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  1. HIV evolution in early infection: selection pressures, patterns...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    host environment and immune responses typically experienced by the newly transmitted virus. For example, sites that tend to evolve rapidly across multiple early-infection...

  2. Confirmation of a late Oligocene-early Miocene age of the Deseadan Salla Beds of Bolivia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naeser, C.W.; McKee, E.H.; Johnson, N.M.; MacFadden, B.J.

    1987-11-01

    Three new fission-track (zircon) and four new K-Ar (biotite) dates corroborate a late Oligocene-early Miocene age (22-28 Ma) for the Salla Beds of Bolivia. These ages contrast markedly with the previously accepted age of about 35 Ma for these strata and their contained faunas, and recasts of order and chronology of interchange between New World and Old World mammals.

  3. Atomic structure of Cu-10. 9 at % Be alloys in the early stages of aging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koo, Y.M.

    1987-01-01

    Diffuse x-ray scattering was employed to investigate the local atomic structure and static strains in a single crystal of a Cu-10.9 at. % Be alloy in the early stages of aging. In addition to these experiments, neutron elastic and inelastic scattering were obtained to investigate the phonon properties in the as-quenched state of this alloy. In the as-quenched state, there is a nearly regular array of small ellipsoidal Be clusters aligned along <100> directions (This produces the tweed contrast seen in TEM). The density of these clusters is 7.5 x 10/sup 26//m/sup 3/. The diffuse streaks seen in electron diffraction patterns are due largely to thermal diffuse scattering. Phonon-dispersion curves show no large differences from those of pure copper, except at (xi xi xi)/sub T/ zone boundary, where there is softening. This difference may be due to a Kohn anomaly. The elastic anisotropy of this alloy increases considerably with alloying, which probably leads to the plate-like GP zone morphology in subsequent aging treatments. The structure of the GP zones is a mixture of Be-rich single- and multi-layered zones. As aging proceeds, the zones grow in thickness.

  4. Extended main sequence turnoffs in intermediate-age star clusters: a correlation between turnoff width and early escape velocity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goudfrooij, Paul; Kozhurina-Platais, Vera; Kalirai, Jason S.; Correnti, Matteo E-mail: verap@stsci.edu E-mail: correnti@stsci.edu; and others

    2014-12-10

    We present a color-magnitude diagram analysis of deep Hubble Space Telescope imaging of a mass-limited sample of 18 intermediate-age (1-2 Gyr old) star clusters in the Magellanic Clouds, including eight clusters for which new data were obtained. We find that all star clusters in our sample feature extended main-sequence turnoff (eMSTO) regions that are wider than can be accounted for by a simple stellar population (including unresolved binary stars). FWHM widths of the MSTOs indicate age spreads of 200-550 Myr. We evaluate the dynamical evolution of clusters with and without initial mass segregation. Our main results are (1) the fraction of red clump (RC) stars in secondary RCs in eMSTO clusters scales with the fraction of MSTO stars having pseudo-ages of ?1.35 Gyr; (2) the width of the pseudo-age distributions of eMSTO clusters is correlated with their central escape velocity v {sub esc}, both currently and at an age of 10 Myr. We find that these two results are unlikely to be reproduced by the effects of interactive binary stars or a range of stellar rotation velocities. We therefore argue that the eMSTO phenomenon is mainly caused by extended star formation within the clusters; and (3) we find that v {sub esc} ? 15 km s{sup 1} out to ages of at least 100 Myr for all clusters featuring eMSTOs, and v {sub esc} ? 12 km s{sup 1} at all ages for two lower-mass clusters in the same age range that do not show eMSTOs. We argue that eMSTOs only occur for clusters whose early escape velocities are higher than the wind velocities of stars that provide material from which second-generation stars can form. The threshold of 12-15 km s{sup 1} is consistent with wind velocities of intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch stars and massive binary stars in the literature.

  5. Modeling of early age loss of lithium ions from pore solution of cementitious systems treated with lithium nitrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Taehwan Olek, Jan

    2015-01-15

    Addition of lithium nitrate admixture to the fresh concrete mixture helps to minimize potential problems related to alkali-silica reaction. For this admixture to function as an effective ASR control measure, it is imperative that the lithium ions remain in the pore solution. However, it was found that about 50% of the originally added lithium ions are removed from the pore solution during early stages of hydration. This paper revealed that the magnitude of the Li{sup +} ion loss is highly dependent on the concentration of Li{sup +} ions in the pore solution and the hydration rate of the cementitious systems. Using these findings, an empirical model has been developed which can predict the loss of Li{sup +} ions from the pore solution during the hydration period. The proposed model can be used to investigate the effects of mixture parameters on the loss of Li{sup +} ions from the pore solution of cementitious system.

  6. Post-treatment control of HIV infection

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Conway, Jessica M.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2015-04-13

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV is not a cure. However, recent studies suggest that ART, initiated early during primary infection, may induce post-treatment control (PTC) of HIV infection with HIV RNA maintained at <50 copies per mL. We investigate the hypothesis that ART initiated early during primary infection permits PTC by limiting the size of the latent reservoir, which, if small enough at treatment termination, may allow the adaptive immune response to prevent viral rebound (VR) and control infection. We use a mathematical model of within host HIV dynamics to capture interactions among target cells, productively infected cells, latently infectedmore » cells, virus, and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Analysis of our model reveals a range in CTL response strengths where a patient may show either VR or PTC, depending on the size of the latent reservoir at treatment termination. Below this range, patients will always rebound, whereas above this range, patients are predicted to behave like elite controllers. As a result, using data on latent reservoir sizes in patients treated during primary infection, we also predict population-level VR times for non-controllers consistent with observations.« less

  7. Post-treatment control of HIV infection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conway, Jessica M.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2015-04-13

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV is not a cure. However, recent studies suggest that ART, initiated early during primary infection, may induce post-treatment control (PTC) of HIV infection with HIV RNA maintained at <50 copies per mL. We investigate the hypothesis that ART initiated early during primary infection permits PTC by limiting the size of the latent reservoir, which, if small enough at treatment termination, may allow the adaptive immune response to prevent viral rebound (VR) and control infection. We use a mathematical model of within host HIV dynamics to capture interactions among target cells, productively infected cells, latently infected cells, virus, and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Analysis of our model reveals a range in CTL response strengths where a patient may show either VR or PTC, depending on the size of the latent reservoir at treatment termination. Below this range, patients will always rebound, whereas above this range, patients are predicted to behave like elite controllers. As a result, using data on latent reservoir sizes in patients treated during primary infection, we also predict population-level VR times for non-controllers consistent with observations.

  8. HIV vaccine strategy expands immune responses

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HIV vaccine strategy expands immune responses HIV vaccine strategy expands immune responses Two teams of researchers have announced an HIV vaccination strategy that has been shown...

  9. HIV Molecular Immunology 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yusim, Karina; Korber, Bette Tina Marie; Barouch, Dan; Koup, Richard; de Boer, Rob; Moore, John P.; Brander, Christian; Haynes, Barton F.; Walker, Bruce D.

    2015-02-03

    HIV Molecular Immunology is a companion volume to HIV Sequence Compendium. This publication, the 2014 edition, is the PDF version of the web-based HIV Immunology Database (http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/content/immunology/). The web interface for this relational database has many search options, as well as interactive tools to help immunologists design reagents and interpret their results. In the HIV Immunology Database, HIV-specific B-cell and T-cell responses are summarized and annotated. Immunological responses are divided into three parts, CTL, T helper, and antibody. Within these parts, defined epitopes are organized by protein and binding sites within each protein, moving from left to right through the coding regions spanning the HIV genome. We include human responses to natural HIV infections, as well as vaccine studies in a range of animal models and human trials. Responses that are not specifically defined, such as responses to whole proteins or monoclonal antibody responses to discontinuous epitopes, are summarized at the end of each protein section. Studies describing general HIV responses to the virus, but not to any specific protein, are included at the end of each part. The annotation includes information such as crossreactivity, escape mutations, antibody sequence, TCR usage, functional domains that overlap with an epitope, immune response associations with rates of progression and therapy, and how specific epitopes were experimentally defined. Basic information such as HLA specificities for T-cell epitopes, isotypes of monoclonal antibodies, and epitope sequences are included whenever possible. All studies that we can find that incorporate the use of a specific monoclonal antibody are included in the entry for that antibody. A single T-cell epitope can have multiple entries, generally one entry per study. Finally, maps of all defined linear epitopes relative to the HXB2 reference proteins are provided.

  10. HIV Sequence Compendium 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, Brian Thomas; Leitner, Thomas Kenneth; Apetrei, Cristian; Hahn, Beatrice; Mizrachi, Ilene; Mullins, James; Rambaut, Andrew; Wolinsky, Steven; Korber, Bette Tina Marie

    2015-10-05

    This compendium is an annual printed summary of the data contained in the HIV sequence database. We try to present a judicious selection of the data in such a way that it is of maximum utility to HIV researchers. Each of the alignments attempts to display the genetic variability within the different species, groups and subtypes of the virus. This compendium contains sequences published before January 1, 2015. Hence, though it is published in 2015 and called the 2015 Compendium, its contents correspond to the 2014 curated alignments on our website. The number of sequences in the HIV database is still increasing. In total, at the end of 2014, there were 624,121 sequences in the HIV Sequence Database, an increase of 7% since the previous year. This is the first year that the number of new sequences added to the database has decreased compared to the previous year. The number of near complete genomes (>7000 nucleotides) increased to 5834 by end of 2014. However, as in previous years, the compendium alignments contain only a fraction of these. A more complete version of all alignments is available on our website, http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/ content/sequence/NEWALIGN/align.html As always, we are open to complaints and suggestions for improvement. Inquiries and comments regarding the compendium should be addressed to seq-info@lanl.gov.

  11. HIV Sequence Compendium 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuiken, Carla; Foley, Brian; Leitner, Thomas; Apetrei, Christian; Hahn, Beatrice; Mizrachi, Ilene; Mullins, James; Rambaut, Andrew; Wolinsky, Steven; Korber, Bette

    2010-12-31

    This compendium is an annual printed summary of the data contained in the HIV sequence database. In these compendia we try to present a judicious selection of the data in such a way that it is of maximum utility to HIV researchers. Each of the alignments attempts to display the genetic variability within the different species, groups and subtypes of the virus. This compendium contains sequences published before January 1, 2010. Hence, though it is called the 2010 Compendium, its contents correspond to the 2009 curated alignments on our website. The number of sequences in the HIV database is still increasing exponentially. In total, at the time of printing, there were 339,306 sequences in the HIV Sequence Database, an increase of 45% since last year. The number of near complete genomes (>7000 nucleotides) increased to 2576 by end of 2009, reflecting a smaller increase than in previous years. However, as in previous years, the compendium alignments contain only a small fraction of these. Included in the alignments are a small number of sequences representing each of the subtypes and the more prevalent circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) such as 01 and 02, as well as a few outgroup sequences (group O and N and SIV-CPZ). Of the rarer CRFs we included one representative each. A more complete version of all alignments is available on our website, http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/content/sequence/NEWALIGN/align.html. Reprints are available from our website in the form of both HTML and PDF files. As always, we are open to complaints and suggestions for improvement. Inquiries and comments regarding the compendium should be addressed to seq-info@lanl.gov.

  12. Norma Early

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Norma Early Norma Early NEarly-1.jpg Norma J. Early Executive Assistant NJEarly@lbl.gov Phone: (510) 486-5893 Fax: (510) 486-4316 1 Cyclotron Rd MS 943-256 Berkeley, CA 94720 Last edited: 2016-04-29 11:34:42

  13. Research deciphers HIV attack plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research deciphers HIV attack plan Research deciphers HIV attack plan These findings will help inform vaccine design and interpretation of vaccine trials, and provide new insights into the basic biology of viral/host dynamics of infection. March 29, 2013 Bette Korber Bette Korber Contact Nancy Ambrosiano Communications Office (505) 667-0471 Email The viruses that make it through transmission barriers to infect a new person are particularly infectious and resilient," said Los Alamos National

  14. AGING GAUGE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Betts, Robert E.; Crawford, John F.

    1989-04-04

    An aging gauge comprising a container having a fixed or a variable sized t opening with a cap which can be opened to control the sublimation rate of a thermally sublimational material contained within the container. In use, the aging gauge is stored with an item to determine total heat the item is subjected to and also the maximum temperature to which the item has been exposed. The aging gauge container contains a thermally sublimational material such as naphthalene or similar material which has a low sublimation rate over the temperature range from about 70.degree. F. to about 160.degree. F. The aging products determined by analyses of a like item aged along with the aging gauge for which the sublimation amount is determined is employed to establish a calibration curve for future aging evaluation. The aging gauge is provided with a means for determining the maximum temperature exposure (i.e., a thermally indicating material which gives an irreversible color change, Thermocolor pigment). Because of the relationship of doubling reaction rates for increases of 10.degree. C., equivalency of item used in accelerated aging evaluation can be obtained by referring to a calibration curve depicting storage temperature on the abscissa scale and multiplier on the ordinate scale.

  15. Aging gauge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Betts, Robert E.; Crawford, John F.

    1989-01-01

    An aging gauge comprising a container having a fixed or a variable sized t opening with a cap which can be opened to control the sublimation rate of a thermally sublimational material contained within the container. In use, the aging gauge is stored with an item to determine total heat the item is subjected to and also the maximum temperature to which the item has been exposed. The aging gauge container contains a thermally sublimational material such as naphthalene or similar material which has a low sublimation rate over the temperature range from about 70.degree. F. to about 160.degree. F. The aging products determined by analyses of a like item aged along with the aging gauge for which the sublimation amount is determined is employed to establish a calibration curve for future aging evaluation. The aging gauge is provided with a means for determining the maximum temperature exposure (i.e., a thermally indicating material which gives an irreversible color change, Thermocolor pigment). Because of the relationship of doubling reaction rates for increases of 10.degree. C., equivalency of item used in accelerated aging evaluation can be obtained by referring to a calibration curve depicting storage temperature on the abscissa scale and multiplier on the ordinate scale.

  16. HIV-1 stimulates nuclear entry of amyloid beta via dynamin dependent EEA1 and TGF-β/Smad signaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    András, Ibolya E. Toborek, Michal

    2014-04-15

    Clinical evidence indicates increased amyloid deposition in HIV-1-infected brains, which contributes to neurocognitive dysfunction in infected patients. Here we show that HIV-1 exposure stimulates amyloid beta (Aβ) nuclear entry in human brain endothelial cells (HBMEC), the main component of the blood–brain barrier (BBB). Treatment with HIV-1 and/or Aβ resulted in concurrent increase in early endosomal antigen-1 (EEA1), Smad, and phosphorylated Smad (pSmad) in nuclear fraction of HBMEC. A series of inhibition and silencing studies indicated that Smad and EEA1 closely interact by influencing their own nuclear entry; the effect that was attenuated by dynasore, a blocker of GTP-ase activity of dynamin. Importantly, inhibition of dynamin, EEA1, or TGF-β/Smad effectively attenuated HIV-1-induced Aβ accumulation in the nuclei of HBMEC. The present study indicates that nuclear uptake of Aβ involves the dynamin-dependent EEA1 and TGF-β/Smad signaling pathways. These results identify potential novel targets to protect against HIV-1-associated dysregulation of amyloid processes at the BBB level. - Highlights: • HIV-1 induces nuclear accumulation of amyloid beta (Aβ) in brain endothelial cells. • EEA-1 and TGF-Β/Smad act in concert to regulate nuclear entry of Aβ. • Dynamin appropriates the EEA-1 and TGF-Β/Smad signaling. • Dynamin serves as a master regulator of HIV-1-induced nuclear accumulation of Aβ.

  17. Emergence of recombinant forms in geographic regions with co-circulating HIV subtypes in the dynamic HIV-1 epidemic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Ming; Letiner, Thomas K; Korber, Bette T; Foley, Brian

    2009-01-01

    We have reexamined the subtype designations of {approx}10,000 subtype A, B, C, G, and AG, BC, BF recombinant sequences, and compared the results of the new analysis with their published designations. Intersubtype recombinants dominate HIV epidemics in three different geographical regions. The circulating recombinant from (CRF) CRF02-AG, common in West Central Africa, appears to result from a recombination event that occurred early in the divergence between subtypes A and G, although additional more recent recombination events may have contributed to the breakpoint pattern in this recombinant lineage as well. The Chinese recombinant epidemic strains CRF07 and CRF08, in contrast, result from recent recombinations between more contemporary strains. Nevertheless, CRF07 and CRF08 contributed to many subsequent recombination events. The BF recombinant epidemics in two HIV-1 epicenters in South America are not independent and BF epidemics in South America have an unusually high fraction of unique recombinant forms (URFs) that have each been found only once and carry distinctive breakpoints. Taken together, these analyses reveal a complex and dynamic picture of the current HIV-1 epidemic, and suggest a means of grouping and tracking relationships between viruses through preservation of shared breakpints.

  18. HIV classification using coalescent theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Ming; Letiner, Thomas K; Korber, Bette T

    2008-01-01

    Algorithms for subtype classification and breakpoint detection of HIV-I sequences are based on a classification system of HIV-l. Hence, their quality highly depend on this system. Due to the history of creation of the current HIV-I nomenclature, the current one contains inconsistencies like: The phylogenetic distance between the subtype B and D is remarkably small compared with other pairs of subtypes. In fact, it is more like the distance of a pair of subsubtypes Robertson et al. (2000); Subtypes E and I do not exist any more since they were discovered to be composed of recombinants Robertson et al. (2000); It is currently discussed whether -- instead of CRF02 being a recombinant of subtype A and G -- subtype G should be designated as a circulating recombination form (CRF) nd CRF02 as a subtype Abecasis et al. (2007); There are 8 complete and over 400 partial HIV genomes in the LANL-database which belong neither to a subtype nor to a CRF (denoted by U). Moreover, the current classification system is somehow arbitrary like all complex classification systems that were created manually. To this end, it is desirable to deduce the classification system of HIV systematically by an algorithm. Of course, this problem is not restricted to HIV, but applies to all fast mutating and recombining viruses. Our work addresses the simpler subproblem to score classifications of given input sequences of some virus species (classification denotes a partition of the input sequences in several subtypes and CRFs). To this end, we reconstruct ancestral recombination graphs (ARG) of the input sequences under restrictions determined by the given classification. These restritions are imposed in order to ensure that the reconstructed ARGs do not contradict the classification under consideration. Then, we find the ARG with maximal probability by means of Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods. The probability of the most probable ARG is interpreted as a score for the classification. To our knowledge, this particular problem was not addressed up to now. The software package Lamarc Kuhner et al. (2000) allows for sampling ARGs, but it assumes that recombination events only involve one breakpoint. However, in HIV recombinants usually have more than one breakpoint. Moreover, Lamarc does not perform an explicit breakpoint detection, but tries to find them by chance. Although this approach is suitable for most situations, it will not lead to satisfying results in case of highly recombining viruses with multiple breakpoints.

  19. Stapled HIV-1 peptides recapitulate antigenic structures and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Stapled HIV-1 peptides recapitulate antigenic structures and engage broadly neutralizing antibodies Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Stapled HIV-1 peptides recapitulate ...

  20. HIV/Cancer DB Match Document

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    COLLECTION AND VERIFICATION OF DATA FOR MATCHED RECORDS FROM US CANCER AND HIV/AIDS REGISTRIES Janice Watkins, Oak Ridge Associated Universities, T. Borges, Robert Stafford, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Robert Biggar, James Goedert, National Cancer Institute Janice Watkins, ORAU, MS 45, P.O. Box 117, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 Key Words: AIDS, HIV/AIDS Registry, Cancer Registry, data verification, record matching BACKGROUND Data for investigating cancer rates, cofactors, and disease progression in HIV

  1. HIV transcription is induced in dying cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei; Schreck, S. |; Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R.

    1996-02-01

    Using HeLa cells stably transfected with an HIV-LTR-CAT construct, we demonstrated a peak in CAT induction that occurs in viable (but not necessarily cell-division-competent) cells 24 h following exposure to some cell-killing agents. {gamma} rays were the only cell-killing agent which did not induce HIV transcription; this can be attributed to the fact that {gamma}-ray-induced apoptotic death requires functional p53, which is not present in HeLa cells. For all other agents, HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent and correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture. Doses which caused over 99% cell killing induced HIV-LTR transcription maximally, demonstrating that cells that will go on to die by 14 days are the cells expressing HIV-LTR-CAT.

  2. HIV-1 transmission linkage in an HIV-1 prevention clinical trial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leitner, Thomas; Campbell, Mary S; Mullins, James I; Hughes, James P; Wong, Kim G; Raugi, Dana N; Scrensen, Stefanie

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1 sequencing has been used extensively in epidemiologic and forensic studies to investigate patterns of HIV-1 transmission. However, the criteria for establishing genetic linkage between HIV-1 strains in HIV-1 prevention trials have not been formalized. The Partners in Prevention HSV/HIV Transmission Study (ClinicaITrials.gov NCT00194519) enrolled 3408 HIV-1 serodiscordant heterosexual African couples to determine the efficacy of genital herpes suppression with acyclovir in reducing HIV-1 transmission. The trial analysis required laboratory confirmation of HIV-1 linkage between enrolled partners in couples in which seroconversion occurred. Here we describe the process and results from HIV-1 sequencing studies used to perform transmission linkage determination in this clinical trial. Consensus Sanger sequencing of env (C2-V3-C3) and gag (p17-p24) genes was performed on plasma HIV-1 RNA from both partners within 3 months of seroconversion; env single molecule or pyrosequencing was also performed in some cases. For linkage, we required monophyletic clustering between HIV-1 sequences in the transmitting and seroconverting partners, and developed a Bayesian algorithm using genetic distances to evaluate the posterior probability of linkage of participants sequences. Adjudicators classified transmissions as linked, unlinked, or indeterminate. Among 151 seroconversion events, we found 108 (71.5%) linked, 40 (26.5%) unlinked, and 3 (2.0%) to have indeterminate transmissions. Nine (8.3%) were linked by consensus gag sequencing only and 8 (7.4%) required deep sequencing of env. In this first use of HIV-1 sequencing to establish endpoints in a large clinical trial, more than one-fourth of transmissions were unlinked to the enrolled partner, illustrating the relevance of these methods in the design of future HIV-1 prevention trials in serodiscordant couples. A hierarchy of sequencing techniques, analysis methods, and expert adjudication contributed to the linkage determination process.

  3. Design Evolution Study - Aging Options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. McDaniel

    2002-04-05

    The purpose of this study is to identify options and issues for aging commercial spent nuclear fuel received for disposal at the Yucca Mountain Mined Geologic Repository. Some early shipments of commercial spent nuclear fuel to the repository may be received with high-heat-output (younger) fuel assemblies that will need to be managed to meet thermal goals for emplacement. The capability to age as much as 40,000 metric tons of heavy metal of commercial spent nuclear he1 would provide more flexibility in the design to manage this younger fuel and to decouple waste receipt and waste emplacement. The following potential aging location options are evaluated: (1) Surface aging at four locations near the North Portal; (2) Subsurface aging in the permanent emplacement drifts; and (3) Subsurface aging in a new subsurface area. The following aging container options are evaluated: (1) Complete Waste Package; (2) Stainless Steel inner liner of the waste package; (3) Dual Purpose Canisters; (4) Multi-Purpose Canisters; and (5) New disposable canister for uncanistered commercial spent nuclear fuel. Each option is compared to a ''Base Case,'' which is the expected normal waste packaging process without aging. A Value Engineering approach is used to score each option against nine technical criteria and rank the options. Open issues with each of the options and suggested future actions are also presented. Costs for aging containers and aging locations are evaluated separately. Capital costs are developed for direct costs and distributable field costs. To the extent practical, unit costs are presented. Indirect costs, operating costs, and total system life cycle costs will be evaluated outside of this study. Three recommendations for aging commercial spent nuclear fuel--subsurface, surface, and combined surface and subsurface are presented for further review in the overall design re-evaluation effort. Options that were evaluated but not recommended are: subsurface aging in a new subsurface area (high cost); surface aging in the complete waste package (risk to the waste package and impact on the Waste Handling Facility); and aging in the stainless steel liner (impact on the waste package design and new high risk operations added to the waste packaging process). The selection of a design basis for aging will be made in conjunction with the other design re-evaluation studies.

  4. Accelerated Aging Studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accelerated Aging Studies LA-UR -15-27339 This document is approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited Property (max) log (aging time) Property (failure) Property (time=0) Accelerated Aging Data Predicted Storage Aging Response log (predicted lifetime) Property (max) log (aging time) Property (failure) Property (time=0) Accelerated Aging Data Predicted Storage Aging Response log (predicted lifetime) Accelerated Aging Studies Factors such as temperature, pressure, or radiation

  5. Antibody evolution could guide HIV vaccine development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory. Contact Nancy Ambrosiano Communications Office (505) 667-0471 Email Our hope is that a vaccine based on the series of HIV variants that evolved within this subject,...

  6. Immunogenic compositions comprising human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) mosaic Nef proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korber, Bette T.; Perkins, Simon; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Fischer, William M.; Theiler, James; Letvin, Norman; Haynes, Barton F.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Yusim, Karina; Kuiken, Carla

    2012-02-21

    The present invention relates to mosaic clade M HIV-1 Nef polypeptides and to compositions comprising same. The polypeptides of the invention are suitable for use in inducing an immune response to HIV-1 in a human.

  7. Science On Tap - Understanding HIV and Infectious Diseases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science On Tap - Understanding HIV and Infectious Diseases Science On Tap - Understanding HIV and Infectious Diseases WHEN: Sep 17, 2015 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM WHERE: UnQuarked Wine...

  8. Lab works on new model for HIV transmission and evolution

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    works on new model for HIV transmission and evolution Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:May 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Lab works on new model for HIV transmission and evolution Mutates at different rates in different populations February 1, 2014 Lab works on new model for HIV transmission and evolution Lab works on new model for HIV transmission and evolution Contacts Community Programs Office Director Kurt

  9. HIV vaccine research focus of Laboratory-sponsored talk

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HIV vaccine research focus of talk HIV vaccine research focus of Laboratory-sponsored talk Ruy Ribeiro talk explores the mechanisms of HIV infection, puts them in the context of vaccine development, and summarizes current efforts to date to create an effective HIV vaccine. November 13, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience,

  10. HIV virus spread and evolution studied through computer modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HIV and evolution studied through computer modeling HIV virus spread and evolution studied through computer modeling This approach distinguishes between susceptible and infected individuals to capture the full infection history, including contact tracing data for infected individuals. November 19, 2013 Scanning electron micrograph of HIV-1 budding (in green) from cultured lymphocytes. The image has been colored to highlight important features. Scanning electron micrograph of HIV-1 budding (in

  11. Quantification of the epitope diversity of HIV-1-specific binding antibodies by peptide microarrays for global HIV-1 vaccine development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephenson, Kathryn E.; Neubauer, George H.; Reimer, Ulf; Pawlowski, Nikolaus; Knaute, Tobias; Zerweck, Johannes; Korber, Bette T.; Barouch, Dan H.

    2014-11-14

    An effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) will have to provide protection against a vast array of different HIV-1 strains. Current methods to measure HIV-1-specific binding antibodies following immunization typically focus on determining the magnitude of antibody responses, but the epitope diversity of antibody responses has remained largely unexplored. Here we describe the development of a global HIV-1 peptide microarray that contains 6564 peptides from across the HIV-1 proteome and covers the majority of HIV-1 sequences in the Los Alamos National Laboratory global HIV-1 sequence database. Using this microarray, we quantified the magnitude, breadth, and depth of IgG binding to linear HIV-1 sequences in HIV-1-infected humans and HIV-1-vaccinated humans, rhesus monkeys and guinea pigs. The microarray measured potentially important differences in antibody epitope diversity, particularly regarding the depth of epitope variants recognized at each binding site. Our data suggest that the global HIV-1 peptide microarray may be a useful tool for both preclinical and clinical HIV-1 research.

  12. Quantification of the epitope diversity of HIV-1-specific binding antibodies by peptide microarrays for global HIV-1 vaccine development

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stephenson, Kathryn E.; Neubauer, George H.; Reimer, Ulf; Pawlowski, Nikolaus; Knaute, Tobias; Zerweck, Johannes; Korber, Bette T.; Barouch, Dan H.

    2014-11-14

    An effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) will have to provide protection against a vast array of different HIV-1 strains. Current methods to measure HIV-1-specific binding antibodies following immunization typically focus on determining the magnitude of antibody responses, but the epitope diversity of antibody responses has remained largely unexplored. Here we describe the development of a global HIV-1 peptide microarray that contains 6564 peptides from across the HIV-1 proteome and covers the majority of HIV-1 sequences in the Los Alamos National Laboratory global HIV-1 sequence database. Using this microarray, we quantified the magnitude, breadth, and depth ofmore » IgG binding to linear HIV-1 sequences in HIV-1-infected humans and HIV-1-vaccinated humans, rhesus monkeys and guinea pigs. The microarray measured potentially important differences in antibody epitope diversity, particularly regarding the depth of epitope variants recognized at each binding site. Our data suggest that the global HIV-1 peptide microarray may be a useful tool for both preclinical and clinical HIV-1 research.« less

  13. Accelerated Aging Studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accelerated Aging Studies LA-UR -15-27339 This document is approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited Property (max) log (aging time) Property (failure) Property ...

  14. HIV transcription is induced in dying cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei; Schreck, S. |

    1995-06-01

    Using HeLa cells stably transfected with an HIV-LTR-CAT construct, we demonstrated a peak in CAT induction that occurs in viable (but not necessarily cell-division-competent) cells 24 h following exposure to some cell-killing agents. {gamma} rays were the only cell-killing agent which did not induce HIV transcription; this can be attributed to the fact that {gamma}-ray-induced apoptotic death requires functional p53, which is not present in HeLa cells. For all other agents, HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent and correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. HIV/AIDS Information Resources from NLM

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HIV/AIDS Information Resources from the National Library of Medicine® Updated February 2013 HIV/AIDS Information Resources from the National Library of Medicine ® This document was prepared for the National Library of Medicine by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) through an interagency agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). ORISE is managed by Oak Ridge Associated Universities under DOE contract number DE-AC05-06OR23100. The Oak Ridge Institute for Science

  16. Recombination elevates the effective evolutionary rate and facilitates the establishment of HIV-1 infection in infants after mother-to-child transmission

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sanborn, Keri B.; Somasundaran, Mohan; Luzuriaga, Katherine; Leitner, Thomas K.

    2015-11-16

    Some previous studies have demonstrated that single HIV-1 genotypes are commonly transmitted from mother to child, but such analyses primarily used single samples from mother and child. It is possible that in a single sample, obtained early after infection, only the most replication competent virus is detected even when other forms may have been transmitted. Such forms may have advantages later in infection, and may thus be detected in follow-up samples. Furthermore, because HIV-1 frequently recombines, phylogenetic analyses that ignore recombination may miss transmission of multiple forms if they recombine after transmission. Moreover, recombination may facilitate adaptation, thus providing anmore » advantage in establishing infection. The effect of recombination on viral evolution in HIV-1 infected children has not been well defined.« less

  17. Residual Viremia in Treated HIV+ Individuals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Conway, Jessica M.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2016-01-06

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) effectively controls HIV infection, suppressing HIV viral loads. However, some residual virus remains, below the level of detection, in HIV-infected patients on ART. Furthermore, the source of this viremia is an area of debate: does it derive primarily from activation of infected cells in the latent reservoir, or from ongoing viral replication? Our observations seem to be contradictory: there is evidence of short term evolution, implying that there must be ongoing viral replication, and viral strains should thus evolve. The phylogenetic analyses, and rare emergent drug resistance, suggest no long-term viral evolution, implying that virus derived frommore » activated latent cells must dominate. We use simple deterministic and stochastic models to gain insight into residual viremia dynamics in HIV-infected patients. Our modeling relies on two underlying assumptions for patients on suppressive ART: that latent cell activation drives viral dynamics and that the reproductive ratio of treated infection is less than 1. Nonetheless, the contribution of viral replication to residual viremia in patients on ART may be non-negligible. However, even if the portion of viremia attributable to viral replication is significant, our model predicts (1) that latent reservoir re-seeding remains negligible, and (2) some short-term viral evolution is permitted, but long-term evolution can still be limited: stochastic analysis of our model shows that de novo emergence of drug resistance is rare. Thus, our simple models reconcile the seemingly contradictory observations on residual viremia and, with relatively few parameters, recapitulates HIV viral dynamics observed in patients on suppressive therapy.« less

  18. Residual Viremia in Treated HIV+ Individuals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Conway, Jessica M.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2016-01-06

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) effectively controls HIV infection, suppressing HIV viral loads. However, some residual virus remains, below the level of detection, in HIV-infected patients on ART. Furthermore, the source of this viremia is an area of debate: does it derive primarily from activation of infected cells in the latent reservoir, or from ongoing viral replication? Our observations seem to be contradictory: there is evidence of short term evolution, implying that there must be ongoing viral replication, and viral strains should thus evolve. The phylogenetic analyses, and rare emergent drug resistance, suggest no long-term viral evolution, implying that virus derived frommore »activated latent cells must dominate. We use simple deterministic and stochastic models to gain insight into residual viremia dynamics in HIV-infected patients. Our modeling relies on two underlying assumptions for patients on suppressive ART: that latent cell activation drives viral dynamics and that the reproductive ratio of treated infection is less than 1. Nonetheless, the contribution of viral replication to residual viremia in patients on ART may be non-negligible. However, even if the portion of viremia attributable to viral replication is significant, our model predicts (1) that latent reservoir re-seeding remains negligible, and (2) some short-term viral evolution is permitted, but long-term evolution can still be limited: stochastic analysis of our model shows that de novo emergence of drug resistance is rare. Thus, our simple models reconcile the seemingly contradictory observations on residual viremia and, with relatively few parameters, recapitulates HIV viral dynamics observed in patients on suppressive therapy.« less

  19. Early Notification Gages

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Early Notification Gages Early Notification Gages Every year, a few storms produce enough runoff on LANL land to reach the Rio Grande. August 1, 2013 Gage E060.1: Pueblo Canyon Gage E060.1: Pueblo Canyon RELATED IMAGES http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7325/9628681767_42d206d583

  20. Low dose rectal inoculation of rhesus macaques by SIV SME660 or SIV MAC251 recapitulates human mucosal infection by HIV-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koraber, Bette; Perelson, Alan; Hraber, Peter; Giorgi, E; Bhattacharya, T

    2009-01-01

    Recently, we developed a novel approach to the identification of transmitted or early founder HIV -1 genomes in acutely infected humans based on single genome amplification and sequencing. Here we tested this approach in 18 acutely infected Indian rhesus macaques to determine the molecular features of SIV transmission. Animals were inoculated intrarectally (IR) or intravenously (IV) with stocks of SIVmac251 or SIVsmE660 that exhibited sequence diversity typical of early-chronic HIV -1 infection. 987 full-length SIV env sequences (median of 48 per animal) were determined from plasma virion RNA one to five weeks after infection. IR inoculation was followed by productive infection by one or few viruses (median 1; range 1-5) that diversified randomly with near star-like phylogeny and a Poisson distribution of mutations. Consensus viral sequences from ramp-up and peak viremia were identical to viruses found in the inocula or differed from them by only one or few nuc1eotides, providing direct evidence that early plasma viral sequences coalesce to transmitted/founder virus( es). IV infection was approximately 10,000-fold more efficient than IR infection, and viruses transmitted by either route represented the full genetic spectra of the inocula. These findings identify key similarities in mucosal transmission and early diversification between SIV and HIV -1.

  1. HIV-AIDS Information Resources from the NLM - ACIO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Templin-Branner, W.

    2010-10-01

    As the treatment and management of HIV/AIDS continues to evolve with new scientific breakthroughs, treatment discoveries, and management challenges, it is difficult for people living with HIV/AIDS and those who care for them to keep up with the latest information on HIV/AIDS screening and testing, prevention, treatment, and research. The National Library of Medicine (NLM), of the National Institutes of Health, has a wealth of health information resources freely available on the Internet to address these needs.

  2. New global HIV vaccine design shows promise in monkeys

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New global HIV vaccine design shows promise in monkeys New global HIV vaccine design shows promise in monkeys These vaccines are specifically designed to present the most common forms of parts of the virus that can be recognized by the immune system. October 30, 2013 Bette Korber of Los Alamos National Laboratory, who developed a component of a new vaccine against HIV, now being tested in monkeys. Bette Korber of Los Alamos National Laboratory, who developed a component of a new vaccine against

  3. Scientists use world's fastest supercomputer to create the largest HIV

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    evolutionary tree HIV evolutionary tree Scientists use world's fastest supercomputer to create the largest HIV evolutionary tree Researchers are using the supercomputer to analyze vast quantities of genetic sequences from HIV infected people in the hope of zeroing in on possible vaccine target areas. October 27, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering

  4. Consortium to design human trials of mosaic HIV vaccine

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Human trials of mosaic HIV vaccine Consortium to design human trials of mosaic HIV vaccine The vaccine represents a novel strategy for fighting the virus that causes AIDS by attempting to address one of the most daunting challenges in HIV vaccine design. October 18, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to

  5. Recombination enhances HIV-1 envelope diversity by facilitating...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    plasma virus population Prev Next Title: Recombination enhances HIV-1 envelope diversity by facilitating the survival of latent genomic fragments in the plasma virus ...

  6. LANL researchers use computer modeling to study HIV | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    researchers use computer modeling to study HIV | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

  7. Early Career Awards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Early Career Awards January 21, 2010 Grants to support innovation in basic science, energy security, climate change LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, January 21, 2010-Five Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists have been awarded five-year research grants under the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act through the U.S. Department of Energy's prestigious Office of Science Early Career Research Program, Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced recently. The awards represent a significant investment of

  8. Early application case studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Early application case studies Early application case studies The Babbage test system was used to study representative applications and kernels in various scientific fields to gain experience with the challenges and strategies needed to optimize code performance on the MIC architecture. Below we highlight a few examples: BerkeleyGW The BerkeleyGW package is a materials science application that calculates electronic and optical properties with quantitative accuracy, a critical need in materials

  9. Parylene C Aging Studies.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Achyuthan, Komandoor; Sawyer, Patricia Sue.; Mata, Guillermo Adrian; White II, Gregory Von; Bernstein, Robert

    2014-09-01

    Parylene C is used in a device because of its conformable deposition and other advantages. Techniques to study Parylene C aging were developed, and %22lessons learned%22 that could be utilized for future studies are the result of this initial study. Differential Scanning Calorimetry yielded temperature ranges for Parylene C aging as well as post-deposition treatment. Post-deposition techniques are suggested to improve Parylene C performance. Sample preparation was critical to aging regimen. Short-term (~40 days) aging experiments with free standing and ceramic-supported Parylene C films highlighted %22lessons learned%22 which stressed further investigations in order to refine sample preparation (film thickness, single sided uniform coating, machine versus laser cutting, annealing time, temperature) and testing issues (%22necking%22) for robust accelerated aging of Parylene C.

  10. DOE Early Career awards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    reactions and climate uncertainties earn Los Alamos scientists DOE Early Career awards May 10, 2013 LOS ALAMOS, N.M., May 10, 2013-Two Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers are among the 61 national recipients of the Energy Department's Early Career Research Program awards for 2013. Marian Jandel won for his proposal, "New Data on Neutron Reactions Relevant to Basic and Applied Science," selected by the Office of Nuclear Physics. Nathan M. Urban will be supported for his work on

  11. Cancer and Aging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campisi, Julie

    2015-05-06

    Berkeley Lab biochemist Judy Campisi discusses her work on understanding the molecular and cellular basis of aging and the control of cellular senescence and its role in tumor suppression.

  12. Identification of full-length transmitted/founder viruses and their progeny in primary HIV-1 infection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korber, Bette; Hraber, Peter; Giorgi, Elena; Bhattacharya, T

    2009-01-01

    Identification of transmitted/founder virus genomes and their progeny by is a novel strategy for probing the molecular basis of HIV-1 transmission and for evaluating the genetic imprint of viral and host factors that act to constrain or facilitate virus replication. Here, we show in a cohort of twelve acutely infected subjects (9 clade B; 3 clade C), that complete genomic sequences of transmitted/founder viruses could be inferred using single genome amplification of plasma viral RNA, direct amplicon sequencing, and a model of random virus evolution. This allowed for the precise identification, chemical synthesis, molecular cloning, and biological analysis of those viruses actually responsible for productive clinical infection and for a comprehensive mapping of sequential viral genomes and proteomes for mutations that are necessary or incidental to the establishment of HIV-1 persistence. Transmitted/founder viruses were CD4 and CCR5 tropic, replicated preferentially in activated primary T-Iymphocytes but not monocyte-derived macrophages, and were effectively shielded from most heterologous or broadly neutralizing antibodies. By 3 months of infection, the evolving viral quasispecies in three subjects showed mutational fixation at only 2-5 discreet genomic loci. By 6-12 months, mutational fixation was evident at 18-27 genomic loci. Some, but not all, of these mutations were attributable to virus escape from cytotoxic Tlymphocytes or neutralizing antibodies, suggesting that other viral or host factors may influence early HIV -1 fitness.

  13. Generalized Coalescents may be Necessary for Modeling Intrahost HIV

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Evolution (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Generalized Coalescents may be Necessary for Modeling Intrahost HIV Evolution Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Generalized Coalescents may be Necessary for Modeling Intrahost HIV Evolution Authors: Wallstrom, Timothy Clarke [1] ; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy [1] ; Wilkins, Jon [2] ; Fischer, William Mclean [1] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory Ronin Institute Publication Date: 2016-05-04 OSTI Identifier: 1253498

  14. Stapled HIV-1 peptides recapitulate antigenic structures and engage broadly

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    neutralizing antibodies (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Stapled HIV-1 peptides recapitulate antigenic structures and engage broadly neutralizing antibodies Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Stapled HIV-1 peptides recapitulate antigenic structures and engage broadly neutralizing antibodies Authors: Bird, Gregory H. ; Irimia, Adriana ; Ofek, Gilad ; Kwong, Peter D. ; Wilson, Ian A. ; Walensky , Loren D. [1] ; NIH) [2] ; Scripps) [2]

  15. Science On Tap - Understanding HIV and Infectious Diseases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science On Tap - Understanding HIV and Infectious Diseases Science On Tap - Understanding HIV and Infectious Diseases WHEN: Sep 17, 2015 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM WHERE: UnQuarked Wine Room 145 Central Park Square, Los Alamos, New Mexico, 87544 USA SPEAKER: Ruy Ribeiro, Los Alamos National Laboratory CONTACT: Jessica Privette 505 667-0375 CATEGORY: Bradbury INTERNAL: Calendar Login Science On Tap - Every Third Thursday Event Description Science On Tap happens every third Thursday of the month, featuring

  16. Mosaic clade M human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope immunogens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korber, Bette T.; Fischer, William; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F.; Letvin, Norman; Hahn; Beatrice H.

    2011-05-31

    The present invention relates to mosaic clade M HIV-1 Env polypeptides and to compositions comprising same. The polypeptides of the invention are suitable for use in inducing an immune response to HIV-1 in a human.

  17. Broad and potent HIV-1 neutralization by a human antibody that...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    antibody, termed 35O22, which binds a novel HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) epitope. ... The specificity of 35O22 represents a novel site of vulnerability on HIV Env, which ...

  18. Diverse ages and origins of basement complexes, Luzon, Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geary, E.E.; Harrison, T.M.; Heizler, M.

    1988-04-01

    Geological field investigations and /sup 40/Ar//sup 39/Ar ages from two basement complexes in southeast Luzon document the first known occurrences of pre-Late Cretaceous age rocks in the eastern Philippines. However, individual components within the two complexes vary in age from Late Jurassic (Caramoan basement complex) to Early Cretaceous and early Miocene (Camarines Norte-Calaguas Islands basement complex). These and other data show that southeast Luzon basement complexes are genetically diverse, and they indicate that the concept of an old, autochthonous basement in the Philippines is open to question. This supports the hypothesis that the Philippine Archipelago is an amalgamation of allochthonous Mesozoic and Cenozoic island-arc, ocean-basin, and continental fragments that were assembled during the Tertiary.

  19. The challenges of modelling antibody repertoire dynamics in HIV infection

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Luo, Shishi; Perelson, Alan S.

    2015-07-20

    Antibody affinity maturation by somatic hypermutation of B-cell immunoglobulin variable region genes has been studied for decades in various model systems using well-defined antigens. While much is known about the molecular details of the process, our understanding of the selective forces that generate affinity maturation are less well developed, particularly in the case of a co-evolving pathogen such as HIV. Despite this gap in understanding, high-throughput antibody sequence data are increasingly being collected to investigate the evolutionary trajectories of antibody lineages in HIV-infected individuals. Here, we review what is known in controlled experimental systems about the mechanisms underlying antibody selectionmore » and compare this to the observed temporal patterns of antibody evolution in HIV infection. In addition, we describe how our current understanding of antibody selection mechanisms leaves questions about antibody dynamics in HIV infection unanswered. Without a mechanistic understanding of antibody selection in the context of a co-evolving viral population, modelling and analysis of antibody sequences in HIV-infected individuals will be limited in their interpretation and predictive ability.« less

  20. CASL OLCF Early Science Award

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Steven Hamilton Wayne Joubert John Turner CASL-U-2013-0231-000 CASL OLCF Early ... Principle Investigators: * ORNL: John Turner, Tom Evans, Andrew Godfrey * Westinghouse ...

  1. Ectopic expression of anti-HIV-1 shRNAs protects CD8{sup +} T cells

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    modified with CD4ζ CAR from HIV-1 infection and alleviates impairment of cell proliferation (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Ectopic expression of anti-HIV-1 shRNAs protects CD8{sup +} T cells modified with CD4ζ CAR from HIV-1 infection and alleviates impairment of cell proliferation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ectopic expression of anti-HIV-1 shRNAs protects CD8{sup +} T cells modified with CD4ζ CAR from HIV-1 infection and alleviates impairment of cell proliferation

  2. Early Entrance Coproduction Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mushtaq Ahmed; John H. Anderson; Earl R. Berry; Troy Raybold; Lalit S. Shah; Kenneth A. Yackly

    2004-01-26

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals. The objective is to have these products produced by technologies capable of using synthesis gas derived from coal and/or other carbonaceous feedstocks. The objectives of Phase I were to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan for implementation in Phase II; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology that produces high-value products, particularly those that are critical to our domestic fuel and power requirements. The work performed under Phase II will resolve critical knowledge and technology gaps on the integration of gasification and downstream processing to coproduce some combination of power, fuels, and chemicals from coal and/or other carbonaceous feedstocks. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation.

  3. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mushtaq Ahmed; John H. Anderson; Charles Benham; Earl R. Berry; Fred Brent; Belma Demirel; Ming He; Troy Raybold; Manuel E. Quintana; Lalit S. Shah; Kenneth A. Yackly

    2003-06-09

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals. The objective is to have these products produced by technologies capable of using synthesis gas derived from coal and/or other carbonaceous feedstocks. The objectives of Phase I were to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan for implementation in Phase II; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology that produces high-value products, particularly those that are critical to our domestic fuel and power requirements. The project will resolve critical knowledge and technology gaps on the integration of gasification and downstream processing to coproduce some combination of power, fuels, and chemicals from coal and/or other carbonaceous feedstocks. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation.

