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1

The Committee convened in the Clark Room, Holiday Inn Capitol,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

MEETING MEETING - - - Thursday, April 25, 1996 - - - The Committee convened in the Clark Room, Holiday Inn Capitol, 550 C Street, S.W., Washington, D.C., at 9:00 a.m., Dr. Timothy D. Mount, Chairman, presiding. PRESENT: TIMOTHY D. MOUNT, Chairman SAMPRIT CHATTERJEE BRENDA G. COX JOHN D. GRACE CALVIN KENT GRETA M. LJUNG RICHARD A. LOCKHART DANIEL A. RELLES PRESENT (Continued): BRADLEY O. SKARPNESS G. CAMPBELL WATKINS ALSO PRESENT: RENEE MILLER YVONNE BISHOP MARY HUTZLER JAY HAKES DOUGLAS HALE ART HOLLAND ARTHUR RYPINSKI LOUISE GUEY-LEE JOHN CYMBALSKY ERIN BOEDECKER JERRY COFFEY INDER KUNDRA C O N T E N T S PAGE Presentation by Jay Hakes 6 Presentation by Yvonne Bishop 34 Presentation by Art Rypinski 43 Presentation by Richard A. Lockhart 61 Presentation by Douglas Hale 84

2

The Committee met in the Clark Room in the Holiday Inn Capitol,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

FRIDAY FRIDAY APRIL 24, 1998 - - - The Committee met in the Clark Room in the Holiday Inn Capitol, 550 C Street, S.W., Washington, D.C., at 9:00 a.m., Daniel Relles, Chair, presiding. PRESENT: DANIEL RELLES Chair CHARLES BISCHOFF Member CAROL CRAWFORD Member CALVIN KENT Member GRETA M. LJUNG Member POLLY PHIPPS Member SEYMOUR SUDMAN Member ROY WHITMORE Member JAMES HAMMITT Guest I N D E X Page Opening Comments from the Chair 3 Recognizing Previous Judges of the EIA Graphics 4 Contest and Announcing Winners, Jay Hakes EIA Survey Issues: Addressing Declining Budgets 12 Dwight French (EIA) Discussion: Seymour Sudman (ASA) 36 Questions from the Committee 45

3

The Committee met in the Columbia Room at the Holiday Inn  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Friday, April 21, 1995 - - - The Committee met in the Columbia Room at the Holiday Inn Capitol, 550 C Street S.W., Washington, D.C., at 9:00 a.m., Timothy D. Mount, Chairman, presiding. PRESENT: TIMOTHY D. MOUNT, Chair DAVID R. BELLHOUSE CHARLES W. BISCHOFF BRENDA G. COX FAYE DUCHIN JOHN D. GRACE PHILIP HANSWER CALVIN KENT GRETA M. LJUNG JAMES L. O'BRIEN DANIEL A. RELLES BRADLEY O. SKARPNESS G. CAMPBELL WATKINS A-G-E-N-D-A Page No. Introductory Remarks, TIMOTHY MOUNT, Chairman 3 Announcement of Winners on Contest On 3 Statistical Graphs, LARRY PETTIS Review of Survey Design for Residential Energy Consumption Survey BRENDA COX, Discussant 7 DAVID BELLHOUSE, Discussant 29 Dates for Future Meetings, TIMOTHY MOUNT 42

4

The Committee met in the Columbia Room at the Holiday Inn Capitol,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

THURSDAY, THURSDAY, APRIL 20, 1995 The Committee met in the Columbia Room at the Holiday Inn Capitol, 550 C Street, S.W., Washington, D.C., at 9:00 a.m., Timothy D. Mount, Chair, presiding. PRESENT: TIMOTHY D. MOUNT, Chair DAVID R. BELLHOUSE CHARLES W. BISCHOFF BRENDA G. COX FAYE DUCHIN JOHN D. GRACE PHILIP HANSER CALVIN KENT GRETA M. LJUNG JAMES L. O'BRIEN DANIEL A. RELLES BRADLEY O. SKARPNESS G. CAMPBELL WATKINS AGENDA Introductions by Committee Chair . . . . . . . . . 3 Opening Remarks by Administrator . . . . . . . . . 6 Summary of EIA Follow-up on Comments From Previous Meetings, Yvonne Bishop . . . . . . . . 28 Effects of Structural Changes in Industry 1. Electricity Issues Impact on EIA's Data Collection Activities . . 31 Noel Balthasar, Presenter Phil Hanser, Discussant

5

Hotel gets 9-month payback on HVAC project. [Midtown Holiday Inn, Richmond, VA  

SciTech Connect

The Midtown Holiday Inn at Richmond, Virginia, recovered its $45,200 investment in heating and cooling modifications in nine months by reducing energy consumption by 43%. Natural gas use was reduced 48% and electricity 25%, while comfort levels were improved. The retrofit involved replacing the old three-pipe design, which traditionally returns both heating and cooling water and is inefficient during fall and spring when both hot and chill water are needed. A new control strategy keeps the chiller and boiler from working simultaneously by alternating the two on 15-minute cycles. The chiller automatically cuts off when outside air goes below 55/sup 0/F, while the boiler shuts off at 75/sup 0/F. (DCK)

Deans, B.

1982-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

6

The Committee convened in the Clark Room of the Holiday Inn  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

- - - - - - - - - - COMMITTEE ON ENERGY STATISTICS - - - - - MEETING - - - - - FRIDAY, APRIL 26, 1996 The Committee convened in the Clark Room of the Holiday Inn Capitol, 550 C Street, S.W., Washington, D.C., at 9:00 a.m., DR. TIMOTHY D. MOUNT, Chair, presiding. PRESENT: TIMOTHY D. MOUNT, Chair SAMPRIT CHATTERJEE BRENDA G. COX JOHN D. GRACE CALVIN KENT GRETA M. LJUNG RICHARD A. LOCKHART DANIEL A. RELLES BRADLEY O. SKARPNESS G. CAMPBELL WATKINS ALSO PRESENT: RENEE MILLER YVONNE M. BISHOP DIANE LIQUE L.A. PETTIS JAY HAKES JOHN WOOD GORDON M. KAUFMAN ROY KASS NANCY LEACH I-N-D-E-X Introductory Remarks: Announcement of Winners of the Contest on Graphs and Visuals Displays 3 Restructuring the Oil and Gas Crude Reserves Program (Agenda Item 5) Presenter: John Wood, Office of Oil and Gas 8

7

The Committee met in the Clark Room, Holiday Inn Capitol at 550  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PUBLIC MEETING + + + THURSDAY, APRIL 10, 1997 + + + The Committee met in the Clark Room, Holiday Inn Capitol at 550 C Street, S.W., Washington, D.C., at 9:00 a.m., G. Campbell Watkins, Chairman, presiding. PRESENT: G. CAMPBELL WATKINS, Chairman DAVID R. BELLHOUSE CHARLES W. BISCHOFF BRENDA G. COX CAROL A. GOTWAY CRAWFORD CALVIN KENT GRETA M. LJUNG DANIEL A. RELLES BRADLEY O. SKARPNESS PRESENT (Continued): ROY WHITMORE C O N T E N T S PAGE Opening Remarks, Lynda Carlson 10 Update on 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Mike Laurence 16 The Use of a Variant of Poisson Sampling: Paula Weir 58, 85 David Bellhouse 72 Roy Whitmore 79 Presentation by Administrator Jay Hakes 112 Results of Customer Satisfaction Survey, Colleen Blessing 138 Annual Energy Outlook/Short-term Energy

8

Annual Review of BPA-Funded Projects in Natural and Artificial Propagation of Salmonids, March 27-29, 1985, Holiday Inn Airport, Portland, Oregon.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fish and Wildlife Division of Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) hosted a meeting for contractors to present the results of fiscal year 1984 research conducted to implement the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program. The meeting focused on those projects specifically related to natural and artificial propagation of salmonids. The presentations were held at the Holiday Inn Airport in Portland, Oregon, on March 27-29, 1985. This document contains abstracts of the presentations from that meeting. Section 1 contains abstracts on artificial propagation, fish health, and downstream migration, and Section 2 contains abstracts on natural propagation and habitat improvement. The abstracts are indexed by BPA Project Number and by Fish and Wildlife Program Measure. The registered attendees at the meeting are listed alphabetically in Appendix A and by affiliation in Appendix B.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Signature Holidays | Facebook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Signature Holidays, Bangalore, India. 83 likes · 1 talking about this. To enhance your travel & holiday experiences at very competitive rates.

10

Signature Holidays | Facebook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Signature Holidays, Bangalore. 81 Me gusta · 2 personas están hablando de esto. To enhance your travel & holiday experiences at very competitive rates.

11

Berkeley Lab Holiday Schedule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subscribe to the Berkeley Lab Holiday Schedule via Google Calendar or ICS. Go here for Google CalendarICS subscription help. The Laboratory has announced the following holiday...

12

Holiday Gift Drive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Holiday Gift Drive Holiday Gift Drive Holiday Gift Drive Every year, Laboratory employees help fulfill the holiday wishes of children and seniors in our communities. In 2012, our employees helped more than 1,030 Northern New Mexico children, senior citizens and families have a brighter holiday season. September 16, 2013 Every holiday season, employees of Los Alamos National Laboratory donate and distribute gifts to families in need throughout Northern New Mexico. Contacts Giving Drives Ed Vigil Community Programs Office (505) 665-9205 Email Giving Drives Enrique Trujillo Community Programs Office (505) 665-6384 Email Helping New Mexico families feel the holiday spirit The 2013 campaign runs from November 21-December 18. 2012 Holiday Gift Drive partners Boys and Girls Club Del Norte (Abiquiu Site)

13

Holiday Food Drive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Food Drive Food Drive Holiday Food Drive During the recent holiday food drive, employees donated enough food to provide about 23,604 holiday meals for Northern New Mexico families. More than 432 frozen turkeys were donated this year by employees and other donors during 'Bring a Turkey to Work Day,' an annual Lab event that takes places Thanksgiving week. September 16, 2013 LANL employees organize food for the Holiday Food Drive. Contacts Giving Drives Ed Vigil Community Programs Office (505) 665-9205 Email Giving Drives Enrique Trujillo Community Programs Office (505) 665-6384 Email Helping feed Northern New Mexico families Community partners The Food Depot (Santa Fe) Del Norte Credit Union Smith's Food and Drug Giving Holiday Food Drive Holiday Gift Drive LANL Laces Los Alamos Employees' Scholarship Fund

14

Post-Holiday Holiday Shopping | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Post-Holiday Holiday Shopping Post-Holiday Holiday Shopping Post-Holiday Holiday Shopping January 10, 2012 - 4:31pm Addthis Elizabeth Spencer Communicator, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Ah, January. It's still cold and it's still dark all the time, but now all the cheerful Christmas lights have come down so there's nothing to break up the monotony. What's there to do? Well, while it's a little late now, you might want to go do some post-holiday holiday shopping. Yes, I know. That sounds insane. Everyone is thoroughly sick of holiday shopping. You've spent enough money already. I know. But I was out wandering through the stores during the first week of January when I happened to pass by heavily discounted holiday products. And in that great wasteland of 50% off products and half-empty shelves, I found a vast

15

NERSC Holiday Schedule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NERSC NERSC Holiday Schedule NERSC Holiday Schedule December 20, 2013 by Francesca Verdier (0 Comments) All NERSC computing and storage systems will remain in full operation throughout the holiday season (Tuesday December 24 through Wednesday January 1). From Tuesday December 24 through Wednesday January 1, NERSC Consulting and Account Support services will be available *only* on Friday December 27 and Monday December 30, from 8:00 to 5:00 Pacific Time. Normal Consulting and Account Support schedules will resume on Thursday, January 2. As always, critical system problems may be reported at any time to NERSC Operations at 1-800-666-3772, menu option 1, or 1-510-486-6821. You should also contact Operations if you need to have your password reset (or login failures cleared) over the holidays.

16

Countdown to the Thanksgiving Holiday  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Food Safety While Hiking, Camping Food Safety While Hiking, Camping & Boating Food Safety Information United States Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service USDA Photo Countdown to the Thanksgiving Holiday A s Thanksgiving approaches, cooking the traditional turkey dinner gives rise to anxieties and questions. What kind of turkey should I buy? Should I buy a frozen turkey or a fresh one? How do I store my turkey? A few simple steps will not only ease your holiday fears, but will ensure a delicious and a safe meal for you, your family, and your friends. The following information may help you prepare your special Thanksgiving meal and help you countdown to the holiday. Plan Ahead Plan your menu several weeks before the holiday. Shopping early will ease the countdown tension for

17

Helping make the holidays happier  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Helping Make The Holidays Happier Helping Make The Holidays Happier Community Connections: Our link to Northern New Mexico Communities Latest Issue:Dec. 2013 - Jan. 2014 All Issues » submit Helping make the holidays happier This year's LANL food drive collected enough donations to provide 11,600 meals for those in need. January 1, 2013 dummy image Read our archives Contacts Editor Linda Anderman Email Community Programs Office Kurt Steinhaus Email The contributions by employees included 164 turkeys that added up to a total of 8,700 pounds of food. This year's LANL food drive collected enough donations to provide 11,600 meals for those in need. The contributions by Lab employees and contractors included 164 turkeys that added up to a total of 8,700 pounds of food. The Laboratory employees' and contractors' food donations were distributed

18

Office of Science CFC Holiday Bake Sale | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Science CFC Holiday Bake Sale Office of Science CFC Holiday Bake Sale Office of Science CFC Holiday Bake Sale December 5, 2012 11:30AM to 1:30PM EST GTN Cafeteria Buy...

19

Your Holidays...Brought to You by Fuel Cells - Energy ...  

Your Holidays...Brought to You by Fuel Cells. December 20, 2013. A story about how fuel cells are helping bring the holidays to you is currently ...

20

The Committee met in the Clark Room in the Holiday Inn Capitol...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and the timeliness? The quality of inventories, basically, hinges on the quality of the national energy statistics, which as you know, varies from good to abysmal. If you have...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "holiday inn express" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The Committee met in the Clark Room of the Capitol Holiday Inn...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

greatest interest. To spur this development the Board has sponsored meetings with major energy opinion-makers around town, including representatives from the Federal agencies,...

22

Energy-Efficient Holiday Decorating Tips | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy-Efficient Holiday Decorating Tips Energy-Efficient Holiday Decorating Tips Energy-Efficient Holiday Decorating Tips December 19, 2012 - 10:36am Addthis Using LED lights for your holiday decorations can save you energy and money. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/peterspiro Using LED lights for your holiday decorations can save you energy and money. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/peterspiro Erik Hyrkas Erik Hyrkas Media Relations Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy What does this mean for me? You can save money on your holiday lighting while still enjoying a decorated household. With holidays almost upon us and home decorating to do, costs and energy savings should be on the brain. So as you put the finishing touches on that giant lighting display, be sure to read these energy-efficient holiday

23

Buying an Appliance this Holiday Season? ENERGY STAR Products...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

an Appliance this Holiday Season? ENERGY STAR Products will Save You Money and Energy All Year Buying an Appliance this Holiday Season? ENERGY STAR Products will Save You Money...

24

It's Finally Time to Think about the Holidays! | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Addthis Using LED holiday lights is just one of the ways that you can save energy and money this holiday season. | Photo courtesy of iStockphoto.comAvailableLight Using LED...

25

Energy-Efficient Holiday Decorating Tips | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tips Energy-Efficient Holiday Decorating Tips December 19, 2012 - 10:36am Addthis Using LED lights for your holiday decorations can save you energy and money. | Photo courtesy of...

26

Tips to Save Energy During the Holidays | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tips to Save Energy During the Holidays Tips to Save Energy During the Holidays Tips to Save Energy During the Holidays December 2, 2008 - 1:33pm Addthis Allison Casey Senior Communicator, NREL The winter holiday season has officially begun, and with it comes the frenzy of decorating, holiday gatherings, gift buying, and errand running. Don't let your energy-saving efforts fall by the wayside amid all the festivities; the tips below will help you save energy and money even as you celebrate. Use LED Holiday Lights LED-or light-emitting diode-holiday lights are much more efficient than traditional incandescent lights. While the initial purchase price of LED light strings is higher, consider the cost of running each type of light string for 12 hours per day for 40 days: Type of Light Electricity Cost *

27

Growth and characterizations of semipolar (1122) InN  

SciTech Connect

We report on metal-organic vapor phase epitaxial growth of (1122) InN on (1122) GaN templates on m-plane (1010) sapphire substrates. The in-plane relationship of the (1122) InN samples is [1123]{sub InN} Double-Vertical-Line Double-Vertical-Line [0001]{sub sapphire} and [1100]{sub InN} Double-Vertical-Line Double-Vertical-Line [1210]{sub sapphire}, replicating the in-plane relationship of the (1122) GaN templates. The surface of the (1122) InN samples and the (1122) GaN templates shows an undulation along [1100]{sub InN,GaN}, which is attributed to anisotropic diffusion of indium/gallium atoms on the (1122) surfaces. The growth rate of the (1122) InN layers was 3-4 times lower compared to c-plane (0001) InN. High resolution transmission electron microscopy showed a relaxed interface between the (1122) InN layers and the (1122) GaN templates, consistent with x-ray diffraction results. Basal plane stacking faults were found in the (1122) GaN templates but they were terminated at the InN/(1122) GaN interface due to the presence of misfit dislocations along the entire InN/GaN interface. The misfit dislocations were contributed to the fully relaxation and the tilts of the (1122) InN layers. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to determine the polarity of the grown (1122) InN sample, indicating an In-polar (1122) InN. The valence band maximum was determined to be at (1.7 {+-} 0.1) eV for the (1122) InN sample, comparable to In-polar c-plane InN.

Dinh, Duc V.; Skuridina, D.; Solopow, S.; Frentrup, M.; Pristovsek, M.; Vogt, P.; Kneissl, M. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Hardenbergstrasse 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Ivaldi, F.; Kret, S.; Szczepanska, A. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Science, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02668 Warsaw (Poland)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Holiday Gifts for Energy Efficiency | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Holiday Gifts for Energy Efficiency Holiday Gifts for Energy Efficiency Holiday Gifts for Energy Efficiency December 18, 2013 - 3:58pm Addthis Energy-efficient light bulbs can make great energy-saving stocking stuffers. Energy-efficient light bulbs can make great energy-saving stocking stuffers. Erik Hyrkas Erik Hyrkas Media Relations Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy How can I participate? Look for these energy-saving gifts while doing your holiday shopping this year. As the days get colder and shopping becomes a holiday pastime, it's a great opportunity to think about efficiency and savings (and that doesn't just mean rationing wrapping paper). With that in mind, I've drawn up a list of energy-efficient holiday gifts for your energy-conscious loved ones. With these gifts, your carbon footprint and home electric bill could

29

Fuel Cell Powers Up Festivities at Secretary Chu's Holiday Party |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Cell Powers Up Festivities at Secretary Chu's Holiday Party Fuel Cell Powers Up Festivities at Secretary Chu's Holiday Party Fuel Cell Powers Up Festivities at Secretary Chu's Holiday Party December 16, 2011 - 11:25am Addthis A clean, efficient fuel cell powered the tree lights at the 2011 Energy Department holiday party. | Energy Department file photo. A clean, efficient fuel cell powered the tree lights at the 2011 Energy Department holiday party. | Energy Department file photo. Sunita Satyapal Program Manager, Hydrogen & Fuel Cell Technology Program How does it work? Fuel cells work like batteries, but they do not run down or need recharging. They produce electricity and heat as long as fuel is supplied. Employees at the Energy Department's annual holiday party were greeted with many familiar sights - festive decorations, sugar cookies, and a

30

Sales Tax Holiday for Energy-Efficient Appliances  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In November 2007, Maryland enacted legislation creating a sales and use tax "holiday" for certain energy-efficient appliances, beginning in 2011. Under the law, qualifying appliances purchased...

31

Energy Saving Holiday Kitchen Trivia | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficiency & Renewable Energy What does this mean for me? Knowing which kitchen appliances are most efficient can save you money this holiday season. Cooking is an important...

32

Electrical and optical properties of p-type InN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and optical properties of p-type InN Marie A. Mayer 1,2 ,concentration. 1200 nm undoped, n-type InN reference samplefunction of temperature for p-type InN samples with varying

Mayer, M.A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Holiday Message from the Administrator | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Holiday Message from the Administrator | National Nuclear Security Holiday Message from the Administrator | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Holiday Message from the Administrator Holiday Message from the Administrator Posted By Thomas D'Agostino, NNSA Administrator With the holiday season upon us, I hope you will be able to spend time with

34

Holiday Message from the Administrator | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Holiday Message from the Administrator | National Nuclear Security Holiday Message from the Administrator | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Holiday Message from the Administrator Holiday Message from the Administrator Posted By Thomas D'Agostino, NNSA Administrator With the holiday season upon us, I hope you will be able to spend time with

35

Solar Field Powers Historic Garden Holiday Display | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Field Powers Historic Garden Holiday Display Field Powers Historic Garden Holiday Display Solar Field Powers Historic Garden Holiday Display December 21, 2011 - 2:58pm Addthis This is part of the holiday light display at Longwood Gardens in Pennsylvania's Brandwine Valley. This year, they commissioned an American-made 1.2 megawatt, 10.7-acre solar field as part of their goal to generate three megawatts of renewable energy by 2018. | Photo courtesy of Longwood Gardens/W. Hill This is part of the holiday light display at Longwood Gardens in Pennsylvania's Brandwine Valley. This year, they commissioned an American-made 1.2 megawatt, 10.7-acre solar field as part of their goal to generate three megawatts of renewable energy by 2018. | Photo courtesy of Longwood Gardens/W. Hill Kristin Swineford Communication Specialist, Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs

36

Energy Saving Holiday Kitchen Trivia | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Saving Holiday Kitchen Trivia Saving Holiday Kitchen Trivia Energy Saving Holiday Kitchen Trivia November 20, 2012 - 4:08pm Addthis Did you know that your dishwasher can be used as an oven in emergencies? | Photo courtesy of Chris Gunn, NREL. Did you know that your dishwasher can be used as an oven in emergencies? | Photo courtesy of Chris Gunn, NREL. Erik Hyrkas Erik Hyrkas Media Relations Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy What does this mean for me? Knowing which kitchen appliances are most efficient can save you money this holiday season. Cooking is an important part of the holiday season. Food brings people together in ways many material gifts cannot. But with winter temperatures creeping in, electricity savings are something to keep in mind, especially

37

Transmission Electron Microscopy Study of InN Nanorods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transmission Electron Microscopy Study of InN Nanorods Z.epitaxy and studied by transmission electron microscopy,establish their quality. Transmission electron microscopy (

Liliental-Weber, Z.; Li, X.; Kryliouk, Olga; Park, H.J.; Mangum, J.; Anderson, T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

NNSA Employees give back this holiday season | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Employees give back this holiday season | National Nuclear Security Employees give back this holiday season | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > NNSA Employees give back this holiday season NNSA Employees give back this holiday season Posted By Office of Public Affairs NNSA celebrates the contributions of the men and women working across the

39

Save Money with LED Holiday Light Strings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Money with LED Holiday Light Strings Money with LED Holiday Light Strings Save Money with LED Holiday Light Strings December 1, 2009 - 11:19am Addthis Allison Casey Senior Communicator, NREL It's hard to believe, but the holidays are in full swing and many of you are starting to decorate your homes. Those of you who started around Halloween are probably feeling pretty smart because you got your decorating done while the weather was nice. I see you there, snacking on your Thanksgiving leftovers, laughing at me shivering in the cold and struggling to undo the knot in my lights. Don't look so smug. Those of us who haven't started decorating yet may actually be the smart ones this year, because we still have a chance to buy LED light strings. LED (or light emitting diode) light strings can use 90% less energy than

40

NNSA Employees give back this holiday season | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

recruited volunteers to place wreaths at some of the 44,000 gravesites at the Santa Fe National Cemetery. Nevada Site Office and NSTec gift exchange Holiday Food and Gift Drives...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "holiday inn express" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

LED Holiday Lights: Festive, Safe, and Efficient! | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Holiday Lights: Festive, Safe, and Efficient! Holiday Lights: Festive, Safe, and Efficient! LED Holiday Lights: Festive, Safe, and Efficient! November 23, 2010 - 6:30am Addthis Allison Casey Senior Communicator, NREL This week brings a day that many people look forward to all year-and I'm not talking about Thanksgiving, or Black Friday. I'm talking about that magical day when it's finally okay to drag the dusty boxes from the basement or attic, to lovingly sort and display your decorations, to untangle your light strings and set up the stepladder, all in anticipation of one glorious moment: Dad's annual trip to the emergency room. I kid (and sincerely hope that's not your yearly ritual), but in addition to safety when hanging your lights this year, I hope you'll think about something else: efficiency.

42

LED Holiday Lights: Festive, Safe, and Efficient! | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LED Holiday Lights: Festive, Safe, and Efficient! LED Holiday Lights: Festive, Safe, and Efficient! LED Holiday Lights: Festive, Safe, and Efficient! December 2, 2010 - 4:34pm Addthis Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Ed. Note cross posted from the Energy Savers Blog. Written by Allison Casey This week brings a day that many people look forward to all year -- and I'm not talking about Thanksgiving, or Black Friday. I'm talking about that magical day when it's finally okay to drag the dusty boxes from the basement or attic, to lovingly sort and display your decorations, to untangle your light strings and set up the stepladder, all in anticipation of one glorious moment: Dad's annual trip to the emergency room. I kid (and sincerely hope that's not your yearly ritual), but in addition

43

It's Finally Time to Think about the Holidays! | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

It's Finally Time to Think about the Holidays! It's Finally Time to Think about the Holidays! It's Finally Time to Think about the Holidays! December 5, 2012 - 12:13pm Addthis Using LED holiday lights is just one of the ways that you can save energy and money this holiday season. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/AvailableLight Using LED holiday lights is just one of the ways that you can save energy and money this holiday season. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/AvailableLight Elizabeth Spencer Communicator, National Renewable Energy Laboratory What are the key facts? You can learn more ways to save energy and money through old Energy Saver blog posts. Last month, I was absolutely determined to keep away from the topic of Christmas LED lights because Thanksgiving hadn't even happened yet. And I

44

Google Maps -hampton inn rochester http://maps.google.com/ 1 of 2 9/29/05 13:25  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Google Maps - hampton inn rochester http://maps.google.com/ 1 of 2 9/29/05 13:25 A Hampton Inn 717: 36 Hotels. Google Maps hampton inn rochester #12;Google Maps - hampton inn rochester http://maps.google

Richmond, Michael W.

45

Holiday Heights, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Holiday Heights, New Jersey: Energy Resources Holiday Heights, New Jersey: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.9459512°, -74.2540324° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.9459512,"lon":-74.2540324,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

46

EM Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Team's Holiday Spirit Shines | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Team's Holiday Spirit Shines EM Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Team's Holiday Spirit Shines EM Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Team's Holiday Spirit Shines December 23, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Aspen Cass, a relative of an EM Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) employee, holds donated coats with Farok Sharif (left), president and project manager of Nuclear Waste Partnership, the WIPP management and operating contractor, and Joe Franco, manager of CBFO. Aspen Cass, a relative of an EM Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) employee, holds donated coats with Farok Sharif (left), president and project manager of Nuclear Waste Partnership, the WIPP management and operating contractor, and Joe Franco, manager of CBFO. The clothing drive’s organizers — Margaret Gee (left), Yolanda Navarrete (center) and Dana Dorr — hold up some of the donated coats before providing them to Carlsbad area schools. Gee is with CBFO and Navarrete and Dorr are with Nuclear Waste Partnership (NWP). NWP's Yolanda Salmon, another drive organizer, is not pictured.

47

Buying an Appliance this Holiday Season? ENERGY STAR Products will Save You  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buying an Appliance this Holiday Season? ENERGY STAR Products will Buying an Appliance this Holiday Season? ENERGY STAR Products will Save You Money and Energy All Year! Buying an Appliance this Holiday Season? ENERGY STAR Products will Save You Money and Energy All Year! December 12, 2012 - 11:40am Addthis When shopping for appliances or electronics for the holidays, look for the ENERGY STAR® and EnergyGuide labels. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL 22090. When shopping for appliances or electronics for the holidays, look for the ENERGY STAR® and EnergyGuide labels. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL 22090. Erin Connealy Communications Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy How can I participate? Look for the ENERGY STAR® label to find energy-efficient appliances. It's the holiday season, which is a perfect time to find a great deal on

48

South Carolina Community Lights Up the Season with Energy-Efficient Holiday  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

South Carolina Community Lights Up the Season with Energy-Efficient South Carolina Community Lights Up the Season with Energy-Efficient Holiday Lights South Carolina Community Lights Up the Season with Energy-Efficient Holiday Lights December 20, 2011 - 1:12pm Addthis Carolers sing in front of Forest Acres, South Carolina's new LED holiday light display. | Photo courtesy of Richland County, S.C. Carolers sing in front of Forest Acres, South Carolina's new LED holiday light display. | Photo courtesy of Richland County, S.C. Eric Escudero Eric Escudero Senior Public Affairs Specialist & Contractor, Golden Field Office What does this mean for me? LED holiday lights reduce energy usage by 90 percent when compared to traditional incandescent lights. A South Carolina community is proving that energy efficiency can improve the holidays by reducing energy and maintenance costs, thanks to its new

49

South Carolina Community Lights Up the Season with Energy-Efficient Holiday  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

South Carolina Community Lights Up the Season with Energy-Efficient South Carolina Community Lights Up the Season with Energy-Efficient Holiday Lights South Carolina Community Lights Up the Season with Energy-Efficient Holiday Lights December 20, 2011 - 1:12pm Addthis Carolers sing in front of Forest Acres, South Carolina's new LED holiday light display. | Photo courtesy of Richland County, S.C. Carolers sing in front of Forest Acres, South Carolina's new LED holiday light display. | Photo courtesy of Richland County, S.C. Eric Escudero Eric Escudero Senior Public Affairs Specialist & Contractor, Golden Field Office What does this mean for me? LED holiday lights reduce energy usage by 90 percent when compared to traditional incandescent lights. A South Carolina community is proving that energy efficiency can improve the holidays by reducing energy and maintenance costs, thanks to its new

50

SRR Staff Send the Holidays to Soldiers Overseas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SRR Staff Send the Holidays to Soldiers Overseas SRR Staff Send the Holidays to Soldiers Overseas SRR Staff Send the Holidays to Soldiers Overseas December 21, 2012 - 11:49am Addthis Staffers fill holiday boxes for soldiers overseas. Staffers fill holiday boxes for soldiers overseas. A request for razors from a U.S. Army private serving in Afghanistan transformed into a full-scale holiday gift rescue operation by employees of the Savannah River Site's liquid waste contractor, Savannah River Remediation (SRR). The soldier's stepmom helped rally the "troops" in her office to send him and other soldiers some Christmas cheer. "My stepson's unit is responsible for protecting an Army base far from any city and in a mountainous area of Afghanistan," the SRR Finance and Business Administration employee told her colleagues. "We would get

51

Buying an Appliance this Holiday Season? ENERGY STAR Products will Save You  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buying an Appliance this Holiday Season? ENERGY STAR Products will Buying an Appliance this Holiday Season? ENERGY STAR Products will Save You Money and Energy All Year! Buying an Appliance this Holiday Season? ENERGY STAR Products will Save You Money and Energy All Year! December 12, 2012 - 11:40am Addthis When shopping for appliances or electronics for the holidays, look for the ENERGY STAR® and EnergyGuide labels. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL 22090. When shopping for appliances or electronics for the holidays, look for the ENERGY STAR® and EnergyGuide labels. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL 22090. Erin Connealy Communications Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy How can I participate? Look for the ENERGY STAR® label to find energy-efficient appliances. It's the holiday season, which is a perfect time to find a great deal on

52

How do You Save Energy During the Holidays? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

do You Save Energy During the Holidays? do You Save Energy During the Holidays? How do You Save Energy During the Holidays? December 20, 2011 - 9:03am Addthis Between family vacations, shopping, and cooking extravagant meals, energy conservation isn't usually at the top our list of things to do during the holiday season. But there are plenty of ways to save money & energy even now by doing little - and even fun - things to reduce our utility bills and use less energy overall. This week, Amanda showed us how she saves money and avoids single-use wrapping paper by creatively wrapping Christmas presents in found items such as grocery ads, magazine pages, and used packing paper. Saving doesn't have to stop there - you can also reduce your energy use during the holidays by: Following some of our past holiday kitchen cooking tips

53

Fountain Inn, South Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inn, South Carolina: Energy Resources Inn, South Carolina: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.6890095°, -82.1956679° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.6890095,"lon":-82.1956679,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

54

Self-compensation in highly n-type InN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Acceptor-type defects in highly n-type InN are probed using positron annihilation spectroscopy. Results are compared to Hall effect measurements and calculated electron mobilities. Based on this, self-compensation in n-type InN is studied, and the microscopic origin of compensating and scattering centers in irradiated and Si-doped InN is discussed. We find significant compensation through negatively charged indium vacancy complexes as well as additional acceptor-type defects with no or small effective open volume, which act as scattering centers in highly n-type InN samples.

Rauch, C.; Tuomisto, F. [Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University, P.O. Box 11100, FI-00076 Aalto, Espoo (Finland); King, P. D. C. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, North Haugh, St. Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Veal, T. D. [Stephenson Institute for Renewable Energy and Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 4ZF (United Kingdom); Lu, H.; Schaff, W. J. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Cornell University, 425 Philips Hall, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

2012-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

55

Sonoma Mission Inn Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mission Inn Geothermal Area Mission Inn Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Sonoma Mission Inn Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.3138,"lon":-122.4823,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

56

Sales Tax Holiday for Energy-Efficient Appliances | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sales Tax Holiday for Energy-Efficient Appliances Sales Tax Holiday for Energy-Efficient Appliances Sales Tax Holiday for Energy-Efficient Appliances < Back Eligibility General Public/Consumer Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heating Water Heating Maximum Rebate None, but sale price limited to $1,500 per appliance Program Info Start Date 08/28/2008 State Missouri Program Type Sales Tax Incentive Rebate Amount 100% sales tax exemption Provider Missouri Department of Revenue The state of Missouri offers consumers a seven-day ''exemption from state sales taxes'' on certain Energy Star certified new appliances. The state sales tax holiday, known as the "Show-Me Green Sales Tax Holiday", applies to Energy Star certified appliances up to $1,500 in price intended for

57

Texas AgriLife Research Procedure 31.04.01.A1.01 Holidays Page 1 of 1 Texas AgriLife Research Procedures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas AgriLife Research Procedure 31.04.01.A1.01 Holidays Page 1 of 1 Texas AgriLife Research, work on holidays and religious holidays. Texas AgriLife Research (AgriLife Research) employees located on the Texas A&M University campus in Bryan/ College Station follow the holiday schedule of Texas A

58

What Do You Think of Your LED Holiday Lights? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Think of Your LED Holiday Lights? Think of Your LED Holiday Lights? What Do You Think of Your LED Holiday Lights? December 23, 2010 - 6:30am Addthis This year, we've been encouraging people to switch to LED light strings for their holiday decorations. With the many options for shapes, colors, and sizes, people are discovering that they like or dislike various aspects of the lights. One of the biggest things to like, of course, is the major energy savings, but some folks have also discovered that the lights have a slightly different color or reflect off of ornaments in a different way. Change can be difficult, especially when we've been seeing the same types of decorations for so many years, but we hope that you've made the switch and are enjoying the savings and festivity that LED lights can add to your

59

#tipsEnergy: How to Save Energy During the Holidays | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

As part of this month's tipsEnergy, we want to know your tips for saving energy and money during the holiday season. Storified by Energy Department Fri, Dec 21 2012 11:13:01...

60

What Do You Think of Your LED Holiday Lights? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

What Do You Think of Your LED Holiday Lights? What Do You Think of Your LED Holiday Lights? What Do You Think of Your LED Holiday Lights? December 23, 2010 - 6:30am Addthis This year, we've been encouraging people to switch to LED light strings for their holiday decorations. With the many options for shapes, colors, and sizes, people are discovering that they like or dislike various aspects of the lights. One of the biggest things to like, of course, is the major energy savings, but some folks have also discovered that the lights have a slightly different color or reflect off of ornaments in a different way. Change can be difficult, especially when we've been seeing the same types of decorations for so many years, but we hope that you've made the switch and are enjoying the savings and festivity that LED lights can add to your

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "holiday inn express" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Your Holidays ... Brought to You by Fuel Cells | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Holidays ... Brought to You by Fuel Cells Holidays ... Brought to You by Fuel Cells Your Holidays ... Brought to You by Fuel Cells December 19, 2013 - 11:44am Addthis Fuel cells, which work like batteries but don’t run down or need recharging, are ideal for powering material handling equipment, like forklifts and airport baggage carts, because they reduce recharging time and cut carbon pollution. This is helping them become more mainstream in the U.S., with more than 4,000 vehicles in operation in 2012, and this year, they might even be helping bring you holidays to you. | Photo courtesy of Plug Power, Inc. Fuel cells, which work like batteries but don't run down or need recharging, are ideal for powering material handling equipment, like forklifts and airport baggage carts, because they reduce recharging time

62

Cut Gas Costs This Holiday Traveling Season with Three Easy Tips |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cut Gas Costs This Holiday Traveling Season with Three Easy Tips Cut Gas Costs This Holiday Traveling Season with Three Easy Tips Cut Gas Costs This Holiday Traveling Season with Three Easy Tips November 26, 2013 - 9:23am Addthis Turning off your engine while waiting in the parking lot is a great way to save money on gas. | Photo courtesy of Kristy Keel-Blackmon, NREL/21196. Turning off your engine while waiting in the parking lot is a great way to save money on gas. | Photo courtesy of Kristy Keel-Blackmon, NREL/21196. Jason Lutterman Communications Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy How can I participate? Drive smart this holiday season and stay informed with tools such as the speed penalty calculator on fueleconomy.gov. Yesterday you learned from Becky about three tools to help you save on fuel

63

Cut Gas Costs This Holiday Traveling Season with Three Easy Tips |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cut Gas Costs This Holiday Traveling Season with Three Easy Tips Cut Gas Costs This Holiday Traveling Season with Three Easy Tips Cut Gas Costs This Holiday Traveling Season with Three Easy Tips November 26, 2013 - 9:23am Addthis Turning off your engine while waiting in the parking lot is a great way to save money on gas. | Photo courtesy of Kristy Keel-Blackmon, NREL/21196. Turning off your engine while waiting in the parking lot is a great way to save money on gas. | Photo courtesy of Kristy Keel-Blackmon, NREL/21196. Jason Lutterman Communications Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy How can I participate? Drive smart this holiday season and stay informed with tools such as the speed penalty calculator on fueleconomy.gov. Yesterday you learned from Becky about three tools to help you save on fuel

64

OSTI and Norwood Elementary, holiday buddies for many years | OSTI, US Dept  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

and Norwood Elementary, holiday buddies for many years and Norwood Elementary, holiday buddies for many years NEWS MEDIA CONTACT: Cathey Daniels, (865) 576-9539 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE December 14, 2011 OSTI and Norwood Elementary, holiday buddies for many years The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) brightens the holidays for a number of area school children. Since the early 1990s, staff at OSTI have sponsored an Angel Tree Program for students from Norwood Elementary School. This year, each child in the program had three Angels on the OSTI tree. The wrapped gifts were collected and delivered to the Oliver Springs Angel Tree Ministry which distributes the gifts to the children before the winter break. Earlier in December, OSTI collected food items to be distributed to children for their

65

Y-12 employees make holiday merry for local families | National Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

employees make holiday merry for local families | National Nuclear employees make holiday merry for local families | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Y-12 employees make holiday merry for local families Y-12 employees make holiday merry for local families Posted By Office of Public Affairs Nearly 50 Y-12 employees served as Santa's elves in the 2012 Angel Tree

66

Y-12 employees make holiday merry for local families | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

employees make holiday merry for local families | National Nuclear employees make holiday merry for local families | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Y-12 employees make holiday merry for local families Y-12 employees make holiday merry for local families Posted By Office of Public Affairs Nearly 50 Y-12 employees served as Santa's elves in the 2012 Angel Tree

67

Y-12 employees help make holiday merrier for many | Y-12 National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

employees help make ... Y-12 employees help make holiday merrier for many Posted: December 21, 2012 - 9:00am Bicycles and helmets provided by Y-12 workers await distribution to...

68

#tipsEnergy: How to Save Energy During the Holidays | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

How to Save Energy During the Holidays Once a month, we ask you to share your energy-saving tips so the larger energy community can learn from you, and we feature some...

69

How Do You Save Money on Summer Holidays? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

How Do You Save Money on Summer Holidays? How Do You Save Money on Summer Holidays? How Do You Save Money on Summer Holidays? July 6, 2012 - 6:20pm Addthis Earlier this week, Amanda talked about how you can save money celebrating the 4th of July. She mentioned several ways you can save energy by doing the things you probably did anyway -- like leaving the house or barbequing. But now that the 4th has come and gone, we're curious how you spent yours! Did you find any creative ways to save energy this 4th? You have the chance to share your thoughts on a question about energy efficiency or renewable energy for consumers. E-mail your responses to the Energy Saver team at consumer.webmaster@nrel.gov. Addthis Related Articles Could You Save Money on Your Refrigerator? How do You Save Energy During the Holidays?

