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1

Toshifumi Hotchi  

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Melissa M. Lunden, Anna G. Mirer, Michael Spears, and Douglas P. Sullivan. Natural Gas Variability in California: Environmental Impacts and Device Performance - Experimental...

2

Toshifumi Hotchi  

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photocatalytic oxidation (UVPCO) air cleaners In Indoor Air 2008. Copenhagen, Denmark: Indoor Air, Paper ID: 297, 2008. Download: Apte, Michael G., Norman Bourassa, David...

3

Publications  

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C., Alfred T. Hodgson, Toshifumi Hotchi, Katherine Y. Ming, Richard G. Sextro, Emily E. Wood, and Nancy J. Brown. "Sorption of organic gases in residential rooms." Atmospheric...

4

Publications  

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Filters 2004 Singer, Brett C., Alfred T. Hodgson, Toshifumi Hotchi, and J. J. Kim. "Passive measurement of nitrogen oxides to assess traffic-related pollutant exposure for the...

5

Publications  

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83 results: 83 results: BibTex RIS RTF XML Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year (Desc) ] Filters: Author is Alfred T. Hodgson [Clear All Filters] 2013 Maddalena, Randy L., Na Li, Alfred T. Hodgson, Francis J. Offermann, and Brett C. Singer. "Maximizing Information from Residential Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds." In Healthy Buildings 2012 - 10th International Conference. Brisbane, Australia, 2013. 2008 Hodgson, Alfred T., Hugo Destaillats, Toshifumi Hotchi, and William J. Fisk. Benefits and technological challenges in the implementation of TiO2-based ultraviolet photocatalytic oxidation (UVPCO) air cleaners In Indoor Air 2008. Copenhagen, Denmark: Indoor Air, Paper ID: 297, 2008. Maddalena, Randy L., Hugo Destaillats, Marion L. Russell, Alfred T. Hodgson, and Thomas E. McKone. "Indoor pollutants emitted by electronic

6

Keith O. Hodgson, 2002 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

2000's Keith O. Hodgson, 2002 Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Chemistry: For his contributions to the development of synchrotron X-rays to the investigation...

7

Publications  

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M. Logue, Toshifumi Hotchi, Brett C. Singer, and Max H. Sherman. Experiments to Evaluate and Implement Passive Tracer Gas Methods to Measure Ventilation Rates in Homes., 2012...

8

Publications  

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results: results: BibTex RIS RTF XML Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year (Desc) ] Filters: Author is Satish Kumar [Clear All Filters] 2006 Sathaye, Jayant A., Lynn K. Price, Satish Kumar, Stephane Rue de la du Can, Corina Warfield, and Srinivasan Padmanabhan. Conference Paper Partnerships for Clean Development and Climate: Business and Technology Cooperation Benefits., 2006. Sathaye, Jayant A., Stephane Rue de la du Can, Satish Kumar, Maithili Iyer, Christina Galitsky, Amol Phadke, Michael A. McNeil, Lynn K. Price, Ranjit Bharvirkar, and Srinivasan Padmanabhan. Implementing End-use Efficiency Improvements in India: Drawing from Experience in the US and Other Countries. USAID|INDIA, 2006. 2002 Apte, Michael G., Alfred T. Hodgson, Derek G. Shendell, Dennis L. DiBartolomeo, Toshifumi Hotchi, Satish Kumar, Seung-Min Lee, Shawna M.

9

Benefits and technological challenges in the implementation of TiO2-based  

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Benefits and technological challenges in the implementation of TiO2-based Benefits and technological challenges in the implementation of TiO2-based ultraviolet photocatalytic oxidation (UVPCO) air cleaners Title Benefits and technological challenges in the implementation of TiO2-based ultraviolet photocatalytic oxidation (UVPCO) air cleaners Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2008 Authors Hodgson, Alfred T., Hugo Destaillats, Toshifumi Hotchi, and William J. Fisk Conference Name Indoor Air 2008 Pagination 17-22 Date Published August 2008 Publisher Indoor Air, Paper ID: 297 Conference Location Copenhagen, Denmark Abstract Indoor air cleaners based on TiO2 photocatalytic oxidation of organic pollutants are a promising technology to improve or maintain indoor air quality while reducing ventilation energy costs. We evaluated the performance of a pilot scale UVPCO air cleaner under realistic conditions in single pass and recirculation modes

10

Publications  

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9 results: 9 results: BibTex RIS RTF XML Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year (Desc) ] Filters: Author is Emily E. Wood [Clear All Filters] 2007 Singer, Brett C., Alfred T. Hodgson, Toshifumi Hotchi, Katherine Y. Ming, Richard G. Sextro, Emily E. Wood, and Nancy J. Brown. "Sorption of organic gases in residential rooms." Atmospheric Environment 41 (2007): 3251-3265. 2006 Jayaraman, Buvaneswari, Elizabeth U. Finlayson, Michael D. Sohn, Tracy L. Thatcher, Phillip N. Price, Emily E. Wood, Richard G. Sextro, and Ashok J. Gadgil. "Tracer Gas Transport under Mixed Convection Conditions in an Experimental Atrium: Comparison Between Experiments and CFD Predictions." Atmospheric Environment 40 (2006): 5236-5250. 2005 Jayaraman, Buvaneswari, Elizabeth U. Finlayson, Emily E. Wood, Tracy L.

11

Publications  

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R., Tracy L. Thatcher, Richard G. Sextro, William W. Delp, Sheng-Chieh Chang, Emily E. Wood, Jean C. Deputy, Toshifumi Hotchi, M. R. Sippola, and Douglas P. Sullivan. Joint Urban...

12

Evaluation of a Combined Ultraviolet Photocatalytic Oxidation (UVPCO) /  

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Evaluation of a Combined Ultraviolet Photocatalytic Oxidation (UVPCO) / Evaluation of a Combined Ultraviolet Photocatalytic Oxidation (UVPCO) / Chemisorbent Air Cleaner for Indoor Air Applications Title Evaluation of a Combined Ultraviolet Photocatalytic Oxidation (UVPCO) / Chemisorbent Air Cleaner for Indoor Air Applications Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-62202 Year of Publication 2007 Authors Hodgson, Alfred T., Hugo Destaillats, Toshifumi Hotchi, and William J. Fisk Report Number LBNL-62202 Abstract We previously reported that gas-phase byproducts of incomplete oxidation were generated when a prototype ultraviolet photocatalytic oxidation (UVPCO) air cleaner was operated in the laboratory with indoor-relevant mixtures of VOCs at realistic concentrations. Under these conditions, there was net production of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, two important indoor air toxicants. Here, we further explore the issue of byproduct generation. Using the same UVPCO air cleaner, we conducted experiments to identify common VOCs that lead to the production of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde and to quantify their production rates. We sought to reduce the production of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde to acceptable levels by employing different chemisorbent scrubbers downstream of the UVPCO device. Additionally, we made preliminary measurements to estimate the capacity and expected lifetime of the chemisorbent media. For most experiments, the system was operated at 680 - 780 m3/h (400 - 460 cfm).

13

Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large  

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Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large Retail Building Title Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large Retail Building Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-59293 Year of Publication 2006 Authors Hotchi, Toshifumi, Alfred T. Hodgson, and William J. Fisk Keywords market sectors, technologies Abstract Mock Critical Peak Pricing (CPP) events were implemented in a Target retail store in the San Francisco Bay Area by shutting down some of the building's packaged rooftop air-handling units (RTUs). Measurements were made to determine how this load shedding strategy would affect the outdoor air ventilation rate and the concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the sales area. Ventilation rates prior to and during load shedding were measured by tracer gas decay on two days. Samples for individual VOCs, including formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, were collected from several RTUs in the morning prior to load shedding and in the late afternoon. Shutting down a portion (three of 11 and five of 12, or 27 and 42%) of the RTUs serving the sales area resulted in about a 30% reduction in ventilation, producing values of 0.50-0.65 air changes per hour. VOCs with the highest concentrations (>10 μg/m3) in the sales area included formaldehyde, 2-butoxyethanol, toluene and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane. Substantial differences in concentrations were observed among RTUs. Concentrations of most VOCs increased during a single mock CPP event, and the median increase was somewhat higher than the fractional decrease in the ventilation rate. There are few guidelines for evaluating indoor VOC concentrations. For formaldehyde, maximum concentrations measured in the store during the event were below guidelines intended to protect the general public from acute health risks.