  4. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mushtaq Ahmed; John H. Anderson; Earl R. Berry; Fred Brent; Ming He; Jimmy O. Ong; Mike K. Porter; Randy Roberts; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit S. Shah; Kenneth A. Yackly

    2002-11-22

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals. The objective is to have these products produced by technologies capable of using synthesis gas derived from coal and/or other carbonaceous feedstocks. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan for implementation in Phase II; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology that produces high-value products, particularly those that are critical to our domestic fuel and power requirements. The project will resolve critical knowledge and technology gaps on the integration of gasification and downstream processing to coproduce some combination of power, fuels, and chemicals from coal and/or other carbonaceous feedstocks. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation.

  5. Fragment Screen against HIV Protease: Discovery of Two Allosteric Binding

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sites Fragment Screen against HIV Protease: Discovery of Two Allosteric Binding Sites figure 1 Figure 1. Surface rendering of the HIV protease structure showing solvent-exposed clefts on the protein surface into which the fragments bind. (A) The exo site binds 2-methylcyclohexanol, and (B) the outside/top of the flap binds indole-6-carboxylic acid. The exo site is a pre-existing feature of the protein fold while the outside/top of the flap rearranges to accommodate fragment binding. These

  6. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred D. Brent; Lalit Shah; Earl Berry; Charles H. Schrader; John Anderson; Ming He; James F. Stevens; Centha A. Davis; Michael Henley; Jerome Mayer; Harry Tsang; Jimell Erwin; Jennifer Adams; Michael Tillman; Chris Taylor; Marjan J. Roos; Robert F. Earhart

    2004-01-27

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC or TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. Each of the EECP subsystems was assessed for technical risks and barriers. A plan was developed to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). The potential technical and economic risks to the EECP from Task 2.5 can be mitigated by demonstrating that the end-use products derived from the upgrading of the F-T synthesis total liquid product can meet or exceed current specifications for the manufacture of ethylene and propylene chemicals from F-T naphtha, for the generation of hydrogen from F-T naphtha to power fuel cells, for direct blending of F-T diesels into transportation fuels, for the conversion of F-T heavy product wax to transportation fuels, and the conversion of F-T Heavy product wax to a valuable high melting point food-grade specialty wax product. Product evaluations conducted under Task 2.5 of Phase II successfully mitigated the above technical and economic risks to the EECP with the development of product yields and product qualities for the production of chemicals, transportation fuels, and specialty food-grade waxes from the F-T synthesis products.

  7. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Anderson; Charles Schrader

    2004-01-26

    In 1999, the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded a Cooperative Agreement to Texaco Energy Systems Inc. to provide a preliminary engineering design of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP). Since the award, continuous and diligent work has been undertaken to achieve the design of an economical facility that makes strides toward attaining the goal of DOE's Vision 21 Program. The objective of the EECP is to convert coal and/or petroleum coke to power while coproducing transportation fuels, chemicals, and useful utilities such as steam. This objective is being pursued in a three-phase effort through the partnership of the DOE with prime contractor Texaco Energy Systems, LLC. (TES), the successor to Texaco Energy Systems, Inc. The key subcontractors to TES include General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown and Root. ChevronTexaco provided gasification technology and Rentech Inc.'s Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology that has been developed for non-natural gas sources. GE provided gas turbine technology for the combustion of low energy content gas. Praxair provided air separation technology and KBR provided engineering to integrate the facility. A conceptual design was completed in Phase I and the report was accepted by the DOE in May 2001. The Phase I work identified risks and critical research, development, and testing that would improve the probability of technical success of the EECP. The objective of Phase II was to mitigate the risks by executing research, development, and testing. Results from the Phase II work are the subject of this report. As the work of Phase II concluded, it became evident that sufficient, but not necessarily complete, technical information and data would be available to begin Phase III - Preliminary Engineering Design. Work in Phase II requires additional technical development work to correctly apply technology at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The decision to proceed with Phase III centers on locating a new site and favorable commercial and economic factors.

  8. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Storm; Govanon Nongbri; Steve Decanio; Ming He; Lalit Shah; Charles Schrader; Earl Berry; Peter Ricci; Belma Demirel; Charles Benham; Mark Bohn

    2004-01-12

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC or TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, Inc., GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. During Phase I, a design basis for the Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis section was developed based on limited experience with the specified feed gas and operating conditions. The objective of this Task in Phase II RD&T work was to confirm the performance of the F-T reactor at the set design conditions. Although much of the research, development, and testing work were done by TES outside of this project, several important issues were addressed in this phase of the project. They included Rejuvenation/Regeneration of the Fischer-Tropsch Catalyst, online Catalyst Withdrawal and Addition from the synthesis reactor, and the Fischer-Tropsch Design Basis Confirmation. In Phase III the results from these RD&T work will be incorporated in developing the engineering design package. This Topical Report documents the Phase II RD&T work that was completed for this task.

  9. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles Benham; Mark Bohn; John Anderson; Earl Berry; Fred Brent; Ming He; Randy Roberts; Lalit Shah; Marjan Roos

    2003-09-15

    The 1999 U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) award to Texaco Energy Systems Inc. (presently Texaco Energy Systems LLC, a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco) was made to provide a Preliminary Engineering Design of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP). Since the award presentation, work has been undertaken to achieve an economical concept design that makes strides toward the DOE Vision 21 goal. The objective of the EECP is to convert coal and/or petroleum coke to electric power plus transportation fuels, chemicals and useful utilities such as steam. The use of petroleum coke was added as a fuel to reduce the cost of feedstock and also to increase the probability of commercial implementation of the EECP concept. This objective has been pursued in a three phase effort through the partnership of the DOE with prime contractor Texaco Energy Systems LLC and subcontractors General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown and Root (KBR). ChevronTexaco is providing gasification technology and Rentech's Fischer-Tropsch technology that has been developed for non-natural gas feed sources. GE is providing gas turbine technology for the combustion of low energy content gas. Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering to integrate the facility. The objective of Phase I was to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. Phase I Preliminary Concept Report was completed in 2000. The Phase I Preliminary Concept Report was prepared based on making assumptions for the basis of design for various technologies that are part of the EECP concept. The Phase I Preliminary Concept Report was approved by the DOE in May 2001. The Phase I work identified technical and economic risks and critical research, development, and testing that would improve the probability of the technical and economic success of the EECP. The Project Management Plan (Task 1) for Phase II was approved by the DOE in 2001. The results of RD&T efforts for Phase II are expected to improve the quality of assumptions made in Phase I for basis of design for the EECP concept. The RD&T work plan (Task 2 and 3) for Phase II has been completed. As the RD&T work conducted during Phase II concluded, it became evident that sufficient, but not necessarily complete, technical information and data would be available to begin Phase III - Basic Engineering Design. Also due to the merger of Chevron and Texaco, the proposed refinery site for the EECP was not available. It became apparent that some additional technical development work would be needed to correctly apply the technology at a specific site. The objective of Task 4 of Phase II is to update the concept basis of design produced during Phase I. As part of this task, items that will require design basis changes and are not site dependent have been identified. The team has qualitatively identified the efforts to incorporate the impacts of changes on EECP concept. The design basis has been modified to incorporate those changes. The design basis changes for those components of EECP that are site and feedstock dependent will be done as part of Phase III, once the site has been selected.

  10. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Anderson; Mark Anselmo; Earl Berry; Mark Bohn; Ming He; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit Shah; Donald Todd; Robert Schavey

    2004-01-12

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to its detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC (TES) (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR). The work was under cooperative agreements with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing the gasification technology and the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech Inc., GE is providing the combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing the air separation technology, and KBR is providing overall engineering. Each of the EECP's subsystems was assessed for technical risks and barriers in Phase I. A plan was identified to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). The RD&T Plan identified catalyst/wax separation as a potential technical and economic risk. To mitigate risks to the proposed EECP concept, Phase II RD&T included tests for secondary catalyst/wax separation systems as part of Task 2.3--Catalyst/Wax Separation. The LCI Scepter{reg_sign} Microfiltration system was determined to be best suited for producing a filtrate that met the EECP secondary catalyst/wax separation standards of producing F-T wax containing less than10 ppmw solids. As part of task 2.3, micro-filtration removal efficiencies and production rates for two FT feeds, Rentech Inc. bubble column reactor (BCR) product and LaPorte Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) product, were evaluated. Based on comparisons between the performances of these two materials, the more readily available LaPorte AFDU material was judged an acceptable analog to the BCR material that would be produced in a larger-scale F-T synthesis. The present test was initiated to obtain data in an extended range of concentration for use in the scale-up design of the secondary catalyst/wax separation system that would be operating at the EECP capacity.

  11. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdalla H. Ali; Raj Kamarthi; John H. Anderson; Earl R. Berry; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit S. Shah

    2003-04-16

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. During Phase I the team identified the integration of the water produced in the F-T synthesis section with the gasification section as an area of potential synergy. By utilizing the F-T water in the petroleum coke slurry for the gasifier, the EECP can eliminate a potential waste stream and reduce capital costs. There is a low technical risk for this synergy, however, the economic risk, particularly in regards to the water, can be high. The economic costs include the costs of treating the water to meet the locally applicable environmental standards. This option may require expensive chemicals and treatment facilities. EECP Phase II included tests conducted to confirm the viability of integrating F-T water in the slurry feed for the gasifier. Testing conducted at ChevronTexaco's Montebello Technology Center (MTC) included preparing slurries made using petroleum coke with F-T water collected at the LaPorte Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). The work included bench scale tests to determine the slurry ability of the petroleum coke and F-T water. The results of the tests show that F-T water does not adversely affect slurries for the gasifier. There are a few cases where in fact the addition of F-T water caused favorable changes in viscosity of the slurries. This RD&T task was executed in Phase II and results are reported herein.

  12. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Anderson; Mark Anselmo; Earl Berry; Mark Bohn; Roko Bujas; Ming He; Ken Kwik; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit Shah; Dennis Slater; Donald Todd; Don Wall

    2003-08-21

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC (TES), a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco, General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, Inc. GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. Each of the EECP subsystems were assessed for technical risks and barriers. A plan was identified to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). The RD&T Plan identified catalyst/wax separation as a potential technical and economic risk. To mitigate risks to the proposed EECP, Phase II RD&T included tests of an alternative (to Rentech's Dynamic Settler) primary catalyst/wax separation device and secondary catalyst/wax separation systems. The team evaluated multiple technologies for both primary and secondary catalyst/wax separation. Based on successful testing at Rentech (outside of DOE funding) and difficulties in finalizing a contract to demonstrate alternative primary catalyst/wax separation technology (using magnetic separation technology), ChevronTexaco has selected the Rentech Dynamic Settler for primary catalyst/wax separation. Testing has shown the Dynamic Settler is capable of producing filtrate exceeding the proposed EECP primary catalyst/wax separation goal of less than 0.1 wt%. The LCI Scepter{reg_sign} Microfiltration system appeared to be best suited for producing a filtrate that met the EECP secondary catalyst/wax separation standards of 10 parts per million (weight) [ppmw]. The other technologies, magnetic separation and electrostatic separation, were promising and able to reduce the solids concentrations in the filtrate. Additional RD&T will be needed for magnetic separation and electrostatic separation technologies to obtain 10 ppmw filtrate required for the proposed EECP. The Phase II testing reduces the technical and economic risks and provides the information necessary to proceed with the development of an engineering design for the EECP Fischer-Tropsch catalyst/wax separation system.

  13. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John H. Anderson; Charles Benham; Earl R. Berry; Ming He; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit S. Shah; O.O. Omatete; T.D. Burchell

    2004-01-12

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC or TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. During Phase I the team identified several potential methods to reduce or minimize the environmental impact of the proposed EECP. The EECP Project Team identified F-T catalyst disposal, beneficial gasifier slag usage (other than landfill), and carbon dioxide recovery for the gas turbine exhaust for study under this task. Successfully completing the Task 2.10 RD&T provides additional opportunities for the EECP to meet the goals of DOE's Vision 21 Program. The gasification section offers several opportunities to maximize the environmental benefits of an EECP. The spent F-T catalyst can be sent to landfills or to the gasification section. Testing in Phase II shows that the spent F-T catalyst with a small wax coating can safely meet federal landfill requirements. As an alternative to landfilling, it has been proposed to mix the spent F-T catalyst with the petroleum coke and feed this mixture to the gasification unit. Based on ChevronTexaco's experience with gasification and the characteristics of the spent F-T catalyst this appears to be an excellent opportunity to reduce one potential waste stream. The slag from the gasification unit can be commercially marketed for construction or fuel (such as cement kiln fuel) uses. The technical and economic benefits of these options must be reviewed for the final EECP before incorporating a specific alternative into the design basis. Reducing greenhouse gas emissions, particularly carbon dioxide, is an important goal of the EECP. The Texaco gasification process provides opportunities to capture high purity streams of carbon dioxide. For Phase II, a carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS) was tested to determine its potential to remove high purity carbon dioxide from the exhaust of a gas turbine. Testing on with a simulated gas turbine exhaust shows that the CFCMS is able to remove high purity carbon dioxide from the exhaust. However, more development is required to optimize the system.

  14. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randy Roberts

    2003-04-25

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using petroleum coke and ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I was to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC. (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). ChevronTexaco is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology and KBR is providing engineering. Each of the EECP subsystems were assessed for technical risks and barriers. A plan was identified to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). The RD&T Plan identified F-T reactor scale-up as a potential technical risk. The objective of Task 2.3 was to confirm engineering models that allow scale-up to commercial slurry phase bubble column (SPBC) reactors operating in the churn-turbulent flow regime. In developmental work outside the scope of this project, historical data, literature references, and a scale-up from a 1 1/2-in. (3.8 cm) to 6-ft (1.8 m) SPBC reactor have been reviewed. This review formed the background for developing scale-up models for a SPBC reactor operating in the churn-turbulent flow regime. The necessary fundamental physical parameters have been measured and incorporated into the mathematical catalyst/kinetic model developed from the SPBC and CSTR work outside the scope of this EECP project. The mathematical catalyst/kinetic model was used to compare to experimental data obtained at Rentech during the EECP Fischer-Tropsch Confirmation Run (Task 2.1; reported separately). The prediction of carbon monoxide (CO) conversion as a function of days on stream compares quite closely to the experimental data.

  15. Miller wins Early Career Award

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Miller wins Early Career Award Miller wins Early Career Award Karen Miller recognized for her accomplishments as a young professional in the field of nuclear materials management and for her leadership and contributions to the Institute. October 1, 2014 Karen Miller Karen Miller Miller's research focuses on detector development for international safeguards applications. The Institute of Nuclear Materials Management (INMM) recognized Karen Miller of the LANL's Safeguards Science and Technology

  16. receive DOE Early Career Award

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    researcher Joel Rowland to receive DOE Early Career Award May 8, 2014 Research focuses on land surface dynamics in Arctic environments LOS ALAMOS, N.M., May 8, 2014-Los Alamos National Laboratory researcher Joel Rowland is one of 35 national recipients of 2014 Early Career Research Program awards from the Department of Energy. Rowland's research was recognized by DOE's Office of Biological and Environmental Research for incorporating hydrological controls on carbon cycling in flood plain

  17. Gandolfi wins Early Career Prize

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gandolfi wins Early Career Prize August 20, 2013 Stefano Gandolfi of LANL's Nuclear and Particle Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology group received the prestigious International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP) Early Career prize in nuclear physics at the International Nuclear Physics Conference in Florence, Italy. Gandolfi gave a plenary talk after the award presentation. His citation reads: "For developing a new method of calculating many body observables from ab-initio two body

  18. Clocking the Early Universe's Expansion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Clocking the Early Universe Clocking the Early Universe's Expansion Calculations Performed at NERSC Help Scientists Close in on the Nature of Dark Energy April 17, 2014 Margie Wylie, mwylie@lbl.gov, +1 510 486 7421 NERSC PI: David Schlegel Lead Institution: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Project Title: Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey NERSC Resources Used: Hopper DOE Program Office: High Energy Physics Astronomers have made the most accurate calculation yet of the expansion rate of

  19. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdalla H. Ali; John H. Anderson; Earl R. Berry; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit S. Shah

    2003-04-16

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. Each of the EECP subsystems were assessed for technical risks and barriers. A plan was identified to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). The RD&T Plan identified petroleum coke characteristics as a potential technical risk. The composition of petroleum coke varies from one refinery to another. Petroleum coke characteristics are a function of the crude oil slate available at the refinery and the coker operating parameters. The specific petroleum coke characteristics at a refinery affect the design of the Gasification and Acid Gas Removal (AGR) subsystems. Knowing the petroleum coke composition provides the necessary data to proceed to the EECP Phase III engineering design of the gasification process. Based on ChevronTexaco's experience, the EECP team ranked the technical, economic, and overall risks of the petroleum coke composition related to the gasification subsystem as low. In Phase I of the EECP Project, the Motiva Port Arthur Refinery had been identified as the potential EECP site. As a result of the merger between Texaco and Chevron in October 2001, Texaco was required to sell its interest in the Motiva Enterprises LLC joint venture to Shell Oil Company and Saudi Refining Inc. To assess the possible impact of moving the proposed EECP host site to a ChevronTexaco refinery, samples of petroleum coke from two ChevronTexaco refineries were sent to MTC for bench-scale testing. The results of the analysis of these samples were compared to the Phase I EECP Gasification Design Basis developed for Motiva's Port Arthur Refinery. The analysis confirms that if the proposed EECP is moved to a new refinery site, the Phase I EECP Gasification Design Basis would have to be updated. The lower sulfur content of the two samples from the ChevronTexaco refineries indicates that if one of these sites were selected, the Sulfur Recovery Unit (SRU) might be sized smaller than the current EECP design. This would reduce the capital expense of the SRU. Additionally, both ChevronTexaco samples have a higher hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratio than the Motiva Port Arthur petroleum coke. The higher hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratio could give a slightly higher F-T products yield from the F-T Synthesis Reactor. However, the EECP Gasification Design Basis can not be updated until the site for the proposed EECP site is finalized. Until the site is finalized, the feedstock (petroleum coke) characteristics are a low risk to the EECP project.

  20. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred D. Brent; Lalit Shah; Earl Berry; Charles H. Schrader; John Anderson; J. Erwin; Matthew G. Banks; Terry L. Ullman

    2004-01-12

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC or TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. Each of the EECP subsystems was assessed for technical risks and barriers. A plan was developed to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). Phase II RD&T Task 2.6 identified as potential technical risks to the EECP the fuel/engine performance and emissions of the F-T diesel fuel products. Hydrotreating the neat F-T diesel product reduces potentially reactive olefins, oxygenates, and acids levels and alleviates corrosion and fuel stability concerns. Future coproduction plants can maximize valuable transportation diesel by hydrocracking the F-T Synthesis wax product to diesel and naphtha. The upgraded neat F-T diesel, hydrotreater F-T diesel, and hydrocracker F-T diesel products would be final blending components in transportation diesel fuel. Phase II RD&T Task 2.6 successfully carried out fuel lubricity property testing, fuel response to lubricity additives, and hot-start transient emission tests on a neat F-T diesel product, a hydrocracker F-T diesel product, a blend of hydrotreater and hydrocracker F-T diesel products, and a Tier II California Air Resources Board (CARB)-like diesel reference fuel. Only the neat F-T diesel passed lubricity inspection without additive while the remaining three fuel candidates passed with conventional additive treatment. Hot-start transient emission tests were conducted on the four fuels in accordance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Federal Test Procedure (FTP) specified in Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 86, and Subpart N on a rebuilt 1991 Detroit Diesel Corporation Series 60 heavy-duty diesel engine. Neat F-T diesel fuel reduced oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}), total particulate (PM), hydrocarbons (HC), carbon monoxide (CO), and the Soluble Organic Fraction (SOF) by 4.5%, 31%, 50%, 29%, and 35%, respectively, compared to the Tier II CARB-like diesel. The hydrocracker F-T diesel product and a blend of hydrocracker and hydrotreater F-T diesel products also reduced NO{sub x}, PM, HC, CO and SOF by 13%, 16% to 17%, 38% to 63%, 17% to 21% and 21% to 39% compared to the Tier II CARB-like diesel. The fuel/engine performance and emissions of the three F-T diesel fuels exceed the performance of a Tier II CARB-like diesel. Phase II RD&T Task 2.6 successfully met the lubricity property testing and F-T diesel fuel hot-start transient emissions test objectives. The results of the testing help mitigate potential economic risks on obtaining a premium price for the F-T diesel fuel in the marketplace. The F-T diesel fuel superior properties of low sulfur, low aromatics, and high cetane resulted in lower emissions yields if compared to conventional diesel fuels.

  1. Aging and the geochemical environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    This report describes and assesses the aging process and related environmental aspects that may provide useful insights toward postponing some of the inevitable effects of aging. Although the Panel on Aging and the Geochemical Environment is convinced that the geochemical environment is associated with aging, it of course recognizes that other factors may also be significant or, perhaps, more important. Accordingly, the report is intended to enhance the awareness of biomedical and geochemical research scientists, decision makers in related areas, and the lay public interested in an understanding of the relation of the geochemical environment to senescence.

  2. Caribbean Equal Access Program: HIV/AIDS Information Resources from the National Library of Medicine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nancy Dancy, NLM, and Wilma Templin-Branner, ORISE

    2009-01-01

    As the treatment and management of HIV/AIDS continues to evolve with new scientific breakthroughs, treatment discoveries, and management challenges, it is difficult for people living with HIV/AIDS and those who care for them to keep up with the latest information on HIV/AIDS prevention, treatment, and research. The National Library of Medicine, of the National Institutes of Health, has a wealth of health information resources freely available on the Internet to address these needs.

  3. ORISE Resources: How to Find Reliable HIV/AIDS Treatment Information on the

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Internet ORISE resource created for NLM assists in finding and evaluating HIV/AIDS information on the Web Produced by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) for the National Library of Medicine, this document identifies websites that provide the most accurate and up-to-date information about HIV/AIDS treatment and research. Consulting quality HIV/AIDS websites is an efficient, inexpensive, and powerful way to find current information. It includes information on clinical

  4. HIV genetic research to be discussed at Bradbury Science Museum lecture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Feb. 12 HIV genetic research to be discussed Feb. 12 HIV genetic research to be discussed at Bradbury Science Museum lecture Feb. 12 Tanmoy Bhattacharya will talk about the Lab's research in HIV genetics and how the deluge of new data is going to impact its future. February 7, 2014 Bradbury Science Museum Bradbury Science Museum Contact Steve Sandoval Communications Office (505) 665-9206 Email "In biology, access to large amounts of genetic information about organisms revolutionized the

  5. Market Transformation: Fuel Cell Early Adoption (Presentation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transformation: Fuel Cell Early Adoption (Presentation) Market Transformation: Fuel Cell Early Adoption (Presentation) Presented at the DOE Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation Workshop held ...

  6. Early Station Costs Questionnaire | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Early Station Costs Questionnaire Early Station Costs Questionnaire Presentation by Marc Melaina, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, at the Hydrogen Infrastructure Market ...

  7. LANL exceeds Early Recovery Act recycling goals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LANL exceeds Early Recovery Act recycling goals LANL exceeds Early Recovery Act recycling goals Lab demolition projects under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act have...

  8. Proteomic Analysis of Saliva in HIV-positive Heroin Addicts Reveals Proteins Correlated with Cognition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dominy, Stephen; Brown, Joseph N.; Ryder, Mark I.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-04-01

    The prevalence of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) remains high despite effective antiretroviral therapies. Multiple etiologies have been proposed over the last few years to account for this phenomenon, including the neurotoxic effects of antiretrovirals and co-morbid substance abuse. However, no underlying molecular mechanism has been identified. Emerging evidence in several fields has linked the gut to brain diseases, but the effect of the gut on the brain during HIV infection has not been explored. Saliva is the most accessible gut biofluid, and is therefore of great scientific interest for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. This study presents a longitudinal, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics study investigating saliva samples taken from 8 HIV-positive (HIV+) and 11 -negative (HIV-) heroin addicts. In the HIV+ group, 58 proteins were identified that show significant correlations with cognitive scores and that implicate disruption of protein quality control pathways by HIV. Notably, no proteins from the HIV- heroin addict cohort showed significant correlations with cognitive scores. In addition, the majority of correlated proteins have been shown to be associated with exosomes, allowing us to propose that the salivary glands and/or oral epithelium may modulate brain function during HIV infection through the release of discrete packets of proteins in the form of exosomes.

  9. Closer to HIV vaccine goal with new insight into viral factors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    donor's predominant virus subpopulation in the genital tract differed from that in the blood. Comparing the HIV sequence population in each newly infected partner with that in the...

  10. Rock of Ages | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Ages Jump to: navigation, search Name Rock of Ages Facility Rock of Ages Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Rock of Ages Energy...

  11. Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister System Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister System Performance Specification: Revision 1 Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister System Performance Specification: Revision 1 ...

  12. AGING SYSTEM DESIGN DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Beesley

    2005-02-07

    This plan provides an overview, work to date, and the path forward for the design development strategy of the Aging cask for aging commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) at the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) repository site. Waste for subsurface emplacement at the repository includes US Department of Energy (DOE) high-level radioactive waste (HLW), DOE SNF, commercial fuel in dual-purpose canisters (DPCs), uncanistered bare fuel, naval fuel, and other waste types. Table 1-1 lists the types of radioactive materials that may be aged at YMP, and those materials that will not be placed in an aging cask or module. This plan presents the strategy for design development of the Aging system. The Aging system will not handle naval fuel, DOE HLW, MCOs, or DOE SNF since those materials will be delivered to the repository in a state and sequence that allows them to be placed into waste packages for emplacement. Some CSNF from nuclear reactors, especially CSNF that is thermally too hot for emplacement underground, will need to be aged at the repository.

  13. AGING FACILITY CRITICALITY SAFETY CALCULATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.E. Sanders

    2004-09-10

    The purpose of this design calculation is to revise and update the previous criticality calculation for the Aging Facility (documented in BSC 2004a). This design calculation will also demonstrate and ensure that the storage and aging operations to be performed in the Aging Facility meet the criticality safety design criteria in the ''Project Design Criteria Document'' (Doraswamy 2004, Section 4.9.2.2), and the functional nuclear criticality safety requirement described in the ''SNF Aging System Description Document'' (BSC [Bechtel SAIC Company] 2004f, p. 3-12). The scope of this design calculation covers the systems and processes for aging commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and staging Department of Energy (DOE) SNF/High-Level Waste (HLW) prior to its placement in the final waste package (WP) (BSC 2004f, p. 1-1). Aging commercial SNF is a thermal management strategy, while staging DOE SNF/HLW will make loading of WPs more efficient (note that aging DOE SNF/HLW is not needed since these wastes are not expected to exceed the thermal limits form emplacement) (BSC 2004f, p. 1-2). The description of the changes in this revised document is as follows: (1) Include DOE SNF/HLW in addition to commercial SNF per the current ''SNF Aging System Description Document'' (BSC 2004f). (2) Update the evaluation of Category 1 and 2 event sequences for the Aging Facility as identified in the ''Categorization of Event Sequences for License Application'' (BSC 2004c, Section 7). (3) Further evaluate the design and criticality controls required for a storage/aging cask, referred to as MGR Site-specific Cask (MSC), to accommodate commercial fuel outside the content specification in the Certificate of Compliance for the existing NRC-certified storage casks. In addition, evaluate the design required for the MSC that will accommodate DOE SNF/HLW. This design calculation will achieve the objective of providing the criticality safety results to support the preliminary design of the Aging Facility. As the ongoing design evolution remains fluid, the results from this design calculation should be evaluated for applicability to any new or modified design. Consequently, the results presented in this document are limited to the current design. The information contained in this document was developed by Environmental and Nuclear Engineering and is intended for the use of Design and Engineering in its work regarding the various criticality related activities performed in the Aging Facility. Yucca Mountain Project personnel from Environmental and Nuclear Engineering should be consulted before the use of the information for purposes other than those stated herein or use by individuals other than authorized personnel in Design and Engineering.

  14. Non-uniform Aging on Super Duty Diesel Truck Aged Urea Cu/Zeolite...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Aging on Super Duty Diesel Truck Aged Urea CuZeolite SCR Catalysts Non-uniform Aging on Super Duty Diesel Truck Aged Urea CuZeolite SCR Catalysts CuZeolite SCR catalysts aged ...

  15. Cell Senescence: Aging and Cancer

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Campisi, Judith

    2013-05-29

    Scientists have identified a molecular cause behind the ravages of old age and in doing so have also shown how a natural process for fighting cancer in younger persons can actually promote cancer in older individuals.

  16. The age of the universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schramm, D.N.

    1996-10-01

    An overview of the current controversy on the age of the universe is presented. It is shown that the age of the oldest star, globular clusters, yields an age estimate of approximately 14 {+-} 2 {+-} 2 Gyr (where the first {+-} is statistical and the second systematic, and the two should {ital not} be added in quadrature), with a firm lower bound of {ge} 10 Gyr. It is shown how radioactive dating, nucleocosmochronology, also yields a firm lower bound of {approx_gt} 10 Gyr. The currently favored values for the Hubble constant, when converted to ages using a cosmological model with zero cosmological constant, are shown {ital not} to be in conflict with statistical and systematic uncertainties at the present time when one takes both into account, even for critical density universes. 25 refs. , 3 figs., 1 tab.

  17. 3 Million Square Feet of Aging Nuclear Weapons Buildings Torn Down |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Nuclear Security Administration 3 Million Square Feet of Aging Nuclear Weapons Buildings Torn Down August 13, 2008 Agency Passes Goal One Year Early WASHINGTON, DC - Three million square feet of old buildings, many from the earliest days of the Cold War, have been torn down across the eight sites that make up the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA's) national security complex. This accomplishment, achieved a year early, will allow NNSA to be more efficient in meeting

  18. Nucleic acids encoding mosaic clade M human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope immunogens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korber, Bette T; Fischer, William; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F; Letvin, Norman; Hahn, Beatrice H

    2015-04-21

    The present invention relates to nucleic acids encoding mosaic clade M HIV-1 Env polypeptides and to compositions and vectors comprising same. The nucleic acids of the invention are suitable for use in inducing an immune response to HIV-1 in a human.

  19. LANL exceeds Early Recovery Act

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    exceeds Early Recovery Act recycling goals March 8, 2010 More than 136 tons of metal saved from demolished buildings LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, March 9, 2009-Los Alamos National Laboratory announced today that Lab demolition projects under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act have recovered more than 136 tons of recyclable metal since work began last year, largely due to the skill of heavy equipment operators and efforts to gut the buildings before they come down. Some 106 tons of metal came

  20. The early days of incineration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valenti, M.

    1995-05-01

    Landfills reaching capacity, beaches fouled with trash, neighborhood residents protesting waste disposal sites in their backyards, and municipalities forced to recycle. Sound familiar? These issues might have been taken from today`s headlines, but they were also problems facing mechanical engineers a century ago. Conditions such as these were what led engineers to design the first incinerators for reducing the volume of municipal garbage, as well as for producing heat and electricity. The paper discusses these early days.

  1. Understanding aging in pentaerythritol tetranitrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Geoffrey W; Sandstrom, Mary M; Giambra, Anna M; Archuleta, Jose G; Monroe, Deidre C

    2009-01-01

    Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate (PETN) powder is commonly used in detonators because of its sensitivity and explosive power. PETN detonation is largely determined by the average PETN particle size. This is an issue for aging and storage of weapons because PETN has a relatively high vapor pressure and its average particle size changes due to thermal energy input from the environment. PETN aging is a well known problem although the mechanism is not well understood. It is important to understand PETN aging so that predictive models can be constructed that will benefit stockpile surveillance and lifetime extension programs. PETN particles are known to coarsen over time at relatively low temperatures. Particle coarsening requires mass redistribution since decomposition causes powders to become finer as PETN mass is lost. Two possible mechanisms for mass redistribution are vapor phase transfer via sublimation-redeposition and solid-state mass transfer through surface diffusion. In this work we have examined PETN powders us ing permeability, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and optical microscopy based particle analysis. The results of these measurements lead us to a suggested coarsening mechanism that we reproduce with rudimentary simulations. The physical mechanisms used in the simulations are then used to create an empirical model of the coarsening that may be used to make predictions of PETN aging. In the future we will be measuring the vapor pressures and other physical properties of our powders to be able to make predictions using simulations.

  2. Aging and the geochemical environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The report describes and assesses the aging process and related environmental aspects. Specific geographic areas of increased and decreased longevity were identified and geochemically characterized in terms of surface rocks, drinking water quality, soils, and abnormal absorption of trace elements by plants. Environmental factors that may be related to increased longevity are discussed. 11 references, 32 figures, 8 tables. (ACR)

  3. AGE UFMG Incubator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: AGE-UFMG Incubator Place: Brazil Sector: Services Product: General Financial & Legal Services ( Academic Research foundation ) References: AGE-UFMG...

  4. Asian Age Enterprise Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Asian Age Enterprise Ltd Place: Dhaka, Bangladesh Zip: 1000 Product: Bangladeshi private project developer. References: Asian Age...

  5. Equal Access Initiative HIV/AIDS Information Resources from NLM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Templin-Branner W. and N. Dancy

    2010-09-11

    The Equal Access Initiative: HIV/AIDS Information Resources from the National Library of Medicine training is designed specifically for the National Minority AIDS Council 2010 Equal Access Initiative (EAI) Computer Grants Program awardees to provide valuable health information resources from the National Library of Medicine and other reliable sources to increase awareness of the wealth of treatment information and educational materials that are available on the Internet and to improve prevention and treatment education for their clients. These resources will also meet the needs of community-based

  6. Early Science Program | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science at ALCF Allocation Programs INCITE Program ALCC Program Director's Discretionary (DD) Program ALCF Data Science Program Early Science Program ALCF Theta Early Science Program: Call for Proposals ALCF Theta Early Science Program: Proposal Instructions INCITE 2016 Projects ALCC 2015 Projects ESP Projects View All Projects Publications ALCF Tech Reports Industry Collaborations Early Science Program As part of the process of bringing a new supercomputer into production, the ALCF hosts the

  7. For Early Adopters | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Education » For Early Adopters For Early Adopters Many people consider hydrogen and fuel cells to be longer-term technologies, but they're beginning to enter the market now in certain applications. Potential "early adopters" can learn more about hydrogen and fuel cells today to better understand near-term opportunities and consider and prepare for using these technologies in the future. Early Markets for Fuel Cell Technology Battelle Memorial Institute conducted a study to identify

  8. Recommendation 177: Facilitating Early Public Input

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE should initiate consultation meetings with stake holders immediately to allow early public input into the planning for IFDP

  9. STARTech Early Ventures | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: STARTech Early Ventures Place: United States Sector: Services Product: General Financial & Legal Services ( Partnership (investment, law etc) ) References: STARTech...

  10. Early detection of contagious diseases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colston, Jr., Billy W.; Milanovich, Fred P.; Estacio, Pedro; Chang, John

    2011-08-09

    This invention provides an electronic proximity apparatus and a surveillance method using such an apparatus for alerting individuals that are exposed to a contagious disease. When a person becomes symptomatic and is diagnosed as positive for a given contagious agent, individuals that have recently maintained a threshold proximity with respect to an infected individual are notified and advised to seek immediate medial care. Treatment of individuals in the very early phases of infection (pre-symptomatic) significantly reduces contagiousness of the infected population first exposed to the contagious disease, thus preventing spread of the disease throughout the general population.

  11. Insights gained from aging research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blahnik, D.E.; Casada, D.A.; Edson, J.L.; Fineman, D.L.; Gunther, W.E.; Haynes, H.D.; Hoopingarner, K.R.; Jacobus, M.J.; Jarrell, D.B.; Kryter, R.C.; Magelby, H.L.; Murphy, G.A.; Subudhi, M.M.

    1992-03-01

    The US NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research has implemented hardware-oriented engineering research programs to identify and resolve technical issues related to the aging of systems, structures, and components (SSCs) in operating nuclear power plants. This report provides a summary of those research results which have been compiled and published in NUREGS and related technical reports. The systems, components and structures that have been studied are organized by alphabetical order. The research results summary on the SSCs is followed by an assessment guide to emphasize inspection techniques which may be useful for detecting aging degradation in nuclear power plants. This report will be updated periodically to reflect new research results on these or other SSCs.

  12. Broad and potent HIV-1 neutralization by a human antibody that binds the

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    gp41-gp120 interface (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Broad and potent HIV-1 neutralization by a human antibody that binds the gp41-gp120 interface Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Broad and potent HIV-1 neutralization by a human antibody that binds the gp41-gp120 interface The isolation of human monoclonal antibodies is providing important insights into the specificities that underlie broad neutralization of HIV-1 (reviewed in ref. 1). Here we report a broad and extremely

  13. Appreciating HIV-1 diversity: subtypic differences in ENV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gnanakaran, S; Shen, Tongye; Lynch, Rebecca M; Derdeyn, Cynthia A

    2008-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) group M is responsible for the current AIDS pandemic and exhibits exceedingly high levels of viral genetic diversity around the world, necessitating categorization of viruses into distinct lineages, or subtypes. These subtypes can differ by around 35% in the envelope (Env) glycoproteins of the virus, which are displayed on the surface of the virion and are targets for both neutralizing antibody and cell-mediated immune responses. This diversity reflects the remarkable ability of the virus to adapt to selective pressures, the bulk of which is applied by the host immune response, and represents a serious obstacle for developing an effective vaccine with broad coverage. Thus, it is important to understand the underlying biological consequences of inter-subtype diversity. Recent studies have revealed that the HIV-1 subtypes exhibit phenotypic differences that result from subtle differences in Env structure, particularly within the highly immunogenic V3 domain, which participates directly in viral entry. This review will therefore explore current research that describes subtypic differences in Env at the genetic and phenotypic level, focusing in particular on V3, and highlighting recent discoveries about the unique features of subtype C Env, which is the most prevalent subtype globally.

  14. Developing a Dynamic Pharmacophore Model for HIV-1 Integrase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Heather A.; Masukawa, Keven M.; Rubins, Kathleen; Bushman, Frederic; Jorgensen, William L.; Lins, Roberto; Briggs, James; Mccammon, Andy

    2000-05-11

    We present the first receptor-based pharmacophore model for HIV-1 integrase. The development of ''dynamic'' pharmacophore models is a new method that accounts for the inherent flexibility of the active site and aims to reduce the entropic penalties associated with binding a ligand. Furthermore, this new drug discovery method overcomes the limitation of an incomplete crystal structure of the target protein. A molecular dynamics (MD) simulation describes the flexibility of the uncomplexed protein. Many conformational models of the protein are saved from the MD simulations and used in a series of multi-unit search for interacting conformers (MUSIC) simulations. MUSIC is a multiple-copy minimization method, available in the BOSS program; it is used to determine binding regions for probe molecules containing functional groups that complement the active site. All protein conformations from the MD are overlaid, and conserved binding regions for the probe molecules are identified. Those conserved binding regions define the dynamic pharmacophore model. Here, the dynamic model is compared to known inhibitors of the integrase as well as a three-point, ligand-based pharmacophore model from the literature. Also, a ''static'' pharmacophore model was determined in the standard fashion, using a single crystal structure. Inhibitors thought to bind in the active site of HIV-1 integrase fit the dynamic model but not the static model. Finally, we have identified a set of compounds from the Available Chemicals Directory that fit the dynamic pharmacophore model, and experimental testing of the compounds has confirmed several new inhibitors.

  15. Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister System Performance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Specification: Revision 1 | Department of Energy Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister System Performance Specification: Revision 1 Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister System Performance Specification: Revision 1 This document provides specifications for selected system components of the Transportation, Aging and Disposal (TAD) canister-based system. PDF icon Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister System Performance Specification: Revision 1 More Documents &

  16. Airlines & Aviation Alternative Fuels: Our Drive to Be Early...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Airlines & Aviation Alternative Fuels: Our Drive to Be Early Market Adopters Airlines & Aviation Alternative Fuels: Our Drive to Be Early Market Adopters Plenary III: Early Market ...

  17. An Early Analysis Laboratory | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    An Early Analysis Laboratory An Early Analysis Laboratory An early analysis laboratory for Y-12's wartime product from the Calutron operations

  18. Aging of Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate (PETN)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foltz, M F

    2009-04-22

    Pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) is a relatively sensitive explosive used in many electroexplosive devices as well as in medicine. Of primary interest to LLNL is its use in items such as exploding bridgewire (EBW) detonators and exploding bridge foil initiators (EFI). In these devices the crystalline powder is pressed into a granular, low-density compact that can be initiated by an exploding wire or foil. The long-term stability of this pressed compact is of interest to weapon stockpile lifetime prediction studies. Key points about potential aging mechanisms can be summarized as follows: (1) There are a number of factors that can contribute to PETN instability. These include particle size, polymorphic phase transitions, crystal structure, impurities, moisture, occlusions, chemical incompatibility and biological (microorganism) action. of these factors the most important for long-term aging of high surface area powders used in detonators appears to be that of particle size growth. (2) There is a great deal of literature on the thermal degradation kinetics of PETN, unfortunately much of it with little bearing on ambient temperature aging during long-term storage. PETN is very stable with respect to thermal decomposition. Low-temperature thermal studies have not revealed evidence of chemical degradation products in archived PETN. Data extrapolated to 30 C predicts a half-life of 12 million years. (3) Moisture seems to lower the activation energy for and accelerate the decomposition of PETN. (4) External drivers affecting stability include temperature, moisture, radiation fields, and stress, while internal drivers include residual solvents, and impurities. Temperature affects kinetic processes of crystal growth such as adsorption, desorption, and diffusion rates of molecules on the surface of PETN crystals. A low-level radiation field may induce unexpected changes in the chemical makeup of PETN and its homologue impurities. Stress at high pressure points caused by crystalline surface irregularities may cause a decrease in surface area over time due to smoothing of contact points and sintering. PETN has been found to contain a number of impurities, including homologues, pentaerythryl ethers with a mixture of hydroxyl and nitrate functional groups, and organic salts, that can alter its physical and chemical properties. (5) The processes of sublimation/recrystallization and surface diffusion are important processes that can cause changes in PETN crystal morphology, particle size distribution and specific surface area. Sublimation feeds a process called Ostwald ripening, which involves the spontaneous growth of larger crystals from those of smaller size. This process proceeds with age regardless of storage conditions unless the crystals are treated to retard growth. The coarsening mechanisms include Ostwald ripening, 'sintering', and surface diffusion. The latter has not been experimentally observed, but a molecular modeling approach has attempted to investigate this phenomenon theoretically. (6) Threshold test fire, particle size distribution, specific surface area, thermal analysis, chemical analysis, powder compact specific surface area and density are approaches that have been used in the attempt to assess changes attributable to aging of PETN, with varying results. The biggest problem lies in the aging mechanism itself, which likely influences small changes in morphology, both internal and external, and particle size distribution changes on a scale too small to reliably monitor. Other aspects, such as subtle changes in density profiles within pressed powder compacts, may be beyond the capability of current technology to assess. Crystal growth significant enough to affect the PETN particle size distribution is expected to impact detonator performance. (7) Factors relevant to stabilizing particle size growth include crystal morphology, powder surface area and particle size distribution; crystal density and internal defects; and powder compact density and density gradients.

  19. De novo design and discovery of potent, nonpeptidal HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lam, P.Y.S.; Eyermann, C.J.; Hodge, C.N.; Jadhav, P.K.; Ru, Yu; Bacheler, L.T.; Meek, J.L.; Otto, M.J.; Rayner, M.M.; Wong, N.Y.; Chang, C.H.; Weber, P.C.; Jackson, D.A.; Sharpe, T.R.; Erickson-Viitanen, S.K.

    1993-12-31

    Intense worldwide research in HIV-1 protease inhibition has resulted in many inhibitors with nanomolar Ki. However, they are mostly pseudopeptides (containing amide bonds) and substrate-like. In this work the authors report that using 3-D database searching, computer modeling and x-ray structures of the HIV-1 protease/inhibitor complex, a completely novel class of potent nonpeptides has been designed and synthesized. The Ki is in the subnanomolar range and the IC90 for the cell assays in the submicromolar range. Confirmation of the mode of binding was achieved by a high resolution x-ray structure of a HIV-1 protease/inhibitor complex. Molecular recognition studies between HIV-1 protease and these inhibitors will also be discussed.

  20. SNF AGING SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.L. Swanson

    2005-04-06

    The purpose of this system description document (SDD) is to establish requirements that drive the design of the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) aging system and associated bases, which will allow the design effort to proceed. This SDD will be revised at strategic points as the design matures. This SDD identifies the requirements and describes the system design, as it currently exists, with emphasis on attributes of the design provided to meet the requirements. This SDD is an engineering tool for design control; accordingly, the primary audience and users are design engineers. This SDD is part of an iterative design process. It leads the design process with regard to the flow down of upper tier requirements onto the system. Knowledge of these requirements is essential in performing the design process. The SDD follows the design with regard to the description of the system. The description provided in the SDD reflects the current results of the design process. Throughout this SDD, the term aging cask applies to vertical site-specific casks and to horizontal aging modules. The term overpack is a vertical site-specific cask that contains a dual-purpose canister (DPC) or a disposable canister. Functional and operational requirements applicable to this system were obtained from ''Project Functional and Operational Requirements'' (F&OR) (Curry 2004 [DIRS 170557]). Other requirements that support the design process were taken from documents such as ''Project Design Criteria Document'' (PDC) (BSC 2004 [DES 171599]), ''Site Fire Hazards Analyses'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 172174]), and ''Nuclear Safety Design Bases for License Application'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 171512]). The documents address requirements in the ''Project Requirements Document'' (PRD) (Canori and Leitner 2003 [DIRS 166275]). This SDD includes several appendices. Appendix A is a Glossary; Appendix B is a list of key system charts, diagrams, drawings, lists and additional supporting information; and Appendix C is a list of procedures that will be used to operate the system.

  1. Structural Insight into HIV-1 Restriction by MxB (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Insight into HIV-1 Restriction by MxB Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structural Insight into HIV-1 Restriction by MxB Authors: Fribourgh, Jennifer L. ; Nguyen, Henry C. ; Matreyek, Kenneth A. ; Alvarez, Frances Joan D. ; Summers, Brady J. ; Dewdney, Tamaria G. ; Aiken, Christopher ; Zhang, Peijun ; Engelman, Alan ; Xiong, Yong [1] ; DFCI) [2] ; Pitt) [2] ; Vanderbilt-MED) [2] + Show Author Affiliations (Yale) ( Publication Date: 2015-02-19 OSTI Identifier: 1164180

  2. Affinity Maturation of a Potent Family of HIV Antibodies Is Primarily

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Focused on Accommodating or Avoiding Glycans (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Affinity Maturation of a Potent Family of HIV Antibodies Is Primarily Focused on Accommodating or Avoiding Glycans Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Affinity Maturation of a Potent Family of HIV Antibodies Is Primarily Focused on Accommodating or Avoiding Glycans Authors: Garces, Fernando ; Lee, Jeong Hyun ; de Val, Natalia ; Torrents de la Pena, Alba ; Kong, Leopold ; Puchades, Cristina ; Hua, Yuanzi ;

  3. Antibodies to a conformational epitope on gp41 neutralize HIV-1 by

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    destabilizing the Env spike (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Antibodies to a conformational epitope on gp41 neutralize HIV-1 by destabilizing the Env spike Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Antibodies to a conformational epitope on gp41 neutralize HIV-1 by destabilizing the Env spike Authors: Lee, Jeong Hyun ; Leaman, Daniel P. ; Kim, Arthur S. ; Torrents de la Peña, Alba ; Sliepen, Kwinten ; Yasmeen, Anila ; Derking, Ronald ; Ramos, Alejandra ; de Taeye, Steven W. ; Ozorowski,

  4. Nucleic acids encoding modified human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) group M consensus envelope glycoproteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haynes, Barton F.; Gao, Feng; Korber, Bette T.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Shaw, George M.; Kothe, Denise; Li, Ying Ying; Decker, Julie; Liao, Hua-Xin

    2011-12-06

    The present invention relates, in general, to an immunogen and, in particular, to an immunogen for inducing antibodies that neutralizes a wide spectrum of HIV primary isolates and/or to an immunogen that induces a T cell immune response. The invention also relates to a method of inducing anti-HIV antibodies, and/or to a method of inducing a T cell immune response, using such an immunogen. The invention further relates to nucleic acid sequences encoding the present immunogens.