70

I-N-N Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

N Electric Coop, Inc N Electric Coop, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name I-N-N Electric Coop, Inc Place Alaska Utility Id 9188 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location AK Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Rate- Single Phase Commercial Commercial Three Phase Service Commercial Community Facitity Commercial Residential Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.5710/kWh Commercial: $0.5110/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from

71

Konocti Harbor Inn Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Konocti Harbor Inn Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Konocti Harbor Inn Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Konocti Harbor Inn Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Konocti Harbor Inn Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Kelseyville, California Coordinates 38.9779531°, -122.8394375° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

72

The Saratoga Inn Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inn Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Inn Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name The Saratoga Inn Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility The Saratoga Inn Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Saratoga, Wyoming Coordinates 41.4549621°, -106.8064263° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

73

Riverside Inn Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Riverside Inn Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Riverside Inn Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Riverside Inn Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Riverside Inn Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Lava Hot Springs, Idaho Coordinates 42.6193625°, -112.0110712° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

74

Growth and depth dependence of visible luminescence in wurtzite InN epilayers  

SciTech Connect

We present detailed investigation of growth and depth dependence of visible ({approx}1.9 eV) photoluminescence (PL) in wurtzite InN epilayers grown by magnetron sputtering. For normal surface incidence, PL peak was found to redshift with increasing growth temperatures. Cross-sectional PL measurements were able to separate contributions from the InN epilayers and sapphire substrates, which not only demonstrated the visible luminescence in InN but also revealed the blueshift of the PL peak with laser spot focusing from epilayer surface toward the interface. The results have been well explained by the growth mechanism and residual strain along growth direction of InN epilayers.

Pu, X.D.; Shen, W.Z.; Zhang, Z.Q.; Ogawa, H.; Guo, Q.X. [Laboratory of Condensed Matter Spectroscopy and Opto-Electronic Physics, Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 1954 Hua Shan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China); Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Saga University, Saga 840-8502 (Japan)

2006-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

75

Mythologies of an American everyday landscape : Henry Ford at the Wayside Inn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ford purchased property in 1923 in Sudbury, Massachusetts in order to preserve an historic inn associated with the poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. Over the next twenty years, his mission expanded to create an idealized ...

Wortham, Brooke Danielle

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

River Inn Natural Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inn Natural Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Inn Natural Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name River Inn Natural Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility River Inn Natural Hot Spring Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Reno, Nevada Coordinates 39.5296329°, -119.8138027° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

77

Furnace Creek Inn Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inn Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Inn Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Furnace Creek Inn Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Furnace Creek Inn Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Death Valley, California Coordinates Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

78

Memorial Day Weekend Sales Tax Holiday for Energy-Efficient Products |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Memorial Day Weekend Sales Tax Holiday for Energy-Efficient Memorial Day Weekend Sales Tax Holiday for Energy-Efficient Products Memorial Day Weekend Sales Tax Holiday for Energy-Efficient Products < Back Eligibility General Public/Consumer Savings Category Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Air conditioners: price of less than $6,000; Refrigerators: price of less than $2,000; No limit on total purchases. Program Info Start Date 05/2008 State Texas Program Type Sales Tax Incentive Rebate Amount 100% of sales and use tax (6.25% - 8.25% depending on local jurisdiction) Provider Comptroller of Public Accounts Purchases of certain energy-efficient products during Memorial Day weekend are exempt from the state sales and use tax.* This amounts to a three-day

79

North Pole's Holiday Wish for An Energy Efficient 2012 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

North Pole's Holiday Wish for An Energy Efficient 2012 North Pole's Holiday Wish for An Energy Efficient 2012 North Pole's Holiday Wish for An Energy Efficient 2012 December 23, 2011 - 4:20pm Addthis The city of North Pole, Alaska, is hoping to use $100,000 in Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant funds to improve the energy efficiency of several key city facilities.| Photo courtesy of the a href"http://www.northpolefire.org/">North Pole Fire Department. The city of North Pole, Alaska, is hoping to use $100,000 in Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant funds to improve the energy efficiency of several key city facilities.| Photo courtesy of the a href"http://www.northpolefire.org/">North Pole Fire Department. Chris Galm Marketing & Communications Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency &

80

Sales Tax Holiday for Energy-Efficient Appliances | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sales Tax Holiday for Energy-Efficient Appliances Sales Tax Holiday for Energy-Efficient Appliances Sales Tax Holiday for Energy-Efficient Appliances < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Program Info Start Date 7/1/2008 State North Carolina Program Type Sales Tax Incentive Rebate Amount 100% sales tax exemption for certain Energy Star appliances Provider N.C. Department of Revenue '''Note: Legislation enacted in June 2011 ([http://www.ncleg.net/enactedlegislation/sessionlaws/html/2011-2012/sl201... S.B. 267]) that removed geothermal heat pumps from the list of energy systems and equipment eligible for this exemption.''' In July 2008, North Carolina enacted legislation establishing a "sales tax

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "holiday inn express" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

How Do You Save Money on Summer Holidays? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Money on Summer Holidays? Money on Summer Holidays? How Do You Save Money on Summer Holidays? July 6, 2012 - 6:20pm Addthis Earlier this week, Amanda talked about how you can save money celebrating the 4th of July. She mentioned several ways you can save energy by doing the things you probably did anyway -- like leaving the house or barbequing. But now that the 4th has come and gone, we're curious how you spent yours! Did you find any creative ways to save energy this 4th? You have the chance to share your thoughts on a question about energy efficiency or renewable energy for consumers. E-mail your responses to the Energy Saver team at consumer.webmaster@nrel.gov. Addthis Related Articles How do You Save Energy During the Holidays? Could You Save Money on Your Refrigerator? Simple and inexpensive actions can help you save energy and money during the cool fall and winter months. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com.

82

They're Here! Winter, Holidays, and the New Year. How Will You Save Energy?  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

They're Here! Winter, Holidays, and the New Year. How Will You Save They're Here! Winter, Holidays, and the New Year. How Will You Save Energy? They're Here! Winter, Holidays, and the New Year. How Will You Save Energy? December 22, 2009 - 10:11am Addthis Winter officially hit this week, and those of you on the east coast found out in a big way. Many of you are still shoveling out while trying to take care of those last-minute holiday preparations. (I'm actually kind of jealous. I love shoveling snow. I just hate driving in it.) Anyway, I know you're busy, so before you run off to bake more cookies (send me some?), here are some quick energy-related reminders for the next few weeks: Celebrate Efficiently As you're running through your to-do list, don't forget to think about how you can save energy during all of the hustle and bustle. Our entry from

83

Ramp meters on trial: Evidence from the Twin Cities metering holiday  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ramp meters on trial: Evidence from the Twin Cities metering holiday David Levinson a,*, Lei Zhang; accepted 15 December 2004 Abstract Ramp meters in the Twin Cities have been the subject of a recent test metering for several representative freeways during the afternoon peak period. Seven performance measures

Levinson, David M.

84

Microsoft Word - CX-Drummond-MacksInn_WoodPoleReplacementFY12_WEB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10, 2012 10, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-CELILO SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Mark Hadley Lineman Foreman III - TFIF-Idaho Falls Proposed Action: Wood pole replacements along the Drummond-Macks Inn, Macks Inn- Madison, and Targhee Tap 115-kV transmission line rights-of-way. PP&A Project Number: 2191 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance activities... Location: The project area is located in Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Idaho Falls District. Project locations are listed below: Project Location Township Range Section(s) County Line Name Structures Use Ownership 4N 45E 11 Teton Targhee Tap 8/8 Agriculture Private 14N 44E 22 Fremont Macks Inn- Madison

85

Lois Curfman McInnes, 2011 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Lois Curfman McInnes, 2011 Lois Curfman McInnes, 2011 The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award Lawrence Award Home Nomination & Selection Guidelines Award Laureates 2000's 1990's 1980's 1970's 1960's Ceremony The Life of Ernest Orlando Lawrence Contact Information The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-9395 E: lawrence.award@science.doe.gov 2000's Lois Curfman McInnes, 2011 Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Computer, Information, and Knowledge Sciences: For scientific leadership in advancing the innovative and transformative numerical software package PETSc, which provides robust, efficient, scalable, and extensible tools that are the backbone of numerous high-performance DOE simulation computer

86

Fe-doped InN layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Iron(Fe)-doped InN (InN:Fe) layers have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy. It is found that Fe-doping leads to drastic increase of residual electron concentration, which is different from the semi-insulating property of Fe-doped GaN. However, this heavy n-type doping cannot be fully explained by doped Fe-concentration ([Fe]). Further analysis shows that more unintentionally doped impurities such as hydrogen and oxygen are incorporated with increasing [Fe] and the surface is degraded with high density pits, which probably are the main reasons for electron generation and mobility reduction. Photoluminescence of InN is gradually quenched by Fe-doping. This work shows that Fe-doping is one of good choices to control electron density in InN.

Wang Xinqiang; Liu Shitao; Ma Dingyu; Zheng Xiantong; Chen Guang; Xu Fujun; Tang Ning; Shen Bo [State Key Laboratory of Artificial Microstructure and Mesoscopic Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhang Peng; Cao Xingzhong; Wang Baoyi [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analysis Techniques, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Huang Sen; Chen, Kevin J. [Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (Hong Kong); Zhou Shengqiang [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), 01314 Dresden (Germany); Yoshikawa, Akihiko [Center for SMART Green Innovation Research, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan)

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

87

Electrical and optical properties of p-type InN  

SciTech Connect

We have performed comprehensive studies of optical, thermoelectric and electrical properties of Mg doped InN with varying Mg doping levels and sample thicknesses. Room temperature photoluminescence spectra show a Mg acceptor related emission and the thermopower provides clear evidence for the presence of mobile holes. Although the effects of the hole transport are clearly observed in the temperature dependent electrical properties, the sign of the apparent Hall coefficient remains negative in all samples. We show that the standard model of two electrically well connected layers (n-type surface electron accumulation and p-type bulk) does not properly describe Hall effect in p-type InN.

Mayer, M. A.; Choi, S.; Bierwagen, O.; Smith, III, H. M.; Haller, E. E.; Speck, J. S.; Walukiewicz, W.

2011-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

88

Effect of interfacial lattice mismatch on bulk carrier concentration and band gap of InN  

SciTech Connect

The issue of ambiguous values of the band gap (0.6 to 2 eV) of InN thin film in literature has been addressed by a careful experiment. We have grown wurtzite InN films by PA-MBE simultaneously on differently modified c-plane sapphire substrates and characterized by complementary structural and chemical probes. Our studies discount Mie resonances caused by metallic In segregation at grain boundaries as the reason for low band gap values ( Almost-Equal-To 0.6 eV) and also the formation of Indium oxides and oxynitrides as the cause for high band gap value ( Almost-Equal-To 2.0 eV). It is observed that polycrystallinity arising from azimuthal miss-orientation of c-oriented wurtzite InN crystals increases the carrier concentration and the band gap values. We have reviewed the band gap, carrier concentration, and effective mass of InN in literature and our own measurements, which show that the Moss-Burstein relation with a non-parabolic conduction band accounts for the observed variation of band gap with carrier concentration.

Kuyyalil, Jithesh [FOTON, UMR 6082, INSA, F-35708 Rennes (France); Tangi, Malleswararao; Shivaprasad, S. M. [Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur, Bangalore-560064 (India)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

89

Sales Tax Exemption for Energy-Efficient Products (Sales Tax Holiday) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sales Tax Exemption for Energy-Efficient Products (Sales Tax Sales Tax Exemption for Energy-Efficient Products (Sales Tax Holiday) Sales Tax Exemption for Energy-Efficient Products (Sales Tax Holiday) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info Start Date 3/23/2007 Expiration Date 7/1/2017 State Virginia Program Type Sales Tax Incentive Rebate Amount 100% exemption from state sales and use tax Provider Virginia Department of Taxation Virginia allows a four-day sales tax exemption on Energy Star products of $2,500 or less per product, purchased for non-commercial home or personal use. Beginning in 2007, the 100% exemption from the state sales and use tax applies to sales occurring during the four-day period that commencing

90

LOGISTICAL INFORMATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... ISOs, grid operators, utilities, power electronic ... Wyndham Garden Hotel Gaithersburg 805 Russell Ave. ... Holiday Inn Hotels 2 Montgomery Village Ave ...

2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

91

LOGISTICAL INFORMATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... power electronic equipment manufacturers, energy and power ... Wyndham Garden Hotel Gaithersburg 805 Russell ... Holiday Inn Hotels 2 Montgomery ...

2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

92

Microsoft Word - CX-Drummond-MacksInn-WoodPoleReplacementFY13_WEB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

29, 2012 29, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-CELILO SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Mark Hadley Lineman Foreman III - TFIF-Idaho Falls Proposed Action: Wood pole replacements along the Drummond-Macks Inn, Macks Inn- Madison, and Swan Valley-Teton 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line rights-of-way. PP&A Project Number: 2486 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance activities Location: The project area is located in Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Idaho Falls District. Project locations are listed below: Project Location Township Range Section(s) County Line Name Structures Use Ownership 3N 44E 28 Teton Swan Valley - Teton 10/6 Forest Forest Service 14S 5E 19 Fremont

93

Phase-coherence and symmetry in four-terminal magnetotransport measurements on InN nanowires  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Universal conductance fluctuations in n-type doped InN nanowires are investigated at temperatures down to 0.35 K. The nanowires were grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The effect of the contact resistance is eliminated by performing the measurements in a four-terminal configuration. We find that the decrease in the conductance fluctuation amplitude with temperature is due to small energy transfer phase-breaking processes and thermal broadening. In contrast to measurements in a two-terminal configuration, the symmetry of the conductance under magnetic field reversal is lost.

Frielinghaus, R.; Estevez Hernandez, S.; Calarco, R.; Schaepers, Th. [Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems (IBN-1) and JARA-Fundamentals of Future Information Technology, Research Centre Juelich GmbH, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

2009-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

94

Metallicity of InN and GaN surfaces exposed to NH{sub 3}.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A systematic study of energies and structures of InN and GaN (0001) surfaces exposed to NH{sub 3} and its decomposition products was performed with first-principles methods. A phenomenological model including electron counting contributions is developed based on calculated DFT energies and is used to identify low-energy structures. These predictions are checked with additional DFT calculations. The equilibrium phase diagrams are found to contain structures that violate the electron counting rule. Densities of states for these structures indicate n-type conductivity, consistent with available experimental results.

Walkosz, W.; Zapol, P.; Stephenson, G. B. (Materials Science Division)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

2012 BATTERIES GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, MARCH 4-9, 2012  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Gordon Research Conference on BATTERIES was held at Four Points Sheraton / Holiday Inn Express, Ventura, California, March 4-9, 2012. The Conference was well-attended with 176 participants. Gordon Research Conferences does not permit publication of meeting proceedings.

Stephen Harris

2012-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

96

TEAM CUMBERLAND The Inn at Opryland 2401 Music Valley Dr, Nashville  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TEAM CUMBERLAND TEAM CUMBERLAND The Inn at Opryland 2401 Music Valley Dr, Nashville November 13, 2013 On Tuesday, November 12 th , 6:15 PM CST, the group will meet in the hotel lobby and walk to Caney Fork Fish Camp Restaurant for dinner (Dutch-treat). The meeting on Wednesday, November 13 th , begins at 8:00 AM CST and should conclude by 1:00 PM CST. Breaks to be announced based on agenda progression. Dress: Business Casual 1. Welcome ................................................................................................... Joel Seymour 2. Opening Remarks .................... J. McCarty, R. Kirsch, LTC Hudson, D. Dale, K. Legg 3. Washington Update ............................................................... Fred Ragan, Steve Adams 4. Center Hill & Wolf Creek Dam Repair Status ........................................... Jamie James

97

Train directions from Newark Airport to Nassau Inn or Palmer House Hotel Train is the most convenient way to get to Princeton from EWR. From the terminals at  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Train directions from Newark Airport to Nassau Inn or Palmer House Hotel Train is the most://tinyurl.com/yc8g3rf or the Palmer House http://www.princeton.edu/palmerhouse/images/map.jpg Train directions from

98

Likelihood of Confusion—The Basis for Trademark Infringement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Famous service marks are Holiday Inn® for hotel services and McDonald's® for restaurant services. In this article, for convenience, both trademarks and service ...

99

Wine Valley Inn: A mineral water spa in Calistoga, California. Geothermal-energy-system conceptual design and economic feasibility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to determine the engineering and economic feasibility for utilizing geothermal energy for air conditioning and service water heating at the Wine Valley Inn, a mineral water spa in Calistoga, California. The study evaluates heating, ventilating, air conditioning and water heating systems suitable for direct heat geothermal application. Due to the excellent geothermal temperatures available at this site, the mechanics and economics of a geothermally powered chilled water cooling system are evaluated. The Wine Valley Inn has the resource potential to have one of the few totally geothermal powered air conditioning and water heating systems in the world. This total concept is completely developed. A water plan was prepared to determine the quantity of water required for fresh water well development based on the special requirements of the project. An economic evaluation of the system is included to justify the added capital investment needed to build the geothermally powered mineral spa. Energy payback calculations are presented. A thermal cascade system is proposed to direct the geothermal water through the energy system to first power the chiller, then the space heating system, domestic hot water, the two spas and finally to heat the swimming pool. The Energy Management strategy required to automatically control this cascade process using industrial quality micro-processor equipment is described. Energy Management controls are selected to keep equipment sizing at a minimum, pump only the amount of geothermal water needed and be self balancing.

Not Available

1981-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

100

Winter and Holiday Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Source: American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons HOME HOME HOME HOME Do not drink and decorate. Inspect, properly set up, and position ladders. Use a step stool instead of furniture. Be mindful of rearranged furniture. Minimize clutter. LUGGAGE LUGGAGE LUGGAGE LUGGAGE Pack light. Use proper lifting techniques. Do not rush when lifting or carrying heavy suitcases or packages. Take care when placing luggage in overhead compartments. WINTER SPORTS WINTER SPORTS WINTER SPORTS WINTER SPORTS Warm up muscles. Wear appropriate protective gear. Know and abide by winter sports rules. Keep equipment in good working condition and use properly. If you or someone else experiences hypothermia, immediately seek shelter and medical attention.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "holiday inn express" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

International Cooperation Holiday Cheer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Elizabeth Melton, Angela Ramsey and Chelsea Richey. U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office P.O. Box 98518, Las Vegas, NV 89193-8518...

102

Role of nanoscale AlN and InN for the microwave characteristics of AlGaN/(Al,In)N/GaN-based HEMT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new AlGaN/GaN-based high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) is proposed and its micro-wave characteristics are discussed by introducing a nanoscale AlN or InN layer to study the potential improvement in their high frequency performance. The 2DEG transport mechanism including various sub-band calculations for both (Al,In) N-based HEMTs are also discussed in the paper. Apart from direct current characteristics of the proposed HEMT, various microwave parameters such as transconductance, unit current gain (h{sub 21} = 1) cut-off frequency (f{sub t}), high power-gain frequency (f{sub max}). Masons available/stable gain and masons unilateral gain are also discussed for both devices to understand its suitable deployment in microwave frequency range.

Lenka, T. R., E-mail: trlenka@gmail.com; Panda, A. K., E-mail: akpanda62@hotmail.com [National Institute of Science and Technology (India)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

COMMITTEE ON ENERGY STATISTICS. THURSDAY, APRIL 20, 1995. The Committee met in the Columbia Room at the Holiday Inn Capitol, 550 C Street, S.W., Washington, D.C., at ...

104

Mauritian Cuisine Tet Holiday in Vietnam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this small nation has grown and become a country filled with pride. What is Azerbaijan? Gulsabah Atakishiyeva Apr. 20 Azerbaijan is a country which little have been said and heard of. Yet it has a long history "What is Azerbaijan?" will create a picture of the country, briefly touching history and geography

Pringle, James "Jamie"

105

Video: Fire Safety for the Holidays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... failed to fire the tree. Finally they applied an open flame to the tree using a propane torch. The branches ignited briefly, but ...

2013-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

106

Today LED Holiday Lights, Tomorrow the World?  

SciTech Connect

This article for The APEM Advantage, the quarterly newsletter of the Association of Professional Energy Managers (APEM) describes the recent increase in the popularity of light emitting diode (LED) lighting and compares LED light output with that of incandescent and compact fluorescent lighting.

Gordon, Kelly L.

2004-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

107

1find out more at sustain.appstate.edu 2011 Sustainability Yearbook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

include solar powered trash compactors, a solar thermal installation at the Broyhill Inn which will serve the Ivory Tower Brewery and a solar powered "A" at Kidd Brewer Stadium. For more information about REI Clawson flips the switch on Boone's solar-powered holiday tree. For more information about ASUSES, visit

Rose, Annkatrin

108

Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This is the front matter for the 7th Biennial Symposium, International Society for Environmental Biotechnology, held at the Holiday Inn Chicago Mart Plaza, Chicago, Illinois on the dates of June 18-21, 2004. It contains a list of the symposium organizers, acknowledgements and the symposium overview.

Ananda M. Chakrabarty

2009-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

109

6th annual MIDYEAR UPDATE -ECONOMIC OUTLOOK "MONTANA'S CONSTRUCTION-LESS RECOVERY"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

:00 ­ 1:30 p.m. Best Western Helena Great Northern Hotel Co-sponsored by Helena Area Chamber of Commerce of Commerce and CVB & Montana-Dakota Utilities Wednesday, August 10 7:00 ­ 8:30 a. m. Holiday Inn Bozeman Co

Crone, Elizabeth

110

FIRE Physics Validation Review Hampton Inn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

:00 am FIRE Divertor Design Mike Ulrickson 9:00 am FIRE Vacuum Vessel and Remote Handling Overview Brad

111

The Express  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

site. We will let you know what is site. We will let you know what is new through this newsletter. As you will find in this issue, briefs of various alternative fuels information are provided by category. We will also begin an addi- tional service, the AFDC Express. The Express will provide impor- tant information on late-breaking issues via e-mail and fax. If you would like to receive these, you should ensure that the Center has your correct information. For those of you who have finished this editorial of sorts, fear not, it is the only one I will write. If any editorials appear in future issues, they will be from others in the alternative fuels industry. Enjoy the Update. Lee Slezak AFDC Program Manager U.S. Department of Energy Printed with a renewable-source ink on paper containing at least 50% wastepaper, including 20% postconsumer waste

112

Chemistry Department Social Events  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Social Events Holiday Party 2012 Holiday Party 2011 Holiday Party 2009 Holiday Party 2008 Softball 2008 Holiday Party 2007 Holiday Party 2006 RMB @ BNL Summer BBQ 2006 Holiday...

113

Experiments in expression recognition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Despite the significant effort devoted to methods for expression recognition, suitable training and test databases designed explicitly for expression research have been largely neglected. Additionally, possible techniques ...

Skelley, James P. (James Paul)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

SNAP 2008 Collaboration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lodging Block room reservation for September 24 (check-in) - September 27 (check-out) has been made at the Holiday Inn Greenbelt. 50 rooms have been blocked, but can be adjusted higher on as needed basis. Please make your hotel reservation NLT Monday, August 25, 2008. After August 25, reservations will be taken on a space available basis. Holiday Inn Greenbelt (minimum of 50 rooms available) : 7200 Hanover Drive Greenbelt, MD 20770 Phone: 301-982-7000 The rate is $149.00 per night plus tax - includes full breakfast buffet. Parking and wireless internet in the rooms are both free of charge. To make your reservation, please call the hotel at 301-982-7000 NLT Monday, August 25, 2008 . To obtain the special discount rate, please mention the Group Name "SNAP/USRA". You will then need to give them your credit card information to make the reservation.

115

Shared-savings cuts hotel's losses from EMS removal  

SciTech Connect

A shared-savings contract will minimize the Myrtle Beach, SC Downtown Holiday Inn's losses of replacing a poorly performing Energy Master energy-management system with Scientific Atlanta equipment. The contract with Energy Master Inc. (EMI), which saved Holiday Inn the $80,000 to $90,000 purchase price, also permitted removal (a year after installation) of the equipment when it failed to generate energy savings. A dispute between Associated Energy Consultants (AEC), which was to receive half the savings in exchange for arranging the equipment financing, is described. At $51,745, the 262-point Scientific Atlanta system should have a 1.7-year payback. The hotel's electric bills were $2000 a month lower during the first three months of operation. (DCK)

Galvin, C.

1982-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

116

High expression Zymomonas promoters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Identified are mutants of the promoter of the Z. mobilis glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene, which direct improved expression levels of operably linked heterologous nucleic acids. These are high expression promoters useful for expression of chimeric genes in Zymomonas, Zymobacter, and other related bacteria.

Viitanen, Paul V. (West Chester, PA); Tao, Luan (Havertown, PA); Zhang, Yuying (New Hope, PA); Caimi, Perry G. (Kennett Square, PA); McCole, Laura (East Fallowfield, PA): Zhang, Min (Lakewood, CO); Chou, Yat-Chen (Lakewood, CO); McCutchen, Carol M. (Wilmington, DE); Franden, Mary Ann (Centennial, CO)

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

117

Primary Causes of Wetland Loss at Madison Bay, Terrebonne ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

A Book Season Like No Other: See What's Coming Next; FREE Express Shipping, Save in Stores with Membership; Holiday Boxed Cards: 30% Off; Special ...

118

Holiday City-Berkeley, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

City-Berkeley, New Jersey: Energy Resources City-Berkeley, New Jersey: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.9645797°, -74.2707509° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.9645797,"lon":-74.2707509,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

119

Solar Express | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Express Jump to: navigation, search Name Solar Express Place Italy Product A joint venture established to install some 11MW of photovoltaic generation capacity around the...

120

Defining the meaning of tabular mathematical expressions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mathematical expressions in tabular form (also called ''tabular expressions'' or ''tables'') have been shown to be useful for documenting and analysing software systems. They are usually easier to read than conventional mathematical expressions but are ... Keywords: Expression semantics, Mathematical documentation, Software documentation, Software engineering, Tabular expressions

Ying Jin; David Lorge Parnas

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "holiday inn express" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Collective systems for creative expression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis defines collective systems as a unique category of creative expression through the procedures of micro and macro cycles that address the transition from connectivity to collectivity. This thesis discusses the ...

Ar?kan, Harun Burak

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

An expressive language of signatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current languages allow a programmer to describe an interface only by enumerating its parts, possibly including other interfaces wholesale. Such languages cannot express relationships between interfaces, yet when independently developed software components ... Keywords: interfaces, objective Caml, programming in the large, signature manipulation, signatures, standard ML

Norman Ramsey; Kathleen Fisher; Paul Govereau

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Generating Referring Expressions that Involve Gradable Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article examines the role of gradable properties in referring expressions from the perspective of natural language generation. First, we propose a simple semantic analysis of vague descriptions (i.e., referring expressions that contain gradable ...

Kees van Deemter

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

PAPILLON: expressive eyes for interactive characters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PAPILLON is a technology for designing highly expressive animated eyes for interactive characters, robots and toys. Expressive eyes are essential in any form of face-to-face communication [2] and designing them has been a critical challenge in ...

Eric Brockmeyer; Ivan Poupyrev; Moshe Mahler; Joanne Dauner; James Krahe

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Sales Tax Exemption for Energy-Efficient Products (Sales Tax Holiday) (Georgia))  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Georgia allows an annual state and local sales tax exemption on Energy Star products of $1,500 or less per product, purchased for non-commercial home or personal use.The 100% exemption from the...

126

Load Forecasting on Special Days & Holidays in Power Distribution Substation Using Neural & Fuzzy Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The demand for neural and fuzzy network techniques to predict the increasing load and its application has changed to an ordinary action. However the facts of the real world caused special and exceptional conditions to be created in this network. Like ... Keywords: Power system, Load forecasting, neural & fuzzy network, Short-term prediction of load.

Saeid Nahi

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Sukes – A Krants Fun Yomim Toyvim (Sukkot – A Garland of the Jewish Holidays)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PK lOa^-praiT ^o^ag i n n anp mg ? ogn PT8 7^an ou T^K oyyapgnyaag ,yaypiia n p n anp i n au pg ? ogn iyag ,po n$n ,

Layner Lainer, Sore Rafalin Sarah Rafalin

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

B&W Y-12 annual holiday ethics letter to suppliers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sincerely yours, B:W102 technical services LLC bear creek road p.o. box 2009 II oak ridge. to 37831-6501 * phone 865.241.1247 'fax 865.241.215(1 WWN1.y12.doe.gov November 11, 2013...

129

2 2000-01 Annual Schedule of Classes Veterans' Day honored as holiday  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the published deadline, payments must be made in per- son at 1125 Murphy Hall and are assessed an additional $50.00 Transcripts--additional services/fees Same-day Processing Service (per addressee) Special handling Special, and release of academic transcripts. See the "Registration" section for additional information about holds

Grether, Gregory

130

Baculovirus expression system and method for high throughput expression of genetic material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides novel recombinant baculovirus expression systems for expressing foreign genetic material in a host cell. Such expression systems are readily adapted to an automated method for expression foreign genetic material in a high throughput manner. In other aspects, the present invention features a novel automated method for determining the function of foreign genetic material by transfecting the same into a host by way of the recombinant baculovirus expression systems according to the present invention.

Clark, Robin (Benecia, CA); Davies, Anthony (Mill Valley, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Methods for monitoring multiple gene expression  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to methods for monitoring differential expression of a plurality of genes in a first filamentous fungal cell relative to expression of the same genes in one or more second filamentous fungal cells using microarrays containing Trichoderma reesei ESTs or SSH clones, or a combination thereof. The present invention also relates to computer readable media and substrates containing such array features for monitoring expression of a plurality of genes in filamentous fungal cells.

Berka, Randy; Bachkirova, Elena; Rey, Michael

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Methods for monitoring multiple gene expression  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to methods for monitoring differential expression of a plurality of genes in a first filamentous fungal cell relative to expression of the same genes in one or more second filamentous fungal cells using microarrays containing Trichoderma reesei ESTs or SSH clones, or a combination thereof. The present invention also relates to computer readable media and substrates containing such array features for monitoring expression of a plurality of genes in filamentous fungal cells.

Berka, Randy (Davis, CA); Bachkirova, Elena (Davis, CA); Rey, Michael (Davis, CA)

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Load Express  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Create project files with Load Express in just 4 easy steps. Select a weather profile, enter simulation parameters, define the zonesrooms in the building and create air handler...

134

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Load Express  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

graphical interface makes Load Express a powerful engineering tool with a very short learning curve. The "rookie" or experienced user can quickly and accurately perform load...

135

Bayesian survival analysis using gene expression.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis developed and applied Bayesian models for the analysis of survival data. The gene expression was considered as explanatory variables within the Bayesian survival… (more)

Thamrin, Sri Astuti

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Another Small Business Success Story Factory Express  

Factory Express a New Mexico Service Disabled Veteran-Owned Company... a New Mexico small business that supplies and services office equipment and ...

137

Differential Gene Expression Pre-processing: from CEL files to ExpressionSet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

different between mutants and wild types Install Libraries and Load Data > source-processing: from CEL files to ExpressionSet Gene Annotation Visualize Expression Profile using Heatmap Produce

Qiu, Weigang

138

Representing and visualizing calendar expressions in texts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Temporal expressions that refer to a part of a calendar area in terms of common calendar divisions are studied. Our claim is that such a "calendar expression" (CE) can be described by a succession of operators operating on a calendar base (CB). These ...

Delphine Battistelli; Javier Couto; Jean-Luc Minel; Sylviane R. Schwer

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Meaning and Use of Indefinite Expressions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sentences containing pronouns and indefinite noun phrases can be said to express open propositions, propositions which display gaps to be filled. This paper addresses the question what is the linguistic content of these expressions, what information ... Keywords: cross speaker anaphora, discourse representation, dynamic interpretation, formal semantics and pragmatics, multi-speaker dialogue, speaker's reference

Paul Dekker

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Arithmetic Boolean Expression Manipulator Using BDDs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, there has been a lot of works on LSI design systems using Binary Decision Diagrams (BDDs), which are efficient representations of Boolean functions. We previously developed a Boolean expression manipulator, that can quickly calculate ... Keywords: BDD, Boolean expression, Boolean function, LSI CAD, combinatorial problem

Shin-Ichi Minato; F. Somenzi

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "holiday inn express" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Complexity and expressive power of logic programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article surveys various complexity and expressiveness results on different forms of logic programming. The main focus is on decidable forms of logic programming, in particular, propositional logic programming and datalog, but we also mention general ... Keywords: Complexity, datalog, expressive power, logic programming, nonmonotonic logic, query languages

Evgeny Dantsin; Thomas Eiter; Georg Gottlob; Andrei Voronkov

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Exploration of intention expression for robots  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a novel exploration on how to enable a robot to express its intention so that the humans and robot can form a synergic relationship. A systematic design approach is proposed to obtain a set of possible intentions for a given robot ... Keywords: augmented reality, intention expression, robot

Ivan Shindev; Yu Sun; Michael Coovert; Jenny Pavlova; Tiffany Lee

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

How many multiword expressions do people know?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

What is a multiword expression (MWE) and how many are there? Mark Liberman gave a great invited talk at ACL-89, titled “How Many Words Do People Know?” where he spent the entire hour questioning the question. Many of the same ... Keywords: Web search, Word, intelligence, knowledge, multiword expression, phrase

Kenneth Church

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Expression of eukaryotic polypeptides in chloroplasts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a gene expression system in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, preferably plant cells and intact plants. In particular, the invention relates to an expression system having a RB47 binding site upstream of a translation initiation site for regulation of translation mediated by binding of RB47 protein, a member of the poly(A) binding protein family. Regulation is further effected by RB60, a protein disulfide isomerase. The expression system is capable of functioning in the nuclear/cytoplasm of cells and in the chloroplast of plants. Translation regulation of a desired molecule is enhanced approximately 100 fold over that obtained without RB47 binding site activation.

Mayfield, Stephen P

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

145

KK3, Growth Orientation Control of InN by Pulsed Excitation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DD3, A New Approach to Make ZnO-Cu2O Heterojunctions for Solar Cells ... E2, AlGaAs/GaAs/GaN Wafer Fused HBTs with Ar Implanted Extrinsic Collectors.

146

Electrical and Electrothermal Transport Properties of n- and p-type InN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

control sensors. Platinum RTD (resistive temperature device)as secondary inputs. The RTD sensors are used in conjunctionare coming from the backup RTD sensors. the leads of a high

Miller, Nathaniel Reed

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Rational Expression Simplification with Polynomial Side ... - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

standard basis vectors ei. For example: [ x2 + y. 2y. ] .... Notice that the first row of G contains a Gr?bner basis for ?F? and the remaining rows express this basis in ...

148

An expectation model of referring expressions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis introduces EMRE, an expectation-based model of referring expressions. EMRE is proposed as a model of non-syntactic dependencies - in particular, discourse-level semantic dependencies that bridge sentence gaps. ...

Kræmer, John, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Computational generation of referring expressions: A survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article offers a survey of computational research on referring expression generation (REG). It introduces the REG problem and describes early work in this area, discussing what basic assumptions lie behind it, and showing how its remit has widened ...

Emiel Krahmer; Kees van Deemter

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Measuring Facial Emotional Expressions Using Genetic Programming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or groupings of muscles that perform specific actions in facial expressions. [Ekman, 1979] identified six key happiness as a contraction of the left and right zygo- matic major muscles. From inspection we can set

Slater, Mel

151

U-058: Apache Struts Conversion Error OGNL Expression Injection...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: Apache Struts Conversion Error OGNL Expression Injection Vulnerability U-058: Apache Struts Conversion Error OGNL Expression Injection Vulnerability December 12, 2011 - 9:00am...

152

Diurnal oscillation of SBE expression in sorghum endosperm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of SBE expression in sorghum endosperm Joel Mutisya 1,2 ,expression patterns of the sorghum SBEI, SBEIIA and SBEIIBthe developing endosperm of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) were

Mutisya, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY - EXPRESS LICENSING PROGRAM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY - EXPRESS LICENSING PROGRAM LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY - EXPRESS LICENSING PROGRAM NON-EXCLUSIVE PATENT LICENSE AGREEMENT This Agreement between Los Alamos National Security, LLC ("LANS"), under its United States Department of Energy ("DOE") Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396, to manage and operate Los Alamos National Laboratory ("LANL"), and ______________________________________, a _____________________________ corporation Company Name ("LICENSEE") (State of Incorporation) having its principal place of business at: ________________________________________________________________________________________ (Company Address) is effective on the date of execution by the last signing Party and payment of the License Issue Fee

154

PRESENT:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PUBLIC MEETING PUBLIC MEETING + + + + + FRIDAY NOVEMBER 14, 1997 + + + + + WASHINGTON, D.C. The Committee met in the Clark Room of the Capital Holiday Inn, 550 C Street, S.W., at 10:30 a.m., G. Campbell Watkins, Chair, presiding. PRESENT: G. CAMPBELL WATKINS, Chair DANIEL A. RELLES, Vice Chair DAVID R. BELLHOUSE R. SAMPRIT CHATTERJEE BRENDA G. COX CAROL A. GOTWAY CRAWFORD PHILIP HANSEN CALVIN KENT GRETA M. LJUNG ROY W. WHITMORE INVITED GUESTS: SEYMOUR SUDMAN RICHARD TABORS EIA STAFF PRESENT: JAY HAKES, EIA Administrator BILL WEINIG LYNDA CARLSON DAVID MOREHOUSE JOHN WOOD ART ANDERSON BOB MANICKE I N D E X Item: Page: World Oil Supply; Evidence from 4 Estimating Supply Functions by Country Questions from the Committee 54 Public Comments 62 Closing Comments by the Chair 67 P-R-O-C-E-E-D-I-N-G-S

155

Federal Utility Partnership Working Group November 2007 Meeting Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FEDERAL UTILITY PARTNERSHIP WORKING GROUP MEETING NOVEMBER 28-29, 2007 SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA HOSTED BY: SAN DIEGO GAS AND ELECTRIC INTRODUCTION The Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) held its Fall 2007 meeting in San Diego, California on November 28-29. The meeting was hosted by San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E) and was held at the Holiday Inn on the Bay. A total of 123 individuals attended the meeting, including at least 11 new members. Organizations represented included 48 utility officials, 6 Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) representatives, 40 federal agency representatives, 8 national laboratory representatives, and 21 representatives from energy-related organizations. The working group is a joint effort between FEMP and the utility industry to stimulate the exchange of information among

156

REGISTRATION LIST P PR RE ES SO OL LI IC CI IT TA AT TI IO ON  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

REGISTRATION LIST REGISTRATION LIST P PR RE ES SO OL LI IC CI IT TA AT TI IO ON N C CO ON NF FE ER RE EN NC CE E August 9, 2011 Holiday Inn Capitol  550 C Street, SW  Washington, DC 20024 Page 1 of 9 Instructions: (iii) Please indicate (by checking the appropriate box) whether the organization you represent is a large business, small business, or not a business. (iv) Please indicate (by checking the appropriate box) whether your name or the name of your organization may be released on the NNSA website as an attendee of this conference. (v) Please provide an email address if you would like it to be released on the NNSA website. An email address cannot be released if you select neither in column (iv). Name Organization Name Large/Small (iii) Release Attendance? (iv) Email (to release)

157

REPORT OF THE BASIC ENERGY SCIENCES ADVISORY COMMITTEE PANEL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BASIC ENERGY SCIENCES BASIC ENERGY SCIENCES ADVISORY COMMITTEE PANEL ON D.O.E. SYNCHROTRON RADIATION SOURCES AND SCIENCE NOVEMBER 1997 EPRI Electric Power Research Institute Powering Progress through Innovative Solutions January 14th, 1998 Dr. Martha A. Krebs, Director Office of Energy Research United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Dear Martha, The purpose of this letter is to summarize the discussions of the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee at its meeting on October 8 - 9, 1997 at the Holiday Inn in Gaithersburg as they related to the report from our Panel on Synchrotron Radiation Sources and Science. This Panel was assembled in response to the Charge presented to BESAC in your letter of October 9th, 1996 to reassess the need for and the opportunities presented by each of the four synchrotron

158

May 7 - 8, 2012 NIEHS Trainer's Exchange - Final Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Trainers' Exchange for Department of National Trainers' Exchange for Department of Energy (DOE) Safety and Health Trainers Workshop Report May 7-8, 2012 Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown World's Fair Park, Knoxville, TN 2 Table of Contents 3 Workshop Report 12 Attachment A- Workshop Agenda 14 Attachment B- Workshop Abstracts Photographs by Jim Remington, NIEHS Top: Sharon Beard, NIEHS. Bottom: Don Ellenberger, CPWR. 3 2012 National Trainers' Exchange for Department of Energy (DOE) Safety and Health Trainers BACKGROUND The National Defense Authorization Act for fiscal years 1992 and 1993 (42 USC 7274(d)) authorized the Secretary of Energy to make awards: "to provide training and education to persons who are or may be engaged in hazardous substance response or emergency response at DOE nuclear weapons facilities; and to develop response curricula

159

Agenda12810 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

8, 2010 8, 2010 Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) NSAC Home Meetings Members Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (629KB) NP Committees of Visitors NP Home Meetings December 8, 2010 Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee Meeting December 8, 2010 Where: Holiday Inn National Airport Hotel, Shenandoah Ballroom I & II, 2650 Jefferson Davis Highway, Arlington, VA, Phone Number: 703-684-7200. Purpose/Topics: Perspectives from Department of Energy and National Science Foundation Update from the Department of Energy and National Science Foundation's Nuclear Physics Offices Technical Talk on F-RIB Presentation of New Charge Public Comment For further information you may contact Brenda May at 301-903-0536 AGENDA December 8, 2010

160

Occupancy sensors for HVAC gaining in hotel industry  

SciTech Connect

The hotel industry is overcoming its skepticism as occupancy sensors with built-in thermistors to control heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) units demonstrate their ability to cut energy costs as much as 30%. Despite the successful demonstrations and acceptance by Holiday Inn, some hotel managers of other chains continue to resist. Occupancy sensors have either ultrasonic or infrared signals, but differ from lighting control devices by also having internal thermistors and remote door switches. This allows the rooms to reach comfort levels only when the guest is present since occupants are only minimally affected if temperatures are modified during unoccupied periods. The system works best for roadside-type motels rather than convention hotels, where occupants are in and out of their rooms.

Ladd, C.

