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  1. NY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    NY 17.8 Prepared by Oak Ridge Associated Universities Prepgred for Office of Operationaf Safety U.S. Department of Energy Ezrt /ur / POST REMEDIAL ACTION SURVEY PROPERTY OF MODERN LANDFILL, INC. FORMER LOOW SITE LEWISTON, NEW YORK J.D. BERGER R a d i o l o g l c a l S t t e A s s e s s r n e n t P r o g r a m M a n p o t a e r E d u c a t l o n , R e s e a r c h , a n d T r a l n i n g D l v i s l o n FINAL REPORT January 1982 POST REIEDIAT ACTION SURVBY PROPERTY OF }TODBRN I.AIIDPILL' INC.

  2. Sylvania Corporation, Hicksville, NY and Bayside, NY | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NY Sylvania Corporation, Hicksville, NY and Bayside, NY Sylvania Corporation, Hicksville, NY and Bayside, NY, July 8, 2004. sylvania_corporation.pdf PDF icon Sylvania Corporation, Hicksville, NY and Bayside, NY More Documents & Publications Sylvania Corporation, Hicksville, NY and Bayside NY Sylvania Corporation, Hicksville, NY and Bayside, NY - Addendum to July 8, 2004 Index2.doc

  3. Sylvania Corporation, Hicksville, NY and Bayside NY | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sylvania Corporation, Hicksville, NY and Bayside NY Sylvania Corporation, Hicksville, NY and Bayside NY Sylvania Corporation, Hicksville, NY and Bayside NY. Memorandum_to_reader.pdf Memorandum July 8, 2004. PDF icon Sylvania Corporation, Hicksville, NY and Bayside NY More Documents & Publications Sylvania Corporation, Hicksville, NY and Bayside, NY Sylvania Corporation, Hicksville, NY and Bayside, NY - Addendum to July 8, 2004 Index2.doc

  4. NY Green Bank

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    NY Green Bank 1359 Broadway, 19th Floor, New York, NY 10018 212.379.6257 | www.greenbank.ny.gov | info@nygreenbank.ny.gov Monday, October 6 th , 2014 Remarks by Nicholas Whitcombe, Managing Director, New York Green Bank Panel 1: Attracting and Maintaining Capital for Energy Transmission, Storage, and Distribution Quadrennial Energy Review Public Meeting in New York, NY: Energy Infrastructure Finance The conventional clean energy capital markets for large scale infrastructure are deep and robust.

  5. Sylvania Corporation, Hicksville, NY and Bayside, NY - Addendum to July

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8, 2004 | Department of Energy NY - Addendum to July 8, 2004 Sylvania Corporation, Hicksville, NY and Bayside, NY - Addendum to July 8, 2004 Sylvania Corporation, Hicksville, NY and Bayside, NY - Addendum to July 8, 2004, additional_sylvania.pdf memorandum Date: October 6, 2004 Reply to Attn of: Department of Energy Headquarters FOIA/Privacy Act Office PDF icon Sylvania Corporation, Hicksville, NY and Bayside, NY - Addendum to July 8, 2004 More Documents & Publications Index2.doc

  6. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Buffalo NY Site - NY 54

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Buffalo NY Site - NY 54 FUSRAP Considered Sites Buffalo, NY Alternate Name(s): Bliss & Laughlin Steel Company Niagara Cold Drawn Steel Corporation Ramco Steel Incorporated NY.54-1 NY.54-4 Location: 110 Hopkins Street, Buffalo, New York NY.54-1 Historical Operations: Machined and straightened uranium rods as subcontracted work from National Lead Company, an AEC contractor. NY.54-3 NY.54-4 LTSM012601 Eligibility Determination: Eligible NY.54-4 Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Surveys,

  7. NY-Sun Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NY-Sun loan program is part of broader NY-Sun Initiative program to accelerate the use of solar PV across the State. In addition to cash incentives, NY-Sun Initiative also provides State sponsored...

  8. Clifford Ho

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Clifford Ho - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear

  9. Renewable Heat NY

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NOTE: On August 2015, NYSERDA increased the incentive levels for technologies offered under the Renewable Heat NY program. In general, new incentives fund up to 45% of the total project cost, which...

  10. Category:Syracuse, NY | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    KB SVLargeOffice Syracuse NY Consolidated Edison Co-NY Inc.png SVLargeOffice Syracuse... 68 KB SVMediumOffice Syracuse NY Consolidated Edison Co-NY Inc.png SVMediumOffice...

  11. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- New York, NY, Site - NY 61

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    York, NY, Site - NY 61 FUSRAP Considered Sites New York, NY Alternate Name(s): Baker and Williams Warehouses Ralph Ferrara Company Warehouses Ralph Ferrara, Inc. NY.61-2 Location: 513-519, 521-527, and 529-535 West 20th Street, New York, New York NY.61-3 Historical Operations: Received and stored uranium ores and concentrates for MED. NY.61-5 NY.61-6 NY.61-7 Eligibility Determination: Eligible NY.61-1 NY.61-2 Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Surveys, Verification Surveys NY.61-3 NY.61-4

  12. ACIM-~ NY.49

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ' h:. ,,, ,_" , ACIM-~ NY.49 .,. i MEMORANDUM TO: FILE DATE FE: __~-tt_c~7' e_-_~-~------- --------- "%Kf-- ---- ---i------- Current: ~~~~~~--------__---_______ xf yee, date contacted- IVPE OF OPERATION f- ------------- Research & Development 0 Production scale testing 0 Pilot Scale 0 Bench Scale Process z Theoretical Studies Sample 84 Analysis 0 Production 0 Disposal/Storage a Facility Type 0 Manufacturing 0 University 0 Research Organization 0 Government Sponsored Fat a Other

  13. NY-%-3 P

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    NY-%-3 P m F P F ?- P m ?- c m P P CII (I pl F F- 3?r -J-J-. _- /, i ;. / 0 Aerospace Report No. ATR-82 (796344-2 i Aq, is y !i,' Evaluation of the 1943Hto# 1946 ilid Liquid Effluent Discharge From the Linde Air Products Company Ceramics Plant December 198 I Prepared for Office of Operational Safety Assistant Secretary for Environmental Protection, Safety, and Emergency Preparedness U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Prepared by Environment and Conservation Directorate Eastern Technical Division THE

  14. Category:Rochester, NY | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Rochester NY Consolidated Edison Co-NY Inc.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 70 KB SVQuickServiceRestaurant Rochester NY...

  15. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Niagara Falls Storage Site NY - NY 17

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Considered Sites > Niagara Falls Storage Site NY - NY 17 FUSRAP Considered Sites Niagara Falls Storage Site, NY Alternate Name(s): Lake Ontario Ordnance Works (LOOW) Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) DOE-Niagara Falls Storage Site NY.17-1 NY.17-3 Location: Lewiston, New York NY.17-5 Historical Operations: Stored, shipped, and buried radioactive equipment and waste for MED and AEC containing uranium, radium, and thorium. Contains Interim Waste Containment Structure. NY.17-1 NY.17-2 NY.17-14

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Guterl Specialty Steel - NY 12

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Guterl Specialty Steel - NY 12 FUSRAP Considered Sites Guterl Specialty Steel, NY Alternate Name(s): Simonds Saw and Steel Co. Guterl Steel Allegheny Ludlum Steel Corp. NY.12-1 NY.12-2 Location: Ohio Street and Route 95, Lockport, New York NY.12-12 Historical Operations: Performed rolling mill operations on natural uranium and thorium metal. NY.12-6 NY.12-7 Eligibility Determination: NY.12-11 Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Surveys NY.12-1 NY.12-4 NY.12-8 NY.12-9 NY.12-12 Site Status: Cleanup

  17. Upstate NY Power Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NY Power Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name: Upstate NY Power Corp Place: West Seneca, New York Zip: 14224-3454 Sector: Wind energy Product: Developer of clean energy projects...

  18. Western NY Energy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Western NY Energy LLC Place: Mount Morris, New York Zip: 14510 Product: Bioethanol producer. References: Western NY Energy LLC1 This article is a stub. You can help...

  19. AER NY Kinetics LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AER NY Kinetics LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: AER NY Kinetics LLC Address: PO Box 585 21 Entrance Avenue Place: Ogdensburg Zip: 13669 Region: United States Sector: Marine...

  20. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Syracuse University - NY 29

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Syracuse University - NY 29 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY (NY.29) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Syracuse , New York NY.29-1 Evaluation Year: 1994 NY.29-2 Site Operations: Activities included work with uranium oxide and the precipitation of thorium iodate from homogeneous solution. NY.29-1 NY.29-3 NY.29-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination remote NY.29-2 Radioactive Materials

  1. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Colonie - NY 06

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Colonie - NY 06 FUSRAP Considered Sites Colonie, NY Alternate Name(s): Colonie Interim Storage Site National Lead Industries NY.06-1 Location: 1130 Central Avenue, Colonie, New York NY.06-1 Historical Operations: Fabricated and processed uranium metal for the AEC, resulting in contamination from thorium and natural, enriched, and depleted uranium. NY.06-1 NY.06-4 NY.06-5 Eligibility Determination: Eligible NY.06-2 NY.06-3 Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Surveys, Verification Surveys NY.06-6

  2. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Gleason Works - NY 55

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Gleason Works - NY 55 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: GLEASON WORKS (NY.55 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Rochester , New York NY.55-1 Evaluation Year: 1994 NY.55-2 Site Operations: Metal fabrication operations - Rolled uranium metal. NY.55-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote NY.55-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium NY.55-1

  3. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Hooker Chemical Co - NY 05

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Hooker Chemical Co - NY 05 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Hooker Chemical Co. (NY.05) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Occidental Chemical Corporation Hooker Electrochemical Corporation NY.05-1 NY.05-2 Location: Niagara Falls , New York NY.05-3 Evaluation Year: 1985 NY.05-1 NY.05-2 Site Operations: Design, engineering, construction, equipping and operation of a plant for the manufacture of Product 45 (xylene hexachloride); MFL (Miller's

  4. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Niagara Falls Vicinity Properties NY -

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    NY 17 Niagara Falls Vicinity Properties NY - NY 17 FUSRAP Considered Sites Niagara Falls Vicinity Properties, NY Alternate Name(s): Lake Ontario Ordnance Works (LOOW) Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) DOE-Niagara Falls Storage Site NY.17-1 NY.17-3 Location: Lewiston , New York NY.17-5 Historical Operations: Stored, shipped, and buried radioactive equipment and waste for MED and AEC containing uranium, radium, and thorium. Portions of the former site are privately owned, creating a

  5. NY Green Bank | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    sector to address and alleviate market and financial barriers preventing a thriving clean energy marketplace. NY Green Bank does not accept deposits or offer retail loans, and...

  6. NY.O-20- I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ; I.-' NY.O-20- I ' 3% 3 MEMORANDUM TO: FILE FKOM: An&x?! w311E? SUHYECT: .Elimination of Pyroferric Co. New Yor SITE ALT NAME: EYE&XCLG f2!Y2~!2Y 621 E. 216th St. CITY: N__ew_ yw-r; STATE: N__V _ok!kEKm. Past: P_rrof_errrLc Go: current: Qwner contacted X yes no; if yes, date co Past owner2 IYE OE C)PEEux!N g Research et Develapment Faci - Production scale testing x M XX - Experimental tests U - Henoh.Scale Process R - Theoretical Studies Gove - Sample % Analysis 0 Production

  7. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Markite Co - NY 49

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Markite Co - NY 49 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: MARKITE CO. (NY.49 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 155 Waverly Place , New York , New York NY.49-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NY.49-2 Site Operations: Conducted experiments with very small amounts of uranium and thorium. NY.49-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Handled limited amounts of radioactive materials - Potential for contamination remote NY.49-2 Radioactive Materials

  8. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- ACF Industries Inc - NY 13

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Inc - NY 13 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: ACF Industries, Inc. (NY.13 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: American Car and Foundry Company NY.13-2 Location: Buffalo , New York NY.13-2 Evaluation Year: 1987 NY.13-1 Site Operations: Procured, produced, and delivered mechanical and cryogenic weapons components. No radioactive materials used at the site. NY.13-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Declared clean by AEC and returned to the prime

  9. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Bethlehem Steel Corporation - NY 02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Bethlehem Steel Corporation - NY 02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: BETHLEHEM STEEL CORPORATION (NY.02 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Lackawanna , New York NY.02-1 Evaluation Year: 1985 NY.02-2 Site Operations: Conducted high temperature alpha-phase rolling tests on uranium metal in the 1950s. NY.02-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Radiation levels below criteria NY.02-5 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary

  10. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Columbia University - NY 03

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Columbia University - NY 03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Columbia University (NY.03 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: New York , New York NY.03-1 Evaluation Year: 1985 NY.03-2 NY.03-3 Site Operations: Early research and development -- nuclear chain reaction (fission) and gaseous diffusion during the 1940s. NY.03-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Radiation levels below criteria - Indication of university sponsored

  11. New York Battery and Energy Storage Technology Consortium NY...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Battery and Energy Storage Technology Consortium NY BEST Jump to: navigation, search Name: New York Battery and Energy Storage Technology Consortium (NY-BEST) Place: Albany, New...

  12. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- National Carbon Co - NY 48

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Carbon Co - NY 48 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: NATIONAL CARBON CO (NY.48) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: New York , New York NY.48-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NY.48-2 Site Operations: Produced graphite for the MED/AEC. NY.48-1 NY.48-2 NY.48-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for residual radioactive contamination considered remote - No indication that radioactive material was used on the site NY.48-2 Radioactive

  13. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- New York University - NY 50

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    University - NY 50 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: NEW YORK UNIVERSITY (NY.50) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: New York , New York NY.50-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NY.50-1 Site Operations: Activities were related to equipment development. Counters and a small quantity of uranium oxide were provided by the AEC for work under contract AT(30-1)-1256. NY.50-2 NY.50-3 NY.50-4 NY.50-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for

  14. YoungHo Shin | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    YoungHo Shin YoungHo Shin Principal Process Development Engineer Telephone (630) 252-4861 E-mail yshin@anl.gov

  15. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Love Canal - NY 24

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Love Canal - NY 24 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: LOVE CANAL (NY.24 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None NY.24-1 Location: Region running from Old Military Road from the 16-acre rectangular piece of land in the southeast corner of Niagara Falls into the Township of Lewiston , Niagara Falls , New York NY.24-3 Evaluation Year: 1987 NY.24-1 Site Operations: Chemical storage and disposal. NY.24-1 NY.24-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Seaway Industrial Park - NY 09

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Seaway Industrial Park - NY 09 FUSRAP Considered Sites Seaway Industrial Park, NY Alternate Name(s): Seaway Industrial Landfill Seaway Landfill Charles St. Plant NY.09-2 NY.09-3 Location: River Road, Tonawanda, New York NY.09-4 Historical Operations: Received approximately 6,000 cubic yards of low-grade uranium mill tailings and processing residues from the Ashland (Tonawanda North Units 1 and 2) sites. NY.09-5 Eligibility Determination: Eligible NY.09-1 Radiological Survey(s): Assessment

  17. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Sylvania Corning Plant - NY 19

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Plant - NY 19 FUSRAP Considered Sites Sylvania-Corning, NY Alternate Name(s): Sylvania Electric Products, Inc. Sylvania Corp. NY.19-1 NY.19-4 Location: Cantiaque Road, Hicksville, Long Island, New York NY.19-5 Historical Operations: Pilot-scale production of powdered metal uranium slugs for AEC's Hanford reactor. NY.19-4 Eligibility Determination: Eligible Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Survey NY.19-3 Site Status: Cleanup in progress by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. USACE Website Long-term

  18. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- American Railway Express Office - NY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    0-03 Railway Express Office - NY 0-03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: American Railway Express Office (NY.0-03 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: American Railway Express (Downtown) , New York , New York NY.0-03-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NY.0-03-1 Site Operations: None - Involved with a fire during transport of uranium scrap. NY.0-03-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination remote NY.0-03-1 NY.0-03-2

  19. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Electromet Corporation - NY 04

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Electromet Corporation - NY 04 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Electromet Corporation (NY.04 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to US EPA and New York State Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 4625 Royal Avenue , Niagara Falls , New York NY.04-1 Evaluation Year: 1985 NY.04-2 NY.04-3 Site Operations: Cast zirconium sponge into ingots in the 1950s. NY.04-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority NY.04-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary

  20. US MidAtl NY Site Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    MidAtl NY Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 US MidAtl NY Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US MidAtl NY Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US MidAtl NY Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * New York households consume an average of 103 million Btu per year, 15% more than the U.S. average. * Electricity consumption in

  1. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn - NY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    0-19 Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn - NY 0-19 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: NY.0-19 (POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE OF BROOKLYN) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: New York , New York NY.0-19-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NY.0-19-1 Site Operations: Research and development involving only small quantities of radiological material in a controlled environment. NY.0-19-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination remote

  2. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Radiation Applications Inc - NY 57

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Radiation Applications Inc - NY 57 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: RADIATION APPLICATIONS, INC. ( NY.57 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: RAI NY.57-1 Location: 370 Lexington Avenue , New York , New York NY.57-3 Evaluation Year: 1991 NY.57-4 Site Operations: Developed foam separation techniques and proposed investigations to remove cesium and strontium from fission product waste solutions. No indication that a substantial quantity of

  3. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Rensslaer Polytechnic Institute - NY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    18 Rensslaer Polytechnic Institute - NY 18 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: RENSSLAER POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE (NY.18 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Troy , New York NY.18-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NY.18-1 Site Operations: Research activities involving small quantities of radioactive materials in a controlled environment - under AEC license. NY.18-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for residual contamination

  4. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Sacandaga - NY 51

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Sacandaga - NY 51 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: SACANDAGA (NY.51) Eliminated - Condition certified Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 823 Sacandaga Road , Glenville , New York NY.51-1 Evaluation Year: 1992 NY.51-2 Site Operations: Plant operated by General Electric during period spanning 1947 to 1951. Facilities housed studies involving radar, physics studies and sodium technology development. NY.51-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Radiation levels below criteria

  5. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Buflovak Co - NY 56

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Buflovak Co - NY 56 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Buflovak Co. (NY.56 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 1543 Fillmore Ave. , Buffalo , New York NY.56-1 Evaluation Year: 1991 NY.56-2 Site Operations: Research and testing with uranium raffinate. NY.56-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Possibility for contamination considered remote due to scope of tests conducted and indication of cleanup operations after tests

  6. Ming-Yang Ho | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ming-Yang Ho Ming-Yang Ho Ming-Yang Ho Graduate Student E-mail: mxh504@psu.edu Website: Pennsylvania State University Graduate Students

  7. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Allegheny-Ludlum Steel Corp - NY 01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    NY 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Allegheny-Ludlum Steel Corp (NY.01 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Al-Tech Specialty Steel Corporation NY.01-1 Location: Spring Street Road , Watervliet , New York NY.01-1 NY.01-2 Evaluation Year: 1985 NY.01-3 Site Operations: Metal fabrication -- rolled uranium ingots into rods. NY.01-4 NY.01-5 NY.01-6 NY.01-7 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Radiation levels below criteria NY.01-8 NY.01-9 Radioactive

  8. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Staten Island Warehouse - NY 22

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Staten Island Warehouse - NY 22 FUSRAP Considered Sites Staten Island Warehouse, NY Alternate Name(s): Archer-Daniels Midland Company NY.22-3 Location: 2393 Richmond Terrace, Port Richmond, New York NY.22-2 Historical Operations: Stored pitchblende (high-grade uranium ore), which was purchased by the MED for the first atomic bomb. NY.22-3 Eligibility Determination: Eligible Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Survey NY.22-5 Site Status: Referred by DOE, evaluation in progess by U.S. Army Corps of

  9. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Ledoux and Co - NY 37

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Ledoux and Co - NY 37 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: LEDOUX AND CO. (NY.37 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 155 Avenue of the Americas , New York , New York NY.37-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NY.37-1 Site Operations: Prime contractor to AEC, African Metals. LeDoux handled radioactive materials under this contract at other locations; records indicate that radioactive materials were not sent to the New York office.

  10. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Seneca Army Depot - NY 11

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Seneca Army Depot - NY 11 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: SENECA ARMY DEPOT (NY.11 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Romulus , New York Evaluation Year: 1985 NY.11-2 NY.11-3 Site Operations: Eleven bunkers were used to store approximately 2,000 drums of pitchblende ore in the early 1940's. The bunkers were returned to munitions storage service after removal of the ore drums. NY.11-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Referred to

  11. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Tonawanda North Units 1 and 2 - NY 10

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Tonawanda North Units 1 and 2 - NY 10 FUSRAP Considered Sites Tonawanda North, NY, Units 1 and 2 Alternate Name(s): Ashland #1 and Ashland #2 Haist Property Seaway Area D Rattlesnake Creek NY.10-1 Location: State Highway 266, east of Interstate Highway 190, Tonawanda, NY NY.10-4 Historical Operations: Served as a repository for refined uranium and vanadium residues containing thorium and radium, generated by Linde Air Products. NY.10-4 NY.10-5 NY.10-6 NY.10-7 NY.10-9 Eligibility Determination:

  12. NlZWYORK4,N.Y.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFRICAN .METALS~ C~RPO~~XON 41 BROAD STREET . i. ,,J iI: : LE OCT 2 2 1945 NlZWYORK4,N.Y. :October 5, 1945. Af-2-a L.: I.__: '../ . ._ The Area Engineer, U.S. Engineer Office, P.O. BOX 42, Station F., New York 16, N.Y. Gentlemen: Contract W-7405 eng-4. Reference is made to your letter EIDM A-33 MS of August 27th, 1945. Contract W-7405 eng-4 called for the delivery of 100 T of M-31, the M308 content of which was sold to you, whereas we reserved all rights to the R-l contained therein. We hereby

  13. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- American Machine and Foundry Co - NY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    26 NY 26 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: American Machine and Foundry Co ( NY.26 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Lutheran Medical Center NY.26-1 Location: Second Avenue and 56th Street , Brooklyn , New York NY.26-2 Evaluation Year: 1992 NY.26-1 Site Operations: 1951 - 1954 conducted metal fabrication operation on uranium and thorium metals. NY.26-3 NY.26-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote

  14. NY-Sun PV Incentive Program (Residential and Small Business)...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    NY-Sun CommercialIndustrial Incentive program that offers incentives for grid connected PV systems larger than 200 KW. The New York State Energy Research and Development...

  15. Business Council of Westchester County (NY) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    101 Place: White Plains, New York Zip: 10604 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Services Product: Green Power Marketer Website: www.westchesterny.org Coordinates:...

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Fordham University - NY 0-12

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Fordham University - NY 0-12 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Fordham University (NY.0-12 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: New York , New York NY.0-12-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NY.0-12-1 Site Operations: Research and development involving small quantities of radioactive material in a controlled environment NY.0-12-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination remote NY.0-12-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes

  17. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Linde Air Products Div - Buffalo - NY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    65 Div - Buffalo - NY 65 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: LINDE AIR PRODUCTS DIV. BUFFALO (NY.65 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Linde Chandler Street Plant NY.65-1 Location: Buffalo , New York NY.65-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NY.65-1 Site Operations: Developed and produced non-radioactive material for the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant under contract with the AEC. NY.65-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No indication that

  18. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Simmons Machine and Tool Inc - NY 35

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Simmons Machine and Tool Inc - NY 35 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: SIMMONS MACHINE AND TOOL, INC (NY.35) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 1000 North Broadway , Albany , New York NY.35-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NY.35-2 Site Operations: Tested equipment and machined uranium to test the equipment (one time event). NY.35-1 NY.35-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote due to limited scope

  19. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Enterprise Metal Products - NY 0-10

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Enterprise Metal Products - NY 0-10 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Enterprise Metal Products (NY.0-10 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Brooklyn , New York NY.0-10-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NY.0-10-1 Site Operations: Machined magnesium metal NY.0-10-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination remote NY.0-10-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated

  20. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- West Valley Demonstration Project - NY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    23 Valley Demonstration Project - NY 23 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: West Valley Demonstration Project (NY.23) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see http://www.em.doe.gov/SiteInfo/westvalleydemoproject.aspx Documents Related to West Valley Demonstration Project

  1. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Linde Air Products Division - NY 08

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Division - NY 08 FUSRAP Considered Sites Linde Air Products Division - Towanda, NY Alternate Name(s): Praxair Linde Aire Products Div. of Union Carbide Corp. Linde Ceramics Plant Uranium Refinery, Linde Site NY.08-4 Location: East Park Drive and Woodward, Tonawanda, New York NY.08-5 Historical Operations: Processed uranium compounds for MED and AEC. Includes Towanda Landfill as a VP. NY.08-1 NY.08-2 Eligibility Determination: Eligible NY.08-9 Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Surveys NY.08-3

  2. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Radium Chemical Co Inc - NY 60

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Radium Chemical Co Inc - NY 60 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: RADIUM CHEMICAL CO., INC (NY.60 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: New York , New York NY.60-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NY.60-1 Site Operations: Commercial Producer of Radium. NY.60-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Commercial site - EPA cleanup project NY.60-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes NY.60-1 Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radium NY.60-1

  3. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Eastman Kodak Laboratory - NY 0-09

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Eastman Kodak Laboratory - NY 0-09 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Eastman Kodak Laboratory (NY.0-09 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Eastman Kodak Rochester Lab NY.0-09-1 Location: Rochester , New York NY.0-09-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NY.0-09-1 NY.0-09-2 Site Operations: Research and development with natural uranium solutions in 1943. NY.0-09-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination remote NY.0-09-2 Radioactive

  4. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Ferro Metal and Chemical Co - NY 42

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Ferro Metal and Chemical Co - NY 42 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Ferro Metal & Chemical Co. (NY.42 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 50 Broad Street , New York , New York NY.42-1 NY.42-2 Evaluation Year: 1987 NY.42-2 Site Operations: Procured uranium from foreign sources. No record of radioactive material at this site NY.42-1 NY.42-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No indication that radioactive materials were used at

  5. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Floyd Bennett Field - NY 0-11

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Floyd Bennett Field - NY 0-11 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Floyd Bennett Field (NY.0-11 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Naval Air Station NY.0-11-1 Location: Buildings 67 and 69 , Brooklyn , New York NY.0-11-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NY.0-11-1 Site Operations: The Air station was considered by the AEC but was not used. NY.0-11-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No involvement with MED/AEC operations NY.0-11-1 Radioactive Materials

  6. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Union Mines Development Corp - NY 0-22

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Mines Development Corp - NY 0-22 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: UNION MINES DEVELOPMENT CORP. (NY.0-22) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Union Carbide NY.0-22-1 Location: New York , New York NY.0-22-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NY.0-22-1 Site Operations: The company owned uranium mines or reserves located in the western U.S. NY.0-22-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No reason to believe radioactive material was used at this site NY.0-22-1

  7. NY-Sun Commerical/Industrial Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) through NY-Sun Commercial/Industrial Incentive Program (PON 3082) provides incentives for installation of non-residential new grid...

  8. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Colonie - NY 06

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    of Engineers but will eventually transfer to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. NY.06-1 - DOE Report (DOEOR20722-53); Colonie Interim Storage Site...

  9. New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, Albany, NY |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, Albany, NY New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, Albany, NY This presentation on the NYSERDA Hydrogen Program was given on July 12, 2006. PDF icon education_presentation_nyserda.pdf More Documents & Publications State of the States: Fuel Cells in America 2014 State of the States: Fuel Cells in America 2010 New York State-wide Alternative Fuel Vehicle Program for Vehicles and Fueling

  10. Los Alamos technology to be featured on CSI: NY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LANL technology featured on CSI: NY Los Alamos technology to be featured on CSI: NY The multipurpose "sampler gun" rapidly collects and tracks radiological, chemical, and biological samples in solid, liquid, or gaseous forms. March 27, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and

  11. QER Public Meeting in New York, NY: Energy Infrastructure Finance |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy York, NY: Energy Infrastructure Finance QER Public Meeting in New York, NY: Energy Infrastructure Finance Meeting Date and Location New York University Kimmel Center for University Life Room 914 60 Washington Square South New York, New York 10010 Meeting Information Agenda: Energy Infrastructure Finance Click Here to comment on the Energy Infrastructure Finance public meeting. Click here to watch a video of the meeting. . See links below to download PDFs of the meeting

  12. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Pfohl Brothers Landfill - NY 66

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Pfohl Brothers Landfill - NY 66 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Pfohl Brothers Landfill (NY.66 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Five-Year Review Report Pfohl Brothers Landfill Superfund Site Erie County Town of Cheektowaga, New York EPA REGION 2 Congressional District(s): 30 Erie Cheektowaga NPL LISTING HISTORY Documents

  13. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Wilson Warehouse - NY 64

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Wilson Warehouse - NY 64 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Wilson Warehouse (NY.64) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: This site is one of a group of 77 FUSRAP considered sites for which few, if any records are available in their respective site files to provide an historical account of past operations and their relationship, if any,

  14. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Ithaca Gun Co Inc - NY 53

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Ithaca Gun Co Inc - NY 53 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: ITHACA GUN CO., INC. (NY.53 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 123 Lake Street , Ithaca , New York NY.53-1 Evaluation Year: 1994 NY.53-2 Site Operations: Conducted tests involving the forging of hollow uranium billets into tubes for the AEC. Also investigated alternative methods of producing fuel cores. NY.53-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No radioactive

  15. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Utica Street Warehouse - NY 0-23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Street Warehouse - NY 0-23 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: UTICA STREET WAREHOUSE (NY.0-23) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 240 West Utica Street , Buffalo , New York NY.0-23-2 Evaluation Year: 1987 NY.0-23-1 Site Operations: Stored and rebarrelled uranium process residues from operations at Linde. NY.0-23-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Original building demolished. Current land use - Parking facility. Potential for

  16. Origin State>> CA CA ID ID ID IL KY MD MO NM NM NY NY OH SC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MO NM NM NY NY OH SC TN TN TN, WA, CA TN TN TN TN Total Shipments by Route Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory General Atomics Batelle Energy Alliance Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Argonne National Laboratory Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Aberdeen Proving Grounds National Security Technologies Sandia National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory Brookhaven National Laboratory CH2M Hill B&W West Valley, LLC Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

  17. Origin State>> CA CA ID ID ID IL KY MD NM NM NV NY NY OH TN

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NM NM NV NY NY OH TN TN TN, WA, CA TN TN TN TN TX Total Shipments by Route Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory General Atomics Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Batelle Energy Alliance Idaho National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Aberdeen Proving Ground Los Alamos National Laboratory Sandia National Laboratory National Security Technologies Brookhaven National Laboratory West Valley Environmental Services Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

  18. Origin State>> CA ID ID ID IL KY MD NM NM NY NY OH SC TN TN

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MD NM NM NY NY OH SC TN TN TN, WA, CA TN TN TN TN TX Total Shipments by Route Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Batelle Energy Alliance Idaho National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Aberdeen Proving Ground Los Alamos National Laboratory Sandia National Laboratory Brookhaven National Laboratory West Valley Environmental Services Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Savannah River Site Duratek/Energy Solutions Babcox

  19. Origin State>> CA ID ID ID IL KY NV NY NY OH TN TN TN, WA, CA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NV NY NY OH TN TN TN, WA, CA TN TN TN TN TX Total Shipments by Route Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Batelle Energy Alliance Idaho National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant National Security Technologies Brookhaven National Laboratory West Valley Environmental Services Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Duratek/Energy Solutions Babcox & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12 Plant Materials & Energy Corporation

  20. Origin State>> CA ID ID ID IL MD NM NM NV NY NY OH SC TN TN

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NV NY NY OH SC TN TN TN, WA, CA TN TN TN Total Shipments by Route Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Batelle Energy Alliance Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Argonne National Laboratory Aberdeen Proving Ground Sandia National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory National Security Technologies Brookhaven National Laboratory West Valley Environmental Services Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Savannah River Site Duratek/Energy Solutions Babcox & Wilcox

  1. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Frederick Flader Inc - NY 0-13

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Frederick Flader Inc - NY 0-13 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Frederick Flader, Inc. (NY.0-13 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Frederick Flader Division of Eaton Manufacturing Co. NY.0-13-1 Location: 583 Division Street , N. Tonawanda , New York NY.0-13-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NY.0-13-1 Site Operations: Provided consulting services and supported development of auxiliary equipment related to nuclear power NY.0-13-1 Site Disposition:

  2. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Long Island College of Medicine - NY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    0-14 Long Island College of Medicine - NY 0-14 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Long Island College of Medicine (NY.0-14 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: New York , New York NY.0-14-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NY.0-14-1 Site Operations: Performed research utilizing small quantities of radioactive materials in a controlled environment. NY.0-14-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination remote NY.0-14-1

  3. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Lucius Pitkin - NY 0-15

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Lucius Pitkin - NY 0-15 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Lucius Pitkin (NY.0-15 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 47 Fulton Street , New York , New York NY.0-15-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NY.0-15-1 Site Operations: No MED or AED work done at this site. Contractor supervised activities at Middlesex Sampling Plant in Middlesex, NJ such as assaying, sampling and weighing of ore. NY.0-15-1 NY.0-15-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No

  4. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Memorial Hospital - NY 0-16

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Memorial Hospital - NY 0-16 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: MEMORIAL HOSPITAL (NY.0-16 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: New York , New York NY.0-16-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NY.0-16-1 Site Operations: Conducted studies for MED including a "Physiological Study of Sunbath Treatments." Involvement with radioactive materials unknown. NY.0-16-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination remote NY.0-16-1

  5. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Pyroferric Co - NY 0-20

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Pyroferric Co - NY 0-20 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: PYROFERRIC CO. (NY.0-20) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 621 E. 216th Street , New York , New York NY.0-20-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NY.0-20-1 Site Operations: One small scale experiment was conducted with non-radioactive material. NY.0-20-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated NY.0-20-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: No Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None Radiological

  6. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- African Metals - NY 0-01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    African Metals - NY 0-01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: African Metals (NY 0-01) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Afrimet NY.0-01-1 Location: 41 Broad Street , New York , New York NY.0-01-2 Evaluation Year: 1987 NY.0-01-1 Site Operations: U.S. Agent for Union Miniere du Haut Katanga; site of the main corporate offices; no radioactive materials handled at this location. NY.0-01-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No potential for

  7. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Allegheny-Ludlum Steel Corp - NY 0-02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    NY 0-02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: ALLEGHENY-LUDLUM STEEL CORP. (NY.0-02 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Al-Tech Specialty Steel NY.0-02-1 Location: Watervliet and Dunkirk , New York NY.0-02-1 Evaluation Year: 1985 NY.0-02-2 Site Operations: Processed uranium metal for the AEC in the early 1950s; rolled uranium billets into rods. NY.0-02-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination remote - Confirmed by radiological

  8. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Colorado Fuel and Iron - NY 0-08

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Fuel and Iron - NY 0-08 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Colorado Fuel and Iron (NY.0-08 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Watervliet , New York NY.0-08-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NY.0-08-1 Site Operations: Site was a contractor to DuPont. Exact nature of operations is not clear. No records to indicate that radioactive materials were handled at the site. NY.0-08-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated NY.0-08-1 Radioactive Materials

  9. Champlain, NY Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) (Million Cubic Feet) Champlain, NY Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2014 63 2015 1 2 1 2 20 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports by Point of Entry Champlain, NY LNG Imports from All Countries

  10. US ENC MI Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    MI Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC MI Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Michigan households use 123 million Btu of energy per home, 38% more than the U.S. average. * High consumption, combined with low costs for heating fuels

  11. Submit Your Ideas for the NY Energy Data Jam | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Submit Your Ideas for the NY Energy Data Jam Submit Your Ideas for the NY Energy Data Jam June 19, 2013 - 11:03am Q&A What idea would you present at the Data Jam? Join the...