14

Sorption of organic gases in residential rooms  

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residential rooms residential rooms Title Sorption of organic gases in residential rooms Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-59303 Year of Publication 2007 Authors Singer, Brett C., Alfred T. Hodgson, Toshifumi Hotchi, Katherine Y. Ming, Richard G. Sextro, Emily E. Wood, and Nancy J. Brown Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 41 Start Page Chapter Pagination 3251-3265 Keywords adsorption, hazardous air pollutants, nerve agents, sink effect, volatile organic compounds Abstract Experiments were conducted to characterize organic gas sorption in residential rooms studied ''as-is'' with furnishings and material surfaces unaltered and in a furnished chamber designed to simulate a residential room. Results are presented for 10 rooms (five bedrooms, two bathrooms, a home office, and two multi-function spaces) and the chamber. Exposed materials were characterized and areas quantified. A mixture of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was rapidly volatilized within each room as it was closed and sealed for a 5-h Adsorb phase; this was followed by 30-min Flush and 2-h closed-room Desorb phases. Included were alkane, aromatic, and oxygenated VOCs representing a range of ambient and indoor air pollutants. Three organophosphorus compounds served as surrogates for Sarin-like nerve agents. Measured gas-phase concentrations were fit to three variations of a mathematical model that considers sorption occurring at a surface sink and potentially a second, embedded sink. The 3-parameter sink-diffusion model provided acceptable fits for most compounds and the 4-parameter two-sink model provided acceptable fits for the others. Initial adsorption rates and sorptive partitioning increased with decreasing vapor pressure for the alkanes, aromatics and oxygenated VOCs. Best-fit sorption parameters obtained from experimental data from the chamber produced best-fit sorption parameters similar to those obtained from the residential rooms

15

Sorption of organic gases in a furnished room  

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a furnished room a furnished room Title Sorption of organic gases in a furnished room Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-53943 Year of Publication 2004 Authors Singer, Brett C., Kenneth L. Revzan, Toshifumi Hotchi, Alfred T. Hodgson, and Nancy J. Brown Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 38 Start Page Chapter Issue 16 Pagination 2483-2494 Abstract We present experimental data and semi-empirical models describing the sorption of organic gases in a simulated indoor residential environment. Two replicate experiments were conducted with 20 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in a 50-m3 room finished with painted wallboard, carpet and cushion, draperies and furnishings. The VOCs span a wide volatility range and include ten Hazardous Air Pollutants. VOCs were introduced to the static chamber as a pulse and their gas-phase concentrations were measured during a net adsorption period and a subsequent net desorption period. Three sorption models were fit to the measured concentrations for each compound to determine the simplest formulation needed to adequately describe the observed behavior. Sorption parameter values were determined by fitting the models to adsorption period data then checked by comparing measured and predicted behavior during desorption. The adequacy of each model was evaluated using a goodness of fit parameter calculated for each period. Results indicate that sorption usually does not greatly affect indoor concentrations of methyl-tert-butyl ether, 2-butanone, isoprene and benzene. In contrast, sorption appears to be a relevant indoor process for many of the VOCs studied, including C8-C10 aromatic hydrocarbons (HC), terpenes, and pyridine. These compounds sorbed at rates close to typical residential air change rates and exhibited substantial sorptive partitioning at equilibrium. Polycyclic aromatic HCs, aromatic alcohols, ethenylpyridine and nicotine initially adsorbed to surfaces at rates of 1.5 to >6 h-1 and partitioned 95 to >99% in the sorbed phase at equilibrium

16

Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large  

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Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large Retail Building Title Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large Retail Building Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2006 Authors Hotchi, Toshifumi, Alfred T. Hodgson, and William J. Fisk Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract Mock Critical Peak Pricing (CPP) events were implemented in a Target retail store in the San Francisco Bay Area by shutting down some of the building's packaged rooftop air-handling units (RTUs). Measurements were made to determine how this load shedding strategy would affect the outdoor air ventilation rate and the concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the sales area. Ventilation rates prior to and during load shedding were measured by tracer gas decay on two days. Samples for individual VOCs, including formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, were collected from several RTUs in the morning prior to load shedding and in the late afternoon. Shutting down a portion (three of 11 and five of 12, or 27 and 42%) of the RTUs serving the sales area resulted in about a 30% reduction in ventilation, producing values of 0.50-0.65 air changes per hour. VOCs with the highest concentrations (>10 μg/m3) in the sales area included formaldehyde, 2-butoxyethanol, toluene and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane. Substantial differences in concentrations were observed among RTUs. Concentrations of most VOCs increased during a single mock CPP event, and the median increase was somewhat higher than the fractional decrease in the ventilation rate. There are few guidelines for evaluating indoor VOC concentrations. For formaldehyde, maximum concentrations measured in the store during the event were below guidelines intended to protect the general public from acute health risks

17

Sorption of organic gases in residential bedrooms and bathrooms  

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Sorption of organic gases in residential bedrooms and bathrooms Sorption of organic gases in residential bedrooms and bathrooms Title Sorption of organic gases in residential bedrooms and bathrooms Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-56787 Year of Publication 2005 Authors Singer, Brett C., Alfred T. Hodgson, Toshifumi Hotchi, Katherine Y. Ming, Richard G. Sextro, Emily E. Wood, and Nancy J. Brown Conference Name Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate - Indoor Air 2005 Volume 2(9) Publisher Tsinghua University Press Conference Location Beijing, China Abstract Experiments were conducted to characterize organic gas sorption in residential bedrooms (n=4), bathrooms (n=2), and a furnished test chamber. Rooms were studied "as-is" with material surfaces and furnishings unaltered. Surface materials were characterized and areas quantified. Experiments included rapid volatilization of a volatile organic compound (VOC) mixture with the room closed and sealed for a 5-h Adsorb phase, followed by 30-min Flush and 2-h closed-room Desorb phases. The mixture included n-alkanes, aromatics, glycol ethers, 2-ethyl-1-hexanol, dichlorobenzene, and organophosphorus compounds. Measured gas-phase concentrations were fit to three variations of a mathematical model that considers sorption occurring at one surface sink and one potential embedded sink. The 2-parameter sink model tracked measurements for most compounds, but improved fits were obtained for some VOCs with a 3-parameter sink-diffusion or a 4-parameter two-sink model. Sorptive partitioning and initial adsorption rates increased with decreasing vapour pressure within each chemical class.

18

Simultaneous Energy Savings and IEQ Improvements in Relocatable Classrooms  

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Simultaneous Energy Savings and IEQ Improvements in Relocatable Classrooms Simultaneous Energy Savings and IEQ Improvements in Relocatable Classrooms Title Simultaneous Energy Savings and IEQ Improvements in Relocatable Classrooms Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-52690 Year of Publication 2003 Authors Apte, Michael G., Dennis L. DiBartolomeo, Toshifumi Hotchi, Alfred T. Hodgson, Seung-Min Lee, Shawna M. Liff, Leo I. Rainer, Derek G. Shendell, Douglas P. Sullivan, and William J. Fisk Pagination 13 Date Published 06/2003 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract Relocatable classrooms (RCs) are commonly used by school districts with changing demographics and enrollment sizes. We designed and constructed four energy-efficient RCs for this study to demonstrate technologies with the potential to simultaneously improve energy efficiency and indoor environmental quality (IEQ). Two were installed at each of two school districts, and energy use and IEQ parameters were monitored during occupancy. Two RCs (one per school) were finished with materials selected for reduced emissions of toxic and odorous volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Each had two HVAC systems, operated on alternate weeks, consisting of a standard heat-pump system and an indirect-direct evaporative cooling (IDEC) system with gas-fired hydronic heating. The IDEC system provides continuous outside air ventilation at "15 CFM (7.5 L s-1) person-1, efficient particle filtration while using significantly less energy for cooling. School year long measurements included: carbon dioxide (CO2), particles, VOCs, temperature, humidity, thermal comfort, noise, meteorology, and energy use. IEQ monitoring results indicate that important ventilation-relevant indoor CO2 and health-relevant VOC concentration reductions were achieved while average cooling and heating energy costs were simultaneously reduced by 50% and 30%, respectively.