1985-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "holiday inn express" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Workshop on Program for Elimination of Requirements Marginal to Safety: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

These are the proceedings of the Public Workshop on the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Program for Elimination of Requirements Marginal to Safety. The workshop was held at the Holiday Inn, Bethesda, on April 27 and 28, 1993. The purpose of the workshop was to provide an opportunity for public and industry input to the program. The workshop addressed the institutionalization of the program to review regulations with the purpose of eliminating those that are marginal. The objective is to avoid the dilution of safety efforts. One session was devoted to discussion of the framework for a performance-based regulatory approach. In addition, panelists and attendees discussed scope, schedules and status of specific regulatory items: containment leakage testing requirements, fire protection requirements, requirements for environmental qualification of electrical equipment, requests for information under 10CFR50.54(f), requirements for combustible gas control systems, and quality assurance requirements.

Dey, M. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Safety Issue Resolution; Arsenault, F.; Patterson, M.; Gaal, M. [SCIENTECH, Inc., Rockville, MD (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Verifying security invariants in ExpressOS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Security for applications running on mobile devices is important. In this paper we present ExpressOS, a new OS for enabling high-assurance applications to run on commodity mobile devices securely. Our main contributions are a new OS architecture and ... Keywords: automatic theorem proving, microkernel, mobile security, programming by con- tracts

Haohui Mai; Edgar Pek; Hui Xue; Samuel Talmadge King; Parthasarathy Madhusudan

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Integrating gene expression profiling and clinical data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a combination of machine learning techniques to integrate predictive profiling from gene expression with clinical and epidemiological data. Starting from BioDCV, a complete software setup for predictive classification and feature ranking without ... Keywords: BioDCV, Biomarkers, Classification, DNA microarray, Feature selection, Functional genomics, SVM, Statistical learning

Silvano Paoli; Giuseppe Jurman; Davide Albanese; Stefano Merler; Cesare Furlanello

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

PANDA EXPRESS ENTRES NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION CALORIES CALORIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PANDA EXPRESS ENTRÃ?ES NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION SERVING SIZE CALORIES CALORIES FROM FAT TOTAL FAT (g) SATURATED FAT (g) TRANS FAT (g) CHOLESTEROL (mg) SODIUM (mg) TOTAL CARBOHYDRATES (g) DIETARY FIBER (g) SUGARS (g) PROTEIN (g) Indicates spicy dishes. CHICKEN Orange Flavored Chicken 5.5 oz. 500 245 27 5.5 1

Finzi, Adrien

165

Extracting and classifying Urdu multiword expressions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a method for automatically extracting and classifying multiword expressions (mWEs) for Urdu on the basis of a relatively small unannotated corpus (around 8.12 million tokens). The mWEs are extracted by an unsupervised method and ...

Annette Hautli; Sebastian Sulger

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Book Review Bayesian Inference for Gene Expression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Book Review Bayesian Inference for Gene Expression and Proteomics. Edited by Kim-Anh Do, Peter Mu for a long time. This book is a timely publication entirely devoted to cutting-edge Bayesian methods in their own biological research. Moreover, the book calls for more methodological and theoretical research

Vannucci, Marina

167

Regulation of methane genes and genome expression  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the start of this project, it was known that methanogens were Archaeabacteria (now Archaea) and were therefore predicted to have gene expression and regulatory systems different from Bacteria, but few of the molecular biology details were established. The goals were then to establish the structures and organizations of genes in methanogens, and to develop the genetic technologies needed to investigate and dissect methanogen gene expression and regulation in vivo. By cloning and sequencing, we established the gene and operon structures of all of the “methane” genes that encode the enzymes that catalyze methane biosynthesis from carbon dioxide and hydrogen. This work identified unique sequences in the methane gene that we designated mcrA, that encodes the largest subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase, that could be used to identify methanogen DNA and establish methanogen phylogenetic relationships. McrA sequences are now the accepted standard and used extensively as hybridization probes to identify and quantify methanogens in environmental research. With the methane genes in hand, we used northern blot and then later whole-genome microarray hybridization analyses to establish how growth phase and substrate availability regulated methane gene expression in Methanobacterium thermautotrophicus ?H (now Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus). Isoenzymes or pairs of functionally equivalent enzymes catalyze several steps in the hydrogen-dependent reduction of carbon dioxide to methane. We established that hydrogen availability determine which of these pairs of methane genes is expressed and therefore which of the alternative enzymes is employed to catalyze methane biosynthesis under different environmental conditions. As were unable to establish a reliable genetic system for M. thermautotrophicus, we developed in vitro transcription as an alternative system to investigate methanogen gene expression and regulation. This led to the discovery that an archaeal protein, designated TFE, that had sequences in common with the eukaryotic general transcription factor TFIIE, stimulated archaeal transcription initiation and that the archaeal TATA-box binding protein (TBP) remained attached to the promoter region whereas the transcription factor TFB dissociated from the template DNA following initiation. DNA sequences that directed the localized assembly of archaeal histones into archaeal nucleosomes were identified, and we established that transcription by an archaeal RNA polymerase was slowed but not blocked by archaeal nucleosomes. We developed a new protocol to purify archaeal RNA polymerases and with this enzyme and additional improvements to the in vitro transcription system, we established the template requirements for archaeal transcription termination, investigated the activities of proteins predicted to be methane gene regulators, and established how TrpY, a novel archaeal regulator of expression of the tryptophan biosynthetic operon functions in M. thermautotrophicus. This also resulted in the discovery that almost all M. thermautotrophicus mutants isolated as spontaneously resistant to 5-methyl tryptophan (5MTR) had mutations in trpY and were therefore 5MTR through de-repressed trp operon expression. This established a very simple, practical procedure to determine and quantify the DNA sequence changes that result from exposure of this Archaeon to any experimental mutagenesis protocol. Following the discovery that the Thermococcus kodakaraensis was amenable to genetic manipulation, we established this technology at OSU and subsequently added plasmid expression, a reporter system and additional genetic selections to the T. kodakaraensis genetic toolbox. We established that transcription and translation are coupled in this Archaeon, and by combining in vitro transcription and in vivo genetics, we documented that both TFB1 and TFB2 support transcription initiation in T. kodakaraensis. We quantified the roles of ribosome binding sequences and alternative initiation codons in translation initiation, established that polarity e

John N. Reeve

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

168

Gene Expression in the Stallion Testes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the genes that regulate spermatogenesis and steroidogenesis in the testis is critical for enhancement of stallion fertility. Stallion testicular samples were used to identify candidate genes by cDNA microarrays that simultaneously assessed expression levels of 9132 genes. First, gene expression was compared between light (spermatogenically active) and dark (spermatogenically inactive) testis tissue of 1.5-year-old horses (n = 3). Ninety-three genes were differentially expressed (35 light specific, 58 dark specific) in matched paired samples. Second, gene expression was compared between testicular tissue of two mature stallions, one with normal quality semen (fertile) and one with poor quality semen (subfertile). A total of 233 genes were differentially expressed (122 in fertile tissue, 111 in subfertile tissue). Of these, phosphodiesterase 3B (PDE3B), steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein, and outer dense fiber of sperm tails 2 (ODF2) mRNAs, were localized and quantified by in situ hybridization (ISH) in mature stallions and/or in unilateral cryptorchids. ISH revealed differences (P < 0.05) among mature stallions (n = 10) for PDE3B (localized to seminiferous tubules) and StAR protein (localized to interstitial spaces) mRNAs. A positive correlation coefficient (r = .556, p = .025) was found between StAR protein mRNA and plasma concentration of testosterone. Additionally, both gene products were evaluated in 1-year-old (n = 3) and 3-year-old (n = 3) unilateral cryptorchid stallions. Expression of both PDE3B and StAR protein gene was significantly higher in mature, descended testes compared to mature, retained testes and the descended and retained testes of immature, cryptorchid stallions. StAR protein gene demonstrated significantly higher expression in immature retained testes compared to immature descended testes. A precision-cut tissue slice (PCTS) in vitro culture system was evaluated as a potential tool to study equine testes function. Testes from immature stallions (n = 3) were cut into slices (mean slice weight = 13.85 +/- 0.20 mg; mean slice thickness = 515.00 +/- 2.33 ?m) and exposed to medium containing ovine luteinizing hormone (oLH) at concentrations of 0, 5, 50 and 500 ng/ml for 6 h at 32 degrees C. Medium content of testosterone and estradiol was increased 500% and 120%, respectively, by addition of oLH versus that observed for the testis tissue slices treated with 0 ng oLH (control). An oLH concentration-dependent increase in StAR protein mRNA in tissue slices was detected by in situ hybridization; whereas, differences for PDE3B and ODF2 mRNAs were not observed. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the stallion is an excellent model for studying male fertility due to the initiation of spermatogenesis, frequency of cryptorchidism, and routine castration providing useful tissue to use for studying gene expression.

Laughlin, Andy M.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Molecular genetics of ligninase expression. Progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this research for the past three years have been to (1) elucidate the structure and genomic organization of genes involved in lignin degradation; and (2) investigate the expression of these genes in Phanerochaete chrysosporium and in heterologous hosts. Major accomplishments include the following: (1) the P. chrysosporium gene encoding glyoxal oxidase has been cloned, sequenced, and efficiently expressed in Aspergillus; (2) mapping methods were developed allowing the integration of genetic and physical maps of P. chrysosporium; (3) highly specific and sensitive PCR techniques were developed for discriminating closely related mRNAs. Application of this technique will help to identify specific genes involved in degradation of lignin and organopollutants; (4) investigations have revealed a novel insertional mutation in lignin peroxidase gene lipI.

Cullen, D. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Bacteriology

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Noise minimization in eukaryotic gene expression  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All organisms have elaborate mechanisms to control rates of protein production. However, protein production is also subject to stochastic fluctuations, or noise. Several recent studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli have investigated the relationship between transcription and translation rates and stochastic fluctuations in protein levels, or more generally, how such randomness is a function of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. However, the fundamental question of whether stochasticity in protein expression is generally biologically relevant has not been addressed, and it remains unknown whether random noise in the protein production rate of most genes significantly affects the fitness of any organism. We propose that organisms should be particularly sensitive to variation in the protein levels of two classes of genes: genes whose deletion is lethal to the organism and genes that encode subunits of multiprotein complexes. Using an experimentally verified model of stochastic gene expression in S. cerevisiae, we estimate the noise in protein production for nearly every yeast gene, and confirm our prediction that the production of essential and complex-forming proteins involves lower levels of noise than does the production of most other genes. Our results support the hypothesis that noise in gene expression is a biologically important variable, is generally detrimental to organismal fitness, and is subject to natural selection.

Fraser, Hunter B.; Hirsh, Aaron E.; Giaever, Guri; Kumm, Jochen; Eisen, Michael B.

2004-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

171

Commercial/industrial applications spur solar development  

SciTech Connect

Several large commercial buildings with solar systems are examined. The first building mentioned is the La Quinta Motor Inn located in Dallas, Texas. The system supplies approximately 90% of the hot water for the rooms and laundry. The largest solar cooling system is located in Frenchman's Reef, the Holiday Inn, St. Thomas, Virgin Islands. The system was funded by a 75% grant from the Energy Research and Development Administration. In Decatur, Alabama, construction has begun on a solar heating system that will be used at a large soybean oil extraction facility. The project is also sponsored in part by ERDA. The solar panels will be used to air dry the soy beans. The largest solar-powered irrigation system is located in Gila River Ranch southwest of Phoenix, Arizona. The system includes a 50-hp pump capable of delivering up to 10,000 gallons of irrigation water per minute. It operates with 5,500 ft/sup 2/ of parabolic tracking collectors.

Comstock, W.S.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

STATISTICAL MECHANICS CONFERENCE HOTEL INFORMATION The following hotels can be used during the conference and will provide a discounted rate. When making your reservation please mention  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conference stay at this hotel and will utilize the shuttle service) Convenient to Rutgers University ­ lessSTATISTICAL MECHANICS CONFERENCE HOTEL INFORMATION The following hotels can be used during Hotel front desk: 732-828-8000 | Hotel fax: 732-220-0314 Howard Johnson Express Inn official website

Glashausser, Charles

173

OPEN 4:30p.m. 1:00a.m. daily (except University holidays)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.79 Gatorade: Red, Yellow, Orange, Light Blue, Medium Blue; G2: Red, Orange, Purple, Dark Blue Canned Soda, 12 Wings and 2 Large Wedges $49.99 Three Sbarro Cheese Pizzas $37.99 Pizza and Wing Special: One Topping Pizza and 20 Wings $29.99 Specials Sbarro Pizza Made with all-natural ingredients, including dough made

Raina, Ramesh

174

Expression of Stable Isotopically Labeled Proteins for Use as ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Expression of Stable Isotopically Labeled Proteins for Use as Internal Standards for Mass Spectrometric Quantitation of Clinical Protein Biomarkers. ...

2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

175

CSP is expressive enough for A.W. Roscoe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CSP is expressive enough for A.W. Roscoe Oxford University Computing Laboratory {Bill.Roscoe@comlab.ox.ac.uk} Abstract. Recent results show that Hoare's CSP, augmented by one additional operator, can express every operator whose operational semantics are expressible in a new notation and are therefore "CSP

Oxford, University of

176

TOFU: a socially expressive robot character for child interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The TOFU project introduces a robotic platform for enabling new opportunities in robot based learning with emphasis on storytelling and artistic expression. This project introduces a socially expressive robot character designed to mimic the expressive ... Keywords: animation, education, interface design, robot, robot character

Ryan Wistort; Cynthia Breazeal

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Facial expression recognition from near-infrared videos  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Facial expression recognition is to determine the emotional state of the face regardless of its identity. Most of the existing datasets for facial expressions are captured in a visible light spectrum. However, the visible light (VIS) can change with ... Keywords: Component-based facial features, Facial expression recognition, Near-infrared (NIR), Spatiotemporal descriptors, Visible light (VIS)

Guoying Zhao; Xiaohua Huang; Matti Taini; Stan Z. Li; Matti PietikäInen

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Expression of multiple proteins in transgenic plants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for the production of multiple proteins in transgenic plants. A DNA construct for introduction into plants includes a provision to express a fusion protein of two proteins of interest joined by a linking domain including plant ubiquitin. When the fusion protein is produced in the cells of a transgenic plant transformed with the DNA construction, native enzymes present in plant cells cleave the fusion protein to release both proteins of interest into the cells of the transgenic plant. Since the proteins are produced from the same fusion protein, the initial quantities of the proteins in the cells of the plant are approximately equal.

Vierstra, Richard D. (Madison, WI); Walker, Joseph M. (Madison, WI)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Gene expression in physically impeded maize roots  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two approaches were used to search for genes which respond to physical impedance. First, cDNA clones induced by mechanical stress or drought stress of other plant species were hybridized to mRNA from maize root tips. The results showed that only two clones, TCH1 induced by wind stress in Arabidopsis, and LP2 induced by drought stress in pine, had high homology with the RNA in maize root tips, but they did not reveal an inducible pattern of expression in the impeded maize roots tips. Second, a cDNA library was constructed from mMRNA from a 10 min physical impedance treatment of maize roots tips and was differentially screened with radioactive labeled cDNA probes synthesized using mRNA extracted from stressed and non-stressed maize roots tips. Three clones, PIIGI, pIIG2, and pIRG3, were identified as responding to a 10 min physical impedance stress. The first two cDNA clones (PIIGI and pIIG2), whose expressions were induced in a 10 min physical impedance treatment, were characterized further. cDNA PIIGI contains 678 hp with an open reading frame which specifies a polypeptide of 129 amino acid residues which showed 97% similarity at the nucleic acid level to maize root cortical cell delineating protein. Northern analysis with cDNA PIIGI as a probe showed that the expression was strongly induced by the 10 min physical impedance treatment and genomic Southern analysis showed that a relatively conserved gene family exists in maize. The CDNA pIIG2 has a nucleotide sequence of 830 bp with an open reading frame which specifies a polypeptide of 210 amino acid residues, but in a search of the GENBANK database it did not show significant homology with any identified gene of known function. Genomic Southern hybridization using cDNApIIG2 found duplicated loci in maize but single loci in rice. The third cDNA clone pIRG3, 800 bp, whose expression was reduced about 33% by 10 to 30 min physical impedance, is identical to the partial sequence of maize "calreticulin!' gene by GENBANK search.

Huang, Ying-Fei

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Peroxidase gene expression during tomato fruit ripening  

SciTech Connect

Auxin oxidation has been reported to play a critical role in the initiation of pear fruit ripening and a tomato fruit peroxidase (POD) has been shown to have IAA-oxidase activity. However, little is known about changes in the expression of POD mRNA in tomato fruit development. They are investigating the expression of POD mRNA during tomato fruit maturation. Fruit pericarp tissues from six stages of fruit development and ripening (immature green, mature green, breaker, turning, ripe, and red ripe fruits) were used to extract poly (A)/sup +/ RNAs. These RNAs were translated in vitro in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate system using L-/sup 35/S-methionine. The /sup 35/S-labeled products were immunoprecipitated with POD antibodies to determine the relative proportions of POD mRNA. High levels of POD mRNA were present in immature green and mature green pericarp, but declined greatly by the turning stage of fruit ripening. In addition, the distribution of POD mRNA on free vs bound polyribosomes will be presented, as well as the presence or absence of POD mRNA in other tomato tissues.

Biggs, M.S.; Flurkey, W.H.; Handa, A.K.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "holiday inn express" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Performance Analysis of Enhanced Clustering Algorithm for Gene Expression Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microarrays are made it possible to simultaneously monitor the expression profiles of thousands of genes under various experimental conditions. It is used to identify the co-expressed genes in specific cells or tissues that are actively used to make proteins. This method is used to analysis the gene expression, an important task in bioinformatics research. Cluster analysis of gene expression data has proved to be a useful tool for identifying co-expressed genes, biologically relevant groupings of genes and samples. In this paper we applied K-Means with Automatic Generations of Merge Factor for ISODATA- AGMFI. Though AGMFI has been applied for clustering of Gene Expression Data, this proposed Enhanced Automatic Generations of Merge Factor for ISODATA- EAGMFI Algorithms overcome the drawbacks of AGMFI in terms of specifying the optimal number of clusters and initialization of good cluster centroids. Experimental results on Gene Expression Data show that the proposed EAGMFI algorithms could identify compact clus...

Chandrasekhar, T; Elayaraja, E

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

U-116: IBM Tivoli Provisioning Manager Express for Software Distribution  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: IBM Tivoli Provisioning Manager Express for Software 6: IBM Tivoli Provisioning Manager Express for Software Distribution Multiple Vulnerabilities U-116: IBM Tivoli Provisioning Manager Express for Software Distribution Multiple Vulnerabilities March 5, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: IBM Tivoli Provisioning Manager Express for Software Distribution Multiple Vulnerabilities PLATFORM: IBM Tivoli Provisioning Manager Express for Software Distribution 4.x ABSTRACT: Multiple vulnerabilities have been reported in IBM Tivoli Provisioning Manager Express for Software Distribution, which can be exploited by malicious people to conduct SQL injection attacks and compromise a user's system. reference LINKS: Secunia Advisory SA48216 CVE-2012-0198 CVE-2012-0199 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: Certain input passed via "Printer.getPrinterAgentKey" to the SoapServlet

183

An IDE for software development using tabular expressions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present preliminary work on an IDE for formal software development using tabular expressions as the basis for precise specifications and descriptions of software behaviour.

Dennis K. Peters; Mark Lawford; Baltasar Trancón y Widemann

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

BSA 94-18: T7 Gene Expression System  

The expression of recombinant proteins in bacterial cells under the control of the T7 RNA polymerase promoter is one of the most highly productive ...

185

Genomics, Gene Expression and Other Studies in Soybean Rust  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Joint Genome Institute Genomics, Gene Expression and otherRust Martha Lucía Posada-Buitrago Ph.D Genomics DivisionEvolutionary Genomics DOE- Joint Genome Institute Lawrence

Posada-Buitrago, Martha Lucia

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Regulation of the chitinase gene expression in suspension-cultured ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plant Molecular Biology 39: 907–914, 1999. © 1999 Kluwer Academic Publishers . Printed in the Netherlands. 907. Regulation of the chitinase gene expression ...

187

On the expressiveness of CSP A.W. Roscoe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the expressiveness of CSP A.W. Roscoe February 16, 2011 Abstract We define "CSP express every operator of Hoare's CSP. Furthermore we show that every op- erator with CSP-like operational semantics can be simulated in CSP with the addition of an exception-throwing operator P A Q in which any

Oxford, University of

188

Discrimination of personal web pages by extracting subjective expressions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a method for discriminating between personal and non-personal web pages. The method can support surveys of personal opinions about products and services. In the proposed method, subjective expressions are extracted from pages ... Keywords: document classification, films, movies, personal opinions, personal preferences, personal web pages, products, restaurants, subjective expressions, tourist destinations

Takahiro Hayashi; Koji Abe; Debabrata Roy; Rikio Onai

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Parametric spectral analysis of malaria gene expression time series data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spectral analysis of DNA microarray gene expressions time series data is important for understanding the regulation of gene expression and gene function of the Plasmodium falciparum in the intraerythrocytic developmental cycle. In this paper, ... Keywords: autoregressive model, microarray time series analysis, plasmodium falciparum, singular spectrum analysis, spectral estimation

Liping Du; Shuanhu Wu; Alan Wee-Chung Liew; David Keith Smith; Hong Yan

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Express location: supporting coordination of mobile delivery work  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces Express Location, a mobile web application, supporting drivers in delivery service in the daily coordination of work. Remote communication and cooperation takes place on a shared map view around the drivers' locations and next stop, ... Keywords: CSCW, delivery service, drawing, drivers, express location, field study, location-awareness, mobility, visual representations, workspace

Markus Westerlund; Maria Normark; Lars Erik Holmquist

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Gene identification in Phytophthora capsici through expressed sequence tags  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) are a rich source of information for gene discovery. In this paper, we describe the annotation of ESTs of Phytophthora capsici whose complete genome is not yet available. P. capsici is an Oomycete plant pathogen ... Keywords: Phytophthora capsici, expressed sequence tags, gene functional annotation

N. Reena; A. Chandrasekar; A. Riju; P. L. Nima; S. J. Eapen; M. Anandaraj

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

EIS-0447: Champlain Hudson Power Express Transmission Line Project, New  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Champlain Hudson Power Express Transmission Line Project, 7: Champlain Hudson Power Express Transmission Line Project, New York EIS-0447: Champlain Hudson Power Express Transmission Line Project, New York Summary This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a DOE proposal to grant a Presidential permit to Champlain Hudson Power Express, Inc., to construct, operate, maintain, and connect a new 1000-megawatt (MW) electric transmission system across the U.S.-Canada border in northeastern New York State. The proposed transmission line would run from the Canadian Province of Quebec to New York City. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download December 6, 2013 EIS-0447: DOE Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact Statement Champlain Hudson Power Express Transmission Line Project, New York

193

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- American Railway Express Office - NY  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Railway Express Office - Railway Express Office - NY 0-03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: American Railway Express Office (NY.0-03 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: American Railway Express (Downtown) , New York , New York NY.0-03-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NY.0-03-1 Site Operations: None - Involved with a fire during transport of uranium scrap. NY.0-03-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination remote NY.0-03-1 NY.0-03-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium scrap NY.0-03-2 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP NY.0-03-1 Also see Documents Related to American Railway Express Office

194

Diurnal oscillation of SBE expression in sorghum endosperm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spatial and temporal expression patterns of the sorghum SBEI, SBEIIA and SBEIIB genes, encoding, respectively, starch branching enzyme (SBE) I, IIA and IIB, in the developing endosperm of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) were studied. Full-length genomic and cDNA clones for sorghum was cloned and the SBEIIA cDNA was used together with gene-specific probes for sorghum SBEIIB and SBEI. In contrast to sorghum SBEIIB, which was expressed primarily in endosperm and embryo, SBEIIA was expressed also in vegetative tissues. All three genes shared a similar temporal expression profile during endosperm development, with a maximum activity at 15-24 days after pollination. This is different from barley and maize where SBEI gene activity showed a significantly later onset compared to that of SBEIIA and SBEIIB. Expression of the three SBE genes in the sorghum endosperm exhibited a diurnal rhythm during a 24-h cycle.

Sun, Chuanxin; Mutisya, J.; Rosenquist, S.; Baguma, Y.; Jansson, C.

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

195

Probing cell-free gene expression noise in femtoliter volumes  

SciTech Connect

Cell-free systems offer a simplified and flexible context that enables important biological reactions while removing complicating factors such as fitness, division, and mutation that are associated with living cells. However, cell-free expression in unconfined spaces is missing important elements of expression in living cells. In particular, the small volume of living cells can give rise to significant stochastic effects, which are negligible in bulk cell-free reactions. Here, we confine cell-free gene expression reactions to cell relevant 20 fL volumes (between the volumes of E. coli and S. cerevisiae), in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) containers. We demonstrate that expression efficiency varies widely at this volume, and we analyze gene expression noise. Noise analysis reveals signatures of translational bursting while noise dynamics suggest that overall cell-free expression is limited by a diminishing translation rate. In addition to offering a unique approach to understanding noise in gene circuits, our work contributes to a deeper understanding of the biophysical properties of cell-free expression systems, thus aiding efforts to harness cell-free systems for synthetic biology applications.

Karig, David K [ORNL; Jung, Seung-Yong [ORNL; Srijanto, Bernadeta R [ORNL; Collier, Pat [ORNL; Simpson, Michael L [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Pacific Power - FinAnswer Express | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pacific Power - FinAnswer Express Pacific Power - FinAnswer Express Pacific Power - FinAnswer Express < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit State Government Savings Category Other Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Construction Design & Remodeling Manufacturing Heat Pumps Heating Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Lighting: 70% of cost Incentive amount cannot reduce the project simple payback below one year Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting T-8 Lighting Fixtures: $0.25-$21 T-5 Lighting Fixtures: $0.25-$20 Cold Cathode: $5

197

Rocky Mountain Power - FinAnswer Express | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rocky Mountain Power - FinAnswer Express Rocky Mountain Power - FinAnswer Express Rocky Mountain Power - FinAnswer Express < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Industrial Savings Category Other Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Manufacturing Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Idaho Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount '''New Construction/Major Renovation Only''' Interior Lighting: $0.08/kwh annual energy savings LED Fixture (Exterior): $100 Induction Fixture (Exterior): $125 CFL Wallpack (Exterior): $30 Lighting Control (Exterior): $70 '''Retrofit Only''' Fluorescent Fixture Upgrades: $5-$20/fixture

198

Pacific Power - FinAnswer Express | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pacific Power - FinAnswer Express Pacific Power - FinAnswer Express Pacific Power - FinAnswer Express < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit State Government Savings Category Other Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Construction Design & Remodeling Manufacturing Heat Pumps Heating Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate General: 70% of energy efficiency project cost If incentive brings the simple payback below one year, the incentive is reduced so the simple payback equals one year. Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount T-8 Lighting Fixtures: $3-$7

199

01-02253B_OR_Knox_map.ai  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INN BULL RUN STEAM PLANT (TVA) COMFORT INN JAMESON INN BENEFITS OFFICE OF TECH. TRANSFER SNS PROJECT OFFICE COMMERCE PARK OAK RIDGEKNOXVILLE ROUTE MAP A B C D E F G H I J K L M N...

200

EIS-0447: Champlain Hudson Power Express Transmission Line Project, New  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

447: Champlain Hudson Power Express Transmission Line Project, 447: Champlain Hudson Power Express Transmission Line Project, New York EIS-0447: Champlain Hudson Power Express Transmission Line Project, New York Summary This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of a DOE proposal to grant a Presidential permit to Champlain Hudson Power Express, Inc., to construct, operate, maintain, and connect a new 1000-megawatt (MW) electric transmission system across the U.S.-Canada border in northeastern New York State. The proposed transmission line will run from the Canadian Province of Quebec to New York City. DOE also published a notice correcting the location of the public hearing that was held on November 19, 2013. Public Comment Opportunities As of December 6, 2013 - Comment Period Extended through 1/15/14 Written comments must be received by January 15, 2014. Comments submitted

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "holiday inn express" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Motifs, binding, and expression : computational studies of transcriptional regulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organisms must control gene expression in response to developmental, nutritional, or other environmental cues. This process is known as transcriptional regulation and occurs through complex networks of proteins interacting ...

MacIsaac, Kenzie D. (Kenzie Daniel), 1975-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

A Systems Genetics Approach to Evaluate Serum Cytokine Expression Profiles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluate Serum Cytokine Expression Profiles Evaluate Serum Cytokine Expression Profiles in 10 cGy-Irradiated Mice: Possible Connection to Susceptibility/Resistance to Cancer E.A. Blakely Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract Goal: To use a systems-genetics approach to evaluate serum cytokine expression profiles in 10 cGy-whole-body-irradiated mice (BALB/c and Spret/EiJ parental strains, and their F1 offspring backcrossed (F1Bx) to female BALB/c). Background and Significance: Even low doses of ionizing radiation (∼10 cGy) can alter the composition of the tissue microenvironment by rapidly affecting cytokine production and activities, extracellular matrix (ECM) composition, and the expression of receptors that mediate cell-to-cell interactions (1). The stroma in mammary glands is constantly changing

203

DNA damage induced clusterin expression - A sensitive measure of genomic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

damage induced clusterin expression - A sensitive measure of genomic damage induced clusterin expression - A sensitive measure of genomic instability David Boothman University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas Abstract Secretory clusterin (sCLU) is a glycoprotein secreted from cells following exposure to genotoxic stress, and sCLU expression is elevated in many different disease states. sCLU is a pro-survival protein that acts as a molecular chaperone to remove cell debris caused by trauma to cells and tissues in vivo. sCLU expression is extremely sensitive to oxidative stress and DNA damage and can be induced by low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR), as low as 2 cGy. We previously demonstrated that sCLU was induced after LDIR by activation of the Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 Receptor (IGF-1R), and downstream stimulation of Src/MAPK/Erk-1/2 to promote binding of the Egr-1

204

Express Farms Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Express Farms Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Express Farms Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Express Farms Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Express Farms Sector Geothermal energy Type Greenhouse Location Marsing, Idaho Coordinates 43.5454359°, -116.8131958° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

205

Los Alamos National Laboratory announces Express Licensing program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LANL announces Express Licensing program LANL announces Express Licensing program Los Alamos National Laboratory announces Express Licensing program With the launch of a new "Express Licensing" program, access to innovative technology invented at Los Alamos National Laboratory has gotten easier. August 1, 2013 The following sequence shows the formation of nanoFOAM technology developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. NanoFOAMs are self-supporting nanoporous metal foams that have potential applications in oil-refining processes, filtration of liquid or airborne germs, rocket fuels or catalytic production of a range of products from ammonia to plastics. NanoFOAM is just one of many licensable technologies available at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The following sequence shows the formation of nanoFOAM technology developed

206

V-188: Apache XML Security XPointer Expressions Processing Buffer Overflow  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: Apache XML Security XPointer Expressions Processing Buffer 8: Apache XML Security XPointer Expressions Processing Buffer Overflow Vulnerability V-188: Apache XML Security XPointer Expressions Processing Buffer Overflow Vulnerability June 28, 2013 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability has been reported in Apache XML Security PLATFORM: vulnerability is reported in versions prior to 1.7.2 ABSTRACT: The vulnerability addresses the possibility of a heap overflow condition REFERENCE LINKS: Secunia Advisory SA53959 Apache Advisory CVE-2013-2210 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High DISCUSSION: The vulnerability is caused due to an error within the XML Signature Reference processing code and can be exploited to cause a heap-based buffer overflow via a specially crafted document containing malformed XPointer expressions. IMPACT: Successful exploitation may allow execution of arbitrary code

207

FedEx Express Gasoline Hybrid Electric Delivery Truck Evaluation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FedEx Express Gasoline Hybrid Electric Delivery Truck Evaluation: 12-Month Report R. Barnitt Technical Report NRELTP-5400-48896 January 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the...

208

Data mining techniques for large-scale gene expression analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modern computational biology is awash in large-scale data mining problems. Several high-throughput technologies have been developed that enable us, with relative ease and little expense, to evaluate the coordinated expression ...

Palmer, Nathan Patrick

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Context-specific Bayesian clustering for gene expression data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recent growth in genomic data and measurement of genome-wide expression patterns allows to examine gene regulation by transcription factors using computational tools. In this work, we present a class of mathematical models that help in understanding ...

Yoseph Barash; Nir Friedman

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

An Alternative Expression for the Eady Wave Growth Rate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energetics of Eady's (1949) model of baroclinic instability are used to express the wavenumber-dependent disturbance growth rate in terms of upward and northward fluxes of heat and momentum. This formulation leads to simple physical ...

Daniel Keyser; Richard A. Anthes

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

A meta-algorithm for the generation of referring expressions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a new approach to the generation of referring expressions. We propose to formalize a scene as a labeled directed graph and describe content selection as a subgraph construction problem. Cost functions are used to guide ...

Emiel Krahmer; Sebastiaan van Erk; André Verleg

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Extended caching, backjumping and merging for expressive description logics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With this contribution we push the boundary of some known optimisations such as caching to the very expressive Description Logic $\\mathcal{SROIQ}$. The developed method is based on a sophisticated dependency management and a precise unsatisfiability ...

Andreas Steigmiller; Thorsten Liebig; Birte Glimm

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Propagation networks : a flexible and expressive substrate for computation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this dissertation I propose a shift in the foundations of computation. Modem programming systems are not expressive enough. The traditional image of a single computer that has global effects on a large memory is too ...

Radul, Alexey

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Mediator and cohesin connect gene expression and chromatin architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transcription factors control cell-specific gene expression programs through interactions with diverse coactivators and the transcription apparatus. Gene activation may involve DNA loop formation between enhancer-bound ...

Kagey, Michael H.

215

Reasoning support for expressive ontology languages using a theorem prover  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is claimed in [45] that first-order theorem provers are not efficient for reasoning with ontologies based on description logics compared to specialised description logic reasoners. However, the development of more expressive ontology languages requires ...

Ian Horrocks; Andrei Voronkov

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Deterministic Ensemble Forecasts Using Gene-Expression Programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method called gene-expression programming (GEP), which uses symbolic regression to form a nonlinear combination of ensemble NWP forecasts, is introduced. From a population of competing and evolving algorithms (each of which can create a ...

Atoossa Bakhshaii; Roland Stull

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Gene expression profiles of microdissected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains an important cause of malignancy-related death and is the eighth most common cancer with the lowest overall 5-year relative survival rate. To identify new molecular markers and candidates for new therapeutic regimens, we investigated the gene expression profile of microdissected cells from 11 normal pancreatic ducts, 14 samples of PDAC, and 4 well-characterized pancreatic cancer cell lines using the Affymetrix U133 GeneChip set. RNA was extracted from microdissected samples and cell lines, amplified, and labeled using a repetitive in vitro transcription protocol. Differentially expressed genes were identified using the significance analysis of microarrays program. We found 616 differentially expressed genes. Within these, 140 were also identified in PDAC by others, such as Galectin-1, Galectin-3, and MT-SP2. We validated the differential expression of several genes (e.g., CENPF, MCM2, MCM7, RAMP, IRAK1, and PTTG1) in PDAC by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. We present a whole genome expression study of microdissected tissues from PDAC, from microdissected normal ductal pancreatic cells and pancreatic cancer cell lines using highdensity microarrays. Within the panel of genes, we identified novel differentially expressed genes, which have not been associated with the pathogenesis of PDAC before.

Robert Grützmann; Christian Pilarsky; Ole Ammerpohl Y; Jutta Lüttges Z; Bence Sipos Z; Melanie Foerder; Ingo Alldinger; Beatrix Jahnke; Hans Konrad Schackert; Holger Kalthoff Y; Bernd Kremer B; Hans Detlev Saeger

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Gene expression profiles of Nitrosomonas europaea, an obligate chemolitotroph  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nitrosomonas europaea is an aerobic lithoautotrophic bacterium that uses ammonia (NH3) as its energy source. As a nitrifier, it is an important participant in the nitrogen cycle, which can also influence the carbon cycle. The focus of this work was to explore the genetic structure and mechanisms underlying the lithoautotrophic growth style of N. europaea. Whole genome gene expression: The gene expression profile of cells in exponential growth and during starvation was analyzed using microarrays. During growth, 98% of the genes increased in expression at least two fold compared to starvation conditions. In growing cells, approximately 30% of the genes were expressed eight fold higher, Approximately 10% were expressed more than 15 fold higher. Approximately 3% (91 genes) were expressed to more than 20 fold of their levels in starved cells. Carbon fixation gene expression: N. europaea fixes carbon via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) cycle via a type I ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO). This study showed that transcription of cbb genes was up-regulated when the carbon source was limited, while amo, hao and other energy harvesting related genes were down-regulated. Iron related gene expression: Because N. europaea has a relatively high content of hemes, sufficient Fe must be available in the medium for it to grow. The genome revealed that approximately 5% of the coding genes in N. europaea are dedicated to Fe transport and assimilation. Nonetheless, with the exception of citrate biosynthesis genes, N. europaea lacks genes for siderophore production. The Fe requirements for growth and the expression of the putative membrane siderophore receptors were determined. The N. europaea genome has over 100 putative genes ({approx}5% of the coding genes) related to Fe uptake and its siderophore receptors could be grouped phylogenetically in four clusters. Fe related genes, such as a number of TonB-dependent Fe-siderophore receptors for ferrichrome and enterobactin, and diffusion protein OmpC were expressed to higher levels under Fe limitation. N. europaea has a high Fe requirement and under Fe limiting conditions (0.2 {micro}M), is capable to assimilate up to 70% of the available Fe without the ability to produce siderophores.

Daniel J. Arp

2005-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

219

Gene expression profiles of Nitrosomonas europaea, an obligate chemolitotroph  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nitrosomonas europaea is an aerobic lithoautotrophic bacterium that uses ammonia (NH3) as its energy source. As a nitrifier, it is an important participant in the nitrogen cycle, which can also influence the carbon cycle. The focus of this work was to explore the genetic structure and mechanisms underlying the lithoautotrophic growth style of N. europaea. Whole genome gene expression. The gene expression profile of cells in exponential growth and during starvation was analyzed using microarrays. During growth, 98% of the genes increased in expression at least two fold compared to starvation conditions. In growing cells, approximately 30% of the genes were expressed eight fold higher, Approximately 10% were expressed more than 15 fold higher. Approximately 3% (91 genes) were expressed to more than 20 fold of their levels in starved cells. Carbon fixation gene expression. N. europaea fixes carbon via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) cycle via a type I ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO). This study showed that transcription of cbb genes was up-regulated when the carbon source was limited, while amo, hao and other energy harvesting related genes were down-regulated. Iron related gene expression. Because N. europaea has a relatively high content of hemes, sufficient Fe must be available in the medium for it to grow. The genome revealed that approximately 5% of the coding genes in N. europaea are dedicated to Fe transport and assimilation. Nonetheless, with the exception of citrate biosynthesis genes, N. europaea lacks genes for siderophore production. The Fe requirements for growth and the expression of the putative membrane siderophore receptors were determined. The N. europaea genome has over 100 putative genes ({approx}5% of the coding genes) related to Fe uptake and its siderophore receptors could be grouped phylogenetically in four clusters. Fe related genes, such as a number of TonB-dependent Fe-siderophore receptors for ferrichrome and enterobactin, and diffusion protein OmpC were expressed to higher levels under Fe limitation. N. europaea has a high Fe requirement and under Fe limiting conditions (0.2 ?M), is capable to assimilate up to 70% of the available Fe without the ability to produce siderophores.

Daniel J Arp

2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

220

CX-009709: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

09: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-009709: Categorical Exclusion Determination Wood Pole Replacements Along the Drummond-Macks Inn, Macks Inn-Madison, and Swan Valley-Teton...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "holiday inn express" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

DOE Seeks Public-Private Sector Expressions of Interest for Global...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Public-Private Sector Expressions of Interest for Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Initiative DOE Seeks Public-Private Sector Expressions of Interest for Global Nuclear Energy...

222

Rocky Mountain Power - FinAnswer Express | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rocky Mountain Power - FinAnswer Express Rocky Mountain Power - FinAnswer Express Rocky Mountain Power - FinAnswer Express < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Industrial Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Other Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Insulation Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Utah Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Interior Lighting: $0.08/kWh annual savings Induction Fixture (Exterior): $125/unit LED Outdoor/Roadway Fixture (Exterior): $100/unit CFL Wall Pack (Exterior): $30/unit Lighting Controls: $75/sensor Wall Insulation: $0.07/sq. ft. Roof Insulation: $0.05/sq. ft.

223

Rocky Mountain Power - FinAnswer Express | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rocky Mountain Power - FinAnswer Express Rocky Mountain Power - FinAnswer Express Rocky Mountain Power - FinAnswer Express < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Industrial Installer/Contractor Savings Category Other Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Manufacturing Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Design & Remodeling Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Lighting Retrofit: 70% of project cost Program Info State Wyoming Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Custom: $0.10/annual kWh saved Interior Lighting: $0.08/kwh annual energy savings LED Fixture (Exterior): $100 Induction Fixture (Exterior): $125 Lighting Control (Exterior): $70 Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps: $50-$100/ton

224

Metaproteomics reveals abundant transposase expression in mutualistic endosymbionts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transposases, enzymes that catalyze the movement of mobile genetic elements, are the most abundant genes in nature. While many bacteria encode an abundance of transposases in their genomes, the current paradigm is that transposase gene expression is tightly regulated and generally low due to its severe mutagenic effects. In the current study, we detected the highest number of transposase proteins ever reported in bacteria, in symbionts of the gutless marine worm Olavius algarvensis using metaproteomics. At least 26 different transposases from 12 different families were detected and genomic and proteomic analyses suggest many of these are active. This high expression of transposases indicates that the mechanisms for their tight regulation have been disabled or destroyed. Based on recent studies on other symbionts and pathogens that showed high transposase transcription, we speculate that abundant transposase expression might be common in symbionts and pathogens.

Kleiner, Manuel [Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology; Young, Jacque C [ORNL; Shah, Manesh B [ORNL; Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Dubilier, Nicole [Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous genes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol. 13 figs.