  12. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Utica Drop Forge and Tool Corp - NY 39

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Drop Forge and Tool Corp - NY 39 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: UTICA DROP FORGE & TOOL CORP. (NY.39) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Utica , New York NY.39-1 Evaluation Year: 1994 NY.39-2 Site Operations: Interest expressed by Utica Drop Forge & Tool Corporation to Conduct Uranium Forging and Casting for the AEC. No indication that the contractor actually did a substantial amount of work of this nature at

  13. Interoperability of Demand Response Resources Demonstration in NY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wellington, Andre

    2014-03-31

    The Interoperability of Demand Response Resources Demonstration in NY (Interoperability Project) was awarded to Con Edison in 2009. The objective of the project was to develop and demonstrate methodologies to enhance the ability of customer sited Demand Response resources to integrate more effectively with electric delivery companies and regional transmission organizations.

  14. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Wolff-Alport and Co - NY 30

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Wolff-Alport and Co - NY 30 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Wolff-Alport and Co (NY.30) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to US EPA Region II and New York City Department of Health Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 1127 Irving Avenue , Brooklyn , New York NY.30-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NY.30-1 Site Operations: Commercial operation -- sold thorium residues to the AEC, which in turn shipped the residues to Maywood for storage. NY.30-2 Site Disposition:

  15. CONTRACT HO, AT(JO-l)-510

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    b I,: . 1 :{ - 7 ok-4 1% This document consists ofwpages. Eo.ZSIof2Scopies, Series 4. CONTRACT HO, AT(JO-l)-510 & F-J tlt-~3fjfTd1 / i /- /-&.;c-,' -.C.~ ATOMIC EKEBGY COMXISSIOB CONTRXTQR & ADDRESS: BRUSH BEBYLLIUM CCWANX/----y. 4301 Perkins Avenue Cleveland 3, Ohio SONTRACT EylR: BIESURCH, .DEVXLOPMEWl' AND PRODUCTIOH LOCATION: Cleveland, Ohio . $538250.00 AMOUET OF INITIAL COMJlISSIO19 OBLIGATIOB: Divisfon of Dlsburaement, U. S. Treasury Department, Bew York, E. Y. (Submit

  16. US ENC MI Site Consumption

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on central air conditioning for cooling. 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% US ENC MI OtherNone Propane Electricity Natural Gas MAIN HEATING FUEL USED COOLING EQUIPMENT USED DIVISION:...

  17. S3TEC Seminar - Dr. Cliff Ho, Sandia National Laboratories | Solid State

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Thermal Energy Conversion Dr. Cliff Ho, Sandia National Laboratories Seminar Wednesday Mar 2, 2016 12:00pm Location: 1-150 Speaker: Cliff Ho S3TEC welcomes Dr. Cliff Ho

  18. Real-time sub-<mi>>ngstrom...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Real-time sub-<mi>>ngstrom imaging of reversible and irreversible conformations in rhodium catalysts and graphene Kisielowski, Christian; Wang,...

  19. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Greenhill Contracting, New Paltz, NY

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    | Department of Energy New Paltz, NY DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Greenhill Contracting, New Paltz, NY DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Greenhill Contracting, New Paltz, NY Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home in New Paltz, NY, that achieved a HERS score of 37 without PV or 7 with 7.5-kW PV. The two-story 2,288-ft2 home is one of 9 certified homes. All of the homes have R-22 ICF walls, R-20 closed-cell spray foam under the slab, a ground-source heat pump with

  20. I?raak Nuke, NXOO Leaa Km&l, NY00

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    W. ti. &&n,Nor I?raak Nuke, NXOO Leaa Km&l, NY00 fjlrt~olfloatlon Camad .- ,' I i 2 Jr,' ; !

  1. FIRST Robotics at NY Tech Valley | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pit Boss Reflects on Bot Challenge Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window) Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window) Pit Boss Reflects on Bot Challenge Lynn DeRose 2015.03.27 Hi everyone, from BBQ to robots all in the same week! This past weekend I had the privilege to volunteer at the FIRST(tm) Robotics Competition (FRC) NY Tech Valley Regional at RPI.

  2. Champlain, NY Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Canada

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Champlain, NY Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2014 63 2015 1 2 1 2 20 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas

  3. Microsoft PowerPoint - Xie_twpice_NY06.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Variational Analysis of Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP_ICE) Data (01/22/2006 - 2/13/2006) The TWP_ICE Workshop , NASA/GISS, New York, NY, 13-15 November, 2006 A joint effort between LLNL (Xie, McCoy, Klein), BMRC (Hume, Jakob), SUNYSB (Zhang), and other TWPICE participants 143km 130km 172km 99km 148km A Quick Update Done! 3-hourly radiosondes (6 stations) Background field from the ECMWF analysis Radar precipitation Surface turbulence fluxes from Monash University (Darwin

  4. Magnetic and magnetothermodynamic properties of Ho5Si4 (Conference) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect and magnetothermodynamic properties of Ho5Si4 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Magnetic and magnetothermodynamic properties of Ho5Si4 The magnetic and magnetocaloric properties of Ho{sub 5}Si{sub 4} have been investigated. The compound undergoes a second order ferromagnetic transition at 76 K (T{sub c}) and a spin reorientation transition at about 15 K. The temperature dependencies of heat capacity data measured in various magnetic fields corroborate the second

  5. Mi GmbH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mi GmbH Jump to: navigation, search Name: Mi GmbH Place: Switzerland Zip: CH-6340 Sector: Solar Product: Baar-based manufacturer and distributor of fruit juices. The firm is also...

  6. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory - NY 16

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory - NY 16 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (NY.16) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see http://www.knollslab.com/ Documents Related to Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory

  7. miRNAs in brain development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petri, Rebecca; Malmevik, Josephine; Fasching, Liana; Åkerblom, Malin; Jakobsson, Johan

    2014-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. In the brain, a large number of miRNAs are expressed and there is a growing body of evidence demonstrating that miRNAs are essential for brain development and neuronal function. Conditional knockout studies of the core components in the miRNA biogenesis pathway, such as Dicer and DGCR8, have demonstrated a crucial role for miRNAs during the development of the central nervous system. Furthermore, mice deleted for specific miRNAs and miRNA-clusters demonstrate diverse functional roles for different miRNAs during the development of different brain structures. miRNAs have been proposed to regulate cellular functions such as differentiation, proliferation and fate-determination of neural progenitors. In this review we summarise the findings from recent studies that highlight the importance of miRNAs in brain development with a focus on the mouse model. We also discuss the technical limitations of current miRNA studies that still limit our understanding of this family of non-coding RNAs and propose the use of novel and refined technologies that are needed in order to fully determine the impact of specific miRNAs in brain development. - Highlights: • miRNAs are essential for brain development and neuronal function. • KO of Dicer is embryonically lethal. • Conditional Dicer KO results in defective proliferation or increased apoptosis. • KO of individual miRNAs or miRNA families is necessary to determine function.

  8. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Michigan Velsicol Chemical Corp - MI

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    03 Michigan Velsicol Chemical Corp - MI 03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: MICHIGAN [VELSICOL] CHEMICAL CORP. (MI.03 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Velsicol Chemical Corp. MI.03-1 Location: St. Louis , Michigan MI.03-2 Evaluation Year: Circa 1987 MI.03-3 Site Operations: Rare earth processing facility. MI.03-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority - NRC survey MI.03-3 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive

  9. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Star Cutter Corp - MI 15

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Star Cutter Corp - MI 15 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: STAR CUTTER CORP. (MI.15) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Farmington , Michigan MI.15-1 Evaluation Year: 1991 MI.15-2 Site Operations: Performed a one time uranium slug drilling operation test in 1956. MI.15-3 MI.15-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based on limited scope and quantity of materials handled MI.15-2 Radioactive

  10. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: AquaZephyr, Ithaca, NY | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy AquaZephyr, Ithaca, NY DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: AquaZephyr, Ithaca, NY Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home in Ithaca, NY, that achieves a HERS 56 without PV or HERS 15 with 4-kW of PV. The two-story, 1,664-ft2 home is one of 17 single-family and 4 duplex homes built as part of an energy-efficient cooperative. The homes have very simple designs and achieve the Passive House Standard with double-stud walls filled with R-22 closed-cell spray foam plus R-30 blown

  11. Theoretical rate coefficients for allyl + HO2 and allyloxy decomposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldsmith, C. F.; Klippenstein, S. J.; Green, W. H.

    2011-01-01

    The kinetics of the allyl + HO{sub 2} bimolecular reaction, the thermal decomposition of C{sub 3}H{sub 5}OOH, and the unimolecular reactions of C{sub 3}H{sub 5}O are studied theoretically. High-level ab initio calculations of the C{sub 3}H{sub 5}OOH and C{sub 3}H{sub 5}O potential energy surfaces are coupled with RRKM master equation methods to compute the temperature- and pressure-dependence of the rate coefficients. Variable reaction coordinate transition state theory is used to characterize the barrierless transition states for the allyl + HO{sub 2} and C{sub 3}H{sub 5}O + OH reactions. The predicted rate coefficients for allyl + HO{sub 2} ? C{sub 3}H{sub 5}OOH ? products are in good agreement with experimental values. The calculations for allyl + HO{sub 2} ? C{sub 3}H{sub 6} + O{sub 2} underpredict the observed rate. The new rate coefficients suggest that the reaction of allyl + HO{sub 2} will promote chain-branching significantly more than previous models suggest.

  12. File:USDA-CE-Production-GIFmaps-NY.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NY.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage New York Ethanol Plant Locations Size of this preview: 776 600 pixels. Full resolution (1,650 1,275 pixels,...

  13. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Pfaltz and Bauer Inc - New York - NY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    45 New York - NY 45 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Pfaltz and Bauer Inc - New York (NY.45) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: This site is one of a group of 77 FUSRAP considered sites for which few, if any records are available in their respective site files to provide an historical account of past operations and their

  14. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Pier 38 - NY 0-18

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Pier 38 - NY 0-18 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Pier 38 (NY.0-18 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: This site is one of a group of 77 FUSRAP considered sites for which few, if any records are available in their respective site files to provide an historical account of past operations and their relationship, if any, with MED/AEC

  15. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- West Milton Reactor Site - NY 21

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Milton Reactor Site - NY 21 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: West Milton Reactor Site (NY.21) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: This site is one of a group of 77 FUSRAP considered sites for which few, if any records are available in their respective site files to provide an historical account of past operations and their

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- University of Michigan - MI 08

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Michigan - MI 08 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN (MI.08) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Ann Arbor , Michigan MI.08-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MI.08-2 Site Operations: Conducted research with a supersonic reflectroscope to detect flaws within a metal slug and developed methods for testing the adequacy of coatings which are applied to pieces of uranium metal. MI.08-1 MI.08-3 Site Disposition:

  17. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Wolverine Tube Division - MI 05

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Wolverine Tube Division - MI 05 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Wolverine Tube Division (MI.05) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Wolverine Tube Division of Calumet & Hecla Consolidated Copper Co. Star Tool Hermes Automotive Manufacturing Corporation MI.05-1 MI.05-2 Location: 1411 Central Avenue , Detroit , Michigan MI.05-3 Evaluation Year: 1990 MI.05-2 Site Operations: 1943 - Conducted research and development of methods for spinning

  18. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Adrian - MI 01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Adrian - MI 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Adrian, MI Alternate Name(s): Bridgeport Brass Co. Special Metals Extrusion Plant Bridgeport Brass Company General Motors General Motors Company, Adrian MI.01-1 Location: 1450 East Beecher Street, Adrian, Michigan MI.01-3 Historical Operations: Performed uranium extrusion research and development and metal fabrication work for the AEC using uranium, thorium, and plutonium. MI.01-2 Eligibility Determination: Eligible MI.01-1 Radiological Survey(s):

  19. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Carboloy Co - MI 12

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Carboloy Co - MI 12 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Carboloy Co. (MI.12 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - AEC licensed facility Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: General Electric MI.12-1 Location: 11177 E. Eight Mile Road , Detroit , Michigan MI.12-1 MI.12-2 Evaluation Year: 1987-1991 MI.12-3 MI.12-4 MI.12-6 Site Operations: Turned-down the outer diameter of uranium metal slugs and conducted pilot plant scale operations for hot pressing uranium dioxide pellets

  20. U.S. Natural Gas Exports to Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MI St. Clair, MI Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Buffalo, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY...

  1. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Oliver Corp - MI 11

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Oliver Corp - MI 11 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: OLIVER CORP. (MI.11 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to NRC Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Behnke Warehousing Incorporated MI.11-1 Location: 433 East Michigan Avenue , Battle Creek , Michigan MI.11-1 Evaluation Year: 1986 MI.11-4 Site Operations: Conducted production scale briquetting of green salt and magnesium blend under AEC license Nos. SNM-591, SUB-579, and C-3725. MI.11-1 MI.11-3 Site

  2. Water exchange dynamics around H?O? and OH? ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, Santanu; Dang, Liem X.

    2015-05-01

    Proton transfer in water and other solvents is a complicated process and an active research area. Conformational changes of water hydrating a proton can have a significant influence on proton dynamics. A hydrated proton leads to H?O? that forms three hydrogen bonds with neighboring water molecules. In this letter, we report the first computer simulation of the dynamics of water exchanging between the first and second solvation shells of H?O?. Employing different rate theories for chemical reactions such as the transition state theory, the Grote-Hynes theory, the reactive flux method, and the Impey-Madden-McDonald method, we calculate the solvent exchange rates from molecular dynamics simulations that account for explicit polarization effects. In addition, we also study water exchanges around OH? and find that the corresponding time scale (~50 picoseconds [ps]) is much smaller than that for H?O? (~100 ps). Results from all the rate theories are computed and compared. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  3. The NuMI Neutrino Beam

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamson, P.; Anderson, K.; Andrews, M.; Andrews, R.; Anghel, I.; Augustine, D.; Aurisano, A.; Avvakumov, S.; Ayres, D. S.; Baller, B.; et al

    2015-10-20

    Our paper describes the hardware and operations of the Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) beam at Fermilab. It elaborates on the design considerations for the beam as a whole and for individual elements. The most important part of our design details pertaining to individual components is described. Beam monitoring systems and procedures, including the tuning and alignment of the beam and NuMI long-term performance, are also discussed.

  4. Isolation of 163Ho from dysprosium target material by HPLC for neutrino mass measurements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mocko, Veronika; Taylor, Wayne  A.; Nortier, Francois M.; Engle, Jonathan  W.; Barnhart, Todd  E.; Nickles, Robert  J.; Pollington, Anthony  D.; Kunde, Gerd  J.; Rabin, Michael  W.; Birnbaum, Eva  R.

    2015-04-29

    The rare earth isotope 163Ho is of interest for neutrino mass measurements. This report describes the isolation of 163Ho from a proton-irradiated dysprosium target and its purification. A Dy metal target was irradiated with 16 MeV protons for 10 h. After target dissolution, 163Ho was separated from the bulk Dy via cation-exchange high performance liquid chromatography using 70 mmol dm–3 α-hydroxyisobutyric acid as the mobile phase. Subsequent purification of the collected Ho fraction was performed to remove the α-hydroxyisobutyrate chelating agent and to concentrate the Ho in a low ionic strength aqueous matrix. The final solution was characterized by MC-ICP-MSmore » to determine the 163Ho/165Ho ratio, 163Ho and the residual Dy content. The HPLC purification process resulted in a decontamination factor 1.4E5 for Dy. As a result, the isolated Ho fraction contained 24.8 ±1.3 ng of 163Ho corresponding to holmium recovery of 72 ± 3%.« less

  5. Submit Your Ideas for the NY Energy Data Jam | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ideas for the NY Energy Data Jam Submit Your Ideas for the NY Energy Data Jam June 19, 2013 - 11:03am Q&A What idea would you present at the Data Jam? Join the Conversation Addthis Applications powered by open energy data were on display at the Energy Datapalooza in June 2012. | Photo by Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department. Applications powered by open energy data were on display at the Energy Datapalooza in June 2012. | Photo by Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department. Alex Cohen Alex Cohen Former

  6. Buffalo, NY Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    to Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Buffalo, NY Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2015 1 1 1 1 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 02/29/2016 Next Release Date: 03/31/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Exports by Point of Exit Buffalo, NY Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Canada

  7. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Westinghouse Naval Ordnance - MI 02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Naval Ordnance - MI 02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: WESTINGHOUSE NAVAL ORDNANCE (MI.02 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Detroit , Michigan MI.02-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MI.02-2 Site Operations: Worked under contract with the Albuquerque Operations Office. No indication that radioactive material was involved under the contract. MI.02-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No indication radioactive

  8. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Detrex Corp - MI 10

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Detrex Corp - MI 10 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Detrex Corp. (MI.10 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Detroit , Michigan MI.10-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MI.10-2 Site Operations: Conducted experimental runs relative to pickling/degreasing of one handful of uranium turnings MI.10-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote due to small quantity of material handled - There is no

  9. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Ithaca Neighborhood Housing Services, Ithaca, NY

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Ithaca, NY, that scored HERS 50 without PV. These 1,160-square-foot affordable town houses have R-20 advance framed walls, R-52 blown cellulose in attic, radiant heat with 92.5 AFUE boiler, and triple-pane windows.

  10. SGDP Report Now Available: Interoperability of Demand Response Resources Demonstration in NY (February 2015)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Interoperability of Demand Response Resources Demonstration in NY was awarded to Con Edison in 2009 as part of DOE's Smart Grid Demonstration Project (SGDP) grants funded by the Recovery Act. The objective of the project was to develop and demonstrate methodologies to enhance the ability of customer sited demand response resources, both conventional and renewable, to integrate more effectively with electric delivery companies

  11. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: AquaZephyr, Ithaca, NY

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home in Ithaca, NY, that achieves a HERS 56 without PV or HERS 15 with 4-kW of PV. The two-story, 1,664-ft2 home is one of 17 single-family and 4 duplex homes...

  12. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Greenhill Contracting, New Paltz, NY

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home in New Paltz, NY, that achieved a HERS score of 37 without PV or 7 with 7.5-kW PV. The two-story 2,288-ft2 home is one of 9 certified homes. All of the...

  13. Theoretical study of reactions of HO{sub 2} in low-temperature oxidation of benzene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altarawneh, Mohammednoor; Dlugogorski, Bogdan Z.; Kennedy, Eric M.; Mackie, John C.

    2010-07-15

    We have generated a set of thermodynamic and kinetic parameters for the reactions involving HO{sub 2} in the very early stages of benzene oxidation at low temperatures using density functional theory (DFT). In particular, we report the rate constants for the reactions of HO{sub 2} with benzene and phenyl. The calculated reaction rate constant for the abstraction of H-C{sub 6}H{sub 5} by HO{sub 2} is found to be in good agreement with the limited experimental values. HO{sub 2} addition to benzene is found to be more important than direct abstraction. We show that the reactions of HO{sub 2} with the phenyl radical generate the propagating radical OH in a highly exoergic reaction. The results presented herein should be useful in modeling the oxidation of aromatic compounds at low temperatures. (author)

  14. “Nodal Gap” induced by the incommensurate diagonal spin density modulation in underdoped high- <mi>Tmi>c> superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Tao; Gao, Yi; Zhu, Jian -Xin

    2015-03-07

    Recently it was revealed that the whole Fermi surface is fully gapped for several families of underdoped cuprates. The existence of the finite energy gap along the <mi>d>-wave nodal lines (nodal gap) contrasts the common understanding of the <mi>d>-wave pairing symmetry, which challenges the present theories for the high-<mi>Tmi><mi>c>superconductors. Here we propose that the incommensurate diagonal spin-density-wave order can account for the above experimental observation. The Fermi surface and the local density of states are also studied. Our results are in good agreement with many important experiments in high-<mi>Tmi><mi>c>superconductors.

  15. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Ferguson Design and Construction Inc., Sagaponack, NY, Custom Home

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Long Island, NY, that scored HERS 43 without PV. This 5,088-square-foot custom home has R-25 double-stud walls, a vaulted roof with R-40 blown cellulose, R-10 XPS under slab, a hydro air system with 91% efficient boiler for forced air and radiant floor heat, and 100% LED lights.

  16. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study 2013: Ferguson Design and Construction, Inc., Sagaponak, NY

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ferguson Design & Construction, Inc. Sagaponack, NY BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE The U.S. Department of Energy invites home builders across the country to meet the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specifi ed in DOE's Zero Energy Ready Home program (formerly known as Challenge Home). Every DOE Zero Energy ReadyHome starts with ENERGY STAR for Homes Version 3 for an energy-effi cient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Advanced technologies are designed

  17. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study 2013: Ithaca Neighborhood Housing Services, Ithaca, NY

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ithaca Neighborhood Housing Services Ithaca, NY BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE The U.S. Department of Energy invites home builders across the country to meet the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specifi ed in DOE's Zero Energy Ready Home program (formerly known as Challenge Home). Every DOE Zero Energy Ready Home starts with ENERGY STAR for Homes Version 3 for an energy-effi cient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Advanced technologies are designed in to

  18. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Dow Chemical Co - Midland - MI 06

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Midland - MI 06 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Dow Chemical Co. - Midland (MI.06 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Midland , Michigan MI.06-1 Evaluation Year: Circa 1987 MI.06-2 Site Operations: Conducted development work for production of magnesium-thorium alloys. MI.06-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - AEC licensed site MI.06-1 MI.06-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled:

  19. Isolation of 163Ho from dysprosium target material by HPLC for neutrino mass measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mocko, Veronika; Taylor, Wayne  A.; Nortier, Francois M.; Engle, Jonathan  W.; Barnhart, Todd  E.; Nickles, Robert  J.; Pollington, Anthony  D.; Kunde, Gerd  J.; Rabin, Michael  W.; Birnbaum, Eva  R.

    2015-04-29

    The rare earth isotope 163Ho is of interest for neutrino mass measurements. This report describes the isolation of 163Ho from a proton-irradiated dysprosium target and its purification. A Dy metal target was irradiated with 16 MeV protons for 10 h. After target dissolution, 163Ho was separated from the bulk Dy via cation-exchange high performance liquid chromatography using 70 mmol dm–3 α-hydroxyisobutyric acid as the mobile phase. Subsequent purification of the collected Ho fraction was performed to remove the α-hydroxyisobutyrate chelating agent and to concentrate the Ho in a low ionic strength aqueous matrix. The final solution was characterized by MC-ICP-MS to determine the 163Ho/165Ho ratio, 163Ho and the residual Dy content. The HPLC purification process resulted in a decontamination factor 1.4E5 for Dy. As a result, the isolated Ho fraction contained 24.8 ±1.3 ng of 163Ho corresponding to holmium recovery of 72 ± 3%.

  20. Nitrogen effects on crystallization kinetics of amorphous TiOxNy thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hukari, Kyle; Dannenberg, Rand; Stach, E.A.

    2001-03-30

    The crystallization behavior of amorphous TiOxNy (x>>y) thin films was investigated by in-situ transmission electron microscopy. The Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kozolog (JMAK) theory is used to determine the Avrami exponent, activation energy, and the phase velocity pre-exponent. Addition of nitrogen inhibits diffusion, increasing the nucleation temperature, while decreasing the growth activation energy. Kinetic variables extracted from individual crystallites are compared to JMAK analysis of the fraction transformed and a change of 6 percent in the activation energy gives agreement between the methods. From diffraction patterns and index of refraction the crystallized phase was found to be predominantly anatase.

  1. DOE Zero Ready Home Case Study: AquaZephyr, Eco-Vilage Ithaca, Ithaca NY

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AquaZephyr Eco-Village Ithaca Ithaca, NY DOE ZERO ENERGY READY HOME(tm) The U.S. Department of Energy invites home builders across the country to meet the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specified in DOE's Zero Energy Ready Home program (formerly known as Challenge Home). Every DOE Zero Energy Ready Home starts with ENERGY STAR Certified Homes Version 3.0 for an energy-efficient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Advanced technologies are designed in to

  2. DOE Zero Ready Home Case Study: Greenhill Contracting, The Preserve, New Paltz, NY

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Preserve New Paltz, NY DOE ZERO ENERGY READY HOME(tm) The U.S. Department of Energy invites home builders across the country to meet the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specified in DOE's Zero Energy Ready Home program (formerly known as Challenge Home). Every DOE Zero Energy Ready Home starts with ENERGY STAR Certified Homes Version 3.0 for an energy-efficient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Advanced technologies are designed in to give you

  3. CRANE CO. 757 THIRD AVENUE NEW YORK. N.Y. THOMAS UNGERLAND ASSOCIATE GENERAL COUNSEL

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ? z _ - c 0-e . CRANE CO. 757 THIRD AVENUE NEW YORK. N.Y. THOMAS UNGERLAND ASSOCIATE GENERAL COUNSEL December 14, 1987 James J. Fiore Director Office of Nuclear Energy Department of Energy Washington, D.C. Re: Crane - Indian Orchard Dear M r. Fiore: W e acknowledge receipt of your letter to Paul Hundt, dated September 29, 1987, which requests certain information about Crane's plant site in Indian Orchard, Massachusetts. The plant is not currently operating. Crane was unable to locate any records

  4. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- General Motors Co - Flint - MI 07

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Motors Co - Flint - MI 07 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: GENERAL MOTORS CO. (MI.07 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: A.C. Spark Plug Dort Highway Plant MI.07-1 MI.07-2 Location: Flint , Michigan MI.07-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MI.07-3 Site Operations: Processed thorium oxide, uranium oxide, and beryllium oxide into crucibles for the Chicago Area. MI.07-3 MI.07-4 MI.07-5 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination

  5. The Office of Minority Economic Impact (MI) was established in...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Minority Economic Impact (MI) was established in Fiscal Year 1979 pursuant to Section 641 ... PART 3 - - MINORITY ECONOMIC IMPACT SEC. 641. MINORITY ECONOMIC IMPACT. "(a) Establishment ...

  6. ,"Detroit, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Detroit, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release...

  7. MINOS Experiment and NuMI Beam Home Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NuMI-MINOS Neutrino Logo NuMI Beamline and MINOS Experiment Neutrino Logo The MINOS Experiment and NuMI Beamline Fermilab Logo MINOS Experiment Links ◊ MINOS for the Public ◊ Scientific Results ◊ MINOS at Work ◊ NuMI at Work ◊ MINOS+ Experiment Fermilab Neutrino Links ◊ Neutrino FAQ ◊ MINOS Underground Areas at Fermilab ◊ PPD Intensity Frontier Dept Back to - - - ◊ Fermilab at Work ◊ Fermilab Home the MINOS Far Detector in the Soudan Mine MINOS collaborators assembling the

  8. Magnetic structures of R5Ni2In4 and R11Ni4In9 ( R = Tb and Ho...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Tb and Ho): Strong hierarchy in the temperature dependence of the magnetic ordering in the multiple rare-earth sublattices In this study, the magnetic properties and magnetic ...

  9. Role for DNA methylation in the regulation of miR-200c and miR-141 expression in normal and cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vrba, Lukas; Jensen, Taylor J.; Garbe, James C.; Heimark, Ronald L.; Cress, Anne E.; Dickinson, Sally; Stampfer, Martha R.; Futscher, Bernard W.

    2009-12-23

    BACKGROUND: The microRNA-200 family participates in the maintenance of an epithelial phenotype and loss of its expression can result in epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Furthermore, the loss of expression of miR-200 family members is linked to an aggressive cancer phenotype. Regulation of the miR-200 family expression in normal and cancer cells is not fully understood. METHODOLOGY/ PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Epigenetic mechanisms participate in the control of miR-200c and miR-141 expression in both normal and cancer cells. A CpG island near the predicted mir-200c/mir-141 transcription start site shows a striking correlation between miR-200c and miR-141 expression and DNA methylation in both normal and cancer cells, as determined by MassARRAY technology. The CpG island is unmethylated in human miR-200/miR-141 expressing epithelial cells and in miR-200c/miR-141 positive tumor cells. The CpG island is heavily methylated in human miR-200c/miR-141 negative fibroblasts and miR-200c/miR-141 negative tumor cells. Mouse cells show a similar inverse correlation between DNA methylation and miR-200c expression. Enrichment of permissive histone modifications, H3 acetylation and H3K4 trimethylation, is seen in normal miR-200c/miR-141-positive epithelial cells, as determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to real-time PCR. In contrast, repressive H3K9 dimethylation marks are present in normal miR-200c/miR-141-negative fibroblasts and miR-200c/miR-141 negative cancer cells and the permissive histone modifications are absent. The epigenetic modifier drug, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, reactivates miR-200c/miR-141 expression showing that epigenetic mechanisms play a functional role in their transcriptional control. CONCLUSIONS/ SIGNIFICANCE: We report that DNA methylation plays a role in the normal cell type-specific expression of miR-200c and miR-141 and this role appears evolutionarily conserved, since similar results were obtained in mouse. Aberrant DNA methylation of the miR-200c/141 CpG island is closely linked to their inappropriate silencing in cancer cells. Since the miR-200c cluster plays a significant role in EMT, our results suggest an important role for DNA methylation in the control of phenotypic conversions in normal cells.

  10. The origin and fate of the sediments composing a migrating dune field, Amagansett, NY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maher, T. (Suffolk Community Coll., Selden, NY (United States). Environmental Science Dept.); Kandelin, J. (Suffolk Community Coll., Selden, NY (United States). Dept. of Earth and Space Science); Black, J.A. (Geosciences Inc., Patchogue, NY (United States))

    1993-03-01

    The migrating dune system, located in Amagansett, NY, consists of a series of three parabolic dunes ranging in heights from 10 to 30 meters. The dunes are migrating under the influence of the prevailing winds, in a southeasterly direction. The migration continues until the dunes encounter the countervailing prevailing winds, off the Atlantic Ocean. A series of flow charts have been prepared to indicate the possible sources of sediment for this system. These charts, in conjunction with geomorphic analysis, stratigraphic data and various sediment characteristics indicate that the sediments are transported by coastal currents. Once deposited they form a linear dune system. Eolian transport from this dune then supplies the sediment to the migrating dune system.

  11. miR-92a family and their target genes in tumorigenesis and metastasis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Molin; Guan, Xingfang; Sun, Yuqiang; Mi, Jun; Shu, Xiaohong; Liu, Fang; Li, Chuangang

    2014-04-15

    The miR-92a family, including miR-25, miR-92a-1, miR-92a-2 and miR-363, arises from three different paralog clusters miR-17-92, miR-106a-363, and miR-106b-25 that are highly conservative in the process of evolution, and it was thought as a group of microRNAs (miRNAs) correlated with endothelial cells. Aberrant expression of miR-92a family was detected in multiple cancers, and the disturbance of miR-92a family was related with tumorigenesis and tumor development. In this review, the progress on the relationship between miR-92a family and their target genes and malignant tumors will be summarized. - Highlights: Aberrant expression of miR-92a, miR-25 and miR-363 can be observed in many kinds of malignant tumors. The expression of miR-92a family is regulated by LOH, epigenetic alteration, transcriptional factors such as SP1, MYC, E2F, wild-type p53 etc. Roles of miR-92a family in tumorigenesis and development: promoting cell proliferation, invasion and metastasis, inhibiting cell apoptosis.

  12. Detroit, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    data. Release Date: 09302015 Next Release Date: 10302015 Referring Pages: U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Imports by Point of Entry Detroit, MI Natural Gas Imports by Pipeline from...

  13. Detroit, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Date: 09302015 Next Release Date: 10302015 Referring Pages: U.S. Price of Natural Gas Pipeline Imports by Point of Entry Detroit, MI Natural Gas Imports by Pipeline from...

