-free hydrothermal method for the first time. Both the molar ratios of Cd/S precursor in the solution and the reaction temperature play important roles in the formation of the CdS hollow nanospheres. The concentrations of capping agent hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) are also crucial for the morphology and size of the final product. IL was found to be a key component in the formation of CdS hollow structures, because solid spheres were obtained in the absence of IL. A subsequent growth mechanism of hollow interior by localized Ostwald ripening process has been further discussed. Such hollow structures show high photocatalytic ability in the photodegradation of methylene blue. - Graphical abstract: TEM images of typical as-prepared CdS hollow nanospheres.

Li Xinping; Gao Yanan; Yu Li [Key Laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry, Shandong University, Ministry of Education, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China); Zheng Liqiang, E-mail: lqzheng@sdu.edu.c [Key Laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry, Shandong University, Ministry of Education, Jinan, Shandong 250100 (China)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Method for heating, forming and tempering a glass sheet  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for heating, forming and tempering a glass sheet is disclosed including the steps of heating at least one glass sheet to at least a first predetermined temperature, applying microwave energy to the glass sheet to heat the glass sheet to at least a second predetermined temperature, forming the glass sheet to a predetermined configuration, and cooling an outer surface of the glass sheet to at least a third predetermined temperature to temper the glass sheet. 2 figs.

Boaz, P.T.; Sitzman, G.W.

1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

215

A Rotating Electrode System for the Generation of Metal Alloy Microspheres  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TerraPower LLC is designing a fast breed and burn reactor intended to operate for up to 40 years without refueling, designated as the Travelling Wave Reactor (TWR). Various U-Zr alloy fuel designs have been proposed for the TWR that may require a powder feed for fabrication. A simple and economic option for laboratory scale powder production is the Rotating Electrode Process (REP), which produces microsphere shaped powder by melting the tip of a rotating bar with an electric arc. In order to fully characterize this process for various U-Zr alloys and provide the feed material for testing fabrication techniques, a Rotating Electrode System (RES) was designed and built. The RES is largely based on a combination of two designs; an early REP system developed by Starmet Corporation in the 19xxa and a later design optimized for U-Mo powder production by Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The RES designed for this work was improved based on input from vendors specializing in their respective areas of expertise and is capable of atomizing up to a 1.26 cm diameter metal alloy rod at 40,000 RPM. Every component of the machine can be disassembled and transferred through a 35.56 cm (14 in) diameter air lock of a glovebox so that it can operate in a controlled environment. The RES was tested by atomizing various diameter copper rods to prove system functionality. The tests were carried out in air using an argon cover gas in the powder collection chamber, known as the catch pan to limit oxidation rates of the newly generated microspheres. The powder produced showed strong sphericity ranging from 50 µm to 500 µm in diameter. Problems and areas of concern that were encountered during operation have been addressed so that the RES can be further optimized to better atomize U-Zr alloys once transferred into the glovebox.

Thompson, Chad 1984-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

A History of the Theories of Glass Structure: Can We Really Believe ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field Assisted Viscous Flow and Crystallization in a Sodium Aluminosilicate Glass · Glass Ceramics ... Terahertz Properties of Lithium Iron Phosphate Glasses.

217

High pressure-resistant nonincendive emulsion explosive  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved emulsion explosive composition including hollow microspheres/bulking agents having high density and high strength. The hollow microspheres/bulking agents have true particle densities of about 0.2 grams per cubic centimeter or greater and include glass, siliceous, ceramic and synthetic resin microspheres, expanded minerals, and mixtures thereof. The preferred weight percentage of hollow microspheres/bulking agents in the composition ranges from 3.0 to 10.0 A chlorinated paraffin oil, also present in the improved emulsion explosive composition, imparts a higher film strength to the oil phase in the emulsion. The emulsion is rendered nonincendive by the production of sodium chloride in situ via the decomposition of sodium nitrate, a chlorinated paraffin oil, and sodium perchlorate. The air-gap sensitivity is improved by the in situ formation of monomethylamine perchlorate from dissolved monomethylamine nitrate and sodium perchlorate. The emulsion explosive composition can withstand static pressures to 139 bars and dynamic pressure loads on the order of 567 bars.

Ruhe, Thomas C. (Duquesne, PA); Rao, Pilaka P. (Baghlingampalli, IN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Process for preparing improved silvered glass mirrors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Glass mirrors having improved weathering properties are prepared by an improvement in the process for making the mirrors. The glass surface after it has been cleaned but before it is silvered, is contacted with a solution of lanthanide rare earths in addition to a sensitization solution of tin or palladium. The addition of the rare earths produces a mirror which has increased resistance to delamination of the silver from the glass surface in the presence of water.

Buckwalter, C.Q. Jr.

1980-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

219

Glass Property Data and Models for Estimating High-Level Waste Glass Volume  

SciTech Connect

This report describes recent efforts to develop glass property models that can be used to help estimate the volume of high-level waste (HLW) glass that will result from vitrification of Hanford tank waste. The compositions of acceptable and processable HLW glasses need to be optimized to minimize the waste-form volume and, hence, to save cost. A database of properties and associated compositions for simulated waste glasses was collected for developing property-composition models. This database, although not comprehensive, represents a large fraction of data on waste-glass compositions and properties that were available at the time of this report. Glass property-composition models were fit to subsets of the database for several key glass properties. These models apply to a significantly broader composition space than those previously publised. These models should be considered for interim use in calculating properties of Hanford waste glasses.

Vienna, John D.; Fluegel, Alexander; Kim, Dong-Sang; Hrma, Pavel R.

2009-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

220

Prestressed glass, aezoelectric electrical power source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical power source which comprises a body of prestressed glass having a piezoelectric transducer supported on the body in direct mechanical coupling therewith.

Newson, Melvin M. (Albuquerque, NM)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hollow glass microspheres" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Fractography of Thermally Shocked Glass Cookware  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fractography of fractured glass cookware can be a time consuming process of putting ... to Conduct Thermal Shock Test on Refractories Using Steel Blocks.

222

Electrochemical cell with high conductivity glass electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A secondary electrochemical cell with sodium-sulfur or other molten reactants is provided with a ionically conductive glass electrolyte. The cell is contained within an electrically conductive housing with a first portion at negative potential and a second portion insulated therefrom at positive electrode potential. The glass electrolyte is formed into a plurality of elongated tubes and placed lengthwise within the housing. The positive electrode material, for instance sulfur, is sealed into the glass electrolyte tubes and is provided with an elongated axial current collector. The glass electrolyte tubes are protected by shield tubes or sheets that also define narrow annuli for wicking of the molten negative electrode material. 6 figs.

Nelson, P.A.; Bloom, I.D.; Roche, M.F.

1987-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

223

Electrochemical cell with high conductivity glass electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A secondary electrochemical cell with sodium-sulfur or other molten reactants is provided with an ionically conductive glass electrolyte. The cell is contained within an electrically conductive housing with a first portion at negative potential and a second portion insulated therefrom at positive electrode potential. The glass electrolyte is formed into a plurality of elongated tubes and placed lengthwise within the housing. The positive electrode material, for instance sulfur, is sealed into the glass electrolyte tubes and is provided with an elongated axial current collector. The glass electrolyte tubes are protected by shield tubes or sheets that also define narrow annuli for wicking of the molten negative electrode material.

Nelson, P.A.; Bloom, I.D.; Roche, M.F.

1986-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

224

Carbon Emissions: Stone, Clay, and Glass Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy-Related Carbon Emissions for Selected Stone, Clay, and Glass Industries, 1994. The cement and lime manufacturing industries emit almost half of ...

225

Carbon Emissions: Stone, Clay, and Glass Industry  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Stone et al. Industries Energy-Related Carbon Emissions for the Stone, Clay, and Glass Industry by Source, 1994. Three sources, coal, natural gas, and electricity, account for...

226

Nanocrystal Formation in Glasses - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Nanocrystal Formation in Glasses ... copper have been treated in hydrogen atmospheres to form nanocrystals imbedded in a glassy matrix.

227

Mechanical Properties of Thin Film Metallic Glass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because of these and other properties, thin film metallic-glasses (TFMGs) are a promising structural material for fabricating the next generation of micro- and ...

228

Nepheline Crystallization in Nuclear Waste Glasses: Progress ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, One significant limitation to waste loading in glass for Hanford defense wastes is the commonly high Al concentrations. The primary concern is ...

229

Lithiated Glass Scintillating-Particle Neutron Detector  

developed from glass that has been loaded with a high concentration of lithium-6, a neutron-absorbing material. A scintillating material in the form ...

230

Lithiated Glass Scintillating-Particle Neutron Detector ...  

... ORNL invention uses a matrix material developed from glass that has been loaded with a high concentration of lithium-6, a neutron-absorbing ...

231

Advanced Characterization Techniques of Glasses - Programmaster ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 8, 2012 ... Many researchers rely on NMR of glass-forming cations to understand network structure, often in combination with other experimental and ...

232

Modeling the Electrical Conductivity in Glass Melts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The electrical resistivity of oxide melts is important for the design and operation of electric furnaces. The electrical properties of glass and slag ...

233

Bulk Metallic Glasses VIII - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 2, 2010 ... Sponsorship, The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society .... The Oxidation Behavior of an FeCo-Based Bulk Metallic Glass at 600 - 700C.

234

Properties of Glass-Ceramics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 21   Maximum use temperatures of selected glass-ceramics...9608 Corning 1000 1830 â?¦ LAS I â?¦ 1000 1830 46% SiC fiber-reinforced composite LAS II (Nb) â?¦ 1100 2010 46% SiC fiber-reinforced composite LAS III (Nb,Zr) â?¦ 1200 2190 46% SiC fiber-reinforced composite LAS-type â?¦ 1200â??1300 2190â??2370 â?¦ Cordierite 9606 Corning 1100 2010 Creep over 900 °C (1650 °F)...

235

Determination of Ideal Broth Formulations Needed to Prepare Hydrous Cerium Oxide Microspheres via the Internal Gelation Process  

SciTech Connect

A simple test tube methodology was used to determine optimum process parameters for preparing hydrous cerium oxide microspheres via the internal gelation process.1 Broth formulations of cerium ammonium nitrate [(NH4)2Ce(NO3)6], hexamethylenetetramine, and urea were found that can be used to prepare hydrous cerium oxide gel spheres in the temperature range of 60 to 90 C. A few gel-forming runs were made in which microspheres were prepared with some of these formulations to be able to equate the test-tube gelation times to actual gelation times. These preparations confirmed that the test-tube methodology is reliable for determining the ideal broth formulations.

Collins, Jack Lee [ORNL; Chi, Anthony [ORNL

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Solar Glass Fact Sheet Harvard Green Campus Initiative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Glass Fact Sheet Harvard Green Campus Initiative What is Solar Glass? Solar glass is a type electricity and the rest to let in light. Solar glass is not fully transparent, so it should not be used or patterned to minimize heat gain and control glare are ideal candidates. Solar glass can be made in different

Paulsson, Johan

237

Storage and disposal of radioactive waste as glass in canisters  

SciTech Connect

A review of the use of waste glass for the immobilization of high-level radioactive waste glass is presented. Typical properties of the canisters used to contain the glass, and the waste glass, are described. Those properties are used to project the stability of canisterized waste glass through interim storage, transportation, and geologic disposal.

Mendel, J.E.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Energy Blog | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

19, 2011 19, 2011 SRNL's Porous Walled Hollow Glass Microspheres (which are about half the width of a human hair in diameter) have a network of interconnected pores that enable them to be filled with, hold and release gases and other materials. | Image courtesy of SRNL Tiny Glass Bubbles With Big Potential If these glass microspheres' walls could talk...They would explain how their tiny pores allow the potential for handling, storing and transporting a variety of materials, including drugs that have targeted delivery and hydrogen. August 18, 2011 The Re_house is nearing completion. | Courtesy of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Solar Decathlon Team. Solar Decathlon Team Leading the Way Toward Sustainable Living, Even in the Wake of Disasters For this year's Solar Decathlon, the University of Illinois at

239

Blog Feed: Vehicles | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 25, 2011 August 25, 2011 Have You Seen Energy Efficiency Improvements in Your Neighborhood? After discovering a renewable energy project in our blogger's own community, we're curious: What energy-saving, innovative projects have you come across in your neighborhood? August 19, 2011 SRNL's Porous Walled Hollow Glass Microspheres (which are about half the width of a human hair in diameter) have a network of interconnected pores that enable them to be filled with, hold and release gases and other materials. | Image courtesy of SRNL Tiny Glass Bubbles With Big Potential If these glass microspheres' walls could talk...They would explain how their tiny pores allow the potential for handling, storing and transporting a variety of materials, including drugs that have targeted delivery and

240

Integration of a terahertz quantum cascade laser with a hollow waveguide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to the integration of a quantum cascade laser with a hollow waveguide on a chip to improve both the beam pattern and manufacturability. By coupling the QCL output into a single-mode rectangular waveguide the radiation mode structure can be known and the propagation, manipulation, and broadcast of the QCL radiation can then be entirely controlled by well-established rectangular waveguide techniques. By controlling the impedance of the interface, enhanced functions, such as creating amplifiers, efficient coupling to external cavities, and increasing power output from metal-metal THz QCLs, are also enabled.

Wanke, Michael C. (Albuquerque, NM); Nordquist, Christopher D. (Albuquerque, NM)

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hollow glass microspheres" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Development of Bulk Metallic Glasses with High Plasticity Using the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air-Oxidation of a (Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5)98Er2 Bulk Metallic Glass at 350-500oc · Anelastic Deformation of a Metallic Glass · Anisotropy in Metallic Glasses.

242

Experimental Study on the Separation of CO2 from Flue Gas Using Hollow Fiber Membrane Contactors with Aqueous Solution of Potassium Glycinate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experimental study on CO2 removal from flue gas using polypropylene hollow fiber membrane contactors were conducted. Aqueous solutions of potassium glycinate were used as absorption solution to absorb CO2 in the experiments. Under moderate operating ... Keywords: Gas absorption, Carbon dioxide, Potassium glycinate, Hollow fiber membrane contactor, Membrane absorption

Weifeng Zhang; Qiuhua Wang; Mengxiang Fang; Zhongyang Luo; Kefa Cen

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Load relaxation studies of a metallic glass  

SciTech Connect

Experimental results of load relaxation studies of a commercial metallic glass as a function of temperature are reported. The data suggest that metallic glasses exhibit deformation behavior with flow laws similar to those governing plastic deformation in crystalline solids. The lack of appreciable work hardening in annealed material and the identification of an anelastic component are also indicated by the experimental observations. (GHT)

Hadnagy, T.D.; Krenisky, D.J.; Ast, D.G.; Li, C.Y.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Monitoring and analyzing waste glass compositions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device and method are described for determining the viscosity of a fluid, preferably molten glass. The apparatus and method use the velocity of rising bubbles, preferably helium bubbles, within the molten glass to determine the viscosity of the molten glass. The bubbles are released from a tube positioned below the surface of the molten glass so that the bubbles pass successively between two sets of electrodes, one above the other, that are continuously monitoring the conductivity of the molten glass. The measured conductivity will change as a bubble passes between the electrodes enabling an accurate determination of when a bubble has passed between the electrodes. The velocity of rising bubbles can be determined from the time interval between a change in conductivity of the first electrode pair and the second, upper electrode pair. The velocity of the rise of the bubbles in the glass melt is used in conjunction with other physical characteristics, obtained by known methods, to determine the viscosity of the glass melt fluid and, hence, glass quality. 2 figures.

Schumacher, R.F.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Viscous Glass Sealants for SOFC Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two series of silicate glasses that contain gallium as the primary critical component have been identified and optimized for viscous sealing of solid oxide fuel cells operating from 650 to 850°C. Both series of glass sealants crystallize partially upon heat treatment and yield multiphase microstructures that allow viscous flow at temperatures as low as 650°C. A fully amorphous sealant was also developed by isolating, synthesizing and testing a silicate glass of the same composition as the remnant glassy phase in one of the two glass series. Of ~40 glasses tested for longer than 500 hours, a set of 5 glasses has been further tested for up to 1000h in air, wet hydrogen, and against both yttria-stabilized zirconia and aluminized stainless steel. In some cases the testing times reached 2000h. The reactivity testing has provided new insight into the effects of Y, Zr, and Al on bulk and surface crystallization in boro-gallio-silicate glasses, and demonstrated that at least 5 of the newly-developed glasses are viable viscous sealants.

Scott Misture

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

246

Monitoring and analyzing waste glass compositions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device and method for determining the viscosity of a fluid, preferably molten glass. The apparatus and method uses the velocity of rising bubbles, preferably helium bubbles, within the molten glass to determine the viscosity of the molten glass. The bubbles are released from a tube positioned below the surface of the molten glass so that the bubbles pass successively between two sets of electrodes, one above the other, that are continuously monitoring the conductivity of the molten glass. The measured conductivity will change as a bubble passes between the electrodes enabling an accurate determination of when a bubble has passed between the electrodes. The velocity of rising bubbles can be determined from the time interval between a change in conductivity of the first electrode pair and the second, upper electrode pair. The velocity of the rise of the bubbles in the glass melt is used in conjunction with other physical characteristics, obtained by known methods, to determine the viscosity of the glass melt fluid and, hence, glass quality.

Schumacher, Ray F. (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

The Precise Inner Solutions of Gravity field Equations of Hollow and Solid Spheres and the Theorem of Singularity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the present calculation of the inner solution of gravity field equation with spherical symmetry, in order to avoid the singularity appearing in the center of sphere, we actually let the integral constant to be zero. It is proved in this paper that the constant can not be zero. The metric of inner gravity field of hollow sphere is calculated at first. Then let the inner radius of hollow sphere become zero, we obtain the metric of inner gravity field of solid sphere. Based on the definition of energy momentum tensor of general relativity, the gravity masses of hollow and solid spheres in curved space are calculated strictly. The results indicate that no matter what the masses and densities of hollow sphere and solid sphere are, space-time singularities would appear in the centers of spheres. Meanwhile, no matter what the mass and density are, the intensity of pressure at the center point of solid sphere can not be infinite. That is to say, the material can not collapse towards the center of so-called black hole. In stead, it may be that there exist the spherical surfaces of infinite pressure inside the hollow and solid spheres, and material would collapse toward the surfaces so that the common spheres are unsteady. At the center of solid sphere and on its neighboring region, pressure intensities would become negative values. There may be a region for hollow sphere in which pressure intensities would become negative values too. The results only indicate that the singularity black holes predicated by general relativity are caused by the descriptive method of curved space-time and can not exist in nature actually. If black holes exist really in the universe, they can only be the Newtonian black holes, not the Einstein's black holes.

Mei Xiaochun

2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

248

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Wednesday, 28 September 2011 00:00 Natural materials are renowned for their unique combination of outstanding mechanical properties and exquisite microstructure. For example, bone, cork, and wood are porous biological materials with high specific stiffness (stiffness per unit weight) and specific strength. The outstanding mechanical properties of these materials are attributed to their anisotropic structures, which have optimized strength-to-density and stiffness-to-density ratios. Working at ALS Beamline 8.3.2, researchers from Berkeley Lab and the Imperial College London have created bioactive glass scaffolds that mirror nature's efficient materials. The three-dimensional glass scaffold is as porous as trabecular bone, has a compressive strength comparable to that of cortical bone, and a strength-to-porosity ratio higher than any previously reported scaffolds.

249

Decontamination processes for waste glass canisters  

SciTech Connect

The process which will be used to decontaminate waste glass canisters at the Savannah River Plant consists of: decontamination (slurry blasting); rinse (high-pressure water); and spot decontamination (high-pressure water plus slurry). No additional waste will be produced by this process because glass frit used in decontamination will be mixed with the radioactive waste and fed into the glass melter. Decontamination of waste glass canisters with chemical and abrasive blasting techniques was investigated. The ability of a chemical technique with HNO/sub 3/-HF and H/sub 2/C/sub 2/O/sub 4/ to remove baked-on contamination was demonstrated. A correlation between oxide removal and decontamination was observed. Oxide removal and, thus, decontamination by abrasive blasting techniques with glass frit as the abrasive was proposed and demonstrated.

Rankin, W.N.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Titanium sealing glasses and seals formed therefrom  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Alkaline-earth lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions containing CaO, La.sub.2 O.sub.3, B.sub.2 O.sub.3, TiO.sub.2 and Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 in various combinations of mole-% are provided. These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys that have a high aqueous durability for component or device applications requiring exposure to moisture, water or body fluids. Particular applications of the titanium sealing-glass compositions include forming glass-to-metal seals for lithium batteries and implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps).

Brow, Richard K. (Albuquerque, NM); McCollister, Howard L. (Albuquerque, NM); Phifer, Carol C. (Albuquerque, NM); Day, Delbert E. (Rolla, MO)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Glass heat pipe evacuated tube solar collector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A glass heat pipe is adapted for use as a solar energy absorber in an evacuated tube solar collector and for transferring the absorbed solar energy to a working fluid medium or heat sink for storage or practical use. A capillary wick is formed of granular glass particles fused together by heat on the inside surface of the heat pipe with a water glass binder solution to enhance capillary drive distribution of the thermal transfer fluid in the heat pipe throughout the entire inside surface of the evaporator portion of the heat pipe. Selective coatings are used on the heat pipe surface to maximize solar absorption and minimize energy radiation, and the glass wick can alternatively be fabricated with granular particles of black glass or obsidian.

McConnell, Robert D. (Lakewood, CO); Vansant, James H. (Tracy, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Gaseous Sulfate Solubility in Glass: Experimental Method  

SciTech Connect

Sulfate solubility in glass is a key parameter in many commercial glasses and nuclear waste glasses. This report summarizes key publications specific to sulfate solubility experimental methods and the underlying physical chemistry calculations. The published methods and experimental data are used to verify the calculations in this report and are expanded to a range of current technical interest. The calculations and experimental methods described in this report will guide several experiments on sulfate solubility and saturation for the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Enhanced Waste Glass Models effort. There are several tables of sulfate gas equilibrium values at high temperature to guide experimental gas mixing and to achieve desired SO3 levels. This report also describes the necessary equipment and best practices to perform sulfate saturation experiments for molten glasses. Results and findings will be published when experimental work is finished and this report is validated from the data obtained.