Ingram, L.O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, B.E.

1998-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

226

Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous genes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol.

Ingram, Lonnie O. (Gainesville, FL); Ohta, Kazuyoshi (Gainesville, FL); Wood, Brent E. (Gainesville, FL)

2000-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

227

Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous genes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol.

Ingram, Lonnie O. (Gainesville, FL); Ohta, Kazuyoshi (Gainesville, FL); Wood, Brent E. (Gainesville, FL)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Robust expression of a bioactive mammalian protein in chlamydomonas chloroplast  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and compositions are disclosed to engineer chloroplast comprising heterologous mammalian genes via a direct replacement of chloroplast Photosystem II (PSII) reaction center protein coding regions to achieve expression of recombinant protein above 5% of total protein. When algae is used, algal expressed protein is produced predominantly as a soluble protein where the functional activity of the peptide is intact. As the host algae is edible, production of biologics in this organism for oral delivery or proteins/peptides, especially gut active proteins, without purification is disclosed.

Mayfield, Stephen P. (Cardiff, CA)

2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

229

Defining, expressing, and using context in a simulation environment  

SciTech Connect

Reuse and interoperability are two keywords in the mantra of the modeling and simulation community. In order to achieve these goals, one must be able to capture, express, and manage the context of individual entities, models, and applications. Capturing the context requires having a thorough understanding of what the entity, model, or application was intended to do and is able to do. While many aspects of context are not easily expressible in a format or language that could be understood and managed in a simulation environment, there are some aspects that can be and the authors discuss how these aspects can be represented in a generalized object-oriented framework.

Hummel, J. R.; Christiansen, J. H.

2000-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

230

Asymptotic Expressions for Charge Matrix Elements of the Fluxonium Circuit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In charge-coupled circuit QED systems, transition amplitudes and dispersive shifts are governed by the matrix elements of the charge operator. For the fluxonium circuit, these matrix elements are not limited to nearest-neighbor energy levels and are conveniently tunable by magnetic flux. Previously, their values were largely obtained numerically. Here, we present analytical expressions for the fluxonium charge matrix elements. We show that new selection rules emerge in the asymptotic limit of large Josephson energy and small inductive energy. We illustrate the usefulness of our expressions for the qualitative understanding of charge matrix elements in the parameter regime probed by previous experiments.

Zhu, Guanyu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Comparing disease expression across species: an examination of radiation and species specific disease expression in Mus musculus and Peromyscus leucopus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

disease expression across species: an examination of radiation and species specific disease expression across species: an examination of radiation and species specific disease expression in Mus musculus and Peromyscus leucopus William Liu 1 , Benjamin Haley 1 , Mary J. Kwasny 2 , Tatjana Paunesku 1 , Gayle Woloschak 1 1. Department of Radiation Oncology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois 60611 2. Department of Preventative Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois 60611 From 1969 to 1992, the Janus program at Argonne National Laboratory performed a large series of radiobiology experiments, examining the effects of varying doses of neutron and gamma radiation on two disparate species of mice, Mus musculus and Peromyscus leucopus. Much of this data has since been digitized and made freely accessible online. This study aims to revisit

232

Observing facial expressions and gaze positions for personalized webpage recommendation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a new method for personalized webpage recommendation. The method is capable of inferring a user's personal reading interest distribution according to implicit user feedbacks coming from the user's past online reading activities. With the inferred ... Keywords: eye-tracking, facial expression, implicit user feedback, personalized recommendation, web content recommendation

Songhua Xu; Hao Jiang; Francis C. M. Lau

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Review: Clustering of high throughput gene expression data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High throughput biological data need to be processed, analyzed, and interpreted to address problems in life sciences. Bioinformatics, computational biology, and systems biology deal with biological problems using computational methods. Clustering is ... Keywords: Bioinformatics, Clustering, Gene expression data, High throughput data, Microarrays

Harun Pirim; Burak Ek?Io?Lu; Andy D. Perkins; ÇEtin YüCeer

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

78. Mudugar video documentaries, Creative Expressions of Nisha  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

'Creative Expressions of Nisha' is a short documentary on the visual art skills of Nisha, a 6-year-old Mudugar girl. The collection is a result of the WOLP funding that Dr Rayson K Alex received in 2011. The project was to collect the oral...

Alex, Rayson K.

235

On the longest perpetual reductions in orthogonal expression reduction systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study perpetual reductions in orthogonal (or conflict-free) fully extended expression reduction systems (OERS). ERS is a formalism for rewriting that subsumes term rewriting systems (TRSs) and the &lgr;-calculus. We design a strategy ... Keywords: &lgr;-calculus, perpetual reductions, rewrite systems, strong normalization

Zurab Khasidashvili

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Formal semantics and expressiveness of a web service composition language  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Web Services have become the standard for exposing services on the Internet. Since many operations require the collaboration between two or more services, the need to have languages to express Web Services compositions has emerged. In this paper, we ... Keywords: PEWS, operational semantics, web services, workflow patterns

Marcelo Guerra Hahn; Regina Motz; Alberto Pardo; Martin A. Musicante

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Regulation of nif gene expression and the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Regulation of nif gene expression and the energetics of N2 fixation over the diel importance in biogeochemical cycling of nitrogen. We analyzed the levels of nif transcripts of Synechococcus ecotypes, NifH subunit and nitrogenase activity over the diel cycle in the microbial mat of an alkaline hot

238

Transposon-induced nuclear mutations that alter chloroplast gene expression  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to use mutant phenotypes as a guide to nuclear genes that determine the timing and localization of chloroplast development The immediate goals are to identify nuclear mutants with defects in chloroplast gene expression from maize lines harboring active Mu transposons; characterize their phenotypes to determine the precise defect in gene expression; clone several of the most interesting mutations by exploiting the transposon tag; and use the clones to further define the roles of these genes in modulating chloroplast gene expression. Three mutants were described earlier that had global defects in chloroplast gene expression. We have found that two of these mutations are allelic. Both alleles have global defects in chloroplast translation initiation, as revealed by the failure to assemble chloroplast mRNAs into polysomes. We have isolated and characterized three new mutants from Mu lines that have novel defects in chloroplast RNA metabolism. We are now ready to begin the task of cloning several of these genes, by using the Mu transposon tag.

Barkan, A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Microsoft Expression Design Step by Step, 1st edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The smart way to learn Microsoft Expression Design one step at a time! Work at your own pace through the easy numbered steps, practice files on CD, and hands-on exercises to master the fundamentals of creating professional-looking designs and illustrations ...

Sara Froehlich

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Classification of co-expressed genes from DNA regulatory regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The analysis of non-coding DNA regulatory regions is one of the most challenging open problems in computational biology. In this paper we investigate whether we can predict functional information about genes by using information extracted from their ... Keywords: Combinatorial and machine learning methods integration, Gene classification, Gene expression and bio-sequence data integration, Motif extraction and selection

Giulio Pavesi; Giorgio Valentini

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "holiday inn express" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Gene Expression Profile...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

human cDNA clones, we focused on differential gene expression for a low-dose x-ray irradiation at 2cGy and its comparison with high-dose at 4Gy. Four time points were studied at...

242

Dynamic, expressive speech animation from a single mesh  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work we present a method for human face animation which allows us to generate animations for a novel person given just a single mesh of their face. These animations can be of arbitrary text and may include emotional expressions. We build a multilinear ...

Kevin Wampler; Daichi Sasaki; Li Zhang; Zoran Popovi?

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

A modular NFA architecture for regular expression matching  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a non-deterministic finite automata (NFA) based architecture for regexp scanners on FPGA, called CES: the Character Class with Constraint Repetition (CCR) based regExp Scanner. CES is designed to realize a new MIN-MAX counting algorithm, which ... Keywords: FPGA, NFA, character class constraint repetition, overlapped matching, regular expression

Hao Wang; Shi Pu; Gabriel Knezek; Jyh-Charn Liu

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Request for Expression of Interest Infrastructure Construction Package  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.S. Department of Energy's NNSA 1 of 5 Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is seeking Expressions of Interest Employer / Operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA 2 of 5.S. Department of Energy's NNSA 3 of 5 Phasing of the Work will be required. SUBCONTRACTOR shall provide

245

A survey of computer systems for expressive music performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a survey of research into automated and semiautomated computer systems for expressive performance of music. We will examine the motivation for such systems and then examine the majority of the systems developed over the last 25 years. To highlight ... Keywords: Music performance, computer music, generative performance, machine learning

Alexis Kirke; Eduardo Reck Miranda

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Modelling affect expression and recognition in an interactive learning environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Affective reasoning holds significant potential for intelligent tutoring systems. Incorporating affective reasoning into pedagogical decision-making capabilities could enable learning environments to create customised experiences that are dynamically ... Keywords: HCI, ITS, affect expression, affect recognition, affective student modelling, empathy, human-computer interaction, inductive learning, intelligent tutoring systems, interactive learning, physiological response, self-efficacy, situational context, student affect

Scott W. McQuiggan; James C. Lester

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Cloning and expression of equine NF-kB2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is a macrophage-tropic retrovirus that causes persistent disease in horses and ponies. In addition to its structural proteins, EIAV encodes four regulatory/accessory genes, tat, rev, ttm, and S2. It has been documented EIAV S2 gene expression is essential for disease expression of EIAV. Using a yeast two-hybrid assay, it was shown that S2 protein interacts with human NF-KB2. NF-KB2 plays a key role in the alternative or non-canonical NF-KB pathway. In order to determine if the interaction of S2 with NF-KB2 might be relevant to equine disease, a cDNA representing full length equine NF-KB2 was generated in our laboratory using PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends. To our knowledge this is the first time that equine NF-KB2 cDNAs have been recovered and characterized. The sequence of equine NF-KB2 was 95% homologous to human overall, however a major difference was found in the ankyrin repeat region where protein-protein interactions occur. Two splice variants of equine NF-KB2 were found that correspond to splice variants of human NF- KB2. We tested the interaction of EIAV S2 and equine NF-KB2 using the yeast two hybrid system (Y2H) and co-immunoprecipitation. Unfortunately we were not able to detect an interaction between EIAV S2 and equine NF-KB2 in either system. Despite this result, NF-KB2 is an important component in the immune response so we examined its expression in equine macrophages. Moreover we were interested to know if EIAV might affect expression levels of equine NF-KB2, as NF-KB2 is a target of other viruses. Hence, the expression level of equine NF-KB2 was measured in uninfected and infected primary equine monocyte- derived macrophage (eMDM). Using quantitative PCR we determined that equine NF-KB2 gene expression is decreased in eMDM after 3 days post plating, about the time that monocytes start to differentiate into mature macrophages. However EIAV infection of eMDM upregulated the expression level of NF-KB2.

Mirhosseini, Negin

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Project Information Project Title: Express Stack Tools  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Express Stack Tools Express Stack Tools Date: 11/16/2010 DOE Code: 6730.020.81023 Contractor Code: 8067-971 Project Lead: Brian Black Project Overview 1) This project will test open and cased Hole logging tools in multiple wells. The tools to be testied include: 1. Brief project description [include anything that could impact the natural gamma, borehole temperature, compensated neutron, compensated density with PE, dual environment] induction/short guard, neutron prompt gamma, and acoustic televiewer tool. Radioactive sources will be run in the well as part of the toolstring. 2. Legal location 3. Duration of the project 2) 48-X-28 well location, SE %, SW %, Tsp 39N Rng 78W, Section 28; 45::3-X-21 well location, NE %, SW 4. Major equipment to be used %, Tsp 39N, Rng 78W, Section 21; 46-TpX-10 well location, NE %, SW Y.., Tsp38N, Rng 78W, Section 10.

249

Gene expression analysis of human primary prostate epithelial and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

expression analysis of human primary prostate epithelial and expression analysis of human primary prostate epithelial and fibroblast cell cultures to an acute dose of 10cGy J. Tyson McDonald Steward St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center Abstract Primary tissue represents a better model for studies than immortalized cell lines that are adapted to culture conditions and may no longer reflect a realistic biological state. In this study, normal tissues from clinically indicated robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy were grossly identified, sectioned into frozen or formalin fixed samples, and processed as primary cultures. Normal epithelial and fibroblast primary cell cultures were derived from regions of normal tissue, as confirmed by analysis on adjacent tissue by hematoxylin and eosin staining, were exposed to acute

250

ANALYTIC EXPRESSIONS FOR THE LIGHT-SCATTERING CROSS SECTION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ANALYTIC ANALYTIC EXPRESSIONS FOR THE LIGHT-SCATTERING CROSS SECTION AND ÅNGSTRÖM EXPONENT OF AN AEROSOL Ernie R. Lewis Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11933 elewis@bnl.gov BACKGROUND For an aerosol consisting of spherical particles with size distribution of number concentration dN(r)/dr and real index of refraction m (thus no absorption), the light-scattering coefficient σ sp

251

An Expression for the Temperature Gradient in Chaotic Fields  

SciTech Connect

A coordinate system adapted to the invariant structures of chaotic magnetic fields is constructed. The coordinates are based on a set of ghost-surfaces, defined via an action-gradient flow between the minimax and minimizing periodic orbits. The construction of the chaotic coordinates allows an expression describing the temperature gradient across a chaotic magnetic field to be derived. The results are in close agreement with a numerical calculation.

S.R. Hudson

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

252

Imaging gene expression in real-time using aptamers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Signal transduction pathways are usually activated by external stimuli and are transient. The downstream changes such as transcription of the activated genes are also transient. Real-time detection of promoter activity is useful for understanding changes in gene expression, especially during cell differentiation and in development. A simple and reliable method for viewing gene expression in real time is not yet available. Reporter proteins such as fluorescent proteins and luciferase allow for non-invasive detection of the products of gene expression in living cells. However, current reporter systems do not provide for real-time imaging of promoter activity in living cells. This is because of the long time period after transcription required for fluorescent protein synthesis and maturation. We have developed an RNA reporter system for imaging in real-time to detect changes in promoter activity as they occur. The RNA reporter uses strings of RNA aptamers that constitute IMAGEtags (Intracellular MultiAptamer GEnetic tags), which can be expressed from a promoter of choice. The tobramycin, neomycin and PDC RNA aptamers have been utilized for this system and expressed in yeast from the GAL1 promoter. The IMAGEtag RNA kinetics were quantified by RT-qPCR. In yeast precultured in raffinose containing media the GAL1 promoter responded faster than in yeast precultured in glucose containing media. IMAGEtag RNA has relatively short half-life (5.5 min) in yeast. For imaging, the yeast cells are incubated with their ligands that are labeled with fluorescent dyes. To increase signal to noise, ligands have been separately conjugated with the FRET (Förster resonance energy transfer) pairs, Cy3 and Cy5. With these constructs, the transcribed aptamers can be imaged after activation of the promoter by galactose. FRET was confirmed with three different approaches, which were sensitized emission, acceptor photobleaching and donor lifetime by FLIM (fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy). Real-time transcription was measured by FLIM-FRET, which was detected by the decrease in donor lifetime resulting from ligand binding to IMAGEtags that were newly synthesized from the activated GAL1 promoter. The FRET signal was specific for transcribed IMAGEtags.

Shin, Il Chung

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

253

MicroRNA expression in canine mammary cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a vital role in differentiation, proliferation and tumorigenesis by binding to messenger RNAs (mRNA) and inhibiting translation. To initiate an investigation into the identification of miRNAs in the domestic dog, an emerging model for human disease, a comparison of the human and canine genetic databases was conducted. The bioinformatics work revealed significant conservation of miRNA genes between the two species. Proof of principle experiments, including serial dilutions and sequencing, were performed to verify that primers made to amplify human mature miRNAs can be used to amplify canine miRNAs, providing that the mature sequences are conserved. TaqMan® Real-time RT-PCR, a sensitive and specific method, was used to isolate the first miRNA mature products from canine tissues. The expression levels of miR-17-3p, miR-17-5p, miR-18, miR-19a, miR-19b, miR-20, and miR-92 were evaluated in five canine tissues (heart, lung, brain, kidney, and liver). Because miRNAs have been found to act as both tumor suppressors and oncogenes in several different cancers, expression patterns of ten miRNAs (miR-15a, miR-16, miR-17-5p, miR-21, miR-29b, miR-125b, miR-145, miR-155, miR-181b, let-7f) known to be associated with human breast cancer were compared between malignant canine mammary tumors (n=6) and normal canine mammary tissue (n=10). Resulting data revealed miR-29b and miR-21 to have a statistically significant (p<0.05) up-regulation in cancerous samples. Overall expression patterns showed nine of the ten miRNAs follow the same pattern of expression in the domestic dog as the human, while the miR-145 expression does not show a difference between the normal and cancerous samples.

Boggs, Rene' Michelle

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Helsinki Journal, Entry 21, December 24, 2006 I always find myself looking back on the year during the holidays: taking stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Helsinki Alex skating at the Anaconda Skate Park #12;Life in Missoula has been getting better with each

Bardsley, John

255

Sustainable Energy Concepts: A Sustainable energy concept for Safari Resort Beekse Bergen.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Research to sustainable energy concepts with a holiday resort as case study. Near the safaripark a new holiday resort will be built. The missing natrual… (more)

Vons, G.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

EIS-0450: TransWest Express 600 kV Direct Current Transmission...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

50: TransWest Express 600 kV Direct Current Transmission Project in Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, and Nevada EIS-0450: TransWest Express 600 kV Direct Current Transmission Project in...

257

Real-time Expression Cloning using Appearance Models Barry-John Theobald  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

expressions to be transferred and rendered in real-time. 3) The mapped expression can be constrained to have of a complex interaction between various anatomical layers, which include bone, muscle, sub- cutaneous fat

Theobald, Barry-John

258

Methods and constructs for expression of foreign proteins in photosynthetic organisms  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for expressing and purifying foreign proteins in photosynthetic organisms comprising the simultaneous expression of both the heterologous protein and a means for compartmentalizing or sequestering of the protein.

Laible, Philip D. (Villa Park, IL); Hanson, Deborah K. (Downers Grove, IL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

REPRODUCTIONRESEARCH Adiponectin and its receptors are expressed in the chicken testis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the abdominal fat pad. Using anti-chicken adiponectin, ADIPOR1, or ADIPOR2 antibodies and immunohistochemistryREPRODUCTIONRESEARCH Adiponectin and its receptors are expressed in the chicken testis: influence of adiponectin expression in the chicken, we previously reported that adiponectin and its receptors are expressed

Ramachandran, Ramesh

260

Rice Transformation as a Means to Study Gene Expression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An exceptionally effective transformation procedure has been established by using class I embryo-derived rice callus. Every treated callus clump yielded multiple independently transformed plants (average 40 plantlets). Analysis of genomic DNA blots and pollen expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) from T0 plants revealed that 64% bore a single locus T-DNA insertion in which half had one T-DNA copy. Additive transgene expression was observed fromT0 plants with GFP driven by mUbi1 promoter. Transgenic plants could be rapidly characterized by analyzing GFP pollen from T0 plants without the need for further generations or genomic DNA blot analysis. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation of microspore-derived callus for generating large numbers of T-DNA haploid and doubled haploid(DH) plants has also been investigated. The established transformation procedure resulted in 100% transformation frequency for class I microspore-derived rice callus. Each callus typically yields multiple independent transgenic plants. Genomic DNA blot analysis suggested 98% of the transgenic plants are independent events. About half of the transgenic plants were identified as haploid plants, whereas half are DH hemizygous or homozygous transgenic plants. DH homozygous transgenic plants were obtained from T0plants and confirmed by pollen GFP expression and genomic blot analysis in T0transgenic DH plants. In this study, about 60% ofT0transgenic DH plants had a single locus T-DNA insertion of which 45% bore one T-DNA copy. Furthermore, in a population of over 2,000 haploid and doubled haploid T-DNA plants , about 25% showed phenotypic differences from non-transformed haploid plants. Approximately 5% were seriously phenotypically abnormal including lethal or semi-lethal mutants. This highly efficient transformation procedure using microspore-derived callus could be valuable in speeding up plant breeding and in new gene discovery. Diversification of the mUbi1 promoter led to a minimal promoter that has a similar function as the original mUbi1. Transient and stable transformation as measured from gene expression driven by the minimal promoter suggested that it has a similar function as the original wild type promoter.

Jiang, Yiming

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "holiday inn express" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Recombinant genomes which express chloramphenicol acetyltransferase in mammalian cells  

SciTech Connect

The authors constructed a series of recombinant genomes which directed expression of the enzyme chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) in mammalian cells. The prototype recombinant in this series, pSV2-cat, consisted of the beta-lactamase gene and origin of replication from pBR322 coupled to a simian virus 40 (SV40) early transcription region into which CAT coding sequences were inserted. Readily measured levels of CAT accumulated within 48 h after the introduction of pSV2-cat DNA into African green monkey kidney CV-1 cells. Because endogenous CAT activity is not present in CV-1 or other mammalian cells, and because rapid, sensitive assays for CAT activity are available, these recombinants provided a uniquely convenient system for monitoring the expression of foreign DNAs in tissue culture cells. To demonstrate the usefulness of this system, we constructed derivatives of pSV2-cat from which part or all of the SV 40 promoter region was removed. Deletion of one copy of the 72-base-pair repeat sequence in the SV40 promoter caused no significant decrease in CAT synthesis in monkey kidney CV-1 cells; however, an additional deletion of 50 base pairs from the second copy of the repeats reduced CAT synthesis to 11% of its level in the wild type. They also constructed a recombinant, pSVO-cat, in which the entire SV40 promoter region was removed and a unique HindIII site was substituted for the insertion of other promoter sequences.

Gorman, C.M.; Moffat, L.F.; Howard, B.H.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

A hierarchy of ECM-mediated signalling tissue-specific gene expression regulates tissue-specific gene expression  

SciTech Connect

A dynamic and reciprocal flow of information between cells and the extracellular matrix contributes significantly to the regulation of form and function in developing systems. Signals generated by the extracellular matrix do not act in isolation. Instead, they are processed within the context of global signalling hierarchies whose constituent inputs and outputs are constantly modulated by all the factors present in the cell's surrounding microenvironment. This is particularly evident in the mammary gland, where the construction and subsequent destruction of such a hierarchy regulates changes in tissue-specific gene expression, morphogenesis and apoptosis during each developmental cycle of pregnancy, lactation and involution.

Roskelley, Calvin D; Srebrow, Anabella; Bissell, Mina J

1995-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

263

V-085: Cisco Unity Express Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Request  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Cisco Unity Express Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site 5: Cisco Unity Express Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Request Forgery Attacks V-085: Cisco Unity Express Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Request Forgery Attacks February 6, 2013 - 1:06am Addthis PROBLEM: Cisco Unity Express Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Request Forgery Attacks PLATFORM: Cisco Unity Express prior to 8.0 ABSTRACT: A vulnerability was reported in Cisco Unity Express. REFERENCE LINKS: Cisco Security Notice SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1028075 CVE-2013-1120 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: Cisco Unity Express software prior to version 8.0 contains vulnerabilities that could allow an unauthenticated, remote attacker to conduct cross site request forgery attacks. The vulnerabilities are due to insufficient input validation. An attacker could exploit these vulnerabilities by

264

Agenda112901 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

29-30, 2001 29-30, 2001 Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) NSAC Home Meetings Members Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (629KB) NP Committees of Visitors NP Home Meetings November 29-30, 2001 Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee Meeting November 29-30, 2001 Holiday Inn 550 C Street, SW Washington, D.C. Preliminary Agenda November 29, 2001 Session 1 8:30 a.m. Welcome James Symons 8:40 a.m. Report from DOE 9:05 a.m. Report from NSF 9:30 a.m. Congressional Perspective D Goldston, House Science Committee Staff 10:00 a.m. Administrative Perspective M. Holland, OMB 10:30 a.m. Break Session 2 11:00 a.m. Presentation of Low Energy Sub-Committee Report B. Filippone 12:00 p.m. Lunch Session 3 1:30 p.m. Discussion of Low Energy Review Report 2:45 p.m.

265

Wave Dynamic Analysis of the Seismic Response of a Reinforced Concrete Building  

SciTech Connect

This paper evaluates the response of the seven-story instrumented building, Holiday Inn Hotel, during the 1994 Northridge earthquake through the wave propagation dynamic analysis. The building has been instrumented during other earthquakes, the most important of these was the 1971 San Fernando earthquake, where the building was located only 22 [km] from the epicenter and didn't showing structural damage. From the accelerograms analysis is detected the propagation of Rayleigh and soil waves in the building, where the first has a polarized particle motion on a vertical plane and the second has a coupled particle motion in the horizontal plane. Both waves impose their frequencies to the building response, whose fundamental frequency (1.4 [Hz] according to ambient vibration test) is less than the frequencies of the identified waves. Due to the impact that these observations have in the seismic design of buildings, as a first attempt, a simple method is proposed to estimate the drift produced by the propagation of a Rayleigh wave in buildings.

Astroza, Rodrigo [Faculty of Engineering, University of Los Andes, Santiago (Chile); Saragoni, G. Rodolfo [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

266

Performance Evaluation of Gene Expression Programming for Hydraulic Data Mining  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Predication is one of the fundamental tasks of data mining. In recent years, Artificial Intelligence techniques are widely being used in data mining applications where conventional statistical methods were used such as Regression and classification. The aim of this work is to show the applicability of Gene Expression Programming (GEP), a recently developed AI technique, for hydraulic data prediction and to evaluate its performance by comparing it with Multiple Linear Regression (MLR). Both GEP and MLR were used to model the hydraulic jump over a roughened bed using very large series of experimental data that contain all the important flow and roughness parameters such as the initial Froude number, the height of roughness ratio, the length of roughness ratio, the initial length ratio (from the gate) and the roughness density. The results show that GEP is a promising AI approach for hydraulic data prediction.

Khalid Eldr; Abdel-azim Negm

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Expression of hPNAS-4 Radiosensitizes Lewis Lung Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: This study aimed to transfer the hPNAS-4 gene, a novel apoptosis-related human gene, into Lewis lung cancer (LL2) and observe its radiosensitive effect on radiation therapy in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Materials: The hPNAS-4 gene was transfected into LL2 cells, and its expression was detected via western blot. Colony formation assay and flow cytometry were used to detect the growth and apoptosis of cells treated with irradiation/PNAS-4 in vitro. The hPNAS-4 gene was transferred into LL2-bearing mice through tail vein injection of the liposome/gene complex. The tumor volumes were recorded after radiation therapy. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunohistochemistry staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay were performed to detect the tumor cell growth and apoptosis in vivo. Results: The hPNAS-4 gene was successfully transferred into LL2 cells and tumor tissue, and its overexpressions were confirmed via western blot analysis. Compared with the control, empty plasmid, hPNAS-4, radiation, and empty plasmid plus radiation groups, the hPNAS-4 plus radiation group more significantly inhibited growth and enhanced apoptosis of LL2 cells in vitro and in vivo (P<.05). Conclusions: The hPNAS-4 gene was successfully transferred into LL2 cells and tumor tissue and was expressed in both LL2 cell and tumor tissue. The hPNAS-4 gene therapy significantly enhanced growth inhibition and apoptosis of LL2 tumor cells by radiation therapy in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, it may be a potential radiosensitive treatment of radiation therapy for lung cancer.

Zeng Hui [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China); Yuan Zhu [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China); Zhu Hong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China); Li Lei; Shi Huashan [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China); Wang Zi; Fan Yu; Deng Qian; Zeng Jianshuang; He Yinbo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China); Xiao Jianghong [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China); Li Zhiping, E-mail: lizhiping620312@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

268

Circadian oscillation of starch branching enzyme gene expression in the sorghum endosperm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Expression of the three SBE genes, encoding starch branching enzymes, in the sorghum endosperm exhibited a diurnal rhythm during a 24-h cycle. Remarkably, the oscillation in SBE expression was maintained in cultured spikes after a 48-h dark treatment, also when fed a continuous solution of sucrose or abscisic acid. Our findings suggest that the rhythmicity in SBE expression in the endosperm is independent of cues from the photosynthetic source and that the oscillator resides within the endosperm itself.

Mutisya, J.; Sun, C.; Jansson, C.

2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

269

Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-362 Champlain Hudson Power Express Inc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Application from Champlain Hudson Power Express Inc to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S. - Canada Border.

270

Stem Cell Marker Expression in Mouse Lung after Exposure to Acute...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

stem cell specific marker expression in mouse lung after whole-body exposure to irradiation with either photons or protons and evaluate modulating effects of preirradiation...

271

Over-expressing a barley ZIP gene doubles grain zinc content in barley (Hordeum vulgare)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the ZRT, IRT-related protein (ZIP) family have recently beenover-expressing a barley ZIP gene, HvZIP7 to evaluate its

Tiong, Jingwen; Genc, Yusuf; McDonald, Glenn K; Langridge, Peter; Huang, Chun Y Dr

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

The Clarinet as Extension of the Voice and Expressive Conduit of Musical Styles in Diverse Ensembles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Original research into the links between vocal and clarinet tone reveals how clarinettists act as expressive conduits of musical styles in diverse ensembles. This research… (more)

Rainey, Lucy

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Low doses of neutrons induce changes in gene expression  

SciTech Connect

Studies were designed to identify genes induced following low-dose neutron but not following {gamma}-ray exposure in fibroblasts. Our past work had shown differences in the expression of {beta}-protein kinase C and c-fos genes, both being induced following {gamma}-ray but not neutron exposure. We have identified two genes that are induced following neutron, but not {gamma}-ray, exposure: Rp-8 (a gene induced by apoptosis) and the long terminal repeat (LTR) of the human immunodeficiency (HIV). Rp-8 mRNA induction was demonstrated in Syrian hamster embryo fibroblasts and was found to be induced in cells exposed to neutrons administered at low (0.5 cGy/min) and at high dose rate (12 cGy/min). The induction of transcription from the LTR of HIV was demonstrated in HeLa cells bearing a transfected construct of the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene driven by the HIV-LTR promoter. Measures of CAT activity and CAT transcripts following irradiation demonstrated an unresponsiveness to {gamma} rays over a broad range of doses. Twofold induction of the HIV-LTR was detected following neutron exposure (48 cGy) administered at low (0.5 cGy/min) but not high (12 cGy/min) dose rates. Ultraviolet-mediated HIV-LTR induction was inhibited by low-dose-rate neutron exposure.

Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, C.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R. [Loyola Univ., Maywood, IL (United States)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Low doses of neutrons induce changes in gene expression  

SciTech Connect

Studies were designed to identify genes induced following low-dose neutron but not following [gamma]-ray exposure in fibroblasts. Our past work had shown differences in the expression of [beta]-protein kinase C and c-fos genes, both being induced following [gamma]-ray but not neutron exposure. We have identified two genes that are induced following neutron, but not [gamma]-ray, exposure: Rp-8 (a gene induced by apoptosis) and the long terminal repeat (LTR) of the human immunodeficiency (HIV). Rp-8 mRNA induction was demonstrated in Syrian hamster embryo fibroblasts and was found to be induced in cells exposed to neutrons administered at low (0.5 cGy/min) and at high dose rate (12 cGy/min). The induction of transcription from the LTR of HIV was demonstrated in HeLa cells bearing a transfected construct of the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene driven by the HIV-LTR promoter. Measures of CAT activity and CAT transcripts following irradiation demonstrated an unresponsiveness to [gamma] rays over a broad range of doses. Twofold induction of the HIV-LTR was detected following neutron exposure (48 cGy) administered at low (0.5 cGy/min) but not high (12 cGy/min) dose rates. Ultraviolet-mediated HIV-LTR induction was inhibited by low-dose-rate neutron exposure.

Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, C.M. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R. (Loyola Univ., Maywood, IL (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Neutrinos from Stored Muons nuSTORM: Expression of Interest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nuSTORM facility has been designed to deliver beams of electron and muon neutrinos from the decay of a stored muon beam with a central momentum of 3.8 GeV/c and a momentum spread of 10%. The facility is unique in that it will: serve the future long- and short-baseline neutrino-oscillation programmes by providing definitive measurements of electron-neutrino- and muon-neutrino-nucleus cross sections with percent-level precision; allow searches for sterile neutrinos of exquisite sensitivity to be carried out; and constitute the essential first step in the incremental development of muon accelerators as a powerful new technique for particle physics. Of the world's proton-accelerator laboratories, only CERN and FNAL have the infrastructure required to mount nuSTORM. Since no siting decision has yet been taken, the purpose of this Expression of Interest (EoI) is to request the resources required to: investigate in detail how nuSTORM could be implemented at CERN; and develop options for decisive European contributions to the nuSTORM facility and experimental programme wherever the facility is sited. The EoI defines a two-year programme culminating in the delivery of a Technical Design Report.

D. Adey; S. K. Agarwalla; C. M. Ankenbrandt; R. Asfandiyarov; J. J. Back; G. Barker; E. Baussan; R. Bayes; S. Bhadra; V. Blackmore; A. Blondel; S. A. Bogacz; C. Booth; S. B. Boyd; A. Bravar; S. J. Brice; A. D. Bross; F. Cadoux; H. Cease; A. Cervera; J. Cobb; D. Colling; L. Coney; A. Dobbs; J. Dobson; A. Donini; P. J. Dornan; M. Dracos; F. Dufour; R. Edgecock; J. Evans; M. A. George; T. Ghosh; A. deGouvea; J. J. Gomez-Cadenas; A. Haesler; G. Hanson; M. Geelhoed; P. F. Harrison; M. Hartz; P. Hernandez; J. A. Hernando-Morata; P. J. Hodgson; P. Huber; A. Izmaylov; Y. Karadhzov; T. Kobilarcik; J. Kopp; L. Kormos; A. Korzenev; A. Kurup; Y. Kuno; P. Kyberd; J. P. Lagrange; A. M. Laing; J. Link; A. Liu; K. R. Long; N. McCauley; K. T. McDonald; K. Mahn; C. Martin; J. Martin; O. Mena; S. R. Mishra; N. Mokhov; J. Morfin; Y. Mori; W. Murray; D. Neuffer; R. Nichol; E. Noah; M. A. Palmer; S. Parke; S. Pascoli; J. Pasternak; M. Popovic; P. Ratoff; M. Ravonel; M. Rayner; S. Ricciardi; C. Rogers; P. Rubinov; E. Santos; A. Sato; E. Scantamburlo; J. K. Sedgbeer; D. R. Smith; P. J. Smith; J. T. Sobczyk; S. Soldner-Rembold; F. J. P. Soler; M. Sorel; A. Stahl; L. Stanco; P. Stamoulis; S. Striganov; H. Tanaka; I. J. Taylor; C. Touramanis; C. D. Tunnel; Y. Uchida; N. Vassilopoulos; M. O. Wascko; A. Weber; E. Wildner; M. J. Wilking; W. Winter; U. K. Yang

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

276

PROCEEDINGS OF WORKSHOP ON THERMOMECHANICAL-HYDROCHEMICAL MODELING FOR A HARDROCK WASTE REPOSITORY. JULY 29-31, 1980. MARRIOTT INN, BERKELEY, CA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mental Results," SAND 80-0679, Sandia National Laboratories,CA 94720 Lynn D. Tyler Sandia Laboratories Kirkland A.F.B.OH 43201 Roger Zimmerman Sandia Laboratories Division 4537

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

PROCEEDINGS OF WORKSHOP ON THERMOMECHANICAL-HYDROCHEMICAL MODELING FOR A HARDROCK WASTE REPOSITORY. JULY 29-31, 1980. MARRIOTT INN, BERKELEY, CA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Isolation Project, Rockwell Hanford Opera- tions, RHO-BWI-A&M John B. Case Rockwell Hanford Operations N.G.W. Cook UCBJ. G. Patricio Rockwell Hanford Operations Bob Ri ecker lASl

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

PROCEEDINGS OF WORKSHOP ON THERMOMECHANICAL-HYDROCHEMICAL MODELING FOR A HARDROCK WASTE REPOSITORY. JULY 29-31, 1980. MARRIOTT INN, BERKELEY, CA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

testing was begun ; n tuff on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) inNTS and in basalt at the Hanford Site have, for all practical purposes, just beguno Essentially, in situ testingtesting is an integral part of rock mass characteri zat i on from the vi ewpoi nts

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

PROCEEDINGS OF WORKSHOP ON THERMOMECHANICAL-HYDROCHEMICAL MODELING FOR A HARDROCK WASTE REPOSITORY. JULY 29-31, 1980. MARRIOTT INN, BERKELEY, CA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

80-0679, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (inConducted at Sandia National Laboratories in Support of theLawrence Livermore National Laboratory Massachusetts

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

PROCEEDINGS OF WORKSHOP ON THERMOMECHANICAL-HYDROCHEMICAL MODELING FOR A HARDROCK WASTE REPOSITORY. JULY 29-31, 1980. MARRIOTT INN, BERKELEY, CA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

all four processes: heat transfer, fluid flow, mechanicalthe coupled processes of rock stress/strain, heat transfer,j,i S Heat Transfer 2 Interrelationship of Processes in the

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "holiday inn express" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Gene Expression and Association Analyses of Stress Responses in Loblolly Pine (Pinus taeda L.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The molecular mechanisms underlying disease-resistance and drought-resistance in forest trees are not well understood. Linking variation in gene expression with genetic polymorphisms and with variations in disease- and drought-resistance phenotypes can provide information about these complex traits. We used real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect variations in the expression of 88 disease- and drought-responsive genes within an association population of 354 loblolly pine trees (Pinus taeda L.). Using association genetics approaches, we then linked 3,938 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in candidate genes with gene expression phenotypes to identify novel disease- and drought-responsive genes. To further examine differences in gene expression induced by drought, Fusarium circinatum (responsible for pitch canker disease), and drought F. circinatum, the expression of 114 genes identified through comparative and association genetics approaches was analyzed on a subset of 24 loblolly pine trees possessing a range of pitch canker- and drought-resistance phenotypes. Significant differences in the uninduced expression of all 88 genes measured on the association population were observed among loblolly pine trees. Principal component analysis showed that some variation within the association population could be accounted for by population substructure of geographic origin. Hierarchical clustering of genes based on uninduced expression did not consistently group together functionally similar genes probably because expression was collected on unstressed stem tissue. This was supported in the smaller expression study as correlations between expression values of genes in the same functional networks were usually stronger when induced by a treatment compared with correlations between the uninduced expression of genes in the control group. Gene expression frequently changed by up to 4-fold in response to one or more treatments, but PtMYB12 was the only gene that exhibited a statistically significant change in response to treatments. ANOVA analyses of gene expression controlling for pitch canker resistance and for water use efficiency phenotypes identified differentially expressed genes suggesting that they may be contributing to these phenotypes. Finally, association genetics approaches detected 101 significant associations between SNPs in 94 candidate genes potentially involved in stress responses and 27 gene expression phenotypes.

Seeve, Candace Marie

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

APS User News-at-a-Glance, Issue 3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contents: New Argonne Director Tours APS Holiday Closings Announced First APS User Activity Report Posted on the Web APS User Statistics Be Generous this Season: Share Your Research Results with Colleagues! APS User News-at-a-Glance Issue 3; December 13, 2000 All of us at the Advanced Photon Source wish you a happy holiday season and a scientifically productive new year! 1. New Argonne Director Tours APS (Contact: gks@aps.anl.gov) Photo of Hermann Grunder During a recent tour of the APS, Hermann Grunder, newly appointed Director of Argonne National Laboratory, expressed great enthusiasm for the quality and diversity of scientific research being conducted here. Grunder walked the complete accelerator complex, beginning in the Linac, viewing the Low Energy Undulator Test Line, walking through

283

Low doses of neutrons induce changes in gene expression  

SciTech Connect

Studies were designed to identify genes induced in fibroblasts after exposure to low-dose neutron radiation but not after {gamma} rays. Our past work had shown similar modulation of transcripts for {alpha}-tubulin, {beta}- and {gamma}-actins, ornithine decarboxylase and interleukin 1 after exposure to either neutrons or {gamma} rays. However, differences in the expression of {beta}-protein kinase C and c-fos genes were observed, with both being induced after exposure to {gamma} rays but not neutrons. Recently, we have identified two genes that are induced after exposure to neutrons but not {gamma} rays: Rp-8 (a gene associated with apoptosis) and the long terminal repeat (LTR) of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Induction of Rp-8 mRNA was demonstrated in Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) fibroblasts and was found to be induced in cells exposed to neutrons administered at low (0.005 Gy/min) and high dose rate (0.12 Gy/min). No induction of other genes associated with apoptosis such as Rp-2, bcl-2 and Tcl-30 was observed. The induction of transcription from the LTR of HIV was demonstrated in HeLa cells bearing a transfected construct of the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene driven by the HIV-LTR promoter. Measurements of CAT activity and CAT transcripts after irradiation demonstrated an unresponsiveness to {gamma} rays over a broad range of doses (0.1-3 Gy). Twofold induction of the HIV-LTR was detected after exposure to neutrons (0.48 Gy) administered at low (0.05 Gy/min) but not high (0.12 Gy/min) dose rates. Ultraviolet-mediated HIV-LTR induction, however, was inhibited by exposure to low-dose-rate neutron irradiation. These results are interesting in light of reports that Rp-8 is induced during apoptosis and that HIV causes apoptosis. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, C.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R. [Loyola Univ. of Chicago, Maywood, IL (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Mimosa: mixture model of co-expression to detect modulators of regulatory interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Functionally related genes tend to be correlated in their expression patterns across multiple conditions and/or tissue-types. Thus co-expression networks are often used to investigate functional groups of genes. In particular, when one of the genes is ...