  14. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Revere Copper and Brass Co - MI 04

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Revere Copper and Brass Co - MI 04 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: REVERE COPPER AND BRASS CO. ( MI.04 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Revere Copper and Brass MI.04-1 Location: 5851 West Jefferson Street , Detroit , Michigan MI.04-1 Evaluation Year: 1990 MI.04-2 Site Operations: Extrusion of tuballoy rods, myrnalloy rods and beryllium shapes in the 1940s. MI.04-3 MI.04-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Radiation levels below criteria

  15. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Baker-Perkins Co - MI 13

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Baker-Perkins Co - MI 13 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Baker-Perkins Co (MI 13) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Saginaw , Michigan MI.13-1 Evaluation Year: 1991 MI.13-1 MI.13-2 Site Operations: Small scale oxide mixing demonstrations and testing in May, 1956. MI.13-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination remote based on limited scope of activities at the site MI.13-3 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes

  16. Yu Ho (Ric) Wen > Postdoc - Archer Group > Researchers, Postdocs &

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Graduates > The Energy Materials Center at Cornell Yu Ho (Ric) Wen Postdoc - Archer Group yw563@cornell.edu Ric completed his PhD from National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan. His current research involves rheology and structure of tethered hybrid materials and their applications to lubricants

  17. Analysis of emission spectra of Ho{sup 3+}:LFBCd glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naresh, V. Buddhudu, S.

    2014-04-24

    In the present paper, we report on the absorption and emission properties of (0.1-1.5 mol %) Ho{sup 3+} doped LFBCd (Li{sub 2}O{sub ?}LiF{sub ?}B{sub 2}O{sub 3?}CdO) glasses prepared via melt quenching method. On exciting these glasses at (?{sub exci}) = 452 nm, two emissions at 556 nm ({sup 5}S{sub 2}?{sup 5}I{sub 8}; Green), 655 nm ({sup 5}F{sub 5}?{sup 5}I{sub 8}; Red) have been obtained. Upon exciting these glasses with a 980 nm diode laser, NIR emissions at 1195 nm ({sup 5}I{sub 6}?{sup 5}I{sub 8}), 1951 nm ({sup 5}I{sub 7}?{sup 5}I{sub 8}) have been measured for 1 mol % Ho{sup 3+}:LFBCd glass. For higher concentration beyond 1.0 mol %, emission quenching of Ho{sup 3+} glass has been noticed and which has successfully been explained in terms of an energy level diagram. From absorption cross-section data, stimulated emission cross-section has been evaluated by applying McCumber's theory and further cross-sectional gain has also been computed for the emissions at 1195 nm (?1.20 ?m) and 1951 nm (?2.0 ?m) of 1 mol % Ho{sup 3+}:LFBCd glass.

  18. Origin State>> CA ID ID ID IL MD NM NM NY OH TN TN TN, WA, CA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NY OH TN TN TN, WA, CA TN TN TN TX Total Shipments by Route Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Batelle Energy Alliance Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Argonne National Laboratory Aberdeen Proving Ground Sandia National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory Brookhaven National Laboratory Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Duratek/Energy Solutions Babcox & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12 Plant Materials & Energy Corporation (M&EC) Perma-Fix

  19. Origin State>> CA ID ID IL IL KY NM NM NV NY OH TN TN TN, WA,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IL IL KY NM NM NV NY OH TN TN TN, WA, CA TN TN TN TN Total Shipments by Route Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Batelle Energy Alliance Idaho National Laboratory Energx Argonne National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Sandia National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory National Security Technologies West Valley Environmental Services Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Duratek/Energy Solutions Babcox & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12 Plant

  20. HIA 2015 DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: United Way of Long Island Housing Development Corporation, Patchogue, NY

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Way of Long Island Housing Development Corporation Patchogue, NY DOE ZERO ENERGY READY HOME(tm) The U.S. Department of Energy invites home builders across the country to meet the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specified in DOE's Zero Energy Ready Home program (formerly known as Challenge Home). Every DOE Zero Energy Ready Home starts with ENERGY STAR Certified Homes Version 3.0 for an energy-efficient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Advanced

  1. Thin films of the spin ice compound Ho{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Thin films of the spin ice compound Ho{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Thin films of the spin ice compound Ho{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} The pyrochlore compounds Ho{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} and Dy{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} show an exotic form of magnetism called the spin ice state, resulting from the interplay between geometrical frustration and ferromagnetic coupling. A fascinating feature of this state is the appearance of magnetic

  2. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Mitts-Merrel Co - MI 14

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Mitts-Merrel Co - MI 14 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: MITTS-MERREL CO. (MI.14 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Mitts & Merrell Co. MI.14-1 Location: Saginaw , Michigan MI.14-1 Evaluation Year: 1993 MI.14-2 Site Operations: Reduced thorium metal chunks into particle sized pieces on a small test scale during the mid-1950s. MI.14-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based on limited quantity of

  3. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Naval Ordnance Plant - MI 0-03

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Plant - MI 0-03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: NAVAL ORDNANCE PLANT (MI.0-03) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DoD for action Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Centerline , Michigan MI.0-03-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MI.0-03-1 Site Operations: Assembled bomb components. MI.0-03-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority - Referred to DoD MI.0-03-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None

  4. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Dow-Detroit Edison Project - MI 0-02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Dow-Detroit Edison Project - MI 0-02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Dow-Detroit Edison Project (MI.0-02 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Detroit , Michigan MI.0-02-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MI.0-02-1 Site Operations: Performed reference design work for a special fast breeder type reactor. MI.0-02-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No radioactive material handled at the site MI.0-02-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: No

  5. The generalized second law of thermodynamics in Ho?ava-Lifshitz cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamil, Mubasher; Saridakis, Emmanuel N.; Setare, M.R. E-mail: msaridak@phys.uoa.gr

    2010-11-01

    We investigate the validity of the generalized second law of thermodynamics in a universe governed by Ho?ava-Lifshitz gravity. Under the equilibrium assumption, that is in the late-time cosmological regime, we calculate separately the entropy time-variation for the matter fluid and, using the modified entropy relation, that of the apparent horizon itself. We find that under detailed balance the generalized second law is generally valid for flat and closed geometry and it is conditionally valid for an open universe, while beyond detailed balance it is only conditionally valid for all curvatures. Furthermore, we also follow the effective approach showing that it can lead to misleading results. The non-complete validity of the generalized second law could either provide a suggestion for its different application, or act as an additional problematic feature of Ho?ava-Lifshitz gravity.

  6. Visualiser of two-micron laser radiation based on Ho:CaF{sub 2} crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyapin, A A; Ryabochkina, P A; Ushakov, S N; Fedorov, P P

    2014-06-30

    The anti-Stokes luminescence spectra of Ho:CaF{sub 2} crystals corresponding to the {sup 5}G{sub 4} ? {sup 5}I{sub 8}, {sup 5}G{sub 5} ? {sup 5}I{sub 8}, {sup 5}F{sub 3} ? {sup 5}I{sub 8}, {sup 5}F{sub 4}({sup 5}S{sub 2}) ? {sup 5}I{sub 8}, {sup 5}F{sub 5} ? {sup 5}I{sub 8}, {sup 5}S{sub 2} ? {sup 5}I{sub 7}, {sup 5}I{sub 4} ? {sup 5}I{sub 8}, {sup 5}I{sub 5} ? {sup 5}I{sub 8}, {sup 5}F{sub 5} ? {sup 5}I{sub 7}, {sup 5}F{sub 3} ? {sup 5}I{sub 6}, {sup 5}I{sub 6} ? {sup 5}I{sub 8}, {sup 5}F{sub 5} ? {sup 5}I{sub 6}, and {sup 5}I{sub 5} ? {sup 5}I{sub 7} transitions upon excitation of the {sup 5}I{sub 7} level of Ho{sup 3+} ions are studied. A method for visualisation of IR radiation in the two-micron range using Ho:CaF{sub 2} crystals is proposed. The energy efficiency of conversion of two-micron laser radiation to radiation in the red spectral range 620 690 nm by a 1 mol % HoF{sub 3}:CaF{sub 2} crystal is estimated to be no higher than 0.02%. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  7. Holographic dark energy with varying gravitational constant in Ho?ava-Lifshitz cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Setare, M.R.; Jamil, Mubasher E-mail: mjamil@camp.nust.edu.pk

    2010-02-01

    We investigate the holographic dark energy scenario with a varying gravitational constant in a flat background in the context of Ho?ava-Lifshitz gravity. We extract the exact differential equation determining the evolution of the dark energy density parameter, which includes G variation term. Also we discuss a cosmological implication of our work by evaluating the dark energy equation of state for low redshifts containing varying G corrections.

  8. miRNA-205 affects infiltration and metastasis of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhouquan; Department of Tumor, SenGong Hospital of Shaanxi, Xian 710300 ; Liao, Hehe; Deng, Zhiping; Yang, Po; Du, Ning; Zhanng, Yunfeng; Ren, Hong

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: We detected expression of miR-205 in breast cancer cell lines and tissue samples. We suggest miR-205 is downregulated in human breast cancer tissues and MCF7 cells. We suggest the lower expression of miR-205 play a role in breast cancer onset. These data suggest that miR-205 directly targets HER3 in human breast cancer. -- Abstract: Background: An increasing number of studies have shown that miRNAs are commonly deregulated in human malignancies, but little is known about the function of miRNA-205 (miR-205) in human breast cancer. The present study investigated the influence of miR-205 on breast cancer malignancy. Methods: The expression level of miR-205 in the MCF7 breast cancer cell line was determined by quantitative (q)RT-PCR. We then analyzed the expression of miR-205 in breast cancer and paired non-tumor tissues. Finally, the roles of miR-205 in regulating tumor proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and target gene expression were studied by MTT assay, flow cytometry, qRT-PCR, Western blotting and luciferase assay. Results: miR-205 was downregulated in breast cancer cells or tissues compared with normal breast cell lines or non-tumor tissues. Overexpression of miR-205 reduced the growth and colony-formation capacity of MCF7 cells by inducing apoptosis. Overexpression of miR-205 inhibited MCF7 cell migration and invasiveness. By bioinformation analysis, miR-205 was predicted to bind to the 3? untranslated regions of human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)3 mRNA, and upregulation of miR-205 reduced HER3 protein expression. Conclusion: miR-205 is a tumor suppressor in human breast cancer by post-transcriptional inhibition of HER3 expression.

  9. White light emitting Ho{sup 3+}-doped CdS nanocrystal ingrained glass nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dey, Chirantan; Karmakar, Basudeb; Goswami, Madhumita

    2015-02-23

    We report the generation of white light from Ho{sup 3+} ion doped CdS nanocrystal ingrained borosilicate glass nanocomposites prepared by the conventional melt-quench method. Near visible 405?nm diode laser excited white light emission is produced by tuning the blue emission from the Ho{sup 3+} ions, green band edge, and orange-red surface-state emissions of the nanocrystalline CdS, which are further controlled by the size of the nanocrystals. The absorption and emission spectra evidenced the excitation of Ho{sup 3+} ions by absorption of photons emitted by the CdS nanocrystals. The high color rendering index (CRI?=?8489) and befitting chromaticity coordinates (x?=?0.3080.309, y?=?0.3260.338) of white light emission, near visible harmless excitation wavelength (405?nm), and high absorbance values at excitation wavelength point out that these glass nanocomposites may serve as a prominent candidate for resin free high power white light emitting diodes.

  10. Cosmological QCD phase transition in steady non-equilibrium dissipative Ho?avaLifshitz early universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khodadi, M. Sepangi, H.R.

    2014-07-15

    We study the phase transition from quarkgluon plasma to hadrons in the early universe in the context of non-equilibrium thermodynamics. According to the standard model of cosmology, a phase transition associated with chiral symmetry breaking after the electro-weak transition has occurred when the universe was about 110?s old. We focus attention on such a phase transition in the presence of a viscous relativistic cosmological background fluid in the framework of non-detailed balance Ho?avaLifshitz cosmology within an effective model of QCD. We consider a flat FriedmannRobertsonWalker universe filled with a non-causal and a causal bulk viscous cosmological fluid respectively and investigate the effects of the running coupling constants of Ho?avaLifshitz gravity, ?, on the evolution of the physical quantities relevant to a description of the early universe, namely, the temperature T, scale factor a, deceleration parameter q and dimensionless ratio of the bulk viscosity coefficient to entropy density (?)/s . We assume that the bulk viscosity cosmological background fluid obeys the evolution equation of the steady truncated (Eckart) and full version of the IsraelStewart fluid, respectively. -- Highlights: In this paper we have studied quarkhadron phase transition in the early universe in the context of the Ho?avaLifshitz model. We use a flat FRW universe with the bulk viscosity cosmological background fluid obeying the evolution equation of the steady truncated (Eckart) and full version of the IsraelStewart fluid, respectively.

  11. Port Huron, MI Liquefied Natural Gas Exports (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Port Huron, MI Liquefied Natural Gas Exports (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1 2014 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 2015 1 1 1 1 1 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 02/29/2016 Next Release Date: 03/31/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Exports by Point of Exit Port Huron, MI LNG Exports to All Countries

  12. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Amex Specialty Metal Corp - MI 0-01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Amex Specialty Metal Corp - MI 0-01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Amex Specialty Metal Corp (MI.0-01 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Coldwater , Michigan MI.0-01-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MI.0-01-1 Site Operations: No indication that AMEX performed work for MED or AEC activities. Originally included on FUSRAP list due to fact that AMEX purchased milling equipment from a company that had done uranium milling.

  13. HIA 2015 DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Greenhill Contracting, Green Acres #20, #26, #28, New Paltz, NY

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Green Acres #20, #26, #28 New Paltz, NY DOE ZERO ENERGY READY HOME(tm) The U.S. Department of Energy invites home builders across the country to meet the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specified in DOE's Zero Energy Ready Home program (formerly known as Challenge Home). Every DOE Zero Energy Ready Home starts with ENERGY STAR Certified Homes Version 3.0 for an energy-efficient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Advanced technologies are designed in to

  14. Radiosensitizing Effects of Ectopic miR-101 on Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cells Depend on the Endogenous miR-101 Level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Susie; Wang Hongyan; Ng, Wooi Loon; Curran, Walter J.; Wang Ya

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Previously, we showed that ectopic miR-101 could sensitize human tumor cells to radiation by targeting ATM and DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) to inhibit DNA repair, as the endogenous miR-101 levels are low in tumors in general. However, the heterogeneity of human cancers may result in an exception. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that a few tumor cell lines with a high level of endogenous miR-101 would prove less response to ectopic miR-101. Methods and Materials: Fourteeen non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines and one immortalized non-malignant lung epithelial cell line (NL20) were used for comparing endogenous miR-101 levels by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Based on the different miR-101 levels, four cell lines with different miR-101 levels were chosen for transfection with a green fluorescent protein-lentiviral plasmid encoding miR-101. The target protein levels were measured by using Western blotting. The radiosensitizing effects of ectopic miR-101 on these NSCLC cell lines were determined by a clonogenic assay and xenograft mouse model. Results: The endogenous miR-101 level was similar or lower in 13 NSCLC cell lines but was 11-fold higher in one cell line (H157) than in NL20 cells. Although ectopic miR-101 efficiently decreased the ATM and DNA-PKcs levels and increased the radiosensitization level in H1299, H1975, and A549 cells, it did not change the levels of the miR-101 targets or radiosensitivity in H157 cells. Similar results were observed in xenograft mice. Conclusions: A small number of NSCLC cell lines could have a high level of endogenous miR-101. The ectopic miR-101 was able to radiosensitize most NSCLC cells, except for the NSCLC cell lines that had a much higher endogenous miR-101 level. These results suggest that when we choose one miRNA as a therapeutic tool, the endogenous level of the miRNA in each tumor should be considered.

  15. Observation of large magnetocaloric effect in HoRu{sub 2}Si{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paramanik, Tapas Das, Kalipada; Das, I.

    2014-02-28

    Detailed magnetic, magnetotransport, and magnetocaloric measurements on HoRu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} have been performed. In this Letter, we report presence of spin reorientation transition below paramagnetic to antiferromagnetic transition temperature (T{sub N} = 19 K). Large magnetic entropy change 9.1 J/kg K and large negative magnetoresistance ∼21% in a magnetic field of 5 T has been observed around T{sub N}, which is associated with field induced spin-flip metamagnetic transition.

  16. miR-30a suppresses breast cancer cell proliferation and migration by targeting Eya2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, Jing; Xu, Xiaojie; Kang, Lei; Zhou, Liying; Wang, Shibin; Lu, Juming; Cheng, Long; Fan, Zhongyi; Yuan, Bin; Tian, Peirong; Zheng, Xiaofei; Yu, Chengze; Ye, Qinong; Lv, Zhaohui

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: miR-30a represses Eya2 expression by binding to the 3?-untranslated region of Eya2. The miR-30a/EYA2 axis regulates breast cancer cell proliferation and migration. The miR-30a/EYA2 axis modulates G1/S cell cycle progression. The miR-30a/EYA2 axis is dysregulated in breast cancer patients. - Abstract: Eye absent (Eya) proteins are involved in cell fate determination in a broad spectrum of cells and tissues. Aberrant expression of Eya2 has been documented in a variety of cancers and correlates with clinical outcome. However, whether microRNAs (miRNAs) can regulate Eya2 expression remains unknown. Here, we show that miR-30a represses Eya2 expression by binding to the 3?-untranslated region of Eya2. Overexpression of Eya2 in miR-30a-transfected breast cancer cells effectively rescued the inhibition of cell proliferation and migration caused by miR-30a. Knockdown of Eya2 by small-interfering RNA (siRNA) in breast cancer cells mimicked the effect induced by miR-30a and abolished the ability of miR-30a to regulate breast cancer cell proliferation and migration. The miR-30a/Eya2 axis could regulate G1/S cell cycle progression, accompanied by the modulation of expression of cell cycle-related proteins, including cyclin A, cyclin D1, cyclin E, and c-Myc. Moreover, miR-30a expression was downregulated in breast cancer patients, and negatively correlated with Eya2, which was upregulated in breast cancer patients. These data suggest that the miR-30a/Eya2 axis may play an important role in breast cancer development and progression and that miR-30a activation or Eya2 inhibition may be a useful strategy for cancer treatment.

  17. Sample dependence of giant magnetocaloric effect in a cluster-glass system Ho{sub 5}Pd{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toyoizumi, Saori Tamaki, Akira; Kitazawa, Hideaki; Mamiya, Hiroaki; Terada, Noriki; Tamura, Ryo; Dönni, Andreas; Kawamura, Yukihiko; Morita, Kengo

    2015-05-07

    In order to investigate the effect of vacancy on the magnetocaloric effect in Ho{sub 5}Pd{sub 2}, we have carried out X-ray diffraction, magnetization, and specific heat measurements in the rare-earth intermetallic compound Ho{sub 5+x}Pd{sub 2}(−0.4 ≤ x ≤ 0.4). The maximum magnetic entropy change −ΔS{sub m}{sup max}, the maximum adiabatic temperature change ΔT{sub ad}{sup max}, and the relative cooling power of Ho{sub 5+x}Pd{sub 2} take large values at x = 0−0.4 for the field change of 5 T. The paramagnetic Curie temperature θ{sub p} increases with an increase of x. This fact suggests that the enhancement of ferromagnetic coupling among the correlated spins leads to the increase of magnetocaloric effect.

  18. Magnetism of Ho1-xTbxAl? alloys: Critical dependence of a first-order transition on Tb concentration

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khan, Mahmud; Mudryk, Ya.; Gschneidner, K. A.; Pecharsky, V. K.

    2011-12-27

    HoAl? exhibits a first-order spin reorientation transition at 20 K, which is manifested as a sharp peak in the heat capacity. When Ho is partially replaced by only 5% of Tb, the sharp heat-capacity peak in Ho1-xTbxAl? (x = 0.05) disappears, and then reappears again for x ? 0.07. For x = 0.05, the anomaly corresponding to the spin reorientation transition is barely seen in the heat capacity, but as x exceeds 0.07 the weak anomaly transforms to a sharp peak. The spin reorientation transition temperature increases to 29 K for x = 0.05, and as x increases further themoretransition shifts to lower temperature and returns to ~20 K for x = 0.25. The transition is no longer observed when x exceeds 0.60. Temperature-dependent x-ray powder-diffraction data confirm the first-order nature of the spin reorientation transition for the alloy with x = 0.40, and indicate that the compound retains the room-temperature cubic structure within the sensitivity of the technique. Experimental observations are discussed considering the easy magnetization directions of HoAl? and TbAl?.less

  19. Genome-Wide Analysis of miRNA targets in Brachypodium and Biomass Energy Crops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Pamela J.

    2015-08-11

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) contribute to the control of numerous biological processes through the regulation of specific target mRNAs. Although the identities of these targets are essential to elucidate miRNA function, the targets are much more difficult to identify than the small RNAs themselves. Before this work, we pioneered the genome-wide identification of the targets of Arabidopsis miRNAs using an approach called PARE (German et al., Nature Biotech. 2008; Nature Protocols, 2009). Under this project, we applied PARE to Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium), a model plant in the Poaceae family, which includes the major food grain and bioenergy crops. Through in-depth global analysis and examination of specific examples, this research greatly expanded our knowledge of miRNAs and target RNAs of Brachypodium. New regulation in response to environmental stress or tissue type was found, and many new miRNAs were discovered. More than 260 targets of new and known miRNAs with PARE sequences at the precise sites of miRNA-guided cleavage were identified and characterized. Combining PARE data with the small RNA data also identified the miRNAs responsible for initiating approximately 500 phased loci, including one of the novel miRNAs. PARE analysis also revealed that differentially expressed miRNAs in the same family guide specific target RNA cleavage in a correspondingly tissue-preferential manner. The project included generation of small RNA and PARE resources for bioenergy crops, to facilitate ongoing discovery of conserved miRNA-target RNA regulation. By associating specific miRNA-target RNA pairs with known physiological functions, the research provides insights about gene regulation in different tissues and in response to environmental stress. This, and release of new PARE and small RNA data sets should contribute basic knowledge to enhance breeding and may suggest new strategies for improvement of biomass energy crops.

  20. DLEU2, frequently deleted in malignancy, functions as a critical host gene of the cell cycle inhibitory microRNAs miR-15a and miR-16-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lerner, Mikael; Harada, Masako; Loven, Jakob; Castro, Juan; Davis, Zadie; Oscier, David; Henriksson, Marie; Sangfelt, Olle; Grander, Dan; Corcoran, Martin M.

    2009-10-15

    The microRNAs miR-15a and miR-16-1 are downregulated in multiple tumor types and are frequently deleted in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma. Despite their abundance in most cells the transcriptional regulation of miR-15a/16-1 remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that the putative tumor suppressor DLEU2 acts as a host gene of these microRNAs. Mature miR-15a/miR-16-1 are produced in a Drosha-dependent process from DLEU2 and binding of the Myc oncoprotein to two alterative DLEU2 promoters represses both the host gene transcript and levels of mature miR-15a/miR-16-1. In line with a functional role for DLEU2 in the expression of the microRNAs, the miR-15a/miR-16-1 locus is retained in four CLL cases that delete both promoters of this gene and expression analysis indicates that this leads to functional loss of mature miR-15a/16-1. We additionally show that DLEU2 negatively regulates the G1 Cyclins E1 and D1 through miR-15a/miR-16-1 and provide evidence that these oncoproteins are subject to miR-15a/miR-16-1-mediated repression under normal conditions. We also demonstrate that DLEU2 overexpression blocks cellular proliferation and inhibits the colony-forming ability of tumor cell lines in a miR-15a/miR-16-1-dependent way. Together the data illuminate how inactivation of DLEU2 promotes cell proliferation and tumor progression through functional loss of miR-15a/miR-16-1.

  1. Microfluidic Molecular Assay Platform for the Detection of miRNAs...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article: Microfluidic Molecular Assay Platform for the Detection of miRNAs, mRNAs, Proteins, and Post-translational Modifications at Single-cell Resolution. Citation Details...

  2. Ultraviolet and white photon avalanche upconversion in Ho{sup 3+}-doped nanophase glass ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lahoz, F.; Martin, I.R.; Calvilla-Quintero, J.M.

    2005-01-31

    Ho{sup 3+}-doped fluoride nanophase glass ceramics have been synthesized from silica-based oxyfluoride glass. An intense white emission light is observed by the naked eye under near infrared excitation at 750 nm. This visible upconversion is due to three strong emission bands in the primary color components, red, green, and blue. Besides, ultraviolet signals are also recorded upon the same excitation wavelength. The excitation mechanism of both the ultraviolet and the visible emissions is a photon avalanche process with a relatively low pump power threshold at about 20 mW. The total upconverted emission intensity has been estimated to increase by about a factor of 20 in the glass ceramic compared to the precursor glass, in which an avalanche type mechanism is not generated.

  3. Groundwater protection for the NuMI project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wehmann, A.; Smart, W.; Menary, S.; Hylen, J.; Childress, S.

    1997-10-01

    The physics requirements for the long base line neutrino oscillation experiment MINOS dictate that the NuMI beamline be located in the aquifer at Fermilab. A methodology is described for calculating the level of radioactivation of groundwater caused by operation of this beamline. A conceptual shielding design for the 750 meter long decay pipe is investigated which would reduce radioactivation of the groundwater to below government standards. More economical shielding designs to meet these requirements are being explored. Also, information on local geology, hydrogeology, government standards, and a glossary have been included.

  4. Spin structure and magnetic frustration in multiferroic RMn{sub 2}O{sub 5} (R=Tb,Ho,Dy)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blake, G.R.; Chapon, L.C.; Radaelli, P.G.; Park, S.; Hur, N.; Cheong, S-W.; Rodriguez-Carvajal, J.

    2005-06-01

    We have studied the crystal and magnetic structures of the magnetoelectric materials RMn{sub 2}O{sub 5} (R=Tb,Ho,Dy) using neutron diffraction as a function of temperature. All three materials display incommensurate antiferromagnetic ordering below 40 K, becoming commensurate on further cooling. For R=Tb,Ho, a commensurate-incommensurate transition takes place at low temperatures. The commensurate magnetic structures have been solved and are discussed in terms of competing exchange interactions. The spin configuration within the ab plane is essentially the same for each system, and the radius of R determines the sign of the magnetic exchange between adjacent planes. The inherent magnetic frustration in these materials is lifted by a small lattice distortion, primarily involving shifts of the Mn{sup 3+} cations and giving rise to a canted antiferroelectric phase.

  5. Disorder from order among anisotropic next-nearest-neighbor Ising spin chains in SrHo2O4

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wen, J. -J.; Tian, W.; Garlea, V. O.; Koohpayeh, S. M.; McQueen, T. M.; Li, H. -F.; Yan, J. -Q.; Rodriguez-Rivera, J. A.; Vaknin, D.; Broholm, C. L.

    2015-02-26

    In this study, we describe why Ising spin chains with competing interactions in SrHo2O4 segregate into ordered and disordered ensembles at low temperatures (T). Using elastic neutron scattering, magnetization, and specific heat measurements, the two distinct spin chains are inferred to have Néel (↑↓↑↓) and double-Néel (↑↑↓↓) ground states, respectively. Below TN = 0.68(2)K, the Néel chains develop three-dimensional long range order (LRO), which arrests further thermal equilibration of the double-Néel chains so they remain in a disordered incommensurate state for T below TS = 0.52(2)K. SrHo2O4 distills an important feature of incommensurate low dimensional magnetism: kinetically trapped topological defectsmore » in a quasi–d–dimensional spin system can preclude order in d + 1 dimensions.« less

  6. Non-canonical microRNAs miR-320 and miR-702 promote proliferation in Dgcr8-deficient embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Byeong-Moo; Choi, Michael Y.

    2012-09-21

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) lacking non-canonical miRNAs proliferate slower. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-320 and miR-702 are two non-canonical miRNAs expressed in ESCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-320 and miR-702 promote proliferation of Dgcr8-deficient ESCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-320 targets p57 and helps to release Dgcr8-deficient ESCs from G1 arrest. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-702 targets p21 and helps to release Dgcr8-deficient ESCs from G1 arrest. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs are known to contribute significantly to stem cell phenotype by post-transcriptionally regulating gene expression. Most of our knowledge of microRNAs comes from the study of canonical microRNAs that require two sequential cleavages by the Drosha/Dgcr8 heterodimer and Dicer to generate mature products. In contrast, non-canonical microRNAs bypass the cleavage by the Drosha/Dgcr8 heterodimer within the nucleus but still require cytoplasmic cleavage by Dicer. The function of non-canonical microRNAs in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) remains obscure. It has been hypothesized that non-canonical microRNAs have important roles in ESCs based upon the phenotypes of ESC lines that lack these specific classes of microRNAs; Dicer-deficient ESCs lacking both canonical and non-canonical microRNAs have much more severe proliferation defect than Dgcr8-deficient ESCs lacking only canonical microRNAs. Using these cell lines, we identified two non-canonical microRNAs, miR-320 and miR-702, that promote proliferation of Dgcr8-deficient ESCs by releasing them from G1 arrest. This is accomplished by targeting the 3 Prime -untranslated regions of the cell cycle inhibitors p57 and p21 and thereby inhibiting their expression. This is the first report of the crucial role of non-canonical microRNAs in ESCs.

  7. miR-182 targets CHL1 and controls tumor growth and invasion in papillary thyroid carcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Hongling; Fang, Jin; Zhang, Jichen; Zhao, Zefei; Liu, Lianyong; Wang, Jingnan; Xi, Qian; Gu, Mingjun

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: miR-182 and CHL1 expression patterns are negatively correlated. CHL1 is a direct target of miR-182 in PTC cells. miR-182 suppression inhibits PTC cell growth and invasion. CHL1 is involved in miR-182-mediated cell behavior. - Abstract: In this study, we investigated the role and underlying mechanism of action of miR-182 in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). Bioinformatics analysis revealed close homolog of LI (CHL1) as a potential target of miR-182. Upregulation of miR-182 was significantly correlated with CHL1 downregulation in human PTC tissues and cell lines. miR-182 suppressed the expression of CHL1 mRNA through direct targeting of the 3?-untranslated region (3?-UTR). Downregulation of miR-182 suppressed growth and invasion of PTC cells. Silencing of CHL1 counteracted the effects of miR-182 suppression, while its overexpression mimicked these effects. Our data collectively indicate that miR-182 in PTC promotes cell proliferation and invasion through direct suppression of CHL1, supporting the potential utility of miR-182 inhibition as a novel therapeutic strategy against PTC.

  8. miR-128 and its target genes in tumorigenesis and metastasis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Molin, E-mail: molin_li@hotmail.com [Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Fu, Weiming [Center for Food Safety and Environmental Technology, Guangzhou Institute of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 511458 (China); Wo, Lulu; Shu, Xiaohong [Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116044 (China); Liu, Fang [The second affiliated hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116023 (China); Li, Chuangang, E-mail: li_chuangang@sina.com [The second affiliated hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2013-12-10

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of endogenous, non-coding, 1824 nucleotide length single-strand RNAs that could modulate gene expression at post-transcriptional level. Previous studies have shown that miR-128 enriched in the brain plays an important role in the development of nervous system and the maintenance of normal physical functions. Aberrant expression of miR-128 has been detected in many types of human tumors and its validated target genes are involved in cancer-related biological processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. In this review, we will summarize the roles of miR-128 and its target genes in tumorigenesis and metastasis. - Highlights: Aberrant expression of miR-128 can be observed in many kinds of malignant tumors. The molecular mechanisms regulating miR-128 expression are elucidated. Roles of miR-128 and its target genes in tumorigenesis and metastasis are summarized.

  9. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Cobblestone Homes, Midland, MI |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Cobblestone Homes, Midland, MI DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Cobblestone Homes, Midland, MI Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home in Midland, MI, that scored HERS 49 without PV or HERS 44 with 1.4 kW of PV. The custom home served as a prototype and energy efficiency demonstration model while performance testing was conducted. The 2-story, 2,745-ft2 home has 2.5 inches of closed-cell spray foam in the 2x4 wall cavities, plus 1-inch of rigid exterior foam; a

  10. File:USDA-CE-Production-GIFmaps-MI.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MI.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Michigan Ethanol Plant Locations Size of this preview: 463 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 600 pixels. Full...

  11. Climate Action Champions: Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, MI |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, MI Climate Action Champions: Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, MI The Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians is a 44,000-strong federally recognized Indian tribe that is an economic, social and cultural force in its community across the eastern Upper Peninsula counties of Chippewa, Luce, Mackinac, Schoolcraft, Alger, Delta and Marquette, with housing and tribal centers, casinos, and other enterprises that employ

  12. Training Session: Buffalo, NY

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This 3.5-hour training provides builders with a comprehensive review of zero energy-ready home construction including the business case, detailed specifications, and opportunities to be recognized...

  13. NY Green Bank

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    capital markets for large scale infrastructure are deep and robust. These markets enjoy economies of scale with low relative transaction costs and well-understood risk. These...

  14. miR-196a targets netrin 4 and regulates cell proliferation and migration of cervical cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jie; Zheng, Fangxia; Yu, Gang; Yin, Yanhua; Lu, Qingyang

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: miR-196a was overexpressed in cervical cancer tissue compared to normal tissue. miR-196a expression elevated proliferation and migration of cervical cancer cells. miR-196a inhibited NTN4 expression by binding 3?-UTR region of NTN4 mRNA. NTN4 inversely correlated with miR-196a expression in cervical tissue and cell line. NTN4 expression was low in cervical cancer tissue compared to normal tissue. -- Abstract: Recent research has uncovered tumor-suppressive and oncogenic potential of miR-196a in various tumors. However, the expression and mechanism of its function in cervical cancer remains unclear. In this study, we assess relative expression of miR-196a in cervical premalignant lesions, cervical cancer tissues, and four cancer cell lines using quantitative real-time PCR. CaSki and HeLa cells were treated with miR-196a inhibitors, mimics, or pCDNA/miR-196a to investigate the role of miR-196a in cancer cell proliferation and migration. We demonstrated that miR-196a was overexpressed in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 23 and cervical cancer tissue. Moreover, its expression contributes to the proliferation and migration of cervical cancer cells, whereas inhibiting its expression led to a reduction in proliferation and migration. Five candidate targets of miR-196a chosen by computational prediction and Cervical Cancer Gene Database search were measured for their mRNA in both miR-196a-overexpressing and -depleted cancer cells. Only netrin 4 (NTN4) expression displayed an inverse association with miR-196a. Fluorescent reporter assays revealed that miR-196a inhibited NTN4 expression by targeting one binding site in the 3?-untranslated region (3?-UTR) of NTN4 mRNA. Furthermore, qPCR and Western blot assays verified NTN4 expression was downregulated in cervical cancer tissues compared to normal controls, and in vivo mRNA level of NTN4 inversely correlated with miR-196a expression. In summary, our findings provide new insights about the functional role of miR-196a in cervical carcinogenesis and suggested a potential use of miR-196a for clinical diagnosis and as a therapeutic target.