19

Passive Tracer Gas Methods to Measure  

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Experiments to Evaluate and Implement Experiments to Evaluate and Implement Passive Tracer Gas Methods to Measure Ventilation Rates in Homes Melissa Lunden, David Faulkner, Elizabeth Heredia, Sebastian Cohn, Darryl Dickerhoff, Federico Noris, Jennifer Logue, Toshifumi Hotchi, Brett Singer and Max H. Sherman Environmental Energy Technologies Division October 2012 LBNL-5984E 2 Disclaimer: This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States

20

Final methodology for a field study of indoor environmental quality and  

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Final methodology for a field study of indoor environmental quality and Final methodology for a field study of indoor environmental quality and energy efficiency in new relocatable classrooms in Northern California Title Final methodology for a field study of indoor environmental quality and energy efficiency in new relocatable classrooms in Northern California Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-51101 Year of Publication 2002 Authors Shendell, Derek G., Dennis L. DiBartolomeo, William J. Fisk, Alfred T. Hodgson, Toshifumi Hotchi, Seung-Min Lee, Douglas P. Sullivan, Michael G. Apte, and Leo I. Rainer Abstract The prevalence of relocatable classrooms (RCs) at schools is rising due to federal and state initiatives to reduce K-3 class size, and limited capital resources. Concerns regarding inadequate ventilation and indoor air and environmental quality (IEQ) in RCs have been raised. Adequate ventilation is an important link between improved IEQ and energy efficiency for schools. Since students and teachers spend the majority of a 7-8 hour school day inside classrooms, indoor contaminant concentrations are assumed to drive personal school-day exposures. We conducted a demonstration project in new relocatable classrooms (RCs) during the 2001-02 school year to address these issues. Four new 24' x 40' (960 ft2) RCs were constructed and sited in pairs at an elementary school campus in each of two participant school districts (SD) in Northern California. Each RC was equipped with two heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, one per module. The two HVAC systems were a standard heat pump with intermittent 25-50% outdoor air ventilation and an energy-efficient advanced system, based on indirect-direct evaporative cooling with an integrated natural gas-fired hydronic heating loop and improved particle filtration, providing continuous 100% outdoor air ventilation at = 15 ft3 min-1 occupant-1. Alternate carpets, wall panels, and ceiling panels were installed in two classrooms - one in each pair - based on the results of a laboratory study of VOC emissions from standard and alternate materials. Numerous IEQ and outdoor air quality and meteorological parameters were measured either continuously over the school year or as integrated school day samples during the fall cooling and winter heating seasons. Details of the RC designs, the field monitoring methodology including handling, storage, transport and management of chemical samples and data, and analyses to be conducted are presented

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hodgson toshifumi hotchi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Chemical Emissions of Residential Materials and Products: Review of Available Information  

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Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Monitoring in Sixteen Relocatable Classrooms Michael G. Apte, Bourassa Norman, David Faulkner, Alfred T. Hodgson, Toshfumi Hotchi, Michael Spears, Douglas P. Sullivan, Duo Wang Environmental Energy Technologies Division Indoor Environment Department Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 4 April 2008 This research was sponsored by the California Energy Commission through the Public Interest Energy Research program as the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Classroom HVAC: Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy research project, CEC Contract Number 500-03-041. The study was

22

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Monitoring in Sixteen Relocatable Classrooms  

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03E 03E Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Monitoring in Sixteen Relocatable Classrooms Michael G. Apte, Bourassa Norman*, David Faulkner, Alfred T. Hodgson, Toshfumi Hotchi, Michael Spears, Douglas P. Sullivan, and Duo Wang 4 April 2008 Indoor Environment Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory *Now with the California Energy Commission PIER Program, Sacramento CA. This research was sponsored by the California Energy Commission through the Public Interest Energy Research program as the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Classroom HVAC: Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy research project, CEC Contract Number 500-03-041.

23

Publications  

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2 results: 2 results: BibTex RIS RTF XML Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year (Desc) ] Filters: Author is Marion L. Russell [Clear All Filters] 2013 Mullen, Nasim A., Marion L. Russell, Melissa M. Lunden, and Brett C. Singer. "Investigation of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde sampling rate and ozone interference for passive deployment of Waters Sep-Pak XPoSure samplers." Atmospheric Environment 80 (2013): 184-189. Noris, Federico, Gary Adamkiewicz, William W. Delp, Toshifumi Hotchi, Marion L. Russell, Brett C. Singer, Michael Spears, Kimberly Vermeer, and William J. Fisk. "Indoor environmental quality benefits of apartment energy retrofits." Building Environment 68 (2013): 170-178. Maddalena, Randy L., Amanda Parra, Marion L. Russell, and Wen-Yee Lee. Measurement of Passive Uptake Rates for Volatile Organic Compounds on

24

TY JOUR  

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Indoor environmental quality benefits of apartment energy retrofits Indoor environmental quality benefits of apartment energy retrofits JF Building Environment A1 Federico Noris A1 Gary Adamkiewicz A1 William W Delp A1 Toshifumi Hotchi A1 Marion L Russell A1 Brett C Singer A1 Michael Spears A1 Kimberly Vermeer A1 William J Fisk KW Apartments Energy Indoor environmental quality Retrofit Selection AB p span style color e2e2e font family Arial Unicode MS Arial Unicode Arial URW Gothic L Helvetica Tahoma sans serif font size px font style normal font variant normal font weight letter spacing normal line height px orphans auto text align justify text indent px text transform none white space normal widows auto word spacing px webkit text size adjust auto webkit text stroke width px background color ffffff display inline

25

Publications  

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6 results: 6 results: BibTex RIS RTF XML Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year (Desc) ] Filters: Author is Sheng-Chieh Chang [Clear All Filters] 2008 Galitsky, Christina, Sheng-Chieh Chang, Ernst Worrell, and Eric R. Masanet. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry.. LBNL, 2008. 2006 Galitsky, Christina, Sheng-Chieh Chang, Ernst Worrell, and Eric R. Masanet. Improving Energy Efficiency in Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Operations., 2006. 2004 Price, Phillip N., Sheng-Chieh Chang, and Michael D. Sohn. Characterizing buildings for airflow models: What should we measure?. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 2004. Black, Douglas R., Tracy L. Thatcher, Richard G. Sextro, William W. Delp, Sheng-Chieh Chang, Emily E. Wood, Jean C. Deputy, Toshifumi Hotchi, M. R.

26

Marion Russell  

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Marion L Russell Marion L Russell Marion Russell Indoor Environment Group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road MS 70-108B Berkeley CA 94720 Office Location: 70-0222 (510) 495-2915 MLRussell@lbl.gov This publications database is an ongoing project, and not all Division publications are represented here yet. Publications 2013 Noris, Federico, Gary Adamkiewicz, William W. Delp, Toshifumi Hotchi, Marion L. Russell, Brett C. Singer, Michael Spears, Kimberly Vermeer, and William J. Fisk. "Indoor environmental quality benefits of apartment energy retrofits." Building Environment 68 (2013): 170-178. Download: PDF (2.56 MB) Mullen, Nasim A., Marion L. Russell, Melissa M. Lunden, and Brett C. Singer. "Investigation of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde sampling rate and

27

Natural Gas Variability in California: Environmental Impacts and Device  

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Natural Gas Variability in California: Environmental Impacts and Device Natural Gas Variability in California: Environmental Impacts and Device Performance - Experimental Evaluation of Pollutant Emissions from Residential Appliances Title Natural Gas Variability in California: Environmental Impacts and Device Performance - Experimental Evaluation of Pollutant Emissions from Residential Appliances Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-2897E Year of Publication 2009 Authors Singer, Brett C., Michael G. Apte, Douglas R. Black, Toshifumi Hotchi, Donald Lucas, Melissa M. Lunden, Anna G. Mirer, Michael Spears, and Douglas P. Sullivan Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Keywords carbon monoxide, dioxide, energy performance of buildings group, formaldehyde, indoor air quality, indoor airflow and pollutant transport, indoor environment department, liquefied natural gas, nitrogen, nitrogen oxides, particle number, pollutant exposures, ultrafine particles

28

Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of Low-to-Moderate CO2  

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Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of Low-to-Moderate CO2 Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of Low-to-Moderate CO2 Concentrations on Human Decision-Making Performance Title Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of Low-to-Moderate CO2 Concentrations on Human Decision-Making Performance Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Refereed LBNL Report Number LBNL-6196E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Satish, Usha, Mark J. Mendell, Krishnamurthy Shekhar, Toshifumi Hotchi, Douglas P. Sullivan, Siegfried Streufert, and William J. Fisk Journal Environmental Health Perspectives Volume 120 Issue 12 Pagination 1671-1677 Date Published 09/20/2012 Keywords carbon dioxide, cognition, Decision Making, human performance, indoor environmental quality, ventilation Abstract Background - Associations of higher indoor carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations with impaired