Matthew Hansen; Logan Everett; Larry Singh; Sridhar Hannenhalli

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Spectral analysis of microarray gene expression time series data of Plasmodium falciparum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a new strategy to analyse the periodicity of gene expression profiles using Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA) and Autoregressive (AR) model based spectral estimation. By combining the advantages of SSA and AR modelling, more ... Keywords: SSA, autoregressive spectral estimation model, bioinformatics, drug discovery, gene expression profiles, gene target, microarray time series analysis, plasmodium falciparum, singular spectrum analysis

Liping Du; Shuanhu Wu; Alan Wee-Chung Liew; David K. Smith; Hong Yan

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

A novel approach to determine normal variation in gene expression data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Animal models for human diseases are of crucial importance for studying gene expression and regulation. In the last decade the development of mouse models for cancer, diabetes, neuro-degenerative and many other diseases has been on steady rise. Microarray ... Keywords: gene expression, hypertension, immune response, mouse models, normal variance, principal component analysis, replicates

Vinay Nadimpally; Mohammed J. Zaki

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Independent arrays or independent time courses for gene expression time series data analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we apply three different independent component analysis (ICA) methods, including spatial ICA (sICA), temporal ICA (tICA), and spatiotemporal ICA (stICA), to gene expression time series data and compare their performance in clustering genes ... Keywords: DNA microarray, Gene expression data, Independent component analysis, Principal component analysis

Sookjeong Kim; Jong Kyoung Kim; Seungjin Choi

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

A method of extracting malicious expressions in bulletin board systems by using context analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bulletin board systems are well-known basic services on the Internet for information frequent exchange. The convenience of bulletin boards enables us to communicate with other persons and to read the communication contents at any time. However, malicious ... Keywords: Bulletin board systems, Context analysis, Filtering systems, Malicious expressions, Multi-attribute rules, Separate co-occurrence expressions

Hiroshi Hanafusa; Kazuhiro Morita; Masao Fuketa; Jun-ichi Aoe

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

A theory for comparing the expressive power of access control models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a theory for comparing the expressive power of access control models. The theory is based on simulations that preserve security properties. We perceive access control systems as state-transition systems and present two kinds of simulations, ... Keywords: Access control, access matrix, discretionary access control, expressive power, reduction, role-based access control, state-matching reduction, trust management

Mahesh V. Tripunitara; Ninghui Li

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Physically based facial expression synthesizer with performance analysis and GPU-aided simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance analysis of a physically-based facial expression synthesizer with a novel algorithm for designing parametric muscle model is described. The facial expression synthesizer is partitioned into four general activities: construction of volumetric ... Keywords: GPU based simulation, facial animation, performance analysis, physically based simulation

C. Chen; E. C. Prakash

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Categorical perception of voicing, colors and facial expressions: A developmental study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of the present paper was to compare the development of perceptual categorization of voicing, colors and facial expressions in French-speaking children (from 6 to 8 years) and adults. Differences in both categorical perception, i.e. the correspondence ... Keywords: Boundary precision, Categorical perception, Colors, Development, Facial expressions, Voice onset time

I. Hoonhorst; V. Medina; C. Colin; E. Markessis; M. Radeau; P. Deltenre; W. Serniclaes

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Cold Shock Expression System pCold TF DNA 1TAKARA BIO INC.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cold Shock Expression System pCold TF DNA 1TAKARA BIO INC. v.050630 Cat.# 3365 URL Shock Expression System pCold TF DNA v.050630 Cat.# 3365 URL:http://www.takara-bio.com Elucidation protein yield, purity, and solubility for ex- pressed recombinant proteins using "cold shock" technology

Lebendiker, Mario

293

3D/4D facial expression analysis: An advanced annotated face model approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Facial expression analysis has interested many researchers in the past decade due to its potential applications in various fields such as human-computer interaction, psychological studies, and facial animation. Three-dimensional facial data has been ... Keywords: 3D face models, 4D face videos, Expression recognition, Mesh registration

Tianhong Fang; Xi Zhao; Omar Ocegueda; Shishir K. Shah; Ioannis A. Kakadiaris

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Intracellular calcium-expression-display (ICED) device operated by compressive stimulation of cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of steady compressive stimulation on intracellular calcium expression in MG-63 human osteoblast-like bone cells were examined using a fabricated micro cell chip with a microchannel array. A computer-controlled pneumatic system was used to ... Keywords: Cell chip, Compressive stress, Intracellular calcium-expression-display (ICED)

Tae Kyung Kim; Ok Chan Jeong

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Correlation between stimulated emotion extracted from EEG and its manifestation on facial expression  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Determining correlation between aroused emotion and its manifestation on facial expression, voice, gesture and posture have interesting applications in psychotherapy. A set of audiovisual stimulus, selected by a group of experts, is used to excite emotion ... Keywords: EEG, facial expression, feedforward, neural learning, nonlinear correlation

A. Chakraborty; P. Bhowmik; S. Das; A. Halder; A. K. Nagar

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Molecular biology, a widely used expression for a changeable meaning Gabriel Gachelin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Molecular biology, a widely used expression for a changeable meaning Gabriel Gachelin Centre de to introduce the round table on the dynamics of molecular biology and to take the opportunity to express my personal view on that question. "Molecular biology" is a widely accepted term. Numerous excellent studies

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

297

MicroRNA expression profiling of human breast cancer identifies new markers of tumour subtype  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a class of short non-coding RNAs found in many plants and animals, often act post-transcriptionally to inhibit gene expression. Results Here we report the analysis of miRNA expression in 93 primary human...

Blenkiron, Cherie; Goldstein, Leonard D; Thorne, Natalie P; Spiteri, Inmaculada; Chin, Suet-Feung; Dunning, Mark J; Barbosa-Morais, Nuno L; Teschendorff, Andrew E; Green, Andrew R; Ellis, Ian O; Tavare, Simon; Caldas, Carlos; Miska, Eric A

2007-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

298

Concurrent expression of heme oxygenase-1 and p53 in human retinal pigment epithelial cell line  

SciTech Connect

Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a stress-responsive protein that is known to regulate cellular functions such as cell proliferation, inflammation, and apoptosis. Here, we investigated the effects of HO activity on the expression of p53 in the human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell line ARPE-19. Cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP) induced the expression of both HO-1 and p53 without significant toxicity to the cells. In addition, the blockage of HO activity with the iron chelator DFO or with HO-1 siRNA inhibited the CoPP-induced expression of p53. Similarly, zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP), an inhibitor of HO, suppressed p53 expression in ARPE-19 cells, although ZnPP increased the level of HO-1 protein while inhibiting HO activity. Also, CoPP-induced p53 expression was not affected by the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Based on these results, we conclude that HO activity is involved in the regulation of p53 expression in a ROS-independent mechanism, and also suggest that the expression of p53 in ARPE-19 cells is associated with heme metabolites such as biliverdin/bilirubin, carbon monoxide, and iron produced by the activity of HO.

Lee, Sang Yull [Department of Biochemistry, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Hong Jae [Department of General Surgery, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kang Mi; Song, Ju Dong [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, 1-10 Ami-Dong, Seo-Gu, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Hun Taeg [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Iksan, Chonbuk 570-749 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Chul [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, 1-10 Ami-Dong, Seo-Gu, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: ycpark@pusan.ac.kr

2008-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

299

SATB1 tethers multiple gene loci to reprogram expression profiledriving breast cancer metastasis  

SciTech Connect

Global changes in gene expression occur during tumor progression, as indicated by expression profiling of metastatic tumors. How this occurs is poorly understood. SATB1 functions as a genome organizer by folding chromatin via tethering multiple genomic loci and recruiting chromatin remodeling enzymes to regulate chromatin structure and expression of a large number of genes. Here we show that SATB1 is expressed at high levels in aggressive breast cancer cells, and is undetectable in non-malignant breast epithelial cells. Importantly, RNAi-mediated removal of SATB1 from highly-aggressive MDA-MB-231 cells altered the expression levels of over 1200 genes, restored breast-like acinar polarity in three-dimensional cultures, and prevented the metastastic phenotype in vivo. Conversely, overexpression of SATB1 in the less-aggressive breast cancer cell line Hs578T altered the gene expression profile and increased metastasis dramatically in vivo. Thus, SATB1 is a global regulator of gene expression in breast cancer cells, directly regulating crucial metastasis-associated genes, including ERRB2 (HER2/NEU), TGF-{beta}1, matrix metalloproteinase 3, and metastasin. The identification of SATB1 as a protein that re-programs chromatin organization and transcription profiles to promote breast cancer metastasis suggests a new model for metastasis and may provide means of therapeutic intervention.

Han, Hye-Jung; Kohwi, Yoshinori; Kohwi-Shigematsu, Terumi

2006-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

300

The recombinant expression and potential applications of bacterial organophosphate hydrolase in Zea mays L.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organophosphate hydrolase (OPH, EC 3.1.8.1) is a bacterial enzyme with a broad spectrum of potential substrates that include organophosphorus pesticides, herbicides, and chemical warfare agents. OPH has been expressed successfully in bacterial, fungal, and insect cell culture systems; however, none of these systems produces amounts of enzyme suitable for applications outside of the research laboratory. Therefore, a transgenic Zea mays L. (maize) system was developed to express OPH as an alternate to the current OPH expression systems. The bacterial gene encoding the OPH protein was optimized for transcriptional and translational expression in maize. The optimized gene was inserted into the maize genome under the control of embryo specific, endosperm specific, and constitutive plant promoters. Select transformants were analyzed for the expression of OPH. Expression was observed in the seeds of plants transformed with each of the three constructs with the highest expression observed with the embryo specific and constitutive promoter constructs. The highest OPH expressing lines of transgenic maize had expression levels higher than those reported for the E. coli expression system. OPH was purified from transgenic maize seed and analyzed for posttranslational modification and kinetic properties. OPH was observed to undergo a glycosylation event when expressed in maize that yielded at least two forms of OPH homogolous dimer. The glycosylated form of OPH bound tightly to the Concanavalin A sepharose and remained active after months of storage at room temperature. OPH activity was checked against a number of organophosphate herbicides. Enzymatic activity was observed against the herbicide Amiprophos-methyl and kinetic properties were measured. Enzymatic activity was also tested against the organophosphate Haloxon. Transgenic maize callus, leaf, and seed tissue could be screened for the presence of the optimized opd gene by enzymatic activity. Comparison of the growth of transgenic and control callus on media containing organophosphates showed that the transgenic callus was resistant to the herbicidal effects of haloxon. Transgenic plants expressing OPH were also resistant to the herbicide bensulide when compared to control plants. This indicates that OPH can be used as a screenable marker in plant systems and may be a potential scorable marker system as well.

Pinkerton, Terrence Scott

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "holiday inn express" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Ensuring critical event sequences in high consequence computer based systems as inspired by path expressions  

SciTech Connect

The goal of our work is to provide a high level of confidence that critical software driven event sequences are maintained in the face of hardware failures, malevolent attacks and harsh or unstable operating environments. This will be accomplished by providing dynamic fault management measures directly to the software developer and to their varied development environments. The methodology employed here is inspired by previous work in path expressions. This paper discusses the perceived problems, a brief overview of path expressions, the proposed methods, and a discussion of the differences between the proposed methods and traditional path expression usage and implementation.

Kidd, M.E.C.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Ensuring critical event sequences in high integrity software by applying path expressions  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this work is to extend the use of existing path expression theory and methodologies to ensure that critical software event sequences are maintained even in the face of malevolent attacks and harsh or unstable operating environments. This will be accomplished by providing dynamic fault management measures directly to the software developer and to their varied development environments. This paper discusses the perceived problems, a brief overview of path expressions, and the author`s proposed extension areas. The authors discuss how the traditional path expression usage and implementation differs from the intended usage and implementation.

Kidd, M.E.C.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

RNA binding protein and binding site useful for expression of recombinant molecules  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a gene expression system in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, preferably plant cells and intact plants. In particular, the invention relates to an expression system having a RB47 binding site upstream of a translation initiation site for regulation of translation mediated by binding of RB47 protein, a member of the poly(A) binding protein family. Regulation is further effected by RB60, a protein disulfide isomerase. The expression system is capable of functioning in the nuclear/cytoplasm of cells and in the chloroplast of plants. Translation regulation of a desired molecule is enhanced approximately 100 fold over that obtained without RB47 binding site activation.

Mayfield, Stephen (Cardiff, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

EXPRESSION OF BRUCELLA GENES REQUIRED FOR LIPOPOLYSACCARIDE PRODUCTION UNDER THE CONTROL OF ARAC AND PTAC PROMOTERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brucella spp. are gram-negative, facultative intracellular pathogen that causes an infectious and contagious bacterial disease, brucellosis, in humans and animals. Previous research showed that lipopolysaccaride (LPS) is a classically demonstrated virulence mechanism in Brucella. The main objective of this project was to design an inducible system that would allow or prevent the expression of LPS using the manBA genes which encode components of LPS through the regulation of different promoters, pTac and araC. This will allow us to better understand the significance of LPS expression and its link to virulence. If we are able to regulate the expression of LPS in smooth and rough strains, we will be able to further understand these differences and eventually help to create attenuated vaccines against brucellosis. Construction of manBA expression vectors using pTac and araC promoters was carried out in the E. coli strain, DH10B as well as the conditions required for induction of manBA expression. The constructs were transferred into a Brucella melitensis (16M) manBA deletion mutant to determine optimal induction conditions. During the induction, specific time points were monitored for variations in manBA expression. Methods used to detect manBA expression include: acriflavine agglutination, SDS-PAGE followed by staining and Western Blots. Results showed that LPS expression could be regulated by pTac and araC promoters under specified induction conditions. Although the pTac promoter was found to be leaky, we were able to induce LPS expression in Brucella melitensis with the addition of glucose to the growth medium. The araC promoter construct was more tightly regulated than the pTac promoter and required DMEM, a defined media for expression. Therefore, we have developed two inducible systems which would aid in the study of LPS virulence mechanism in Brucella. Future work will include infecting murine macrophages using the inducible Brucella constructs to study intracellular trafficking and survival of the transformed bacteria. Construction of manBA expression vectors using pTac and araC promoters was carried out in E. coli strain, DH10B The conditions required for induction of manBA expression were tested for the respective promoters in E. coli DH10B. The constructs were transferred into Brucella melitensis (16M) manBA-knockouts to carry out induction under experimentally determined conditions in Brucella. During the induction, specific time points were monitored for variations in manBA expression. Methods used to detect manBA expression include: Acriflavine agglutination, SDS-PAGE followed by staining and Western Blots. Results show that LPS expression can be regulated by pTac and araC promoters under specified induction conditions. Although the pTac promoter was leaky, we were able to induce LPS expression in Brucella melitensis with the help of glucose. The araC promoter construct was more tightly regulated than the pTac promoter and required DMEM, a defined media for expression. Therefore, we have developed two inducible systems which would aid in the study of LPS virulence mechanism in Brucella. We also used a special staining method of the SDS-PAGE to detect LPS production. Future work will include infecting murine macrophages using the inducible Brucella constructs to study intracellular trafficking and survival of the transformed bacteria.

Han, Shuo

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

305

A study of mammalian microRNA-mediated repression of gene expression by ribosome profiling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All cells in a multicellular organism carry the same genes, yet these same genes direct the differentiation of many different cell types. This is facilitated by differential gene expression, the control of which can be ...

Guo, Huili

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Real-Time Inference of Mental States from Facial Expressions and Upper Body Gestures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a real-time system for detecting facial action units and inferring emotional states from head and shoulder gestures and facial expressions. The dynamic system uses three levels of inference on progressively ...

Baltrusaitis, Tadas

307

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Wide Expression of LLIR and the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wide Expression of LLIR and the Biological Consequences Wide Expression of LLIR and the Biological Consequences David J. Chen Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Why This Project It is known that changes in gene expression alter biological effects. It is necessary to identify the specific genes that demonstrate altered expression after exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation and to determine pathways involved in DNA damage recognition, signaling, and repair that are associated with radiation-induced adaptive and bystander effects. Project Goals Identification of genes whose transcription is regulated in response to low levels of ionizing radiation Identification of the genes and communication pathways that control these responses to low dose radiation Identification of the cellular and molecular targets that influence

308

EIS-0450: TransWest Express 600 kV Direct Current Transmission Project in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: TransWest Express 600 kV Direct Current Transmission 0: TransWest Express 600 kV Direct Current Transmission Project in Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, and Nevada EIS-0450: TransWest Express 600 kV Direct Current Transmission Project in Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, and Nevada Summary This EIS, being prepared jointly by DOE's Western Area Power Administration and the Department of the Interior's Bureau of Land Management (Wyoming State Office), evaluates the environmental impacts of granting a right-of-way for the TransWest Express 600-kilovolt Direct Current Transmission Project and amending a land use plan. The project consists of an overhead transmission line that would extend approximately 725 miles from south-central Wyoming, through Colorado and Utah. Western proposes to be a joint owner of the project. Public Comment Opportunities

309

Dicer deletion and short RNA expression analysis in mouse embryonic stem cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RNA interference (RNAi) manages many aspects of eukaryotic gene expression through sequence-specific interactions with RNA. Short RNAs, 20-30 nucleotides in length, guide the various effector proteins of RNAi to silence ...

Calabrese, Joseph Mauro

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Microarray analysis of microRNA expression in the developing mammalian brain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: MicroRNAs are a large new class of tiny regulatory RNAs found in nematodes, plants, insects and mammals. MicroRNAs are thought to act as post-transcriptional modulators of gene expression. In invertebrates ...

Miska, Eric A

311

Biomedical data retrieval utilizing textual data in a gene expression database by Richard Lu, MD.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: The commoditization of high-throughput gene expression sequencing and microarrays has led to a proliferation in both the amount of genomic and clinical data that is available. Descriptive textual information ...

Lu, Richard, M.D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Endogenous control of stochastic gene expression in the development of Caenorhabditis elegans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies in the past decade have established gene expression as an inherently variable process. Accompanying this exciting finding is a fundamental question: how do physiological events, such as cell fate specification, ...

Ji, Ni, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Microbial metatranscriptomics : towards understanding microbial gene expression and regulation in natural habitats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metagenomic research has paved the way for a comprehensive understanding of the microbial gene parts list in nature, but a full understanding of microbial gene expression, regulation, and ecology remains a challenge. In ...

Shi, Yanmei, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Caenorhabditis elegans aristaless/Arx gene alr-1 restricts variable gene expression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Variable expressivity of mutant phenotypes in genetically identical individuals is a phenomenon widely reported but poorly understood. For example, mutations in the gene encoding the transcription factor ALR-1 in Caenorhabditis ...

Topalidou, Irini

315

Design and simulation of a PCI Express Gen 3.0 communication channel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PCI Express (PCIe) is a serial interconnect technology, developed by the PCI-Sig organization, which provides high bandwidth data transmission with the added benefits of reduced board space requirements, smaller connectors ...

Warnakulasuriyarachchi, Dilini (Dilini M.)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

APPLYING DATA MINING TECHNIQUES FOR CANCER CLASSIFICATION ON GENE EXPRESSION DATA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cancer classification through gene expression data analysis has recently emerged as an active area of research. This paper applies Genetic Algorithms (GA) for selecting a group of relevant genes from cancer microarray data. Then, the popular classifiers, ...

Jinn-Yi Yeh

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Molecular Biology, Pathobiology, and Genetics Intrinsic Gene Expression Profiles of Gliomas Are a Better  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular Biology, Pathobiology, and Genetics Intrinsic Gene Expression Profiles of Gliomas distinct molecular subgroups that correlate with survival. These include two favorable prognostic subgroups with poor prognosis (median survival, molecular subtypes

318

Spatial Regulation of Gene Expression in Neurons During Synapse Formation and Synaptic Plasticity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

translation of sensorin reporter in isolated SNs orin SNs paired with non-target MNs. Figure 2.14 Pre-expressed in either isolated SNs or SNs paired with non-

Kim, Sangmok

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Analytical Expressions for Doppler Spectra of Scatter from Hydrometeors Observed with a Vertically Directed Radar Beam  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A generalized expression is derived for the correlation function of signals backscattered from hydrometeors observed with a vertically pointed radar beam in which particle size distribution, turbulence, and mean wind are not homogeneous. This ...

Ming Fang; Richard J. Doviak; Bruce A. Albrecht

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Drug-loaded nanoparticles induce gene expression in human pluripotent stem cell derivatives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

typically contain few functional groups for further chemical modification. Doxycycline (DXC), a potent small complex spatiotemporal control of gene expression and cell transitions.8 Doxycycline (DXC) is a small

Saha, Krishanu

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "holiday inn express" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

A method to detect transfected chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene expression in intact animals  

SciTech Connect

A rapid procedure is described for assaying chloramphenicol acetyltransferase enzyme activity in intact animals following transfection of the RSV CAT plasmid into mouse bone marrow cells by electroporation. The reconstituted mice were injected with ({sup 14}C)chloramphenicol and ethyl acetate extracts of 24-h urine samples were analyzed by TLC autoradiography for the excretion of {sup 14}C-labeled metabolites. CAT expression in vivo can be detected by the presence of acetylated {sup 14}C-labeled metabolites in the urine within 1 week after bone marrow transplantation and, under the conditions described, these metabolites can be detected for at least 3 months. CAT expression in intact mice as monitored by the urine assay correlates with the CAT expression in the hematopoietic tissues assayed in vitro. This method offers a quick mode of screening for introduced CAT gene expression in vivo without sacrificing the mice.

Narayanan, R.; Jastreboff, M.M.; Chiu, Chang Fang; Ito, Etsuro; Bertino, J.R. (Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (USA))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Project Results: Evaluating FedEx Express Hybrid-Electric Delivery...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to measure fuel consumption data from some of the vehicles as a way to cross-check the primary data sources. FedEx Express personnel performed all scheduled and unscheduled...

323

Many human large intergenic noncoding RNAs associate with chromatin-modifying complexes and affect gene expression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We recently showed that the mammalian genome encodes >1,000 large intergenic noncoding (linc)RNAs that are clearly conserved across mammals and, thus, functional. Gene expression patterns have implicated these lincRNAs in ...

Presser, Aviva

324

A PCI Express to PCIX Bridge optimized for performance and area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis project involves the architecture, implementation, and verification of a high bandwidth, low cost ASIC digital logic core that is compliant with the PCI Express to PCIX Bridge Specification. The core supports ...

Chong, Margaret J. (Margaret Jane), 1981-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

How community is expressed in place : spatial manifestations of two parishes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I believe that we become human only through contact with one another, and I am interested in our architectural expression and accommodation of our life in communities specifically communities larger than the family and ...

Macy, Christine

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Comparison of Structure Parameter Scaling Expressions with Turbulence Closure Model Predictions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The convective boundary-layer scaling expressions presented by Wyngaard and LeMone (1980) are compared with predictions from a turbulence closure model. We first examine a model experiment involving a clear-air, convectively driven boundary layer ...

Stephen D. Burk

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Genomic Analysis of Parent-of-Origin Allelic Expression in Arabidopsis thaliana Seeds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Differential expression of maternally and paternally inherited alleles of a gene is referred to as gene imprinting, a form of epigenetic gene regulation common to flowering plants and mammals. In plants, imprinting primarily ...

Gehring, Mary

328

DOE Seeks Public-Private Sector Expressions of Interest for Global Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Public-Private Sector Expressions of Interest for Global Public-Private Sector Expressions of Interest for Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Initiative DOE Seeks Public-Private Sector Expressions of Interest for Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Initiative March 17, 2006 - 3:46pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel Bodman today announced that the Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking expressions of interest from the public and private sectors by March 31, 2006, to propose and evaluate sites suitable for demonstrating advanced recycling technologies under the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). "The successful demonstration of GNEP recycling technologies will enable the U.S. and our international partners to substantially change the way that spent nuclear fuel is managed, assuring a safe, long-term, and

329

A statistical and learning based oncogene detection and classification scheme using human cDNA expressions for ovarian carcinoma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a human ovarian cDNA expression database is analyzed for detecting oncogenes and then selected oncogenes are used to identify pathological stages of ovarian carcinoma. This human ovarian cDNA expression database collects 41 patient samples ... Keywords: Artificial neural network (ANN), Gene expression analysis, Microarray database, Oncogenes, Ovarian cancer, cDNA, t-Test

Meng-Hsiun Tsai; Ching-Hao Lai; Shyr-Shen Yu

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Development of a new noncytopathic Semliki Forest virus vector providing high expression levels and stability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alphavirus vectors express high levels of recombinant proteins in mammalian cells, but their cytopathic nature makes this expression transient. In order to generate a Semliki Forest virus (SFV) noncytopathic vector we introduced mutations previously described to turn Sindbis virus noncytopathic into a conserved position in an SFV vector expressing LacZ. Interestingly, mutant P718T in replicase nsp2 subunit was able to replicate in only a small percentage of BHK cells, producing {beta}-gal-expressing colonies without selection. Puromycin N-acetyl-transferase (pac) gene was used to replace LacZ in this mutant allowing selection of an SFV noncytopathic replicon containing a second mutation in nsp2 nuclear localization signal (R649H). This latter mutation did not confer a noncytopathic phenotype by itself and did not alter nsp2 nuclear translocation. Replicase synthesis was diminished in the SFV double mutant, leading to genomic and subgenomic RNA levels that were 125-fold and 66-fold lower than in wild-type vector, respectively. Interestingly, this mutant expressed {beta}-gal levels similar to parental vector. By coexpressing pac and LacZ from independent subgenomic promoters this vector was able to generate stable cell lines maintaining high expression levels during at least 10 passages, indicating that it could be used as a powerful system for protein production in mammalian cells.

Casales, Erkuden; Rodriguez-Madoz, Juan R.; Ruiz-Guillen, Marta; Razquin, Nerea; Cuevas, Yolanda; Prieto, Jesus [Division of Gene Therapy, School of Medicine, Center for Applied Medical Research (CIMA), University of Navarra, Av. Pio XII 55, 31008 Pamplona (Spain); Smerdou, Cristian [Division of Gene Therapy, School of Medicine, Center for Applied Medical Research (CIMA), University of Navarra, Av. Pio XII 55, 31008 Pamplona (Spain)], E-mail: csmerdou@unav.es

2008-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

331

On Expressive Powers of Timed Logics: Comparing Boundedness, Non-punctuality and Deterministic Freezing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Timed temporal logics exhibit a bewildering diversity of operators and the resulting decidability and expressiveness properties also vary considerably. We study the expressive powers of timed logics TPTL[U,S] and MTL[U,S] as well as their several fragments. Extending the LTL EF games of Etessami and Wilke, we define MTL Ehrenfeucht-Fraisse games on a pair of timed words. Using the associated EF theorem we show that, expressively, the timed logics BoundedMTL[U,S], MTL[F,P] and MITL[U,S] (respectively incorporating the restrictions of boundedness, unary modalities and non-punctuality), are all pairwise incomparable. Going to more expressive logics, we show that MTL[U,S] is expressively incomparable with the unary freeze logic TPTL[F,P] extending the result of Bouyer et al. Finally, we consider the deterministic freeze logic TTL[X,Y], which is expressively equivalent to partially ordered 2-way deterministic timed automata (po2DTA). As our second main result, we show by explicit reductions that TTL[X,Y] lies stri...

Pandya, Paritosh K

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Intrinsic and extrinsic regulation of type III secretion gene expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that is particularly problematic in the healthcare setting where it is a frequent cause of pneumonia, bloodstream, and urinary tract infections. An important determinant of P. aeruginosa virulence is a type III secretion system (T3SS). T3SS-dependent intoxication is a complex process that minimally requires binding of P. aeruginosa to host cells, injection of the cytotoxic effector proteins through the host cell plasma membrane, and induction of T3SS gene expression. The latter process, referred to as contact-dependent expression, involves a well-characterized regulatory cascade that activates T3SS gene expression in response to host cell contact. Although host cell contact is a primary activating signal for T3SS gene expression, the involvement of multiple membrane-bound regulatory systems indicates that additional environmental signals also play a role in controlling expression of the T3SS. These regulatory systems coordinate T3SS gene expression with many other cellular activities including motility, mucoidy, polysaccharide production, and biofilm formation. The signals to which the organism responds are poorly understood but many seem to be coupled to the metabolic state of the cell and integrated within a master circuit that assimilates informational signals from endogenous and exogenous sources. Herein we review

Manisha R. Diaz; Jessica M. King; Timothy L. Yahr; Jürgen Heesemann; Max Von; Matthew C. Wolfgang; Timothy L. Yahr; Department Of

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Gene Expression of ANP, BNP and ET-1 in the Heart of Rats during Pulmonary Embolism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aims: Atrial natriuretic petide (ANP), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and endothelin-1 (ET-1) may reflect the severity of right ventricular dysfunction (RVD) in patients with pulmonary embolism (PE). The exact nature and source of BNP, ANP and ET-1 expression and secretion following PE has not previously been studied. Methods and Results: Polystyrene microparticles were injected to induce PE in rats. Gene expression of BNP, ANP and ET-1 were determined in the 4 cardiac chambers by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (QPCR). Plasma levels of ANP, BNP, ET-1 and cardiac troponin I (TNI) were measured in plasma. PE dose-dependently increased gene expression of ANP and BNP in the right ventricle (RV) and increased gene expression of ANP in the right atrium (RA). In contrast PE dosedependently decreased BNP gene expression in both the left ventricle (LV) and the left atrium (LA). Plasma levels of BNP, TNI and ET-1 levels dose-dependently increased with the degree of PE. Conclusion: We found a close correlation between PE degree and gene-expression of ANP, and BNP in the cardiac chambers with a selective increase in the right chambers of the heart. The present data supports the idea of natriuretic peptides as

Henrik Gutte; Jytte Oxbøl; Ulrik Sloth Kristoffersen; Jann Mortensen; Andreas Kjær

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

NF45/ILF2 tissue expression, promoter analysis, and interleukin-2 transactivating function  

SciTech Connect

NF45/ILF2 associates with NF90/ILF3 in the nucleus and regulates IL-2 gene transcription at the antigen receptor response element (ARRE)/NF-AT DNA target sequence (P.N. Kao, L. Chen, G. Brock, J. Ng, A.J. Smith, B. Corthesy, J. Biol. Chem. 269 (1994) 20691-20699). NF45 is widely expressed in normal tissues, especially testis, brain, and kidney, with a predominantly nuclear distribution. NF45 mRNA expression is increased in lymphoma and leukemia cell lines. The human and murine NF45 proteins differ only by substitution of valine by isoleucine at amino acid 142. Fluorescence in situ hybridization localized the human NF45 gene to chromosome 1q21.3, and mouse NF45 gene to chromosome 3F1. Promoter analysis of 2.5 kB of the murine NF45 gene reveals that significant activation is conferred by factors, possible including NF-Y, that bind to the CCAAT-box sequence. The function of human NF45 in regulating IL-2 gene expression was characterized in Jurkat T-cells stably transfected with plasmids directing expression of NF45 cDNA in sense or antisense orientations. NF45 sense expression increased IL-2 luciferase reporter gene activity 120-fold, and IL-2 protein expression 2-fold compared to control cells. NF45 is a highly conserved, regulated transcriptional activator, and one target gene is IL-2.

Zhao Guohua [Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305-5236 (United States); Shi Lingfang [Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305-5236 (United States); Qiu Daoming [Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305-5236 (United States); Hu Hong [Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305-5236 (United States); Kao, Peter N. [Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305-5236 (United States)]. E-mail: peterkao@stanford.edu

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Nidogen-1 regulates laminin-1-dependent mammary-specific gene expression  

SciTech Connect

Nidogen-1 (entactin) acts as a bridge between the extracellular matrix molecules laminin-1 and type IV collagen, and thus participates in the assembly of basement membranes. To investigate the role of nidogen-1 in regulating cell-type-specific gene expression in mammary epithelium, we designed a culture microecosystem in which each component, including epithelial cells, mesenchymal cells, lactogenic hormones and extracellular matrix, could be controlled. We found that primary and established mesenchymal and myoepithelial cells synthesized and secreted nidogen-1, whereas expression was absent in primary and established epithelial cells. In an epithelial cell line containing mesenchymal cells, nidogen-1 was produced by the mesenchymal cells but deposited between the epithelial cells. In this mixed culture, mammary epithelial cells express b-casein in the presence of lactogenic hormones. Addition of either laminin-1 plus nidogen-1, or laminin-1 alone to mammary epithelial cells induced b- casein production. We asked whether recombinant nidogen-1 alone could signal directly for b-casein. Nidogen-1 did not induce b-casein synthesis in epithelial cells, but it augmented the inductive capacity of laminin-1. These data suggest that nidogen-1 can cooperate with laminin-1 to regulate b-casein expression. Addition of full length nidogen-1 to the mixed cultures had no effect on b-casein gene expression; however, a nidogen-1 fragment containing the laminin-1 binding domain, but lacking the type IV collagen-binding domain, had a dominant negative effect on b-casein expression. These data point to a physiological role for nidogen-1 in the basement membrane-induced gene expression by epithelial cells.

Pujuguet, Philippe; Simian, Marina; Liaw, Jane; Timpl, Rupert; Werb, Zena; Bissell, Mina J..

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Expression of Candidate Genes for Horn Growth in Early Bovine Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bovine horns develop primarily after birth and the presence or absence of horns is due to a single gene. It has been reported that the horn bud appears in the bovine embryo at d 60 of gestation. Our hypothesis is that the gene that determines the presence of horns is expressed in osteoprogenitor cells of the early fetus and will affect the expression of RUNX2, MSX1, MSX2, and/or TWIST1. To test this hypothesis, bovine fetal samples were collected from commercial females at the Caviness Packing Company in Hereford, Texas. Fetuses ranged from d 28 to d 80 of gestation. A survey of the expression of genes from the region on bovine chromosome 1 known to contain the locus that causes horns (IFNAR1 to SOD1), was conducted using qualitative and quantitative RT-PCR, and in situ hybridization. Genes with known roles in osteogenesis and chrondrogenesis (MSX1, TWIST1, RUNX2 and SOX9) were included as positive controls. With the exception of OLIG1, which was only expressed in the brain, all of the genes investigated were expressed in fetal frontal and parietal bones by qualitative RT-PCR. The level of expression of C21orf59, C21orf66, IL10RB, and SFRS15 increased in the frontal bone of horned samples from d 55 to d 70 of gestation. At d 60 of gestation, a change in the shape of the frontal bone was observed, which has been reported to be the developmental stage when the horn bud appears. At this time point, MSX1, TWIST1, RUNX2 and SOX9 were detected in frontal bone, in cells from the osteoblast lineage, as expected. Furthermore, C21orf59, C21orf62, C21or66 and SFRS15 from the polled interval were localized to developing mesenchyme, osteoblasts and/or osteoclasts of the frontal bone, suggesting that each of these genes has a role in intramembranous bone formation. In addition, gradients of expressed C21orf66 and SFRS15 were detected in developing endochondral bone. There was evidence of an antisense transcript of C21orf66 expressed in the same cell types as the sense transcript. Further characterization of this antisense transcript demonstrated that it covered the entire sense transcript. Based on observed expression in the mesenchyme, rather than just in mature osteoblasts or osteoclasts, C21orf66 and/or its antisense transcript become the most likely candidates for the polled locus.

Vitanza, Sarah M.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Systems - Pisgah Inn Solar Expand existing solar hot water heating system by adding 12 solar thermal panels and install a new 9.8 kW photovoltaic system on the Inn's existing...

338

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.10 Hotels/Motels  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 2003 Floorspace and Energy Consumption for Hotels and MotelsInns (1) Hotels MotelsInns Average Electricity Consumption(kBtusSF): 61.3 40.5 Average Natural Gas...

339

Post transcriptional regulation of chloroplast gene expression by nuclear encoded gene products  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many individual chloroplast genes require the products of a collection of nuclear genes for their successful expression. These nuclear gene products apparently work with great specificity, each committed to the expression of a single chloroplast gene. We have chosen as a model nuclear mutants of Chlamydomonas affected in different stages in the expression of the chloroplast encoded Photosystem II polypeptide, D2. We have made the progress in understanding how nuclear gene products affect the translation of the D2 encoding MRNA. Two nuclear genes are required for this process which have been mapped genetically. In contrast to other examples of nuclear control of translation in the chloroplast, these nuclear gene products appear to be required either for specific stages in translation elongation or for the post-translational stabilization of the nascent D2 protein. Pseudoreversion analysis has led us to a locus which may be directly involved in D2 expression. We have made considerable progress in pursuing the molecular basis of psbd MRNA stabilization. psbD 5' UTR specific transcripts have been synthesized in vitro and used in gel mobility shift assays. UV-crosslinking studies are underway to identify the transacting factors which bind to these sequences. The continued examination of these mutants will help us to understand how nuclear gene products work in this specific case of chloroplast gene expression, and will elucidate how two distinct genomes can interact generally.

Kuchka, M.R.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Epidermal growth factor receptor expression in radiation-induced dog lung tumors by immunocytochemical localization  

SciTech Connect

In studies to determine the role of growth factors in radiation-induced lung cancer, epidermal growth factor (EGFR) expression was examined by immunocytochemistry in 51 lung tumors from beagle dogs exposed to inhaled plutonium; 21 of 51 (41%) tumors were positive for EGFR. The traction of tumors positive for EGFR and the histological type of EGFR-positive tumors in the plutonium-exposed dogs were not different from spontaneous dog lung tumors, In which 36% were positive for EGFR. EGFR involvement in Pu-induced lung tumors appeared to be similar to that in spontaneous lung tumors. However, EGFR-positive staining was observed in only 1 of 16 tumors at the three lowest Pu exposure levels, compared to 20 of 35 tumors staining positive at the two highest Pu exposure levels. The results in dogs were in good agreement with the expression of EGFR reported in human non-small cell carcinoma of the lung, suggesting that Pu-induced lung tumors in the dog may be a suitable animal model to investigate the role of EGFR expression in lung carcinogenesis. In humans, EGFR expression in lung tumors has been primarily related to histological tumor types. In individual dogs with multiple primary lung tumors, the tumors were either all EGFR positive or EGFR negative, suggesting that EGFR expression may be related to the response of the individual dog as well as to the histological type of tumor.

Leung, F.L.; Park, J.F.; Dagle, G.E.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "holiday inn express" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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341

Photo of the Week: An Express Train to Crescent Junction | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

An Express Train to Crescent Junction An Express Train to Crescent Junction Photo of the Week: An Express Train to Crescent Junction January 4, 2013 - 1:53pm Addthis In the 1950s, one of the largest uranium deposits in the U.S. was found near Moab, Utah. The Department of Energy began cleaning up the uranium mill tailings from the Moab Site in April 2009, using steel containers to transport more than five million tons of tailings for safe disposal near Crescent Junction, Utah. In this May 2012 photo, one of the trains is shown on the Union Pacific Railroad in Utah, passing a butte capped by a familiar southwest U.S. rock formation known as Navajo Sandstone. | Photo courtesy of the Department of Energy. In the 1950s, one of the largest uranium deposits in the U.S. was found near Moab, Utah. The Department of Energy began cleaning up the uranium

342

Linking Advanced Visualization and MATLAB for the Analysis of 3D Gene Expression Data  

SciTech Connect

Three-dimensional gene expression PointCloud data generated by the Berkeley Drosophila Transcription Network Project (BDTNP) provides quantitative information about the spatial and temporal expression of genes in early Drosophila embryos at cellular resolution. The BDTNP team visualizes and analyzes Point-Cloud data using the software application PointCloudXplore (PCX). To maximize the impact of novel, complex data sets, such as PointClouds, the data needs to be accessible to biologists and comprehensible to developers of analysis functions. We address this challenge by linking PCX and Matlab via a dedicated interface, thereby providing biologists seamless access to advanced data analysis functions and giving bioinformatics researchers the opportunity to integrate their analysis directly into the visualization application. To demonstrate the usefulness of this approach, we computationally model parts of the expression pattern of the gene even skipped using a genetic algorithm implemented in Matlab and integrated into PCX via our Matlab interface.

Ruebel, Oliver; Keranen, Soile V.E.; Biggin, Mark; Knowles, David W.; Weber, Gunther H.; Hagen, Hans; Hamann, Bernd; Bethel, E. Wes

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

343

Induction of growth factor RNA expression in human malignant melanoma: markers of transformation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alteration in the expression of growth factors is widely accepted as being one of several critical defects in the generation of the malignant cell. In the present study, 19 human metastatic melanoma cell lines were compared to 14 normal human foreskin melanocyte cell lines for the production of RNA transcripts specific for 11 different growth factors. Using the extremely sensitive technique of polymerase chain reaction to amplify growth factor-specific complementary DNAs, we analyzed the following: transforming growth factor (TGF) types a, fi,, ti¡.and /i.,,acidic (a) fibroblast growth factor (FGF), basic (b) FGF, FGF-5, keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), HST, and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) types A and B. There were clear distinctions among the patterns of growth factor RNA expression by normal melanocytes and malignant melanoma cells. The prototypic melanocyte pattern of expression in cluded TGF0!, TGF/Sj, and KGF. A subset of melanocyte cell lines also

Anthony P. Albino; Brigid M. Davis; David M. Nanus; Contact The Aacr Publications; Anthony P. Albino; Brigid M. Davis; David M. Nanus

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Arsenic trioxide phosphorylates c-Fos to transactivate p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} expression  

SciTech Connect

An infamous poison, arsenic also has been used as a drug for nearly 2400 years; in recently years, arsenic has been effective in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia. Increasing evidence suggests that opposite effects of arsenic trioxide (ATO) on tumors depend on its concentrations. For this reason, the mechanisms of action of the drug should be elucidated, and it should be used therapeutically only with extreme caution. Previously, we demonstrated the opposing effects of ERK1/2 and JNK on p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} (p21) expression in response to ATO in A431 cells. In addition, JNK phosphorylates c-Jun (Ser{sup 63/73}) to recruit TGIF/HDAC1 to suppress p21 gene expression. Presently, we demonstrated that a high concentration of ATO sustains ERK1/2 phosphorylation, and increases c-Fos biosynthesis and stability, which enhances p21 gene expression. Using site-directed mutagenesis, a DNA affinity precipitation assay, and functional assays, we demonstrated that phosphorylation of the C-terminus of c-Fos (Thr{sup 232}, Thr{sup 325}, Thr{sup 331}, and Ser{sup 374}) plays an important role in its binding to the p21 promoter, and in conjunction with N-terminus phosphorylation of c-Fos (Ser{sup 70}) to transactivate p21 promoter expression. In conclusion, a high concentration of ATO can sustain ERK1/2 activation to enhance c-Fos expression, then dimerize with dephosphorylated c-Jun (Ser{sup 63/73}) and recruit p300/CBP to the Sp1 sites (- 84/- 64) to activate p21 gene expression in A431 cells.