Bliss, Mary

2013-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

253

Heat capacity at the glass transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A fundamental problem of glass transition is to explain the jump of heat capacity at the glass transition temperature $T_g$ without asserting the existence of a distinct solid glass phase. This problem is also common to other disordered systems, including spin glasses. We propose that if $T_g$ is defined as the temperature at which the liquid stops relaxing at the experimental time scale, the jump of heat capacity at $T_g$ follows as a necessary consequence due to the change of system's elastic, vibrational and thermal properties. In this picture, we discuss time-dependent effects of glass transition, and identify three distinct regimes of relaxation. Our approach explains widely observed logarithmic increase of $T_g$ with the quench rate and the correlation of heat capacity jump with liquid fragility.

Kostya Trachenko; Vadim Brazhkin

2010-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

254

Method for heating and forming a glass sheet  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for heating and forming a glass sheet includes the steps of heating a glass sheet to at least a first predetermined temperature, applying microwave energy to the glass sheet to heat the glass sheet to at least a second predetermined temperature, cooling an outer surface of the glass sheet to at least a third predetermined temperature and forming the glass sheet using forming rollers to a predetermined configuration.

Boaz, Premakaran Tucker (Livonia, MI)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Direct conversion of halogen-containing wastes to borosilicate glass  

SciTech Connect

Glass has become a preferred waste form worldwide for radioactive wastes: however, there are limitations. Halogen-containing wastes can not be converted to glass because halogens form poor-quality waste glasses. Furthermore, halides in glass melters often form second phases that create operating problems. A new waste vitrification process, the Glass Material Oxidation and dissolution System (GMODS), removes these limitations by converting halogen-containing wastes into borosilicate glass and a secondary, clean, sodium-halide stream.

Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Rudolph, J.C.

1996-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

256

Controllable synthesis of Ce{sub 1-x}Zr{sub x}O{sub 2} hollow nanospheres via supercritical anti-solvent precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nanocrystalline Ce{sub 1-x}Zr{sub x}O{sub 2} hollow nanospheres were successfully synthesized via supercritical anti-solvent precipitation using supercritical CO{sub 2} as the anti-solvent. It was found that the as-produced samples exhibited hollow spherical structures with uniform diameters ranging from 30 to 50 nm and the sphere walls were composed of various oriented nanocrystallites, with sizes of 3-7 nm. The results of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy showed that the formation of the hollow structures could be controlled by adjusting the solution concentration. The results of temperature-programmed reduction and oxygen storage capacity measurements showed that the hollow nanospheres had enhanced redox properties. A possible mechanism for the formation of Ce{sub 1-x}Zr{sub x}O{sub 2} hollow nanospheres has also been proposed and experimental investigated.

Jiang Haoxi [Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Technology of Ministry of Education, R and D Center for Petrochemical Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Post-Doctor Station for Science and Technology of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Post-Doctor Workstation for Science and Technology, Shandong Haihua Group Co. Ltd, Weifang, Shandong 262737 (China); Huang Pan; Liu Lin [Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Technology of Ministry of Education, R and D Center for Petrochemical Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Zhang Minhua, E-mail: mhzhang@tju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Technology of Ministry of Education, R and D Center for Petrochemical Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

257

Facile synthesis of hollow nano-spheres and hemispheres of cobalt by polyol reduction This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Facile synthesis of hollow nano-spheres and hemispheres of cobalt by polyol reduction This article.1088/0957-4484/21/37/375602 Facile synthesis of hollow nano-spheres and hemispheres of cobalt by polyol reduction Haitao Yang1 2010 Published 17 August 2010 Online at stacks.iop.org/Nano/21/375602 Abstract The hydrophilic hollow

Gao, Hongjun

258

Chalcogenide Glasses Developed for Optical Micro-sensor Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... In the sensor field, chalcogenide glasses are well established membranes or thin ... Ion Exchanged Mixed Glass Cullet Proppants for Stimulation of Oil and ...

259

Anomalous Adsorption of Ultrafast Laser Irradiation in Glass ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Anomalous Adsorption of Ultrafast Laser Irradiation in Glass ... and is driven by the stress induced by absorption of ultrafast light in glass.

260

Cost model for a small glass manufacturing enterprise.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The cost model developed is for small, glass-manufacturing enterprises to help themdetermine their product costs. It estimates the direct cost in glass manufacturing such as… (more)

Gopisetti, Swetha.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hollow glass microspheres" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Ion-Exchanged Glass with High Damage Resistance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ion Exchanged Mixed Glass Cullet Proppants for Stimulation of Oil and Natural Gas Bearing Shales · Modeling the Electrical Conductivity in Glass Melts.

262

Research Needs: Glass Solar Reflectance and Vinyl Siding  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Needs: Glass Solar Reflectance and Vinyl Siding Title Research Needs: Glass Solar Reflectance and Vinyl Siding Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5022E Year...

263

Thermal Performance Impacts of Center-of-Glass Deflections in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts of Center-of-Glass Deflections in Installed Insulating Glazing Units Title Thermal Performance Impacts of Center-of-Glass Deflections in Installed Insulating Glazing...

264

Understanding Structure of Glass from Its Response to External Stimuli  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ion Exchanged Mixed Glass Cullet Proppants for Stimulation of Oil and Natural Gas Bearing Shales · Modeling the Electrical Conductivity in Glass Melts.

265

Corrosion of Photomultiplier Tube Glasses in High Purity Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ion Exchanged Mixed Glass Cullet Proppants for Stimulation of Oil and Natural Gas Bearing Shales · Modeling the Electrical Conductivity in Glass Melts.

266

Ion Exchanged Mixed Glass Cullet Proppants for Stimulation of Oil ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Glass and Optical Materials. Presentation Title, Ion Exchanged Mixed Glass Cullet Proppants for Stimulation of Oil and Natural Gas Bearing Shales.

267

M. Bulk Metallic Glasses, Nanocrystalline Materials, and Ultrafine ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Age Hardening of 7075 Alloy Processed by High-pressure Sliding (HPS) ... Atomic Structure and its Change during Glass Transition of Metallic Glasses.

268

Infra-red transparent glass as per ancient Indian text ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The test results revealed that new glass could be compared with Calcium Fluoride Glass. ... Optical Response of Laser Materials in High Radiation Environments.

269

209- Development of Borosilicate Glasses for the Immobilization of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

027- Search for the Rigidity Transition and Intermediate Phase in Lithium Oxide Silicate Glass Systems Using .... 101- Viscous Silicate SOFC Glass Sealants.

270

Fogged Glass by Biofilm Formation and Its Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ion Exchanged Mixed Glass Cullet Proppants for Stimulation of Oil and Natural Gas Bearing Shales · Modeling the Electrical Conductivity in Glass Melts.

271

Refractive index of glass and its dipersion for visible light.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The classification of optical glass and empirical relations between the refractive index and its dispersion are discussed in terms of moments of the glass's IR and UV absorption spectra. The observed linear dependence of index on dispersion within glass families is shown to arise primarily from the approximately linear superposition of the electronic absorptions of glass former and glass modifiers. The binary classification into crown and flint glasses is also based primarily on electronic spectra: Crown glasses are 'wide-gap' materials with excitation energies greater than {approx}12.4 eV, while flint glasses are their 'narrow-gap' counterpart.

Smith, D. Y.; Karstens, W. (Physics); (Univ. of Vermont); (Saint Michael's Coll.)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

China Glass Solar aka CG Solar formerly Weihai Bluestar Terra...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Glass Solar aka CG Solar formerly Weihai Bluestar Terra Photovoltaic Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name China Glass Solar (aka CG Solar, formerly Weihai Bluestar Terra...

273

Cuttings Analysis At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cuttings Analysis At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Cuttings Analysis At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP)...

274

Multispectral Imaging At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Glass Buttes Area Exploration Technique Multispectral Imaging Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding...

275

Aeromagnetic Survey At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Glass Buttes Area Exploration Technique Aeromagnetic Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding...

276

Development Wells At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity...

277

Oxidation Behavior of Metallic Glass - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, M. Bulk Metallic Glasses, Nanocrystalline Materials, and ... Application of Metallic Glass for High Performance Si Solar Cell: Oxidation Behavior of ...

278

Fabrication of Bulk Metallic Glass Foams via Severe Plastic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, M. Bulk Metallic Glasses, Nanocrystalline Materials, and ... Application of Metallic Glass for High Performance Si Solar Cell: Oxidation Behavior of ...

279

Bulk Metallic Glass Composites Fabricated within the Supercooled ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present work, lightweight magnesium base Bulk Metallic Glass Composites ... Application of Metallic Glass for High Performance Si Solar Cell: Oxidation ...

280

Gas separation with glass membranes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking to develop high temperature, high pressure inorganic membrane technology to perform a variety of gas separation processes to improve the efficiency and economics of advanced power generation systems such as direct coal-fueled turbines (DCFT) and the integrated gasification combined cycle process (IGCC). The temperatures encountered in these power generation systems are far above the temperature range for organic membrane materials. Inorganic materials such as ceramics are therefore the most likely membrane materials for use at high temperatures. This project focussed on silica glass fiber membranes made by PPG Industries (Pittsburgh, PA). The goals were both experimental and theoretical. The first objective was to develop a rational theory for the performance of these membranes. With existing theories as a starting point, a new theory was devised to explain the unusual molecular sieving'' behavior exhibited by these glass membranes. An apparatus was then devised for making permeation performance measurements at conditions of interest to DOE (temperatures to 2000[degrees]F; pressures to 1000 psia). With this apparatus, gas mixtures could be made typical of coal combustion or coal gasification processes, these gases could be passed into a membrane test cell, and the separation performance determined. Data were obtained for H[sub 2]/CO,N[sub 2]/CO[sub 2], 0[sub 2]/N[sub 2], and NH[sub 3]/N[sub 2] mixtures and for a variety of pure component gases (He, H[sub 2], CO[sub 2], N[sub 2], CO, NH[sub 3]). The most challenging part of the project turned out to be the sealing of the membrane at high temperatures and pressures. The report concludes with an overview of the practical potential of these membranes and of inorganic membranes in general of DOE and other applications.

Roberts, D.L.; Abraham, L.C.; Blum, Y.; Way, J.D.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hollow glass microspheres" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Energy implications of glass-container recycling  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses the question of whether glass-container recycling actually saves energy. Glass-container production in 1991 was 10{sup 7} tons, with cullet making up about 30% of the input to manufacture. Two-thirds of the cullet is postconsumer waste; the remainder is in-house scrap (rejects). Most of the glass recycled is made into new containers. Total primary energy consumption includes direct process-energy use by the industry (adjusted to account for the efficiency of fuel production) plus fuel and raw-material transportation and production energies; the grand total for 1991 is estimated to be about 168 {times} 10{sup 12} Btu. The total primary energy use decreases as the percent of glass recycled rises, but the maximum energy saved is only about 13%. If distance to the landfill is kept fixed and that to the recovery facility multiplied by about eight, to 100 mi, a break-even point is reached, and recycling saves no energy. Previous work has shown that to save energy when using glass bottles, reuse is the clear choice. Recycling of glass does not save much energy or valuable raw material and does not reduce air or water pollution significantly. The most important impacts are the small reduction of waste sent to the landfill and increased production rates at glass plants.

Gaines, L.L.; Mintz, M.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Critical review of glass performance modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Borosilicate glass is to be used for permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste in a geologic repository. Mechanistic chemical models are used to predict the rate at which radionuclides will be released from the glass under repository conditions. The most successful and useful of these models link reaction path geochemical modeling programs with a glass dissolution rate law that is consistent with transition state theory. These models have been used to simulate several types of short-term laboratory tests of glass dissolution and to predict the long-term performance of the glass in a repository. Although mechanistically based, the current models are limited by a lack of unambiguous experimental support for some of their assumptions. The most severe problem of this type is the lack of an existing validated mechanism that controls long-term glass dissolution rates. Current models can be improved by performing carefully designed experiments and using the experimental results to validate the rate-controlling mechanisms implicit in the models. These models should be supported with long-term experiments to be used for model validation. The mechanistic basis of the models should be explored by using modern molecular simulations such as molecular orbital and molecular dynamics to investigate both the glass structure and its dissolution process.

Bourcier, W.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Hepatic Arterial Embolization with Doxorubicin-Loaded Superabsorbent Polymer Microspheres in a Rabbit Liver Tumor Model  

SciTech Connect

Objectives: The pharmacokinetic profile after hepatic arterial embolization with superabsorbent microspheres (QuadraSpheres) loaded with doxorubicin was studied. Methods: Rabbits with hepatic VX2 tumors were treated with intra-arterial administration of QuadraSpheres loaded with doxorubicin, or transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) using doxorubicin, Lipiodol and Embospheres, or hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) of doxorubicin. Tumor specimens were evaluated by fluorescence microscopy, and plasma and tumor concentrations of doxorubicin were measured. Results: The peak plasma concentration of doxorubicin was lower in the QuadraSphere group (309.9 ng/ml) than in the HAI (673.4 ng/ml) or TACE (360.5 ng/ml) groups, suggesting higher tumor retention in the QuadraSphere group. Intratumoral doxorubicin levels declined to negligible levels at 1 and 3 days after treatment, respectively, in the HAI and TACE groups. In the QuadraSphere groups, intratumoral doxorubicin level declined after day 1, but was still detectable at 14 days after treatment and was higher than that in the other groups at 1, 3, and 7 days. Intratumoral doxorubicin fluorescence was detected at all time points in the QuadraSphere group, but only at 1 day after treatment in the TACE group. Conclusions: Hepatic arterial administration of doxorubicin-loaded QuadraSpheres enables the sustained release of doxorubicin to hepatic tumors.

Gupta, Sanjay, E-mail: sgupta@mdanderson.org; Wright, Kenneth C. [University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (United States); Ensor, Joe [University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Biostatistics (United States); Van Pelt, Carolyn S. [University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery (United States); Dixon, Katherine A.; Kundra, Vikas [University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (United States)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

284

Fabrication of CeO2 by sol-gel process based on microfluidic technology as an analog preparation of ceramic nuclear fuel microspheres  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microfluidics integrated with sol-gel processes is introduced in preparing monodispersed MOX nuclear fuel microspheres using nonactive cerium as a surrogate for uranium or plutonium. The detailed information about microfluidic devices and sol-gel processes are provided. The effects of viscosity and flow rate of continuous and dispersed phase on size and size distribution of CeO2 microspheres have been investigated. A comprehensive characterization of the CeO2 microspheres has been conducted, including XRD pattern, SEM, density, size and size distribution. The size of prepared monodisperse particles can be controlled precisely in range of 10{\\mu}m to 1000{\\mu}m and the particle CV is below 3%.

Ye, Bin; Li, Jiaolong; Zhao, Zichen; Chang, Zhenqi; Serra, Christophe A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Fabrication of CeO2 by sol-gel process based on microfluidic technology as an analog preparation of ceramic nuclear fuel microspheres  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microfluidics integrated with sol-gel processes is introduced in preparing monodispersed MOX nuclear fuel microspheres using nonactive cerium as a surrogate for uranium or plutonium. The detailed information about microfluidic devices and sol-gel processes are provided. The effects of viscosity and flow rate of continuous and dispersed phase on size and size distribution of CeO2 microspheres have been investigated. A comprehensive characterization of the CeO2 microspheres has been conducted, including XRD pattern, SEM, density, size and size distribution. The size of prepared monodisperse particles can be controlled precisely in range of 10{\\mu}m to 1000{\\mu}m and the particle CV is below 3%.

Bin Ye; Jilang Miao; Jiaolong Li; Zichen Zhao; Zhenqi Chang; Christophe A. Serra

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

286

Melting of foaming batches: Nuclear waste glass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple model is presented for the rate of melting of a batch blanket in an electric glassmelting furnace. The melting process is assumed to be jointly controlled by the heat transfer from the pool of molten glass and the batch-to-glass conversion kinetics. Factors affecting the melting rate in the conversion-controlled regime are discussed. Attention is paid to gas evolution from redox reactions in waste glass batches and component accumulation within the blanket. It is suggested that the high rate of the blanket-free melting in a mechanically agitated furnace is made possible by increasing the rate of melt surface renewal. 27 refs.

Hrma, P.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

The Color Glass Condensate at RHIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Color Glass Condensate formalism and its application to high energy heavy ion collisions at RHIC are discussed. We argue that the RHIC data supports the view that the Color Glass Condensate provides the initial conditions for gold-gold collisions at RHIC while final state (Quark Gluon Plasma) effects are responsible for the high $p_t$ suppression in mid rapidity. At forward rapidities in deuteron-gold collisions, however, Color Glass Condensate is the underlying physics of the observed suppression of the particle spectra and their centrality dependence.

Jamal Jalilian-Marian

2004-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

288

Glass melter off-gas system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of an apparatus and method for melting glass in a glass melter in such a way as to reduce deposition of particulates in the off-gas duct. Deposit accumulation is reduced by achieving an off-gas velocity above approximately 15 meters/second and an off-gas temperature as close as possible to, but not higher than, the glass softening point. Because the deposits are largely water-soluble, those that do form on the interior surface of the duct can be readily removed by injecting water or steam directly into the off-gas duct from its entrance or exit.

Jantzen, C.M.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

289

GLASS COMPOSITION AND PROCESS OF MAKING  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Glass compositions are described which are suitable for scintillators of thermal-neutron counters. The glass consists of from 70 to 75 mole% of B/sub 2/O/ sub 3/, from 7 to 9 mole% of Ce/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and from 23 to 16 mole% of Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ plus Na/sub 2 /O in a mole ratio of 1 to 1.5. The process of making the glass from cerous oxalate, ammonium pentaborate, sodium carbonate, and hydrated alumina in a nonoxidizing atmosphere at 1400-1500 deg C is given. (AEC)

Bishay, A.M.

1962-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

SLUDGE BATCH 7B GLASS VARIABILITY STUDY  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is preparing to initiate processing Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b). In support of the upcoming processing, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provided a recommendation to utilize Frits 418 with a 6% Na{sub 2}O addition (26 wt% Na{sub 2}O in sludge) and 702 with a 4% Na{sub 2}O addition (24 wt% Na{sub 2}O in sludge) to process SB7b. This recommendation was based on assessments of the compositional projections for SB7b available at the time from the Savannah River Remediation (SRR). To support qualification of SB7b, SRNL executed a variability study to assess the applicability of the current durability models for SB7b. The durability models were assessed over the expected composition range of SB7b, including potential caustic additions, combined with Frits 702 and 418 over a 32-40% waste loading (WL) range. Thirty four glasses were selected based on Frits 418 and 702 coupled with the sludge projections with an additional 4-6% Na{sub 2}O to reflect the potential caustic addition. Six of these glasses, based on average nominal sludge compositions including the appropriate caustic addition, were developed for both Frit 418 and Frit 702 at 32, 36 and 40% WL to provide coverage in the center of the anticipated SB7b glass region. All glasses were fabricated and characterized using chemical composition analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the Product Consistency Test (PCT). To comply with the DWPF Glass Product Control Program, a total of thirty four glasses were fabricated to assess the applicability of the current DWPF PCCS durability models. Based on the measured PCT response, all of the glasses were acceptable with respect to the Environmental Assessment (EA) benchmark glass regardless of thermal history. The NL[B] values of the SB7b variability study glasses were less than 1.99 g/L as compared to 16.695 g/L for EA. A small number of the D-optimally selected 'outer layer' extreme vertices (EV) glasses were not predictable using the current Product Composition Control System (PCCS) models for durability, but were acceptable compared to the EA glass when tested. These glasses fell outside of the lower 95% confidence band, which demonstrates conservatism in the model. A few of the glasses fell outside of the upper 95% confidence band; however, these particular glasses have normalized release values that were much lower than the values of EA and should be of no practical concern. Per the requirements of the DWPF Glass Product Control Program, the PCCS durability models have been shown to be applicable to the SB7b sludge system with a range of Na{sub 2}O concentrations blended with Frits 418 or 702. PCT results from the glasses fabricated as part of the variability study were shown to be predictable by the current DWPF PCCS models and/or acceptable with respect to the EA benchmark glass regardless of thermal history or compositional view.

Johnson, F.; Edwards, T.

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

291

Thin-wall hollow ceramic spheres from slurries. Quarterly project status report, 1 January--31 March 1991  

SciTech Connect

The hollow sphere materials were alumina, mullite, and mullite- ZrO{sub 2} (the Zr reduced the high-temperature thermal conductivity). During this phase, three major tasks were emphasized: Use of opacifiers (Zr oxide) to reduce the high-temperature thermal conductivity of the sphere, convert the slurries from organic-based to aqueous-based, and technology transfer to industry.

Chapman, A.T.; Cochran, J.K.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

292

Synthesis of Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} homogeneous core/hollow-shell structures with excellent adsorption performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-scale Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} homogeneous core/hollow-shell structures with cube-shaped and dumbbell-shaped morphologies have been synthesized trough a facile and low-cost method. The microscopy analyses indicate that the core-shell microcubes have an average edge length of 2.5 {mu}m with a shell thickness of about 150 nm, and the core-shell microdumbbells were formed with a length of about 3 {mu}m and shell thickness of about 160 nm. The possible formation mechanism was discussed on the basis of transmission electron microscopy observations. The novel homogeneous core/hollow-shell structures were found to exhibit excellent performance in wastewater treatment. - Graphical abstract: A simple method is described for fabrication of Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} homogeneous core/hollow-shell structures and the as-prepared materials showed a good ability to remove an organic pollutant in waste water. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} homogeneous core/hollow-shell structures were successfully prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A simple and high yield method was employed to fabricate such novel structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The products showed a good ability to remove an organic pollutant in waste water.