29

Publications  

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62 results: 62 results: BibTex RIS RTF XML Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year (Desc) ] Filters: Author is Mark J. Mendell [Clear All Filters] 2013 Fisk, William J., Usha Satish, Mark J. Mendell, Toshifumi Hotchi, and Douglas P. Sullivan. "Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Higher Levels of CO2 May Diminish Decision Making Performance." ASHRAE Journal 55, no. 3 (2013): 84-85. Mendell, Mark J., Ekaterina Eliseeva, Morris G. Davies, Michael Spears, Agnes B. Lobscheid, William J. Fisk, and Michael G. Apte. "Association of Classroom Ventilation with Reduced Illness Absence: A Prospective Study in California Elementary Schools." Indoor Air (2013). Fisk, William J., Mark J. Mendell, Molly Davies, Ekaterina Eliseeva, David Faulkner, Tienzen Hong, and Douglas P. Sullivan. Demand Controlled

30

Publications  

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6 results: 6 results: BibTex RIS RTF XML Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year (Desc) ] Filters: Author is Donald Lucas [Clear All Filters] 2012 Holder, Amara L., Brietta J. Carter, Regine Goth-Goldstein, Donald Lucas, and Catherine P. Koshland. "Increased Cytotoxicity of Oxidized Flame Soot." Atmospheric Pollution Research 3, no. 1 (2012): 25-31. 2009 Keenan, Christina R., Regine Goth-Goldstein, Donald Lucas, and David L. Sedlak. "Oxidative Stress Induced by Zero-Valent Iron Nanoparticles and Fe(II) in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells." Environmental Science & Technology 43, no. 12 (2009): 4555-4560. Singer, Brett C., Michael G. Apte, Douglas R. Black, Toshifumi Hotchi, Donald Lucas, Melissa M. Lunden, Anna G. Mirer, Michael Spears, and Douglas P. Sullivan. Natural Gas Variability in California: Environmental Impacts

31

Michael Spears  

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Spears Spears Indoor Environment Group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road MS 90-3058 Berkeley CA 94720 Office Location: 90-3029J (510) 486-7044 MSpears@lbl.gov This publications database is an ongoing project, and not all Division publications are represented here yet. Publications 2013 Mendell, Mark J., Ekaterina Eliseeva, Morris G. Davies, Michael Spears, Agnes B. Lobscheid, William J. Fisk, and Michael G. Apte. "Association of Classroom Ventilation with Reduced Illness Absence: A Prospective Study in California Elementary Schools." Indoor Air (2013). Download: PDF (1.57 MB) Noris, Federico, Gary Adamkiewicz, William W. Delp, Toshifumi Hotchi, Marion L. Russell, Brett C. Singer, Michael Spears, Kimberly Vermeer, and William J. Fisk. "Indoor environmental quality benefits of apartment energy

32

Publications  

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9 results: 9 results: BibTex RIS RTF XML Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year (Desc) ] Filters: Author is Sippola, M.R. [Clear All Filters] 2005 Sippola, M. R., and William W. Nazaroff. "Particle Deposition in Ventilation Ducts: Connectors, Bends and Developing Flow." Aerosol Science and Technology 39 (2005): 139-150. 2004 Black, Douglas R., Tracy L. Thatcher, Richard G. Sextro, William W. Delp, Sheng-Chieh Chang, Emily E. Wood, Jean C. Deputy, Toshifumi Hotchi, M. R. Sippola, and Douglas P. Sullivan. Joint Urban 2003: Indoor Measurements Final Data Report. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 2004. 2003 Sippola, M. R., and William W. Nazaroff. "Experiments Measuring Particle Deposition from Fully Developed Turbulent Flow in Ventilation Ducts." Aerosol Science and Technology 38 (2003): 914-925.

33

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Monitoring in Sixteen Relocatable Classrooms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBNL-203E LBNL-203E Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Monitoring in Sixteen Relocatable Classrooms Appendix Michael G. Apte, Bourassa Norman*, David Faulkner, Alfred T. Hodgson, Toshfumi Hotchi, Michael Spears, Douglas P. Sullivan, and Duo Wang 4 April 2008 A-1 Tables Table A-1. Thermal Comfort Results - May 2005, September 2005, November 2005 Room 13 - 9/19/2005 AM/PM Time Period Operative T and RH Acceptable (% of time) Operative T and RH, and Air Velocity acceptable (% of time) Average Indoor Air T (°C) Average Indoor Air RH (%) AM AM1 66.7 0.0 21.3 67.1 PM PM1 40.0 0.0 24.9 46.8 Room 13 - 5/16/2005 AM AM1 0.0 0.0 21.1 0.4 PM PM1 0.0 0.0 20.8 55.5 Room 13 - 12/1/2005 AM AM1 0.0% 0.0% 17.8 38.5

34

Indoor environmental quality benefits of apartment energy retrofits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor environmental quality benefits of apartment energy retrofits Indoor environmental quality benefits of apartment energy retrofits Title Indoor environmental quality benefits of apartment energy retrofits Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-6373E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Noris, Federico, Gary Adamkiewicz, William W. Delp, Toshifumi Hotchi, Marion L. Russell, Brett C. Singer, Michael Spears, Kimberly Vermeer, and William J. Fisk Journal Building Environment Volume 68 Pagination 170-178 Date Published 10/2013 Keywords Apartments; Energy; Indoor environmental quality; Retrofit; Selection Abstract Sixteen apartments serving low-income populations in three buildings were retrofit with the goal of simultaneously reducing energy consumption and improving indoor environmental quality (IEQ). Retrofit measures varied among apartments and included, among others, envelope sealing, installation of continuous mechanical ventilation systems, upgrading bathroom fans and range hoods, attic insulation, replacement of heating and cooling systems, and adding wall-mounted particle air cleaners. IEQ parameters were measured, generally for two one-week periods before and after the retrofits. The measurements indicate an overall improvement in IEQ conditions after the retrofits. Comfort conditions, bathroom humidity, and concentrations of carbon dioxide, acetaldehyde, volatile organic compounds, and particles generally improved. Formaldehyde and nitrogen dioxide levels decreased in the building with the highest concentrations, were unchanged in a second building, and increased in a third building. IEQ parameters other than particles improved more in apartments with continuous mechanical ventilation systems installed. In general, but not consistently, larger percent increases in air exchange rates were associated with larger percent decreases in indoor levels of the pollutants that primarily come from indoor sources.

35

SSRL HEADLINES June 2005  

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SPEAR3 operation. http:www-ssrl.slac.stanford.eduspear3500ma 4. Director of the DOE Office of Science Addresses SLAC Staff (contact: Keith Hodgson, hodgson@ssrl.slac.stanford...

36

PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR ARTICLE This article was downloaded by: [Chow, T. Edwin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a ; Michael E. Hodgson b a Department of Earth and Resource Science, University of Michigan--Flint, Flint, MI*{ and MICHAEL E. HODGSON{ {Department of Earth and Resource Science, University of Michigan--Flint, Flint, MI

Chow, Tzeekiu Edwin

37

SPEAR3 | A Brighter Source at SSRL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reu ben Yotam Management Richard Boyce Dave Dungan Tom Elioff Bob Hettel Keith Hodgson Hanley Lee Management Support Jeff Chan Gary Howerton Stephanie Carlson Lisa Dunn Cathy...

38

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Emissions of TMPB-DIB (a plasticizer found in vinyl products) were found to be higher than values reported in comparable housing by Hodgson et al.,3.

39

Emission Factors For Formaldehyde - Home | Energy Analysis ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Emissions of TMPB-DIB (a plasticizer found in vinyl products) were found to be higher than values reported in comparable housing by Hodgson et al.,3.

40

December 2004 Pub  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 *Sequestration in the News *Recent Publications *Events and Announcements *Legislative Activity Sequestration in the News Scoop, "Hodgson: Climate Change and Business." Speaking at the 2004 Australia-New Zealand Conference and Trade Expo, Hon Pete Hodgson addressed the business opportunities associated with climate change. Said Hodgson, "Research plays a role, globally, in the quest for a bunch of holy grails, ranging from nuclear fusion, hydrogen storage to carbon sequestration, new biotechnologies for new biofuels, and the like. New Zealand, like many other countries is a participant in that quest. Business opportunities in these areas are prospective, rather than imminent, but if any of those holy grails

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41

SSRL HEADLINES Nov 2006  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light on BL12 and Other Operations Updates X-ray Diffraction and the Fight against Heart Disease LCLS Lehman Review Keith Hodgson Elected 2006 AAAS Fellow SLAC Security Gate...