  5. Vaccine-elicited primate antibodies use a distinct approach to the HIV-1

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    primary receptor binding site informing vaccine redesign (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Vaccine-elicited primate antibodies use a distinct approach to the HIV-1 primary receptor binding site informing vaccine redesign Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Vaccine-elicited primate antibodies use a distinct approach to the HIV-1 primary receptor binding site informing vaccine redesign Authors: Tran, Karen ; Poulsen, Christian ; Guenaga, Javier ; de Val, Natalia ; Wilson, Richard ;

  6. Early Oak Ridge Trailer Home | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Home Early Oak Ridge Trailer Home A typical trailer home

  7. Early Childhood Experiences Conference on October 30

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    First Born Program presents "Understanding Early Childhood Experiences as a Primary Public Health Concern." October 1, 2012 dummy image Read our archives Contacts Editor...

  8. SQUID Instrumentation for Early Cancer Diagnostics: Combining...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: SQUID Instrumentation for Early Cancer Diagnostics: Combining SQUID-Based ... Research Org: Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Sponsoring Org: LDRD Country of ...

  9. National Ignition Facility Reaches Milestone Early | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Reaches Milestone Early | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the...

  10. SQUID Instrumentation for Early Cancer Diagnostics: Combining...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Cancer Diagnostics: Combining SQUID-Based Ultra-Low Field MRI and Superparamagnetic Relaxometry Citation Details In-Document Search Title: SQUID Instrumentation for Early Cancer ...

  11. Lawrence Livermore researchers awarded early career funding ...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientists Jennifer Pett-Ridge and Todd Gamblin have been selected by DOE's Office of Science Early Career Research program to receive ...

  12. The New ICE Age | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for the heavy truck market PDF icon deer12gruden.pdf More Documents & Publications The New ICE Age The New ICE Age Roadmapping Engine Technology for Post-2020 Heavy Duty ...

  13. Pressurized-water reactor internals aging degradation study. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luk, K.H.

    1993-09-01

    This report documents the results of a Phase I study on the effects of aging degradations on pr internals. Primary stressers for internals an generated by the primary coolant flow in the they include unsteady hydrodynamic forces and pump-generated pressure pulsations. Other stressors are applied loads, manufacturing processes, impurities in the coolant and exposures to fast neutron fluxes. A survey of reported aging-related failure information indicates that fatigue, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and mechanical wear are the three major aging-related degradation mechanisms for PWR internals. Significant reported failures include thermal shield flow-induced vibration problems, SCC in guide tube support pins and core support structure bolts, fatigue-induced core baffle water-jet impingement problems and excess wear in flux thimbles. Many of the reported problems have been resolved by accepted engineering practices. Uncertainties remain in the assessment of long-term neutron irradiation effects and environmental factors in high-cycle fatigue failures. Reactor internals are examined by visual inspections and the technique is access limited. Improved inspection methods, especially one with an early failure detection capability, can enhance the safety and efficiency of reactor operations.

  14. Aging induced property changes in metal tritides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schober, T.

    1988-09-01

    Recent aging studies performed on dilute and concentrated metal tritides are reviewed. Also, new results concerning property changes in metal tritides as a function of aging time are included. The authors mainly report on TEM studies of aged tritides, the swelling behavior, hardness measurements, selected mechanical properties, acoustic emission and tritium diffusion experiments. Models of the microstructure of aged tritides are also reported. Density measurements on tritides are discussed.

  15. Improved Pharmacological and Structural Properties of HIV Fusion Inhibitor AP3 over Enfuvirtide: Highlighting Advantages of Artificial Peptide Strategy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhu, Xiaojie; Zhu, Yun; Ye, Sheng; Wang, Qian; Xu, Wei; Su, Shan; Sun, Zhiwu; Yu, Fei; Liu, Qi; Wang, Chao; et al

    2015-08-19

    Enfuvirtide (T20), is the first HIV fusion inhibitor approved for treatment of HIV/AIDS patients who fail to respond to the current antiretroviral drugs. However, its clinical application is limited because of short half-life, drug resistance and cross-reactivity with the preexisting antibodies in HIV-infected patients. Using an artificial peptide strategy, we designed a peptide with non-native protein sequence, AP3, which exhibited potent antiviral activity against a broad spectrum of HIV-1 strains, including those resistant to T20, and had remarkably longer in vivo half-life than T20. While the preexisting antibodies in HIV-infected patients significantly suppressed T20’s antiviral activity, these antibodies neither recognizedmore » AP3, nor attenuated its anti-HIV-1 activity. Structurally different from T20, AP3 could fold into single-helix and interact with gp41 NHR. The two residues, Met and Thr, at the N-terminus of AP3 form a hook-like structure to stabilize interaction between AP3 and NHR helices. Therefore, AP3 has potential for further development as a new HIV fusion inhibitor with improved antiviral efficacy, resistance profile and pharmacological properties over enfuvirtide. Meanwhile, this study highlighted the advantages of artificially designed peptides, and confirmed that this strategy could be used in developing artificial peptide-based viral fusion inhibitors against HIV and other enveloped viruses.« less

  16. The interaction of RNA helicase DDX3 with HIV-1 Rev-CRM1-RanGTP complex during the HIV replication cycle

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mahboobi, Seyed Hanif; Javanpour, Alex A.; Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.

    2015-02-27

    Molecular traffic between the nucleus and the cytoplasm is regulated by the nuclear pore complex (NPC), which acts as a highly selective channel perforating the nuclear envelope in eukaryotic cells. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) exploits the nucleocytoplasmic pathway to export its RNA transcripts across the NPC to the cytoplasm. Despite extensive study on the HIV life cycle and the many drugs developed to target this cycle, no current drugs have been successful in targeting the critical process of viral nuclear export, even though HIV’s reliance on a single host protein, CRM1, to export its unspliced and partially spliced RNAmore » transcripts makes it a tempting target. Due to recent findings implicating a DEAD-box helicase, DDX3, in HIV replication and a member of the export complex, it has become an appealing target for anti-HIV drug inhibition. In the present research, we have applied a hybrid computational protocol to analyze protein-protein interactions in the HIV mRNA export cycle. This method is based on molecular docking followed by molecular dynamics simulation and accompanied by approximate free energy calculation (MM/GBSA), computational alanine scanning, clustering, and evolutionary analysis. We highlight here some of the most likely binding modes and interfacial residues between DDX3 and CRM1 both in the absence and presence of RanGTP. This work shows that although DDX3 can bind to free CRM1, addition of RanGTP leads to more concentrated distribution of binding modes and stronger binding between CRM1 and RanGTP.« less

  17. The interaction of RNA helicase DDX3 with HIV-1 Rev-CRM1-RanGTP complex during the HIV replication cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahboobi, Seyed Hanif; Javanpour, Alex A.; Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.

    2015-02-27

    Molecular traffic between the nucleus and the cytoplasm is regulated by the nuclear pore complex (NPC), which acts as a highly selective channel perforating the nuclear envelope in eukaryotic cells. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) exploits the nucleocytoplasmic pathway to export its RNA transcripts across the NPC to the cytoplasm. Despite extensive study on the HIV life cycle and the many drugs developed to target this cycle, no current drugs have been successful in targeting the critical process of viral nuclear export, even though HIV’s reliance on a single host protein, CRM1, to export its unspliced and partially spliced RNA transcripts makes it a tempting target. Due to recent findings implicating a DEAD-box helicase, DDX3, in HIV replication and a member of the export complex, it has become an appealing target for anti-HIV drug inhibition. In the present research, we have applied a hybrid computational protocol to analyze protein-protein interactions in the HIV mRNA export cycle. This method is based on molecular docking followed by molecular dynamics simulation and accompanied by approximate free energy calculation (MM/GBSA), computational alanine scanning, clustering, and evolutionary analysis. We highlight here some of the most likely binding modes and interfacial residues between DDX3 and CRM1 both in the absence and presence of RanGTP. This work shows that although DDX3 can bind to free CRM1, addition of RanGTP leads to more concentrated distribution of binding modes and stronger binding between CRM1 and RanGTP.

  18. Structure-Based Design of Novel HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors to Combat Drug Resistance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghosh,A.; Sridhar, P.; Leshchenko, S.; Hussain, A.; Li, J.; Kovalevsky, A.; Walters, D.; Wedelind, J.; Grum-Tokars, V.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    Structure-based design and synthesis of novel HIV protease inhibitors are described. The inhibitors are designed specifically to interact with the backbone of HIV protease active site to combat drug resistance. Inhibitor 3 has exhibited exceedingly potent enzyme inhibitory and antiviral potency. Furthermore, this inhibitor maintains impressive potency against a wide spectrum of HIV including a variety of multi-PI-resistant clinical strains. The inhibitors incorporated a stereochemically defined 5-hexahydrocyclopenta[b]furanyl urethane as the P2-ligand into the (R)-(hydroxyethylamino)sulfonamide isostere. Optically active (3aS,5R,6aR)-5-hydroxy-hexahydrocyclopenta[b]furan was prepared by an enzymatic asymmetrization of meso-diacetate with acetyl cholinesterase, radical cyclization, and Lewis acid-catalyzed anomeric reduction as the key steps. A protein-ligand X-ray crystal structure of inhibitor 3-bound HIV-1 protease (1.35 Angstroms resolution) revealed extensive interactions in the HIV protease active site including strong hydrogen bonding interactions with the backbone. This design strategy may lead to novel inhibitors that can combat drug resistance.

  19. AGING PERFORMANCE OF MODEL 9975 PACKAGE FLUOROELASTOMER O-RINGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, E.; Daugherty, W.; Skidmore, E.; Dunn, K.; Fisher, D.

    2011-05-31

    The influence of temperature and radiation on Viton{reg_sign} GLT and GLT-S fluoroelastomer O-rings is an ongoing research focus at the Savannah River National Laboratory. The O-rings are credited for leaktight containment in the Model 9975 shipping package used for transportation of plutonium-bearing materials. At the Savannah River Site, the Model 9975 packages are being used for interim storage. Primary research efforts have focused on surveillance of O-rings from actual packages, leak testing of seals at bounding aging conditions and the effect of aging temperature on compression stress relaxation behavior, with the goal of service life prediction for long-term storage conditions. Recently, an additional effort to evaluate the effect of aging temperature on the oxidation of the materials has begun. Degradation in the mechanical properties of elastomers is directly related to the oxidation of the polymer. Sensitive measurements of the oxidation rate can be performed in a more timely manner than waiting for a measurable change in mechanical properties, especially at service temperatures. Measuring the oxidation rate therefore provides a means to validate the assumption that the degradation mechanisms(s) do not change from the elevated temperatures used for accelerated aging and the lower service temperatures. Monitoring the amount of oxygen uptake by the material over time at various temperatures can provide increased confidence in lifetime predictions. Preliminary oxygen consumption analysis of a Viton GLT-based fluoroelastomer compound (Parker V0835-75) using an Oxzilla II differential oxygen analyzer in the temperature range of 40-120 C was performed. Early data suggests oxygen consumption rates may level off within the first 100,000 hours (10-12 years) at 40 C and that sharp changes in the degradation mechanism (stress-relaxation) are not expected over the temperature range examined. This is consistent with the known long-term heat aging resistance of fluoroelastomers relative to hydrocarbon-based elastomers, and in absence of antioxidants that may be consumed over time. Additional experimental effort will be undertaken in the short term range within the first 100 hours of thermal aging to capture further details of the oxygen consumption rate.

  20. Radiation Therapy for Neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kishan, Amar U.; Modjtahedi, Bobeck S.; Morse, Lawrence S.; Lee, Percy

    2013-03-01

    In the enormity of the public health burden imposed by age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), much effort has been directed toward identifying effective and efficient treatments. Currently, anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) injections have demonstrated considerably efficacy in treating neovascular ARMD, but patients require frequent treatment to fully benefit. Here, we review the rationale and evidence for radiation therapy of ARMD. The results of early photon external beam radiation therapy are included to provide a framework for the sequential discussion of evidence for the usage of stereotactic radiation therapy, proton therapy, and brachytherapy. The evidence suggests that these 3 modern modalities can provide a dose-dependent benefit in the treatment of ARMD. Most importantly, preliminary data suggest that all 3 can be used in conjunction with anti-VEGF therapeutics, thereby reducing the frequency of anti-VEGF injections required to maintain visual acuity.

  1. Early steps in the Cold War

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    everyone agreed upon exactly what type bomb should be built. Even Robert Oppenheimer and Edward Teller, both leading scientists who were at the forefront of the nuclear age,...

  2. Early Internal and External Dose Magnitude Estimation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Internal and External Dose Estimation (initial version: 08/2008, current version: 10/2015) Early Internal and External Dose Magnitude Estimation The Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site REAC/TS PO Box 117, MS-39 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (865)576-3131 http://orise.orau.gov/reacts prepared by: Stephen L. (Steve) Sugarman, MS, CHP, CHCM Health Physics Project Manager Cytogenetic Biodosimetry Laboratory Coordinator Early Internal and External Dose Estimation (initial version: 08/2008,

  3. Lessons Learned with Early PV Plant Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lessons Learned with Early PV Plant Integration" Elsa Gonzalez, Rachel Sall, Frankie Greco and David Narang with Arizona Public Service Company June 12, 2014 2 Speakers Frankie Greco Distribution Interconnection Team Arizona Public Service Company Elsa Gonzales Distribution Operations Engineer Arizona Public Service Company David Narang Senior Engineer Arizona Public Service Company Rachel Sall Arizona Public Service Company Lessons Learned with Early PV Plant Integration Elsa Gonzalez

  4. Characterization of Field-Aged Exhaust Gas Recirculation Cooler...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Field-Aged Exhaust Gas Recirculation Cooler Deposits Characterization of Field-Aged Exhaust Gas Recirculation Cooler Deposits Characterized field-aged exhaust gas recirculation ...

  5. Helium Nano-Bubble Evolution in Aging Metal Tritides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowgill, Donald F.

    2005-07-15

    A continuum-scale, evolutionary model of bubble nucleation, growth and He release for aging metal tritides is described which accounts for major features of the tritide database. Bubble nucleation, modeled as self-trapping of interstitially diffusing He atoms, occurs during the first few days following tritium introduction into the metal. Bubble growth by dislocation loop punching yields good agreement between He atomic volumes and bubble pressures determined from bulk swelling and {sup 3}He NMR data. The bubble spacing distribution determined from NMR is shown to remain fixed with age, justifying the separation of nucleation and growth phases and providing a sensitive test of the growth formulation. Late in life, bubble interactions are proposed to produce cooperative stress effects, which lower the bubble pressure. Helium generated near surfaces and surface-connected porosity accounts for the low-level early helium release. Use of an average ligament stress criterion predicts an onset of inter-bubble fracture in good agreement with the He/Metal ratio observed for rapid He release. From the model, it is concluded that He retention can be controlled through control of bubble nucleation.

  6. HIV/AIDS Information Resources from the National Library of Medicine-STOP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Templin-Branner, W. and N. Dancy

    2010-06-15

    The HIV/AIDS Information Resources from the National Library of Medicine training is designed specifically for the UNCFSP HBCU Screening, Testing, Outreach, and Prevention (STOP) HIV/AIDS Program project members to provide valuable health information resources from the National Library of Medicine and other reliable sources to increase awareness of the wealth of treatment information and educational materials that are available on the Internet and to improve prevention and treatment education for their clients. These resources will also meet the needs of community-based organizations

  7. Small-Molecule CD4-Mimics: Structure-Based Optimization of HIV-1 Entry

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Inhibition (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Small-Molecule CD4-Mimics: Structure-Based Optimization of HIV-1 Entry Inhibition Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Small-Molecule CD4-Mimics: Structure-Based Optimization of HIV-1 Entry Inhibition Authors: Melillo, Bruno ; Liang, Shuaiyi ; Park, Jongwoo ; Schön, Arne ; Courter, Joel R. ; LaLonde, Judith M. ; Wendler, Daniel J. ; Princiotto, Amy M. ; Seaman, Michael S. ; Freire, Ernesto ;

  8. LIFE: The Case for Early Commercialization of Fusion Energy ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: LIFE: The Case for Early Commercialization of Fusion Energy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: LIFE: The Case for Early Commercialization of Fusion Energy ...

  9. Entanglement Entropy of the Early Universe in Generalized Chaplygin...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Entanglement Entropy of the Early Universe in Generalized Chaplygin Gas Model Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Entanglement Entropy of the Early Universe in Generalized...

  10. SQUID-based ULF MRI and Superparamagnetic Relaxometry for Early...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Relaxometry for Early Cancer Diagnostics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: SQUID-based ULF MRI and Superparamagnetic Relaxometry for Early Cancer Diagnostics Authors: ...

  11. SQUID-based ULF MRI and Superparamagnetic Relaxometry for Early...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Relaxometry for Early Cancer Diagnostics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: SQUID-based ULF MRI and Superparamagnetic Relaxometry for Early Cancer Diagnostics You are ...

  12. The Princeton Tritium Observatory for Light, Early Universe,...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The Princeton Tritium Observatory for Light, Early Universe, Massive Neutrino Yield (PTOLEMY) The Princeton Tritium Observatory for Light, Early Universe, Massive Neutrino Yield...

  13. Laboratory researcher Joel Rowland to receive DOE Early Career...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rowland to receive DOE Early Career Award Laboratory researcher Joel Rowland to receive DOE Early Career Award Rowland's research was recognized by DOE for incorporating...

  14. Effects of main-sequence mass loss on the turnoff ages of globular clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guzik, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Willson, Bowen, and Struck-Marcell have proposed that globular cluster main-sequence turnoff ages can be reconciled with the lower ages of the Galaxy and universe deduced from other methods by incorporating an epoch of early main-sequence mass-loss by stars of spectral types A through early-F. The proposed mass loss is pulsation-driven, and facilitated by rapid rotation. This paper presents stellar evolution calculations of Pop. II (Z = 0.001) mass-losing stars of initial mass 0.8 to 1.6 M/sub /circle dot//, with exponentially-decreasing mass loss rates of e-folding times 0.5 to 2.0 Gyr, evolving to a final mass of 0.7 M/sub /circle dot//. The calculations indicate that a globular cluster with apparent turnoff age 18 Gyr could have an actual age as low as /approximately/12 Gyr. Observational implications that may help to verify the hypothesis, e.g. low C/N abundance ratios among red giants following first dredge-up, blue stragglers, red giant deficiencies, and signatures in cluster mass/luminosity functions, are also discussed.25 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Distinctive microstructural features of aged sodium silicate-activated slag concretes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    San Nicolas, Rackel; Bernal, Susan A.; Meja de Gutirrez, Ruby; Deventer, Jannie S.J. van; Provis, John L.

    2014-11-15

    Electron microscopic characterisation of 7-year old alkali-activated blast-furnace slag concretes enabled the identification of distinct microstructural features, providing insight into the mechanisms by which these materials evolve over time. Backscattered electron images show the formation of Liesegang-type ring formations, suggesting that the reaction at advanced age is likely to follow an Oswald supersaturationnucleationdepletion cycle. Segregation of Ca-rich veins, related to the formation of Ca(OH){sub 2}, is observed in microcracked regions due to the ongoing reaction between the pore solution and available calcium from remnant slag grains. A highly dense and uniform interfacial transition zone is identified between siliceous aggregate particles and the alkali activated slag binders, across the concretes assessed. Alkali-activated slag concretes retain a highly dense and stable microstructure at advanced ages, where any microcracks induced at early ages seem to be partially closing, and the remnant slag grains continue reacting.

  16. Computational Age Dating of Special Nuclear Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-06-30

    This slide-show presented an overview of the Constrained Progressive Reversal (CPR) method for computing decays, age dating, and spoof detecting. The CPR method is: Capable of temporal profiling a SNM sample; Precise (compared with known decay code, such a ORIGEN); Easy (for computer implementation and analysis).  We have illustrated with real SNM data using CPR for age dating and spoof detection. If SNM is pure, may use CPR to derive its age. If SNM is mixed, CPR will indicate that it is mixed or spoofed.

  17. EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2016 Early Release

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AEO2016 Early Release: Summary of Two Cases Release Date: May 17, 2016 | Full Report Release Date: July 7, 2016 | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0383ER(2016) This release is an annotated PowerPoint summary and the data for two cases from the Annual Energy Outlook 2016-the Reference case and the No Clean Power Plan case. The AEO2016 full version, including additional cases and discussion, will be released July 7, 2016. Download the AEO2016 Early Release: An Annotated Summary of Two Cases The Annual

  18. Tracing the HIV-1 subtype B mobility in Europe: a phylogeographic approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leitner, Thomas; Paraskevis, D; Pybus, O; Magiorkinis, G; Hatzakis, A

    2008-01-01

    The prevalence and the origin of HIV-1 subtype B, the most prevalent circulating clade among the long-term residents in Europe, have been studied extensively. However the spatial diffusion of the epidemic from the perspective of the virus has not previously been traced. In the current study we inferred the migration history of HIV-1 subtype B by way of a phylogeography of viral sequences sampled from 16 European countries and Israel. Migration events were inferred from viral phylogenies by character reconstruction using parsimony. With regard to the spatial dispersal of the HIV subtype B sequences across viral phylogenies, in most of the countries in Europe the epidemic was introduced by multiple sources and subsequently spread within local networks. Poland provides an exception where most of the infections were the result of a single point introduction. According to the significant migratory pathways, we show that there are considerable differences across Europe. Specifically, Greece, Portugal, Serbia and Spain, provide sources shedding HIV-1; Austria, Belgium and Luxembourg, on the other hand, are migratory targets, while for Denmark, Germany, Italy, Israel, Norway, the Netherlands, Sweden, Switzerland and the UK we inferred significant bidirectional migration. For Poland no significant migratory pathways were inferred. Subtype B phylogeographies provide a new insight about the geographical distribution of viral lineages, as well as the significant pathways of virus dispersal across Europe, suggesting that intervention strategies should also address tourists, travellers and migrants.

  19. The higher barrier of darunavir and tipranavir resistance for HIV-1 protease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yong; Liu, Zhigang; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Kovari, Iulia A.; Dewdney, Tamaria G.; Reiter, Samuel J.; Kovari, Ladislau C.

    2011-11-17

    Darunavir and tipranavir are two inhibitors that are active against multi-drug resistant (MDR) HIV-1 protease variants. In this study, the invitro inhibitory efficacy was tested against a MDR HIV-1 protease variant, MDR 769 82T, containing the drug resistance mutations of 46L/54V/82T/84V/90M. Crystallographic and enzymatic studies were performed to examine the mechanism of resistance and the relative maintenance of potency. The key findings are as follows: (i) The MDR protease exhibits decreased susceptibility to all nine HIV-1 protease inhibitors approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), among which darunavir and tipranavir are the most potent; (ii) the threonine 82 mutation on the protease greatly enhances drug resistance by altering the hydrophobicity of the binding pocket; (iii) darunavir or tipranavir binding facilitates closure of the wide-open flaps of the MDR protease; and (iv) the remaining potency of tipranavir may be preserved by stabilizing the flaps in the inhibitor-protease complex while darunavir maintains its potency by preserving protein main chain hydrogen bonds with the flexible P2 group. These results could provide new insights into drug design strategies to overcome multi-drug resistance of HIV-1 protease variants.

  20. Structural properties of the histidine-containing loop in HIV-1RNase H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kern, G.; Pelton, J.; Marqusee, S.; Kern, D.

    2001-01-02

    The isolated HIV-1 RNase H domain is inactive. This inactivity has been linked to the lack of structure in the C-terminus of the isolated domain. His539 residing in a loop preceding the C-terminal Helix was studies by NMR to determine the stability and conformational properties of this region.

  1. Cast Stainless Steel Aging Research Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This work plan proposes to build a systematic knowledge base for the thermal aging behavior of cast stainless steels (CASSs) within a limited time of five years. The final output of execution of...

  2. Early Oak Ridge Home | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Home Early Oak Ridge Home A typical dwelling predating the Manhattan Project homes

  3. Early Oak Ridge Trailer Homes | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Early Oak Ridge Trailer Homes A row of trailer homes used

  4. Documenting stone age cleverness by tool development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Documenting stone age cleverness by tool development Documenting stone age cleverness by tool development Ancient stone tools show the pace of remarkable technological enhancements over time. March 7, 2013 Ancient stone tools showing the pace of remarkable technological enhancements over time (1.75 to 0.85 million years ago). Credit, Los Alamos National Laboratory. Ancient stone tools showing the pace of remarkable technological enhancements over time (1.75 to 0.85 million years ago). Credit,

  5. Preexisting compensatory amino acids compromise fitness costs of a HIV-1T cell escape mutation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Donglai; Zuo, Tao; Hora, Bhavna; Song, Hongshuo; Kong, Wei; Yu, Xianghui; Goonetilleke, Nilu; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Perelson, Alan S.; Haynes, Barton F.; McMichael, Andrew J.; Gao, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Background: Fitness costs and slower disease progression are associated with a cytolytic T lymphocyte (CTL) escape mutation T242N in Gag in HIV-1-infected individuals carrying HLA-B*57/5801 alleles. However, the impact of different context in diverse HIV-1 strains on the fitness costs due to the T242N mutation has not been well characterized. To better understand the extent of fitness costs of the T242N mutation and the repair of fitness loss through compensatory amino acids, we investigated its fitness impact in different transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses. Results: The T242N mutation resulted in various levels of fitness loss in four different T/F viruses. However, the fitness costs were significantly compromised by preexisting compensatory amino acids in (Isoleucine at position 247) or outside (glutamine at position 219) the CTL epitope. Moreover, the transmitted T242N escape mutant in subject CH131 was as fit as the revertant N242T mutant and the elimination of the compensatory amino acid I247 in the T/F viral genome resulted in significant fitness cost, suggesting the fitness loss caused by the T242N mutation had been fully repaired in the donor at transmission. Analysis of the global circulating HIV-1 sequences in the Los Alamos HIV Sequence Database showed a high prevalence of compensatory amino acids for the T242N mutation and other T cell escape mutations. Conclusions: Our results show that the preexisting compensatory amino acids in the majority of circulating HIV-1 strains could significantly compromise the fitness loss due to CTL escape mutations and thus increase challenges for T cell based vaccines.

  6. Early Hadron Physics at the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Askew, A.

    2010-08-05

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is presently undergoing beam commissioning in preparation for physics running in 2010 at a center of mass energy of 7 TeV. I will briefly describe the hadron physics capabilities of the ATLAS, CMS, and LHCb detectors, their performance with cosmic ray and early collision data, as well as their plans for physics with the first data.

  7. Materials Design and Discovery: Catalysis and Energy Storage (Mira Early

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Science Program Final Technical Report): ALCF-2 Early Science Program Technical Report (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Materials Design and Discovery: Catalysis and Energy Storage (Mira Early Science Program Final Technical Report): ALCF-2 Early Science Program Technical Report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Materials Design and Discovery: Catalysis and Energy Storage (Mira Early Science Program Final Technical Report): ALCF-2 Early Science Program Technical Report Authors:

  8. Helium nano-bubble evolution in aging metal tritides.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowgill, Donald F.

    2004-05-01

    A continuum-scale, evolutionary model of helium (He) nano-bubble nucleation, growth and He release for aging bulk metal tritides is presented which accounts for major features of the experimental database. Bubble nucleation, modeled as self-trapping of interstitially diffusing He atoms, is found to occur during the first few days following tritium introduction into the metal and is sensitive to the He diffusivity and pairing energy. An effective helium diffusivity of 0.3 x 10{sup -16} cm{sup 2}/s at 300 K is required to generate the average bubble density of 5x 1017 bubbles/cm3 observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Early bubble growth by dislocation loop punching with a l/radius bubble pressure dependence produces good agreement with He atomic volumes and bubble pressures determined from swelling data, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements, and hydride pressure-composition-temperature (PCT) shifts. The model predicts that later in life neighboring bubble interactions may first lower the loop punching pressure through cooperative stress effects, then raise the pressure by partial blocking of loops. It also accounts for the shape of the bubble spacing distribution obtained from NMR data. This distribution is found to remain fixed with age, justifying the separation of nucleation and growth phases, providing a sensitive test of the growth formulation, and indicating that further significant bubble nucleation does not occur throughout life. Helium generated within the escape depth of surfaces and surface-connected porosity produces the low-level early helium release. Accelerated or rapid release is modeled as inter-bubble fracture using an average ligament stress criterion. Good agreement is found between the predicted onset of fracture and the observed He-metal ratio (HeM) for rapid He release from bulk palladium tritide. An examination of how inter-bubble fracture varies over the bubble spacing distribution shows that the critical Hem will be lower for thin films or small particle material. It is concluded that control of He retention can be accomplished through control of bubble nucleation.

  9. Dr. Googin and his early days at Y-12, part 11 ? Early days...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    As we continue the story of John Googin's early days at Y-12, he also noted in his biography of the Manhattan Project years, some observations about Oak Ridge in general. John's...

  10. A survey of early warning technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, G.D.; Arlowe, H.D.; Williams, J.D.

    1995-07-01

    This paper presents a survey of technologies useful in providing early warning in physical security systems. Early warning is important in virtually all types of security systems whether they are used for temporary (tactical, portable, or semi-permanent) applications, border warning, fixed-site detection, or standoff surveillance detection. With the exception of the standoff surveillance detection systems, all systems discussed in this paper usually involve a moving target. The fact that a person(s) to be detected in a standoff surveillance scenario is not moving presents challenging problems and requires different applications of technology. The technologies commonly used to detect moving targets and some suggestions for detection of stationary targets are addressed in this paper.

  11. Bayes Method Plant Aging Risk Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-03-13

    DORIAN is an integrated package for performing Bayesian aging analysis of reliability data; e.g. for identifying trends in component failure rates and/or outage durations as a function of time. The user must specify several alternatives hypothesized aging models (i.e. possible trends) along with prior probabilities indicating the subjective probability that each trend is actually the correct one. DORIAN then uses component failure and/or repair data over time to update these prior probabilities and develop amore » posterior probability for each aging model, representing the probability that each model is the correct one in light of the observed data rather than a priori. Mean, median, and 5th and 95th percentile trends are also compiled from the posterior probabilities.« less

  12. Ending Aging in Super Glassy Polymer Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lau, CH; Nguyen, PT; Hill, MR; Thornton, AW; Konstas, K; Doherty, CM; Mulder, RJ; Bourgeois, L; Liu, ACY; Sprouster, DJ; Sullivan, JP; Bastow, TJ; Hill, AJ; Gin, DL; Noble, RD

    2014-04-16

    Aging in super glassy polymers such as poly(trimethylsilylpropyne) (PTMSP), poly(4-methyl-2-pentyne) (PMP), and polymers with intrinsic microporosity (PIM-1) reduces gas permeabilities and limits their application as gas-separation membranes. While super glassy polymers are initially very porous, and ultra-permeable, they quickly pack into a denser phase becoming less porous and permeable. This age-old problem has been solved by adding an ultraporous additive that maintains the low density, porous, initial stage of super glassy polymers through absorbing a portion of the polymer chains within its pores thereby holding the chains in their open position. This result is the first time that aging in super glassy polymers is inhibited whilst maintaining enhanced CO2 permeability for one year and improving CO2/N-2 selectivity. This approach could allow super glassy polymers to be revisited for commercial application in gas separations.

  13. Robert Kolasinski wins DOE Early Career Award

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kolasinski wins DOE Early Career Award - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management

  14. Lessons Learned with Early PV Plant Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lessons Learned with Early PV Plant Integration Page 1 of 23 Kristen Ardani (NREL), Elsa Gonzales (Arizona Public Service Company), Rachel Sall (Arizona Public Service Company), Frankie Greco (Arizona Public Service Company), David Narang (Arizona Public Service Company) Page 1 of 23 [Speaker: Kristen Ardani] Cover Slide: Thank you everyone for joining us today for the DG Interconnection Collaborative informational webinar. Today we have speakers from Arizona Public Service Company, who will

  15. Early Life Crises of Habitable Planets

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Pierrehumbert, Raymond [University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States

    2009-09-01

    There are a number of crises that a potentially habitable planet must avoid or surmount if its potential is to be realized. These include the runaway greenhouse, loss of atmosphere by chemical or physical processes, and long-lasting global glaciation. In this lecture I will present research on the climate dynamics governing such processes, with particular emphasis on the lessons to be learned from the cases of Early Mars and the Neoproterozoic Snowball Earth.

  16. Tritium Aging Effects in Palladium on Kieselguhr

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shanahan, K.L.; Holder, J.S.; Wermer, J.R.

    1998-10-01

    50 weight % Pd on kieselguhr (Pd/k) is used in hydrogen isotope separation processes at the Savannah River Site. Long term aging studies on this material were undertaken in June, 1992. P-c-T data showing the aging effect of tritium loading for long periods will be presented and discussed covering from June, 1992 to March, 1997. Lowering of plateau pressures and increasing indications of in homogeneities have been observed in both tritium and deuterium absorption isotherms at 0 C, and desorption isotherms at 80 and 120 C.

  17. Aging assessment of reactor instrumentation and protection system components. Aging-related operating experiences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gehl, A.C.; Hagen, E.W.

    1992-07-01

    A study of the aging-related operating experiences throughout a five-year period (1984--1988) of six generic instrumentation modules (indicators, sensors, controllers, transmitters, annunciators, and recorders) was performed as a part of the Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program. The effects of aging from operational and environmental stressors were characterized from results depicted in Licensee Event Reports (LERs). The data are graphically displayed as frequency of events per plant year for operating plant ages from 1 to 28 years to determine aging-related failure trend patterns. Three main conclusions were drawn from this study: (1) Instrumentation and control (I&C) modules make a modest contribution to safety-significant events: 17% of LERs issued during 1984--1988 dealt with malfunctions of the six I&C modules studied, and 28% of the LERs dealing with these I&C module malfunctions were aging related (other studies show a range 25--50%); (2) Of the six modules studied, indicators, sensors, and controllers account for the bulk (83%) of aging-related failures; and (3) Infant mortality appears to be the dominant aging-related failure mode for most I&C module categories (with the exception of annunciators and recorders, which appear to fail randomly).

  18. A Potent and Broad Neutralizing Antibody Recognizes and Penetrates the HIV Glycan Shield

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pejchal, Robert; Doores, Katie J.; Walker, Laura M.; Khayat, Reza; Huang, Po-Ssu; Wang, Sheng-Kai; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Ramos, Alejandra; Crispin, Max; Depetris, Rafael; Katpally, Umesh; Marozsan, Andre; Cupo, Albert; Maloveste, Sebastien; Liu, Yan; McBride, Ryan; Ito, Yukishige; Sanders, Rogier W.; Ogohara, Cassandra; Paulson, James C.; Feizi, Ten; Scanlan, Christopher N.; Wong, Chi-Huey; Moore, John P.; Olson, William C.; Ward, Andrew B.; Poignard, Pascal; Schief, William R.; Burton, Dennis R.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2015-10-15

    The HIV envelope (Env) protein gp120 is protected from antibody recognition by a dense glycan shield. However, several of the recently identified PGT broadly neutralizing antibodies appear to interact directly with the HIV glycan coat. Crystal structures of antigen-binding fragments (Fabs) PGT 127 and 128 with Man{sub 9} at 1.65 and 1.29 angstrom resolution, respectively, and glycan binding data delineate a specific high mannose-binding site. Fab PGT 128 complexed with a fully glycosylated gp120 outer domain at 3.25 angstroms reveals that the antibody penetrates the glycan shield and recognizes two conserved glycans as well as a short {beta}-strand segment of the gp120 V3 loop, accounting for its high binding affinity and broad specificify. Furthermore, our data suggest that the high neutralization potency of PGT 127 and 128 immunoglobulin Gs may be mediated by cross-linking Env trimers on the viral surface.

  19. The Sandia MEMS Passive Shock Sensor : dormancy and aging. (Technical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report) | SciTech Connect The Sandia MEMS Passive Shock Sensor : dormancy and aging. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Sandia MEMS Passive Shock Sensor : dormancy and aging. This report presents the results of an aging experiment that was established in FY09 and completed in FY10 for the Sandia MEMS Passive Shock Sensor. A total of 37 packages were aged at different temperatures and times, and were then tested after aging to determine functionality. Aging temperatures were

  20. The Next ICE Age | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    developments in diesel engines for light- and heavy-duty applications PDF icon deer12_ruth.pdf More Documents & Publications The Next ICE Age Cummins SuperTruck Program - Technology and System Level Demonstration of Highly Efficient and Clean, Diesel Powered Class 8 Trucks SuperTruck Program: Engine Project Review

  1. Equal Access Initiative: HIV/AIDS Information Resources from the National Library of Medicine

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Equal Access Initiative: HIV/AIDS Information Resources from the National Library of Medicine Instructors: Nicole Dancy, National Library of Medicine Wilma Templin-Branner, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education For Grantees of National Minority AIDS Council 2010 Equal Access Initiative Computer Grants Program United States Conference on AIDS September 11, 2010 2 Purpose  To familiarize participants with reliable online health information from the National Library of Medicine and other

  2. ORISE: Equal Access Initiative - HIV/AIDS Information Resources from the National Library of Medicine

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EQUAL ACCESS INITIATIVE: HIV/AIDS Information Resources from the National Library of Medicine A Training Course developed for the Grant Recipients of the National Minority AIDS Council 2010 Equal Access Initiative Computer Grants Presented at United States Conference on AIDS Orlando, Florida September 11, 2010 Disclaimer Every effort has been made to ensure that the screen graphics and the exercises in this document are up-to-date and accurate. However, due to the frequency of Web updates, they

  3. ORISE: How to Find Reliable HIV/AIDS Treatment on the Internet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Find Reliable HIV/AIDS Treatment Information on the Internet August 2011 This document was prepared for the National Library of Medicine by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education through an interagency agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy. ORISE is managed by Oak Ridge Associated Universities under DOE contract number DE-AC06OR23100. Evaluating Health Information on the Internet The World Wide Web contains an abundance of free health information, available 24 hours per day.

  4. Affinity Maturation of a Potent Family of HIV Antibodies Is Primarily

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Focused on Accommodating or Avoiding Glycans (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect This content will become publicly available on December 16, 2016 Title: Affinity Maturation of a Potent Family of HIV Antibodies Is Primarily Focused on Accommodating or Avoiding Glycans Authors: Garces, Fernando ; Lee, Jeong Hyun ; de Val, Natalia ; Torrents de la Pena, Alba ; Kong, Leopold ; Puchades, Cristina ; Hua, Yuanzi ; Stanfield, Robyn L. ; Burton, Dennis R. ; Moore, John P. ; Sanders, Rogier W. ; Ward,

  5. Insights into the respiratory tract microbiota of patients with cystic fibrosis during early Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Keravec, Marlène; Mounier, Jérôme; Prestat, Emmanuel; Vallet, Sophie; Jansson, Janet K.; Burgaud, Gaëtan; Rosec, Sylvain; Gouriou, Stéphanie; Rault, Gilles; Coton, Emmanuel; et al

    2015-08-09

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays a major role in cystic fibrosis (CF) progression. Therefore, it is important to understand the initial steps of P. aeruginosa infection. The structure and dynamics of CF respiratory tract microbial communities during the early stages of P. aeruginosa colonization were characterized by pyrosequencing and cloning-sequencing. The respiratory microbiota showed high diversity, related to the young age of the CF cohort (mean age 10 years). Wide inter- and intra-individual variations were revealed. A common core microbiota of 5 phyla and 13 predominant genera was found, the majority of which were obligate anaerobes. A few genera were significantly moremore » prevalent in patients never infected by P. aeruginosa. Persistence of an anaerobic core microbiota regardless of P. aeruginosa status suggests a major role of certain anaerobes in the pathophysiology of lung infections in CF. Some genera may be potential biomarkers of pulmonary infection state.« less

  6. Mechanical Testing of TR-55 Rubber Thermally Aged Under Tensile...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Mechanical Testing of TR-55 Rubber Thermally Aged Under Tensile Strain Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Mechanical Testing of TR-55 Rubber Thermally Aged Under Tensile ...

  7. Tensile Testing of Aged TR-55 Silicone Rubber (Gamma Radiation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Tensile Testing of Aged TR-55 Silicone Rubber (Gamma Radiation Under Tensile Strain): ... Title: Tensile Testing of Aged TR-55 Silicone Rubber (Gamma Radiation Under Tensile ...

  8. Diagnostic and Prognostic Analysis of Battery Performance & Aging...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diagnostic and Prognostic Analysis of Battery Performance & Aging based on Kinetic and ... More Documents & Publications Diagnostic Testing and Analysis Toward Understanding Aging ...

  9. Space-Age Ceramics Get Their Toughest Test

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Space-Age Ceramics Get Their Toughest Test Print Advanced ceramic composites can withstand ... of the mechanical properties of these space-age materials at ultrahigh temperatures ...

  10. Aging and deaging effects in shape memory alloys (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Aging and deaging effects in shape memory alloys Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Aging and deaging effects in shape memory alloys Authors: Xue, Dezhen ; Zhou, Yumei ; ...

  11. Aging and deaging effects in shape memory alloys (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Aging and deaging effects in shape memory alloys Title: Aging and deaging effects in shape memory alloys Authors: Xue, Dezhen ; Zhou, Yumei ; Ding, Xiangdong ; Lookman, Turab ; ...

  12. New Report: Early Lessons Learned in Bringing SSL to Market

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has published a new report that documents early challenges and lessons learned in the development of the SSL market. Entitled Solid-State Lighting: Early Lessons...

  13. Early Users to Test New Burst Buffer on Cori

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Early Users to Test New Burst Buffer on Cori Early Users to Test New Burst Buffer on Cori Designed to Accelerate IO Performance October 5, 2015 Corimockup NERSC has selected a ...

  14. Opportunities for the Early Production of Fischer-Tropsch (F...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for the Early Production of Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) Fuels in the U.S. -- An Overview Opportunities for the Early Production of Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) Fuels in the U.S. -- An Overview...

  15. Early implementation of SiC cladding fuel performance models...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Early implementation of SiC cladding fuel performance models in BISON Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Early implementation of SiC cladding fuel ...

  16. Recombination enhances HIV-1 envelope diversity by facilitating the survival of latent genomic fragments in the plasma virus population

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Immonen, Taina T.; Conway, Jessica M.; Romero-Severson, Ethan O.; Perelson, Alan S.; Leitner, Thomas; Kouyos, Roger Dimitri

    2015-12-22

    HIV-1 is subject to immune pressure exerted by the host, giving variants that escape the immune response an advantage. Virus released from activated latent cells competes against variants that have continually evolved and adapted to host immune pressure. Nevertheless, there is increasing evidence that virus displaying a signal of latency survives in patient plasma despite having reduced fitness due to long-term immune memory. We investigated the survival of virus with latent envelope genomic fragments by simulating within-host HIV-1 sequence evolution and the cycling of viral lineages in and out of the latent reservoir. Our model incorporates a detailed mutation process including nucleotide substitution, recombination, latent reservoir dynamics, diversifying selection pressure driven by the immune response, and purifying selection pressure asserted by deleterious mutations. We evaluated the ability of our model to capture sequence evolution in vivo by comparing our simulated sequences to HIV-1 envelope sequence data from 16 HIV-infected untreated patients. Empirical sequence divergence and diversity measures were qualitatively and quantitatively similar to those of our simulated HIV-1 populations, suggesting that our model invokes realistic trends of HIV-1 genetic evolution. Moreover, reconstructed phylogenies of simulated and patient HIV-1 populations showed similar topological structures. Our simulation results suggest that recombination is a key mechanism facilitating the persistence of virus with latent envelope genomic fragments in the productively infected cell population. Recombination increased the survival probability of latent virus forms approximately 13-fold. Prevalence of virus with latent fragments in productively infected cells was observed in only 2% of simulations when we ignored recombination, while the proportion increased to 27% of simulations when we allowed recombination. We also found that the selection pressures exerted by different fitness landscapes influenced the shape of phylogenies, diversity trends, and survival of virus with latent genomic fragments. Furthermore, our model predicts that the persistence of latent genomic fragments from multiple different ancestral origins increases sequence diversity in plasma for reasonable fitness landscapes.

  17. Two Jefferson Lab Scientists Win Prestigious Early Career Awards |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jefferson Lab Two Jefferson Lab Scientists Win Prestigious Early Career Awards Two Jefferson Lab Scientists Win Prestigious Early Career Awards Early Award - Two scientists, Jozef Dudek and Pavel Evtushenko, have won highly coveted awards totaling $3.25 million from the U.S. Department of Energy, joining a select group of just 65 individuals, including 21 from national laboratories. The Early Career Research Program was created last year by the DOE's Office of Science to bolster the nation's

  18. Jefferson Lab Scientist Receives 2009 Presidential Early Career Award |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jefferson Lab Receives 2009 Presidential Early Career Award Jefferson Lab Scientist Receives 2009 Presidential Early Career Award Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers recipent Gianluigi Ciovati Jefferson Lab Director Hugh Montgomery (left) congratulates Gianluigi Ciovati, who was named a 2009 recipient of a Presidential Early Career Award. Joining them in celebrating the award was Andrew Hutton, associate director for the Accelerator Division. Photo: Greg Adams

  19. Energy Department Scientists and Engineers Honored with Presidential Early

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Career Awards | Department of Energy Scientists and Engineers Honored with Presidential Early Career Awards Energy Department Scientists and Engineers Honored with Presidential Early Career Awards December 19, 2008 - 9:16am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - At a White House ceremony today, eight "early career" researchers, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), were honored with the Presidential Early Career

  20. HUMAN RADIATION STUDIES: REMEMBERING THE EARLY YEARS

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOBEH -0454 HUMAN RADIATION STUDIES: REMEMBERING THE EARLY YEARS Oral History of Dr. George Voelz, M.D. Conducted November 29,1994 United States Department of Energy Office of Human Radiation Experiments May I995 OlSTRiBUTLON OF THIS DOCUMENT is UMLIMtTEB FOREWORD N DECEMBER 1993, U.S. Secretary of Energy Hazel R. O'Leary announced her Openness Initiative. As part of this initiative, the Department of Energy I undertook an effort to identie and catalog historical documents on radiation

  1. Early black hole signals at the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, Ben; Bleicher, Marcus; Stoecker, Horst

    2007-10-26

    The production of mini black holes due to large extra dimensions is a speculative but possible scenario. We survey estimates for di-jet suppression, and multi-mono-jet emission due to black hole production. We further look for a possible sub-scenario which is the formation of a stable or meta-stable black hole remnant (BHR). We show that the beauty of such objects is, that they are relatively easy to observe, even in the early phase of LHC running.

  2. Method for early detection of infectious mononucleosis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Willard, K.E.

    1982-08-10

    Early detection of infectious mononucleosis is carried out using a sample of human blood by isolating and identifying the presence of Inmono proteins in the sample from a two-dimensional protein map with the proteins being characterized by having isoelectric banding as measured in urea of about -16 to -17 with respect to certain isoelectric point standards and molecular mass of about 70 to 75 K daltons as measured in the presence of sodium dodecylsulfate containing polyacrylamide gels, the presence of the Inmono proteins being correlated with the existence of infectious mononucleosis.