Cao Jie, E-mail: candj@mail.ustc.edu.cn [Anhui Provincial Key Lab of Photonics Devices and Materials, Anhui Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Science at Microscale and Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Mao Qinghe [Anhui Provincial Key Lab of Photonics Devices and Materials, Anhui Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Qian Yitai [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Science at Microscale and Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

293

Future perspectives of using hollow fibers as structured packings in light hydrocarbon distillation  

SciTech Connect

Olefin and paraffin are the largest chemical commodities. Furthermore, they are major building blocks for the petrochemical industry. Each year, petroleum refining, consumes 4,500 TBtu/yr in separation energy, making it one of the most energy-intensive industries in the United States). Just considering liquefied petroleum gas (ethane/propane/butane) and olefins (ethylene and propylene) alone, the distillation energy consumption is about 400 TBtu/yr in the US. Since petroleum distillation is a mature technology, incremental improvements in column/tray design will only provide a few percent improvements in the performance. However, each percent saving in net energy use amounts to savings of 10 TBtu/yr and reduces CO{sub 2} emissions by 0.2 MTon/yr. In practice, distillation columns require 100 to 200 trays to achieve the desired separation. The height of a transfer unit (HTU) of conventional packings is typical in the range of 36-60 inch. Since 2006, we had explored using several non-selective membranes as the structured packings to replace the conventional packing materials used in propane and propylene distillation. We obtained the lowest HTU of < 8 inch for the hollow fiber column, which was >5 times shorter than that of the conventional packing materials. In 2008, we also investigated this type of packing materials in iso-/n-butane distillation. Because of a slightly larger relative volatility of iso-/n-butane than that of propane/propylene, a wider and a more stable operational range was obtained for the iso-/n-butane pair. However, all of the experiments were conducted on a small scale with flowrate of < 25 gram/min. Recently, we demonstrated this technology on a larger scale (<250 gram/min). Within the loading range of F-factor < 2.2 Pa{sup 0.5}, a pressure drop on the vapor side is below 50 mbar/m, which suggests that the pressure drop of hollow fibers packings is not an engineering barrier for the applications in distillations. The thermal stability study suggests that polypropylene hollow fibers are stable after a long time exposure to C{sub 2} - C{sub 4} mixtures. The effects of packing density on the separation efficiency will be discussed.

Yang, Dali [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Orler, Bruce [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tornga, Stephanie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Welch, Cindy [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

294

Community Geothermal Technology Program: Hawaii glass project. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Objective was to develop a glass utilizing the silica waste material from geothermal energy production, and to supply local artists with this glass to make artistic objects. A glass composed of 93% indigenous Hawaiian materials was developed; 24 artists made 110 objects from this glass. A market was found for art objects made from this material.

Miller, N. [comp.; Irwin, B.

1988-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

295

Glass/polymer composites and methods of making  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to new glass/polymer composites and methods for making them. More specifically, the invention is glass/polymer composites having phases that are at the molecular level and thereby practicably indistinguishable. The invention further discloses making molecular phase glass/polymer composites by mixing a glass and a polymer in a compatible solvent.

Samuels, W. D. (Richland, WA); Exarhos, Gregory J. (Richland, WA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Natural materials are renowned for their unique combination of outstanding mechanical properties and exquisite microstructure. For example, bone, cork, and wood are porous biological materials with high specific stiffness (stiffness per unit weight) and specific strength. The outstanding mechanical properties of these materials are attributed to their anisotropic structures, which have optimized strength-to-density and stiffness-to-density ratios. Working at ALS Beamline 8.3.2, researchers from Berkeley Lab and the Imperial College London have created bioactive glass scaffolds that mirror nature's efficient materials. The three-dimensional glass scaffold is as porous as trabecular bone, has a compressive strength comparable to that of cortical bone, and a strength-to-porosity ratio higher than any previously reported scaffolds.

297

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Natural materials are renowned for their unique combination of outstanding mechanical properties and exquisite microstructure. For example, bone, cork, and wood are porous biological materials with high specific stiffness (stiffness per unit weight) and specific strength. The outstanding mechanical properties of these materials are attributed to their anisotropic structures, which have optimized strength-to-density and stiffness-to-density ratios. Working at ALS Beamline 8.3.2, researchers from Berkeley Lab and the Imperial College London have created bioactive glass scaffolds that mirror nature's efficient materials. The three-dimensional glass scaffold is as porous as trabecular bone, has a compressive strength comparable to that of cortical bone, and a strength-to-porosity ratio higher than any previously reported scaffolds.

298

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Natural materials are renowned for their unique combination of outstanding mechanical properties and exquisite microstructure. For example, bone, cork, and wood are porous biological materials with high specific stiffness (stiffness per unit weight) and specific strength. The outstanding mechanical properties of these materials are attributed to their anisotropic structures, which have optimized strength-to-density and stiffness-to-density ratios. Working at ALS Beamline 8.3.2, researchers from Berkeley Lab and the Imperial College London have created bioactive glass scaffolds that mirror nature's efficient materials. The three-dimensional glass scaffold is as porous as trabecular bone, has a compressive strength comparable to that of cortical bone, and a strength-to-porosity ratio higher than any previously reported scaffolds.

299

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Natural materials are renowned for their unique combination of outstanding mechanical properties and exquisite microstructure. For example, bone, cork, and wood are porous biological materials with high specific stiffness (stiffness per unit weight) and specific strength. The outstanding mechanical properties of these materials are attributed to their anisotropic structures, which have optimized strength-to-density and stiffness-to-density ratios. Working at ALS Beamline 8.3.2, researchers from Berkeley Lab and the Imperial College London have created bioactive glass scaffolds that mirror nature's efficient materials. The three-dimensional glass scaffold is as porous as trabecular bone, has a compressive strength comparable to that of cortical bone, and a strength-to-porosity ratio higher than any previously reported scaffolds.

300

Glass Buttes Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Glass Buttes Geothermal Area Glass Buttes Geothermal Area (Redirected from Glass Buttes Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Glass Buttes Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (14) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Oregon Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hollow glass microspheres" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Cooperative motions in supercooled liquids and glasses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Far ir-spectra and heat-capacities for propylene carbonateO. & Suga, H. Heat-capacities and glass transitions of 1-1999). [70] Johari, G. P. Heat capacity and entropy of an

Stevenson, Jacob D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Bipolaron Model of Superconductivity in Chalcogenide Glasses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we propose a small bipolaron model for the superconductivity in the Chalcogenide glasses (c-As2Te3 and c-GeTe). The results are agree with the experiments.

Liang-You Zheng; Bo-Cheng Wang; Shan T. Lai

2010-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

303

Measurement of DWPF glass viscosity - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This report details the results of a scoping study funded by the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for the measurement of melt viscosities for simulated glasses representative of Macrobatch 2 (Tank 42/51 feed).

Harbour, J.R.

2000-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

304

Preparation of fullerene/glass composites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Synthesis of fullerene/glass composites. A direct method for preparing solid solutions of C.sub.60 in silicon dioxide (SiO.sub.2) glass matrices by means of sol-gel chemistry is described. In order to produce highly concentrated fullerene-sol-gel-composites it is necessary to increase the solubility of these "guests" in a delivery solvent which is compatible with the starter sol (receiving solvent). Sonication results in aggregate disruption by treatment with high frequency sound waves, thereby accelerating the rate of hydrolysis of the alkoxide precursor, and the solution process for the C.sub.60. Depending upon the preparative procedure, C.sub.60 dispersed within the glass matrix as microcrystalline domains, or dispersed as true molecular solutions of C.sub.60 in a solid glass matrix, is generated by the present method.

Mattes, Benjamin R. (Santa Fe, NM); McBranch, Duncan W. (Santa Fe, NM); Robinson, Jeanne M. (Los Alamos, NM); Koskelo, Aaron C. (Los Alamos, NM); Love, Steven P. (Los Alamos, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES OF GLASS. A BIBLIOGRAPHY  

SciTech Connect

A bibliography on the electrical properties of glass is presented. The 267 references covering the period from 1930 through 1960 are arranged according to subject. An author index is included. (M.C.G.)

Kepple, R.

1961-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Glassy and Glass Composite Nuclear Wasteforms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Glassy and Glass Composite Nuclear Wasteforms ... for aqueous wastes which should be solidified for safe storage and disposal. ... Creep Behavior of High Temperature Alloys for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Applications.

307

JOINT SESSION: Bioactive Glasses: Structure and Bioactivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 10, 2012 ... Solid state NMR investigating 29Si, 31P and 19F nucleii has been used to characterize both the structure of the glasses and follow the ...

308

Model for TCLP Releases from Waste Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A first-order property model for normalized Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) release as a function of glass composition was developed using data collected from various studies. The normalized boron release is used to estimate the release of toxic elements based on the observation that the boron release represents the conservative release for those constituents of interest. The current TCLP model has two targeted application areas: (1) delisting of waste-glass product as radioactive (not mixed) waste and (2) designating the glass wastes generated from waste-glass research activities as hazardous or non-hazardous. This report describes the data collection and model development for TCLP releases and discusses the issues related to the application of the model.

Kim, Dong-Sang; Vienna, John D.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Model for TCLP Releases from Waste Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A first-order property model for normalized Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) release as a function of glass composition was developed using collected data from various studies. The normalized boron release is used to estimate the release of toxic elements based on the observation that the boron release represents the conservative release for those constituents of interest. The current TCLP model has two targeted application areas: (1) delisting of waste-glass product as radioactive (not mixed) waste and (2) designating the glass wastes generated from waste-glass research activities as hazardous or non-hazardous. This report describes the data collection and model development for TCLP releases and discusses the issues related to the application of the model.

Kim, Dong-Sang; Vienna, John D.

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

High expansion, lithium corrosion resistant sealing glasses  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Glass compositions containing CaO, Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, B.sub.2 O.sub.3, SrO and BaO in various combinations of mole % are provided. These compositions are capable of forming stable glass-to-metal seals with pin materials of 446 Stainless Steel and Alloy-52 rather than molybdenum, for use in harsh chemical environments, specifically in lithium batteries.

Brow, Richard K. (Albuquerque, NM); Watkins, Randall D. (Albuquerque, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

THE COLOUR GLASS CONDENSATE: AN INTRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In these lectures, the authors develop the theory of the Colour Glass Condensate. This is the matter made of gluons in the high density environment characteristic of deep inelastic scattering or hadron-hadron collisions at very high energy. The lectures are self contained and comprehensive. They start with a phenomenological introduction, develop the theory of classical gluon fields appropriate for the Colour Glass, and end with a derivation and discussion of the renormalization group equations which determine this effective theory.

IANCU,E.; LEONIDOV,A.; MCLERRAN,L.

2001-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

312

Cordierite Glass-Ceramics for Dielectric Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to examine the potential of using Malaysian silica sand deposit as SiO2 raw material in producing cordierite glass-ceramics (2MgO-2Al2O3-5SiO2) for dielectric materials. Upgraded silica sands from Terengganu and ex-mining land in Perak were used in the test-works. The glass batch of the present work has a composition of 45.00% SiO2, 24.00% Al2O3, 15.00% MgO and 8.50% TiO2 as nucleation agent. From the differential thermal analysis results, the crystallization temperature was found to start around 900 deg. C. The glass samples were heat-treated at 900 deg. C and 1000 deg. C. The X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) results showed glass-ceramics from Terengganu samples containing mainly cordierite and minor {beta}-quartz crystals. However, glass-ceramics from ex-mining land samples contained mainly {alpha}-quartz and minor cordierite crystals. Glass-ceramics with different crystal phases exhibit different mechanical, dielectric and thermal properties. Based on the test works, both silica sand deposits, can be potentially used to produce dielectric material component.

Siti Mazatul Azwa Saiyed Mohd Nurddin; Selamat, Malek; Ismail, Abdullah [Minerals Research Centre, Department of Minerals and Geoscience Malaysia, Jalan Sultan Azlan Shah, 31400 Ipoh (Malaysia)

2007-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

313

A molecular view of vapor deposited glasses  

SciTech Connect

Recently, novel organic glassy materials that exhibit remarkable stability have been prepared by vapor deposition. The thermophysical properties of these new ''stable'' glasses are equivalent to those that common glasses would exhibit after aging over periods lasting thousands of years. The origin of such enhanced stability has been elusive; in the absence of detailed models, past studies have discussed the formation of new polyamorphs or that of nanocrystals to explain the observed behavior. In this work, an atomistic molecular model of trehalose, a disaccharide of glucose, is used to examine the properties of vapor-deposited stable glasses. Consistent with experiment, the model predicts the formation of stable glasses having a higher density, a lower enthalpy, and higher onset temperatures than those of the corresponding ''ordinary'' glass formed by quenching the bulk liquid. Simulations reveal that newly formed layers of the growing vapor-deposited film exhibit greater mobility than the remainder of the material, thereby enabling a reorganization of the film as it is grown. They also reveal that ''stable'' glasses exhibit a distinct layered structure in the direction normal to the substrate that is responsible for their unusual properties.

Singh, Sadanand; Pablo, Juan J. de [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

2011-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

314

Investigation of a high impedance magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator with hollow load  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel high-impedance magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator (MILO) with greatly restrained power deposition on the anode has been investigated. Methods to increase the MILO impedance and decrease the anode current are discussed. A MILO with impedance of 30 {Omega} and power conversion efficiency of 25% is presented by particle-in-cell simulations. Compared with the previous MILO in our lab, the anode current of the proposed MILO is reduced about 50%, the power conversion efficiency doubles, and the power deposition on anode is reduced nearly one half. Furthermore, considerations for reducing the power deposition on load have also been carried out in MILO design, and the load current is reduced to 4.6 kA, only 17% of the total anode current. Finally, a hollow load was introduced to reduce the power deposition density on the load, without decreasing the power conversion efficiency.

Zhou Heng; Shu Ting; Li Zhiqiang [College of Opto-electric Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Hunan 410073 (China)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

Plasma Treatment of Polyethylene Powder Particles in Hollow Cathode Glow Discharge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polyethylen (PE) is widely used in the production of foils, insulators, packaging materials, plastic bottles etc. Untreated PE is hydrophobic due to its unpolar surface. Therefore, it is hard to print or glue PE and the surface has to be modified before converting.In the present experiments a hollow cathode glow discharge is used as plasma source which is mounted in a spiral conveyor in order to ensure a combines transport of PE powder particles. With this set-up a homogeneous surface treatment of the powder is possible while passing the glow discharge. The plasma treatment causes a remarkable enhancement of the hydrophilicity of the PE powder which can be verified by contact angle measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

Wolter, Matthias; Quitzau, Meike; Bornholdt, Sven; Kersten, Holger [IEAP, University Kiel, Kiel (Germany)

2008-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

316

Debris-less method and apparatus for forming apertures in hollow metallic articles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is a method for forming an aperture in a wall of a hollow metallic article without introducing metallic debris therein. In a typical operation, an annular groove is formed in an exterior portion of the wall. The groove defines an annular wall segment, and the bottom of the groove is shaped to slope downwardly away from the segment to form a tapered annular web which connects the segment to the wall. Any suitable coupling is attached to the outer face of the segment, as by welding. Pull then is applied to the coupling to effect circumferential breakage of the web, thus forming a removable single-piece wall fragment consisting of the web and segment. The fragment and the coupling member attached thereto then are removed from the wall.

Jordan, C.L.; Chodelka, E.J.

1980-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

317

Sealed glass coating of high temperature ceramic superconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and article of manufacture of a lead oxide based glass coating on a high temperature superconductor. The method includes preparing a dispersion of glass powders in a solution, applying the dispersion to the superconductor, drying the dispersion before applying another coating and heating the glass powder dispersion at temperatures below oxygen diffusion onset and above the glass melting point to form a continuous glass coating on the superconductor to establish compressive stresses which enhance the fracture strength of the superconductor.

Wu, Weite (Tainan, TW); Chu, Cha Y. (Garnerville, NY); Goretta, Kenneth C. (Downers Grove, IL); Routbort, Jules L. (Darien, IL)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Engineering Glass Passivation Layers -Model Results  

SciTech Connect

The immobilization of radioactive waste into glass waste forms is a baseline process of nuclear waste management not only in the United States, but worldwide. The rate of radionuclide release from these glasses is a critical measure of the quality of the waste form. Over long-term tests and using extrapolations of ancient analogues, it has been shown that well designed glasses exhibit a dissolution rate that quickly decreases to a slow residual rate for the lifetime of the glass. The mechanistic cause of this decreased corrosion rate is a subject of debate, with one of the major theories suggesting that the decrease is caused by the formation of corrosion products in such a manner as to present a diffusion barrier on the surface of the glass. Although there is much evidence of this type of mechanism, there has been no attempt to engineer the effect to maximize the passivating qualities of the corrosion products. This study represents the first attempt to engineer the creation of passivating phases on the surface of glasses. Our approach utilizes interactions between the dissolving glass and elements from the disposal environment to create impermeable capping layers. By drawing from other corrosion studies in areas where passivation layers have been successfully engineered to protect the bulk material, we present here a report on mineral phases that are likely have a morphological tendency to encrust the surface of the glass. Our modeling has focused on using the AFCI glass system in a carbonate, sulfate, and phosphate rich environment. We evaluate the minerals predicted to form to determine the likelihood of the formation of a protective layer on the surface of the glass. We have also modeled individual ions in solutions vs. pH and the addition of aluminum and silicon. These results allow us to understand the pH and ion concentration dependence of mineral formation. We have determined that iron minerals are likely to form a complete incrustation layer and we plan to look more closely at Vivianite [Fe3(PO4)2-8(H2O)] and Siderite [FeCO3] in the next stage of the project.

Skorski, Daniel C.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Strachan, Denis M.; Lepry, William C.

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

319

Irradiated-Microsphere Gamma Analyzer (IMGA): an integrated system for HTGR coated particle fuel performance assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Irradiated-Microsphere Gamma Analyzer (IMGA) System, designed and built at ORNL, provides the capability of making statistically accurate failure fraction measurements on irradiated HTGR coated particle fuel. The IMGA records the gamma-ray energy spectra from fuel particles and performs quantitative analyses on these spectra; then, using chemical and physical properties of the gamma emitters it makes a failed-nonfailed decision concerning the ability of the coatings to retain fission products. Actual retention characteristics for the coatings are determined by measuring activity ratios for certain gamma emitters such as /sup 137/Cs//sup 95/Zr and /sup 144/Ce//sup 95/Zr for metallic fission product retention and /sup 134/Cs//sup 137/Cs for an indirect measure of gaseous fission product retention. Data from IMGA (which can be put in the form of n failures observed in N examinations) can be accurately described by the binomial probability distribution model. Using this model, a mathematical relationship between IMGA data (n,N), failure fraction, and confidence level was developed. To determine failure fractions of less than or equal to 1% at confidence levels near 95%, this model dictates that from several hundred to several thousand particles must be examined. The automated particle handler of the IMGA system provides this capability. As a demonstration of failure fraction determination, fuel rod C-3-1 from the OF-2 irradiation capsule was analyzed and failure fraction statistics were applied. Results showed that at the 1% failure fraction level, with a 95% confidence level, the fissile particle batch could not meet requirements; however, the fertile particle exceeded these requirements for the given irradiation temperature and burnup.

Kania, M.J.; Valentine, K.H.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Device and method for imploding a microsphere with a fast liner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma in a small localized region. A relativistic electron beam generator or accelerator produces a high-voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low-density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high-density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, hydrogen boron or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10.sup.17 to 10.sup.20 electrons per cubic centimeter. The target gas is ionized prior to application of the electron beam by means of a laser or other preionization source to form a plasma. Utilizing a relativistic electron beam with an individual particle energy exceeding 3 MeV, classical scattering by relativistic electrons passing through isolation foils is negligible. As a result, relativistic streaming instabilities are initiated within the high-density target plasma causing the relativistic electron beam to efficiently deposit its energy and momentum into a small localized region of the high-density plasma target. Fast liners disposed in the high-density target plasma are explosively or ablatively driven to implosion by a heated annular plasma surrounding the fast liner generated by an annular relativistic electron beam. An azimuthal magnetic field produced by axial current flow in the annular plasma, causes the energy in the heated annular plasma to converge on the fast liner to drive the fast liner to implode a microsphere.

Thode, Lester E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hollow glass microspheres" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

An Insulating Glass Knowledge Base  

SciTech Connect

This report will discuss issues relevant to Insulating Glass (IG) durability performance by presenting the observations and developed conclusions in a logical sequential format. This concluding effort discusses Phase II activities and focuses on beginning to quantifying IG durability issues while continuing the approach presented in the Phase I activities (Appendix 1) which discuss a qualitative assessment of durability issues. Phase II developed a focus around two specific IG design classes previously presented in Phase I of this project. The typical box spacer and thermoplastic spacer design including their Failure Modes and Effect Analysis (FMEA) and Fault Tree diagrams were chosen to address two currently used IG design options with varying components and failure modes. The system failures occur due to failures of components or their interfaces. Efforts to begin quantifying the durability issues focused on the development and delivery of an included computer based IG durability simulation program. The focus/effort to deliver the foundation for a comprehensive IG durability simulation tool is necessary to address advancements needed to meet current and future building envelope energy performance goals. This need is based upon the current lack of IG field failure data and the lengthy field observation time necessary for this data collection. Ultimately, the simulation program is intended to be used by designers throughout the current and future industry supply chain. Its use is intended to advance IG durability as expectations grow around energy conservation and with the growth of embedded technologies as required to meet energy needs. In addition the tool has the immediate benefit of providing insight for research and improvement prioritization. Included in the simulation model presentation are elements and/or methods to address IG materials, design, process, quality, induced stress (environmental and other factors), validation, etc. In addition, acquired data is presented in support of project and model assumptions. Finally, current and suggested testing protocol and procedure for future model validation and IG physical testing are discussed.

Michael L. Doll; Gerald Hendrickson; Gerard Lagos; Russell Pylkki; Chris Christensen; Charlie Cureija

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Glass science tutorial: Lecture No. 4, commercial glass melting and associated air emission issues  

SciTech Connect

This document serves as a manual for a workshop on commercial glass melting and associated air emission issues. Areas covered include: An overview of the glass industry; Furnace design and construction practices; Melting furnace operation; Energy input methods and controls; Air legislation and regulations; Soda lime emission mechanisms; and, Post furnace emission controls. Supporting papers are also included.