  15. Magnetic structures of R5Ni2In4 and R11Ni4In9 ( R = Tb and Ho): Strong

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    hierarchy in the temperature dependence of the magnetic ordering in the multiple rare-earth sublattices (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Magnetic structures of R5Ni2In4 and R11Ni4In9 ( R = Tb and Ho): Strong hierarchy in the temperature dependence of the magnetic ordering in the multiple rare-earth sublattices Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on November 9, 2016 Title: Magnetic structures of R5Ni2In4 and R11Ni4In9 ( R = Tb and Ho): Strong

  16. miR-421 induces cell proliferation and apoptosis resistance in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma via downregulation of FOXO4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Liang; Department of Otolaryngology, Guangzhou General Hospital of PLA Guangzhou Command, Guangzhou 510010 ; Tang, Yanping; Wang, Jian; Yan, Zhongjie; Xu, Ruxiang

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •miR-421 is upregulated in nasopharyngeal carcinoma. •miR-421 induces cell proliferation and apoptosis resistance. •FOXO4 is a direct and functional target of miR-421. -- Abstract: microRNAs have been demonstrated to play important roles in cancer development and progression. Hence, identifying functional microRNAs and better understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms would provide new clues for the development of targeted cancer therapies. Herein, we reported that a microRNA, miR-421 played an oncogenic role in nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Upregulation of miR-421 induced, whereas inhibition of miR-421 repressed cell proliferation and apoptosis resistance. Furthermore, we found that upregulation of miR-421 inhibited forkhead box protein O4 (FOXO4) signaling pathway following downregulation of p21, p27, Bim and FASL expression by directly targeting FOXO4 3′UTR. Additionally, we demonstrated that FOXO4 expression is critical for miR-421-induced cell growth and apoptosis resistance. Taken together, our findings not only suggest that miR-421 promotes nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell proliferation and anti-apoptosis, but also uncover a novel regulatory mechanism for inactivation of FOXO4 in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

  17. Ionizing RadiationInducible miR-27b Suppresses Leukemia Proliferation via Targeting Cyclin A2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Bo; Li, Dongping; Kovalchuk, Anna; Litvinov, Dmitry; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Ionizing radiation is a common carcinogen that is important for the development of leukemia. However, the underlying epigenetic mechanisms remain largely unknown. The goal of the study was to explore microRNAome alterations induced by ionizing radiation (IR) in murine thymus, and to determine the role of IR-inducible microRNA (miRNA/miR) in the development of leukemia. Methods and Materials: We used the well-established C57BL/6 mouse model and miRNA microarray profiling to identify miRNAs that are differentially expressed in murine thymus in response to irradiation. TIB152 human leukemia cell line was used to determine the role of estrogen receptor? (ER?) in miR-27b transcription. The biological effects of ectopic miR-27b on leukemogenesis were measured by western immunoblotting, cell viability, apoptosis, and cell cycle analyses. Results: Here, we have shown that IR triggers the differential expression of miR-27b in murine thymus tissue in a dose-, time- and sex-dependent manner. miR-27b was significantly down-regulated in leukemia cell lines CCL119 and TIB152. Interestingly, ER? was overexpressed in those 2cell lines, and it was inversely correlated with miR-27b expression. Therefore, we used TIB152 as a model system to determine the role of ER? in miR-27b expression and the contribution of miR-27b to leukemogenesis. ?-Estradiol caused a rapid and transient reduction in miR-27b expression reversed by either ER?-neutralizing antibody or ERK1/2 inhibitor. Ectopic expression of miR-27b remarkably suppressed TIB152cell proliferation, at least in part, by inducing S-phase arrest. In addition, it attenuated the expression of cyclin A2, although it had no effect on the levels of PCNA, PPAR?, CDK2, p21, p27, p-p53, and cleaved caspase-3. Conclusion: Our data reveal that ?-estradiol/ER? signaling may contribute to the down-regulation of miR-27b in acute leukemia cell lines through the ERK1/2 pathway, and that miR-27b may function as a tumor suppressor that inhibits cell proliferation by targeting cyclin A2.

  18. miR-339-5p inhibits alcohol-induced brain inflammation through regulating NF-κB pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yu; Wei, Guangkuan; Di, Zhiyong; Zhao, Qingjie

    2014-09-26

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Alcohol upregulates miR-339-5p expression. • miR-339-5p inhibits the NF-kB pathway. • miR-339-5p interacts with and blocks activity of IKK-beat and IKK-epsilon. • miR-339-5p modulates IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α. - Abstract: Alcohol-induced neuroinflammation is mediated by the innate immunesystem. Pro-inflammatory responses to alcohol are modulated by miRNAs. The miRNA miR-339-5p has previously been found to be upregulated in alcohol-induced neuroinflammation. However, little has been elucidated on the regulatory functions of this miRNA in alcohol-induced neuroinflammation. We investigated the function of miR-339-5p in alcohol exposed brain tissue and isolated microglial cells using ex vivo and in vitro techniques. Our results show that alcohol induces transcription of miR 339-5p, IL-6, IL-1β and TNF-α in mouse brain tissue and isolated microglial cells by activating NF-κB. Alcohol activation of NF-κB allows for nuclear translocation of the NF-κB subunit p65 and expression of pro-inflammatory mediators. miR-339-5p inhibited expression of these pro-inflammatory factors through the NF-κB pathway by abolishing IKK-β and IKK-ε activity.

  19. Post Mortem of 120k mi Light-Duty Urea SCR and DPF System | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Post Mortem of 120k mi Light-Duty Urea SCR and DPF System Post Mortem of 120k mi Light-Duty Urea SCR and DPF System Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT). PDF icon deer07_lambert.pdf More Documents & Publications Urea SCR and DPF System for Tier 2 Diesel Light-Duty Trucks

  20. Port Huron, MI Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    to Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Port Huron, MI Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1 2014 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 2015 1 1 1 1 1 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 02/29/2016 Next Release Date: 03/31/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Exports by Point of Exit Port Huron, MI Natural Gas Exports to Canad

  1. Time-Resolved Quantitative Measurement of OH HO2 and CH2O in Fuel Oxidation Reactions by High Resolution IR Absorption Spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Haifeng; Rotavera, Brandon; Taatjes, Craig A.

    2014-08-01

    Combined with a Herriott-type multi-pass slow flow reactor, high-resolution differential direct absorption spectroscopy has been used to probe, in situ and quantitatively, hydroxyl (OH), hydroperoxy (HO 2 ) and formaldehyde (CH 2 O) molecules in fuel oxidation reactions in the reactor, with a time resolution of about 1 micro-second. While OH and CH 2 O are probed in the mid-infrared (MIR) region near 2870nm and 3574nm respectively, HO 2 can be probed in both regions: near-infrared (NIR) at 1509nm and MIR at 2870nm. Typical sensitivities are on the order of 10 10 - 10 11 molecule cm -3 for OH at 2870nm, 10 11 molecule cm -3 for HO 2 at 1509nm, and 10 11 molecule cm -3 for CH 2 O at 3574nm. Measurements of multiple important intermediates (OH and HO 2 ) and product (CH 2 O) facilitate to understand and further validate chemical mechanisms of fuel oxidation chemistry.

  2. Source characterization and control technology assessment of methylene chloride emissions from Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, NY. Final report, July 1988-April 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walata, S.A.; Rehm, R.M.

    1989-07-01

    This report gives results of an assessment of potential control technologies for methylene chloride (also known as dichloromethane or DCM) emission sources at Eastman Kodak Company's Kodak Park facility in Rochester, NY. DCM is a solvent used by Kodak in the manufacture of cellulose triacetate film support. Work has involved: a plant visit where major DCM emission sources were inspected, and evaluation of current and potential control technologies for the DCM emission sources. The report contains information gathered during the plant visit to the Kodak Park facility. Included are emission estimates determined by Kodak of all emission points greater than 8000 lb (3600 kg)/yr DCM, as well as a description of each point observed during the visit. Also included are results of an evaluation of control technologies that might be applied to the major emission sources. A cost analysis of different add-on control devices is provided for four of the uncontrolled emission points.

  3. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Cobblestone Homes, Midland, MI

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home in Midland, MI, that scored HERS 49 without PV or HERS 44 with 1.4 kW of PV. The custom home served as a prototype and energy efficiency demonstration...

  4. MiR-18a regulates the proliferation, migration and invasion of human glioblastoma cell by targeting neogenin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Yichen; Wang, Ping; Zhao, Wei; Yao, Yilong; Liu, Xiaobai; Ma, Jun; Xue, Yixue; Liu, Yunhui

    2014-05-15

    MiR-17-92 cluster has recently been reported as an oncogene in some tumors. However, the association of miR-18a, an important member of this cluster, with glioblastoma remains unknown. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the expression of miR-18a in glioblastoma and its role in biological behavior of U87 and U251 human glioblastoma cell lines. Quantitative RT-PCR results showed that miR-18a was highly expressed in glioblastoma tissues and U87 and U251 cell lines compared with that in human brain tissues and primary normal human astrocytes, and the expression levels were increased along with the rising pathological grades of glioblastoma. Neogenin was identified as the target gene of miR-18a by dual-luciferase reporter assays. RT-PCR and western blot results showed that its expression levels were decreased along with the rising pathological grades of glioblastoma. Inhibition of miR-18a expression was established by transfecting exogenous miR-18a inhibitor into U87 and U251 cells, and its effects on the biological behavior of glioblastoma cells were studied using CCK-8 assay, transwell assay and flow cytometry. Inhibition of miR-18a expression in U87 and U251 cells significantly up-regulated neogenin, and dramatically suppressed the abilities of cell proliferation, migration and invasion, induced cell cycle arrest and promoted cellular apoptosis. Collectively, these results suggest that miR-18a may regulate biological behavior of human glioblastoma cells by targeting neogenin, and miR-18a can serve as a potential target in the treatment of glioblastoma. - Highlights: MiR-18a was highly expressed in glioblastoma tissues and U87 and U251 cell lines. Neogenin was identified as the target gene of miR-18a. Neogenin expressions were decreased along with the rising pathological grades of glioblastoma. Inhibition of miR-18a suppressed biological behavior of glioma cells by up-regulating neogenin.

  5. miR-7 and miR-218 epigenetically control tumor suppressor genes RASSF1A and Claudin-6 by targeting HoxB3 in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Qiaoyan; Zhu, Fufan; Chen, Puxiang

    2012-07-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both miR-7 and miR-218 down-regulates HoxB3 expression by targeting the 3 Prime -UTR of HoxB3 mRNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A reverse correlation between the levels of endogenous miR-7, miR218 and HoxB3 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Epigenetic changes involve in the reactivation of HoxB3. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both miRNAs inhibits the cell cycle and clone formation of breast cancer cells. -- Abstract: Many microRNAs have been implicated as key regulators of cellular growth and differentiation and have been found to dysregulate proliferation in human tumors, including breast cancer. Cancer-linked microRNAs also alter the epigenetic landscape by way of DNA methylation and post-translational modifications of histones. Aberrations in Hox gene expression are important for oncogene or tumor suppressor during abnormal development and malignancy. Although recent studies suggest that HoxB3 is critical in breast cancer, the putative role(s) of microRNAs impinging on HoxB3 is not yet fully understood. In this study, we found that the expression levels of miR-7 and miR-218 were strongly and reversely associated with HoxB3 expression. Stable overexpression of miR-7 and miR-218 was accompanied by reactivation of tumor suppressor genes including RASSF1A and Claudin-6 by means of epigenetic switches in DNA methylation and histone modification, giving rise to inhibition of the cell cycle and clone formation of breast cancer cells. The current study provides a novel link between overexpression of collinear Hox genes and multiple microRNAs in human breast malignancy.

  6. Disorder from order among anisotropic next-nearest-neighbor Ising spin chains in SrHo2O4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen, J. -J.; Tian, W.; Garlea, V. O.; Koohpayeh, S. M.; McQueen, T. M.; Li, H. -F.; Yan, J. -Q.; Rodriguez-Rivera, J. A.; Vaknin, D.; Broholm, C. L.

    2015-02-26

    In this study, we describe why Ising spin chains with competing interactions in SrHo2O4 segregate into ordered and disordered ensembles at low temperatures (T). Using elastic neutron scattering, magnetization, and specific heat measurements, the two distinct spin chains are inferred to have Nel (????) and double-Nel (????) ground states, respectively. Below TN = 0.68(2)K, the Nel chains develop three-dimensional long range order (LRO), which arrests further thermal equilibration of the double-Nel chains so they remain in a disordered incommensurate state for T below TS = 0.52(2)K. SrHo2O4 distills an important feature of incommensurate low dimensional magnetism: kinetically trapped topological defects in a quasiddimensional spin system can preclude order in d + 1 dimensions.

  7. 3d-4f spin interaction and field-induced metamagnetism in RCrO{sub 4} (R?=?Ho, Gd, Lu) compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Midya, A.; Khan, N.; Bhoi, D.; Mandal, P.

    2014-05-07

    We observe that the zircon-type RCrO{sub 4} (R?=?Ho, Gd, Lu) compounds exhibit complicated magnetic properties and large magnetic entropy change due to the strong competition between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic interactions. For a field change of 7?T, the maximum values of entropy change and refrigerant capacity reach 28?J?kg{sup ?1}?K{sup ?1} and 740?J?kg{sup ?1}, respectively, for GdCrO{sub 4} whereas the corresponding values for HoCrO{sub 4} are 29?J?kg{sup ?1}?K{sup ?1} and 550?J?kg{sup ?1}. For GdCrO{sub 4} compound, the magnetic entropy change is quite large even at low temperatures well below the ferromagnetic transition.

  8. The fluorite-pyrochlore transformation of Ho{sub 2-y}Nd{sub y}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clements, Richard; Hester, James R.; Kennedy, Brendan J.; Ling, Chris D.; Stampfl, Anton P.J.

    2011-08-15

    Twelve members of the Ho{sub 2-y}Nd{sub y}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} series, prepared using conventional solid state methods, have been characterised by neutron powder diffraction. Ho{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} has a defect fluorite structure whereas Nd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} is found to adopt the ordered pyrochlore structure with the composition induced fluorite-pyrochlore transformation occurring near y=1. Rietveld analysis on the neutron data for all the compositions reveals an increase in lattice parameter as a function of y across the entire series, with a small discontinuity associated with the transformation. The neutron profile results suggest that domains of pyrochlore-type initially begin to form before crystallising into a separate phase, and therefore that anion and cation ordering processes are distinct. There is a strong correlation between the extent of disorder in the anion sublattice and the x-parameter of 48f oxygen. These results point the way to a better understanding of the stability observed in pyrochlore structures. - Graphical abstract: Neutron diffraction profiles for Nd{sub 2-y}Ho{sub y}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} type oxides reveal details of the transformation from the ordered pyrochlore structure (y=0) to the disordered fluorite structure (y=2). Highlights: > Structures of twelve members of the Ho{sub 2-y}Nd{sub y}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} series studied using neutron powder diffraction. > Domains of pyrochlore-type materials form at low doping levels. > Higher doping stabilises the pyrochlore. > Anion and cation ordering processes are distinct.

  9. Low temperature (550-700 K) oxidation pathways of cyclic ketones: Dominance of HO2-elimination channels yielding conjugated cyclic coproducts

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Scheer, Adam M.; Welz, Oliver; Vasu, Subith S.; Osborn, David L.; Taatjes, Craig A.

    2015-04-13

    The low-temperature oxidation of three cyclic ketones, cyclopentanone (CPO; C5H8O), cyclohexanone (CHO; C6H10 O), and 2-methyl-cyclopentanone (2-Me-CPO; CH3–C5H7 O), is studied between 550 and 700 K and at 4 or 8 Torr total pressure. Initial fuel radicals R are formedvia fast H-abstraction from the ketones by laser-photolytically generated chlorine atoms. Intermediates and products from the subsequent reactions of these radicals in the presence of excess O2 are probed with time and isomeric resolution using multiplexed photoionization mass spectrometry with tunable synchrotron ionizing radiation. For CPO and CHO the dominant product channel in the R + O2 reactions is chain-terminating HO2-eliminationmore » yielding the conjugated cyclic coproducts 2-cyclopentenone and 2-cyclohexenone, respectively. Results on oxidation of 2-Me-CPO also show a dominant contribution from HO2-elimination. Moreover, the photoionization spectrum of the co-product suggests formation of 2-methyl-2-cyclopentenone and/or 2-cyclohexenone, resulting from a rapid Dowd–Beckwith rearrangement, preceding addition to O2, of the initial (2-oxocyclopentyl)methyl radical to 3-oxocyclohexyl. Cyclic ethers, markers for hydroperoxyalkyl radicals (QOOH), key intermediates in chain-propagating and chain-branching low-temperature combustion pathways, are only minor products. The interpretation of the experimental results is supported by stationary point calculations on the potential energy surfaces of the associated R + O2 reactions at the CBS-QB3 level. Furthermore, the calculations indicate that HO2-elimination channels are energetically favored and product formation via QOOH is disfavored. Lastly, the prominence of chain-terminating pathways linked with HO2 formation in low-temperature oxidation of cyclic ketones suggests little low-temperature reactivity of these species as fuels in internal combustion engines.« less

  10. Lasing characteristics of ZrO{sub 2}Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}Ho{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borik, M A; Lomonova, E E; Kulebyakin, A V; Ushakov, S N; Lyapin, A A; Ryabochkina, P A; Chabushkin, A N

    2013-09-30

    The spectral dependences of the gain cross section of the {sup 5}I{sub 8} ? {sup 5}I{sub 7}, {sup 5}I{sub 7} ? {sup 5}I{sub 8} transition of Ho{sup 3+} ions in the ZrO{sub 2} 13.6 mol % Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} 0.4 mol % Ho{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystal are calculated at different relative population inversions using the absorption and luminescence spectra of the {sup 5}I{sub 8} ? {sup 5}I{sub 7} and {sup 5}I{sub 7} ? {sup 5}I{sub 8} transitions of Ho{sup 3+} ions at T=''300'' K. Lasing of these crystals at the {sup 5}I{sub 7} ? {sup 5}I{sub 8} transition is obtained for the first time under pumping by a Tm : YLiF{sub 4} laser (?{sub p} = 1.905 ?m). The lasing wavelength is 2.17 ?m. (lasers)

  11. Measurements and modeling of HO2 formation in the reactions of n-C3H7 and i-C3H7 radicals with O2.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taatjes, Craig A.; Estupinan, Edgar Garcia; Klippenstein, Stephen J.

    2004-08-01

    The formation of HO{sub 2} in the reactions of C{sub 2}H{sub 5}, n-C{sub 3}H{sub 7}, and i-C{sub 3}H{sub 7} radicals with O{sub 2} is investigated using the technique of laser photolysis/long-path frequency-modulation spectroscopy. The alkyl radicals are formed by 266 nm photolysis of alkyl iodides. The formation of HO{sub 2} from the subsequent reaction of the alkyl radicals with O{sub 2} is followed by infrared frequency-modulation spectroscopy. The concentration of I atoms is simultaneously monitored by direct absorption of a second laser probe on the spin?orbit transition. The measured profiles are compared to a kinetic model taken from time-resolved master-equation results based on previously published ab initio characterizations of the relevant stationary points on the potential-energy surface. The ab initio energies are adjusted to produce agreement with the present experimental data and with available literature studies. The isomer specificity of the present results enables refinement of the model for i-C{sub 3}H{sub 7} + O{sub 2} and improved agreement with experimental measurements of HO{sub 2} production in propane oxidation.

  12. Photoluminescence properties of Ho{sup 3+} ion in lithium-fluoroborate glass containing different modifier oxides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balakrishna, A. Rajesh, D. Ratnakaram, Y. C.

    2014-04-24

    Trivalent holmium (0.5 mol%) doped lithium fluoro-borate glasses with the chemical compositions 49.5Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7?}20BaF{sub 2?}10NaF?20MO (where M=Mg, Ca, Cd and Pb), 49.5Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7?}20BaF{sub 2?}10NaF?10MgO?10CaO and 49.5Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7?}20BaF{sub 2?}10NaF?10CdO?10PbO were synthesized and investigated their photoluminescence properties. The variation in chemical composition by varying modifier oxides causes changes in the structural spectroscopic behavior of Ho{sup 3+} ions. These changes are examined by UV-VIS- NIR and luminescence spectroscopic techniques. The visible luminescence spectra were obtained by exciting samples at 409 nm radiation.

  13. Material Activation Benchmark Experiments at the NuMI Hadron Absorber Hall in Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsumura, H.; Matsuda, N.; Kasugai, Y.; Toyoda, A.; Yashima, H.; Sekimoto, S.; Iwase, H.; Oishi, K.; Sakamoto, Y.; Nakashima, H.; Leveling, A.; Boehnlein, D.; Lauten, G.; Mokhov, N.; Vaziri, K.

    2014-06-15

    In our previous study, double and mirror symmetric activation peaks found for Al and Au arranged spatially on the back of the Hadron absorber of the NuMI beamline in Fermilab were considerably higher than those expected purely from muon-induced reactions. From material activation bench-mark experiments, we conclude that this activation is due to hadrons with energy greater than 3 GeV that had passed downstream through small gaps in the hadron absorber.

  14. Targeting miR-21 enhances the sensitivity of human colon cancer HT-29 cells to chemoradiotherapy in vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Jun; Lei, Wan; Fu, Jian-Chun; Zhang, Ling; Li, Jun-He; Xiong, Jian-Ping

    2014-01-17

    Highlight: MiR-21 plays a significant role in 5-FU resistance. This role might be attributed to targeting of hMSH2 as well as TP and DPD via miR-21 targeted hMSH2. Indirectly targeted TP and DPD to influence 5-FU chemotherapy sensitivity. -- Abstract: 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is a classic chemotherapeutic drug that has been widely used for colorectal cancer treatment, but colorectal cancer cells are often resistant to primary or acquired 5-FU therapy. Several studies have shown that miR-21 is significantly elevated in colorectal cancer. This suggests that this miRNA might play a role in this resistance. In this study, we investigated this possibility and the possible mechanism underlying this role. We showed that forced expression of miR-21 significantly inhibited apoptosis, enhanced cell proliferation, invasion, and colony formation ability, promoted G1/S cell cycle transition and increased the resistance of tumor cells to 5-FU and X radiation in HT-29 colon cancer cells. Furthermore, knockdown of miR-21 reversed these effects on HT-29 cells and increased the sensitivity of HT-29/5-FU to 5-FU chemotherapy. Finally, we showed that miR-21 targeted the human mutS homolog2 (hMSH2), and indirectly regulated the expression of thymidine phosphorylase (TP) and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD). These results demonstrate that miR-21 may play an important role in the 5-FU resistance of colon cancer cells.

  15. miR-21 modulates tumor outgrowth induced by human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells in vivo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, Keun Koo; Lee, Ae Lim; Kim, Jee Young; Medical Research Center for Ischemic Tissue Engineering, Pusan National University, Yangsan, Gyeongnam 626-870; BK21 Medical Science Education Center, School of Medicine, Pusan National University, Yangsan, Gyeongnam 626-870 ; Lee, Sun Young; Medical Research Center for Ischemic Tissue Engineering, Pusan National University, Yangsan, Gyeongnam 626-870 ; Bae, Yong Chan; Jung, Jin Sup

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-21 modulates hADSC-induced increase of tumor growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The action is mostly mediated by the modulation of TGF-{beta} signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of miR-21 enhances the blood flow recovery in hindlimb ischemia. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have generated a great deal of interest in clinical situations, due principally to their potential use in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering applications. However, the therapeutic application of MSCs remains limited, unless the favorable effects of MSCs on tumor growth in vivo, and the long-term safety of the clinical applications of MSCs, can be more thoroughly understood. In this study, we determined whether microRNAs can modulate MSC-induced tumor outgrowth in BALB/c nude mice. Overexpression of miR-21 in human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) inhibited hADSC-induced tumor growth, and inhibition of miR-21 increased it. Downregulation of transforming growth factor beta receptor II (TGFBR2), but not of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, in hADSCs showed effects similar to those of miR-21 overexpression. Downregulation of TGFBR2 and overexpression of miR21 decreased tumor vascularity. Inhibition of miR-21 and the addition of TGF-{beta} increased the levels of vascular endothelial growth factor and interleukin-6 in hADSCs. Transplantation of miR-21 inhibitor-transfected hADSCs increased blood flow recovery in a hind limb ischemia model of nude mice, compared with transplantation of control oligo-transfected cells. These findings indicate that MSCs might favor tumor growth in vivo. Thus, it is necessary to study the long-term safety of this technique before MSCs can be used as therapeutic tools in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

  16. Building America Case Study: Apartment Compartmentalization with an Aerosol-Based Sealing Process - Queens, NY; Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-07-01

    Air sealing of building enclosures is a difficult and time-consuming process. Current methods in new construction require laborers to physically locate small and sometimes large holes in multiple assemblies and then manually seal each of them. The innovation demonstrated under this research study was the automated air sealing and compartmentalization of buildings through the use of an aerosolized sealant, developed by the Western Cooling Efficiency Center at University of California Davis.
    CARB sought to demonstrate this new technology application in a multifamily building in Queens, NY. The effectiveness of the sealing process was evaluated by three methods: air leakage testing of overall apartment before and after sealing, point-source testing of individual leaks, and pressure measurements in the walls of the target apartment during sealing. Aerosolized sealing was successful by several measures in this study. Many individual leaks that are labor-intensive to address separately were well sealed by the aerosol particles. In addition, many diffuse leaks that are difficult to identify and treat were also sealed. The aerosol-based sealing process resulted in an average reduction of 71% in air leakage across three apartments and an average apartment airtightness of 0.08 CFM50/SF of enclosure area.

  17. MiR-145 is downregulated in human ovarian cancer and modulates cell growth and invasion by targeting p70S6K1 and MUC1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Huijuan; Xiao, ZhengHua; Wang, Ke; Liu, Wenxin; Hao, Quan

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: MiR-145 is downregulated in human ovarian cancer. MiR-145 targets p70S6K1 and MUC1. p70S6K1 and MUC1 are involved in miR-145 mediated tumor cell growth and cell invasion, respectively. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of small non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression at post-transcriptional levels. Previous studies have shown that miR-145 is downregulated in human ovarian cancer; however, the roles of miR-145 in ovarian cancer growth and invasion have not been fully demonstrated. In the present study, Northern blot and qRT-PCR analysis indicate that miR-145 is downregulated in ovarian cancer tissues and cell lines, as well as in serum samples of ovarian cancer, compared to healthy ovarian tissues, cell lines and serum samples. Functional studies suggest that miR-145 overexpression leads to the inhibition of colony formation, cell proliferation, cell growth viability and invasion, and the induction of cell apoptosis. In accordance with the effect of miR-145 on cell growth, miR-145 suppresses tumor growth in vivo. MiR-145 is found to negatively regulate P70S6K1 and MUC1 protein levels by directly targeting their 3?UTRs. Importantly, the overexpression of p70S6K1 and MUC1 can restore the cell colony formation and invasion abilities that are reduced by miR-145, respectively. MiR-145 expression is increased after 5-aza-CdR treatment, and 5-aza-CdR treatment results in the same phenotype as the effect of miR-145 overexpression. Our study suggests that miR-145 modulates ovarian cancer growth and invasion by suppressing p70S6K1 and MUC1, functioning as a tumor suppressor. Moreover, our data imply that miR-145 has potential as a miRNA-based therapeutic target for ovarian cancer.

  18. Testing CPT conservation using the NuMI neutrino beam with the MINOS experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auty, David John

    2010-05-01

    The MINOS experiment was designed to measure neutrino oscillation parameters with muon neutrinos. It achieves this by measuring the neutrino energy spectrum and flavor composition of the man-made NuMI neutrino beam 1km after the beam is formed and again after 735 km. By comparing the two spectra it is possible to measure the oscillation parameters. The NuMI beam is made up of 7.0% {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}, which can be separated from the {nu}{sub {mu}} because the MINOS detectors are magnetized. This makes it possible to study {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} oscillations separately from those of muon neutrinos, and thereby test CPT invariance in the neutrino sector by determining the {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} oscillation parameters and comparing them with those for {nu}{sub {mu}}, although any unknown physics of the antineutrino would appear as a difference in oscillation parameters. Such a test has not been performed with beam {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} before. It is also possible to produce an almost pure {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} beam by reversing the current through the magnetic focusing horns of the NuMI beamline, thereby focusing negatively, instead of positively charged particles. This thesis describes the analysis of the 7% {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} component of the forward horn current NuMI beam. The {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} of a data sample of 3.2 x 10{sup 20} protons on target analysis found 42 events, compared to a CPT conserving prediction of 58.3{sub -7.6}{sup +7.6}(stat.){sub -3.6}{sup +3.6}(syst.) events. This corresponds to a 1.9 {sigma} deficit, and a best fit value of {Delta}{bar m}{sub 32}{sup 2} = 18 x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{bar {theta}}{sub 23} = 0.55. This thesis focuses particularly on the selection of {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} events, and investigates possible improvements of the selection algorithm. From this a different selector was chosen, which corroborated the findings of the original selector. The thesis also investigates how the systematic errors affect the precision of {Delta}{bar m}{sub 32}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{bar {theta}}{sub 23}. Furthermore, it describes a study to determine the gains of the PMTs via the single-photoelectron spectrum. The results were used as a crosscheck of the gains determined at higher intensities by an LED-based light-injection system.

  19. DOE Zero Ready Home Case Study: Cobblestone Homes, 2014 Model Home, Midland, MI

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cobblestone Homes 2014 Model Home Midland, MI DOE ZERO ENERGY READY HOME(tm) The U.S. Department of Energy invites home builders across the country to meet the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specified in DOE's Zero Energy Ready Home program (formerly known as Challenge Home). Every DOE Zero Energy Ready Home starts with ENERGY STAR Certified Homes Version 3.0 for an energy-efficient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Advanced technologies are designed

  20. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATlON OF CONTRACT MI54 I See Block 16C I

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    MI54 I See Block 16C I REQ. NO. Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Pantex, LLC PO Box 30020 Amarillo, TX 79120 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. 1 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 1 4. REQUlSlTlONlPURCHASE 1 5. PROJECT NO. (If a ~ ~ l i c a b l e ) l.CoNTRACTIDCODE ~ . . U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Service Center Property and M&O Contract Support Department P.O. Box 5400 Albuquerque, NM 87185-5400 I I 9B. DATED (SEE ITEM 1 1 ) PAGE 1 OF 2 PAGES 6. ISSUED BY CODE 1 7.

  1. Natural Gas Heat Pump and Air Conditioner | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Natural Gas Heat Pump and Air Conditioner Natural Gas Heat Pump and Air Conditioner Lead Performer: Thermolift - Stony Brook, NY Partners: -- New York State Energy Research & Development Authority - Albany, NY -- Stony Brook University - Stony Brook, NY -- Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Oak Ridge, TN -- National Grid - Washington, DC -- Applied Thermodynamic Apparatus (ATA) - Ann Arbor, MI -- Fala Technologies - Kingston, NY -- LoDolce - Saugerties, NY DOE Funding: $750,000 Cost Share:

  2. Assessment of radiological releases from the NuMI facility during MINOS and NOvA operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martens, Mike; /Fermilab

    2007-04-01

    This report makes projections of the radiological releases from the NuMI facility during operations for the MINOS and NO ?A experiments. It includes an estimate of the radionuclide levels released into the atmosphere and the estimated tritium and sodium-22 concentrations in the NuMI sump water and Fermilab pond system. The analysis was performed for NuMI operations with a beam power on target increased from the present 400 kW design up to a possible 1500 kW with future upgrades. The total number of protons on target was assumed to be 18 x 10{sup 20} after the completion of MINOS and 78 x 10{sup 20} after the completion of NO ?A.

  3. NY); Logvenov, Gennady (Port Jefferson Station, NY); Gozar, Adrian...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial...

  4. Obama Administration Announces $20 Million for 10 Public-Private Partnerships to Support American Manufacturing and Encourage Investment in the U.S.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Investments will promote job creation and economic growth in local industry clusters in AZ, CA, MI, NY, OK, OR, PA, TN AND WA

  5. Overcoming phase instability of RBaCo2O5+ (R = Y and Ho) by Sr substitution for application as cathodes in solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jung-Hyun; Young Nam, Kim; Bi, Zhonghe; Manthiram, Arumugam; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Huq, Ashfia

    2013-01-01

    Phase instabilities of the RBaCo2O5+ (R = Y and Ho) layered-perovskites and their decompositions into RCoO3 and BaCoO3-z at 800 oC in air were investigated. This will restrict their high temperature applications such as cathodes in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). However, appropriate amount of Sr substitution ( 60 % for R = Y and 70 % for R = Ho) for Ba successfully stabilized the R(Ba1-xSrx)Co2O5+ phase at elevated temperatures. This can be explained by decreasing oxygen vacancies at R-O layer, decreasing R-O bonding length, and consequent improvement of structural integrity. In addition, the Sr substitution (x = 0.6 - 1.0) for Ba provided added benefit with respect to the chemical stability against Ce0.8Gd0.2O1.9 (GDC) electrolyte, which is a critical requirement for the cathodes in SOFC. Among the various compositions investigated, the Y(Ba0.3Sr0.7)Co2O5+ + GDC composite cathode delivered the optimum electrochemical performances with a stable phase demonstrating the potential as a cathode in SOFC.