42

ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geochemical Studies of an Oil Shale Deposit B. Branstetter,Elements During In Situ Oil Shale Retorting J. P. Fox, R. D.Elements During In Situ Oil Shale Retorting A. T. Hodgson

Cairns, E.L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

SSRL HEADLINES November 2007  

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5 November, 2007 5 November, 2007 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - Tuning the Properties of Iron-Sulfur Clusters in Proteins Science Highlight - A Step Toward Understanding High-Temperature Superconductors Call for User Publications, Awards, Invited Lectures JCSG Celebrates Its 500th Structure Planning Any International Shipments? Holiday Shutdown User Administration Update __________________________________________________________________________ 1. Science Highlight - Tuning the Properties of Iron-Sulfur Clusters in Proteins (contacts: B. Hedman, hedman@ssrl.slac.stanford; K.O. Hodgson, hodgson@slac.stanford.edu; E.I. Solomon, edward.solomon@stanford.edu) Proteins containing iron-sulfur clusters are ubiquitous in nature and

44

Kitchen Ventilation Should be High Performance (Not Optional)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kitchen Ventilation Kitchen Ventilation Should be High Performance (not Optional) Brett C. Singer Residential Building Systems & Indoor Environment Groups Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Building America Technical Update Denver, CO April 30, 2013 Acknowledgements PROGRAM SUPPORT *U.S. Department of Energy - Building America Program *U.S. Environmental Protection Agency - Indoor Environments Division *U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development - Office of Healthy Homes & Lead Hazard Control *California Energy Commission - Public Interest Energy Research Program TECHNICAL CONTRIBUTIONS *Woody Delp, Tosh Hotchi, Melissa Lunden, Nasim Mullen, Chris Stratton, Doug Sullivan, Iain Walker Kitchen Ventilation Simplified PROBLEM: * Cooking burners & cooking produce odors, moisture

45

Revised May 24, 2013 21st Conference on Postal and Delivery Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Method Thomas Bozzo, Kristen Capogrossi, Kelly Eakin, John Pickett, &Mithuna Srinivasan: Are Postal Price Elkela, Heikki Nikali, and Chris J. Paterson: Comparative Study ­ Digitalization of Consumer Invoices Chris Rowsell: The UK's New Regulatory Framework for Postal Services ­ One Year On Paul Hodgson, Helen

Lin, Xiaodong

46

GEOLOGY FORUM, August 2010 e215 REPLY: doi: 10.1130/G31237Y.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

unconfined sheets to slope valleys, and ultimately delta-slope in the Karoo Basin, South Africa. The overall, based on the work of Kane and Hodgson (2011) from the Fort Brown Formation of the Karoo Basin., Kavanagh, J.P., 2011. Depositional architecture and sequence stratigraphy of the Karoo basin floor to shelf

47

1:30 - 1:45  

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Imaging and Spectro-microscopy: the Present and the Future Imaging and Spectro-microscopy: the Present and the Future Tuesday (10/8/02) J. Miao - Chair 1:30 - 1:45 K. Hodgson, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory Welcome Remarks 1:45 - 2:15 J. Stöhr, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory Real Space Imaging by Means of X-Ray Photoemission Electron Microscopy 2:15 - 2:45 J. Kirz, State University of New York at Stony Brook STXM and diffraction-imaging - the view from the NSLS 2:45 - 3:15 C. Fadley, University of California, Davis & Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Holographic Imaging of Local Atomic Structure: Where Is It and Where Can It Go? 3:15 - 3: 30 Break K. Hodgson - Chair 3:30 - 4:00 I. Robinson, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Phasing of Three Dimensional Diffraction Patterns from Finite-Sized

48

SSRL HEADLINES Jan 2001  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SSRL Headlines Vol. 1, No. 7 January, 2001 SSRL Headlines Vol. 1, No. 7 January, 2001 Contents of This Issue: SLAC to Provide Short-Term User Lodging Space Stanford Faculty Senate Meeting and Field Trip to SLAC Evaluation of Crystallogaphy Collaboratory Software Development SSRL Proposal Review Panel Meets for the 50th Time LCLS Technical Advisory Committee Meeting User Research Administration 1. SLAC to Provide Short-Term User Lodging Space (contact: Keith Hodgson, hodgson@ssrl.slac.stanford.edu) On January 31, SLAC Director Jonathan Dorfan announced a new initiative to help accommodate the growing user community on site. A new building project is being directed toward providing a remedy for the lack of short-term lodging for users in the area. SLAC will be constructing a three-story user lodging building that will have 110 rooms and some common meeting areas.

49

X-ray Imaging Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Imaging and Spectro-microscopy: Imaging and Spectro-microscopy: the Present and the Future Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory October 8-9, 2002 Organizers: John Miao & Keith Hodgson A workshop on "X-ray Imaging and Spectro-microscopy: the Present and the Future" was held on October 8-9, 2002. This workshop, organized by John Miao (SSRL) and Keith Hodgson (SSRL) provided a forum to discuss the scientific applications of a variety of imaging and spectro-microscopic techniques, including photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM), angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), coherent diffraction imaging, x-ray microscopy, micro-tomography, holographic imaging, and x-ray micro-probe. Twelve invited speakers discussed the important scientific applications of these techniques, and also predicted the future scientific directions with the advance of instrumentation and x-ray sources. The workshop was well attended with over fifty registered attendees.

50

2006 Nature Publishing Group The finished DNA sequence of human  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Hodgson1 , Jennifer Hume1 , Andrew Jackson1 , Ziad Mohid Khan1 , Christie Kovar-Smith1 , Lora R. Lewis1 , David Steffen1 , Ruth C. Lovering3 , David A. Wheeler1 , Kim C. Worley1 , Yi Yuan1 , Zhengdong Zhang1 , Charles Q. Adams1 , M. Ali Ansari-Lari1 , Mulu Ayele1 , Mary J. Brown1 , Guan Chen1 , Zhijian Chen1

Cai, Long

51

Formadehyde in New Homes: Ventilation vs. Source Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

at at Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting March 1, 2012 Austin, Texas Formaldehyde in New Homes --- Ventilation vs. Source Control Brett C. Singer and Henry Willem Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Acknowledgments * Funding - U.S. Department of Energy - Building America Program - U.S. EPA - Indoor Environments Division - U.S. HUD - Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control - Cal. Energy Commission Public Interest Environmental Research * Technical Contributions - Fraunhofer - Ibacos - IEE-SF * LBNL Team - Sherman, Hotchi, Russell, Stratton, and Others Background 1  Formaldehyde is an irritant and a carcinogen  Odor threshold: about 800 ppb  Widely varying health standards  US HUD (8-h): 400 ppb

52

NREL: Awards and Honors - Smart, High-Performance Polyphenylenesulfide  

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Smart, High-Performance Polyphenylenesulfide (PPS) Coating System Smart, High-Performance Polyphenylenesulfide (PPS) Coating System Developers: Dr. Keith Gawlik, National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Dr. Toshifumi Sugama, Brookhaven National Laboratory; Edward Curran, Bob Curran & Sons Corporation; Edward Hallahan, Ticona Corporation. The PPS coating system is a giant step forward in the technology of coating carbon-steel surfaces for use in hostile, corrosive environments. It is a smart coating system that repairs itself. It has a high thermal conductivity. It protects surfaces from corrosion, oxidation, cracking, flaking, and fouling. And its use not only extends the life of carbon-steel tubing by 4 to 5 fold, but also cuts capital and maintenance costs for these tubes by as much as two orders of magnitude. The key to these characteristics lies in the PPS coatings' unique

53

SSRL HEADLINES May 2011  

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1 May, 2011 1 May, 2011 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: From the Director of SSRL: Thinking Big-Picture Science Highlight - Controlling for X-ray Radiation Damage in Measuring a Metalloenzyme Transition State Science Highlight - Hydrogen Storage Goes Nano Keith O. Hodgson Elected to the National Academy of Sciences User Jonathan Rivnay Receives Materials Research Society Graduate Student Award User Markus Guehr Receives DOE Early Career Research Award Workshop Announcement: XDL 2011 - Science at the Hard X-ray Diffraction Limit Upcoming SSRL Events: NUFO, SRXAS, Users' Conference User Administration Update In the News: Fungi, Light Source Development, PV Modules __________________________________________________________________________