Kruger, A.A.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Computational studies of the glass-forming ability of model bulk metallic glasses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are produced by rapidly thermally quenching supercooled liquid metal alloys below the glass transition temperature at rates much faster than the critical cooling rate R_c below which crystallization occurs. The glass-forming ability of BMGs increases with decreasing R_c, and thus good glass-formers possess small values of R_c. We perform molecular dynamics simulations of binary Lennard-Jones (LJ) mixtures to quantify how key parameters, such as the stoichiometry, particle size difference, attraction strength, and heat of mixing, influence the glass-formability of model BMGs. For binary LJ mixtures, we find that the best glass-forming mixtures possess atomic size ratios (small to large) less than 0.92 and stoichiometries near 50:50 by number. In addition, weaker attractive interactions between the smaller atoms facilitate glass formation, whereas negative heats of mixing (in the experimentally relevant regime) do not change R_c significantly. These studies represent a first step in the development of computational methods for quantitatively predicting glass-formability.

Kai Zhang; Minglei Wang; Stefanos Papanikolaou; Yanhui Liu; Jan Schroers; Mark D. Shattuck; Corey S. O'Hern

2013-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

324

Glass and glass-derivative seals for use in energy-efficient fuel cells and lamps  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), a series of 18 sealing glasses have been prepared and characterized. From the whole design space, several glasses were ''downselected'' and studied in detail to describe their behaviors in simulated fuel cell environments. One of the glasses was found to outperform all others, including the well-known G18 sealant developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The new glass composition showed lower bulk electrical conductivity, excellent sealing and wetting behavior when sealing under applied load, and qualitatively superior performance when exposed to wet hydrogen for 800 hours. Traditional melting was used to prepare all of the glasses that were studied in detail. The sol-gel approach was used to synthesize several compositions, but it was found that the glasses crystallized very rapidly during heating, precluding sealing. The glass characterization included measurements of the viscosity and thermal expansion of the glasses, as well as the thermal expansion of the partly crystalline glass ceramics. In addition, the wetting and sintering behavior of all glasses has been measured, as well as the crystallization behavior. The time and temperature at which crystalline phases form from the glasses has been determined for all of the glasses. Each glass ceramic contains at least two crystalline phases, and most of the crystalline phases have been positively identified. The body of fundamental data provides a platform for future developments for high temperature sealants, and the newly-developed glass compositions appear promising for large-scale testing. The second component of the work, focused on seals for higher-temperature discharge lighting, has focused on determining the phase relations in the yttria-alumina-silica system at various silica levels. Functional testing of one of the candidate sealants demonstrated that it performs well in current HID lighting applications. Further testing is required to evaluate its performance in next-generation lamps that operate at higher temperatures, but the baseline phase equilibria and crystallization behavior has been established for additional development. Again, traditional melting and sol-gel synthesis have been employed, and the sol-gel method was successful for preparing new phases that were discovered during the work. Four new phases have been identified and synthesized in pure form, from which full structure solutions were obtained as well as the anisotropic thermal expansion for each phase.

Scott Misture; Arun Varshineya; Matthew Hall; Sylvia DeCarr; Steve Bancheri

2005-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

325

GLASS AND GLASS-DERIVATIVE SEALS FOR USE IN ENERGY-EFFICIENT FUEL CELLS AND LAMPS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As the project approaches the end of the first year, the materials screening components of the work are ahead of schedule, while all other tasks are on schedule. For solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), a series of 16 sealing glasses have been prepared and characterized. Traditional melting was used to prepare all of the glasses, and the sol-gel approach has been used to prepare some of the glasses as well as other compositions that might be viable because of the low processing temperatures afforded by the sol-gel method. The glass characterization included measurements of the viscosity and thermal expansion of the glasses, as well as the thermal expansion of the partly crystalline glass ceramics. In addition, the wetting and sintering behavior of all glasses has been measured, as well as the crystallization behavior. The time and temperature at which crystalline phases form from the glasses has been determined for all of the glasses. Each glass ceramic contains at least two crystalline phases, and most of the crystalline phases have been positively identified. Room temperature leak testing has been completed for all sealants, and experiments are in progress to determine the DC electrochemical degradation and degradation in wet hydrogen. The second component of the work, focused on seals for higher-temperature discharge lighting, has focused on determining the phase relations in the yttria--alumina--silica system at various silica levels. Again, traditional melting and sol-gel synthesis have been employed, and the sol-gel method was successful for preparing new phases that were discovered during the work. High temperature diffraction and annealing studies have clarified the phase relations for the samples studies, although additional work remains. Four new phases have been identified and synthesized in pure form, from which full structure solutions were obtained as well as the anisotropic thermal expansion for each phase. Functional testing of lamps are on on-going and will be analyzed during year 2 of the contract.

Scott Misture; Arun Varshneya; Matthew Hall; Sylvia DeCarr; Steve Bancheri

2004-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

326

Glass viscosity calculation based on a global statistical modelling approach  

SciTech Connect

A global statistical glass viscosity model was developed for predicting the complete viscosity curve, based on more than 2200 composition-property data of silicate glasses from the scientific literature, including soda-lime-silica container and float glasses, TV panel glasses, borosilicate fiber wool and E type glasses, low expansion borosilicate glasses, glasses for nuclear waste vitrification, lead crystal glasses, binary alkali silicates, and various further compositions from over half a century. It is shown that within a measurement series from a specific laboratory the reported viscosity values are often over-estimated at higher temperatures due to alkali and boron oxide evaporation during the measurement and glass preparation, including data by Lakatos et al. (1972) and the recently published High temperature glass melt property database for process modeling by Seward et al. (2005). Similarly, in the glass transition range many experimental data of borosilicate glasses are reported too high due to phase separation effects. The developed global model corrects those errors. The model standard error was 9-17°C, with R^2 = 0.985-0.989. The prediction 95% confidence interval for glass in mass production largely depends on the glass composition of interest, the composition uncertainty, and the viscosity level. New insights in the mixed-alkali effect are provided.

Fluegel, Alex

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Vacuum fusion bonding of glass plates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved apparatus and method for vacuum fusion bonding of large, patterned glass plates. One or both glass plates are patterned with etched features such as microstructure capillaries and a vacuum pumpout moat, with one plate having at least one hole therethrough for communication with a vacuum pumpout fixture. High accuracy alignment of the plates is accomplished by a temporary clamping fixture until the start of the fusion bonding heat cycle. A complete, void-free fusion bond of seamless, full-strength quality is obtained through the plates; because the glass is heated well into its softening point and because of a large, distributed force that is developed that presses the two plates together from the difference in pressure between the furnace ambient (high pressure) and the channeling and microstructures in the plates (low pressure) due to the vacuum drawn. The apparatus and method may be used to fabricate microcapillary arrays for chemical electrophoresis; for example, any apparatus using a network of microfluidic channels embedded between plates of glass or similar moderate melting point substrates with a gradual softening point curve, or for assembly of glass-based substrates onto larger substrates, such as in flat panel display systems.

Swierkowski, Steve P. (Livermore, CA); Davidson, James C. (Livermore, CA); Balch, Joseph W. (Livermore, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Vacuum fusion bonding of glass plates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved apparatus and method for vacuum fusion bonding of large, patterned glass plates. One or both glass plates are patterned with etched features such as microstructure capillaries and a vacuum pumpout moat, with one plate having at least one hole therethrough for communication with a vacuum pumpout fixture. High accuracy alignment of the plates is accomplished by a temporary clamping fixture until the start of the fusion bonding heat cycle. A complete, void-free fusion bond of seamless, full-strength quality is obtained through the plates; because the glass is heated well into its softening point and because of a large, distributed force that is developed that presses the two plates together from the difference in pressure between the furnace ambient (high pressure) and the channeling and microstructures in the plates (low pressure) due to the vacuum drawn. The apparatus and method may be used to fabricate microcapillary arrays for chemical electrophoresis; for example, any apparatus using a network of microfluidic channels embedded between plates of glass or similar moderate melting point substrates with a gradual softening point curve, or for assembly of glass-based substrates onto larger substrates, such as in flat panel display systems.

Swierkowski, Steve P. (Livermore, CA); Davidson, James C. (Livermore, CA); Balch, Joseph W. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Dynamics of window glass fracture in explosions  

SciTech Connect

An exploratory study was conducted under the Architectural Surety Program to examine the possibility of modifying fracture of glass in the shock-wave environment associated with terrorist bombings. The intent was to explore strategies to reduce the number and severity of injuries resulting from those attacks. The study consisted of a series of three experiments at the Energetic Materials Research and Testing Center (EMRTC) of the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology at Socorro, NM, in which annealed and tempered glass sheets were exposed to blast waves at several different levels of overpressure and specific impulse. A preliminary assessment of the response of tempered glass to the blast environment suggested that inducing early failure would result in lowering fragment velocity as well as reducing the loading from the window to the structure. To test that possibility, two different and novel procedures (indentation flaws and spot annealing) were used to reduce the failure strength of the tempered glass while maintaining its ability to fracture into small cube-shaped fragments. Each experiment involved a comparison of the performance of four sheets of glass with different treatments.

Beauchamp, E.K.; Matalucci, R.V.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are provided comprising various combinations (in terms of mole-%) of boron oxide (B.sub.2 O.sub.3), barium oxide (BaO), lanthanum oxide (La.sub.2 O.sub.3), and at least one other oxide selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide (Al.sub.2 O.sub.3), calcium oxide (CaO), lithium oxide (Li.sub.2 O), sodium oxide (Na.sub.2 O), silicon dioxide (SiO.sub.2), or titanium dioxide (TiO.sub.2). These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys having an improved aqueous durability and favorable sealing characteristics. Examples of the sealing-glass compositions are provided having coefficients of thermal expansion about that of titanium or titanium alloys, and with sealing temperatures less than about 900.degree. C., and generally about 700.degree.-800.degree. C. The barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are useful for components and devices requiring prolonged exposure to moisture or water, and for implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps).

Brow, Richard K. (Albuquerque, NM); McCollister, Howard L. (Albuquerque, NM); Phifer, Carol C. (Albuquerque, NM); Day, Delbert E. (Rolla, MO)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are provided comprising various combinations (in terms of mole-%) of boron oxide (B{sub 2}O{sub 3}), barium oxide (BaO), lanthanum oxide (La{sub 2}O{sub 3}), and at least one other oxide selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), calcium oxide (CaO), lithium oxide (Li{sub 2}O), sodium oxide (Na{sub 2}O), silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}), or titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}). These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys having an improved aqueous durability and favorable sealing characteristics. Examples of the sealing-glass compositions are provided having coefficients of thermal expansion about that of titanium or titanium alloys, and with sealing temperatures less than about 900 C, and generally about 700--800 C. The barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are useful for components and devices requiring prolonged exposure to moisture or water, and for implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps). 1 fig.

Brow, R.K.; McCollister, H.L.; Phifer, C.C.; Day, D.E.

1997-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

332

Properties of glass-bonded zeolite monoliths  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been shown that mineral waste forms can be used to immobilize waste salt generated during the pyrochemical processing of spent fuel from the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). Solid, leach resistant monoliths were formed by hot-pressing mixtures of salt-occluded zeolite A powders and glass frit at 990 K and 28 MPa. Additional samples have now been fabricated and tested. Normalized release rates for all elements, including iodide and chloride, were less than 1 g/m{sup 2}d in 28-day tests in deionized water and in brine at 363 K (90{degrees}C). Preliminary results indicate that these rates fall with time with both leachants and that the zeolite phase in the glass-bonded zeolite does not function as an ion exchanger. Some material properties were measured. The Poisson ratio and Young`s modulus were slightly smaller in glass-bonded zeolite than in borosilicate glass. Density depended on zeolite fraction. The glass-bonded zeolite represents a promising mineral waste form for IFR salt.

Lewis, M.A.; Fischer, D.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Murphy, C.D. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Kirkendall-effect-based growth of dendrite-shaped CuO hollow micro/nanostructures for lithium-ion battery anodes  

SciTech Connect

Three-dimensional (3D) dendrite-shaped CuO hollow micro/nanostructures have been prepared via a Kirkendall-effect-based approach for the first time and have been demonstrated as a high-performance anode material for lithium-ion batteries. The as-prepared hollow structures were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and electrochemical properties. A CuO hollow structure composed of nanocubes outside and a dense film inside was selected as a typical example of the optimized design; it exhibited significantly improved cyclability at a current rate of 0.5 C, with the average Coulombic efficiency of {approx}97.0% and 57.9% retention of the discharge capacity of the second cycle after 50 cycles. The correlation between the structure features of the hollow CuO and their electrochemical behavior was discussed in detail. Smaller size of primary structure and larger internal space of electrode materials are crucial to better electrochemical performance. This work represents that Kirkendall effect is a promising method to fabricate excellent hollow electrode materials for Li-ion batteries. - Graphical abstract: SEM images of 3D dendrite-shaped CuO hollow micro/nanostructures prepared via a Kirkendall-effect-based approach have been shown. The as-prepared CuO electrode exhibited significantly improved cyclability for Li-ion batteries.

Hu Yingying, E-mail: yyhu@phy.ccnu.edu.c [Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Huazhong Normal University, Wuhan 430079, Hubei (China); Huang Xintang, E-mail: xthuang@phy.ccnu.edu.c [Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Huazhong Normal University, Wuhan 430079, Hubei (China); Wang Kai; Liu Jinping; Jiang Jian; Ding Ruimin; Ji Xiaoxu; Li Xin [Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Huazhong Normal University, Wuhan 430079, Hubei (China)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

334

Glass Buttes Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Glass Buttes Geothermal Area Glass Buttes Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Glass Buttes Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (14) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Oregon Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

335

Irradiation effects on borosilicate waste glasses  

SciTech Connect

The effects of alpha decay on five borosilicate glasses containing simulated nuclear high-level waste oxides were studied. Irradiations carried out at room temperature were achieved by incorporating 1 to 8 wt % /sup 244/Cm/sub 2/O/sub 3/ in the glasses. Density changes and stored-energy build-up saturated at doses less than 2 x 10/sup 21/ alpha decays/kg. Damage manifested by stored energy was completely annealed at 633/sup 0/K. Positive and negative density changes were observed which never exceeded 1%. Irradiation had very little effect on mechanical strength or on chemical durability as measured by aqueous leach rates. Also, no effects were observed on the microstructure for vitreous waste glasses, although radiation-induced microcracking could be achieved on specimens that had been devitrified prior to irradiation.

Roberts, F.P.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Glass material oxidation and dissolution system: Converting miscellaneous fissile materials to glass  

SciTech Connect

The cold war and the development of nuclear energy have resulted in significant inventories of miscellaneous fissile materials (MFMs). MFMs include (1) plutonium scrap and residue, (2) miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel (SNF), (3) certain hot cell wastes, and (4) many one-of-a-kind materials. Major concerns associated with the long-term management of these materials include: safeguards and nonproliferation issues; health, environment, and safety concerns. waste management requirements; and high storage costs. These issues can be addressed by converting the MFMs to glass for secure, long-term storage or repository disposal; however, conventional glass-making processes require oxide-like feed materials. Converting MFMs to oxide-like materials with subsequent vitrification is a complex and expensive process. A new vitrification process has been invented, the Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS), which directly converts metals, ceramics, and amorphous solids to glass; oxidizes organics with the residue converted to glass; and converts chlorides to borosilicate glass and a secondary sodium chloride (NaCl) stream. Laboratory work has demonstrated the conversion of cerium (a plutonium surrogate), uranium, Zircaloy, stainless steel, multiple oxides, and other materials to glass. However, significant work is required to develop GMODS further for applications at an industrial scale. If implemented, GMODS will provide a new approach to manage these materials.

Forsberg, C.W.; Ferrada, J.J.

1996-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

337

Future perspectives of using hollow fibers as structured packings in light hydrocarbon distillation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Olefin and paraffin are the largest chemical commodities. Furthermore, they are major building blocks for the petrochemical industry. Each year, petroleum refining, consumes 4,500 TBtu/yr in separation energy, making it one of the most energy-intensive industries in the United States). Just considering liquefied petroleum gas (ethane/propane/butane) and olefins (ethylene and propylene) alone, the distillation energy consumption is about 400 TBtu/yr in the US. Since petroleum distillation is a mature technology, incremental improvements in column/tray design will only provide a few percent improvements in the performance. However, each percent saving in net energy use amounts to savings of 10 TBtu/yr and reduces CO{sub 2} emissions by 0.2 MTon/yr. In practice, distillation columns require 100 to 200 trays to achieve the desired separation. The height of a transfer unit (HTU) of conventional packings is typical in the range of 36-60 inch. Since 2006, we had explored using several non-selective membranes as the structured packings to replace the conventional packing materials used in propane and propylene distillation. We obtained the lowest HTU of 5 times shorter than that of the conventional packing materials. In 2008, we also investigated this type of packing materials in iso-/n-butane distillation. Because of a slightly larger relative volatility of iso-/n-butane than that of propane/propylene, a wider and a more stable operational range was obtained for the iso-/n-butane pair. However, all of the experiments were conducted on a small scale with flowrate of < 25 gram/min. Recently, we demonstrated this technology on a larger scale (<250 gram/min). Within the loading range of F-factor < 2.2 Pa{sup 0.5}, a pressure drop on the vapor side is below 50 mbar/m, which suggests that the pressure drop of hollow fibers packings is not an engineering barrier for the applications in distillations. The thermal stability study suggests that polypropylene hollow fibers are stable after a long time exposure to C{sub 2} - C{sub 4} mixtures. The effects of packing density on the separation efficiency will be discussed.

Yang, Dali [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Orler, Bruce [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tornga, Stephanie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Welch, Cindy [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

338

Properties of low cost, high volume glasses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The properties of new and weathered samples of low cost, high volume glasses have been studied to determine their usefulness for solar energy applications. Glasses of varying compositions produced by float, drawn, rolled fusion, and twin ground techniques were examined. Spectral transmittance and reflectance were measured and solar weighted values calculated. Laser raytrace techniques were used to evaluate surface parallelism and bulk homogeneity. Compositional changes were examined with scanning electron microscopy, x-ray fluorescence, and Auger electron spectroscopy. These techniques were used in conjunction with ellipsometry to study the surface effects associated with weathering.

Lind, M. A.; Hartman, J. S.; Buckwalter, C. Q.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Nonlinear mechanics of thermoreversibly associating dendrimer glasses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We model the mechanics of associating trivalent dendrimer network glasses with a focus on their energy dissipation properties. Various combinations of sticky bond (SB) strength and kinetics are employed. The toughness (work-to-fracture) of these systems displays a surprising deformation-protocol dependence; different association parameters optimize different properties. In particular, "strong, slow" SBs optimize strength, while "weak, fast" SBs optimize ductility via self-healing during deformation. We relate these observations to breaking, reformation, and partner-switching of SBs during deformation. These studies point the way to creating associating-polymer network glasses with tailorable mechanical properties.

Arvind Srikanth; Robert S. Hoy; Berend C. Rinderspacher; Jan W. Andzelm

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

340

Direction of CRT waste glass processing: Electronics recycling industry communication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Given a large flow rate of CRT glass {approx}10% of the panel glass stream will be leaded. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The supply of CRT waste glass exceeded demand in 2009. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recyclers should use UV-light to detect lead oxide during the separation process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recycling market analysis techniques and results are given for CRT glass. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Academic initiatives and the necessary expansion of novel product markets are discussed. - Abstract: Cathode Ray Tube, CRT, waste glass recycling has plagued glass manufacturers, electronics recyclers and electronics waste policy makers for decades because the total supply of waste glass exceeds demand, and the formulations of CRT glass are ill suited for most reuse options. The solutions are to separate the undesirable components (e.g. lead oxide) in the waste and create demand for new products. Achieving this is no simple feat, however, as there are many obstacles: limited knowledge of waste glass composition; limited automation in the recycling process; transportation of recycled material; and a weak and underdeveloped market. Thus one of the main goals of this paper is to advise electronic glass recyclers on how to best manage a diverse supply of glass waste and successfully market to end users. Further, this paper offers future directions for academic and industry research. To develop the recommendations offered here, a combination of approaches were used: (1) a thorough study of historic trends in CRT glass chemistry; (2) bulk glass collection and analysis of cullet from a large-scale glass recycler; (3) conversations with industry members and a review of potential applications; and (4) evaluation of the economic viability of specific uses for recycled CRT glass. If academia and industry can solve these problems (for example by creating a database of composition organized by manufacturer and glass source) then the reuse of CRT glass can be increased.

Mueller, Julia R., E-mail: mueller.143@osu.edu [Ohio State University, William G. Lowrie Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, OH (United States) and University of Queensland, School of Chemical Engineering (Australia) and Ohio State University, Materials Science and Engineering, OH (United States); Boehm, Michael W. [University of Queensland, School of Chemical Engineering (Australia); Drummond, Charles [Ohio State University, Materials Science and Engineering, OH (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hollow glass microspheres" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

PLUTONIUM SOLUBILITY IN HIGH-LEVEL WASTE ALKALI BOROSILICATE GLASS  

SciTech Connect

The solubility of plutonium in a Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) reference glass and the effect of incorporation of Pu in the glass on specific glass properties were evaluated. A Pu loading of 1 wt % in glass was studied. Prior to actual plutonium glass testing, surrogate testing (using Hf as a surrogate for Pu) was conducted to evaluate the homogeneity of significant quantities of Hf (Pu) in the glass, determine the most appropriate methods to evaluate homogeneity for Pu glass testing, and to evaluate the impact of Hf loading in the glass on select glass properties. Surrogate testing was conducted using Hf to represent between 0 and 1 wt % Pu in glass on an equivalent molar basis. A Pu loading of 1 wt % in glass translated to {approx}18 kg Pu per Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister, or about 10X the current allowed limit per the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (2500 g/m{sup 3} of glass or about 1700 g/canister) and about 30X the current allowable concentration based on the fissile material concentration limit referenced in the Yucca Mountain Project License Application (897 g/m{sup 3}3 of glass or about 600 g Pu/canister). Based on historical process throughput data, this level was considered to represent a reasonable upper bound for Pu loading based on the ability to provide Pu containing feed to the DWPF. The task elements included evaluating the distribution of Pu in the glass (e.g. homogeneity), evaluating crystallization within the glass, evaluating select glass properties (with surrogates), and evaluating durability using the Product Consistency Test -- Method A (PCT-A). The behavior of Pu in the melter was evaluated using paper studies and corresponding analyses of DWPF melter pour samples.The results of the testing indicated that at 1 wt % Pu in the glass, the Pu was homogeneously distributed and did not result in any formation of plutonium-containing crystalline phases as long as the glass was prepared under 'well-mixed' conditions. The incorporation of 1 wt % Pu in the glass did not adversely impact glass viscosity (as assessed using Hf surrogate) or glass durability. Finally, evaluation of DWPF glass pour samples that had Pu concentrations below the 897 g/m{sup 3} limit showed that Pu concentrations in the glass pour stream were close to targeted compositions in the melter feed indicating that Pu neither volatilized from the melt nor stratified in the melter when processed in the DWPF melter.