  3. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Market Prices and Uncertainty Report Crude Oil Prices: Crude oil prices continued upward and reached the highest levels of the year. The North Sea Brent front-month futures price rose $6.34 per barrel (b) from April 1 to settle at $45.01/b on May 5 (Figure 1). The West Texas Intermediate (WTI) front-month futures price rose $7.53/b and settled at $44.32/b over the same period. Early data on petroleum product consumption in 2016 suggest that last year's strong growth may continue this year. U.S.

  4. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Market Prices and Uncertainty Report Crude Oil Prices: International crude oil prices, which reached their highest point of the year in June, fell to their lowest levels of the year in early August. The North Sea Brent front month futures price settled at $105.44/barrel on August 7, a decrease of $6.85/barrel from July 1 (Figure 1). The front month West Texas Intermediate (WTI) contract also fell, settling at $97.34/barrel on August 7, $8.00/barrel lower than on July 1. A further easing of

  5. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Market Prices and Uncertainty Report Crude Oil Prices: Crude oil prices moved lower through much of July and early August. The North Sea Brent front month futures price declined $12.49 per barrel (b) since July 1 to settle at $49.52/b on August 6 (Figure 1). The West Texas Intermediate (WTI) front month futures price declined $12.30/b over the same time, settling at $44.66/b on August 6. Both benchmarks recorded their largest month-over-month decline since January 2015. One of the factors that

  6. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Market Prices and Uncertainty Report Crude Oil Prices: Crude oil futures prices reached the lowest level in 12 years in December and early January. The North Sea Brent front month futures price settled at $33.75 per barrel (b) on January 7, $10.69/b lower than the close on December 1 (Figure 1). The West Texas Intermediate (WTI) front month futures price settled at $33.27, a decrease of $8.58/b over the same period. Global crude oil prices declined after the December 4 Organization of Petroleum

  7. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Market Prices and Uncertainty Report Crude Oil Prices: Crude oil prices continued upward and reached the highest levels of the year. The North Sea Brent front-month futures price rose $6.34 per barrel (b) from April 1 to settle at $45.01/b on May 5 (Figure 1). The West Texas Intermediate (WTI) front-month futures price rose $7.53/b and settled at $44.32/b over the same period. Early data on petroleum product consumption in 2016 suggest that last year's strong growth may continue this year. U.S.

  8. Early Career Research Program | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Home Early Career Research Program Researchers from NNSA labs receive DOE Early Career Research awards Three researchers from NNSA's three national labs are among 44 recipients from across the nation to receive significant funding for research as part of DOE's Early Career Research Program. The effort, now in its sixth year, is designed to bolster the nation's scientific workforce by...

  9. Ritonavir binds to and downregulates estrogen receptors: Molecular mechanism of promoting early atherosclerosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiang, Jin; Wang, Ying; Su, Ke; Liu, Min; Hu, Peng-Chao; Ma, Tian; Li, Jia-Xi; Wei, Lei; Zheng, Zhongliang; Yang, Fang

    2014-10-01

    Estrogenic actions are closely related to cardiovascular disease. Ritonavir (RTV), a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitor, induces atherosclerosis in an estrogen-related manner. However, how RTV induce pathological phenotypes through estrogen pathway remains unclear. In this study, we found that RTV increases thickness of coronary artery walls of Sprague Dawley rats and plasma free fatty acids (FFA) levels. In addition, RTV could induce foam cell formation, downregulate both estrogen receptor ? (ER?) and ER? expression, upregulate G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) expression, and all of them could be partially blocked by 17?-estradiol (E2), suggesting RTV acts as an antagonist for E2. Computational modeling shows a similar interaction with ER? between RTV and 2-aryl indoles, which are highly subtype-selective ligands for ER?. We also found that RTV directly bound to ER? and selectively inhibited the nuclear localization of ER?, and residue Leu536 in the hydrophobic core of ligand binding domain (LBD) was essential for the interaction with RTV. In addition, RTV did not change the secondary structure of ER?-LBD like E2, which explained how ER? lost the capacity of nuclear translocation under the treatment of RTV. All of the evidences suggest that ritonavir acts as an antagonist for 17?-estradiol in regulating ? subtype estrogen receptor function and early events of atherosclerosis. - Graphical abstract: RTV directly binds to ER? and Leu536 in the hydrophobic core of ligand binding domain is essential for the interaction. - Highlights: RTV increases the thickness of rat coronary artery wall and foam cell formation. RTV downregulates the expression of ER? and ER?. RTV inhibits ER? promoter activity. RTV directly binds to ER? and the key amino acid is Leu536. RTV inhibits the nuclear translocation of ER? and GPER.

  10. Insights into accelerated aging of SSL luminaires

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Davis, J. Lynn; Lamvik, Michael; Bittle, James; Shepherd, Sarah; Yaga, Robert; Baldasaro, Nick; Solano, Eric; Bobashev, Georgiy

    2013-09-30

    Although solid-state lighting (SSL) products are often intended to have product lifetimes of 15 years or more, the rapid change in technology has created a need for accelerated life tests (ALTs) that can be performed in the span of several months. A critical element of interpreting results from any systems-level ALT is understanding of the impact of the test environment on each component. Because of its ubiquity in electronics, the use of temperature-humidity environments as potential ALTs for SSL luminaires was investigated. Results from testing of populations of three commercial 6” downlights in environments of 85oC and 85% relative humiditymore » (RH) and 75oC and 75% RH are reported. These test environments were found to accelerate lumen depreciation of the entire luminaire optical system, including LEDs, lenses, and reflectors. The effects of aging were found to depend strongly on both the optical materials that were used and the design of the luminaire; this shows that the lumen maintenance behavior of SSL luminaires must be addressed at the optical systems level. Temperature-Humidity ALTs can be a useful test in understand lumainaire depreciation provided that proper consideration is given to the different aging rates of various materials. Since the impact of the temperature-humidity environment varies among components of the optical system, uniform aging of all system components in a single test is difficult to achieve.« less

  11. Insights into accelerated aging of SSL luminaires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, J. Lynn; Lamvik, Michael; Bittle, James; Shepherd, Sarah; Yaga, Robert; Baldasaro, Nick; Solano, Eric; Bobashev, Georgiy

    2013-09-30

    Although solid-state lighting (SSL) products are often intended to have product lifetimes of 15 years or more, the rapid change in technology has created a need for accelerated life tests (ALTs) that can be performed in the span of several months. A critical element of interpreting results from any systems-level ALT is understanding of the impact of the test environment on each component. Because of its ubiquity in electronics, the use of temperature-humidity environments as potential ALTs for SSL luminaires was investigated. Results from testing of populations of three commercial 6 downlights in environments of 85oC and 85% relative humidity (RH) and 75oC and 75% RH are reported. These test environments were found to accelerate lumen depreciation of the entire luminaire optical system, including LEDs, lenses, and reflectors. The effects of aging were found to depend strongly on both the optical materials that were used and the design of the luminaire; this shows that the lumen maintenance behavior of SSL luminaires must be addressed at the optical systems level. Temperature-Humidity ALTs can be a useful test in understand lumainaire depreciation provided that proper consideration is given to the different aging rates of various materials. Since the impact of the temperature-humidity environment varies among components of the optical system, uniform aging of all system components in a single test is difficult to achieve.

  12. Discovering colorons at the early stage LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dicus, Duane A.; Kao, Chung; Sayre, Joshua; Nandi, S.

    2011-05-01

    Prospects are investigated for the discovery of massive hypergluons using data from the early runs of the Large Hadron Collider. A center of mass energy of 7 TeV and an integrated luminosity of 1 fb{sup -1} or 5 fb{sup -1} are assumed. A phenomenological Lagrangian is adopted to evaluate the cross section of a pair of colored vector bosons (colorons, {rho}-tilde) decaying into four colored scalar resonances (hyperpions, {pi}-tilde), which then decay into eight gluons. The dominant eight-jet background from the production of 8g, 7g1q, 6g2q, and 5g3q is included. We find an abundance of signal events and that realistic cuts reduce the background enough to establish a 5{sigma} signal for the coloron mass of up to 733 GeV with 1 fb{sup -1} or 833 GeV with 5 fb{sup -1}.

  13. Petrobras experience on early production systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aramando, S.

    1983-05-01

    Beginning in 1974, PETROBRAS oil production was declining in spite of the significant growth of reserves due to the discovery of oil offshore in the Campos Basin. A project using platforms will require from four to eight years and require a large capital investment. The Early Production Systems were utilized to reduce the time for initial production from the Basin, better define the conditions of the reservoir, improve the cash flow, and acquire a more complete knowledge of maritime operations. The first system was installed in 1977 and today there are ten operating, two others are being installed and eight more are in the planning stage. This paper includes PETROBRAS' accomplishments and presents its plans for the future.

  14. Helium Release Behavior of Aged Titanium Tritides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SHANAHAN, KIRKL.

    2004-07-27

    One sample of bulk Ti has been loaded with a 50 per cent / 50 per cent deuterium/tritium mixture and statically aged for 6.5 years. Thermal desorption of the sample shows an initial release of hydrogen isotopes followed by 3He release. Subsequent D2 loading/desorption was used to quantify the trapped tritium heel. The sample shows an excess hydrogen capacity as a second thermal desorption peak that partially disappears and shifts with annealing at 923-973K. The main hydrogen desorption peak also shifts to higher temperature, indicating a partial reversal of the tritium-decay induced damage by annealing.

  15. The ? Andromedae system: new constraints on the companion mass, system age, and further multiplicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinkley, Sasha; David, Trevor; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.; Pueyo, Laurent; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Oppenheimer, Ben R.; Brenner, Douglas; Veicht, Aaron; Nilsson, Ricky; Mamajek, Eric E.; Kraus, Adam L.; Rice, Emily L.; Ireland, Michael J.; Vasisht, Gautam; Cady, Eric; Roberts, Jennifer E.; Zimmerman, Neil; Parry, Ian R.; Beichman, Charles; Dekany, Richard; and others

    2013-12-20

    ? Andromedae is a B9IVn star at 52 pc for which a faint substellar companion separated by 55 2 AU was recently announced. In this work, we present the first spectrum of the companion, '? And B,' using the Project 1640 high-contrast imaging platform. Comparison of our low-resolution YJH-band spectra to empirical brown dwarf spectra suggests an early-L spectral type. Fitting synthetic spectra from PHOENIX model atmospheres to our observed spectrum allows us to constrain the effective temperature to ?2000 K as well as place constraints on the companion surface gravity. Further, we use previously reported log(g) and T {sub eff} measurements of the host star to argue that the ? And system has an isochronal age of 220 100 Myr, older than the 30 Myr age reported previously. This interpretation of an older age is corroborated by the photometric properties of ? And B, which appear to be marginally inconsistent with other 10-100 Myr low-gravity L-dwarfs for the spectral type range we derive. In addition, we use Keck aperture masking interferometry combined with published radial velocity measurements to rule out the existence of any tight stellar companions to ? And A that might be responsible for the system's overluminosity. Further, we show that luminosity enhancements due to a nearly 'pole-on' viewing angle coupled with extremely rapid rotation is unlikely. ? And A is thus consistent with its slightly evolved luminosity class (IV), and we propose here that ? And, with a revised age of 220 100 Myr, is an interloper to the 30 Myr Columba association with which it was previously associated. The photometric and spectroscopic evidence for ? And B combined with our reassessment of the system age implies a substellar companion mass of 50{sub ?13}{sup +16} M {sub Jup}, consistent with a brown dwarf rather than a planetary-mass companion.

  16. LIFE: The Case for Early Commercialization of Fusion Energy (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: LIFE: The Case for Early Commercialization of Fusion Energy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: LIFE: The Case for Early Commercialization of Fusion Energy This paper presents the case for early commercialization of laser inertial fusion energy (LIFE). Results taken from systems modeling of the US electrical generating enterprise quantify the benefits of fusion energy in terms of carbon emission, nuclear waste and plutonium production

  17. Manhattan Project: Early Government Support, 1939-1942

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Albert Einstein and Leo Szilard EARLY GOVERNMENT SUPPORT (1939-1942) Events Einstein's Letter, 1939 Early Uranium Research, 1939-1941 Piles and Plutonium, 1939-1941 Reorganization and Acceleration, 1940-1941 The MAUD Report, 1941 A Tentative Decision to Build the Bomb, 1941-1942 As the news of the fission breakthrough spread from Berlin in early 1939, many physicists within the United States (and elsewhere) immediately realized the potential danger posed by atomic energy. Especially concerned

  18. Manhattan Project: Early Uranium Research, 1939-1941

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ernest Lawrence, Arthur Compton, Vannevar Bush, and James Conant discuss uranium research, Berkeley, March 29, 1940. EARLY URANIUM RESEARCH (1939-1941) Events > Early Government Support, 1939-1942 Einstein's Letter, 1939 Early Uranium Research, 1939-1941 Piles and Plutonium, 1939-1941 Reorganization and Acceleration, 1940-1941 The MAUD Report, 1941 A Tentative Decision to Build the Bomb, 1941-1942 President Franklin D. Roosevelt responded to the call for government support of uranium research

  19. Two Jefferson Lab Scientists Win Prestigious Early Career Awards |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jefferson Lab Two Jefferson Lab Scientists Win Prestigious Early Career Awards Two Jefferson Lab Scientists Win Prestigious Early Career Awards fellowship Two scientists, Jozef Dudek and Pavel Evtushenko, have won highly coveted awards totaling $3.25 million from the U.S. Department of Energy, joining a select group of just 65 individuals, including 21 from national laboratories, to win an award this year. The Early Career Research Program was created last year by the DOE'S Office of Science

  20. National Idling Reduction Network News - Early Spring 2009 | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Early Spring 2009 National Idling Reduction Network News - Early Spring 2009 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon early_spring09_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - January 2009 National Idling Reduction Network News - August 2009 National Idling Reduction Network News

  1. Numerical simulations shed new light on early universe

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Numerical simulations shed new light on early universe Numerical simulations shed new light on early universe The code simulates conditions during the first few minutes of cosmological evolution to model the role of neutrinos, nuclei and other particles in shaping the early universe. April 21, 2016 Los Alamos scientists developed the BURST computer code to predict-to unprecedented precision-the amounts of light nuclei synthesized in the Big Bang. Los Alamos scientists developed the BURST

  2. Sandia National Laboratories' Stanley Atcitty Wins Presidential Early

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Career Award for Scientists and Engineers | Department of Energy National Laboratories' Stanley Atcitty Wins Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers Sandia National Laboratories' Stanley Atcitty Wins Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers July 24, 2012 - 11:27am Addthis Dr. Stanley Atcitty, an energy storage systems researcher at Sandia National Laboratories, has been named a winner of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers

  3. Hickam Air Force Base Fuel Cell Vehicles: Early Implementation Experience |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Hickam Air Force Base Fuel Cell Vehicles: Early Implementation Experience Hickam Air Force Base Fuel Cell Vehicles: Early Implementation Experience This report sumarizes early implementation experience from an evaluation of two prototype fuel cell vehicles operating at Hickam Air Force Base in Honolulu, Hawaii. PDF icon 42233.pdf More Documents & Publications Renewable Hydrogen Production at Hickam Air Force Base Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Transit Bus Evaluations: Joint

  4. Physicist wins early-career award for isotope work

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    May » Physicist wins early-career award for isotope work Physicist wins early-career award for isotope work Jonathan Ward Engle, is among 49 winners, of the US Department of Energy's Early Career Research Program awards for 2016. May 12, 2016 Jonathan Ward Engle Jonathan Ward Engle Contact Nancy Ambrosiano Communications Office (505) 667-0471 Email "Jonathan's work brings distinctive mission and science together, connecting the strong history of Los Alamos research in isotopes with

  5. Early Markets: Fuel Cells for Backup Power | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Backup Power Early Markets: Fuel Cells for Backup Power This fact sheet describes the advantages of using fuel cell technology for application in emergency backup power. PDF icon Early Markets: Fuel Cells for Backup Power More Documents & Publications Early Stage Market Change and Effects of the Recovery Act Fuel Cell Program -- 2015 Update Backup Power Cost of Ownership Analysis and Incumbent Technology Comparison Market Transformation Fact Sheet

  6. Deactivation of Accelerated Engine-Aged and Field-Aged SCR Catalysts and

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the Role of the DOC | Department of Energy A technique for accelerated aging of SCR system (DOC -> SCR-> DPF) reveals two deactivation mechanisms and replicates field-aged effects PDF icon deer09_toops.pdf More Documents & Publications Impact of Biodiesel-Based Na on the Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) of NOx Using Cu-zeolite Impacts of Biodiesel on Emission Control Devices Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008-2009 Fuels Technologies R&D Progress Report

  7. Hickam Air Force Base Fuel Cell Vehicles: Early Implementation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technical Report NRELTP-560-42233 October 2007 Hickam Air Force Base Fuel Cell Vehicles: Early Implementation Experience Leslie Eudy, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Kevin ...

  8. Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years. Oral history...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    G. Whaley, August 15, 1994 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years. Oral history of Donner Lab Administrator Baird G. ...

  9. Petascale, Adaptive CFD (ALCF ESP Technical Report): ALCF-2 Early...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Petascale, Adaptive CFD (ALCF ESP Technical Report): ALCF-2 Early Science Program Technical Report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Petascale, Adaptive CFD (ALCF ESP ...

  10. Secretary Chu Announces 69 Early Career Scientists to Receive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    support of scientists in the early career years is crucial to renewing America's ... Science plans to continue the program, choosing new candidates on an annual basis, and ...

  11. ALCF Theta Early Science Program: Proposal Instructions | Argonne...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    General Information and Submission Instructions Our intent is for Theta Early Science ... PI and co-PI information Project Summary Executive Summary Benefit to Community Science ...

  12. Black Hole Remnants in the Early Universe (Journal Article) ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Black Hole Remnants in the Early Universe Authors: Scardigli, Fabio ; Gruber, Christine ; Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. ; Chen, Pisin ; Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. KIPAC, Menlo ...

  13. Entanglement Entropy of the Early Universe in Generalized Chaplygin...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Entanglement Entropy of the Early Universe in Generalized Chaplygin Gas Model Authors: Chen, Pisin ; Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. KIPAC, Menlo Park ; Niu, Yuezhen ; Peking U. ...

  14. Influence of Surface Orientation and Defects on Early Stage Oxidation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Influence of Surface Orientation and Defects on Early Stage Oxidation and Ultrathin Oxide Growth on Pure Copper Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Influence of Surface ...

  15. Modeling the effects of vorinostat in vivo reveals both transient and delayed HIV transcriptional activation and minimal killing of latently infected cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ke, Ruian; Lewin, Sharon R.; Elliott, Julian H.; Perelson, Alan S.; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2015-10-23

    Recent efforts to cure human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection have focused on developing latency reversing agents as a first step to eradicate the latent reservoir. The histone deacetylase inhibitor, vorinostat, has been shown to activate HIV RNA transcription in CD4+ T-cells and alter host cell gene transcription in HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy. In order to understand how latently infected cells respond dynamically to vorinostat treatment and determine the impact of vorinostat on reservoir size in vivo, we have constructed viral dynamic models of latency that incorporate vorinostat treatment. We fitted these models to data collected from a recent clinical trial in which vorinostat was administered daily for 14 days to HIV-infected individuals on suppressive ART. The results show that HIV transcription is increased transiently during the first few hours or days of treatment and that there is a delay before a sustained increase of HIV transcription, whose duration varies among study participants and may depend on the long term impact of vorinostat on host gene expression. Parameter estimation suggests that in latently infected cells, HIV transcription induced by vorinostat occurs at lower levels than in productively infected cells. Lastly, the estimated loss rate of transcriptionally induced cells remains close to baseline in most study participants, suggesting vorinostat treatment does not induce latently infected cell killing and thus reduce the latent reservoir in vivo.

  16. Modeling the effects of vorinostat in vivo reveals both transient and delayed HIV transcriptional activation and minimal killing of latently infected cells

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ke, Ruian; Lewin, Sharon R.; Elliott, Julian H.; Perelson, Alan S.; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2015-10-23

    Recent efforts to cure human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection have focused on developing latency reversing agents as a first step to eradicate the latent reservoir. The histone deacetylase inhibitor, vorinostat, has been shown to activate HIV RNA transcription in CD4+ T-cells and alter host cell gene transcription in HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy. In order to understand how latently infected cells respond dynamically to vorinostat treatment and determine the impact of vorinostat on reservoir size in vivo, we have constructed viral dynamic models of latency that incorporate vorinostat treatment. We fitted these models to data collected from a recentmore » clinical trial in which vorinostat was administered daily for 14 days to HIV-infected individuals on suppressive ART. The results show that HIV transcription is increased transiently during the first few hours or days of treatment and that there is a delay before a sustained increase of HIV transcription, whose duration varies among study participants and may depend on the long term impact of vorinostat on host gene expression. Parameter estimation suggests that in latently infected cells, HIV transcription induced by vorinostat occurs at lower levels than in productively infected cells. Lastly, the estimated loss rate of transcriptionally induced cells remains close to baseline in most study participants, suggesting vorinostat treatment does not induce latently infected cell killing and thus reduce the latent reservoir in vivo.« less

  17. Age Dating of Mixed SNM--Preliminary Investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, D., Guss, P. P., Yfantis, E., Klingensmith, A., Emer, D.

    2011-12-01

    Recently we investigated the nuclear forensics problem of age determination for mixed special nuclear material (SNM). Through limited computational mixing experiments and interactive age analysis, it was observed that age dating results are generally affected by the mixing of samples with different assays or even by small radioactive material contamination. The mixing and contamination can be detected through interactive age analysis, a function provided by the Decay Interaction, Visualization and Analysis (DIVA) software developed by NSTec. It is observed that for mixed SNM with two components, the age estimators typically fall into two distinct clusters on the time axis. This suggests that averaging or other simple statistical methods may not always be suitable for age dating SNM mixtures. Instead, an interactive age analysis would be more suitable for age determination of material components of such SNM mixtures. This work was supported by the National Center for Nuclear Security (NCNS).

  18. Energy age wind ltd Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    48291 Sector: Wind energy Product: Energy-age-wind aims to develop small scale vertical-axis wind turbines. References: energy-age-wind ltd & Co. KG1 This article is a stub....

  19. Space-Age Ceramics Get Their Toughest Test

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Space-Age Ceramics Get Their Toughest Test Space-Age Ceramics Get Their Toughest Test Print Wednesday, 17 April 2013 07:23 Advanced ceramic composites can withstand the ultrahigh ...

  20. Space-Age Ceramics Get Their Toughest Test

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Space-Age Ceramics Get Their Toughest Test Space-Age Ceramics Get Their Toughest Test Print Tuesday, 11 December 2012 14:54 Advanced ceramic composites can withstand the ultrahigh ...

  1. Fact #614: March 15, 2010 Average Age of Household Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The average age of household vehicles has increased from 6.6 years in 1977 to 9.2 years in 2009. Pickup trucks have the oldest average age in every year listed. Sport utility vehicles (SUVs), first...

  2. Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging Print Wednesday, 25 February 2009 00:00 XPD helicase is an enzyme...

  3. Sean; Tanner, Danelle Mary 47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; AGING; SENSORS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    an aging experiment that was established in FY09 and completed in FY10 for the Sandia MEMS Passive Shock Sensor. A total of 37 packages were aged at different temperatures and...

  4. Emerging nondestructive inspection methods for aging aircraft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beattie, A; Dahlke, L; Gieske, J

    1994-01-01

    This report identifies and describes emerging nondestructive inspection (NDI) methods that can potentially be used to inspect commercial transport and commuter aircraft for structural damage. The nine categories of emerging NDI techniques are: acoustic emission, x-ray computed tomography, backscatter radiation, reverse geometry x-ray, advanced electromagnetics, including magnetooptic imaging and advanced eddy current techniques, coherent optics, advanced ultrasonics, advanced visual, and infrared thermography. The physical principles, generalized performance characteristics, and typical applications associated with each method are described. In addition, aircraft inspection applications are discussed along with the associated technical considerations. Finally, the status of each technique is presented, with a discussion on when it may be available for use in actual aircraft maintenance programs. It should be noted that this is a companion document to DOT/FAA/CT-91/5, Current Nondestructive Inspection Methods for Aging Aircraft.

  5. Passive absolute age and temperature history sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robinson, Alex; Vianco, Paul T.

    2015-11-10

    A passive sensor for historic age and temperature sensing, including a first member formed of a first material, the first material being either a metal or a semiconductor material and a second member formed of a second material, the second material being either a metal or a semiconductor material. A surface of the second member is in contact with a surface of the first member such that, over time, the second material of the second member diffuses into the first material of the first member. The rate of diffusion for the second material to diffuse into the first material depends on a temperature of the passive sensor. One of the electrical conductance, the electrical capacitance, the electrical inductance, the optical transmission, the optical reflectance, or the crystalline structure of the passive sensor depends on the amount of the second material that has diffused into the first member.

  6. Evaluation of aging degradation of structural components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

    1992-03-01

    Irradiation embrittlement of the neutron shield tank (NST) A212 Grade B steel from the Shippingport reactor, as well as thermal embrittlement of CF-8 cast stainless steel components from the Shippingport and KRB reactors, has been characterized. Increases in Charpy transition temperature (CTT), yield stress, and hardness of the NST material in the low-temperature low-flux environment are consistent with the test reactor data for irradiations at < 232{degrees}C. The shift in CTT is not as severe as that observed in surveillance samples from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR): however, it shows very good agreement with the results for HFIR A212-B steel irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. The results indicate that fluence rate has not effect on radiation embrittlement at rates as low as 2 {times} 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}{center dot}s at the low operating temperature of the Shippingport NST, i.e., 55{degrees}C. This suggest that radiation damage in Shippingport NST and HFIR surveillance samples may be different because of the neutron spectra and/or Cu and Ni content of the two materials. Cast stainless steel components show relatively modest decreases in fracture toughness and Charpy-impact properties and a small increase in tensile strength. Correlations for estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steels predict accurate or slightly conservative values for Charpy-impact energy, tensile flow stress, fracture toughness J-R curve, and J{sub IC} of the materials. The kinetics of thermal embrittlement and degree of embrittlement at saturation, i.e., the minimum impact energy achieved after long-term aging, were established from materials that were aged further in the laboratory. The results were consistent with the estimates. The correlations successfully predict the mechanical properties of the Ringhals 2 reactor hot- and crossover-leg elbows (CF-8M steel) after service of {approx}15 y.

  7. Evaluation of aging degradation of structural components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

    1992-03-01

    Irradiation embrittlement of the neutron shield tank (NST) A212 Grade B steel from the Shippingport reactor, as well as thermal embrittlement of CF-8 cast stainless steel components from the Shippingport and KRB reactors, has been characterized. Increases in Charpy transition temperature (CTT), yield stress, and hardness of the NST material in the low-temperature low-flux environment are consistent with the test reactor data for irradiations at < 232{degrees}C. The shift in CTT is not as severe as that observed in surveillance samples from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR): however, it shows very good agreement with the results for HFIR A212-B steel irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. The results indicate that fluence rate has not effect on radiation embrittlement at rates as low as 2 {times} 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}s at the low operating temperature of the Shippingport NST, i.e., 55{degrees}C. This suggest that radiation damage in Shippingport NST and HFIR surveillance samples may be different because of the neutron spectra and/or Cu and Ni content of the two materials. Cast stainless steel components show relatively modest decreases in fracture toughness and Charpy-impact properties and a small increase in tensile strength. Correlations for estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steels predict accurate or slightly conservative values for Charpy-impact energy, tensile flow stress, fracture toughness J-R curve, and J{sub IC} of the materials. The kinetics of thermal embrittlement and degree of embrittlement at saturation, i.e., the minimum impact energy achieved after long-term aging, were established from materials that were aged further in the laboratory. The results were consistent with the estimates. The correlations successfully predict the mechanical properties of the Ringhals 2 reactor hot- and crossover-leg elbows (CF-8M steel) after service of {approx}15 y.

  8. Characterizing Radiation-Aged Polysiloxane-Silica Composites...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Relation: Journal Name: Chemical ... ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL ... CHEMISTRY; AGING; CHAINS; DECAY; MAGNETIZATION; NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE; PHYSICS; ...

  9. HAZMAT. I. The evolution of far-UV and near-UV emission from early M stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Barman, Travis S. E-mail: barman@lpl.arizona.edu

    2014-10-01

    The spectral energy distribution, variability, and evolution of the high-energy radiation from an M dwarf planet host is crucial in understanding the planet's atmospheric evolution and habitability and in interpreting the planet's spectrum. The star's extreme-UV (EUV), far-UV (FUV), and near-UV (NUV) emission can chemically modify, ionize, and erode the atmosphere over time. This makes determining the lifetime exposure of such planets to stellar UV radiation critical for both the evolution of a planet's atmosphere and our potential to characterize it. Using the early M star members of nearby young moving groups, which sample critical ages in planet formation and evolution, we measure the evolution of the GALEX NUV and FUV flux as a function of age. The median UV flux remains at a 'saturated' level for a few hundred million years, analogous to that observed for X-ray emission. By the age of the Hyades Cluster (650 Myr), we measure a drop in UV flux by a factor of 2-3 followed by a steep drop from old (several Gyrs) field stars. This decline in activity beyond 300 Myr follows roughly t {sup –1}. Despite this clear evolution, there remains a wide range, of 1-2 orders of magnitude, in observed emission levels at every age. These UV data supply the much-needed constraints to M dwarf upper-atmosphere models, which will provide empirically motivated EUV predictions and more accurate age-dependent UV spectra as inputs to planetary photochemical models.

  10. Competitive exclusion by autologous antibodies can prevent broad HIV-1 antibodies from arising

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Luo, Shishi; Perelson, Alan S.

    2015-08-31

    The past decade has seen the discovery of numerous broad and potent monoclonal antibodies against HIV type 1 (HIV-1). Eliciting these antibodies via vaccination appears to be remarkably difficult, not least because they arise late in infection and are highly mutated relative to germline antibody sequences. Here, using a computational model, we show that broad antibodies could in fact emerge earlier and be less mutated, but that they may be prevented from doing so as a result of competitive exclusion by the autologous antibody response. We further find that this competitive exclusion is weaker in infections founded by multiple distinctmore » strains, with broadly neutralizing antibodies emerging earlier than in infections founded by a single strain. Our computational model simulates coevolving multitype virus and antibody populations. Broadly neutralizing antibodies may therefore be easier for the adaptive immune system to generate than previously thought. As a result, if less mutated broad antibodies exist, it may be possible to elicit them with a vaccine containing a mixture of diverse virus strains.« less

  11. Competitive exclusion by autologous antibodies can prevent broad HIV-1 antibodies from arising

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Shishi; Perelson, Alan S.

    2015-08-31

    The past decade has seen the discovery of numerous broad and potent monoclonal antibodies against HIV type 1 (HIV-1). Eliciting these antibodies via vaccination appears to be remarkably difficult, not least because they arise late in infection and are highly mutated relative to germline antibody sequences. Here, using a computational model, we show that broad antibodies could in fact emerge earlier and be less mutated, but that they may be prevented from doing so as a result of competitive exclusion by the autologous antibody response. We further find that this competitive exclusion is weaker in infections founded by multiple distinct strains, with broadly neutralizing antibodies emerging earlier than in infections founded by a single strain. Our computational model simulates coevolving multitype virus and antibody populations. Broadly neutralizing antibodies may therefore be easier for the adaptive immune system to generate than previously thought. As a result, if less mutated broad antibodies exist, it may be possible to elicit them with a vaccine containing a mixture of diverse virus strains.

  12. The Transuranium Elements: Early History (Nobel Lecture)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    McMillan, E. M.

    1951-12-12

    In this talk the author tells of the circumstances that led to the discovery of neptunium, the first element beyond uranium, and the partial identification of plutonium, the next one beyond that. The part of the story that lies before 1939 has already been recounted here in the Nobel lectures of Fermi and Hahn. Rather the author starts with the discovery of fission by Hahn and Strassmann. News of this momentous discovery reached Berkeley early in 1939. The staff of the Radiation Laboratory was put into a state of great excitement and several experiments of a nature designed to check and extend the announced results were started, using ionization chambers and pulse amplifiers, cloud chambers, chemical methods, and so forth. The author decided to do an experiment of a very simple kind. When a nucleus of uranium absorbs a neutron and fission takes place, the two resulting fragments fly apart with great violence, sufficient to propel them through air or other matter for some distance. This distance, called the "range", is quantity of some interest, and the author undertook to measure it by observing the depth of penetration of the fission fragments in a stack of thin aluminum foils. The fission fragments came from a thin layer of uranium oxide spread on a sheet of paper, and exposed to neutrons from a beryllium target bombarded by 8 Mev deuterons in the 37-inch cyclotron. The aluminum foils, each with a thickness of about half a milligram per square centimeter, were stacked like the pages of a book in immediate contact with the layer of uranium oxide. After exposure to the neutrons, the sheets of aluminum were separated and examined for radioactivity by means of an ionization chamber. The fission fragments of course are radioactive atoms, and their activity is found where they stop.

  13. Recombination enhances HIV-1 envelope diversity by facilitating the survival of latent genomic fragments in the plasma virus population

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Immonen, Taina T.; Conway, Jessica M.; Romero-Severson, Ethan O.; Perelson, Alan S.; Leitner, Thomas; Kouyos, Roger Dimitri

    2015-12-22

    HIV-1 is subject to immune pressure exerted by the host, giving variants that escape the immune response an advantage. Virus released from activated latent cells competes against variants that have continually evolved and adapted to host immune pressure. Nevertheless, there is increasing evidence that virus displaying a signal of latency survives in patient plasma despite having reduced fitness due to long-term immune memory. We investigated the survival of virus with latent envelope genomic fragments by simulating within-host HIV-1 sequence evolution and the cycling of viral lineages in and out of the latent reservoir. Our model incorporates a detailed mutation processmore » including nucleotide substitution, recombination, latent reservoir dynamics, diversifying selection pressure driven by the immune response, and purifying selection pressure asserted by deleterious mutations. We evaluated the ability of our model to capture sequence evolution in vivo by comparing our simulated sequences to HIV-1 envelope sequence data from 16 HIV-infected untreated patients. Empirical sequence divergence and diversity measures were qualitatively and quantitatively similar to those of our simulated HIV-1 populations, suggesting that our model invokes realistic trends of HIV-1 genetic evolution. Moreover, reconstructed phylogenies of simulated and patient HIV-1 populations showed similar topological structures. Our simulation results suggest that recombination is a key mechanism facilitating the persistence of virus with latent envelope genomic fragments in the productively infected cell population. Recombination increased the survival probability of latent virus forms approximately 13-fold. Prevalence of virus with latent fragments in productively infected cells was observed in only 2% of simulations when we ignored recombination, while the proportion increased to 27% of simulations when we allowed recombination. We also found that the selection pressures exerted by different fitness landscapes influenced the shape of phylogenies, diversity trends, and survival of virus with latent genomic fragments. Furthermore, our model predicts that the persistence of latent genomic fragments from multiple different ancestral origins increases sequence diversity in plasma for reasonable fitness landscapes.« less

  14. New Report: Early Lessons Learned in Bringing SSL to Market

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has published a new report that documents early challenges and lessons learned in the development of the SSL market. Entitled "Solid-State Lighting: Early Lessons Learned on the Way to Market," it summarizes ear

  15. Aging management guideline for commercial nuclear power plants - heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booker, S.; Lehnert, D.; Daavettila, N.; Palop, E.

    1994-06-01

    This Aging Management Guideline (AMG) describes recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in commercial nuclear power plant heat exchangers important to license renewal. The intent of this AMG is to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR 54. This AMG is presented in a manner that allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein.

  16. Early Cognitive Outcomes Following Proton Radiation in Pediatric Patients With Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pulsifer, Margaret B.; Sethi, Roshan V.; Kuhlthau, Karen A.; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: To report, from a longitudinal study, cognitive outcome in pediatric patients treated with proton radiation therapy (PRT) for central nervous system (CNS) tumors. Methods and Materials: Sixty patients receiving PRT for medulloblastoma (38.3%), gliomas (18.3%), craniopharyngioma (15.0%), ependymoma (11.7%), and other CNS tumors (16.7%) were administered age-appropriate measures of cognitive abilities at or near PRT initiation (baseline) and afterward (follow-up). Patients were aged ≥6 years at baseline to ensure consistency in neurocognitive measures. Results: Mean age was 12.3 years at baseline; mean follow-up interval was 2.5 years. Treatment included prior surgical resection (76.7%) and chemotherapy (61.7%). Proton radiation therapy included craniospinal irradiation (46.7%) and partial brain radiation (53.3%). At baseline, mean Wechsler Full Scale IQ was 104.6; means of all 4 Index scores were also in the average range. At follow-up, no significant change was observed in mean Wechsler Full Scale IQ, Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Reasoning/Organization, or Working Memory. However, Processing Speed scores declined significantly (mean 5.2 points), with a significantly greater decline for subjects aged <12 years at baseline and those with the highest baseline scores. Cognitive outcome was not significantly related to gender, extent of radiation, radiation dose, tumor location, histology, socioeconomic status, chemotherapy, or history of surgical resection. Conclusions: Early cognitive outcomes after PRT for pediatric CNS tumors are encouraging, compared with published outcomes from photon radiation therapy.

  17. Preexisting compensatory amino acids compromise fitness costs of a HIV-1 T cell escape mutation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Donglai; Zuo, Tao; Hora, Bhavna; Song, Hongshuo; Kong, Wei; Yu, Xianghui; Goonetilleke, Nilu; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Perelson, Alan S.; Haynes, Barton F.; et al

    2014-01-01

    Background: Fitness costs and slower disease progression are associated with a cytolytic T lymphocyte (CTL) escape mutation T242N in Gag in HIV-1-infected individuals carrying HLA-B*57/5801 alleles. However, the impact of different context in diverse HIV-1 strains on the fitness costs due to the T242N mutation has not been well characterized. To better understand the extent of fitness costs of the T242N mutation and the repair of fitness loss through compensatory amino acids, we investigated its fitness impact in different transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses. Results: The T242N mutation resulted in various levels of fitness loss in four different T/F viruses. However, themore » fitness costs were significantly compromised by preexisting compensatory amino acids in (Isoleucine at position 247) or outside (glutamine at position 219) the CTL epitope. Moreover, the transmitted T242N escape mutant in subject CH131 was as fit as the revertant N242T mutant and the elimination of the compensatory amino acid I247 in the T/F viral genome resulted in significant fitness cost, suggesting the fitness loss caused by the T242N mutation had been fully repaired in the donor at transmission. Analysis of the global circulating HIV-1 sequences in the Los Alamos HIV Sequence Database showed a high prevalence of compensatory amino acids for the T242N mutation and other T cell escape mutations. Conclusions: Our results show that the preexisting compensatory amino acids in the majority of circulating HIV-1 strains could significantly compromise the fitness loss due to CTL escape mutations and thus increase challenges for T cell based vaccines.« less

  18. Weldable, age hardenable, austenitic stainless steel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brooks, J.A.; Krenzer, R.W.

    1975-07-22

    An age hardenable, austenitic stainless steel having superior weldability properties as well as resistance to degradation of properties in a hydrogen atmosphere is described. It has a composition of from about 24.0 to about 34.0 weight percent (w/o) nickel, from about 13.5 to about 16.0 w/o chromium, from about 1.9 to about 2.3 w/o titanium, from about 1.0 to about 1.5 w/ o molybdenum, from about 0.01 to about 0.05 w/o carbon, from about 0 to about 0.25 w/o manganese, from about 0 to about 0.01 w/o phosphorous and preferably about 0.005 w/o maximum, from about 0 to about 0.010 w/o sulfur and preferably about 0.005 w/o maximum, from about 0 to about 0.25 w/o silicon, from about 0.1 to about 0.35 w/o aluminum, from about 0.10 to about 0.50 w/o vanadium, from about 0 to about 0.0015 w/o boron, and the balance essentially iron. (auth)

  19. Early Market TRL/MRL Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronnebro, Ewa; Stetson, Ned

    2013-12-01

    he focus of this report is TRL/MRL analysis of hydrogen storage; it documents the methodology and results of an effort to identify hydrogen storage technologies technical and manufacturing readiness for early market motive and non-motive applications and to provide a path forward toward commercialization. Motive applications include materials handling equipment (MHE) and ground support equipment (GSE), such as forklifts, tow tractors, and specialty vehicles such as golf carts, lawn mowers and wheel chairs. Non-motive applications are portable, stationary or auxiliary power units (APUs) and include portable laptops, backup power, remote sensor power, and auxiliary power for recreational vehicles, hotels, hospitals, etc. Hydrogen storage technologies assessed include metal hydrides, chemical hydrides, sorbents, gaseous storage, and liquid storage. The assessments are based on a combination of Technology Readiness Level (TRL) and Manufacturing Readiness Level (MRL) designations that enable evaluation of hydrogen storage technologies at varying levels of development. The manufacturing status could be established from eight risk elements: Technical Maturity, Design, Materials, Cost & Funding, Process Capability, Personnel, Facilities and Manufacturing Planning. This approach provides a logical methodology and roadmap to enable the identification of hydrogen storage technologies, their advantages/disadvantages, gaps and R&D needs on an unbiased and transparent scale that is easily communicated to interagency partners. This technology readiness assessment (TRA) report documents the process used to conduct the TRA/MRA (technology and manufacturing readiness assessment), reports the TRL and MRL for each assessed technology and provides recommendations based on the findings. To investigate the state of the art and needs to mature the technologies, PNNL prepared a questionnaire to assign TRL and MRL for each hydrogen storage technology. The questionnaire was sent to identified hydrogen storage technology developers and manufacturers who were asked to perform a self-assessment. We included both domestic and international organizations including U.S. national laboratories, U.S. companies, European companies and Japanese companies. PNNL collected the data and performed an analysis to deduce the level of maturity and to provide program recommendations.

  20. Non-uniform Aging on Super Duty Diesel Truck Aged Urea Cu/Zeolite SCR

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Catalysts | Department of Energy Cu/Zeolite SCR catalysts aged for 50k miles on a Super Duty diesel truck PDF icon deer10_cheng.pdf More Documents & Publications Deactivation Mechanisms of Base Metal/Zeolite Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction Materials, and Development of Zeolite-Based Hydrocarbon Adsorber Materials Deactivation Mechanisms of Base Metal/Zeolite Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction Materials, and Development of Zeolite-Based Hydrocarbon Adsorber Materials Understanding the

  1. Risk of Cerebrovascular Events in Elderly Patients After Radiation Therapy Versus Surgery for Early-Stage Glottic Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Julian C.; Kruser, Tim J.; Gondi, Vinai; Mohindra, Pranshu; Cannon, Donald M.; Harari, Paul M.; Bentzen, Sren M.

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: Comprehensive neck radiation therapy (RT) has been shown to increase cerebrovascular disease (CVD) risk in advanced-stage head-and-neck cancer. We assessed whether more limited neck RT used for early-stage (T1-T2 N0) glottic cancer is associated with increased CVD risk, using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database. Methods and Materials: We identified patients ?66 years of age with early-stage glottic laryngeal cancer from SEER diagnosed from 1992 to 2007. Patients treated with combined surgery and RT were excluded. Medicare CPT codes for carotid interventions, Medicare ICD-9 codes for cerebrovascular events, and SEER data for stroke as the cause of death were collected. Similarly, Medicare CPT and ICD-9 codes for peripheral vascular disease (PVD) were assessed to serve as an internal control between treatment groups. Results: A total of 1413 assessable patients (RT, n=1055; surgery, n=358) were analyzed. The actuarial 10-year risk of CVD was 56.5% (95% confidence interval 51.5%-61.5%) for the RT cohort versus 48.7% (41.1%-56.3%) in the surgery cohort (P=.27). The actuarial 10-year risk of PVD did not differ between the RT (52.7% [48.1%-57.3%]) and surgery cohorts (52.6% [45.2%-60.0%]) (P=.89). Univariate analysis showed an increased association of CVD with more recent diagnosis (P=.001) and increasing age (P=.001). On multivariate Cox analysis, increasing age (P<.001) and recent diagnosis (P=.002) remained significantly associated with a higher CVD risk, whereas the association of RT and CVD remained not statistically significant (HR=1.11 [0.91-1.37,] P=.31). Conclusions: Elderly patients with early-stage laryngeal cancer have a high burden of cerebrovascular events after surgical management or RT. RT and surgery are associated with comparable risk for subsequent CVD development after treatment in elderly patients.

  2. Improved Pharmacological and Structural Properties of HIV Fusion Inhibitor AP3 over Enfuvirtide: Highlighting Advantages of Artificial Peptide Strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Xiaojie; Zhu, Yun; Ye, Sheng; Wang, Qian; Xu, Wei; Su, Shan; Sun, Zhiwu; Yu, Fei; Liu, Qi; Wang, Chao; Zhang, Tianhong; Zhang, Zhenqing; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Jianqing; Du, Lanying; Liu, Keliang; Lu, Lu; Zhang, Rongguang; Jiang, Shibo

    2015-08-19

    Enfuvirtide (T20), is the first HIV fusion inhibitor approved for treatment of HIV/AIDS patients who fail to respond to the current antiretroviral drugs. However, its clinical application is limited because of short half-life, drug resistance and cross-reactivity with the preexisting antibodies in HIV-infected patients. Using an artificial peptide strategy, we designed a peptide with non-native protein sequence, AP3, which exhibited potent antiviral activity against a broad spectrum of HIV-1 strains, including those resistant to T20, and had remarkably longer in vivo half-life than T20. While the preexisting antibodies in HIV-infected patients significantly suppressed T20’s antiviral activity, these antibodies neither recognized AP3, nor attenuated its anti-HIV-1 activity. Structurally different from T20, AP3 could fold into single-helix and interact with gp41 NHR. The two residues, Met and Thr, at the N-terminus of AP3 form a hook-like structure to stabilize interaction between AP3 and NHR helices. Therefore, AP3 has potential for further development as a new HIV fusion inhibitor with improved antiviral efficacy, resistance profile and pharmacological properties over enfuvirtide. Meanwhile, this study highlighted the advantages of artificially designed peptides, and confirmed that this strategy could be used in developing artificial peptide-based viral fusion inhibitors against HIV and other enveloped viruses.

  3. LEAVING THE DARK AGES WITH AMIGA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manrique, Alberto; Salvador-Sol, Eduard; Juan, Enric; Rozas, Jos Mara; Sagrist, Antoni; Casteels, Kevin; Hatziminaoglou, Evanthia; Bruzual, Gustavo; Magris, Gladis

    2015-01-01

    We present an Analytic Model of Intergalactic-medium and GAlaxy (AMIGA) evolution since the dark ages. AMIGA is in the spirit of the popular semi-analytic models of galaxy formation, although it does not use halo merger trees but interpolates halo properties in grids that are progressively built. This strategy is less memory-demanding and allows one to start modeling at sufficiently high redshifts and low halo masses to have trivial boundary conditions. The number of free parameters is minimized by making a causal connection between physical processes usually treated as independent of each other, which leads to more reliable predictions. However, the strongest points of AMIGA are the following: (1) the inclusion of molecular cooling and metal-poor, population III (Pop III) stars with the most dramatic feedback and (2) accurate follow up of the temperature and volume filling factor of neutral, singly ionized, and doubly ionized regions, taking into account the distinct halo mass functions in those environments. We find the following general results. Massive Pop III stars determine the intergalactic medium metallicity and temperature, and the growth of spheroids and disks is self-regulated by that of massive black holes (MBHs) developed from the remnants of those stars. However, the properties of normal galaxies and active galactic nuclei appear to be quite insensitive to Pop III star properties due to the much higher yield of ordinary stars compared to Pop III stars and the dramatic growth of MBHs when normal galaxies begin to develop, which cause the memory loss of the initial conditions.