54

SSRL HEADLINES May 2005  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 May, 2005 1 May, 2005 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - The Flip-side of MsbA Transporter Science Highlight - The First Known Native Cadmium Enzyme Found in Marine Phytoplankton X-rays Illuminate Ancient Archimedes Text Fallen Tree Interrupts User Operations for Several Days DOE Site Review of SLAC in Washington DC Keith Hodgson Named Deputy Director of SLAC DOE Review of LCLS Project and Proposed LUSI Project Director of OSTP Visits SLAC Axel Brunger Elected to the National Academy of Sciences Spring Meeting of the SLAC Scientific Policy Committee Machine Readable Passports Required for All Visa Waiver Program Travel as of June 26, 2005 __________________________________________________________________________

55

The use of electrochemical sensors for monitoring urban air quality in low-cost, high-density networks.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electrolyte reservoirs for increased long-term baseline stability, and larger integral batteries allowing operation for in excess of 3 months without intervention. In this case sensors were sealed with rubber O-rings on the bottom of the enclosure behind a... The use of electrochemical sensors for monitoring urban air quality in low-cost, high-density networks. M. I. Mead1*, O.A.M. Popoola1, G. B. Stewart1, P. Landshoff3, M. Calleja2, M. Hayes2, J. J. Baldovi1, T. F. Hodgson1, M. W. McLeod1, J. Dicks4...

Mead, M I; Popoola, O A M; Stewart, G B; Landshoff, P; Calleja, M; Hayes, M; Baldovi, J J; Hodgson, T F; McLeod, M W; Dicks, J; Lewis, A; Cohen, J; Baron, R; Saffell, J R; Jones, R L

56

BERAC Meeting Minutes November 27-28, 2001 | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Minutes November 27-28, 2001 Minutes November 27-28, 2001 Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) BERAC Home Meetings BERAC Minutes BERAC Minutes Archive Members Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (40KB) BER Committees of Visitors BER Home Meetings BERAC Meeting Minutes November 27-28, 2001 Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page MINUTES Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) Meeting Office of Biological and Environmental Research Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy DATE: November 27-28, 2001 LOCATION: American Geophysical Union, Washington, D.C. The meeting was announced in the Federal Register. PARTICIPANTS: Approximately 85 people were in attendance during the meeting. Fourteen BERAC members were present: Keith Hodgson S. James Adelstein

57

Award Laureates | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Award Laureates Award Laureates The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award Lawrence Award Home Nomination & Selection Guidelines Award Laureates 2000's 1990's 1980's 1970's 1960's Ceremony The Life of Ernest Orlando Lawrence Contact Information The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-9395 E: lawrence.award@science.doe.gov Award Laureates Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page 2000's Laureates 1990's Laureates 1980's Laureates 1970's Laureates 1960's Laureates 2002 C. Jeffrey Brinker Claire M. Fraser Bruce T. Goodwin Keith O. Hodgson Saul Perlmutter Benjamin D. Santer Paul J. Turinsky 2004 Nathaniel J. Fisch Bette Korber Claire E. Max Fred N. Mortensen Richard J. Saykally Ivan K. Schuller

58

Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

19 results: 19 results: BibTex RIS RTF XML Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year (Desc) ] Filters: Author is Leo I. Rainer [Clear All Filters] 2012 Bourassa, Norman, Leo I. Rainer, Evan Mills, and Joan Glickman. The Home Energy Scoring Tool: A Simplified Asset Rating for Single Family Homes In 2012 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings. Pacific Grove, CA, USA, 2012. 2005 Akbari, Hashem, Ronnen M. Levinson, and Leo I. Rainer. "Monitoring the energy-use effects of cool roofs on California commercial buildings." Energy and Buildings 37 (2005): 1007-1016. 2004 Apte, Michael G., Alfred T. Hodgson, Derek G. Shendell, Leo I. Rainer, and Marc A. Hoeschele. Designing Building Systems to Save Energy and Improve Indoor Environments: A Practical Demonstration In 2004 ACEEE Summer Study

59

Photon Science : SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photon Science Photon Science Directorate | Science Highlights | Publications | SLAC Faculty Affairs | Org Chart Photon Science Faculty Arthur I. Bienenstock * Britt Hedman Anders Nilsson Gordon E. Brown, Jr. Keith O. Hodgson Jens Nørskov Axel T. Brunger Norbert Holtkamp R. Paul Phizackerley * Herman Winick * Philip Bucksbaum Zhirong Huang Piero A. Pianetta Bob Byer Harold Y. Hwang Srinivas Raghu Bruce Clemens Kent Irwin David A. Reis Yi Cui Chi-Chang Kao Zhi-Xun Shen Thomas Devereaux Ingolf Lindau * Edward I. Solomon Sebastian Doniach Aaron Lindenberg Joachim Stöhr Kelly Gaffney Wendy Mao Soichi Wakatsuki John Galayda Todd J. Martinez William Weis (Chair) Jerry Hastings Nicholas Melosh Helmut Wiedemann * *Emeritus Visiting/Consulting Faculty Faculty Affairs Office Particle Physics and Astrophysics Faculty

60

Randy Maddalena  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Randy L. Maddalena Randy L. Maddalena Randy Maddalena Indoor Environment Group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road MS 70-0108B Berkeley CA 94720 Office Location: 70-0221A (510) 486-4924 RLMaddalena@lbl.gov This publications database is an ongoing project, and not all Division publications are represented here yet. Publications 2013 Maddalena, Randy L., Na Li, Alfred T. Hodgson, Francis J. Offermann, and Brett C. Singer. "Maximizing Information from Residential Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds." In Healthy Buildings 2012 - 10th International Conference. Brisbane, Australia, 2013. Download: PDF (1.37 MB) Maddalena, Randy L., Amanda Parra, Marion L. Russell, and Wen-Yee Lee. Measurement of Passive Uptake Rates for Volatile Organic Compounds on

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hodgson toshifumi hotchi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

HB2009 Instructions for Full paper  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Maximizing Information from Residential Maximizing Information from Residential Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds Randy Maddalena 1,* , Na Li 2 , Alfred Hodgson 2 , Francis Offermann 3 , Brett Singer 1 1 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environmental Energy Technologies Division Berkeley, California, U.S.A. 2 Berkeley Analytical Associates Richmond, California, U.S.A 3 Indoor Environmental Engineering San Francisco, California, U.S.A February 2013 Funding was provided by the U.S. Dept. of Energy Building Technologies Program, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy under DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231; by the U.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control through Interagency Agreement I-PHI-01070, by the U.S. Environmental

62

Linear Collider Collaboration Tech Notes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 03/12/99 2 03/12/99 PEP-II RF Cavity Revisited December 3, 1999 R. Rimmer, G. Koehler, D. Li, N. Hartmann, N. Folwell, J. Hodgson, B. McCandless Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Berkeley, CA, USA Stanford, CA, USA Abstract: This report describes the results of numerical simulations of the PEP-II RF cavity performed after the completion of the construction phase of the project and comparisons are made to previous calculations and measured results. These analyses were performed to evaluate new calculation techniques for the HOM distribution and RF surface heating that were not available at the time of the original design. These include the use of a high frequency electromagnetic element in ANSYS and the new Omega 3P code to study wall

63

The Environmental Chamber  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 The Environmental Chamber Al Hodgson and Richard Allen test methyl chloride exposures using the environmental chamber. On the second floor of an unremarkable building at LBL, researchers are using a room within a room to smoke out indoor air pollutants. The environmental chamber is a stainless-steel-lined room of 540 ft cubed (20 meters cubed) which can be operated in several ways to meet the needs of different research projects, including studies for which a very low background is required. Scientists of the Indoor Environment Program and their collaborators use the chamber as a controlled indoor environment to study the behavior of a variety of indoor pollutants ranging from cigarette smoke to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from new carpets. At the moment, four projects use the facility. Principal investigator Al