Marra, J.; Crawford, C.; Fox, K.; Bibler, N.

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

342

IMPACTS OF SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE STREAMS ON DWPF GLASS FORMULATION KT07-SERIES GLASS COMPOSITIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the third in a series of studies of the impacts of the addition of Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) and Monosodium Titanate (MST) from the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) glass waste form and the applicability of the DWPF process control models. MST from the Salt Waste Processing Facility is also considered in the study. The KT07-series glasses were selected to evaluate any potential impacts of noble metals on their properties and performance. The glasses characterized thus far for the SCIX study have not included noble metals since they are not typically tracked in sludge batch composition projections. However, noble metals can act as nucleation sites in glass melts, leading to enhanced crystallization. This crystallization can potentially influence the properties and performance of the glass, such as chemical durability, viscosity, and liquidus temperature. The noble metals Ag, Pd, Rh, and Ru were added to the KT07-series glasses in concentrations based on recent measurements of Sludge Batch 6, which was considered to contain a high concentration of noble metals. The KT04-series glasses were used as the baseline compositions. After fabrication, the glasses were characterized to determine their homogeneity, chemical composition, durability, and viscosity. Liquidus temperature measurements are also underway but were not complete at the time of this report. The liquidus temperature results for the KT07-series glasses, along with several of the earlier glasses in the SCIX study, will be documented separately. All of the KT07-series glasses, both quenched and slowly cooled, were found to be amorphous by X-ray diffraction. Chemical composition measurements showed that all of the glasses met their targeted compositions. The Product Consistency Test (PCT) results showed that all of the glasses had chemical durabilities that were far better than that of the Environmental Assessment benchmark glass. The measured PCT responses were well predicted by the current DWPF Product Composition Control System (PCCS) durability models. The measured viscosity values for each KT07-series glass were acceptable for DWPF processing and were well predicted by the current PCCS model. Overall, the results show that the inclusion of relatively high concentrations of noble metals (in terms of expected values for a DWPF sludge batch) had no significant impact on the properties and performance of these glass compositions. There were no significant differences in the measured properties when compared to those of the KT04-series glasses, which did not contain noble metals. Liquidus temperature measurements are still underway and there may be an impact of the noble metals on those measurements. However, no adverse effects were noted in terms of crystallization after slow cooling. At the completion of these studies, all of the data generated will be reviewed with regard to the applicability of the DWPF PCCS models and recommendations will be made as to whether the validation ranges of the current models can be extended, or whether some or all of the models need to be refit to allow for the incorporation of the SCIX streams. As changes are made to the projected sludge compositions and the volume of the SCIX material, additional evaluations should be performed.

Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

343

Glass Transition by Gelation in a Phase Separating Binary Alloy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use molecular dynamics simulations to show that glass transition in a model phase separating amorphous alloy, Cu50Nb50, occurs by gelation. At the glass transition, a mechanically stiff, percolating network of atoms ...

Baumer, Richard E.

344

Nano-structured self-cleaning superhydrophobic glass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

glass have been fabricated by Teflon coating, polystyrene-block-blocks, and RIE processes. Teflon nanopillars- decorated glassblock-poly (4-vinylpyridine) (PS-b- P4VP) coatings on a glass

Kim, Jin Yeol

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

EA-0821: Operation of the Glass Melter Thermal Treatment Unit...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Operation of the Glass Melter Thermal Treatment Unit at the U.S. Department of Energy's Mound Plant, Miamisburg, Ohio EA-0821: Operation of the Glass Melter Thermal Treatment...

346

Weathering and leaching of glass for solar heliostats  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to assess the effects of weathering on the transmittance of glass, several old samples were collected from two desert environments for evaluation. The glass obtained by PNL at the Hanford reservation in Washington came from south-facing, vertical windows which were known to be over forty years old. The glass obtained by Sandia from Barstow, California, is estimated to be over twenty years old. To determine the durability of glasses proposed for heliostat mirrors, selected samples were leached in a Soxhlet apparatus and pH 4 and pH 9 buffer solutions. The glass samples produced by the float process are soda-lime-silica glasses, whereas the glass samples produced by the fusion process are aluminosilicate glasses. Results are presented and discussed. (WHK)

Rusin, J. M.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

The Development of Glass Compositions for the Vitrification of Ion ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation explores the development of a glass system intended for the ... The Effects of Lithium Nitrate on Highly Active Liquor in the Calcination Process ... Viscosity of Multicomponent Glasses as a Function of Temperature and ...

348

Science and Technology of Chemical Strengthening of Glass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of Cooper's contributions to glass was the scientific understanding of the ... Field Assisted Viscous Flow and Crystallization in a Sodium Aluminosilicate Glass ... Mechanisms of the Conversion Reaction in FeF2 Cathodes Exposed to Li in ...

349

Conversion of Rare Earth Doped Borate Glass to Rare Earth ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A History of the Theories of Glass Structure: Can We Really Believe What is ... Field Assisted Viscous Flow and Crystallization in a Sodium Aluminosilicate Glass ... Mechanisms of the Conversion Reaction in FeF2 Cathodes Exposed to Li in ...

350

Advanced Characterization as Applied to the Corrosion of Glass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A History of the Theories of Glass Structure: Can We Really Believe What is ... Field Assisted Viscous Flow and Crystallization in a Sodium Aluminosilicate Glass ... Mechanisms of the Conversion Reaction in FeF2 Cathodes Exposed to Li in ...

351

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Metallic Glass: A Crystal...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Metallic Glass: A Crystal at Heart June 16, 2011 Menlo Park, Calif.-Glass, by definition, is amorphous; its atoms lack order and are arranged every which way. But when scientists...

352

Theoretical solution for light transmission of a bended hollow light guide  

SciTech Connect

Hollow light guides with very high reflective inner surfaces are novel daylight systems that collect sunlight and skylight available on the roof of buildings transporting it into deep or windowless interiors in building cores. Thus the better utilization of daylight can result in energy savings and wellbeing in these enclosed indoor spaces. An analytical complex solution of a straight tube system was solved in the HOLIGILM method with a user-friendly tool available on the http://www.holigilm.info. An even more difficult light flow transport is to be determined in bended tubes usually placed on sloped roofs where a bend is necessary to adjust the vertical pass through the ceilings. This paper presents the theoretical derivation of the model with its graphical representation and coordinate system respecting backward ray-tracing bend distortions. To imagine the resulting illuminance on the horizontal plane element in the interior, the virtual ray (i.e. luminance in an elementary solid angle) has to pass the ceiling diffuser interface, the inner mirror like tube with a bend, through a roof cupola attachment to the element of the sky and sun light source. Due to this complexity and the lengthy derivation and explanations more practical applications will be published later in a separate contribution. (author)

Kocifaj, Miroslav; Darula, Stanislav; Kittler, Richard [ICA, Slovak Academy of Sciences, 9, Dubravska Road, 845 03 Bratislava (Slovakia); Kundracik, Frantisek [Department of Experimental Physics, FMPI, Comenius University, Mlynska dolina, 842 48 Bratislava (Slovakia)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

Factors Affecting the Dissolution of Resorbable Bioactive Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Factors affecting dissolution are numerous: residual stress, composition, ... and manufacturing method on the dissolution behaviour of glasses with fixed overall ...

354

Space-time thermodynamics of the glass transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Space-time Thermodynamics of the Glass Transition Maurobehavior in terms of a thermodynamics of trajectory space.

Merolle, Mauro; Garrahan, Juan P.; Chandler, David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Glass Ion Exchange: One Century of "Tough" Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... ion-exchange to glass components such as pharmaceutical packaging, transparent lightweight armor, transparencies for private vehicles, trains and aircrafts, ...

356

Ceramic and Glass Composite Interconnects for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2011. Symposium, Energy Conversion/Fuel Cells. Presentation Title, Ceramic and Glass ...

357

Glass manufacturing is an energy-intensive industry mainly ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration ... There is substantial potential for energy efficiency improvements in glass manufacturing. Estimates range from ...

358

Glass-Ceramic Seal for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells - Available ...  

Computers & Electronics; Consumer Products; Energy & Utilities; Manufacturing & Warehousing; Video(s) Glass frit is dispersed in a ...

359

Glass molding process with mold lubrication  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Improvements are provided in glass forming processes of the type wherein hot metal blank molds are employed by using the complementary action of a solid film lubricant layer, of graphite dispersed in a cured thermoset organopolysiloxane, along with an overspray of a lubricating oil.

Davey, Richard G. (Toledo, OH)

1978-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

360

DWPF Glass Melter Technology Manual: Volume 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document details information about the design of a glass melter to be used at the Defense Waste Processing Facility located at the Savannah River Plant. Information contained in this document consists solely of a machine drawing and parts list and purchase orders with specifications of equipment used in the development of the melter.

Iverson, D.C.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hollow glass microspheres" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Bioactive glass coatings with hydroxyapatite and Bioglass ...  

Table 1 Composition and main properties of glasses and HA Composition (wt%) a „ 4 E (10~63C~1)(3C) (GPa) SiO 2 Na 2 OK 2 O CaO MgO P 2 O 5 6P57 56.5 11.0 3.0 15.0 8 ...

362

Window selection: problems and promise of glass  

SciTech Connect

In the past few years, technical innovations in glass and window design have made windows more energy efficient, reducing energy costs and increasing the comfort levels in buildings. These innovations make it possible for occupants to enjoy the benefits of real windows while enabling owners and managers to lower overall operating costs. 1 figure, 1 table.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Polymers replace glass in Nova fuel capsules  

SciTech Connect

The glass fuel-capsule designs used in previous laser-fusion research are not adaptable to the implosion-physics requirements of Nova and other more powerful laser facilities that may be available in the future. As one tries to learn more about the physics of high-density compression, it becomes increasingly important to replace the glass with lower-Z material. Accordingly, the authors have shut down the high-temperature drop-tower furnaces they used to make glass capsules, and they are focusing all their efforts on developing new techniques for making polymer capsules. These capsules are ten times larger in diameter than the glass capsules used in the early days of laser-fusion research, but they are still only one-tenth as large as a high-gain capsule must be. The polymer capsules will be used in classified indirect-drive targets. This article describes how the decisions were made on which polymers to use in the NOVA fuel capsules, the techniques explored, and the properties of the prototype capsules.

Burnham, A.K.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

DWPF Glass Melter Technology Manual: Volume 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document details information about the design of a glass melter to be used at the Defense Waste Processing Facility located at the Savannah River Site. Topics discussed include: Information collected during testing, equipment, materials, design basis, feed tubes, and an evaluation of the performance of various components. Information is conveyed using many diagrams and photographs.

Iverson, D.C.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

365

The Conservation of Seventeenth Century Archaeological Glass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary goal of the conservator is to stabilize and conserve artifacts with the best possible treatment available. Ideally, these treatments are noninvasive and reversible, and maintain the integrity of the object as a top priority. In this respect, it is the responsibility of the conservator to research other possible treatments when traditional methods prove to be insufficient to properly stabilize and conserve an object. Sometimes choosing to treat with a seemingly unorthodox method is the only chance for the objects survival. Though glass is considered one of the most stable archaeological materials, noninvasive, reversible treatments are not always possible given the level of deterioration glass objects undergo within the archaeological setting, specifically the underwater or waterlogged archaeological setting. This research is a consideration and investigation of the use of silicone polymers and silanes as consolidation materials for 17th-century glass recovered from aqueous environments. Working within the Conservation Research Laboratory and the Archaeological Preservation Research Laboratory at Texas A and M University, a newly developed polymer passivation technique utilizing materials acquired from the Dow Corning Corporation was applied to archaeological glass recovered from the 1686 shipwreck La Belle, excavated in Matagorda Bay off the coast of Texas by the Texas Historical Commission from 1996 to 1997. The successful application of a hydroxyl ended silicone polymer Q-1 3563, combined with a methyltrimethoxysilane intermediate crosslinker, Q-9 1315, at a 15% solution by weight and catalyzed with dibutyltin diacetate (DBTDA Fascat 4200) occurred in 1999. This project was the first large scale application of silicone polymers and silanes to 17th-century archaeological glass recovered from a marine site. Through this investigation we answered a number of questions regarding the use and application of the silicone technologies and confirmed that these materials are a viable resource for glass consolidation and conservation in terms of the suggested conservation guidelines of the IIC. The silicone technology was successfully applied to numerous types, forms, colors and degradation levels of glass. This included successful application to composite artifacts and the retreatment of objects unsuccessfully treated with a "traditional" method.

Arcak, Cory

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

HIGH ALUMINUM HLW GLASSES FOR HANFORDS WTP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The world's largest radioactive waste vitrification facility is now under construction at the United State Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford site. The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is designed to treat nearly 53 million gallons of mixed hazardous and radioactive waste now residing in 177 underground storage tanks. This multi-decade processing campaign will be one of the most complex ever undertaken because of the wide chemical and physical variability of the waste compositions generated during the cold war era that are stored at Hanford. The DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) has initiated a program to improve the long-term operating efficiency of the WTP vitrification plants with the objective of reducing the overall cost of tank waste treatment and disposal and shortening the duration of plant operations. Due to the size, complexity and duration of the WTP mission, the lifecycle operating and waste disposal costs are substantial. As a result, gains in High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW) waste loadings, as well as increases in glass production rate, which can reduce mission duration and glass volumes for disposal, can yield substantial overall cost savings. EnergySolutions and its long-term research partner, the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) of the Catholic University of America, have been involved in a multi-year ORP program directed at optimizing various aspects of the HLW and LAW vitrification flow sheets. A number of Hanford HLW streams contain high concentrations of aluminum, which is challenging with respect to both waste loading and processing rate. Therefore, a key focus area of the ORP vitrification process optimization program at EnergySolutions and VSL has been development of HLW glass compositions that can accommodate high Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations while maintaining high processing rates in the Joule Heated Ceramic Melters (JHCMs) used for waste vitrification at the WTP. This paper, reviews the achievements of this program with emphasis on the recent enhancements in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} loadings in HLW glass and its processing characteristics. Glass formulation development included crucible-scale preparation and characterization of glass samples to assess compliance with all melt processing and product quality requirements, followed by small-scale screening tests to estimate processing rates. These results were used to down-select formulations for subsequent engineering-scale melter testing. Finally, further testing was performed on the DM1200 vitrification system installed at VSL, which is a one-third scale (1.20 m{sup 2}) pilot melter for the WTP HLW melters and which is fitted with a fully prototypical off-gas treatment system. These tests employed glass formulations with high waste loadings and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} contents of {approx}25 wt%, which represents a near-doubling of the present WTP baseline maximum Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} loading. In addition, these formulations were processed successfully at glass production rates that exceeded the present requirements for WTP HLW vitrification by up to 88%. The higher aluminum loading in the HLW glass has an added benefit in that the aluminum leaching requirements in pretreatment are reduced, thus allowing less sodium addition in pretreatment, which in turn reduces the amount of LAW glass to be produced at the WTP. The impact of the results from this ORP program in reducing the overall cost and schedule for the Hanford waste treatment mission will be discussed.

KRUGER AA; JOSEPH I; BOWMAN BW; GAN H; KOT W; MATLACK KS; PEGG IL

2009-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

367

CADMIUM-RARE EARTH BORATE GLASS AS REACTOR CONTROL MATERIAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor control rod fabricated from a cadmiumrare earth-borate glass is presented. The rare earth component of this glass is selected from among those rare earths having large neutron capture cross sections, such as samarium, gadolinium or europium. Partlcles of this glass are then dispersed in a metal matrix by standard powder metallurgy techniques.

Ploetz, G.L.; Ray, W.E.

1958-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Energy efficient residential new construction: market transformation. Spectral selective glass. Final project report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final report describes the following tasks associated with this project: cost and availability of spectrally selective glass (SSG); window labeling problem and field verification of glass; availability of SSG replacement glass and tempered glass; HVAC load reduction due to spectrally selective glass; and comsumer appreciation of spectrally selective glass. Also included in the report are four attachments: builder and HVAC subcontractor presentation, sample advertisements, spectrally selective glass demonstration model, and invitation to SCE Glass mini trade-show.

Hammon, Robert

2000-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

369

Relationship between the shear viscosity and heating rate in metallic glasses below the glass transition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been shown that first-order irreversible structural relaxation with distributed activation energies must lead to a linear decrease of the logarithm of Newtonian shear viscosity with the logarithm of heating rate upon linear heating of glass. Such a behavior is indeed observed in the experiments on metallic glasses. Structural relaxation-induced viscous flow leads to infra-low-frequency Maxwell viscoelastic internal friction, which is predicted to increase with the heating rate.

Khonik, Vitaly A.; Kobelev, N. P. [Department of General Physics, State Pedagogical University, Lenin Street 86, 394043 Voronezh (Russian Federation); Institute for Solid State Physics, Chernogolovka, 142432 Moscow District (Russian Federation)

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Aging in attraction-driven colloidal glasses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aging in an attraction-driven colloidal glass is studied by computer simulations. The system is equilibrated without attraction and instantaneously ``quenched'', at constant colloid volume fraction, to one of two states beyond the glass transition; one is close to the transition, and the other one deep in the glass. The evolution of structural properties shows that bonds form in the system, increasing the local density, creating density deficits (holes) elsewhere. This process slows down with the time elapsed since the quench. As a consequence of bond formation, there is a slowing down of the dynamics, as measured by the mean squared displacement and the density, bond, and environment correlation functions. The density correlations can be time-rescaled to collapse their long time (structural) decay. The time scale for structural relaxation shows for both quenches a super-linear dependence on waiting time; it grows faster than the bond lifetime, showing the collective origin of the transition. At long waiting times and high attraction strength, we observe {\\rem completely} arrested dynamics for more than three decades in time, although individual bonds are not permanent on this time scale. The localization length decreases as the state moves deeper in the glass; the non-ergodicity parameter oscillates in phase with the structure factor. Our main results are obtained for systems with a barrier in the pair potential that inhibits phase separation. However, when this barrier is removed for the case of a deep quench, we find changes in the static structure but almost none in the dynamics. Hence our results for the aging behavior remain relevant to experiments in which the glass transition competes with phase separation.

Antonio M. Puertas; Matthias Fuchs; Michael E. Cates

2006-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

371

Sealed glass coating of high temperature ceramic superconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and article of manufacture of a lead oxide based glass coating on a high temperature superconductor is disclosed. The method includes preparing a dispersion of glass powders in a solution, applying the dispersion to the superconductor, drying the dispersion before applying another coating and heating the glass powder dispersion at temperatures below oxygen diffusion onset and above the glass melting point to form a continuous glass coating on the superconductor to establish compressive stresses which enhance the fracture strength of the superconductor. 8 figs.

Wu, W.; Chu, C.Y.; Goretta, K.C.; Routbort, J.L.

1995-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

372

Glass Mica Composite Seals for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel glass-mica composite seal was developed based on the previous concept of ''infiltrated'' mica seals for solid oxide fuel cells. A Ba-Al-Ca silicate sealing glass was mixed with mica flakes to form the glass-mica composite seals. The glass-mica composite seals were tested thermal cycle stability in terms of the high temperature leakage and compressive stresses. Post mortem analyses were used to characterize the fracture and leak path of the glass-mica composite seals.

Chou, Y S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

2005-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

373

Energy Efficient Glass Melting - The Next Generation Melter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate a high intensity glass melter, based on the submerged combustion melting technology. This melter will serve as the melting and homogenization section of a segmented, lower-capital cost, energy-efficient Next Generation Glass Melting System (NGMS). After this project, the melter will be ready to move toward commercial trials for some glasses needing little refining (fiberglass, etc.). For other glasses, a second project Phase or glass industry research is anticipated to develop the fining stage of the NGMS process.

David Rue

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

DEVELOPMENT OF GLASS MATRICES FOR HLW RADIOACTIVE WASTES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vitrification is currently the most widely used technology for the treatment of high level radioactive wastes (HLW) throughout the world. Most of the nations that have generated HLW are immobilizing in either borosilicate glass or phosphate glass. One of the primary reasons that glass has become the most widely used immobilization media is the relative simplicity of the vitrification process, e.g. melt waste plus glass forming frit additives and cast. A second reason that glass has become widely used for HLW is that the short range order (SRO) and medium range order (MRO) found in glass atomistically bonds the radionuclides and governs the melt properties such as viscosity, resistivity, sulphate solubility. The molecular structure of glass controls contaminant/radionuclide release by establishing the distribution of ion exchange sites, hydrolysis sites, and the access of water to those sites. The molecular structure is flexible and hence accounts for the flexibility of glass formulations to waste variability. Nuclear waste glasses melt between 1050-1150 C which minimizes the volatility of radioactive components such as Tc{sup 99}, Cs{sup 137}, and I{sup 129}. Nuclear waste glasses have good long term stability including irradiation resistance. Process control models based on the molecular structure of glass have been mechanistically derived and have been demonstrated to be accurate enough to control the world's largest HLW Joule heated ceramic melter in the US since 1996 at 95% confidence.

Jantzen, C.