  4. A collaborative success story -- The rebirth of an aging waste-to-energy plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shultz, D.S.

    1996-12-31

    In 1993 American Ref-Fuel purchased an early generation waste-to-energy plant burdened with technical and environmental obsolescence and facing eminent closure. Through the successful collaboration of public regulatory agencies, private industry, local government and organized labor, the facility will be retrofitted and repowered to meet new source performance emission standards and re-established as an integral component in the Niagara Frontier`s solid waste disposal scheme. The environmental revitalization of this Niagara Falls, New York plant will require a capital expenditure of $150 million and construction work is scheduled to be completed by mid 1996. This case study is an example of how aging environmental infrastructure, through careful planning and collaboration between the public and private sector, can be retrofitted for the next century while maintaining employing and contributing over $193 million to the local economy.

  5. Early Users to Test New Burst Buffer on Cori

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Early Users to Test New Burst Buffer on Cori Early Users to Test New Burst Buffer on Cori Designed to Accelerate I/O Performance October 5, 2015 Corimockup NERSC has selected a number of HPC research projects to participate in the center's new Burst Buffer Early User Program, where they will be able to test and run their codes using the new Burst Buffer feature on the center's newest supercomputer, Cori. Cori Phase 1, recently installed in the new Computational Research and Theory building at

  6. Space-Age Ceramics Get Their Toughest Test

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Space-Age Ceramics Get Their Toughest Test Space-Age Ceramics Get Their Toughest Test Print Wednesday, 17 April 2013 07:23 Advanced ceramic composites can withstand the ultrahigh operational temperatures projected for hypersonic jet and next-generation gas-turbine engines, but real-time analysis of the mechanical properties of these space-age materials at ultrahigh temperatures has been a challenge-until now. Researchers have developed the first testing facility that enables microtomography of

  7. Space-Age Ceramics Get Their Toughest Test

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Space-Age Ceramics Get Their Toughest Test Space-Age Ceramics Get Their Toughest Test Print Tuesday, 11 December 2012 14:54 Advanced ceramic composites can withstand the ultrahigh operational temperatures projected for hypersonic jet and next generation gas turbine engines, but real-time analysis of the mechanical properties of these space-age materials at ultrahigh temperatures has been a challenge - until now. Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley researchers have developed the first testing facility

  8. Sandia Lightning Early Warning Network: Digital-based upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, G.M.

    1994-05-01

    This report describes the layout and operation of the recently upgraded Sandia Lightning Early Warning Network, which was upgraded from an analog-based to a digital-based telemetry system.

  9. PPPL physicist Brian Grierson wins DOE Early Career Research...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    wins DOE Early Career Research Program grant By John Greenwald May 13, 2014 Tweet ... The five-year grant will total some 2.5 million and fund exploration of the mechanisms ...

  10. Physicist Peter Winter wins Department of Energy Early Career...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    received a DOE Early Career Award, a prestigious five-year research grant totaling 2.5 million. The grant will help to fund Winter's contributions to the muon g-2 ("g minus 2") ...

  11. Data Analysis of Early Fuel Cell Market Demonstrations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.; Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.

    2009-11-17

    Presentation about early fuel cell markets, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Hydrogen Secure Data Center and its role in data analysis and demonstrations, and composite data products, and results reported to multiple stakeholders.

  12. Sandia researcher Stephanie Hansen receives DOE Early Career...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NNSA Blog Sandia National Laboratories researcher Stephanie Hansen has received a 2.5 million, five-year Early Career Research Program award from the DOE's Office of Science for ...

  13. The role of phase instabilities in the early material response...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The role of phase instabilities in the early material response during laser-induced breakdown in bulk fused silica Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The role of phase...

  14. Ahmed Diallo wins DOE Early Career Research Program funding ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Early Career Research Program funding By Kitta MacPherson May 16, 2013 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Ahmed Diallo (Photo by Elle Starkman PPPL Office of...

  15. Fuel Cells Today: Early Market Applications and Learning Demonstrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-09-09

    This MP3 provides an overview of early market fuel cell applications including today's commercially available fuel cells and "learning demonstrations" to validate fuel cell technology in real world conditions.

  16. Structural basis of HIV-1 capsid recognition by PF74 and CPSF6

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bhattacharya, Akash; Alam, Steven L.; Fricke, Thomas; Zadrozny, Kaneil; Sedzicki, Jaroslaw; Taylor, Alexander B.; Demeler, Borries; Pornillos, Owen; Ganser-Pornillos, Barbie K.; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; et al

    2014-12-17

    Upon infection of susceptible cells by HIV-1, the conical capsid formed by ~250 hexamers and 12 pentamers of the CA protein is delivered to the cytoplasm. In this study, the capsid shields the RNA genome and proteins required for reverse transcription. In addition, the surface of the capsid mediates numerous host–virus interactions, which either promote infection or enable viral restriction by innate immune responses. In the intact capsid, there is an intermolecular interface between the N-terminal domain (NTD) of one subunit and the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the adjacent subunit within the same hexameric ring. The NTD–CTD interface is criticalmore » for capsid assembly, both as an architectural element of the CA hexamer and pentamer and as a mechanistic element for generating lattice curvature. Here we report biochemical experiments showing that PF-3450074 (PF74), a drug that inhibits HIV-1 infection, as well as host proteins cleavage and polyadenylation specific factor 6 (CPSF6) and nucleoporin 153 kDa (NUP153), bind to the CA hexamer with at least 10-fold higher affinities compared with nonassembled CA or isolated CA domains. The crystal structure of PF74 in complex with the CA hexamer reveals that PF74 binds in a preformed pocket encompassing the NTD–CTD interface, suggesting that the principal inhibitory target of PF74 is the assembled capsid. Likewise, CPSF6 binds in the same pocket. Given that the NTD–CTD interface is a specific molecular signature of assembled hexamers in the capsid, binding of NUP153 at this site suggests that key features of capsid architecture remain intact upon delivery of the preintegration complex to the nucleus.« less

  17. Structural basis of HIV-1 capsid recognition by PF74 and CPSF6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhattacharya, Akash; Alam, Steven L.; Fricke, Thomas; Zadrozny, Kaneil; Sedzicki, Jaroslaw; Taylor, Alexander B.; Demeler, Borries; Pornillos, Owen; Ganser-Pornillos, Barbie K.; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Ivanov, Dmitri N.; Yeager, Mark

    2014-12-17

    Upon infection of susceptible cells by HIV-1, the conical capsid formed by ~250 hexamers and 12 pentamers of the CA protein is delivered to the cytoplasm. In this study, the capsid shields the RNA genome and proteins required for reverse transcription. In addition, the surface of the capsid mediates numerous host–virus interactions, which either promote infection or enable viral restriction by innate immune responses. In the intact capsid, there is an intermolecular interface between the N-terminal domain (NTD) of one subunit and the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the adjacent subunit within the same hexameric ring. The NTD–CTD interface is critical for capsid assembly, both as an architectural element of the CA hexamer and pentamer and as a mechanistic element for generating lattice curvature. Here we report biochemical experiments showing that PF-3450074 (PF74), a drug that inhibits HIV-1 infection, as well as host proteins cleavage and polyadenylation specific factor 6 (CPSF6) and nucleoporin 153 kDa (NUP153), bind to the CA hexamer with at least 10-fold higher affinities compared with nonassembled CA or isolated CA domains. The crystal structure of PF74 in complex with the CA hexamer reveals that PF74 binds in a preformed pocket encompassing the NTD–CTD interface, suggesting that the principal inhibitory target of PF74 is the assembled capsid. Likewise, CPSF6 binds in the same pocket. Given that the NTD–CTD interface is a specific molecular signature of assembled hexamers in the capsid, binding of NUP153 at this site suggests that key features of capsid architecture remain intact upon delivery of the preintegration complex to the nucleus.

  18. Variation of the radiative properties during black carbon aging...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A theoretical black carbon (BC) aging model is developed to account for three typical evolution stages, namely, freshly emitted aggregates, coated BC by soluble material, and BC ...

  19. An Accelerated Aging Method for Diesel Exhaust Aftertreatment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    An Accelerated Aging Method for Diesel Exhaust Aftertreatment Systems Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in ...

  20. Rapid Aging Protocols for Diesel Aftertreatment Devices: NOx...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rapid Aging Protocols for Diesel Aftertreatment Devices: NOx Abatement Catalysts Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER ...

  1. Aging Management Program for Stainless Steel Dry Storage System Canisters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, Darrell S.; Lin, Bruce P.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2015-06-01

    This is a conference paper presenting an aging management program for stainless steel dry storage system canisters. NRC is lead author of paper. PNNL provided input.

  2. The Development of Rapid Aging and Poisoning Protocols for Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications CLEERS Aftertreatment Modeling and Analysis Effect of Thermal Aging on NO oxidation and NOx storage in a Fully-Formulated Lean NOx Trap CLEERS ...

  3. Quadrennial Energy Review Storage: Is It Finally Coming of Age...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Powering forward. Together. July 11, 2014 Department of Energy Quadrennial Energy Review Storage: Is It Finally Coming of Age? Arlen Orchard, General Manager & CEO * About SMUD * ...

  4. Mechanical Testing of TR-55 Rubber Thermally Aged Under Tensile...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; AGING; ELONGATION; HEATING; RUBBERS; STIMULI; STRAINS; TESTING; ULTIMATE STRENGTH Word Cloud ...

  5. The Sandia MEMS Passive Shock Sensor : dormancy and aging. (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; AGING; SENSORS; SHOCK WAVES; PERFORMANCE TESTING; MICROELECTRONIC ...

  6. Space-Age Ceramics Get Their Toughest Test

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Space-Age Ceramics Get Their Toughest Test Print Advanced ceramic composites can withstand the ultrahigh operational temperatures projected for hypersonic jet and next-generation...

  7. Age Inversiones in Media Ambiente AIMA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Inversiones in Media Ambiente AIMA Jump to: navigation, search Name: Age Inversiones in Media Ambiente (AIMA) Place: Spain Product: Invests in projects that aim to generate energy...

  8. Y-12 hosts NNSA Aging Infrastructure Workshop | Y-12 National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from across the NNSA complex and private industry gathered in Oak Ridge to discuss lessons learned and brainstorm solutions for dealing with the aging nuclear...

  9. Y-12 hosts NNSA aging infrastructure workshop | National Nuclear...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    throughout NNSA and private industry recently gathered in Oak Ridge, Tenn., to discuss lessons learned and brainstorm solutions for dealing with the aging nuclear...

  10. Health, Productivity and Safety in the Workforce: Does Age Make...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... REPORTED HEALTH CONDITIONS* Age** N (%) Depression ***LD Sleeping Problems LD Overweight ... example, 16.3% workers 50 reported depression and had 131.58 (per 100 FTEs) fewer ...

  11. DOE Science Showcase - "PECASE: Outstanding early career research

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    honored" | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information "PECASE: Outstanding early career research honored" Energy Department Scientists & Engineers Honored with Presidential Early Career Awards PECASE award ceremony DOE recently recognized the following scientists and engineers at the outset of their independent research careers: Dillon Fong and Elena V. Shevchenko of Argonne National Laboratory Find Dillon Fong's research in the Energy

  12. An early deployment strategy for carbon capture, utilisation, and storage

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: An early deployment strategy for carbon capture, utilisation, and storage Citation Details In-Document Search Title: An early deployment strategy for carbon capture, utilisation, and storage This report describes the current use of CO2 for EOR, and discusses potential expansion of EOR using CO2 from power plants. Analysis of potential EOR development in the USA, where most current CO2-based EOR production takes place, indicates that

  13. Memorandum of Understanding on early coordination of federal authorizations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and related environmental reviews required in order to site electric transmission facilities: August 2006 | Department of Energy on early coordination of federal authorizations and related environmental reviews required in order to site electric transmission facilities: August 2006 Memorandum of Understanding on early coordination of federal authorizations and related environmental reviews required in order to site electric transmission facilities: August 2006 With the signing of this

  14. Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM): Early

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Site Demonstration (Conference) | SciTech Connect Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM): Early Site Demonstration Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM): Early Site Demonstration The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management, Technology Innovation and Development (EM-32), is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM).

  15. Early Stage R&D Technologies - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Marketing Summaries Site Map Printable Version Share this resource About Search Categories (15) Advanced Materials Biomass and Biofuels Building Energy Efficiency Electricity Transmission Energy Analysis Energy Storage Geothermal Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Industrial Technologies Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Startup America Vehicles and Fuels Wind Energy Partners (27) Visual Patent Search Success Stories Browse Early Stage R&D Marketing Summaries Early

  16. Early Adoption of Fuel Cell Technologies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Adoption of Fuel Cell Technologies Early Adoption of Fuel Cell Technologies Many private sector organizations-grocers, banks, tire and hardware companies, logistics providers, and others-have begun to realize the value of using fuel cells to support their operations. And they aren't the only ones. Federal agencies across the country are incorporating advanced energy technologies, such as fuel cells, into their facilities. Federal Deployment and Demonstration Government adoption of early market

  17. Early Market Applications for Fuel Cell Technologies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Market Applications for Fuel Cell Technologies Early Market Applications for Fuel Cell Technologies Fuel Cell Technologies Office market transformation efforts focus on several key early market applications: Specialty vehicles Emergency backup power Prime power for critical loads Specialty Vehicles For specialty vehicles such as forklifts, fuel cells can be a cost-competitive alternative to traditional lead-acid batteries because: Photo of a Hydrogenics hydrogen-powered forklift in front of an

  18. New Technology Allows Early Closure of NNSA Monitoring Station, Saves

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Taxpayer Dollars | National Nuclear Security Administration New Technology Allows Early Closure of NNSA Monitoring Station, Saves Taxpayer Dollars October 22, 2012 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) today announced that it has closed its Transparency Monitoring Office (TMO) in Novouralsk, Russia ahead of schedule. The early closure was made possible by the successful use of U.S.-designed unattended monitoring technology in Russia and will save U.S.

  19. Early detection of chemotherapy-refractory patients by monitoring textural

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    alterations in diffuse optical spectroscopic images (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Early detection of chemotherapy-refractory patients by monitoring textural alterations in diffuse optical spectroscopic images Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Early detection of chemotherapy-refractory patients by monitoring textural alterations in diffuse optical spectroscopic images Purpose: Changes in textural characteristics of diffuse optical spectroscopic (DOS) functional images,

  20. Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) About About Home Organization Budget Field Offices Federal Advisory Committees History Scientific and Technical Information Honors & Awards Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) DOE's Winners Since 1996 2012 Ceremony 2014 Ceremony The Enrico Fermi Award The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award DOE Nobel Laureates Federal Laboratory Consortium Excellence in

  1. Inflationary gravitational waves and the evolution of the early universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jinno, Ryusuke; Moroi, Takeo; Nakayama, Kazunori E-mail: moroi@hep-th.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-01-01

    We study the effects of various phenomena which may have happened in the early universe on the spectrum of inflationary gravitational waves. The phenomena include phase transitions, entropy productions from non-relativistic matter, the production of dark radiation, and decoupling of dark matter/radiation from thermal bath. These events can create several characteristic signatures in the inflationary gravitational wave spectrum, which may be direct probes of the history of the early universe and the nature of high-energy physics.

  2. Laboratory researcher Joel Rowland to receive DOE Early Career Award

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rowland to receive DOE Early Career Award Laboratory researcher Joel Rowland to receive DOE Early Career Award Rowland's research was recognized by DOE for incorporating hydrological controls on carbon cycling in flood plain ecosystems into Earth System Models. May 8, 2014 Joel Rowland Joel Rowland Contact Steve Sandoval Communications Office (505) 665-9206 Email "Joel contributed to the vitality of our Laboratory as a postdoc and continues to provide an innovative and intellectual spark as

  3. Three NNSA researchers receive President's highest early-career STEM

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    award | National Nuclear Security Administration Three NNSA researchers receive President's highest early-career STEM award Thursday, May 5, 2016 - 10:35am Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz, left, and NNSA Administrator Frank Klotz, right, join physicist Tammy Ma as she celebrates receiving a PECASE award for her work with the National Ignition Facility. Yesterday Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz hosted a special ceremony honoring DOE's 13 recipients of the 2016 Presidential Early Career

  4. Energy Department Announces 61 Scientists to Receive Early Career Research

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program Funding | Department of Energy 61 Scientists to Receive Early Career Research Program Funding Energy Department Announces 61 Scientists to Receive Early Career Research Program Funding May 7, 2013 - 12:56pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - Underscoring the Obama Administration's commitment to investing in innovation and the American workforce, Acting Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman today announced that 61 scientists from across the nation will receive up to

  5. Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers Award

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Ceremony Introduction | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Transcribed Media Home » About » Honors and Awards » PECASE » 2012 » Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers Award Ceremony Introduction Transcribed Media Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 2012 Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers Award Ceremony Introduction Print Text Size: A A A

  6. Early Markets: Fuel Cells for Material Handling Equipment | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Material Handling Equipment Early Markets: Fuel Cells for Material Handling Equipment This fact sheet describes the use of hydrogen fuel cells to power material handling equipment (MHE) and includes cost and performance comparisons for fuel cell-powered and battery-powered MHE. PDF icon Early Markets: Fuel Cells for Material Handling Equipment More Documents & Publications An Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered Material Handling Equipment Market

  7. Alberi to Participate in DOE's Early Career Research Program - News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Releases | NREL Alberi to Participate in DOE's Early Career Research Program Project will research new semiconductors to advance photovoltaic and other technologies. July 3, 2012 Kirstin Alberi Kirstin Alberi A researcher at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE)'s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has been selected by DOE's Office of Basic Energy Sciences as one of 68 scientists to participate in DOE's Early Career Research Program. Kirstin Alberi is eligible to receive up to $2.5

  8. Breakout Group 4: Early Markets and Demonstrations | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4: Early Markets and Demonstrations Breakout Group 4: Early Markets and Demonstrations Report from Breakout Group 4 of the Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation Workshop, January 23-24, 2008 PDF icon fc_pre-solicitation_workshop_earlymarket_demo.pdf More Documents & Publications DOE Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation Workshop Agenda, January 23-24, 2008, Golden, Colorado Breakout Group 3: Water Management Breakout Group 5: Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

  9. Theoretical foundation for measuring the groundwater age distribution.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, William Payton; Arnold, Bill Walter

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we use PFLOTRAN, a highly scalable, parallel, flow and reactive transport code to simulate the concentrations of 3H, 3He, CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, SF6, 39Ar, 81Kr, 4He and themean groundwater age in heterogeneous fields on grids with an excess of 10 million nodes. We utilize this computational platform to simulate the concentration of multiple tracers in high-resolution, heterogeneous 2-D and 3-D domains, and calculate tracer-derived ages. Tracer-derived ages show systematic biases toward younger ages when the groundwater age distribution contains water older than the maximum tracer age. The deviation of the tracer-derived age distribution from the true groundwater age distribution increases with increasing heterogeneity of the system. However, the effect of heterogeneity is diminished as the mean travel time gets closer the tracer age limit. Age distributions in 3-D domains differ significantly from 2-D domains. 3D simulations show decreased mean age, and less variance in age distribution for identical heterogeneity statistics. High-performance computing allows for investigation of tracer and groundwater age systematics in high-resolution domains, providing a platform for understanding and utilizing environmental tracer and groundwater age information in heterogeneous 3-D systems. Groundwater environmental tracers can provide important constraints for the calibration of groundwater flow models. Direct simulation of environmental tracer concentrations in models has the additional advantage of avoiding assumptions associated with using calculated groundwater age values. This study quantifies model uncertainty reduction resulting from the addition of environmental tracer concentration data. The analysis uses a synthetic heterogeneous aquifer and the calibration of a flow and transport model using the pilot point method. Results indicate a significant reduction in the uncertainty in permeability with the addition of environmental tracer data, relative to the use of hydraulic measurements alone. Anthropogenic tracers and their decay products, such as CFC11, 3H, and 3He, provide significant constraint oninput permeability values in the model. Tracer data for 39Ar provide even more complete information on the heterogeneity of permeability and variability in the flow system than the anthropogenic tracers, leading to greater parameter uncertainty reduction.

  10. Aging Behavior and Performance Projections for a Polysulfide Elastomer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Celina, Mathias C.; Giron, Nicholas Henry; Quintana, Adam

    2015-05-01

    The accelerated aging behavior and aging state of a 30 year old field retrieved polysulfide elastomer was examined. The material is used as an environmental thread sealant for a stainless steel bolt in a steel threaded insert in an aluminum assembly. It is a two component curable polysulfide elastomer that is commercially available in a similar formulation as was applied 30 years ago. The primary goal of this study was to establish if aging over 30 years under moderate aging conditions (mostly ambient temperature and humidity) resulted in significant property changes, or if accelerated aging could identify developing aging pathways which would prevent the extended use of this material. The aging behavior of this material was examined in three ways: A traditional accelerated thermo-oxidative aging study between 95 to 140°C which focused on physical and chemical properties changes, an evaluation of the underlying oxidation rates between RT and 125°C, and an assessment of the aging state of a small 30 year old sample. All three data sets were used to establish aging characteristics, their time evolution, and to extrapolate the observed behavior to predict performance limits at RT. The accelerated aging study revealed a relatively high average activation energy of ~130 kJ/mol which gives overconfident performance predictions. Oxidation rates showed a decreasing behavior with aging time and a lower E a of ~84 kJ/mol from time - temperature superposition , but also predicted sufficient additional performance at RT. Consistent with these projections for extended RT performance, only small changes were observed for the 30 year old material. Extrapolations using this partially aged material also predict ongoing use as a viable option. Unexpected RT degradation could only develop into a concern should the oxidation rate not trend lower over time as was observed at elevated temperature. Considering all data acquired in this limited aging study , there are no immediately apparent concerns with this material for ongoing use. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS We thank Lisa Deibler for providing us with a small sample of field aged and new commercial material.

  11. Accelerated Aging of Roofing Materials - 2013 BTO Peer Review | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Materials - 2013 BTO Peer Review Accelerated Aging of Roofing Materials - 2013 BTO Peer Review Emerging Technologies Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review PDF icon emrgtech24_destaillats_040413.pdf More Documents & Publications Accelerated Aging of Roofing Materials Stay-Clean and Durable White Elastomeric Roof Coatings New Cool Roof Coatings and Affordable Cool Color Asphalt

  12. Age and gender specific biokinetic model for strontium in humans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shagina, N. B.; Tolstykh, E. I.; Degteva, M. O.; Anspaugh, L. R.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2015-03-01

    A biokinetic model for strontium in humans is necessary for quantification of internal doses due to strontium radioisotopes. The ICRP-recommended biokinetic model for strontium has limitation for use in a population study, because it is not gender specific and does not cover all age ranges. The extensive Techa River data set on 90Sr in humans (tens of thousands of measurements) is a unique source of data on long-term strontium retention for men and women of all ages at intake. These, as well as published data, were used for evaluation of age- and gender-specific parameters for a new compartment biokinetic model for strontium (Sr-AGe model). The Sr-AGe model has similar structure as the ICRP model for the alkaline earth elements. The following parameters were mainly reevaluated: gastro-intestinal absorption and parameters related to the processes of bone formation and resorption defining calcium and strontium transfers in skeletal compartments. The Sr-AGe model satisfactorily describes available data sets on strontium retention for different kinds of intake (dietary and intravenous) at different ages (080 years old) and demonstrates good agreement with data sets for different ethnic groups. The Sr-AGe model can be used for dose assessment in epidemiological studies of general population exposed to ingested strontium radioisotopes.

  13. Nuclear power plant Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL). Appendix B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kasza, K.E.; Diercks, D.R.; Holland, J.W.; Choi, S.U.

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of this generic aging lessons learned (GALL) review is to provide a systematic review of plant aging information in order to assess materials and component aging issues related to continued operation and license renewal of operating reactors. Literature on mechanical, structural, and thermal-hydraulic components and systems reviewed consisted of 97 Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) reports, 23 NRC Generic Letters, 154 Information Notices, 29 Licensee Event Reports (LERs), 4 Bulletins, and 9 Nuclear Management and Resources Council Industry Reports (NUMARC IRs) and literature on electrical components and systems reviewed consisted of 66 NPAR reports, 8 NRC Generic Letters, 111 Information Notices, 53 LERs, 1 Bulletin, and 1 NUMARC IR. More than 550 documents were reviewed. The results of these reviews were systematized using a standardized GALL tabular format and standardized definitions of aging-related degradation mechanisms and effects. The tables are included in volume s 1 and 2 of this report. A computerized data base has also been developed for all review tables and can be used to expedite the search for desired information on structures, components, and relevant aging effects. A survey of the GALL tables reveals that all ongoing significant component aging issues are currently being addressed by the regulatory process. However, the aging of what are termed passive components has been highlighted for continued scrutiny. This report consists of Volume 2, which consists of the GALL literature review tables for the NUMARC Industry Reports reviewed for the report.

  14. INTERMEDIATE-AGE STELLAR POPULATIONS IN CLASSICAL QUASI-STELLAR OBJECT HOST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canalizo, Gabriela; Stockton, Alan E-mail: stockton@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2013-08-01

    Although mergers and starbursts are often invoked in the discussion of quasi-stellar object (QSO) activity in the context of galaxy evolution, several studies have questioned their importance or even their presence in QSO host galaxies. Accordingly, we are conducting a study of z {approx} 0.2 QSO host galaxies previously classified as passively evolving elliptical galaxies. We present deep Keck/LRIS spectroscopy of a sample of 15 hosts and model their stellar absorption spectra using stellar synthesis models. The high signal-to-noise ratio of our spectra allows us to break various degeneracies that arise from different combinations of models, varying metallicities, and contamination from QSO light. We find that none of the host spectra can be modeled by purely old stellar populations and that the majority of the hosts (14/15) have a substantial contribution from intermediate-age populations with ages ranging from 0.7 to 2.4 Gyr. An average host spectrum is strikingly well fit by a combination of an old population and a 2.1 (+0.5, -0.7) Gyr population. The morphologies of the host galaxies suggest that these aging starbursts were induced during the early stages of the mergers that resulted in the elliptical-shaped galaxies that we observe. The current active galactic nucleus activity likely corresponds to the late episodes of accretion predicted by numerical simulations, which occur near the end of the mergers, whereas earlier episodes may be more difficult to observe due to obscuration. Our off-axis observations prevent us from detecting any current star formation or young stellar populations that may be present in the central few kiloparsecs.

  15. Seismic ruggedness of aged electrical components: Final report (Phase 2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gleason, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    Seismic tests on new and aged components have shown that, for many types of commonly used nuclear plant electrical components, deterioration due to aging does not significantly affect the ability of the components to function during and after a seismic event. This was demonstrated for capacitors, circuit breakers, contactors (motor starters), control station assemblies, electronic alarms, electronics, fuses, fuse blocks, inductors, meters, motors, pressure transmitters, power supplies, relays, RTDs, solenoid valves, terminal blocks, time delay relays, transformers and switches. A few switch types (limit, pressure and rotary) were observed to be more prone to contact chatter in an aged condition than in an unaged condition. However, the ability of these devices to switch during and after shaking was not affected by aging. These results can be referenced to eliminate the cost of aging prior to seismic qualification testing for many types of electrical components.

  16. Aging management guideline for commercial nuclear power plants-pumps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booker, S.; Katz, D.; Daavettila, N.; Lehnert, D.

    1994-03-01

    This Aging Management Guideline (AMG) describes recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in BWR and PWR commercial nuclear power plant pumps important to license renewal. The intent of this AMG is to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR Part 54. This AMG is presented in a manner that allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein.

  17. Strain-Specific V3 and CD4 Binding Site Autologous HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies Select Neutralization-Resistant Viruses

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moody, M.  Anthony; Gao, Feng; Gurley, Thaddeus  C.; Amos, Joshua  D.; Kumar, Amit; Hora, Bhavna; Marshall, Dawn  J.; Whitesides, John  F.; Xia, Shi-Mao; Parks, Robert; et al

    2015-09-09

    The third variable (V3) loop and the CD4 binding site (CD4bs) of the viral envelope are frequently targeted by neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) in HIV-1-infected individuals. In chronic infection, virus escape mutants repopulate the plasma and V3 and CD4bs nAbs emerge that can neutralize heterologous tier 1 easy-to-neutralize, but not tier 2 difficult-to-neutralize HIV-1 isolates. However, neutralization sensitivity of autologous plasma viruses to this type of nAb response has not been studied. We describe the development and evolution in vivo of antibodies distinguished by their target specificity for V3and CD4bs epitopes on autologous tier 2 viruses but not on heterologous tiermore » 2 viruses. A surprisingly high fraction of autologous circulating viruses was sensitive to these antibodies. These findings demonstrate a role for V3 and CD4bs antibodies in constraining the native envelope trimer in vivo to a neutralization-resistant phenotype, explaining why HIV-1 transmission generally occurs by tier 2 neutralization-resistant viruses.« less

  18. Strain-Specific V3 and CD4 Binding Site Autologous HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies Select Neutralization-Resistant Viruses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moody, M.  Anthony; Gao, Feng; Gurley, Thaddeus  C.; Amos, Joshua  D.; Kumar, Amit; Hora, Bhavna; Marshall, Dawn  J.; Whitesides, John  F.; Xia, Shi-Mao; Parks, Robert; Lloyd, Krissey  E.; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Lu, Xiaozhi; Bonsignori, Mattia; Finzi, Andrés; Vandergrift, Nathan  A.; Alam, S.  Munir; Ferrari, Guido; Shen, Xiaoying; Tomaras, Georgia  D.; Kamanga, Gift; Cohen, Myron  S.; Sam, Noel  E.; Kapiga, Saidi; Gray, Elin S.; Tumba, Nancy  L.; Morris, Lynn; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Gorny, Miroslaw  K.; Mascola, John  R.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Shaw, George  M.; Sodroski, Joseph  G.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Montefiori, David C.; Hraber, Peter T.; Korber, Bette T.; Haynes, Barton F.

    2015-09-09

    The third variable (V3) loop and the CD4 binding site (CD4bs) of the viral envelope are frequently targeted by neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) in HIV-1-infected individuals. In chronic infection, virus escape mutants repopulate the plasma and V3 and CD4bs nAbs emerge that can neutralize heterologous tier 1 easy-to-neutralize, but not tier 2 difficult-to-neutralize HIV-1 isolates. However, neutralization sensitivity of autologous plasma viruses to this type of nAb response has not been studied. We describe the development and evolution in vivo of antibodies distinguished by their target specificity for V3and CD4bs epitopes on autologous tier 2 viruses but not on heterologous tier 2 viruses. A surprisingly high fraction of autologous circulating viruses was sensitive to these antibodies. These findings demonstrate a role for V3 and CD4bs antibodies in constraining the native envelope trimer in vivo to a neutralization-resistant phenotype, explaining why HIV-1 transmission generally occurs by tier 2 neutralization-resistant viruses.

  19. Synergistic activity profile of griffithsin in combination with tenofovir, maraviroc and enfuvirtide against HIV-1 clade C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferir, Geoffrey; Palmer, Kenneth E.; Schols, Dominique

    2011-09-01

    Griffithsin (GRFT) is possibly the most potent anti-HIV peptide found in natural sources. Due to its potent and broad-spectrum antiviral activity and unique safety profile it has great potential as topical microbicide component. Here, we evaluated various combinations of GRFT against HIV-1 clade B and clade C isolates in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and in CD4{sup +} MT-4 cells. In all combinations tested, GRFT showed synergistic activity profile with tenofovir, maraviroc and enfuvirtide based on the median effect principle with combination indices (CI) varying between 0.34 and 0.79 at the calculated EC{sub 95} level. Furthermore, the different glycosylation patterns on the viral envelope of clade B and clade C gp120 had no observable effect on the synergistic interactions. Overall, we can conclude that the evaluated two-drug combination increases their antiviral potency and supports further clinical investigations in pre-exposure prophylaxis for GRFT combinations in the context of HIV-1 clade C infection.

  20. Comparative Effectiveness of 5 Treatment Strategies for Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in the Elderly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirvani, Shervin M.; Jiang, Jing; Chang, Joe Y.; Welsh, James W.; Gomez, Daniel R.; Swisher, Stephen; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Smith, Benjamin D.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: The incidence of early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) among older adults is expected to increase because of demographic trends and computed tomography-based screening; yet, optimal treatment in the elderly remains controversial. Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare cohort spanning 2001-2007, we compared survival outcomes associated with 5 strategies used in contemporary practice: lobectomy, sublobar resection, conventional radiation therapy, stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR), and observation. Methods and Materials: Treatment strategy and covariates were determined in 10,923 patients aged {>=}66 years with stage IA-IB NSCLC. Cox regression, adjusted for patient and tumor factors, compared overall and disease-specific survival for the 5 strategies. In a second exploratory analysis, propensity-score matching was used for comparison of SABR with other options. Results: The median age was 75 years, and 29% had moderate to severe comorbidities. Treatment distribution was lobectomy (59%), sublobar resection (11.7%), conventional radiation (14.8%), observation (12.6%), and SABR (1.1%). In Cox regression analysis with a median follow-up time of 3.2 years, SABR was associated with the lowest risk of death within 6 months of diagnosis (hazard ratio [HR] 0.48; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.38-0.63; referent is lobectomy). After 6 months, lobectomy was associated with the best overall and disease-specific survival. In the propensity-score matched analysis, survival after SABR was similar to that after lobectomy (HR 0.71; 95% CI 0.45-1.12; referent is SABR). Conventional radiation and observation were associated with poor outcomes in all analyses. Conclusions: In this population-based experience, lobectomy was associated with the best long-term outcomes in fit elderly patients with early-stage NSCLC. Exploratory analysis of SABR early adopters suggests efficacy comparable with that of surgery in select populations. Evaluation of these therapies in randomized trials is urgently needed.

  1. THE POTENTIAL IMPORTANCE OF BINARY EVOLUTION IN ULTRAVIOLET-OPTICAL SPECTRAL FITTING OF EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Zhongmu; Mao, Caiyan; Chen, Li; Zhang, Qian; Li, Maocai

    2013-10-10

    Most galaxies possibly contain some binaries, and more than half of Galactic hot subdwarf stars, which are thought to be a possible origin of the UV-upturn of old stellar populations, are found in binaries. However, the effect of binary evolution has not been taken into account in most works on the spectral fitting of galaxies. This paper studies the role of binary evolution in the spectral fitting of early-type galaxies, via a stellar population synthesis model including both single and binary star populations. Spectra from ultraviolet to optical bands are fitted to determine a few galaxy parameters. The results show that the inclusion of binaries in stellar population models may lead to obvious change in the determination of some parameters of early-type galaxies and therefore it is potentially important for spectral studies. In particular, the ages of young components of composite stellar populations become much older when using binary star population models instead of single star population models. This implies that binary star population models will measure significantly different star formation histories for early-type galaxies compared to single star population models. In addition, stellar population models with binary interactions on average measure larger dust extinctions than single star population models. This suggests that when binary star population models are used, negative extinctions are possibly no longer necessary in the spectral fitting of galaxies (see previous works, e.g., Cid Fernandes et al. for comparison). Furthermore, it is shown that optical spectra have strong constraints on stellar age while UV spectra have strong constraints on binary fraction. Finally, our results suggest that binary star population models can provide new insight into the stellar properties of globular clusters.

  2. Transmitted virus fitness and host T cell responses collectively define divergent infection outcomes in two HIV-1 recipients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yue, Ling; Pfafferott, Katja J.; Baalwa, Joshua; Conrod, Karen; Dong, Catherine C.; Chui, Cecilia; Rong, Rong; Claiborne, Daniel T.; Prince, Jessica L.; Tang, Jianming; Ribeiro, Ruy M.; Cormier, Emmanuel; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Perelson, Alan S.; Shaw, George M.; Karita, Etienne; Gilmour, Jill; Goepfert, Paul; Derdeyn, Cynthia A.; Allen, Susan A.; Borrow, Persephone; Hunter, Eric; Douek, Daniel C.

    2015-01-08

    Control of virus replication in HIV-1 infection is critical to delaying disease progression. While cellular immune responses are a key determinant of control, relatively little is known about the contribution of the infecting virus to this process. To gain insight into this interplay between virus and host in viral control, we conducted a detailed analysis of two heterosexual HIV-1 subtype A transmission pairs in which female recipients sharing three HLA class I alleles exhibited contrasting clinical outcomes: R880F controlled virus replication while R463F experienced high viral loads and rapid disease progression. Near full-length single genome amplification defined the infecting transmitted/founder (T/F) virus proteome and subsequent sequence evolution over the first year of infection for both acutely infected recipients. T/F virus replicative capacities were compared in vitro, while the development of the earliest cellular immune response was defined using autologous virus sequence-based peptides. The R880F T/F virus replicated significantly slower in vitro than that transmitted to R463F. While neutralizing antibody responses were similar in both subjects, during acute infection R880F mounted a broad T cell response, the most dominant components of which targeted epitopes from which escape was limited. In contrast, the primary HIV-specific T cell response in R463F was focused on just two epitopes, one of which rapidly escaped. This comprehensive study highlights both the importance of the contribution of the lower replication capacity of the transmitted/founder virus and an associated induction of a broad primary HIV-specific T cell response, which was not undermined by rapid epitope escape, to long-term viral control in HIV-1 infection. It underscores the importance of the earliest CD8 T cell response targeting regions of the virus proteome that cannot mutate without a high fitness cost, further emphasizing the need for vaccines that elicit a breadth of T cell responses to conserved viral epitopes.

  3. Transmitted virus fitness and host T cell responses collectively define divergent infection outcomes in two HIV-1 recipients

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yue, Ling; Pfafferott, Katja J.; Baalwa, Joshua; Conrod, Karen; Dong, Catherine C.; Chui, Cecilia; Rong, Rong; Claiborne, Daniel T.; Prince, Jessica L.; Tang, Jianming; et al

    2015-01-08

    Control of virus replication in HIV-1 infection is critical to delaying disease progression. While cellular immune responses are a key determinant of control, relatively little is known about the contribution of the infecting virus to this process. To gain insight into this interplay between virus and host in viral control, we conducted a detailed analysis of two heterosexual HIV-1 subtype A transmission pairs in which female recipients sharing three HLA class I alleles exhibited contrasting clinical outcomes: R880F controlled virus replication while R463F experienced high viral loads and rapid disease progression. Near full-length single genome amplification defined the infecting transmitted/foundermore » (T/F) virus proteome and subsequent sequence evolution over the first year of infection for both acutely infected recipients. T/F virus replicative capacities were compared in vitro, while the development of the earliest cellular immune response was defined using autologous virus sequence-based peptides. The R880F T/F virus replicated significantly slower in vitro than that transmitted to R463F. While neutralizing antibody responses were similar in both subjects, during acute infection R880F mounted a broad T cell response, the most dominant components of which targeted epitopes from which escape was limited. In contrast, the primary HIV-specific T cell response in R463F was focused on just two epitopes, one of which rapidly escaped. This comprehensive study highlights both the importance of the contribution of the lower replication capacity of the transmitted/founder virus and an associated induction of a broad primary HIV-specific T cell response, which was not undermined by rapid epitope escape, to long-term viral control in HIV-1 infection. It underscores the importance of the earliest CD8 T cell response targeting regions of the virus proteome that cannot mutate without a high fitness cost, further emphasizing the need for vaccines that elicit a breadth of T cell responses to conserved viral epitopes.« less

  4. Recommendations for the treatment of aging in standard technical specifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orton, R.D.; Allen, R.P.

    1995-09-01

    As part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated the standard technical specifications for nuclear power plants to determine whether the current surveillance requirements (SRs) were effective in detecting age-related degradation. Nuclear Plant Aging Research findings for selected systems and components were reviewed to identify the stressors and operative aging mechanisms and to evaluate the methods available to detect, differentiate, and trend the resulting aging degradation. Current surveillance and testing requirements for these systems and components were reviewed for their effectiveness in detecting degraded conditions and for potential contributions to premature degradation. When the current surveillance and testing requirements appeared ineffective in detecting aging degradation or potentially could contribute to premature degradation, a possible deficiency in the SRs was identified that could result in undetected degradation. Based on this evaluation, PNL developed recommendations for inspection, surveillance, trending, and condition monitoring methods to be incorporated in the SRs to better detect age- related degradation of these selected systems and components.

  5. COPI selectively drives maturation of the early Golgi

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Papanikou, Effrosyni; Day, Kasey J.; Austin, Jotham; Glick, Benjamin S.

    2015-12-28

    COPI coated vesicles carry material between Golgi compartments, but the role of COPI in the secretory pathway has been ambiguous. Previous studies of thermosensitive yeast COPI mutants yielded the surprising conclusion that COPI was dispensable both for the secretion of certain proteins and for Golgi cisternal maturation. To revisit these issues, we optimized the anchor-away method, which allows peripheral membrane proteins such as COPI to be sequestered rapidly by adding rapamycin. Video fluorescence microscopy revealed that COPI inactivation causes an early Golgi protein to remain in place while late Golgi proteins undergo cycles of arrival and departure. These dynamics generatemore » partially functional hybrid Golgi structures that contain both early and late Golgi proteins, explaining how secretion can persist when COPI has been inactivated. Our findings suggest that cisternal maturation involves a COPI-dependent pathway that recycles early Golgi proteins, followed by multiple COPI-independent pathways that recycle late Golgi proteins.« less

  6. An aging study of wire chambers with dimethyl ether

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jibaly, M.; Chrusch, P. Jr.; Hilgenberg, G.; Majewski, S.; Wojcik, R.; Sauli, F.; Gaudaen, J.

    1989-02-01

    The authors report results on the aging of different types of resistive and non-resistive wires in wire chambers filled with dimethyl ether (DME) of varying degrees of purity. Among the Freon impurities detected in our DME batches, only Freon-11 was found to contribute to the aging process. Of the resistive wires, Nicotin and Stablohm produced fast aging, whereas stainless steel withstood extended irradiation in purified DME (up to 1 C/cm) without any apparent damage. Gold-plated tungsten and molybdenum wires produced results comparable to those of the stainless steel.

  7. Initial precipitation and hardening mechanism during non-isothermal aging in an Al–Mg–Si–Cu 6005A alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Wenchao; Ji, Shouxun; Huang, Lanping; Sheng, Xiaofei; Li, Zhou; Wang, Mingpu

    2014-08-15

    The characterization of precipitation and hardening mechanism during non-isothermal aging had been investigated using high resolution transmission electron microscopy for an Al–Mg–Si–Cu 6005A alloy. It was proposed that the needle-shaped β″ precipitates with a three-dimension coherency strain-field and an increased number density in the Al matrix provided the maximum strengthening effect for the Al–Mg–Si–Cu 6005A alloy. Simultaneously, it was also found that the formation and evolution of clusters in the early precipitation were associated with the vacancy binding energy, during which Si atoms played an important role in controlling the numbers density of Mg/Si co-clusters, and the excess Si atoms provided the increased number of nucleation sites for the subsequent precipitates to strengthen and improve the precipitation rate. Finally, based on the experimental observation and theoretical analysis, the precipitation sequence during the early precipitation in the Al–Mg–Si–Cu 6005A alloy was proposed as: supersaturated solid solution → Si-vacancy pairs, Mg-vacancy pairs and Mg clusters → Si clusters, and dissolution of Mg clusters → Mg atoms diffusion into the existing Si clusters → Mg/Si co-clusters → GP zone. - Highlights: • β″ precipitates provide the maximum strengthening effect for the 6005A alloy. • Si atoms play an important role in controlling the numbers of Mg/Si co-clusters. • The early aging sequence is deduced based on the solute-vacancy binding energy.

  8. Particle infectivity of HIV-1 full-length genome infectious molecular clones in a subtype C heterosexual transmission pair following high fidelity amplification and unbiased cloning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deymier, Martin J.; Claiborne, Daniel T.; Ende, Zachary; Ratner, Hannah K.; Kilembe, William; Hunter, Eric

    2014-11-15

    The high genetic diversity of HIV-1 impedes high throughput, large-scale sequencing and full-length genome cloning by common restriction enzyme based methods. Applying novel methods that employ a high-fidelity polymerase for amplification and an unbiased fusion-based cloning strategy, we have generated several HIV-1 full-length genome infectious molecular clones from an epidemiologically linked transmission pair. These clones represent the transmitted/founder virus and phylogenetically diverse non-transmitted variants from the chronically infected individual's diverse quasispecies near the time of transmission. We demonstrate that, using this approach, PCR-induced mutations in full-length clones derived from their cognate single genome amplicons are rare. Furthermore, all eight non-transmitted genomes tested produced functional virus with a range of infectivities, belying the previous assumption that a majority of circulating viruses in chronic HIV-1 infection are defective. Thus, these methods provide important tools to update protocols in molecular biology that can be universally applied to the study of human viral pathogens. - Highlights: • Our novel methodology demonstrates accurate amplification and cloning of full-length HIV-1 genomes. • A majority of plasma derived HIV variants from a chronically infected individual are infectious. • The transmitted/founder was more infectious than the majority of the variants from the chronically infected donor.

  9. Hydrogen Storage Needs for Early Motive Fuel Cell Markets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Storage Needs for Early Motive Fuel Cell Markets J. Kurtz, C. Ainscough, L. Simpson, and M. Caton Technical Report NREL/TP-5600-52783 November 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Hydrogen Storage Needs for Early

  10. Radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Wei

    2013-03-15

    Radiotherapy is an indispensible part of the management of all stages of breast cancer. In this article, the common indications for radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer (stages 0, I, and II) are reviewed, including whole-breast radiotherapy as part of breast-conserving treatment for early invasive breast cancer and pre-invasive disease of ductal carcinoma in situ, post-mastectomy radiotherapy, locoregional radiotherapy, and partial breast irradiation. Key clinical studies that underpin our current practice are discussed briefly.

  11. Early Days of Coal Research | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Early Days of Coal Research Early Days of Coal Research Wartime Needs Spur Interest in Coal-to-Oil Processes In 1944 General George S. Patton's Third Army was racing across southern France. In his haste to be the first U.S. commander to cross into Germany, however, Patton overextended his supply lines. His armored columns ground to a dead stop. Faced the choice of waiting until he could be resupplied or draining the fuel of captured German vehicles, Patton chose the latter. His tanks and armored

  12. Ahmed Diallo wins DOE Early Career Research Program funding | Princeton

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma Physics Lab Ahmed Diallo wins DOE Early Career Research Program funding By Kitta MacPherson May 16, 2013 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Ahmed Diallo (Photo by Elle Starkman/ PPPL Office of Communications) Ahmed Diallo Physicist Ahmed Diallo of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) has won a highly competitive Early Career Research Program grant sponsored by the DOE's Office of Science. His $500,000 per year award, which can be

  13. Fracture and thermal aging of resin-filled silicone elastomers...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Fracture and thermal aging of resin-filled ... Publication Date: 2016-03-24 OSTI Identifier: 1236865 Resource Type: Journal Article ...

  14. Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging Print XPD helicase is an enzyme that unwinds the DNA double helix; it is one component of an essential repair mechanism that maintains the...

  15. Science on Saturday attracts science fans of all ages | Princeton...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science on Saturday attracts science fans of all ages By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe January 28, 2013 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Joshua E. G. Peek, a Hubble Fellow at ...

  16. Fact #558: February 16, 2009 Transit Vehicle Age and Cost

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Heavy rail cars have the greatest longevity of the transit vehicles listed below with an average vehicle age of more than 22 years. However, in terms of cost for purchasing a new rail car, heavy...