  6. ZERH Training Session: Syracuse, NY

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE Zero Energy Ready Home is a high performance home which is so energy efficient, that a renewable energy system can offset all or most of its annual energy Consumption.US DOE Zero Energy...

  7. NY_10-13.pdf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  8. NY_17-18.pdf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  9. NY_08-10.pdf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  10. NY_29-4.pdf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  11. NY_36-3.pdf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  12. NY_40-1.pdf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  13. NY_48-1.pdf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  14. NY_50-2.pdf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  15. NY_60-1.pdf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  16. miR-206 is down-regulated in breast cancer and inhibits cell proliferation through the up-regulation of cyclinD2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Jing; Tian, Ye; Li, Juan; Lu, Binbin; Sun, Ming; Zou, Yanfen; Kong, Rong; Luo, Yanhong; Shi, Yongguo; Wang, Keming; Ji, Guozhong

    2013-04-05

    Highlights: ? miR-206 was downexpressed in tumor samples compared with matched normal samples. ? Enhanced expression of miR-206 could inhibit breast cancer growth in vitro. ? Luciferase confirmed miR-206 functions as an anti-oncogene by targeting cyclinD2. ? A reverse correlation between miR-206 and cyclinD2 in breast cancer was found. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs act as important gene regulators in human genomes, and their aberrant expression is linked to many malignancies. Aberrant expression of miR-206 has been frequently reported in cancer studies; however, the role and mechanism of its function in breast cancer remains unclear. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed to detect the relative expression levels of miR-206 in breast cancer and normal breast tissues. Lower expression of miR-206 in breast cancer tissues was associated with larger tumour size and a more advanced clinical stage. Further in vitro observations showed that the enforced expression of miR-206 in MCF-7 breast cancer cells inhibited cell growth by blocking the G1/S transition and suppressed cell proliferation and colony formation, implying that miR-206 functions as a tumour suppressor in the progression of breast cancer. Interestingly, Luciferase assays first revealed that miR-206 inhibited cyclinD2 expression by targeting two binding sites in the 3?-untranslated region of cyclinD2 mRNA. qRT-PCR and Western blot assays verified that miR-206 reduced cyclinD2 expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. A reverse correlation between miR-206 and cyclinD2 expression was noted in breast cancer tissues. Altogether, our results identify a crucial tumour suppressive role of miR-206 in the progression of breast cancer, at least partly via up-regulation of the expression of cyclinD2, and suggest that miR-206 might be a candidate prognostic predictor or an anticancer therapeutic target for breast cancer patients.

  17. Validation of the MCNPX-PoliMi Code to Design a Fast-Neutron Multiplicity Counter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. L. Dolan; A. C. Kaplan; M. Flaska; S. A. Pozzi; D. L. Chichester

    2012-07-01

    Many safeguards measurement systems used at nuclear facilities, both domestically and internationally, rely on He-3 detectors and well established mathematical equations to interpret coincidence and multiplicity-type measurements for verifying quantities of special nuclear material. Due to resource shortages alternatives to these existing He-3 based systems are being sought. Work is also underway to broaden the capabilities of these types of measurement systems in order to improve current multiplicity analysis techniques. As a part of a Material Protection, Accounting, and Control Technology (MPACT) project within the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cycle Technology Program we are designing a fast-neutron multiplicity counter with organic liquid scintillators to quantify important quantities such as plutonium mass. We are also examining the potential benefits of using fast-neutron detectors for multiplicity analysis of advanced fuels in comparison with He-3 detectors and testing the performance of such designs. The designs are being developed and optimized using the MCNPX-PoliMi transport code to study detector response. In the full paper, we will discuss validation measurements used to justify the use of the MCNPX-PoliMi code paired with the MPPost multiplicity routine to design a fast neutron multiplicity counter with liquid scintillators. This multiplicity counter will be designed with the end goal of safeguarding advanced nuclear fuels. With improved timing qualities associated with liquid scintillation detectors, we can design a system that is less limited by nuclear materials of high activities. Initial testing of the designed system with nuclear fuels will take place at Idaho National Laboratory in a later stage of this collaboration.

  18. T-1025 IU SciBath-768 detector tests in MI-12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tayloe, Rex; Cooper, R.; Garrison, L.; Thornton, T.; Rebenitsch, L.; DeJongh, Fritz; Loer, Benjamin; Ramberg, Erik; Yoo, Jonghee; /Fermilab

    2012-02-11

    This is a memorandum of understanding between the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and the experimenters of Department of Physics and Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, who have committed to participate in detector tests to be carried out during the 2012 Fermilab Neutrino program. The memorandum is intended solely for the purpose of recording expectations for budget estimates and work allocations for Fermilab, the funding agencies and the participating institutions. it reflects an arrangement that currently is satisfactory to the parties; however, it is recognized and anticipated that changing circumstances of the evolving research program will necessitate revisions. The parties agree to modify this memorandum to reflect such required adjustments. Actual contractual obligations will be set forth in separate documents. The experimenters propsoe to test their prototype 'SciBat-768' detector in the MI-12 building for 3 months (February-April) in Spring 2012. The major goal of this effort is to measure or limit the flux of beam-induced neutrons in a far-off-axis (> 45{sup o}) location of the Booster Neutrino Beamline (BNB). This flux is of interest for a proposed coherent neutral-current neutrino-argon elastic scattering experiment. A second goal is to collect more test data for the SciBath-768 to enable better understanding and calibration of the device. The SciBath-768 detector successfully ran for 3 months in the MINOS Underground Area in Fall 2011 as testbeam experiment T-1014 and is currently running above ground in the MINOS service building. For the run proposed here, the experiments are requesting: space in MI-12 in which to run the SciBath detector during February-April 2012 while the BNB is operating; technical support to help with moving the equipment on site; access to power, internet, and accelerator signals; and a small office space from which to run and monitor the experiment.

  19. Executive summary of major NuMI lessons learned: a review of relevant meetings of Fermilab's DUSEL Beamline Working Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, Mike; Appel, Jeffrey A.; Bogert, Dixon; Childress, Sam; Cossairt, Don; Griffing, William; Grossman, Nancy; Harding, David; Hylen, Jim; Kuchler, Vic; Laughton, Chris; /Fermilab /Argonne /Brookhaven /LBL, Berkeley

    2009-05-01

    We have gained tremendous experience with the NuMI Project on what was a new level of neutrino beams from a high power proton source. We expect to build on that experience for any new long baseline neutrino beam. In particular, we have learned about some things which have worked well and/or where the experience is fairly directly applicable to the next project (e.g., similar civil construction issues including: tunneling, service buildings, outfitting, and potential claims/legal issues). Some things might be done very differently (e.g., decay pipe, windows, target, beam dump, and precision of power supply control/monitoring). The NuMI experience does lead to identification of critical items for any future such project, and what issues it will be important to address. The DUSEL Beamline Working Group established at Fermilab has been meeting weekly to collect and discuss information from that NuMI experience. This document attempts to assemble much of that information in one place. In this Executive Summary, we group relevant discussion of some of the major issues and lessons learned under seven categories: (1) Differences Between the NuMI Project and Any Next Project; (2) The Process of Starting Up the Project; (3) Decision and Review Processes; (4) ES&H: Environment, Safety, and Health; (5) Local Community Buy-In; (6) Transition from Project Status to Operation; and (7) Some Lessons on Technical Elements. We concentrate here on internal project management issues, including technical areas that require special attention. We cannot ignore, however, two major external management problems that plagued the NuMI project. The first problem was the top-down imposition of an unrealistic combination of scope, cost, and schedule. This situation was partially corrected by a rebaselining. However, the full, desirable scope was never achievable. The second problem was a crippling shortage of resources. Critical early design work could not be done in a timely fashion, leading to schedule delays, inefficiencies, and corrective actions. The Working Group discussions emphasized that early planning and up-front appreciation of the problems ahead are very important for minimizing the cost and for the greatest success of any such project. Perhaps part of the project approval process should re-enforce this need. The cost of all this up-front work is now reflected in the DOE cost of any project we do. If we are being held to an upper limit on the project cost, the only thing available for compromise is the eventual project scope.

  20. Mitsubishi iMiEV: An Electric Mini-Car in NREL's Advanced Technology Vehicle Fleet (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This fact sheet highlights the Mitsubishi iMiEV, an electric mini-car in the advanced technology vehicle fleet at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). In support of the U.S. Department of Energy's fast-charging research efforts, NREL engineers are conducting charge and discharge performance testing on the vehicle. NREL's advanced technology vehicle fleet features promising technologies to increase efficiency and reduce emissions without sacrificing safety or comfort. The fleet serves as a technology showcase, helping visitors learn about innovative vehicles that are available today or are in development. Vehicles in the fleet are representative of current, advanced, prototype, and emerging technologies.

  1. Syntheses, structure and rare earth metal photoluminescence of new and known isostructural A{sub 2}Mo{sub 4}Sb{sub 2}O{sub 18} (A=Ce, Pr, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu) compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohitkar, Shrikant A.; Kalpana, G.; Vidyasagar, K.

    2011-04-15

    Nine new A{sub 2}Mo{sub 4}Sb{sub 2}O{sub 18} (A=Ce, Pr, Eu, Tb, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu) compounds have been synthesized by solid-state reactions. They are isostructural with six reported analogues of yttrium and other lanthanides and the monoclinic unit cell parameters of all fifteen of them vary linearly with the size of A{sup 3+} ion. Single crystal X-ray structures of eight A{sub 2}Mo{sub 4}Sb{sub 2}O{sub 18} (A=Ce, Pr, Eu, Gd, Tb, Ho, Er, Tm) compounds have been determined. Neat A{sub 2}Mo{sub 4}Sb{sub 2}O{sub 18} (A=Pr, Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm) compounds exhibit characteristic rare earth metal photoluminescence. -- Graphical abstract: Among the fifteen isostructural A{sub 2}Mo{sub 4}Sb{sub 2}O{sub 18} (A=rare earth metal) molybdoantimonites, eight (A=Pr, Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm) compounds exhibit neat characteristic lanthanide photoluminescence in the 200-800 nm range at room temperature. Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} Syntheses of nine new A{sub 2}Mo{sub 4}Sb{sub 2}O{sub 18} (A=Ce, Pr, Eu, Tb, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu) compounds. {yields} X-ray structures of eight A{sub 2}Mo{sub 4}Sb{sub 2}O{sub 18} (A=Ce, Pr, Eu, Gd, Tb, Ho, Er, Tm) compounds. {yields} Photoluminescence of neat A{sub 2}Mo{sub 4}Sb{sub 2}O{sub 18} (A=Pr, Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm) compounds.

  2. Magnetic structures of R5Ni2In4 and R 11Ni4In9 ( R = Tb and Ho): strong hierarchy in the temperature dependence of the magnetic ordering in the multiple rare-earth sublattices

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ritter, C.; Provino, A.; Manfrinetti, P.; Pecharsky, V. K.; Gschneidner, K. A.; Dhar, S. K.

    2015-11-09

    The magnetic properties and magnetic structures of the R5Ni2In4 and the microfibrous R 11Ni4In9 compounds with R = Tb and Ho have been examined using magnetization, heat capacity, and neutron diffraction data. Rare earth atoms occupy three and five symmetrically inequivalent rare earth sites in R5Ni2In4 and R 11Ni4In9 compounds, respectively. As a result of the intra- and inter-magnetic sublattice interactions, the magnetic exchange interactions are different for various rare earth sites; this leads to a cascade of magnetic transitions with a strong hierarchy in the temperature dependence of the magnetic orderings.

  3. Optical amplification in disordered electrooptic Tm{sup 3+} and Ho{sup 3+} codoped lanthanum-modified lead zirconate titanate ceramics and study of spectroscopy and communication between cations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Hua; Zhang, Kun; Xu, Long; Sun, Fankui; Zhang, Jingwen; Chen, Xuesheng; Li, Kewen K.

    2014-02-21

    Rare earth doped electro-optic (EO) ceramics of lanthanum-modified lead zirconate titanate (PLZT) are promising in building multifunctional optical devices, by taking advantage of both EO effect and optical activity. In this work, the combination of the measured spectra of absorption and photoluminescence, the fluorescent decay, the calculated Judd-Ofelt parameters, and measured single pass gain in Tm{sup 3+}, Ho{sup 3+} codoped PLZT ceramics have marked them out as promising gain media in building electrically controllable lasers/optical amplifiers and other multifunctional devices. Optical energy storage was also observed in the optical amplification dynamics.

  4. Evaluation of Multiplexed 16S rRNA Microbial Population Surveys Using Illumina MiSeq Platform (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Tremblay, Julien [DOE JGI

    2013-01-25

    Julien Tremblay from DOE JGI presents "Evaluation of Multiplexed 16S rRNA Microbial Population Surveys Using Illumina MiSeq Platorm" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  5. A library of MiMICs allows tagging of genes and reversible, spatial and temporal knockdown of proteins in Drosophila

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nagarkar-Jaiswal, Sonal; Lee, Pei-Tseng; Campbell, Megan E.; Chen, Kuchuan; Anguiano-Zarate, Stephanie; Cantu Gutierrez, Manuel; Busby, Theodore; Lin, Wen-Wen; He, Yuchun; Schulze, Karen L.; et al

    2015-03-31

    Here, we document a collection of ~7434 MiMIC (Minos Mediated Integration Cassette) insertions of which 2854 are inserted in coding introns. They allowed us to create a library of 400 GFP-tagged genes. We show that 72% of internally tagged proteins are functional, and that more than 90% can be imaged in unfixed tissues. Moreover, the tagged mRNAs can be knocked down by RNAi against GFP (iGFPi), and the tagged proteins can be efficiently knocked down by deGradFP technology. The phenotypes associated with RNA and protein knockdown typically correspond to severe loss of function or null mutant phenotypes. Finally, we demonstratemore » reversible, spatial, and temporal knockdown of tagged proteins in larvae and adult flies. This new strategy and collection of strains allows unprecedented in vivo manipulations in flies for many genes. These strategies will likely extend to vertebrates.« less

  6. Repression of miR-17-5p with elevated expression of E2F-1 and c-MYC in non-metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma and enhancement of cell growth upon reversing this expression pattern

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El Tayebi, H.M.; Omar, K.; Hegy, S.; El Maghrabi, M.; El Brolosy, M.; Hosny, K.A.; Esmat, G.; Abdelaziz, A.I.

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: The oncogenic miR-17-5p is downregulated in non-metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma patients. E2F-1 and c-MYC transcripts are upregulated in non-metastatic HCC patients. miR-17-5p forced overexpression inhibited E2F-1 and c-MYC expression in HuH-7 cells. miR-17-5p mimicking increased HuH-7 cell growth, proliferation, migration and colony formation. miR-17-5p is responsible for HCC progression among the c-MYC/E2F-1/miR-17-5p triad members. -- Abstract: E2F-1, c-MYC, and miR-17-5p is a triad of two regulatory loops: a negative and a positive loop, where c-MYC induces the expression of E2F-1 that induces the expression of miR-17-5p which in turn reverses the expression of E2F-1 to close the loop. In this study, we investigated this triad for the first time in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), where miR-17-5p showed a significant down-regulation in 23 non-metastatic HCC biopsies compared to 10 healthy tissues; however, E2F-1 and c-MYC transcripts were markedly elevated. Forced over-expression of miR-17-5p in HuH-7 cells resulted in enhanced cell proliferation, growth, migration and clonogenicity with concomitant inhibition of E2F-1 and c-MYC transcripts expressions, while antagomirs of miR-17-5p reversed these events. In conclusion, this study revealed a unique pattern of expression for miR-17-5p in non-metastatic HCC patients in contrast to metastatic HCC patients. In addition we show that miR-17-5p is the key player among the triad that tumor growth and spread.

  7. Resonances in Coupled <mimi><mi>Kmi>-<mi>ηK> Scattering from Quantum Chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.; Thomas, Christopher E.; Wilson, David J.

    2014-10-01

    Using first-principles calculation within Quantum Chromodynamics, we are able to reproduce the pattern of experimental strange resonances which appear as complex singularities within coupled πK, ηK scattering amplitudes. We make use of numerical computation within the lattice discretized approach to QCD, extracting the energy dependence of scattering amplitudes through their relation- ship to the discrete spectrum of the theory in a finite-volume, which we map out in unprecedented detail.

  8. Waddington, NY Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    349,980 267,227 231,831 241,506 214,671 187,219 1996-2014 Pipeline Prices 4.60 5.44 4.99 3.87 5.58 8.54...

  9. Massena, NY Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2011 2012 2013 2014 View History Pipeline Volumes 0 472 0 0 2011-2014 Pipeline Prices -- 2.96 -- -- 2011...

  10. Energize NY Finance | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Corporation (EIC). The property that is being financed should be current on property tax payments, and must not have any involuntary liens or defaults. Financing...

  11. Massena, NY Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    5,595 3,965 3,992 4,147 3,819 3,049 1996-2015 Pipeline Prices 6.48 6.55 5.75 6.04 7.34 5.65

  12. Waddington, NY Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    30,731 38,791 25,121 39,196 8,775 2007-2015 Pipeline Prices -- 4.71 3.42 5.16 5.77 3.58 2007

  13. Acceleration Of Wound Healing Ny Photodynamic Therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hasan, Tayyaba; Hamblin, Michael R.; Trauner, Kenneth

    2000-08-22

    Disclosed is a method for accelerating wound healing in a mammal. The method includes identifying an unhealed wound site or partially-healed wound site in a mammal; administering a photosensitizer to the mammal; waiting for a time period wherein the photosensitizer reaches an effective tissue concentration at the wound site; and photoactivating the photosensitizer at the wound site. The dose of photodynamic therapy is selected to stimulate the production of one or more growth factor by cells at the wound site, without causing tissue destruction.

  14. Champlain, NY LNG Imports from Canada

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9,173 8,293 6,766 7,228 4,922 4,446 1996-2015 Pipeline Prices 6.02 6.11 4.50 7.22 13.60 5.57 1996-2015 Liquefied Natural Gas Volumes 0 63 26 2013-2015 Liquefied Natural Gas Prices -- 10.69 8.78 2013

  15. US MidAtl NY Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    consumption in New York homes is much lower than the U.S. average, because many households use other fuels for major energy end uses like space heating, water heating, and cooking. ...

  16. GE Global Research in Niskayuna, NY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Niskayuna, USA Niskayuna, USA GE Global Research headquarters is the nerve center for innovative work across technologies and collaboration across GE businesses. Click to email...

  17. Microsoft Word - NY.17-16.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Ms. ... Leithner: This is in reference to the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) Vicinity ...

  18. Microsoft Word - FUSRAP Colonie NY.rtf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Colonie Interim Storage Site (CISS) Colonie, New York FACT SHEET Jan 2004 DESCRIPTION: The site consists of a total area of 11.2 acres plus 56 vicinity properties. The site was owned and operated by National Lead Industries (NL) from 1937-1984. The facility was used for electroplating and manufacturing various components from uranium and thorium. Radioactive materials released from the plant exhaust stacks spread to site buildings, portions of the grounds, and 56 commercial and residential

  19. Microfluidic molecular assay platform for the detection of miRNAs, mRNAs, proteins, and post-translational modifications at single-cell resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Meiye; Singh, Anup K.

    2014-07-15

    In this study, cell signaling is a dynamic and complex process. A typical signaling pathway may begin with activation of cell surface receptors, leading to activation kinase cascade that culminates in induction of mRNA and non-coding miRNA production in the nucleus, followed by modulation of mRNA expression by miRNAs in the cytosol, and end with production of proteins in response to the signaling pathway. Signaling pathways involve proteins, miRNA, and mRNAs, along with various forms of transient post-translational modifications, and detecting each type of signaling molecule requires categorically different sample preparation methods such as Western blotting for proteins, PCR for nucleic acids, and flow cytometry for post-translational modifications. Since we know that cells in populations behave heterogeneously1, especially in the cases of stem cells, cancer, and hematopoiesis, there is need for a new technology that provides capability to detect and quantify multiple categories of signaling molecules in intact single cells to provide a comprehensive view of the cell’s physiological state. In this technical brief, we describe our microfluidic platform with a portfolio of customized molecular assays that can detect nucleic acids, proteins, and post-translational modifications in single intact cells with >95% reduction in reagent requirement in under 8 hours.

  20. Microfluidic Molecular Assay Platform for the Detection of miRNAs, mRNAs, Proteins, and Posttranslational Modifications at Single-Cell Resolution

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wu, Meiye; Singh, Anup K.

    2014-07-15

    Cell signaling is a dynamic and complex process. A typical signaling pathway may begin with activation of cell surface receptors, leading to activation kinase cascade that culminates in induction of mRNA and non-coding miRNA production in the nucleus, followed by modulation of mRNA expression by miRNAs in the cytosol, and end with production of proteins in response to the signaling pathway. Signaling pathways involve proteins, miRNA, and mRNAs, along with various forms of transient post-translational modifications, and detecting each type of signaling molecule requires categorically different sample preparation methods such as Western blotting for proteins, PCR for nucleic acids, andmoreflow cytometry for post-translational modifications. Since we know that cells in populations behave heterogeneously1, especially in the cases of stem cells, cancer, and hematopoiesis, there is need for a new technology that provides capability to detect and quantify multiple categories of signaling molecules in intact single cells to provide a comprehensive view of the cells physiological state. In this technical brief, we describe our microfluidic platform with a portfolio of customized molecular assays that can detect nucleic acids, proteins, and post-translational modifications in single intact cells with >95% reduction in reagent requirement in under 8 hours.less

  1. Microfluidic molecular assay platform for the detection of miRNAs, mRNAs, proteins, and post-translational modifications at single-cell resolution

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wu, Meiye; Singh, Anup K.

    2014-07-15

    In this study, cell signaling is a dynamic and complex process. A typical signaling pathway may begin with activation of cell surface receptors, leading to activation kinase cascade that culminates in induction of mRNA and non-coding miRNA production in the nucleus, followed by modulation of mRNA expression by miRNAs in the cytosol, and end with production of proteins in response to the signaling pathway. Signaling pathways involve proteins, miRNA, and mRNAs, along with various forms of transient post-translational modifications, and detecting each type of signaling molecule requires categorically different sample preparation methods such as Western blotting for proteins, PCR formore » nucleic acids, and flow cytometry for post-translational modifications. Since we know that cells in populations behave heterogeneously1, especially in the cases of stem cells, cancer, and hematopoiesis, there is need for a new technology that provides capability to detect and quantify multiple categories of signaling molecules in intact single cells to provide a comprehensive view of the cell’s physiological state. In this technical brief, we describe our microfluidic platform with a portfolio of customized molecular assays that can detect nucleic acids, proteins, and post-translational modifications in single intact cells with >95% reduction in reagent requirement in under 8 hours.« less

  2. Magnetic structures of R5Ni2In4 and R11Ni4In9 ( R = Tb and Ho): Strong hierarchy in the temperature dependence of the magnetic ordering in the multiple rare-earth sublattices

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ritter, C.; Provino, A.; Manfrinetti, P.; Pecharsky, V. K.; Gschneidner, Jr., K. A.; Dhar, S. K.

    2015-11-09

    In this study, the magnetic properties and magnetic structures of the R5Ni2In4 and the microfibrous R 11Ni4In9 compounds with R = Tb and Ho have been examined using magnetization, heat capacity, and neutron diffraction data. Rare earth atoms occupy three and five symmetrically inequivalent rare earth sites in R5Ni2In4 and R 11Ni4In9 compounds, respectively. As a result of the intra- and inter-magnetic sublattice interactions, the magnetic exchange interactions are different for various rare earth sites; this leads to a cascade of magnetic transitions with a strong hierarchy in the temperature dependence of the magnetic orderings.

  3. Magnetic properties and magnetocaloric effect in the RCu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and RCu{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} (R = Ho, Er) compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mo, Zhao-Jun; Shen, Jun E-mail: tangcc@hebut.edu.cn; Wu, Jian-Feng; Yan, Li-Qin; Wang, Li-Chen; Sun, Ji-rong; Shen, Bao-Gen; Gao, Xin-Qiang; Tang, Cheng-Chun E-mail: tangcc@hebut.edu.cn

    2014-02-21

    The magnetic properties and magnetocaloric effect (MCE) in RCu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and RCu{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} (R = Ho, Er) compounds have been investigated. All these compounds possess an antiferromagnetic (AFM)-paramagnetic (PM) transition around their respective Neel temperatures. The RCu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} compounds undergo spin-glassy behavior above Neel temperature. Furthermore, a field-induced metamagnetic transition from AFM to ferromagnetic (FM) states is observed in these compounds. The calculated magnetic entropy changes show that all RCu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and RCu{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} (R = Ho, Er) compounds, especially, ErCu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} exhibits large MCEs with no thermal hysteresis and magnetic hysteresis loss. The value of −ΔS{sub M}{sup max} reaches 22.8 J/Kg K for magnetic field changes from 0 to 5 T. In particular, for field changes of 1 and 2 T, the giant reversible magnetic entropy changes −ΔS{sub M}{sup max} are 8.3 and 15.8 J/kg K at 2.5 K, which is lower than the boiling point of helium. The low-field giant magnetic entropy change, together with ignorable thermal hysteresis and field hysteresis loss of ErCu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} compound is expected to have effective applications in low temperature magnetic refrigeration.

  4. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    CMEs Globex on September 5, 2006. Prior to that, NYMEX offered the financially-settled standard-sized and NYMEX miNY energy futures contracts for trading on the Globex on June...

  5. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    CMEs Globex on September 5, 2006. Prior to that, NYMEX offered the financially-settled standard-sized and NYMEX miNY energy futures contracts for trading on the Globex on June...

  6. Approach to Recover Hydrocarbons from Currently Off-Limit Areas of the Antrim Formation, MI Using Low-Impact Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Wood; William Quinlan

    2008-09-30

    The goal of this project was to develop and execute a novel drilling and completion program in the Antrim Shale near the western shoreline of Northern Michigan. The target was the gas in the Lower Antrim Formation (Upper Devonian). Another goal was to see if drilling permits could be obtained from the Michigan DNR that would allow exploitation of reserves currently off-limits to exploration. This project met both of these goals: the DNR (Michigan Department of Natural Resources) issued permits that allow drilling the shallow subsurface for exploration and production. This project obtained drilling permits for the original demonstration well AG-A-MING 4-12 HD (API: 21-009-58153-0000) and AG-A-MING 4-12 HD1 (API: 21-009-58153-0100) as well as for similar Antrim wells in Benzie County, MI, the Colfax 3-28 HD and nearby Colfax 2-28 HD which were substituted for the AG-A-MING well. This project also developed successful techniques and strategies for producing the shallow gas. In addition to the project demonstration well over 20 wells have been drilled to date into the shallow Antrim as a result of this project's findings. Further, fracture stimulation has proven to be a vital step in improving the deliverability of wells to deem them commercial. Our initial plan was very simple; the 'J-well' design. We proposed to drill a vertical or slant well 30.48 meters (100 feet) below the glacial drift, set required casing, then angle back up to tap the resource lying between the base to the drift and the conventional vertical well. The 'J'-well design was tested at Mancelona Township in Antrim County in February of 2007 with the St. Mancelona 2-12 HD 3.

  7. Arsenite evokes IL-6 secretion, autocrine regulation of STAT3 signaling, and miR-21 expression, processes involved in the EMT and malignant transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Fei; Xu, Yuan; Ling, Min; Zhao, Yue; Xu, Wenchao; Liang, Xiao; Jiang, Rongrong; Wang, Bairu; Bian, Qian; Liu, Qizhan

    2013-11-15

    Arsenite is an established human carcinogen, and arsenite-induced inflammation contributes to malignant transformation of cells, but the molecular mechanisms by which cancers are produced remain to be established. The present results showed that, evoked by arsenite, secretion of interleukin-6 (IL-6), a pro-inflammatory cytokine, led to the activation of STAT3, a transcription activator, and to increased levels of a microRNA, miR-21. Blocking IL-6 with anti-IL-6 antibody and inhibiting STAT3 activation reduced miR-21 expression. For human bronchial epithelial cells, cultured in the presence of anti-IL-6 antibody for 3 days, the arsenite-induced EMT and malignant transformation were reversed. Thus, IL-6, acting on STAT3 signaling, which up-regulates miR-21in an autocrine manner, contributes to the EMT induced by arsenite. These data define a link from inflammation to EMT in the arsenite-induced malignant transformation of HBE cells. This link, mediated through miRNAs, establishes a mechanism for arsenite-induced lung carcinogenesis. - Highlights: Arsenite evokes IL-6 secretion. IL-6 autocrine mediates STAT3 signaling and up-regulates miR-21expression. Inflammation is involved in arsenite-induced EMT.

  8. Correlation between upconversion photoluminescence and dielectric response in Ba-substituted (Sr{sub 1?x}Ba{sub x}){sub 4}(La{sub 0.85}Ho{sub 0.025}Yb{sub 0.125}){sub 2}Ti{sub 4}Nb{sub 6}O{sub 30}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, T.; Wang, X. D.; Zhao, C. Z.; Liu, M. F.; Liu, J. M.

    2014-06-30

    The filled tetragonal tungsten bronze (Sr{sub 1?x}Ba{sub x}){sub 4}(La{sub 0.85}Ho{sub 0.025}Yb{sub 0.125}){sub 2}Ti{sub 4}Nb{sub 6}O{sub 30} (SBLTNx: Ho-Yb) ceramics with different Ba substitution levels (x) are prepared. The upconversion photoluminescence (UC-PL) and dielectric permittivity are investigated. The substitution of Sr{sup 2+} ions at the A{sub 2}-sites by larger Ba{sup 2+} ions results in substantial variation of the UC-PL intensity as a function of substitution level x. Furthermore, the dielectric response to the substitution of Sr{sup 2+} by Ba{sup 2+} suggests a close correlation between the UC-PL intensity and dielectric permittivity. The origin for this correlation is discussed based on the random stress field (RSF) model.

  9. Solar Market Analytics, Roadmapping, and Tracking NY (SMART NY) Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Case, Tria; Reilly, Laurie; Kling, Alison

    2014-05-15

    This is the final report, including links to Working Group reports and an attached Working Group report for SunShot Initiative Rooftop Solar Challenge I, from Sustainable CUNY of the City University of New York, on behalf of New York City

  10. Ecloud Build-Up Simulations for the FNAL MI for a Mixed Fill Pattern: Dependence on Peak SEY and Pulse Intensity During the Ramp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furman, M. A.

    2010-12-11

    We present simulation results of the build-up of the electron-cloud density n{sub e} in three regions of the FNAL Main Injector (MI) for a beam fill pattern made up of 5 double booster batches followed by a 6th single batch. We vary the pulse intensity in the range N{sub t} = (2-5) x 10{sup 13}, and the beam kinetic energy in the range E{sub k} = 8-120 GeV. We assume a secondary electron emission model qualitatively corresponding to TiN, except that we let the peak value of the secondary electron yield (SEY) {delta}{sub max} vary as a free parameter in a fairly broad range. Our main conclusions are: (1) At fixed N{sub t} there is a clear threshold behavior of n{sub e} as a function of {delta}{sub max} in the range {approx} 1.1-1.3. (2) At fixed {delta}{sub max}, there is a threshold behavior of n{sub e} as a function of N{sub t} provided {delta}{sub max} is sufficiently high; the threshold value of N{sub t} is a function of the characteristics of the region being simulated. (3) The dependence on E{sub k} is weak except possibly at transition energy. Most of these results were informally presented to the relevant MI personnel in April 2010.

  11. Synthesis of nanocrystalline REBO{sub 3} (RE=Y, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Ho) and YBO{sub 3}:Eu using a borohydride-based solution precursor route

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henkes, Amanda E.; Schaak, Raymond E.

    2008-12-15

    A solution precursor route has been used to synthesize a series of nanocrystalline rare-earth borates. Amorphous precursor powders are precipitated during an aqueous reaction between RE{sup 3+} and NaBH{sub 4}, and the isolated powders can be annealed in air at 700 deg. C to form YBO{sub 3}, NdBO{sub 3}, SmBO{sub 3}, EuBO{sub 3}, GdBO{sub 3}, and HoBO{sub 3}. YBO{sub 3}:Eu formed using this strategy shows red-orange emission properties that are similar to high-quality nanocrystals prepared by other methods. The materials have been characterized by FTIR spectroscopy, powder XRD, SEM, DSC, UV-Vis fluorimetry, and TEM with EDS and element mapping. - Graphical abstract: Amorphous nanoscopic precursor powders are formed through the aqueous reaction of RE{sup 3+} with NaBH{sub 4}. Once isolated, the powders can be annealed at 700 deg. C in air to form a series of nanocrystalline REBO{sub 3} orthoborates. Nanocrystalline YBO{sub 3}:Eu formed using this strategy shows red-orange emission properties when excited with UV light.

  12. The Office of Minority Economic Impact (MI) was established in Fiscal Year 1979 pursuant to Section 641 Title V1, Part 3 of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act (Public Law 95-619), dated November 9, 1978

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Minority Economic Impact (MI) was established in Fiscal Year 1979 pursuant to Section 641 Title V1, Part 3 of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act (Public Law 95- 619), dated November 9, 1978. The following is MI's legislative mandate. PART 3 - - MINORITY ECONOMIC IMPACT SEC. 641. MINORITY ECONOMIC IMPACT. "(a) Establishment of Office of Minority Economic Impact -- Title II of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7131 - - 7139) is amended by adding at the end thereof

  13. besser | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Email Address: besser@ameslab.gov Publications 2014 Zhang, Y.; Mendelev, M.I.; Wang, C.Z.; Ott, R.; Zhang, F.; Besser, M.F.; Ho, K.M.; Kramer, M.J.. Impact of...