2010-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

375

GlassPoint Solar Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GlassPoint Solar Inc GlassPoint Solar Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name GlassPoint Solar Inc. Place San Francisco, California Zip 94105 Sector Solar Product San Francisco-based developer and marketer of solar industrial process heat generating equipment for a wide range of industries including enhanced oil recovery, municipal waste water treatment and electrical power generation. References GlassPoint Solar Inc.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. GlassPoint Solar Inc. is a company located in San Francisco, California . References ↑ "GlassPoint Solar Inc." Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=GlassPoint_Solar_Inc&oldid=345889

376

Ammonia-treated phosphate glasses useful for sealing to metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of improving surface-dependent properties of phosphate glass such as durability and wear resistance without significantly affecting its thermal expansion coefficient is provided which comprises annealing the glass in a dry ammonia atmosphere at temperatures approximating the transition temperature of the glass. The ammonia annealing treatment of the present invention is carried out for a time sufficient to allow incorporation of a thin layer of nitrogen into the surface of the phosphate glass, and the treatment improves the durability of the glass without the reduction in the thermal expansion coefficient that has restricted the effectiveness of prior ammonia treatments. The improved phosphate glass resulting from this method is superior in wear resistance, yet maintains suitable thermal expansion properties so that it may be used effectively in a variety of applications requiring hermetic glass-metal seals.

Brow, R.K.; Day, D.E.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

377

Control of Nepheline Crystallization in Nuclear Waste Glass  

SciTech Connect

Glass frits with a high B{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration have been designed which, when combined with high-alumina concentration nuclear waste streams, will form glasses with durabilities that are acceptable for repository disposal and predictable using a free energy of hydration model. Two glasses with nepheline discriminator values closest to 0.62 showed significant differences in normalized boron release between the quenched and heat treated versions of each glass. X-ray diffraction confirmed that nepheline crystallized in the glass with the lowest nepheline discriminator value, and nepheline may also exist in the second glass as small nanocrystals. The high-B{sub 2}O{sub 3} frit was successful in producing simulated waste glasses with no detectable nepheline crystallization at waste loadings of up to 45 wt%. The melt rate of this frit was also considerably better than other frits with increased concentrations of Na{sub 2}O.

Fox, Kevin

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Bulk Metallic Glasses Deform via Slip Avalanches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inelastic deformation of metallic glasses occurs via slip events with avalanche dynamics similar to those of earthquakes. For the first time in these materials, measurements have been obtained with sufficiently high temporal resolution to extract both the exponents and the scaling functions that describe the nature, statistics and dynamics of the slips according to a simple mean-field model. These slips originate from localized deformation in shear bands. The mean-field model describes the slip process as an avalanche of rearrangements of atoms in shear transformation zones (STZs). Small slips show the predicted power-law scaling and correspond to limited propagation of a shear front, while large slips are associated with uniform shear on unconstrained shear bands. The agreement between the model and data across multiple independent measures of slip statistics and dynamics provides compelling evidence for slip avalanches of STZs as the elementary mechanism of inhomogeneous deformation in metallic glasses.

James Antonaglia; Wendelin J. Wright; Xiaojun Gu; Rachel R. Byer; Todd C. Hufnagel; Michael LeBlanc; Jonathan T. Uhl; Karin A. Dahmen

2013-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

379

Water dynamics in controlled pore silica glasses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water in porous silica glass is a suitable system for investigating the effect of confinement on translational diffusion. These systems are important because of their relevance in catalytic and separation processes. Two factors are to be considered in the case of confined water: (1) the effects of hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces on interfacial water and (2) how the dynamics of the hydrogen bond network changes due to the volume of confinement. Here quasi-elastic neutron scattering experiments at room temperature on water filled controlled pore glasses with radius of 15, 24 and 32 {angstrom}, are presented and analyzed using the random-jump diffusion model. Both the average residence time and the mean jump distance increase with decreasing pore radius.

Bordallo, H. N.; Herwig, K. W.; Dozier, W. D.; Drake, F.

1999-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

380

DWPF Glass Melter Technology Manual: Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document details information about the design of a glass melter to be used at the Defense Waste Processing Facility located at the Savannah River Site. Topics include: melter overview, design basis, materials, vessel configuration, insulation, refractory configuration, electrical isolation, electrodes, riser and pour spout heater design, dome heaters, feed tubes, drain valves, differential pressure pouring, and melter test results. Information is conveyed using many diagrams and photographs.

Iverson, D.C.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hollow glass microspheres" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Analysis and Research on the Thermal Properties of Energy-efficient Building Glass: A Case Study in PVB Laminated Glass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new kind of PVB-laminated glass is introduced as an energy-efficient building glass. Based on tests and calculations of the shading coefficients of flat glass, LOW-E coated glass and PVB-laminated glass with different thickness, their effects on room base temperature and cooling load of the residential buildings in the hot-summer-warm-winter zone are simulated and analyzed. Compared with flat glass, the PVB laminated glass shields 44 percent of the solar radiation from entering the room and reduces 40 percent of the shading coefficient. At the same time, 28 percent of the cooling load, 21 percent of installed capacity and 8.6 percent of full-load operation time can be saved.

Chen, Z.; Meng, Q.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Methods of making glass wool blowing insulation  

SciTech Connect

A process is described of making pieces of glass wool, suitable to be blown into attics as thermal insulation, from an elongated generally laminar resiliently compressible glass wool blanket having an original thickness in an unrestrained condition and made of glass fibers bonded with thermoset resin. The process comprises feeding the blanket longitudinally through a compressing station where it is resiliently compressed from its original thickness to a smaller thickness, and feeding the compressed blanket longitudinally between a rotating backup roll and a cooperative rotating cutting roll from one side of the rolls, the cutting roll including a supporting cylinder. A plywood blade-mounting cylinder is mounted on the supporting cylinder, circular cutting blades each have shank portions spaced from each other and disposed substantially completely around an inner periphery of the blade. Straight cutting blades have shank portions spaced from each other and disposed substantially completely along a length of the blade. Resiliently compressible plugs, the circular cutting blades respectively are separately mounted on the plywood cylinder circumferentially distributed substantially throughout the length spaced equally from each other axially by a distance smaller than the original thickness of the blanket, and having their shank portions mounted respectively in slits extending substantially all the way through a wall thickness of the plywood cylinder. The straight cutting blades respectively are separatedly mounted on the plywood cylinder axially distributed throughout the circumference.

Johnson, A.R.; Yawberg, R.C.

1987-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

383

Electrostatic transfer of epitaxial graphene to glass.  

SciTech Connect

We report on a scalable electrostatic process to transfer epitaxial graphene to arbitrary glass substrates, including Pyrex and Zerodur. This transfer process could enable wafer-level integration of graphene with structured and electronically-active substrates such as MEMS and CMOS. We will describe the electrostatic transfer method and will compare the properties of the transferred graphene with nominally-equivalent 'as-grown' epitaxial graphene on SiC. The electronic properties of the graphene will be measured using magnetoresistive, four-probe, and graphene field effect transistor geometries [1]. To begin, high-quality epitaxial graphene (mobility 14,000 cm2/Vs and domains >100 {micro}m2) is grown on SiC in an argon-mediated environment [2,3]. The electrostatic transfer then takes place through the application of a large electric field between the donor graphene sample (anode) and the heated acceptor glass substrate (cathode). Using this electrostatic technique, both patterned few-layer graphene from SiC(000-1) and chip-scale monolayer graphene from SiC(0001) are transferred to Pyrex and Zerodur substrates. Subsequent examination of the transferred graphene by Raman spectroscopy confirms that the graphene can be transferred without inducing defects. Furthermore, the strain inherent in epitaxial graphene on SiC(0001) is found to be partially relaxed after the transfer to the glass substrates.

Ohta, Taisuke; Pan, Wei; Howell, Stephen Wayne; Biedermann, Laura Butler; Beechem Iii, Thomas Edwin; Ross, Anthony Joseph, III

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Standard test method for determining liquidus temperature of immobilized waste glasses and simulated waste glasses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 These practices cover procedures for determining the liquidus temperature (TL) of nuclear waste, mixed nuclear waste, simulated nuclear waste, or hazardous waste glass in the temperature range from 600°C to 1600°C. This method differs from Practice C829 in that it employs additional methods to determine TL. TL is useful in waste glass plant operation, glass formulation, and melter design to determine the minimum temperature that must be maintained in a waste glass melt to make sure that crystallization does not occur or is below a particular constraint, for example, 1 volume % crystallinity or T1%. As of now, many institutions studying waste and simulated waste vitrification are not in agreement regarding this constraint (1). 1.2 Three methods are included, differing in (1) the type of equipment available to the analyst (that is, type of furnace and characterization equipment), (2) the quantity of glass available to the analyst, (3) the precision and accuracy desired for the measurement, and (4) candi...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

High-Intensity Plasma Glass Melter Final Technical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the energy efficiency and reduced emissions that can be obtained with a dual torch DC plasma transferred arc-melting system. Plasmelt Glass Technologies, LLC was formed to solicit and execute the project, which utilize a full-scale test melter system. The system is similar to the one that was originally constructed by Johns Manville, but Plasmelt has added significant improvements to the torch design and melter system that has extended the original JM short torch lives. The original JM design has been shown to achieve melt rates 5 to 10 times faster than conventional gas or electric melting, with improved energy efficiency and reduced emissions. This project began on 7/28/2003 and ended 7/27/06. A laboratory scale melter was designed, constructed, and operated to conduct multiple experimental melting trials on various glass compositions. Glass quality was assessed. Although the melter design is generic and equally applicable to all sectors within the glass industry, the development of this melter has focused primarily on fiberglass with additional exploratory melting trials of frits, specialty, and minerals-melting applications. Throughput, energy efficiency, and glass quality have been shown to be heavily dependent on the selected glass composition. During this project, Plasmelt completed the proof-of-concept work in our Boulder, CO Lab to show the technical feasibility of this transferred-arc plasma melter. Late in the project, the work was focused on developing the processes and evaluating the economic viability of plasma melting aimed at the specific glasses of interest to specific client companies. Post project work is on going with client companies to address broader non-glass materials such as refractories and industrial minerals. Exploratory melting trials have been conducted on several glasses of commercial interest including: C-glass, E-glass, S-Glass, AR-Glass, B-glass, Lighting Glass, NE-Glass, and various frits. Exploratory melts of non-glassy materials, such as wollastonite, zirconium silicate, and alumino-silicate melts were successfully done indicating that plasma melting has potential application beyond glass. Experimental results were generated that show the high quality of plasma-melted fiberglass compositions, such as E-glass, can result in good fiberizing performance. Fiberizing performance and tensile strength data were achieved during the project to support this conclusion. High seed counts are a feature of the current lab scale melter and must be dealt with via other means, since fining work was outside the scope of this project.

Gonterman, J. Ronald; Weinstein, Michael A.

2006-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

386

A one-pot synthetic approach to prepare palladium nanoparticles embedded hierarchically porous TiO{sub 2} hollow spheres for hydrogen peroxide sensing  

SciTech Connect

A simple one-step method to fabricate hierarchically porous TiO{sub 2}/Pd composite hollow spheres without any template was developed by using solvothermal treatment. Pd nanoparticles (2-5 nm) were well dispersed in the mesopores of the TiO{sub 2} hollow spheres via in-situ reduction. In our experiment, polyvinylpyrrolidone played an important role in the synthetic process as the reducing agent and the connective material between TiO{sub 2} and Pd nanoparticles. HF species generated from solvothermal reaction leaded to the formation of TiO{sub 2} hollow spheres and Ostwald ripening was another main factor that affected the size and structure of the hollow spheres. The as-prepared TiO{sub 2}/Pd composite hollow spheres exhibited high electrocatalytic activity towards the reduction of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The sensitivity was about 226.72 {mu}A mM{sup -1} cm{sup -2} with a detection limit of 3.81 {mu}M at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. These results made the hierarchically porous TiO{sub 2}/Pd composite a promising platform for fabricating new nonenzymic biosensors. - Graphical Abstract: A new one-step solvothermal method was developed to prepare Pd nanoparticles embedded hierarchically porous TiO{sub 2} hollow spheres. Due to its unique nanostructure, the prepared TiO{sub 2}/Pd modified GC electrode exhibit a high sensitivity (226.72 {mu}A mM{sup -1} cm{sup -2}), a relatively low reduction potential (-0.2 V), a fast response time (<3 s) and a relatively low detection limit of 3.81 {mu}M (S/N=3) towards H{sub 2}O{sub 2}.

Kong Lirong [Alan G. MacDiarmid Institute, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Lu Xiaofeng, E-mail: xflu@jlu.edu.c [Alan G. MacDiarmid Institute, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Bian Xiujie; Zhang Wanjin [Alan G. MacDiarmid Institute, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Wang Ce, E-mail: cwang@jlu.edu.c [Alan G. MacDiarmid Institute, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

387

Correlation of Atomic Cluster Symmetry and Glass-Forming Ability of Metallic Glass  

SciTech Connect

Local structures play a crucial role in glass formation and properties. In addition to topological short-range order, the geometric property of site symmetry is another important but less known characteristic of local structures. It is shown that the observed sharp increase of glass forming ability of Ce{sub 70-x}Al{sub 10}Cu{sub 20}Co{sub x} upon Co addition is correlated with a dramatic increase of Al site symmetry, as reflected by decreasing quadrupole frequency measured by {sup 27}Al NMR. The result is consistent with the structure model of Al-centered icosahedral clusters as the predominant structural building blocks.

Xi Xuekui; Li Lilong; Wu Yue [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Curriculum in Applied and Materials Sciences, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-3255 (United States); Zhang Bo; Wang Weihua [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China)

2007-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

388

The beryllium hollow-body solar sail: exploration of the Sun's gravitational focus and the inner Oort Cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spacecraft kinematics, peak perihelion temperature and space environment effects during solar-radiation-pressure acceleration for a beryllium hollow-body interstellar solar sail inflated with hydrogen fill gas are investigated. We demonstrate that diffusion is alleviated by an on-board fill gas reserve and electrostatic pressure can be alleviated by increasing perihelion distance. For a 0.1 AU perihelion, a 937 m radius sail with a sail mass of 150 kg and a payload mass of 150 kg, perihelion sail temperature is about 1000 K, peak acceleration is about 0.6 g, and solar-system exit velocity is about 400 km/s. After sail deployments, the craft reaches the 200 AU heliopause in 2.5 years, the Sun's inner gravitational focus at 550 AU in about 6.5 years and 2,550 AU in 30 years. The Be hollow-body sail could be applied in the post 2040 time frame to verify general relativity predictions regarding the Sun's inner gravitational focus and to explore particles and fields in the Sun's inner Oort Comet Cloud.

Matloff, Gregory L; Maccone, Claudio; Johnson, Les

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

The beryllium hollow-body solar sail: exploration of the Sun's gravitational focus and the inner Oort Cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spacecraft kinematics, peak perihelion temperature and space environment effects during solar-radiation-pressure acceleration for a beryllium hollow-body interstellar solar sail inflated with hydrogen fill gas are investigated. We demonstrate that diffusion is alleviated by an on-board fill gas reserve and electrostatic pressure can be alleviated by increasing perihelion distance. For a 0.1 AU perihelion, a 937 m radius sail with a sail mass of 150 kg and a payload mass of 150 kg, perihelion sail temperature is about 1000 K, peak acceleration is about 0.6 g, and solar-system exit velocity is about 400 km/s. After sail deployments, the craft reaches the 200 AU heliopause in 2.5 years, the Sun's inner gravitational focus at 550 AU in about 6.5 years and 2,550 AU in 30 years. The Be hollow-body sail could be applied in the post 2040 time frame to verify general relativity predictions regarding the Sun's inner gravitational focus and to explore particles and fields in the Sun's inner Oort Comet Cloud.

Gregory L. Matloff; Roman Ya. Kezerashvili; Claudio Maccone; Les Johnson

2008-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

390

Decontamination of DWPF canisters by glass frit blasting  

SciTech Connect

High-level radioactive waste at the Savannah River Plant will be incorporated in borosilicate glass for permanent disposal. The waste glass will be encapsulated in a 304L stainless steel canister. During the filling operation the outside of the canister will become contaminated. This contamination must be reduced to an accepable level before the canister leaves the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Tests with contaminated coupons have demonstrated that this decontamination can be accomplished by blasting the surface with glass frit. The contaminated glass frit byproduct of this operation is used as a feedstock for the waste glass process, so no secondary waste is created. Three blasting techniques, using glass frit as the blasting medium, were evaluated. Air-injected slurry blasting was the most promising and was chosen for further development. The optimum parametric values for this process were determined in tests using coupon weight loss as the output parameter. 1 reference, 13 figures, 3 tables.

Ward, C.R.; Rankin, W.N.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Improving Glass Walls Thermal Resistance In Air-Conditioned Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The solar radiation through an air conditioned building depends on what is called the building envelope. Building envelope consists of the surfaces that separate the inside from the building outdoors. Area, direction, and specifications of glass walls; as one of envelope surfaces; has an important impact on solar radiation. Design and construction of glass walls have significant effects on building comfort and energy consumption. This paper describes methods of improving glass walls thermal resistance in air conditioned buildings. Effect of glass wall radiation temperature on the indoor temperature distribution of building rooms is also investigated. Heat gain through various types of glass is discussed. Optimization and testing of these types are carried out theoretically and experimentally as well. A series of experiments on different types of glass with special strips is performed.

Galal, T.; Kulaib, A. M.; Alajmi, R.; Al-Ansary. A; Abuzaid, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

EMPIRICAL MODEL FOR FORMULATION OF CRYSTAL-TOLERANT HLW GLASSES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historically, high-level waste (HLW) glasses have been formulated with a low liquideus temperature (T{sub L}), or temperature at which the equilibrium fraction of spinel crystals in the melt is below 1 vol % (T{sub 0.01}), nominally below 1050 C. These constraints cannot prevent the accumulation of large spinel crystals in considerably cooler regions ({approx} 850 C) of the glass discharge riser during melter idling and significantly limit the waste loading, which is reflected in a high volume of waste glass, and would result in high capital, production, and disposal costs. A developed empirical model predicts crystal accumulation in the riser of the melter as a function of concentration of spinel-forming components in glass, and thereby provides guidance in formulating crystal-tolerant glasses that would allow high waste loadings by keeping the spinel crystals small and therefore suspended in the glass.

KRUGER AA; MATYAS J; HUCKLEBERRY AR; VIENNA JD; RODRIGUEZ CA

2012-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

393

Method for forming glass-to-metal seals  

SciTech Connect

A method for forming a glass-to-metal seal in which the glass has a higher melting point than the metal. The molten glass is vacuum injection molded onto the metal, thus melting a very thin layer of the surface of the metal long enough to form a seal, but not long enough to cause a distortion in the shape of the metal component.

Kramer, Daniel P. (Dayton, OH); Massey, Richard T. (Hamilton, OH)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Using sputter coated glass to stabilize microstrip gas chambers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

By sputter coating a thin-layer of low-resistive, electronically-conductive glass on various substrates (including quartz and ceramics, thin-film Pestov glass), microstrip gas chambers (MSGC) of high gain stability, low leakage current, and a high rate capability can be fabricated. This design can make the choice of substrate less important, save the cost of ion-implantation, and use less glass material.

Gong, Wen G. (Albany, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Graded index antireflective coatings for glass. Second annual report  

SciTech Connect

M.I.T. is conducting research which will lead to a process for forming broad band antireflective (AR) coatings on glass. Use of these coatings increases the extractable heat from flat-plate solar collectors by 30 to 50% compared with their performance under equivalent solar flux, surface temperature and ambient conditions without broad band AR coatings. Graded index surface films can virtually eliminate reflection losses if controlled properly. Graded index films on a borosilicate glass (Corning Glass Works No. 7740, Pyrex) has been demonstrated. While glass treated this way exhibited adequate optical properties, the glass itself, cannot be fabricated by the float glass process because of excessive working temperatures, and consequently is too expensive for solar applications. The objective of this work is to define glass compositions and processing steps which will result in graded index surface films (which exhibit broad band AR characteristics) on glasses which can be fabricated by the float glass process. The mechanism by which these graded index surface films are produced on glass surfaces consists of preferentially etching one phase from a phase separated glass. The film which remains consists of a porous structure in which the fraction of solid phase increases continuously from the free surface toward the bulk glass. Scattering effects are eliminated by limiting the size of the pore structure to dimensions which are substantially less than the wavelength of light. With this structure, the local index of refraction is proportional to the fraction of solid phase which is present. Characterizations are intended to define the microstructural and chemical nature of the surface film throughout its thickness. Progress is reported. (WHK)

Haggerty, J.S.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Formulation and Characterization of Waste Glasses with Varying Processing Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the preliminary results of glass formulation and characterization accomplished within the finished scope of the EM-31 technology development tasks for WP-4 and WP-5, including WP-4.1.2: Glass Formulation for Next Generation Melter, WP-5.1.2.3: Systematic Glass Studies, and WP-5.1.2.4: Glass Formulation for Specific Wastes. This report also presents the suggested studies for eventual restart of these tasks. The initial glass formulation efforts for the cold crucible induction melter (CCIM), operating at {approx}1200 C, with selected HLW (AZ-101) and LAW (AN-105) successfully developed glasses with significant increase of waste loading compared to that is likely to be achieved based on expected reference WTP formulations. Three glasses formulated for AZ-101HLW and one glass for AN-105 LAW were selected for the initial CCIM demonstration melter tests. Melter tests were not performed within the finished scope of the WP-4.1.2 task. Glass formulations for CCIM were expanded to cover additional HLWs that have high potential to successfully demonstrate the unique advantages of the CCIM technologies based on projected composition of Hanford wastes. However, only the preliminary scoping tests were completed with selected wastes within the finished scope. Advanced glass formulations for the reference WTP melter, operating at {approx}1200 C, were initiated with selected specific wastes to determine the estimated maximum waste loading. The incomplete results from these initial formulation efforts are summarized. For systematic glass studies, a test matrix of 32 high-aluminum glasses was completed based on a new method developed in this study.

Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, M. J.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Lepry, William C.; Lang, Jesse B.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Vienna, John D.; Johnson, Fabienne; Marra, James C.; Peeler, David K.