64

A New Type of pi-Molecular Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Structure, and Magnetism of a New Type of pi-Molecular Complex Structure, and Magnetism of a New Type of pi-Molecular Complex Containing Binuclear Copper(II) Complexes and Benzene: Bis[2,2-dimethyl-7-(phenylimino)-3,5, 7-octanetrionato]dicopper(II)-Benzene and Bis[2,2-dimethyl-7- ((4-nitrophenyl)imino)-3,5,7-octanetrionato]dicopper(II)-Bis(benzene) James F. Wishart, Christopher Ceccarelli, Richard L. Lintvedt, Jeremy M. Berg, David P. Foley, Tom Frey, James E. Hahn, Keith O. Hodgson and Robert Weis Inorg. Chem. 22, 1667-1671 (1983) Abstract: The title compounds have been crystallized and examined by X-ray diffraction techniques. The structure of Cu2(PAAan)2°C6H6 consists of stacks of alternating bis[2,2-dimethyl-7-(phenylimino)-3,5,7-octanetrionato]dicopper(II), Cu2(PAAan)2, and benzene molecules in an ADAD... pattern. Crystal data are

65

California Demonstration Energy Efficiency-Indoor Environmental Quality  

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California Demonstration Energy Efficiency-Indoor Environmental Quality California Demonstration Energy Efficiency-Indoor Environmental Quality Project: Predicted Relocatable Classroom Indoor Air Quality due to Low-Emitting Interior Materials and Enhanced Ventilation Title California Demonstration Energy Efficiency-Indoor Environmental Quality Project: Predicted Relocatable Classroom Indoor Air Quality due to Low-Emitting Interior Materials and Enhanced Ventilation Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2001 Authors Apte, Michael G., William J. Fisk, Alfred T. Hodgson, Marion L. Russell, and Derek G. Shendell Conference Name Proceedings of the 11th Annual Meeting of the International Society of Exposure Analysis, Charleston, SC Date Published November 4-8, 20 Publisher International Society for Exposure Analysis, Boston, MA

66

Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

34 results: 34 results: BibTex RIS RTF XML Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year (Desc) ] Filters: Author is Randy L. Maddalena [Clear All Filters] 2013 Maddalena, Randy L., Na Li, Alfred T. Hodgson, Francis J. Offermann, and Brett C. Singer. "Maximizing Information from Residential Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds." In Healthy Buildings 2012 - 10th International Conference. Brisbane, Australia, 2013. Maddalena, Randy L., Amanda Parra, Marion L. Russell, and Wen-Yee Lee. Measurement of Passive Uptake Rates for Volatile Organic Compounds on Commercial Thermal Desorption Tubes and the Effect of Ozone on Sampling. Berkeley: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 2013. Maddalena, Randy L., Melissa M. Lunden, Daniel Wilson, Cristina Ceballos, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, Jonathan L. Slack, and Larry L. Dale. Quantifying

67

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic Compounds in FEMA Temporary Housing Units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sixteen previously occupied temporary housing units (THUs) were studied to assess emissions of volatile organic compounds. The whole trailer emission factors wereevaluated for 36 VOCs including formaldehyde. Indoor sampling was carried out in the THUs located in Purvis staging yard in Mississippi, USA. Indoor temperature andrelative humidity (RH) were also measured in all the trailers during sampling. Indoor temperatures were varied (increased or decreased) in a selection of THUs using theheating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Indoor temperatures during sampling ranged from 14o C to 33o C, and relative humidity (RH) varied between 35percentand 74percent. Ventilation rates were increased in some trailers using bathroom fans and vents during some of the sampling events. Ventilation rates measured during some aselection of sampling events varied from 0.14 to 4.3 h-1. Steady state indoor formaldehyde concentrations ranged from 10 mu g-m-3 to 1000 mu g-m-3. The formaldehyde concentrations in the trailers were of toxicological significance. The effects of temperature, humidity and ventilation rates were also studied. A linearregression model was built using log of percentage relative humidity, inverse of temperature (in K-1), and inverse log ACH as continuous independent variables, trailermanufacturer as a categorical independent variable, and log of the chemical emission factors as the dependent variable. The coefficients of inverse temperature, log relativehumidity, log inverse ACH with log emission factor were found to be statistically significant for all the samples at the 95percent confidence level. The regression model wasfound to explain about 84percent of the variation in the dependent variable. Most VOC concentrations measured indoors in the Purvis THUs were mostly found to be belowvalues reported in earlier studies by Maddalena et al.,1,2 Hodgson et al.,3 and Hippelein4. Emissions of TMPB-DIB (a plasticizer found in vinyl products) were found to be higher than values reported in comparable housing by Hodgson et al.,3. Emissions of phenol were also found to be slightly higher than values reported in earlier studies1,2,3. This study can assist in retrospective formaldehyde exposure assessments of THUs where estimates of the occupants indoor formaldehyde exposures are needed.

Parthasarathy, Srinandini; Maddalena, Randy L.; Russell, Marion L.; Apte, Michael G.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Effect of outside air ventilation rate on VOC concentrations and emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effect of outside air ventilation rate on VOC concentrations and emissions Effect of outside air ventilation rate on VOC concentrations and emissions in a call center Title Effect of outside air ventilation rate on VOC concentrations and emissions in a call center Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2002 Authors Hodgson, Alfred T., David Faulkner, Douglas P. Sullivan, Dennis L. DiBartolomeo, Marion L. Russell, and William J. Fisk Conference Name Proceedings of the Indoor Air 2002 Conference, Monterey, CA Volume 2 Pagination 168-173 Publisher Indoor Air 2002, Santa Cruz, CA Abstract A study of the relationship between outside air ventilation rate and concentrations of VOCs generated indoors was conducted in a call center. Ventilation rates were manipulated in the building's four air handling units (AHUs). Concentrations of VOCs in the AHU returns were measured on 7 days during a 13- week period. Indoor minus outdoor concentrations and emission factors were calculated. The emission factor data was subjected to principal component analysis to identify groups of co-varying compounds based on source type. One vector represented emissions of solvents from cleaning products. Another vector identified occupant sources. Direct relationships between ventilation rate and concentrations were not observed for most of the abundant VOCs. This result emphasizes the importance of source control measures for limiting VOC concentrations in buildings

69

Color, the Visual Arts, and Representations of Otherness in the Victorian Novel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation investigates the cultural connections made between race and color in works of fiction from the Victorian and Edwardian era, particularly how authors who are also artists invent fantastically colored characters who are purple, blue, red, and yellow to rewrite (and sometimes reclaim) difference in their fiction. These strange and eccentric characters include the purple madwoman in Charlotte Bronts Jane Eyre (1847), the blue gentleman from Wilkie Collinss Poor Miss Finch (1872), the red peddler in Thomas Hardys The Return of the Native (1878), and the little yellow girls of Arthur Conan Doyles The Yellow Face (1893) and Frances Hodgson Burnetts The Secret Garden (1911). These fictional texts serve as a point of access into the cultural meanings of color in the nineteenth century and are situated at the intersection of Victorian discourses on the visual arts and race science. The second half of the nineteenth century constitutes a significant moment in the history of color: the rapid development of new color technologies helps to trigger the upheavals of the first avant-garde artistic movements and a reassessment of colorings prestige in the art academies. At the same time, race science appropriates color, using it as a criterion for classification in the establishment of global racial hierarchies. By imagining what it would be like to change ones skin color, these artist-authors employ the aesthetic realm of color to explore the nature of human difference and alterity. In doing so, some of them are able to successfully formulate their own challenges to nineteenth-century racial discourse.

Durgan, Jessica

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Indoor Secondary Pollutants from Household Product Emissions in the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor Secondary Pollutants from Household Product Emissions in the Indoor Secondary Pollutants from Household Product Emissions in the Presence of Ozone: A Bench-Scale Chamber Study Title Indoor Secondary Pollutants from Household Product Emissions in the Presence of Ozone: A Bench-Scale Chamber Study Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-58785 Year of Publication 2006 Authors Destaillats, Hugo, Melissa M. Lunden, Brett C. Singer, Beverly K. Coleman, Alfred T. Hodgson, Charles J. Weschler, and William W. Nazaroff Journal Environmental Science and Technology Volume 40 Start Page Chapter Pagination 4421-4428 Abstract Ozone-driven chemistry is a major source of indoor secondary pollutants of health concern. This study investigates secondary air pollutants formed from reactions between constituents of household products and ozone. Gas-phase product emissions were introduced along with ozone at constant rates into a 198-L Teflon-lined reaction chamber. Gas-phase concentrations of reactive terpenoids and oxidation products were measured. Formaldehyde was a predominant oxidation byproduct for the three studied products, with yields under most conditions of 20-30% with respect to ozone consumed. Acetaldehyde, acetone, glycolaldehyde, formic acid and acetic acid were each also detected for two or three of the products. Immediately upon mixing of reactants, a scanning mobility particle sizer detected particle nucleation events that were followed by a significant degree of ultrafine particle growth. The production of secondary gaseous pollutants and particles depended primarily on the ozone level and was influenced by other parameters such as the air-exchange rate. Hydroxyl radical concentrations in the range 0.04-200 × 105 molecules cm-3 were measured. OH concentrations were observed to vary strongly with residual ozone level in the chamber, which was in the range 1 - 25 ppb, as is consistent with expectations from a simplified kinetic model. In a separate test, we exposed the dry residue of two products to ozone in the chamber and observed the formation of gas-phase and particle-phase secondary oxidation products