  14. Configuration of ripple domains and their topological defects...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Park, Yeonggu 1 ; Choi, Jin Sik 2 ; Choi, Taekjib 3 ; Lee, Mi Jung 1 ; Jia, Quanxi 4 ; Park, Minwoo 1 ; Lee, Hoonkyung 1 ; Park, Bae Ho 1 + Show Author...

  15. Configuration of ripple domains and their topological defects...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    materials. Authors: Park, Yeonggu 1 ; Choi, Jin Sik 2 ; Choi, Taekjib 3 ; Lee, Mi Jung 1 ; Jia, Quanxi 4 ; Park, Minwoo 1 ; Lee, Hoonkyung 1 ; Park, Bae Ho 1 + Show...

  16. Photoelectron imaging and theoretical study on the structure and chemical binding of the mixed-ligand M(I) complexes, [HMSH]{sup ?} (M = Cu, Ag, and Au)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qin, Zhengbo; Liu, Zhiling; Cong, Ran; Xie, Hua; Tang, Zichao, E-mail: zctang@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: fanhj@dicp.ac.cn; Fan, Hongjun, E-mail: zctang@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: fanhj@dicp.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2014-03-21

    We have reported a combined photoelectron imaging and theoretical study on gaseous mixed-ligand M(I) complexes of [HMSH]{sup ?} (M = Cu, Ag, and Au). With the aid of Franck-Condon simulations, vibrationally resolved photoelectron spectra yield accurate electron affinities of 3.269(6), 3.669(10), and 3.591(6) eV for [HCuSH], [HAgSH], and [HAuSH], respectively. And low-frequency modes are observed: 368(12) cm{sup ?1} for [HCuSH], 286(12) cm{sup ?1} for [HAgSH], and 327(12) cm{sup ?1} for [HAuSH], respectively. Extensive theoretical calculations are performed to aid in the spectral assignments and the calculated values agree well with the experimental observations. Although the S and H atoms have little discrepancy in electronegativity (2.20 for H and 2.54 for S), distinct bonding properties are demonstrated between HM and MS bond. It is revealed that there exists significant ionic bonding between MS in [HMSH]{sup ?} (M = Cu, Ag, and Au), while a gradual transition from ionic behavior between HCu in [HCuSH]{sup ?} to quite strong covalent bonding between HAu in [HAuSH]{sup ?}, supported by a variety of chemical bonding analyses.

  17. Improved Measurement of the <mi>?>?<mi mathvariant='normal'>emi>?> Branching Ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.; Aoki, M.; Blecher, M.; Britton, D. I.; Bryman, D. A.; vom Bruch, D.; Chen, S.; Comfort, J.; Ding, M.; Doria, L.; Cuen-Rochin, S.; Gumplinger, P.; Hussein, A.; Igarashi, Y.; Ito, S.; Kettell, S. H.; Kurchaninov, L.; Littenberg, L. S.; Malbrunot, C.; Mischke, R. E.; Numao, T.; Protopopescu, D.; Sher, A.; Sullivan, T.; Vavilov, D.; Yamada, K.

    2015-08-01

    A new measurement of the branching ratio Re/?=?(?+ ? e+? + ?+ ? e+??)/?(?+ ? ?+? + ?+??+??) resulted in Rexpe/?=[1.23440.0023(stat)0.0019(syst)] x 10-4. This is in agreement with the standard model prediction and improves the test of electron-muon universality to the level of 0.1%.

  18. Comparative proteomic analysis of Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1: Insights into the metabolic versatility of a gram-positive sulfate- and metal-reducing bacterium

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Otwell, Anne E.; Callister, Stephen J.; Zink, Erika M.; Smith, Richard D.; Richardson, Ruth E.

    2016-02-19

    In this study, the proteomes of the metabolically versatile and poorly characterized Gram-positive bacterium Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1 were compared across four cultivation conditions including sulfate reduction, soluble Fe(III) reduction, insoluble Fe(III) reduction, and pyruvate fermentation. Collectively across conditions, we observed at high confidence ~38% of genome-encoded proteins. Here, we focus on proteins that display significant differential abundance on conditions tested. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first full-proteome study focused on a Gram-positive organism cultivated either on sulfate or metal-reducing conditions. Several proteins with uncharacterized function encoded within heterodisulfide reductase (hdr)-containing loci were upregulated on either sulfatemore » (Dred_0633-4, Dred_0689-90, and Dred_1325-30) or Fe(III)-citrate-reducing conditions (Dred_0432-3 and Dred_1778-84). Two of these hdr-containing loci display homology to recently described flavin-based electron bifurcation (FBEB) pathways (Dred_1325-30 and Dred_1778-84). Additionally, we propose that a cluster of proteins, which is homologous to a described FBEB lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) complex, is performing lactate oxidation in D. reducens (Dred_0367-9). Analysis of the putative sulfate reduction machinery in D. reducens revealed that most of these proteins are constitutively expressed across cultivation conditions tested. In addition, peptides from the single multiheme c-type cytochrome (MHC) in the genome were exclusively observed on the insoluble Fe(III) condition, suggesting that this MHC may play a role in reduction of insoluble metals.« less

  19. Identification of proteins capable of metal reduction from the proteome of the Gram-positive bacterium Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1 using an NADH-based activity assay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otwell, Annie E.; Sherwood, Roberts; Zhang, Sheng; Nelson, Ornella D.; Li, Zhi; Lin, Hening; Callister, Stephen J.; Richardson, Ruth E.

    2015-01-01

    Metal reduction capability has been found in numerous species of environmentally abundant Gram-positive bacteria. However, understanding of microbial metal reduction is based almost solely on studies of Gram-negative organisms. In this study, we focus on Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1, a Gram-positive metal reducer whose genome lacks genes with similarity to any characterized metal reductase. D. reducens has been shown to reduce not only Fe(III), but also the environmentally important contaminants U(VI) and Cr(VI). By extracting, separating, and analyzing the functional proteome of D. reducens, using a ferrozine-based assay in order to screen for chelated Fe(III)-NTA reduction with NADH as electron donor, we have identified proteins not previously characterized as iron reductases. Their function was confirmed by heterologous expression in E. coli. These are the protein NADH:flavin oxidoreductase (Dred_2421) and a protein complex composed of oxidoreductase FAD/NAD(P)-binding subunit (Dred_1685) and dihydroorotate dehydrogenase 1B (Dred_1686). Dred_2421 was identified in the soluble proteome and is predicted to be a cytoplasmic protein. Dred_1685 and Dred_1686 were identified in both the soluble as well as the insoluble (presumably membrane) protein fraction, suggesting a type of membrane-association, although PSORTb predicts both proteins are cytoplasmic. Furthermore, we show that these proteins have the capability to reduce soluble Cr(VI) and U(VI) with NADH as electron donor. This study is the first functional proteomic analysis of D. reducens, and one of the first analyses of metal and radionuclide reduction in an environmentally relevant Gram-positive bacterium.

  20. MicroBooNE Proposal Addendum March

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MicroBooNE Proposal Addendum March 3, 2008 H. Chen, G. de Geronimo, J. Farrell, A. Kandasamy, F. Lanni, D. Lissauer, D. Makowiecki, J. Mead, V. Radeka, S. Rescia, J. Sondericker, B. Yu Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY L. Bugel, J. M. Conrad, Z. Djurcic, V. Nguyen, M. Shaevitz, W. Willis ‡ Columbia University, New York, NY C. James, S. Pordes, G. Rameika Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL C. Bromberg, D. Edmunds Michigan State University, Lansing, MI P. Nienaber St.

  1. Magnetic structures of R5Ni2In4 and R11Ni4In9 ( R = Tb and Ho): Strong hierarchy in the temperature dependence of the magnetic ordering in the multiple rare-earth sublattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritter, C.; Provino, A.; Manfrinetti, P.; Pecharsky, V. K.; Gschneidner, Jr., K. A.; Dhar, S. K.

    2015-11-09

    In this study, the magnetic properties and magnetic structures of the R5Ni2In4 and the microfibrous R 11Ni4In9 compounds with R = Tb and Ho have been examined using magnetization, heat capacity, and neutron diffraction data. Rare earth atoms occupy three and five symmetrically inequivalent rare earth sites in R5Ni2In4 and R 11Ni4In9 compounds, respectively. As a result of the intra- and inter-magnetic sublattice interactions, the magnetic exchange interactions are different for various rare earth sites; this leads to a cascade of magnetic transitions with a strong hierarchy in the temperature dependence of the magnetic orderings.

  2. Resonant <mi>?+?>?<mi>?+?>0 amplitude from Quantum Chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briceo, Ral A.; Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.; Shultz, Christian J.; Thomas, Christopher E.; Wilson, David J.

    2015-12-08

    We present the first ab initio calculation of a radiative transition of a hadronic resonance within Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). We compute the amplitude for $\\pi\\pi \\to \\pi\\gamma^\\star$, as a function of the energy of the $\\pi\\pi$ pair and the virtuality of the photon, in the kinematic regime where $\\pi\\pi$ couples strongly to the unstable $\\rho$ resonance. This exploratory calculation is performed using a lattice discretization of QCD with quark masses corresponding to $m_\\pi \\approx 400$ MeV. As a result, we obtain a description of the energy dependence of the transition amplitude, constrained at 48 kinematic points, that we can analytically continue to the $\\rho$ pole and identify from its residue the $\\rho \\to \\pi\\gamma^\\star$ form-factor.

  3. MI_07-5.pdf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  4. Niagara Falls, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 9,497 6,894 4,421 2,459 935 1,060 1,452 979 644 1,443 1,404 1,583 2012 1,411 720 681 93 7 56 31 6 12 35 105 2013 299 291...

  5. Waddington, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 35,222 28,023 21,841 13,715 12,079 14,620 21,184 14,405 12,504 15,162 18,131 24,944 2012 30,005 25,448 20,375 12,699 12,562 17,240 19,119 16,870 14,930 17,082 26,948 28,228 2013 30,284 28,462 30,812 14,028 9,391 10,773 15,366 7,708 8,022 9,364 22,246 28,215 2014 30,895 25,231 24,163 13,176 9,354 11,036 9,386 6,935 7,869 8,422 17,343 23,409 2015 31,386 30,303 29,987 10,141 2,827 2,720 5,889 5,975 5,506 14,520 19,502 16,327

  6. Niagara Falls, NY Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    88,983 32,770 3,159 1,650 2,957 2,539 1996-2015 Pipeline Prices 5.43 4.68 3.22 4.04 5.08 3.2

  7. Niagara Falls, NY Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    6,535 23,386 158,102 162,321 161,822 1998-2015 Pipeline Prices -- 4.76 4.09 4.15 5.51 2.96 1998

  8. NY-Sun Commerical/ Industrial Incentive Program | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    incentives for installation of non-residential new grid connected solar photovoltaic (PV) systems that are greater than 200 kW. Incentives are awarded on a first-come, first...

  9. Northern Westchester Energy Action Consortium (NY) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Consortium are regional solutions for: *Energy efficiency and conservation programs *Renewable energy use *Waste management including organic waste *Transportation efficiency...

  10. New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, Albany, NY

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Development Authority Albany, New York NYSERDA Hydrogen Program State & Regional Hydrogen Initiatives July 12, 2006 New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) * A Public Benefit Corp established in 1975 by State Legislature * Mission: To identify solutions to State's energy challenges in ways that benefit the State's economy and environment * Forge public/private partnerships with businesses, municipalities, residents, and other energy stakeholders to accomplish this

  11. Consolidated Edison Co-NY Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    CONS TOT REV (THOUSAND ) TOT SALES (MWH) TOT CONS 2009-03 180,424 829,996 2,282,842 177,132 1,007,995 393,452 2,556 15,772 240 104 656 5 360,216 1,854,419 2,676,539 2009-02...

  12. Property:EIA/861/IsoNy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Inc. + true + M Major Energy Electric Services + true + N NOCO Electric + true + NRG Power Marketing LLC + true + National Grid Generation, LLC + true + (previous 25) (next...

  13. Methane Gas Utilization Project from Landfill at Ellery (NY)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pantelis K. Panteli

    2012-01-10

    Landfill Gas to Electric Energy Generation and Transmission at Chautauqua County Landfill, Town of Ellery, New York. The goal of this project was to create a practical method with which the energy, of the landfill gas produced by the decomposing waste at the Chautauqua County Landfill, could be utilized. This goal was accomplished with the construction of a landfill gas to electric energy plant (originally 6.4MW and now 9.6MW) and the construction of an inter-connection power-line, from the power-plant to the nearest (5.5 miles) power-grid point.

  14. Grand Island, NY Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    63,548 47,616 23,000 5,758 1,413 4,940 1996-2015 Pipeline Prices 5.20 4.68 3.01 3.92 9.80 4.23

  15. Grand Island, NY Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1,517 6,194 848 174 7,259 2007-2015 Pipeline Prices -- 3.82 3.02 3.84 9.80 2.38 2007

  16. Waddington, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2.92 2.82 2.38 2.54 2000's 4.24 4.81 3.60 5.81 6.51 9.38 7.62 7.57 9.42 4.60 2010's 5.44 4.99 3.87 5.58 8.54 5.00

  17. Waddington, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 5.32 5.46 5.14 5.14 5.20 5.22 5.22 5.00 4.71 4.55 4.32 4.20 2012 4.31 3.57 3.26 2.86 2.76 3.03 3.43 3.52 3.46 3.77 5.25 5.05 2013 6.86 6.48 5.16 5.04 4.88 4.62 4.42 3.98 4.03 3.98 4.69 7.40 2014 16.04 13.46 10.48 5.37 4.95 5.01 4.57 4.27 4.31 4.15 4.84 4.81 2015 6.23 10.52 4.38 2.89 2.79 2.79 3.03 2.75 2.99 2.87 2.63 2.54

  18. Waddington, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 288,807 295,568 293,234 324,400 2000's 337,989 290,981 285,188 296,989 331,234 349,230 406,033 422,315 395,758 349,980 2010's 267,227 231,831 241,506 214,671 187,219 175,084

  19. Waddington, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 35,222 28,023 21,841 13,715 12,079 14,620 21,184 14,405 12,504 15,162 18,131 24,944 2012 30,005 25,448 20,375 12,699 12,562 17,240 19,119 16,870 14,930 17,082 26,948 28,228 2013 30,284 28,462 30,812 14,028 9,391 10,773 15,366 7,708 8,022 9,364 22,246 28,215 2014 30,895 25,231 24,163 13,176 9,354 11,036 9,386 6,935 7,869 8,422 17,343 23,409 2015 31,386 30,303 29,987 10,141 2,827 2,720 5,889 5,975 5,506 14,520 19,502 16,327

  20. Champlain, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 3.29 3.40 3.53 3.68 2000's 3.86 4.03 4.17 4.34 4.53 4.81 5.04 5.23 5.63 5.21 2010's 6.02 6.11 4.50 7.22 13.60 5.57

  1. Champlain, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 7.34 6.56 5.91 5.40 5.47 5.45 5.64 5.26 4.94 4.57 4.49 4.78 2012 5.18 4.34 3.70 2.84 3.04 3.46 4.07 3.84 3.85 4.32 6.07 5.49 2013 10.24 10.66 6.06 5.47 5.00 4.48 4.63 4.16 4.27 4.18 4.43 7.72 2014 21.06 20.80 14.47 5.49 5.28 5.53 4.98 4.44 4.28 4.15 5.48 5.05 2015 5.91 11.77 4.62 3.39 3.64 3.57 3.80 3.61 3.68 3.26 2.84 2.85

  2. Microsoft Word - NY17-15 01-50.rtf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    OR/20722-84 Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) Contract No. DE-ACO5-810R20722 POST-REMEDIAL ACTION REPORT FOR THE NIAGARA FALLS STORAGE SITE VICINITY PROPERTIES - 1983 AND 1984 Lewiston, New York December 1986 Bechtel National, Inc. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. Neither the United States nor the United States Department of Energy, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors, or their

  3. seca-core-tech-prw-ny | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Laboratory Development of Ceramic Composites as SOFC Anodes PDF-481KB Olga Marina Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Compressive Seal Development PDF-1051KB Y.S....

  4. Estes, Deven P. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    an exchangeable proton, is eventually formed. We have determined the bond dissociation free energy and pKa of the new O-H bond in 6 to be 50.5 kcalmol and 13.4, respectively,...

  5. Radiological Scoping Survey of the Scotia Depot, Scotia, NY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, E. N.

    2008-02-25

    The objectives of the radiological scoping survey were to collect adequate field data for use in evaluating the radiological condition of Scotia Depot land areas, warehouses, and support buildings.

  6. Buffalo, NY Liquefied Natural Gas Exports Price (Dollars per...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2015 7.65 7.65 7.65 7.75 - No Data Reported; -- Not Applicable; NA Not...

  7. Buffalo, NY Liquefied Natural Gas Exports (Million Cubic Feet...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Natural Gas Exports (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2015 1 1 1 1 - No Data Reported; -- Not Applicable; NA Not Available; W ...

  8. DOE Awards Small Business Contract for West Valley NY Services

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CINCINNATI – The Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a task order (contract) to Chenega Global Services, LLC of Anchorage, Alaska, for administrative and technical support services at the West Valley Demonstration Project, West Valley, New York. The contract has a one-year performance period with a value of $1.3 million, and contains two one-year extension options with a total value of $4.12 million. Chenega Global Services is a certified small and disadvantaged business under the Small Business Administration.

  9. Champlain, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1,825 1,988 1,676 394 292 100 462 224 178 189 214 751 2012 1,070 862 537 288 186 347 644 403 427 469 640 892 2013 1,174 1,217 956 321 247 128 445 288 287 467 2014 1,289 1,051 522...

  10. Origin State>> CA CA ID ID IL KY NJ NM NY NY NV OH OH OH SC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mix Wastew Treatment Project Argonne National Laboratory Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Sandia National Laboratory Brookhaven National Laboratory West Valley Demonstration Project National Security Technologies, Inc. Mound Closure Project Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Fernald Closure Project Savannah River Site BWXT Y-12 Plant Duratek Nuclear Fuels UT-Battelle Bechtel Jacobs Permafix M&EC EnergX (Foster Wheeler) Pantex Plant SOUTHERN I-15, CA-127,

  11. Origin State>> CA CA ID ID IL KY NJ NM NY NY NV OH OH OH SC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mixed Waste Treatment Project Argonne National Laboratory Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Sandia National Laboratory Brookhaven National Laboratory West Valley Demonstration Project National Security Technologies, Inc. Mound Closure Project Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Fernald Closure Project Savannah River Site BWXT Y-12 Plant Duratek Nuclear Fuels UT-Battelle Bechtel Jacobs Permafix M&EC EnergX (formerly Foster Wheeler) Pantex Plant SOUTHERN I-15,

  12. Origin State>> CA CA ID ID IL KY NJ NM NY NY NV OH OH SC TN

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SC TN TN TN TN TN TN TN TX Total Shipments by Route Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Boeing/Rocketdyne Idaho National Labaratoy Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Argonne National Laboratory Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Sandia National Laboratory Brookhaven National Laboratory West Valley Demonstration Project National Security Technologies, Inc. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Fernald Closure Project Savannah River Site BWXT Y-12 Plant Duratek

  13. F-1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Central West North Central East North Central Mountain AK WA MT WY ID NV UT CO AZ NM TX OK IA KS MO IL IN KY TN MS AL FL GA SC NC WV PA NJ MD DE NY CT VT ME RI MA NH VA WI MI OH...

  14. F-5 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Figure F4. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions Atlantic WA MT WY ID NV UT CO AZ NM TX OK IA KS MO IL IN KY TN MS AL FL GA SC NC WV PA NJ MD DE NY CT ME RI MA NH VA WI MI OH NE...

  15. Lattice dynamics of <mi>BaFe>2<mi>X>3(<mi>X= mathvariant='normal'>Smi>,<mi>Se>) compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popovi?, Z. V.; ?epanovi?, M.; Lazarevi?, N.; Opa?i?, M.; Radonji?, M. M.; Tanaskovi?, D.; Lei, Hechang; Petrovic, C.

    2015-02-27

    We present the Raman scattering spectra of the S=2 spin ladder compounds BaFe?X? (X=S,Se) in a temperature range between 20 and 400 K. Although the crystal structures of these two compounds are both orthorhombic and very similar, they are not isostructural. The unit cell of BaFe?S? (BaFe?Se?) is base-centered Cmcm (primitive Pnma), giving 18 (36) modes to be observed in the Raman scattering experiment. We have detected almost all Raman active modes, predicted by factor group analysis, which can be observed from the cleavage planes of these compounds. Assignment of the observed Raman modes of BaFe?S(Se)? is supported by the lattice dynamics calculations. The antiferromagnetic long-range spin ordering in BaFe?Se? below TN=255K leaves a fingerprint both in the A1g and B3g phonon mode linewidth and energy.

  16. Search for proton decay via <mi>p>?<mi>?K>+ using 260 <mi>kilotonyear> data of Super-Kamiokande

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abe, K.; Hayato, Y.; Iyogi, K.; Kameda, J.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Nakahata, M.; Nakayama, S.; Wendell, R.?A.; Sekiya, H.; Shiozawa, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Takeda, A.; Takenaga, Y.; Ueno, K.; Yokozawa, T.; Kaji, H.; Kajita, T.; Kaneyuki, K.; Lee, K.?P.; Okumura, K.; McLachlan, T.; Labarga, L.; Kearns, E.; Raaf, J.?L.; Stone, J.?L.; Sulak, L.?R.; Goldhaber, M.; Bays, K.; Carminati, G.; Kropp, W.?R.; Mine, S.; Renshaw, A.; Smy, M.?B.; Sobel, H.?W.; Ganezer, K.?S.; Hill, J.; Keig, W.?E.; Jang, J.?S.; Kim, J.?Y.; Lim, I.?T.; Albert, J.?B.; Scholberg, K.; Walter, C.?W.; Wongjirad, T.; Ishizuka, T.; Tasaka, S.; Learned, J.?G.; Matsuno, S.; Smith, S.?N.; Hasegawa, T.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakamura, K.; Nishikawa, K.; Oyama, Y.; Sakashita, K.; Sekiguchi, T.; Tsukamoto, T.; Suzuki, A.?T.; Takeuchi, Y.; Ieki, K.; Ikeda, M.; Kubo, H.; Minamino, A.; Murakami, A.; Nakaya, T.; Fukuda, Y.; Choi, K.; Itow, Y.; Mitsuka, G.; Miyake, M.; Mijakowski, P.; Hignight, J.; Imber, J.; Jung, C.?K.; Taylor, I.; Yanagisawa, C.; Ishino, H.; Kibayashi, A.; Koshio, Y.; Mori, T.; Sakuda, M.; Takeuchi, J.; Kuno, Y.; Kim, S.?B.; Okazawa, H.; Choi, Y.; Nishijima, K.; Koshiba, M.; Totsuka, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Martens, K.; Marti, Ll.; Obayashi, Y.; Vagins, M.?R.; Chen, S.; Sui, H.; Yang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Connolly, K.; Dziomba, M.; Wilkes, R.?J.

    2014-10-14

    We have searched for proton decay via p??K+ using Super-Kamiokande data from April 1996 to February 2013, 260 kilotonyear exposure in total. No evidence for this proton decay mode is found. A lower limit of the proton lifetime is set to ?/B(p??K+)>5.91033 years at 90% confidence level.

  17. A Proposal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Proposal for a New Experiment Using the Booster and NuMI Neutrino Beamlines: MicroBooNE October 15, 2007 H. Chen, J. Farrell, F. Lanni, D. Lissauer, D. Makowiecki, J. Mead, V. Radeka, S. Rescia, J. Sondericker, B. Yu Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY L. Bugel, J. M. Conrad, V. Nguyen, M. Shaevitz, W. Willis ‡ Columbia University, New York, NY C. James, S. Pordes, G. Rameika Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL C. Bromberg, D. Edmunds Michigan State University, Lansing,

  18. Superconducting and magnetic properties of <mi>Sr>3<mi>Ir>4<mi>Sn>13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, P. K.; Amato, A.; Khasanov, R.; Luetkens, H.; Wang, Kefeng; Petrovic, C.; Cook, R. M.; Lees, M. R.; Morenzoni, E.

    2014-10-10

    In this research, magnetization and muon spin relaxation or rotation (SR) measurements have been performed to study the superconducting and magnetic properties of Sr?Ir?Sn??. From magnetization measurements the lower and upper critical fields of Sr?Ir?Sn?? are found to be 81(1) Oe and 14.4(2) kOe, respectively. Zero-field SR data show no sign of any magnetic ordering or weak magnetism in Sr?Ir?Sn??. Transverse-field SR measurements in the vortex state provided the temperature dependence of the magnetic penetration depth ?. The dependence of ?? with temperature is consistent with the existence of single s-wave energy gap in the superconducting state of Sr?Ir?Sn?? with a gap value of 0.82(2) meV at absolute zero temperature. The magnetic penetration depth at zero temperature ?(0) is 291(3) nm. The ratio ?(0)/kBTc = 2.1(1) indicates that Sr?Ir?Sn?? should be considered as a strong-coupling superconductor.

  19. Two nucleon systems at <mi>mmi><mi>π>~450<mi>MeV> from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orginos, Kostas; Parreño, Assumpta; Savage, Martin J.; Beane, Silas R.; Chang, Emmanuel; Detmold, William

    2015-12-23

    Nucleon-nucleon systems are studied with lattice quantum chromodynamics at a pion mass of $m_\\pi\\sim 450~{\\rm MeV}$ in three spatial volumes using $n_f=2+1$ flavors of light quarks. At the quark masses employed in this work, the deuteron binding energy is calculated to be $B_d = 14.4^{+3.2}_{-2.6} ~{\\rm MeV}$, while the dineutron is bound by $B_{nn} = 12.5^{+3.0}_{-5.0}~{\\rm MeV}$. Over the range of energies that are studied, the S-wave scattering phase shifts calculated in the 1S0 and 3S1-3D1 channels are found to be similar to those in nature, and indicate repulsive short-range components of the interactions, consistent with phenomenological nucleon-nucleon interactions. In both channels, the phase shifts are determined at three energies that lie within the radius of convergence of the effective range expansion, allowing for constraints to be placed on the inverse scattering lengths and effective ranges. Thus, the extracted phase shifts allow for matching to nuclear effective field theories, from which low energy counterterms are extracted and issues of convergence are investigated. As part of the analysis, a detailed investigation of the single hadron sector is performed, enabling a precise determination of the violation of the Gell-Mann–Okubo mass relation.

  20. Coupled <mi>ππ>, <mi>K><mi>K>¯ scattering in <mi>P>-wave and the <mi>ρ> resonance from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, David J.; Briceño, Raúl A.; Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.; Thomas, Christopher E.

    2015-11-02

    In this study, we determine elastic and coupled-channel amplitudes for isospin-1 meson-meson scattering in $P$-wave, by calculating correlation functions using lattice QCD with light quark masses such that $m_\\pi = 236$ MeV in a cubic volume of $\\sim (4 \\,\\mathrm{fm})^3$. Variational analyses of large matrices of correlation functions computed using operator constructions resembling $\\pi\\pi$, $K\\overline{K}$ and $q\\bar{q}$, in several moving frames and several lattice irreducible representations, leads to discrete energy spectra from which scattering amplitudes are extracted. In the elastic $\\pi\\pi$ scattering region we obtain a detailed energy-dependence for the phase-shift, corresponding to a $\\rho$ resonance, and we extend the analysis into the coupled-channel $K\\overline{K}$ region for the first time, finding a small coupling between the channels.

  1. Observation of <mi>D>0 meson nuclear modifications in <mi>Au+Au> collisions at <mi>smi><mi>NN>=200 <mi>GeV>

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J.?K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M.?M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C.?D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E.?C.; Averichev, G.?S.; Banerjee, A.; Beavis, D.?R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.?K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L.?C.; Bordyuzhin, I.?G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A.?V.; Brovko, S.?G.; Bltmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T.?P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Caldern de la Barca Snchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M.?C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.?F.; Chen, J.?H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M.?J.?M.; Contin, G.; Cramer, J.?G.; Crawford, H.?J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L.?C.; Debbe, R.?R.; Dedovich, T.?G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A.?A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J.?L.; Draper, J.?E.; Du, C.?M.; Dunkelberger, L.?E.; Dunlop, J.?C.; Efimov, L.?G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K.?S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C.?E.; Gagliardi, C.?A.; Gangadharan, D.?R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D.?S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J.?W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G.?W.; Hofman, D.?J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H.?Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T.?J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W.?W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E.?G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H.?W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z.?H.; Kikola, D.?P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D.?D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A.?F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R.?A.; Lamont, M.?A.?C.; Landgraf, J.?M.; Landry, K.?D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J.?H.; LeVine, M.?J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z.?M.; Lisa, M.?A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W.?J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R.?S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G.?L.; Ma, Y.?G.; Madagodagettige Don, D.?M.?M.?D.; Mahapatra, D.?P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H.?S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T.?S.; Minaev, N.?G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M.?M.; Morozov, D.?A.; Mustafa, M.?K.; Nandi, B.?K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T.?K.; Nelson, J.?M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L.?V.; Noh, S.?Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S.?B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E.?W.; Olvitt, D.?L.; Pachr, M.; Page, B.?S.; Pal, S.?K.; Pan, Y.?X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A.?M.; Pruthi, N.?K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P.?R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R.?L.; Riley, C.?K.; Ritter, H.?G.; Roberts, J.?B.; Rogachevskiy, O.?V.; Romero, J.?L.; Ross, J.?F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N.?R.; Sahu, P.?K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R.?P.; Schmah, A.?M.; Schmidke, W.?B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P.?V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W.?Q.; Shi, S.?S.; Shou, Q.?Y.; Sichtermann, E.?P.; Singaraju, R.?N.; Skoby, M.?J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H.?M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T.?D.?S.; Stevens, J.?R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X.?M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D.?N.; Symons, T.?J.?M.; Szelezniak, M.?A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A.?H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J.?H.; Timmins, A.?R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R.?E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B.?A.; Tsai, O.?D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D.?G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Vanfossen, J.?A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G.?M.?S.; Vasiliev, A.?N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbk, F.; Viyogi, Y.?P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.?S.; Wang, X.?L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J.?C.; Westfall, G.?D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S.?W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.?F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.

    2014-09-30

    We report the first measurement of charmed-hadron (D0) production via the hadronic decay channel (D0?K-+?+) in Au+Au collisions at ?sNN=200 GeV with the STAR experiment. The charm production cross section per nucleon-nucleon collision at midrapidity scales with the number of binary collisions, Nbin, from p+p to central Au+Au collisions. The D0 meson yields in central Au+Aucollisions are strongly suppressed compared to those in p+p scaled by Nbin, for transverse momenta pT>3 GeV/c, demonstrating significant energy loss of charm quarks in the hot and dense medium. An enhancement at intermediate pT is also observed. Model calculations including strong charm-medium interactions and coalescence hadronization describe our measurements.

  2. Measurement of the structure function of the nearly free neutron using spectator tagging in inelastic <mi mathvariant='normal'>Hmi>2 ( <mi>e>, <mi>emi>'<mi>ps> ) <mi>X> scattering with CLAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tkachenko, S.; Baillie, N.; Kuhn, S. E.; Zhang, J.; Arrington, J.; Bosted, P.; Bltmann, S.; Christy, M. E.; Dutta, D.; Ent, R.; Fenker, H.; Griffioen, K. A.; Ispiryan, M.; Kalantarians, N.; Keppel, C. E.; Melnitchouk, W.; Tvaskis, V.; Adhikari, K. P.; Aghasyan, M.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G. E.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fleming, J. A.; Garillon, B.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Ho, D.; Holtrop, M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Jo, H. S.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; King, P. M.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lenisa, P.; Lewis, S.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H.; MacCormick, M.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Mineeva, T.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moutarde, H.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Phillips, J. J.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabati, F.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Senderovich, I.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Simonyan, A.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Strauch, S.; Tang, W.; Ungaro, M.; Vlassov, A. V.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zana, L.; Zonta, I.

    2014-04-24

    In this study, much less is known about neutron structure than that of the proton due to the absence of free neutron targets. Neutron information is usually extracted from data on nuclear targets such as deuterium, requiring corrections for nuclear binding and nucleon off-shell effects. These corrections are model dependent and have significant uncertainties, especially for large values of the Bjorken scaling variable x. As a consequence, the same data can lead to different conclusions, for example, about the behavior of the d quark distribution in the proton at large x.

  3. Measurement of the Effective Weak Mixing Angle in<mi>p><mi>p>?<mi>Zmi>/?>*?<mi>emi>+<mi>e>-Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.? M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B.? S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J.? P.; Alexeev, G.? D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. ?V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. ?F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S.? B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besanon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P.? C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E.? E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. ?B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C.? P.; Camacho-Prez, E.; Casey, B.? C.?K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K.? M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S.? W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. ?E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. ?J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Dliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S.? P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H.? T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. ?F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L.? V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. ?D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V.? N.; Faur, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H.? E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P. ?H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garca-Gonzlez, J. ?A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C.? E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. ?D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grnendahl, S.; Grnewald, M.? W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J.? M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. ?P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M.? D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. ?D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J.? L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A.? S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffr, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M.? S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A.? W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. ?N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J.? M.; Kozelov, A.? V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. ?A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H.? S.; Lee, S.? W.; Lee, W. ?M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q.? Z.; Lim, J.? K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V.? V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A.? L.; Maciel, A. ?K.?A.; Madar, R.; Magaa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V.? L.; Mansour, J.; Martnez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. ?L.; Meijer, M.? M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. ?G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N.? K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H.? A.; Negret, J.? P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H.? T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. ?K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Ptroff, P.; Pleier, M. -A.; Podstavkov, V. ?M.; Popov, A.? V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P.? N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Snchez-Hernndez, A.; Sanders, M.? P.; Santos, A. ?S.; Savage, G.; Savitskyi, M.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. ?D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. ?A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Snow, G.? R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Sldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D.? A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V.? V.; Tsai, Y. -T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W.? M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E.? W.; Vasilyev, I.? A.; Verkheev, A. ?Y.; Vertogradov, L. ?S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.