Liu Zimiao [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Huang, H.-S. [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: huanghs@mail.ncku.edu.tw

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Standard Reference Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Inn, KGW, Liggett, WS, and Hutchinson, JMR (1984), "The National Bureau of Standards Rocky Flats Soil Standard Reference Material," Nuclear ...

346

Conference Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Dennis Kelsh Meredith Newman Isabel Fisenne Dirk Gombert Thomas Hinton JM Robin Hutchinson Kenneth Inn John Leyba William Landing ...

1997-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

347

Calendar of Events Feb. 9 and March 9, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Meeting, Plantation Inn, Crystal River, Fl. For more information visit: http://fshs.org. July 31 and Aug

Watson, Craig A.

348

On the magnetic dipole energy expression of an arbitrary current distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that the magnetic dipole energy term appearing in the expansion of the magnetic potential energy of a localized current distribution has the form $ U= + \\bf{m} \\cdot \\bf{B}$ which is wrong by a sign from the well known $ - \\bf{m} \\cdot \\bf{B}$ expression. Implication of this result in relation to the electric dipole energy $ - \\bf{p} \\cdot \\bf{E}$, and the force and torque on the magnetic dipole based on this energy expression is also discussed.

Lee, Keeyung

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Arsenite enhances tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}-induced expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Epidemiological studies demonstrated a high association of vascular diseases with arsenite exposure. We hypothesize that arsenite potentiates the effect of proinflammatory cytokines on vascular endothelial cells, and hence contributes to atherosclerosis. In this study, we investigated the effect of arsenite and its induction of glutathione (GSH) on vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) protein expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in response to tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}), a typical proinflammatory cytokine. Our study demonstrated that arsenite pretreatment potentiated the TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression with up-regulations of both activator protein-1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B). To elucidate the role of GSH in regulation of AP-1, NF-{kappa}B, and VCAM-1 expression, we employed L-buthionine (S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO), a specific {gamma}-glutamylcysteine synthetase ({gamma}-GCS) inhibitor, to block intracellular GSH synthesis. Our investigation revealed that, by depleting GSH, arsenite attenuated the TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression as well as a potentiation of AP-1 and an attenuation of NF-{kappa}B activations by TNF-{alpha}. Moreover, we found that depletion of GSH would also attenuate the TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression with a down-regulation of the TNF-{alpha}-induced NF-{kappa}B activation and without significant effect on AP-1. On the other hand, the TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression could be completely abolished by inhibition of AP-1 or NF-{kappa}B activity, suggesting that activation of both AP-1 and NF-{kappa}B was necessary for VCAM-1 expression. In summary, we demonstrate that arsenite enhances the TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression in HUVECs via regulation of AP-1 and NF-{kappa}B activities in a GSH-sensitive manner. Our present study suggested a potential mechanism for arsenite in the induction of vascular inflammation and vascular diseases via modulating the actions of proinflammatory cytokines.

Tsou, T.-C. [Division of Environmental Health and Occupational Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, 100 Shih-Chuan 1st Road, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: tctsou@nhri.org.tw; Yeh, Szu Ching [Division of Environmental Health and Occupational Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, 100 Shih-Chuan 1st Road, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Tsai, E.-M. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kaohsiung Medical University Chung-Ho Memorial Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Tsai, F.-Y. [Division of Environmental Health and Occupational Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, 100 Shih-Chuan 1st Road, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Chao, H.-R. [Department of Environmental and Safety Health Engineering, Chung Hwa College of Medical Technology, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Chang, Louis W. [Division of Environmental Health and Occupational Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, 100 Shih-Chuan 1st Road, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China)

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

350

Expression of paracrine growth factors and their receptors in the ovine uterus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Epithelial-mesenchymal interactions are necessary for epithelial cell proliferation, differentiation, and function in the uterus and are mediated, in part, by paracrine growth factors of stromal origin. The objective of this study was to determine if potential candidates fibroblast growth factor-7 (FGF-7), FGF-10, and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), and their respective receptors, FGFR2IIIb and c-met, are present in the ovine uterus and to characterize their temporal and spatial expression during the estrous cycle and early pregnancy. An ovine FGF-10 cDNA was cloned from an ovine endometrial cDNA library. The ovine FGF-10 cDNA encodes a protein of 213 amino acids and possesses an unusually long 5' untranslated region (UTR). In situ hybridization demonstrated that ovine FGF-10 mRNA was expressed by endometrial stromal cells and by mesenchymal cells of the chorioallantoic placenta. The mRNA for FGF-7, a homologue of FGF-10, was localized in the tunica muscularis of blood vessels in endometrium and myometrium. In contrast, FGF receptor 2IIIb, the high affinity receptor for both FGF-10 and FGF-7, was expressed exclusively in luminal epithelium (LE), glandular epithelium (GE), and placental trophectoderm/chorion. The in vivo expression indicated that FGF-7 and FGF-10 are uterine stromal cell-derived mediators of uterine epithelial and conceptus trophectodermal functions. The nonoverlapping spatial patterns of expression for FGF-10 and FGF-7 in the ovine uterus and conceptus suggest that they have independent roles in uterine function and conceptus development. Partial cDNAs for ovine HGF and c-met were cloned. In situ hybridization analyses demonstrated that HGF mRNA was expressed by stromal cells of the endometrium, whereas c-met mRNA was localized exclusively to LE and GE. In the conceptus, HGF mRNA was expressed by chorioallantoic mesenchyme and c-met was expressed by trophectoderm. Results indicate that HGF, a stromal-derived paracrine growth factor, is present in the ovine uterus and placenta and potentially involved in endometrial epithelial-stromal interactions and chorioallantoic stromal-trophectodermal interactions. Collectively, FGF-7, FGF-10 and HGF are paracrine growth factors in the ovine uterus that act locally as stromal mediators of uterine epithelial cell function(s) during the estrous cycle and both uterine epithelial and trophectoderm/chorion functions during pregnancy.

Chen, Chen

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

MMP1 bimodal expression and differential response to inflammatory mediators is linked to promoter polymorphisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gene promoter, immunoprecipitation using anti- bodies against c-fos, ETS1, ETS2 and GATA3 was car- ried out in HUVECs isolated from two individuals of 1G genotype and in HUVECs isolated from two individuals of 2G genotype cultured in both IM and UT... to investigate vascular biology. Angiogenesis 2003, 6:93-104. 40. Edgar R, Domrachev M, Lash AE: Gene Expression Omnibus: NCBI gene expression and hybridization array data repository. Nucleic Acids Res 2002, 30:207-210. doi:10.1186/1471-2164-12-43 Cite...

Affara, Muna; Dunmore, Benjamin J; Sanders, Deborah A; Johnson, Nicola; Print, Cristin G; Charnock-Jones, D Stephen

2011-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

352

A simple Bayesian estimate of direct RNAi gene regulation events from differential gene expression profiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,13]. * Correspondence: paul.a.wilson@gsk.com 1Computational Biology, GlaxoSmithKline Medicine Research Centre, Gunnels Wood Road, Stevenage, SG1 2NY, UK Full list of author information is available at the end of the article Wilson and Plucinski BMC Genomics 2011, 12... differential expression profile. Hierarchical clustering and heat map representations of the most differentially expressed tran- scripts (Additional File 1 Figure S9) suggest that the KSHV-miR-k12-11 transfected dataset is more similar to the control data than...

Wilson, Paul A; Plucinski, Mathew

2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

353

Modelling and measuring single cell RNA expression levels find considerable transcriptional differences among phenotypically identical cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

unit bins); y-axis: proportion of genes in each bin. 0 0.05 0.1 0.15 0.2 0.25 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 Log (base 2) expression ratios Fr eq ue nc yPage 9 of 12 (page number not for citation purposes) should generally apply to expression experiments per... following linear T7-based amplifi- cation [16,25], multiplexed FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization) [26] and quantitative PCR [27]. Transcrip- tional bursting has been observed in Escherichia coli, in which protein levels have very little correlation...

Subkhankulova, Tatiana; Gilchrist, Michael J; Livesey, Frederick J

2008-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

354

Assessing the influence of import-coupling on OCL expression maintainability: A cognitive theory-based perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to present the definition of the measures for the import-coupling of OCL expressions, along with the empirical validation of these as early indicators of the maintainability of OCL expressions. This empirical validation has been ... Keywords: Cognitive models, Comprehensibility, Experiments, Import-coupling, Maintainability, Mental models, Meta-analysis, Modifiability, OCL expressions, Software measures, UML/OCL models

Luis Reynoso; Esperanza Manso; Marcela Genero; Mario Piattini

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

A New Expression for 3N Bound State Faddeev Equation in a 3D Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A spin-isospin dependent three-dimensional approach has been applied for formulation of the three-nucleon bound state and a new expression for Faddeev equation based on three-nucleon free basis state has been obtained. Then the three-nucleon wave function has been obtained as a function of five independent variables.

M. Harzchi; S. Bayegan

2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

356

Effects of adrenergic agents on the expression of zebrafish (Danio rerio) vitellogenin Ao1  

SciTech Connect

Teleost vitellogenins (VTGs) are large multidomain apolipoproteins, traditionally considered to be estrogen-responsive precursors of the major egg yolk proteins, expressed and synthesized mainly in hepatic tissue. The inducibility of VTGs has made them one of the most frequently used in vivo and in vitro biomarkers of exposure to estrogen-active substances. A significant level of zebrafish vtgAo1, a major estrogen responsive form, has been unexpectedly found in heart tissue in our present studies. Our studies on zebrafish cardiomyopathy, caused by adrenergic agonist treatment, suggest a similar protective function of the cardiac expressed vtgAo1. We hypothesize that its function is to unload surplus intracellular lipids in cardiomyocytes for 'reverse triglyceride transportation' similar to that found in lipid transport proteins in mammals. Our results also demonstrated that zebrafish vtgAo1 mRNA expression in heart can be suppressed by both {alpha}-adrenergic agonist, phenylephrine (PE) and {beta}-adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol (ISO). Furthermore, the strong stimulation of zebrafish vtgAo1 expression in plasma induced by the {beta}-adrenergic antagonist, MOXIsylyl, was detected by Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay (ELISA). Such stimulation cannot be suppressed by taMOXIfen, an antagonist to estrogen receptors. Thus, our present data indicate that the production of teleost VTG in vivo can be regulated not only by estrogenic agents, but by adrenergic signals as well.

Yin Naida [Key Laboratory of Biodiversity and Conservation of Aquatic Organisms, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei 430072 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Jin Xia; He Jiangyan [Key Laboratory of Biodiversity and Conservation of Aquatic Organisms, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei 430072 (China); Yin Zhan [Key Laboratory of Biodiversity and Conservation of Aquatic Organisms, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei 430072 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)], E-mail: zyin@ihb.ac.cn

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Heart valve cardiomyocytes of mouse embryos express the serotonin transporter SERT  

SciTech Connect

Multiple evidence demonstrate a role for serotonin and its transporter SERT in heart valve development and disease. By utilizing a Cre/loxP system driven by SERT gene expression, we recently demonstrated a regionally restricted distribution of SERT-expressing cells in developing mouse heart. In order to characterize the cell types exhibiting SERT expression within the mouse heart valves at early developmental stages, in this study we performed immunohistochemistry for Islet1 (Isl1) and connexin-43 (Cx-43) on heart sections from SERT{sup Cre/+};ROSA26R embryos previously stained with X-gal. We observed the co-localization of LacZ staining with Isl1 labelling in the outflow tract, the right ventricle and the conal region of E11.5 mouse heart. Cx-43 labelled cells co-localized with LacZ stained cells in the forming atrioventricular valves. These results demonstrate the cardiomyocyte phenotype of SERT-expressing cells in heart valves of the developing mouse heart, thus suggesting an active role of SERT in early heart valve development.

Pavone, Luigi Michele [Department of Biological Structures, Functions and Technologies, University of Naples Federico II, Via F. Delpino 1, 80137 Naples (Italy); Department of Biochemistry and Medical Biotechnologies, University of Naples Federico II, Naples (Italy)], E-mail: pavone@dbbm.unina.it; Spina, Anna; Lo Muto, Roberta; Santoro, Dionea [Department of Biological Structures, Functions and Technologies, University of Naples Federico II, Via F. Delpino 1, 80137 Naples (Italy); Department of Biochemistry and Medical Biotechnologies, University of Naples Federico II, Naples (Italy); Mastellone, Vincenzo [Department of Experimental Medicine 'G. Salvatore', University of Magna Graecia, Catanzaro (Italy); Avallone, Luigi [Department of Biological Structures, Functions and Technologies, University of Naples Federico II, Via F. Delpino 1, 80137 Naples (Italy)

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

358

Neuroinformatics for Genome-Wide 3-D Gene Expression Mapping in the Mouse Brain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large scale gene expression studies in the mammalian brain offer the promise of understanding the topology, networks and ultimately the function of its complex anatomy, opening previously unexplored avenues in neuroscience. High-throughput methods permit ... Keywords: Bioinformatics (genome or protein) databases, Data mining, Registration, Segmentation, Information Visualization

Lydia Ng; Sayan Pathak; Chihchau Kuan; Chris Lau; Hong-wei Dong; Andrew Sodt; Chinh Dang; Brian Avants; Paul Yushkevich; James Gee; David Haynor; Ed Lein; Allan Jones; Mike Hawrylycz

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Optical flow image analysis of facial expressions of human emotion: forensic applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to induce emotions in individuals to determine if specific facial movements could be detected and analysed by the optical flow technique. This analysis is in the form of motion vector plots. The procedure ascertains if ... Keywords: emotion, facial expression, forensics, image analysis, optical flow, physiological measurement, surveillance

Carmen J. Duthoit; T. Sztynda; S. K. L. Lal; B. T. Jap; J. I. Agbinya

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Investigating the Efficacy of Nonlinear Dimensionality Reduction Schemes in Classifying Gene and Protein Expression Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recent explosion in procurement and availability of high-dimensional gene- and protein-expression profile datasets for cancer diagnostics has necessitated the development of sophisticated machine learning tools with which to analyze them. A major ... Keywords: Bioinformatics (genome or protein) databases, Clustering, classification, and association rules, Data and knowledge visualization, Data mining, Feature extraction or construction

George Lee; Carlos Rodriguez; Anant Madabhushi

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "holiday inn express" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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361

An effective density-based hierarchical clustering technique to identify coherent patterns from gene expression data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an effective tree-based clustering technique (Gene ClusTree) for finding clusters over gene expression data. GeneClusTree attempts to find all the clusters over subspaces using a tree-based density approach by scanning the whole database in ... Keywords: coherent patterns, maximal space cluster, p-value, reduced space cluster, z-score

Sauravjyoti Sarmah; Rosy Das Sarmah; Dhruba Kumar Bhattacharyya

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Arsenic-induced alteration in the expression of genes related to type 2 diabetes mellitus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chronic exposure to high concentrations of arsenic in drinking water is associated with an increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes. The present revision focuses on the effect of arsenic on tissues that participate directly in glucose homeostasis, integrating the most important published information about the impairment of the expression of genes related to type 2 diabetes by arsenic as one of the possible mechanisms by which it leads to the disease. Many factors are involved in the manner in which arsenic contributes to the occurrence of diabetes. The reviewed studies suggest that arsenic might increase the risk for type 2 diabetes via multiple mechanisms, affecting a cluster of regulated events, which in conjunction trigger the disease. Arsenic affects insulin sensitivity in peripheral tissue by modifying the expression of genes involved in insulin resistance and shifting away cells from differentiation to the proliferation pathway. In the liver arsenic disturbs glucose production, whereas in pancreatic beta-cells arsenic decreases insulin synthesis and secretion and reduces the expression of antioxidant enzymes. The consequences of these changes in gene expression include the reduction of insulin secretion, induction of oxidative stress in the pancreas, alteration of gluconeogenesis, abnormal proliferation and differentiation pattern of muscle and adipocytes as well as peripheral insulin resistance.

Diaz-Villasenor, Andrea [Department of Genomic Medicine and Environmental Toxicology, Instituto de Investigaciones Biomedicas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Escolar, Cd. Universitaria, Coyoacan 04510 Mexico, DF (Mexico)], E-mail: andreadv@biomedicas.unam.mx; Burns, Anna L. [Department of Genomic Medicine and Environmental Toxicology, Instituto de Investigaciones Biomedicas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Escolar, Cd. Universitaria, Coyoacan 04510 Mexico, DF (Mexico); Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico); Hiriart, Marcia [Department of Biophysics, Instituto de Fisiologia Celular, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico); Cebrian, Mariano E. [Seccion Externa de Toxicologia, CINVESTAV, IPN (Mexico); Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia [Department of Genomic Medicine and Environmental Toxicology, Instituto de Investigaciones Biomedicas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Escolar, Cd. Universitaria, Coyoacan 04510 Mexico, DF (Mexico)

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Expression after Myocardial Infarction in Sheep: ANP Is Synthesized by Fibroblasts Infiltrating the Infarct*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE NATRIURETIC peptide family of hormones contributes to the control of body fluid homeostasis and blood pressure regulation through their combined actions on vasculature, kidneys, and adrenal glands (1). The three bestknown members of this family are atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) (2), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) (3), and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) (4). ANP and BNP are produced predominantly by the cardiac atrium and ventricle, respectively, in response to increased atrial and ventricular transmural pressure. These two natriuretic peptides have pronounced hypotensive, diuretic, and natriuretic effects (1). Plasma levels of ANP and BNP are markedly elevated in heart failure (5) and after myocardial infarction (MI) (6), and are powerful predictors of ventricular dysfunction and mortality (7). Moreover, within heart tissue, gene expression of both ANP and BNP is reportedly up-regulated in animal models of MI and heart failure (8–11) and in human heart disease (12, 13). Although ANP is expressed primarily in the atria in adults, the ventricle is the major site of both ANP and BNP expression in embryos (14). The appearance of increased ANP expression in adult ventricles is a marker for

Brain Natriuretic Peptide (bnp; Vicky A. Cameron; Miriam T. Rademaker; Leigh J. Ellmers; Eric A. Espiner; M. Gary Nicholls; A. Mark Richards

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Say it with Systems: Expanding Kodu's Expressive Power through Gender-Inclusive Mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Say it with Systems: Expanding Kodu's Expressive Power through Gender-Inclusive Mechanics Teale@etr.org ° Microsoft FUSE Labs mattmac@microsoft.com ABSTRACT While game mechanics are a primary focus in game design and programming environments. But game mechanics are central here as well, with different tools supporting

California at Santa Cruz, University of

365

"Bouncing star" smart-ball project: focusing on the interaction of expressions and exhibitions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on the development of "Bouncing Star," a smart-ball system, and its applications as an entertainment system. The concept of a "smart-ball interface" is described. We then explain the interaction of the expressions of the ball that we produced. ... Keywords: ball, digital sports, interactive computer graphics, wireless

Sachiko Kodama; Toshiki Sato; Hideki Koike; Akira Fujimoto

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Regulation of hepatic PPAR{gamma}2 and lipogenic gene expression by melanocortin  

SciTech Connect

The central melanocortin system regulates hepatic lipid metabolism. Hepatic lipogenic gene expression is regulated by transcription factors including sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP-1c), carbohydrate responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma}2 (PPAR{gamma}2). However, it is unclear if central melanocortin signaling regulates hepatic lipogenic gene expression through the activation of these transcription factors. To delineate the molecular mechanisms by which the melanocortin system regulates hepatic lipid metabolism, we examined the effect of intracerebroventricular injection of SHU9119, a melanocortin receptor antagonist, on hepatic expression levels of genes involved in lipid metabolism in mice. SHU9119 treatment increased hepatic triglyceride content and mRNA levels of lipogenic genes, SREBP-1c, and PPAR{gamma}2, whereas it did not cause any changes in hepatic ChREBP mRNA levels. These findings suggest that reduced central melanocortin signaling increases hepatic lipid deposition by stimulating hepatic lipogenic gene expression at least partly through the activation of SREBP-1c and PPAR{gamma}2.

Poritsanos, Nicole J.; Wong, Davie [Department of Physiology, University of Manitoba, 730 William Avenue, Winnipeg, MB, R3E 3J7 (Canada); Vrontakis, Maria E. [Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Science, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3E 3J7 (Canada); Mizuno, Tooru M. [Department of Physiology, University of Manitoba, 730 William Avenue, Winnipeg, MB, R3E 3J7 (Canada)], E-mail: mizunot@cc.umanitoba.ca

2008-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

367

NANO EXPRESS Open Access Ultrafast nano-oscillators based on interlayer-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NANO EXPRESS Open Access Ultrafast nano-oscillators based on interlayer- bridged carbon nanoscrolls nano-oscillators based on carbon nanoscrolls (CNSs) using molecular dynamics simulations. Initiated of gigahertz. We demonstrate an effective strategy to reduce the dissipation of the CNS-based nano

Li, Teng

368

NANO EXPRESS Open Access Resonant frequency of gold/polycarbonate hybrid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NANO EXPRESS Open Access Resonant frequency of gold/polycarbonate hybrid nano resonators fabricated on plastics via nano-transfer printing Edward Dechaumphai1 , Zhao Zhang1 , Nathan P Siwak2,3 , Reza Ghodssi2,3 , Teng Li1,4* Abstract We report the fabrication of gold/polycarbonate (Au/PC) hybrid nano resonators

Li, Teng

369

A bi-modal face recognition framework integrating facial expression with facial appearance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Among many biometric characteristics, the facial biometric is considered to be the least intrusive technology that can be deployed in the real-world visual surveillance environment. However, in facial biometric, little research attention has been paid ... Keywords: Biometrics, Facial appearance, Facial expression, Fusion techniques, Human Computer Interface (HCI), Multimodal biometrics

Pohsiang Tsai; Longbing Cao; Tom Hintz; Tony Jan

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Genetic Background Modulates Gene Expression Profile Induced by Skin Irradiation in Ptch1 Mice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Ptch1 germ-line mutations in mice predispose to radiation-induced basal cell carcinoma of the skin, with tumor incidence modulated by the genetic background. Here, we examined the possible mechanisms underlying skin response to radiation in F1 progeny of Ptch1{sup neo67/+} mice crossed with either skin tumor-susceptible (Car-S) or -resistant (Car-R) mice and X-irradiated (3 Gy) at 2 days of age or left untreated. Methods and Materials: We conducted a gene expression profile analysis in mRNA samples extracted from the skin of irradiated or control mice, using Affymetrix whole mouse genome expression array. Confirmation of the results was done using real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Results: Analysis of the gene expression profile of normal skin of F1 mice at 4 weeks of age revealed a similar basal profile in the nonirradiated mice, but alterations in levels of 71 transcripts in irradiated Ptch1{sup neo67/+} mice of the Car-R cross and modulation of only eight genes in irradiated Ptch1{sup neo67/+} mice of the Car-S cross. Conclusions: These results indicate that neonatal irradiation causes a persistent change in the gene expression profile of the skin. The tendency of mice genetically resistant to skin tumorigenesis to show a more complex pattern of transcriptional response to radiation than do genetically susceptible mice suggests a role for this response in genetic resistance to basal cell tumorigenesis.

Galvan, Antonella; Noci, Sara [Department of Experimental Oncology and Laboratories, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy); Mancuso, Mariateresa; Pazzaglia, Simonetta; Saran, Anna [ENEA Laboratories, Rome (Italy); Dragani, Tommaso A. [Department of Experimental Oncology and Laboratories, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy)], E-mail: tommaso.dragani@istitutotumori.mi.it

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

The improvement of breast cancer prognosis accuracy from integrated gene expression and clinical data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Predicting the accurate prognosis of breast cancer from high throughput microarray data is often a challenging task. Although many statistical methods and machine learning techniques were applied to diagnose the prognosis outcome of breast cancer, they ... Keywords: Breast cancer prognosis, Cancer classification, Clinical data, Gene expression, Gene selection, Genetic algorithm, Support vector machine

Austin H. Chen; Chenyin Yang

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Systematic analysis of gene expression in human brains before and after death  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

represent expected regression lines with the slope = 1. 4 2 0 2 4 4 2 0 2 4 Resection Au to ps y 4 2 0 2 4 4 2 0 2 4 Resection Au to ps yn Genome Biology 2005, 6:R112 regression lines (?) fitted through the distributions of the expression differences...

Franz, Henriette; Ullmann, Claudia; Becker, Albert; Ryan, Margaret; Bahn, Sabine; Arendt, Thomas; Simon, Matthias; Paabo, Svante; Khaitovich, Philipp

2005-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

373

f-SROIQ(G): an expressive fuzzy Description Logic supporting fuzzy data type group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To satisfy the need of representing and reasoning with fuzzy knowledge and fuzzy data information in the context of the Semantic Web, an expressive fuzzy Description Logic (DL) named f-SROIQ(G) is proposed in this paper. The fuzzy DL f-SROIQ(G) ... Keywords: f-SROIQ(G), fuzzy data type group, fuzzy description logic

Li Yan; Fu Zhang; Z. M. Ma

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Independent component analysis: Mining microarray data for fundamental human gene expression modules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As public microarray repositories rapidly accumulate gene expression data, these resources contain increasingly valuable information about cellular processes in human biology. This presents a unique opportunity for intelligent data mining methods to ... Keywords: Data mining, Gene modules, Independent component analysis, Microarrays, Parthenolide

Jesse M. Engreitz; Bernie J. Daigle, Jr.; Jonathan J. Marshall; Russ B. Altman

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Three-Dimensional Face Recognition in the Presence of Facial Expressions: An Annotated Deformable Model Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present the computational tools and a hardware prototype for 3D face recognition. Full automation is provided through the use of advanced multistage alignment algorithms, resilience to facial expressions by employing a deformable model ... Keywords: Face and gesture recognition, information search and retrieval.

Ioannis A. Kakadiaris; Georgios Passalis; George Toderici; Mohammed N. Murtuza; Yunliang Lu; Nikos Karampatziakis; Theoharis Theoharis

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Mining time-shifting co-regulation patterns from gene expression data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous work for finding patterns only focuses on grouping objects under the same subset of dimensions. Thus, an important bio-interesting pattern, i.e. time-shifting, will be ignored during the analysis of time series gene expression data. In this ...

Ying Yin; Yuhai Zhao; Bin Zhang; Guoren Wang

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Using facial expressions and peripheral physiological signals as implicit indicators of topical relevance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multimedia search systems face a number of challenges, emanating mainly from the semantic gap problem. Implicit feedback is considered a useful technique in addressing many of the semantic-related issues. By analysing implicit feedback information search ... Keywords: affective feedback, facial expression analysis, multimedia retrieval, classification, pattern recognition, physiological signal processing, support vector machines

Ioannis Arapakis; Ioannis Konstas; Joemon M. Jose

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) regulates myogenesis and {beta}1 integrin expression in vitro  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Myogenesis in vitro involves myoblast cell cycle arrest, migration, and fusion to form multinucleated myotubes. Extracellular matrix (ECM) integrity during these processes is maintained by the opposing actions of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) proteases and their inhibitors, the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). Here, we report that TIMP-2, MMP-2, and MT1-MMP are differentially expressed during mouse myoblast differentiation in vitro. A specific role for TIMP-2 in myogenesis is demonstrated by altered TIMP-2{sup -/-} myotube formation. When differentiated in horse serum-containing medium, TIMP-2{sup -/-} myotubes are larger than wild-type myotubes. In contrast, when serum-free medium is used, TIMP-2{sup -/-} myotubes are smaller than wild-type myotubes. Regardless of culture condition, myotube size is directly correlated with MMP activity and inversely correlated with {beta}1 integrin expression. Treatment with recombinant TIMP-2 rescues reduced TIMP-2{sup -/-} myotube size and induces increased MMP-9 activation and decreased {beta}1 integrin expression. Treatment with either MMP-2 or MMP-9 similarly rescues reduced myotube size, but has no effect on {beta}1 integrin expression. These data suggest a specific regulatory relationship between TIMP-2 and {beta}1 integrin during myogenesis. Elucidating the role of TIMP-2 in myogenesis in vitro may lead to new therapeutic options for the use of TIMP-2 in myopathies and muscular dystrophies in vivo.

Lluri, Gentian; Langlois, Garret D. [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Vermont College of Medicine, 149 Beaumont Ave., HSRF 418, Burlington, VT 05405 (United States); Soloway, Paul D. [Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Jaworski, Diane M. [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Vermont College of Medicine, 149 Beaumont Ave., HSRF 418, Burlington, VT 05405 (United States)], E-mail: diane.jaworski@uvm.edu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Systems for the expression of orthogonal translation components eubacterial host cells  

SciTech Connect

The invention relates to compositions and methods for the in vivo production of polypeptides comprising one or more unnatural amino acids. Specifically, the invention provides plasmid systems for the efficient eubacterial expression of polypeptides comprising one or more unnatural amino acids at genetically-programmed positions.

Ryu, Youngha (San Diego, CA); Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA)

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

380

Ah receptor represses acute-phase response gene expression without binding to its cognate response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Repression of the nuclear factor-kB (NF-kB) pathway has been extensively researched because of its pivotal NF-kB regulated-gene expression, especially acute-phase genes, such as serum amyloid A (Saa). Using of transcription factors, such as nuclear factor-kB (NF-kB), signal transducer and activator of transcription-3

Perdew, Gary

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "holiday inn express" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Control of Stochastic Gene Expression by Host Factors at the HIV Promoter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

promoter contains cis- acting Sp1 and NF-kB elements that regulate gene expression via the recruitment lentivirus variants with mutations introduced in the Sp1 and NF-kB elements, we employed flow cytometry, m and reduction in the regulation of histone acetylation and deacetylation. Furthermore, the NF-kB sites exhibit

Schaffer, David V.

382

Immunocytochemical Investigation of Nuclear Progestin Receptor Expression within Dopaminergic Neurones of the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Psychology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA. Center for Neuroendocrine Studies, University oestradiol benzoate to induce high levels of hypothalamic progestin receptor expression, or oil, and perfused hypo- thalamus of oestradiol-treated females. Conversely, very few cells in the hypothalamus of oil

Blaustein, Jeffrey D.

383

Effects of Ethanol and NAP on Cerebellar Expression of the Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule L1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The neural cell adhesion molecule L1 is critical for brain development and plays a role in learning and memory in the adult. Ethanol inhibits L1-mediated cell adhesion and neurite outgrowth in cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs), and these actions might underlie the cerebellar dysmorphology of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. The peptide NAP potently blocks ethanol inhibition of L1 adhesion and prevents ethanol teratogenesis. We used quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting of extracts of cerebellar slices, CGNs, and astrocytes from postnatal day 7 (PD7) rats to investigate whether ethanol and NAP act in part by regulating the expression of L1. Treatment of cerebellar slices with 20 mM ethanol, 10 212 M NAP, or both for 4 hours, 24 hours, and 10 days did not significantly affect L1 mRNA and protein levels. Similar treatment for 4 or 24 hours did not regulate L1 expression in primary cultures of CGNs and astrocytes, the predominant cerebellar cell types. Because ethanol also damages the adult cerebellum, we studied the effects of chronic ethanol exposure in adult rats. One year of binge drinking did not alter L1 gene and protein expression in extracts from whole cerebellum. Thus, ethanol does not alter L1 expression in the developing or adult cerebellum; more likely, ethanol disrupts L1 function by modifying its conformation

Devon M. Fitzgerald; Michael E. Charness; Kimberly A. Leite-morris; Suzhen Chen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

VAMPIRE microarray suite: a web-based platform for the interpretation of gene expression data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the increased computational load. Since all of these transactions are stored in the VAMPIRE database, no dataVAMPIRE microarray suite: a web-based platform for the interpretation of gene expression data of analysis, collectively known as variance-modeled posterior inference with regional exponentials (VAMPIRE

385

Improvement of juice expression after separation of sweet sorghum pith from rind leaf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sweet sorghum stalks were chopped, the pitch separated from the rind-leaf, and the pitch portion only was fed through a screw press for juice expression. Maximum juice yield was achieved with 75% of the fresh weight in the pitch fraction. The screw press capacity decreased as fiber content of the material increased.

Weitzel, T.; Cundiff, J.F.; Vaughan, D.H.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

An empirical study of the relationship between the concepts expressed in source code and dependence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Programs express domain-level concepts in their source code. It might be expected that such concepts would have a degree of semantic cohesion. This cohesion ought to manifest itself in the dependence between statements all of which contribute to the ... Keywords: Concept assignment, Program comprehension, Program slicing, Software engineering

David Binkley; Nicolas Gold; Mark Harman; Zheng Li; Kiarash Mahdavi

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Discovery of Mineralization Predication Classification Rules by Using Gene Expression Programming Based on PCA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Classification is one of the fundamental tasks in geology field. In this paper, we propose an evolutionary approach for discovering classification rules of mineralization predication from distinct combinations of geochemistry elements by using gene expression ... Keywords: GEP, Principal Component Analysis, mineralization predication

Dongmei Zhang; Yue Huang; Jing Zhi

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Comparison of Relative RT-PCR and Northern Blot Analyses to Measure Expression of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commentary Comparison of Relative RT-PCR and Northern Blot Analyses to Measure Expression of -1­polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) is much more sensitive. Ob- taining quantitative RT-PCR results, however, can be challenging. Relative RT-PCR uses standard PCR techniques but permits the comparison of transcript quantities

Hsiang, Tom

389

Dietary resveratrol administration increases MnSOD expression and activity in mouse brain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SOD protein level (140%) and activity (75%). The increase in MnSOD was not due to a substantial proliferationDietary resveratrol administration increases MnSOD expression and activity in mouse brain Ellen L oxidative stress. In vitro studies have shown an increase in antioxidant enzyme activities following

Stuart, Jeffrey A.

390

Real-Time Gene Expression Profiling of Live Shewanella Oneidensis Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this proposal is to make real-time observations of gene expression in live Shewanella oneidensis cells with high sensitivity and high throughput. Gene expression, a central process to all life, is stochastic because most genes often exist in one or two copies per cell. Although the central dogma of molecular biology has been proven beyond doubt, due to insufficient sensitivity, stochastic protein production has not been visualized in real time in an individual cell at the single-molecule level. We report the first direct observation of single protein molecules as they are generated, one at a time in a single live E. coli cell, yielding quantitative information about gene expression [Science 2006; 311: 1600-1603]. We demonstrated a general strategy for live-cell single-molecule measurements: detection by localization. It is difficult to detect single fluorescence protein molecules inside cytoplasm - their fluorescence is spread by fast diffusion to the entire cell and overwhelmed by the strong autofluorescence. We achieved single-molecule sensitivity by immobilizing the fluorescence protein on the cell membrane, where the diffusion is much slowed. We learned that under the repressed condition protein molecules are produced in bursts, with each burst originating from a stochastically-transcribed single messenger RNA molecule, and that protein copy numbers in the bursts follow a geometric distribution. We also simultaneously published a paper reporting a different method using ?-glactosidase as a reporter [Nature 440, 358 (2006)]. Many important proteins are expressed at low levels, inaccessible by previous proteomic techniques. Both papers allowed quantification of protein expression with unprecedented sensitivity and received overwhelming acclaim from the scientific community. The Nature paper has been identified as one of the most-cited papers in the past year [http://esi-topics.com/]. We have also an analytical framework describing the steady-state distribution of protein concentration in live cells, considering that protein production occurs in random bursts with an exponentially distributed number of molecules. This model allows for the extraction of kinetic parameters of gene expression from steady-state distributions of protein concentration in a cell population, which are available from single cell data obtained by fluorescence microscopy. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 168302 (2006)]. A major objective in the Genome to Life (GtL) program is to monitor and understand the gene expression profile of a complete bacterial genome. We developed genetic and imaging methods for sensitive protein expression profiling in individual S. oneidensis cell. We have made good progress in constructing YFP-library with several hundred chromosomal fusion proteins and studied protein expression profiling in living Shewanella oneidensis cells. Fluorescence microscopy revealed the average abundance of specific proteins, as well as their noise in gene expression level across a population. We also explored ways to adapt our fluorescence measurement for other growth conditions, such as anaerobic growth.

Xiaoliang Sunney Xie

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

391

Twenty-first workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

PREFACE The Twenty-First Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at the Holiday Inn, Palo Alto on January 22-24, 1996. There were one-hundred fifty-five registered participants. Participants came from twenty foreign countries: Argentina, Austria, Canada, Costa Rica, El Salvador, France, Iceland, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, the Philippines, Romania, Russia, Switzerland, Turkey and the UK. The performance of many geothermal reservoirs outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Professor Roland N. Horne opened the meeting and welcomed visitors. The key note speaker was Marshall Reed, who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. Sixty-six papers were presented in the technical sessions of the workshop. Technical papers were organized into twenty sessions concerning: reservoir assessment, modeling, geology/geochemistry, fracture modeling hot dry rock, geoscience, low enthalpy, injection, well testing, drilling, adsorption and stimulation. Session chairmen were major contributors to the workshop, and we thank: Ben Barker, Bobbie Bishop-Gollan, Tom Box, Jim Combs, John Counsil, Sabodh Garg, Malcolm Grant, Marcel0 Lippmann, Jim Lovekin, John Pritchett, Marshall Reed, Joel Renner, Subir Sanyal, Mike Shook, Alfred Truesdell and Ken Williamson. Jim Lovekin gave the post-dinner speech at the banquet and highlighted the exciting developments in the geothermal field which are taking place worldwide. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank our students who operated the audiovisual equipment. Shaun D. Fitzgerald Program Manager.

None

1996-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

392

BioLattice: A framework for the biological interpretation of microarray gene expression data using concept lattice analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motivation: A challenge in microarray data analysis is to interpret observed changes in terms of biological properties and relationships. One powerful approach is to make associations of gene expression clusters with biomedical ontologies and/or biological ... Keywords: Clustering, Concept analysis, Concept lattice, DNA microarray, Gene expression

Jihun Kim; Hee-Joon Chung; Yong Jung; Kack-Kyun Kim; Ju Han Kim

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

A novel HMM-based clustering algorithm for the analysis of gene expression time-course data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel hidden Markov model (HMM) and clustering algorithm for the analysis of gene expression time-course data is proposed. The proposed model, called the profile-HMM, is specifically designed to explicitly take into account the dynamic nature of temporal ... Keywords: Clustering, Gene expression time-course data, Hidden Markov models, Temporal dependences, Time-series analysis

Yujing Zeng; Javier Garcia-Frias

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase plays a key role in regulating MAPKAPK2 expression  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of three major families of the mitogen-activated kinases (MAPK), p38 as well as JNK, has been shown to transduce extracellular stress stimuli into cellular responses by phospho-relay cascades. Among p38 families, p38{alpha} is a widely characterized isoform and the biological phenomena are explained by its kinase activity regulating functions of its downstream substrates. However, its specific contributions to each phenomenon are yet not fully elucidated. For better understanding of the role of MAPKs, especially p38{alpha}, we utilized newly established mouse fibroblast cell lines originated from a p38{alpha} null mouse, namely, a parental cell line without p38{alpha} gene locus, knockout of p38{alpha} (KOP), Zeosin-resistant (ZKOP), revertant of p38{alpha} (RKOP), and Exip revertant (EKOP). EKOP is smaller in size but grows faster than the others. Although comparable amounts of ERK and JNK are expressed in each cell line, ERK is highly phosphorylated in EKOP even in normal culture conditions. Serum stimulation after serum starvation led to ERK phosphorylation in RKOP and ZKOP, but not in EKOP as much. On the contrary, relative phosphorylation level of JNK to total JNK in response to UV was low in RKOP. And its phosphorylation as well as total JNK is slightly lower in EKOP. RKOP is less sensitive to UV irradiation as judged by the survival rate. Stress response upon UV or sorbitol stimuli, leading to mitogen activate protein kinase activated kinase 2 (MAPKAPK2) phosphorylation, was only observed in RKOP. Further experiments reveal that MAPKAPK2 expression is largely suppressed in ZKOP and EKOP. Its expression was recovered by re-introduction of p38{alpha}. The loss of MAPKAPK2 expression accompanied by the defect of p38{alpha} is confirmed in an embryonic extract prepared from p38{alpha} null mice. These data demonstrate that p38 signal pathway is regulated not only by phosphorylation but also by modulation of the expression of its component. Together, we have established cell lines that can be used in analyzing the functions of MAPKs, especially p38{alpha}, and show that p38 is indispensable for MAPKAPK2 expression.