71

Effect of Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound Concentrations in a Call Center Title Effect of Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound Concentrations in a Call Center Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2003 Authors Hodgson, Alfred T., David Faulkner, Douglas P. Sullivan, Dennis L. DiBartolomeo, Marion L. Russell, and William J. Fisk Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 37 Start Page Chapter Pagination 5517-5528 Abstract A study of the relationship between outside air ventilation rate and concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) generated indoors was conducted in a call center office building. The building, with two floors and a floor area of 4,600 m2, was located in the San Francisco Bay Area, CA. Ventilation rates were manipulated with the building's four air handling units (AHUs). VOC concentrations in the AHU returns were measured on seven days during a 13-week period. VOC emission factors were determined for individual zones on days when they were operating at near steady-state conditions. The emission factor data were subjected to principal component (PC) analysis to identify groups of co-varying compounds. Potential sources of the PC vectors were ascribed based on information from the literature supporting the associations. Two vectors with high loadings of compounds including formaldehyde, 2,2,4-trimethyl-1,3- pentanediol monoisobutyrate, decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (d5 siloxane), and isoprene likely identified occupant-related sources. One vector likely represented emissions from building materials. Another vector represented emissions of solvents from cleaning products. The relationships between indoor minus outdoor VOC concentrations and ventilation rate were qualitatively examined for eight VOCs. Of these, acetaldehyde and hexanal, which were likely associated with material sources, and d5 siloxane exhibited general trends of higher concentrations at lower ventilation rates. For other compounds, the operation of the building and variations in pollutant generation and removal rates apparently combined to obscure the inverse relationship between VOC concentrations and ventilation. This result emphasizes the importance of utilizing source control measures, in addition to adequate ventilation, to limit concentrations of VOCs of concern in office buildings

72

The Geysers Geothermal Field Update1990/2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this report, we have presented data in four sections: (1) THE GEYSERS HISTORICAL UPDATE 1990-2010 - A historical update of the primary developments at The Geysers between 1990 and 2010 which uses as its start point Section IIA of the Monograph - 'Historical Setting and History of Development' that included articles by James Koenig and Susan Hodgson. (2) THE GEYSERS COMPREHENSIVE REFERENCE LIST 1990-2010 - In this section we present a rather complete list of technical articles and technical related to The Geysers that were issued during the period 1990-2010. The list was compiled from many sources including, but not limited to scientific journals and conference proceedings. While the list was prepared with care and considerable assistance from many geothermal colleagues, it is very possible that some papers could have been missed and we apologize to their authors in advance. The list was subdivided according to the following topics: (1) Field characterization; (2) Drilling; (3) Field development and management; (4) Induced seismicity; (5) Enhanced Geothermal Systems; (6) Power production and related issues; (7) Environment-related issues; and (8) Other topics. (3) GRC 2010 ANNUAL MEETING GEYSERS PAPERS - Included in this section are the papers presented at the GRC 2010 Annual Meeting that relate to The Geysers. (4) ADDITIONAL GEYSERS PAPERS 1990-2010 - Eighteen additional technical papers were included in this publication in order to give a broad background to the development at The Geysers after 1990. The articles issued during the 1990-2010 period were selected by colleagues considered knowledgeable in their areas of expertise. We forwarded the list of references given in Section 2 to them asking to send us with their selections with a preference, because of limited time, to focus on those papers that would not require lengthy copyright approval. We then chose the articles presented in this section with the purpose of providing the broadest possible view across all technical fields, as related to The Geysers steam-dominated geothermal system. The Geysers has seen many fundamental changes between 1990-2010 and yet the geothermal resource seems still to be robust to the extent that, long after its anticipated life span, we are seeing new geothermal projects being developed on the north and west peripheries of the field. It is hoped that this report provides a focused data source particularly for those just starting their geothermal careers, as well as those who have been involved in the interesting and challenging field of geothermal energy for many years. Despite many hurdles The Geysers has continued to generate electrical power for 50 years and its sustainability has exceeded many early researchers expectations. It also seems probable that, with the new projects described above, generation will continue for many years to come. The success of The Geysers is due to the technical skills and the financial acumen of many people, not only over the period covered by this report (1990-2010), but since the first kilowatt of power was generated in 1960. This Special Report celebrates those 50 years of geothermal development at The Geysers and attempts to document the activities that have brought success to the project so that a permanent record can be maintained. It is strongly hoped and believed that a publication similar to this one will be necessary in another 20 years to document further activities in the field.

Brophy, P.; Lippmann, M.; Dobson, P.F.; Poux, B.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Synthesis, Characterization, to application of water soluble and easily removable cationic pressure sensitive adhesives  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In recent years, the world has expressed an increasing interest in the recycling of waste paper to supplement the use of virgin fiber as a way to protect the environment. Statistics show that major countries are increasing their use of recycled paper. For example, in 1991 to 1996, the U.S. increased its recovered paper utilization rate from 31% to 39%, Germany went from 50% to 60%, the UK went from 60% to 70%, France increased from 46% to 49%, and China went from 32% to 35% [1]. As recycled fiber levels and water system closures both increase, recycled product quality will need to improve in order for recycled products to compete with products made from virgin fiber [2]. The use of recycled fiber has introduced an increasing level of metal, plastic, and adhesive contamination into the papermaking process which has added to the complexity of the already overwhelming task of providing a uniform and clean recycle furnish. The most harmful of these contaminates is a mixture of adhesives and polymeric substances that are commonly known as stickies. Stickies, which enter the mill with the pulp furnish, are not easily removed from the repulper and become more difficult the further down the system they get. This can be detrimental to the final product quality. Stickies are hydrophobic, tacky, polymeric materials that are introduced into the papermaking system from a mixture of recycled fiber sources. Properties of stickies are very similar to the fibers used in papermaking, viz. size, density, hydrophobicity, and electrokinetic charge. This reduces the probability of their removal by conventional separation processes, such as screening and cleaning, which are based on such properties. Also, their physical and chemical structure allows for them to extrude through screens, attach to fibers, process equipment, wires and felts. Stickies can break down and then reagglomerate and appear at seemingly any place in the mill. When subjected to a number of factors including changes in pH, temperature, concentration, charge, and shear forces, stickies can deposit [3]. These deposits can lead to decreased runnability, productivity and expensive downtime. If the stickie remains in the stock, then machine breaks can be common. Finally, if the stickie is not removed or deposited, it will either leave in the final product causing converting and printing problems or recirculate within the mill. It has been estimated that stickies cost the paper industry between $600 and $700 million a year due to the cost of control methods and lost production attributed to stickies [3]. Also, of the seven recycling mills opened in the United States between 1994 and 1997, four have closed citing stickies as the main reason responsible for the closure [4]. Adhesives are widely used throughout the paper and paperboard industry and are subsequently found in the recycled pulp furnish. Hodgson stated that even the best stock preparation process can only remove 99% of the contaminants, of which the remaining 1% is usually adhesives of various types which are usually 10-150 microns in effective diameter [5]. The large particles are removed by mechanical means such as cleaners and screens, and the smaller, colloidal particles can be removed with washing. The stickies that pass through the cleaning and screening processes cause 95% of the problems associated with recycling [6]. The cleaners will remove most of the stickies that have a density varying from the pulp slurry ({approx}1.0 g/cm3) and will accept stickies with densities ranging from 0.95-1.05 g/cm3 [2]. The hydrophobicity of the material is also an important characteristic of the stickie [7]. The hydrophobicity causes the stickies to agglomerate with other hydrophobic materials such as other stickies, lignin, and even pitch. The tacky and viscous nature of stickies contributes to many product and process problems, negatively affecting the practicality of recycled fiber use. The source of stickies that evade conventional removal techniques are usually synthetic polymers, including acrylates, styrene butadiene rub

Institute of Paper Science Technology

2004-01-30T23:59:59.000Z