  17. Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage Systems for Extended...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    dry cask storage system designs; and 4) AMPs and TLAAs for the SSCs that are important to safety in the DCSS designs. PDF icon Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage Systems...

  18. Tensile-property characterization of thermally aged cast stainless steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michaud, W.F.; Toben, P.T.; Soppet, W.K.; Chopra, O.K.

    1994-02-01

    The effect of thermal aging on tensile properties of cast stainless steels during service in light water reactors has been evaluated. Tensile data for several experimental and commercial heats of cast stainless steels are presented. Thermal aging increases the tensile strength of these steels. The high-C Mo-bearing CF-8M steels are more susceptible to thermal aging than the Mo-free CF-3 or CF-8 steels. A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting the change in tensile flow and yield stresses and engineering stress-vs.-strain curve of cast stainless steel as a function of time and temperature of service. The tensile properties of aged cast stainless steel are estimated from known material information, i.e., chemical composition and the initial tensile strength of the steel. The correlations described in this report may be used for assessing thermal embrittlement of cast stainless steel components.

  19. Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging Print XPD helicase is an enzyme that unwinds the DNA double helix; it is one component of an essential repair mechanism...

  20. Maximum Entry and Mandatory Separation Ages for Certain Security Employees

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-10-11

    The Policy in response to government-wide Office of Personnel Management regulations regarding establishment of mandatory retirement ages for employees in certain security related positions. Superseded by DOE P 310.1 Admin Chg 1, 12-1-11.

  1. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Materials Aging and Degradation

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Technical Program Plan | Department of Energy Program: Materials Aging and Degradation Technical Program Plan Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Materials Aging and Degradation Technical Program Plan Components serving in a nuclear reactor plant must withstand a very harsh environment including extended time at temperature, neutron irradiation, stress, and/or corrosive media. The many modes of degradation are complex and vary depending on location and material. However,

  2. Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging Print XPD helicase is an enzyme that unwinds the DNA double helix; it is one component of an essential repair mechanism that maintains the integrity of DNA. XPD is unique, however, in that pinpoint mutations of this single protein are responsible for three different human diseases: in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), extreme sensitivity to sunlight promotes cancer; Cockayne syndrome (CS) involves stunted growth and premature aging;

  3. Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging Print XPD helicase is an enzyme that unwinds the DNA double helix; it is one component of an essential repair mechanism that maintains the integrity of DNA. XPD is unique, however, in that pinpoint mutations of this single protein are responsible for three different human diseases: in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), extreme sensitivity to sunlight promotes cancer; Cockayne syndrome (CS) involves stunted growth and premature aging;

  4. Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging Print XPD helicase is an enzyme that unwinds the DNA double helix; it is one component of an essential repair mechanism that maintains the integrity of DNA. XPD is unique, however, in that pinpoint mutations of this single protein are responsible for three different human diseases: in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), extreme sensitivity to sunlight promotes cancer; Cockayne syndrome (CS) involves stunted growth and premature aging;

  5. Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging Print XPD helicase is an enzyme that unwinds the DNA double helix; it is one component of an essential repair mechanism that maintains the integrity of DNA. XPD is unique, however, in that pinpoint mutations of this single protein are responsible for three different human diseases: in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), extreme sensitivity to sunlight promotes cancer; Cockayne syndrome (CS) involves stunted growth and premature aging;

  6. Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging Print Wednesday, 25 February 2009 00:00 XPD helicase is an enzyme that unwinds the DNA double helix; it is one component of an essential repair mechanism that maintains the integrity of DNA. XPD is unique, however, in that pinpoint mutations of this single protein are responsible for three different human diseases: in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), extreme sensitivity to sunlight

  7. Modelling aging effects on a thermal cycling absorption process column

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laquerbe, C.; Contreras, S.; Demoment, J.

    2008-07-15

    Palladium coated on alumina is used in hydrogen separation systems operated at CEA/Valduc, and more particularly in Thermal Cycling Absorption Process columns. With such materials, tritium decay is known to induce aging effects which have direct side effects on hydrogen isotopes absorption isotherms. Furthermore in a TCAP column, aging occurs in an heterogeneous way. The possible impacts of these intrinsic material evolutions on the separation performances are investigated here through a numerical approach. (authors)

  8. Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging Print XPD helicase is an enzyme that unwinds the DNA double helix; it is one component of an essential repair mechanism that maintains the integrity of DNA. XPD is unique, however, in that pinpoint mutations of this single protein are responsible for three different human diseases: in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), extreme sensitivity to sunlight promotes cancer; Cockayne syndrome (CS) involves stunted growth and premature aging;

  9. Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enzyme Structure Provides Insights into Cancer and Aging Print XPD helicase is an enzyme that unwinds the DNA double helix; it is one component of an essential repair mechanism that maintains the integrity of DNA. XPD is unique, however, in that pinpoint mutations of this single protein are responsible for three different human diseases: in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), extreme sensitivity to sunlight promotes cancer; Cockayne syndrome (CS) involves stunted growth and premature aging;

  10. Characterizing Radiation-Aged Polysiloxane-Silica Composites: Identifying

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Changes in Network Topology via 1H NMR (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Characterizing Radiation-Aged Polysiloxane-Silica Composites: Identifying Changes in Network Topology via 1H NMR Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Characterizing Radiation-Aged Polysiloxane-Silica Composites: Identifying Changes in Network Topology via 1H NMR Characterizing and quantifying changes in elastomeric materials upon exposure to harsh environments is important in the estimation of

  11. Space-Age Ceramics Get Their Toughest Test

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Space-Age Ceramics Get Their Toughest Test Print Advanced ceramic composites can withstand the ultrahigh operational temperatures projected for hypersonic jet and next-generation gas-turbine engines, but real-time analysis of the mechanical properties of these space-age materials at ultrahigh temperatures has been a challenge-until now. Researchers have developed the first testing facility that enables microtomography of ceramic composites under controlled loads at ultrahigh temperatures and in

  12. Space-Age Ceramics Get Their Toughest Test

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Space-Age Ceramics Get Their Toughest Test Print Advanced ceramic composites can withstand the ultrahigh operational temperatures projected for hypersonic jet and next-generation gas-turbine engines, but real-time analysis of the mechanical properties of these space-age materials at ultrahigh temperatures has been a challenge-until now. Researchers have developed the first testing facility that enables microtomography of ceramic composites under controlled loads at ultrahigh temperatures and in

  13. Space-Age Ceramics Get Their Toughest Test

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Space-Age Ceramics Get Their Toughest Test Print Advanced ceramic composites can withstand the ultrahigh operational temperatures projected for hypersonic jet and next-generation gas-turbine engines, but real-time analysis of the mechanical properties of these space-age materials at ultrahigh temperatures has been a challenge-until now. Researchers have developed the first testing facility that enables microtomography of ceramic composites under controlled loads at ultrahigh temperatures and in

  14. Space-Age Ceramics Get Their Toughest Test

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Space-Age Ceramics Get Their Toughest Test Print Advanced ceramic composites can withstand the ultrahigh operational temperatures projected for hypersonic jet and next-generation gas-turbine engines, but real-time analysis of the mechanical properties of these space-age materials at ultrahigh temperatures has been a challenge-until now. Researchers have developed the first testing facility that enables microtomography of ceramic composites under controlled loads at ultrahigh temperatures and in

  15. Space-Age Ceramics Get Their Toughest Test

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Space-Age Ceramics Get Their Toughest Test Print Advanced ceramic composites can withstand the ultrahigh operational temperatures projected for hypersonic jet and next-generation gas-turbine engines, but real-time analysis of the mechanical properties of these space-age materials at ultrahigh temperatures has been a challenge-until now. Researchers have developed the first testing facility that enables microtomography of ceramic composites under controlled loads at ultrahigh temperatures and in

  16. Space-Age Ceramics Get Their Toughest Test

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Space-Age Ceramics Get Their Toughest Test Print Advanced ceramic composites can withstand the ultrahigh operational temperatures projected for hypersonic jet and next-generation gas-turbine engines, but real-time analysis of the mechanical properties of these space-age materials at ultrahigh temperatures has been a challenge-until now. Researchers have developed the first testing facility that enables microtomography of ceramic composites under controlled loads at ultrahigh temperatures and in

  17. Space-Age Ceramics Get Their Toughest Test

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Space-Age Ceramics Get Their Toughest Test Print Advanced ceramic composites can withstand the ultrahigh operational temperatures projected for hypersonic jet and next-generation gas-turbine engines, but real-time analysis of the mechanical properties of these space-age materials at ultrahigh temperatures has been a challenge-until now. Researchers have developed the first testing facility that enables microtomography of ceramic composites under controlled loads at ultrahigh temperatures and in

  18. Accelerated Aging of Roofing Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Accelerated Aging of Roofing Materials Accelerated Aging of Roofing Materials Addthis 1 of 2 Berkeley Lab Heat Island Group chemist Mohamad Sleiman prepares to insert clean and soiled roofing specimens into a weatherometer. The weatherometer simulates exposure to heat, moisture, and UV radiation. Image: Heat Island Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 2 of 2 Berkeley Lab Heat Island Group chemist Mohamad Sleiman configures a weatherometer to simulate the effects of heat, moisture, and UV

  19. NP Early Career Opportunities Archives | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Funding Opportunities » NP Early Career Opportunities » NP Early Career Opportunities Archives Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Funding Opportunities Closed Funding Opportunity Announcements (FOAs) Closed Lab Announcements Award Search / Public Abstracts Additional Requirements and Guidance for Digital Data Management Reviews NP Early Career Opportunities NP Early Career Opportunities Archives Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC)

  20. Aging study of boiling water reactor high pressure injection systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conley, D.A.; Edson, J.L.; Fineman, C.F.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of high pressure injection systems is to maintain an adequate coolant level in reactor pressure vessels, so that the fuel cladding temperature does not exceed 1,200{degrees}C (2,200{degrees}F), and to permit plant shutdown during a variety of design basis loss-of-coolant accidents. This report presents the results of a study on aging performed for high pressure injection systems of boiling water reactor plants in the United States. The purpose of the study was to identify and evaluate the effects of aging and the effectiveness of testing and maintenance in detecting and mitigating aging degradation. Guidelines from the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program were used in performing the aging study. Review and analysis of the failures reported in databases such as Nuclear Power Experience, Licensee Event Reports, and the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System, along with plant-specific maintenance records databases, are included in this report to provide the information required to identify aging stressors, failure modes, and failure causes. Several probabilistic risk assessments were reviewed to identify risk-significant components in high pressure injection systems. Testing, maintenance, specific safety issues, and codes and standards are also discussed.

  1. Evidence of aging effects on certain safety-related components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magleby, H.L.; Atwood, C.L.; MacDonald, P.E.; Edson, J.L.; Bramwell, D.L.

    1996-01-01

    In response to interest shown by the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), Principal Working Group I (PWG- 1) of the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) conducted a generic study on the effects of aging of active components in nuclear power plants. (This focus on active components is consistent with PWG-l`s mandate; passive components are primarily within the mandate of PWG-3.) Representatives from France, Sweden, Finland, Japan, the United States, and the United Kingdom participated in the study by submitting reports documenting aging studies performed in their countries. This report consists of summaries of those reports, along with a comparison of the various statistical analysis methods used in the studies. The studies indicate that with some exceptions, active components generally do not present a significant aging problem in nuclear power plants. Design criteria and effective preventative maintenance programs, including timely replacement of components, are effective in mitigating potential aging problems. However, aging studies (such as qualitative and statistical analyses of failure modes and maintenance data) are an important part of efforts to identify and solve potential aging problems. Solving these problems typically includes such strategies as replacing suspect components with improved components, and implementing improved maintenance programs.

  2. Strong early seed-specific gene regulatory region

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Broun, Pierre; Somerville, Chris

    2002-01-01

    Nucleic acid sequences and methods for their use are described which provide for early seed-specific transcription, in order to modulate or modify expression of foreign or endogenous genes in seeds, particularly embryo cells. The method finds particular use in conjunction with modifying fatty acid production in seed tissue.

  3. Strong early seed-specific gene regulatory region

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Broun, Pierre; Somerville, Chris

    1999-01-01

    Nucleic acid sequences and methods for their use are described which provide for early seed-specific transcription, in order to modulate or modify expression of foreign or endogenous genes in seeds, particularly embryo cells. The method finds particular use in conjunction with modifying fatty acid production in seed tissue.

  4. $40M to Establish New Observatory Probing Early Universe

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    $40M to Establish New Observatory Probing Early Universe The new Simons Observatory is planned in Chile's Atacama Desert to boost ongoing studies of the evolution of the universe, from its earliest moments to today. The observatory will probe the subtle properties of the universe's first light, known as cosmic microwave background radiation. Berkeley Lab is among the observatory's collaborators.

  5. Challenges for Early Responders to a Nuclear / Radiological Terrorism Incident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, M.A.; Stearns, L.J.; Davie, A.D.; Day, E.

    2007-07-01

    Even in the best of circumstances, most municipalities would face severe challenges in providing effective incident response to a large scale radiation release caused by nuclear terrorism or accident. Compounding obvious complexities, the effectiveness of first and early responders to a radiological emergency may also be hampered by an insufficient distribution of radiation detection and monitoring equipment, local policies concerning triage and field decontamination of critical victims, malfunctioning communications, inadequate inter-agency agility, and the psychological 'fear' impact on early responders. This paper examines several issues impeding the early response to nuclear terrorism incidents with specific consideration given to the on-going and forward-thinking preparedness efforts currently being developed in the Sacramento, California region. Specific recommendations are provided addressing hot zone protocols, radiation detection and monitoring equipment, hasty patient packaging techniques, vertically and horizontally integrated pre-event training, mitigating psychological fear, and protocols for the effective 'hand-off' from first responders to subsequent early response-recovery teams. (authors)

  6. Adapting Dry Cask Storage for Aging at a Geologic Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Sanders; D. Kimball

    2005-08-02

    A Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Aging System is a crucial part of operations at the proposed Yucca Mountain repository in the United States. Incoming commercial SNF that does not meet thermal limits for emplacement will be aged on outdoor pads. U.S. Department of Energy SNF will also be managed using the Aging System. Proposed site-specific designs for the Aging System are closely based upon designs for existing dry cask storage (DCS) systems. This paper evaluates the applicability of existing DCS systems for use in the SNF Aging System at Yucca Mountain. The most important difference between existing DCS facilities and the Yucca Mountain facility is the required capacity. Existing DCS facilities typically have less than 50 casks. The current design for the aging pad at Yucca Mountain calls for a capacity of over 2,000 casks (20,000 MTHM) [1]. This unprecedented number of casks poses some unique problems. The response of DCS systems to off-normal and accident conditions needs to be re-evaluated for multiple storage casks. Dose calculations become more complicated, since doses from multiple or very long arrays of casks can dramatically increase the total boundary dose. For occupational doses, the geometry of the cask arrays and the order of loading casks must be carefully considered in order to meet ALARA goals during cask retrieval. Due to the large area of the aging pad, skyshine must also be included when calculating public and worker doses. The expected length of aging will also necessitate some design adjustments. Under 10 CFR 72.236, DCS systems are initially certified for a period of 20 years [2]. Although the Yucca Mountain facility is not intended to be a storage facility under 10 CFR 72, the operational life of the SNF Aging System is 50 years [1]. Any cask system selected for use in aging will have to be qualified to this design lifetime. These considerations are examined, and a summary is provided of the adaptations that must be made in order to use DCS technologies successfully at a geologic repository.

  7. Age-related degradation of Westinghouse 480-volt circuit breakers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subudhi, M.; Shier, W.; MacDougall, E. )

    1990-07-01

    An aging assessment of Westinghouse DS-series low-voltage air circuit breakers was performed as part of the Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) program. The objectives of this study are to characterize age-related degradation within the breaker assembly and to identify maintenance practices to mitigate their effect. Since this study has been promulgated by the failures of the reactor trip breakers at the McGuire Nuclear Station in July 1987, results relating to the welds in the breaker pole lever welds are also discussed. The design and operation of DS-206 and DS-416 breakers were reviewed. Failure data from various national data bases were analyzed to identify the predominant failure modes, causes, and mechanisms. Additional operating experiences from one nuclear station and two industrial breaker-service companies were obtained to develop aging trends of various subcomponents. The responses of the utilities to the NRC Bulletin 88-01, which discusses the center pole lever welds, were analyzed to assess the final resolution of failures of welds in the reactor trips. Maintenance recommendations, made by the manufacturer to mitigate age-related degradation were reviewed, and recommendations for improving the monitoring of age-related degradation are discussed. As described in Volume 2 of this NUREG, the results from a test program to assess degradation in breaker parts through mechanical cycling are also included. The testing has characterized the cracking of center-pole lever welds, identified monitoring techniques to determine aging in breakers, and provided information to augment existing maintenance programs. Recommendations to improve breaker reliability using effective maintenance, testing, and inspection programs are suggested. 13 refs., 21 figs., 8 tabs.

  8. Nuclear plant-aging research on reactor protection systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, L.C.

    1988-01-01

    This report presents the rsults of a review of the Reactor Trip System (RTS) and the Engineered Safety Feature Actuating System (ESFAS) operating experiences reported in Licensee Event Reports (LER)s, the Nuclear Power Experience data base, Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System, and plant maintenance records. Our purpose is to evaluate the potential significance of aging, including cycling, trips, and testing as contributors to degradation of the RTS and ESFAS. Tables are presented that show the percentage of events for RTS and ESFAS classified by cause, components, and subcomponents for each of the Nuclear Steam Supply System vendors. A representative Babcock and Wilcox plant was selected for detailed study. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Nuclear Plant Aging Research guidelines were followed in performing the detailed study that identified materials susceptible to aging, stressors, environmental factors, and failure modes for the RTS and ESFAS as generic instrumentation and control systems. Functional indicators of degradation are listed, testing requirements evaluated, and regulatory issues discussed.

  9. Age constraints on fluid inclusions in calcite at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neymark, Leonid A.; Amelin, Yuri V.; Paces, James B.; Peterman, Zell E.; Whelan, Joseph F.

    2001-04-29

    The {sup 207}Pb/{sup 235}U ages for 14 subsamples of opal or chalcedony layers younger than calcite formed at elevated temperature range between 1.88 {+-} 0.05 and 9.7 {+-} 1.5 Ma with most values older than 6-8 Ma. These data indicate that fluids with elevated temperatures have not been present in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain since about 1.9 Ma and most likely since 6-8 Ma. Discordant U-Pb isotope data for chalcedony subsamples representing the massive silica stage in the formation of the coatings are interpreted using a model of the diffusive loss of U decay products. The model gives an age estimate for the time of chalcedony formation around 10-11 Ma, which overlaps ages of clay minerals formed in tuffs below the water table at Yucca Mountain during the Timber Mountain thermal event.

  10. Website Reveals Early Lessons in Electric Vehicle Deployment - News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Website Policies / Important Links Website Policies / Important Links Javascript Not Enabled OSTI Security Website Policies and Important Links Releases | NREL

    Website Reveals Early Lessons in Electric Vehicle Deployment New web page is an online blueprint for community leaders February 22, 2011 Cities and states have new blueprints to follow as they prepare for the arrival of plug-in electric vehicles. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) just

  11. Early Career: Emergent Atomic and Magnetic Structures | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Early Career: Emergent Atomic and Magnetic Structures Research Personnel Updates Publications They're Alive Read More Caught in the Act! Read More Previous Pause Next Characterization Determining the nature of the macromolecule-mediated magnetic nanoparticle formation: Uniform magnetic nanoparticles with large magnetic moment and controlled magnetic anisotropy have important technological applications from data storage and quantum computing to catalysis and drug delivery. The Emergent Magnetic

  12. Energy Department Scientists and Engineers Honored with Presidential Early

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Career Awards | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Energy Department Scientists and Engineers Honored with Presidential Early Career Awards News News Home Featured Articles Science Headlines 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Science Highlights Presentations & Testimony News Archives Communications and Public Affairs Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 12.19.08 Energy

  13. NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Early Fuel Cell Market

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Demonstrations Early Fuel Cell Market Demonstrations Photo of fuel cell backup power system in outdoor setting. Photo of fuel cell forklifts in warehouse setting. Fuel cell backup power systems offer longer continuous runtimes and greater durability than traditional batteries in harsh outdoor environments. For specialty vehicles such as forklifts, fuel cells can be a cost-competitive alternative to traditional lead-acid batteries. Learn More Subscribe to the biannual Fuel Cell and Hydrogen

  14. REGIONAL PARTNERSHIPSThe Pioneer Regional Partnerships are early-stage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    REGIONAL PARTNERSHIPSThe Pioneer Regional Partnerships are early-stage public/private collaborative projects that address specific near-term grid modernization issues important to the identified region and its stakeholders. The Grid Modernization Laboratory Consortium (GMLC) has initiated 11 proposed partnerships to accomplish the following:Address a key state/regional grid modernization challenge that is visible and important to local industry and government stakeholders.Engage collaboration

  15. MSET: An Early Warning System with Broad Industrial Application - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Portal Industrial Technologies Industrial Technologies Energy Analysis Energy Analysis Find More Like This Return to Search MSET: An Early Warning System with Broad Industrial Application Argonne National Laboratory Contact ANL About This Technology MSET Fault Detection Algorithm MSET Fault Detection Algorithm Technology Marketing Summary The success of modern industries- especially those that are electricity-intensive-depends on complex engineering systems to ensure safe,

  16. Energy Department Early Career Scientists and Engineers Honored |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy June 13, 2005 - 4:50pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -- At an awards ceremony today, nine "early career" researchers funded by the Department of Energy (DOE) and its National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) were honored for their work ranging from the development and synthesis of nanoscale materials to improved medical diagnostic imaging. DOE's scientists are among 58 researchers supported by eight federal departments and agencies receiving the Presidential

  17. Energy Department Early Career Scientists and Engineers Honored |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy November 1, 2007 - 4:21pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - At a White House ceremony today, eight "early career" researchers, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science and its National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), were honored for their work ranging from computer vision and machine intelligence to identifying genetic switches in the human genome. DOE's scientists are among 58 researchers supported by nine federal departments and

  18. TIDAL INTERACTION AS THE ORIGIN OF EARLY-TYPE DWARF GALAXIES IN GROUP ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paudel, Sanjaya; Ree, Chang H.

    2014-11-20

    We present a sample of dwarf galaxies that suffer ongoing disruption by the tidal forces of nearby massive galaxies. By analyzing structural and stellar population properties using the archival imaging and spectroscopic data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), we find that they are likely a ''smoking gun'' example of the formation through tidal stirring of early-type dwarf galaxies (dEs) in the galaxy group environment. The inner cores of these galaxies are fairly intact and the observed light profiles are well fit by the Srsic functions while the tidally stretched stellar halos are prominent in the outer parts. They are all located within a sky-projected distance of 50 kpc from the centers of the host galaxies and no dwarf galaxies have relative line-of-sight velocities larger than 205 km s{sup 1} to their hosts. We derive the Composite Stellar Population properties of these galaxies by fitting the SDSS optical spectra to a multiple-burst composite stellar population model. We find that these galaxies accumulate a significant fraction of stellar mass within the last 1 Gyr and contain a majority stellar population with an intermediate age of 2 to 4 Gyr. Based on this evidence, we argue that tidal stirring, particularly through the galaxy-galaxy interaction, might have an important role in the formation and evolution of dEs in the group environment where the influence of other gas stripping mechanism might be limited.

  19. THE NEAR-ULTRAVIOLET LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OF YOUNG, EARLY M-TYPE DWARF STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ansdell, Megan; Baranec, Christoph; Gaidos, Eric; Mann, Andrew W.; Lpine, Sebastien; James, David; Buccino, Andrea; Mauas, Pablo; Petrucci, Romina; Law, Nicholas M.; Riddle, Reed

    2015-01-01

    Planets orbiting within the close-in habitable zones of M dwarf stars will be exposed to elevated high-energy radiation driven by strong magnetohydrodynamic dynamos during stellar youth. Near-ultraviolet (NUV) irradiation can erode and alter the chemistry of planetary atmospheres, and a quantitative description of the evolution of NUV emission from M dwarfs is needed when modeling these effects. We investigated the NUV luminosity evolution of early M-type dwarfs by cross-correlating the Lpine and Gaidos catalog of bright M dwarfs with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) catalog of NUV (1771-2831 ) sources. Of the 4805 sources with GALEX counterparts, 797 have NUV emission significantly (>2.5?) in excess of an empirical basal level. We inspected these candidate active stars using visible-wavelength spectra, high-resolution adaptive optics imaging, time-series photometry, and literature searches to identify cases where the elevated NUV emission is due to unresolved background sources or stellar companions; we estimated the overall occurrence of these ''false positives'' (FPs) as ?16%. We constructed an NUV luminosity function that accounted for FPs, detection biases of the source catalogs, and GALEX upper limits. We found the NUV luminosity function to be inconsistent with predictions from a constant star-formation rate and simplified age-activity relation defined by a two-parameter power law.

  20. Tracing recent star formation of red early-type galaxies out to z ? 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ko, Jongwan; Lee, Jong Chul; Hwang, Ho Seong; Im, Myungshin; Le Borgne, Damien; Elbaz, David

    2014-08-20

    We study the mid-infrared (IR) excess emission of early-type galaxies (ETGs) on the red sequence at z < 1 using a spectroscopic sample of galaxies in the fields of Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS). In the mass-limited sample of 1025 galaxies with M {sub star} > 10{sup 10.5} M {sub ?} and 0.4 < z < 1.05, we identify 696 Spitzer 24 ?m detected (above the 5?) galaxies and find them to have a wide range of NUV-r and r-[12 ?m] colors despite their red optical u r colors. Even in the sample of very massive ETGs on the red sequence with M {sub star} > 10{sup 11.2} M {sub ?}, more than 18% show excess emission over the photospheric emission in the mid-IR. The combination with the results of red ETGs in the local universe suggests that the recent star formation is not rare among quiescent, red ETGs at least out to z ? 1 if the mid-IR excess emission results from intermediate-age stars or/and from low-level ongoing star formation. Our color-color diagram including near-UV and mid-IR emissions are efficient not only for identifying ETGs with recent star formation, but also for distinguishing quiescent galaxies from dusty star-forming galaxies.

  1. Overview of Modeling and Simulations of Plutonium Aging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, A J; Wolfer, W G

    2007-04-24

    Computer-aided materials research is now an integral part of science and technology. It becomes particularly valuable when comprehensive experimental investigations and materials testing are too costly, hazardous, or of excessive duration; then, theoretical and computational studies can supplement and enhance the information gained from limited experimental data. Such is the case for improving our fundamental understanding of the properties of aging plutonium in the nuclear weapons stockpile. The question of the effects of plutonium aging on the safety, security, and reliability of the nuclear weapons stockpile emerged after the United States closed its plutonium manufacturing facility in 1989 and decided to suspend any further underground testing of nuclear weapons in 1992. To address this, the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) initiated a research program to investigate plutonium aging, i.e., the changes with time of properties of Pu-Ga alloys employed in the nuclear weapons and to develop models describing these changes sufficiently reliable to forecast them for several decades. The November 26, 2006 press release by the NNSA summarizes the conclusions of the investigation, '...there appear to be no serious or sudden changes occurring, or expected to occur, in plutonium that would affect performance of pits beyond the well-understood, gradual degradation of plutonium materials'. Furthermore, 'These studies show that the degradation of plutonium in our nuclear weapons will not affect warhead reliability for decades', then NNSA Administrator Linton Brooks said. 'It is now clear that although plutonium aging contributes, other factors control the overall life expectancy of nuclear weapons systems'. The origin of plutonium aging is the natural decay of certain plutonium isotopes. Specifically, it is the process of alpha decay in which a plutonium atom spontaneously splits into a 5 MeV alpha particle and an 85keV uranium recoil. The alpha particle traverses the lattice, slowly loosing energy through electronic excitations, acquiring two electrons to become a helium atom, then finally coming to rest approximately 10 microns away with the generation of a few-hundred Frenkel pairs. The uranium recoil immediately displaces a couple-thousand Pu atoms from their original lattice sites. This process, which occurs at a rate of approximately 41 parts-per-million per year, is the source of potential property changes in aging plutonium. Plutonium aging encompasses many areas of research: radiation damage and radiation effects, diffusion of point defects, impurities and alloying elements, solid state phase transformations, dislocation dynamics and mechanical properties, equations of state under extreme pressures, as well as surface oxidation and corrosion. Theory, modeling, and computer simulations are involved to various degrees in many of these areas. The joint research program carried out at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory encompassed experimental measurements of numerous properties of newly fabricated reference alloys, archival material that have accumulated the effects of several decades of radioactive decay, and accelerated aging alloys in which the isotropic composition was adjusted to increase the rate of self-irradiation damage. In particular, the physical and chemical processes of nuclear materials degradation were to be studied individually and in great depth. Closely coupled to the experimental efforts are theory, modeling, and simulations. These efforts, validated by the experiments, aim to develop predictive models to evaluate the effects of age on the properties of plutonium. The need to obtain a scientific understanding of plutonium aging has revitalized fundamental research on actinides and plutonium in particular. For example, the experimental discovery of superconductivity in Pu-based compounds, the observation of helium bubbles in naturally aged material, and the measurement of phonon dispersion properties in gallium-stabilized delta plu

  2. The role of blood cell membrane lipids on the mode of action of HIV-1 fusion inhibitor sifuvirtide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matos, Pedro M.; Freitas, Teresa; Castanho, Miguel A.R.B.; Santos, Nuno C.

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} Sifuvirtide interacts with erythrocyte and lymphocyte membrane in a concentration dependent manner by decreasing its dipole potential. {yields} Dipole potential variations in lipid vesicles show sifuvirtide's lipid selectivity towards saturated phosphatidylcholines. {yields} This peptide-membrane interaction may direct the drug towards raft-like membrane domains where the receptors used by HIV are located, facilitating its inhibitory action. -- Abstract: Sifuvirtide is a gp41 based peptide that inhibits HIV-1 fusion with the host cells and is currently under clinical trials. Previous studies showed that sifuvirtide partitions preferably to saturated phosphatidylcholine lipid membranes, instead of fluid-phase lipid vesicles. We extended the study to the interaction of the peptide with circulating blood cells, by using the dipole potential sensitive probe di-8-ANEPPS. Sifuvirtide decreased the dipole potential of erythrocyte and lymphocyte membranes in a concentration dependent manner, demonstrating its interaction. Also, the lipid selectivity of the peptide towards more rigid phosphatidylcholines was confirmed based on the dipole potential variations. Overall, the interaction of the peptide with the cell membranes is a contribution of different lipid preferences that presumably directs the peptide towards raft-like domains where the receptors are located, facilitating the reach of the peptide to its molecular target, the gp41 in its pre-fusion conformation.

  3. Aging Behavior of Viton{sup R} O-Ring Seals in the 9975 Shipping Package - 12594

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skidmore, T. Eric; Daugherty, William L.; Hoffman, Elizabeth N.; Dunn, Kerry A.; Stephen Bellamy, J.; Shuler, James M.

    2012-07-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is storing plutonium (Pu) materials in the K-Area Materials Storage (KAMS) facility. The Pu materials were packaged according to the DOE-STD-3013 standard and shipped to the SRS in Type B 9975 packages. The robust 9975 shipping package was not designed for long-term product storage, but it is a specified part of the storage configuration and the KAMS facility safety basis credits the 9975 design with containment. Within the 9975 package, nested stainless steel containment vessels are closed with dual O-ring seals based on Viton{sup R} GLT or GLT-S fluoro-elastomer. The aging behavior of the O-ring compounds is being studied to provide the facility with advanced notice of nonconformance and to develop life prediction models. A combination of field surveillance, leak testing of surrogate fixtures aged at bounding service temperatures, and accelerated-aging methodologies based on compression stress-relaxation and oxygen consumption analysis is being used to evaluate seal performance. A summary of the surveillance program relative to seal aging behavior is presented. The aging behavior of fluoro-elastomer seals based on Viton{sup R} GLT and GLT-S is being studied to develop life prediction models in support of long-term storage of plutonium materials in the 9975 shipping packages at the Savannah River Site. Field surveillance data in combination with accelerated-aging data suggest a significant lifetime for the seals. Typical storage conditions are not anticipated to challenge the leak-tightness of the seals for many years. Early life prediction models based on compression stress relaxation indicate a seal lifetime of ?12 years at the maximum service temperature predicted (93 deg. C). Seal lifetimes at lower, more realistic conditions are likely significantly longer. Service life predictions based on CSR data are thus far conservative relative to predictions based on time to leakage failure. Surveillance data on packages examined after 6 years in storage show only minor compression set of the O-rings and no significant degradation. Surveillance and testing will continue as needed to validate and refine life prediction models. (authors)

  4. Early life ethanol exposure causes long-lasting disturbances in rat mesenchymal stem cells via epigenetic modifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leu, Yu-Wei; Chu, Pei-Yi; Chen, Chien-Min; Yeh, Kun-Tu; Liu, Yu Ming; Lee, Yen-Hui; Kuo, Shan-Tsu; Hsiao, Shu-Huei

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • Ethanol exposure alters proliferation and differentiation of MSCs. • Ethanol exposure suppresses osteogenesis and adipogenesis of MSCs. • H3K27me3-associated genes/pathways are affected in ethanol-exposed MSCs. • Expression of lineage-specific genes is dysregulated in ethanol-exposed MSCs. - Abstract: Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is a birth defect due to maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy. Because mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are the main somatic stem cells in adults and may contribute to tissue homeostasis and repair in adulthood, we investigated whether early life ethanol exposure affects MSCs and contributes to the propensity for disease onset in later life. Using a rodent model of FAS, we found that ethanol exposure (5.25 g/kg/day) from postnatal days 4 to 9 in rat pups (mimic of human third trimester) caused long-term anomalies in bone marrow-derived MSCs. MSCs isolated from ethanol-exposed animals were prone to neural induction but resistant to osteogenic and adipogenic inductions compared to their age-matched controls. The altered differentiation may contribute to the severe trabecular bone loss seen in ethanol-exposed animals at 3 months of age as well as overt growth retardation. Expression of alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, aP2, and PPARγ were substantially inhibited, but BDNF was up-regulated in MSCs isolated from ethanol-exposed 3 month-old animals. Several signaling pathways were distorted in ethanol-exposed MSCs via altered trimethylation at histone 3 lysine 27. These results demonstrate that early life ethanol exposure can have long-term impacts in rat MSCs by both genetic and epigenetic mechanisms.

  5. Brain surgery breathes new life into aging plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makansi, J.

    2006-04-15

    Unlike managing the human aging process, extending the life of a power plant often includes brain surgery, modernizing its control and automation system. Lately, such retrofits range from wholesale replacing of existing controls to the addition of specific control elements that help optimize performance. Pending revisions to safety codes and cybersecurity issues also need to be considered. 4 figs.

  6. Aging of Alloy 617 at 650 and 750 Degrees C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julian Benz; Thomas Lillo; Richard Wright

    2013-01-01

    Alloy 617 has been selected as the primary candidate for heat exchanger applications in advanced reactors. For the VHTR this application could require extended service up to a reactor outlet temperature of 950°C. A key hurdle to using this alloy in the VHTR heat exchanger application is qualifying the alloy for Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. In order to Code qualify the material it is necessary to characterize the influence of long term aging on the mechanical behavior. Alloy 617 has been aged at 650 and 750°C for times up to 5300 hours. The microstructure after aging has been characterized using optical and transmission electron microscopies. It has been determined that in addition to carbides, a significant volume fraction of ?’ phase (Ni3Al) is formed at these temperatures. The ?’ does not contribute significantly to changing the tensile or impact properties of the aged material. It does, however, appear to increase creep resistance and impede creep crack growth.

  7. Accelerated Light Aging of PV Encapsulants | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Correlation of Xenon Arc and Mirror Accelerated Outdoor Aging from 1993-1997 PDF icon pvmrw13_uvth_str_reid.pdf More Documents & Publications Literature Review of the Effects of UV Exposure on PV Modules Retrospective Benefit-Cost Evaluation of DOE Investment in Photovoltaic Energy Systems Retrospective Benefit-Cost Evaluation of DOE Investments in Photovoltaic Energy Systems

  8. Decreases in Human Semen Quality with Age Among Healthy Men

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eskenazi, B.; Wyrobek, A.J.; Kidd, S.A.; Moore, L.; Young, S.S.; Moore, D.

    2001-12-01

    The objective of this report is to characterize the associations between age and semen quality among healthy active men after controlling for identified covariates. Ninety-seven healthy, nonsmoking men between 22 and 80 years without known fertility problems who worked for or retired from a large research laboratory. There was a gradual decrease in all semen parameters from 22-80 years of age. After adjusting for covariates, volume decreased 0.03 ml per year (p = 0.001); sperm concentration decreased 2.5% per year (p = 0.005); total count decreased 3.6% per year of age (p < 0.001); motility decreased 0.7% per year (P < 0.001); progressive motility decreased 3.1% per year (p < 0.001); and total progressively motile sperm decreased 4.8% per year (p < 0.001). In a group of healthy active men, semen volume, sperm concentration, total sperm count, and sperm motility decrease continuously between 22-80 years of age, with no evidence of a threshold.

  9. Characterization of Field-Aged Exhaust Gas Recirculation Cooler Deposits |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy Characterized field-aged exhaust gas recirculation coolers from 7 engine manufacturers, discussed differences and commonalities, and provided understanding of cooler fouling and prevention. PDF icon deer10_lance.pdf More Documents & Publications Materials Issues Associated with EGR Systems Materials Issues Associated with EGR Systems Materials Issues Associated with EGR Systems (Agreement ID:18571)

  10. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Recommendations for communication activities and public participation in the Early Site Permit Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-27

    On October 24, 1992, President Bush signed into law the National Energy Policy Act of 1992. The bill is a sweeping, comprehensive overhaul of the Nation`s energy laws, the first in more than a decade. Among other provisions, the National Energy Policy Act reforms the licensing process for new nuclear power plants by adopting a new approach developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 1989, and upheld in court in 1992. The NRC 10 CFR Part 52 rule is a three-step process that guarantees public participation at each step. The steps are: early site permit approval; standard design certifications; and, combined construction/operating licenses for nuclear power reactors. Licensing reform increases an organization`s ability to respond to future baseload electricity generation needs with less financial risk for ratepayers and the organization. Costly delays can be avoided because design, safety and siting issues will be resolved before a company starts to build a plant. Specifically, early site permit approval allows for site suitability and acceptability issues to be addressed prior to an organization`s commitment to build a plant. Responsibility for site-specific activities, including communications and public participation, rests with those organizations selected to try out early site approval. This plan has been prepared to assist those companies (referred to as sponsoring organizations) in planning their communications and public involvement programs. It provides research findings, information and recommendations to be used by organizations as a resource and starting point in developing their own plans.

  11. Iodine Loading of NO Aged Silver Exchanged Mordenite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patton, K. K.; Bruffey, S. H.; Jubin, J. T.; Walker, Jr., J. F.

    2014-09-30

    In an off-gas treatment system for used nuclear fuel processing, a solid sorbent will typically be exposed to a gas stream for months at a time. This gas stream may be at elevated temperature and could contain water vapor, gaseous nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), nitric acid vapors, and a variety of other constituents. For this reason, it is important to evaluate the effects of long-term exposure, or aging, on proposed sorbents. Silver exchanged mordenite (AgZ) is being studied at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to determine its iodine sorption capacity after long term exposure to increasingly more complex chemical environments. Studies previously conducted at ORNL investigated the effects of aging reduced silver exchanged mordenite (Ag{sup 0}Z) in dry air, moist air, and NO2. This study investigated the effects of extended exposure to nitric oxide (NO) gas on the iodine capture performance of Ag{sup 0}Z. A deep bed of Ag{sup 0}Z was aged in a 1% nitric oxide (NO) air stream, and portions of the bed were removed at pre-determined intervals. After being removed from the NO stream, each sample was loaded with iodine in a thin bed configuration. These samples were analyzed by neutron activation analysis (NAA) to quantify the iodine content in the sample. Samples were removed at one week and one month. A 78% decrease in sample capacity was seen after one week of exposure, with no further decrease observed after 1 month of aging. The observed loss in capacity is larger in magnitude than previous studies exposing Ag{sup 0}Z to dry air, moist air, or NO2 gas. The aging study was terminated after one month and repeated; this successfully demonstrated the reproducibility of the results.

  12. Early Stage Market Change and Effects of the Recovery Act Fuel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Early Stage Market Change and Effects of the Recovery Act Fuel Cell Program -- 2015 Update Early Stage Market Change and Effects of the Recovery Act Fuel Cell Program -- 2015 ...

  13. Early-Stage Market Change and Effects of the Recovery Act Fuel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Early-Stage Market Change and Effects of the Recovery Act Fuel Cell Program Early-Stage Market Change and Effects of the Recovery Act Fuel Cell Program On April 15, 2009, the U.S. ...

  14. Major Design Changes Late in Title II or early in Title III Can...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Design Changes Late in Title II or early in Title III Can Be Costly PMLL Identifier: ... design changes occur late in Title II or early in Title III Discussion: Numerous ...

  15. Use of Occupancy Sensors in LED Parking Lot and Garage Applications: Early Experiences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinzey, B. R.; Myer, M. A.; Royer, M. P.; Sullivan, G. P.

    2012-10-01

    Final GATEWAY program report on the early experiences of using occupancy sensors in LED parking lot and garage applications.

  16. Airlines & Aviation Alternative Fuels: Our Drive to Be Early Market

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Adopters | Department of Energy Airlines & Aviation Alternative Fuels: Our Drive to Be Early Market Adopters Airlines & Aviation Alternative Fuels: Our Drive to Be Early Market Adopters Plenary III: Early Market Adopters Airlines & Aviation Alternative Fuels: Our Drive to Be Early Market Adopters Nancy N. Young, Vice President, Environmental Affairs, Airlines for America PDF icon young_bioenergy_2015.pdf More Documents & Publications QER - Comment of Airlines for America

  17. Investigation of Aging Mechanisms in Lean NOx Traps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Crocker

    2010-03-31

    Lean NO{sub x} traps (LNTs) represent a promising technology for the abatement of NO{sub x} under lean conditions. Although LNTs are starting to find commercial application, the issue of catalyst durability remains problematic. LNT susceptibility to sulfur poisoning is the single most important factor determining effective catalyst lifetime. The NO{sub x} storage element of the catalyst has a greater affinity for SO{sub 3} than it does for NO{sub 2}, and the resulting sulfate is more stable than the stored nitrate. Although this sulfate can be removed from the catalyst by means of high temperature treatment under rich conditions, the required conditions give rise to deactivation mechanisms such as precious metal sintering, total surface area loss, and solid state reactions between the various oxides present. The principle objective of this project was to improve understanding of the mechanisms of lean NO{sub x} trap aging, and to understand the effect of washcoat composition on catalyst aging characteristics. The approach utilized involved detailed characterization of model catalysts prior to and after aging, in tandem with measurement of catalyst performance in NO{sub x} storage and reduction. In this manner, NO{sub x} storage and reduction characteristics were correlated with the evolution of catalyst physico-chemical properties upon aging. Rather than using poorly characterized proprietary catalysts, or simple model catalysts of the Pt/BaO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} type (representing the first generation of LNTs), Pt/Rh/BaO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts were employed which also incorporated CeO{sub 2} or CeO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2}, representing a model system which more accurately reflects current LNT formulations. Catalysts were prepared in which the concentration of each of the main components was systematically varied: Pt (50, 75 or 100 g/ft{sup 3}), Rh (10 or 20 g/ft{sup 3}), BaO (15, 30 or 45 g/L), and either CeO{sub 2} (0, 50 or 100 g/L) or CeO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} (0, 50 or 100 g/L). A high surface area La-stabilized alumina was used to support the BaO phase. Catalysts were obtained by washcoating onto standard cordierite substrates, the total washcoat loading being set at 260 g/L. La-stabilized alumina was used as the balance. Subsequent to de-greening, the NO{sub x} storage and reduction characteristics of the catalysts were evaluated on a bench reactor, after which the catalysts were aged on a bench reactor to the equivalent of ca. 75,000 miles of road aging using a published accelerated aging protocol. The aged catalysts were then subjected to the same evaluation proecdure used for the de-greened catalysts. In addition to the use of standard physico-chemical analytical techniques for studying the fresh and aged model catalysts, use was made of advanced analytical tools for characterizing their NO{sub x} storage/reduction and sulfation/desulfation characteristics, such as Spatially resolved capillary-inlet Mass Spectrometry (SpaciMS) and in situ Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS).

  18. EARLY TESTS OF DRUM TYPE PACKAGINGS - THE LEWALLEN REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, A.

    2010-07-29

    The need for robust packagings for radioactive materials (RAM) was recognized from the earliest days of the nuclear industry. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Rocky Flats Plant developed a packaging for shipment of Pu in the early 1960's, which became the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) 6M specification package. The design concepts were employed in other early packagings. Extensive tests of these at Savannah River Laboratory (now Savannah River National Laboratory) were performed in 1969 and 1970. The results of these tests were reported in 'Drum and Board-Type Insulation Overpacks of Shipping Packages for Radioactive Materials', by E. E. Lewallen. The Lewallen Report was foundational to design of subsequent drum type RAM packaging. This paper summarizes this important early study of drum type packagings. The Lewallen Report demonstrated the ability packagings employing drum and insulation board overpacks and engineered containment vessels to meet the Type B package requirements. Because of the results of the Lewallen Report, package designers showed high concern for thermal protection of 'Celotex'. Subsequent packages addressed this by following strategies like those recommended by Lewallen and by internal metal shields and supplemental, encapsulated insulation disks, as in 9975. The guidance provide by the Lewallen Report was employed in design of a large number of drum size packagings over the following three decades. With the increased public concern over transportation of radioactive materials and recognition of the need for larger margins of safety, more sophisticated and complex packages have been developed and have replaced the simple packagings developed under the Lewallen Report paradigm.

  19. Hydrogen Storage Needs for Early Motive Fuel Cell Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, J.; Ainscough, C.; Simpson, L.; Caton, M.

    2012-11-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) objective for this project is to identify performance needs for onboard energy storage of early motive fuel cell markets by working with end users, manufacturers, and experts. The performance needs analysis is combined with a hydrogen storage technology gap analysis to provide the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cell Technologies Program with information about the needs and gaps that can be used to focus research and development activities that are capable of supporting market growth.

  20. SECONDARY WASTE MANAGEMENT STRATEGY FOR EARLY LOW ACTIVITY WASTE TREATMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CRAWFORD TW

    2008-07-17

    This study evaluates parameters relevant to River Protection Project secondary waste streams generated during Early Low Activity Waste operations and recommends a strategy for secondary waste management that considers groundwater impact, cost, and programmatic risk. The recommended strategy for managing River Protection Project secondary waste is focused on improvements in the Effiuent Treatment Facility. Baseline plans to build a Solidification Treatment Unit adjacent to Effluent Treatment Facility should be enhanced to improve solid waste performance and mitigate corrosion of tanks and piping supporting the Effiuent Treatment Facility evaporator. This approach provides a life-cycle benefit to solid waste performance and reduction of groundwater contaminants.

  1. Development of an assisting detection system for early infarct diagnosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sim, K. S.; Nia, M. E.; Ee, C. S.