Sudo, Tatsuhiko [Antibiotics Laboratory and Bioarchitect Research Group, DRI, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)]. E-mail: sudo@riken.jp; Kawai, Kayoko [Antibiotics Laboratory and Bioarchitect Research Group, DRI, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-okubo, Saitama, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Matsuzaki, Hiroshi [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-okubo, Saitama, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Osada, Hiroyuki [Antibiotics Laboratory and Bioarchitect Research Group, DRI, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-okubo, Saitama, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan)

2005-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

395

Abnormal Gene Expression of Four Genes in Cells from Family Members of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Abnormal Gene Expression of Four Genes in Cells from Family Members of Abnormal Gene Expression of Four Genes in Cells from Family Members of Hereditary-type Retinoblastoma Patients relative to Normal Individuals Chin-Yu Wang, 1 Yuanlin Peng, 1 Zhonghui Yang, 2 Chuan-Yuan Li, 2 Hatsumi Nagasawa, 1 Markus M. Fitzek, 3 John B. Little, 4 Joel S. Bedford, 1 and Eric Y. Chuang 5 1 Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado; 2 Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina; 3 Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts-New England Medical Center; 4 Department of Genetics and Complex Diseases, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts; and 5 Department of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan

396

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Protocol for Measuring and Expressing Performance for ESS - Vilayanur Viswanathan, PNNL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Protocol for Measuring and Expressing Protocol for Measuring and Expressing Performance for Energy Storage Systems D. Conover, V. Viswanathan, K. Bray and M. Kintner-Meyer (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) D. Schoenwald, D. Rose, and S. Ferreira (Sandia National Laboratory) September 28, 2012 USDOE-OE ESS Peer Review Washington, DC Dr. Imre Gyuk - Energy Storage Program Manager, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Problem Statement The energy storage market is expanding, with a variety of storage technologies available The lack of a uniform way to evaluate energy storage system (ESS) performance is causing confusion in the market Without an accepted basis for comparing ESS performance, the application and use of storage technology will be hampered

397

The pKZ1 transgene as a sensitive passive gene expression reporter for low  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

pKZ1 transgene as a sensitive passive gene expression reporter for low pKZ1 transgene as a sensitive passive gene expression reporter for low dose radiation responses Pamela J Sykes Flinders University and Medical Centre Abstract After high radiation dose exposures, changes in a number of biological endpoints in vivo can be readily observed above the normal background variation that exists in any biological system. Where these responding biological endpoints can be tied to carcinogenic risk, for example, apoptosis, proliferation or chromosomal aberrations, the net effect of the radiation exposure on cancer risk can be surmised. If the biological changes are proportional to radiation dose, then at much lower doses, the biological responses will eventually fall within the range of normal inter-individual and temporal variation, making statistical proof of any

398

Snohomish County PUD No 1 - Solar Express Rebate Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rebate Program Rebate Program Snohomish County PUD No 1 - Solar Express Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Local Government Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Water Heating Maximum Rebate Residential PV: $2,500 Commercial PV: $10,000 Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount PV: $500/kW-DC SWH: $500/system Provider Snohomish County PUD In March 2009, Snohomish County PUD introduced the Solar Express Program. This program provides rebates to support residential and commercial installations of solar photovoltaics (PV) and solar water heating (SWH). The program also provides loans to support residential installations. This rebate program provides $500 per kilowatt (kW) of installed PV, up to

399

Snohomish County PUD No 1 - Solar Express Loan Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Loan Program Loan Program Snohomish County PUD No 1 - Solar Express Loan Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Water Heating Maximum Rebate Solar Water Heater: $14,000 Solar PV: $25,000 Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Loan Program Rebate Amount Solar Water Heater: up to $14,000 Solar PV: up to $25,000 Provider Snohomish County PUD In March 2009, Snohomish County PUD introduced the Solar Express Program. This program provides rebates and loans to support residential and commercial installations of solar photovoltaics (PV) and solar water heating (SWH). Only residential customers can take advantage of the loan program. Low-interest loans are available to residential customers. Loans with 2.9%

400

Expression of Nanog gene promotes NIH3T3 cell proliferation  

SciTech Connect

Cells are the functional elements in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. A large number of cells are usually needed for these purposes. However, there are numbers of limitations for in vitro cell proliferation. Nanog is an important self-renewal determinant in embryonic stem cells. However, it remains unknown whether Nanog will influence the cell cycle and cell proliferation of mature cells. In this study, we expressed Nanog in NIH3T3 cells and showed that expression of Nanog in NIH3T3 promoted cells to enter into S phase and enhanced cell proliferation. This suggests that Nanog gene might function in a similar fashion in mature cells as in ES cells. In addition, it may provide an approach for in vitro cell expansion.

Zhang Jingyu [Key Laboratory of Molecular Developmental Biology, Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Graduate School, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Wang Xia [Key Laboratory of Molecular Developmental Biology, Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Chen Bing [Key Laboratory of Molecular Developmental Biology, Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Suo Guangli [Key Laboratory of Molecular Developmental Biology, Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Zhao Yanhong [Key Laboratory of Molecular Developmental Biology, Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Duan Ziyuan [Key Laboratory of Molecular Developmental Biology, Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Dai Jianwu [Key Laboratory of Molecular Developmental Biology, Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China)]. E-mail: jwdai@genetics.ac.cn

2005-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "holiday inn express" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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401

Express and Confirmation AOC Swapping Commands for DMT DSLs (99-118)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Two new bit-swap commands are introduced by this contribution: An Express-Swap command for reliable and very fast implementation of swapping and a Bit-Swap Confirmation command for low-complexity implementation of absolutely reliable swapping. ________________________________________________________________________ NOTICE This contribution has been prepared to assist Standards Committee T1 - Telecommunications. This document is offered to the Committee as a basis for discussion and is not a binding on any of the companies listed as authors. The requirements are subject to change after further study. The authors specifically reserve the right to add to, amend, or withdraw the statements contained herein. 03/06/99 2 T1E1.4/99-118 Express and Confirmation AOC Swapping Commands for DMT DSLs (99-118) L. Hoo, A. Salvekar, C. Aldana, & J.M. Cioffi Information Systems Laboratory Stanford University Stanford, CA 94305 Cioffi@stanford.edu P. Chow & J. Carlo Broadband Access Group ...

Source Hoo Salvekar; Source L. Hoo; L. Hoo; A. Salvekar; A. Salvekar; C. Aldana; C. Aldana; J. M. Cioffi; J. M. Cioffi; P. Chow; P. Chow; J. Carlo; J. Carlo

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Analytical expressions for maximum wind turbine average power in a Rayleigh wind regime  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Average or expectation values for annual power of a wind turbine in a Rayleigh wind regime are calculated and plotted as a function of cut-out wind speed. This wind speed is expressed in multiples of the annual average wind speed at the turbine installation site. To provide a common basis for comparison of all real and imagined turbines, the Rayleigh-Betz wind machine is postulated. This machine is an ideal wind machine operating with the ideal Betz power coefficient of 0.593 in a Rayleigh probability wind regime. All other average annual powers are expressed in fractions of that power. Cases considered include: (1) an ideal machine with finite power and finite cutout speed, (2) real machines operating in variable speed mode at their maximum power coefficient, and (3) real machines operating at constant speed.

Carlin, P.W.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

In silico method for modelling metabolism and gene product expression at genome scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transcription and translation use raw materials and energy generated metabolically to create the macromolecular machinery responsible for all cellular functions, including metabolism. A biochemically accurate model of molecular biology and metabolism will facilitate comprehensive and quantitative computations of an organism's molecular constitution as a function of genetic and environmental parameters. Here we formulate a model of metabolism and macromolecular expression. Prototyping it using the simple microorganism Thermotoga maritima, we show our model accurately simulates variations in cellular composition and gene expression. Moreover, through in silico comparative transcriptomics, the model allows the discovery of new regulons and improving the genome and transcription unit annotations. Our method presents a framework for investigating molecular biology and cellular physiology in silico and may allow quantitative interpretation of multi-omics data sets in the context of an integrated biochemical description of an organism.

Lerman, Joshua A.; Hyduke, Daniel R.; Latif, Haythem; Portnoy, Vasiliy A.; Lewis, Nathan E.; Orth, Jeffrey D.; Rutledge, Alexandra C.; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Zengler, Karsten; Palsson, Bernard O.

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

404

Shape factor, C /SUB A/ , expressed as skin, S /SUB CA/  

SciTech Connect

This work presents the conversion of the shape factor, C /SUB A/ , to a pseudosteady-state skin term, S /SUB CA/ . When the shape factor is expressed as a skin term, it becomes easier to see the effect that a well placement in a given drainage area will have on the well's performance. Skin factors for published drainage shapes and well locations are given.

Fetkovich, M.J.; Vienot, M.E.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

The Higgs field can be expressed through the lepton and quark fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Higgs field is a central point of the Standard Model supplying masses to other fields through the symmetry breaking mechanism. However, it is associated with an elementary particle which is not yet discovered experimentally. In this short note I suggest a way for expressing the Higgs field through other fields of the Standard Model. If this is the case, being not an independent field, the Higgs field does not require an elementary particle to be associated with it.

Ruslan Sharipov

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

SNEG - Mathematica package for symbolic calculations with second-quantization-operator expressions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In many-particle problems involving interacting fermions or bosons, the most natural language for expressing the Hamiltonian, the observables, and the basis states is the language of the second-quantization operators. It thus appears advantageous to write numerical computer codes which allow the user to define the problem and the quantities of interest directly in terms of operator strings, rather than in some low-level programming language. Here I describe a Mathematica package which provides a flexible framework for performing the required translations between several different representations of operator expressions: condensed notation using pure ASCII character strings, traditional notation ("pretty printing"), internal Mathematica representation using nested lists (used for automatic symbolic manipulations), and various higher-level ("macro") expressions. The package consists of a collection of transformation rules that define the algebra of operators and a comprehensive library of utility functions. While the emphasis is given on the problems from solid-state and atomic physics, the package can be easily adapted to any given problem involving non-commuting operators. It can be used for educational and demonstration purposes, but also for direct calculations of problems of moderate size.

Rok Zitko

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

407

Essential role of Chk1 in S phase progression through regulation of RNR2 expression  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chk1 is an essential kinase for maintaining genome integrity and cell cycle checkpoints through phosphorylating several downstream targets. Recently, we demonstrated that Chk1 is also required for cell proliferation in somatic cells under unperturbed condition through regulating transcription of several genes. Here, we show that Chk1 is required for S phase progression and RNR2 is a critical downstream target of genes transcriptionally regulated by Chk1. Hence, although RNR2 expression reached maximum at S phase in the presence of Chk1, Chk1 depletion arrested the cell cycle at S phase and reduced RNR2 expression at both mRNA and protein levels. Ectopic expression of RNR2 failed to rescue the S phase arrest observed in Chk1 depleted cells, suggesting the presence of an additional Chk1-target(s) for completion of S phase other than RNR2. Therefore, our results suggest that Chk1 is required for DNA replication at least through regulating RNR2 gene transcription.

Naruyama, Hiromichi [Department of Cell Biology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601 (Japan); Department of Urology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601 (Japan); Shimada, Midori; Niida, Hiroyuki; Zineldeen, Doaa H. [Department of Cell Biology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601 (Japan); Hashimoto, Yoshihiro; Kohri, Kenjiro [Department of Urology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601 (Japan); Nakanishi, Makoto [Department of Cell Biology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601 (Japan)], E-mail: mkt-naka@med.nagoya-cu.ac.jp

2008-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

408

The 5th Symposium on Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Plant Gene Expression (PTRoPGE)  

SciTech Connect

The 5th Symposium on Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Plant Gene Expression (PTRoPGE) will be held June 8-12, 2005 at the University of Texas at Austin. Exciting new and ongoing discoveries show significant regulation of gene expression occurs after transcription. These post-transcriptional control events in plants range from subtle regulation of transcribed genes and phosphorylation, to the processes of gene regulation through small RNAs. This meeting will focus on the regulatory role of RNA, from transcription, through translation and finally degradation. The cross-disciplinary design of this meeting is necessary to encourage interactions between researchers that have a common interest in post-transcriptional gene expression in plants. By bringing together a diverse group of plant molecular biologist and biochemists at all careers stages from across the world, this meeting will bring about more rapid progress in understanding how plant genomes work and how genes are finely regulated by post-transcriptional processes to ultimately regulate cells.

Karen S. Browning; Marie Petrocek; Bonnie Bartel

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Expression of HPV16 E5 produces enlarged nuclei and polyploidy through endoreplication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anogenital cancers and head and neck cancers are causally associated with infection by high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV). The mechanism by which high-risk HPVs contribute to oncogenesis is poorly understood. HPV16 encodes three genes (HPV16 E5, E6, and E7) that can transform cells when expressed independently. HPV16 E6 and E7 have well-described roles causing genomic instability and unregulated cell cycle progression. The role of HPV16 E5 in cell transformation remains to be elucidated. Expression of HPV16 E5 results in enlarged, polyploid nuclei that are dependent on the level and duration of HPV16 E5 expression. Live cell imaging data indicate that these changes do not arise from cell-cell fusion or failed cytokinesis. The increase in nuclear size is a continual process that requires DNA synthesis. We conclude that HPV16 E5 produces polyploid cells by endoreplication. These findings provide insight into how HPV16 E5 can contribute to cell transformation.

Hu Lulin [Department of Cell Biology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Potapova, Tamara A. [Cell Cycle and Cancer Biology, Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Li Shibo [Department of Pathology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Rankin, Susannah; Gorbsky, Gary J. [Cell Cycle and Cancer Biology, Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Angeletti, Peter C. [Nebraska Center for Virology, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States); Ceresa, Brian P., E-mail: brian-ceresa@oushc.ed [Department of Cell Biology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

410

The unique glutathione reductase from Xanthomonas campestris: Gene expression and enzyme characterization  

SciTech Connect

The glutathione reductase gene, gor, was cloned from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli. Its gene expression and enzyme characteristics were found to be different from those of previously studied homologues. Northern blot hybridization, promoter-lacZ fusion, and enzyme assay experiments revealed that its expression, unlike in Escherichia coli, is OxyR-independent and constitutive upon oxidative stress conditions. The deduced amino acid sequence shows a unique NADPH binding motif where the most highly conserved arginine residue, which is critical for NADPH binding, is replaced by glutamine. Interestingly, a search of the available Gor amino acid sequences from various sources, including other Xanthomonas species, revealed that this replacement is specific to the genus Xanthomonas. Recombinant Gor enzyme was purified and characterized, and was found to have a novel ability to use both, NADPH and NADH, as electron donor. A gor knockout mutant was constructed and shown to have increased expression of the organic peroxide-inducible regulator gene, ohrR.

Loprasert, Suvit [Laboratory of Biotechnology, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Lak Si, Bangkok 10210 (Thailand)]. E-mail: suvit@cri.or.th; Whangsuk, Wirongrong [Laboratory of Biotechnology, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Lak Si, Bangkok 10210 (Thailand); Sallabhan, Ratiboot [Laboratory of Biotechnology, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Lak Si, Bangkok 10210 (Thailand); Mongkolsuk, Skorn [Laboratory of Biotechnology, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Lak Si, Bangkok 10210 (Thailand); Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

2005-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

411

NF-{kappa}B regulates Lef1 gene expression in chondrocytes  

SciTech Connect

The relation of Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling to osteoarthritis progression has been revealed with little information on the underlying molecular mechanism. In this study we found overexpression of Lef1 in cartilage tissue of osteoarthritic patients and elucidated molecular mechanism of NF-{kappa}B-mediated Lef1 gene regulation in chondrocytes. Treatment of IL-1{beta} augmented Lef1 upregulation and nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B in chondrocytes. Under IL-1{beta} signaling, treatment of NF-{kappa}B nuclear translocation inhibitor SN-50 reduced Lef1 expression. A conserved NF-{kappa}B-binding site between mouse and human was selected through bioinformatic analysis and mapped at the 14 kb upstream of Lef1 transcription initiation site. NF-{kappa}B binding to the site was confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Lef1 expression was synergistically upregulated by interactions of NF-{kappa}B with Lef1/{beta}-catenin in chondrocytes. Our results suggest a pivotal role of NF-{kappa}B in Lef1 expression in arthritic chondrocytes or cartilage degeneration.

Yun, Kangsun [Department of Life Sciences, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yoo Duk [Department of Pathology, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju 501-749 (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Jong Hee [Department of Pathology, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju 501-749 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Zeeyoung [Department of Life Sciences, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Im, Sin-Hyeog [Department of Life Sciences, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: imsh@gist.ac.kr

2007-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

412

Expression Optimization and Inducible Negative Feedback in Cell-Free Systems  

SciTech Connect

Synthetic biology offers great promise to a variety of applications through the forward engineering of biological function. Most efforts in this field have focused on employing living cells. Cell-free approaches, on the other hand, offer simpler and more flexible contexts, but few synthetic systems based on cell-free protein expression have been constructed. Here, we evaluate cell-free regulatory systems based on T7 promoter driven expression, and we demonstrate negative feedback, an essential motif in many natural and engineered systems. First, we characterize variants of TetR and LacI repressible T7 promoters in a cell-free context and examine sequence elements that determine expression efficiency. Then, we explore different approaches for composing regulatory systems, leading to the implementation of inducible negative feedback in E. coli extracts and in the minimal PURE system, which consists of purified proteins necessary for transcription and translation. Our quantitative cell-free component characterizations and demonstration of negative feedback embody important steps on the path to harnessing biological function in a bottom up fashion.

Karig, David K [ORNL; Iyer, Sukanya [ORNL; Simpson, Michael L [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

The expression of lactate dehydrogenase in Zea mays seedlings under hypoxic and anoxic conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ability of root cells to survive flooded (low 02) conditions may depend, in part, on energy produced anaerobically during fermentation to ethanol or lactic acid. The Davies-Roberts hypothesis predicts only a transient formation of lactic acid in anoxic maize root tips, catalyzed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), prior to sustained ethanolic fermentation. The initial lactic acid production may contribute to cytoplasmic acidosis. However, barley roots, when deprived of oxygen, exhibit a long term induction of LDH activity, which might indicate an alternative role for LDH in oxygen-depleted tissues. LDH enzymatic activity, message levels and lactic acid accumulation in response to hypoxic environments were examined in a variety of maize root tissues (primary root axis, nodal root axis, primary root tip, and the nodal root tip) from seedlings of different ages. In the 'open system', in which the roots were sparged with N2 while shoots remained exposed to air, Ldh1 transcripts and enzymatic activity were induced in the root axes. In contrast, root tips had high basal (aerobic) levels of LDH expression which did not increase further under 02-deprivation. There was less accumulation of intracellular lactic acid in the root tips during anoxia following 24 h of hypoxia. However, total lactic acid production increased in the root axes, corresponding with the increase in LDH expression. Experiments with pre-emergent seedlings of different ages from the 'closed system', in which the entire seedling was maintained in the same gaseous atmosphere, revealed different LDH expression patterns in response to 02 deficit, depending on age. Intracellular accumulation of lactate during the first hour of anoxia was several times higher in younger seedlings, and regardless of treatment, the initial rate of lactic acid export into the medium remained the same. These results suggest that lactic acid fermentation during anoxia may be regulated by the relative expression levels of PDC and ADH. Furthermore, the increased expression of LDH in the root axes, which are more resistant to long term anoxia than root tips, may indicate LDH contributes to energy metabolism and cell survival in these more mature zones.

MacAlpine, David Michael

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Confirmation of the Expression of a Large Set of Conserved Hypothetical Proteins in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1  

SciTech Connect

High-throughput “omic” technologies have allowed for a relatively rapid, yet comprehensive analysis of the global expression patterns within an organism in response to perturbations. In the current study, tryptic peptides were identified with high confidence from capillary liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of 26 chemostat cultures of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under various conditions. Using at least one distinctive and a total of two total peptide identifications per protein, we detected the expression of 758 conserved hypothetical proteins. This included 359 such proteins previously described (Kolker et al, 2005) with an additional 399 reported herein for the first time. The latter 399 proteins ranged from 5.3 to 208.3 kDa, with 44 being of 100 amino acid residues or less. Using a combination of information including peptide detection in cells grown under specific culture conditions and predictive algorithms such as PSORT and PSORT-B, possible/plausible functions are proposed for some conserved hypothetical proteins. Such proteins were found not only to be expressed, but 19 were only expressed under certain culturing conditions, thereby providing insight into potential functions. These findings also impact the genomic annotation for S. oneidensis MR-1 by confirming that these genes code for expressed proteins. Our results indicate that 399 proteins can now be upgraded from “conserved hypothetical protein” to “expressed protein in Shewanella,” 19 of which appeared to be expressed under specific culture conditions.

Elias, Dwayne A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Smith, Richard D.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Lipton, Mary S.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

EMSL: About EMSL: Strategy and Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(6 am -6 pm), seven days a week (4380 hours) minus 8 holidays (96 hours.) and 1 planned power outage (26 hours). See the enlarged image png 51kb. Note: Holidays are...

416

Fall and Winter Energy-Saving Tips | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for energy-efficient water heating. Lower Your Holiday Lighting Costs Use light-emitting diode -- or "LED" -- holiday light strings to reduce the cost of decorating your home...

417

Differential transcriptional regulation of IL-8 expression by human airway epithelial cells exposed to diesel exhaust particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) induces inflammatory signaling characterized by MAP kinase-mediated activation of NFkB and AP-1 in vitro and in bronchial biopsies obtained from human subjects exposed to DEP. NFkB and AP-1 activation results in the upregulation of genes involved in promoting inflammation in airway epithelial cells, a principal target of inhaled DEP. IL-8 is a proinflammatory chemokine expressed by the airway epithelium in response to environmental pollutants. The mechanism by which DEP exposure induces IL-8 expression is not well understood. In the current study, we sought to determine whether DEP with varying organic content induces IL-8 expression in lung epithelial cells, as well as, to develop a method to rapidly evaluate the upstream mechanism(s) by which DEP induces IL-8 expression. Exposure to DEP with varying organic content differentially induced IL-8 expression and IL-8 promoter activity human airway epithelial cells. Mutational analysis of the IL-8 promoter was also performed using recombinant human cell lines expressing reporters linked to the mutated promoters. Treatment with a low organic-containing DEP stimulated IL-8 expression by a mechanism that is predominantly NFkB-dependent. In contrast, exposure to high organic-containing DEP induced IL-8 expression independently of NFkB through a mechanism that requires AP-1 activity. Our study reveals that exposure to DEP of varying organic content induces proinflammatory gene expression through multiple specific mechanisms in human airway epithelial cells. The approaches used in the present study demonstrate the utility of a promoter-reporter assay ensemble for identifying transcriptional pathways activated by pollutant exposure.

Tal, Tamara L. [Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States); Simmons, Steven O. [Integrated Systems Toxicology, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States); Silbajoris, Robert; Dailey, Lisa [Environmental and Public Health, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States); Cho, Seung-Hyun [Air Pollution Prevention Control Division, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States); Research Participation Program, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge (United States); Ramabhadran, Ram [Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States); Integrated Systems Toxicology, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States); Linak, William [Air Pollution Prevention Control Division, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States); Reed, William; Bromberg, Philip A. [Center for Environmental Medicine, Asthma, and Lung Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States); Samet, James M., E-mail: samet.james@epa.go [Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States); Environmental and Public Health, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

418

Relationship between the tissue-specificity of mouse gene expression and the evolutionary origin and function of the proteins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to few tissues [9]. In germ cells, where lactate is a preferred energy source [10], we observe specific expression of Ldhc (testis-specific expression). The expression of Ldhc is an example of a function occurring in the ancestral unicellular cell... , Schaffer AA, Zhang J, Zhang Z, Miller W, Lip- man DJ: Gapped BLAST and PSI-BLAST: a new generation of protein database search programs. Nucleic Acids Res 1997, 25:3389-3402. 25. Janssen P, Enright AJ, Audit B, Cases I, Goldovsky L, Harte N, Kunin V...

Freilich, Shiri; Massingham, Tim; Bhattacharyya, Sumit; Ponstingl, Hannes; Lyons, Paul A; Freeman, Tom C; Thornton, Janet M

2005-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

419

New Opera in Two Acts By Jonathan Dawe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the porn industry, Holiday Pops with the Princeton Symphony, From Paris to Berlin to New York (Gala Concert

Lazar, Aurel A.

420

Cluster analysis of genome-wide expression differences in disease-unaffected ileal mucosa in inflammatory bowel diseases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Whole human genome (Agilent) expression profiling was conducted on disease-unaffected ileal RNA collected from the proximal margin of resected ileum from 47 ileal Crohn's disease (CD), 27 ulcerative colitis (UC) and 25 control patients without inflammatory ...

Tianyi Zhang; Robert A. DeSimone; Hongyan Chen; Christina M. Hamm; Jeffrey Yuan; Qing Qing Gong; Steven R. Hunt; Themistocles Dassopoulos; Rodney D. Newberry; Daniel N. Frank; Charles E. Robertson; Norman R. Pace; Erica Sodergren; George Weinstock; Xiangmin Jiao; Wei Zhu; Ellen Li

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

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421

A Novel Mechanism for Regulation of Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Gene Expression via a Stabilization of mRNA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From: Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic Disease A Novel Mechanism for Regulation of Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Gene Expression via a Stabilization of mRNA Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry PRESS

422

The facade and the contextual expression of dynamic use : a culinary arts school and restaurant in Paris  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores the possibility of independent, expressive, and contemporary design resulting from an initial contextual investigation. The site is located in Paris, on Avenue Montaigne, adjacent to the mid-point of ...

Luthringshauser, Heidi E. (Heidi Elizabeth)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Using the Cre-loxP system to randomize target gene expression states and generate diverse phenotypes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modifying the expression of multiple genes enables both deeper understanding of their function and the engineering of complex multigenic cellular phenotypes. However, deletion or overexpression of multiple genes is typically ...

Niesner, Bradley (Bradley Joseph)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Constitutive Gs activation using a single-construct tetracycline-inducible expression system in embryonic stem cells and mice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vector mediates doxycycline-controlled Abbreviations EB:L, Manns MP, Kubicka S: Doxycycline regulation in a singleEF1a) promoter to drive doxycycline-regulated expression of

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

One pyrimidine dimer inactivates expression of a transfected gene in xeroderma pigmentosum cells  

SciTech Connect

The authors have developed a host cell reactivation assay of DNA repair utilizing UV-treated plasmid vectors. The assay primarily reflects cellular repair of transcriptional activity of damaged DNA measured indirectly as enzyme activity of the transfected genes. They studied three plasmids (pSV2cat, 5020 base pairs; pSV2catSVgpt, 7268 base pairs; and pRSVcat, 5027 base pairs) with different sizes and promoters carrying the bacterial cat gene (CAT, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase) in a construction that permits cat expression in human cells. All human simian virus 40-transformed cells studied expressed high levels of the transfected cat gene. UV treatment of the plasmids prior to transfection resulted in differential decrease in CAT activity in different cell lines. With pSV2catSVgpt, UV inactivation of CAT expression was greater in the xeroderma pigmentosum group A and D lines than in the other human cell lines tested. The D0 of the CAT inactivation curve was 50 J X m-2 for pSV2cat and for pRSVcat in the xeroderma pigmentosum group A cells. The similarity of the D0 data in the xeroderma pigmentosum group A cells for three plasmids of different size and promoters implies they all have similar UV-inactivation target size. UV-induced pyrimidine dimer formation in the plasmids was quantified by assay of the number of UV-induced T4 endonuclease V-sensitive sites. In the most sensitive xeroderma pigmentosum cells, with all three plasmids, one UV-induced pyrimidine dimer inactivates a target of about 2 kilobases, close to the size of the putative CAT mRNA.

Protic-Sabljic, M.; Kraemer, K.H.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Two Residues in the T-loop of GlnK Determine NifL-dependent Nitrogen Control of nif Gene Expression*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two Residues in the T-loop of GlnK Determine NifL-dependent Nitrogen Control of nif Gene Expression NifL-mediated inhibition of NifA activity in response to the nitrogen status, and GlnB, when expressed heterologous system, in which K. pneumoniae nifLA is expressed in E. coli, to investigate the impor- tance

Merrick, Mike

427

Gene Expression in the Third Dimension: The ECM-nucleus Connection  

SciTech Connect

Decades ago, we and others proposed that the dynamic interplay between a cell and its surrounding environment dictates cell phenotype and tissue structure. Whereas much has been discovered about the effects of extracellular matrix molecules on cell growth and tissue specific gene expression, the nuclear mechanisms through which these molecules promote these physiological events remain unknown. Using mammary epithelial cells as a model, the purpose of this review is to discuss how the extracellular matrix influences nuclear structure and function in a three-dimensional context to promote epithelial morphogenesis and function in the mammary gland.

Spencer, Virginia A; Xu, Ren; Bissell, Mina

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Expressing the Behavior of Three Very Different Concurrent Systems by Using Natural Extensions of Separation Logic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Separation Logic is a non-classical logic used to verify pointer-intensive code. In this paper, however, we show that Separation Logic, along with its natural extensions, can also be used as a specification language for concurrent-system design. To do so, we express the behavior of three very different concurrent systems: a Subway, a Stopwatch, and a 2x2 Switch. The Subway is originally implemented in LUSTRE, the Stopwatch in Esterel, and the 2x2 Switch in Bluespec.

Daylight, Edgar G; Sergio, Davide; 10.4204/EPTCS.8.3

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Expression of a functional extracellular calcium-sensing receptor in human aortic endothelial cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o}) regulates the functions of many cell types through a G protein-coupled [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o}-sensing receptor (CaR). Whether the receptor is functionally expressed in vascular endothelial cells is largely unknown. In cultured human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC), RT-PCR yielded the expected 555-bp product corresponding to the CaR, and CaR protein was demonstrated by fluorescence immunostaining and Western blot. RT-PCR also demonstrated the expression in HAEC of alternatively spliced variants of the CaR lacking exon 5. Although stimulation of fura 2-loaded HAEC by several CaR agonists (high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o}, neomycin, and gadolinium) failed to increase intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}), the CaR agonist spermine stimulated an increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} that was diminished in buffer without Ca{sup 2+} and was abolished after depletion of an intracellular Ca{sup 2+} pool with thapsigargin or after blocking IP{sub 3}- and ryanodine receptor-mediated Ca{sup 2+} release with xestospongin C and with high concentration ryanodine, respectively. Spermine stimulated an increase in DAF-FM fluorescence in HAEC, consistent with NO production. Both the increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and in NO production were reduced or absent in HAEC transfected with siRNA specifically targeted to the CaR. HAEC express a functional CaR that responds to the endogenous polyamine spermine with an increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}, primarily due to release of IP{sub 3}- and ryanodine-sensitive intracellular Ca{sup 2+} stores, leading to the production of NO. Expression of alternatively spliced variants of the CaR may result in the absence of a functional response to other known CaR agonists in HAEC.

Ziegelstein, Roy C. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, Division of Cardiology, Baltimore, MD 21224-2780 (United States); Xiong Yali [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, Division of Cardiology, Baltimore, MD 21224-2780 (United States); He Chaoxia [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, Division of Cardiology, Baltimore, MD 21224-2780 (United States); Hu Qinghua [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, Division of Cardiology, Baltimore, MD 21224-2780 (United States)]. E-mail: qinghuaa@jhmi.edu

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

430

Two-transcript gene expression classifiers in the diagnosis and prognosis of human diseases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ral ssBioMed CentBMC Genomics Open AcceResearch article Two-transcript gene expression classifiers in the diagnosis and prognosis of human diseases Lucas B Edelman1,2,6, Giuseppe Toia1,2, Donald Geman4, Wei Zhang5 and Nathan D Price*1,2,3 Address... : 1Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801, USA, 2Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801, USA, 3Department of Chemical and Biomolecular...

Edelman, Lucas B; Toia, Giuseppe; Geman, Donald; Zhang, Wei; Price, Nathan D

2009-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

431

In silico analysis of motifs in promoters of Differentially Expressed Genes in rice (Oryza sativa L.) under anoxia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to characterise the molecular mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of Differentially Expressed Genes (DEGs) in rice coleoptiles under anoxia by identifying motifs that are common in the promoter region of co-regulated ... Keywords: AREs, DEGs, Oryza sativa, anaerobic response elements, anoxia, bioinformatics, consensus promoter motif, differentially expressed genes, eukaryotic promoters, gene promoters, in silico motifs, in-silico motifs, microarrays, molecular mechanisms, motif detection, promoter motifs, rice, transcriptional regulation

Ashutosh Kumar; Shuchi Smita; Neeti Sahu; Vivekanand Sharma; Shankaracharya; Ambarish S. Vidyarthi; Dev Mani Pandey

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Expression of CAR in SW480 and HepG2 cells during G1 is associated with cell proliferation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) is a transcription factor to regulate the expression of several genes related to drug-metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that CAR protein accumulates during G1 in human SW480 and HepG2 cells. After the G1/S phase transition, CAR protein levels decreased, and CAR was hardly detected in cells by the late M phase. CAR expression in both cell lines was suppressed by RNA interference-mediated suppression of CDK4. Depletion of CAR by RNA interference in both cells and by hepatocyte growth factor treatment in HepG2 cells resulted in decreased MDM2 expression that led to p21 upregulation and repression of HepG2 cell growth. Thus, our results demonstrate that CAR expression is an early G1 event regulated by CDK4 that contributes to MDM2 expression; these findings suggest that CAR may influence the expression of genes involved in not only the metabolism of endogenous and exogenous substances but also in the cell proliferation.

Osabe, Makoto [Department of Pharmaco-Biochemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, 52-1 Yada, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan); Sugatani, Junko [Department of Pharmaco-Biochemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, 52-1 Yada, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan); Global COE Program, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, Shizuoka (Japan)], E-mail: sugatani@u-shizuoka-ken.ac.jp; Takemura, Akiko; Yamazaki, Yasuhiro; Ikari, Akira [Department of Pharmaco-Biochemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, 52-1 Yada, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan); Kitamura, Naomi [Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama (Japan); Negishi, Masahiko [Pharmacogenetics Section, Laboratory of Reproductive and Developmental Toxicology, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Miwa, Masao [Department of Pharmaco-Biochemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, 52-1 Yada, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan)

2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

433

Role of Morphological Growth State and Gene Expression in Desulfovibrio africanus strain Walvis Bay Mercury Methylation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The biogeochemical transformations of mercury are a complex process, with the production of methylmercury, a potent human neurotoxin, repeatedly demonstrated in sulfate- and Fe(III)- reducing as well as methanogenic bacteria. However, little is known regarding the morphology, genes or proteins involved in methylmercury generation. Desulfovibrio africanus strain Walvis Bay is a Hg-methylating -proteobacterium with a sequenced genome and has unusual pleomorphic forms. In this study, a relationship between the pleomorphism and Hg methylation was investigated. Proportional increases in the sigmoidal (regular) cell form corresponded with increased net MeHg production, but decreased when the pinched cocci (persister) form became the major morphotype. D. africanus microarrays indicated that the ferrous iron transport genes (feoAB), as well as ribosomal genes and several genes whose products are predicted to have metal binding domains (CxxC), were up-regulated during exposure to Hg in the exponential phase. While no specific methylation pathways were identified, the finding that Hg may interfere with iron transport and the correlation of growth-phase dependent morphology with MeHg production are notable. The identification of these relationships between differential gene expression, morphology, and the growth phase dependence of Hg transformations suggests that actively growing cells are primarily responsible for methylation, and so areas with ample carbon and electron-acceptor concentrations may also generate a higher proportion of methylmercury than more oligotrophic environments. The observation of increased iron transporter expression also suggests that Hg methylation may interfere with iron biogeochemical cycles.

Moberly, James G [ORNL; Miller, Carrie L [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Biswas, Abir [ORNL; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Elias, Dwayne A [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Regulation of E2F-1 gene expression in human breast cancer cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

17?-Estradiol induces E2F-1 gene expression in ZR-75 and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Analysis of the E2F-1 gene promoter in MCF-7 cells previously showed that hormone-induced transactivation required interactions between estrogen receptor ? (ER?)/Sp1 bound to upstream GC-rich sites and NFYA bound to downstream CCAAT sites within the -169 to -54 promoter region. This promoter region was also E2-responsive in ER?-positive ZR-75 cells; however, further analysis of the promoter showed that cooperative ER?/Sp1/NFY interactions were not necessary for hormone-induced transactivation in ZR-75 cells. The upstream GC-rich motifs are activated independently by ER?/Sp1 in ZR-75 but not MCF-7 cells, and the downstream CCAAT sites were also E2-responsive. E2 also induced reporter gene activity in ZR-75 cells transfected with an expression plasmid containing the yeast GAL4 DNA binding domain fused to pM-NFYA and a construct containing five tandem GAL4 response elements. Subsequent studies showed that hormonal activation of pE2F-1jm1 and pM-NFYA are dependent on non-genomic pathways in which E2 activates cAMP/protein kinase A. Hormone-dependent regulation of E2F-1 gene expression in ZR-75 and MCF-7 involves different mechanisms, demonstrating the importance of cell context on transactivation pathways, even among ER-positive breast cancer cell lines. TCDD inhibited ER?-mediated responses in MCF-7 and ZR-75 cells. E2- induced E2F-1protein and mRNA levels in MCF-7 and ZR-75 cells and this response was inhibited by TCDD. Constructs containing GC-rich sites alone or in combination with the downstream NFY sites were used in transactivation studies to investigate the mechanism of inhibitory AhR-ER? crosstalk. Although TCDD inhibited E2-induced mRNA, protein and reporter gene actitivity, it was not possible to determine if the inhibitory response was due to limiting ER? protein levels due to proteasome degradation since proteaome inhibitors alone blocke hormone-dependent responses. TCDD also inhibited the cAMP/PKA pathway by inhibiting adenyl cyclase activity. In Drosophila SL-2 cells cotransfected with the GC-rich -169 to -54 region, ER? and Sp1 plasmids E2 induced transactivation in cells cotransfected with AhR/Arnt expression plasmids suggesting that the AhR complex suppressed ER?/Sp1 action. These results demonstrate that TCDD inhibits E2-dependent activation of both non-genomic and genomic pathways of ER-mediated E2F-1 gene expression. 17?-Estradiol induces E2F-1 gene expression in ZR-75 and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Analysis of the E2F-1 gene promoter in MCF-7 cells previously showed that hormone-induced transactivation required interactions between estrogen receptor ? (ER?)/Sp1 bound to upstream GC-rich sites and NFYA bound to downstream CCAAT sites within the -169 to -54 promoter region. This promoter region was also E2-responsive in ER?-positive ZR-75 cells; however, further analysis of the promoter showed that cooperative ER?/Sp1/NFY interactions were not necessary for hormone-induced transactivation in ZR-75 cells. The upstream GC-rich motifs are activated independently by ER?/Sp1 in ZR-75 but not MCF-7 cells, and the downstream CCAAT sites were also E2-responsive. E2 also induced reporter gene activity in ZR-75 cells transfected with an expression plasmid containing the yeast GAL4 DNA binding domain fused to pM-NFYA and a construct containing five tandem GAL4 response elements. Subsequent studies showed that hormonal activation of pE2F-1jm1 and pM-NFYA are dependent on non-genomic pathways in which E2 activates cAMP/protein kinase A. Hormone-dependent regulation of E2F-1 gene expression in ZR-75 and MCF-7 involves different mechanisms, demonstrating the importance of cell context on transactivation pathways, even among ER-positive breast cancer cell

Ngwenya, Sharon Khethiwe

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

SATB1 packages densely-looped, transciptionally-active chromatinfor coordinated expression of cytokine genes  

SciTech Connect

SATB1 is an important regulator of nuclear architecture that anchors specialized DNA sequences onto its cage-like network and recruits chromatin remodeling/modifying factors to control gene transcription. We studied the role of SATB1 in regulating the coordinated expression of Il5, Il4, and Il13 from the 200kb cytokine gene cluster region of mouse chromosome 11 during T-helper 2 (Th2)-cell activation. We show that upon cell activation, SATB1 is rapidly induced to form a unique transcriptionally-active chromatin structure that includes the cytokine gene region. Chromatin is folded into numerous small loops all anchored by SATB1, is histone H3 acetylated at lysine 9/14, and associated with Th2-specific factors, GATA3, STAT6, c-Maf, the chromatin-remodeling enzyme Brg-1, and RNA polymerase II across the 200kb region. Before activation, the chromatin displays some of these features, such as association with GATA3 and STAT6, but these were insufficient for cytokine gene expression. Using RNA interference (RNAi), we show that upon cell activation, SATB1 is not only required for chromatin folding into dense loops, but also for c-Maf induction and subsequently for Il4, Il5, and Il13 transcription. Our results show that SATB1 is an important determinant for chromatin architecture that constitutes a novel higher-order, transcriptionally-active chromatin structure upon Th2-cell activation.

Cai, Shutao; Lee, Charles C.; Kohwi-Shigematsu, Terumi

2006-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

436

A replication-deficient rabies virus vaccine expressing Ebola virus glycoprotein is highly attenuated for neurovirulence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We are developing inactivated and live-attenuated rabies virus (RABV) vaccines expressing Ebola virus (EBOV) glycoprotein for use in humans and endangered wildlife, respectively. Here, we further characterize the pathogenesis of the live-attenuated RABV/EBOV vaccine candidates in mice in an effort to define their growth properties and potential for safety. RABV vaccines expressing GP (RV-GP) or a replication-deficient derivative with a deletion of the RABV G gene (RV{Delta}G-GP) are both avirulent after intracerebral inoculation of adult mice. Furthermore, RV{Delta}G-GP is completely avirulent upon intracerebral inoculation of suckling mice unlike parental RABV vaccine or RV-GP. Analysis of RV{Delta}G-GP in the brain by quantitative PCR, determination of virus titer, and immunohistochemistry indicated greatly restricted virus replication. In summary, our findings indicate that RV-GP retains the attenuation phenotype of the live-attenuated RABV vaccine, and RV{Delta}G-GP would appear to be an even safer alternative for use in wildlife or consideration for human use.