2011-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

397

Low temperature process for obtaining thin glass films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for coating a substrate with a glass-like film comprises, applying to the substrate an aqueous alcoholic solution containing a polymeric network of partially hydrolyzed metal alkoxide into which network there is incorporated finely powdered glass, whereby there is achieved on the substrate a coherent and adherent initial film; and heating said film to a temperature sufficient to melt said powdered glass component, thereby converting said initial film to a final densified film.

Brinker, C. Jeffrey (Albuquerque, NM); Reed, Scott T. (Albuquerque, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Aging, Fragility and Reversibility Window in Bulk Alloy Glasses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-reversing relaxation enthalpies (DHnr) at glass transitions Tg(x) in the PxGexSe1-2x ternary display wide, sharp and deep global minima (~ 0) in the 0.09 age, in contrast to aging observed for fragile glass compositions outside the window. Thermal reversibility and lack of aging seem to be paradigms of self-organization which molecular glasses share with protein structures which repetitively and reversibly change conformation near Tg and the folding temperature respectively.

S. Chakravarty; D. G. Georgiev; P. Boolchand; M. Micoulaut

2007-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

399

Method and apparatus for making uniform pellets for fusion reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for making uniform pellets for laser driven fusion reactors which comprises selection of a quantity of glass frit which has been accurately classified as to size within a few micrometers and contains an occluded material, such as urea, which gasifies and expands when heated. The sized particles are introduced into an apparatus which includes a heated vertical tube with temperatures ranging from 800.degree. C to 1300.degree. C. The particles are heated during the drop through the tube to molten condition wherein the occluded material gasifies to form hollow microspheres which stabilize in shape and plunge into a collecting liquid at the bottom of the tube. The apparatus includes the vertical heat resistant tube, heaters for the various zones of the tube and means for introducing the frit and collecting the formed microspheres.

Budrick, Ronald G. (Ann Arbor, MI); King, Frank T. (Hillsboro, OR); Martin, Alfred J. (Ann Arbor, MI); Nolen, Jr., Robert L. (Ann Arbor, MI); Solomon, David E. (Ann Arbor, MI)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Optical Spectroscopy of Borate Glasses Doped with Trivalent Rare ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Luminescence properties of rare-earth ions are well-known, but quantum efficiencies ... Ion Exchanged Mixed Glass Cullet Proppants for Stimulation of Oil and ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hollow glass microspheres" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Glass Ceramic Waste Form Development for Fission Products from ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Materials Issues in Nuclear Waste Management in the 21st Century. Presentation Title, Glass Ceramic Waste Form Development for Fission ...

402

Glass Does a Double-Take | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Highlights rss feed Glass Does a Double-Take APRIL 4, 2008 Bookmark and Share Predicted phase diagram as a function of reduced temperature () and volume fraction (). Inset...

403

Metallic Glasses for Electro-Catalytic Applications - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motivated by these characteristics, we have explored the use of a number of metallic glasses as electro-catalysts in direct alcohol fuel cells. We demonstrate that ...

404

LBNL-5022E Research Needs: Glass Solar Reflectance and Vinyl...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

022E Research Needs: Glass Solar Reflectance and Vinyl Siding Authors: R. Hart*, C. Curcija, D. Arasteh, H. Goudey, C. Kohler, S. Selkowitz Environmental Energy Technologies...

405

Characterization of Fluorescent Lamp Glass Waste Powders for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The glass waste presents favorable characteristics for incorporation into clayey ceramic ... Codin, Located in Campos (RJ), to Produce Soil-Cement Blocks.

406

Welding/sealing glass-enclosed space in a vacuum  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of welding and sealing the edges of two juxtaposed glass sheets together to seal a vacuum space between the sheets comprises the steps of positioning a radiation absorbent material, such as FeO, VO{sub 2}, or NiO, between the radiation transmissive glass sheets adjacent the edges and then irradiating the absorbent material, preferably with a laser beam, through at least one of the glass sheets. Heat produced by the absorbed radiation in the absorbent material melts glass in the portions of both glass sheets that are adjacent the absorbent material, and the melted glass from both sheets flows together to create the weld when the melted glass cools and hardens. The absorbent material can be dissolved and diffused into the melted glass to the extent that it no longer absorbs enough energy to keep the glass melted, thus, with appropriate proportioning of absorbent material to source energy power and welding heat needed, the process can be made self-stopping. 8 figs.

Tracy, C.E.; Benson, D.K.

1996-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

407

047 Glass-Ceramic Composites for High Energy Density Capacitors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

047 Glass-Ceramic Composites for High Energy Density Capacitors .... 150 Analysis of Hf-Ta Alloys for Oxidation Protection in Ultra High Temperature ...

408

Research Needs: Glass Solar Reflectance and Vinyl Siding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

properties of reflected solar radiation from glass surfaces,transfer at the siding surface. Direct solar radiation tosiding, reflected solar radiation from nearby surfaces,

Hart, Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Atomic Structure and its Change during Glass Transition of Metallic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In addition, we will discuss how the atomic structure evolves during glass transition ... Age Hardening of 7075 Alloy Processed by High-pressure Sliding ( HPS).

410

Welding/sealing glass-enclosed space in a vacuum  

SciTech Connect

A method of welding and sealing the edges of two juxtaposed glass sheets together to seal a vacuum space between the sheets comprises the steps of positioning a radiation absorbant material, such as FeO, VO.sub.2, or NiO, between the radiation transmissive glass sheets adjacent the edges and then irradiating the absorbant material, preferably with a laser beam, through at least one of the glass sheets. Heat produced by the absorbed radiation in the absorbant material melts glass in the portions of both glass sheets that are adjacent the absorbant material, and the melted glass from both sheets flows together to create the weld when the melted glass cools and hardens. The absorbant material can be dissolved and diffused into the melted glass to the extent that it no longer absorbs enough energy to keep the glass melted, thus, with appropriate proportioning of absorbant material to source energy power and welding heat needed, the process can be made self-stopping.

Tracy, C. Edwin (Golden, CO); Benson, David K. (Golden, CO)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Edge-Strength of Thin Chemically Strengthened Glass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Structure and Transport Properties of Nanoconfined Water in Porous Silica and Water-Glass ... on the Mechanical and Optical Properties of Multiphase Ceramics.

412

Nano/Micro Vacuum Triodes Using Glass Fiber Drawing Methods  

Nano/Micro Vacuum Triodes Using Glass Fiber Drawing Methods Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity. Licensing rights to this intellectual ...

413

Electrical Properties and Glasses for Energy and Memory Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 9, 2012 ... Terahertz Properties of Lithium Iron Phosphate Glasses: Robert ... to form a viscous, gas-tight, and stress-free sealing layer during the cell ...

414

Potential for energy conservation in the glass industry  

SciTech Connect

While the glass industry (flat glass, container glass, pressed and blown glass, and insulation fiber glass) has reduced its specific energy use (Btu/ton) by almost 30% since 1972, significant potential for further reduction still remains. State-of-the-art technologies are available which could lead to incremental improvements in glass industry energy productivity; however, these technologies must compete for capital with projects undertaken for other reasons (e.g., capacity expansion, equipment rebuild, labor cost reduction, product quality improvement, or compliance with environmental, health or safety regulations). Narrowing profit margins in the large tonnage segments of the glass industry in recent years and the fact that energy costs represent less than 25% of the value added in glass manufacture have combined to impede the widespread adoption of many state-of-the-art conservation technologies. Savings in energy costs alone have not provided the incentive to justify the capital expenditures required to realize the energy savings. Beyond implementation of state-of-the-art technologies, significant potential energy savings could accrue from advanced technologies which represent a radical departure from current glass making technology. Long-term research and development (R and D) programs, which address the technical and economic barriers associated with advanced, energy-conserving technologies, offer the opportunity to realize this energy-saving potential.

Garrett-Price, B.A.; Fassbender, A.G.; Bruno, G.A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Cavitation in Metallic Glass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have undertaken a series of molecular dynamics simulations of cavitation under hydrostatic tension in a binary metallic glass analog using pair-wise ...

416

High-Speed Fracture Phenomena of Glass Bottle by Underwater ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, High-Speed Fracture Phenomena of Glass Bottle by Underwater Shock Wave. Author(s), Hidetoshi Sakamoto, Shinjirou Kawabe, Yoshifumi ...

417

Vitrification of DOE Problematic Wastes Using Iron Phosphate Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, This work is to formulate and optimize iron phosphate glass compositions which are suitable for vitrifying several specified Hanford HLW and  ...

418

Borosilicate Glass Formulations for Advanced Joule Heated Melters  

Summary – Hanford High Cr/S HLW • Selected formulations have waste loadings of 40 and 45 wt% • ~23 – 38% increase over previous glass formulations

419

Glass fiber composition. [for use as thermal insulation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a glass fiber composition useful for thermal insulation having a low melting temperature and high chemical durability.

Wolf, G.A.; Kupfer, M.J.

1980-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

420

In Situ Structural Characterization for Metallic Glasses and Nano ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, In Situ Structural Characterization for Metallic Glasses and Nano-materials under High Pressure via Synchrotron Techniques. Author(s) ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hollow glass microspheres" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Vitrification and Glass Characterization for Nuclear Materials Disposal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 20, 2011 ... One significant limitation to waste loading in glass for Hanford .... to the high level sludge vitrified at the Defense Waste Processing Facility.

422

Interaction-Flip Identities in Spin Glasses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the properties of fluctuation for the free energies and internal energies of two spin glass systems that differ for having some set of interactions flipped. We show that their difference has a variance that grows like the volume of the flipped region. Using a new interpolation method, which extends to the entire circle the standard interpolation technique, we show by integration by parts that the bound imply new overlap identities for the equilibrium state. As a side result the case of the non-interacting random field is analyzed and the triviality of its overlap distribution proved.

Pierluigi Contucci; Cristian Giardina; Claudio Giberti

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

423

Molten Glass for Thermal Storage: Advanced Molten Glass for Heat Transfer and Thermal Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HEATS Project: Halotechnics is developing a high-temperature thermal energy storage system using a new thermal-storage and heat-transfer material: earth-abundant and low-melting-point molten glass. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun is not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. Halotechnics new thermal storage material targets a price that is potentially cheaper than the molten salt used in most commercial solar thermal storage systems today. It is also extremely stable at temperatures up to 1200°C—hundreds of degrees hotter than the highest temperature molten salt can handle. Being able to function at high temperatures will significantly increase the efficiency of turning heat into electricity. Halotechnics is developing a scalable system to pump, heat, store, and discharge the molten glass. The company is leveraging technology used in the modern glass industry, which has decades of experience handling molten glass.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

A comparison of glass reaction at high and low glass surface/solution volume  

SciTech Connect

Static leach tests have been performed at glass surface area/leachant volume (SA/V) ratios of 10, 340, 2,000, and 20,000 m[sup [minus]1] to assess the effects of the SA/V on the mechanism and rate of the glass reaction. Tests were performed using actinide-doped borosilicate waste glasses [Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) 131 and SRL 202] to monitor the distribution of released radionuclides in tests at different SA/V. Solution results show the major effect of the SA/V to be dilution of reaction of products. Differences in the pH and silicic acid concentrations attained in tests at different SA/V then affect the reaction rate. Tests at low SA/V maintain leachate pH values similar to the initial leachant, while tests at higher SA/V result in higher leachate pH values being attained due to ion-exchange reactions. Transuranics released as the glass corrodes may exist in the leachate in concentrations far above their solubility limits by sorbing onto colloids, although the colloids may eventually settle out of solution. Transuranics also sorb onto the steel reaction vessel. The glass reaction progress can be characterized by three stages: (a) an initial stage where the reaction rate depends on the leachant pH, (b) an intermediate stage where the reaction slows toward a minimum rate as the leachate solution approaches saturation,'' and (c) a long-term stage where the reaction rate may be affected by the formation of secondary phases that control the solution chemistry. Tests at different SA/V cannot always be compared directly because the dominant reaction step and the observed reaction stage (initial, intermediate, or long-term) may not be the same.

Ebert, W.L.; Bates, J.K. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Modeling and simulation of CO2 removal from power plant flue gas by PG solution in a hollow fiber membrane contactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The absorption of carbon dioxide from nitrogen-carbon dioxide mixture was investigated in a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) hollow fiber membrane module using potassium glycinate (PG) aqueous solution. A mathematical model was developed to simulate the ... Keywords: Absorption, Flue gas, Membrane contactor, Modeling, Potassium glycinate, Power plant

S. Eslami; S. M. Mousavi; S. Danesh; H. Banazadeh

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Direct observation of a magnetic Bose glass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Bose glass is a novel state of matter that emerges in systems of interacting bosons in the presence of quenched disorder. At sufficiently low temperatures, disorder-free bosons are subject to so-called Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC). BEC can involve atoms in liquid 4He, laser-cooled ions in magnetic traps,2 Cooper pairs in superconductors, or magnons in magnetic systems. Due to peculiarities of Bose statistics, particles lose their individuality and occupy a unique quantum-mechanical state. The wave function of this condensate establishes long-range quantum phase coherence across a macroscopic sample. This, in turn, spawns unique quantum phenomena such as superfluity,5 Josephson effect6 and vortex matter. For repulsive bosons, quenched disorder disrupts the condensate and interferes with phase coherence. The result is a peculiar glassy state with only short-range phase correlations. While some experimental evidence of this was found in ultracold atoms,9 novel high-temperature superconductors,10 and quantum magnets,11, 12 none of the studies were direct. The key characteristic, namely the wave function of the condensate disrupted by disorder on the microscopic scale, remained inaccessible. Hereby we report a direct neutron diffraction observation of short range correlations of the BEC order parameter in a magnetic Bose glass. This phase is realized in the quantum spin ladder compound IPA-Cu(Cl0.96Br0.04)3, where disorder is induced by random chemical substitution.

Hong, Tao [ORNL; Zheludev, Andrey I [ORNL; Manaka, H. [Kagoshima University, Kagoshima JAPAN; Regnault, L.-P. [CEA, Grenoble, France

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Glass Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Glass Mountain Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Glass Mountain Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (2) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7,"lon":-121.45,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

428

Reduction of Glass Surface Reflectance by Ion Beam Surface Modification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the final report for DOE contract DE-EE0000590. The purpose of this work was to determine the feasibility of the reduction of the reflection from the front of solar photovoltaic modules. Reflection accounts for a power loss of approximately 4%. A solar module having an area of one square meter with an energy conversion efficiency of 18% generates approximately 180 watts. If reflection loss can be eliminated, the power output can be increased to 187 watts. Since conventional thin-film anti-reflection coatings do not have sufficient environmental stability, we investigated the feasibility of ion beam modification of the glass surface to obtain reduction of reflectance. Our findings are generally applicable to all solar modules that use glass encapsulation, as well as commercial float glass used in windows and other applications. Ion implantation of argon, fluorine, and xenon into commercial low-iron soda lime float glass, standard float glass, and borosilicate glass was studied by implantation, annealing, and measurement of reflectance. The three ions all affected reflectance. The most significant change was obtained by argon implantation into both low-iron and standard soda-lime glass. In this way samples were formed with reflectance lower than can be obtained with a single-layer coatings of magnesium fluoride. Integrated reflectance was reduced from 4% to 1% in low-iron soda lime glass typical of the glass used in solar modules. The reduction of reflectance of borosilicate glass was not as large; however borosilicate glass is not typically used in flat plate solar modules. Unlike conventional semiconductor ion implantation doping, glass reflectance reduction was found to be tolerant to large variations in implant dose, meaning that the process does not require high dopant uniformity. Additionally, glass implantation does not require mass analysis. Simple, high current ion implantation equipment can be developed for this process; however, before the process can be employed on full scale solar modules, equipment must be developed for ion implanting large sheets of glass. A cost analysis shows that the process can be economical. Our finding is that the reduction of reflectance by ion beam surface modification is technically and economically feasible. The public will benefit directly from this work by the improvement of photovoltaic module efficiency, and indirectly by the greater understanding of the modification of glass surfaces by ion beams.

Mark Spitzer

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

429

Initial Examination of Low Velocity Sphere Impact of Glass Ceramics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes US Army TARDEC sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) involving low velocity (energy of impact and the elastic property mismatch between sphere and target material. Quasistatic spherical indentation was also performed on both glass ceramics and their contact damage responses were compared to those of soda-lime silicate and borosilicate glasses. Lastly, variability of contact damage response was assessed by performing spherical indentation testing across the area of an entire glass ceramic tile. The primary observations from this low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) testing were: (1) Resistan{trademark}-L glass ceramic required the highest velocity of sphere impact for damage to initiate. Starphire{reg_sign} soda-lime silicate glass was second best, then Resistan{trademark}-G1 glass ceramic, and then BOROFLOAT{reg_sign} borosilicate glass. (2) Glass-ceramic Resistan{trademark}-L also required the largest force to initiate ring crack from quasi-static indentation. That ranking was followed, in descending order, by Starphire{reg_sign} soda-lime silicate glass, Resistan{trademark}-G1 glass ceramic, and BOROFLOAT{reg_sign} borosilicate glass. (3) Spheres with a lower elastic modulus require less force to initiate fracture in Resistan{trademark}-G1 from quasi-static spherical indentation. This indicates that friction is affecting ring crack initiation in Resistan{trademark}-G1. Friction also affected ring crack initiation in Starphire{reg_sign} soda-lime silicate and BOROFLOAT{reg_sign} borosilicate glasses. Among these three materials, friction was the most pronounced (largest slope in the RCIF-elastic modulus graph) in the Starphire{reg_sign} and least pronounced in the BOROFLOAT{reg_sign}. The reason for this is not understood, but differences in deformation behavior under high contact stresses could be a cause or contributor to this. (4) The force necessary to initiate contact-induced fracture is higher under dynamic conditions than it is under quasi-static conditions in Resistan{trademark}-L and Resistan{trademark}-G1 glass ceramics. This is a trend observed too in Starphire{reg_sign} and BOROFLOAT{reg_sign}. (5) There is a subtle indication there was intra-tile differences in spherical indentation-induced ring crack initiation forces. This is not a material property nor is it exclusive to glass-ceramic Resistan{trademark}-G1 glass ceramic, rather, it is a statistical mechanical response to an accumulated history of processing and handling of that specific tile.

Morrissey, Timothy G [ORNL; Fox, Ethan E [ORNL; Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL; Ferber, Mattison K [ORNL

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Optical Basicity and Nepheline Crystallization in High Alumina Glasses  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to find compositions that increase waste loading of high-alumina wastes beyond what is currently acceptable while avoiding crystallization of nepheline (NaAlSiO4) on slow cooling. Nepheline crystallization has been shown to have a large impact on the chemical durability of high-level waste glasses. It was hypothesized that there would be some composition regions where high-alumina would not result in nepheline crystal production, compositions not currently allowed by the nepheline discriminator. Optical basicity (OB) and the nepheline discriminator (ND) are two ways of describing a given complex glass composition. This report presents the theoretical and experimental basis for these models. They are being studied together in a quadrant system as metrics to explore nepheline crystallization and chemical durability as a function of waste glass composition. These metrics were calculated for glasses with existing data and also for theoretical glasses to explore nepheline formation in Quadrant IV (passes OB metric but fails ND metric), where glasses are presumed to have good chemical durability. Several of these compositions were chosen, and glasses were made to fill poorly represented regions in Quadrant IV. To evaluate nepheline formation and chemical durability of these glasses, quantitative X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and the Product Consistency Test were conducted. A large amount of quantitative XRD data is collected here, both from new glasses and from glasses of previous studies that had not previously performed quantitative XRD on the phase assemblage. Appendix A critically discusses a large dataset to be considered for future quantitative studies on nepheline formation in glass. Appendix B provides a theoretical justification for choice of the oxide coefficients used to compute the OB criterion for nepheline formation.

Rodriguez, Carmen P.; McCloy, John S.; Schweiger, M. J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Winschell, Abigail E.

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

431

Initial Examination of Low Velocity Sphere Impact of Glass Ceramics  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes US Army TARDEC sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) involving low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) sphere impact testing of two materials from the lithium aluminosilicate family reinforced with different amounts of ceramic particulate, i.e., glass-ceramic materials, SCHOTT Resistan{trademark}-G1 and SCHOTT Resistan{trademark}-L. Both materials are provided by SCHOTT Glass (Duryea, PA). This work is a follow-up to similar sphere impact studies completed by the authors on PPG's Starphire{reg_sign} soda-lime silicate glass and SCHOTT BOROFLOAT{reg_sign} borosilicate glass. A gas gun or a sphere-drop test setup was used to produce controlled velocity delivery of silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) spheres against the glass ceramic tile targets. Minimum impact velocities to initiate fracture in the glass-ceramics were measured and interpreted in context to the kinetic energy of impact and the elastic property mismatch between sphere and target material. Quasistatic spherical indentation was also performed on both glass ceramics and their contact damage responses were compared to those of soda-lime silicate and borosilicate glasses. Lastly, variability of contact damage response was assessed by performing spherical indentation testing across the area of an entire glass ceramic tile. The primary observations from this low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) testing were: (1) Resistan{trademark}-L glass ceramic required the highest velocity of sphere impact for damage to initiate. Starphire{reg_sign} soda-lime silicate glass was second best, then Resistan{trademark}-G1 glass ceramic, and then BOROFLOAT{reg_sign} borosilicate glass. (2) Glass-ceramic Resistan{trademark}-L also required the largest force to initiate ring crack from quasi-static indentation. That ranking was followed, in descending order, by Starphire{reg_sign} soda-lime silicate glass, Resistan{trademark}-G1 glass ceramic, and BOROFLOAT{reg_sign} borosilicate glass. (3) Spheres with a lower elastic modulus require less force to initiate fracture in Resistan{trademark}-G1 from quasi-static spherical indentation. This indicates that friction is affecting ring crack initiation in Resistan{trademark}-G1. Friction also affected ring crack initiation in Starphire{reg_sign} soda-lime silicate and BOROFLOAT{reg_sign} borosilicate glasses. Among these three materials, friction was the most pronounced (largest slope in the RCIF-elastic modulus graph) in the Starphire{reg_sign} and least pronounced in the BOROFLOAT{reg_sign}. The reason for this is not understood, but differences in deformation behavior under high contact stresses could be a cause or contributor to this. (4) The force necessary to initiate contact-induced fracture is higher under dynamic conditions than it is under quasi-static conditions in Resistan{trademark}-L and Resistan{trademark}-G1 glass ceramics. This is a trend observed too in Starphire{reg_sign} and BOROFLOAT{reg_sign}. (5) There is a subtle indication there was intra-tile differences in spherical indentation-induced ring crack initiation forces. This is not a material property nor is it exclusive to glass-ceramic Resistan{trademark}-G1 glass ceramic, rather, it is a statistical mechanical response to an accumulated history of processing and handling of that specific tile.