    2015-04-24

    In this paper, a detection assisting system for early infarct detection is developed. This new developed method is used to assist the medical practitioners to diagnose infarct from computed tomography images of brain. Using this assisting system, the infarct could be diagnosed at earlier stages. The non-contrast computed tomography (NCCT) brain images are the data set used for this system. Detection module extracts the pixel data from NCCT brain images, and produces the colourized version of images. The proposed method showed great potential in detecting infarct, and helps medical practitioners to make earlier and better diagnoses.

  2. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Nuclear Power Plant Siting Database

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1994-01-28

    This database is a repository of comprehensive licensing and technical reviews of siting regulatory processes and acceptance criteria for advanced light water reactor (ALWR) nuclear power plants. The program is designed to be used by applicants for an early site permit or combined construction permit/operating license (10CFRR522, Subparts A and C) as input for the development of the application. The database is a complete, menu-driven, self-contained package that can search and sort the supplied datamore » by topic, keyword, or other input. The software is designed for operation on IBM compatible computers with DOS.« less

  3. Method for early detection of cooling-loss events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bermudez, Sergio A.; Hamann, Hendrik; Marianno, Fernando J.

    2015-06-30

    A method of detecting cooling-loss event early is provided. The method includes defining a relative humidity limit and change threshold for a given space, measuring relative humidity in the given space, determining, with a processing unit, whether the measured relative humidity is within the defined relative humidity limit, generating a warning in an event the measured relative humidity is outside the defined relative humidity limit and determining whether a change in the measured relative humidity is less than the defined change threshold for the given space and generating an alarm in an event the change is greater than the defined change threshold.

  4. Method for early detection of cooling-loss events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bermudez, Sergio A.; Hamann, Hendrik F.; Marianno, Fernando J.

    2015-12-22

    A method of detecting cooling-loss event early is provided. The method includes defining a relative humidity limit and change threshold for a given space, measuring relative humidity in the given space, determining, with a processing unit, whether the measured relative humidity is within the defined relative humidity limit, generating a warning in an event the measured relative humidity is outside the defined relative humidity limit and determining whether a change in the measured relative humidity is less than the defined change threshold for the given space and generating an alarm in an event the change is greater than the defined change threshold.

  5. NP Early Career Opportunities | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NP Early Career Opportunities Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Funding Opportunities Closed Funding Opportunity Announcements (FOAs) Closed Lab Announcements Award Search / Public Abstracts Additional Requirements and Guidance for Digital Data Management Reviews NP Early Career Opportunities NP Early Career Opportunities Archives Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) Community Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S.

  6. Insights into the respiratory tract microbiota of patients with cystic fibrosis during early Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keravec, Marlène; Mounier, Jérôme; Prestat, Emmanuel; Vallet, Sophie; Jansson, Janet K.; Burgaud, Gaëtan; Rosec, Sylvain; Gouriou, Stéphanie; Rault, Gilles; Coton, Emmanuel; Barbier, Georges; Héry-Arnaud, Geneviève

    2015-08-09

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays a major role in cystic fibrosis (CF) progression. Therefore, it is important to understand the initial steps of P. aeruginosa infection. The structure and dynamics of CF respiratory tract microbial communities during the early stages of P. aeruginosa colonization were characterized by pyrosequencing and cloning-sequencing. The respiratory microbiota showed high diversity, related to the young age of the CF cohort (mean age 10 years). Wide inter- and intra-individual variations were revealed. A common core microbiota of 5 phyla and 13 predominant genera was found, the majority of which were obligate anaerobes. A few genera were significantly more prevalent in patients never infected by P. aeruginosa. Persistence of an anaerobic core microbiota regardless of P. aeruginosa status suggests a major role of certain anaerobes in the pathophysiology of lung infections in CF. Some genera may be potential biomarkers of pulmonary infection state.

  7. PETN: Variation in Physical and Chemical Characteristics Related to Aging.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monroe, D. C.; Laintz, K. E.; Kramer, J. F.; Peterson, P. D.

    2006-01-01

    Physical and chemical analyses of five PETN (pentaerythritol tetranitrate) batches have been conducted to assist in defining powder acceptance criteria for qualification of newly manufactured powders, as well as for examination of potential changes related to aging and thus changes in performance. Results showed that (1) repeatable Fisher Sub-Sieve Sizer measurements (which relate well to historic performance data) could be obtained with consistent sample setup and measurement techniques; (2) BET nitrogen adsorption estimates of surface area correlate well with Fisher measurements and appear less variable; (3) PharmaVision particle size analyses show promise in discriminating among PETN batches; and (4) SEMs are extremely useful in semi-quantitative discrimination among batches. Physical and chemical data will be related to performance data (to be obtained) to develop quantitative physical and chemical tests useful in predicting performance over time, i.e., as powders age.

  8. Manhattan Project: Postscript--The Nuclear Age, 1945-Present

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Government-suggested fallout shelter design, 1950s POSTSCRIPT--THE NUCLEAR AGE (1945-Present) Events Informing the Public, August 1945 The Manhattan Engineer District, 1945-1946 First Steps toward International Control, 1944-1945 Search for a Policy on International Control, 1945 Negotiating International Control, 1945-1946 Civilian Control of Atomic Energy, 1945-1946 Operation Crossroads, July 1946 The VENONA Intercepts, 1946-1980 The Cold War, 1945-1990 Nuclear Proliferation, 1949-present Joe

  9. Materials Compatibility and Aging for Flux and Cleaner Combinations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Archuleta, Kim; Piatt, Rochelle

    2015-01-01

    A materials study of high reliability electronics cleaning is presented here. In Phase 1, mixed type substrates underwent a condensed contaminants application to view a worst- case scenario for unremoved flux with cleaning agent residue for parts in a silicone oil filled environment. In Phase 2, fluxes applied to copper coupons and to printed wiring boards underwent gentle cleaning then accelerated aging in air at 65% humidity and 30 O C. Both sets were aged for 4 weeks. Contaminants were no-clean (ORL0), water soluble (ORH1 liquid and ORH0 paste), and rosin (RMA; ROL0) fluxes. Defluxing agents were water, solvents, and engineered aqueous defluxers. In the first phase, coupons had flux applied and heated, then were placed in vials of oil with a small amount of cleaning agent and additional coupons. In the second phase, pairs of copper coupons and PWB were hand soldered by application of each flux, using tin-lead solder in a strip across the coupon or a set of test components on the PWB. One of each pair was cleaned in each cleaning agent, the first with a typical clean, and the second with a brief clean. Ionic contamination residue was measured before accelerated aging. After aging, substrates were removed and a visual record of coupon damage made, from which a subjective rank was applied for comparison between the various flux and defluxer combinations; more corrosion equated to higher rank. The ORH1 water soluble flux resulted in the highest ranking in both phases, the RMA flux the least. For the first phase, in which flux and defluxer remained on coupons, the aqueous defluxers led to worse corrosion. The vapor phase cleaning agents resulted in the highest ranking in the second phase, in which there was no physical cleaning. Further study of cleaning and rinsing parameters will be required.

  10. Accelerated Aging of Roofing Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Materials Accelerated Aging of Roofing Materials 1 of 2 Berkeley Lab Heat Island Group chemist Mohamad Sleiman prepares to insert clean and soiled roofing specimens into a weatherometer. The weatherometer simulates exposure to heat, moisture, and UV radiation. Image: Heat Island Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 2 of 2 Berkeley Lab Heat Island Group chemist Mohamad Sleiman configures a weatherometer to simulate the effects of heat, moisture, and UV radiation on roofing materials.

  11. Maximum Entry and Mandatory Separation Ages for Certain Security Employees

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-10-11

    The policy establishes the DOE policy on maximum entry and mandatory separation ages for primary or secondary positions covered under special statutory retirement provisions and for those employees whose primary duties are the protection of officials of the United States against threats to personal safety or the investigation, apprehension, and detention of individuals suspected or convicted of offenses against the criminal laws of the United States. Admin Chg 1, dated 12-1-11, supersedes DOE P 310.1.

  12. Deactivation mechanisms of NOx storage materials arising from thermal aging

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and sulfur poisoning | Department of Energy Presents the reliationship between Pt particle size and NOx storage performance over model catalysts. Novel reaction protocol designed to decouple effects of thermal deactivation and incomplete desulfation. PDF icon deer08_muntean.pdf More Documents & Publications Mechanisms of Sulfur Poisoning of NOx Adsorber (LNT) Materials Investigation of Aging Mechanisms in Lean NOx Traps CLEERS Coordination & Development of Catalyst Process Kinetic

  13. Report on aging of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.; Ellingwood, B.R.

    1996-03-01

    The Structural Aging Program provides the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use in continued service assessments of nuclear power plant safety-related concrete structures. The program was organized under four task areas: Program Management, Materials Property Data Base, Structural Component Assessment/Repair Technology, and Quantitative Methodology for Continued Service Determinations. Under these tasks, over 90 papers and reports were prepared addressing pertinent aspects associated with aging management of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures. Contained in this report is a summary of program results in the form of information related to longevity of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures, a Structural Materials Information Center presenting data and information on the time variation of concrete materials under the influence of environmental stressors and aging factors, in-service inspection and condition assessments techniques, repair materials and methods, evaluation of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures, and a reliability-based methodology for current and future condition assessments. Recommendations for future activities are also provided. 308 refs., 61 figs., 50 tabs.

  14. 2012 ACCOMPLISHMENTS - TRITIUM AGING STUDIES ON STAINLESS STEELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, M.

    2013-01-31

    This report summarizes the research and development accomplishments during FY12 for the tritium effects on materials program. The tritium effects on materials program is designed to measure the long-term effects of tritium and its radioactive decay product, helium-3, on the structural properties of forged stainless steels which are used as the materials of construction for tritium reservoirs. The FY12 R&D accomplishments include: (1) Fabricated and Thermally-Charged 150 Forged Stainless Steel Samples with Tritium for Future Aging Studies; (2) Developed an Experimental Plan for Measuring Cracking Thresholds of Tritium-Charged-and-Aged Steels in High Pressure Hydrogen Gas; (3) Calculated Sample Tritium Contents For Laboratory Inventory Requirements and Environmental Release Estimates; (4) Published report on Cracking Thresholds and Fracture Toughness Properties of Tritium-Charged-and-Aged Stainless Steels; and, (5) Published report on The Effects of Hydrogen, Tritium, and Heat Treatment on the Deformation and Fracture Toughness Properties of Stainless Steels. These accomplishments are highlighted here and references given to additional reports for more detailed information.

  15. AGING AND IODINE LOADING OF SILVER-FUNCTIONALIZED AEROGELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruffey, Stephanie H [ORNL; Jubin, Robert Thomas [ORNL; Anderson, Kaara K [ORNL; Walker Jr, Joseph Franklin [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Engineered silver-functionalized silica aerogels are being investigated for their application in off-gas treatment at a used nuclear fuel reprocessing facility. Reprocessing will release several key volatile radionuclides, including iodine-129. To achieve regulatory compliance, iodine-129 must be removed from any off-gas stream prior to environmental discharge. Silver-functionalized aerogels have been demonstrated to have high iodine capture capacity, high porosity and potential for conversion into a waste form. Capture materials used in off-gas treatment may be exposed to a heated, high humidity, acidic gas stream for months. Extended exposure to this stream could affect sorbent performance. It was the aim of this study to evaluate what impacts might be observed when Ag0-functionalized aerogels prepared at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory were contacted with a dry air stream for up to 6 months and then used to adsorb iodine from a synthetic off-gas stream. Results demonstrate that there is some loss of iodine capture capacity caused by aging, but that this loss is not as marked as for aging of more traditional iodine sorbents, such as silver-impregnated mordenite. Specifically, aging silver-functionalized aerogel under a dry air stream for up to 6 months can decrease its iodine capacity from 41wt% to 32wt%.

  16. Aging and iodine loading of silver-functionalized aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruffey, S.H.; Jubin, R.T.; Anderson, K.K.; Walker, J.F. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, MS-6223, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Engineered silver-functionalized silica aerogels are being investigated for their potential application in off-gas treatment at a used nuclear fuel reprocessing facility. Reprocessing will release several key volatile radionuclides, including iodine-129. To achieve regulatory compliance, iodine-129 must be removed from any off-gas stream prior to environmental discharge. Ag{sup 0}-functionalized aerogels have been demonstrated to have high iodine-capture capacity, high porosity, and potential for conversion into a waste form. Capture materials used in off-gas treatment may be exposed to a heated, high-humidity, acidic gas stream for months. Extended exposure to this stream could affect sorbent performance. It was the aim of this study to evaluate what impacts might be observed when Ag{sup 0}-functionalized aerogels prepared at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory were contacted with a dry air stream for up to 6 months and then used to adsorb iodine from a synthetic off-gas stream. Results demonstrate that there is some loss of iodine-capture capacity caused by aging, but that this loss is not as marked as for aging of more traditional iodine sorbents, such as silver-impregnated mordenite. Specifically, aging silver-functionalized aerogel under a dry air stream for up to 6 months can decrease its iodine capacity from 41 wt% to 32 wt%. (authors)

  17. Performance of bolted closure joint elastomers under cask aging conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verst, C.; Sindelar, R.; Skidmore, E.; Daugherty, W.

    2015-07-23

    The bolted closure joint of a bare spent fuel cask is susceptible to age-related degradation and potential loss of confinement function under long-term storage conditions. Elastomeric seals, a component of the joint typically used to facilitate leak testing of the primary seal that includes the metallic seal and bolting, is susceptible to degradation over time by several mechanisms, principally via thermo-oxidation, stress-relaxation, and radiolytic degradation under time and temperature condition. Irradiation and thermal exposure testing and evaluation of an ethylene-propylene diene monomer (EPDM) elastomeric seal material similar to that used in the CASTOR® V/21 cask for a matrix of temperature and radiation exposure conditions relevant to the cask extended storage conditions, and development of semiempirical predictive models for loss of sealing force is in progress. A special insert was developed to allow Compressive Stress Relaxation (CSR) measurements before and after the irradiation and/or thermal exposure without unloading the elastomer. A condition of the loss of sealing force for the onset of leakage was suggested. The experimentation and modeling being performed could enable acquisition of extensive coupled aging data as well as an estimation of the timeframe when loss of sealing function under aging (temperature/radiation) conditions may occur.

  18. Boiling-Water Reactor internals aging degradation study. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luk, K.H.

    1993-09-01

    This report documents the results of an aging assessment study for boiling water reactor (BWR) internals. Major stressors for BWR internals are related to unsteady hydrodynamic forces generated by the primary coolant flow in the reactor vessel. Welding and cold-working, dissolved oxygen and impurities in the coolant, applied loads and exposures to fast neutron fluxes are other important stressors. Based on results of a component failure information survey, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and fatigue are identified as the two major aging-related degradation mechanisms for BWR internals. Significant reported failures include SCC in jet-pump holddown beams, in-core neutron flux monitor dry tubes and core spray spargers. Fatigue failures were detected in feedwater spargers. The implementation of a plant Hydrogen Water Chemistry (HWC) program is considered as a promising method for controlling SCC problems in BWR. More operating data are needed to evaluate its effectiveness for internal components. Long-term fast neutron irradiation effects and high-cycle fatigue in a corrosive environment are uncertainty factors in the aging assessment process. BWR internals are examined by visual inspections and the method is access limited. The presence of a large water gap and an absence of ex-core neutron flux monitors may handicap the use of advanced inspection methods, such as neutron noise vibration measurements, for BWR.

  19. Early Clinical Outcomes Demonstrate Preserved Cognitive Function in Children With Average-Risk Medulloblastoma When Treated With Hyperfractionated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, Tejpal; Jalali, Rakesh; Goswami, Savita; Nair, Vimoj; Moiyadi, Aliasgar; Epari, Sridhar; Sarin, Rajiv

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To report on acute toxicity, longitudinal cognitive function, and early clinical outcomes in children with average-risk medulloblastoma. Methods and Materials: Twenty children {>=}5 years of age classified as having average-risk medulloblastoma were accrued on a prospective protocol of hyperfractionated radiation therapy (HFRT) alone. Radiotherapy was delivered with two daily fractions (1 Gy/fraction, 6 to 8 hours apart, 5 days/week), initially to the neuraxis (36 Gy/36 fractions), followed by conformal tumor bed boost (32 Gy/32 fractions) for a total tumor bed dose of 68 Gy/68 fractions over 6 to 7 weeks. Cognitive function was prospectively assessed longitudinally (pretreatment and at specified posttreatment follow-up visits) with the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children to give verbal quotient, performance quotient, and full-scale intelligence quotient (FSIQ). Results: The median age of the study cohort was 8 years (range, 5-14 years), representing a slightly older cohort. Acute hematologic toxicity was mild and self-limiting. Eight (40%) children had subnormal intelligence (FSIQ <85), including 3 (15%) with mild mental retardation (FSIQ 56-70) even before radiotherapy. Cognitive functioning for all tested domains was preserved in children evaluable at 3 months, 1 year, and 2 years after completion of HFRT, with no significant decline over time. Age at diagnosis or baseline FSIQ did not have a significant impact on longitudinal cognitive function. At a median follow-up time of 33 months (range, 16-58 months), 3 patients had died (2 of relapse and 1 of accidental burns), resulting in 3-year relapse-free survival and overall survival of 83.5% and 83.2%, respectively. Conclusion: HFRT without upfront chemotherapy has an acceptable acute toxicity profile, without an unduly increased risk of relapse, with preserved cognitive functioning in children with average-risk medulloblastoma.

  20. Aging of Iodine-Loaded Silver Mordenite in NO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruffey, Stephanie H.; Jubin, Robert Thomas; Patton, Kaara K.; Walker Jr, Joseph Franklin

    2014-04-01

    Used nuclear fuel facilities need to control and minimize radioactive emissions. Off-gas systems are designed to remove radioactive contaminants, such as 85Kr, 14C, 3H, and 129I. In an off-gas system, any capture material will be exposed to a gas stream for months at a time. This gas stream may be at elevated temperature and could contain water, NOx gas, or a variety of other constituents comprising the dissolver off-gas stream in a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. For this reason, it is important to evaluate the effects of long-term exposure, or aging, on proposed capture materials. One material under consideration is reduced silver mordenite (Ag0Z), which is recognized for its efficient iodine capture properties. Iodine is immobilized on Ag0Z as AgI, a solid with low volatility (m.p. ? 500C). The aim of this study was to determine whether extended aging at elevated temperature in a nominally 2% NO2 environment would result in a loss of immobilized iodine from this material due to either physical or chemical changes that might occur during aging. Charges of iodine-loaded reduced silver mordenite (I2-Ag0Z) were exposed to a 2% NO2 environment for 1, 2, 3, and 4 months at 150C, then analyzed for iodine losses The aging study was completed successfully. The material did not visibly change color or form. The results demonstrate that no significant iodine loss was observed over the course of 4 months of 2% NO2 aging of I2-Ag0Z at elevated temperature within the margin of error and the variability (~10%) in the loading along the beds. This provides assurance that iodine will remain immobilized on Ag0Z during extended online use in an off-gas capture treatment system. Future tests should expose I2-Ag0Z to progressively more complex feed gases in an effort to accurately replicate the conditions expected in a reprocessing facility.

  1. New Technologies for Repairing Aging Cables in Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Kevin L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fifield, Leonard S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Westman, Matthew P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-09-11

    The goal of this project is to demonstrate a proof-of-concept for a technique to repair aging cables that have been subjected to degradation associated with long-term thermal and radiation exposure in nuclear power plants. The physical degradation of the aging cables manifests itself primarily as cracking and increased brittleness of the polymeric electrical insulation. Therefore, the proposed cable-repair concept comprises development of techniques to impart a softening agent within the deteriorated polymer insulation jacket so as to regain the ability of the insulation to stretch without failing and possibly to heal existing cracks in the insulation. Our approach is to use commercially available ethylene-propylene rubber (EPR) as the relevant test material, demonstrate the adsorption of chemical treatments in the EPR and quantify changes in resulting physical and mechanical properties. EPR cable samples have been thermally treated in air to produce specimens corresponding to the full range of cable age-performance points from new (>350% elongation at break) to end-of-life (<50% elongation at break). The current focus is on two chemical treatments selected as candidates for restoring age-related cable elasticity loss: a rubber plasticizer and a reactive silane molecule. EPR specimens of 200, 150, 100, and 50% elongation at break have been soaked in the candidate chemical treatments and the kinetics of chemical uptake, measured by change in mass of the samples, has been determined. Mechanical properties as a function of aging and chemical treatment have been measured including ultimate tensile strength, tensile modulus at 50% strain, elongation at break, and storage modulus. Dimensional changes with treatment and changes in glass transition temperature were also investigated. These ongoing experiments are expected to provide insight into the physical-chemical nature of the effect of thermal degradation on EPR rejuvenation limits and to advance novel methods for restoring the ability of degraded EPR to be compliant and resist fracture. The results of this research reveal that absorption of chemical treatments can lower the glass transition temperature and modulus of EPR. Chemical treatments pursued thus far have proven ineffective at restoring EPR strength and elongation at break. Future work will combine the plasticizer modalities found to successfully increase the volume of the EPR, reduce EPR glass transition temperature and reduce EPR modulus with promising chemistries that will repair the damage of the polymer, potentially using the plasticizer as a host for the new chemistry.

  2. Powertrain Component Inspection from Mid-Level Blends Vehicle Aging Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shoffner, Brent; Johnson, Ryan; Heimrich, Martin J.; Lochte, Michael

    2010-11-01

    The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 calls on the nation to significantly increase its use of renewable fuels to meet its transportation energy needs. The law expands the renewable fuel standard to require use of 36 billion gallons of renewable fuel by 2022. Given that ethanol is the most widely used renewable fuel in the U.S. market, ethanol will likely make up a significant portion of the 36-billion-gallon requirement. The vast majority of ethanol used in the United States is blended with gasoline to create E10-gasoline with up to 10% ethanol. The remaining ethanol is sold in the form of E85 - a gasoline blend with as much as 85% ethanol that can only be used in flexible-fuel vehicles (FFVs). Consumption of E85 is at present limited by both the size of the FFV fleet and the number of E85 fueling stations. Gasoline consumption in the United States is currently about 140 billion gallons per year; thus the maximum use of ethanol as E10 is only about 14 billion gallons. While the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) remains committed to expanding the E85 infrastructure, that market represented less than 1% of the ethanol consumed in 2010 and will not be able to absorb projected volumes of ethanol in the near term. Because of these factors, DOE and others have been assessing the viability of using mid-level ethanol blends (E15 or E20) as a way to accommodate growing volumes of ethanol. The DOE Mid-Level Ethanol Blends Test Program has been under way since 2007, supported jointly by the Office of the Biomass Program and the Vehicle Technologies Program. One of the larger projects, the Catalyst Durability Study, or Vehicle Aging Study, will be completed early in calendar year 2011. The following report describes a subproject of the Vehicle Aging Study in which powertrain components from 18 of the vehicles were examined at Southwest Research Institute under contract to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

  3. Aspirin and Statin Nonuse Associated With Early Biochemical Failure After Prostate Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaorsky, Nicholas G.; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Li, Tianyu; Horwitz, Eric M.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To present the largest retrospective series investigating the effect of aspirin and statins, which are hypothesized to have antineoplastic properties, on biochemical failure (nadir plus 2 ng/mL) after prostate radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Between 1989 and 2006, 2051 men with clinically localized prostate cancer received definitive RT alone (median dose, 76 Gy). The rates of aspirin use and statin use (defined as any use at the time of RT or during follow-up) were 36% and 34%, respectively. The primary endpoint of the study was an interval to biochemical failure (IBF) of less than 18 months, which has been shown to be the single strongest predictor of distant metastasis, prostate cancer survival, and overall survival after RT. Patient demographic characteristics and tumor staging factors were assessed with regard to associations with the endpoint. Univariate analysis was performed with the {chi}{sup 2} test for categorical variables and the Wilcoxon test for continuous variables. Multivariable analysis was performed with a multiple logistic regression. Results: The median follow-up was 75 months. Univariate analysis showed that an IBF of less than 18 months was associated with aspirin nonuse (P<.0001), statin nonuse (P<.0001), anticoagulant nonuse (P=.0006), cardiovascular disease (P=.0008), and prostate-specific antigen (continuous) (P=.008) but not with Gleason score, age, RT dose, or T stage. On multivariate analysis, only aspirin nonuse (P=.0012; odds ratio, 2.052 [95% confidence interval, 1.328-3.172]) and statin nonuse (P=.0002; odds ratio, 2.465 [95% confidence interval, 1.529-3.974]) were associated with an IBF of less than 18 months. Conclusions: In patients who received RT for prostate cancer, aspirin or statin nonuse was associated with early biochemical failure, a harbinger of distant metastasis and death. Further study is needed to confirm these findings and to determine the optimal dosing and schedule, as well as the relative benefits and risks, of both therapies in combination with RT.

  4. The progenitors of the compact early-type galaxies at high redshift

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Christina C.; Giavalisco, Mauro; Lee, Bomee; Cassata, Paolo; Tundo, Elena; Conselice, Christopher J.; Wiklind, Tommy; Guo, Yicheng; Barro, Guillermo; Faber, Sandra M.; Koo, David C.; Bell, Eric F.; Dekel, Avishai; Ferguson, Henry C.; Grogin, Norman; Koekemoer, Anton; Hathi, Nimish; Huang, Kuang-Han; Kocevski, Dale; and others

    2014-01-01

    We use GOODS and CANDELS images to identify progenitors of massive (M > 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}) compact early-type galaxies (ETGs) at z ∼ 1.6. Because merging and accretion increase the size of the stellar component of galaxies, if the progenitors are among known star-forming galaxies, these must be compact themselves. We select candidate progenitors among compact Lyman-break galaxies at z ∼ 3 on the basis of their mass, star-formation rate (SFR), and central stellar density, and we find that these account for a large fraction of, and possibly all, compact ETGs at z ∼ 1.6. We find that the average far-UV spectral energy distribution (SED) of the candidates is redder than that of the non-candidates, but the optical and mid-IR SED are the same, implying that the redder UV of the candidates is inconsistent with larger dust obscuration and consistent with more evolved (aging) star formation. This is in line with other evidence suggesting that compactness is a sensitive predictor of passivity among high-redshift massive galaxies. We also find that the light distribution of both the compact ETGs and their candidate progenitors does not show any extended 'halos' surrounding the compact 'core,' both in individual images and in stacks. We argue that this is generally inconsistent with the morphology of merger remnants, even if gas rich, as predicted by N-body simulations. This suggests that the compact ETGs formed via highly dissipative, mostly gaseous accretion of units whose stellar components are very small and undetected in the Hubble Space Telescope images, with their stellar mass assembling in situ, and that they have not experienced any major merging until the epoch of observations at z ∼ 1.6.

  5. A cohort study of developmental polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) exposure in relation to post-vaccination antibody response at 6-months of age

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jusko, Todd A.; De Roos, Anneclaire J.; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Program in Epidemiology, Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA ; Paige Lawrence, B.; Palkovicova, Lubica; Nemessanyi, Tomas; Drobna, Beata; Fabisikova, Anna; Kocan, Anton; Sonneborn, Dean; Jahnova, Eva; Kavanagh, Terrance J.; Trnovec, Tomas; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva

    2010-05-15

    Background: Extensive experimental data in animals indicate that exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) during pregnancy leads to changes in offspring immune function during the postnatal period. Whether developmental PCB exposure influences immunologic development in humans has received little study. Methods: The study population was 384 mother-infant pairs recruited from two districts of eastern Slovakia for whom prospectively collected maternal, cord, and 6-month infant blood specimens were available. Several PCB congeners were measured in maternal, cord, and 6-month infant sera by high-resolution gas chromatography with electron capture detection. Concentrations of IgG-specific anti-haemophilus influenzae type b, tetanus toxoid, and diphtheria toxoid were assayed in 6-month infant sera using ELISA methods. Multiple linear regression was used to estimate the relation between maternal, cord, and 6-month infant PCB concentrations and the antibody concentrations evaluated at 6-months of age. Results: Overall, there was little evidence of an association between infant antibody concentrations and PCB measures during the pre- and early postnatal period. In addition, our results did not show specificity in terms of associations limited to a particular developmental period (e.g. pre- vs. postnatal), a particular antibody, or a particular PCB congener. Conclusions: At the PCB concentrations measured in this cohort, which are high relative to most human populations today, we did not detect an association between maternal or early postnatal PCB exposure and specific antibody responses at 6-months of age.

  6. Early test facilities and analytic methods for radiation shielding: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ingersoll, D.T. ); Ingersoll, J.K. )

    1992-11-01

    This report represents a compilation of eight papers presented at the 1992 American Nuclear Society/European Nuclear Society International Meeting. The meeting is of special significance since it commemorates the fiftieth anniversary of the first controlled nuclear chain reaction. The papers contained in this report were presented in a special session organized by the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division in keeping with the historical theme of the meeting. The paper titles are good indicators of their content and are: (1) The origin of radiation shielding research: The Oak Ridge experience, (2) Shielding research at the hanford site, (3) Aircraft shielding experiments at General Dynamics Fort Worth, 1950-1962, (4) Where have the neutrons gone , a history of the tower shielding facility, (5) History and evolution of buildup factors, (6) Early shielding research at Bettis atomic power laboratory, (7) UK reactor shielding: then and now, (8) A very personal view of the development of radiation shielding theory.

  7. AEO2013 Early Release Base Overnight Project Technological Total Overnight

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Early Release Base Overnight Project Technological Total Overnight Variable Fixed Heatrate 6 nth-of-a- kind Online Size Lead time Cost in 2012 Contingency Optimism Cost in 2012 4 O&M 5 O&M in 2012 Heatrate Technology Year 1 (MW) (years) (2011 $/kW) Factor 2 Factor 3 (2011 $/kW) (2011 $/MWh) (2011$/kW) (Btu/kWh) (Btu/kWh) Scrubbed Coal New 7 2016 1300 4 2,694 1.07 1.00 2,883 4.39 30.64 8,800 8,740 Integrated Coal-Gasification Comb Cycle (IGCC) 7 2016 1200 4 3,475 1.07 1.00 3,718 7.09

  8. Latest Jurassic-early Cretaceous regressive facies, northeast Africa craton

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Houten, F.B.

    1980-06-01

    Nonmarine to paralic detrital deposits accumulated in six large basins between Algeria and the Arabo-Nubian shield during major regression in latest Jurassic and Early Cretaceous time. The Ghadames Sirte (north-central Libya), and Northern (Egypt) basins lay along the cratonic margin of northeastern Africa. The Murzuk, Kufra, and Southern (Egypt) basins lay in the south within the craton. Data for reconstructing distribution, facies, and thickness of relevant sequences are adequate for the three northern basins only. High detrital influx near the end of Jurassic time and in mid-Cretaceous time produced regressive nubian facies composed largely of low-sinuosity stream and fahdelta deposits. In the west and southwest the Ghadames, Murzuk, and Kufra basins were filled with a few hundred meters of detritus after long-continued earlier Mesozoic aggradation. In northern Egypt the regressive sequence succeeded earlier Mesozoic marine sedimentation; in the Sirte and Southern basins correlative deposits accumulated on Precambrian and Variscan terranes after earlier Mesozoic uplift and erosion. Waning of detrital influx into southern Tunisia and adjacent Libya in the west and into Israel in the east initiated an Albian to early Cenomanian transgression of Tethys. By late Cenomanian time it had flooded the entire cratonic margin, and spread southward into the Murzuk and Southern basins, as well as onto the Arabo-Nubian shield. Latest Jurassic-earliest Cretaceous, mid-Cretaceous, and Late Cretaceous transgressions across northeastern Africa recorded in these sequences may reflect worldwide eustatic sea-level rises. In contrast, renewed large supply of detritus during each regression and a comparable subsidence history of intracratonic and marginal basins imply regional tectonic control. 6 figures.

  9. Early Proterozoic transcontinental orogenic belts in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Schmus, W.R. . Dept. of Geology); Bickford, M.E. . Dept. of Geology); Condie, K.C. . Dept. Geoscience)

    1993-02-01

    It has been recognized for many years that Early Proterozoic orogenic rocks in the western US range from 1.8 to 1.6 Ga, with a general distribution such that 1.8 to 1.7 Ga rocks underlie Colorado, northern Arizona, and northern New Mexico and 1.7 to 1.6 Ga rocks underlie southern Arizona and southern New Mexico. Recent U-Pb geochronologic and Sm-Nd isotopic studies by a variety of research groups have refined crustal history in the western region and have extended knowledge eastward into the buried midcontinent basement. As a result, the authors propose that 1.8 Ga to 1.6 Ga crust of the US by divided into two distinct, but overlapping, orogenic belts: a 1.8 to 1.7 Ga Inner Accretionary Belt and a 1.7 to 1.6 Ga Outer Tectonic Belt. The Inner Accretionary Belt (IAB) comprises rock suites with compositions and isotopic signatures compatible with origin as juvenile crustal terranes formed as oceanic or off-shore and related terranes that were accreted to southern Laurentia between 1.8 and 1.6 Ga. The IAB includes the Yavapai Province of Arizona, Early Proterozoic basement of Colorado and southern Wyoming, and the basement of Nebraska. The Mojave Province of California may be part of this belt, although it also includes components derived from older Proterozoic or Archean crust. Extension of the IAB eastward from Nebraska is uncertain at present, although coeval rocks that may be eastern manifestations of this 1.8 to 1.7 Ga orogenesis occur in Wisconsin (1.76 Ga granite-rhyolite suite), Ontario (Killarney granite), Labrador (Makkovic Province) and southern Greenland (Ketilidian orogen). The Outer Tectonic Belt (OTB) comprises rock suites which have compositions, structures, and isotopic signature compatible with origin in continental margin tectonic settings between 1.7 and 1.6 Ga.

  10. TH-E-BRF-03: A Multivariate Interaction Model for Assessment of Hippocampal Vascular Dose-Response and Early Prediction of Radiation-Induced Neurocognitive Dysfunction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farjam, R; Pramanik, P; Srinivasan, A; Chapman, C; Tsien, C; Lawrence, T; Cao, Y

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Vascular injury could be a cause of hippocampal dysfunction leading to late neurocognitive decline in patients receiving brain radiotherapy (RT). Hence, our aim was to develop a multivariate interaction model for characterization of hippocampal vascular dose-response and early prediction of radiation-induced late neurocognitive impairments. Methods: 27 patients (17 males and 10 females, age 31–80 years) were enrolled in an IRB-approved prospective longitudinal study. All patients were diagnosed with a low-grade glioma or benign tumor and treated by 3-D conformal or intensity-modulated RT with a median dose of 54 Gy (50.4–59.4 Gy in 1.8− Gy fractions). Six DCE-MRI scans were performed from pre-RT to 18 months post-RT. DCE data were fitted to the modified Toft model to obtain the transfer constant of gadolinium influx from the intravascular space into the extravascular extracellular space, Ktrans, and the fraction of blood plasma volume, Vp. The hippocampus vascular property alterations after starting RT were characterized by changes in the hippocampal mean values of, μh(Ktrans)τ and μh(Vp)τ. The dose-response, Δμh(Ktrans/Vp)pre->τ, was modeled using a multivariate linear regression considering integrations of doses with age, sex, hippocampal laterality and presence of tumor/edema near a hippocampus. Finally, the early vascular dose-response in hippocampus was correlated with neurocognitive decline 6 and 18 months post-RT. Results: The μh(Ktrans) increased significantly from pre-RT to 1 month post-RT (p<0.0004). The multivariate model showed that the dose effect on Δμh(Ktrans)pre->1M post-RT was interacted with sex (p<0.0007) and age (p<0.00004), with the dose-response more pronounced in older females. Also, the vascular dose-response in the left hippocampus of females was significantly correlated with memory function decline at 6 (r = − 0.95, p<0.0006) and 18 (r = −0.88, p<0.02) months post-RT. Conclusion: The hippocampal vascular response to radiation could be sex and age dependent. The early hippocampal vascular dose-response could predict late neurocognitive dysfunction. (Support: NIH-RO1NS064973)

  11. Analog morphocorrelation: new technique with implications for high-resolution absolute age dating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnold, A.J.; Parker, W.C.; Berggren, W.A.

    1986-05-01

    The conventional approach to increased biostratigraphic resolution involves identifying additional datum planes defined by discrete events. Multivariate techniques used to refine a conventional taxonomic zonal scheme offer no improvement in precision; however, since the characters on which the zonal boundaries are based often show continuous stratigraphic variation, they offer an opportunity for continuous stratigraphic correlation based on the stage of evolution. Morphometric analysis was conducted on two lineages: (1) the Globorotalia cibaoensis-G. crassaformis linage, using a reference section from the early Pliocene of the Rio Grande rise, spanning approximately 2.6 m.y.; and (2) the G. conoidea-G.inflata lineage, using a reference section from the late Miocene to the Holocene from the southwest Pacific, spanning approximately 8 m.y. Stepwise multiple regression of morphologic variates generated an equation with an age-prediction precision (95% confidence) of +/- 122 k.y. in the G. crassaformis lineage and +/- 463 k.y. in the G conoidea lineage (accuracy depends on calibration of absolute dates in the reference section and our knowledge of sedimentation rates over the measured interval). Using single-equation analog morphocorrelation, any sample overlapped by the reference lineage can be correlated, which reduce the need for repeated sampling in a search for discrete events. The authors demonstrate that analysis of continuous morphologic variation can increase stratigraphic precision with a few carefully chosen variables, and that analog morpho-correlation can yield absolute dates, rather than relative dates with quantified error. Any disadvantages inherent in analog morphocorrelation are also found in conventional biostratigraphic techniques, but are usually unquantified and unrecognized.

  12. THE STRUCTURAL EVOLUTION OF FORMING AND EARLY STAGE STAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaehnig, Karl O.; Da Rio, Nicola; Tan, Jonathan C. E-mail: ndario@ufl.edu

    2015-01-10

    We study the degree of angular substructure in the stellar position distribution of young members of Galactic star-forming regions, looking for correlations with distance from cluster center, surface number density of stars, and local dynamical age. To this end we adopt the catalog of members in 18 young (?1-3Myr) clusters from the Massive Young Star-Forming Complex Study in Infrared and X-ray Survey and the statistical analysis of the angular dispersion parameter, ?{sub ADP,} {sub N}. We find statistically significant correlation between ?{sub ADP,} {sub N} and physical projected distance from the center of the clusters, with the centers appearing smoother than the outskirts, consistent with more rapid dynamical processing on local dynamical, free-fall or orbital timescales. Similarly, smoother distributions are seen in regions of higher surface density, or older dynamical ages. These results indicate that dynamical processing that erases substructure is already well-advanced in young, sometimes still-forming, clusters. Such observations of the dissipation of substructure have the potential to constrain theoretical models of the dynamical evolution of young and forming clusters.

  13. COTNAINSETREFERENCE NO OF DOCUMENT BEING CONTINUED ~AGE OF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NO OF DOCUMENT BEING CONTINUED ~AGE OF CONINUTIO SHE PF, , '-C c NAME OF OFFEROR OR CONTRACTOR WASHAINGTON. 1 IVEP, PPOTFCIO SDO2LUYI, roLT ITEM NO SUPPLIES/SERVICES QUANTITY UNIT UNIT PRICE AMOUNT App-rl Usel fU))J ( P~~PA 14 CIYBI Pr-' T 1, Contract N umber I)E-AC27-08RVI 4800 Continuation Page, Modification 106 Pagye 3 of 4 Attachment DE-AC27-O8RVI 4800, MODIFICATION 106 Replacement Pages Section B, Page B-3, (2 pages total including this cover page) Tank Operations Contract Section B

  14. Accelerated aging of GaAs concentrator solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory, P.E.

    1982-04-01

    An accelerated aging study of AlGaAs/GaAs solar cells has been completed. The purpose of the study was to identify the possible degradation mechanisms of AlGaAs/GaAs solar cells in terrestrial applications. Thermal storage tests and accelerated AlGaAs corrosion studies were performed to provide an experimental basis for a statistical analysis of the estimated lifetime. Results of this study suggest that a properly designed and fabricated AlGaAs/GaAs solar cell can be mechanically rugged and environmentally stable with projected lifetimes exceeding 100 years.

  15. Tank waste chemistry: A new understanding of waste aging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babad, H.; Camaioni, D.M.; Lilga, M.A.; Samuels, W.D.; Strachan, D.M.

    1993-02-01

    There is concern about the risk of uncontrolled exothermic reaction(s) in Hanford Site waste tanks containing NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}/NO{sub 2} based salts and/or metal hydroxide sludges in combination with organics or ferrocyanides. However, gradual oxidation of the waste in the tanks to less reactive species appears to have reduced the risk. In addition, wastes sampled to date contain sufficiently large quantities of water so that propagation reactions are highly unlikely. This paper investigates various aspects of the aging of Hanford tank wastes.

  16. Estimating the age of alleles by use of intraallelic variability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slatkin, M.; Rannala, B.

    1997-02-01

    A method is presented for estimating the age of an allele by use of its frequency and the extent of variation among different copies. The method uses the joint distribution of the number of copies in a population sample and the coalescence times of the intraallelic gene genealogy conditioned on the number of copies. The linear birth-death process is used to approximate the dynamics of a rare allele in a finite population. A maximum-likelihood estimate of the age of the allele is obtained by Monte Carlo integration over the coalescence times. The method is applied to two alleles at the cystic fibrosis (CFTR) locus, {Delta}F508 and G542X, for which intraallelic variability at three intronic microsatellite loci has been examined. Our results indicate that G542X is somewhat older than {Delta}F508. Although absolute estimates depend on the mutation rates at the microsatellite loci, our results support the hypothesis that {Delta}F508 arose <500 generations ({approx}10,000 years) ago. 32 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Aging assessment of surge protective devices in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, J.F.; Subudhi, M.; Carroll, D.P.

    1996-01-01

    An assessment was performed to determine the effects of aging on the performance and availability of surge protective devices (SPDs), used in electrical power and control systems in nuclear power plants. Although SPDs have not been classified as safety-related, they are risk-important because they can minimize the initiating event frequencies associated with loss of offsite power and reactor trips. Conversely, their failure due to age might cause some of those initiating events, e.g., through short circuit failure modes, or by allowing deterioration of the safety-related component(s) they are protecting from overvoltages, perhaps preventing a reactor trip, from an open circuit failure mode. From the data evaluated during 1980--1994, it was found that failures of surge arresters and suppressers by short circuits were neither a significant risk nor safety concern, and there were no failures of surge suppressers preventing a reactor trip. Simulations, using the ElectroMagnetic Transients Program (EMTP) were performed to determine the adequacy of high voltage surge arresters.

  18. NMR studies of aging effects in palladium tritide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abell, G.C.; Attalla, A.

    1988-09-01

    This paper presents Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) studies of aging phenomena in palladium tritide. /sup 3/He NMR relaxation parameters have been measured as a function of temperature for 6-, 13-, and 22-month-old beta phase palladium tritide. The most significant result of this study is the observation of a solid/fluid phase transition near 250 K of /sup 3/He that has accumulated in the PdT/sub x/ substrate via triton decay. Although the existence of solid helium at relatively high temperatures had been predicted for helium in metals, it had not previously been confirmed in any metal/helium system. The observed melting temperatures, together with the known equation of state for /sup 4/He, allow a determination of the helium density as a function of age. The atomic density obtained in this way is approximately 2.0 times that of palladium metal, agreeing with densities inferred from dilatometric measurements of other metal tritides and also with predictions based on the concept of dislocation loop punching by highly overpressurized He bubbles. The /sup 3/He signal in the 22-month-old sample was sufficiently strong to allow a detailed study of melting as a function of temperature, and provides information on the distribution of densities over the ensemble of bubbles.

  19. SSL Early Lessons Learned on the Way to the Market | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    SSL Early Lessons Learned on the Way to the Market SSL Early Lessons Learned on the Way to the Market PDF icon SSL Early Lessons Learned Report Summary.pdf More Documents & Publications Caliper Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality Characteristics of LED A Lamps DOE Booth Presentations from LIGHTFAIR International 2015 Lighting Designer Roundtable on Solid-State Lighting

  20. Solid-State Lighting: Early Lessons Learned on the Way to Market |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Webcasts » Solid-State Lighting: Early Lessons Learned on the Way to Market Solid-State Lighting: Early Lessons Learned on the Way to Market This February 20, 2014 webinar presented information from a new DOE report, Solid-State Lighting: Early Lessons Learned on the Way to Market. The SSL market continues to evolve rapidly and LED lighting products are now available for virtually all general illumination applications. With this groundbreaking new technology everyone

  1. Prenatal PCBs disrupt early neuroendocrine development of the rat hypothalamus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickerson, Sarah M.; Cunningham, Stephanie L.; Gore, Andrea C.

    2011-04-01

    Neonatal exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) can interfere with hormone-sensitive developmental processes, including brain sexual differentiation. We hypothesized that disruption of these processes by gestational PCB exposure would be detectable as early as the day after birth (postnatal day (P) 1) through alterations in hypothalamic gene and protein expression. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were injected twice, once each on gestational days 16 and 18, with one of the following: DMSO vehicle; the industrial PCB mixture Aroclor 1221 (A1221); a reconstituted mixture of the three most prevalent congeners found in humans, PCB138, PCB153, and PCB180; or estradiol benzoate (EB). On P1, litter composition, anogenital distance (AGD), and body weight were assessed. Pups were euthanized for immunohistochemistry of estrogen receptor {alpha} (ER{alpha}) or TUNEL labeling of apoptotic cells or quantitative PCR of 48 selected genes in the preoptic area (POA). We found that treatment with EB or A1221 had a sex-specific effect on developmental apoptosis in the neonatal anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV), a sexually dimorphic hypothalamic region involved in the regulation of reproductive neuroendocrine function. In this region, exposed females had increased numbers of apoptotic nuclei, whereas there was no effect of treatment in males. For ER{alpha}, EB treatment increased immunoreactive cell numbers and density in the medial preoptic nucleus (MPN) of both males and females, while A1221 and the PCB mixture had no effect. PCR analysis of gene expression in the POA identified nine genes that were significantly altered by prenatal EDC exposure, in a manner that varied by sex and treatment. These genes included brain-derived neurotrophic factor, GABA{sub B} receptors-1 and -2, IGF-1, kisspeptin receptor, NMDA receptor subunits NR2b and NR2c, prodynorphin, and TGF{alpha}. Collectively, these results suggest that the disrupted sexual differentiation of the POA by prenatal EDC exposures is already evident as early as the day after birth, effects that may change the trajectory of postnatal development and compromise adult reproductive function.

  2. NEW LIMITS ON EARLY DARK ENERGY FROM THE SOUTH POLE TELESCOPE...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We present new limits on early dark energy (EDE) from the cosmic microwave background (CMB) using data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) satellite on large ...

  3. Design Support of an Above Cap-rock Early Detection Monitoring...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sandstone) and is used to support assessment of early-leak detection capabilities. ... This preliminary modeling evaluation considers both pressure response and geochemical ...

  4. Early Stage Market Change and Effects of the Recovery Act Fuel Cell Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    -- 2015 Update | Department of Energy Early Stage Market Change and Effects of the Recovery Act Fuel Cell Program -- 2015 Update Early Stage Market Change and Effects of the Recovery Act Fuel Cell Program -- 2015 Update A 2015 Update to "Early Stage Market Change and Effects of the Recovery Act Fuel Cell Program." A report prepared for Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, April 17, 2015. PDF icon 2015 Update Report More Documents & Publications Early-Stage Market Change and

  5. Early Career Research Program Homepage | U.S. DOE Office of Science...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Office of Science of the Department of Energy announces the fiscal year 2016 Early Career Research Program. The funding opportunity for researchers in universities and DOE ...