Papaneri, Amy B. [Emerging Viral Pathogens Section, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Fort Detrick, MD 21702 (United States)] [Emerging Viral Pathogens Section, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Fort Detrick, MD 21702 (United States); Wirblich, Christoph [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States)] [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Cann, Jennifer A.; Cooper, Kurt [Integrated Research Facility, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Fort Detrick MD, 21702 (United States)] [Integrated Research Facility, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Fort Detrick MD, 21702 (United States); Jahrling, Peter B. [Emerging Viral Pathogens Section, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Fort Detrick, MD 21702 (United States) [Emerging Viral Pathogens Section, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Fort Detrick, MD 21702 (United States); Integrated Research Facility, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Fort Detrick MD, 21702 (United States); Schnell, Matthias J., E-mail: matthias.schnell@jefferson.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Jefferson Vaccine Center, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Blaney, Joseph E., E-mail: jblaney@niaid.nih.gov [Emerging Viral Pathogens Section, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Fort Detrick, MD 21702 (United States)

2012-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

437

Targeted Expression of Stromelysin-1 in Mammary Gland Provides Evidence for a Role of Proteinases in Branching Morphogenesis and the Requirement for an Intact Basement Membrane for Tissue-specific Gene Expression  

SciTech Connect

The extracellular matrix (ECM) is an important regulator of the differentiated phenotype of mammary epithelial cells in culture. Despite the fact that ECM-degrading enzymes have been implicated in morphogenesis and tissue remodeling, there is little evidence for a direct role for such regulation in vivo. We generated transgenic mice that express autoactivated isoforms of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1, under the control of the whey acidic protein gene promoter, to examine the effect of inappropriate expression of this enzyme. Stromelysin-1 is implicated as the primary player in the loss of basement membrane and loss of function in the mammary gland during involution. The transgene was expressed at low levels in mammary glands of virgin female mice, leading to an unexpected phenotype: The primary ducts had supernumerary branches and showed precocious development of alveoli that expressed beta-casein at levels similar to that of an early- to mid-pregnant gland. Lactating glands showed high levels of transgene expression, with accumulation at the basement membrane, and a decrease in laminin and collagen IV, resulting in a loss of basement membrane integrity; this was accompanied by a dramatic alteration of alveolar morphology, with decreased size and shrunken lumina containing little beta-casein. During pregnancy, expression of endogenous whey acidic protein and beta-casein was reduced in transgenic glands, confirming the observed dependence of milk protein transcription of ECM in mammary epithelial cells in culture. These data provide direct evidence that stromelysin-1 activity can be morphogenic for mammary epithelial cells, inducing hyperproliferation and differentiation in virgin animals, and that its lytic activity can, indeed, disrupt membrane integrity and reduce mammary-specific function. We conclude that the balance of ECM-degrading enzymes with their inhibitors, and the associated regulation of ECM structure, is crucial for tissue-specific gene expression and morphogenesis in vivo.

Sympson, Carolyn J; Talhouk, Rabih S; Alexander, Caroline M; Chin, Jennie R; Cliff, Shirley M; Bissell, Mina J; Werb, Zena

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Prognostic Significance of Human Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonuclease (APE/Ref-1) Expression in Rectal Cancer Treated With Preoperative Radiochemotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Human apurinic endonuclease/redox factor 1 (APE/Ref-1) mediates repair of radiation-induced DNA lesions and regulates transcription via redox-based activation. We investigated the predictive and prognostic significance of APE/Ref-1 expression in pretreatment biopsy specimens in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) (cT3-T4 or N+). Methods and Materials: APE/Ref-1 expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in pretreatment biopsy specimens obtained from 83 patients with LARC. Patients received preoperative radiotherapy of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions, combined with oral capecitabine and leucovorin chemotherapy, followed by curative surgery. The prognostic significance of various clinicopathologic characteristics, including APE/Ref-1 protein expression, was evaluated. Results: APE/Ref-1 was expressed in 97% of patient samples. Exclusive APE/Ref-1 nuclear staining was observed in 49 of 83 samples (59%), and mixed nuclear and cytoplasmic staining was observed in 31 samples (37%). APE/Ref-1 nuclear expression levels were low in 49 patients (59%) and high in 34 patients (41%). The level of APE/Ref-1 nuclear expression was not a prognostic factor for overall and disease-free survival. Cytoplasmic expression of APE/Ref-1 was a borderline-significant predictive factor for pathologic tumor response (p = 0.08) and a significant prognostic factor for disease-free survival, as shown by univariate analysis (p = 0.037). Multivariate analysis confirmed that cytoplasmic localization of APE/Ref-1 is a significant predictor of disease-free survival (hazard ratio, 0.45; p = 0.046). Conclusions: APE/Ref-1 was expressed in a majority of pretreatment biopsy specimens from patients with LARC. The level of APE/Ref-1 nuclear expression was not a significant predictive and prognostic factor; however, cytoplasmic localization of the protein was negatively associated with disease-free survival. These results indicate that cytoplasmic expression of APE/Ref-1 represents an adverse prognostic factor for LARC patients who receive preoperative radiochemotherapy.

Kim, Jun-Sang, E-mail: k423j@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Radiation Oncology, College of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cancer Research Institute, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin-Man [Cancer Research Institute, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Liang, Zhe Long [Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Ji Young [Department of Radiation Oncology, College of Medicine, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sup; Huh, Gil Ja; Kim, Ki-Hwan [Department of Radiation Oncology, College of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Moon-June [Department of Radiation Oncology, College of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cancer Research Institute, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

www.mdpi.com/journal/ijms Characterization of Rice NADPH Oxidase Genes and Their Expression under Various Environmental Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Plasma membrane NADPH oxidases (Noxs) are key producers of reactive oxygen species under both normal and stress conditions in plants. We demonstrate that at least eleven genes in the genome of rice (Oryza sativa L.) were predicted to encode Nox proteins, including nine genes (OsNox1–9) that encode typical Noxs and two that encode ancient Nox forms (ferric reduction oxidase 1 and 7, OsFRO1 and OsFRO7). Phylogenetic analysis divided the Noxs from nine plant species into six subfamilies, with rice Nox genes distributed among subfamilies I to V. Gene expression analysis using semi-quantitative RT-PCR and real-time qRT-PCR indicated that the expression of rice Nox genes depends on organs and environmental conditions. Exogenous calcium strongly stimulated the expression of OsNox3, OsNox5, OsNox7, and OsNox8, but depressed the expression of OsFRO1. Drought stress substantially upregulated the expression of OsNox1–3, OsNox5, OsNox9, and OsFRO1, but downregulated OsNox6. High temperature upregulated OsNox5–9, but significantly downregulated OsNox1–3 and OsFRO1. NaCl treatment increased the expression of OsNox2, OsNox8, OsFRO1, and OsFRO7, but decreased that of OsNox1, OsNox3, OsNox5, and OsNox6. These results suggest that the expression profilesInt. J. Mol. Sci. 2013, 14 9441

Gang-feng Wang; Wen-qiang Li; Wen-yan Li; Guo-li Wu; Cong-yi Zhou; Kun-ming Chen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Examination of dioxin and its alteration of gene expression via DNA Microarray Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Endocrine disruptive chemicals are known to produce harmful developmental effects on humans and other animals. Since substantial quantities of these chemicals are concentrated in the fat reserves of their victims, it is reasonable to expect a correlation between chemical concentration and physical effect before and to research further into the actuality of the EDCs effects. Some health hazards that are suspected to result from chemical exposure in humans are cleft lip and palate problems, feminization of male offspring, extreme premature puberty in female offspring, neural tube defects, autism, ototoxity, fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), fetal tobacco syndrome (FTS), Type II diabetes also known as Non Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (NIDDM), and ADD/ADHD. Little evidence has been available to demonstrate how dioxin specifically alters gene expression, both in developing embryos and adults. Recently, Texas A&M University has acquired several DNA Microarray Systems, which are revolutionizing the examination of research into gene expression alterations. A new cell line of human embryonic kidney cells (293T/17 epithelial) have been properly cultured, had the RNA successfully isolated, and patterns were interpreted for genetic change using DNA Microarray Analysis. Through a cDNA slide specifically spotted with DNA of approximately 1200 endocrine regulated genes, the RNA of these cells can be examined using the DNA Microarray System after being exposed to different concentrations of dioxin, estradiol, DMSO, combinations of chemicals, and finally a control line of unexposed cells. Specific altered genes of the human embryo are predicted to be represented as changed in the RNA of cells previously exposed to dioxin. A nearly undetectable amount of dioxin (10?? M), was introduced to these cells, and produced significant variation from the natural gene expression. These data suggest that major advances in the prevention of physical pain and deformities in both developmental and everyday lives of both humans and animals could be attained by reducing exposure to environmental chemicals. The genes that are altered by the effects of TCDD promise further research, investigation, and prevention of many disruptive diseases.

Wright, Justin Charles

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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441

Expression and Evaluation of Recombinant Babesia bovis Antigens of Vaccine Potential Against Tick Fever in Cattle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Babesia bovis is a causative agent of bovine babesiosis and is transmitted by vector ticks, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) spp. The disease has a high mortality rate in susceptible cattle, causing serious economic loss. At present, the only commercial vaccine is culture-based with limited availability. No effective molecular vaccine has been developed to date. Generating a vaccine with specific critical epitopes responsible for protection against B. bovis is critically important. Immunity against B. bovis requires both innate and adaptive responses, with antigen-specific CD4+ T cells essential to the latter through production of IFN-?. Fourteen B. bovis proteins were selected as putative vaccine candidates and their full-length genes cloned for recombinant protein production intended for evaluating peripheral blood mononuclear cell IFN-? secretion level from experimentally infected animals in ELISPOT. All proteins expressed in insoluble form (inclusion bodies) and could not be purified. B. bovis genes were then truncated to exclude signal peptide and transmembrane regions, then cloned and expressed using pET101/D-TOPO in Escherichia coli to obtain soluble, useable proteins. Only recombinant B. bovis MSA1, MSA2b and MSA2a1 proteins were successfully expressed in soluble form. These proteins induce invasion-blocking antibodies in immunized cattle, are hypothesized to elicit protection in susceptible animals, but were previously studied by others. Due to failure to produce new candidates to assay, the animal experiments were not performed. Instead, sera from field-infected cattle were assayed for reactivity against the MSA proteins by indirect immunofluorescent antibody (IFA) and western blot (WB) analysis. Field sera from South Texas (#41) and the Mexican Yucatan (#6, #9 and #11) along with positive and negative controls were tested. In IFA test, cattle #6, #9 and #41 were positive while #11 was negative. In WB, #41 and #6 reacted with the recombinant MSA proteins and with control B. bovis whole parasite lysate. However, both #11 and #9 had no signal in WB, although the latter was positive in IFA. Several theories may explain this phenomenon, such as the different preparation process of the antigen in the two tests, strain differences between sera and test antigens, or the different design and nature of each test.

Lin, Huaiying 1986-

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Abscisic acid-dependent and -independent expression of the carrot LEA class gene Dc3 in transgenic tobacco seedlings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We studied the expression of three promoter deletion mutants (A218, A599, and A1312) of the Late Embryo Abundant (LEA) class gene Dc3 fused to the reporter gene, B-glucuronidase (GUS) in 14 d old transgenic tobacco seedlings. Seedlings were subjected to one of the following stresses: dehydration, hypoxia, salinity, exogenous ethylene, and exogenous methyl jasmonate (MeJa). GUS activity was quantified fluorometrically, and expression was observed by histochemical staining of the seedlings. An increase in GUS activity was observed in A599 and A1312 mutants in response to dehydration and salinity within 6 h of stress, and at 12 h in response to hypoxia. No increase in endogenous ABA was found in any of the three mutants even after 24 h of hypoxia. ABA-independent increase in GUS activity was observed when endogenous ABA biosynthesis was blocked by fluridone and plants were exposed to 5 [[ ]-' ethylene in air or 100 @M MeJa. No expression was observed in A218 mutant in response to dehydration, salinity, or MeJa. A mild response was observed in response to ethylene or hypoxia. This suggests that the region between-218 and-599 is absolutely necessary for ABA (dehydration and salinity) and MeJa-dependent expression whereas ethylene mediated expression does not require this region of the promoter. This study shows that Dc3, which is an ABA responsive gene, can also be induced by stress signals other than ABA.

Siddiqui, Najeeb Ullah

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Altered microRNA expression patterns in irradiated hematopoietic tissues suggest a sex-specific protective mechanism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To investigate involvement of miRNAs in radiation responses we used microRNAome profiling to analyze the sex-specific response of radiation sensitive hematopoietic lymphoid tissues. We show that radiation exposure resulted in a significant and sex-specific deregulation of microRNA expression in murine spleen and thymus tissues. Among the regulated miRNAs, we found that changes in expression of miR-34a and miR-7 may be involved in important protective mechanisms counteracting radiation cytotoxicity. We observed a significant increase in the expression of tumor-suppressor miR-34a, paralleled by a decrease in the expression of its target oncogenes NOTCH1, MYC, E2F3 and cyclin D1. Additionally, we show that miR-7 targets the lymphoid-specific helicase LSH, a pivotal regulator of DNA methylation and genome stability. While miR-7 was significantly down-regulated LSH was significantly up-regulated. These cellular changes may constitute an attempt to counteract radiation-induced hypomethylation. Tissue specificity of miRNA responses and possible regulation of miRNA expression upon irradiation are discussed.

Ilnytskyy, Yaroslav; Zemp, Franz J.; Koturbash, Igor [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Lethbridge, 4401 University Drive, Lethbridge, Alta., T1K 3M4 (Canada); Kovalchuk, Olga [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Lethbridge, 4401 University Drive, Lethbridge, Alta., T1K 3M4 (Canada)], E-mail: olga.kovalchuk@uleth.ca

2008-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

444

FADD Expression as a Prognosticator in Early-Stage Glottic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx Treated Primarily With Radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: We recently reported on the identification of the Fas-associated death domain (FADD) as a possible driver of the chromosome 11q13 amplicon and the association between increased FADD expression and disease-specific survival in advanced-stage laryngeal carcinoma. The aim of this study was to examine whether expression of FADD and its Ser194-phosphorylated isoform (pFADD) predicts local control in patients with early-stage glottic carcinoma primarily treated with radiotherapy only. Methods and Materials: Immunohistochemical staining for FADD and pFADD was performed on pretreatment biopsy specimens of 92 patients with T1-T2 glottic squamous cell carcinoma primarily treated with radiotherapy between 1996 and 2005. Cox regression analysis was used to correlate expression levels with local control. Results: High levels of pFADD were associated with significantly better local control (hazard ratio, 2.40; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-5.55; p = 0.040). FADD overexpression showed a trend toward better local control (hazard ratio, 3.656; 95% confidence interval, 0.853-15.663; p = 0.081). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that high pFADD expression was the best predictor of local control after radiotherapy. Conclusions: This study showed that expression of phosphorylated FADD is a new prognostic biomarker for better local control after radiotherapy in patients with early-stage glottic carcinomas.

Schrijvers, Michiel L. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Pathology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Pattje, Wouter J. [Department of Pathology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Slagter-Menkema, Lorian [Department of Otorhinolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Pathology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Mastik, Mirjam F.; Gibcus, Johan H. [Department of Pathology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Wal, Jacqueline E. van der [Department of Pathology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Laan, Bernard F.A.M. vn der [Department of Otorhinolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Schuuring, E., E-mail: e.schuuring@umcg.nl [Department of Pathology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

445

Post transcriptional regulation of chloroplast gene expression by nuclear encoded gene products. Progress report, June 1, 1990--June 30, 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many individual chloroplast genes require the products of a collection of nuclear genes for their successful expression. These nuclear gene products apparently work with great specificity, each committed to the expression of a single chloroplast gene. We have chosen as a model nuclear mutants of Chlamydomonas affected in different stages in the expression of the chloroplast encoded Photosystem II polypeptide, D2. We have made the progress in understanding how nuclear gene products affect the translation of the D2 encoding MRNA. Two nuclear genes are required for this process which have been mapped genetically. In contrast to other examples of nuclear control of translation in the chloroplast, these nuclear gene products appear to be required either for specific stages in translation elongation or for the post-translational stabilization of the nascent D2 protein. Pseudoreversion analysis has led us to a locus which may be directly involved in D2 expression. We have made considerable progress in pursuing the molecular basis of psbd MRNA stabilization. psbD 5` UTR specific transcripts have been synthesized in vitro and used in gel mobility shift assays. UV-crosslinking studies are underway to identify the transacting factors which bind to these sequences. The continued examination of these mutants will help us to understand how nuclear gene products work in this specific case of chloroplast gene expression, and will elucidate how two distinct genomes can interact generally.

Kuchka, M.R.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Endothelial Cell Migration and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression Are the Result of Loss of Breast Tissue Polarity  

SciTech Connect

Recruiting a new blood supply is a rate-limiting step in tumor progression. In a three-dimensional model of breast carcinogenesis, disorganized, proliferative transformed breast epithelial cells express significantly higher expression of angiogenic genes compared with their polarized, growth-arrested nonmalignant counterparts. Elevated vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion by malignant cells enhanced recruitment of endothelial cells (EC) in heterotypic cocultures. Significantly, phenotypic reversion of malignant cells via reexpression of HoxD10, which is lost in malignant progression, significantly attenuated VEGF expression in a hypoxia-inducible factor 1{alpha}-independent fashion and reduced EC migration. This was due primarily to restoring polarity: forced proliferation of polarized, nonmalignant cells did not induce VEGF expression and EC recruitment, whereas disrupting the architecture of growth-arrested, reverted cells did. These data show that disrupting cytostructure activates the angiogenic switch even in the absence of proliferation and/or hypoxia and restoring organization of malignant clusters reduces VEGF expression and EC activation to levels found in quiescent nonmalignant epithelium. These data confirm the importance of tissue architecture and polarity in malignant progression.

Chen, Amy; Cuevas, Ileana; Kenny, Paraic A; Miyake, Hiroshi; Mace, Kimberley; Ghajar, Cyrus; Boudreau, Aaron; Bissell, Mina; Boudreau, Nancy

2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

447

Gene Expression Analysis of Apoptosis and Oxidative Stress in Mouse Brain  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of Apoptosis and Oxidative Stress in Mouse Brain Analysis of Apoptosis and Oxidative Stress in Mouse Brain After Low-dose and Acute Radiation Exposure Daila Gridley Loma Linda University & Medical Center Abstract Purpose: 1) To examine the induction of oxidative stress and apoptosis-associated gene expression profiles in brain after whole-body irradiation with low-dose/low-dose-rate (LDR) photons and acute exposure to photons 2) to compare these radiation-induced effects with those produced by LDR and acute exposure to protons. Material and Methods: C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 2 Gy of photons or protons at 0.8 Gy/min and 0.9 Gy/min, respectively, both with and without pre-exposure to 0.01 Gy LDR γ-rays (57Co) at 0.03 cGy/h. Brain tissues were harvested and quick-frozen for analyses by quantitative RTPCR at 56

448

Federal Express CleanFleet Final Report Volume 8: Fleet Economics  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

8 8 F l e e t E c o n o m i c s FINAL REPORT December 1995 December 1995 December 1995 December 1995 December 1995 December 1995 December 1995 This information was prepared by Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus Operations, through sponsor- ship by various companies and associations, the South Coast Air Quality Management District (District), and the California Energy Commission (Commission). Battelle has endeavored to produce a high quality study consistent with its contract commitments. However, because of the research and/or experimental nature of this work, the District or Commission, Battelle, the sponsoring companies and associations, along with the employees, contractors, and subcontractors of each of them, make no warranties, expressed or implied, and they assume no legal liability for the information in this report.

449

Two poplar methyl salicylate esterases display comparable biochemical properties but divergent expression patterns  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Two Two poplar methyl salicylate esterases display comparable biochemical properties but divergent expression patterns Nan Zhao a , Ju Guan a , Farhad Forouhar b , Timothy J. Tschaplinski c , Zong-Ming Cheng a , Liang Tong b , Feng Chen a, * a Department of Plant Sciences, University of Tennessee, 252 Ellington Plant Science Bldg., 2431 Joe Johnson Drive, Knoxville, TN 37996, USA b Department of Biological Sciences, Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027, USA c Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 3 June 2008 Received in revised form 27 October 2008 Available online 10 January 2009 Keywords: Black cottonwood Populus trichocarpa Methyl esterase SABP2 Methyl salicylate Salicylic acid Gene family Molecular modeling a b s t r a c t Two genes encoding proteins

450

High density growth of T7 expression strains with auto-induction option  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A bacterial growth medium for promoting auto-induction of transcription of cloned DNA in cultures of bacterial cells grown batchwise is disclosed. The transcription is under the control of a lac repressor. Also disclosed is a bacterial growth medium for improving the production of a selenomethionine-containing protein or polypeptide in a bacterial cell, the protein or polypeptide being produced by recombinant DNA techniques from a lac or T7lac promoter, the bacterial cell encoding a vitamin B12-dependent homocysteine methylase. Finally, disclosed is a bacterial growth medium for suppressing auto-induction of expression in cultures of bacterial cells grown batchwise, said transcription being under the control of lac repressor.

Studier, F. William (Stony Brook, NY)

2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

451

An Approximate Analytic Expression for the Flux Density of Scintillation Light at the Photocathode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The flux density of light exiting scintillator crystals is an important factor affecting the performance of radiation detectors, and is of particular importance for position sensitive instruments. Recent work by T. Woldemichael developed an analytic expression for the shape of the light spot at the bottom of a single crystal [1]. However, the results are of limited utility because there is generally a light pipe and photomultiplier entrance window between the bottom of the crystal and the photocathode. In this study, we expand Woldemichael s theory to include materials each with different indices of refraction and compare the adjusted light spot shape theory to GEANT 4 simulations [2]. Additionally, light reflection losses from index of refraction changes were also taken into account. We found that the simulations closely agree with the adjusted theory.

Braverman, Joshua B [ORNL; Harrison, Mark J [ORNL; Ziock, Klaus-Peter [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Extent of differential allelic expression of candidate breast cancer genes is similar in blood and breast  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lymphocytes), polymorpho- nuclear cells and red blood cells, we compared the allelic expression ratios in cDNA extracted from total mononuclear cells from 59 healthy unrelated donors, with those obtained for pattern (cis- regulation in LD with tSNP or not... 0 20 00 40 00 60 00 BRCA1 Le ve l o f e xp re ss io n in L C L p=0.76 TT CT CC n=5 n=14 n=1 AA CA CC 70 0 80 0 90 0 10 00 BRCA2 Le ve l o f e xp re ss io n in b re as t p=0.58 n=36 n=39 n=11 AA AG GG 0 50 0 10 00 15 00 20 00 C1qA Le ve l o f e...

Maia, Ana-Teresa; Spiteri, Inmaculada; Lee, Alvin J X; O'Reilly, Martin; Jones, Linda; Caldas, Carlos; Ponder, Bruce A J

2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

453

Human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells differentiate into insulin, somatostatin, and glucagon expressing cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from mouse bone marrow were shown to adopt a pancreatic endocrine phenotype in vitro and to reverse diabetes in an animal model. MSC from human bone marrow and adipose tissue represent very similar cell populations with comparable phenotypes. Adipose tissue is abundant and easily accessible and could thus also harbor cells with the potential to differentiate in insulin producing cells. We isolated human adipose tissue-derived MSC from four healthy donors. During the proliferation period, the cells expressed the stem cell markers nestin, ABCG2, SCF, Thy-1 as well as the pancreatic endocrine transcription factor Isl-1. The cells were induced to differentiate into a pancreatic endocrine phenotype by defined culture conditions within 3 days. Using quantitative PCR a down-regulation of ABCG2 and up-regulation of pancreatic developmental transcription factors Isl-1, Ipf-1, and Ngn3 were observed together with induction of the islet hormones insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin.

Timper, Katharina [Department of Research, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Seboek, Dalma [Department of Research, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Eberhardt, Michael [Department of Research, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Linscheid, Philippe [Department of Research, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Christ-Crain, Mirjam [Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Keller, Ulrich [Department of Research, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Mueller, Beat [Department of Research, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Zulewski, Henryk [Department of Research, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland) and Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Clinical Nutrition, University Hospital, Basel (Switzerland)]. E-mail: henryk.zulewski@unibas.ch

2006-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

454

Federal Express CleanFleet Final Report Volume 4: Fuel Economy  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

4 4 F u e l E c o n o m y December 1995 This information was prepared by Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus Operations, through sponsorship by various companies and associations, the South Coast Air Quality Management District (District), and the California Energy Commission (Commission). Battelle has endeavored to produce a high quality study consistent with its contract commitments. However, because of the research and/or experimental nature of this work, the District or Commission, Battelle, the sponsoring companies and associations, along with the employees, contractors, and subcontractors of each of them, make no warranties, expressed or implied, and they assume no legal liability for the information in this report. The District or Commission has not approved or disapproved this report, nor has the District or

455

Effect of 1918 PB1-F2 expression on influenza A virus infection kinetics  

SciTech Connect

Relatively little is known about the viral factors contributing to the lethality of the 1918 pandemic, although its unparalleled virulence was likely due in part to the newly discovered PB1-F2 protein. This protein, while unnecessary for replication, increases apoptosis in monocytes, alters viral polymerase activity in vitro, and produces enhanced inflammation and increased secondary pneumonia in vivo. However, the effects the PB1-F2 protein have in vivo remain unclear. To address the mechanisms involved, we intranasally infected groups of mice with either influenza A virus PR8 or a genetically engineered virus that expresses the 1918 PB1-F2 protein on a PR8 background, PR8-PB1-F2(1918). Mice inoculated with PR8 had viral concentrations peaking at 72 hours, while those infected with PR8-PB1-F2(1918) reached peak concentrations earlier, 48 hours. Mice given PR8-PB1-F2(1918) also showed a faster decline in viral loads. We fit a mathematical model to these data to estimate parameter values and select the best model. This model supports a lower viral clearance rate and higher infected cell death rate with the PR8-PB1-F2(1918) virus, although the viral production rate may also be higher. We hypothesize that the higher PR8-PB1-F2(1918) viral titers early in an infection are due to both an increase in viral production with decreased viral clearance, and that the faster decline in the later stages of infection result from elevated cell death rates. We discuss the implications these mechanisms have during an infection with a virus expressing a virulent PBI-F2 on the possibility of a pandemic and on the importance of antiviral treatments.

Ribeiro, Ruy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Perelson, Alan S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Amber M [UNIV OF UTAH; Adler, Frederick R [UNIV OF UTAH; Mcauley, Julie L [ST. JUDES CHILDREN RESEARCH; Mccullers, Jonathan A [ST. JUDES CHILDREN RESEARCH

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Induction of murine CYP1A2 gene expression by acenaphthylene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acenaphthylene and related polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are industrial combustion by-products which are also found in cooked foods. Recent studies in this laboratory have shown that acenaphthylene induces Cypla2 gene expression in mice and this study further investigates this induction response. Studies with six genetically-inbred strains of mice have shown that the activity of acenaphthylene (300 mg/kg) as an inducer of CYPlA2-dependent methoxyresorufin 0-demethylase (MROD) was age-and strain-dependent. The results showed that DBA mice, compared to the C57BL/6, C3H, CBA, A/j and SJL strains were most responsive to induction after a single dose of acenaphthylene (300 mg/kg). Hepatic MROD activity in acenaphthylene-treated DBA mice was induced 22-and 4-fold in males and females respectively. In contrast, a <2 to 4-fold induction of ethoxyresorufin 0-deethylase (EROD) activity was observed in both sexes. The other inbred strains had higher basal rates of hepatic MROD activity than the DBA strain, (i.e. C3H, C57BL/6, CBA, A/j and SJL). Differences in induction of MROD activity by acenaphthylene among the strains was primarily due to allelic variation (responsive or non responsive) at the aryl hydrocarbon (Ah) locus. Current studies are focused on further characterizing the strain-specific effects of acenaphthylene and related compounds and the molecular regulation of hepatic CYPlA2 gene expression in male and female DBA mice and other rodent species.

Miggins, John Wesley

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Expression, purification and characterization of enoyl-ACP reductase II, FabK, from Porphyromonas gingivalis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rapid rise in bacterial drug resistance coupled with the low number of novel antimicrobial compounds in the discovery pipeline has led to a critical situation requiring the expedient discovery and characterization of new antimicrobial drug targets. Enzymes in the bacterial fatty acid synthesis pathway, FAS-II, are distinct from their mammalian counterparts, FAS-I, in terms of both structure and mechanism. As such, they represent attractive targets for the design of novel antimicrobial compounds. Enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase II, FabK, is a key, rate-limiting enzyme in the FAS-II pathway for several bacterial pathogens. The organism, Porphyromonas gingivalis, is a causative agent of chronic periodontitis that affects up to 25% of the US population and incurs a high national burden in terms of cost of treatment. P. gingivalis expresses FabK as the sole enoyl reductase enzyme in its FAS-II cycle, which makes this a particularly appealing target with potential for selective antimicrobial therapy. Herein we report the molecular cloning, expression, purification and characterization of the FabK enzyme from P. gingivalis, only the second organism from which this enzyme has been isolated. Characterization studies have shown that the enzyme is a flavoprotein, the reaction dependent upon FMN and NADPH and proceeding via a Ping-Pong Bi-Bi mechanism to reduce the enoyl substrate. A sensitive assay measuring the fluorescence decrease of NADPH as it is converted to NADP{sup +} during the reaction has been optimized for high-throughput screening. Finally, protein crystallization conditions have been identified which led to protein crystals that diffract x-rays to high resolution.

Hevener, Kirk E.; Mehboob, Shahila; Boci, Teuta; Truong, Kent; Santarsiero, Bernard D.; Johnson, Michael E. (UIC)

2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

458

Analysis of molecular expression patterns and integration with other knowledge bases using probabilistic Bayesian network models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

How can molecular expression experiments be interpreted with greater than ten to the fourth measurements per chip? How can one get the most quantitative information possible from the experimental data with good confidence? These are important questions whose solutions require an interdisciplinary combination of molecular and cellular biology, computer science, statistics, and complex systems analysis. The explosion of data from microarray techniques present the problem of interpreting the experiments. The availability of large-scale knowledge bases provide the opportunity to maximize the information extracted from these experiments. We have developed new methods of discovering biological function, metabolic pathways, and regulatory networks from these data and knowledge bases. These techniques are applicable to analyses for biomedical engineering, clinical, and fundamental cell and molecular biology studies. Our approach uses probabilistic, computational methods that give quantitative interpretations of data in a biological context. We have selected Bayesian statistical models with graphical network representations as a framework for our methods. As a first step, we use a nave Bayesian classifier to identify statistically significant patterns in gene expression data. We have developed methods which allow us to (a) characterize which genes or experiments distinguish each class from the others, (b) cross-index the resulting classes with other databases to assess biological meaning of the classes, and (c) display a gross overview of cellular dynamics. We have developed a number of visualization tools to convey the results. We report here our methods of classification and our first attempts at integrating the data and other knowledge bases together with new visualization tools. We demonstrate the utility of these methods and tools by analysis of a series of yeast cDNA microarray data and to a set of cancerous/normal sample data from colon cancer patients. We discuss extending our methods to inferring biological pathways and networks using more complex dynamic Bayesian networks.

Moler, Edward J.; Mian, I.S.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Exposure to diesel exhaust up-regulates iNOS expression in ApoE knockout mice  

SciTech Connect

Traffic related particulate matter air pollution is a risk factor for cardiovascular events; however, the biological mechanisms are unclear. We hypothesize that diesel exhaust (DE) inhalation induces up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), which is known to contribute to vascular dysfunction, progression of atherosclerosis and ultimately cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Methods: ApoE knockout mice (30-week) were exposed to DE (at 200 {mu}g/m{sup 3} of particulate matter) or filtered-air (control) for 7 weeks (6 h/day, 5 days/week). iNOS expression in the blood vessels and heart was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and western blotting analysis. To examine iNOS activity, thoracic aortae were mounted in a wire myograph, and vasoconstriction stimulated by phenylephrine (PE) was measured with and without the presence of the specific inhibitor for iNOS (1400 W). NF-{kappa}B (p65) activity was examined by ELISA. The mRNA expression of iNOS and NF-{kappa}B (p65) was determined by real-time PCR. Results: DE exposure significantly enhanced iNOS expression in the thoracic aorta (4-fold) and heart (1.5 fold). DE exposure significantly attenuated PE-stimulated vasoconstriction by {approx} 20%, which was partly reversed by 1400 W. The mRNA expression of iNOS and NF-{kappa}B was significantly augmented after DE exposure. NF-{kappa}B activity was enhanced 2-fold after DE inhalation, and the augmented NF-{kappa}B activity was positively correlated with iNOS expression (R{sup 2} = 0.5998). Conclusions: We show that exposure to DE increases iNOS expression and activity possibly via NF-{kappa}B-mediated pathway. We suspect that DE exposure-caused up-regulation of iNOS contributes to vascular dysfunction and atherogenesis, which could ultimately lead to urban air pollution-associated cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. - Highlights: > Exposed ApoE knockout mice (30-week) to diesel exhaust (DE) for 7 weeks. > Examine iNOS expression and activity in the blood vessels and heart. > DE exposure enhanced iNOS protein and mRNA expression in the aorta and heart. > iNOS activity was also increased after DE exposure. > This up-regulation of iNOS may contribute to vascular dysfunction and atherogenesis.

Bai Ni [Department of Anesthesiology, Pharmacology and Therapeutics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); James Hogg Research Centre, Providence Heart and Lung Institute, St. Paul's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Kido, Takashi [James Hogg Research Centre, Providence Heart and Lung Institute, St. Paul's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Kavanagh, Terrance J.; Kaufman, Joel D.; Rosenfeld, Michael E. [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Breemen, Cornelis van [Department of Anesthesiology, Pharmacology and Therapeutics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Eeden, Stephan F. van, E-mail: Stephan.vanEeden@hli.ubc.ca [James Hogg Research Centre, Providence Heart and Lung Institute, St. Paul's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Expression of Autoactivated Stromelysin-1 in Mammary Glands of Transgenic Mice Leads to a Reactive Stroma During Early Development  

SciTech Connect

Extracellular matrix and extracellular matrix-degrading matrix metalloproteinases play a key role in interactions between the epithelium and the mesenchyme during mammary gland development and disease. In patients with breast cancer, the mammary mesenchyme undergoes a stromal reaction, the etiology of which is unknown. We previously showed that targeting of an autoactivating mutant of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1 to mammary epithelia of transgenic mice resulted in reduced mammary function during pregnancy and development of preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions. Here we examine the cascade of alterations before breast tumor formation in the mammary gland stroma once the expression of the stromelysin-1 transgene commences. Beginning in postpubertal virgin animals, low levels of transgene expression in mammary epithelia led to increased expression of endogenous stromelysin-1 in stromal fibroblasts and up-regulation of other matrix metalloproteinases, without basement membrane disruption. These changes were accompanied by the progressive development of a compensatory reactive stroma, characterized by increased collagen content and vascularization in glands from virgin mice. This remodeling of the gland affected epithelial-mesenchymal communication as indicated by inappropriate expression of tenascin-C starting by day 6 of pregnancy. This, together with increased transgene expression, led to basement membrane disruption starting by day 15 of pregnancy. We propose that the highly reactive stroma provides a prelude to breast epithelial tumors observed in these animals. Epithelial development depends on an exquisite series of inductive and instructive interactions between the differentiating epithelium and the mesenchymal (stromal) compartment. The epithelium, which consists of luminal and myoepithelial cells, is separated from the stroma by a basement membrane (BM), which plays a central role in mammary gland homeostasis and gene expression. In vivo, stromal cells produce fibronectin, collagens, proteoglycans, and some components of the BM, as well as a number of proteinases that can effectively degrade BM constituents. Stromal and epithelial cells of the mammary gland interact to regulate BM synthesis and degradation and, thus, mammary function. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are extracellular matrix (ECM)-degrading enzymes involved in mammary gland morphogenesis and involution. During late pregnancy and lactation, when the gland becomes fully functional, the expression of MMPs is low however, during involution, when the gland loses function and is remodeled, synthesis of ECM-degrading proteinases increases dramatically.11 Disturbance of the balance between MMPs and MMP inhibitors leads to either unscheduled involution or prolonged lactation. Mammary glands of virgin mice expressing an autoactivating stromelysin-1 (SL-1) transgene display supernumerary branches and precocious alveolar development, accompanied by the synthesis of {beta}-casein at levels found normally only during early pregnancy. During late pregnancy, increased expression of the SL-1 transgene leads to a reduction in expression of pregnancy-specific genes. Later in life, some SL-1 transgenic mice develop hyperplastic, dysplastic, and ductal carcinoma in situ-like lesions, as well as malignant tumors. Little is known about the sequence of changes that occurs before formation of an overt reactive stroma in breast cancer. In the present study, we address the question of whether and how the stromal compartment is altered as a consequence of inappropriate SL-1 transgene expression in the epithelium.

Thomasset, N.; Lochter, A.; Sympson, C.J.; Lund, L.R.; Williams, D.R.; Behrendtsen, O.; Werb, Z.; Bissell, M.J.

1998-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Effects of nitrogen and phosphorus availability on the expression of the coccolith-vesicle V-ATPase (subunit c) of Pleurochrysis (Haptophyta)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to light, nitrate and availability of inorganic carbon. NewOF NITROGEN AND PHOSPHORUS AVAILABILITY ON THE EXPRESSION OFbe- tween nutrient availability, principally nitrogen and

Corstjens, PLAM; Gonzalez, Elma L

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Fuels Performance Technologies: Milestone FY06 9.1 -- Using IQT measurements, develop simplified kinetic expressions for ignition of fuels that could be used in HCCI engine models  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Discusses the development of a new fuel characterization, based on simplified kinetic expression, to quantify ignition quality for low-temperature combustion vehicle applications.

Taylor, J. D.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Lifelong voluntary exercise in the mouse prevents age-related alterations in gene expression in the heart  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the heart A. M. BRONIKOWSKI,1,7 P. A. CARTER,2 T. J. MORGAN,2 T. GARLAND, JR.,3 N. UNG,1 T. D. PUGH,4 R voluntary exercise in the mouse prevents age-related alterations in gene expression in the heart. Physiol changes that normally occur in the aging heart. Male mice (Mus domesticus) were sampled from the 16th

Bronikowski, Anne

464

Transposon-induced nuclear mutations that alter chloroplast gene expression. Annual report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to use mutant phenotypes as a guide to nuclear genes that determine the timing and localization of chloroplast development The immediate goals are to identify nuclear mutants with defects in chloroplast gene expression from maize lines harboring active Mu transposons; characterize their phenotypes to determine the precise defect in gene expression; clone several of the most interesting mutations by exploiting the transposon tag; and use the clones to further define the roles of these genes in modulating chloroplast gene expression. Three mutants were described earlier that had global defects in chloroplast gene expression. We have found that two of these mutations are allelic. Both alleles have global defects in chloroplast translation initiation, as revealed by the failure to assemble chloroplast mRNAs into polysomes. We have isolated and characterized three new mutants from Mu lines that have novel defects in chloroplast RNA metabolism. We are now ready to begin the task of cloning several of these genes, by using the Mu transposon tag.

Barkan, A.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

465

Generation of Dutch referring expressions using the D-TUNA corpus Marissa Hoek (m.d.hoek@student.utwente.nl)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generation of Dutch referring expressions using the D-TUNA corpus Marissa Hoek (m is done on the Dutch version of the TUNA-corpus, which contains annotated human-produced descriptions the lexical choice from the D-TUNA corpus, and used templates generated from the corpus which specified

Vellekoop, Michel

466

H2A.Z Acidic Patch Couples Chromatin Dynamics to Regulation of Gene Expression Programs during ESC Differentiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The histone H2A variant H2A.Z is essential for embryonic development and for proper control of developmental gene expression programs in embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Divergent regions of amino acid sequence of H2A.Z likely ...

Subramanian, Vidya

467

Increased Production of Fatty Acids and Triglycerides in Aspergillus oryzae by Enhancing Expressions of Fatty Acid Synthesis-Related Genes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microbial production of fats and oils is being developedas a means of converting biomass to biofuels. Here we investigate enhancing expression of enzymes involved in the production of fatty acids and triglycerides as a means to increase production of these compounds in Aspergillusoryzae. Examination of the A.oryzaegenome demonstrates that it contains twofatty acid synthases and several other genes that are predicted to be part of this biosynthetic pathway. We enhancedthe expressionof fatty acid synthesis-related genes by replacing their promoters with thepromoter fromthe constitutively highly expressedgene tef1. We demonstrate that by simply increasing the expression of the fatty acid synthasegenes we successfullyincreasedtheproduction of fatty acids and triglyceridesby more than two fold. Enhancement of expression of the fatty acid pathway genes ATP-citrate lyase and palmitoyl-ACP thioesteraseincreasedproductivity to a lesser extent.Increasing expression ofacetyl-CoA carboxylase caused no detectable change in fatty acid levels. Increases in message level for each gene were monitored usingquantitative real-time RT-PCR. Our data demonstrates that a simple increase in the abundance of fatty acid synthase genes can increase the detectable amount of fatty acids.

Tamano, Koichi; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Karagiosis, Sue A.; Culley, David E.; Deng, Shuang; Collett, James R.; Umemura, Myco; Koike, Hideaki; Baker, Scott E.; Machida, Masa

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Guidelines and recommended terms for expression of stable-isotope-ratio and gas-ratio measurement results, {  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, geology, oceanography, and paleo- climatology. The Commission on Isotopic Abundances and Atomic WeightsGuidelines and recommended terms for expression of stable- isotope-ratio and gas-ratio measurement results, { Tyler B. Coplen* U.S. Geological Survey, 431 National Center, Reston, VA 20192, USA To minimize

469

Epigenetic modifications and chromatin loop organization explain the different expression profiles of the Tbrg4, WAP and Ramp3 genes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Whey Acidic Protein (WAP) gene expression is specific to the mammary gland and regulated by lactogenic hormones to peak during lactation. It differs markedly from the more constitutive expression of the two flanking genes, Ramp3 and Tbrg4. Our results show that the tight regulation of WAP gene expression parallels variations in the chromatin structure and DNA methylation profile throughout the Ramp3-WAP-Tbrg4 locus. Three Matrix Attachment Regions (MAR) have been predicted in this locus. Two of them are located between regions exhibiting open and closed chromatin structures in the liver. The third, located around the transcription start site of the Tbrg4 gene, interacts with topoisomerase II in HC11 mouse mammary cells, and in these cells anchors the chromatin loop to the nuclear matrix. Furthermore, if lactogenic hormones are present in these cells, the chromatin loop surrounding the WAP gene is more tightly attached to the nuclear structure, as observed after a high salt treatment of the nuclei and the formation of nuclear halos. Taken together, our results point to a combination of several epigenetic events that may explain the differential expression pattern of the WAP locus in relation to tissue and developmental stages.

Mont