Morrissey, Timothy G [ORNL; Fox, Ethan E [ORNL; Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL; Ferber, Mattison K [ORNL

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

ANOMALOUS ELECTRON PRODUCTION IN THE LEAD-GLASS WALL EXPERIMENT AT SPEAR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

x 19 array of lea,J-glass "back-block counters" (BB), 10.Sdeposited in the lead-glass back blocks (ESS) is (Thisactive converter (baelblock) lead-glass counter was viewed

Madaras, R.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Glass Formation and Phase Equilibria Studies in the TeO 2 -ZnO ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2013. Symposium, Glass and ... Glass Formation of LaTiZrO System by Containerless Processing ... Ion Exchanged Mixed Glass Cullet Proppants for Stimulation of Oil and Natural Gas Bearing Shales.

434

Constructing magnetic polyaniline/metal hybrid nanostructures using polyaniline/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} composite hollow spheres as supports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polyaniline (PANI)/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} composite hollow spheres have been successfully synthesized in one step using sulfonated polystyrene (PS) spheres as templates. The magnetic PANI hollow spheres were used as supports for noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) such as Au and Pd. The morphology, composition and magnetic properties of the resulting products were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma (ICP) atomic spectra and vibrating sample magnetometer. The catalytic activity of magnetic PANI/Au composite shells on the oxidation of dopamine was investigated by cyclic voltammetry. The obtained results provide our product with a practical application for the detection of dopamine. On the other hand, the catalytic activity of magnetic PANI/Pd composite shells on the reduction of 4-nitroaniline was investigated by spectroscopic methods and compared with Pd/C catalyst which was already widely used in industrial production. - Graphical abstract: TEM image of PANI/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} hollow spheres which can be used as supports for a variety of catalysts such as noble metal nanoparticles. Based on the unique properties of polyaniline hollow spheres and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs, we designed the synthesis of polyaniline/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs composite hollow spheres as supports for catalysts such as noble metal NPs. As a result, the obtained composites exhibit enhanced catalytic activities and can be easily separated from reaction mixture by using an NdFeB permanent magnet.

Kong Lirong; Lu Xiaofeng; Jin, E; Jiang Shan; Bian Xiujie [Alan G. MacDiarmid Institute, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Zhang Wanjin, E-mail: wjzhang@jlu.edu.c [Alan G. MacDiarmid Institute, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Wang Ce, E-mail: cwang@jlu.edu.c [Alan G. MacDiarmid Institute, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

435

Assessment, development, and testing of glass for blast environments.  

SciTech Connect

Glass can have lethal effects including fatalities and injuries when it breaks and then flies through the air under blast loading (''the glass problem''). One goal of this program was to assess the glass problem and solutions being pursued to mitigate it. One solution to the problem is the development of new glass technology that allows the strength and fragmentation to be controlled or selected depending on the blast performance specifications. For example the glass could be weak and fail, or it could be strong and survive, but it must perform reliably. Also, once it fails it should produce fragments of a controlled size. Under certain circumstances it may be beneficial to have very small fragments, in others it may be beneficial to have large fragments that stay together. The second goal of this program was to evaluate the performance (strength, reliability, and fragmentation) of Engineered Stress Profile (ESP) glass under different loading conditions. These included pseudo-static strength and pressure tests and free-field blast tests. The ultimate goal was to provide engineers and architects with a glass whose behavior under blast loading is less lethal. A near-term benefit is a new approach for improving the reliability of glass and modifying its fracture behavior.

Glass, Sarah Jill

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Thermodynamics and Universality for Mean Field Quantum Spin Glasses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study aspects of the thermodynamics of quantum versions of spin glasses. By means of the Lie-Trotter formula for exponential sums of operators, we adapt methods used to analyze classical spin glass models to answer analogous questions about quantum models.

Nick Crawford

2006-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

437

Solubility effects in waste-glass/demineralized-water systems  

SciTech Connect

Aqueous systems involving demineralized water and four glass compositions (including standins for actinides and fission products) at temperatures of up to 150/sup 0/C were studied. Two methods were used to measure the solubility of glass components in demineralized water. One method involved approaching equilibrium from subsaturation, while the second method involved approaching equilibrium from supersaturation. The aqueous solutions were analyzed by induction-coupled plasma spectrometry (ICP). Uranium was determined using a Scintrex U-A3 uranium analyzer and zinc and cesium were determined by atomic absorption. The system that results when a waste glass is contacted with demineralized water is a complex one. The two methods used to determine the solubility limits gave very different results, with the supersaturation method yielding much higher solution concentrations than the subsaturation method for most of the elements present in the waste glasses. The results show that it is impossible to assign solubility limits to the various glass components without thoroughly describing the glass-water systems. This includes not only defining the glass type and solution temperature, but also the glass surface area-to-water volume ratio (S/V) of the system and the complete thermal history of the system. 21 figures, 22 tables. (DLC)

Fullam, H.T.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Disposition of actinides released from high-level waste glass  

SciTech Connect

A series of static leach tests was conducted using glasses developed for vitrifying tank wastes at the Savannah River Site to monitor the disposition of actinide elements upon corrosion of the glasses. In these tests, glasses produced from SRL 131 and SRL 202 frits were corroded at 90{degrees}C in a tuff groundwater. Tests were conducted using crushed glass at different glass surface area-to-solution volume (S/V) ratios to assess the effect of the S/V on the solution chemistry, the corrosion of the glass, and the disposition of actinide elements. Observations regarding the effects of the S/V on the solution chemistry and the corrosion of the glass matrix have been reported previously. This paper highlights the solution analyses performed to assess how the S/V used in a static leach test affects the disposition of actinide elements between fractions that are suspended or dissolved in the solution, and retained by the altered glass or other materials.

Ebert, W.L.; Bates, J.K.; Buck, E.C.; Gong, M.; Wolf, S.F.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Glass for low-cost photovoltaic solar arrays  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In photovoltaic systems, the encapsulant material that protects the solar cells should be highly transparent and very durable. Glass satisfies these two criteria and is considered a primary candidate for low-cost, photovoltaic encapsulation systems. In this report, various aspects of glass encapsulation are treated that are important for the designer of photovoltaic systems. Candidate glasses and available information defining the state of the art of glass encapsulation materials and processes for automated, high volume production of terrestrial photovoltaic devices and related applications are presented. The criteria for consideration of the glass encapsulation systems were based on the LSA (Low-cost Solar Array) Project goals for arrays: (a) a low degradation rate, (b) high reliability, (c) an efficiency greater than 10 percent, (d) a total array price less than $500/kW, and (e) a production capacity of 5 x 10/sup 5/ kW/yr. The glass design areas treated herein include the types of glass, sources and costs, physical properties and glass modifications, such as antireflection coatings. 78 references.

Bouquet, F.L.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

DWPF Melter Glass Pump Implementation and Design Improvement  

SciTech Connect

In order to improve the melt rate of high level waste slurry feed being vitrified in the Savannah River Sites (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Melter, a melter glass pump (pump 1) was installed in the DWPF Melter on February 10, 2004. The glass pump increased melt rate by generating a forced convection within the molten glass pool, thereby increasing the heat transfer from the molten glass to the unmolten feed cold cap that is on top of the glass pool. After operating for over four months, the pump was removed on June 22, 2004 due to indications that it had failed. The removed pump exhibited obvious signs of corrosion, had collapsed inward at the glass exit slots at the melt line, and was dog-legged in the same area. This lead to the pump being redesigned to improve its mechanical integrity (increased wall thickness and strength) while maintaining its hydraulic diameter as large as possible. The improved DWPF glass pump (pump 2) was installed on September 15, 2004. The impact of the new design on pump life, along with analysis of the glass pumps impact on melt rate in the DWPF Melter is discussed in this paper.

MICHAEL, SMITH

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hollow glass microspheres" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

The recycling of the coal fly ash in glass production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recycling of fly ash obtained from the combustion of coal in thermal power plant has been studied. Coal fly ash was vitrified by melting at 1773 K for 5 hours without any additives. The properties of glasses produced from coal fly ash were investigated by means of Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) techniques. DTA study indicated that there was only one endothermic peak at 1003 K corresponding to the glass transition temperature. XRD analysis showed the amorphous state of the glass sample produced from coal fly ash. SEM investigations revealed that the coal fly ash based glass sample had smooth surface. The mechanical, physical and chemical properties of the glass sample were also determined. Recycling of coal fly ash by using vitrification technique resulted to a glass material that had good mechanical, physical and chemical properties. Toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) results showed that the heavy metals of Pb, Cr, Zn and Mn were successfully immobilized into the glass. It can be said that glass sample obtained by the recycling of coal fly ash can be taken as a non-hazardous material. Overall, results indicated that the vitrification technique is an effective way for the stabilization and recycling of coal fly ash.

Erol, M.M.; Kucukbayrak, S.; Ersoy-Mericboyu, A. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

442

Development of hollow fiber catalytic membrane reactors for high temperature gas cleanup  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technology employed in the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) permits burning coals with a wide range of sulfur concentrations. Emissions from the process should be reduced by an order of magnitude below stringent federal air quality regulations for coal-fired plants. The maximum thermal efficiency of this type of process can be achieved by removing sulfur and particulates from the high temperature gas. The objective of this project was to develop economically and technically viable catalytic membrane reactors for high temperature, high pressure gaseous contaminant control in IGCC systems. These catalytic membrane reactors were used to decompose H{sub 2}S and separate the reaction products. The reactors were designed to operate in the hostile process environment of the IGCC systems, and at temperatures ranging from 500 to 1,000. Feasibility of the membrane reactor process for decomposition of hydrogen sulfide was demonstrated; permeability and selectivity of molecular-sieve and Vycor glass membranes were studied at temperatures up to 1,000 C; experimental study of hydrogen sulfide in the membrane reactor was completed; and a generalized mathematical model was developed for the simulation of the high temperature membrane reactor.

Ma, Y.H.; Moser, W.R.; Pien, S.; Shelekhin, A.B.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Crystallizing hard-sphere glasses by doping with active particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Crystallization and vitrification are two different routes to form a solid. Normally these two processes suppress each other, with the glass transition preventing crystallization at high density (or low temperature). This is even true for systems of colloidal hard spheres, which are commonly used as building blocks for fabricating photonic crystals [1-3]. Here, by performing Brownian dynamics simulations of glass systems consisting of mixtures of active and passive hard spheres, we show that the crystallization of such hard-sphere glasses can be dramatically promoted by doping the system with small amounts of active particles. Surprisingly, even hard-sphere glasses of packing fraction up to $\\phi = 0.635$ crystallize, which is around 0.5% below the random close packing ~ 0.64. Our results suggest a novel way of fabricating crystalline materials from (colloidal) glasses. This is particularly important for materials that get easily kinetically trapped in glassy states, and crystal nucleation hardly occurs.

Ran Ni; Martien A. Cohen Stuart; Marjolein Dijkstra; Peter G. Bolhuis

2013-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

444

Glass-heat-pipe evacuated-tube solar collector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A glass heat pipe is adapted for use as a solar energy absorber in an evacuated tube solar collector and for transferring the absorbed solar energy to a working fluid medium or heat sink for storage or practical use. A capillary wick is formed of granular glass particles fused together by heat on the inside surface of the heat pipe with a water glass binder solution to enhance capillary drive distribution of the thermal transfer fluid in the heat pipe throughout the entire inside surface of the evaporator portion of the heat pipe. Selective coatings are used on the heat pipe surface to maximize solar absorption and minimize energy radiation, and the glass wick can alternatively be fabricated with granular particles of black glass or obsidian.

McConnell, R.D.; VanSant, J.H.

1981-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

445

IRON-PHOSPHATE GLASS FOR IMMOBILIZATION OF RADIOACTIVE TECHNETIUM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technetium-99 (Tc-99) can bring a serious environmental threat because of its high fission yield, long half-life, and high solubility and mobility in the ground water. The present work investigated the immobilization of Tc-99 (surrogated by Re) by heat-treating mixtures of an iron-phosphate glass with 1.5 to 6 wt.% KReO{sub 4} at {approx}1000 C. The Re retention in the glass was as high as {approx}1.2 wt. % while the loss of Re by evaporation during melting was {approx}50%. Re was uniformly distributed within the glass. The normalized Re release by the 7-day Product Consistency Test was {approx}0.39 g/m{sup 2}, comparable with that in phosphate-bonded ceramics and borosilicate glasses. These results suggest that iron-phosphate glass can provide a good matrix for immobilizing Tc-99.

KRUGER AA; HRMA PR; XU K; CHOI J; UM W; HEO J

2012-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

446

Hydrogen speciation in hydrated layers on nuclear waste glass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The hydration of an outer layer on nuclear waste glasses is known to occur during leaching, but the actual speciation of hydrogen (as water or hydroxyl groups) in these layers has not been determined. As part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project, we have used infrared spectroscopy to determine hydrogen speciations in three nuclear waste glass compositions (SRL-131 & 165, and PNL 76-68), which were leached at 90{sup 0}C (all glasses) or hydrated in a vapor-saturated atmosphere at 202{sup 0}C (SRL-131 only). Hydroxyl groups were found in the surface layers of all the glasses. Molecular water was found in the surface of SRL-131 and PNL 76-68 glasses that had been leached for several months in deionized water, and in the vapor-hydrated sample. The water/hydroxyl ratio increases with increasing reaction time; molecular water makes up most of the hydrogen in the thick reaction layers on vapor-phase hydrated glass while only hydroxyl occurs in the least reacted samples. Using the known molar absorptivities of water and hydroxyl in silica-rich glass the vapor-phase layer contained 4.8 moles/liter of molecular water, and 0.6 moles water in the form hydroxyl. A 15 {mu}m layer on SRL-131 glass formed by leaching at 90{sup 0}C contained a total of 4.9 moles/liter of water, 2/3 of which was as hydroxyl. The unreacted bulk glass contains about 0.018 moles/liter water, all as hydroxyl. The amount of hydrogen added to the SRL-131 glass was about 70% of the original Na + Li content, not the 300% that would result from alkali=hydronium ion interdiffusion. If all the hydrogen is then assumed to be added as the result of alkali-H{sup +} interdiffusion, the molecular water observed may have formed from condensation of the original hydroxyl groups.

Aines, R.D.; Weed, H.C.; Bates, J.K.

1987-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

447

Modeling of Glass Making Processes for Improved Efficiency  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of this project was to develop a high-temperature melt properties database with sufficient reliability to allow mathematical modeling of glass melting and forming processes for improved product quality, improved efficiency and lessened environmental impact. It was initiated by the United States glass industry through the NSF Industry/University Center for Glass Research (CGR) at Alfred University [1]. Because of their important commercial value, six different types/families of glass were studied: container, float, fiberglass (E- and wool-types), low-expansion borosilicate, and color TV panel glasses. CGR member companies supplied production-quality glass from all six families upon which we measured, as a function of temperature in the molten state, density, surface tension, viscosity, electrical resistivity, infrared transmittance (to determine high temperature radiative conductivity), non-Newtonian flow behavior, and oxygen partial pres sure. With CGR cost sharing, we also studied gas solubility and diffusivity in each of these glasses. Because knowledge of the compositional dependencies of melt viscosity and electrical resistivity are extremely important for glass melting furnace design and operation, these properties were studied more fully. Composition variations were statistically designed for all six types/families of glass. About 140 different glasses were then melted on a laboratory scale and their viscosity and electrical resistivity measured as a function of temperature. The measurements were completed in February 2003 and are reported on here. The next steps will be (1) to statistically analyze the compositional dependencies of viscosity and electrical resistivity and develop composition-property response surfaces, (2) submit all the data to CGR member companies to evaluate the usefulness in their models, and (3) publish the results in technical journals and most likely in book form.

Thomas P. Seward III

2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

448

Conversion of plutonium-containing materials into borosilicate glass using the glass material oxidation and dissolution system  

SciTech Connect

The end of the cold war has resulted in excess plutonium-containing materials (PCMs) in multiple chemical forms. Major problems are associated with the long-term management of these materials: safeguards and nonproliferation issues; health, environment, and safety concerns; waste management requirements; and high storage costs. These issues can be addressed by conversion of the PCMs to glass: however, conventional glass processes require oxide-like feed materials. Conversion of PCMs to oxide-like materials followed by vitrification is a complex and expensive process. A new vitrification process has been invented, the Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS) to allow direct conversion of PCMs to glass. GMODS directly converts metals, ceramics, and amorphous solids to glass; oxidizes organics with the residue converted to glass; and converts chlorides to borosilicate glass and a secondary sodium chloride stream. Laboratory work has demonstrated the conversion of cerium (a plutonium surrogate), uranium (a plutonium surrogate), Zircaloy, stainless steel, multiple oxides, and other materials to glass. Equipment options have been identified for processing rates between 1 and 100,000 t/y. Significant work, including a pilot plant, is required to develop GMODS for applications at an industrial scale.

Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W. [and others

1996-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

449

Gadolinium Borosilicate Glass-Bonded Gd-Silicate Apatite: A Glass-Ceramic Nuclear Waste Form for Actinides  

SciTech Connect

A Gd-rich crystalline phase precipitated in a sodium gadolinium alumino-borosilicate glass during synthesis. The glass has a chemical composition of 45.39-31.13 wt% Gd2O3, 28.80-34.04 wt% SiO2, 10.75-14.02 wt% Na2O, 4.30-5.89 wt% Al2O3, and 10.75-14.91 wt% B2O3. Backscattered electron images revealed that the crystals are hexagonal, elongated, acicular, prismatic, skeletal or dendritic, tens of mm in size, some reaching 200 mm in length. Electron microprobe analysis confirmed that the crystals are chemically homogeneous and have a formula of NaGd9(SiO4)6O2 with minor B substitution for Si. The X-ray diffraction pattern of this phase is similar to that of lithium gadolinium silicate apatite. Thus, this hexagonal phase is a rare earth silicate with the apatite structure. We suggest that this Gd-silicate apatite in a Gd-borosilicate glass is a potential glass-ceramic nuclear waste form for actinide disposition. Am, Cm and other actinides can easily occupy the Gd-sites. The potential advantages of this glass-ceramic waste form include: (1) both the glass and apatite can be used to immobilize actinides, (2) silicate apatite is thermodynamically more stable than the glass, (3) borosilicate glass-bonded Gd-silicate apatite is easily fabricated, and (4) the Gd is an effective neutron absorber.

Zhao, Donggao (Michigan, Univ Of - Ann Arbor); Li, Liyu (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Davis, Linda L. (ASSOC WESTERN UNIVERSITY); Weber, William J. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Ewing, Rodney C. (Michigan, Univ Of - Ann Arbor); KP Hart and GR Lumpkin

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Flow Test At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Test At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Glass Buttes Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding...

451

A Model of the Effect of Particle Shape on Observed Glass ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ion Exchanged Mixed Glass Cullet Proppants for Stimulation of Oil and Natural Gas Bearing Shales · Modeling the Electrical Conductivity in Glass Melts.

452

Corrosion Behavior of SnO2-Based Ceramics in Soda-Lime Glass ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

027- Search for the Rigidity Transition and Intermediate Phase in Lithium Oxide Silicate Glass Systems Using .... 101- Viscous Silicate SOFC Glass Sealants.

453

Ground Gravity Survey At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Exploration...

454

Field Mapping At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity...

455

What's the Matter? Q-Glasses Could Be a New Class of Solids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Q-Glasses Could Be a New Class of Solids. ... The round nodules are the q-glass, not crystalline but with a well-defined chemical composition. ...

2013-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

456

Water-Gas Samples At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water-Gas Samples At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Glass...

457

“Work-Hardenable” Ductile Ti-based Bulk Metallic Glass Matrix ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highly processable bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) with unique supercooled liquid ... Application of Metallic Glass for High Performance Si Solar Cell: Oxidation ...

458

Mechanical Properties of Al-Ni-Zr Bulk Metallic Glasses Interpreted ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, M. Bulk Metallic Glasses, Nanocrystalline Materials, and ... Application of Metallic Glass for High Performance Si Solar Cell: Oxidation Behavior of ...

459

Fabrication of Cu-Zr-based Bulk Metallic Glasses by Vertical Twin ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, M. Bulk Metallic Glasses, Nanocrystalline Materials, and ... Application of Metallic Glass for High Performance Si Solar Cell: Oxidation Behavior of ...

460

Investigation of Torsion Fracture on Zr-based Bulk Metallic Glass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, M. Bulk Metallic Glasses, Nanocrystalline Materials, and ... Application of Metallic Glass for High Performance Si Solar Cell: Oxidation Behavior of ...

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461

Crack-resistance Curve of a Zr-Ti-Cu-Al Bulk Metallic Glass with ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, M. Bulk Metallic Glasses, Nanocrystalline Materials, and ... Application of Metallic Glass for High Performance Si Solar Cell: Oxidation Behavior of ...

462

Indentation behavior of ion-exchanged glasses  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports indentation fracture mechanics extended to include the effect of a thin layer of residual stress on the indentation strength of brittle materials. The proposed theory was used to predict the residual stress values for an ion-exchanged glass. For flaws placed before the exchange, considerable strengthening was observed, but the value of the surface stress predicted was considerable underestimated. For flaws placed after the exchange, there was no strengthening and the value of the surface stress was predicted to be zero. The failure of the indentation analysis indicates that it has to be modified for accurate stress determination. Thin layers of residual stress were found to retard the initiation of surface damage, but their influence on the strength after damage initiation was minimal.

Tandon, R.; Green, D.J. (Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (US))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

463