  6. Los Alamos' David Mascareñas receives Presidential Early Career Award

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    David Mascareñas receives Presidential Early Career Award February 24, 2016 Top award honors leading early-career science and engineering professionals LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Feb. 24, 2016-David Mascareñas, of Los Alamos National Laboratory's Engineering Institute in the National Security Education Center (NSEC), was named a recipient of the Presidential Early Career Award by President Obama last week and will be honored at an award ceremony this spring in Washington, DC. "These early-career

  7. The Red Storm Architecture and Early Experiences with Multi-core...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Red Storm Architecture and Early Experiences with Multi-core Processors The Red Storm architecture, which was conceived by Sandia ...

  8. Early-type galaxies at intermediate redshift observed with Hubble space telescope WFC3: perspectives on recent star formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutkowski, Michael J.; Jeong, Hyunjin; Yi, Sukyoung K.; Cohen, Seth H.; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Ryan, Russell E. Jr.; Koekemoer, Anton; Hathi, Nimish P.; Dopita, Michael A.

    2014-12-01

    We present an analysis of the stellar populations of 102 visually selected early-type galaxies (ETGs) with spectroscopic redshifts (0.35 ? z ? 1.5) from observations in the Early Release Science program with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We fit one- and two-component synthetic stellar models to the ETGs UV-optical-near-IR spectral energy distributions and find that a large fraction (?40%) are likely to have experienced a minor (f{sub YC} ? 10% of stellar mass) burst of recent (t{sub YC} ? 1 Gyr) star formation. The measured age and mass fraction of the young stellar populations do not strongly trend with measurements of galaxy morphology. We note that massive (M > 10{sup 10.5} M {sub ?}) recent star-forming ETGs appear to have larger sizes. Furthermore, high-mass, quiescent ETGs identified with likely companions populate a distinct region in the size-mass parameter space, in comparison with the distribution of massive ETGs with evidence of recent star formation (RSF). We conclude that both mechanisms of quenching star formation in disk-like ETGs and (gas-rich, minor) merger activity contribute to the formation of young stars and the size-mass evolution of intermediate redshift ETGs. The number of ETGs for which we have both HST WFC3 panchromatic (especially UV) imaging and spectroscopically confirmed redshifts is relatively small, therefore, a conclusion about the relative roles of both of these mechanisms remains an open question.

  9. Age and location of volcanic centers less than or equal to 3...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    age, are shown. Location of the volcanic vents and rocks were taken from Luedke and Smith (1978). Ages were obtained from the original literature in all cases except for McKee...

  10. Age And Nature Of Deposits On The Submarine Flanks Of Piton De...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Age And Nature Of Deposits On The Submarine Flanks Of Piton De La Fournaise (Reunion Island) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Age...

  11. Developing 226Ra and 227Ac age-dating techniques for nuclear...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Accepted Manuscript: Developing 226Ra and 227Ac age-dating techniques for nuclear ... Title: Developing 226Ra and 227Ac age-dating techniques for nuclear forensics to gain ...

  12. Fact #715: February 20, 2012 The Average Age of Light Vehicles Continues to Rise

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The average age for cars and light trucks continues to rise as consumers hold onto their vehicles longer. Between 1995 and 2011, the average age for cars increased by 32% from 8.4 years to 11.1...

  13. APBF- DEC Heavy-Duty NOx Adsorber/DPF Project: Catalyst Aging...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DEC Heavy-Duty NOx AdsorberDPF Project: Catalyst Aging Study APBF- DEC Heavy-Duty NOx AdsorberDPF Project: Catalyst Aging Study 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) ...

  14. Accelerated Thermal Aging of Fe-Zeolite SCR Catalysts Using an...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermal Aging of Fe-Zeolite SCR Catalysts Using an Engine-Based Systems Approach Accelerated Thermal Aging of Fe-Zeolite SCR Catalysts Using an Engine-Based Systems Approach This ...

  15. Characterization of Dry-Air Aged Granules of Silver-Functionalized...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dry-Air Aged Granules of Silver-Functionalized Silica Aerogel Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Characterization of Dry-Air Aged Granules of Silver-Functionalized Silica ...

  16. Characterization of Dry-Air Aged Granules of Silver-Functionalized...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Characterization of Dry-Air Aged Granules of Silver-Functionalized Silica Aerogel Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Characterization of Dry-Air Aged Granules of Silver-Fun...

  17. Delamination Failures in Long-Term Field Aged PV Modules from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Delamination Failures in Long-Term Field Aged PV Modules from Point of View of Encapsulant Delamination Failures in Long-Term Field Aged PV Modules from Point of View of ...

  18. Star formation bimodality in early-type galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amblard, A.; Riguccini, L.; Temi, P.; Im, S.; Fanelli, M.; Serra, P.

    2014-03-10

    We compute the properties of a sample of 221 local, early-type galaxies with a spectral energy distribution (SED) modeling software, CIGALEMC. Concentrating on the star-forming (SF) activity and dust contents, we derive parameters such as the specific star formation rate (sSFR), the dust luminosity, dust mass, and temperature. In our sample, 52% is composed of elliptical (E) galaxies and 48% of lenticular (S0) galaxies. We find a larger proportion of S0 galaxies among galaxies with a large sSFR and large specific dust emission. The stronger activity of S0 galaxies is confirmed by larger dust masses. We investigate the relative proportion of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and SF galaxies in our sample using spectroscopic Sloan Digital Sky Survey data and near-infrared selection techniques, and find a larger proportion of AGN-dominated galaxies in the S0 sample than the E one. This could corroborate a scenario where blue galaxies evolve into red ellipticals by passing through an S0 AGN active period while quenching its star formation. Finally, we find a good agreement comparing our estimates with color indicators.

  19. On the valence fluctuation in the early actinide metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soderlind, P.; Landa, A.; Tobin, J. G.; Allen, P.; Medling, S.; Booth, C. H.; Bauer, E. D.; Cooley, J. C.; Sokaras, D.; Weng, T. -C.; Nordlund, D.

    2015-12-15

    In this study, recent X-ray measurements suggest a degree of valence fluctuation in plutonium and uranium intermetallics. We are applying a novel scheme, in conjunction with density functional theory, to predict 5f configuration fractions of states with valence fluctuations for the early actinide metals. For this purpose we perform constrained integer f-occupation calculations for the α phases of uranium, neptunium, and plutonium metals. For plutonium we also investigate the δ phase. The model predicts uranium and neptunium to be dominated by the f3 and f4 configurations, respectively, with only minor contributions from other configurations. For plutonium (both α and δ phase) the scenario is dramatically different. Here, the calculations predict a relatively even distribution between three valence configurations. The δ phase has a greater configuration fraction of f6 compared to that of the α phase. The theory is consistent with the interpretations of modern X-ray experiments and we present resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy results for α-uranium.

  20. Basin development, petrology, and paleogeography - Early Permian carbonates, northwestern Bolivia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canter, K.L.; Isaacson, P.E. )

    1990-05-01

    Early Permian carbonate rocks of the Yaurichambi Formation in northwestern Bolivia demonstrate in-situ, low-paleolatitude development within a complexly interbedded sequence punctuated by siliciclastics apparently derived from a western source. The Yaurichambi Formation (Copacabana Group) occurs above a regional caliche surface that caps Upper Carboniferous quartzarenites. Lower beds of the formation are characterized by interbedded carbonate and quartz-rich lithologies. This interval is gradationally overlain by a shallowing-upward, carbonate-dominated sequence. Mud-rich wackestones and packstones grade upward to bioclastic packstones and grainstones. Common allochems in bioclastic-rich lithologies include echinoderms, brachiopods, fenestrate bryozoans, intraclasts, and less common corals. Uppermost beds contain abundant siliciclastic interbeds. Where exposed, this carbonate sequence is terminated by the Tiquina Sandstone. Permian rocks were deposited in a northwest-southeast-oriented basin. Siliciclastic flooding from the western and southwestern margin of the basin dominated throughout the Carboniferous and occurred intermittently during the Permian, with apparent shallowing to the south. A low-latitude paleogeographic setting for these rocks is indicated by the carbonate lithologies dominating the Lower Permian sequence. Sedimentary and diagenetic features diagnostic of semi-arid warm-water deposition include penecontemporaneous dolomites, fenestral fabric, and calcretes. Furthermore, the faunas are similar to those found in equivalent strata of the Permian basin area of west Texas, indicating that deposition occurred at relatively low latitudes.

  1. Geothermal heat pumps at Fort Polk: Early results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, P.J.; Shonder, J.A.

    1996-12-31

    At Fort Polk, LA an entire city (4,003 military family housing units) is being converted to geothermal heat pumps (GHP) under a performance contract. At the same time other efficiency measures such as compact fluorescent lights (CFLs), low-flow water outlets, and attic insulation are being installed. If these contracts and this technology are to be used widely in US Department of Defense (DoD) facilities and other public buildings, better data from actual projects is the key. Being the first GHP project of this type and size, Fort Polk proved to be very challenging for all concerned. To get from RFP to start of construction took several years. This hard work by others created a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to address many of the due diligence issues that delayed the Fort Polk project. So that future projects can move faster, an evaluation has been undertaken to address the following barriers: absence of a documented large-scale demonstration of GHP energy, demand, and maintenance savings (a barrier to acceptance by federal customers, performance contractors, and investors); newness of large-scale facility capital renewal procurements at federal facilities under energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs) or traditional appropriations (lack of case studies); and variability in current GHP design tools (increases risks and costs for federal customers, performance contractors, investors and designers). This paper presents early energy and demand savings results based on data collection through January 1996.

  2. On the valence fluctuation in the early actinide metals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Soderlind, P.; Landa, A.; Tobin, J. G.; Allen, P.; Medling, S.; Booth, C. H.; Bauer, E. D.; Cooley, J. C.; Sokaras, D.; Weng, T. -C.; et al

    2015-12-15

    In this study, recent X-ray measurements suggest a degree of valence fluctuation in plutonium and uranium intermetallics. We are applying a novel scheme, in conjunction with density functional theory, to predict 5f configuration fractions of states with valence fluctuations for the early actinide metals. For this purpose we perform constrained integer f-occupation calculations for the α phases of uranium, neptunium, and plutonium metals. For plutonium we also investigate the δ phase. The model predicts uranium and neptunium to be dominated by the f3 and f4 configurations, respectively, with only minor contributions from other configurations. For plutonium (both α and δmore » phase) the scenario is dramatically different. Here, the calculations predict a relatively even distribution between three valence configurations. The δ phase has a greater configuration fraction of f6 compared to that of the α phase. The theory is consistent with the interpretations of modern X-ray experiments and we present resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy results for α-uranium.« less

  3. DUAL HALOS AND FORMATION OF EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Hong Soo; Lee, Myung Gyoon E-mail: mglee@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2013-08-20

    We present a determination of the two-dimensional shape parameters of the blue and red globular cluster systems (GCSs) in a large number of elliptical galaxies and lenticular galaxies (early-type galaxies, called ETGs). We use a homogeneous data set of the globular clusters in 23 ETGs obtained from the HST/ACS Virgo Cluster Survey. The position angles of both blue and red GCSs show a correlation with those of the stellar light distribution, showing that the major axes of the GCSs are well aligned with those of their host galaxies. However, the shapes of the red GCSs show a tight correlation with the stellar light distribution as well as with the rotation property of their host galaxies, while the shapes of the blue GCSs do much less. These provide clear geometric evidence that the origins of the blue and red globular clusters are distinct and that ETGs may have dual halos: a blue (metal-poor) halo and a red (metal-rich) halo. These two halos show significant differences in metallicity, structure, and kinematics, indicating that they are formed in two distinguishable ways. The red halos might have formed via dissipational processes with rotation, while the blue halos are through accretion.

  4. Accelerated aging tests of liners for uranium mill tailings disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, S.M.; Buelt, J.L.; Hale, V.Q.

    1981-11-01

    This document describes the results of accelerated aging tests to determine the long-term effectiveness of selected impoundment liner materials in a uranium mill tailings environment. The study was sponsored by the US Department of Energy under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project. The study was designed to evaluate the need for, and the performance of, several candidate liners for isolating mill tailings leachate in conformance with proposed Environmental Protection Agency and Nuclear Regulatory Commission requirements. The liners were subjected to conditions known to accelerate the degradation mechanisms of the various liners. Also, a test environment was maintained that modeled the expected conditions at a mill tailings impoundment, including ground subsidence and the weight loading of tailings on the liners. A comparison of installation costs was also performed for the candidate liners. The laboratory testing and cost information prompted the selection of a catalytic airblown asphalt membrane and a sodium bentonite-amended soil for fiscal year 1981 field testing.

  5. Electrochemical Aging of Thermal-Sprayed Zinc Anodes on Concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcomb, G.R.; Bullard, S.J.; Covino, B.S. Jr.; Cramer, S.D.; Cryer, C.B.; McGill, G.E.

    1996-10-01

    Thermal-sprayed zinc anodes are used in impressed current cathodic protection systems for some of Oregon's coastal reinforced concrete bridges. Electrochemical aging of zinc anodes results in physical and chemical changes at the zinc-concrete interface. Concrete surfaces heated prior to thermal-spraying had initial adhesion strengths 80 pct higher than unheated surfaces. For electrochemical aging greater than 200 kC/m{sup 2} (5.2 A h/ft{sup 2}), there was no difference in adhesion strengths for zinc on preheated and unheated concrete. Adhesion strengths decreased monotonically after about 400 to 600 kC/m{sup 2} (10.4 to 15.6 A-h/ft{sup 2}) as a result of the reaction zones at the zinc-concrete interface. A zone adjacent to the metallic zinc (and originally part of the zinc coating) was primarily zincite (ZnO), with minor constituents of wulfingite (Zn(OH){sub 2}), simonkolleite (Zn{sub 5}(OH) {sub 8}C{sub l2}{sup .}H{sub 2}O), and hydrated zinc hydroxide sulfates (Zn{sub 4}SO{sub 4}(OH){sub 6}{sup .}xH{sub 2}O). This zone is the locus for cohesive fracture when the zinc coating separates from the concrete during adhesion tests. Zinc ions substitute for calcium in the cement paste adjacent to the coating as the result of secondary mineralization. The initial estimate of the coating service life based on adhesion strength measurements in accelerated impressed current cathodic protection tests is about 27 years.

  6. Human non-neutralizing HIV-1 envelope monoclonal antibodies limit the number of founder viruses during SHIV mucosal infection in rhesus macaques

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Santra, Sampa; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Warrier, Ranjit; Nicely, Nathan I.; Liao, Hua -Xin; Pollara, Justin; Liu, Pinghuang; Alam, S. Munir; Zhang, Ruijun; Cocklin, Sarah L.; et al

    2015-08-03

    HIV-1 mucosal transmission begins with virus or virus-infected cells moving through mucus across mucosal epithelium to infect CD4⁺ T cells. Although broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) are the type of HIV-1 antibodies that are most likely protective, they are not induced with current vaccine candidates. In contrast, antibodies that do not neutralize primary HIV-1 strains in the TZM-bl infection assay are readily induced by current vaccine candidates and have also been implicated as secondary correlates of decreased HIV-1 risk in the RV144 vaccine efficacy trial. Here, we have studied the capacity of anti-Env monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against either the immunodominant regionmore » of gp41 (7B2 IgG1), the first constant region of gp120 (A32 IgG1), or the third variable loop (V3) of gp120 (CH22 IgG1) to modulate in vivo rectal mucosal transmission of a high-dose simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-BaL) in rhesus macaques. 7B2 IgG1 or A32 IgG1, each containing mutations to enhance Fc function, was administered passively to rhesus macaques but afforded no protection against productive clinical infection while the positive control antibody CH22 IgG1 prevented infection in 4 of 6 animals. Enumeration of transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses revealed that passive infusion of each of the three antibodies significantly reduced the number of T/F genomes. Some antibodies that bind HIV-1 Env but fail to neutralize virus in traditional neutralization assays may limit the number of T/F viruses involved in transmission without leading to enhancement of viral infection. For one of these mAbs, gp41 mAb 7B2, we provide the first co-crystal structure in complex with a common cyclical loop motif demonstrated to be critical for infection by other retroviruses.« less

  7. Human non-neutralizing HIV-1 envelope monoclonal antibodies limit the number of founder viruses during SHIV mucosal infection in rhesus macaques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santra, Sampa; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Warrier, Ranjit; Nicely, Nathan I.; Liao, Hua -Xin; Pollara, Justin; Liu, Pinghuang; Alam, S. Munir; Zhang, Ruijun; Cocklin, Sarah L.; Shen, Xiaoying; Duffy, Ryan; Xia, Shi -Mao; Schutte, Robert J.; Pemble IV, Charles W.; Dennison, S. Moses; Li, Hui; Chao, Andrew; Vidnovic, Kora; Evans, Abbey; Klein, Katja; Kumar, Amit; Robinson, James; Landucci, Gary; Forthal, Donald N.; Montefiori, David C.; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Robb, Merlin L.; Michael, Nelson L.; Kim, Jerome H.; Soderberg, Kelly A.; Giorgi, Elena E.; Blair, Lily; Korber, Bette T.; Moog, Christiane; Shattock, Robin J.; Letvin, Norman L.; Schmitz, Joern E.; Moody, M. A.; Gao, Feng; Ferrari, Guido; Shaw, George M.; Haynes, Barton F.; Douek, Daniel C.

    2015-08-03

    HIV-1 mucosal transmission begins with virus or virus-infected cells moving through mucus across mucosal epithelium to infect CD4⁺ T cells. Although broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) are the type of HIV-1 antibodies that are most likely protective, they are not induced with current vaccine candidates. In contrast, antibodies that do not neutralize primary HIV-1 strains in the TZM-bl infection assay are readily induced by current vaccine candidates and have also been implicated as secondary correlates of decreased HIV-1 risk in the RV144 vaccine efficacy trial. Here, we have studied the capacity of anti-Env monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against either the immunodominant region of gp41 (7B2 IgG1), the first constant region of gp120 (A32 IgG1), or the third variable loop (V3) of gp120 (CH22 IgG1) to modulate in vivo rectal mucosal transmission of a high-dose simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-BaL) in rhesus macaques. 7B2 IgG1 or A32 IgG1, each containing mutations to enhance Fc function, was administered passively to rhesus macaques but afforded no protection against productive clinical infection while the positive control antibody CH22 IgG1 prevented infection in 4 of 6 animals. Enumeration of transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses revealed that passive infusion of each of the three antibodies significantly reduced the number of T/F genomes. Some antibodies that bind HIV-1 Env but fail to neutralize virus in traditional neutralization assays may limit the number of T/F viruses involved in transmission without leading to enhancement of viral infection. For one of these mAbs, gp41 mAb 7B2, we provide the first co-crystal structure in complex with a common cyclical loop motif demonstrated to be critical for infection by other retroviruses.

  8. The effect of chrome adhesion layer on quartz resonator aging. (Technical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: The effect of chrome adhesion layer on quartz resonator aging. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The effect of chrome adhesion layer on quartz resonator aging. This SAND report documents a late start LDRD designed to determine the possible aging effects of a quartz resonator gold adhesion layer. Sandia uses quartz resonators for applications. These applications require a very stable frequency source with excellent aging (low drift)

  9. Aging Impacts Transcriptome but not Genome of Hormone-dependentBreast Cancers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yau, Christina; Fedele, Vita; Roydasgupta, Ritu; Fridlyand, Jane; Hubbard, Alan; Gray, Joe W.; Chew, Karen; Dairkee, Shanaz H.; Moore, DanH.; Schittulli, Francesco; Tommasi, Stefania; Paradiso, Angelo; Albertson, Donna G.; Benz, Christopher C.

    2007-10-09

    Age is one of the most important risk factors for human malignancies, including breast cancer; in addition, age-at-diagnosis has been shown to be an independent indicator of breast cancer prognosis. However, except for inherited forms of breast cancer, there is little genetic or epigenetic understanding of the biological basis linking aging with sporadic breast cancer incidence and its clinical behavior.

  10. Accelerated Thermal Aging of Fe-Zeolite SCR Catalysts Using an Engine-Based

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Systems Approach | Department of Energy This research points the way for developing a rapid aging cycle for SSCR-DPF systems. PDF icon deer08_bunting.pdf More Documents & Publications Deactivation of Accelerated Engine-Aged and Field-Aged SCR Catalysts and the Role of the DOC Catalyst Characterization Non-Petroleum-Based Fuels: Effects on Emissions Control Technologies

  11. Fuel age impacts on gaseous fission product capture during separations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jubin, Robert T.; Soelberg, Nicolas R.; Strachan, Denis M.; Ilas, G.

    2012-09-21

    As a result of fuel reprocessing, volatile radionuclides will be released from the facility stack if no processes are put in place to remove them. The radionuclides that are of concern in this document are 3H, 14C, 85Kr, and 129 Rosnick 2007 I. The question we attempt to answer is how efficient must this removal process be for each of these radionuclides? To answer this question, we examine the three regulations that may impact the degree to which these radionuclides must be reduced before process gases can be released from the facility. These regulations are 40 CFR 61 (EPA 2010a), 40 CFR 190(EPA 2010b), and 10 CFR 20 (NRC 2012), and they apply to the total radonuclide release and to the dose to a particular organ – the thyroid. Because these doses can be divided amongst all the radionuclides in different ways and even within the four radionuclides in question, several cases are studied. These cases consider for the four analyzed radionuclides inventories produced for three fuel types—pressurized water reactor uranium oxide (PWR UOX), pressurized water reactor mixed oxide (PWR MOX), and advanced high-temperature gascooled reactor (AHTGR)—several burnup values and time out of reactor extending to 200 y. Doses to the maximum exposed individual (MEI) are calculated with the EPA code CAP-88 ( , 1992). Two dose cases are considered. The first case, perhaps unrealistic, assumes that all of the allowable dose is assigned to the volatile radionuclides. In lieu of this, for the second case a value of 10% of the allowable dose is arbitrarily selected to be assigned to the volatile radionuclides. The required decontamination factors (DFs) are calculated for both of these cases, including the case for the thyroid dose for which 14C and 129I are the main contributors. However, for completeness, for one fuel type and burnup, additional cases are provided, allowing 25% and 50% of the allowable dose to be assigned to the volatile radionuclides. Because 3H and 85Kr have relatively short half-lives, 12.3 y and 10.7 y, respectively, the dose decreases with the time from when the fuel is removed from the reactor to the time it is processed (herein “fuel age”). One possible strategy for limiting the discharges of these short halflife radionuclides is to allow the fuel to age to take advantage of radioactive decay. Therefore, the doses and required DFs are calculated as a function of fuel age. Here we calculate, given the above constraints and assumptions, the minimum ages for each fuel type that would not require additional effluent controls for the shorter half-life volatile radionuclides based on dose considerations. With respect to 129I doses, we find that the highest dose is calculated with iodine as a fine particulate. The dose scales as the fraction of the total 129I that is particulate. Therefore, we assume for all of our calculations that 100% of the 129I is particulate and allow the user of the results given here to scale our calculated doses to their needs. To summarize the data given in the body and appendices of this report, we find that the principal isotopes of concern are 3H and 129I, the latter requiring the highest DFs. The maximum DF value for 129I is 8000 for the illustrated cases. The required DF for 3H could be as high as 720, depending on the age of the fuel processed. The DF for 85Kr could be up to ~60, depending on fuel age. The DF for 14C is in many cases 1 (no treatment required) but could be as high as 30. The DFs required are within the range of DFs that are reported for the capture technologies that are available for the volatile radionuclides. Achieving the required 129I and 3H DFs is more challenging. Variations in stack design and other design factors may also significantly impact the DF requirements.

  12. A review of lunar chronology revealing a preponderance of 4.34-4.37 Ga ages

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Borg, Lars E.; Gaffney, Amy M.; Shearer, Charles K.

    2014-11-24

    In this study, data obtained from Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr isotopic measurements of lunar highlands’ samples are renormalized to common standard values and then used to define ages with a common isochron regression algorithm. The reliability of these ages is evaluated using five criteria that include whether: (1) the ages are defined by multiple isotopic systems, (2) the data demonstrate limited scatter outside uncertainty, (3) initial isotopic compositions are consistent with the petrogenesis of the samples, (4) the ages are defined by an isotopic system that is resistant to disturbance by impact metamorphism, and (5) the rare-earth element abundances determined bymore » isotope dilution of bulk of mineral fractions match those measured by in situ analyses. From this analysis, it is apparent that the oldest highlands’ rock ages are some of the least reliable, and that there is little support for crustal ages older than ~4.40 Ga. A model age for ur-KREEP formation calculated using the most reliable Mg-suite Sm-Nd isotopic systematics, in conjunction with Sm-Nd analyses of KREEP basalts, is 4389 ± 45 Ma. This age is a good match to the Lu-Hf model age of 4353 ± 37 Ma determined using a subset of this sample suite, the average model age of 4353 ± 25 Ma determined on mare basalts with the 146Sm-142Nd isotopic system, with a peak in Pb-Pb ages observed in lunar zircons of ~4340 ± 20 Ma, and the oldest terrestrial zircon age of 4374 ± 6 Ma. The preponderance of ages between 4.34 and 4.37 Ga reflect either primordial solidification of a lunar magma ocean or a widespread secondary magmatic event on the lunar nearside. The first scenario is not consistent with the oldest ages reported for lunar zircons, whereas the second scenario does not account for concordance between ages of crustal rocks and mantle reservoirs.« less

  13. A review of lunar chronology revealing a preponderance of 4.34-4.37 Ga ages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borg, Lars E.; Gaffney, Amy M.; Shearer, Charles K.

    2014-11-24

    In this study, data obtained from Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr isotopic measurements of lunar highlands’ samples are renormalized to common standard values and then used to define ages with a common isochron regression algorithm. The reliability of these ages is evaluated using five criteria that include whether: (1) the ages are defined by multiple isotopic systems, (2) the data demonstrate limited scatter outside uncertainty, (3) initial isotopic compositions are consistent with the petrogenesis of the samples, (4) the ages are defined by an isotopic system that is resistant to disturbance by impact metamorphism, and (5) the rare-earth element abundances determined by isotope dilution of bulk of mineral fractions match those measured by in situ analyses. From this analysis, it is apparent that the oldest highlands’ rock ages are some of the least reliable, and that there is little support for crustal ages older than ~4.40 Ga. A model age for ur-KREEP formation calculated using the most reliable Mg-suite Sm-Nd isotopic systematics, in conjunction with Sm-Nd analyses of KREEP basalts, is 4389 ± 45 Ma. This age is a good match to the Lu-Hf model age of 4353 ± 37 Ma determined using a subset of this sample suite, the average model age of 4353 ± 25 Ma determined on mare basalts with the 146Sm-142Nd isotopic system, with a peak in Pb-Pb ages observed in lunar zircons of ~4340 ± 20 Ma, and the oldest terrestrial zircon age of 4374 ± 6 Ma. The preponderance of ages between 4.34 and 4.37 Ga reflect either primordial solidification of a lunar magma ocean or a widespread secondary magmatic event on the lunar nearside. The first scenario is not consistent with the oldest ages reported for lunar zircons, whereas the second scenario does not account for concordance between ages of crustal rocks and mantle reservoirs.

  14. MILLISECOND PULSAR AGES: IMPLICATIONS OF BINARY EVOLUTION AND A MAXIMUM SPIN LIMIT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiziltan, Buelent; Thorsett, Stephen E., E-mail: bulent@astro.ucsc.ed [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California and UCO/Lick Observatory, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2010-05-20

    In the absence of constraints from the binary companion or supernova remnant, the standard method for estimating pulsar ages is to infer an age from the rate of spin-down. While the generic spin-down age may give realistic estimates for normal pulsars, it can fail for pulsars with very short periods. Details of the spin-up process during the low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) phase pose additional constraints on the period (P) and spin-down rates ( P-dot ) that may consequently affect the age estimate. Here, we propose a new recipe to estimate millisecond pulsar (MSP) ages that parametrically incorporates constraints arising from binary evolution and limiting physics. We show that the standard method can be improved by this approach to achieve age estimates closer to the true age while the standard spin-down age may overestimate or underestimate the age of the pulsar by more than a factor of {approx}10 in the millisecond regime. We use this approach to analyze the population on a broader scale. For instance, in order to understand the dominant energy loss mechanism after the onset of radio emission, we test for a range of plausible braking indices. We find that a braking index of n = 3 is consistent with the observed MSP population. We demonstrate the existence and quantify the potential contributions of two main sources of age corruption: the previously known 'age bias' due to secular acceleration and 'age contamination' driven by sub-Eddington progenitor accretion rates. We explicitly show that descendants of LMXBs that have accreted at very low rates ( m-dot << M-dot{sub Edd}) will exhibit ages that appear older than the age of the Galaxy. We further elaborate on this technique, the implications and potential solutions it offers regarding MSP evolution, the underlying age distribution, and the post-accretion energy loss mechanism.

  15. DARK MATTER HEATING AND EARLY CORE FORMATION IN DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madau, Piero; Shen, Sijing [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Governato, Fabio [Astronomy Department, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    We present more results from a fully cosmological ?CDM simulation of a group of isolated dwarf galaxies that has been shown to reproduce the observed stellar mass and cold gas content, resolved star formation histories, and metallicities of dwarfs in the Local Volume. Here we investigate the energetics and timetable of the cusp-core transformation. As suggested by previous work, supernova-driven gas outflows remove dark matter (DM) cusps and create kiloparsec-size cores in all systems having a stellar mass M {sub *} > 10{sup 6} M {sub ?}. The {sup D}M core mass removal efficiency{sup }dark mass ejected per unit stellar massranges today from a few to a dozen, and increases with decreasing host mass. Because dwarfs form the bulk of their stars prior to redshift 1 and the amount of work required for DM heating and core formation scales approximately as M{sub vir}{sup 5/3}, the unbinding of the DM cusp starts early and the formation of cored profiles is not as energetically onerous as previously claimed. DM particles in the cusp typically migrate to 2-3 core radii after absorbing a few percent of the energy released by supernovae. The present-day slopes of the inner DM mass profiles, ? ? dlog M/dlog R ? 2.5-3, of the simulated ''Bashful'' and ''Doc'' dwarfs are similar to those measured in the luminous Fornax and Sculptor dwarf spheroidals. None of the simulated galaxies has a circular velocity profile exceeding 20 km s{sup 1} in the inner 1kpc, implying that supernova feedback is key to solve the ''too-big-to-fail'' problem for Milky Way subhalos.

  16. HOT GAS HALOS IN EARLY-TYPE FIELD GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mulchaey, John S. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Jeltema, Tesla E., E-mail: mulchaey@obs.carnegiescience.ed, E-mail: tesla@ucolick.or [UCO/Lick Observatories, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2010-05-20

    We use Chandra and XMM-Newton to study the hot gas content in a sample of field early-type galaxies. We find that the L {sub X}-L {sub K} relationship is steeper for field galaxies than for comparable galaxies in groups and clusters. The low hot gas content of field galaxies with L {sub K} {approx_lt} L {sub *} suggests that internal processes such as supernovae-driven winds or active galactic nucleus feedback expel hot gas from low-mass galaxies. Such mechanisms may be less effective in groups and clusters where the presence of an intragroup or intracluster medium can confine outflowing material. In addition, galaxies in groups and clusters may be able to accrete gas from the ambient medium. While there is a population of L {sub K} {approx_lt} L {sub *} galaxies in groups and clusters that retain hot gas halos, some galaxies in these rich environments, including brighter galaxies, are largely devoid of hot gas. In these cases, the hot gas halos have likely been removed via ram pressure stripping. This suggests a very complex interplay between the intragroup/intracluster medium and hot gas halos of galaxies in rich environments, with the ambient medium helping to confine or even enhance the halos in some cases and acting to remove gas in others. In contrast, the hot gas content of more isolated galaxies is largely a function of the mass of the galaxy, with more massive galaxies able to maintain their halos, while in lower mass systems the hot gas escapes in outflowing winds.

  17. Energy transitions in the early 21st Century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Meakin

    2013-01-01

    We are in the early stages of a long and complex transition from a global economy based on fossil energy to an economy based on low carbon renewable energy. However, fossil fuel resources are abundant and widely distributed, and they will remain the dominant source of primary energy for at least the next quarter century. In the United States, displacement of coal by natural gas for electric power generation has done more to reduce CO2 emissions than all new renewables combined, and this may occur globally for the next decade or two, even if the European Union does not take advantage of its large unconventional natural gas resources. Greater energy efficiency (not including the efficiencies associated with displacement of coal by gas) will also be more important than new renewables. Cost/benefit ratios are important for sustainability of the transition, and some energy efficiency technologies and displacement of coal by natural gas have lower cost/benefit ratios than wind power, solar power or biofuels. Money spent on the large scale deployment of wind, solar and especially biofuels would be better spent on research, development and demonstration of a broader suite of technologies that would support the energy transition, with a focus on improving the cost benefit ratios of already deployed technologies and developing alternatives. Advanced nuclear reactors, engineered geothermal systems, fossil fuel recovery coupled with CO2 sequestration and pre-combustion or post-combustion decarbonation of fossil fuels with geological CO2 sequestration are among the technologies that might be more cost effective than wind, solar or biofuels, and biofuels have serious adverse societal and environment consequences.

  18. Solid-State Lighting. Early Lessons Learned on the Way to Market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandahl, L. J.; Cort, K. A.; Gordon, K. L.

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of issues and lessons learned during the early stages of solid-state lighting market introduction in the U.S., which also summarizes early actions taken to avoid potential problems anticipated based on lessons learned from the market introduction of compact fluorescent lamps.

  19. Analysis of the Impacts of an Early Start for Compliance with the Kyoto Protocol

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the Energy Information Administration's analysis of the impacts of an early start, using the same methodology as in Impacts of the Kyoto Protocol on U.S. Energy Markets and Economic Activity, with only those changes in assumptions caused by the early start date.

  20. HEP Early Career Opportunities | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HEP Early Career Opportunities High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Closed Funding Opportunity Announcements (FOAs) Closed Lab Announcements Award Search / Public Abstracts HEP Early Career Opportunities Review Policy / Proposal Guidelines / Reporting Requirements Additional Requirements and Guidance for Digital Data Management Acknowledgements of Federal Support Advisory Committees Community Resources Contact

  1. Static strain aging behavior of ultra low carbon bake hardening steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De, A.K.; Cooman, B.C. de; Vandeputte, S.

    1999-09-10

    A detailed study of static strain aging in ultra low carbon (ULC) steel has not yet been reported. Therefore, the present study was carried out to gain an understanding of the aging kinetics in a ULC steel with a total carbon content of 20 ppm. The influence of dislocation density on the aging process was also taken into account. The kinetics of the aging were determined by means of the measurement of strength properties rather than solute concentration as it was experienced that quantitative estimation of such low amount of carbon during aging course would be too difficult with the existing diagnostic tools.

  2. Determining Remaining Useful Life of Aging Cables in Nuclear Power Plants – Interim Study FY13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Kevin L.; Fifield, Leonard S.; Westman, Matthew P.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Pardini, Allan F.; Tedeschi, Jonathan R.; Jones, Anthony M.

    2013-09-27

    The most important criterion for cable performance is its ability to withstand a design-basis accident. With nearly 1000 km of power, control, instrumentation, and other cables typically found in an NPP, it would be a significant undertaking to inspect all of the cables. Degradation of the cable jacket, electrical insulation, and other cable components is a key issue that is likely to affect the ability of the currently installed cables to operate safely and reliably for another 20 to 40 years beyond the initial operating life. The development of one or more nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques and supporting models that could assist in determining the remaining life expectancy of cables or their current degradation state would be of significant interest. The ability to nondestructively determine material and electrical properties of cable jackets and insulation without disturbing the cables or connections has been deemed essential. Currently, the only technique accepted by industry to measure cable elasticity (the gold standard for determining cable insulation degradation) is the indentation measurement. All other NDE techniques are used to find flaws in the cable and do not provide information to determine the current health or life expectancy. There is no single NDE technique that can satisfy all of the requirements needed for making a life-expectancy determination, but a wide range of methods have been evaluated for use in NPPs as part of a continuous evaluation program. The commonly used methods are indentation and visual inspection, but these are only suitable for easily accessible cables. Several NDE methodologies using electrical techniques are in use today for flaw detection but there are none that can predict the life of a cable. There are, however, several physical and chemical ptoperty changes in cable insulation as a result of thermal and radiation damage. In principle, these properties may be targets for advanced NDE methods to provide early warning of aging and degradation. Examples of such key indicators include changes in chemical structure, mechanical modulus, and dielectric permittivity. While some of these indicators are the basis of currently used technologies, there is a need to increase the volume of cable that may be inspected with a single measurement, and if possible, to develop techniques for in-situ inspection (i.e., while the cable is in operation). This is the focus of the present report.

  3. Final Report Inspection of Aged/Degraded Containments Program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naus, Dan J; Ellingwood, B R; Oland, C Barry

    2005-09-01

    The Inspection of Aged/Degraded Containments Program had primary objectives of (1) understanding the significant factors relating corrosion occurrence, efficacy of inspection, and structural capacity reduction of steel containments and liners of reinforced concrete containments; (2) providing the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) reviewers a means of establishing current structural capacity margins or estimating future residual structural capacity margins for steel containments, and concrete containments as limited by liner integrity; (3) providing recommendations, as appropriate, on information to be requested of licensees for guidance that could be utilized by USNRC reviewers in assessing the seriousness of reported incidences of containment degradation; and (4) providing technical assistance to the USNRC (as requested) related to concrete technology. Primary program accomplishments have included development of a degradation assessment methodology; reviews of techniques and methods for inspection and repair of containment metallic pressure boundaries; evaluation of high-frequency acoustic imaging, magnetostrictive sensor, electromagnetic acoustic transducer, and multimode guided plate wave technologies for inspection of inaccessible regions of containment metallic pressure boundaries; development of a continuum damage mechanics-based approach for structural deterioration; establishment of a methodology for reliability-based condition assessments of steel containments and liners; and fragility assessments of steel containments with localized corrosion. In addition, data and information assembled under this program has been transferred to the technical community through review meetings and briefings, national and international conference participation, technical committee involvement, and publications of reports and journal articles. Appendix A provides a listing of program reports, papers, and publications; and Appendix B contains a listing of program-related presentations.

  4. Solid-State Lighting: Early Lessons Learned on the Way to Market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandahl, Linda J.; Cort, Katherine A.; Gordon, Kelly L.

    2013-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to document early challenges and lessons learned in the solid-state lighting (SSL) market development as part of the DOE’s SSL Program efforts to continually evaluate market progress in this area. This report summarizes early actions taken by DOE and others to avoid potential problems anticipated based on lessons learned from the market introduction of compact fluorescent lamps and identifies issues, challenges, and new lessons that have been learned in the early stages of the SSL market introduction. This study identifies and characterizes12 key lessons that have been distilled from DOE SSL program results.

  5. Manhattan Project: Early Bomb Design, Los Alamos: Laboratory, 1943-1944

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Little Boy at Tinian Island, August 1945 EARLY BOMB DESIGN (Los Alamos: Laboratory, 1943-1944) Events > Bringing it All Together, 1942-1945 Establishing Los Alamos, 1942-1943 Early Bomb Design, 1943-1944 Basic Research at Los Alamos, 1943-1944 Implosion Becomes a Necessity, 1944 Oak Ridge and Hanford Come Through, 1944-1945 Final Bomb Design, 1944-1945 Atomic Rivals and the ALSOS Mission, 1938-1945 Espionage and the Manhattan Project, 1940-1945 Early work on the design of the atomic bomb

  6. X-ray scientist Haidan Wen wins DOE Early Career Award | Argonne National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory X-ray scientist Haidan Wen wins DOE Early Career Award By Louise Lerner * May 3, 2016 Tweet EmailPrint X-ray physicist Haidan Wen of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory has received a DOE Early Career Award, a prestigious research grant for $2.5 million over five years. The effort, now in its seventh year, is designed to bolster the nation's scientific workforce by providing support to exceptional researchers during the crucial early career years,

  7. CUG Honors NERSC Burst Buffer Early User Program with 'Best Paper'

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CUG Honors NERSC Burst Buffer Early User Program with 'Best Paper' CUG Honors NERSC Burst Buffer Early User Program with 'Best Paper' May 11, 2016 Contact: Kathy Kincade, +1 510 495 2124, kkincade@lbl.gov CUGaward NERSC was honored with the 2016 CUG Best Paper award for "Accelerating Science with the NERSC Burst Buffer Early User Program." Wahid Bhimji (right), shown here with CUG Program Chair Andrew Winfer, accepted the award on behalf of the NERSC team that authored the paper. A new

  8. Los Alamos' David Mascareñas receives Presidential Early Career Award

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mascareñas receives Presidential Early Career Award Los Alamos' David Mascareñas receives Presidential Early Career Award David Mascareñas was named a recipient of the Presidential Early Career Award by President Obama last week. February 24, 2016 David Mascareñas David Mascareñas Contact Nick Njegomir Communications Office (505) 665-9394 Email "David is an innovative engineer whose creative thinking is essential to the continuing success of Los Alamos' national-security science

  9. AmeriFlux US-Me4 Metolius-old aged ponderosa pine

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Law, Bev [Oregon State University

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Me4 Metolius-old aged ponderosa pine. Site Description - The site is located on land designated as a Research Natural Area (RNA). The site is very open, with even-aged stands of old-growth trees, young trees and mixed aged stands. The eddy-flux tower footprint was classified as ~ 48% mixed aged, ~27% pure old growth and ~25% young aged stands. The data in this workbook describes the mixed aged component. A separate workbook describes the pure old growth component. Law et al (2001) Global Change Biology 7, 755-777; Law et al (2001) Agricultural and Forest Meteorology 110, 27-43; Anthoni et al (2002) Agricultural and Forest Meteorology 111, 203-222; Irvine & Law (2002) Global Change biology 8,1183-1194, Irivne et al (2004) Tree Physiology 24,753-763.

  10. NEW MEMBERS OF THE SCORPIUS-CENTAURUS COMPLEX AND AGES OF ITS SUB-REGIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Inseok; Zuckerman, B.; Bessell, M. S.

    2012-07-15

    We have spectroscopically identified {approx}100 G-, K-, and M-type members of the Scorpius-Centaurus complex. To deduce the age of these young stars we compare their Li {lambda}6708 absorption line strengths against those of stars in the TW Hydrae association and {beta} Pictoris moving group. These line strengths indicate that Sco-Cen stars are younger than {beta} Pic stars whose ages of {approx}12 Myr have previously been derived from a kinematic traceback analysis. Our derived age, {approx}10 Myr, for stars in the Lower Centaurus Crux and Upper Centaurus Lupus subgroups of ScoCen is younger than previously published ages based on the moving cluster method and upper main-sequence fitting. The discrepant ages are likely due to an incorrect (or lack of) cross-calibration between model-dependent and model-independent age-dating methods.

  11. Aging of nuclear station diesel generators: Evaluation of operating and expert experience: Phase 1, Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoopingarner, K.R.; Vause, J.W.; Dingee, D.A.; Nesbitt, J.F.

    1987-08-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory evaluated operational and expert experience pertaining to the aging degradation of diesel generators in nuclear service. The research, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), identified and characterized the contribution of aging to emergency diesel generator failures. This report, Volume I, reviews diesel-generator experience to identify the systems and components most subject to aging degradation and isolates the major causes of failure that may affect future operational readiness. Evaluations show that as plants age, the percent of aging-related failures increases and failure modes change. A compilation is presented of recommended corrective actions for the failures identified. This study also includes a review of current, relevant industry programs, research, and standards. Volume II reports the results of an industry-wide workshop held on May 28 and 29, 1986 to discuss the technical issues associated with aging of nuclear service emergency diesel generators.

  12. Ar-40/Ar-39 Age Constraints for the Jaramillo Normal Subchron...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    oxygen isotope, climate record calibration of the astronomical timescale proposed by Johnson (1982) and Shackleton et al. (1990). Ar-40Ar-39 ages of a normally magnetized...

  13. Characterization of Dry-Air Aged Granules of Silver-Functionalized...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Silica Aerogel Matyas, Josef; Fryxell, Glen E.; Robinson, Matthew J. Reprocessing; Silver-functionalized arogel; Radioiodine; Aging; Sorption; BET; SEM; XRD...

  14. Aging effects in palladium and LaNi sub 4. 25 Al sub 0. 75 tritides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nobile, A.; Wermer, J.R. ); Walters, R.T. . Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1992-03-01

    Palladium and LaNi{sub 5{minus}x}Al{sub x} (x = 0.30, 0.75, 0.85), which from reversible hydrides, are used for tritium processing and storage in the Savannah River Site (SRS) tritium facilities. As part of a program to develop technology based on the use of reversible metal hydrides for tritium processing and storage, the effects of aging on the thermodynamic behavior of palladium and LaNi{sub 4.25}Al{sub 0.75} tritides are under investigation. During aging, the {sup 3}He tritium decay product remains in the tritide lattice and changes the thermodynamics of the tritium-metal tritide system. Aging effects in 755-day-aged palladium and 1423-day-aged LaNi{sub 4.25}Al{sub 0.75} tritides are reported. Changes in the thermodynamics are determined by measuring tritium desorption isotherms on aging samples. In palladium, aging deceases the desorption isotherm plateau pressure and changes the {alpha}-phase portion of the isotherm. aging-induced changes in desorption isotherms are more drastic in LaNi{sub 4.25}Al{sub 0.75}. Various processes occurring in the tritide lattice which might be responsible for the observed aging effects in palladium and LaNi{sub 4.25}Al{sub 0.75} tritides are discussed in this paper.

  15. Effect of Thermal Aging on NO oxidation and NOx storage in a...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Thermal aging of LNT has numerous material and chemical effects PDF icon deer09toops.pdf More Documents & Publications Impacts of Biodiesel on Emission Control Devices NOx ...

  16. Characterization of Dry-Air Aged Granules of Silver-Functionalized Silica

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Aerogel (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Dry-Air Aged Granules of Silver-Functionalized Silica Aerogel Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Characterization of Dry-Air Aged Granules of Silver-Functionalized Silica Aerogel This is a letter report to complete level 3 milestone "Assess aging characteristics of silica aerogels" for DOE FCRD program. Recently, samples of Ag0-functionalized silica aerogel were aged in flowing dry air for up to 6 months and then loaded with

  17. Using Pb-210/Ra-226 disequilibria for sablefish, Anoplopoma fimbria, age validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kastelle, C.R.; Kimura, D.K. ); Nevissi, A.E.; Gunderson, D.R. )

    1994-04-01

    Age determination of sablefish (Anoplopoma fimbria) is typically done by counting growth zones on the burnt cross-section of the otolith. The break-and-burn method of age determination is difficult to apply to sablefish. Therefore, we applied a relatively new method of fish age validation, using the disequilibrium of Pb-210/Ra-226 in the otoliths. This method of validation complements previous methods which used oxytetracycline (OTC) marking to validate incremental growth in sablefish otoliths. The Pb-210/Ra-226 disequilibria generally confirmed the ageing criteria used to interpret the otolith's burnt cross-section.

  18. Fuel Cell Catalysts Caught in the Act of Aging | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Fuel Cell Catalysts Caught in the Act of Aging Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy ...

  19. Low-Dose Spiral CT Scans for Early Lung Cancer Detection

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Low-dose spiral computed tomography (CT) scanning is a noninvasive medical imaging test that has been used for the early detection of lung cancer for over 16 years (Sone et al. 1998; Henschke et.al. 1999).

  20. Secretary Chu Announces 68 Scientists to Receive Early Career Research Program Funding

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced that 68 scientists from across the nation will receive up to $18.9 million in funding for research grants as part of DOE’s Early Career Research Program.