    2015-07-22

    We present a measurement of the fundamental parameter of the standard model, the weak mixing angle sin2??eff which determines the relative strength of weak and electromagnetic interactions, in pp?Z/?*?e+e- events at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV, using data corresponding to 9.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The effective weak mixing angle is extracted from the forward-backward charge asymmetry as a function of the invariant mass around the Z boson pole. The measured value of sin2??eff=0.231470.00047 is the most precise measurement from light quark interactions to date, with a precision close to the best LEP and SLD results.

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    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013...

  5. Marysville, MI Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    4,925 22,198 41,964 42,866 35,273 24,583 1996-2014 Pipeline Prices 4.85 4.87 4.48 3.18 3.98 5.45 1996...

  6. Comprehensive amplitude analysis of <mi>γγ><mimi>+<mimi>-,<mi>π>0<mi>π>0 and <mi>K>¯<mi>K> below 1.5 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dai, Ling-Yun; Pennington, Michael R.

    2014-08-15

    In this paper we perform an amplitude analysis of essentially all published pion and kaon pair production data from two photon collisions below 1.5 GeV. This includes all the high statistics results from Belle, as well as older data from Mark II at SLAC, CELLO at DESY, Crystal Ball at SLAC. The purpose of this analysis is to provide as close to a model-independent determination of the γγ to meson pair amplitudes as possible. Having data with limited angular coverage, typically |cosθ| < 0.6-0.8, and no polarization information for reactions in which spin is an essential complication, the determination of the underlying amplitudes might appear an intractable problem. However, imposing the basic constraints required by analyticity, unitarity, and crossing-symmetry makes up for the experimentally missing information. Above 1.5 GeV multi-meson production channels become important and we have too little information to resolve the amplitudes. Nevertheless, below 1.5 GeV the two photon production of hadron pairs serves as a paradigm for the application of S-matrix techniques. Final state interactions among the meson pairs is critical to this analysis. To fix these, we include the latest ππ → ππ, K⁻K scattering amplitudes given by dispersive analyses, supplemented in the K⁻K threshold region by the recent precision Dalitz plot analysis from BaBar. With these hadronic amplitudes built into unitarity, we can constrain the overall description of γγ → ππ and K⁻K datasets, both integrated and differential cross-sections, including the high statistics charged and neutral pion data from Belle. A region of solutions is found for the γγ → ππ partial waves with both isospin 0 and 2. Since this analysis invokes coupled hadronic channels, even the relatively poor integrated cross-section data on γγ → K⁻K narrows the patch of solutions to essentially a single form. For this we present the complete partial wave amplitudes, show how well they fit all the available data, and give the two photon couplings of scalar and tensor resonances that appear.

  7. Preferential Eu Site Occupation and Its Consequences in the Ternary Luminescent Halides<mi>AB>2<mi mathvariant='normal'>Imi>5:<mi>Eu>2+(<mi>Ami>=<mi>Limi>Cs>;<mi>B=Sr>, Ba)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, C.  M.; Biswas, Koushik

    2015-07-22

    Several rare-earth-doped, heavy-metal halides have recently been identified as potential next-generation luminescent materials with high efficiency at low cost. AB2I5:Eu2+ (A=Li–Cs; B=Sr, Ba) is one such family of halides. Its members, such as CsBa2I5:Eu2+ and KSr2I5:Eu2+, are currently being investigated as high-performance scintillators with improved sensitivity, light yield, and energy resolution less than 3% at 662 keV. Within the AB2I5 family, our first-principles-based calculations reveal two remarkably different trends in Eu site occupation. The substitutional Eu ions occupy both eightfold-coordinated B1(VIII) and the sevenfold-coordinated B2(VII) sites in the Sr-containing compounds. However, in the Ba-containing crystals, Eu ions strongly prefer the B2(VII)sites. This random versus preferential distribution of Eu affects their electronic properties. The calculations also suggest that in the Ba-containing compounds one can expect the formation of Eu-rich domains. These results provide atomistic insight into recent experimental observations about the concentration and temperature effects in Eu-doped CsBa2I5. We discuss the implications of our results with respect to luminescent properties and applications. We also hypothesize Sr, Ba-mixed quaternary iodides ABaVIIISrVIII5:Eu as scintillators having enhanced homogeneity and electronic properties.

  8. Comprehensive description of <mi>J/?> production in proton-proton collisions at collider energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Yan -Qing; Venugopalan, Raju

    2014-11-04

    We employ a small x Color Glass Condensate + Non-Relativistic QCD (NRQCD) formalism to compute J/? production at low p? in proton-proton collisions at collider energies. Very good agreement is obtained for total cross-sections, rapidity distributions and low momentum p? distributions. Similar agreement is obtained for ?' production. We observe an overlap region in p? where our results match smoothly to those obtained in a next-to-leading order (NLO) collinearly factorized NRQCD formalism. The relative contribution of color singlet and color octet contributions can be quantified in the CGC+NRQCD framework, with the former contributing approximately 10% of the total cross-section.

  9. Detroit, MI Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History Pipeline Volumes 21 79 19 0 165 188 1996-2014 Pipeline Prices 4.53 8.37 5.17 -- 4.44 5.26 1996-2014

  10. Detroit, MI Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    275 43,690 50,347 50,439 46,981 37,528 1996-2015 Pipeline Prices 4.69 4.26 3.10 4.04 5.36 2.91

  11. Evidence for a new excitation at the interface between a high-<mi>Tc> superconductor and a topological insulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zareapour, Parisa; Hayat, Alex; Zhao, Shu Yang F.; Kreshchuk, Michael; Lee, Yong Kiat; Reijnders, Anjan A.; Jain, Achint; Xu, Zhijun; Liu, T. S.; Gu, G. D.; Jia, Shuang; Cava, Robert J.; Burch, Kenneth S.

    2014-12-09

    In this research, high-temperature superconductors exhibit a wide variety of novel excitations. If contacted with a topological insulator, the lifting of spin rotation symmetry in the surface states can lead to the emergence of unconventional superconductivity and novel particles. In pursuit of this possibility, we fabricated high critical-temperature (Tc ~ 85 K) superconductor/topological insulator (Bi?Sr?CaCu?O???/Bi?Te?Se) junctions. Below 75 K, a zero-bias conductance peak (ZBCP) emerges in the differential conductance spectra of this junction. The magnitude of the ZBCP is suppressed at the same rate for magnetic fields applied parallel or perpendicular to the junction. Furthermore, it can still be observed and does not split up to at least 8.5 T. The temperature and magnetic field dependence of the excitation we observe appears to fall outside the known paradigms for a ZBCP.

  12. Microsoft Word - MI.01-8.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ORNL/RASA-96/7 Independent Radiological Verification Survey Results for the Remedial Action Performed at the Former Bridgeport Brass Company Facility, Adrian, Michigan (AD001V) M. E. Murray S. P. McKenzie R. F. Carrier C. A. Johnson ORNL/RASA-96/7 LIFE SCIENCES DIVISION Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Non-Defense Programs (Certification Documentation Review, Investigation, and Completion: Internal Activity No. 14B477101) Independent Radiological Verification Survey Results for the

  13. BlocPower: Crowdsourced Microfinance for Energy Efficiency in...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  14. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix F

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Regional maps Figure F6. Coal supply regions WA ID OR CA NV UT TX OK AR MO LA MS AL GA FL TN SC NC KY VA WV WY CO SD ND MI MN WI IL IN OH MD PA NJ DE CT MA NH VT NY ME RI MT NE IA KS MI AZ NM 500 0 SCALE IN MILES APPALACHIA Northern Appalachia Central Appalachia Southern Appalachia INTERIOR NORTHERN GREAT PLAINS Eastern Interior Western Interior Gulf Lignite Dakota Lignite Western Montana Wyoming, Northern Powder River Basin

  15. GUT-inspired supersymmetric model for <mi>h> ? <mi>?> <mi>?> and the muon <mi>g> - 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ajaib, M. Adeel; Gogoladze, Ilia; Shafi, Qaisar

    2015-05-06

    We study a grand unified theories inspired supersymmetric model with nonuniversal gaugino masses that can explain the observed muon g-2 anomaly while simultaneously accommodating an enhancement or suppression in the h??? decay channel. In order to accommodate these observations and mh?125 to 126 GeV, the model requires a spectrum consisting of relatively light sleptons whereas the colored sparticles are heavy. The predicted stau mass range corresponding to R???1.1 is 100 GeV?m??200 GeV. The constraint on the slepton masses, particularly on the smuons, arising from considerations of muon g-2 is somewhat milder. The slepton masses in this case are predicted to lie in the few hundred GeV range. The colored sparticles turn out to be considerably heavier with mg?4.5 TeV and mt??3.5 TeV, which makes it challenging for these to be observed at the 14 TeV LHC.

  16. Impact of individual nuclear masses on <mi>r>-process abundances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mumpower, M. R.; Surman, R.; Fang, D. -L.; Beard, M.; Möller, P.; Kawano, T.; Aprahamian, A.

    2015-09-15

    We have performed for the first time a comprehensive study of the sensitivity of r-process nucleosynthesis to individual nuclear masses across the chart of nuclides. Using the latest version (2012) of the Finite-Range Droplet Model, we consider mass variations of ±0.5 MeV and propagate each mass change to all affected quantities, including Q values, reaction rates, and branching ratios. We find such mass variations can result in up to an order of magnitude local change in the final abundance pattern produced in an r-process simulation. As a result, we identify key nuclei whose masses have a substantial impact on abundance predictions for hot, cold, and neutron star merger r-process scenarios and could be measured at future radioactive beam facilities.

  17. Pressure-enhanced superconductivity in <mi>Eu>3<mi>Bi>2<mi mathvariant='normal'>Smi>4<mi mathvariant='normal'>Fmi>4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Yongkang; Zhai, Hui -Fei; Zhang, Pan; Xu, Zhu -An; Cao, Guang -Han; Thompson, J. D.

    2014-12-17

    The pressure effect on the newly discovered charge-transferred BiS2-based superconductor, Eu3Bi2S4F4, with a Tc of 1.5 K at ambient pressure, is investigated by transport and magnetic measurements. Accompanied with the enhancement of metallicity under pressures, the onset superconducting transition temperature increases abruptly around 1.0 GPa, reaching ~10.0 K at 2.26 GPa. Alternating current magnetic susceptibility measurements indicate that a new superconducting phase with a higher Tc emerges and dominates at high pressures. In the broad pressure window of 0.68GPa?p?2.00 GPa, the high-Tc phase coexists with the low-Tc phase. Hall effect measurements reveal a significant difference in electronic structures between the two superconducting phases. As a result, our work devotes the effort to establish the commonality of pressure effect on the BiS2-based superconductors, and also uncovers the importance of electron carrier density in the high-Tc phase.

  18. https://mi3.ncdc.noaa.gov/mi3report/MISC/asos-stations.txt

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NCDCID WBAN COOPID CALL NAME ALT_NAME COUNTRY ST COUNTY LAT LO -------- ----- ------ ---- ------------------------------ ------------------------------ -------------------- -- ------------------------------ 20028647 15908 YRL RED LAKE RED LAKE CANADA ON 51.06667 20030346 41415 914226 GUM GUAM INTL AP GUAM NWSO TIYAN GUAM GU GUAM 13.48361 14 20030369 41418 914855 GSN SAIPAN INTL AP SAIPAN INTL AP NORTHERN MARIANA ISL MP SAIPAN 15.11889 14 20022040 26451 500280 ANC ANCHORAGE INTL AP ANCHORAGE INTL

  19. Spin-liquid ground state in the frustrated <mi>J>1-<mi>J>2 zigzag chain system <mi>BaTb>2<mi mathvariant='normal'>Omi>4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aczel, A. A.; Li, L.; Garlea, V. O.; Yan, J. -Q.; Weickert, F.; Zapf, V. S.; Movshovich, R.; Jaime, M.; Baker, P. J.; Keppens, V.; Mandrus, D.

    2015-07-13

    We have investigated polycrystalline samples of the zigzag chain system BaTb2O4 with magnetic susceptibility, heat capacity, neutron powder diffraction, and muon spin relaxation measurements. No magnetic transitions are observed in the bulk measurements, while neutron diffraction reveals low-temperature, short-range, intrachain magnetic correlations between Tb3+ ions. Muon spin relaxation measurements indicate that these correlations are dynamic, as the technique detects no signatures of static magnetism down to 0.095 K. Altogether these findings provide strong evidence for a spin liquid ground state in BaTb2O4.

  20. Further investigation of <mi>g> factors for the lead monofluoride ground state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skripnikov, L. V.; Petrov, A. N.; Titov, A. V.; Mawhorter, R. J.; Baum, A. L.; Sears, T. J.; Grabow, J. -U.

    2015-09-15

    We report the results of our theoretical study and analysis of earlier experimental data for the g-factor tensor components of the ground 2II1/2 state of the free PbF radical. These values obtained both within the relativistic coupled-cluster method combined with the generalized relativistic effective core potential approach and with our fit of the experimental data from [R. J. Mawhorter, B. S. Murphy, A. L. Baum, T. J. Sears, T. Yang, P. M. Rupasinghe, C. P. McRaven, N. E. Shafer-Ray, L. D. Alphei, and J.-U. Grabow, Phys. Rev. A 84, 022508 (2011); A. L. Baum, B.A. thesis, Pomona College, 2011]. The obtained results agree very well with each other but contradict the previous fit performed in the cited works. Our final prediction for g factors is G?=0.081(5),G?=0.27(1).

  1. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Greenhill Contracting The Preserve, New Paltz, NY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-09-01

    These super-insulated homes all have R-22 insulated concrete form walls, R-20 closed-cell spray form under the slab, ground source heat pump, tight air sealing, and morehelping this builder to win a Production Builder award in the 2014 Housing Innovation Awards.

  2. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: AquaZephyr Eco-Village-Ithaca, Ithaca, NY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-09-01

    This two-story, 1,664 ft2 home is one of 17 single-family and four duplex homes built as part of an energy-efficient cooperative. Winner in the Production Builder category of the 2014 Housing Innovation Awards, the home achieves a HERS 56 without photovoltaics and HERS 15 with 4 kW of photovoltaics.

  3. NY-Sun Solar PV Competitive Program (New York) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Industrial, Nonprofit, Construction, InstallerContractor Eligible Technologies Photovoltaics, Anaerobic Digestion Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector State...

  4. NY-Sun PV Incentive Program (Residential, Low-Income, and Small Business)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NYSERDA has established separate megawatt (MW) budgets for different regions of the state. These MW block targets are specified for three regions: areas served by Con Edison, areas served by PSEG...

  5. Massena, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2012 472

  6. Massena, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 873 767 704 412 240 192 197 188 135 37 53 167 2012 573 505 424 324 197 201 211 179 174 224 418 562 2013 588 581 537 346 91 159 184 164 191 265 430 612 2014 666 575 574 283 176 152 169 165 163 172 331 394 2015 589 609 486 216 84 80 89 76 79 217 273 252

  7. Waddington, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 580 1,310 2,522 3,252 3,026 2,668 2,170 2,445 2,379 2,066 5,121 3,191 2012 898 4,000 6,745 4,975 2,721 1,978 1,202 2,306 2,503 4,747 3,808 2,909 2013 3,963 1,204 3,938 2,545 2,849 1,924 740 1,598 1,917 1,951 1,281 1,213 2014 1,937 1,664 1,734 1,740 6,202 3,674 5,112 5,036 4,276 4,714 1,848 1,259 2015 873 598 555 741 582 638 366 378 489 339 853 2,362

  8. Niagara Falls, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 734 660 860 860 194 307 295 1,107 376 151 415 576 2012 583 468 175 58 8,823 13,281 2013 12,716 11,162 12,737 13,738 13,789 13,174 13,904 13,939 13,022 13,267 12,940 13,715 2014 14,211 13,161 14,549 13,012 13,641 13,234 13,634 13,645 13,274 13,071 13,092 13,797 2015 2,696 10,576 13,577 13,247 14,219 13,657 14,297 14,009 14,476 14,578 17,873 18,617

  9. BuildSmart NY Innovators Summit Offers Sneak Peek at Better Buildings Challenge Solutions to Come

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As the newest state partner in the Better Buildings Challenge, New York is off to an impressive start. New York is committed to making its entire portfolio of buildings 20% more efficient by 2020.

  10. File:EIA-Appalach1-NY-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search File File history File usage Appalachian Basin, New York Area Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 BOE Reserve Class Size of this preview: 776 600 pixels. Full...

  11. File:EIA-Appalach1-NY-LIQ.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search File File history File usage Appalachian Basin, New York Area Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 Liquids Reserve Class Size of this preview: 776 600 pixels....

  12. File:EIA-Appalach1-NY-GAS.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search File File history File usage Appalachian Basin, New York Area Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Size of this preview: 776 600 pixels. Full...

  13. GE Teams with NY College to Pilot SOFC Technology |GE Global...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    already holds Platinum-certification from the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) program of the United States Green Building Council." Congressman Paul Tonko...

  14. Revving up Energy Efficiency at the Cummins Plant in Jamestown, NY |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy On the roof of the Cummins plant, tour participants take a peek at a new 2 MW solar panel installation. From left to right: Dennis Phillips, the Jamestown Post Journal, Maria Vargas, DOE, Andre de Fontaine, DOE, Mike Abbate, Cummins.| Photo courtesy of Cummins Inc. On the roof of the Cummins plant, tour participants take a peek at a new 2 MW solar panel installation. From left to right: Dennis Phillips, the Jamestown Post Journal, Maria Vargas, DOE, Andre de Fontaine,

  15. MHK Projects/GCK Technology Shelter Island NY US | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Inc Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesGorlov Helical Turbine Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  16. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: AquaZephyr, Ithaca, NY...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    with double-stud walls filled with R-22 closed-cell spray foam plus R-30 blown cellulose, coated OSB sheathing, 5.5-in. foil-faced polyiso under the slab, polyiso-insulated...

  17. EIS-0003: Proton-Proton Storage Accelerator Facility (Isabelle), Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed this EIS to analyze the significant environmental effects associated with construction and operation of the ISABELLE research facility to be built at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  18. Experiment summary for n/y attenuation through materials (Environments 1A).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DePriest, Kendall Russell

    2006-05-01

    The Radiation Effects Sciences (RES) program is responsible for conducting Neutron Gamma Energy Transport (NuGET) code validation. In support of this task, a series of experiments were conducted in the annular core research reactor (ACRR) to investigate the modification of the incident neutron/gamma environment by aluminum (Al6061) and high-density polyethylene (HDPE) spheres with 4-in and 7-in-diameter. The experiment series described in this report addresses several NuGET validation concerns. The validation experiment series also addresses the design and execution of proper reactor testing to match the hostile radiation environments and to match the component stresses that arise from the hostile radiation environments. This report summarizes the RES Validation: n/{gamma} Attenuation through Materials, Environments 1A, experiments conducted at the ACRR in FY 2003 using ACRR Experiment Plans 933 and 949.

  19. Grand Island, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 586 931 2012 1,802 1,578 824 304 116 261 526 386 159 111 17 109 2013 314 277 161 47 20 10 10 11 2014 132 1 14 8 19 2015 224 565 378 15 0 2,098 3,980

  20. Grand Island, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 13,011 9,155 4,908 3,006 1,434 1,198 3,882 2,751 1,992 1,067 1,749 3,462 2012 4,801 4,288 2,138 2,383 1,575 2,037 2,018 916 829 773 297 945 2013 1,579 2,099 825 266 117 310 61 118 80 1 270 32 2014 1,204 17 111 31 8 29 12 2015 1,125 2,816 633 132 196 1 1 5 29

  1. Massena, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's 0 472 0 0

  2. Massena, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2012 472

  3. Massena, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars per Thousand

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2.92 3.04 2.78 2.81 2000's 4.25 4.96 4.08 6.08 7.06 9.34 8.95 7.78 9.69 6.85 2010's 6.48 6.55 5.75 6.04 7.34 5.65

  4. Massena, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars per Thousand

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 6.63 6.67 7.13 6.84 6.97 5.92 5.48 6.42 5.84 4.29 4.30 5.81 2012 6.07 5.83 5.26 5.21 5.09 5.16 5.01 5.21 5.29 6.03 6.64 6.31 2013 6.56 6.42 6.58 6.32 5.57 5.92 4.59 4.50 4.79 5.11 5.89 6.41 2014 9.00 8.27 8.64 6.68 6.09 6.12 5.78 5.19 5.38 5.22 6.43 6.83 2015 6.31 6.35 6.21 5.40 3.80 3.68 3.60 3.64 3.71 5.32 4.85 5.84

  5. Massena, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 13,642 12,927 9,184 7,258 2000's 7,309 6,931 7,662 6,817 7,357 6,989 6,588 6,887 6,588 5,730 2010's 5,595 3,965 3,992 4,147 3,819 3,049

  6. Massena, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 873 767 704 412 240 192 197 188 135 37 53 167 2012 573 505 424 324 197 201 211 179 174 224 418 562 2013 588 581 537 346 91 159 184 164 191 265 430 612 2014 666 575 574 283 176 152 169 165 163 172 331 394 2015 589 609 486 216 84 80 89 76 79 217 273 252

  7. Niagara Falls, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's NA NA 2000's NA 2.49 5.04 6.77 6.99 -- -- -- -- -- 2010's -- 4.76 4.09 4.15 5.51 2.96

  8. Niagara Falls, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 5.04 5.23 4.96 4.84 4.94 5.04 4.94 4.56 4.39 3.96 4.54 4.07 2012 3.71 3.32 2.93 2.33 4.18 4.09 2013 4.13 3.91 4.34 4.47 4.42 4.24 4.03 3.76 3.85 3.87 4.08 4.67 2014 6.87 10.13 9.18 5.08 4.70 4.57 4.07 3.69 3.69 3.92 5.09 4.80 2015 3.09 5.02 4.48 2.93 2.70 2.63 2.55 2.64 2.67 2.59 2.72 2.42

  9. Niagara Falls, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's NA NA 2000's NA 594 39 2,215 3 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 6,535 23,386 158,102 162,321 161,822

  10. Niagara Falls, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 734 660 860 860 194 307 295 1,107 376 151 415 576 2012 583 468 175 58 8,823 13,281 2013 12,716 11,162 12,737 13,738 13,789 13,174 13,904 13,939 13,022 13,267 12,940 13,715 2014 14,211 13,161 14,549 13,012 13,641 13,234 13,634 13,645 13,274 13,071 13,092 13,797 2015 2,696 10,576 13,577 13,247 14,219 13,657 14,297 14,009 14,476 14,578 17,873 18,617

  11. Niagara Falls, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2.90 2.87 2.62 2.58 2000's 4.10 4.94 3.55 5.71 6.41 9.06 7.43 7.36 9.58 4.63 2010's 5.43 4.68 3.22 4.04 5.08 3.20

  12. Niagara Falls, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 5.02 4.80 4.46 4.75 4.72 5.03 4.80 4.49 4.24 3.98 4.05 3.87 2012 3.46 3.13 2.81 2.38 2.97 3.26 2.43 3.22 3.66 4.18 3.85 2013 3.89 3.75 4.21 4.46 4.38 3.86 3.57 3.33 4.12 3.91 3.24 4.26 2014 4.28 5.86 5.38 21.67 22.33 21.67 22.33 22.33 3.24 2.68 2015 3.45 4.36 3.65 2.08 3.14 2.85 2.73 2.31 1.97

  13. Niagara Falls, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 291,193 288,865 303,599 372,515 2000's 421,016 308,102 367,448 369,052 363,350 390,272 354,703 356,529 298,911 188,525 2010's 88,983 32,770 3,159 1,650 2,957 2,539

  14. Niagara Falls, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 9,497 6,894 4,421 2,459 935 1,060 1,452 979 644 1,443 1,404 1,583 2012 1,411 720 681 93 7 56 31 6 12 35 105 2013 299 291 49 103 12 0 0 6 281 97 41 471 2014 1,092 908 893 0 0 0 0 0 57 6 2015 168 796 162 23 6 356 351 333 346

  15. Price of Buffalo, NY Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Canada (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's -- 12.07 -- -- 2010's -- 7.67

  16. Price of Buffalo, NY Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Canada (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2015 7.65 7.65 7.65 7.75

  17. Price of Champlain, NY Natural Gas LNG Imports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's -- 10.69 8.78

  18. Price of Champlain, NY Natural Gas LNG Imports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2014 10.69 2015 9.66 9.54 9.87 9.92 8.50

  19. Price of Champlain, NY Natural Gas LNG Imports from Canada (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's -- 10.69 8.78

  20. Price of Champlain, NY Natural Gas LNG Imports from Canada (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2014 10.69 2015 9.66 9.54 9.87 9.92 8.50

  1. Price of Massena, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's -- 2.96 -- --

  2. Price of Massena, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2012 2.96

  3. Waddington, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Exports (Price) to Canada (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's -- -- -- 2010's -- 4.71 3.42 5.16 5.77 3.58

  4. Waddington, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Exports (Price) to Canada (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 7.73 6.52 5.03 4.85 4.94 5.07 5.04 4.58 4.38 3.99 4.09 4.11 2012 4.13 3.39 2.83 2.48 2.67 2.78 3.36 3.31 3.20 3.82 5.22 4.65 2013 6.75 7.39 5.25 5.00 4.66 4.28 4.37 3.99 4.00 3.98 4.28 7.05 2014 20.09 17.10 11.65 4.88 4.55 4.59 4.06 3.63 3.62 3.42 5.20 3.86 2015 6.61 12.26 4.43 2.81 2.82 2.54 2.64 2.32 2.98 2.79 2.31 1.81

  5. Waddington, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 2010's 0 30,731 38,791 25,121 39,196 8,775

  6. Waddington, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 580 1,310 2,522 3,252 3,026 2,668 2,170 2,445 2,379 2,066 5,121 3,191 2012 898 4,000 6,745 4,975 2,721 1,978 1,202 2,306 2,503 4,747 3,808 2,909 2013 3,963 1,204 3,938 2,545 2,849 1,924 740 1,598 1,917 1,951 1,281 1,213 2014 1,937 1,664 1,734 1,740 6,202 3,674 5,112 5,036 4,276 4,714 1,848 1,259 2015 873 598 555 741 582 638 366 378 489 339 853 2,362

  7. Buffalo, NY Liquefied Natural Gas Exports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's 7.67

  8. Champlain, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 16,104 16,669 15,258 17,171 2000's 17,436 17,329 16,904 12,579 16,502 17,142 17,721 17,666 17,964 13,986 2010's 9,173 8,293 6,766 7,228 4,922 4,446

  9. Champlain, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 1,825 1,988 1,676 394 292 100 462 224 178 189 214 751 2012 1,070 862 537 288 186 347 644 403 427 469 640 892 2013 1,174 1,217 956 321 247 128 445 288 287 467 508 1,189 2014 1,289 1,051 522 242 169 140 139 154 199 203 424 390 2015 746 901 399 276 159 141 204 180 311 297 549 282

  10. Grand Island, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Exports (Price) to Canada (Dollars

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's -- -- -- 2010's -- 3.82 3.02 3.84 9.80 2.38

  11. Grand Island, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Exports (Price) to Canada (Dollars

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 3.96 3.74 2012 3.18 3.03 2.70 2.65 2.45 2.74 3.00 3.22 3.11 3.38 4.30 3.76 2013 3.68 3.67 4.06 4.76 4.43 4.22 4.31 3.88 2014 8.82 9.67 28.87 4.98 4.17 2015 3.38 4.68 3.53 2.93 3.10 2.23 1.97

  12. Grand Island, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 2010's 0 1,517 6,194 848 174 7,259

  13. Grand Island, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 586 931 2012 1,802 1,578 824 304 116 261 526 386 159 111 17 109 2013 314 277 161 47 20 10 10 11 2014 132 1 14 8 19 2015 224 565 378 15 0 2,098 3,980

  14. Grand Island, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 3.35 3.42 2.80 3.07 2000's 4.24 4.08 3.57 6.26 6.63 9.07 7.61 7.41 8.94 4.85 2010's 5.20 4.68 3.01 3.92 9.80 4.23

  15. Grand Island, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 4.91 4.71 4.67 4.89 4.95 5.14 4.86 4.57 4.43 4.27 3.99 3.77 2012 3.18 3.08 2.77 2.37 2.55 2.67 3.22 3.24 3.22 3.65 4.06 3.82 2013 3.76 3.75 4.03 4.81 4.57 4.27 4.16 4.00 4.13 4.02 4.03 4.30 2014 8.50 8.22 28.04 5.20 5.03 4.18 4.04 2015 3.17 4.89 4.06 2.90 2.60 2.31 1.89 2.75 1.72

  16. Grand Island, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 42,832 42,302 44,981 33,140 2000's 49,012 95,639 110,417 76,421 66,612 92,474 80,907 88,886 61,641 81,898 2010's 63,548 47,616 23,000 5,758 1,413 4,940

  17. Grand Island, NY Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 13,011 9,155 4,908 3,006 1,434 1,198 3,882 2,751 1,992 1,067 1,749 3,462 2012 4,801 4,288 2,138 2,383 1,575 2,037 2,018 916 829 773 297 945 2013 1,579 2,099 825 266 117 310 61 118 80 1 270 32 2014 1,204 17 111 31 8 29 12 2015 1,125 2,816 633 132 196 1 1 5 29

  18. Microsoft PowerPoint - mather_twpice_data_status_ny.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Twin Otter TWP-ICE/ACTIVE Observation Network Egrett (UK) Proteus Dornier (UK) Dimona Tiwi Islands Darwin Mt Bundy Pt Stuart Cape Don Garden Point Southern Surveyor In situ microphysics Radar/Lidar Chemistry/Aerosol/Atm state Fluxes/Atmospheric state Darwin ARM Measurements *Cloud Profiles - mm radar and lidar *T/RH/Wind Profiles - radiosondes (BOM) *Column water - microwave radiometer *Column Aerosol - solar spectral radiometer *Surface radiation budget - solar and terrestrial *Surface

  19. MICROANALYSIS OF NY/NJ HARBOR SEDIMENTS USING SYNCHROTRON X-RAY BEAMS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JONES,K.W.FENG,H.LANZIROTTI,A.MARINKOVIC,N.ET AL.

    2003-12-31

    Sediments found in the New York/New Jersey Harbor are widely contaminated with organic and inorganic compounds of anthropogenic origin. As a result, the environmental health of the Harbor has deteriorated and the efficient operation of the Port compromised by difficulties in disposing of sediments resulting from maintenance and improvements of navigational channels. Knowledge of the properties of the sediments on a micro-scale is useful in understanding the transport of contaminants through the environment, for developing effective methods for sediment decontamination, and for subsequent beneficial use of the cleaned sediments. We have investigated several properties of these sediments using synchrotron radiation techniques. These include computed microtomography using absorption and fluorescence contrast mechanisms, x-ray microscopy, microbeam x-ray fluorescence, and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) for measurements of microstructure, distribution of metals on individual sediment particles, and chemical forms of the contaminants on a micrometer scale. Typical results obtained with these techniques are presented.

  20. DOE ZERH Case Study: Greenhill Contracting, Green Acres #20, #26, #28, New Paltz, NY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2015-09-01

    Case study of three DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning custom homes in the cold climate that got a HERS of 26, 28, and 26 without PV or -3, -1, and -3.5 with PV; with R-22 ICFs, 10” ocsf plus 2.7” c ccsf in attic; ICF basements with 4.3” ccsf under slab; tri;e-pane windows; ERVs, ground source heat pumps (COP 5.7).

  1. DOE ZERH Case Study: United Way of Long Island Housing Development Corporation, Patchogue, NY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2015-09-01

    Case study of a DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning affordable home in the mixed-humid climate that got HERS 40 without PV, -3 with PV, with 2x4 16: on center walls with R-13.5 dense packed cellulose and 1.5” polyiso rigid; basement with 2.5: polyiso on interior; unvented attic with R-48 ocsf under roof deck; ERV tied to wall hung boiler with hydro coil.

  2. BuildSmart NY Innovators Summit Offers Sneak Peek at Better Buildings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    is approximately 205 million square feet of real estate, including universities, prisons, mental health hospitals, office buildings, and facilities that house its trains, buses,...

  3. Observation of a new charged charmoniumlike state in<mi>B>0?<mi>Jmi>/<mi>?mi><mi>Kmi>-<mi>?mi>+decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chilikin, K.; Mizuk, R.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, D.?M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Aziz, T.; Bakich, A.?M.; Bansal, V.; Bondar, A.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bra?ko, M.; Browder, T.?E.; ?ervenkov, D.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B.?G.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, S.-K.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Danilov, M.; Doleal, Z.; Drsal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Dutta, K.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J.?E.; Ferber, T.; Frost, O.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Ganguly, S.; Garmash, A.; Gillard, R.; Goh, Y.?M.; Golob, B.; Grzymkowska, O.; Haba, J.; Hara, T.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; He, X.?H.; Hou, W.-S.; Huschle, M.; Hyun, H.?J.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jaegle, I.; Joo, K.?K.; Julius, T.; Kawasaki, T.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D.?Y.; Kim, H.?J.; Kim, J.?H.; Kim, M.?J.; Kim, Y.?J.; Kinoshita, K.; Ko, B.?R.; Korpar, S.; Krian, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J.?S.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liu, Y.; Liventsev, D.; Lukin, P.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mohanty, G.?B.; Moll, A.; Mori, T.; Mussa, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nedelkovska, E.; Nisar, N.?K.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S.?L.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, C.?W.; Park, H.; Pedlar, T.?K.; Petri?, M.; Piilonen, L.?E.; Ribel, E.; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, V.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Seon, O.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C.?P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Stari?, M.; Steder, M.; Sumisawa, K.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamponi, U.; Tanida, K.; Tatishvili, G.; Teramoto, Y.; Thorne, F.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Vinokurova, A.; Wagner, M.?N.; Wang, C.?H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Wang, X.?L.; Watanabe, Y.; Wehle, S.; Williams, K.?M.; Won, E.; Yamaoka, J.; Yashchenko, S.; Zhang, Z.?P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2014-12-16

    We present the results of an amplitude analysis of B0?J/?K-?+ decays. A new charged charmoniumlike state Zc(4200)+ decaying to J/??+ is observed with a significance of 6.2?. The mass and width of the Zc(4200)+ are 4196+31-29+17-13 MeV/c2 and 370+70-70+70-132 MeV, respectively; the preferred assignment of the quantum numbers is JP=1+. In addition, we find evidence for Zc(4430)+?J/??+. The analysis is based on a 711 fb-1 data sample collected by the Belle detector at the asymmetric-energy e+e- collider KEKB.

  4. Role of <mi>Ce>4+ in the scintillation mechanism of codoped <mi>Gd>3<mi>Ga>3<mi>Al>2<mi mathvariant='normal'>Omi>12:<mi>Ce>

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Yuntao; Meng, Fang; Li, Qi; Koschan, Merry; Melcher, Charles L.

    2014-10-17

    To control the time-response performance of widely used cerium-activated scintillators in cutting-edge medical-imaging devices, such as time-of-flight positron-emission tomography, a comprehensive understanding of the role of Ce valence states, especially stable Ce4+, in the scintillation mechanism is essential. However, despite some progress made recently, an understanding of the physical processes involving Ce4+ is still lacking. The aim of this work is to clarify the role of Ce4+ in scintillators by studying Ca2+ codoped Gd3Ga3Al2O12?Ce?(GGAG?Ce). By using a combination of optical absorption spectra and x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopies, the correlation between Ca2+codoping content and the Ce4+ fraction is seen. The energy-level diagrams of Ce3+ and Ce4+ in the Gd3Ga3Al2O12 host are established by using theoretical and experimental methods, which indicate a higher position of the 5d1 state of Ce4+ in the forbidden gap in comparison to that of Ce3+. Underlying reasons for the decay-time acceleration resulting from Ca2+ codoping are revealed, and the physical processes of the Ce4+-emission model are proposed and further demonstrated by temperature-dependent radioluminescence spectra under x-ray excitation.

  5. Study of <mi mathvariant='normal'>emi>+ mathvariant='normal'>emi>-?<mi mathvariant='normal'>pmi><mi mathvariant='normal'>pmi><mi>?>0 in the vicinity of the <mi>?>(3770)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. ?N.; Ai, X.? C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. ?J.; An, F. ?F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. ?Z.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Ban, Y.; Bennett, J.? V.; Bertani, M.; Bian, J.? M.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Braun, S.; Briere, R.? A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G.? F.; Cetin, S.? A.; Chang, J.? F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H.? S.; Chen, J.? C.; Chen, M.? L.; Chen, S.? J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X.? R.; Chen, Y.? B.; Cheng, H.? P.; Chu, X.? K.; Chu, Y.? P.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H.? L.; Dai, J.? P.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z.? Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; Ding, W.? M.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L.? Y.; Dong, M. ?Y.; Du, S.? X.; Fan, J.? Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. ?S.; Fang, Y.; Fava, L.; Feng, C. ?Q.; Fu, C. ?D.; Fuks, O.; Gao, Q.; Gao, Y.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W.? X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. ?H.; Gu, Y.? T.; Guan, Y.? H.; Guo, A.? Q.; Guo, L.? B.; Guo, T.; Guo, Y.? P.; Han, Y.? L.; Harris, F.? A.; He, K.? L.; He, M.; He, Z.? Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y.? K.; Hou, Z.? L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H.? M.; Hu, J. ?F.; Hu, T.; Huang, G.? M.; Huang, G. ?S.; Huang, H.? P.; Huang, J.? S.; Huang, L.; Huang, X. ?T.; Huang, Y.; Hussain, T.; Ji, C. ?S.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q.? P.; Ji, X. ?B.; Ji, X.? L.; Jiang, L. ?L.; Jiang, L.? W.; Jiang, X.? S.; Jiao, J.? B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D.? P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. ?L.; Kang, X.? S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Kloss, B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Khn, W.; Kupsc, A.; Lai, W.; Lange, J.? S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Leyhe, M.; Li, C.? H.; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D.; Li, D.? M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H.? B.; Li, J.? C.; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, P. ?R.; Li, Q.? J.; Li, T.; Li, W.? D.; Li, W.? G.; Li, X.? L.; Li, X.? N.; Li, X.? Q.; Li, Z.? B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y.? F.; Liang, Y.? T.; Lin, D.? X.; Liu, B.? J.; Liu, C. ?L.; Liu, C.? X.; Liu, F.? H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. ?B.; Liu, H.? H.; Liu, H.? M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J.? P.; Liu, K.; Liu, K.? Y.; Liu, P.? L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S.? B.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y.? B.; Liu, Z.? A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X.? C.; Lu, G.? R.; Lu, H.? J.; Lu, H.? L.; Lu, J.? G.; Lu, X.? R.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y.? P.; Luo, C.? L.; Luo, M.? X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X.? L.; Lv, M.; Ma, F.? C.; Ma, H. ?L.; Ma, Q.? M.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. ?Y.; Maas, F. ?E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q.? A.; Mao, Y.? J.; Mao, Z.? P.; Messchendorp, J.? G.; Min, J.; Min, T.? J.; Mitchell, R.? E.; Mo, X.? H.; Mo, Y.? J.; Moeini, H.; Morales Morales, C.; Moriya, K.; Muchnoi, N.? Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nikolaev, I. ?B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, X.? Y.; Olsen, S.? L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H.? P.; Peters, K.; Ping, J.? L.; Ping, R.? G.; Poling, R.; Q., N.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C.? F.; Qin, L.? Q.; Qin, X.? S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z. ?H.; Qiu, J. ?F.; Rashid, K.? H.; Redmer, C.? F.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X.? D.; Sarantsev, A.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C.? P.; Shen, X.? Y.; Sheng, H.? Y.; Shepherd, M.? R.; Song, W.? M.; Song, X. ?Y.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, G.? X.; Sun, J. ?F.; Sun, S.? S.; Sun, Y.? J.; Sun, Y. ?Z.; Sun, Z. ?J.; Sun, Z.? T.; Tang, C.? J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E.? H.; Toth, D.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G.? S.; Wang, B.; Wang, D.; Wang, D.? Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L.? L.; Wang, L. ?S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P.? L.; Wang, Q.? J.; Wang, S.? G.; Wang, W.; Wang, X.? F.; Wang, Y.? D.; Wang, Y.? F.; Wang, Y.? Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. ?G.; Wang, Z.? H.; Wang, Z.? Y.; Wei, D.? H.; Wei, J.? B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. ?P.; Werner, M.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L.? H.; Wu, N.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L.? G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, Z.? J.; Xie, Y.? G.; Xiu, Q.? L.; Xu, G.? F.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. ?J.; Xu, Q.? N.; Xu, X.? P.; Xue, Z.; Yan, L.; Yan, W.? B.; Yan, W.? C.; Yan, Y.? H.; Yang, H.? X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.? X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M.? H.; Yu, B. ?X.; Yu, C. ?X.; Yu, H.? W.; Yu, J.? S.; Yu, S.? P.; Yuan, C. ?Z.; Yuan, W.? L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. ?A.; Zallo, A.; Zang, S.? L.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. ?X.; Zhang, B.? Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. ?B.; Zhang, C.? C.; Zhang, D.? H.; Zhang, H.? H.; Zhang, H.? Y.; Zhang, J.? J.; Zhang, J.? Q.; Zhang, J.? W.; Zhang, J.? Y.; Zhang, J. ?Z.; Zhang, S.? H.; Zhang, X. ?J.; Zhang, X.? Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.? H.; Zhang, Z.? H.; Zhang, Z.? P.; Zhang, Z.? Y.; Zhao, G.

    2014-08-22

    The process e+e-?pp?0 has been studied by analyzing data collected at ?s=3.773 GeV, at s?=3.650 GeV, and during a ?(3770) line shape scan with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII collider. The Born cross section of pp?0 in the vicinity of the ?(3770) is measured, and the Born cross section of ?(3770)?pp?0 is extracted considering interference between resonant and continuum production amplitudes. Two solutions with the same probability and a significance of 1.5? are found. The solutions for the Born cross section of ?(3770)?pp?0 are 33.81.82.1 pb and 0.06+0.10-0.04+0.01-0.01 pb (<0.22 pb at a 90% confidence level). Using the estimated cross section and a constant decay amplitude approximation, the cross section ?(pp??(3770)?0) is calculated for the kinematic situation of the planned PANDA experiment. The maximum cross section corresponding to the two solutions is expected to be less than 0.79 nb at 90% confidence level and 12210 nb at a center-of-mass energy of 5.26 GeV.

  6. St. Clair, MI Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    612,369 650,590 781,058 754,494 582,509 478,645 1996-2014 Pipeline Prices 4.62 4.86 4.45 3.11 4.07 6.39 1996...

  7. Marysville, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 1,408 2,674 212 579 179 606 34 642 270 1,367 826 1,150 2012 326 264 147 899 1,654 1,086 217 801 1,053 1,472 121 61 2013...

  8. St. Clair, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 123 237 33 91 238 1,469 571 38 1,605 552 270 2012 51 42 2,029 475 370 52 45 69 221 177 2013 884 1,562 1,422 2 26 151 211...

  9. Marysville, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 4,338 5,323 4,952 3,361 3,295 2,761 2,838 2,182 2,061 2,644 3,085 5,122 2012 6,067 6,721 3,354 3,404 2,923 1,986 2,475...

  10. St. Clair, MI Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    6,544 5,591 5,228 3,531 6,019 16,409 1996-2014 Pipeline Prices 5.10 4.97 4.29 2.64 3.96 8.80 1996...

  11. Strangeness suppression of <mi>q><mi>q> creation observed in exclusive reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mestayer, M. D.; Park, K.; Adhikari, K. P.; Aghasyan, M.; Pereira, S. Anefalos; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; DAngelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; Alaoui, A. El; Fassi, L. El; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fleming, J. A.; Forest, T. A.; Garillon, B.; Garon, M.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guegan, B.; Guidal, M.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Hattawy, M.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lenisa, P.; Levine, W. I.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moody, C. I.; Moutarde, H.; Movsisyan, A.; Camacho, C. Munoz; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Peng, P.; Phelps, W.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Raue, B. A.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Roy, P.; Sabati, F.; Saini, M. S.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Simonyan, A.; Sokhan, D.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tang, W.; Tian, Ye; Ungaro, M.; Vernarsky, B.; Vlassov, A. V.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.

    2014-10-10

    In this study, we measured the ratios of electroproduction cross sections from a proton target for three exclusive meson-baryon final states: ?K+, p?0, and n?+, with the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. Using a simple model of quark hadronization, we extract qq creation probabilities for the first time in exclusive two-body production, in which only a single qq pair is created. We observe a sizable suppression of strange quark-antiquark pairs compared to nonstrange pairs, similar to that seen in high-energy production.

  12. Two-leg <mi>SU>(2<mi>n>) spin ladder: A low-energy effective field theory approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lecheminant, P.; Tsvelik, A. M.

    2015-05-07

    We present a field-theory analysis of a model of two SU(2n)-invariant magnetic chains coupled by a generic interaction preserving time reversal and inversion symmetry. Contrary to the SU(2)-invariant case the zero-temperature phase diagram of such two-leg spin ladder does not contain topological phases. Thus, only generalized Valence Bond Solid phases are stabilized when n > 1 with different wave vectors and ground-state degeneracies. In particular, we find a phase which is made of a cluster of 2n spins put in an SU(2n) singlet state. For n = 3, this cluster phase is relevant to ?Yb ultracold atoms, with an emergent SU(6) symmetry, loaded in a double-well optical lattice.

  13. Search for Long-Lived Particles in<mi>emi>+<mi>emi>-Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J.?P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D.?N.; Kerth, L.?T.; Kolomensky, Yu.?G.; Lee, M.?J.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.?S.; McKenna, J.?A.; So, R.?Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V.?E.; Buzykaev, A.?R.; Druzhinin, V.?P.; Golubev, V.?B.; Kravchenko, E.?A.; Onuchin, A.?P.; Serednyakov, S.?I.; Skovpen, Yu.?I.; Solodov, E.?P.; Todyshev, K.?Yu.; Lankford, A.?J.; Dey, B.; Gary, J.?W.; Long, O.; Campagnari, C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Hong, T.?M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J.?D.; West, C.?A.; Eisner, A.?M.; Lockman, W.?S.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Schumm, B.?A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D.?S.; Cheng, C.?H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K.?T.; Hitlin, D.?G.; Miyashita, T.?S.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F.?C.; Rhrken, M.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B.?T.; Pushpawela, B.?G.; Sokoloff, M.?D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P.?C.; Ford, W.?T.; Gaz, A.; Smith, J.?G.; Wagner, S.?R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W.?H.; Spaan, B.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I.?M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M.?R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H.?M.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Prell, S.; Ahmed, H.; Gritsan, A.?V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A.?M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D.?J.; Wright, D.?M.; Coleman, J.?P.; Fry, J.?R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D.?E.; Payne, D.?J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A.?J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D.?N.; Davis, C.?L.; Denig, A.?G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Schubert, K.?R.; Barlow, R.?J.; Lafferty, G.?D.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D.?A.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Patel, P.?M.; Robertson, S.?H.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D.?J.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C.?P.; LoSecco, J.?M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Feltresi, E.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G.?R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M.?A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J.?J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A.?J.?S.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Pilloni, A.; Piredda, G.; Bnger, C.; Dittrich, S.; Grnberg, O.; Hess, M.; Leddig, T.; Vo, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E.?O.; Wilson, F.?F.; Emery, S.; Vasseur, G.; Aston, D.; Bard, D.?J.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M.?R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G.?P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R.?C.; Fulsom, B.?G.; Graham, M.?T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W.?R.; Kim, P.; Leith, D.?W.?G.?S.; Lindemann, D.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H.?L.; MacFarlane, D.?B.; Muller, D.?R.; Neal, H.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B.?N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A.?A.; Schindler, R.?H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M.?K.; Vavra, J.; Wisniewski, W.?J.; Wulsin, H.?W.; Purohit, M.?V.; White, R.?M.; Wilson, J.?R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S.?J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P.?R.; Puccio, E.?M.?T.; Alam, M.?S.; Ernst, J.?A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D.?R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S.?M.; Ritchie, J.?L.; Schwitters, R.?F.; Wray, B.?C.; Izen, J.?M.; Lou, X.?C.; Bianchi, F.; De Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Villanueva-Perez, P.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Beaulieu, A.; Bernlochner, F.?U.; Choi, H.?H.?F.; King, G.?J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M.?J.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I.?M.; Roney, J.?M.; Sobie, R.?J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T.?J.; Harrison, P.?F.; Latham, T.?E.; Band, H.?R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S.?L.

    2015-04-29

    We present a search for a neutral, long-lived particle L that is produced in e+e- collisions and decays at a significant distance from the e+e- interaction point into various flavor combinations of two oppositely charged tracks. The analysis uses an e+e- data sample with a luminosity of 489.1 fb-1 collected by the BABAR detector at the ? (4S), ? (3S), and ? (2S) resonances and just below the ? (4S). Fitting the two-track mass distribution in search of a signal peak, we do not observe a significant signal, and set 90% confidence level upper limits on the product of the L production cross section, branching fraction, and reconstruction efficiency for six possible two-body L decay modes as a function of the L mass. The efficiency is given for each final state as a function of the mass, lifetime, and transverse momentum of the candidate, allowing application of the upper limits to any production model. In addition, upper limits are provided on the branching fraction B(B?XsL), where Xs is a strange hadronic system.

  14. Pressure-induced collapsed-tetragonal phase in <mi>SrCo>2<mi>As>2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jayasekara, W. T.; Kaluarachchi, U. S.; Ueland, B. G.; Pandey, Abhishek; Lee, Y. B.; Taufour, V.; Sapkota, A.; Kothapalli, K.; Sangeetha, N. S.; Fabbris, G.; Veiga, L. S. I.; Feng, Yejun; dos Santos, A. M.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Harmon, B. N.; Canfield, P. C.; Johnston, D. C.; Kreyssig, A.; Goldman, A. I.

    2015-12-08

    We present high-energy x-ray diffraction data under applied pressures up to p = 29GPa, neutron diffraction measurements up to p = 1.1GPa, and electrical resistance measurements up to p = 5.9GPa, on SrCo2As2. Our x-ray diffraction data demonstrate that there is a first-order transition between the tetragonal (T) and collapsed-tetragonal (cT) phases, with an onset above approximately 6 GPa at T = 7K. The pressure for the onset of the cT phase and the range of coexistence between the T and cT phases appears to be nearly temperature independent. The compressibility along the a axis is the same for the T and cT phases, whereas, along the c axis, the cT phase is significantly stiffer, which may be due to the formation of an As-As bond in the cT phase. Our resistivity measurements found no evidence of superconductivity in SrCo2As2 for p ? 5.9 GPa and T ? 1.8 K. The resistivity data also show signatures consistent with a pressure-induced phase transition for p ? 5.5 GPa. Single-crystal neutron diffraction measurements performed up to 1.1 GPa in the T phase found no evidence of stripe-type or A-type antiferromagnetic ordering down to 10 K. Spin-polarized total-energy calculations demonstrate that the cT phase is the stable phase at high pressure with a ca ratio of 2.54. As a result, these calculations indicate that the cT phase of SrCo2As2 should manifest either A-type antiferromagnetic or ferromagnetic order.

  15. Phase transition in bulk single crystals and thin films of <mi mathvariant='normal'>Vmi> mathvariant='normal'>Omi>2 by nanoscale infrared spectroscopy and imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Mengkun; Sternbach, Aaron J.; Wagner, Martin; Slusar, Tetiana V.; Kong, Tai; Bud'ko, Sergey L.; Kittiwatanakul, Salinporn; Qazilbash, M. M.; McLeod, Alexander; Fei, Zhe; Abreu, Elsa; Zhang, Jingdi; Goldflam, Michael; Dai, Siyuan; Ni, Guang -Xin; Lu, Jiwei; Bechtel, Hans A.; Martin, Michael C.; Raschke, Markus B.; Averitt, Richard D.; Wolf, Stuart A.; Kim, Hyun -Tak; Canfield, Paul C.; Basov, D. N.

    2015-06-29

    We have systematically studied a variety of vanadium dioxide (VO2) crystalline forms, including bulk single crystals and oriented thin films, using infrared (IR) near-field spectroscopic imaging techniques. By measuring the IR spectroscopic responses of electrons and phonons in VO2 with sub-grain-size spatial resolution (~20nm), we show that epitaxial strain in VO2 thin films not only triggers spontaneous local phase separations, but leads to intermediate electronic and lattice states that are intrinsically different from those found in bulk. Generalized rules of strain- and symmetry-dependent mesoscopic phase inhomogeneity are also discussed. Furthermore, these results set the stage for a comprehensive understanding of complex energy landscapes that may not be readily determined by macroscopic approaches.

  16. New lifetime measurements in <mi>Pd>109 and the onset of deformation at <mi>N>=60

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bucher, B.; Mach, H.; Aprahamian, A.; Simpson, G. S.; Rissanen, J.; Ghiţă, D. G.; Olaizola, B.; Kurcewicz, W.; Äystö, J.; Bentley, I.; Eronen, T.; Fraile, L. M.; Jokinen, A.; Karvonen, P.; Moore, I. D.; Penttilä, H.; Reponen, M.; Ruchowska, E.; Saastamoinen, A.; Smith, M. K.; Weber, C.

    2015-12-14

    We measured several new subnanosecond lifetimes in 109Pd using the fast-timing βγ γ (t ) method. Fission fragments of the A = 109 mass chain were produced by bombarding natural uranium with 30 MeV protons at the Jyväskylä Ion Guide Isotope Separator On-Line (IGISOL) facility. We obtained lifetimes for excited states in 109Pd populated following β decay of 109Rh. The new lifetimes provide some insight into the evolution of nuclear structure in this mass region. In particular, the distinct structure of the two low-lying 7/2+ states occurring systematically across the Pd isotopic chain is supported by the new lifetime measurements. Finally, the available nuclear data indicate a sudden increase in deformation at N = 60 which is related to the strong p-n interaction between πg9/2 and νg7/2 valence nucleons expected in this region.

  17. Sault St. Marie, MI Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2,044 4,011 9,555 24,913 16,288 4,457 1999-2014 Pipeline Prices 5.04 5.27 4.23 3.20 4.04 6.01 1999...

  18. First MINOS results from the NuMI beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tagg, Nathaniel

    2006-05-01

    As of December 2005, the MINOS long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment collected data with an exposure of 0.93 x 10{sup 20} protons on target. Preliminary analysis of these data reveals a result inconsistent with a no-oscillation hypothesis at level of 5.8 sigma. The data are consistent with neutrino oscillations reported by Super-Kamiokande and K2K, with best fit parameters of {Delta}m{sub 23}{sup 2} = 3.05{sub -0.55}{sup +0.60} x 10{sup -3} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 23} = 0.88{sub -0.15}{sup +0.12}.

  19. Marysville, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 3.48 2.17 2.06 2000's NA NA 3.95 -- 7.80 -- 7.07 7.59 8.59 3.80 2010's 4.44 4.42 2.99 4.15 6.86 2.7

  20. Marysville, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 4.85 4.76 4.36 4.62 4.73 4.70 4.74 4.75 4.21 3.83 3.85 3.79 2012 3.29 3.05 2.61 2.35 2.68 2.64 3.07 3.16 3.14 3.60 3.93 4.22 2013 3.63 3.65 4.57 4.70 4.22 4.17 3.79 4.78 2014 5.52 23.30 24.73 4.80 4.99 4.06 4.09 3.92 4.51 4.03 2015 3.74 2.89 3.07 2.86 2.94 3.05 3.11 2.63 2.29 2.0

  1. Marysville, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 10 1,827 135 2000's NA NA 74 0 303 0 24 876 2,252 5,651 2010's 5,694 9,946 8,099 2,337 4,650 1,961

  2. Marysville, MI Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 1,408 2,674 212 579 179 606 34 642 270 1,367 826 1,150 2012 326 264 147 899 1,654 1,086 217 801 1,053 1,472 121 61 2013 693 176 1,080 14 21 194 114 19 2014 247 117 453 994 5 653 569 574 791 246 2015 23 136 223 142 151 484 57 61 501 182

  3. MHK Technologies/Mi2 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dimensions Device Testing Scale Test *Extensive technology development through computer modeling and prototype testing at the National Research Council towing tank facility...

  4. REC Silicon formerly ASiMI | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.838435,"lon":-100.665669,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""...

  5. Nonuniversal gaugino masses and muon<mi>g>-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gogoladze, Ilia; Nasir, Fariha; Shafi, Qaisar; n, Cem Salih

    2014-08-11

    We consider two classes of supersymmetric models with nonuniversal gaugino masses at the grand unification scale MGUT in an attempt to resolve the apparent muon g-2 anomaly encountered in the Standard Model. We explore two distinct scenarios, one in which all gaugino masses have the same sign at MGUT, and a second case with opposite sign gaugino masses. The sfermion masses in both cases are assumed to be universal at MGUT. We exploit the nonuniversality among gaugino masses to realize large mass splitting between the colored and noncolored sfermions. Thus, the sleptons can have masses in the few hundred GeV range, whereas the colored sparticles turn out to be an order of magnitude or so heavier. In both models the resolution of the muon g-2 anomaly is compatible, among other things, with a 125126 GeV Higgs boson mass and the WMAP dark matter bounds.

  6. High-<mi>Tmi>c> superconductivity at the interface between the <mi>CaCuO>2 and <mi>SrTiO>3 insulating oxides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Di Castro, D.; Cantoni, C.; Ridolfi, F.; Aruta, C.; Tebano, A.; Yang, N.; Balestrino, G.

    2015-09-28

    At interfaces between complex oxides it is possible to generate electronic systems with unusual electronic properties, which are not present in the isolated oxides. One important example is the appearance of superconductivity at the interface between insulating oxides, although, until now, with very low Tc. We report the occurrence of high Tc superconductivity in the bilayer CaCuO2/SrTiO3, where both the constituent oxides are insulating. In order to obtain a superconducting state, the CaCuO2/SrTiO3 interface must be realized between the Ca plane of CaCuO2 and the TiO2 plane of SrTiO3. Only in this case can oxygen ions be incorporated in the interface Ca plane, acting as apical oxygen for Cu and providing holes to the CuO2 planes. In addition, a detailed hole doping spatial profile can be obtained by scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron-energy-loss spectroscopy at the O K edge, clearly showing that the (super)conductivity is confined to about 12 CaCuO2 unit cells close to the interface with SrTiO3. The results obtained for the CaCuO2/SrTiO3 interface can be extended to multilayered high Tc cuprates, contributing to explaining the dependence of Tc on the number of CuO2 planes in these systems.

  7. Separated response functions in exclusive, forward <mi>?> electroproduction on deuterium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huber, G. M.; Blok, H. P.; Butuceanu, C.; Gaskell, D.; Horn, T.; Mack, D. J.; Abbott, D.; Aniol, K.; Anklin, H.; Armstrong, C.; Arrington, J.; Assamagan, K.; Avery, S.; Baker, O. K.; Barrett, B.; Beise, E. J.; Bochna, C.; Boeglin, W.; Brash, E. J.; Breuer, H.; Chang, C. C.; Chant, N.; Christy, M. E.; Dunne, J.; Eden, T.; Ent, R.; Fenker, H.; Gibson, E. F.; Gilman, R.; Gustafsson, K.; Hinton, W.; Holt, R. J.; Jackson, H.; Jin, S.; Jones, M. K.; Keppel, C. E.; Kim, P. H.; Kim, W.; King, P. M.; Klein, A.; Koltenuk, D.; Kovaltchouk, V.; Liang, M.; Liu, J.; Lolos, G. J.; Lung, A.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Markowitz, P.; Matsumura, A.; McKee, D.; Meekins, D.; Mitchell, J.; Miyoshi, T.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Mueller, B.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Okayasu, Y.; Pentchev, L.; Perdrisat, C.; Pitz, D.; Potterveld, D.; Punjabi, V.; Qin, L. M.; Reimer, P. E.; Reinhold, J.; Roche, J.; Roos, P. G.; Sarty, A.; Shin, I. K.; Smith, G. R.; Stepanyan, S.; Tang, L. G.; Tadevosyan, V.; Tvaskis, V.; van der Meer, R. L. J.; Vansyoc, K.; Van Westrum, D.; Vidakovic, S.; Volmer, J.; Vulcan, W.; Warren, G.; Wood, S. A.; Xu, C.; Yan, C.; Zhao, W. -X.; Zheng, X.; Zihlmann, B.

    2015-01-07

    Background: Measurements of forward exclusive meson production at different squared four-momenta of the exchanged virtual photon, Q2, and at different four-momentum transfer, t, can be used to probe QCD's transition from meson-nucleon degrees of freedom at long distances to quark-gluon degrees of freedom at short scales. Ratios of separated response functions in ?? and ?? electroproduction are particularly informative. Ratio for transverse photons may allow this transition to be more easily observed, while the ratio for longitudinal photons provides a crucial verification of the assumed pole dominance, needed for reliable extraction of the pion form factor from electroproduction data. Method: Data were acquired with 2.6-5.2 GeV electron beams and the HMS+SOS spectrometers in Jefferson Lab Hall C, at central Q2 values of 0.6, 1.0, 1.6 GeV2 at W=1.95 GeV, and Q2=2.45 GeV2 at W=2.22 GeV. There was significant coverage in ? And ?, which allowed separation of ?L,T,LT,TT. Results: ?L shows a clear signature of the pion pole, with a sharp rise at small -t. In contrast, ?T is much flatter versus t. The longitudinal/transverse ratios evolve with Q2 and t, and at the highest Q2=2.45 GeV2 show a slight enhancement for ?? Production compared to ??. The ??/??+ ratio for transverse photons exhibits only a small Q2-dependence, following a nearly universal curve with t, with a steep transition to a value of about 0.25, consistent with s-channel quark knockout. The ?TT/?T ratio also drops rapidly with Q2, qualitatively consistent with s-channel helicity conservation. The ??/?? ratio for longitudinal photons indicates a small isoscalar contamination at W=1.95 GeV, consistent with what was observed in our earlier determination of the pion form factor at these kinematics.

  8. Levels in <mi mathvariant='normal'>Nmi>12 via the <mi mathvariant='normal'>Nmi>14 (<mi>pmi>,t>) reaction using the JENSA gas-jet target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chipps, K. A.; Pain, S. D.; Greife, U.; Kozub, R. L.; Bardayan, D. W.; Blackmon, J. C.; Kontos, A.; Linhardt, L. E.; Matos, M.; Pittman, S. T.; Sachs, A.; Schatz, H.; Schmitt, K. T.; Smith, M. S.; Thompson, P.

    2015-09-25

    As one of a series of physics cases to demonstrate the unique benefit of the new Jet Experiments in Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics gas-jet target for enabling next-generation transfer reaction studies, the ?N (p, t)N reaction was studied for the first time, using a pure jet of nitrogen, in an attempt to resolve conflicting information on the structure of N. A new level at 4.561-MeV excitation energy in N was found.

  9. Surface state reconstruction in ion-damaged <mi>SmB>6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wakeham, N.; Wang, Y. Q.; Fisk, Z.; Ronning, F.; Thompson, J. D.

    2015-02-12

    We have used ion-irradiation to damage the (001) surfaces of SmB? single crystals to varying depths, and have measured the resistivity as a function of temperature for each depth of damage. We observe a reduction in the residual resistivity with increasing depth of damage. Our data are consistent with a model in which the surface state is not destroyed by the ion-irradiation, however instead the damaged layer is poorly conducting and the initial surface state is reconstructed below the damage. This behavior is consistent with a surface state that is topologically protected.

  10. EV Community Readiness projects: New York City and Lower Hudson Valley Clean Communities, Inc. (NY, MA, PA); NYSERDA (ME, NH, VT, MA, RI, CT, NY, NJ, PA, DE, MD, DC)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  11. Materials Data on Ho3InN (SG:221) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on BaHo2CuO5 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-19

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on Ba2HoReO6 (SG:225) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-24

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on HoAu4 (SG:87) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on HoCu2 (SG:74) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on CdP2(HO)4 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on KP(HO2)2 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on CuP2(HO)4 (SG:61) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on KP(HO2)2 (SG:43) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on NaP(HO2)2 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on NaZnP2HO7 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on Al2P3(HO3)3 (SG:176) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on KScBP2HO9 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on ZrP2(HO3)2 (SG:164) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on NaZn2P2HO8 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on KVBP2HO9 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on MgAl2P2(HO)18 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on RbScBP2HO9 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on CsMnP3HO10 (SG:5) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on RbGaBP2HO9 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on CaP2(HO2)4 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on RbZn2P2HO8 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on Sc2P3(HO3)3 (SG:176) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on SrP2(HO)4 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on BiP4HO12 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on Ga2P3(HO3)3 (SG:176) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on CaP2(HO)4 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on Fe2P3(HO3)3 (SG:176) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on RbP(HO)2 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on BaCoBP2HO9 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on CsGaP3HO10 (SG:5) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on MgFe2P2(HO)18 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on RbP(HO2)2 (SG:43) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on GaP3(HO5)2 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on RbMnP3HO10 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on MgP(HO)7 (SG:61) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on Mg3P2(HO)16 (SG:12) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on LiP(HO2)2 (SG:33) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on HoGaPd (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-01-27

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on HoTlPd (SG:189) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on Ho2Pd2Pb (SG:127) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-19

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on HoSnPd2 (SG:225) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on Ho3(GePd)4 (SG:71) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on Ho2S3 (SG:122) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. (JS)_BL13 schedule S02-S03FY15HO3FINAL.xlsx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    16 17 18 19 20 21 22 Day Shift 6:00 3996 B Sandberg 3996 B Sandberg 3996 B Sandberg 3996 A Sandberg 3996 A Sandberg 3996 A Sandberg 3996 A Sandberg 3 0 4 Night Shift 18:00 8055 B Ogasawara 80055 B Ogasawara 8055 B Ogasawara 3996 B Sandberg 3996 B Sandberg 3996 A Sandberg 3996 A Sandberg 2 3 2 Feb 23 24 25 26 27 28 1 Day Shift 6:00 AP AP 4247 B Graves 4247 B Graves 4247 B Graves 4247 B Graves 4247 B Graves 5 0 0 Night Shift 18:00 AP AP 4180 C Li 4180 C Li 4180 C Li 4238 A Savikhin 4238 A Savikhin

  16. Materials Data on Ho10Ti6O27 (SG:8) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on Ho10In20Ni9 (SG:129) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-20

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on HoInNi (SG:189) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-01-21

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on Ni(HO)2 (SG:164) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on Ho3(AlNi3)2 (SG:229) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on HoNiSn (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-22

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on HoGa4Ni (SG:63) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-20

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on Ho(NiB)2 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on P(HO)4 (SG:56) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on Ho3CrB7 (SG:63) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-19

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on HoBPd3 (SG:221) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on B(HO)3 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on HoBRh3 (SG:221) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on HoAg2 (SG:139) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on HoInAg2 (SG:225) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on Al(HO)3 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on CoHO2 (SG:166) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on Cr2HO4 (SG:10) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-04-10

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on NbHO3 (SG:1) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on V(HO)2 (SG:58) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on Mg3(HO3)2 (SG:12) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on NaCoP2HO7 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on Na4Al3Si3HO13 (SG:161) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on Ca5P3HO13 (SG:173) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on Te(HO)6 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations