Sample records for highly structured biomimetic

  1. A novel biomimetic approach to the design of high-performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    , ceramic­metal composites are ideal candi- dates. In particular, ceramic-matrix composites (CMCsA novel biomimetic approach to the design of high-performance ceramic­metal composites Maximilien E of extending natural biological design to develop new synthetic ceramic­ metal composite materials is examined

  2. A Miniature Biomimetic Robotic Fish and Its Realtime Path Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    A Miniature Biomimetic Robotic Fish and Its Realtime Path Planning Chao Zhou, Zhiqiang Cao, Shuo a novel miniature biomimetic robotic fish based on single link with compact structure, high maneuverability and multiple sensors. The robotic fish mimics the motion of Thunniform mode, and the methods

  3. S09 Symposium KK, Structure-Property Relationships in Biomineralized and Biomimetic Composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Kisailus; Lara Estroff; Himadri S. Gupta; William J. Landis; Pablo D. Zavattieri

    2010-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical presentations and discussions at this symposium disseminated and assessed current research and defined future directions in biomaterials research, with a focus on structure-function relationships in biological and biomimetic composites. The invited and contributed talks covered a diverse range of topics from fundamental biology, physics, chemistry, and materials science to potential applications in developing areas such as light-weight composites, multifunctional and smart materials, biomedical engineering, and nanoscaled sensors. The invited speakers were chosen to create a stimulating program with a mixture of established and junior faculty, industrial and academic researchers, and American and international experts in the field. This symposium served as an excellent introduction to the area for younger scientists (graduate students and post-doctoral researchers). Direct interactions between participants also helped to promote potential future collaborations involving multiple disciplines and institutions.

  4. Biomimetic self-assembly of a functional asymmetrical electronic device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prentiss, Mara

    Biomimetic self-assembly of a functional asymmetrical electronic device Mila Boncheva, David H a biomimetic strategy for the fabrication of asymmetrical, three-dimensional electronic devices modeled distinct microelectronic elements into a multidomain electronic device with asymmet- rical structure

  5. Borrowing from Nature to Produce Highly Structured Biomimetic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    self-assembles from cellular proteins has captured the interest of many biologists and material scientists who are interested in borrowing from nature's bag of tricks to...

  6. Borrowing from Nature to Produce Highly Structured Biomimetic Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find FindRewindParticleBorn on an Air ForceBorrowing from

  7. Borrowing from Nature to Produce Highly Structured Biomimetic Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find FindRewindParticleBorn on an Air ForceBorrowing

  8. Borrowing from Nature to Produce Highly Structured Biomimetic Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find FindRewindParticleBorn on an Air

  9. Borrowing from Nature to Produce Highly Structured Biomimetic Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find FindRewindParticleBorn on an AirBorrowing from

  10. Borrowing from Nature to Produce Highly Structured Biomimetic Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find FindRewindParticleBorn on an AirBorrowing

  11. Borrowing from Nature to Produce Highly Structured Biomimetic Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find FindRewindParticleBorn on an AirBorrowingBorrowing

  12. Borrowing from Nature to Produce Highly Structured Biomimetic Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess Stories Site MapSolarAbout Neutrinos Generalhas

  13. Borrowing from Nature to Produce Highly Structured Biomimetic Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess Stories Site MapSolarAbout Neutrinos GeneralhasBorrowing from

  14. Analysis of biomimetics in the application of robotic locomotion with a focus on structures, materials and dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Ari Parsons

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biomimetics is the study and analysis of natural systems to inform engineering design and technology development. Through interdisciplinary research and analysis of natural phenomena, engineers are able to gain valuable ...

  15. Biomimetic interfacial interpenetrating polymer networks control neural stem cell behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saha, Krishanu

    Biomimetic interfacial interpenetrating polymer networks control neural stem cell behavior Krishanu polymer network (IPN), we define a robust synthetic and highly-defined plat- form for the culture of adult precisely orchestrate signal presentation to stem cells. Using a biomimetic interfacial interpenetrating

  16. A novel biomimetic approach to the design of high-performance ceramic/metal composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Launey, Maximilien E.; Munch, Etienne; Alsem, Daan Hein; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The prospect of extending natural biological design to develop new synthetic ceramic-metal composite materials is examined. Using ice-templating of ceramic suspensions and subsequent metal infiltration, we demonstrate that the concept of ordered hierarchical design can be applied to create fine-scale laminated ceramic-metal (bulk) composites that are inexpensive, lightweight and display exceptional damage-tolerance properties. Specifically, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Al-Si laminates with ceramic contents up to approximately 40 vol% and with lamellae thicknesses down to 10 {micro}m were processed and characterized. These structures achieve an excellent fracture toughness of 40 MPa{radical}m at a tensile strength of approximately 300 MPa. Salient toughening mechanisms are described together with further toughening strategies.

  17. Biomimetic Hydrogel Materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bertozzi, Carolyn (Albany, CA), Mukkamala, Ravindranath (Houston, TX), Chen, Oing (Albany, CA), Hu, Hopin (Albuquerque, NM), Baude, Dominique (Creteil, FR)

    2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel biomimetic hydrogel materials and methods for their preparation. Hydrogels containing acrylamide-functionalized carbohydrate, sulfoxide, sulfide or sulfone copolymerized with a hydrophilic or hydrophobic copolymerizing material selected from the group consisting of an acrylamide, methacrylamide, acrylate, methacrylate, vinyl and a derivative thereof present in concentration from about 1 to about 99 wt %. and methods for their preparation. The method of use of the new hydrogels for fabrication of soft contact lenses and biomedical implants.

  18. Biomimetic hydrogel materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bertozzi, Carolyn (Albany, CA); Mukkamala, Ravindranath (Houston, TX); Chen, Qing (Albany, CA); Hu, Hopin (Albuquerque, NM); Baude, Dominique (Creteil, FR)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel biomimetic hydrogel materials and methods for their preparation. Hydrogels containing acrylamide-functionalized carbohydrate, sulfoxide, sulfide or sulfone copolymerized with a hydrophilic or hydrophobic copolymerizing material selected from the group consisting of an acrylamide, methacrylamide, acrylate, methacrylate, vinyl and a derivative thereof present in concentration from about 1 to about 99 wt %. and methods for their preparation. The method of use of the new hydrogels for fabrication of soft contact lenses and biomedical implants.

  19. Biomimetic Mineralization: Mesoporous Biological mineral synthesis, in contrast to conven-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biomimetic Mineralization: Mesoporous Structures Biological mineral synthesis, in contrast of mineral crystals. Mesophases are materials which have domain length scales of the order of a few as a molecular blueprint for the site- directed formation of the inorganic phase, by providing an interface

  20. Metalloproteins: Structure Determination (HADH), Inhibition (P4H), and Biomimetic Systems (P-1[Ru(NO)(Cl)])

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Timothy M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Histamine dehydrogenase from Nocardioides simplex (HADH) is a flavoprotein that converts histamine to imidazole acetaldehyde and is highly specific for histamine. Chapter one describes the development of overexpression and ...

  1. High temperature structural insulating material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, W.Y.

    1984-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800/sup 0/C), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m/sup 0/C), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800/sup 0/C, a diameter within the range of 20-200 ..mu..m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2 to 4 ..mu..m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

  2. High temperature structural insulating material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Wayne Y. (Munster, IN)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800.degree. C.), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m.degree. C.), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800.degree. C., a diameter within the range of 20-200 .mu.m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2-4 .mu.m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

  3. Crump Geyser: High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Crump Geyser: High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well Drilling Crump Geyser: High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well...

  4. Sandia Energy - ECIS-UNM: Biomimetic Membranes for Water Purification

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand RequirementsCoatingsUltra-High-Voltage Silicon CarbideAgency:UNM: Biomimetic Membranes

  5. Biomimetic Synthesis of Macroscopic-Scale Calcium Carbonate Thin Films. Evidence for a Multistep Assembly Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aksay, Ilhan A.

    Biomimetic Synthesis of Macroscopic-Scale Calcium Carbonate Thin Films. Evidence for a Multistep growth modification and cessation, and so on. Highly ordered calcium carbonate lamellae formed have synthesized macroscopic and continuous calcium carbonate thin films with thickness ranging from 0

  6. Biomimetic Dye Molecules for Solar Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess Stories Site Map Printable Version ShareBiomimeticBiomimetic

  7. Methodology Water Harvesting Measurements with Biomimetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    Methodology Water Harvesting Measurements with Biomimetic Surfaces Zi Jun Wang and Prof. Anne parameters that affect the water harvesting efficiencies of different surfaces · Optimize the experimental Objectives Water is one of the most essential natural resources. The easy accessibility of water

  8. Biomimetic Synthesis of Noble Metal Nanoparticles and Their Applications as Electro-catalysts in Fuel Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yujing

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Y. , Biomimetic Synthesis of Inorganic Materials and Theirsynthesis of inorganic materials .NPs. 1.2 Biomimetic synthesis of inorganic materials Through

  9. apatite biomimetically grown: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    phosphate cement Tas, A. Cuneyt 8 Biomimetic nanopores: learning from and about nature Materials Science Websites Summary: . A related approach - similar but different to...

  10. Crump Geyser: High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Crump Geyser: High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well Drilling John Casteel Nevada Geothermal Power Co. Validation of Innovative Exploration...

  11. Conformal coating of highly structured surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ginley, David S.; Perkins, John; Berry, Joseph; Gennett, Thomas

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Method of applying a conformal coating to a highly structured substrate and devices made by the disclosed methods are disclosed. An example method includes the deposition of a substantially contiguous layer of a material upon a highly structured surface within a deposition process chamber. The highly structured surface may be associated with a substrate or another layer deposited on a substrate. The method includes depositing a material having an amorphous structure on the highly structured surface at a deposition pressure of equal to or less than about 3 mTorr. The method may also include removing a portion of the amorphous material deposited on selected surfaces and depositing additional amorphous material on the highly structured surface.

  12. Solid state NMR method development and studies of biological and biomimetic nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Yanyan

    2011-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes application and development of advanced solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance techniques for complex materials, in particular organic-inorganic nanocomposites and thermoelectric tellurides. The apatite-collagen interface, essential for understanding the biomineralization process in bone and engineering the interface for controlled bio-mimetic synthesis and optimized mechanical properties, is buried within the nanocomposite of bone. We used multinuclear solid-state NMR to study the composition and structure of the interface. Citrate has been identified as the main organic molecule strongly bound to the apatite surface with a density of 1/(2 nm){sup 2}, covering 1/6 of the total surface area in bovine bone. Citrate provides more carboxylate groups, one of the key functional groups found to affect apatite nucleation and growth, than all the non-collagenous proteins all together in bone; thus we propose that citrate stabilizes apatite crystals at a very small thickness of {approx}3 nm (4 unit cells) to increase bone fracture tolerance. The hypothesis has been confirmed in vitro by adding citrate in the bio-mimetic synthesis of polymerhydroxyapatite nanocomposites. The results have shown that the size of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals decreases as increasing citrate concentration. With citrate concentrations comparable to that in body fluids, similar-sized nanocrystals as in bone have been produced. Besides the dimensions of the apatite crystals, the composition of bone also affects its biofunctional and macroscopic mechanical properties; therefore, our team also extended its effort to enhance the inorganic portion in our bio-mimetic synthesis from originally 15 wt% to current 50 wt% compared to 65 wt% in bovine bone, by using Lysine-Leucine hydroxyapatite nucleating diblock co-polypeptide, which forms a gel at very low concentration. In this thesis, various advanced solid state NMR techniques have been employed to characterize nanocomposites. Meanwhile, we have developed new methods to achieve broadband high resolution NMR and improve the accuracy of inter-nuclear distance measurements involving quadrupolar spins. Broadband high resolution NMR of spin-1/2 nuclei has been accomplished by the adaptation of the magic angle turning (MAT) method to fast magic angle spinning, termed fast MAT, by solving technical problems such as off resonance effects. Fast MAT separates chemical shift anisotropy and isotropic chemical shifts over a spectral range of {approx}1.8 {gamma}B{sub 1} without significant distortions. Fast MAT {sup 125}Te NMR has been applied to study technologically important telluride materials with spectra spreading up to 190 kHz. The signal-to-noise ratio of the spectra is significantly improved by using echo-matched Gaussian filtering in offline data processing. The accuracy of the measured distances between spin-1/2 and quadrupolar nuclei with methods such as SPIDER and REAPDOR has been improved by compensating for the fast longitudinal quadrupolar relaxation on the sub-millisecond with a modified S{sub 0} pulse sequence. Also, the T1Q effect on the spin coherence and its spinning speed dependency has been explored and documented with analytical and numerical simulations as well as experimental measurements.

  13. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carruthers, William D. (Mesa, AZ); Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

  14. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carruthers, William D. (Mesa, AZ); Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

  15. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carruthers, William D. (Mesa, AZ); Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

  16. Biomimetic Dye Molecules for Solar Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find Find MoreTechnicalBiomimetic Dye Molecules for Solar

  17. Biomimetic Dye Molecules for Solar Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find Find MoreTechnicalBiomimetic Dye Molecules for

  18. Biomimetic Dye Molecules for Solar Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find Find MoreTechnicalBiomimetic Dye Molecules

  19. Biomimetic Dye Molecules for Solar Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess Stories Site Map Printable Version ShareBiomimetic Dye

  20. Biomimetic Dye Molecules for Solar Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess Stories Site Map Printable Version ShareBiomimetic

  1. Development of a shape memory alloy actuated biomimetic hydrofoil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Larry Nixon

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of an active biomimetic hydrofoil that utilizes Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) actuator technology is presented herein. This work describes the design and testing of two experimental hydrofoils. The first model had a trailing edge flap...

  2. Biomimetic Model Studies Reveal the Role of the Ca2+ Ion in Photosyste...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biomimetic Model Studies Reveal the Role of the Ca2+ Ion in Photosystem II Friday, October 31, 2014 Fig 1 Figure 1. The biomimetic complexes that model the OEC in the final step of...

  3. Nuclear diffractive structure functions at high energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Marquet; H. Kowalski; T. Lappi; R. Venugopalan

    2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A future high-energy electron-ion collider would explore the non-linear weakly-coupled regime of QCD, and test the Color Glass Condensate (CGC) approach to high-energy scattering. Hard diffraction in deep inelastic scattering off nuclei will provide many fundamental measurements. In this work, the nuclear diffractive structure function F_{2,A}^D is predicted in the CGC framework, and the features of nuclear enhancement and suppression are discussed.

  4. Analysis of Rotational Structure in the High-Resolution Infrared...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rotational Structure in the High-Resolution Infrared Spectrum and Assignment of Vibrational Fundamentals of Analysis of Rotational Structure in the High-Resolution Infrared...

  5. Surface and Structural Stabilities of Carbon Additives in High...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structural Stabilities of Carbon Additives in High Voltage Lithium Ion Batteries. Surface and Structural Stabilities of Carbon Additives in High Voltage Lithium Ion Batteries....

  6. Design and Evaluation of a Biomimetic Agonist-Antagonist Active Knee Prosthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herr, Hugh

    Design and Evaluation of a Biomimetic Agonist-Antagonist Active Knee Prosthesis by ARCHIVES Ernesto;Design and Evaluation of a Biomimetic Agonist-Antagonist Active Knee Prosthesis by Ernesto Carlos. This thesis presents the design and evaluation of a novel biomimetic active knee prosthesis capable

  7. Structures in high-energy fusion data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Esbensen

    2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Structures observed in heavy-ion fusion cross sections at energies above the Coulomb barrier are interpreted as caused by the penetration of centrifugal barriers that are well-separated in energy. The structures are most pronounced in the fusion of lighter, symmetric systems, where the separation in energy between successive angular momentum barriers is relatively large. It is shown that the structures or peaks can be revealed by plotting the first derivative of the energy weighted cross section. It is also shown how an orbital angular momentum can be assign to the observed peaks by comparing to coupled-channels calculations. This is illustrated by analyzing high-energy fusion data for $^{12}$C+$^{16}$O and $^{16}$O+$^{16}$O, and the possibility of observing similar structures in the fusion of heavier systems is discussed.

  8. BIOMIMETIC PROCESSING OF CERAMICS AND CERAMIC-METAL COMPOSITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aksay, Ilhan A.

    625 BIOMIMETIC PROCESSING OF CERAMICS AND CERAMIC-METAL COMPOSITES M. YASREBI, G. H. KIM, K. E of composite materials has become popular and frequently necessary to meet the requirements of technology. The employment of composites is well appreciated firom the fact that unique arrangements of constituent materials

  9. Scleral Reinforcement Through Host Tissue Integration with Biomimetic Enzymatically Degradable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Healy, Kevin Edward

    . Wildsoet, O.D., Ph.D.1 Enzymatically degradable semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (edsIPNs) were Polymer Network James Su, M.Eng.,1 Samuel T. Wall, Ph.D.,2 Kevin E. Healy, Ph.D.,2,3 and Christine FScleral Reinforcement Through Host Tissue Integration with Biomimetic Enzymatically Degradable Semi-Interpenetrating

  10. Biomimetic ratcheting motion of a soft, slender, sessile gel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhury, Manoj K.

    Biomimetic ratcheting motion of a soft, slender, sessile gel L. Mahadevan* , S. Daniel , and M. K, just as in a mechanical ratchet. Worms use a combination of unidirectional waves and the inequality­heal cycle in response to periodic unidirectional pulses producing a material ratchet (1, 4); snakes use

  11. Spin structure in high energy processes: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DePorcel, L.; Dunwoodie, C. [eds.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains papers as the following topics: Spin, Mass, and Symmetry; physics with polarized Z{sup 0}s; spin and precision electroweak physics; polarized electron sources; polarization phenomena in quantum chromodynamics; polarized lepton-nucleon scattering; polarized targets in high energy physics; spin dynamics in storage rings and linear accelerators; spin formalism and applications to new physics searches; precision electroweak physics at LEP; recent results on heavy flavor physics from LEP experiments using 1990--1992 data; precise measurement of the left-right cross section asymmetry in Z boson production by electron-positron collisions; preliminary results on heavy flavor physics at SLD; QCD tests with SLD and polarized beams; recent results from TRISTAN at KEK; recent B physics results from CLEO; searching for the H dibaryon at Brookhaven; recent results from the compton observatory; the spin structure of the deuteron; spin structure of the neutron ({sup 3}HE) and the Bjoerken sum rule; a consumer`s guide to lattice QCD results; top ten models constrained by b {yields} sy; a review of the Fermilab fixed target program; results from the D0 experiment; results from CDF at FNAL; quantum-mechanical suppression of bremsstrahlung; report from the ZEUS collaboration at HERA; physics from the first year of H1 at HERA, and hard diffraction. These papers have been cataloged separately elsewhere.

  12. Biological and Biomimetic Low-Temperature Routes to Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nano-scale Composite Hetero-structures: Novel High Capacity Reversible Anodes for Lithium-ion Batteries Novel Lithium Ion Anode Structures: Overview of New DOE BATT Anode...

  13. acid-based biomimetic hydrogel: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (more) Ma, Manlung 2008-01-01 12 Biomimetic nanopores: learning from and about nature Materials Science Websites Summary: . A related approach - similar but different to...

  14. Biomimetic Materials by Freeze Casting MICHAEL M. PORTER,1,4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Marc A.

    ,8 to nanolithography9,10 and 3-D print- ing,11­13 has been explored to develop synthetic biomimetic materials. Freeze

  15. Effect of high pressure on structural oddities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnstone, Russell D. L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the effect of pressure on crystal structures that are in some way unusual. The aim was to investigate whether pressure could be used to force these ‘structural oddities’ to conform to more conventional ...

  16. Lithium, compression and high-pressure structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olinger, B.; Shaner, J.W.

    1983-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Lithium is found to transform from a body-centered cubic (bcc) to a face-centered cubic (fcc) structure at 6.9 gigapascals (69 kilobars) and 296 kelvin. The relative volume of the bcc structured lithium at 6.9 gigapascals is 0.718, and the fcc structure is 0.25 percent denser. The bulk modulus and its pressure derivative for the bcc structure are 11.57 gigapascals and 3.4, and for the fcc structure are 13.1 gigapascals and 2.8. Extrapolation of the bcc-fcc phase boundary and the melting curve indiactes a triple point around 15 gigapascals and 500 kelvin.

  17. High School Co-op Program Salary Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Salary Structure High School Co-op Program Salary Structure Point your career towards Los Alamos Lab: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive environment that is...

  18. Reflection High-Energy Electron Diffraction Beam-Induced Structural...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beam-Induced Structural and Property Changes on WO3 Thin Films. Reflection High-Energy Electron Diffraction Beam-Induced Structural and Property Changes on WO3 Thin...

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: structural material at high pressure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    structural material at high pressure ECIS-I2CNER: Hydrogen Infrastructure Research Aids Energy Independence Goal On February 14, 2013, in CRF, Energy, Livermore Valley Open Campus...

  20. Ablation Casting Evaluation for High Volume Structural Castings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Casting Evaluation for High Volume Structural Castings 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

  1. Biomimetic synthesis of modified calcium phosphate fine powders and their in vitro studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gergulova, R., E-mail: rumigg@yahoo.com; Tepavitcharova, S., E-mail: rumigg@yahoo.com; Rabadjieva, D., E-mail: rumigg@yahoo.com; Sezanova, K., E-mail: rumigg@yahoo.com; Ilieva, R., E-mail: rumigg@yahoo.com [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Bl. 11, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Alexandrova, R.; Andonova-Lilova, B. [Institute of Experimental Morphology, Pathology and Anthropology with Museum, BAS, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Bl. 25, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Biomimetic approach and subsequent high-temperature treatment were used to synthesize ion modified calcium phosphate fine powders. Thus, using Simulated Body Fluid (SBF) as an ion modifier, a bi-phase mixture of ion modified ?-tricalcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite (?-TCP + HA) was prepared. The use of SBF electrolyte solution enriched with Mg{sup 2+} or Zn{sup 2+} yielded monophase ?-tricalcium phosphate additionally modified with Mg{sup 2+} or Zn{sup 2+} (Mg-?-TCP or Zn-?-TCP). The in vitro behavior of the prepared powders on cell viability and proliferation of murine BALB/c 3T3 fibroblasts and of human Lep 3 cells was studied by MTT test assays and Mosmann method after 72 h incubation. The relative cell viability was calculated.

  2. Structure of crystalline methanol at high pressure David R. Allan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vos, Willem L.

    Structure of crystalline methanol at high pressure David R. Allan Department of Physics structure, including all atomic positions, of methanol at high pressure and room temperature pressure of methanol is 3.5 GPa. In practice however, it is very easy to superpress the liquid phase

  3. Structural Optimization of High Voltage Transmission Line Towers considering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colominas, Ignasi

    Structural Optimization of High Voltage Transmission Line Towers considering Continuum and Discrete/or to common designs largely repeated (e.g. automotive compo- nents), and high voltage transmission towers can than conventional designs of high voltage transmission line towers. The optimization model proposed

  4. Biomimetic approach to cardiac tissue engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radisic, Milica

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (cont.) biochemical and morphological properties in the pretreated group. Finally, in order to mimic capillary structure cardiac fibroblasts and myocytes were co-cultured on a scaffold with a parallel channel array that ...

  5. Studies toward biomimetic claisen condensation using nucleic acid templates and ribozyme catalysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryu, Youngha

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Many different experimental approaches were attempted to achieve carbon-carbon bond formation by nucleic acid template-directed reactions and ribozyme catalysis as potential lipid synthesizing machineries in the RNA world. A novel biomimetic...

  6. Open loop performance of a biomimetic flapping foil autonomous underwater vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, Malima Isabelle, 1981-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flapping foil propulsion is emerging as an alternative to conventional propulsion for underwater vehicles. MIT's Biomimetic Flapping Foil Autonomous Underwater Vehicle is a prototype vehicle that uses four three-dimensional ...

  7. Biomimetic oscillating foil propulsion to enhance underwater vehicle agility and maneuverability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Licht, Stephen Carl

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inspired by the swimming abilities of marine animals, this thesis presents "Finnegan the RoboTurtle", an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) powered entirely by four flapping foils. Biomimetic actuation is shown to produce ...

  8. Development of nano-scale and biomimetic surfaces for biomedical applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henry, James Edward

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    -Chairs of Committee, Theresa Good Daniel z Committee Members, Gerard Cot? Rosana ira Head of Department, Kenneth Hall August 2005 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering iii ABSTRACT Development of Nano-scale and Biomimetic Surfaces... for Biomedical Applications. (August 2005) James Edward Henry, B.S.; M.S., University of Arkansas Co-Chairs of Advisory Committee: Dr. Theresa Good Dr. Daniel Shantz The work described in this dissertation details the development of a biomimetic...

  9. Conversion of methane to higher hydrocarbons (Biomimetic catalysis of the conversion of methane to methanol). Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watkins, B.E.; Taylor, R.T.; Satcher, J.H. [and others

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In addition to inorganic catalysts that react with methane, it is well-known that a select group of aerobic soil/water bacteria called methanotrophs can efficiently and selectively utilize methane as the sole source of their energy and carbon for cellular growth. The first reaction in this metabolic pathway is catalyzed by the enzyme methane monooxygenase (MMO) forming methanol. Methanol is a technology important product from this partial oxidation of methane since it can be easily converted to liquid hydrocarbon transportation fuels (gasoline), used directly as a liquid fuel or fuel additive itself, or serve as a feedstock for chemicals production. This naturally occurring biocatalyst (MMO) is accomplishing a technologically important transformation (methane directly to methanol) for which there is currently no analogous chemical (non-biological) process. The authors approach has been to use the biocatalyst, MMO, as the initial focus in the development of discrete chemical catalysts (biomimetic complexes) for methane conversion. The advantage of this approach is that it exploits a biocatalytic system already performing a desired transformation of methane. In addition, this approach generated needed new experimental information on catalyst structure and function in order to develop new catalysts rationally and systematically. The first task is a comparative mechanistic, biochemical, and spectroscopic investigation of MMO enzyme systems. This work was directed at developing a description of the structure and function of the catalytically active sites in sufficient detail to generate a biomimetic material. The second task involves the synthesis, characterization, and chemical reactions of discrete complexes that mimic the enzymatic active site. These complexes were synthesized based on their best current understanding of the MMO active site structure.

  10. A SIMPLIFIED ANALYSIS FOR HIGH POWER MICROWAVE BANDPASS FILTER STRUCTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Ming

    and wireless diplexers. An exact analysis of the voltage/power distribution inside a filter involves the 3D is derived. This transformation is then used to relate the actual voltage distribution inside a transmissionA SIMPLIFIED ANALYSIS FOR HIGH POWER MICROWAVE BANDPASS FILTER STRUCTURES Apu Sivadas, Ming Yu

  11. Dielectric-Lined High-Gradient Accelerator Structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Rectangular particle accelerator structures with internal planar dielectric elements have been studied, with a view towards devising structures with lower surface fields for a given accelerating field, as compared with structures without dielectrics. Success with this concept is expected to allow operation at higher accelerating gradients than otherwise on account of reduced breakdown probabilities. The project involves studies of RF breakdown on amorphous dielectrics in test cavities that could enable high-gradient structures to be built for a future multi-TeV collider. The aim is to determine what the limits are for RF fields at the surfaces of selected dielectrics, and the resulting acceleration gradient that could be achieved in a working structure. The dielectric of principal interest in this study is artificial CVD diamond, on account of its advertised high breakdown field ({approx}2 GV/m for dc), low loss tangent, and high thermal conductivity. Experimental studies at mm-wavelengths on materials and structures for achieving high acceleration gradient were based on the availability of the 34.3 GHz third-harmonic magnicon amplifier developed by Omega-P, and installed at the Yale University Beam Physics Laboratory. Peak power from the magnicon was measured to be about 20 MW in 0.5 {micro}s pulses, with a gain of 54 dB. Experiments for studying RF high-field effects on CVD diamond samples failed to show any evidence after more than 10{sup 5} RF pulses of RF breakdown up to a tangential surface field strength of 153 MV/m; studies at higher fields were not possible due to a degradation in magnicon performance. A rebuild of the tube is underway at this writing. Computed performance for a dielectric-loaded rectangular accelerator structure (DLA) shows highly competitive properties, as compared with an existing all-metal structure. For example, comparisons were made of a DLA structure having two planar CVD diamond elements with a all-metal CERN structure HDS operating at 30 GHz. It was shown that the ratio of maximum surface electric field to accelerating field at the metal wall is only 0.35-0.4 for DLA, much smaller than the value 2.2 for HDS; and the ratio of surface magnetic field to accelerating field is 3.0 mA/V for DLA, compared with 3.45 mA/V for HDS. These values bode well for DLA in helping to avoid breakdown and to reducing pulsed surface heating and fatigue. The shunt impedance is found to be 160-175 M{Omega}/m for DLA, as compared to 99 M{Omega}/m for HDS. Conclusions are reached from this project that CVD diamond appears promising as a dielectric with a high threshold for RF breakdown, and that rectangular accelerator structures can be devised using planar CVD diamond elements that could be operated at higher acceleration gradients with low probability of RF breakdown, as compared with corresponding all-metallic structures.

  12. High performance capacitors using nano-structure multilayer materials fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Johnson, G.W.; O`Brien, D.W.

    1996-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A high performance capacitor is described which is fabricated from nano-structure multilayer materials, such as by controlled, reactive sputtering, and having very high energy-density, high specific energy and high voltage breakdown. The multilayer capacitors, for example, may be fabricated in a ``notepad`` configuration composed of 200--300 alternating layers of conductive and dielectric materials so as to have a thickness of 1 mm, width of 200 mm, and length of 300 mm, with terminals at each end of the layers suitable for brazing, thereby guaranteeing low contact resistance and high durability. The ``notepad`` capacitors may be stacked in single or multiple rows (series-parallel banks) to increase the voltage and energy density. 5 figs.

  13. High performance capacitors using nano-structure multilayer materials fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barbee, Jr., Troy W. (Palo Alto, CA); Johnson, Gary W. (Livermore, CA); O'Brien, Dennis W. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high performance capacitor fabricated from nano-structure multilayer materials, such as by controlled, reactive sputtering, and having very high energy-density, high specific energy and high voltage breakdown. The multilayer capacitors, for example, may be fabricated in a "notepad" configuration composed of 200-300 alternating layers of conductive and dielectric materials so as to have a thickness of 1 mm, width of 200 mm, and length of 300 mm, with terminals at each end of the layers suitable for brazing, thereby guaranteeing low contact resistance and high durability. The "notepad" capacitors may be stacked in single or multiple rows (series-parallel banks) to increase the voltage and energy density.

  14. High performance capacitors using nano-structure multilayer materials fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barbee, Jr., Troy W. (Palo Alto, CA); Johnson, Gary W. (Livermore, CA); O'Brien, Dennis W. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high performance capacitor fabricated from nano-structure multilayer materials, such as by controlled, reactive sputtering, and having very high energy-density, high specific energy and high voltage breakdown. The multilayer capacitors, for example, may be fabricated in a "notepad" configuration composed of 200-300 alternating layers of conductive and dielectric materials so as to have a thickness of 1 mm, width of 200 mm, and length of 300 mm, with terminals at each end of the layers suitable for brazing, thereby guaranteeing low contact resistance and high durability. The "notepad" capacitors may be stacked in single or multiple rows (series-parallel banks) to increase the voltage and energy density.

  15. High performance capacitors using nano-structure multilayer materials fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Johnson, G.W.; O`Brien, D.W.

    1995-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A high performance capacitor is fabricated from nano-structure multilayer materials, such as by controlled, reactive sputtering, and having very high energy-density, high specific energy and high voltage breakdown. The multilayer capacitors, for example, may be fabricated in a ``notepad`` configuration composed of 200-300 alternating layers of conductive and dielectric materials so as to have a thickness of 1 mm, width of 200 mm, and length of 300 mm, with terminals at each end of the layers suitable for brazing, thereby guaranteeing low contact resistance and high durability. The notepad capacitors may be stacked in single or multiple rows (series-parallel banks) to increase the voltage and energy density. 5 figs.

  16. Ab initio study of the structure and dynamics of solvated highly charged metal ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogatko, Stuart A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Study of the Structure and Dynamics of Solvated Highly27 Chapter 3 Structure and Dynamics of the High Spin Fe 3+66 Chapter 4 Structure and Dynamics of the Hydrated Ca 2+

  17. Nanosheet-structured LiV3O8 with high capacity and excellent...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanosheet-structured LiV3O8 with high capacity and excellent stability for high energy lithium batteries . Nanosheet-structured LiV3O8 with high capacity and excellent stability...

  18. High Performance Abrasion-Resistant Materials: Lessons from Nature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Qianqian

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Materials Science & Engineering C- Biomimetic and SupramolecularMaterials Science & Engineering C- Biomimetic and SupramolecularMaterials Science & Engineering C- Biomimetic and Supramolecular

  19. High x Structure Function of the Virtually Free Neutron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cosyn, Wim

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The pole extrapolation method is applied for the first time to data on semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering off the deuteron with tagged spectator protons to extract the high Bjorken x structure function of the neutron. This approach is based on the extrapolation of the measured cross sections at different momenta of the detected spectator proton to the non-physical pole of the bound neutron in the deuteron. The advantage of the method is that it makes it possible to suppress nuclear effects in a maximally model independent way. The neutron structure functions obtained in this way demonstrate surprising x dependence at x> 0.6, indicating the possibility of a rise in the neutron to proton structure function ratio. Such a rise may indicate new dynamics in the generation of high x quarks in the nucleon. One such mechanism we discuss is the possible dominance of short-range isosinglet quark-quark correlations that can enhance the d-quark distribution in the proton resulting in d/u -> 1.

  20. High energy density capacitors using nano-structure multilayer technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Johnson, G.W.; O`Brien, D.W.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today, many pulse power and industrial applications are limited by capacitor performance. While incremental improvements are anticipated from existing capacitor technologies, significant advances are needed in energy density to enable these applications for both the military and for American economic competitiveness. We propose a program to research and develop a novel technology for making high voltage, high energy density capacitors. Nano-structure multilayer technologies developed at LLNL may well provide a breakthrough in capacitor performance. Our controlled sputtering techniques are capable of laying down extraordinarily smooth sub-micron layers of dielectric and conductor materials. With this technology, high voltage capacitors with an order of magnitude improvement in energy density may be achievable. Well-understood dielectrics and new materials will be investigated for use with this technology. Capacitors developed by nano-structure multilayer technology are inherently solid state, exhibiting extraordinary mechanical and thermal properties. The conceptual design of a Notepad capacitor is discussed to illustrate capacitor and capacitor bank design and performance with this technology. We propose a two phase R&D program to address DNA`s capacitor needs for electro-thermal propulsion and similar pulse power programs. Phase 1 will prove the concept and further our understanding of dielectric materials and design tradeoffs with multilayers. Nano-structure multilayer capacitors will be developed and characterized. As our materials research and modeling prove successful, technology insertion in our capacitor designs will improve the possibility for dramatic performance improvements. In Phase 2, we will make Notepad capacitors, construct a capacitor bank and demonstrate its performance in a meaningful pulse power application. We will work with industrial partners to design full scale manufacturing and move this technology to industry for volume production.

  1. Level Structure of 103Ag at high spins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Ray; N. S. Pattabiraman; Krishichayan; A. Chakraborty; S. Mukhopadhyay; S. S. Ghugre; S. N. Chintalapudi; A. K. Sinha; U. Garg; S. Zhu; B. Kharraja; D. Almehed

    2007-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    High spin states in $^{103}$Ag were investigated with the Gammasphere array, using the $^{72}$Ge($^{35}$Cl,$2p2n$)$^{103}$Ag reaction at an incident beam energy of 135 MeV. A $\\Delta J$=1 sequence with predominantly magnetic transitions and two nearly-degenerate $\\Delta J=1$ doublet bands have been observed. The dipole band shows a decreasing trend in the $B(M1)$ strength as function of spin, a well established feature of magnetic bands. The nearly-degenerate band structures satisfy the three experimental signatures of chirality in the nuclei; however microscopic calculations are indicative of a magnetic phenomenon

  2. High-spin rotational structures in {sup 76}Kr

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valiente-Dobon, J.J.; Svensson, C.E.; Finlay, P.; Grinyer, G.F.; Hyland, B.; Phillips, A.A.; Schumaker, M.A. [Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1 (Canada); O'Leary, C.D.; Jenkins, D.; Johnston-Theasby, F.; Joshi, P.; Kelsall, N.S.; Wadsworth, R. [Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Ragnarsson, I. [Department of Physics, Lund Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 118, S-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Andreoiu, C. [Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1 (Canada); Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3BX (United Kingdom); Appelbe, D.E. [CLRC Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Austin, R.A.E.; Cameron, J.A.; Waddington, J.C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1 (Canada); Ball, G.C. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2A3 (Canada)] [and others

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-spin states in {sup 36}{sub 76}Kr{sub 40} have been populated in the {sup 40}Ca({sup 40}Ca,4p){sup 76}Kr fusion-evaporation reaction at a beam energy of 165 MeV and studied using the Gammasphere and Microball multidetector arrays. The ground-state band and two signature-split negative parity bands of {sup 76}Kr have been extended to {approx}30({Dirac_h}/2{pi}). Lifetime measurements using the Doppler-shift attenuation method show that the transition quadrupole moment of these three bands decrease as they approach their maximum-spin states. Two signatures of a new rotational structure with remarkably rigid rotational behavior have been identified. The high-spin properties of these rotational bands are analyzed within the framework of configuration-dependent cranked Nilsson-Strutinsky calculations.

  3. Structural design criteria for high heat flux components.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majumdar, S.

    1999-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The high temperature design rules of the ITER Structural Design Criteria (ISDC), are applied to first wall designs with high heat flux. The maximum coolant pressure and surface heat flux capabilities are shown to be determined not only by the mechanical properties of the first wall material but also by the details of the blanket design. In a high power density self-cooled lithium blanket, the maximum primary stress in the first wall is controlled by many of the geometrical parameters of the blanket, such as, first wall span, first wall curvature, first wall thickness, side wall thickness, and second wall thickness. The creep ratcheting lifetime of the first wall is also shown to be controlled by many of the same geometrical parameters as well as the coolant temperature. According to most high temperature design codes, the time-dependent primary membrane stress allowable are based on the average temperature (ignoring thermal stress). Such a procedure may sometimes be unconservative, particularly for embrittled first walls with large temperature gradients. The effect of secondary (thermal) stresses on the accumulation of creep deformation is illustrated with a vanadium alloy flat plate first wall design.

  4. Biomimetic soy protein nanocomposites with calcium carbonate crystalline arrays for use as wood adhesive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biomimetic soy protein nanocomposites with calcium carbonate crystalline arrays for use as wood 2010 Available online 21 March 2010 Keywords: Wood glue Calcium carbonate Gecko adhesion Soy protein crosslinking of calcium, carbonate, hydroxyl ions in the adhesive greatly improving the water- resistance

  5. TAILORING OF NANO-AND MICROSTRUCTURE IN BIOMIMETICALLY SYNTHESIZED CERAMIC FILMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Junghyun

    TAILORING OF NANO- AND MICROSTRUCTURE IN BIOMIMETICALLY SYNTHESIZED CERAMIC FILMS Guangneng Zhang University of New York at Binghamton Binghamton, NY 13902-6000 ABSTRACT A novel ceramic thin film deposition approach through which inorganic materials were deposited on a functionalized organic matrix from aqueous

  6. Improving the efficiency of water splitting in dye-sensitized solar cells by using a biomimetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Improving the efficiency of water splitting in dye-sensitized solar cells by using a biomimetic studied this problem in dye-sensitized solar cells where a molecular dye and a porous TiO2 electrode act been demonstrated using dye-sensitized electrodes. The quantum yield for water splitting in these dye

  7. Rapid synthesis of polymer-silica hybrid nanofibers by biomimetic mineralization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    Rapid synthesis of polymer-silica hybrid nanofibers by biomimetic mineralization Pritesh A. Patel. Such a simple route to rapid formation of organic-inorganic hybrid nanofibers could have applications ranging from catalysis to tissue engineering, and nanocomposites in general. Ó 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  8. Analysis of the Waggle Dance Motion of Honeybees for the Design of a Biomimetic Honeybee Robot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rojas, Raúl

    Analysis of the Waggle Dance Motion of Honeybees for the Design of a Biomimetic Honeybee Robot Tim, Cambridge, United Kingdom Abstract The honeybee dance ``language'' is one of the most popular examples honeybee that allows a deeper investigation of the communication process we have recorded hundreds

  9. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of biomimetic dye molecules for solar cells Peter L. Cook,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Himpsel, Franz J.

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy of biomimetic dye molecules for solar cells Peter L. Cook,1 Xiaosong November 2009 Dye-sensitized solar cells are potentially inexpensive alternatives to traditional semiconductor solar cells. In order to optimize dyes for solar cells we systematically investigate

  10. Analysis of the rotational structure in the high-resolution infrared...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rotational structure in the high-resolution infrared spectra of cis,cis- and trans,trans-1,4-difluorobutadiene-1 Analysis of the rotational structure in the high-resolution...

  11. Analysis of the Rotational Structure in the High-Resolution Infrared...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rotational Structure in the High-Resolution Infrared Spectrum of trans-Hexatriene-1-13C1; a Semiexperimental Analysis of the Rotational Structure in the High-Resolution Infrared...

  12. Structure Analysis of a Precipitate Phase in an Ni-Rich High...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structure Analysis of a Precipitate Phase in an Ni-Rich High Temperature NiTiHf Shape Memory Alloy. Structure Analysis of a Precipitate Phase in an Ni-Rich High Temperature NiTiHf...

  13. A Structure-Based Distance Metric for High-Dimensional Space...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Structure-Based Distance Metric for High-Dimensional Space Exploration with Multi-Dimensional Scaling. A Structure-Based Distance Metric for High-Dimensional Space Exploration...

  14. Method for improving performance of highly stressed electrical insulating structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilson, Michael J. (Modesto, CA); Goerz, David A. (Brentwood, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Removing the electrical field from the internal volume of high-voltage structures; e.g., bushings, connectors, capacitors, and cables. The electrical field is removed from inherently weak regions of the interconnect, such as between the center conductor and the solid dielectric, and places it in the primary insulation. This is accomplished by providing a conductive surface on the inside surface of the principal solid dielectric insulator surrounding the center conductor and connects the center conductor to this conductive surface. The advantage of removing the electric fields from the weaker dielectric region to a stronger area improves reliability, increases component life and operating levels, reduces noise and losses, and allows for a smaller compact design. This electric field control approach is currently possible on many existing products at a modest cost. Several techniques are available to provide the level of electric field control needed. Choosing the optimum technique depends on material, size, and surface accessibility. The simplest deposition method uses a standard electroless plating technique, but other metalization techniques include vapor and energetic deposition, plasma spraying, conductive painting, and other controlled coating methods.

  15. High Sensitivity Combined with Extended Structural Coverage of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in producing ions with high efficiency and transmitting them to low pressures for high sensitivity mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. Here we present evidence that not only...

  16. Nanosheet-structured LiV3O8 with high capacity and excellent stability for high energy lithium batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    for high-energy lithium battery applications. 1. Introduction Energy storage and conversion have sources.1­6 Lithium-ion batteries are considered to be the most promising energy-storage systemsNanosheet-structured LiV3O8 with high capacity and excellent stability for high energy lithium

  17. Electronic-Structure of High-Temperature Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RICHERT, BA; Allen, Roland E.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    along 1 Z, demonstrate the two dimen- sionality of the electronic structure. 4's For this triple perovskite structure, there are now three antibonding Cu(d)-0(p) bands protruding above Ep at M and M'. Two of them are nearly the same...

  18. Phosphate bonded structural products from high volume wastes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singh, D.; Wagh, A.S.

    1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A method to produce structural products from benign waste is provided comprising mixing pretreated oxide with phosphoric acid to produce an acid solution, mixing the acid solution with waste particles to produce a slurry, and allowing the slurry to cure. The invention also provides for a structural material comprising waste particles enveloped by an inorganic binder. 1 fig.

  19. Biomimetic amplification of nanoparticle homing to tumors Derfus, Meng Yang, Robert M. Hoffman, Sangeeta Bhatia, Michael J. Sailor, and Erkki Ruoslahti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatia, Sangeeta

    oxide nanoparticles and liposomes coated with this tumor- homing peptide accumulate in tumor vesselsBiomimetic amplification of nanoparticle homing to tumors Derfus, Meng Yang, Robert M. Hoffman.pnas.org/misc/reprints.shtml To order reprints, see: Notes: #12;Biomimetic amplification of nanoparticle homing to tumors Dmitri

  20. The role of straining and morphology in thermal conductivity of a set of SiGe superlattices and biomimetic SiGe nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomar, Vikas

    The role of straining and morphology in thermal conductivity of a set of Si­Ge superlattices and biomimetic Si­Ge nanocomposites This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see and morphology in thermal conductivity of a set of Si­Ge superlattices and biomimetic Si­Ge nanocomposites Vikas

  1. Radiation damage in biomimetic dye molecules for solar cells Peter L. Cook, Phillip S. Johnson, Xiaosong Liu, An-Li Chin, and F. J. Himpsela

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Himpsel, Franz J.

    Radiation damage in biomimetic dye molecules for solar cells Peter L. Cook, Phillip S. Johnson for biomimetic dye molecules for solar cells phthalocyanines and for a biological analog the charge transfer carriers in a solar cell. © 2009 American Institute of Physics. doi:10.1063/1.3267849 I. INTRODUCTION

  2. Exploring electronic structure through high-resolution hard x...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory Modern high brilliance beamlines coupled with recent advances in hard-x-ray optics are establishing high-resolution hard x-ray spectroscopies as a powerful analytical...

  3. Structural steel framing options for mid- and high rise buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Jason A. (Jason Andrew)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Selecting a structural system for a building is a complex, multidisciplinary process. No design project is the same; however, there are certain criteria that are commonly true in the initial phase of evaluating different ...

  4. Identification of high angle structures controlling the geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    that the Rye Patch fault provided the primary plumbing for this geothermal system, and 3D seismic data indicated that most of the structures had dips between 80 and 90 degrees....

  5. Structural stability of methane hydrate at high pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shu, Jinfu; Chen, Xiaojia; Chou, I.-Ming; Yang, Wenge; Hu, Jingzhu; Hemley, Russell J.; Mao, Ho-kwang

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The structural stability of methane hydrate under pressure at room temperature was examined by both in-situ single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction techniques on samples with structure types I, II, and H in diamond-anvil cells. The diffraction data for types II (sII) and H (sH) were refined to the known structures with space groups Fd3m and P6{sub 3}/mmc, respectively. Upon compression, sI methane hydrate transforms to the sII phase at 120 MPa, and then to the sH phase at 600 MPa. The sII methane hydrate was found to coexist locally with sI phase up to 500 MPa and with sH phase up to 600 MPa. The pure sH structure was found to be stable between 600 and 900 MPa. Methane hydrate decomposes at pressures above 3 GPa to form methane with the orientationally disordered Fm3m structure and ice VII (Pn3m). The results highlight the role of guest (CH{sub 4})-host (H{sub 2}O) interactions in the stabilization of the hydrate structures under pressure.

  6. STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING OF HIGH VOLTAGE ELECTRICAL SWITCH CERAMIC INSULATORS IN SEISMIC AREAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING OF HIGH VOLTAGE ELECTRICAL SWITCH CERAMIC INSULATORS IN SEISMIC AREAS damage. 7th European Workshop on Structural Health Monitoring July 8-11, 2014. La Cité, Nantes, France European Workshop on Structural Health Monitoring (2014)" #12;(a) (b) Figure 1 : a) Elect

  7. Demo: On the High Quality Sensor Placement for Structural Health Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Dan

    Demo: On the High Quality Sensor Placement for Structural Health Monitoring Bo Li Dept. of Civil for structural health monitoring systems today. Existing studies on sensor systems from computer science associated with these techniques less useful. We consider the structural health monitoring (SHM) appli

  8. Structure Stability of Methane Hydrate at High Pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J Shu; X Chen; I Chou; W Yang; J Hu; R Hemley; K Mao

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The structural stability of methane hydrate under pressure at room temperature was examined by both in-situ single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction techniques on samples with structure types I, II, and H in diamond-anvil cells. The diffraction data for types II (sII) and H (sH) were refined to the known structures with space groups Fd3m and P6{sub 3}/mmc, respectively. Upon compression, sI methanehydrate transforms to the sII phase at 120 MPa, and then to the sH phase at 600 MPa. The sII methanehydrate was found to coexist locally with sI phase up to 500 MPa and with sH phase up to 600 MPa. The pure sH structure was found to be stable between 600 and 900 MPa. Methanehydrate decomposes at pressures above 3 GPa to form methane with the orientationally disordered Fm3mstructure and ice VII (Pn3m). The results highlight the role of guest (CH{sub 4})-host (H{sub 2}O) interactions in the stabilization of the hydratestructures under pressure.

  9. Correlating ribosome function with high-resolution structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yonath, Ada E.

    ribosome [9], functional complexes of ribosomes with mRNA and tRNAs [10­14] and/or with recycling [15 [24­26] and the ribosomal recycling factor [27]. Most of the currently available structures emerging are elab- orate analyses of results that have led to plausible [62] or controversial biological

  10. High-Pressure MOF Research Yields Structural Insights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football High School football FancyDepartment ofHigh-Pressure

  11. High-Pressure MOF Research Yields Structural Insights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football High School football FancyDepartmentHigh-Pressure MOF

  12. High-Pressure MOF Research Yields Structural Insights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football High School football FancyDepartmentHigh-Pressure

  13. High-Pressure MOF Research Yields Structural Insights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football High School footballHigh-Pressure MOF Research Yields

  14. Ductility enhancement of high performance cementitious composites and structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuang, Eugene (Eugene Yu), 1975-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High performance cementitious composites (HP2C) are a new generation of fiber reinforced cementitious composites (FRCC) with substantial improvements in mechanical behavior. The most important development in these HP2C ...

  15. Water and Solute Flow in a Highly-Structured Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hallmark, C. Tom; Wilding, Larry P.; McInnes, Kevin J.; Heuvelman, Willem J.

    Prevention of groundwater contamination by agricultural activities is a high priority in the United States. Water and contaminants often follow particular flow paths through the soil that lead to rapid movement of pesticides out of the rootzone...

  16. Robust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    described here, which the research team believes will help usher in the next phase of genomics research. The high flux, brilliance, and focus of the x rays from ALS Beamline 12.3.1...

  17. Size-dependent structure of silver nanoparticles under high pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koski, Kristie Jo

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Silver noble metal nanoparticles that are<10 nm often possess multiply twinned grains allowing them to adopt shapes and atomic structures not observed in bulk materials. The properties exhibited by particles with multiply twinned polycrystalline structures are often far different from those of single-crystalline particles and from the bulk. I will present experimental evidence that silver nanoparticles<10 nm undergo a reversible structural transformation under hydrostatic pressures up to 10 GPa. Results for nanoparticles in the intermediate size range of 5 to 10 nm suggest a reversible linear pressure-dependent rhombohedral distortion which has not been previously observed in bulk silver. I propose a mechanism for this transitiion that considers the bond-length distribution in idealized multiply twinned icosahedral particles. Results for nanoparticles of 3.9 nm suggest a reversible linear pressure-dependent orthorhombic distortion. This distortion is interpreted in the context of idealized decahedral particles. In addition, given these size-dependent measurements of silver nanoparticle compression with pressure, we have constructed a pressure calibration curve. Encapsulating these silver nanoparticles in hollow metal oxide nanospheres then allows us to measure the pressure inside a nanoshell using x-ray diffraction. We demonstrate the measurement of pressure gradients across nanoshells and show that these nanoshells have maximum resolved shear strengths on the order of 500 MPa to IGPa.

  18. High Strength Nano-Structured Steel - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football High School football Fancy footwork

  19. High-Pressure MOF Research Yields Structural Insights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football High School football FancyDepartment

  20. High-Pressure MOF Research Yields Structural Insights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football High School football

  1. Biomimetic Model Studies Reveal the Role of the Ca2+ Ion in Photosystem II

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find Find MoreTechnicalBiomimetic Dye Molecules| Stanford

  2. Robust, high-throughput solution structural analyses by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hura, Greg L.; Menon, Angeli L.; Hammel, Michal; Rambo, Robert P.; Poole II, Farris L.; Tsutakawa, Susan E.; Jenney Jr, Francis E.; Classen, Scott; Frankel, Kenneth A.; Hopkins, Robert C.; Yang, Sungjae; Scott, Joseph W.; Dillard, Bret D.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Tainer, John A.

    2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an efficient pipeline enabling high-throughput analysis of protein structure in solution with small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Our SAXS pipeline combines automated sample handling of microliter volumes, temperature and anaerobic control, rapid data collection and data analysis, and couples structural analysis with automated archiving. We subjected 50 representative proteins, mostly from Pyrococcus furiosus, to this pipeline and found that 30 were multimeric structures in solution. SAXS analysis allowed us to distinguish aggregated and unfolded proteins, define global structural parameters and oligomeric states for most samples, identify shapes and similar structures for 25 unknown structures, and determine envelopes for 41 proteins. We believe that high-throughput SAXS is an enabling technology that may change the way that structural genomics research is done.

  3. Learning from Structured Data with High Dimensional Structured Input and Output Domain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fei, Hongliang

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Structured data is accumulated rapidly in many applications, e.g. Bioinformatics, Cheminformatics, social network analysis, natural language processing and text mining. Designing and analyzing algorithms for handling these ...

  4. Gross shell structure at high spin in heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deleplanque, Marie-Agnes; Frauendorf, Stefan; Pashkevich, Vitaly V.; Chu, S.Y.; Unzhakova, Anja

    2003-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental nuclear moments of inertia at high spins along the yrast line have been determined systematically and found to differ from the rigid-body values. The difference is attributed to shell effect and these have been calculated microscopically. The data and quantal calculations are interpreted by means of the semiclassical Periodic Orbit Theory. From this new perspective, features in the moments of inertia as a function of neutron number and spin, as well as their relation to the shell energies can be understood. Gross shell effects persist up to the highest angular momenta observed.

  5. High-Pressure MOF Research Yields Structural Insights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet WhenHiggsmiddlewareHigh-Pressure MOF

  6. Robust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronicResources ResourcesRobust, High-Throughput Analysis of

  7. Robust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronicResources ResourcesRobust, High-Throughput Analysis

  8. Robust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonantNovember 15 toAdvances WindRobust, High-Throughput

  9. High School Co-op Program Salary Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpgHanfordDepartmentInnovationHighMembrane-boundSalary

  10. High-spin structure and Band Termination in $^{103}$Cd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Chakraborty; Krishichayan; S. Mukhopadhyay; S. Ray; S. N. Chintalapudi; S. S. Ghugre; N. S. Pattabiraman; A. K. Sinha; S. Sarkar; U. Garg; S. Zhu; M. Saha Sarkar

    2007-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Excited states of the neutron deficient $^{103}$Cd nucleus have been investigated via the $^{72}$Ge($^{35}$Cl, p3n) reaction at beam energy of 135 MeV by use of in-beam spectroscopic methods. Gamma rays depopulating the excited states were detected using the Gammasphere spectrometer with high-fold $\\gamma$-ray coincidences. A quadrupole $\\gamma$-ray coincidence analysis ($\\gamma^{4}$) has been used to extend the known level scheme. The positive parity levels have been established up to $J = 35/2\\hbar$ and $E_{x} = 7.071$ MeV. In addition to the observation of highly-fragmented level scheme belonging to the positive-parity sequences at E$_{x}\\sim$ 5 MeV, the termination of a negative-parity sequence connected by $E2$ transitions has been established at $J = 47/2 \\hbar$ and $E_{x} = 11.877$ MeV. The experimental results corresponding to both the positive- and negative-parity sequences have been theoretically interpreted in the framework of the core particle coupling model. Evidence is presented for a shape change from collective prolate to non-collective oblate above the $J^{\\pi} = 39/2^{-}$ (8011 keV) level and for a smooth termination of the negative-parity band.

  11. Surface-initiated polymerization from TiO2 nanoparticle surfaces through a biomimetic initiator: A new route toward

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Surface-initiated polymerization from TiO2 nanoparticle surfaces through a biomimetic initiator radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) gave rise to PMMA polymer shell layers tethered to TiO2 nanoparticle functionalized metal oxide nanoparticles that may be useful for construction of functional polymer nanocomposites

  12. Abstract--This paper examines the impact of a biomimetic active knee prosthesis on the metabolic costs associated with a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herr, Hugh

    Abstract--This paper examines the impact of a biomimetic active knee prosthesis on the metabolic compare the antagonistic active knee prosthesis developed at MIT to an electronically controlled, variable-damping commercial knee prosthesis, the Otto Bock C-leg. Use of the active knee prosthesis resulted in both, a 17

  13. Structure and Fine Structure in Multiparticle Production Data at High Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wit Busza

    2004-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A summary is given of data on the longitudinal rapidity and pseudorapidity distributions observed in $e^+e^-$, pp, pA and AA collisions at high energies. The remarkable simplicity and universality observed in the data and its relevance to the study of the high energy density system produced in heavy ion collisions is discussed.

  14. Measurement of the nucleon structure function using high energy muons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyers, P.D.

    1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured the inclusive deep inelastic scattering of muons on nucleons in iron using beams of 93 and 215 GeV muons. To perform this measurement, we have built and operated the Multimuon Spectrometer (MMS) in the muon beam at Fermilab. The MMS is a magnetized iron target/spectrometer/calorimeter which provides 5.61 kg/cm/sup 2/ of target, 9% momentum resolution on scattered muons, and a direct measure of total hadronic energy with resolution sigma/sub nu/ = 1.4..sqrt..nu(GeV). In the distributed target, the average beam energies at the interaction are 88.0 and 209 GeV. Using the known form of the radiatively-corrected electromagnetic cross section, we extract the structure function F/sub 2/(x,Q/sup 2/) with a typical precision of 2% over the range 5 < Q/sup 2/ < 200 GeV/sup 2//c/sup 2/. We compare our measurements to the predictions of lowest order quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and find a best fit value of the QCD scale parameter ..lambda../sub LO/ = 230 +- 40/sup stat/ +- 80/sup syst/ MeV/c, assuming R = 0 and without applying Fermi motion corrections. Comparing the cross sections at the two beam energies, we measure R = -0.06 +- 0.06/sup stat/ +- 0.11/sup syst/. Our measurements show qualitative agreement with QCD, but quantitative comparison is hampered by phenomenological uncertainties. The experimental situation is quite good, with substantial agreement between our measurements and those of others. 86 references.

  15. High-Field DNP and ENDOR with a Novel Multiple-Frequency Resonance Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffin, Robert G.

    cavity simultaneously acts as a NMR coil, allowing for increased efficiency of radiofrequency irradiation to radiation losses of the open structure (20). An application of this particular design at high W frequencies

  16. Laminin and biomimetic extracellular elasticity enhance functional differentiation in mammary epithelia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alcaraz, Jordi; Xu, Ren; Mori, Hidetoshi; Nelson, Celeste M.; Mroue, Rana; Spencer, Virginia A.; Brownfield, Doug; Radisky, Derek C.; Bustamante, Carlos; Bissell, Mina J.

    2008-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In the mammary gland, epithelial cells are embedded in a 'soft' environment and become functionally differentiated in culture when exposed to a laminin-rich extracellular matrix gel. Here, we define the processes by which mammary epithelial cells integrate biochemical and mechanical extracellular cues to maintain their differentiated phenotype. We used single cells cultured on top of gels in conditions permissive for {beta}-casein expression using atomic force microscopy to measure the elasticity of the cells and their underlying substrata. We found that maintenance of {beta}-casein expression required both laminin signalling and a 'soft' extracellular matrix, as is the case in normal tissues in vivo, and biomimetic intracellular elasticity, as is the case in primary mammary epithelial organoids. Conversely, two hallmarks of breast cancer development, stiffening of the extracellular matrix and loss of laminin signalling, led to the loss of {beta}-casein expression and non-biomimetic intracellular elasticity. Our data indicate that tissue-specific gene expression is controlled by both the tissues unique biochemical milieu and mechanical properties, processes involved in maintenance of tissue integrity and protection against tumorigenesis.

  17. Electrospray-assisted characterization and deposition of chlorosomes to fabricate a biomimetic light-harvesting device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Modesto-Lopez, Luis B.; Thimsen, Elijah J.; Collins, Aaron M.; Blankenship, R. E.; Biswas, Pratim

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photosynthesis is an efficient process by which solar energy is converted into chemical energy. Green photosynthetic bacteria such as Chloroflexus aurantiacus have supramolecular antenna complexes called chlorosomes attached to their cytoplasmic membrane that increase the cross section for light absorption even in low-light conditions. Self-assembled bacteriochlorophyll pigments in the chlorosome interior play a key role in the efficient transfer and funneling of the harvested energy. In this work it was demonstrated that chlorosomes can be rapidly and precisely size-characterized online in real time using an electrospray-assisted mobility-based technique. Chlorosomes were electrospray-deposited onto TiO{sub 2} nanostructured films with columnar morphology to fabricate a novel biomimetic device to overcome the solvent compatibility issues associated with biological particles and synthetic dyes. The assembled unit retained the viability of the chlorosomes, and the harvesting of sunlight over a broader range of wavelengths was demonstrated. It was shown that the presence of chlorosomes in the biomimetic device had a 30-fold increase in photocurrent.

  18. Structural integrity and potential failure modes of hanford high-level waste tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, F.C.

    1996-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Structural Integrity of the Hanford High-Level Waste Tanks were evaluated based on the existing Design and Analysis Documents. All tank structures were found adequate for the normal operating and seismic loads. Potential failure modes of the tanks were assessed by engineering interpretation and extrapolation of the existing engineering documents.

  19. ECOS-LINCE: A HIGH INTENSITY MULTI-ION SUPERCONDUCTING LINAC FOR NUCLEAR STRUCTURE AND REACTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ECOS-LINCE: A HIGH INTENSITY MULTI-ION SUPERCONDUCTING LINAC FOR NUCLEAR STRUCTURE AND REACTIONS I as part of the Long-Range Plan of the Nuclear-Physics community. LINCE will be a multi-user facility dedicated to ECOS science: fundamental physics, astrophysics, nuclear structure and reaction dynamics

  20. Lagrangian Structures in Very High-Frequency Radar Data and Optimal Pollution Timing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marsden, Jerrold

    Lagrangian Structures in Very High-Frequency Radar Data and Optimal Pollution Timing Francois radar-based pollution release scheme using the hidden flow structure reduces the effect of industrial pollution in the coastal environment. INTRODUCTION The release of pollution in coastal areas [1, 2, 3] can

  1. High-Speed and Low-Power PID Structures for Embedded Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    High-Speed and Low-Power PID Structures for Embedded Applications Abdelkrim K. Oudjida1 , Nicolas-power finite-word-length PID controllers based on a new recursive multiplication algorithm. Compared scalable PID structures that can be tailored to the desired performance and power budget. All PIDs

  2. The structural impact of commodity farm programs on farms in the Southern Texas High Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirley, Christina Kay

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : Mechanical Engineering 1981 Thesis 5558 THE STRUCTURAL IMPACT OP COMMODITY FARM PROGRAMS ON FARMS IN THE SOUTHERN TEXAS HIGH PLAINS A Thesis by CHRISTINA KAY SHIRLEY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AAM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1981 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics THE STRUCTURAL IMPACT OF COMMODITY FARM PROGRAMS ON FARMS IN THE SOUTHERN TEXAS HIGH PLAINS A Thesi. s by CHRISTINA RAY SHIRLEY Approved as to style...

  3. Development of High-Gradient Dielectric Laser-Driven Particle Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byer, Robert L.

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The thrust of Stanford's program is to conduct research on high-gradient dielectric accelerator structures driven with high repetition-rate, tabletop infrared lasers. The close collaboration between Stanford and SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) is critical to the success of this project, because it provides a unique environment where prototype dielectric accelerator structures can be rapidly fabricated and tested with a relativistic electron beam.

  4. High efficiency proportional neutron detector with solid liner internal structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kisner, Roger Allen; Holcomb, David Eugene; Brown, Gilbert M.

    2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A tube-style neutron detector, a panel-style neutron detector incorporating a plurality of tube-style neutron detectors, and a panel-style neutron detector including a plurality of anode wires are provided. A plurality of channels is provided in a neutron detector such that each channel has an inner surface of a coating layer including a neutron-absorbing material. A wire anode is provided at end of each channel so that electrons generated by a charged daughter particle generated by a neutron are collected to detect a neutron-matter interaction. Moderator units can be incorporated into a neutron detector to provide improved detection efficiencies and/or to determine neutron energy spectrum. Gas-based proportional response from the neutron detectors can be employed for special nuclear material (SNM) detection. This neutron detector can provide similar performance to .sup.3He-based detectors without requiring .sup.3He and without containing toxic, flammable, or high-pressure materials.

  5. Nano-Structured Li3V2(PO4)3 /Carbon Composite for High Rate Lithium...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nano-Structured Li3V2(PO4)3 Carbon Composite for High Rate Lithium Ion Batteries. Nano-Structured Li3V2(PO4)3 Carbon Composite for High Rate Lithium Ion Batteries. Abstract:...

  6. QCD Precision Measurements and Structure Function Extraction at a High Statistics, High Energy Neutrino Scattering Experiment: NuSOnG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, T.; /Florida State U.; Batra, P.; /Columbia U.; Bugel, Leonard G.; /Columbia U.; Camilleri, Leslie Loris; /Columbia U.; Conrad, Janet Marie; /MIT; de Gouvea, A.; /Northwestern U.; Fisher, Peter H.; /MIT; Formaggio, Joseph Angelo; /MIT; Jenkins, J.; /Northwestern U.; Karagiorgi, Georgia S.; /MIT; Kobilarcik, T.R.; /Fermilab /Texas U.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We extend the physics case for a new high-energy, ultra-high statistics neutrino scattering experiment, NuSOnG (Neutrino Scattering On Glass) to address a variety of issues including precision QCD measurements, extraction of structure functions, and the derived Parton Distribution Functions (PDFs). This experiment uses a Tevatron-based neutrino beam to obtain a sample of Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) events which is over two orders of magnitude larger than past samples. We outline an innovative method for fitting the structure functions using a parameterized energy shift which yields reduced systematic uncertainties. High statistics measurements, in combination with improved systematics, will enable NuSOnG to perform discerning tests of fundamental Standard Model parameters as we search for deviations which may hint of 'Beyond the Standard Model' physics.

  7. A THz Coaxial Two-Channel Dielectric Wakefield Structure for High Gradient Acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, T. C. [Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Omega-P, Inc., New Haven, CT (United States); Sotnikov, G. V. [Omega-P, Inc., New Haven, CT (United States); NSC Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Kharkov (Ukraine); Hirshfield, J. L. [Omega-P, Inc., New Haven, CT (United States); Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2010-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A coaxial two-channel dielectric wakefield structure is examined for use as a high gradient accelerator. A THz design, having radius {approx}1 mm, is shown to provide GeV/m--level acceleration gradient, high transformer ratio, and stable accelerated bunch motion when excited by a stable-moving 5-GeV 6-nC annular drive bunch.

  8. Facile synthesis of Li2Spolypyrrole composite structures for high-performance Li2S cathodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    Facile synthesis of Li2S­polypyrrole composite structures for high-performance Li2S cathodes Zhi demon- strate facile, in situ synthesis of Li2S­polypyrrole composites for use as high-performance Li2S polysulfides during cycling. Poly- pyrrole, being a conducting polymer, also helps to facilitate elec- tronic

  9. Spontaneous Formation of Biomimetic, Nanoporous Membrane Channels | U.S.

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhaven NationalRegionals » High School Rules, Forms, andOfficeof

  10. Final report : CO2 reduction using biomimetic photocatalytic nanodevices.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, Robert M.; Shelnutt, John Allen; Medforth, Craig John (University of New Mexico Albuquerque, NM); Song, Yujiang; Wang, Zhongchun; Miller, James Edward; Wang, Haorong

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nobel Prize winner Richard Smalley was an avid champion for the cause of energy research. Calling it 'the single most important problem facing humanity today,' Smalley promoted the development of nanotechnology as a means to harness solar energy. Using nanotechnology to create solar fuels (i.e., fuels created from sunlight, CO{sub 2}, and water) is an especially intriguing idea, as it impacts not only energy production and storage, but also climate change. Solar irradiation is the only sustainable energy source of a magnitude sufficient to meet projections for global energy demand. Biofuels meet the definition of a solar fuel. Unfortunately, the efficiency of photosynthesis will need to be improved by an estimated factor of ten before biofuels can fully replace fossil fuels. Additionally, biological organisms produce an array of hydrocarbon products requiring further processing before they are usable for most applications. Alternately, 'bio-inspired' nanostructured photocatalytic devices that efficiently harvest sunlight and use that energy to reduce CO{sub 2} into a single useful product or chemical intermediate can be envisioned. Of course, producing such a device is very challenging as it must be robust and multifunctional, i.e. capable of promoting and coupling the multi-electron, multi-photon water oxidation and CO{sub 2} reduction processes. Herein, we summarize some of the recent and most significant work towards creating light harvesting nanodevices that reduce CO{sub 2} to CO (a key chemical intermediate) that are based on key functionalities inspired by nature. We report the growth of Co(III)TPPCl nanofibers (20-100 nm in diameter) on gas diffusion layers via an evaporation induced self-assembly (EISA) method. Remarkably, as-fabricated electrodes demonstrate light-enhanced activity for CO{sub 2} reduction to CO as evidenced by cyclic voltammograms and electrolysis with/without light irradiation. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time to observe such a light-enhanced CO{sub 2} reduction reaction based on nanostructured cobalt(III) porphyrin catalysts. Additionally, gas chromatography (GC) verifies that light irradiation can improve CO production by up to 31.3% during 2 hours of electrolysis. In addition, a variety of novel porphyrin nano- or micro-structures were also prepared including nanospheres, nanotubes, and micro-crosses.

  11. Structural changes in nano-crystalline mackinawite (FeS) at high - pressure.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehm, L.; Michael, F. M.; Antao, S. M.; Martin, C. D.; Lee, P. L.; Shastri, S. D.; Chupas, P. J.; Parise, J. B.; Stony Brook Univ.

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high-pressure behavior of nanocrystalline mackinawite (FeS) with particle sizes of 6, 7 and 8 nm has been investigated by high-energy X-ray total scattering and pair distribution function analysis. An irreversible first-order structural phase transition from tetragonal mackinawite to orthorhombic FeS-II was observed at about 3 GPa. The transition is induced by the closure of the van der Waals gap in the layered mackinawite structure. A grain size effect on the transition pressure and the compressibility was observed.

  12. Highly damped quasinormal modes and the small scale structure of quantum corrected black hole exteriors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babb, James; Kunstatter, Gabor [Department of Physics, The University of Winnipeg, 515 Portage Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3B 2E9 (Canada); Daghigh, Ramin [Natural Sciences Department, Metropolitan State University, 700 East Seventh Street, Saint Paul, Minnesota, 55106 (United States)

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Quasinormal modes provide valuable information about the structure of spacetime outside a black hole. There is also a conjectured relationship between the highly damped quasinormal modes and the semiclassical spectrum of the horizon area/entropy. In this paper, we show that for spacetimes characterized by more than one scale, the 'infinitely damped' modes in principle probe the structure of spacetime outside the horizon at the shortest length scales. We demonstrate this with the calculation of the highly damped quasinormal modes of the nonsingular, single-horizon, quantum corrected black hole derived in [A. Peltola and G. Kunstatter, Phys. Rev. D 79, 061501 (2009); ].

  13. Liquid-based biomimetic hairlike structures can be micro-fabricated using a novel technology de-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    Wentzloff is researching energy-efficient receiver architectures incorporating an RF MEMS filter-bank frontend to increase battery life- time. Because channel selection is achieved at the front end, a fully

  14. Tailored Macroporous SiCN and SiC Structures for High-Temperature Fuel Reforming**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenis, Paul J. A.

    Tailored Macroporous SiCN and SiC Structures for High-Temperature Fuel Reforming** By In-Kyung Sung such as the reforming of hydrocarbon fuels (e.g., die- sel or JP-8) into hydrogen for use in portable power sources the reaction rate of endothermic reactions (such as the steam reforming of hydrocarbons), at the macroscale

  15. Variable selection using Adaptive Non-linear Interaction Structures in High dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radchenko, Peter

    superior predictive performance over other approaches. Some key words: Non-Linear Regression; InteractionsVariable selection using Adaptive Non-linear Interaction Structures in High dimensions Peter a tra- ditional linear regression model in which the number of predictors, p, is large relative

  16. Beyond Basic Region Caching: Specializing Cache Structures for High Performance and Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKee, Sally A.

    Beyond Basic Region Caching: Specializing Cache Structures for High Performance and Energy University Tallahassee, FL 32306-4530 tyson@cs.fsu.edu Abstract. Increasingly tight energy design goals with a set of smaller region caches that significantly reduces energy consumption with little performance

  17. Specializing Cache Structures for High Performance and Energy Conservation in Embedded Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKee, Sally A.

    Specializing Cache Structures for High Performance and Energy Conservation in Embedded Systems University Tallahassee, FL 32306-4530 tyson@cs.fsu.edu Abstract. Increasingly tight energy design goals of smaller region caches that significantly reduces energy consump- tion with little performance impact

  18. Wurtzite GaN Surface Structures Studied by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Reflection High Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feenstra, Randall

    Wurtzite GaN Surface Structures Studied by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Reflection High Energy studies of the surface reconstructions for both the Ga-face and the N-face of wurtzite GaN films grown a surface phenomenon. Although numerous surface studies of wurtzite GaN have been performed, progress

  19. Journal of Applied Physics 104,093504 (2008) Picosecond laser structuration under high pressures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A research on ultra-short laser modification of materials has been a subject of numerous studies last two. The main effect is specific to the ambient gas and laser pulse duration in the ablation regime: whenJournal of Applied Physics 104,093504 (2008) Picosecond laser structuration under high pressures

  20. High-pressure phases of CaCO3: Crystal structure prediction and experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oganov, Artem R.

    High-pressure phases of CaCO3: Crystal structure prediction and experiment Artem R. Oganov a October 2005 Available online 18 November 2005 Editor: G.D. Price Abstract Post-aragonite phase of CaCO3 transformation in CaCO3 at 40 GPa, Am. Mineral. 90 (2005) 667­671], is believed to be a major carbon- containing

  1. 1 Copyright 2004 by ASME SINGLE HIGH ASPECT RATIO PILLAR SUPPORT STRUCTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , or build them up layer by layer[1]. These fabrication techniques have led to the creation of new device1 Copyright © 2004 by ASME SINGLE HIGH ASPECT RATIO PILLAR SUPPORT STRUCTURES: Multi-scale Chip for conformance to the surface prior to larger scale conformation, thus the combination does not increase

  2. Porous silicon structures with high surface area/specific pore size

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Northrup, M. Allen (Berkeley, CA); Yu, Conrad M. (Antioch, CA); Raley, Norman F. (Danville, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fabrication and use of porous silicon structures to increase surface area of heated reaction chambers, electrophoresis devices, and thermopneumatic sensor-actuators, chemical preconcentrates, and filtering or control flow devices. In particular, such high surface area or specific pore size porous silicon structures will be useful in significantly augmenting the adsorption, vaporization, desorption, condensation and flow of liquids and gasses in applications that use such processes on a miniature scale. Examples that will benefit from a high surface area, porous silicon structure include sample preconcentrators that are designed to adsorb and subsequently desorb specific chemical species from a sample background; chemical reaction chambers with enhanced surface reaction rates; and sensor-actuator chamber devices with increased pressure for thermopneumatic actuation of integrated membranes. Examples that benefit from specific pore sized porous silicon are chemical/biological filters and thermally-activated flow devices with active or adjacent surfaces such as electrodes or heaters.

  3. Porous silicon structures with high surface area/specific pore size

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Northrup, M.A.; Yu, C.M.; Raley, N.F.

    1999-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Fabrication and use of porous silicon structures to increase surface area of heated reaction chambers, electrophoresis devices, and thermopneumatic sensor-actuators, chemical preconcentrates, and filtering or control flow devices. In particular, such high surface area or specific pore size porous silicon structures will be useful in significantly augmenting the adsorption, vaporization, desorption, condensation and flow of liquids and gases in applications that use such processes on a miniature scale. Examples that will benefit from a high surface area, porous silicon structure include sample preconcentrators that are designed to adsorb and subsequently desorb specific chemical species from a sample background; chemical reaction chambers with enhanced surface reaction rates; and sensor-actuator chamber devices with increased pressure for thermopneumatic actuation of integrated membranes. Examples that benefit from specific pore sized porous silicon are chemical/biological filters and thermally-activated flow devices with active or adjacent surfaces such as electrodes or heaters. 9 figs.

  4. Structural Design Optimization and Comparative Analysis of a New HighPerformance Robot Arm via Finite Element Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitcomb, Louis L.

    Structural Design Optimization and Comparative Analysis of a New High­Performance Robot Arm via, 1997 Abstract This paper reports the structural design of a new high­performance robot arm. Design Introduction Our goal is to design and build a robot arm for high performance tracking and force control

  5. Developing Biomimetic Design Principles for the Highly Optimized and Robust Design of Products and Their Components 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadia, Anosh Porus

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineering design methods focus on developing products that are innovative, robust, and multi-functional. In this context, the term robust refers to a product's ability to accomplish successfully its predetermined functions. ...

  6. A novel biomimetic approach to the design of high-performance ceramic/metal composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Launey, Maximilien E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rosso,  M.   2006  Ceramic  and  metal  matrix  composites: In  particular,  ceramic?matrix  composites  (CMCs)  are 

  7. Thermodynamics and Structural Properties of the High Density Gaussian Core Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atsushi Ikeda; Kunimasa Miyazaki

    2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We numerically study thermodynamic and structural properties of the one-component Gaussian core model (GCM) at very high densities. The solid-fluid phase boundary is carefully determined. We find that the density dependence of both the freezing and melting temperatures obey the asymptotic relation, $\\log T_f$, $\\log T_m \\propto -\\rho^{2/3}$, where $\\rho$ is the number density, which is consistent with Stillinger's conjecture. Thermodynamic quantities such as the energy and pressure and the structural functions such as the static structure factor are also investigated in the fluid phase for a wide range of temperature above the phase boundary. We compare the numerical results with the prediction of the liquid theory with the random phase approximation (RPA). At high temperatures, the results are in almost perfect agreement with RPA for a wide range of density, as it has been already shown in the previous studies. In the low temperature regime close to the phase boundary line, although RPA fails to describe the structure factors and the radial distribution functions at the length scales of the interparticle distance, it successfully predicts their behaviors at shorter length scales. RPA also predicts thermodynamic quantities such as the energy, pressure, and the temperature at which the thermal expansion coefficient becomes negative, almost perfectly. Striking ability of RPA to predict thermodynamic quantities even at high densities and low temperatures is understood in terms of the decoupling of the length scales which dictate thermodynamic quantities from the interparticle distance which dominates the peak structures of the static structure factor due to the softness of the Gaussian core potential.

  8. High resolution structure of the large ribosomal subunit from a Mesophilic Eubacterium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harms, Joerg; Schluenzen, Frank; Zarivach, Raz; Bashan, Anat; Gat, Sharon; Agmon, Ilana; Bartels, Heike; Franceschi, Francois; Yonath, Ada (Weizmann Inst Israel); (Mac Planck Germany); (Max Planck Germany)

    2009-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the high resolution structure of the large ribosomal subunit from Deinococcus radiodurans (D50S), a gram-positive mesophile suitable for binding of antibiotics and functionally relevant ligands. The over-all structure of D50S is similar to that from the archae bacterium Haloarcula marismortui (H50S); however, a detailed comparison revealed significant differences, for example, in the orientation of nucleotides in peptidyl transferase center and in the structures of many ribosomal proteins. Analysis of ribosomal features involved in dynamic aspects of protein biosynthesis that are partially or fully disordered in H50S revealed the conformations of intersubunit bridges in unbound subunits, suggesting how they may change upon subunit association and how movements of the L1-stalk may facilitate the exit of tRNA.

  9. High energy density capacitors for power electronic applications using nano-structure multilayer technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Johnson, G.W.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Power electronics applications are currently limited by capacitor size and performance. Only incremental improvements are anticipated in existing capacitor technologies, while significant performance advances are required in energy density and overall performance to meet the technical needs of the applications which are important for U.S. economic competitiveness. One application, the Power Electronic Building Block (PEBB), promises a second electronics revolution in power electronic design. High energy density capacitors with excellent electrical thermal and mechanical performance represent an enabling technology in the PEBB concept. We propose a continuing program to research and develop LLNL`s nano-structure multilayer technologies for making high voltage, high energy density capacitors. Our controlled deposition techniques are capable of synthesizing extraordinarily smooth sub-micron thick layers of dielectric and conductor materials. We have demonstrated that, with this technology, high voltage capacitors with an order of magnitude improvement in energy density are achievable.

  10. Cavity resonance absorption in ultra-high bandwidth CRT deflection structure by a resistive load

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunham, M.E.; Hudson, C.L.

    1993-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved ultra-high bandwidth helical coil deflection structure for a cathode ray tube is described comprising a first metal member having a bore therein, the metal walls of which form a first ground plane; a second metal member coaxially mounted in the bore of the first metal member and forming a second ground plane; a helical deflection coil coaxially mounted within the bore between the two ground planes; and a resistive load disposed in one end of the bore and electrically connected to the first and second ground planes, the resistive load having an impedance substantially equal to the characteristic impedance of the coaxial line formed by the two coaxial ground planes to inhibit cavity resonance in the structure within the ultra-high bandwidth of operation. Preferably, the resistive load comprises a carbon film on a surface of an end plug in one end of the bore.

  11. MAGNETIC FIELD STRUCTURE IN A HIGH-MASS OUTFLOW/DISK SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beuther, H. [Max-Planck-Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Vlemmings, W. H. T. [Argelander Institute for Astronomy, University of Bonn, Auf dem Huegel 71, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Rao, R. [Academia Sinica, Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Van der Tak, F. F. S., E-mail: beuther@mpia.d, E-mail: wouter@astro.uni-bonn.d, E-mail: rrao@sma.hawaii.ed, E-mail: vdtak@sron.n [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Landleven 12, 9747 AD Groningen (Netherlands)

    2010-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    To characterize the magnetic field structure of the outflow and core region within a prototypical high-mass star-forming region, we analyzed polarized CO(3-2)-for the first time observed with the Submillimeter Array-as well as 880 {mu}m submillimeter continuum emission from the high-mass outflow/disk system IRAS 18089-1732. Both emission features with polarization degrees at a few percent level indicate that the magnetic field structure is largely aligned with the outflow/jet orientation from small core scales to larger outflow scales. Although quantitative estimates are crude, the analysis indicates that turbulent energy dominates over magnetic energy. The data also suggest a magnetic field strength increase from the lower-density envelope to the higher-density core.

  12. The Time Structure of Hadronic Showers in highly granular Calorimeters with Tungsten and Steel Absorbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adloff, C; Chefdeville, M.; Drancourt, C.; Gaglione, R.; Geffroy, N.; Karyotakis, Y.; Koletsou, I.; Prast, J.; Vouters, G.; Repond, J.; Schlereth, J.; Xia, L.; Baldolemar, E.; Li, J.; Park, S.T.; Sosebee, M.; White, A.P.; Yu, J.; Eigen, G.; Thomson, M.A.; Ward, D.R.; Benchekroun, D.; Hoummada, A.; Khoulaki, Y.; Apostolakis, J.; Arfaoui, A.; Benoit, M.; Dannheim, D.; Elsener, K.; Folger, G.; Grefe, C.; Ivantchenko, V.; Killenberg, M.; Klempt, W.; van der Kraaij, E.; Linssen, L.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Münnich, A.; Poss, S.; Ribon, A.; Roloff, P.; Sailer, A.; Schlatter, D.; Sicking, E.; Strube, J.; Uzhinskiy, V.; Carloganu, C.; Gay, P.; Manen, S.; Royer, L.; Cornett, U.; David, D.; Ebrahimi, A.; Falley, G.; Feege, N.; Gadow, K.; Göttlicher, P.; Günter, C.; Hartbrich, O.; Hermberg, B.; Karstensen, S.; Krivan, F.; Krüger, K.; Lu, S.; Lutz, B.; Morozov, S.; Morgunov, V.; Neubüser, C.; Reinecke, M.; Sefkow, F.; Smirnov, P.; Terwort, M.; Fagot, A.; Tytgat, M.; Zaganidis, N.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Morin, L.; Garutti, E.; Laurien, S.; Marchesini, I.; Matysek, M.; Ramilli, M.; Briggl, K.; Eckert, P.; Harion, T.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-Ch.; Shen, W.; Stamen, R.; Chang, S.; Khan, A.; Kim, D.H.; Kong, D.J.; Oh, Y.D.; Bilki, B.; Norbeck, E.; Northacker, D.; Onel, Y.; Wilson, G.W.; Kawagoe, K.; Miyazaki, Y.; Sudo, Y.; Ueno, H.; Yoshioka, T.; Dauncey, P.D.; Cortina Gil, E.; Mannai, S.; Baulieu, G.; Calabria, P.; Caponetto, L.; Combaret, C.; Della Negra, R.; Ete, R.; Grenier, G.; Han, R.; Ianigro, J-C.; Kieffer, R.; Laktineh, I.; Lumb, N.; Mathez, H.; Mirabito, L.; Petrukhin, A.; Steen, A.; Tromeur, W.; Vander Donckt, M.; Zoccarato, Y.; Berenguer Antequera, J.; Calvo Alamillo, E.; Fouz, M.-C.; Puerta-Pelayo, J.; Corriveau, F.; Bobchenko, B.; Chadeeva, M.; Danilov, M.; Epifantsev, A.; Markin, O.; Mizuk, R.; Novikov, E.; Rusinov, V.; Tarkovsky, E.; Kozlov, V.; Soloviev, Y.; Besson, D.; Buzhan, P.; Ilyin, A.; Kantserov, V.; Kaplin, V.; Popova, E.; Tikhomirov, V.; Gabriel, M.; Kiesling, C.; Seidel, K.; Simon, F.; Soldner, C.; Szalay, M.; Tesar, M.; Weuste, L.; Amjad, M.S.; Bonis, J.; Conforti di Lorenzo, S.; Cornebise, P.; Fleury, J.; Frisson, T.; van der Kolk, N.; Richard, F.; Pöschl, R.; Rouene, J.; Anduze, M.; Balagura, V.; Becheva, E.; Boudry, V.; Brient, J-C.; Cornat, R.; Frotin, M.; Gastaldi, F.; Guliyev, E.; Haddad, Y.; Magniette, F.; Ruan, M.; Tran, T.H.; Videau, H.; Callier, S.; Dulucq, F.; Martin-Chassard, G.; de la Taille, Ch.; Raux, L.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; Zacek, J.; Cvach, J.; Gallus, P.; Havranek, M.; Janata, M.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lednicky, D.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Popule, J.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Ruzicka, P.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; Belhorma, B.; Ghazlane, H.; Kotera, K.; Ono, H.; Takeshita, T.; Uozumi, S.; Chai, J.S.; Song, H.S.; Lee, S.H.; Götze, M.; Sauer, J.; Weber, S.; Zeitnitz, C.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The intrinsic time structure of hadronic showers influences the timing capability and the required integration time of hadronic calorimeters in particle physics experiments, and depends on the active medium and on the absorber of the calorimeter. With the CALICE T3B experiment, a setup of 15 small plastic scintillator tiles read out with Silicon Photomultipliers, the time structure of showers is measured on a statistical basis with high spatial and temporal resolution in sampling calorimeters with tungsten and steel absorbers. The results are compared to GEANT4 (version 9.4 patch 03) simulations with different hadronic physics models. These comparisons demonstrate the importance of using high precision treatment of low-energy neutrons for tungsten absorbers, while an overall good agreement between data and simulations for all considered models is observed for steel.

  13. The Time Structure of Hadronic Showers in highly granular Calorimeters with Tungsten and Steel Absorbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Adloff; J. -J. Blaising; M. Chefdeville; C. Drancourt; R. Gaglione; N. Geffroy; Y. Karyotakis; I. Koletsou; J. Prast; G. Vouters J. Repond; J. Schlereth; L. Xia E. Baldolemar; J. Li; S. T. Park; M. Sosebee; A. P. White; J. Yu; G. Eigen; M. A. Thomson; D. R. Ward; D. Benchekroun; A. Hoummada; Y. Khoulaki J. Apostolakis; S. Arfaoui; M. Benoit; D. Dannheim; K. Elsener; G. Folger; C. Grefe; V. Ivantchenko; M. Killenberg; W. Klempt; E. van der Kraaij; L. Linssen; A. -I. Lucaci-Timoce; A. Münnich; S. Poss; A. Ribon; P. Roloff; A. Sailer; D. Schlatter; E. Sicking; J. Strube; V. Uzhinskiy; C. Carloganu; P. Gay; S. Manen; L. Royer; U. Cornett; D. David; A. Ebrahimi; G. Falley; N. Feege; K. Gadow; P. Göttlicher; C. Günter; O. Hartbrich; B. Hermberg; S. Karstensen; F. Krivan; K. Krüger; S. Lu; B. Lutz; S. Morozov; V. Morgunov; C. Neubüser; M. Reinecke; F. Sefkow; P. Smirnov; M. Terwort; A. Fagot; M. Tytgat; N. Zaganidis; J. -Y. Hostachy; L. Morin; E. Garutti; S. Laurien; I. Marchesini; M. Matysek; M. Ramilli; K. Briggl; P. Eckert; T. Harion; H. -Ch. Schultz-Coulon; W. Shen; R. Stamen; S. Chang; A. Khan; D. H. Kim; D. J. Kong; Y. D. Oh; B. Bilki; E. Norbeck; D. Northacker; Y. Onel; G. W. Wilson; K. Kawagoe; Y. Miyazaki; Y. Sudo; H. Ueno; T. Yoshioka; P. D. Dauncey; E. Cortina Gil; S. Mannai; G. Baulieu; P. Calabria; L. Caponetto; C. Combaret; R. Della Negra; R. Ete; G. Grenier; R. Han; J-C. Ianigro; R. Kieffer; I. Laktineh; N. Lumb; H. Mathez; L. Mirabito; A. Petrukhin; A. Steen; W. Tromeur; M. Vander Donckt; Y. Zoccarato J. Berenguer Antequera; E. Calvo Alamillo; M. -C. Fouz; J. Puerta-Pelayo; F. Corriveau; B. Bobchenko; M. Chadeeva; M. Danilov; A. Epifantsev; O. Markin; R. Mizuk; E. Novikov; V. Rusinov; E. Tarkovsky; V. Kozlov; Y. Soloviev; D. Besson; P. Buzhan; A. Ilyin; V. Kantserov; V. Kaplin; E. Popova; V. Tikhomirov; M. Gabriel; C. Kiesling; K. Seidel; F. Simon; C. Soldner; M. Szalay; M. Tesar; L. Weuste; M. S. Amjad; J. Bonis; S. Conforti di Lorenzo; P. Cornebise; J. Fleury; T. Frisson; N. van der Kolk; F. Richard; R. Pöschl; J. Rouene; M. Anduze; V. Balagura; E. Becheva; V. Boudry; J-C. Brient; R. Cornat; M. Frotin; F. Gastaldi; E. Guliyev; Y. Haddad; F. Magniette; M. Ruan; T. H. Tran; H. Videau; S. Callier; F. Dulucq; G. Martin-Chassard; Ch. de la Taille; L. Raux; N. Seguin-Moreau; J. Zacek; J. Cvach; P. Gallus; M. Havranek; M. Janata; J. Kvasnicka; D. Lednicky; M. Marcisovsky; I. Polak; J. Popule; L. Tomasek; M. Tomasek; P. Ruzicka; P. Sicho; J. Smolik; V. Vrba; J. Zalesak; . Belhorma; H. Ghazlane; K. Kotera; H. Ono; T. Takeshita; S. Uozumi; J. S. Chai; H. S. Song; S. H. Lee; M. Götze; J. Sauer; S. Weber; C. Zeitnitz

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The intrinsic time structure of hadronic showers influences the timing capability and the required integration time of hadronic calorimeters in particle physics experiments, and depends on the active medium and on the absorber of the calorimeter. With the CALICE T3B experiment, a setup of 15 small plastic scintillator tiles read out with Silicon Photomultipliers, the time structure of showers is measured on a statistical basis with high spatial and temporal resolution in sampling calorimeters with tungsten and steel absorbers. The results are compared to GEANT4 (version 9.4 patch 03) simulations with different hadronic physics models. These comparisons demonstrate the importance of using high precision treatment of low-energy neutrons for tungsten absorbers, while an overall good agreement between data and simulations for all considered models is observed for steel.

  14. High-pressure structural and elastic properties of Tl{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomis, O., E-mail: osgohi@fis.upv.es; Vilaplana, R. [Centro de Tecnologías Físicas, MALTA Consolider Team, Universitat Politècnica de València, 46022 València (Spain); Santamaría-Pérez, D. [Departamento de Física Aplicada-ICMUV, MALTA Consolider Team, Universidad de Valencia, Edificio de Investigación, C/Dr. Moliner 50, 46100 Burjassot (Spain); Earth Sciences Department, University College London, Gower Street, WC1E 6BT London (United Kingdom); Ruiz-Fuertes, J. [Departamento de Física Aplicada-ICMUV, MALTA Consolider Team, Universidad de Valencia, Edificio de Investigación, C/Dr. Moliner 50, 46100 Burjassot (Spain); Geowissenschaften, Goethe-Universität, Altenhöferallee 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Sans, J. A.; Manjón, F. J.; Mollar, M. [Instituto de Diseño para la Fabricación y Producción Automatizada, MALTA Consolider Team, Universitat Politècnica de València, 46022 València (Spain); and others

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The structural properties of Thallium (III) oxide (Tl{sub 2}O{sub 3}) have been studied both experimentally and theoretically under compression at room temperature. X-ray powder diffraction measurements up to 37.7?GPa have been complemented with ab initio total-energy calculations. The equation of state of Tl{sub 2}O{sub 3} has been determined and compared to related compounds. It has been found experimentally that Tl{sub 2}O{sub 3} remains in its initial cubic bixbyite-type structure up to 22.0?GPa. At this pressure, the onset of amorphization is observed, being the sample fully amorphous at 25.2?GPa. The sample retains the amorphous state after pressure release. To understand the pressure-induced amorphization process, we have studied theoretically the possible high-pressure phases of Tl{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Although a phase transition is theoretically predicted at 5.8?GPa to the orthorhombic Rh{sub 2}O{sub 3}-II-type structure and at 24.2?GPa to the orthorhombic ?-Gd{sub 2}S{sub 3}-type structure, neither of these phases were observed experimentally, probably due to the hindrance of the pressure-driven phase transitions at room temperature. The theoretical study of the elastic behavior of the cubic bixbyite-type structure at high-pressure shows that amorphization above 22?GPa at room temperature might be caused by the mechanical instability of the cubic bixbyite-type structure which is theoretically predicted above 23.5?GPa.

  15. Comparisons on offshore structure responses to random waves using linear and high-order wave theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramos Heredia, Rafael Juda

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the first time I met him. I would also like to convey my appreciation to my sponsor, Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, and to the Offshore Technology Research Center for providing the experimental data contained in this work. Special thanks go to Dr. John M... of the Department) May 1995 Major Subject: Ocean Engineering Comparisons on Offshore Structure Responses to Random Waves Using Linear and High-order Wave Theories. (May 1995) Refuel Juda Ramos Heredia, B. S. , Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico City Chair...

  16. Studies of local and intermediate range structure in crystalline and amorphouse materials at high pressure using high-energy x-rays.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehm, L.; Antao, M.; Chen, J.; Locke, D. R.; Michel, F. M.; Martin, C. D.; Yu, T.; Lee, P. L.; Chupas, P. J.; Shastri, S. D.; Guo, Q.; Parise, J. B.; Stony Brook Univ.; BNL

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The method of high-energy total elastic X-ray scattering to determine the atomic structure of nanocrystalline, highly disordered, and amorphous materials is presented. The current state of the technique, its potential, and limitations are discussed with two successful studies on the pressure induced phase transition in mackinawite (FeS) and the high-pressure behavior of liquid gallium.

  17. Studies of Local and Intermediate Range Structure in Crystalline and Amorphous Materials at High Pressure Using High-Energy X-rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehm,L.; Antao, S.; Chen, J.; Locke, D.; Michel, F.; Martin, D.; Yu, T.; Parise, J.; Lee, P.; et al.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The method of high-energy total elastic X-ray scattering to determine the atomic structure of nanocrystalline, highly disordered, and amorphous materials is presented. The current state of the technique, its potential, and limitations are discussed with two successful studies on the pressure induced phase transition in mackinawite (FeS) and the high-pressure behavior of liquid gallium.

  18. HIGH SPEED, IN-FLIGHT STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING SYSTEM FOR MEDIUM ALTITUDE LONG ENDURANCE UNMANNED AIR VEHICLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    HIGH SPEED, IN-FLIGHT STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING SYSTEM FOR MEDIUM ALTITUDE LONG ENDURANCE on Structural Health Monitoring July 8-11, 2014. La Cité, Nantes, France Copyright © Inria (2014) 274 hal Health Monitoring (2014)" #12;substantiation of structural bonded jointsmay be based on: "repeatable

  19. Structure determination of the high-pressure phase of CdSe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yanchun, E-mail: liyc@ihep.ac.cn, E-mail: liuj@ihep.ac.cn; Lin, Chuanlong; Li, Xiaodong; Liu, Jing, E-mail: liyc@ihep.ac.cn, E-mail: liuj@ihep.ac.cn [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, 100049 Beijing (China); Li, Gong [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Xu, Jian [Institute of Fluid Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, P. O. Box 919-102, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China)

    2014-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Structural phase transition sequence of CdSe has been investigated at pressures up to 60?GPa under quasi-hydrostatic conditions using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. A phase transition from the wurtzite type (B4) to the NaCl-type (B1) structure has been observed, followed by another phase transition to an orthorhombic structure at 27?GPa, in agreement with previous reports. We show that this high-pressure orthorhombic phase has a Pnma symmetry rather than being a Cmcm-symmetric structure as previously suggested. From our observations, the appearance of the new reflections and reflection splitting with increasing pressure is due to the change of atomic relative positions in crystal lattice and the difference in the compression ratio of lattice parameters for the Pnma structure, and we find no evidence for the third phase transition reported previously. The pressure-induced phase transition of CdSe has been further confirmed by the density-functional theory calculations.

  20. Theory of factors limiting high gradient operation of warm accelerating structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nusinovich, Gregory S. [University of Maryland; Antonsen, Thomas M. [University of Maryland; Kishek, Rami [University of Maryland

    2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report summarizes the research performed during the time period from 8/1/2010 to 7/31/2013. It consists of two parts describing our studies in two directions: (a) analysis of factors limiting operation of dielectric-loaded accelerating (DLA) structures where the main problem is the occurrence of multipactor on dielectric surfaces, and (b) studies of effects associated with either RF magnetic or RF electric fields which may cause the RF breakdown in high-gradient metallic accelerating structures. In the studies of DLA structures, at least, two accomplishments should be mentioned: the development of a 3D non-stationary, self-consistent code describing the multipactor phenomena and yielding very good agreement with some experimental data obtained in joint ANL/NRL experiments. In the metallic structures, such phenomena as the heating and melting of micro-particles (metallic dust) by RF electric and magnetic fields in single-shot and rep-rate regimes is analyzed. Also, such processes in micro-protrusions on the structure surfaces as heating and melting due to the field emitted current and the Nottingham effect are thoroughly investigated with the account for space charge of emitted current on the field emission from the tip.

  1. Ultra-High Performance Concrete with Tailored Properties Cementitious materials comprise a large portion of domestic structures and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    Ultra-High Performance Concrete with Tailored Properties Cementitious materials comprise a large portion of domestic structures and infrastructure. The development of ultra-high performance concrete of buildings or structures to dynamic loading and fire. Overview of research program on UHPC or CEP (concrete

  2. Biomimetic bluff body drag reduction by self-adaptive porous flaps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazellier, Nicolas; Kourta, Azeddine

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performances of an original passive control system based on a biomimetic approach are assessed by investigating the flow over a bluff-body. This control device consists in a couple of flaps made from the combination of a rigid plastic skeleton coated with a porous fabric mimicking the shaft and the vane of the bird's feathers, respectively. The sides of a square cylinder have been fitted with this system so as to enable the flaps to freely rotate around their leading edge. This feature allows the movable flaps to self-adapt to the flow conditions. Comparing both the uncontrolled and the controlled flow, a significant drag reduction (up to 22%) has been obtained over a broad range of Reynolds number. The investigation of the mean flow reveals a noticeable modification of the flow topology at large scale in the vicinity of the controlled cylinder accounting for the increase of the pressure base in comparison with the natural flow. Meanwhile, the study of the relative motion of both flaps points out that the...

  3. High-resolution structure of a retroviral protease folded as a monomer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilski, Miroslaw [A. Mickiewicz University, 60-780 Poznan (Poland); Polish Academy of Sciences, 61-704 Poznan (Poland); Kazmierczyk, Maciej; Krzywda, Szymon [A. Mickiewicz University, 60-780 Poznan (Poland); Zábranská, Helena [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 166 10 Prague (Czech Republic); Cooper, Seth; Popovi?, Zoran [University of Washington, Box 352350, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Khatib, Firas; DiMaio, Frank; Thompson, James; Baker, David [University of Washington, Box 357350, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Pichová, Iva [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 166 10 Prague (Czech Republic); Jaskolski, Mariusz, E-mail: mariuszj@amu.edu.pl [A. Mickiewicz University, 60-780 Poznan (Poland); Polish Academy of Sciences, 61-704 Poznan (Poland)

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The crystal structure of Mason–Pfizer monkey virus protease folded as a monomer has been solved by molecular replacement using a model generated by players of the online game Foldit. The structure shows at high resolution the details of a retroviral protease folded as a monomer which can guide rational design of protease dimerization inhibitors as retroviral drugs. Mason–Pfizer monkey virus (M-PMV), a D-type retrovirus assembling in the cytoplasm, causes simian acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (SAIDS) in rhesus monkeys. Its pepsin-like aspartic protease (retropepsin) is an integral part of the expressed retroviral polyproteins. As in all retroviral life cycles, release and dimerization of the protease (PR) is strictly required for polyprotein processing and virion maturation. Biophysical and NMR studies have indicated that in the absence of substrates or inhibitors M-PMV PR should fold into a stable monomer, but the crystal structure of this protein could not be solved by molecular replacement despite countless attempts. Ultimately, a solution was obtained in mr-rosetta using a model constructed by players of the online protein-folding game Foldit. The structure indeed shows a monomeric protein, with the N- and C-termini completely disordered. On the other hand, the flap loop, which normally gates access to the active site of homodimeric retropepsins, is clearly traceable in the electron density. The flap has an unusual curled shape and a different orientation from both the open and closed states known from dimeric retropepsins. The overall fold of the protein follows the retropepsin canon, but the C{sup ?} deviations are large and the active-site ‘DTG’ loop (here NTG) deviates up to 2.7 Å from the standard conformation. This structure of a monomeric retropepsin determined at high resolution (1.6 Å) provides important extra information for the design of dimerization inhibitors that might be developed as drugs for the treatment of retroviral infections, including AIDS.

  4. Nano-sized structured layered positive electrode materials to enable high energy density and high rate capability lithium batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deng, Haixia; Belharouak, Ilias; Amine, Khalil

    2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Nano-sized structured dense and spherical layered positive active materials provide high energy density and high rate capability electrodes in lithium-ion batteries. Such materials are spherical second particles made from agglomerated primary particles that are Li.sub.1+.alpha.(Ni.sub.xCo.sub.yMn.sub.z).sub.1-tM.sub.tO.sub.2-dR.sub.d- , where M is selected from can be Al, Mg, Fe, Cu, Zn, Cr, Ag, Ca, Na, K, In, Ga, Ge, V, Mo, Nb, Si, Ti, Zr, or a mixture of any two or more thereof, R is selected from F, Cl, Br, I, H, S, N, or a mixture of any two or more thereof, and 0.ltoreq..alpha..ltoreq.0.50; 0

  5. Solar wind suprathermal electron Stahl widths across high-speed stream structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skoug, Ruth M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Steinberg, John T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goodrich, Katherine A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Anderson, Brett R [DARTMUTH UNIV.

    2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Suprathermal electrons (100-1500 eV) observed in the solar wind typically show a strahl distribution, that is, a beam directed away from the Sun along the magnetic field direction. The strahl width observed at 1 AU is highly variable, ranging from 10-70 degrees. The obsenred finite width of the strahl results from the competition between beam focusing as the interplanetary magnetic field strength drops with distance from the Sun, and pitch-angle scattering as the beam interacts with the solar wind plasma in transit from the sun. Here we examine strahl width, observed with ACE SWEPAM across high-speed stream structures to investigate variations in electron scattering as a function of local plasma characteristics. We find that narrow strahls (less than 20 degrees wide), indicating reduced scattering, are observed within high-speed streams. Narrow strahls are also observed in both very low temperature solar wind, in association with ICMEs. Case studies of high-speed streams typically show the strahl narrowing at the leading edge of the stream. In some cases, the strahl narrows at the reverse shock or pressure wave, in other cases at the stream interface. The narrowing can either occur discontinuously or gradually over a period of hours. Within the high-speed wind, the strahl remains narrow for a period of hours to days, and then gradually broadens. The strahl width is roughly constant at all energies across these structures. For some fraction of high-speed streams, counterstreaming is associated with passage of the corotating interaction region. In these cases, we find the widths of the two counterstreaming beams frequently differ by more than 40 degrees. This dramatic difference in strahl width contrasts with observations in the solar wind as a whole, in which counterstreaming strahls typically differ in width by less than 20 degrees.

  6. High Efficiency Solar-based Catalytic Structure for CO{sub 2} Reforming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menkara, Hisham

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Throughout this project, we developed and optimized various photocatalyst structures for CO{sub 2} reforming into hydrocarbon fuels and various commodity chemical products. We also built several closed-loop and continuous fixed-bed photocatalytic reactor system prototypes for a larger-scale demonstration of CO{sub 2} reforming into hydrocarbons, mainly methane and formic acid. The results achieved have indicated that with each type of reactor and structure, high reforming yields can be obtained by refining the structural and operational conditions of the reactor, as well as by using various sacrificial agents (hole scavengers). We have also demonstrated, for the first time, that an aqueous solution containing acid whey (a common bio waste) is a highly effective hole scavenger for a solar-based photocatalytic reactor system and can help reform CO{sub 2} into several products at once. The optimization tasks performed throughout the project have resulted in efficiency increase in our conventional reactors from an initial 0.02% to about 0.25%, which is 10X higher than our original project goal. When acid whey was used as a sacrificial agent, the achieved energy efficiency for formic acid alone was ~0.4%, which is 16X that of our original project goal and higher than anything ever reported for a solar-based photocatalytic reactor. Therefore, by carefully selecting sacrificial agents, it should be possible to reach energy efficiency in the range of the photosynthetic efficiency of typical crop and biofuel plants (1-3%).

  7. High-temperature, structural disorder, phase transitions, and piezoelectric properties of GaPO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haines, J.; Cambon, O.; Prudhomme, N.; Fraysse, G.; Keen, D. A.; Chapon, L. C.; Tucker, M. G. [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie de la Matiere Condensee, UMR CNRS 5617, Universite Montpellier II, Place Eugene Bataillon, cc003, 34095 Montpellier cedex 5 (France); Department of Physics, Oxford University, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); and ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EQ (United Kingdom)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gallium orthophosphate was studied at high temperature up to 1303 K by total neutron scattering and 1173 K by piezoelectric measurements. Rietveld refinements at 1223 K confirm the stability of the structural distortion in the {alpha}-quartz-type phase with an average tilt angle {delta}=18.8 deg. at this temperature. In contrast, reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) refinements of total neutron scattering data indicate that, whereas the degree of structural disorder initially slowly varies over a very large temperature interval in the {alpha}-quartz-type phase, an increase in disorder is observed beginning above 1023 K. Piezoelectric measurements indicate that the quality factor (Q) of GaPO{sub 4} resonators remains stable up to this temperature above which the piezoelectric properties of the material degrade. This degradation can be correlated to the increase in structural disorder. RMC refinements indicate that the high-temperature {beta}-cristobalite-type phase at 1303 K is characterized by significant thermally induced disorder with oxygen atom density forming a continuous ring around the vector joining neighboring gallium and phosphorous atoms. Gallium phosphate may be expected to retain its piezoelectric properties up to within 200 K of the phase transition temperature and as a consequence be used in applications at temperatures slightly above 1000 K.

  8. High thermoelectric performance BiSbTe alloy with unique low-dimensional structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie Wenjie [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634-0978 (United States); Tang Xinfeng; Yan Yonggao; Zhang Qingjie [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Tritt, Terry M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634-0978 (United States)

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a detailed description of an innovative route of a melt spinning (MS) technique combined with a subsequent spark plasma sintering process in order to obtain high performance p-type Bi{sub 0.52}Sb{sub 1.48}Te{sub 3} bulk material, which possesses a unique low-dimensional structure. The unique structure consists of an amorphous structure, 5-15 nm fine nanocrystalline regions, and coherent interfaces between the resulting nanocrystalline regions. Measurements of the thermopower, electrical conductivity, and thermal conductivity have been performed over a range of temperature of 300-400 K. We found that MS technique can give us considerable control over the resulting nanostructure with good thermal stability during the temperature range of 300-400 K and this unique structure can effectively adjust the transport of phonons and electrons, in a manner such that it is beneficial to the overall thermoelectric performance of the material, primarily a reduction in the lattice thermal conductivity. Subsequently, this results in a maximum figure of merit ZT value of 1.56 at 300 K for p-type Bi{sub 0.52}Sb{sub 1.48}Te{sub 3} bulk material. This ZT value is over a 50% improvement of that of the state of the art commercial Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} materials. We also report results of thermal cycling of this material for over one hundred cycles between 300-400 K. Our work offers an innovative route for developing high performance bismuth telluride based alloys and devices, which have even broader prospects for commercial applications. This technique may also be applicable to other thermoelectric materials.

  9. Improved Structure and Fabrication of Large, High-Power KHPS Rotors - Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corren, Dean [Verdant Power, Inc.; Colby, Jonathan [Verdant Power, Inc.; Adonizio, Mary Ann [Verdant Power, Inc.

    2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Verdant Power, Inc, working in partnership with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and the University of Minnesota St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL), among other partners, used evolving Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and Finite Element Analysis (FEA) models and techniques to improve the structure and fabrication of large, high-power composite Kinetic Hydropower System (KHPS) rotor blades. The objectives of the project were to: design; analyze; develop for manufacture and fabricate; and thoroughly test, in the lab and at full scale in the water, the improved KHPS rotor blade.

  10. Efficient electronic structure calculation for molecular ionization dynamics at high x-ray intensity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hao, Yajiang; Hanasaki, Kota; Son, Sang-Kil; Santra, Robin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the implementation of an electronic-structure approach dedicated to ionization dynamics of molecules interacting with x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses. In our scheme, molecular orbitals for molecular core-hole states are represented by linear combination of numerical atomic orbitals that are solutions of corresponding atomic core-hole states. We demonstrate that our scheme efficiently calculates all possible multiple-hole configurations of molecules formed during XFEL pulses. The present method is suitable to investigate x-ray multiphoton multiple ionization dynamics and accompanying nuclear dynamics, providing essential information on the chemical dynamics relevant for high-intensity x-ray imaging.

  11. Formation of surface nano-structures by plasma expansion induced by highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moslem, W. M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said (Egypt); Centre for Theoretical Physics, The British University in Egypt (BUE), El-Shorouk City, Cairo (Egypt) and International Centre for Advanced Studies in Physical Sciences, Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, Ruhr University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); El-Said, A. S. [Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Nuclear and Radiation Physics Laboratory, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, 35516 Mansoura (Egypt) and Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Bautzner Landstr. 128, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Slow highly charged ions (HCIs) create surface nano-structures (nano-hillocks) on the quartz surface. The formation of hillocks was only possible by surpassing a potential energy threshold. By using the plasma expansion approach with suitable hydrodynamic equations, the creation mechanism of the nano-hillocks induced by HCIs is explained. Numerical analysis reveal that within the nanoscale created plasma region, the increase of the temperature causes an increase of the self-similar solution validity domain, and consequently the surface nano-hillocks become taller. Furthermore, the presence of the negative (positive) nano-dust particles would lead to increase (decrease) the nano-hillocks height.

  12. Optimization of Cricket-inspired, Biomimetic Artificial Hair Sensors for Flow Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Izadi, N; Floris, J; Krijnen, G

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High density arrays of artificial hair sensors, biomimicking the extremely sensitive mechanoreceptive filiform hairs found on cerci of crickets have been fabricated successfully. We assess the sensitivity of these artificial sensors and present a scheme for further optimization addressing the deteriorating effects of stress in the structures. We show that, by removing a portion of chromium electrodes close to the torsional beams, the upward lift at the edges of the membrane due to the stress, will decrease hence increase the sensitivity.

  13. Modeling the Structural Response from a Propagating High Explosive Using Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margraf, J

    2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This report primarily concerns the use of two massively parallel finite element codes originally written and maintained at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. ALE3D is an explicit hydrodynamics code commonly employed to simulate wave propagation from high energy scenarios and the resulting interaction with nearby structures. This coupled response ensures that a structure is accurately applied with a blast loading varying both in space and time. Figure 1 illustrates the radial outward propagation of a pressure wave due to a center detonated spherical explosive originating from the lower left. The radial symmetry seen in this scenario is lost when instead a cylindrocal charge is detonated. Figure 2 indicates that a stronger, faster traveling pressure wave occurs in the direction of the normal axis to the cylinder. The ALE3D name is derived because of the use of arbitrary-Lagrange-Eulerian elements in which the mesh is allowed to advect; a process through which the mesh is modified to alleviate tanlging and general mesh distortion often cuased by high energy scenarios. The counterpart to an advecting element is a Lagrange element, whose mesh moves with the material. Ideally all structural components are kept Lagrange as long as possible to preserve accuracy of material variables and minimize advection related errors. Advection leads to mixed zoning, so using structural Lagrange elements also improves the visualization when post processing the results. A simplified representation of the advection process is shown in Figure 3. First the mesh is distorted due to material motion during the Lagrange step. The mesh is then shifted to an idealized and less distorted state to prevent irregular zones caused by the Lagrange motion. Lastly, the state variables are remapped to the elements of the newly constructed mesh. Note that Figure 3 represents a purely Eulerian mesh relaxation because the mesh is relocated back to the pre-Lagrange position. This is the case when the material flows through a still mesh. This is not typically done in an ALE3D analysis, especially if Lagrange elements exist. Deforming Lagrange elements would certainly tangle with a Eulerian mesh eventually. The best method in this case is to have an advecting mesh positioned as some relaxed version of the pre and post Lagrange step; this gives the best opportunity of modeling a high energy event with a combination of Lagrange and ALE elements. Dyne3D is another explicit dynamic analysis code, ParaDyn being the parallel version. ParaDyn is used for predicting the transient response of three dimensional structures using Lagrangian solid mechanics. Large deformation and mesh tangling is often resolved through the use of an element deletion scheme. This is useful to accommodate component failure, but if it is done purely as a means to preserve a useful mesh it can lead to problems because it does not maintain continuity of the material bulk response. Whatever medium exists between structural components is typically not modeled in ParaDyn. Instead, a structure either has a known loading profile applied or given initial conditions. The many included contact algorithms can calculate the loading response of materials if and when they collide. A recent implementation of an SPH module in which failed or deleted material nodes are converted to independent particles is currently being utilized for a variety of spall related problems and high velocity impact scenarios. Figure 4 shows an example of a projectile, given an initial velocity, and how it fails the first plate which generates SPH particles which then interact with and damage the second plate.

  14. High resolution interface nanochemistry and structure: Final project report, December 1, 1993--February 28, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, R.W.; Lin, S.H.

    1997-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Work includes studies of interface and grain boundary chemistry and structure in silicon nitride matrix/silicon carbide whisker composites, and in monolithic silicon nitride and silicon carbide synthesized by several different methods. Off-stoichiometric, impurity, and sintering aid elemental distributions in these materials (and other ceramics) have been of great interest because of expected effects on properties but these distributions have proven very difficult to measure because the spatial resolution required is high. The authors made a number of these measurements for the first time, using techniques and instrumentation developed here. Interfaces between metals and SiC are the basis for important metal matrix composites and contacts for high temperature SiC-based solid state electronic devices. The authors have investigated ultrapure interfaces between Ti, Hf, Ti-Hf alloys, Pt, and Co and Si-terminated (0001) 6H SiC single crystals for the first time.

  15. A Biomimetic Approach to Robot Table Tennis Katharina Mlling1,2, Jens Kober1,2, Jan Peters1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and on a real anthropomorphic seven degrees of freedom Barrett WAMTM robot arm. keywords biomimetic robotics approaches, we use an anthropomorphic robot arm with seven degrees of freedom (DoFs) and concentrate is to generate human-like striking movements on an anthropomorphic robot arm with seven DoFs. We investigate

  16. Substrate Structures For Growth Of Highly Oriented And/Or Epitaxial Layers Thereon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arendt, Paul N. (Los Alamos, NM); Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM); Groves, James R. (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM)

    2005-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A composite substrate structure including a substrate, a layer of a crystalline metal oxide or crystalline metal oxynitride material upon the substrate, a layer of an oriented cubic oxide material having a rock-salt-like structure upon the crystalline metal oxide or crystalline metal oxynitride material layer is provided together with additional layers such as one or more layers of a buffer material upon the oriented cubic oxide material layer. Jc's of 2.3×106 A/cm2 have been demonstrated with projected Ic's of 320 Amperes across a sample 1 cm wide for a superconducting article including a flexible polycrystalline metallic substrate, an inert oxide material layer upon the surface of the flexible polycrystalline metallic substrate, a layer of a crystalline metal oxide or crystalline metal oxynitride material upon the layer of the inert oxide material, a layer of an oriented cubic oxide material having a rock-salt-like structure upon the crystalline metal oxide or crystalline metal oxynitride material layer, a layer of a buffer material upon the oriented cubic oxide material layer, and, a top-layer of a high temperature superconducting material upon the layer of a buffer material.

  17. Evaluation of Tavorite-Structured Cathode Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries Using High-Throughput Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mueller, Tim

    Cathode materials with structure similar to the mineral tavorite have shown promise for use in lithium-ion batteries, but this class of materials is relatively unexplored. We use high-throughput density-functional-theory ...

  18. High-pressure X-ray absorption fine structure in the diamond anvil cell and its applications in geological materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Thomas S.

    nano- polycrystalline diamond instead of single crystal anvils, the influence of diamond diffractionHigh-pressure X-ray absorption fine structure in the diamond anvil cell and its applications fine structure in the diamond anvil cell and its applications in geological materials Xinguo Hong1

  19. Ribosomal Proteins S5 and L6: High-resolution Crystal Structures and Roles in Protein Synthesis and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramakrishnan, Venki

    Ribosomal Proteins S5 and L6: High-resolution Crystal Structures and Roles in Protein Synthesis proteins and characterize these mutations. The S5 protein, from the small ribosomal unit, is associated propose that the C-terminal half of S5, which contains the accuracy mutations, organizes RNA structures

  20. Probing Structural Dynamics with High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Research Team: Nigel Browning, James Evans, Patricia Abellan, Russell Tonkyn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Probing Structural Dynamics with High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Research Team: Nigel Browning of the structural dynamics that occur on the µs-ns timescale We will make use of a unique aberration-corrected dynamic TEM (DTEM), where a photoemission source will enable these time-resolved images to be obtained at

  1. Reliability implications of defects in high temperature annealed Si/SiO{sub 2}/Si structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, W.L.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Winokur, P.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Devine, R.A.B.; Mathiot, D. [France Telecom/CNET, Meylan (France); Wilson, I.H.; Xu, J.B. [Chinese Univ. of Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-temperature post-oxidation annealing of poly-Si/SiO{sub 2}/Si structures such as metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors and metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors is known to result in enhanced radiation sensitivity, increased 1/f noise, and low field breakdown. The authors have studied the origins of these effects from a spectroscopic standpoint using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and atomic force microscopy. One result of high temperature annealing is the generation of three types of paramagnetic defect centers, two of which are associated with the oxide close to the Si/SiO{sub 2} interface (oxygen-vacancy centers) and the third with the bulk Si substrate (oxygen-related donors). In all three cases, the origin of the defects may be attributed to out-diffusion of O from the SiO{sub 2} network into the Si substrate with associated reduction of the oxide. The authors present a straightforward model for the interfacial region which assumes the driving force for O out-diffusion is the chemical potential difference of the O in the two phases (SiO{sub 2} and the Si substrate). Experimental evidence is provided to show that enhanced hole trapping and interface-trap and border-trap generation in irradiated high-temperature annealed Si/SiO{sub 2}/Si systems are all related either directly, or indirectly, to the presence of oxygen vacancies.

  2. Adaptive AFM scan speed control for high aspect ratio fast structure tracking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmad, Ahmad; Schuh, Andreas; Rangelow, Ivo W. [Department of Microelectronic and Nanoelectronic Systems, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology Ilmenau University of Technology, Gustav-Kirchhoffstr. 1, 98684 Ilmenau (Germany)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved imaging rates in Atomic Force Microscopes (AFM) are of high interest for disciplines such as life sciences and failure analysis of semiconductor wafers, where the sample topology shows high aspect ratios. Also, fast imaging is necessary to cover a large surface under investigation in reasonable times. Since AFMs are composed of mechanical components, they are associated with comparably low resonance frequencies that undermine the effort to increase the acquisition rates. In particular, high and steep structures are difficult to follow, which causes the cantilever to temporarily loose contact to or crash into the sample. Here, we report on a novel approach that does not affect the scanner dynamics, but adapts the lateral scanning speed of the scanner. The controller monitors the control error signal and, only when necessary, decreases the scan speed to allow the z-piezo more time to react to changes in the sample's topography. In this case, the overall imaging rate can be significantly increased, because a general scan speed trade-off decision is not needed and smooth areas are scanned fast. In contrast to methods trying to increase the z-piezo bandwidth, our method is a comparably simple approach that can be easily adapted to standard systems.

  3. Highly Insulating Glazing Systems using Non-Structural Center Glazing Layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohler, Christian; Arasteh, Dariush; Goudey, Howdy; Kohler, Christian

    2008-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Three layer insulating glass units with two low-e coatings and an effective gas fill are known to be highly insulating, with center-of-glass U-factors as low as 0.57 W/m{sup 2}-K (0.10 Btu/h-ft{sup 2}- F). Such units have historically been built with center layers of glass or plastic which extend all the way through the spacer system. This paper shows that triple glazing systems with non-structural center layers which do not create a hermetic seal at the edge have the potential to be as thermally efficient as standard designs, while potentially removing some of the production and product integration issues that have discouraged the use of triples.

  4. Lubricant-infused micro/nano-structured surfaces with tunable dynamic omniphobicity at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, Daniel; Max, Mankin N.; Belisle, Rebecca A.; Wong, Tak-Sing; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2013-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Omniphobic surfaces that can repel fluids at temperatures higher than 100 #2;°C are rare. Most stateof- the-art liquid-repellent materials are based on the lotus effect, where a thin air layer is maintained throughout micro/nanotextures leading to high mobility of liquids. However, such behavior eventually fails at elevated temperatures when the surface tension of test liquids decreases significantly. Here, we demonstrate a class of lubricant-infused structured surfaces that can maintain a robust omniphobic state even for low-surface-tension liquids at temperatures up to at least 200 °#2;C. We also demonstrate how liquid mobility on such surfaces can be tuned by a factor of 1000.

  5. Support structure design of the Nb?Sn quadrupole for the high luminosity LHC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Juchno, M. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Anerella, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ambrosio, G. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Cheng, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Felice, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ferracin, P. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Perez, J. C. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Prin, H. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Schmalzle, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New low-? quadrupole magnets are being developed within the scope of the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project in collaboration with the US LARP program. The aim of the HLLHC project is to study and implement machine upgrades necessary for increasing the luminosity of the LHC. The new quadrupoles, which are based on the Nb?Sn superconducting technology, will be installed in the LHC Interaction Regions and will have to generate a gradient of 140 T/m in a coil aperture of 150 mm. In this paper, we describe the design of the short model magnet support structure and discuss results of the detailed 3D numerical analysis performed in preparation for the first short model test.

  6. Support structure design of the Nb?Sn quadrupole for the high luminosity LHC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Juchno, M.; Anerella, M.; Ambrosio, G.; Cheng, D.; Felice, H.; Ferracin, P.; Perez, J. C.; Prin, H.; Schmalzle, J.

    2015-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New low-? quadrupole magnets are being developed within the scope of the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project in collaboration with the US LARP program. The aim of the HLLHC project is to study and implement machine upgrades necessary for increasing the luminosity of the LHC. The new quadrupoles, which are based on the Nb?Sn superconducting technology, will be installed in the LHC Interaction Regions and will have to generate a gradient of 140 T/m in a coil aperture of 150 mm. In this paper, we describe the design of the short model magnet support structure and discuss results of themore »detailed 3D numerical analysis performed in preparation for the first short model test.« less

  7. Near interface oxide degradation in high temperature annealed Si/SiO{sub 2}/Si structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devine, R.A.B.; Mathiot, D. [Centre National d`Etudes des Telecommunications (CNET), 38 - Meylan (France); Warren, W.L.; Fleetwood, D.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Degradation of 430 nm thick SiO{sub 2} layers in Si/SiO{sub 2}/Si structures which results from high temperature annealing (1320 C) has been studied using electron spin resonance, infra-red and refractive index measurements. Large numbers of oxygen vacancies are found in a region {le}100 nm from each Si/SiO{sub 2} interface. Two types of paramagnetic defects are observed following {gamma} or x-irradiation or hole injection. The 1106 cm{sup {minus}1} infra-red absorption associated with O interstitials in the Si substrate is found to increase with annealing time. The infra-red and spin resonance observations can be explained qualitatively and quantitatively in terms of a model in which oxygen atoms are gettered from the oxide into the under or overlying Si, the driving force being the increased O solubility limit associated with the anneal temperature.

  8. Phase structure of an Abelian two-Higgs model and high temperature superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. N. Chernodub; E. -M. Ilgenfritz; A. Schiller

    2005-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the phase structure of a three dimensional Abelian Higgs model with singly- and doubly-charged scalar fields coupled to a compact Abelian gauge field. The model is pretending to describe systems of strongly correlated electrons such as high-Tc superconductivity in overdoped regime and exotic phases supporting excitations with fractionalized quantum numbers. We identify the Fermi liquid, the spin gap, the superconductor and the strange metallic phases in which densities and properties of holon and spinon vortices and monopoles are explored. The phase diagram in the 3D coupling space is predicted. We show that at sufficiently strong gauge coupling the spinon-pair and holon condensation transitions merge together and become, unexpectedly, first order.

  9. Cage occupancies in the high pressure structure H methane hydrate: A neutron diffraction study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tulk, Christopher A [ORNL; Klug, Dennis D [National Research Council of Canada; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F [ORNL; Karotsis, Georgios [ORNL; Guthrie, Malcolm [Carnegie Institution of Washington; Molaison, Jamie J [ORNL; Pradhan, Neelam [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron diffraction study was performed on the CD{sub 4}: D{sub 2}O structure H clathrate hydrate to refine its CD{sub 4} fractional cage occupancies. Samples of ice VII and hexagonal (sH) methane hydrate were produced in a Paris-Edinburgh press and in situ neutron diffraction data collected. The data were analyzed with the Rietveld method and yielded average cage occupancies of 3.1 CD{sub 4} molecules in the large 20-hedron (5{sup 12}6{sup 8}) cages of the hydrate unit cell. Each of the pentagonal dodecahedron (5{sup 12}) and 12-hedron (4{sup 3}5{sup 6}6{sup 3}) cages in the sH unit cell are occupied with on average 0.89 and 0.90 CD{sub 4} molecules, respectively. This experiment avoided the co-formation of Ice VI and sH hydrate, this mixture is more difficult to analyze due to the proclivity of ice VI to form highly textured crystals, and overlapping Bragg peaks of the two phases. These results provide essential information for the refinement of intermolecular potential parameters for the water methane hydrophobic interaction in clathrate hydrates and related dense structures.

  10. Structure of W3(OH) from Very High Spectral Resolution Observations of 5 Centimeter OH Masers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent L. Fish; Loránt O. Sjouwerman

    2007-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies of methanol and ground-state OH masers at very high spectral resolution have shed new light on small-scale maser processes. The nearby source W3(OH), which contains numerous bright masers in several different transitions, provides an excellent laboratory for high spectral resolution techniques. We present a model of W3(OH) based on EVN observations of the rotationally-excited 6030 and 6035 MHz OH masers taken at 0.024 km/s spectral resolution. The 6.0 GHz masers are becoming brighter with time and show evidence for tangential proper motions. We confirm the existence of a region of magnetic field oriented toward the observer to the southeast and find another such region to the northeast in W3(OH), near the champagne flow. The 6.0 GHz masers trace the inner edge of a counterclockwise rotating torus feature. Masers at 6030 MHz are usually a factor of a few weaker than at 6035 MHz but trace the same material. Velocity gradients of nearby Zeeman components are much more closely correlated than in the ground state, likely due to the smaller spatial separation between Zeeman components. Hydroxyl maser peaks at very long baseline interferometric resolution appear to have structure on scales both smaller than that resolvable as well as on larger scales.

  11. Synthesis, structural characterization and high pressure phase transitions of monolithium hydronium sulfate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banerjee, Debasis, E-mail: debasis.banerjee@stonybrook.edu [Department of Chemistry, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook 11794-3400 (United States); Plonka, Anna M. [Department of Geosciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook 11794-2100 (United States); Kim, Sun Jin [Nano-Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 131, Cheongryang, Seoul 130-650 (Korea, Republic of); Xu Wenqian [Department of Geosciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook 11794-2100 (United States); Parise, John B. [Department of Chemistry, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook 11794-3400 (United States); Mineral Physics Institute, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11790-2100 (United States)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A three dimensional lithium hydronium sulfate LiSO{sub 4}{center_dot}H{sub 3}O [1], [space group Pna2{sub 1}a=8.7785(12) A, b=9.1297(12) A, c=5.2799(7) A, V=423.16(10) A{sup 3}] was synthesized via solvothermal methods using 1,5-naphthalenedisulfonic acid (1,5-NSA) as the source of sulfate ions. The structure of [1], determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction techniques, consists of corner sharing LiO{sub 4} and SO{sub 4} tetrahedra, forming an anionic 3-D open framework that is charge balanced by hydronium ions positioned within channels running along [001] and forming strong H-bonding with the framework oxygen atoms. Compound [1] undergoes two reversible phase transitions, involving reorientation of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} ions at pressures of approximately 2.5 and 5 GPa at room temperature, as evident from characteristic discontinuous frequency drops in the {nu}{sub 1} mode of the Raman spectra. Additionally, compound [1] forms dense {beta}-lithium sulfate at 300 Degree-Sign C, as evident from temperature dependent powder XRD and combined reversible TGA-DSC experiments. - Graphical abstract: Left: View of corner-shared LiO{sub 4} and SO{sub 4} tetrahedra along [001] direction with hydronium ions situated in the channels. Right: (a) Photograph of the loaded DAC (b) Ambient pressure Raman spectrum of compound [1] (c) Evolution of the {nu}{sub 1} mode with the increasing and decreasing pressure indicating transitions to high-pressure phases at {approx}2.5 (red curves) and {approx}5 GPa (blue curves) and at {approx}3.5 GPa upon decompression. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A 3-D lithium hydronium sulfate is synthesized by solvothermal methods. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two high pressure phase transition occurs due to rotation of sulfate groups. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The framework undergoes a high temperature structural transformation, to form {beta}-Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} phase.

  12. Experimental Study of the Effect of Beam Loading on RF Breakdown Rate in CLIC High-Gradient Accelerating Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tecker, F; Kelisani, M; Doebert, S; Grudiev, A; Quirante, J; Riddone, G; Syratchev, I; Wuensch, W; Kononenko, O; Solodko, A; Lebet, S

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RF breakdown is a key issue for the multi-TeV highluminosity e+e- Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). Breakdowns in the high-gradient accelerator structures can deflect the beam and decrease the desired luminosity. The limitations of the accelerating structures due to breakdowns have been studied so far without a beam present in the structure. The presence of the beam modifies the distribution of the electrical and magnetic field distributions, which determine the breakdown rate. Therefore an experiment has been designed for high power testing a CLIC prototype accelerating structure with a beam present in the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3). A special beam line allows extracting a beam with nominal CLIC beam current and duration from the CTF3 linac. The paper describes the beam optics design for this experimental beam line and the commissioning of the experiment with beam.

  13. Study of iron structure stability in high temperature molten lead-bismuth eutectic with oxygen injection using molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arkundato, Artoto [Physics Department, Faculty of Mathematical and Natural Sciences, Jember University, Jl. Kalimantan 37 Jember (Indonesia); Su'ud, Zaki [Physics Department, Faculty of Mathematical and Natural Sciences, Bandung Institute of Technology, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung (Indonesia); Sudarko [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Mathematical and Natural Sciences, Jember University, Jl. Kalimantan 37 Jember (Indonesia); Shafii, Mohammad Ali [Physics Department, Faculty of Mathematical and Natural Sciences, Andalas University, Padang (Indonesia); Celino, Massimo [ENEA, CR Casaccia, Via Anguillarese 301, Rome (Italy)

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrosion of structural materials in high temperature molten lead-bismuth eutectic is a major problem for design of PbBi cooled reactor. One technique to inhibit corrosion process is to inject oxygen into coolant. In this paper we study and focus on a way of inhibiting the corrosion of iron using molecular dynamics method. For the simulation results we concluded that effective corrosion inhibition of iron may be achieved by injection 0.0532 wt% to 0.1156 wt% oxygen into liquid lead-bismuth. At this oxygen concentration the structure of iron material will be maintained at about 70% in bcc crystal structure during interaction with liquid metal.

  14. Laser spectroscopy of hyperfine structure in highly-charged ions: a test of QED at high fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. F. A. Winters; M. Vogel; D. M. Segal; R. C. Thompson; W. Noertershaeuser

    2007-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview is presented of laser spectroscopy experiments with cold, trapped, highly-charged ions, which will be performed at the HITRAP facility at GSI in Darmstadt (Germany). These high-resolution measurements of ground state hyperfine splittings will be three orders of magnitude more precise than previous measurements. Moreover, from a comparison of measurements of the hyperfine splittings in hydrogen- and lithium-like ions of the same isotope, QED effects at high electromagnetic fields can be determined within a few percent. Several candidate ions suited for these laser spectroscopy studies are presented.

  15. On the origin and highly likely completeness of single-domain protein structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yang

    for review October 27, 2005) The size and origin of the protein fold universe is of fundamental and practical, with the protein fold universe arising from compact conformations of hydrogen-bonded, second- ary structures of protein structure and function. evolution Protein Data Bank protein folding protein structure prediction

  16. High-resolution spectra of solar magnetic features. I. Analysis of penumbral fine structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lites, B.W.; Skumanich, A.; Scharmer, G.B. (High Altitude Observatory, Boulder, CO (USA) Kungliga Svenska Vetenskapsakademien, Stockholm (Sweden))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Swedish Vacuum Telescope on La Palma was used to obtain spectra of the magnetic-sensitive Fe I 630.25 nm line under conditions of exceptional angular resolution (0.32 arcsec) and high spectral resolution (FWHM 2.5 pm). Simultaneous 0.02 s CCD exposures of both the spectrum and the slit-jaw image effectively 'freeze' the atmospheric seeing motions and permit unambiguous identification of the spectra of the various penumbral structures. These spectra reveal the magnetic field strength in penumbral filaments through an intensity fit of the Zeeman splitting of this line. The observations show that: (1) the field strength varies from about 2100 G near the umbra-penumbra boundary to about 900 G at the outer edge of the penumbra, (2) the observed fluctuation of penumbral magnetic field is much less dramatic than the fluctuation in intensity, (3) there is a suggestion of a rapid change in field inclination between some light and dark filaments near the edge of the penumbra, and (4) there is no obvious correlation between Doppler shift (in part due to the Evershed flow) and filament intensity. 43 refs.

  17. Effect of buffer structures on AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor reliability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, L. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Xi, Y. Y. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Ren, F. [University of Florida; Pearton, S. J. [University of Florida; Laboutin, O. [Kopin Corporation, Taunton, MA; Cao, Yu [Kopin Corporation, Taunton, MA; Johnson, Wayne J. [Kopin Corporation, Taunton, MA; Kravchenko, Ivan I [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) with three different types of buffer layers, including a GaN/AlGaN composite layer, or 1 or 2 lm GaN thick layers, were fabricated and their reliability compared. The HEMTs with the thick GaN buffer layer showed the lowest critical voltage (Vcri) during off-state drain step-stress, but this was increased by around 50% and 100% for devices with the composite AlGaN/GaN buffer layers or thinner GaN buffers, respectively. The Voff - state for HEMTs with thin GaN and composite buffers were 100 V, however, this degraded to 50 60V for devices with thick GaN buffers due to the difference in peak electric field near the gate edge. A similar trend was observed in the isolation breakdown voltage measurements, with the highest Viso achieved based on thin GaN or composite buffer designs (600 700 V), while a much smaller Viso of 200V was measured on HEMTs with the thick GaN buffer layers. These results demonstrate the strong influence of buffer structure and defect density on AlGaN/GaN HEMT performance and reliability.

  18. Optical non-reciprocity in magnetic structures related to high-T_c superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orenstein, Joseph W

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cuprates. High-T c superconductivity in the cuprates remainstemperature for superconductivity. Instead, the mostrelated to high-T c superconductors J. Orenstein Department

  19. Wurtzite GaN surface structures studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and reflection high energy electron diffraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtzite GaN surface structures studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and reflection high energy-face of wurtzite GaN films grown using molecular beam epitaxy. N-face reconstructions are primarily adatom numerous surface studies of wurtzite GaN have been performed, progress in determining the true surface

  20. Structural characterization of water-bearing silicate and aluminosilicate glasses by high-resolution solid-state NMR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Structural characterization of water-bearing silicate and aluminosilicate glasses by high-resolution solid-state NMR techniques have been applied to hydrous silicate and aluminosilicate glasses: simple as to completely exclude any of the different previously proposed models for water incorporation in silicate

  1. Self-powered micro-structured solid state neutron detector with very low leakage current and high efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    Self-powered micro-structured solid state neutron detector with very low leakage current and high, fabrication, and performance of solid-state neutron detector based on three-dimensional honeycomb-like silicon supply of 3 He gas.2 Solid state neutron detectors (SSND) can overcome many short- comings of gas tube

  2. Characterising the secondary structure changes occurring in high density systems of BLG dissolved in aqueous pH 3 buffer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ioannou, J. C.; Donald, A. M.; Tromp, R. H.

    2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    to be structured by adding starch and/or oil. Therefore, in-depth knowledge of protein folding/unfolding which can relate to the hydration and solubility of food proteins at high concentrations (e.g. as in the mouth during consumption) is also very important...

  3. Batch Logo --A Strategy for Introducin g PL/1 and Structured Programming to Gifted High School Student s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drew, Mark S.

    Batch Logo -- A Strategy for Introducin g PL/1 and Structured Programming to Gifted High School of the use of ideas borrowed fro m LOGO . We felt that the concepts from a program such as LOGO, even t success graphically . 2. The Teaching Strategy : LOGO in PL 1 The main objective was to gauge th e

  4. The Time Structure of Hadronic Showers in Highly Granular Calorimeters with Tungsten and Steel Absorbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The CALICE Collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The intrinsic time structure of hadronic showers influences the timing capability and the required integration time of hadronic calorimeters in particle physics experiments, and depends

  5. Vibronic fine structure in high-resolution x-ray absorption spectra from ion-bombarded boron nitride nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petravic, Mladen; Peter, Robert; Varasanec, Marijana [Department of Physics and Center for Micro and Nano Sciences and Technologies, University of Rijeka, 51000 Rijeka (Croatia); Li Luhua; Chen Ying [Institute for Technology Research and Innovation, Deakin University, Geelong Waurn Ponds Campus, 3217 (Australia); Cowie, Bruce C. C. [Australian Synchrotron, Clayton VIC 3168 (Australia)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have applied high-resolution near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure measurements around the nitrogen K-edge to study the effects of ion-bombardment on near-surface properties of boron nitride nanotubes. A notable difference has been observed between surface sensitive partial electron yield (PEY) and bulk sensitive total electron yield (TEY) fine-structure measurements. The authors assign the PEY fine structure to the coupling of excited molecular vibrational modes to electronic transitions in NO molecules trapped just below the surface. Oxidation resistance of the boron nitride nanotubes is significantly reduced by low energy ion bombardment, as broken B-N bonds are replaced by N-O bonds involving oxygen present in the surface region. In contrast to the PEY spectra, the bulk sensitive TEY measurements on as-grown samples do not exhibit any fine structure while the ion-bombarded samples show a clear vibronic signature of molecular nitrogen.

  6. Spontaneous formation of highly regular superlattice structure in InGaN epilayers grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Z. H. [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Graduate School of Engineering, Akasaki Research Center, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Kawai, Y.; Honda, Y.; Yamaguchi, M.; Amano, H. [Graduate School of Engineering, Akasaki Research Center, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Fang, Y.-Y.; Chen, C. Q. [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Kondo, H.; Hori, M. [Graduate School of Engineering, Plasma Nanotechnology Research Center, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2011-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In this letter, we have investigated the structural properties of thick InGaN layers grown on GaN by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy, using two growth rates of 1.0 and 3.6 A/s. A highly regular superlattice (SL) structure is found to be spontaneously formed in the film grown at 3.6 A/s but not in the film grown at 1.0 A/s. The faster grown film also exhibits superior structural quality, which could be due to the surface roughness suppression caused by kinetic limitation, and the inhibition of the Frank-Read dislocation generation mechanism within the spontaneously formed SL structure.

  7. Low cost and high performance light trapping structure for thin-film solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, DongLin; Su, Gang

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nano-scaled dielectric and metallic structures are popular light tapping structures in thin-film solar cells. However, a large parasitic absorption in those structures is unavoidable. Most schemes based on such structures also involve the textured active layers that may bring undesirable degradation of the material quality. Here we propose a novel and cheap light trapping structure based on the prism structured SiO2 for thin-film solar cells, and a flat active layer is introduced purposefully. Such a light trapping structure is imposed by the geometrical shape optimization to gain the best optical benefit. By examining our scheme, it is disclosed that the conversion efficiency of the flat a-Si:H thin-film solar cell can be promoted to exceed the currently certified highest value. As the cost of SiO2-based light trapping structure is much cheaper and easier to fabricate than other materials, this proposal would have essential impact and wide applications in thin-film solar cells.

  8. Status of High Power Tests of Normal Conducting Single-Cell Standing Wave Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolgashev, Valery; /SLAC; Tantawi, Sami; /SLAC; Yeremian, Anahid; /SLAC; Higashi, Yasuo; /KEK, Tsukuba; Spataro, Bruno; /INFN, Rome

    2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Our experiments are directed toward the understanding of the physics of rf breakdown in systems that can be used to accelerate electron beams at {approx}11.4 GHz. The structure geometries have apertures, stored energy per cell, and rf pulse duration close to that of the NLC or CLIC. The breakdown rate is the main parameter that we use to compare rf breakdown behavior for different structures at a given set of rf pulse parameters (pulse shape and peak power) at 60 Hz repetition rate. In our experiments, the typical range of the breakdown rate is from one per few hours to {approx}100 per hour. To date we have tested 29 structures. We consistently found that after the initial conditioning, the behavior of the breakdown rate is reproducible for structures of the same geometry and material, and the breakdown rate dependence on peak magnetic fields is stronger than on peak surface electric fields for structures of different geometries. Below we report the main results from tests of seven structures made from hard copper, soft copper alloys and hard-copper alloys. Additional details on these and other structures will be discussed in future publications.

  9. HIGH-RESOLUTION HELIOSEISMIC IMAGING OF SUBSURFACE STRUCTURES AND FLOWS OF A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION OBSERVED BY HINODE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao Junwei; Kosovichev, Alexander G. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States); Sekii, Takashi [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze a solar active region observed by the Hinode Ca II H line using the time-distance helioseismology technique, and infer wave-speed perturbation structures and flow fields beneath the active region with a high spatial resolution. The general subsurface wave-speed structure is similar to the previous results obtained from Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Michelson Doppler Imager observations. The general subsurface flow structure is also similar, and the downward flows beneath the sunspot and the mass circulations around the sunspot are clearly resolved. Below the sunspot, some organized divergent flow cells are observed, and these structures may indicate the existence of mesoscale convective motions. Near the light bridge inside the sunspot, hotter plasma is found beneath, and flows divergent from this area are observed. The Hinode data also allow us to investigate potential uncertainties caused by the use of phase-speed filter for short travel distances. Comparing the measurements with and without the phase-speed filtering, we find out that inside the sunspot, mean acoustic travel times are in basic agreement, but the values are underestimated by a factor of 20%-40% inside the sunspot umbra for measurements with the filtering. The initial acoustic tomography results from Hinode show a great potential of using high-resolution observations for probing the internal structure and dynamics of sunspots.

  10. Understanding and Improving High-Temperature Structural Properties of Metal-Silicide Intermetallics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce S. Kang

    2005-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to understand and improve high-temperature structural properties of metal-silicide intermetallic alloys. Through research collaboration between the research team at West Virginia University (WVU) and Dr. J.H. Schneibel at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), molybdenum silicide alloys were developed at ORNL and evaluated at WVU through atomistic modeling analyses, thermo-mechanical tests, and metallurgical studies. In this study, molybdenum-based alloys were ductilized by dispersing MgAl2O4 or MgO spinel particles. The addition of spinel particles is hypothesized to getter impurities such as oxygen and nitrogen from the alloy matrix with the result of ductility improvement. The introduction of fine dispersions has also been postulated to improve ductility by acting as a dislocation source or reducing dislocation pile-ups at grain boundaries. The spinel particles, on the other hand, can also act as local notches or crack initiation sites, which is detrimental to the alloy mechanical properties. Optimization of material processing condition is important to develop the desirable molybdenum alloys with sufficient room-temperature ductility. Atomistic analyses were conducted to further understand the mechanism of ductility improvement of the molybdenum alloys and the results showed that trace amount of residual oxygen may be responsible for the brittle behavior of the as-cast Mo alloys. For the alloys studied, uniaxial tensile tests were conducted at different loading rates, and at room and elevated temperatures. Thermal cycling effect on the mechanical properties was also studied. Tensile tests for specimens subjected to either ten or twenty thermal cycles were conducted. For each test, a follow-up detailed fractography and microstructural analysis were carried out. The test results were correlated to the size, density, distribution of the spinel particles and processing time. Thermal expansion tests were carried out using thermo-mechanical analyzer (TMA). Results showed that the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) value decreases with the addition of spinel and silicide particles. Thermo-cycling tests showed that molybdenum alloy with 6% wt of spinel (MgAl2O4) developed microcracks which were caused by thermal expansion mismatch between the spinel particles and molybdenum matrix, as well as the processing conditions. Detailed post-mortem studies of microstructures and segregation of impurities to the oxide dispersion/Mo interfaces were conducted using x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS).

  11. Synthesis, structure and properties of high pressure and ambient pressure ternary vanadium oxides 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markkula, Mikael

    2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Transition metal oxides have been extensively studied during past decades. The purpose of this research was to synthesize new or little characterised transition metal oxides using high-pressure/high-temperature (HPHT) ...

  12. Optical non-reciprocity in magnetic structures related to high-T_c superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orenstein, Joseph W

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    related to high-T c superconductors J. Orenstein Departmentphase in cuprate superconductors. This ?nding is independent

  13. High-Throughput 3D Structural Homology Detection via NMR Resonance Christopher James Langmead

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, David

    is the number of residues in the tar- get protein and c is the maximum edge weight in an integer- weighted for two dissimilar amino acid sequences to fold to the "same" ter- tiary structure. For example, the RMSD

  14. High-temperature superconductors as electromagnetic deployment and support structures in spacecraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gettliffe, Gwendolyn Vines

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, we investigate a new structural and mechanical technique aimed at reducing the mass and increasing the stowed-to-deployed ratio of spacecraft systems. This technique uses the magnetic fields generated by ...

  15. Model-based design of an ultra high performance concrete support structure for a wind turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zheng, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A support tower is the main structure which would support rotor, power transmission and control systems, and elevates the rotating blades above the earth boundary layer. A successful design should ensure safe, efficient ...

  16. Fabrication of spatial transient-density structures as high-field plasma photonic devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /plasma density structures with such a scheme is an essential step in the development of plasma photonic devices by a subse- quent long heater pulse, the plasma density is greatly re- duced as a result of hydrodynamic

  17. Two Channel Dielectric-Lined Rectangular High Transformer Ratio Accelerator Structure Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shchelkunov, S. V.; LaPointe, M. A. [Beam Physics Laboratory, Yale University, 272 Whitney Avenue, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Hirshfield, J. L. [Beam Physics Laboratory, Yale University, 272 Whitney Avenue, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Omega-P, Inc., 258 Bradley St., New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Marshall, T. C. [Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Omega-P, Inc., 258 Bradley St., New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Sotnikov, G. [NSC Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Kharkov (Ukraine); Omega-P, Inc., 258 Bradley St., New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Gai, Wei; Conde, M.; Power, J.; Mihalcea, D. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2010-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Current status of a two-channel cm-scale rectangular dielectric lined wakefield accelerator structure is described. This structure is installed at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator facility (AWA), and is presently being evaluated. The device has a transformer ratio of {approx}12.5:1. When driven by a {approx}50 nC single drive bunch it is expected to obtain {approx}6 MV/m acceleration gradient. Related issues are discussed.

  18. Structure Analysis of a Precipitate Phase in an Ni-Rich High Temperature NiTiHf Shape Memory Alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Fan; Coughlin, D. R.; Phillips, Patrick J.; Yang, L.; Devaraj, Arun; Kovarik, Libor; Noebe, Ronald D.; Mills, M. J.

    2013-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal aging of the high temperature shape memory alloy 50.3Ni-29.7Ti-20Hf (at.%) introduces a novel precipitate phase, which plays an important role in improving shape memory properties. The precipitate phase was investigated by conventional electron diffraction, high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and three dimensional atom probe tomography. An unrelaxed orthorhombic atomic structural model is proposed based on these observations. This model was subsequently relaxed by ab initio calculations. As a result of the relaxation, atom shuffle displacements occur, which in turn yields improved agreement with the STEM images. The relaxed structure, which is termed the “H-phase”, has also been verified to be thermodymanically stable at 0 K.

  19. High quantum efficiency photocathode simulation for the investigation of novel structured designs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Opachich, Y. P., E-mail: opachiyp@nv.doe.gov; Ross, P. W.; Huffman, E.; Koch, J. A. [National Security Technologies LLC, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); MacPhee, A. G.; Nagel, S. R.; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Hilsabeck, T. J. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A computer model in CST Studio Suite has been developed to evaluate several novel geometrically enhanced photocathode designs. This work was aimed at identifying a structure that would increase the total electron yield by a factor of two or greater in the 1–30 keV range. The modeling software was used to simulate the electric field and generate particle tracking for several potential structures. The final photocathode structure has been tailored to meet a set of detector performance requirements, namely, a spatial resolution of <40 ?m and a temporal spread of 1–10 ps. We present the details of the geometrically enhanced photocathode model and resulting static field and electron emission characteristics.

  20. Development of a CO?b2?s laser-based system for characterization of high-temperature structural ceramics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowman, David Winslow

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as to style and content by: cZ~ Christian P. Burger (Chair of Committee) Ravin buona ember) Ahmed Gadalla (Member) Walter L. Bradley (Head of Department) May 1991 ABSTRACT Development of a COz Laser-based System for Characterization of High... that will retain good structural properties, particularly strength and toughness, at higher temperatures and over longer exposure times, than are currently attainable with existing metallic superalloys or ceramic systems. The current continuous operating...

  1. High-pressure synthesis and structure of a new aurate, CaAu{sub 2}O{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, J.H.; Parise, J.B. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel aurate, CaAu{sub 2}O{sub 4}, after synthesis under high-pressure conditions was recovered to room temperature by quenching. The structure, determined with synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction and single-crystal X-ray data by model building, was refined using the Rietveld techniques. It contains corner-shared AuO{sub 4} square planes and CaO{sub 8} dodecahedra. 25 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. High-temperature-oxidation-induced ordered structure in Inconel 939 superalloy exposed to oxy-combustion environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Jingxi; Wise, Adam; Nuhfer, Thomas; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Jablonski, Paul D.; Sridhar, Seetharaman; Laughlin, David E.

    2013-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In the integrated oxy-fuel combustion and turbine power generation system, turbine alloys are exposed to high temperature and an atmosphere comprised of steam, CO2 and O2. While surface and internal oxidation of the alloy takes place, the microstructure in the subsurface region also changes due to oxidation that results in the loss of the strengthening precipitates. In an earlier study of the oxidation of Inconel 939 Ni-based superalloy exposed to oxy-fuel combustion environment for up to 1000 hours, a high-temperature-oxidation-induced phase transformation in the sub-surface region was noticed and a two-phase region formed at the expense of strengthening ?' phase. While one of the two phases was identified as the Ni-matrix (? solid solution, face-center-cubic) phase, the other product phase remained unidentified. In this study, the crystal structure of the unknown phase and its orientation relationship with the parent Ni-matrix phase was investigated through electron diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. It was determined that the crystal structure of the unknown phase could be modeled as a ternary derivative of the ordered ?-Ni3Ti phase (D024) structure with lattice parameters of a = 0.5092 nm and c = 0.8336 nm, ? = 90º, ? = 90º and ? = 120º.

  3. Detailed Architecture of a DNA Translocating Machine: The High-resolution Structure of the Bacteriophage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossmann, Michael G.

    . The structure suggests a translocation mechanism in which the longitudinal displacement of the DNA along its of the best known. f29 is a small double- stranded DNA bacteriophage that infects Bacillus subtilis cells from its distal part. Electron microscopy studies, based on two- dimensional projections and three

  4. High-resolution imaging of lowermost mantle structure under the Cocos plate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garnero, Ed

    ] Broadband seismic shear waves are analyzed to investigate the fine-velocity structure in the lowermost in an approximately 700 km long north-south corridor, roughly 150 km wide. Application of a simplified seismic mantle, (2) the birth of an upwelling beneath a recumbent slab, or (3) chemical layering in this region

  5. High Overtone Quasinormal Modes of Analog Black Holes and the Small Scale Structure of the Background Fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramin G. Daghigh; Michael D. Green

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this paper is to build a foundation for, and explore the possibility of, using high overtone quasinormal modes of analog black holes to probe the small scale (microscopic) structure of a background fluid in which an analog black hole is formed. This may provide a tool to study the small scale structure of some interesting quantum systems such as Bose-Einstein condensates. In order to build this foundation, we first look into the hydrodynamic case where we calculate the high overtone quasinormal mode frequencies of a 3+1 dimensional canonical non-rotating acoustic black hole. The leading order calculations have been done earlier in the literature. Here, we obtain the first order correction. We then analyze the high overtone quasinormal modes of acoustic black holes in a Bose-Einstein condensate using the linearized Gross-Pitaevskii equation. We point out that at the high overtone quasinormal mode limit, the only term that is important in the linearized Gross-Pitaevskii equation is the quantum potential term, which is a small scale effect.

  6. Prospects for accelerated development of high performance structural materials Steven J. Zinkle a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    evolved into high-performance 9%Cr reduced-activation ferritic­martensitic steels with superior mechanical strength- ened (ODS) steels are being investigated in worldwide research programs for potential

  7. New Measurements of High-Momentum Nucleons and Short-Range Structures in Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Filippone, Bradley W.

    We present new measurements of electron scattering from high-momentum nucleons in nuclei. These data allow an improved determination of the strength of two-nucleon correlations for several nuclei, including light nuclei ...

  8. Pedestal structure and stability in high-performance plasmas on Alcator C-Mod

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walk, John Reel, Jr

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-performance operation in tokamaks is characterized by the formation of a pedestal, a region of suppressed transport and steep gradients in density, temperature, and pressure near the plasma edge. The pedestal height ...

  9. Structural performance of early 20th century masonry high rise buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buntrock, Rebecca (Rebecca Miriam)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Early generation high rise buildings built between 1890 and World War 11 represent a technical transition between traditional load bearing masonry construction and modern curtain wall systems, and are typically referred ...

  10. Structural optimization of 3D-printed synthetic spider webs for high strength

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Zhao

    Spiders spin intricate webs that serve as sophisticated prey-trapping architectures that simultaneously exhibit high strength, elasticity and graceful failure. To determine how web mechanics are controlled by their topological ...

  11. Improvements on carbon nanotube structures in high-energy density ultracapacitor electrode design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jenicek, David P. (David Pierre)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultracapacitors are a class of electrochemical energy storage device that is gaining significant industrial traction due to their high charging rate and cycle life compared to rechargeable batteries; however, they store ...

  12. New measurements of high-momentum nucleons and short-range structures in nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fomin, N; Asaturyan, R; Benmokhtar, F; Boeglin, W; Bosted, P; Bruell, A; Bukhari, M H S; Chudakov, E; Clasie, B; Connell, S H; Dalton, M M; Daniel, A; Day, D B; Dutta, D; Ent, R; Fassi, L El; Fenker, H; Filippone, B W; Garrow, K; Gaskell, D; Hill, C; Holt, R J; Horn, T; Jones, M K; Jourdan, J; Kalantarians, N; Keppel, C E; Kiselev, D; Kotulla, M; Lindgren, R; Lung, A F; Malace, S; Markowitz, P; McKee, P; Meekins, D G; Mkrtchyan, H; Navasardyan, T; Niculescu, G; Opper, A K; Perdrisat, C; Potterveld, D H; Punjabi, V; Qian, X; Reimer, P E; Roche, J; Rodriguez, V M; Rondon, O; Schulte, E; Seely, J; Segbefia, E; Slifer, K; Smith, G R; Solvignon, P; Tadevosyan, V; Tajima, S; Tang, L; Testa, G; Trojer, R; Tvaskis, V; Vulcan, W F; Wasko, C; Wesselmann, F R; Wood, S A; Wright, J; Zheng, X

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new, high-Q^2 measurements of inclusive electron scattering from high-momentum nucleons in nuclei. This yields an improved extraction of the strength of two-nucleon correlations for several nuclei, including light nuclei where clustering effects can, for the first time, be examined. The data extend to the kinematic regime where three-nucleon correlations are expected to dominate and we observe significantly greater strength in this region than previous measurements.

  13. New measurements of high-momentum nucleons and short-range structures in nuclei

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fomin, N; Arrington, J; Benmokhtar, F; Boeglin, W; Bosted, P; Bruell, A; Bukhari, M.H. S; Chudakov, E; Clasie, B; Connell, S H; Dalton, M M; Daniel, A; Day, D B; Dutta, D; Ent, R; El Fassi, L; Fenker, H; Filippone, B W; Garrow, K; Gaskell, D; Hill, C; Holt, R J; Horn, T; Jones, M K; Jourdan, J; Kalantarians, N; Keppel, C E; Kiselev, D; Kotulla, M; Lindgren, R; Lung, A F; Malace, S; Markowitz, P; McKee, P; Meekins, D G; Mkrtchyan, H; Navasardyan, T; Niculescu, G; Opper, A K; Perdrisat, C; Potterveld, D H; Punjabi, V; Qian, X; Reimer, P E; Roche, J; Rodriguez, V M; Rondon, O; Schulte, E; Seely, J; Segbefia, E; Slifer, K; Smith, G R; Solvignon, P; Tadevosyan, V; Tajima, S; Tang, L; Testa, G; Trojer, R; Tvaskis, V; Vulcan, W F; Wasko, C; Wesselmann, F R; Wood, S A

    2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new, high-Q2 measurements of inclusive electron scattering from high-momentum nucleons in nuclei. This yields an improved extraction of the strength of two-nucleon correlations for several nuclei, including light nuclei where clustering effects can, for the first time, be examined. The data extend to the kinematic regime where three-nucleon correlations are expected to dominate and we observe significantly greater strength in this region than previous measurements.

  14. Structural distortions in 5-10 nm silver nanoparticles under high pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koski, Kristie J.; Kamp, Noelle M.; Kunz, Martin; Knight, Jason K.; Alivisatos, A.P.; Smith, R.K.

    2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present experimental evidence that silver nanoparticles in the size range of 5-10 nm undergo a reversible structural transformation under hydrostatic pressures up to 10 GPa. We have used x-ray diffraction with a synchrotron light source to investigate pressure-dependent and size-dependent trends in the crystal structure of silver nanoparticles in a hydrostatic medium compressed in a diamond-anvil cell. Results suggest a reversible linear pressure-dependent rhombohedral distortion which has not been previously observed in bulk silver. We propose a mechanism for this transition that considers the bond-length distribution in idealized multiply twinned icosahedral particles. To further support this hypothesis, we also show that similar measurements of single-crystal platinum nanoparticles reveal no such distortions.

  15. Nitrogen heat treatments of superconducting niobium radio frequency cavities: a pathway to highly efficient accelerating structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grassellino, A; Melnychuk, O; Trenikhina, Y; Crawford, A; Rowe, A; Wong, M; Sergatskov, D; Khabiboulline, T; Barkov, F

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the experimental finding of a new surface treatment that systematically improves the quality factor of niobium radio frequency cavities for particle acceleration. A combination of annealing in a partial pressure of nitrogen and subsequent electropolishing of the niobium cavity surface leads to extremely low values of the cavities microwave surface resistance, and an improvement in the efficiency of these accelerating structures up to a factor of 3 compared to standard surface treatments, significantly reducing the cryogenic load of SRF cavities for both pulsed and continuous duty cycles. The field dependence of the Mattis-Bardeen/BCS surface resistance RBCS is reversed compared to that of standard chemically polished niobium with dRBCS/dB < 0 in the full range of investigated fields. This treatment can lead to even larger efficiency gains at increasing operating frequencies, and potentially to even larger cost savings by reducing the size of the accelerating structures.

  16. Influence of high-temperature firing in vacuum on the structural properties of yttrium oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solov'eva, A.E.; Artemova, K.K.; Kipshidze, A.V.; Rudenko, L.A.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article presents the results of a study of the influence of firing in the range 1900-2300 degrees C in vacuum on the structural properties of yttrium oxide. It was found that in the 1900-2300 degrees C range there are changes in the mass, the phase composition, and the color of the specimens. Increasing of the firing temperature to 2300 degrees C leads to an increase in the mass loss to 50% over a period of 9 h.

  17. A tribological and biomimetic study of potential bone joint repair materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribeiro, Rahul

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    microscope. Debris morphology and structure was investigated using a transmission electron microscope. The debris composition was analyzed using an X-ray diffractometer. Nanoindentation was incorporated to investigate the surface nanomechanical properties...

  18. The influence of selected containment structures on debris dispersal and transport following high pressure melt ejection from the reactor vessel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilch, M.; Tarbell, W.W.; Brockmann, J.E.

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High pressure expulsion of molten core debris from the reactor pressure vessel may result in dispersal of the debris from the reactor cavity. In most plants, the cavity exits into the containment such that the debris impinges on structures. Retention of the debris on the structures may affect the further transport of the debris throughout the containment. Two tests were done with scaled structural shapes placed at the exit of 1:10 linear scale models of the Zion cavity. The results show that the debris does not adhere significantly to structures. The lack of retention is attributed to splashing from the surface and reentrainment in the gas flowing over the surface. These processes are shown to be applicable to reactor scale. A third experiment was done to simulate the annular gap between the reactor vessel and cavity wall. Debris collection showed that the fraction of debris exiting through the gap was greater than the gap-to-total flow area ratio. Film records indicate that dispersal was primarily by entrainment of the molten debris in the cavity. 29 refs., 36 figs., 11 tabs.

  19. Characterization of the coherent structure in a high speed subsonic jet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wattanachayakul, Montri

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    number Reynolds number PUD Re 0 local hot-wire Reynolds number, P"~w U hot-wire resistance Symbol Description R reference hot-wire resistance St S aw Strouhal number, fD/U hot-wire overheat ratio, lV r %V r T R r 1 T aw adiabatic hot... the structure of the jet. Compressed air is supplied by a reciprocating compressor to a 30 cm. diameter stilling chamber by way of a storage tank, water after cooler, two water separator/filters and a pressure regulator. The water after cooler was used...

  20. Size dependence of cubic to trigonal structural distortion in silver micro- and nanocrystals under high pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Qixum [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhao, Yusheng [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zin, Zhijun [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Zhongwu [CORNELL UNIV; Skrabalak, Sara E [INDIANA UNIV; Xia, Younan [WASHINGTON UNIV

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Silver micro- and nanocrystals with sizes of {approx}2--3.5 {mu}m and {approx}50--100 nm were uniaxially compressed under nonhydrostatic pressures (strong deviatoric stress) up to {approx}30 GPa at room temperature in a symmetric diamond-anvil cell and studied in situ using angle-dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction. A cubic to trigonal structural distortion along a 3-fold rotational axis was discovered by careful and comprehensive analysis of the apparent lattice parameter and full width at half-maximum, which are strongly dependent upon the Miller index and crystal size.

  1. Area detector corrections for high quality synchrotron X-ray structure factor measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skinner L. B.; Parise J.; Benmore, C.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Correction procedures for obtaining accurate X-ray structure factors from large area detectors are considered, including subpanel effects, over excited pixels and careful intensity corrections. Problems associated with data normalization, the use of a pixel response correction from a glass standard and minimization of systematic errors are also discussed. Data from glassy GeSe{sub 2} and liquid water measured with a Perkin Elmer amorphous-Silicon detector are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of these correction procedures. This requires reduction of systematic errors in the measured intensity to around the 0.1% level.

  2. Mach number dependence of the coherent structure in high speed subsonic jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitaker, Kevin William

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    square wave input. The 20-60 VDC was provided by a Power Nate Corporation Nodel BPN-60D power supply and the 15 VDC was built internal to the device. The device ooerated by generating sufficient voltage to create a spark across a 1. 5 mm gap between... model. In this study, the coherent structure was described using a wave type description of the same form used in linear stability analyses. The reason for this selection was that some 1-10 analytical noise prediction techniques use this model...

  3. Structural and mechanical response to a thermo-rheologic history of spinel sludge in high-level waste glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiricka, Milos (ASSOC WESTERN UNIVERSITY); Hrma, Pavel R. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The composition and structure of a sludge sample from a high-level waste glass melter were studied using optical and scanning electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction. At isothermal heat treatments between 1050 C and 1350 C, spinel crystals partly dissolved to form on cooling tiny ({approx}10 um) star-like crystals or dendrites. The shear stress in sludge was measured at a constant shear rate (from 0.005 s{sup -1} to 1.0 s{sup -1}) and temperature (from 1050 C to 1350?C) during repeated deformation and after idling. The initial thixotropic character of the loose structure of the settled sludge turned on subsequent deformation (and idling) to rheopectic behavior. As the spinel concentration in the sludge decreased from 28 mass% (sludge as received) to 15 mass% at 1300 C, the sludge turned into a Newtonian suspension.

  4. A high-order discontinuous Galerkin method for fluid–structure interaction with efficient implicit–explicit time stepping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Froehle, Bradley, E-mail: bfroehle@berkeley.edu; Persson, Per-Olof, E-mail: persson@berkeley.edu

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a high-order accurate scheme for coupled fluid–structure interaction problems. The fluid is discretized using a discontinuous Galerkin method on unstructured tetrahedral meshes, and the structure uses a high-order volumetric continuous Galerkin finite element method. Standard radial basis functions are used for the mesh deformation. The time integration is performed using a partitioned approach based on implicit–explicit Runge–Kutta methods. The resulting scheme fully decouples the implicit solution procedures for the fluid and the solid parts, which we perform using two separate efficient parallel solvers. We demonstrate up to fifth order accuracy in time on a non-trivial test problem, on which we also show that additional subiterations are not required. We solve a benchmark problem of a cantilever beam in a shedding flow, and show good agreement with other results in the literature. Finally, we solve for the flow around a thin membrane at a high angle of attack in both 2D and 3D, and compare with the results obtained with a rigid plate.

  5. New measurements of high-momentum nucleons and short-range structures in nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Fomin; J. Arrington; R. Asaturyan; F. Benmokhtar; W. Boeglin; P. Bosted; A. Bruell; M. H. S. Bukhari; E. Chudakov; B. Clasie; S. H. Connell; M. M. Dalton; A. Daniel; D. B. Day; D. Dutta; R. Ent; L. El Fassi; H. Fenker; B. W. Filippone; K. Garrow; D. Gaskell; C. Hill; R. J. Holt; T. Horn; M. K. Jones; J. Jourdan; N. Kalantarians; C. E. Keppel; D. Kiselev; M. Kotulla; R. Lindgren; A. F. Lung; S. Malace; P. Markowitz; P. McKee; D. G. Meekins; H. Mkrtchyan; T. Navasardyan; G. Niculescu; A. K. Opper; C. Perdrisat; D. H. Potterveld; V. Punjabi; X. Qian; P. E. Reimer; J. Roche; V. M. Rodriguez; O. Rondon; E. Schulte; J. Seely; E. Segbefia; K. Slifer; G. R. Smith; P. Solvignon; V. Tadevosyan; S. Tajima; L. Tang; G. Testa; R. Trojer; V. Tvaskis; W. F. Vulcan; C. Wasko; F. R. Wesselmann; S. A. Wood; J. Wright; X. Zheng

    2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new measurements of electron scattering from high-momentum nucleons in nuclei. These data allow an improved determination of the strength of two-nucleon correlations for several nuclei, including light nuclei where clustering effects can, for the first time, be examined. The data also include the kinematic region where three-nucleon correlations are expected to dominate.

  6. Nano-structured anode material for high-power battery system in electric vehicles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amine, K.; Belharouak, I.; Chen, Z.; Taison, T.; Yumoto, H.; Ota, N.; Myung, S.-T.; Sun, Y.-K. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division); (Enerdel Lithium Power Systems); (Iwate Univ.); (Hanyang Univ.)

    2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A new MSNP-LTO anode is developed to enable a high-power battery system that provides three times more power than any existing battery system. It shows excellent cycle life and low-temperature performance, and exhibits unmatched safety characteristics.

  7. RUI: Structure and Behavior of RF-Driven Plasma Filaments in High-Pressure Gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burin, Michael [CSUSM

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The filamentary discharge seen within commercial plasma globes is commonly enjoyed, yet not well understood. We investigate filament properties in a plasma globe using a variable high voltage amplifier. Results from the 3-year grant period and their physics are discussed.

  8. Structural inference of native and partially folded RNA by high-throughput contact mapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herschlag, Dan

    of the P4­P6 RNA that is stabilized by high concentrations of monovalent salt and whose partial order to the dynamic but otherwise similar molten globule states of proteins. With its applicability to nearly any of large RNA molecules and RNA/protein complexes. hydroxyl radical molten globule Tetrahymena ribozyme two

  9. Turbulent structure of high-density suspensions formed under waves Michael P. Lamb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; KEYWORDS: wave boundary layer, oscillatory, high-density suspension, fluid mud, turbulent kinetic energy on the interactions between turbulent wave boundary layers and a predominantly silt-sized sediment bed. Under a wide, and sediment concentration revealed that the wave boundary layer, while typically >1 cm thick in sediment

  10. HIGH EFFICIENCY Cu(ln,Ga)SepBASED SOLAR CELLS: PROCESSING OF NOVEL ABSORBER STRUCTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scofield, John H.

    be more optimally solved by either lowering substrate temperature or finding other suitable and low-cost ABSTRACT Our effort towards the attainment of high performance devices has yielded several devices, and 15.3% for a 4.85-cm* single cell. Achievement of a 17.2% device efficiency fabricated for operation

  11. Methods for detecting flaring structures in Sagittarius A* with high frequency VLBI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheperd S. Doeleman; Vincent L. Fish; Avery E. Broderick; Abraham Loeb; Alan E. E. Rogers

    2008-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The super massive black hole candidate, Sagittarius A*, exhibits variability from radio to X-ray wavelengths on time scales that correspond to < 10 Schwarzschild radii. We survey the potential of millimeter-wavelength VLBI to detect and constrain time variable structures that could give rise to such variations, focusing on a model in which an orbiting hot spot is embedded in an accretion disk. Non-imaging algorithms are developed that use interferometric closure quantities to test for periodicity, and applied to an ensemble of hot-spot models that sample a range of parameter space. We find that structural periodicity in a wide range of cases can be detected on most potential VLBI arrays using modern VLBI instrumentation. Future enhancements of mm/sub-mm VLBI arrays including phased array processors to aggregate VLBI station collecting area, increased bandwidth recording, and addition of new VLBI sites all significantly aid periodicity detection. The methods described herein can be applied to other models of Sagittarius A*, including jet outflows and Magneto-Hydrodynamic accretion simulations.

  12. Defect structures induced by high-energy displacement cascades in c uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yinbin Miao; Benjamin Beeler; Chaitanya Deo; Maria A. Okuniewski; James F. Stubbins

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Displacement cascade simulations were conducted for the c uranium system based on molecular dynamics. A recently developed modified embedded atom method (MEAM) potential was employed to replicate the atomic interactions while an embedded atom method (EAM) potential was adopted to help characterize the defect structures induced by the displacement cascades. The atomic displacement process was studied by providing primary knock-on atoms (PKAs) with kinetic energies from 1 keV to 50 keV. The influence of the PKA incident direction was examined. The defect structures were analyzed after the systems were fully relaxed. The states of the self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) were categorized into various types of dumbbells, the crowdion, and the octahedral interstitial. The voids were determined to have a polyhedral shape with {110} facets. The size distribution of the voids was also obtained. The results of this study not only expand the knowledge of the microstructural evolution in irradiated c uranium, but also provide valuable references for the radiation-induced defects in uranium alloy fuels. 2014 Elsevier

  13. GeoChip 3.0: A High Throughput Tool for Analyzing Microbial Community, Composition, Structure, and Functional Activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Zhili; Deng, Ye; Nostrand, Joy Van; Tu, Qichao; Xu, Meiying; Hemme, Chris; Wu, Liyou; Hazen, Terry; Zhou, Jizhong; Li, Xingyuan; Gentry, Terry; Yin, Yifeng; Liebich, Jost

    2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Microarray-based genomic technology has been widely used for microbial community analysis, and it is expected that microarray-based genomic technologies will revolutionize the analysis of microbial community structure, function and dynamics. A new generation of functional gene arrays (GeoChip 3.0) has been developed, with 27,812 probes covering 56,990 gene variants from 292 functional gene families involved in carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur cycles, energy metabolism, antibiotic resistance, metal resistance, and organic contaminant degradation. Those probes were derived from 2,744, 140, and 262 species for bacteria, archaea, and fungi, respectively. GeoChip 3.0 has several other distinct features, such as a common oligo reference standard (CORS) for data normalization and comparison, a software package for data management and future updating, and the gyrB gene for phylogenetic analysis. Our computational evaluation of probe specificity indicated that all designed probes had a high specificity to their corresponding targets. Also, experimental analysis with synthesized oligonucleotides and genomic DNAs showed that only 0.0036percent-0.025percent false positive rates were observed, suggesting that the designed probes are highly specific under the experimental conditions examined. In addition, GeoChip 3.0 was applied to analyze soil microbial communities in a multifactor grassland ecosystem in Minnesota, USA, which demonstrated that the structure, composition, and potential activity of soil microbial communities significantly changed with the plant species diversity. All results indicate that GeoChip 3.0 is a high throughput powerful tool for studying microbial community functional structure, and linking microbial communities to ecosystem processes and functioning. To our knowledge, GeoChip 3.0 is the most comprehensive microarrays currently available for studying microbial communities associated with geobiochemical cycling, global climate change, bioenergy, agricuture, land use, ecosystem management, environmental cleanup and restoration, bioreactor systems, and human health.

  14. Magnetic structure of the high temperature superconductor Gd{sub 1–x}Th{sub x}FeAsO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee-Hone, N. R.; Ryan, D. H., E-mail: dhryan@physics.mcgill.ca [Physics Department and Centre for the Physics of Materials, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2T8 (Canada); Cadogan, J. M. [School of Physical, Environmental and Mathematical Sciences, UNSW Canberra at the Australian Defence Force Academy, Canberra, BC 2610 (Australia); Sun, Y. L.; Cao, G. H. [Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The magnetic structure of the high temperature superconductor Gd{sub 1–x}Th{sub x}FeAsO (x?=?0, 0.25) has been determined by neutron powder diffraction. The Gd moments were found to order at T{sub N} ? 4?K and to lie in the basal plane, and form alternating ferromagnetic sheets along the c-axis. The orientation of the gadolinium moments in both the doped and undoped compounds has been confirmed using {sup 155}Gd Mössbauer spectroscopy.

  15. The structural and mechanical properties of a Cu??Zr??(at. %) alloy processed by High-Velocity-Injection (HVI)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hays, Charles C.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    /vacuum coupled pressure gradient. The molten jet rapidly solidifies, as it is in good thermal contact wi th the cir- cular walls of the copper channel. This process (melting and injection) is carried out in inert protective atmospheres (helium). The samples... produced are in the form of cylindrical rods with large length to diameter ratios (40:1). The samples exhibit a good sur- face finish and are of high density. The structural and mechanical characterization of the Cu6 Zr 0(at. %%u) samples produced...

  16. Human walking adaptations to distant limb mass disturbances : investigating biomimetic performance objectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swilling, Benjamin John

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Online optimal trajectory planning is required in the control of humanoid robots, advanced prostheses, and impaired human limbs via functional neuromuscular stimulation . Optimization problems that involve complex, high ...

  17. Crump Geyser: High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration & Slim Well Drilling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objectives: Discover new 260F and 300F geothermal reservoirs in Oregon. To demonstrate the application of high precision geophysics for well targeting. Demonstrate a combined testing approach to Flowing Differential Self Potential (FDSP) and electrical tomography resistivity as a guide to exploration and development. Demonstrate utility and benefits of sump-less drilling for a low environmental impact. Create both short and long term employment through exploration, accelerated development timeline and operation.

  18. THE STRUCTURAL CHEMISTRY OF MOLYBDENUM IN MODEL HIGH LEVEL NUCLEAR WASTE GLASSES, INVESTIGATED BY MO K-EDGE X-RAY ABSORPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheffield, University of

    THE STRUCTURAL CHEMISTRY OF MOLYBDENUM IN MODEL HIGH LEVEL NUCLEAR WASTE GLASSES, INVESTIGATED of molybdenum in model UK high level nuclear waste glasses was investigated by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). Molybdenum K-edge XAS data were acquired from several inactive simulant high level nuclear waste

  19. 2546 IEEE 1`RANSACTIONS ON ELECTRON DEVICES, VOL. ED-32, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 1985 their high-current drivability. However, their structure is so tom-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodall, Jerry M.

    2546 IEEE 1`RANSACTIONS ON ELECTRON DEVICES, VOL. ED-32, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 1985 their high-current drivability. However, their structure is so tom- plicated that it is difficult to fabricate fine devices and high-deltsity IC's. This paper reports a new high-speed device utilizing a 21XEG heterostrucure, which

  20. Ultra-high-resolution Observations of MHD Waves in Photospheric Magnetic Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jess, David B

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we review the recent progress made in the detection, examination, characterisation and interpretation of oscillations manifesting in small-scale magnetic elements in the solar photosphere. This region of the Sun's atmosphere is especially dynamic, and importantly, permeated with an abundance of magnetic field concentrations. Such magnetic features can span diameters of hundreds to many tens of thousands of km, and are thus commonly referred to as the `building blocks' of the magnetic solar atmosphere. However, it is the smallest magnetic elements that have risen to the forefront of solar physics research in recent years. Structures, which include magnetic bright points, are often at the diffraction limit of even the largest of solar telescopes. Importantly, it is the improvements in facilities, instrumentation, imaging techniques and processing algorithms during recent years that have allowed researchers to examine the motions, dynamics and evolution of such features on the smallest spatial and temporal ...

  1. Bioenergetics and mechanical actuation analysis with membrane transport experiments for use in biomimetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    Bioenergetics and mechanical actuation analysis with membrane transport experiments for use considers the mechanics and bioenergetics of a prototype nastic structure system consisting of an array by the hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate. After reviewing the biochemistry and bioenergetics of the active

  2. The structural design of electrode materials for high energy lithium batteries.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thackeray, M.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lithium batteries are used to power a diverse range of applications from small compact devices, such as smart cards and cellular telephones to large heavy duty devices such as uninterrupted power supply units and electric- and hybrid-electric vehicles. This paper briefly reviews the approaches to design advanced materials to replace the lithiated graphite and LiCoO{sub 2} electrodes that dominate today's lithium-ion batteries in order to increase their energy and safety. The technological advantages of lithium batteries are placed in the context of water-based- and high-temperature battery systems.

  3. High Resolution Structure of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae Type IV Pilus: A

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpgHanfordDepartmentInnovationHighMembrane-bound Fibrous

  4. Highly Aligned Carbon Fiber in Polymer Composite Structures via Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tekinalp, Halil L [ORNL; Kunc, Vlastimil [ORNL; Velez-Garcia, Gregorio M [ORNL; Duty, Chad E [ORNL; Love, Lonnie J [ORNL; Naskar, Amit K [ORNL; Blue, Craig A [ORNL; Ozcan, Soydan [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Additive manufacturing, diverging from traditional manufacturing techniques, such as casting and machining materials, can handle complex shapes with great design flexibility without the typical waste. Although this technique has been mainly used for rapid prototyping, interest is growing in using this method to directly manufacture actual parts of complex shape. To use 3D-printing additive manufacturing in wide spread applications, the technique and the feedstock materials require improvements to meet the mechanical requirements of load-bearing components. Thus, we investigated the short fiber (0.2 mm to 0.4 mm) reinforced acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene composites as a feedstock for 3D-printing in terms of their processibility, microstructure and mechanical performance; and also provided comparison with traditional compression molded composites. The tensile strength and modulus of 3D-printed samples increased ~115% and ~700%, respectively. 3D-printer yielded samples with very high fiber orientation in printing direction (up to 91.5 %), whereas, compression molding process yielded samples with significantly less fiber orientation. Microstructure-mechanical property relationships revealed that although the relatively high porosity is observed in the 3D-printed composites as compared to those produced by the conventional compression molding technique, they both exhibited comparable tensile strength and modulus. This phenomena is explained based on the changes in fiber orientation, dispersion and void formation.

  5. High-temperature oxidation and corrosion of structural materials in molten chlorides.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Indacochea, J. E.; Smith, J. L.; Litko, K. R.; Karell, E. J.; Raraz, A. G.; Chemical Engineering

    2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A molten salt-based process for treatment of spent oxide fuels is under development at the Argonne National Laboratory. A major part of the development effort involves identification of corrosion-resistant structural materials for the process vessels. Coupons of two stainless steels, tantalum, and two Inconel alloys were submitted to a corrosion test in an argon atmosphere with 10% oxygen. The coupons were partially immersed in molten lithium chloride salt containing small amounts of lithium metal, lithium oxide, and lithium nitride. Two sets of coupons were tested, the first at 750{sup o}C for 30 days and the second at 650{sup o}C for 6 days. Coupons of the first set corroded completely. In the second set of coupons, all corroded to some extent, but Inconel 600 showed the best performance overall. The salt-exposed region generally showed the greatest corrosion in the other coupons. One of the 316L SS coupons was welded and the weld area was severely attacked.

  6. High energy-density water: density functional theory calculations of structure and electrical conductivity.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desjarlais, Michael Paul; Mattsson, Thomas Kjell Rene

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowledge of the properties of water is essential for correctly describing the physics of shock waves in water as well as the behavior of giant planets. By using finite temperature density functional theory (DFT), we have investigated the structure and electronic conductivity of water across three phase transitions (molecular liquid/ ionic liquid/super-ionic/electronic liquid). There is a rapid transition to ionic conduction at 2000 K and 2 g/cm{sup 3} while electronic conduction dominates at temperatures above 6000 K. We predict that the fluid bordering the super-ionic phase is conducting above 4000 K and 100 GPa. Earlier work instead has the super-ionic phase bordering an insulating fluid, with a transition to metallic fluid not until 7000 K and 250 GPa. The tools and expertise developed during the project can be applied to other molecular systems, for example, methane, ammonia, and CH foam. We are now well positioned to treat also complex molecular systems in the HEDP regime of phase-space.

  7. Development of conducting polymer based biomimetic muscles and fabrication techniques for an artificial pectoral fish fin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, S. Naomi (Sarah Naomi)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fish possess a greater degree of agility, maneuverability, and energy efficiency over current underwater vehicles constructed by engineers. Kinematics studies show that a high degree of three-dimensional control of multiple ...

  8. Modular Lorentz force actuators for efficient biomimetic propulsion of Autonomous Underwater Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Church, Joseph Christopher

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, we developed a highly scalable design for modular Lorentz force actuators for use in segmented flexible-hull undersea vehicles such as the RoboTuna being developed at Franklin W, Olin College of Engineering. ...

  9. A framework for design, modeling, and identification of compliant biomimetic swimmers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wahab, Adam Joseph

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research interests in fish-like devices are generally driven by the notion that through eons of evolution fish have developed optimal mechanisms for efficient propulsion and high degrees of maneuverability. Engineered ...

  10. An engineering analysis of natural and biomimetic self-repair processes for solar energy harvesting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boghossian, Ardemis A. (Ardemis Anoush)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plants have evolved highly sophisticated mechanisms of self-repair to regenerate proteins that become photo-damaged over time. Key to this self-repair process is the reversible self-assembly of protein complexes, which is ...

  11. High temperature applications of structural ceramics. Quarterly progress report, July-September 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, Samuel J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Further studies of Tien's Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/ materials were conducted to obtain critical stress intensity factors and to clarify some inconsistencies in earlier results. Sialon specimens received from Kobayashi were annealed at 1430/sup 0/C for 60 hours with little degradation of the specimen. Billets of SiC materials were ordered from Norton and Carborundum. A literature survey of available data on fracture toughness, crack growth behavior, and creep of SiC, Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/, and sialon was completed. A preliminary crack growth mechanism map for commercial, hot pressed SiC materials was constructed from published information. X-ray analysis has been completed on 17 ..beta..-Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/ plus garnet samples before and after high temperature fracture testing.

  12. The High-Z hydrogen-like atom: a model for polarized structure functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. Artru; K. Benhizia

    2007-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Dirac equation offers a precise analytical description of relativistic two-particle bound states, when one of the constituent is very heavy and radiative corrections are neglected. Looking at the high-Z hydrogen-like atom in the infinite momentum frame and treating the electron as a "parton", various properties usually attributed to the quark distributions in the nucleon are tested, in particular: Bj{\\o}rken scaling; charge, helicity, transversity and momentum sum rules; existence of the parton sea; Soffer inequality; correlation between spin and transverse momentum (Sivers and Boer-Mulders effects); transverse displacement of the center-of-charge and its connection with the magnetic moment. Deep inelastic experiments with photon or positron beams at MeV energies, analogous to DIS or Drell-Yan reactions, are considered.

  13. High Power GaN Oscillators using Field-Plated HEMT Structure Hongtao Xu, Christopher Sanabria, Sten Heikman, Stacia Keller, Umesh K. Mishra, and Robert A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    York, Robert A.

    High Power GaN Oscillators using Field-Plated HEMT Structure Hongtao Xu, Christopher Sanabria, Sten Engineering University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106, USA Abstract -- 5 GHz MMIC GaN oscillators based on AlGaN/GaN HEMTs are presented. By using field-plated HEMT structures, both the output

  14. A Project Management and Systems Engineering Structure for a Generation IV Very High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ed Gorski; Dennis Harrell; Finis Southworth

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) will be an advanced, very high temperature (approximately 1000o C. coolant outlet temperature), gas cooled nuclear reactor and is the nearest term of six Generation IV reactor technologies for nuclear assisted hydrogen production. In 2001, the Generation IV International Forum (GIF), a ten nation international forum working together with the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee (NERAC), agreed to proceed with the development of a technology roadmap and identified the next generation of nuclear reactor systems for producing new sources of power. Since a new reactor has not been licensed in the United States since the 1970s, the risks are too large for a single utility to assume in the development of an unprecedented Generation IV reactor. The government must sponsor and invest in the research to resolve major first of a kind (FOAK) issues through a full-scale demonstration prior to industry implementation. DOE’s primary mission for the VHTR is to demonstrate nuclear reactor assisted cogeneration of electricity and hydrogen while meeting the Generation IV goals for safety, sustainability, proliferation resistance and physical security and economics. The successful deployment of the VHTR as a demonstration project will aid in restarting the now atrophied U.S. nuclear power industry infrastructure. It is envisioned that VHTR project participants will include DOE Laboratories, industry partners such as designers, constructors, manufacturers, utilities, and Generation IV international countries. To effectively mange R&D, engineering, procurement, construction, and operation for this multi-organizational and technologically complex project, systems engineering will be used extensively to ensure delivery of the final product. Although the VHTR is an unprecedented FOAK system, the R&D, when assessed using the Office of Science and Technology Gate Model, falls primarily in the 3rd - Exploratory Development, 4th – Advanced Development, and 5th- Engineering Development stages of maturity rather than in the basic and viability stages. Therefore the R&D must be controlled and project driven from the top down to address specific issues of feasibility, proof of design or support of engineering. The design evolution must be through the systems approach including an iterative process of high-level requirements definition, engineering to focus R&D to verify feasibility, requirements development and conceptual design, R&D to verify design and refine detailed requirements for final detailed design. This paper will define a framework for project management and application of systems engineering at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The VHTR Project includes an overall reactor design and construction activity and four major supporting activities: fuel development and qualification, materials selection and qualification, NRC licensing and regulatory support, and the hydrogen production plant.

  15. Calculational analysis of structural activation induced by 20-100 MeV proton beam loss in high-power linear accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Stacey Kirsten

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1994 Major Subject: Nuclear Engineering CALCULATIONAL ANALYSIS OF STRUCTURAL ACTIVATION INDUCED BY 20-100 MEV PROTON BEAM LOSS IN HIGH-POWER LINEAR ACCELERATORS A Thesis...) Carl A. Beard (Member) / John . Poston (Head of Department) August 1994 Major Subject: Nuclear Engineering ABSTRACT Calculational Analysis of Structural Activation Induced by 20-100 MeV Proton Beam Loss in High-Power Linear Accelerators. (August...

  16. Load test of the 277W Building high bay roof deck and support structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, R.M.

    1994-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The 277W Building high bay roof area was load tested according to the approved load-test procedure, WHC-SD-GN-TP-30015, Revision 1. The 277W Building is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site and has the following characteristics: roof deck -- wood decking supported by 4 x 14 timber purlins; roof membrane -- tar and gravel; roof slope -- flat (<10 deg); and roof elevation -- maximum height of about 63 ft. The 227W Building was visited in March 1994 for a visual inspection. During this inspection, cracked areas were visible in the decking, but it was not possible to determine whether these cracks extended completely through the decking, which is 2-in. thick. The building was revisited in March 1994 for the purpose of writing this test report. Because the roof requires personnel access, a test was determined to be the best way to qualify the roof. The conclusions are that the roof has been qualified for 500-lb total roof load and that the ``No Roof Access`` signs can be changed to ``Roof Access Restricted`` signs.

  17. A Biomimetic Adaptive Algorithm and Low-Power Architecture for Implantable Neural Decoders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarpeshkar, Rahul

    a bank of adaptive linear filters with kernels that emulate synaptic dynamics. The filters trans- form in cochlear-implant systems, include unwanted heat dissipation in the brain, decreased longevity of batteries han- dle large quantities of high-bandwidth analog data, processing neural input signals in a slow-and-parallel

  18. Biomimetic Sampling Architectures for CMOS Image Sensors Fayal Saffih*a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hornsey, Richard

    sensor1 . The processing integration on the same chip, in addition to offering low cost and high (or row) at the end of image capture, the scan returns from the outer ring towards the first inner fabricated in 0.18µm CMOS technology are presented and discussed. We will also present a multi

  19. Probing the Structure of Jet Driven Core-Collapse Supernova and Long Gamma Ray Burst Progenitors with High Energy Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imre Bartos; Basudeb Dasgupta; Szabolcs Marka

    2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Times of arrival of high energy neutrinos encode information about their sources. We demonstrate that the energy-dependence of the onset time of neutrino emission in advancing relativistic jets can be used to extract important information about the supernova/gamma-ray burst progenitor structure. We examine this energy and time dependence for different supernova and gamma-ray burst progenitors, including red and blue supergiants, helium cores, Wolf-Rayet stars, and chemically homogeneous stars, with a variety of masses and metallicities. For choked jets, we calculate the cutoff of observable neutrino energies depending on the radius at which the jet is stalled. Further, we exhibit how such energy and time dependence may be used to identify and differentiate between progenitors, with as few as one or two observed events, under favorable conditions.

  20. Micro-Structured Sapphire Fiber Sensors for Simultaneous Measurements of High-T and Dynamic Gas Pressure in Harsh Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Hai; Tsai, Hai-Lung; Dong, Junhang

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report for the program “Micro-Structured Sapphire Fiber Sensors for Simultaneous Measurements of High Temperature and Dynamic Gas Pressure in Harsh Environments”, funded by NETL, and performed by Missouri University of Science and Technology, Clemson University and University of Cincinnati from October 1, 2009 to September 30, 2014. Securing a sustainable energy economy by developing affordable and clean energy from coal and other fossil fuels is a central element to the mission of The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). To further this mission, NETL funds research and development of novel sensor technologies that can function under the extreme operating conditions often found in advanced power systems. The main objective of this research program is to conduct fundamental and applied research that will lead to successful development and demonstration of robust, multiplexed, microstructured silica and single-crystal sapphire fiber sensors to be deployed into the hot zones of advanced power and fuel systems for simultaneous measurements of high temperature and gas pressure. The specific objectives of this research program include: 1) Design, fabrication and demonstration of multiplexed, robust silica and sapphire fiber temperature and dynamic gas pressure sensors that can survive and maintain fully operational in high-temperature harsh environments. 2) Development and demonstration of a novel method to demodulate the multiplexed interferograms for simultaneous measurements of temperature and gas pressure in harsh environments. 3) Development and demonstration of novel sapphire fiber cladding and low numerical aperture (NA) excitation techniques to assure high signal integrity and sensor robustness.

  1. Highly polarized structures in the near-nuclear regions of Cygnus A: intrinsic anisotropy within the cones?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. N. Tadhunter; W. Sparks; D. J. Axon; L. Bergeron; N. J. Jackson; C. Packham; J. H. Hough; A. Robinson; S. Young

    2000-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We present near-IR imaging polarimetry observations of the nucleus of Cygnus A, taken with the NICMOS camera of the HST at a wavelength of 2.0 microns.These maps reveal a highly collimated region of polarized emission straddling the nucleus and extending to a radius of 1.2 arcseconds. Remarkably, this feature coincides with one, but only one, limb of the edge-brightened bicone structure seen in the total intensity image. The high degree (P_k ~ 25%) and orientation of the extended polarization feature are consistent with a scattering origin. Most plausibly, the detection of polarization along only one limb of the bicone is a consequence of intrinsic anisotropy of the near-IR continuum within the radiation cones, with the direction of maximum intensity of the near-IR radiation field significantly displaced from the direction of the radio axis. The unresolved nuclear core source is also highly polarized (P_k > 28%), with a position angle close to the perpendicular to the radio axis. Given that this high degree of nuclear polarization can only be explained in terms of dichroic extinction if the dichroic mechanism is unusually efficient in Cygnus A, it is more likely that the nuclear polarization is due to the scattering of nuclear light in an unresolved scattering region close to the AGN. In this case, the flux of the core source in the K-band is dominated by scattered rather than transmitted quasar light, and previous extinction estimates based on K-band photometry of the core substantially underestimate the true nuclear extinction.

  2. Structure of a zeolite ZSM-5-Bithiophene complex as determined by high-resolution synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eylem, C.; Hriljac, J.A. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)] [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Ramamurthy, V.; Corbin, D.R. [Du Pont Co., Wilmington, DE (United States)] [Du Pont Co., Wilmington, DE (United States); Parise, J.B. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)] [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure of a zeolite ZSM-5 complex with ca. 4 molecules/unit cell of bithiophene was determined by high-resolution synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction. In adopts monoclinic symmetry in space group P2{sub 1}/n ({alpha} unique) between room temperature and 25 K, with refined lattice parameters at 25 K of a = 20.0614(4), b = 19.8251(4), c = 13.3623(4) {Angstrom}, and a = 90.848(2){degrees}. Structural modeling and Rietveld refinements showed that there are two crystallographically unique bithiophene molecules, each with an occupancy factor of ca. 0.5. One bithiophene is localized at the center of the straight channels with one of the rings residing at the intersection with the sinusoidal channels. The other molecule lies in the sinusoidal channels and projects partially into the straight channels. The relationship between polythiophene chain length and the formation of conducting polythiophene molecular wires in the ZSM-5 framework is discussed. 32 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Laue crystal structure of Shewanella oneidensis cytochrome c nitrite reductase from a high-yield expression system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youngblut, Matthew; Judd, Evan T.; Srajer, Vukica; Sayyed, Bilal; Goelzer, Tyler; Elliott, Sean J.; Schmidt, Marius; Pacheco, A. Andrew (UW); (UC); (BU)

    2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The high-yield expression and purification of Shewanella oneidensis cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR) and its characterization by a variety of methods, notably Laue crystallography, are reported. A key component of the expression system is an artificial ccNiR gene in which the N-terminal signal peptide from the highly expressed S. oneidensis protein 'small tetraheme c' replaces the wild-type signal peptide. This gene, inserted into the plasmid pHSG298 and expressed in S. oneidensis TSP-1 strain, generated approximately 20 mg crude ccNiR per liter of culture, compared with 0.5-1 mg/L for untransformed cells. Purified ccNiR has nitrite and hydroxylamine reductase activities comparable to those previously reported for Escherichia coli ccNiR, and is stable for over 2 weeks in pH 7 solution at 4 C. UV/vis spectropotentiometric titrations and protein film voltammetry identified five independent one-electron reduction processes. Global analysis of the spectropotentiometric data also allowed determination of the extinction coefficient spectra for the five reduced ccNiR species. The characteristics of the individual extinction coefficient spectra suggest that, within each reduced species, the electrons are distributed among the various hemes, rather than being localized on specific heme centers. The purified ccNiR yielded good-quality crystals, with which the 2.59-{angstrom}-resolution structure was solved at room temperature using the Laue diffraction method. The structure is similar to that of E. coli ccNiR, except in the region where the enzyme interacts with its physiological electron donor (CymA in the case of S. oneidensis ccNiR, NrfB in the case of the E. coli protein).

  4. Pressure Effect on the Structural Transition and Suppression of the High-Spin State in the Triple-Layer T'-La?Ni?O?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cheng, J.-G.; Zhou, J.-S.; Goodenough, J. B.; Zhou, H. D.; Matsubayashi, K.; Uwatoko, Y.; Kong, P. P.; Jin, C. Q.; Yang, W. G.; Shen, G. Y.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a comprehensive high-pressure study on the triple-layer T'-La?Ni?O? with a suite of experimental probes, including structure determination, magnetic, and transport properties up to 50 GPa. Consistent with a recent ab inito calculation, application of hydrostatic pressure suppresses an insulator-metal spin-state transition at Pc?6 GPa. However, a low-spin metallic phase does not emerge after the high-spin state is suppressed to the lowest temperature. For P>20 GPa, the ambient T' structure transforms gradually to a T†-type structure, which involves a structural reconstruction from fluorite La–O?–La blocks under low pressures to rock-salt LaO-LaO blocks under high pressures. Absence of the metallic phase under pressure has been discussed in terms of local displacements of O²? ions in the fluorite block under pressure before a global T† phase is established.

  5. Pressure Effect on the Structural Transition and Suppression of the High-Spin State in the Triple-Layer T'-La?Ni?O?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cheng, J.-G.; Zhou, J.-S.; Goodenough, J. B.; Zhou, H. D.; Matsubayashi, K.; Uwatoko, Y.; Kong, P. P.; Jin, C. Q.; Yang, W. G.; Shen, G. Y.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a comprehensive high-pressure study on the triple-layer T'-La?Ni?O? with a suite of experimental probes, including structure determination, magnetic, and transport properties up to 50 GPa. Consistent with a recent ab inito calculation, application of hydrostatic pressure suppresses an insulator-metal spin-state transition at Pc?6 GPa. However, a low-spin metallic phase does not emerge after the high-spin state is suppressed to the lowest temperature. For P>20 GPa, the ambient T' structure transforms gradually to a T†-type structure, which involves a structural reconstruction from fluorite La–O?–La blocks under low pressures to rock-salt LaO-LaO blocks under high pressures. Absence of the metallicmore »phase under pressure has been discussed in terms of local displacements of O²? ions in the fluorite block under pressure before a global T† phase is established.« less

  6. Structure and high-temperature properties of Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} with interstitial additions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Jason

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was motivated by the fact that previous research on the structure and properties of Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} showed unacceptably inconsistent results. The primary reason for these inconsistencies was interstitial contamination of Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} by carbon, nitrogen and oxygen. Thus, this study measured the effects that these interstitial atoms have on some of the previously reported properties. These properties include crystalline structure, thermal expansion anisotropy, electronic structure and bonding, and high temperature oxidation resistance. In Chapter 2 of this study, the lattice parameters and atomic positions of Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} as a function of carbon, nitrogen or oxygen content were measured via x-ray and neutron diffraction. Comparing these lattice parameters to those reported in other studies on supposedly pure Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} confirmed that the majority of the previous studies had samples with a considerable amount of interstitial impurities. In fact, the lattice parameter trends given in Chapter 2 can be used to estimate the types and level of impurities in these studies. Furthermore, Chapter 2 discusses how atomic positions change as interstitial atoms are incorporated into the lattice. These changes in atomic separations suggest that strong bonds form between the interstitial atoms and the surrounding titanium atoms. This is in full agreement with the electronic structure calculations given in Chapter 4. These calculations show that bonding does occur between titanium d-states and interstitial atom p-states at the expense of bonding between some of the titanium and silicon atoms. In addition, carbon seems to be the most strongly bonded interstitial atom. Knowledge of the exact interstitial content and its effect on bonding is important because Chapters 3 and 5 have shown that interstitial atoms have a marked effect on the thermal expansion and oxidation resistance. As discussed in Chapter 3, all interstitial atoms lower the thermal expansion anisotropy of Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} due to the formation of bonds between the interstitial atom and the surrounding titanium atoms. Although interstitial atoms do have an effect on the thermal expansion of Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3}, these effects were not strong enough to explain all the scatter of previous studies. These studies most likely suffered from systematic errors as a result of poor experimental design. The experimental procedure used in this study was designed to significantly reduce these systematic errors.

  7. Experimental verification of the high pressure crystal structures in NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Yanping; Huang, Xiaoli; Zhao, Zhonglong; Li, Wenbo; Jiang, Shuqing; Duan, Defang; Bao, Kuo; Zhou, Qiang; Liu, Bingbing; Cui, Tian, E-mail: cuitian@jlu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, College of Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2014-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed high-pressure study on NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3} has been carried out using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman scattering with a diamond anvil cell up to 20 and 33 GPa, respectively. The Rietveld refinement based on the XRD pattern and analysis of Raman data indicate two first-order phase transitions from the ambient pressure I4 mm structure (?-NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3}) to a high pressure Cmc2{sub 1} phase (?-NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3}) at 2.14 GPa, and further into a monoclinic P2{sub 1} (Z = 2) phase (?-NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3}) at 9.67 GPa. Fitting the measured volumetric compression data to the third order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state reveals a bulk modulus of B{sub 0} = 9.9 ± 0.5 and 17.0 ± 3.0 GPa (with fixed B{sub 0}{sup ?} = 4) for the ?-NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3} below and above 5 GPa, respectively. Still, with the splitting of the NBH rock mode in Raman experiment, it is concluded that a second-order isostructural phase transition occurs at 5 GPa. By analyzing the dihydrogen bonding framework, the origin of the isostructural phase transition is attributed to the number of dihydrogen bondings per molecule in the Cmc2{sub 1} phase increasing from 12 to 14 at 5 GPa.

  8. Electrically Detected Electron-Spin-Echo Envelope Modulation: A Highly Sensitive Technique for Resolving Complex Interface Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Wolf Gero

    for Resolving Complex Interface Structures Felix Hoehne,* Jinming Lu, Andre R. Stegner, Martin Stutzmann

  9. High Pressure Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and High Pressure X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy Studies of Adsorbate Structure, Composition and Mobility during Catalytic Reactions on A Model Single Crystal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montano, M.O.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Guntherodt, H. -J. , Eds. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy III;157. Chapter 7 : High-Pressure Scanning Tunneling Microscopypressure high-temperature scanning tunneling microscope and

  10. Spatial distribution of structural degradation under high-power stress in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    del Alamo, Jesús A.

    and high temperature, the latter being a result of de- vice self-heating. A complicating factor degradation of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors was investigated under high-power electrical electrical degradation that was mostly driven by an electric field across the AlGaN barrier. Under high

  11. Couples Magnetic and Structural Transitions in High-Purity Dy and Gd5SbxGe4-x

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander S. Chernyshov

    2006-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic materials exhibiting magnetic phase transitions simultaneously with structural rearrangements of their crystal lattices hold a promise for numerous applications including magnetic refrigeration, magnetomechanical devices and sensors. We undertook a detailed study of a single crystal of dysprosium metal, which is a classical example of a system where magnetic and crystallographic sublattices can be either coupled or decoupled from one another. Magnetocaloric effect, magnetization, ac magnetic susceptibility, and heat capacity of high purity single crystals of dysprosium have been investigated over broad temperature and magnetic field intervals with the magnetic field vector parallel to either the a- or c-axes of the crystal. Notable differences in the behavior of the physical properties when compared to Dy samples studied in the past have been observed between 110 K and 125 K, and between 178 K and {approx}210 K. A plausible mechanism based on the formation of antiferromagnetic clusters in the impure Dy has been suggested in order to explain the reduction of the magnetocaloric effect in the vicinity of the Neel point. Experimental and theoretical investigations of the influence of commensurability effects on the magnetic phase diagram and the value of the magnetocaloric effect have been conducted. The presence of newly found anomalies in the physical properties has been considered as evidence of previously unreported states of Dy. The refined magnetic phase diagram of dysprosium with the magnetic field vector parallel to the a-axis of a crystal has been constructed and discussed. The magnetic and crystallographic properties of Gd{sub 5}Sb{sub x}Ge{sub 4-x} pseudo-binary system were studied by x-ray diffraction (at room temperature), heat capacity, ac-magnetic susceptibility, and magnetization in the temperature interval 5-320 K in magnetic fields up to 100 kOe. The magnetic properties of three composition (x = 0.5, 1,2) were examined in detail. The Gd{sub 5}Sb{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} compound that adopts Tm{sub 5}Sb{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type of structure (space group is Cmca), shows a second order FM-PM transition at 200 K, whereas Gd{sub 5}Sb{sub x}Ge{sub 4-x} compounds for x = 0.5 and x = 1 (Sm{sub 5}Ge{sub 4}-type of structure, space group is Pnma) exhibit first order phase transformations at 45 K and 37 K, respectively.

  12. Nano-structured Li3V2(PO4)3/carbon composite for high-rate lithium-ion batteries Anqiang Pan a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    Nano-structured Li3V2(PO4)3/carbon composite for high-rate lithium-ion batteries Anqiang Pan a in three dimensions. Three reversible lithium ions can be totally extracted from the lattice of Li3V2(PO4 structure and a curved one-dimensional channel for lithium-ion diffusion, monoclinic Li3V2(PO4)3 provides

  13. Synthesis of novel polyimides for the testing of structure-processing and property relations when used to form high temperature polymer matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tschen Molina, Francisco

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    constants [17], spectroscopic properties [18,19] and molecular order to mention a few [20,21]. The addition of fluorine atoms incorporated into the polyimide, the chemical structure affects many properties that can add superior properties to the polymer...SYNTHESIS OF NOVEL POLYIMIDES FOR THE TESTING OF STRUCTURE- PROCESSING AND PROPERTY RELATIONS WHEN USED TO FORM HIGH TEMPERATURE POLYMER MATRICES A Thesis by FRANCISCO TSCHEN MOLINA Submitted to the Office of Graduate...

  14. High-resolution structure of the M14-type cytosolic carboxypeptidase from Burkholderia cenocepacia refined exploiting PDB-REDO strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rimsa, Vadim; Eadsforth, Thomas C. [University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH, Scotland (United Kingdom); Joosten, Robbie P. [Netherlands Cancer Institute, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hunter, William N., E-mail: w.n.hunter@dundee.ac.uk [University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure of a bacterial M14-family carboxypeptidase determined exploiting microfocus synchrotron radiation and highly automated refinement protocols reveals its potential to act as a polyglutamylase. A potential cytosolic metallocarboxypeptidase from Burkholderia cenocepacia has been crystallized and a synchrotron-radiation microfocus beamline allowed the acquisition of diffraction data to 1.9 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit comprises a tetramer containing over 1500 amino acids, and the high-throughput automated protocols embedded in PDB-REDO were coupled with model–map inspections in refinement. This approach has highlighted the value of such protocols for efficient analyses. The subunit is constructed from two domains. The N-terminal domain has previously only been observed in cytosolic carboxypeptidase (CCP) proteins. The C-terminal domain, which carries the Zn{sup 2+}-containing active site, serves to classify this protein as a member of the M14D subfamily of carboxypeptidases. Although eukaryotic CCPs possess deglutamylase activity and are implicated in processing modified tubulin, the function and substrates of the bacterial family members remain unknown. The B. cenocepacia protein did not display deglutamylase activity towards a furylacryloyl glutamate derivative, a potential substrate. Residues previously shown to coordinate the divalent cation and that contribute to peptide-bond cleavage in related enzymes such as bovine carboxypeptidase are conserved. The location of a conserved basic patch in the active site adjacent to the catalytic Zn{sup 2+}, where an acetate ion is identified, suggests recognition of the carboxy-terminus in a similar fashion to other carboxypeptidases. However, there are significant differences that indicate the recognition of substrates with different properties. Of note is the presence of a lysine in the S1? recognition subsite that suggests specificity towards an acidic substrate.

  15. A two-dimensional fluid-structure coupling algorithm for the interaction of high-speed flows with open shells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tam, Daniel See Wai, 1980-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of future light aerospace structures will require numerical tools to accurately describe the strongly coupled dynamics of the interactions between a light structure and a flow surrounding it. Specific examples ...

  16. Scope and limitations of high energy electron scattering in obtaining relevant structural information about atoms and molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ketkar, S.N.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the course of this work experiments were undertaken to measure the scattering cross-sections for high energy electrons scattering from various target systems. The experiments can be broadly classified into two categories, one dealing with rather small systems and the other dealing with large systems (at least in the view of physicists). Although the experimental aspects, in so much as the experimental measurement of the intensities of the scattered electron is concerned, is the same for both the cases the motivation for performing the experiment is totally different. In the first case, simple atomic and molecular target systems, namely He, H/sub 2/ and D/sub 2/, are used. For such systems, good theoretical framework is available and critical comparisons of experimental cross sections are made with theoretical predictions. Attention is focussed mainly at small momentum transfer (up to 10A/sup -1/), and correlation and binding effects are studied. In the second case, somewhat larger molecular systems, namely naphthalene, anthraquinone, anthracene and dichromium tetraacetate are used. For such systems attention is focused at large momentum transfer (from 10 to 25 A/sup -1/) to obtain structural information about the molecules.

  17. The high pressure synthesis and structure of a new aurate, CaAu{sub 2}O{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, J.H.; Parise, J.B. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel aurate CaAu{sub 2}O{sub 4} has been synthesized by high pressure-temperature technique. The sample was contained in an Au capsule and heated to 1000{approximately}1200{degrees}C at 12{approximately}15 GPa in the split-sphere multi-anvil apparatus (USSA-2000). Electron probe Microanalysis of small crystals indicated an oxide ratio of 0.96(6) CaO:1.01(2) Au{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The compound is pale yellow, with a = 5.991141(1), c = 10.04983(3) {angstrom}, Z = 4, 14{sub 1}/a. The structure was solved using both synchroton x-ray powder diffraction and single crystal x-ray data. It consists of corner-linked AuO{sub 4} square planes and distorted CaO{sub 8} dodecahedra; in the figure Ca{sup 2+} ions (circles) are filled in the cavities surrounded by staggered square planar AuO{sub 4} units.

  18. Structural, optical, and magnetic properties of highly-resistive Sm-implanted GaN thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lo, Fang-Yuh, E-mail: fangyuhlo@ntnu.edu.tw; Huang, Cheng-De; Chou, Kai-Chieh; Guo, Jhong-Yu; Liu, Hsiang-Lin; Chia, Chi-Ta [Department of Physics, National Taiwan Normal University, 11677 Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Ney, Verena; Ney, Andreas [Experimentalphysik, Universität Duisburg-Essen, 47057 Duisburg (Germany); Shvarkov, Stepan; Reuter, Dirk; Wieck, Andreas D. [Lehrstuhl für Angewandte Festkörperphysik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Pezzagna, Sébastien [Lehrstuhl für Angewandte Festkörperphysik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Centre de Recherche sur l'Hétéroépitaxie et ses Application, 06560 Valbonne, UPR-CNRS (France); Chern, Ming-Yau [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, 10617 Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Massies, Jean [Centre de Recherche sur l'Hétéroépitaxie et ses Application, 06560 Valbonne, UPR-CNRS (France)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Samarium ions of 200?keV in energy were implanted into highly-resistive molecular-beam-epitaxy grown GaN thin films with a focused-ion-beam implanter at room temperature. The implantation doses range from 1?×?10{sup 14} to 1?×?10{sup 16?}cm{sup ?2}. Structural properties studied by x-ray diffraction and Raman-scattering spectroscopy revealed Sm incorporation into GaN matrix without secondary phase. The optical measurements showed that the band gap and optical constants changed very slightly by the implantation. Photoluminescence measurements showed emission spectra similar to p-type GaN for all samples. Magnetic investigations with a superconducting quantum interference device identified magnetic ordering for Sm dose of and above 1?×?10{sup 15?}cm{sup ?2} before thermal annealing, while ferromagnetism was only observed after thermal annealing from the sample with highest Sm dose. The long-range magnetic ordering can be attributed to interaction of Sm ions through the implantation-induced Ga vacancy.

  19. Author's personal copy Novel high-pressure structures of MgCO3, CaCO3 and CO2 and their role in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oganov, Artem R.

    Author's personal copy Novel high-pressure structures of MgCO3, CaCO3 and CO2 and their role's lower mantle is believed to be stored in the high-pressure forms of MgCO3 and/or CaCO3 or possibly even picture of phase transformations of CaCO3 at mantle pressures was obtained. Here, using the same approach

  20. Structural and redox properties of mitochondrial cytochrome c...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    systems and biosensors but also in the areas of biomimetic photovoltaic devices, bioremediation, and bacterial metal reduction. Here, we investigate mitochondrial ferricytochrome...

  1. A General Methodology for Introducing Structured Nonorthogonal Grids into High-Order Finite-Difference Time-Domain Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The method employs a coordinate transformation to map an arbitrary nonorthogonal structured grid onto transformation is used to map an arbitrary nonorthogonal structured grid onto a rectangular grid with uniformly rectangular grid can be used to carry out the time stepping. Generating a coordinate transformation to map one

  2. Pressure Effect on the Structural Transition and Suppression of the High-Spin State in the Triple-Layer T'-La?Ni?O?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, J.-G.; Zhou, J.-S.; Goodenough, J. B.; Zhou, H. D.; Matsubayashi, K.; Uwatoko, Y.; Kong, P. P.; Jin, C. Q.; Yang, W. G.; Shen, G. Y.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a comprehensive high-pressure study on the triple-layer T'-La?Ni?O? with a suite of experimental probes, including structure determination, magnetic, and transport properties up to 50 GPa. Consistent with a recent ab inito calculation, application of hydrostatic pressure suppresses an insulator-metal spin-state transition at Pc?6 GPa. However, a low-spin metallic phase does not emerge after the high-spin state is suppressed to the lowest temperature. For P>20 GPa, the ambient T' structure transforms gradually to a T-type structure, which involves a structural reconstruction from fluorite La–O?–La blocks under low pressures to rock-salt LaO-LaO blocks under high pressures. Absence of the metallic phase under pressure has been discussed in terms of local displacements of O²? ions in the fluorite block under pressure before a global T† phase is established.

  3. Self-Assembly of Virus-Structured High Surface Area Nanomaterials and Their Application as Battery Electrodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    arrays, and energy storage devices. Increased surface areas are generally achieved through the synthesis for the self-assembly of high surface area nanostructured materials and devices. One approach is templating for the fabrication of oriented high surface area materials. Introduction High surface area nanostructured materials

  4. Single crystal silicon as a macro-world structural material : application to compact, lightweight high pressure vessels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garza, Tanya Cruz

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Single crystal silicon has promising inherent structural properties which are attractive for weight sensitive applications. Single crystal silicon, however, is a brittle material which makes the usable strength that can ...

  5. Low-loss bloch wave guiding in open structures and highly compact efficient waveguide-crossing arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Popovic, Milos

    2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-loss waveguide structures may comprise a multimode waveguide supporting a periodic light intensity pattern, and attachments disposed at the waveguide adjacent low-intensity regions of the light intensity pattern.

  6. High performance computing and communications Grand Challenges program: Computational structural biology. Final report, August 15, 1992--January 14, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, J.E.

    1997-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Grand Challenge project consists of two elements: (1) a hierarchical methodology for 3D protein structure prediction; and (2) development of a parallel computing environment, the Protein Folding Workbench, for carrying out a variety of protein structure prediction/modeling computations. During the first three years of this project the author focused on the use of selected proteins from the Brookhaven Protein Data Base (PDB) of known structures to provide validation of the prediction algorithms and their software implementation, both serial and parallel. Two proteins in particular have been selected to provide the project with direct interaction with experimental molecular biology. A variety of site-specific mutagenesis experiments are performed on these two proteins to explore the many-to-one mapping characteristics of sequence to structure.

  7. Evaluation of KEK n-in-p planar pixel sensor structures for very high radiation environments with testbeam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motohashi, K; Nakamura, K; Hori, R; Gallrapp, C; Unno, Y; Jinnouchi, O; Altenheiner, S; Arai, Y; Hagihara, M; Backhaus, M; Bomben, M; Forshaw, D; George, M; Hanagaki, K; Hara, K; Hirose, M; Ikegami, Y; Ishijima, N; Jentzsch, J; Kawagoe, K; Kimura, N; Kono, T; Macchiolo, A; Nishimura, R; Oda, S; Otono, H; Rubinskiy, I; Rummler, A; Takashima, R; Takubo, Y; Teoh, J J; Terada, S; Todome, K; Tojo, J; Usui, J; Weigell, P; Weingarten, J; Yamaguchi, D; Yorita, K

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various structures for n-in-p planar pixel sensors have been developed at KEK in order to cope with the huge particle fluence in the upcoming LHC upgrades. Performances of the sensors with different structures have been evaluated with testbeam. The n-in-p devices were connected by bump-bonding to the ATLAS Pixel front-end chip (FE-I4A) and characterized before and after the irradiation to 1×10$^{16}$ 1 MeV$_{neq}$/cm2neq/cm2. Results of measurements with 120 GeV/c momentum pion beam at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) in September 2012 are presented.

  8. High-pressure synthesis and crystal structure of CaFeTi{sub 2}O{sub 6}, a new perovskite structure type

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leinenweber, K.; Parise, J. [Univ. at Stony Brook, NY (United States)] [Univ. at Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Single-crystal and powder samples of a new calcium iron (II) titanate, CaFeTi{sub 2}O{sub 6}, have been synthesized at 12-15 GPa and 1200-1400{degrees}C, and studied by X-ray diffraction. This compound is a variant of the perovskite structure and crystallizes in the tetragonal space group P4{sub 2}/nmc, a = 7.5157(2) {angstrom}, c = 7.5548(2) {angstrom}, and z = 4. Calcium and two iron atoms are ordered on three different A sites, with calcium in approximately 10-fold coordination, with one iron atom in tetrahedral coordination (Fe-O = 2.084(2) {angstrom}), and the other iron atom in square-planar coordination (Fe-O = 2.097(2) {angstrom}). The system of octahedral tilts which this compound adopts has not been observed previously in a perovskite. The tilt system was described in a theoretical treatment of perovskites a{sup +}a{sup +}c{sup {minus}} in the notation of A. M. Glazer and was (incorrectly) assigned to space group Pmmn.

  9. A seasonal high tunnel is a temporary plastic supported structure, at least 6 feet in height, which modifies the cli-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Netoff, Theoden

    resource concerns on private lands with structural and management conservation practices. Applications natural resource benefits from using tunnel struc- tures could include (1) improved plant quality, (2) improved soil quality, and (3) improved water quality through meth- ods such as reduced nutrient

  10. Structural studies of alkali methylidyne radicals: High resolution spectroscopy of NaCH and KCH ,,X~ 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziurys, Lucy M.

    Institute of Physics. S0021-9606 99 02605-7 I. INTRODUCTION The interaction of metals with organic molecules, especially those involving lithium, sodium, and potassium.6 The usefulness of organolithium compounds and therefore concern oligomeric structures. Evaluating the properties of even the simplest organoalkali

  11. High-resolution stratigraphic and structural characterization of the fault-partitioned Hickory Sandstone aquifer system, Mason County, central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Jason Steven

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hickory Sandstone is an important aquifer in central Texas and is partitioned by faults that impede cross-fault fluid flow. This study provides a detailed stratigraphic and structural model in the vicinity of a normal, oblique-slip fault...

  12. Highly Insulating Glazing Systems using Non-Structural Center Glazing Dariush Arasteh, Howdy Goudey, and Christian Kohler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    units with two low-e coatings and an effective gas fill are known to be highly insulating, with center technological routes have emerged: - Aerogel is a micro-porous insulating material currently under R&D worldwide

  13. Very high mobility two-dimensional hole gas in Si/Ge$i,-JGe structures grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -dimensional elec- tron gases with mobility as high as 180 000 cm2/V s at 4.2 K,`" as well as in fabricating InGaP

  14. High resolution seismic and paleomagnetic study of the structure and sedimentation of Sweet and Phleger Banks, northern Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singleton, Scott Wayne

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Core Analysis Geologic Descriptions Magnetic Analysis CHAPTER IV DISCUSSION 70 70 73 77 Stratigraphy . Unit 1 . 77 77 Unit 2 79 Unit 3 81 Structure 83 Phleger Bank Dome Development Sweet Bank Dome Development Radial Faults Magnetic... of resolution. The bathymetry data was then plotted and contoured at a 10 m interval. This interva! was fine enough to reveal the details of dome shape, but broad enough to allow for navigation errors. Seismic Stratigraphy The seismic stratigraphic analysis...

  15. A conformational transition in the structure of a 2'-thiomethyl-modified DNA visualized at high resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pallan, Pradeep S.; Prakash, Thazha P.; Li, Feng; Eoff, Robert L.; Manoharan, Muthiah; Egli, Martin; (Isis Pharm.); (Alnylam Pharm.); (Vanderbilt)

    2009-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Crystal structures of A-form and B-form DNA duplexes containing 2'-S-methyl-uridines reveal that the modified residues adopt a RNA-like C3'-endo pucker, illustrating that the replacement of electronegative oxygen at the 2'-carbon of RNA by sulfur does not appear to fundamentally alter the conformational preference of the sugar in the oligonucleotide context and sterics trump stereoelectronics.

  16. Synthesis of highly efficient antibacterial agent Ag doped ZnO nanorods: Structural, Raman and optical properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jan, Tariq; Iqbal, Javed, E-mail: javed.saggu@iiu.edu.pk [Laboratory of Nanoscience and Technology, Department of Physics, International Islamic University Islamabad (Pakistan); Ismail, Muhammad [Institute of Biomedical and Genetic Engineering (IBGE), Islamabad (Pakistan); Mahmood, Arshad [Nano Devices Labs, National Institute of Lasers and Optronics, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Here, synthesis, structural, morphological, Raman, optical properties and antibacterial activity of undoped and Ag doped ZnO nanorods by chemical co-precipitation technique have been reported. Structural analysis has revealed that Ag doping cannot deteriorate the structure of ZnO and wurtzite phase is maintained. Lattice constants are found to be decreased with the Ag doping. Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy also confirm the X-ray diffraction results. Scanning electron microscopy results have demonstrated the formation of ZnO nanorods with average diameter and length of 96?nm and 700?nm, respectively. Raman spectroscopy results suggest that the Ag doping enhances the number of defects in ZnO crystal. It has been found from optical study that Ag doping results in positional shift of band edge absorption peak. This is attributed to the successful incorporation of Ag dopant into ZnO host matrix. The antibacterial activity of prepared nanorods has been determined by two different methods and compared to that of undoped ZnO nanorods. Ag doped ZnO nanorods exhibit excellent antibacterial activity as compared to that of undoped ZnO nanorods. This excellent antibacterial activity may be attributed to the presence of oxygen vacancies and Zn{sup 2+} interstitial defects. Our preliminary findings suggest that Ag doped ZnO nanorods can be used externally to control the spreading of infections related with tested bacterial strains.

  17. The Need For High Resolution In Studies Of The 3-D Magnetic Field Structure Of AGN Jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shane P. O'Sullivan; Denise C. Gabuzda

    2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We are using "broadband" (4.6 to 43 GHz) multi-frequency VLBA polarization observations of compact AGN to investigate the 3-D structure of their jet magnetic (B) fields. Observing at several frequencies, separated by short and long intervals, enables reliable determination of the distribution of Faraday Rotation, and thereby the intrinsic B field structure. Transverse Rotation Measure (RM) gradients were detected in the jets of 0954+658 and 1418+546, providing evidence for the presence of a helical B field surrounding the jet. The RM in the core regions of 2200+420 (BL Lac), 0954+658 and 1418+546 display different signs in different frequency-intervals (on different spatial scales); we suggest an explanation for this in terms of modest bends in a helical B field surrounding their jets. In future, polarization observations with a combination of VSOP-2 at 8, 22 and 43 GHz and ground arrays at frequencies with corresponding resolution will help map out the distributions of Faraday rotation, spectral index and the 3-D B field structure both across the jet and closer to the central engine, providing strong constraints for any jet B field models.

  18. The correlation between the radial distribution of high-energetic ions and the structural as well as electrical properties of magnetron sputtered ZnO:Al films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bikowski, André; Welzel, Thomas; Ellmer, Klaus [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Institute for Solar Fuels, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, D-14109 Berlin (Germany)] [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Institute for Solar Fuels, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, D-14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The origin of the pronounced radial distributions of structural and electrical properties of magnetron sputtered ZnO:Al films has been investigated. The film properties were correlated with the radially resolved ion-distribution functions. While the positive ions exhibit low energies and a radial distribution with a maximum intensity opposite the center of the target, the negative ions can have energies up to several hundred eV, depending on the target potential, with a radial distribution with two maxima opposite the erosion tracks. The most prominent positive ion is that of the working gas (Ar{sup +}), while the highest flux of the negative ions is measured for negative oxygen O{sup ?}. The radial distribution of the flux of the high-energetic negative ions can clearly be related to the radial variations of the structural (c-axis lattice parameter, crystallite size) and electronic (resistivity) properties for sputtering from the planar target, which points to the decisive role of the high-energetic negative oxygen ions for the film quality. The relation between the negative ion bombardment and the structural as well as electronic properties can be explained by a qualitative model recently developed by us. The same target has also been investigated in the eroded state. In this case, the limited acceptance angle of the mass spectrometer leads to a misinterpretation of the radial distribution of the flux of the high-energetic negative ions. This effect can be explained by a simulation, based on the assumption that the high-energetic negative ions are mainly accelerated in the cathode (target) sheath perpendicular to the uneven substrate surface.

  19. A high-Q^2 measurement of the photon structure function F_2^gamma at LEP2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. J. Taylor

    2000-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The photon structure function F_2^gamma has been measured at of 706 GeV^2, using a sample of two-photon events with a scattered electron observed in the OPAL electromagnetic endcap calorimeter. The data were taken during the years 1997-1999, when LEP operated at e+e- centre-of-mass energies ranging from 183 to 202 GeV, and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 424 pb^-1. This analysis represents the highest measurement of F_2^gamma made to date.

  20. Improvement of magnetic and structural stabilities in high-quality Co{sub 2}FeSi{sub 1?x}Al{sub x}/Si heterointerfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamada, S., E-mail: yamada@ee.es.osaka-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka 560-8531 (Japan); Tanikawa, K.; Oki, S.; Kawano, M.; Miyao, M. [Department of Electronics, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Hamaya, K. [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka 560-8531 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Gobancho, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan)

    2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We study high-quality Co{sub 2}FeSi{sub 1?x}Al{sub x} Heusler compound/Si (0 ? x ? 1) heterointerfaces for silicon (Si)-based spintronic applications. In thermal treatment conditions, the magnetic and structural stabilities of the Co{sub 2}FeSi{sub 1?x}Al{sub x}/Si heterointerfaces are improved with increasing x in Co{sub 2}FeSi{sub 1?x}Al{sub x}. Compared with L2{sub 1}-ordered Co{sub 2}FeSi/Si, B2-ordered Co{sub 2}FeAl/Si can suppress the diffusion of Si atoms into the Heusler-compound structure. This experimental study will provide an important knowledge for applications in Si-based spin transistors with metallic source/drain contacts.

  1. GeoChip 3.0 as a high-thoughput tool for analyzing microbial community composition, structure, and functional activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Z.; Deng, Y.; Van Nostrand, J.D.; Tu, Q.; Xu, M.; Hemme, C.L.; Li, X.; Wu, L.; Gentry, T.J.; Yin, Y.; Liebich, J.; Hazen, T.C.; Zhou, J.

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new generation of functional gene arrays (FGAs; GeoChip 3.0) has been developed, with {approx}28,000 probes covering approximately 57,000 gene variants from 292 functional gene families involved in carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur cycles, energy metabolism, antibiotic resistance, metal resistance and organic contaminant degradation. GeoChip 3.0 also has several other distinct features, such as a common oligo reference standard (CORS) for data normalization and comparison, a software package for data management and future updating and the gyrB gene for phylogenetic analysis. Computational evaluation of probe specificity indicated that all designed probes would have a high specificity to their corresponding targets. Experimental analysis with synthesized oligonucleotides and genomic DNAs showed that only 0.0036-0.025% false-positive rates were observed, suggesting that the designed probes are highly specific under the experimental conditions examined. In addition, GeoChip 3.0 was applied to analyze soil microbial communities in a multifactor grassland ecosystem in Minnesota, USA, which showed that the structure, composition and potential activity of soil microbial communities significantly changed with the plant species diversity. As expected, GeoChip 3.0 is a high-throughput powerful tool for studying microbial community functional structure, and linking microbial communities to ecosystem processes and functioning.

  2. GeoChip 3.0: A High Throughput Tool for Analyzing Microbial Community, Composition, Structure, and Functional Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Zhili

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as automatic updates. 3. GeoChip 3.0 analyses showed thatindicating that GeoChip 3.0 has a high specificity.evaluation of GeoChip 3.0 A. B. Clustering analysis of nifH

  3. The ultimate structure of matter: The high energy physics program from the 1950s through the 1980s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This discusses the following topics in High Energy Physics: The Particle Zoo; The Strong and the Weak; The Particle Explosion; Deep Inside the Nucleon; The Search for Unity; Physics in Collision; The Standard Model; Particles and the Cosmos; and Practical Benefits.

  4. Dynamic response of Cu4Zr54 metallic glass to high strain rate shock loading: plasticity, spall and atomic-level structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Shengnian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Arman, Bedri [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Germann, Timothy C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cagin, Tahir [TEXAS A& M UNIV

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate dynamic response of Cu{sub 46}Zr{sub 54} metallic glass under adiabatic planar shock wave loading (one-dimensional strain) wjth molecular dynamics simulations, including Hugoniot (shock) states, shock-induced plasticity and spallation. The Hugoniot states are obtained up to 60 CPa along with the von Mises shear flow strengths, and the dynamic spall strength, at different strain rates and temperatures. The spall strengths likely represent the limiting values achievable in experiments such as laser ablation. For the steady shock states, a clear elastic-plastic transition is identified (e.g., in the shock velocity-particle velocity curve), and the shear strength shows strain-softening. However, the elastic-plastic transition across the shock front displays transient stress overshoot (hardening) above the Hugoniot elastic limit followed by a relatively sluggish relaxation to the steady shock state, and the plastic shock front steepens with increasing shock strength. The local von Mises shear strain analysis is used to characterize local deformation, and the Voronoi tessellation analysis, the corresponding short-range structures at various stages of shock, release, tension and spallation. The plasticity in this glass is manifested as localized shear transformation zones and of local structure rather than thermal origin, and void nucleation occurs preferentially at the highly shear-deformed regions. The Voronoi and shear strain analyses show that the atoms with different local structures are of different shear resistances that lead to shear localization (e.g., the atoms indexed with (0,0,12,0) are most shear-resistant, and those with (0,2,8,1) are highly prone to shear flow). The dynamic changes in local structures are consistent with the observed deformation dynamics.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of high-surface-area millimeter-sized silica beads with hierarchical multi-modal pore structure by the addition of agar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Yosep; Choi, Junhyun [Department of Mineral Resources and Energy Engineering, Chonbuk National University, 567 Baekje-daero, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju-si, Jeollabuk-do 561–756 (Korea, Republic of); Tong, Meiping, E-mail: tongmeiping@iee.pku.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Water and Sediment Sciences, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Kim, Hyunjung, E-mail: kshjkim@jbnu.ac.kr [Department of Mineral Resources and Energy Engineering, Chonbuk National University, 567 Baekje-daero, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju-si, Jeollabuk-do 561–756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Millimeter-sized spherical silica foams (SSFs) with hierarchical multi-modal pore structure featuring high specific surface area and ordered mesoporous frameworks were successfully prepared using aqueous agar addition, foaming and drop-in-oil processes. The pore-related properties of the prepared spherical silica (SSs) and SSFs were systematically characterized by field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), small-angle X-ray diffraction (SAXRD), Hg intrusion porosimetry, and N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption isotherm measurements. Improvements in the BET surface area and total pore volume were observed at 504 m{sup 2} g{sup ?1} and 5.45 cm{sup 3} g{sup ?1}, respectively, after an agar addition and foaming process. Despite the increase in the BET surface area, the mesopore wall thickness and the pore size of the mesopores generated from the block copolymer with agar addition were unchanged based on the SAXRD, TEM, and BJH methods. The SSFs prepared in the present study were confirmed to have improved BET surface area and micropore volume through the agar loading, and to exhibit interconnected 3-dimensional network macropore structure leading to the enhancement of total porosity and BET surface area via the foaming process. - Highlights: • Millimeter-sized spherical silica foams (SSFs) are successfully prepared. • SSFs exhibit high BET surface area and ordered hierarchical pore structure. • Agar addition improves BET surface area and micropore volume of SSFs. • Foaming process generates interconnected 3-D network macropore structure of SSFs.

  6. Mesoporous Silicon Sponge as an Anti-Pulverization Structure for High-Performance Lithium-ion Battery Anodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xiaolin; Gu, Meng; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Kennard, Rhiannon; Yan, Pengfei; Chen, Xilin; Wang, Chong M.; Sailor, Michael J.; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanostructured silicon is a promising anode material for high performance lithium-ion batteries, yet scalable synthesis of such materials, and retaining good cycling stability in high loading electrode remain significant challenges. Here, we combine in-situ transmission electron microscopy and continuum media mechanical calculations to demonstrate that large (>20 micron) mesoporous silicon sponge (MSS) prepared by the scalable anodization method can eliminate the pulverization of the conventional bulk silicon and limit particle volume expansion at full lithiation to ~30% instead of ~300% as observed in bulk silicon particles. The MSS can deliver a capacity of ~750 mAh/g based on the total electrode weight with >80% capacity retention over 1000 cycles. The first-cycle irreversible capacity loss of pre-lithiated MSS based anode is only <5%. The insight obtained from MSS also provides guidance for the design of other materials that may experience large volume variation during operations.

  7. Density, porosity, mineralogy, and internal structure of cosmic dust and alteration of its properties during high velocity atmospheric entry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohout, T; Suuronen, J -P; Rochette, P; Hutzler, A; Gattacceca, J; Skála, D D Badjukov R; Böhmová, V; ?uda, J

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray microtomography (XMT), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and magnetic hysteresis measurements were used to determine micrometeorite internal structure, mineralogy, crystallography, and physical properties at ~{\\mu}m resolution. The study samples include unmelted, partially melted (scoriaceous) and completely melted (cosmic spherules) micrometeorites. This variety not only allows comparison of the mineralogy and porosity of these three micrometeorite types, but also reveals changes in meteoroid properties during atmospheric entry at various velocities. At low entry velocities, meteoroids do not melt, and their physical properties do not change. The porosity of unmelted micrometeorites varies considerably (0-12%) with one friable example having porosity around 50%. At higher velocities, the range of meteoroid porosity narrows, but average porosity increases (to 16-27%) due to volatile evaporation and partial melting (scoriaceous phase). Metal distribution seems to be mostly unaffected at this stage. At even higher ...

  8. High speed diesel performance/combustion characteristics correlated with structural composition of tar sands derived experimental fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webster, G.D.; Chiappetta, S.J.; Neill, W.S.; Glavihcevski, B.; Stringer, P.L.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two Canadian tar sands derived experimental diesel fuels with cetane numbers of 26 and 36 and a reference fuel with a cetane number of 47 were tested in a Deutz (FIL511D), single cylinder, 4 stroke, naturally aspirated research engine. The fuels were tested at intake and cooling air temperatures of 30 and 0/sup 0/C. The 36 cetane number fuel was tested with advanced, rated and retarded injection timings. Poor engine speed stability at light loads and excessive rates of combustion pressure rise were experienced with the lowest cetane number fuel. Detailed performance/combustion behavior is presented and a correlation with fuel structural compostiton is made. The analytical techniques used to characterize the fuels included liquid chromatography, gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (PNMR).

  9. Structure Functions in Deep Inelastic Lepton Scattering: Data from DOE laboratory experiments as compiled in data reviews by the Durham High Energy Physics Database Group

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Gehrmann, T; Roberts, R. G.; Whalley, M. R.; Durham HEP Database Group

    Gehrmann, Roberts, and Whalley in their 1999 paper, A Compilation of Structure Functions in Deep Inelastic Scattering, published in volume 25 of Journal of Physics G (Nuclear and Particle Physics) note that these data will continue to be relevant to the next generation of hadron colliders. They present data on the unpolarized structure functions F2 and xF3, R D ._L=_T /, the virtual photon asymmetries A1 and A2 and the polarized structure functions g1 and g2, from deep inelastic lepton scattering off protons, deuterium and nuclei. Data are presented in both tabular and graphical format and include predictions based on the MRST98 and CTEQ4 parton distribution functionsö as well. The data gathered from the relevant collaborations at DOE's Fermilab, SLAC, and JLAB are available, and so are data from related collaborations based at CERN and DESY. The Durham High Energy Physics (HEP) Database Group makes these data, extracted from papers and data reviews, available in one place in an easy-to-access format. These data are also include in the Durham HEP Reaction Data Database which can be searched at http://hepdata.cedar.ac.uk/reaction

  10. Structural characterization of Green River oil-shale at high-pressure using pair distribution function analysis and small angle x-ray scattering.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Locke, D. R.; Chupas, P. J.; Chapman, K. W.; Pugmire, R. J.; Winans, R. E.; Univ. of Utah

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The compression behavior of a silicate-rich oil shale from the Green River formation in the pressure range 0.0-2.4 GPa was studied using in situ high pressure X-ray pair distribution function (PDF) measurements for the sample contained within a Paris-Edinburgh cell. The real-space local structural information in the PDF, G(r), was used to evaluate the compressibility of the oil shale. Specifically, the pressure-induced reduction in the medium- to long-range atom distances (6-20 {angstrom}) yielded an average sample compressibility corresponding to a bulk modulus of ca. 61-67 GPa. A structural model consisting of a three phase mixture of the principal crystalline oil shale components (quartz, albite and Illite) provided a good fit to the ambient pressure PDF data (R 30.7%). Indeed the features in the PDF beyond 6 {angstrom}, were similarly well fit by a single phase model of the highest symmetry, highly crystalline quartz component.

  11. Nano-structure multilayer technology fabrication of high energy density capacitors for the power electronic building book

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbee, T.W.; Johnson, G.W.; Wagner, A.V.

    1997-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercially available capacitors do not meet the specifications of the Power Electronic Building Block (PEBB) concept. We have applied our propriety nanostructure multilayer materials technology to the fabrication of high density capacitors designed to remove this impediment to PEBB progress. Our nanostructure multilayer capacitors will also be enabling technology in many industrial and military applications. Examples include transient suppression (snubber capacitors), resonant circuits, and DC filtering in PEBB modules. Additionally, weapon applications require compact energy storage for detonators and pulsed-power systems. Commercial applications run the gamut from computers to lighting to communications. Steady progress over the last five years has brought us to the threshold of commercial manufacturability. We have demonstrated a working dielectric energy density of > 11 J/cm3 in 20 nF devices designed for 1 kV operation.

  12. Experimentally characterizing the electronic structures of f-electron systems using advanced high resolution Fourier transform microwave spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooke, Stephen, A

    2013-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We aim to (i) provide data that directly addresses the fundamental roles of actinide valence electrons in chemical bonding, and (ii) serve to provide prototypical data for the heavy element computational chemistry community. These goals will be achieved through the first pure rotational spectroscopic measurements on prototypical systems at ultra-high resolution. These systems encompass low oxidation state uranium and thorium compounds including, but not limited to, UX and ThX, X = F, Cl, Br, I, and UY and ThY, Y = O, S, and other simple U and Th-containing compounds. Our primary experimental tools involve time-domain rotational spectroscopy achieving line widths and resolutions of a few kHz.

  13. A novel apparatus for in situ compression of submicron structures and particles in a high resolution SEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romeis, S.; Paul, J.; Ziener, M.; Peukert, W. [Institute of Particle Technology, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Cauerstr. 4, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the development and characterization of a novel in situ manipulation device to perform stressing experiments on the submicron scale inside a high resolution field emission scanning electron microscope. The instrument comprises two main assembly groups: an upper part for positioning and moving a mounted probe and a force sensor as well as a specimen support as lower part. The upper part consists of a closed loop tripod piezoelectric scanner mounted on a self-locking coarse positioning stage. Two interlocked steel springs and a linear variable differential transformer measuring the springs' deflections compose the lower part of the instrument. This arrangement acts as force-sensor and sample support. In comparison to already well-established concepts a wide measuring range is covered by adjusting the spring constant between 30 N/m and 50000 N/m. Moreover, the new device offers striking advantages with respect to force calibration and sample deformation measurements. Force calibration is performed using the eigenfrequency of the force detection system directly inside the SEM. Deformation data are obtained with high accuracy by simultaneously recording displacements above and below the specimen. The detrimental apparatus compliance is determined, and the influence on measured data subsequently minimized: an easy to validate two-springs-in-series model is used for data correction. A force resolution in normal direction of 100 nN accompanied by a sample deformation resolution of 5 nm can be achieved with the instrument using an appropriate load cell stiffness. The capabilities and versatility of this instrument are exemplified by compression experiments performed on submicron amorphous silica particles.

  14. High-pressure X-ray diffraction study of SrMoO{sub 4} and pressure-induced structural changes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Errandonea, Daniel [MALTA Consolider Team-Departamento de Fisica Aplicada-ICMUV, Universitat de Valencia, Edificio de Investigacion, c/Dr. Moliner 50, 46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)], E-mail: daniel.errandonea@uv.es; Kumar, Ravhi S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Pressure Science and Engineering Center, University of Nevada, 4505 Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV 89154-4002 (United States); Ma Xinghua; Tu Chaoyang [Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); Graduated School of Chinese Academy of Science, 100039 Beijing (China)

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    SrMoO{sub 4} was studied under compression up to 25 GPa by angle-dispersive X-ray diffraction. A phase transition was observed from the scheelite-structured ambient phase (space group I4{sub 1}/a) to a monoclinic fergusonite phase (space group I2/a) at 12.2(9) GPa. The unit-cell parameters of the high-pressure phase are a=5.265(9) A, b=11.191(9) A, c=5.195 (5) A, and {beta}=90.9(1){sup o}, Z=4 at 13.1 GPa. There is no significant volume collapse at the phase transition. No additional phase transitions were observed and on release of pressure the initial phase is recovered, implying that the observed structural modifications are reversible. The reported transition appeared to be a ferroelastic second-order transformation producing a structure that is a monoclinic distortion of the low-pressure phase and was previously observed in compounds isostructural to SrMoO{sub 4}. A possible mechanism for the transition is proposed and its character is discussed in terms of the present data and the Landau theory. Finally, the room temperature equation of states is reported and the anisotropic compressibility of the studied crystal is discussed in terms of the compression of the Sr-O and Mo-O bonds. - Graphical abstract: The evolution of the structure of SrMoO{sub 4} upon compression was established using synchrotron X-ray diffraction and a diamond-anvil cell. A pressure-induced phase transition was found involving a symmetry decrease from tetragonal to monoclinic. A transition mechanism is proposed and its ferroelastic character is discussed in terms of the Landau theory.

  15. Insight into the Atomic Structure of High-Voltage Spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 Cathode Material in the First Cycle

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Huang, Xuejie; Yu, Xiqian; Lin, Mingxiang; Ben, Liubin; Sun, Yang; Wang, Hao; Yang, Zhenzhong; Gu, Lin; Yang, Xiao -Qing; Zhao, Haofei; et al

    2015-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Application of high-voltage spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode material is the closest and the most realistic approach to meeting the midterm goal of lithium-ion batteries for electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). However, this application has been hampered by long-standing issues, such as capacity degradation and poor first-cycle Coulombic efficiency of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode material. Although it is well-known that the structure of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 into which Li ions are reversibly intercalated plays a critical role in the above issues, performance degradation related to structural changes, particularly in the first cycle, are not fully understood. Here, we report detailed investigations ofmore »local atomic-level and average structure of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 during first cycle (3.5–4.9 V) at room temperature. We observed two types of local atomic-level migration of transition metals (TM) ions in the cathode of a well-prepared LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4//Li half-cell during first charge via an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Surface regions (~2 nm) of the cycled LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 particles show migration of TM ions into tetrahedral Li sites to form a Mn3O4-like structure. However, subsurface regions of the cycled particles exhibit migration of TM ions into empty octahedral sites to form a rocksalt-like structure. The migration of these TM ions are closely related to dissolution of Ni/Mn ions and building-up of charge transfer impedance, which contribute significantly to the capacity degradation and the poor first-cycle Coulombic efficiency of spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode material. Accordingly, we provide suggestions of effective stabilization of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 structure to obtain better electrochemical performance.« less

  16. Insight into the Atomic Structure of High-Voltage Spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 Cathode Material in the First Cycle

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Huang, Xuejie [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Yu, Xiqian [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Lin, Mingxiang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Ben, Liubin [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Sun, Yang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Wang, Hao [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Yang, Zhenzhong [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Gu, Lin [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Yang, Xiao -Qing [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zhao, Haofei [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Yu, Richeng [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Armand, Michel [CIC Energigune, Alava (Spain)

    2015-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Application of high-voltage spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode material is the closest and the most realistic approach to meeting the midterm goal of lithium-ion batteries for electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). However, this application has been hampered by long-standing issues, such as capacity degradation and poor first-cycle Coulombic efficiency of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode material. Although it is well-known that the structure of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 into which Li ions are reversibly intercalated plays a critical role in the above issues, performance degradation related to structural changes, particularly in the first cycle, are not fully understood. Here, we report detailed investigations of local atomic-level and average structure of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 during first cycle (3.5–4.9 V) at room temperature. We observed two types of local atomic-level migration of transition metals (TM) ions in the cathode of a well-prepared LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4//Li half-cell during first charge via an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Surface regions (~2 nm) of the cycled LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 particles show migration of TM ions into tetrahedral Li sites to form a Mn3O4-like structure. However, subsurface regions of the cycled particles exhibit migration of TM ions into empty octahedral sites to form a rocksalt-like structure. The migration of these TM ions are closely related to dissolution of Ni/Mn ions and building-up of charge transfer impedance, which contribute significantly to the capacity degradation and the poor first-cycle Coulombic efficiency of spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode material. Accordingly, we provide suggestions of effective stabilization of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 structure to obtain better electrochemical performance.

  17. ABSTRACT: Modern seismic codes recommend the design of ductile structures able to absorb seismic energy through high plastic deformation. Since seismic ductile design relies on an accurate control of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 ABSTRACT: Modern seismic codes recommend the design of ductile structures able to absorb seismic energy through high plastic deformation. Since seismic ductile design relies on an accurate control-concrete composite structures; Material properties variability; Seismic design; capacity design. 1 GENERAL CONTEXT

  18. Processing, Microstructure and Creep Behavior of Mo-Si-B-Based Intermetallic Alloys for Very High Temperature Structural Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vijay Vasudevan

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This research project is concerned with developing a fundamental understanding of the effects of processing and microstructure on the creep behavior of refractory intermetallic alloys based on the Mo-Si-B system. In the first part of this project, the compression creep behavior of a Mo-8.9Si-7.71B (in at.%) alloy, at 1100 and 1200 C was studied, whereas in the second part of the project, the constant strain rate compression behavior at 1200, 1300 and 1400 C of a nominally Mo-20Si-10B (in at.%) alloy, processed such as to yield five different {alpha}-Mo volume fractions ranging from 5 to 46%, was studied. In order to determine the deformation and damage mechanisms and rationalize the creep/high temperature deformation data and parameters, the microstructure of both undeformed and deformed samples was characterized in detail using x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with back scattered electron imaging (BSE) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD)/orientation electron microscopy in the SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The microstructure of both alloys was three-phase, being composed of {alpha}-Mo, Mo{sub 3}Si and T2-Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2} phases. The values of stress exponents and activation energies, and their dependence on microstructure were determined. The data suggested the operation of both dislocation as well as diffusional mechanisms, depending on alloy, test temperature, stress level and microstructure. Microstructural observations of post-crept/deformed samples indicated the presence of many voids in the {alpha}-Mo grains and few cracks in the intermetallic particles and along their interfaces with the {alpha}-Mo matrix. TEM observations revealed the presence of recrystallized {alpha}-Mo grains and sub-grain boundaries composed of dislocation arrays within the grains (in Mo-8.9Si-7.71B) or fine sub-grains with a high density of b = 1/2<111> dislocations (in Mo-20Si-10B), which are consistent with the values of the respective stress exponents and activation energies that were obtained and provide confirmatory evidence for the operation of diffusional (former alloy) or dislocation (latter alloy) creep mechanisms. In contrast, the intermetallic phases contained very few dislocations, but many cracks. The relative contributions of the {alpha}-Mo and the intermetallic particles to the overall deformation process, including their individual and collective dependence on temperature and strain rate are discussed in light of the present results and those from previous reports.

  19. X-ray and Multiwavelength Insights into the Inner Structure of High-Luminosity Disc-Like Emitters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, B; Eracleous, M; Wu, Jian; Hall, P B; Rafiee, A; Schneider, D P; Wu, Jianfeng

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present X-ray and multiwavelength studies of a sample of eight high-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with disc-like H\\beta emission-line profiles selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. These sources have higher redshift (z~0.6) than the majority of the known disc-like emitters, and they occupy a largely unexplored space in the luminosity-redshift plane. Seven sources have typical AGN X-ray spectra with power-law photon indices of \\Gamma~1.4-2.0; two of them show some X-ray absorption (column density N_H~10^{21}-10^{22} cm^{-2}$ for neutral gas). The other source, J0850+4451, has only three hard X-ray photons detected and is probably heavily obscured (N_H>3x10^{23} cm^{-2}). This object is also identified as a low-ionization broad absorption line (BAL) quasar based on Mg II \\lambda2799 absorption; it is the first disc-like emitter reported that is also a BAL quasar. The IR-to-UV spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of these eight sources are similar to the mean SEDs of typical qu...

  20. Structure and magnetic properties of low-temperature phase Mn-Bi nanosheets with ultra-high coercivity and significant anisotropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Rongming, E-mail: rmliu@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: shenbg@iphy.ac.cn; Zhang, Ming; Niu, E; Li, Zhubai; Zheng, Xinqi; Wu, Rongrong; Zuo, Wenliang; Shen, Baogen; Hu, Fengxia; Sun, Jirong [State Key Laboratory for Magnetism, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The microstructure, crystal structure, and magnetic properties of low-temperature phase (LTP) Mn-Bi nanosheets, prepared by surfactant assistant high-energy ball milling (SA-HEBM) with oleylamine and oleic acid as the surfactant, were examined with scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and vibrating sample magnetometer, respectively. Effect of ball-milling time on the coercivity of LTP Mn-Bi nanosheets was systematically investigated. Results show that the high energy ball milling time from tens of minutes to several hours results in the coercivity increase of Mn-Bi powders and peak values of 14.3 kOe around 10 h. LTP Mn-Bi nanosheets are characterized by an average thickness of tens of nanometers, an average diameter of ?1.5??m, and possess a relatively large aspect ratio, an ultra-high room temperature coercivity of 22.3 kOe, a significant geometrical and magnetic anisotropy, and a strong (00l) crystal texture. Magnetization and demagnetization behaviors reveal that wall pinning is the dominant coercivity mechanism in these LTP Mn-Bi nanosheets. The ultrafine grain refinement introduced by the SA-HEBM process contribute to the ultra-high coercivity of LTP Mn-Bi nanosheets and a large number of defects put a powerful pinning effect on the magnetic domain movement, simultaneously. Further magnetic measurement at 437?K shows that a high coercivity of 17.8 kOe and a strong positive temperature coefficient of coercivity existed in the bonded permanent magnet made by LTP Mn-Bi nanosheets.

  1. Partial Spin Ordering and Complex Magnetic Structure in BaYFeO4: A Neutron Diffraction and High Temperature Susceptibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, Corey [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Greedan, John [McMaster University] [McMaster University; Garlea, Vasile O [ORNL] [ORNL; Flacau, Roxana [National Research Council of Canada] [National Research Council of Canada; Tan, Malinda [California State University, Long Beach (CSULB)] [California State University, Long Beach (CSULB); Derakhshan, Shahab [California State University, Long Beach (CSULB)] [California State University, Long Beach (CSULB)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The novel iron-based compound, BaYFeO4, crystallizes in the Pnma space group with two distinct Fe3+ sites, that are alternately corner-shared [FeO5]7 square pyramids and [FeO6]9 octahedra, forming into [Fe4O18]24 rings, which propagate as columns along the b-axis. A recent report shows two discernible antiferromagnetic (AFM) transitions at 36 and 48 K in the susceptibility, yet heat capacity measurements reveal no magnetic phase transitions at these temperatures. An upturn in the magnetic susceptibility measurements up to 400 K suggests the presence of shortrange magnetic behavior at higher temperatures. In this Article, variable-temperature neutron powder diffraction and hightemperature magnetic susceptibility measurements were performed to clarify the magnetic behavior. Neutron powder diffraction confirmed that the two magnetic transitions observed at 36 and 48 K are due to long-range magnetic order. Below 48 K, the magnetic structure was determined as a spin-density wave (SDW) with a propagation vector, k = (0, 0, 1/3), and the moments along the b-axis, whereas the structure becomes an incommensurate cycloid [k = (0, 0, 0.35)] below 36 K with the moments within the bc-plane. However, for both cases the ordered moments on Fe3+ are only of the order 3.0 B, smaller than the expected values near 4.5 B, indicating that significant components of the Fe moments remain paramagnetic to the lowest temperature studied, 6 K. Moreover, new high-temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements revealed a peak maximum at 550 K indicative of short-range spin correlations. It is postulated that most of the magnetic entropy is thus removed at high temperatures which could explain the absence of heat capacity anomalies at the long-range ordering temperatures. Published spin dimer calculations, which appear to suggest a k = (0, 0, 0) magnetic structure, and allow for neither low dimensionality nor geometric frustration, are inadequate to explain the observed complex magnetic structure.

  2. Updating of ASME Nuclear Code Case N-201 to Accommodate the Needs of Metallic Core Support Structures for High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors Currently in Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mit Basol; John F. Kielb; John F. MuHooly; Kobus Smit

    2007-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    On September 29, 2005, ASME Standards Technology, LLC (ASME ST-LLC) executed a multi-year, cooperative agreement with the United States DOE for the Generation IV Reactor Materials project. The project's objective is to update and expand appropriate materials, construction, and design codes for application in future Generation IV nuclear reactor systems that operate at elevated temperatures. Task 4 was embarked upon in recognition of the large quantity of ongoing reactor designs utilizing high temperature technology. Since Code Case N-201 had not seen a significant revision (except for a minor revision in September, 2006 to change the SA-336 forging reference for 304SS and 316SS to SA-965 in Tables 1.2(a) and 1.2(b), and some minor editorial changes) since December 1994, identifying recommended updates to support the current high temperature Core Support Structure (CSS) designs and potential new designs was important. As anticipated, the Task 4 effort identified a number of Code Case N-201 issues. Items requiring further consideration range from addressing apparent inconsistencies in definitions and certain material properties between CC-N-201 and Subsection NH, to inclusion of additional materials to provide the designer more flexibility of design. Task 4 developed a design parameter survey that requested input from the CSS designers of ongoing high temperature gas cooled reactor metallic core support designs. The responses to the survey provided Task 4 valuable input to identify the design operating parameters and future needs of the CSS designers. Types of materials, metal temperature, time of exposure, design pressure, design life, and fluence levels were included in the Task 4 survey responses. The results of the survey are included in this report. This research proves that additional work must be done to update Code Case N-201. Task 4 activities provide the framework for the Code Case N-201 update and future work to provide input on materials. Candidate materials such as Type 321 and Type 347 austenitic stainless steels, Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel for core support structure construction, and Alloy 718 for Threaded Structural Fasteners were among the recommended materials for inclusion in the Code Case. This Task 4 Report identifies the need to address design life beyond 3 x 105 hours, especially in consideration of 60-year design life. A proposed update to the latest Code Case N-201 revision (i.e., Code Case N-201-5) including the items resolved in this report is included as Appendix A.

  3. Computer Aided Multi-scale Design of SiC-Si3N4 Nanoceramic Composites for High-Temperature Structural Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vikas Tomer; John Renaud

    2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    It is estimated that by using better and improved high temperature structural materials, the power generation efficiency of the power plants can be increased by 15% resulting in significant cost savings. One such promising material system for future high-temperature structural applications in power plants is Silicon Carbide-Silicon Nitride (SiC-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) nanoceramic matrix composites. The described research work focuses on multiscale simulation-based design of these SiC-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} nanoceramic matrix composites. There were two primary objectives of the research: (1) Development of a multiscale simulation tool and corresponding multiscale analyses of the high-temperature creep and fracture resistance properties of the SiC-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} nanocomposites at nano-, meso- and continuum length- and timescales; and (2) Development of a simulation-based robust design optimization methodology for application to the multiscale simulations to predict the range of the most suitable phase morphologies for the desired high-temperature properties of the SiC-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} nanocomposites. The multiscale simulation tool is based on a combination of molecular dynamics (MD), cohesive finite element method (CFEM), and continuum level modeling for characterizing time-dependent material deformation behavior. The material simulation tool is incorporated in a variable fidelity model management based design optimization framework. Material modeling includes development of an experimental verification framework. Using material models based on multiscaling, it was found using molecular simulations that clustering of the SiC particles near Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} grain boundaries leads to significant nanocomposite strengthening and significant rise in fracture resistance. It was found that a control of grain boundary thicknesses by dispersing non-stoichiometric carbide or nitride phases can lead to reduction in strength however significant rise in fracture strength. The temperature dependent strength and microstructural stability was also significantly depended upon the dispersion of new phases at grain boundaries. The material design framework incorporates high temperature creep and mechanical strength data in order to develop a collaborative multiscale framework of morphology optimization. The work also incorporates a computer aided material design dataset development procedure where a systematic dataset on material properties and morphology correlation could be obtained depending upon a material processing scientist's requirements. Two different aspects covered under this requirement are: (1) performing morphology related analyses at the nanoscale and at the microscale to develop a multiscale material design and analyses capability; (2) linking material behavior analyses with the developed design tool to form a set of material design problems that illustrate the range of material design dataset development that could be performed. Overall, a software based methodology to design microstructure of particle based ceramic nanocomposites has been developed. This methodology has been shown to predict changes in phase morphologies required for achieving optimal balance of conflicting properties such as minimal creep strain rate and high fracture strength at high temperatures. The methodology incorporates complex material models including atomistic approaches. The methodology will be useful to design materials for high temperature applications including those of interest to DoE while significantly reducing cost of expensive experiments.

  4. Time series of high resolution photospheric spectra in a quiet region of the Sun. II. Analysis of the variation of physical quantities of granular structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puschmann, K G; Vazquez, M; Bonet, J A; Hanslmeier, A; 10.1051/0004-6361:20047193

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From the inversion of a time series of high resolution slit spectrograms obtained from the quiet sun, the spatial and temporal distribution of the thermodynamical quantities and the vertical flow velocity is derived as a function of logarithmic optical depth and geometrical height. Spatial coherence and phase shift analyzes between temperature and vertical velocity depict the height variation of these physical quantities for structures of different size. An average granular cell model is presented, showing the granule-intergranular lane stratification of temperature, vertical velocity, gas pressure and density as a function of logarithmic optical depth and geometrical height. Studies of a specific small and a specific large granular cell complement these results. A strong decay of the temperature fluctuations with increasing height together with a less efficient penetration of smaller cells is revealed. The T -T coherence at all granular scales is broken already at log tau =-1 or z~170 km. At the layers beyon...

  5. Highly strain-relaxed ultrathin SiGe-on-insulator structure by Ge condensation process combined with H{sup +} irradiation and postannealing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyao, Masanobu; Tanaka, Masanori; Tsunoda, Isao; Sadoh, Taizoh; Enokida, Toyotsugu; Hagino, Hiroyasu; Ninomiya, Masaharu; Nakamae, Masahiko [Department of Electronics, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Analysis and Evaluation Center, Fukuryo Semicon Engineering Corporation, 1-1-1 Imajuku-Higashi, Fukuoka 819-0192 (Japan); SUMCO Corporation, 314 Nishisangao, Noda, Chiba 278-0015 (Japan); SUMCO Corporation, 2201 Oaza Kamioda, Kohoku-cho, Kishima-gun, Saga 849-0597 (Japan)

    2006-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Strain-relaxation process of SiGe-on-insulator (SGOI) structures in the oxidation induced Ge condensation method has been investigated as a function of the SiGe thickness. Complete relaxation was obtained for thick SGOI layers (>100 nm). However, the relaxation rates abruptly decreased with decreasing SiGe thickness below 50 nm, i.e., the relaxation rate of 30% at 30 nm SiGe thickness. In order to improve this phenomenon, a method combined with H{sup +} irradiation with a medium dose (5x10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}) and postannealing (1200 deg. C) has been developed. This successfully achieved the high relaxation rate (70%) in the ultrathin SGOI (30 nm)

  6. Strain control of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor structures on silicon (111) by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aidam, Rolf; Diwo, Elke; Rollbuehler, Nicola; Kirste, Lutz; Benkhelifa, Fouad [Fraunhofer-Institute for Applied Solid State Physics, Tullastrasse 72, 79108 Freiburg (Germany)

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on the use of plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy of AlGaN/GaN-based high electron mobility transistor structures grown on 4 in. Si (111) substrates. In situ measurements of wafer curvature during growth proved to be a very powerful method to analyze the buffer layer's thickness dependent strain. The Ga/N ratio at the beginning of growth of the GaN buffer layer is the critical parameter to control the compressive strain of the entire grown structure. An engineered amount of compressive strain must be designed into the structure to perfectly compensate for the tensile strain caused by differences in the thermal expansion coefficient between the epi-layer and substrate during sample cool down from growth temperatures. A maximum film thickness of 4.2 {mu}m was achieved without the formation of any cracks and a negligible bow of the wafers below 10 {mu}m. Measurement of the as-grown wafers revealed depth profiles of the charge carrier concentration comparable to values achieved on SiC substrates and mobility values of the two dimensional electron gas in the range 1230 to 1350 cm{sup 2}/Vs at a charge carrier concentration of 6.5-7 10{sup 12}/cm{sup 2}. First results on processed wafers with 2 {mu}m thick buffer layer indicate very promising results with a resistance of the buffer, measured on 200 {mu}m long contacts with 15 {mu}m pitch, in the range of R > 10{sup 9}{Omega} at 100 V and breakdown voltages up to 550 V.

  7. High optical and structural quality of GaN epilayers grown on (2{sup ¯}01) ?-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muhammed, M. M.; Roqan, I. S., E-mail: iman.roqan@kaust.edu.sa [Physical Sciences and Engineering Division, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal 23955-6900 (Saudi Arabia); Peres, M.; Franco, N.; Lorenz, K. [IPFN, Instituto Superior Técnico (IST), Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, P-2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Yamashita, Y.; Morishima, Y.; Sato, S.; Kuramata, A. [Tamura Corporation, Sayama, Saitama 350-1328 (Japan)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Producing highly efficient GaN-based optoelectronic devices has been a challenge for a long time due to the large lattice mismatch between III-nitride materials and the most common substrates, which causes a high density of threading dislocations. Therefore, it is essential to obtain alternative substrates with small lattice mismatches, appropriate structural, thermal and electrical properties, and a competitive price. Our results show that (2{sup ¯}01) oriented ?-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} has the potential to be used as a transparent and conductive substrate for GaN-growth. Photoluminescence spectra of thick GaN layers grown on (2{sup ¯}01) oriented ?-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} are found to be dominated by intense bandedge emission. Atomic force microscopy studies show a modest threading dislocation density of ?10{sup 8?}cm{sup ?2}. X-ray diffraction studies show the high quality of the single-phase wurtzite GaN thin film on (2{sup ¯}01) ?-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} with in-plane epitaxial orientation relationships between the ?-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} and the GaN thin film defined by (010) ?-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} || (112{sup ¯}0) GaN and (2{sup ¯}01) ?-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} || (0001) GaN leading to a lattice mismatch of ?4.7%. Complementary Raman spectroscopy indicates that the quality of the GaN epilayer is high.

  8. A high-entropy wind r-process study based on nuclear-structure quantities from the new finite-range droplet model FRDM(2012)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karl-Ludwig Kratz; Khalil Farouqi; Peter Möller

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretical studies of the nucleosynthesis origin of the heavy elements in our Solar System (S.S.) by the rapid neutron-capture process (r-process) still face the entwined uncertainties in the possible astrophysical scenarios and the nuclear-physics properties far from stability. In this paper we present results from the investigation of an r-process in the high-entropy wind (HEW) of core-collapse supernovae (here chosen as one of the possible scenarios for this nucleosynthesis process), using new nuclear-data input calculated in a consistent approach, for masses and $\\beta$-decay properties from the new finite-range droplet model FRDM(2012). The accuracy of the new mass model is 0.56 MeV with respect to {\\sc AME2003}, to which it was adjusted. We compare the new HEW r-process abundance pattern to the latest S.S. r-process residuals and to our earlier calculations with the nuclear-structure quantities based on FRDM(1992). Substantial overall and specific local improvements in the calculated pattern of the r-process between $A\\simeq 110$ and $^{209}$Bi, as well as remaining deficiencies are discussed in terms of the underlying spherical and deformed shell structure far from stability.

  9. 230 GHz VLBI observations of M87: event-horizon-scale structure at the enhanced very-high-energy $\\rm \\gamma$-ray state in 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akiyama, Kazunori; Fish, Vincent L; Doeleman, Sheperd S; Broderick, Avery E; Dexter, Jason; Hada, Kazuhiro; Kino, Motoki; Nagai, Hiroshi; Honma, Mareki; Johnson, Michael D; Algaba, Juan C; Asada, Keiichi; Brinkerink, Christiaan; Blundell, Ray; Bower, Geoffrey C; Cappallo, Roger; Crew, Geoffrey B; Dexter, Matt; Dzib, Sergio A; Freund, Robert; Friberg, Per; Gurwell, Mark; Ho, Paul T P; Inoue, Makoto; Krichbaum, Thomas P; Loinard, Laurent; MacMahon, David; Marrone, Daniel P; Moran, James M; Nakamura, Masanori; Nagar, Neil M; Ortiz-Leon, Gisela; Plambeck, Richard; Pradel, Nicolas; Primiani, Rurik A; Rogers, Alan E E; Roy, Alan L; SooHoo, Jason; Tavares, Jonathan-Leon; Tilanus, Remo P J; Titus, Michael; Wagner, Jan; Weintroub, Jonathan; Yamaguchi, Paul; Young, Ken H; Zensus, Anton; Ziurys, Lucy M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on 230 GHz (1.3 mm) VLBI observations of M87 with the Event Horizon Telescope using antennas on Mauna Kea in Hawaii, Mt. Graham in Arizona and Cedar Flat in California. For the first time, we have acquired 230 GHz VLBI interferometric phase information on M87 through measurement of closure phase on the triangle of long baselines. Most of the measured closure phases are consistent with 0$^{\\circ}$ as expected by physically-motivated models for 230 GHz structure such as jet models and accretion disk models. The brightness temperature of the event-horizon-scale structure is $\\sim 1 \\times 10^{10}$ K derived from the compact flux density of $\\sim 1$ Jy and the angular size of $\\sim 40 $ $\\rm \\mu$as $\\sim$ 5.5 $R_{{\\rm s}}$, which is broadly consistent with the peak brightness of the radio cores at 1-86 GHz located within $\\sim 10^2$ $R_{{\\rm s}}$. Our observations occurred in the middle of an enhancement in very-high-energy (VHE) $\\rm \\gamma$-ray flux, presumably originating in the vicinity of the centr...

  10. A fermi liquid electric structure and the nature of the carriers in high-T/sub c/ cuprates: A photoemission study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arko, A.J.; List, R.S.; Bartlett, R.J.; Cheong, S.W.; Fisk, Z.; Thompson, J.D.; Olson, C.G.; Yang, A.B.; Liu, R.; Gu, C.; Veal, B.W.; Liu, J.Z.; Paulikas, A.P.; Vandervoort, K.; Claus, H.; Campuzano, J.C.; Schirber, J.E.; Shinn, N.D.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed angle-integrated and angle-resolved photoemission measurements at 20 K on well-characterized single crystals of high-T/sub c/ cuprates (both 1:2:3-type and 2:2:1:2-type) cleaved in situ, and find a relatively large, resolution limited Fermi edge which shows large amplitude variations with photon energy, indicative of band structure final state effects. The lineshapes of the spectra of the 1:2:3 materials as a function of photon energy are well reproduced by band structure predictions, indicating a correct mix of 2p and 3d orbitals on the calculations, while the energy positions of the peaks agree with calculated bands only to within /approx/0.5 eV. This may yet prove to reflect the effects of Coulomb correlation. We nevertheless conclude that a Fermi liquid approach to conductivity is appropriate. Angle-resolved data, while still incomplete, suggest agreement with the Fermi surface predicted by the LDA calculations. A BCS-like energy gap is observed in the 2:2:1:2 materials, whose magnitude is twice the weak coupling BCS value (i.e., 2/Delta/ = 7 KT/sub c/). 49 refs., 11 figs.

  11. Prediction of parallel in-register amyloidogenic beta-structures In highly beta-rich protein sequences by pairwise propensity analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan, Allen Wayne

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Amyloids and prion proteins are clinically and biologically important beta-structures, whose supersecondary structures are difficult to determine by standard experimental or computational means. In addition, significant ...

  12. Application of phase-retrieval x-ray diffractometry to carbon doped SiGe(C)/Si(C) superlattice structures. II. High resolution reconstruction using neural network root finder technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dilanian, Ruben A.; Nikulin, Andrei Y.; Darahanau, Aliaksandr V.; Hester, James; Zaumseil, Peter [School of Physics, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Private Mail Bag 1, Menai, New South Wales 2234 (Australia); IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, D-15236 Frankfurt (Germany)

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A neural network root finder approach for finding complex roots of high-degree complex polynomials was applied as part of the phase-retrieval x-ray diffractometry technique to reconstruct strain profiles in SiGe(C)/Si(C) superlattice structures. The high spatial resolution, 5 A, as a result of significantly higher degree of the complex polynomial, 1400 roots, allowed us to obtain more accurate results for the strain profile distribution in SiGe(C)/Si(C) superlattice structures. Previously, such high quality analysis was fundamentally impossible due to the limitations imposed by conventional numerical methods of finding complex polynomial roots.

  13. Polarization-dependent all-optical modulator with ultra-high modulation depth based on a stereo graphene-microfiber structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Fei; Zheng, Bi-cai; Shao, Guang-hao; Ge, Shi-jun; Lu, Yan-qing

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report an in-line polarization-dependent all-optical fiber modulator based on a stereo graphene-microfiber structure (GMF) by utilizing the lab-on-rod technique. Owing to the unique spring-like geometry, an ultra-long GMF interaction length can be achieved, and an ultra-high modulation depth (MD) of ~7.5 dB and a high modulation efficiency (ME) of ~0.2 dB/mW were demonstrated for one polarization state. The MD and ME are more than one order larger than those of other graphene-waveguide hybrid all-optical modulators. By further optimizing the transferring and cleaning process, the modulator can quickly switch between transparent and opaque states for both the two polarization states with a maximized MD of tens of decibels. This modulator is compatible with current fiber-optic communication systems and may be applied in the near future to meet the impending need for ultrafast optical signal processing.

  14. Adsorption geometry, conformation, and electronic structure of 2H-octaethylporphyrin on Ag(111) and Fe metalation in ultra high vacuum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borghetti, Patrizia; Sangaletti, Luigi [I-LAMP and Department of Mathematics and Physics, Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Brescia (Italy); Santo, Giovanni Di; Castellarin-Cudia, Carla; Goldoni, Andrea [ST-INSTM micro- and nano-carbon lab., Elettra - Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., s.s.14 Km. 163.5, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Fanetti, Mattia [ST-INSTM micro- and nano-carbon lab., Elettra - Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., s.s.14 Km. 163.5, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Istituto Officina dei Materiali-CNR, Laboratorio TASC, s.s. 14 km 163.5, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Magnano, Elena; Bondino, Federica [Istituto Officina dei Materiali-CNR, Laboratorio TASC, s.s. 14 km 163.5, 34149 Trieste (Italy)

    2013-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to the growing interest in the ferromagnetic properties of Fe-octaethylporphyrins (Fe-OEP) for applications in spintronics, methods to produce stable Fe-porphyrins with no Cl atoms are highly demanded. Here, we demonstrate the formation of Fe-OEP layers on Ag(111) single crystal by the ultra high vacuum in situ metalation of the free-base 2H-2,3,7,8,12,13,17,18-octaethylporphyrin (2H-OEP) molecules. The metalation proceeds exactly as in the case of 2H-5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin (2H-TPP) on the same substrate. An extensive surface characterization by means of X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, valence band photoemission, and NEXAFS with synchrotron radiation light provides information on molecular conformation and electronic structure in the monolayer and multilayer cases. We demonstrate that the presence of the ethyl groups affects the tilt of the adsorbed molecules, the conformation of the macrocycle, and the polarization screening in multilayers, but has only a minor effect in the metalation process with respect to 2H-TPP.

  15. Regulatory Safety Issues in the Structural Design Criteria of ASME Section III Subsection NH and for Very High Temperatures for VHTR & GEN IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William J. O’Donnell; Donald S. Griffin

    2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this task is to identify issues relevant to ASME Section III, Subsection NH [1], and related Code Cases that must be resolved for licensing purposes for VHTGRs (Very High Temperature Gas Reactor concepts such as those of PBMR, Areva, and GA); and to identify the material models, design criteria, and analysis methods that need to be added to the ASME Code to cover the unresolved safety issues. Subsection NH was originally developed to provide structural design criteria and limits for elevated-temperature design of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) systems and some gas-cooled systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and its Advisory Committee for Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) reviewed the design limits and procedures in the process of reviewing the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) for a construction permit in the late 1970s and early 1980s, and identified issues that needed resolution. In the years since then, the NRC and various contractors have evaluated the applicability of the ASME Code and Code Cases to high-temperature reactor designs such as the VHTGRs, and identified issues that need to be resolved to provide a regulatory basis for licensing. This Report describes: (1) NRC and ACRS safety concerns raised during the licensing process of CRBR , (2) how some of these issues are addressed by the current Subsection NH of the ASME Code; and (3) the material models, design criteria, and analysis methods that need to be added to the ASME Code and Code Cases to cover unresolved regulatory issues for very high temperature service.

  16. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hybrid ceramic/metallic fastener (bolt) includes a headed ceramic shank carrying a metallic end termination fitting. A conventional cap screw threadably engages the termination fitting to apply tensile force to the fastener.

  17. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hybrid ceramic/metallic fastener (bolt) includes a headed ceramic shank carrying a metallic end termination fitting. A conventional cap screw threadably engages the termination fitting to apply tensile force to the fastener.

  18. A novel 3D structure composed of strings of hierarchical TiO{sub 2} spheres formed on TiO{sub 2} nanobelts with high photocatalytic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Yongjian [State Key Laboratory of Alternate Electrical Power System with Renewable Energy Sources, School of Renewable Energy, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); Li, Meicheng, E-mail: mcli@ncepu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Alternate Electrical Power System with Renewable Energy Sources, School of Renewable Energy, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); Suzhou Institute, North China Electric Power University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Song, Dandan; Li, Xiaodan; Yu, Yue [State Key Laboratory of Alternate Electrical Power System with Renewable Energy Sources, School of Renewable Energy, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel hierarchical titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) composite nanostructure with strings of anatase TiO{sub 2} hierarchical micro-spheres and rutile nanobelts framework (TiO{sub 2} HSN) is successfully synthesized via a one-step hydrothermal method. Particularly, the strings of hierarchical spheres are assembled by very thin TiO{sub 2} nanosheets, which are composed of highly crystallized anatase nanocrystals. Meanwhile, the HSN has a large surface area of 191 m{sup 2}/g, which is about 3 times larger than Degussa P25. More importantly, the photocatalytic activity of HSN and P25 were evaluated by the photocatalytic oxidation decomposition of methyl orange (MO) under UV light illumination, and the TiO{sub 2} HSN shows enhanced photocatalytic activity compared with Degussa P25, as result of its continuous hierarchical structures, special conductive channel and large specific surface area. With these features, the hierarchical TiO{sub 2} may have more potential applications in the fields of dye-sensitized solar cells and lithium ion batteries. -- Graphical abstract: Novel TiO{sub 2} with anatase micro-spheres and rutile nanobelts is synthesized. Enhanced photocatalysis is attributed to hierarchical structures (3D spheres), conductive channel (1D nanobelts) and large specific surface area (2D nanosheet). Highlights: • The novel TiO{sub 2} nanostructure (HSN) is fabricated for the first time. • HSN is composed of strings of anatase hierarchical spheres and rutile nanobelt. • HSN presents a larger S{sub BET} of 191 m{sup 2}/g, 3 times larger than the Degussa P25 (59 m{sup 2}/g). • HSN owns three kinds of dimensional TiO{sub 2} (1D, 2D and 3D) simultaneously. • HSN exhibits better photocatalytic performance compared with Degussa P25.

  19. Lithium Dynamics in the Zeolite-Like Lithosilicate RUB-29 and its High-Temperature Structure after Dehydration (Cs14Li42Si72O172)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park,S.; Parise, J.; Franke, M.; Seydel, T.; Paulmann, C.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermally induced modifications of the zeolite-like lithosilicate RUB-29 (Cs14Li24[Li18Si72O172] {center_dot} 14H2O, space group I222, a = 11.208(1), b = 17.286(1), c = 23.536(1) Angstroms, and V = 4660(1) Angstroms3) have been studied focusing on static and dynamical disorder of Li. After the water loss, dehydrated RUB-29 (HT-d-RUB-29) maintains the basic space group I222 at high temperatures from 473 up to 1073 K. However, the distribution of extra-framework Li and Cs cations in HT-d-RUB-29 became distinctly different from those in the original structure. In particular, extra-framework Li cations located within porous 8- and 10-membered ring-channels, where these Li cations were partially coordinated with zeolitic water in the original structure, migrate into densely packed Li2O-layers after dehydration. As a result of the migration, the number of empty sites relevant for Li hopping in Li2O-layers decreases, which give a negative effect on the long-range charge transfer in dehydrated RUB-29. Its DC conductivity values estimated from AC impedance spectra lie between 2 x 10-5 and 6 x 10-5 S cm-1 at 873 K, and a low activation energy of 51 kJ/mol (congruent with 0.53 eV) could be determined for the bulk charge transfer process in dehydrated RUB-29.

  20. Study of calcium-containing orthophosphates of NaZr{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} structural type by high-temperature X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orlova, A. I.; Kanunov, A. E., E-mail: a.kanunov@mail.ru [Nizhni Novgorod State University (Russian Federation); Samoilov, S. G.; Kazakova, A. Yu.; Kazantsev, G. N. [Leipunsky Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (Russian Federation)] [Leipunsky Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (Russian Federation)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Orthophosphates Ca{sub 0.5}Ti{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}, Ca{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}, Ca{sub 0.75}Zr{sub 2}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 0.5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2.5}, and CaMg{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 1.5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} (structural type NaZr{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}), having different occupancies of interframework positions by calcium, have been prepared by the sol-gel method with the subsequent thermal treatment of dried gels and investigated by IR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The analytical indexing of X-ray diffraction patterns is performed within the sp. gr. R3{sup -}. High-temperature X-ray diffraction was used to investigate the behavior of the orthophosphates upon heating: thermal expansion in the temperature range of 20-610 Degree-Sign C (up to 500 Degree-Sign C for Ca{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}). The coefficients of thermal expansion are calculated from the shift of diffraction peaks. The unit-cell parameters of crystals at different temperatures are determined. The dependences of thermal expansion and its anisotropy on the occupancy of cation M positions by calcium are revealed.

  1. The critical role of growth temperature on the structural and electrical properties of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor heterostructures grown on Si(111)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baron, N. [CRHEA-CNRS, rue Bernard Gregory, Parc de Sophia Antipolis, 06560 Valbonne (France); PICOGIGA International, Place Marcel Rebuffat, Parc de Villejust, 91971 Courtaboeuf (France); Cordier, Y.; Chenot, S.; Vennegues, P.; Tottereau, O.; Leroux, M.; Semond, F.; Massies, J. [CRHEA-CNRS, rue Bernard Gregory, Parc de Sophia Antipolis, 06560 Valbonne (France)

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work is dedicated to the study of the growth by ammonia source molecular beam epitaxy of Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N/GaN high electron mobility transistors on (111) oriented silicon substrates. The effect of growth conditions on the structural and electrical properties of the heterostructures was investigated. It is shown that even a slight variation in the growth temperature of the thick GaN buffer on AlN/GaN stress mitigating layers has a drastic influence on these properties via a counterintuitive effect on the dislocation density. Both in situ curvature measurements and ex situ transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction experiments indicate that the relaxation rate of the lattice mismatch stress increases with the growth temperature but finally results in a higher dislocations density. Furthermore, a general trend appears between the final wafer curvature at room temperature and the threading dislocation density. Finally, the influence of the dislocation density on the GaN buffer insulating properties and the two-dimensional electron gas transport properties at the Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N/GaN interface is discussed.

  2. High resolution imaging of NGC 2346 with GSAOI/GeMS: disentangling the planetary nebula molecular structure to understand its origin and evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manchado, Arturo; Villaver, Eva; Garcia-Segura, Guillermo; Shaw, Richard A; Garcia-Hernandez, D A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present high spatial resolution ($\\approx$ 60--90 milliarcseconds) images of the molecular hydrogen emission in the Planetary Nebula (PN) NGC 2346. The data were acquired during the System Verification of the Gemini Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics System + Gemini South Adaptive Optics Imager. At the distance of NGC 2346, 700 pc, the physical resolution corresponds to $\\approx$ 56 AU, which is slightly higher than that an [N II] image of NGC 2346 obtained with HST/WFPC2. With this unprecedented resolution we were able to study in detail the structure of the H$_2$ gas within the nebula for the first time. We found it to be composed of knots and filaments, which at lower resolution had appeared to be a uniform torus of material. We explain how the formation of the clumps and filaments in this PN is consistent with a mechanism in which a central hot bubble of nebular gas surrounding the central star has been depressurized, and the thermal pressure of the photoionized region drives the fragmentation of the swep...

  3. The Structure of a High Fidelity DNA Polymerase Bound to a Mismatched Nucleotide Reveals an ;Ajar; Intermediate Conformation in the Nucleotide Selection Mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Eugene Y.; Beese, Lorena S. (Duke)

    2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    To achieve accurate DNA synthesis, DNA polymerases must rapidly sample and discriminate against incorrect nucleotides. Here we report the crystal structure of a high fidelity DNA polymerase I bound to DNA primer-template caught in the act of binding a mismatched (dG:dTTP) nucleoside triphosphate. The polymerase adopts a conformation in between the previously established 'open' and 'closed' states. In this 'ajar' conformation, the template base has moved into the insertion site but misaligns an incorrect nucleotide relative to the primer terminus. The displacement of a conserved active site tyrosine in the insertion site by the template base is accommodated by a distinctive kink in the polymerase O helix, resulting in a partially open ternary complex. We suggest that the ajar conformation allows the template to probe incoming nucleotides for complementarity before closure of the enzyme around the substrate. Based on solution fluorescence, kinetics, and crystallographic analyses of wild-type and mutant polymerases reported here, we present a three-state reaction pathway in which nucleotides either pass through this intermediate conformation to the closed conformation and catalysis or are misaligned within the intermediate, leading to destabilization of the closed conformation.

  4. Crystal Structure of Cascade

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ribbon-like structure (Figure 1). This structure is facilitated by rotation of nucleotides out of the duplex region at six base pair intervals and stabilized by the highly...

  5. Facile synthesized nanorod structured vanadium pentoxide for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    synthesized nanorod structured vanadium pentoxide for high-rate lithium batteries. Facile synthesized nanorod structured vanadium pentoxide for high-rate lithium batteries....

  6. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, James L. (Drayton Plains, MI)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources.

  7. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, J.L.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources. 2 figs.

  8. Section name Biomimetics at Reading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    world and these can be used as the basis for new technologies. Because nature tends to be very economical with energy, bioinspired technologies have the potential to provide cleaner, greener solutions technologies. Researchers in the Centre enjoy excellent collaborative links with both other universities

  9. Microelectromechanical systems for biomimetical application 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latif, Rhonira

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of adaptive micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) device in biologically-inspired cochlear model (cochlear biomodel) has been seen as a preferable approach to mimic closely the human cochlear response. ...

  10. Effect of reactor pressure on the electrical and structural properties of InN epilayers grown by high-pressure chemical vapor deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    Effect of reactor pressure on the electrical and structural properties of InN epilayers grown://avspublications.org/jvsta/about/rights_and_permissions #12;Effect of reactor pressure on the electrical and structural properties of InN epilayers grown-atmospheric reactor pressures (2.5­18.5 bar) on the electrical and structural properties of InN epilayers deposited

  11. Probing Structure-Property Relationship of Energy Storage Materials Using Ex-Situ, In-Situ Dynamic Microscopy and Spectroscopy with High Spatial and Fast Temporal Resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Probing Structure-Property Relationship of Energy Storage Materials Using Ex-Situ, In-Situ Dynamic, chemistry, and properties of energy storage materials Find general guiding principle for accelerated-situ chemical imaging and spectroscopic study of structure and chemical evolution of new energy storage

  12. Optimization of outrigger structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lame, Ali

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Designing a high rise building has its challenges. Different structural systems have been developed to control the lateral displacement of high rise buildings. One of these systems is called the outrigger which decreases ...

  13. A microsecond time resolved x-ray absorption near edge structure synchrotron study of phase transitions in Fe undergoing ramp heating at high pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marini, C.; Mathon, O.; Pascarelli, S. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, BP220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Occelli, F.; Torchio, R.; Recoules, V.; Loubeyre, P. [CEA, Bruyeres le Chatel, 91297 Arpajon Cedex (France)

    2014-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a microsecond time-resolved x-ray absorption near edge structure study using synchrotron radiation to dynamically detect structural phase transitions in Fe undergoing rapid heating along a quasi-isochoric path. Within a few ms, we observed two structural phase transitions, which transform the ambient bcc phase of Fe into the fcc phase, and then into the liquid phase. This example illustrates the opportunities offered by energy dispersive x-ray absorption spectroscopy in the study of matter under extreme dynamic conditions. Advanced simulations are compared to these data.

  14. High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Iron-Based Amorphous Metals: The Effects of Composition, Structure and Environment on Corrosion Resistance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, J; Choi, J S; Haslam, J; Lian, T; Day, S; Yang, N; Blue, C; Peters, W; Bayles, R; Lewandowski, J; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Lavernia, E; Ajdelsztajn, A; Grave, O; Aprigliano, L; Kaufman, L; Boudreau, J; Branagan, D J; Beardsley, B

    2006-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    New corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals have been identified from published data or developed through combinatorial synthesis, and tested to determine their relative thermal phase stability, microstructure, mechanical properties, damage tolerance, and corrosion resistance. Some alloy additions are known to promote glass formation and to lower the critical cooling rate [F. Guo, S. J. Poon, Applied Physics Letters, 83 (13) 2575-2577, 2003]. Other elements are known to enhance the corrosion resistance of conventional stainless steels and nickel-based alloys [A. I. Asphahani, Materials Performance, Vol. 19, No. 12, pp. 33-43, 1980] and have been found to provide similar benefits to iron-based amorphous metals. Many of these materials can be cast as relatively thick ingots, or applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. A wide variety of thermal spray processes have been developed by industry, and can be used to apply these new materials as coatings. Any of these can be used for the deposition of the formulations discussed here, with varying degrees of residual porosity and crystalline structure. Thick protective coatings have now been made that are fully dense and completely amorphous in the as-sprayed condition. An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Project will be given, with particular emphasis on the corrosion resistance of several different types of iron-based amorphous metals in various environments of interest. The salt fog test has been used to compare the performance of various wrought alloys, melt-spun ribbons, arc-melted drop-cast ingots, and thermal-spray coatings for their susceptibility to corrosion in marine environments. Electrochemical tests have also been performed in seawater. Spontaneous breakdown of the passive film and localized corrosion require that the open-circuit corrosion potential exceed the critical potential. The resistance to localized corrosion is seawater has been quantified through measurement of the open-circuit corrosion potential (E{sub corr}), the breakdown potential (E{sub crit}) and the repassivation potential (E{sub rp}). The greater the difference between the open-circuit corrosion potential and the repassivation potential ({Delta}E), the more resistant a material is to modes of localized corrosion such as pitting and crevice corrosion. Cyclic polarization (CP) was used as a means of measuring the critical potential (E{sub crit}) relative to the open-circuit corrosion potential (E{sub corr}). Linear polarization (LP) has been used to determine the corrosion current (i{sub corr}) and the corresponding corrosion rate. Other aspects of the materials will also be discussed, as well as potential applications.

  15. Cryoelectron Microscopy as a Functional Instrument for Systems Biology, Structural Analysis & Experimental Manipulations with Living Cells. A comprehensive review of the current works

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleg V. Gradov; Margaret A. Gradova

    2015-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this paper is to give an introductory review of the cryoelectron microscopy as a complex data source for the most of the system biology branches, including the most perspective non-local approaches known as "localomics" and "dynamomics". A brief summary of various cryoelectron mi-croscopy methods and corresponding system biological ap-proaches is given in the text. The above classification can be considered as a useful framework for the primary comprehen-sions about cryoelectron microscopy aims and instrumental tools. We do not discuss any of these concepts in details, but merely point out that their methodological complexity follows only from the structure-functional complexity of biological systems which are investigated in this manner. We also postu-late that one can employ some of the cryoelectron microscopic techniques not only for observation, but also for modification and structural refunctionalization of some biological and similar soft matter objects and microscopic samples. In other worlds, we start with the cryoelectron microscopy as a tool for the sys-tem biology and progress to its applying as an instrument for system biology and functional biomimetics; i.e. "system cryobi-ology" goes over into "synthetic cryobiology" or "cryogenic biomimetics". All these conclusions can be deduced from the most recent works of the latest years, including just submitted foreign papers. This article provides an up-to-date description of the conceptual basis for the novel view on the computational cryoelectron microscopy (in silico) approaches and the data mining principles which lie at the very foundation of modern structural analysis and reconstruction.

  16. High temperature crystal structures and superionic properties of SrCl{sub 2}, SrBr{sub 2}, BaCl{sub 2} and BaBr{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hull, Stephen, E-mail: stephen.hull@stfc.ac.uk [The ISIS Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Norberg, Stefan T. [The ISIS Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Ahmed, Istaq; Eriksson, Sten G. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Mohn, Chris E. [Department of Chemistry and Centre for Materials Science and Nanotechnology, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1033 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The structural properties of the binary alkaline-earth halides SrCl{sub 2}, SrBr{sub 2}, BaCl{sub 2} and BaBr{sub 2} have been investigated from ambient temperature up to close to their melting points, using the neutron powder diffraction technique. Fluorite-structured SrCl{sub 2} undergoes a gradual transition to a superionic phase at 900-1100 K, characterised by an increasing concentration of anion Frenkel defects. At a temperature of 920(3) K, the tetragonal phase of SrBr{sub 2} undergoes a first-order transition to a cubic fluorite phase. This high temperature phase shows the presence of extensive disorder within the anion sublattice, which differs from that found in superionic SrCl{sub 2}. BaCl{sub 2} and BaBr{sub 2} both adopt the cotunnite crystal structure under ambient conditions. BaCl{sub 2} undergoes a first-order structural transition at 917(5) K to a disordered fluorite-structured phase. The relationship between the (disordered) crystal structures and the ionic conductivity behaviour is discussed and the influence of the size of the mobile anion on the superionic behaviour is explored. - Graphical abstract: Anomalous behaviour of the lattice expansion of SrCl{sub 2} at temperatures of {approx}1000 K is associated with the gradual transition to a superionic phase, whilst SrBr{sub 2} undergoes a first-order structural transition ({beta}{yields}{alpha}) to a fluorite-structured superionic phase at 920(3) K. Highlights: > Anomalous behaviour of the lattice expansion of SrCl{sub 2} occurs at temperatures {approx}1000 K. > Crystal structure of {beta}-SrBr{sub 2} is described in detail. > On heating, SrBr{sub 2} and BaCl{sub 2} transform to a fluorite-structured superionic phase. > Temperature dependence of the BaCl{sub 2} and BaBr{sub 2} structures is presented. > Nature of the superionic phases within the alkaline-earth halides is discussed.

  17. Electrical characterization and modeling of the Au/CaF{sub 2}/nSi(111) structures with high-quality tunnel-thin fluoride layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vexler, M. I. [Institut fuer Elektronische Bauelemente und Schaltungstechnik, TU Braunschweig, Hans-Sommer-Strasse 66, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany); A. F. Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 26 Polytechnicheskaya Str., 194021 St.-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Sokolov, N. S.; Suturin, S. M.; Banshchikov, A. G. [A. F. Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 26 Polytechnicheskaya Str., 194021 St.-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Tyaginov, S. E. [A. F. Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 26 Polytechnicheskaya Str., 194021 St.-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Christian-Dopper-Laboratory and Institut fuer Mikroelektronik, TU Wien, Gusshausstrasse 25-29, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Grasser, T. [Christian-Dopper-Laboratory and Institut fuer Mikroelektronik, TU Wien, Gusshausstrasse 25-29, A-1040 Vienna (Austria)

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Au/CaF{sub 2}/nSi(111) structures with 4-5 monolayers of epitaxial fluoride are fabricated and electrically tested. The leakage current in these structures was substantially smaller than in similar samples reported previously. Simulations adopting a Franz-type dispersion relation with Franz mass of m{sub F}approx1.2m{sub 0} for carriers in the forbidden band of CaF{sub 2} reproduced the measured current-voltage curves quite satisfactorily. Roughly, these curves could also be reproduced using the parabolic dispersion law with the electron mass of m{sub e}=1.0m{sub 0}, which is a material constant rather than a fitting parameter. Experimental facts and their comparison to modeling results allow qualification of the crystalline quality of fabricated structures as sufficient for device applications.

  18. Ab initio theoretical investigation of the frequency comb structure and coherence in the vuv-xuv regimes via high-order harmonic generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Shih-I; Carrera, Juan J.; Son, Sang-Kil

    2008-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    ;. Phase coherence among excitation pulses essentially prevails as the time delay is prolonged. We now study the effect on the frequency comb structure as the number of phase-locked pulses N is varied. Figure 3#1;c#2; shows the frequency comb structure... mode-locked laser, consider the pulse circulat- ing in a laser cavity #3;14#4;. Since the group and phase veloci- ties inside the cavity are not equal, there is a phase shift #3;#4; from pulse to pulse. The angular frequency spectrum ema- nating from...

  19. Structuring Structural Operational

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousavi, Mohammad

    aan de Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, op gezag van de Rector Magnificus, prof.dr.ir. C.J. van.A. Reniers CIP­DATA LIBRARY TECHNISCHE UNIVERSITEIT EINDHOVEN Mousavi, MohammadReza Structuring Structural Operational Semantics / MohammadReza Mousavi. ­ Eindhoven : Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, 2005

  20. Structuring Structural Operational

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reniers, Michel

    aan de Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, op gezag van de Rector Magnificus, prof.dr.ir. C.J. van.A. Reniers CIP-DATA LIBRARY TECHNISCHE UNIVERSITEIT EINDHOVEN Mousavi, MohammadReza Structuring Structural Operational Semantics / MohammadReza Mousavi. - Eindhoven : Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, 2005

  1. Structural investigations on Co{sub 3-x}Mn{sub x}TeO{sub 6}; (0 < x ? 2); High temperature ferromagnetism and enhanced low temperature anti-ferromagnetism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Harishchandra; Sinha, A. K., E-mail: anil@rrcat.gov.in, E-mail: hng@rrcat.gov.in; Ghosh, Haranath, E-mail: anil@rrcat.gov.in, E-mail: hng@rrcat.gov.in; Singh, M. N. [Indus Synchrotron Utilization Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore—452013 (India); Rajput, Parasmani [Atomic and Molecular Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai—400085 (India); Prajapat, C. L.; Singh, M. R.; Ravikumar, G. [Technical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai—400085 (India)

    2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In the quest of materials with high temperature ferromagnetism and low temperature anti-ferromagnetism, we prepare Co{sub 3-x}Mn{sub x}TeO{sub 6}; (0?structural investigations on these solid solutions as a function of Mn concentration using Synchrotron X-ray diffraction (SXRD) and X-ray absorption near edge structure measurements in corroboration with magnetism are presented. Phase diagram obtained from Rietveld Refinement on SXRD data as a function of Mn concentration indicates doping disproportionate mixing of both monoclinic (C2/c) and rhombohedral (R 3{sup ¯}) structure for x?structure for x???0.5. Further, it shows increase in both lattice parameters as well as average transition metal-oxygen (Co/Mn-O) bond lengths for x???0.5. Co and Mn K-edge XANES spectra reveal that both Co and Mn are in mixed oxidation state, Co{sup 2+}/Mn{sup 2+} and Co{sup 3+}/Mn{sup 3+}. Relative ratios of Co{sup 3+}/Co{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 3+}/Mn{sup 2+} obtained using Linear combination fit decrease with increasing x (for x???0.5). These structural and spectroscopic evidences are used to provide possible interpretation of the observed paramagnetic to ferromagnetic transition at around 185?K followed by an enhanced antiferromagnetic transition ?45?K for x?=?0.5.

  2. Synthesis of novel polyimides for the testing of structure-processing and property relations when used to form high temperature polymer matrices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tschen Molina, Francisco

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    High-performance polymers have found an extreme range of applications in the aerospace industry. Composites which have polymers incorporated in them can usually meet the needs of the design, and are the ideal materials for aerospace applications due...

  3. GeoChip 3.0 as a high-thoughput tool for analyzing microbial community composition, structure, and functional activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Z.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GeoChip 3.0 as a High-Throughput Tool for Analyzinggene arrays (FGAs; GeoChip 3.0) has been developed, with ~contaminant degradation. GeoChip 3.0 also has several other

  4. Calculational analysis of structural activation induced by 20-100 MeV proton beam loss in high-power linear accelerators 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Stacey Kirsten

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to obtain dose rate estimates at several locations near the accelerator. To perform these calculations, simplified computer models were developed from detailed engineering drawings of a typical high-power accelerator design. This research focused on the 20...

  5. High-Pressure Synthesis and Structure Determination of K6(SeO4)(SeO5), The First Potassium Orthoselenate(VI)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orosel,D.; Dinnebeier, R.; Jansen, M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors report on the first synthesis of a potassium orthoselenate(VI), K{sub 6}(SeO{sub 4})(SeO{sub 5}), and the structure determination from synchrotron powder diffraction data. The title compound crystallizes in the tetragonal space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 with a = 8.1259(1) {angstrom}, c = 17.4953(2) {angstrom}, V = 1155.21(2) {angstrom}{sup 3}, and Z = 4. Selenium displays two different complex anions, tetrahedral SeO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and trigonal-bipyramidal SeO{sub 5}{sup 4-}. When the formula is reduced to A{sub 3}B, the spatial arrangement of the constituting building units can be derived from the Li{sub 3}Bi type of structure.

  6. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, James L. (Drayton Plains, MI)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources. One layer of each set of bilayers consist of titanium, and the second layer of each set of bilayers consist of an alloy of nickel with carbon interstitially present in the nickel alloy.

  7. Ultrahigh and High Resolution Structures and Mutational Analysis of Monomeric Streptococcus pyogenes SpeB Reveal a Functional Role for the Glycine-rich C-terminal Loop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    González-Páez, Gonzalo E.; Wolan, Dennis W. (Scripps)

    2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Cysteine protease SpeB is secreted from Streptococcus pyogenes and has been studied as a potential virulence factor since its identification almost 70 years ago. Here, we report the crystal structures of apo mature SpeB to 1.06 {angstrom} resolution as well as complexes with the general cysteine protease inhibitor trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido(4-guanidino)butane and a novel substrate mimetic peptide inhibitor. These structures uncover conformational changes associated with maturation of SpeB from the inactive zymogen to its active form and identify the residues required for substrate binding. With the use of a newly developed fluorogenic tripeptide substrate to measure SpeB activity, we determined IC{sub 50} values for trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido(4-guanidino)butane and our new peptide inhibitor and the effects of mutations within the C-terminal active site loop. The structures and mutational analysis suggest that the conformational movements of the glycine-rich C-terminal loop are important for the recognition and recruitment of biological substrates and release of hydrolyzed products.

  8. High speed door assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shapiro, C.

    1993-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A high speed door assembly is described, comprising an actuator cylinder and piston rods, a pressure supply cylinder and fittings, an electrically detonated explosive bolt, a honeycomb structured door, a honeycomb structured decelerator, and a structural steel frame encasing the assembly to close over a 3 foot diameter opening within 50 milliseconds of actuation, to contain hazardous materials and vapors within a test fixture.

  9. High speed door assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Carolyn (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high speed door assembly, comprising an actuator cylinder and piston rods, a pressure supply cylinder and fittings, an electrically detonated explosive bolt, a honeycomb structured door, a honeycomb structured decelerator, and a structural steel frame encasing the assembly to close over a 3 foot diameter opening within 50 milliseconds of actuation, to contain hazardous materials and vapors within a test fixture.

  10. Correlation Between Structure and Thermoelectric Properties of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Correlation Between Structure and Thermoelectric Properties of Bulk High Performance Materials for Energy Conversion Correlation Between Structure and Thermoelectric Properties of...

  11. High efficiency incandescent lighting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bermel, Peter; Ilic, Ognjen; Chan, Walker R.; Musabeyoglu, Ahmet; Cukierman, Aviv Ruben; Harradon, Michael Robert; Celanovic, Ivan; Soljacic, Marin

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Incandescent lighting structure. The structure includes a thermal emitter that can, but does not have to, include a first photonic crystal on its surface to tailor thermal emission coupled to, in a high-view-factor geometry, a second photonic filter selected to reflect infrared radiation back to the emitter while passing visible light. This structure is highly efficient as compared to standard incandescent light bulbs.

  12. Development of improved processing and evaluation methods for high reliability structural ceramics for advanced heat engine applications Phase II. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pujari, V.J.; Tracey, D.M.; Foley, M.R. [and others

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research program had as goals the development and demonstration of significant improvements in processing methods, process controls, and nondestructive evaluation (NDE) which can be commercially implemented to produce high reliability silicon nitride components for advanced heat engine applications at temperatures to 1370{degrees}C. In Phase I of the program a process was developed that resulted in a silicon nitride - 4 w% yttria HIP`ed material (NCX 5102) that displayed unprecedented strength and reliability. An average tensile strength of 1 GPa and a strength distribution following a 3-parameter Weibull distribution were demonstrated by testing several hundred buttonhead tensile specimens. The Phase II program focused on the development of methodology for colloidal consolidation producing green microstructure which minimizes downstream process problems such as drying, shrinkage, cracking, and part distortion during densification. Furthermore, the program focused on the extension of the process to gas pressure sinterable (GPS) compositions. Excellent results were obtained for the HIP composition processed for minimal density gradients, both with respect to room-temperature strength and high-temperature creep resistance. Complex component fabricability of this material was demonstrated by producing engine-vane prototypes. Strength data for the GPS material (NCX-5400) suggest that it ranks very high relative to other silicon nitride materials in terms of tensile/flexure strength ratio, a measure of volume quality. This high quality was derived from the closed-loop colloidal process employed in the program.

  13. SEPARATION OF DIASTEREOMERS, STRUCTURAL ISOMERS, AND HOMOLOGS OF n5 -CYCLOPENTADIENYL COBALT AND DINUCLEAR MOLYBDENUM COMPLEXES BY REVERSE PHASE HIGH PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY USING DEOXYGENATED SOLVENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huggins, John M.; King, Jr., Joseph A.; Peter, K.; Vollhardt, C.; Winter, Mark J.

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) is being used as an analytical and preparative tool for the characterization and isolation of a series of air-sensitive organometallic compounds, Reverse phase chranatography with octadecylsilyl-modified silica (ODS) as a stationary phase and polar mobile phases saturated with argon are employed in the separation of products,

  14. Setting up the models on NYU's High Performance Computing System I recommend that you start with the exact same structure for running the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Edwin

    Setting up the models on NYU's High Performance Computing System I recommend that you start to understand how it all works. This is set up for work on bowery, as this is the main machine for parallel output or data. This file system is backed up, but it is small -- your quota is on the order

  15. TOPSAN: a collaborative annotation environment for structural genomics.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weekes, Dana; Krishna, S; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Wilson, Ian A; Godzik, Adam; Wooley, John

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    environment for structural genomics Dana Weekes 1† , S Srihigh-throughput structural genomics centers, despite theirbeing determined by structural genomics centers and high-

  16. Comprehensive magnetotransport characterization of two dimensional electron gas in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor structures leading to the assessment of interface roughness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, Manna Kumari [Solid State Physics Laboratory, Lucknow Road, Timarpur, Delhi-110054 (India); Netaji Subhas Institute of Technology, Dwarka, New Delhi-110078 (India); Sharma, Rajesh K., E-mail: rksharma@sspl.drdo.in; Manchanda, Rachna; Bag, Rajesh K.; Muralidharan, Rangarajan [Solid State Physics Laboratory, Lucknow Road, Timarpur, Delhi-110054 (India); Thakur, Om Prakash [Netaji Subhas Institute of Technology, Dwarka, New Delhi-110078 (India)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetotransport in two distinct AlGaN/GaN HEMT structures grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) on Fe-doped templates is investigated using Shubnikov de-Haas Oscillations in the temperature range of 1.8–6 K and multicarrier fitting in the temperature range of 1.8–300 K. The temperature dependence of the two dimensional electron gas mobility is extracted from simultaneous multicarrier fitting of transverse and longitudinal resistivity as a function of magnetic field and the data is utilized to estimate contribution of interface roughness to the mobility and the corresponding transport lifetime. The quantum scattering time obtained from the analysis of Shubnikov de Haas Oscillations in transverse magnetoresistance along with the transport lifetime time were used to estimate interface roughness amplitude and lateral correlation length. The results indicate that the insertion of AlN over layer deposited prior to the growth of GaN base layer on Fe doped GaN templates for forming HEMT structures reduced the parallel conduction but resulted in an increase in interface roughness.

  17. A High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Iron-Based Amorphous Metal - The Effects of Composition, Structure and Environment on Corrosion Resistance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, J.; Haslam, J.; Day, D.; Lian, T.; Saw, C.; Hailey, P.; Choi, J.S.; Rebak, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA, 94550 (United States); Yang, N. [Sandia National Laboratory, Livermore, CA, 94550 (United States); Bayles, R. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC, 20375 (United States); Aprigliano, L. [Consultant, Berlin, MD, 21811 (United States); Payer, J. [Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, 44106 (United States); Perepezko, J.; Hildal, K. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, 53706 (United States); Lavernia, E.; Ajdelsztajn, L. [University of California, Davis, CA, 95616 (United States); Branagan, D. [The NanoSteel Company, Idaho Falls, ID, 83402 (United States); Beardsley, B. [Caterpillar, Peoria, IL, 61656 (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The passive film stability of several Fe-based amorphous metal formulations have been found to be comparable to that of high-performance Ni-based alloys, and superior to that of stainless steels, based on electrochemical measurements of the passive film breakdown potential and general corrosion rates. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) provide corrosion resistance; boron (B) enables glass formation; and rare earths such as yttrium (Y) lower critical cooling rate (CCR). The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal also makes it an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications, as discussed in companion publications. Corrosion data for SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) is discussed here. (authors)

  18. Work Breakdown Structure and Plant/Equipment Designation System Numbering Scheme for the High Temperature Gas- Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Component Test Capability (CTC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey D Bryan

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This white paper investigates the potential integration of the CTC work breakdown structure numbering scheme with a plant/equipment numbering system (PNS), or alternatively referred to in industry as a reference designation system (RDS). Ideally, the goal of such integration would be a single, common referencing system for the life cycle of the CTC that supports all the various processes (e.g., information, execution, and control) that necessitate plant and equipment numbers be assigned. This white paper focuses on discovering the full scope of Idaho National Laboratory (INL) processes to which this goal might be applied as well as the factors likely to affect decisions about implementation. Later, a procedure for assigning these numbers will be developed using this white paper as a starting point and that reflects the resolved scope and outcome of associated decisions.

  19. High Performance Computing School COMSC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    High Performance Computing School COMSC This module aims to provide the students with fundamental knowledge and understanding of techniques associated with High Performance Computing and its practical' skills in analysing and evaluating High Performance Computing and will be structured around

  20. Calcium silicate insulation structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kollie, Thomas G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An insulative structure including a powder-filled evacuated casing utilizes a quantity of finely divided synthetic calcium silicate having a relatively high surface area. The resultant structure-provides superior thermal insulating characteristics over a broad temperature range and is particularly well-suited as a panel for a refrigerator or freezer or the insulative barrier for a cooler or a insulated bottle.

  1. Development of cell-laden hydrogels with high mechanical strength for tissue engineering applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shin, Hyeongho

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of materials with biomimetic mechanical and biological properties is of great interest for regenerative medicine applications. Hydrogels are a promising class of biomaterials due to several advantages, ...

  2. The effects of high temperature processing on the structural and optical properties of oxygenated CdS window layers in CdTe solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paudel, Naba R.; Grice, Corey R.; Xiao, Chuanxiao; Yan, Yanfa [Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Wright Center for Photovoltaics Innovation and Commercialization, The University of Toledo, Toledo, Ohio 43606 (United States)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    High efficiency CdTe solar cells typically use oxygenated CdS (CdS:O) window layers. We synthesize CdS:O window layers at room temperature (RT) and 270?°C using reactive sputtering. The band gaps of CdS:O layers deposited at RT increase when O{sub 2}/(O{sub 2}?+?Ar) ratios in the deposition chamber increase. On the other hand, the band gaps of CdS:O layers deposited at 270?°C decrease as the O{sub 2}/(O{sub 2}?+?Ar) ratios increase. Interestingly, however, our high temperature closed-space sublimation (CSS) processed CdTe solar cells using CdS:O window layers deposited at RT and 270?°C exhibit very similar cell performance, including similar short-circuit current densities. To understand the underlying reasons, CdS:O thin films deposited at RT and 270?°C are annealed at temperatures that simulate the CSS process of CdTe deposition. X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and UV-visible light absorption spectroscopy characterization of the annealed films reveals that the CdS:O films deposited at RT undergo grain regrowth and/or crystallization and exhibit reduced band gaps after the annealing. Our results suggest that CdS:O thin films deposited at RT and 270?°C should exhibit similar optical properties after the deposition of CdTe layers, explaining the similar cell performance.

  3. Development of improved processing and evaluation methods for high reliability structural ceramics for advanced heat engine applications, Phase 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pujari, V.K.; Tracey, D.M.; Foley, M.R.; Paille, N.I.; Pelletier, P.J.; Sales, L.C.; Wilkens, C.A.; Yeckley, R.L. [Norton Co., Northboro, MA (United States)

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The program goals were to develop and demonstrate significant improvements in processing methods, process controls and non-destructive evaluation (NDE) which can be commercially implemented to produce high reliability silicon nitride components for advanced heat engine applications at temperatures to 1,370{degrees}C. The program focused on a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-4% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} high temperature ceramic composition and hot-isostatic-pressing as the method of densification. Stage I had as major objectives: (1) comparing injection molding and colloidal consolidation process routes, and selecting one route for subsequent optimization, (2) comparing the performance of water milled and alcohol milled powder and selecting one on the basis of performance data, and (3) adapting several NDE methods to the needs of ceramic processing. The NDE methods considered were microfocus X-ray radiography, computed tomography, ultrasonics, NMR imaging, NMR spectroscopy, fluorescent liquid dye penetrant and X-ray diffraction residual stress analysis. The colloidal consolidation process route was selected and approved as the forming technique for the remainder of the program. The material produced by the final Stage II optimized process has been given the designation NCX 5102 silicon nitride. According to plan, a large number of specimens were produced and tested during Stage III to establish a statistically robust room temperature tensile strength database for this material. Highlights of the Stage III process demonstration and resultant database are included in the main text of the report, along with a synopsis of the NCX-5102 aqueous based colloidal process. The R and D accomplishments for Stage I are discussed in Appendices 1--4, while the tensile strength-fractography database for the Stage III NCX-5102 process demonstration is provided in Appendix 5. 4 refs., 108 figs., 23 tabs.

  4. Fracture of aluminum naval structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galanis, Konstantinos, 1970-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Structural catastrophic failure of naval vessels due to extreme loads such as underwater or air explosion, high velocity impact (torpedoes), or hydrodynamic loads (high speed vessels) is primarily caused by fracture. ...

  5. Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil Gas Geochemistry and Structural...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil Gas Geochemistry and Structural Analysis to Identify Hidden, High Enthalpy, Extensional Geothermal Systems Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil...

  6. Effect of oxygen incorporation on the structure and elasticity of Ti-Al-O-N coatings synthesized by cathodic arc and high power pulsed magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hans, M., E-mail: hans@mch.rwth-aachen.de; Baben, M. to; Music, D.; Ebenhöch, J.; Schneider, J. M. [Materials Chemistry, RWTH Aachen University, Kopernikusstr. 10, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Primetzhofer, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Lägerhyddsvägen 1, S-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Kurapov, D.; Arndt, M.; Rudigier, H. [Oerlikon Balzers Coating AG, Iramali 18, LI-9496 Balzers, Principality of Liechtenstein (Liechtenstein)

    2014-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Ti-Al-O-N coatings were synthesized by cathodic arc and high power pulsed magnetron sputtering. The chemical composition of the coatings was determined by means of elastic recoil detection analysis and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The effect of oxygen incorporation on the stress-free lattice parameters and Young's moduli of Ti-Al-O-N coatings was investigated by X-ray diffraction and nanoindentation, respectively. As nitrogen is substituted by oxygen, implications for the charge balance may be expected. A reduction in equilibrium volume with increasing O concentration is identified by X-ray diffraction and density functional theory calculations of Ti-Al-O-N supercells reveal the concomitant formation of metal vacancies. Hence, the oxygen incorporation-induced formation of metal vacancies enables charge balancing. Furthermore, nanoindentation experiments reveal a decrease in elastic modulus with increasing O concentration. Based on ab initio data, two causes can be identified for this: First, the metal vacancy-induced reduction in elasticity; and second, the formation of, compared to the corresponding metal nitride bonds, relatively weak Ti-O and Al-O bonds.

  7. Robust conductive mesoporous carbon?silica composite films with highly ordered and oriented orthorhombic structures from triblock-copolymer template co-assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Lingyan; Feng, Dan; Campbell, Casey G.; Gu, Dong; Forster, Aaron M.; Yager, Kevin G.; Fredin, Nathaniel; Lee, Hae-Jeong; Jones, Ronald L.; Zhao, Dongyuan; Vogt, Bryan D. (AZU)

    2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we describe a facile approach to improve the robustness of conductive mesoporous carbon-based thin films by the addition of silica to the matrix through the triconstituent organic-inorganic-organic co-assembly of resol (carbon precursor) and tetraethylorthosilicate (silica precursor) with triblock-copolymer Pluronic F127. The pyrolysis of the resol-silica-pluronic F127 film yields a porous composite thin film with well-defined mesostructure. X-Ray diffraction (XRD), grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS), and electron microscopy measurements indicate that the obtained carbon-based thin films have a highly ordered orthorhombic mesostructure (Fmmm) with uniform large pore size ({approx}3 nm). The orthorhombic mesostructure is oriented and the (010) plane is parallel to the silicon wafer substrate. The addition of silica to the matrix impacts the pore size, surface area, porosity, modulus and conductivity. For composite films with approximately 40 wt% silica, the conductivity is decreased by approximately an order of magnitude in comparison to a pure carbon mesoporous film, but the conductivity is comparable to typical printed carbon inks used in electrochemical sensing, {approx}10 S cm{sup -1}. The mechanical properties of these mesoporous silica-carbon hybrid films are similar to the pure carbon analogs with a Young's modulus between 10 GPa and 15 GPa, but the material is significantly more porous. Moreover, the addition of silica to the matrix appears to improve the adhesion of the mesoporous film to a silicon wafer. These mesoporous silica-carbon composite films have appropriate characteristics for use in sensing applications.

  8. Structural system identification: Structural dynamics model validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Red-Horse, J.R.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Structural system identification is concerned with the development of systematic procedures and tools for developing predictive analytical models based on a physical structure`s dynamic response characteristics. It is a multidisciplinary process that involves the ability (1) to define high fidelity physics-based analysis models, (2) to acquire accurate test-derived information for physical specimens using diagnostic experiments, (3) to validate the numerical simulation model by reconciling differences that inevitably exist between the analysis model and the experimental data, and (4) to quantify uncertainties in the final system models and subsequent numerical simulations. The goal of this project was to develop structural system identification techniques and software suitable for both research and production applications in code and model validation.

  9. High power microwave generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ekdahl, C.A.

    1983-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A microwave generator efficiently converts the energy of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) into a high-power microwave emission using the Smith-Purcell effect which is related to Cerenkov radiation. Feedback for efficient beam bunching and high gain is obtained by placing a cylindrical Smith-Purcell transmission grating on the axis of a toroidal resonator. High efficiency results from the use of a thin cold annular highly-magnetized REB that is closely coupled to the resonant structure.

  10. High-Resolution Microtubule Structures Reveal the Structural Transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, David

    Baker,3 and Eva Nogales2,4,* 1Biophysics Graduate Program, University of California, Berkeley, BerkeleyHoward Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Biochemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98105, USA 4Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University

  11. CHARBEL FARHAT Vivian Church Hoff Professor of Aircraft Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farhat, Charbel

    of Aeronautics and Astronautics Director, Army High Performance Computing Research Center Professor, Department-Driven Systems, Finite Element Approximation, Fluid-Structure Interaction, High Performance Computing, Implosion of Aircraft Structures, Stanford University 2007- Director, Army High Performance Computing Research Center

  12. High voltage design structure for high temperature superconducting device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tekletsadik, Kasegn D. (Rexford, NY)

    2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In accordance with the present invention, modular corona shields are employed in a HTS device to reduce the electric field surrounding the HTS device. In a exemplary embodiment a fault current limiter module in the insulation region of a cryogenic cooling system has at least one fault current limiter set which employs a first corona shield disposed along the top portion of the fault current limiter set and is electrically coupled to the fault current limiter set. A second corona shield is disposed along the bottom portion of the fault current limiter set and is electrically coupled to the fault current limiter set. An insulation barrier is disposed within the insulation region along at least one side of the fault current limiter set. The first corona shield and the second corona shield act together to reduce the electric field surrounding the fault limiter set when voltage is applied to the fault limiter set.

  13. Flow interaction with highly flexible structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoele, Kourosh

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and an upstroke (also known as abduction and adduction,edge vortices along with abduction/adduction tip vortices inperiods, a recovery stroke (abduction) with duration T r and

  14. Flow interaction with highly flexible structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoele, Kourosh

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods Fluids 38, 125– Krasny, R. 1986 Desingularization ofdipole distribution (Krasny, 1986). It has been demonstrated

  15. High Precision Geophysics & Detailed Structural Exploration ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to avoid conflicts with wildlife migration. The drilling will apply closed-circuit, low footprint sump-less drilling techniques for the first time in geothermal exploration...

  16. Structured Estimation In High-Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Negahban, Sahand N.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    nuclear norm relaxation, with later refinements [34, 115]. Gross [57] recognized the utility of the Ahlswede-Winter

  17. Flow interaction with highly flexible structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoele, Kourosh

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    L.A. & Peskin, C.S. 2009 Flexible clap and ?ing in tinyS. & Gursul, I. 2007 Flexible ?apping airfoil propulsion atD. & Gursul, I. 2004 Flexible ?apping airfoil propul- sion

  18. Structural health monitoring for ship structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrar, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Angel, Marian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bement, Matthew [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Salvino, Liming [NSWC, CADEROCK

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently the Office of Naval Research is supporting the development of structural health monitoring (SHM) technology for U.S. Navy ship structures. This application is particularly challenging because of the physical size of these structures, the widely varying and often extreme operational and environmental conditions associated with these ships missions, lack of data from known damage conditions, limited sensing that was not designed specifically for SHM, and the management of the vast amounts of data that can be collected during a mission. This paper will first define a statistical pattern recognition paradigm for SHM by describing the four steps of (1) Operational Evaluation, (2) Data Acquisition, (3) Feature Extraction, and (4) Statistical Classification of Features as they apply to ship structures. Note that inherent in the last three steps of this process are additional tasks of data cleansing, compression, normalization and fusion. The presentation will discuss ship structure SHM challenges in the context of applying various SHM approaches to sea trials data measured on an aluminum multi-hull high-speed ship, the HSV-2 Swift. To conclude, the paper will discuss several outstanding issues that need to be addressed before SHM can make the transition from a research topic to actual field applications on ship structures and suggest approaches for addressing these issues.

  19. Ninebrane structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hisham Sati

    2015-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    String structures in degree four are associated with cancellation of anomalies of string theory in ten dimensions. Fivebrane structures in degree eight have recently been shown to be associated with cancellation of anomalies associated to the NS5-brane in string theory as well as the M5-brane in M-theory. We introduce and describe "Ninebrane structures" in degree twelve and demonstrate how they capture some anomaly cancellation phenomena in M-theory. Along the way we also define certain variants, considered as intermediate cases in degree nine and ten, which we call "2-Orientation" and "2-Spin structures", respectively. As in the lower degree cases, we also discuss the natural twists of these structures and characterize the corresponding topological groups associated to each of the structures, which likewise admit refinements to differential cohomology.

  20. Crystal structure and high temperature transport properties of Yb-filled p-type skutterudites Yb{sub x}Co{sub 2.5}Fe{sub 1.5}Sb{sub 12}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Yongkwan [Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620 (United States); Puneet, Pooja; Tritt, Terry M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Kinard Laboratory, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Nolas, George S., E-mail: gnolas@usf.edu [Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620 (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Partially Yb-filled Fe substituted polycrystalline p-type skutterudites with nominal compositions Yb{sub x}Co{sub 2.5}Fe{sub 1.5}Sb{sub 12}, with varying filler concentrations x, were synthesized by reacting the constituent elements and subsequent solid state annealing, followed by densification by hot-pressing. The compositions and filling fractions were confirmed with a combination of Rietveld refinement and elemental analysis. Their thermoelectric properties were evaluated from 300 to 800 K. The Seebeck coefficients for the specimens increase with increasing temperature and plateau at around 750 K. The thermal conductivity decreases with increasing Yb filling fraction, and bipolar conduction becomes evident and increases at elevated temperatures. A maximum ZT value of 0.8 was obtained at 750 K for Yb{sub 0.47}Co{sub 2.6}Fe{sub 1.4}Sb{sub 12}. The thermoelectric properties and potential for further optimization are discussed in light of our results. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Yb-filled Fe-substituted p-type CoSb{sub 3} skutterudites, Yb{sub x}Co{sub 2.5}Fe{sub 1.5}Sb{sub 12}, were structurally and physically characterized. • Both filling fraction and Co-to-Fe ratio affect the transport properties. • High ZT was obtained for the composition with ?50% Yb filling and a slightly lower than nominal Fe content.

  1. Biomembrane Structure Unit, Biochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, Anthony

    and membrane proteins. However, the lack of essential high-resolution structural details at the molecular level Watts Abstract | Observing drugs and ligands at their site of action in membrane proteins is now targets in the future will be membrane proteins. This is, perhaps, not surprising, as most (~85

  2. Mesoporous Silicon Sponge as an Anti-Pulverization Structure...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mesoporous Silicon Sponge as an Anti-Pulverization Structure for High-Performance Lithium-ion Battery Anodes. Mesoporous Silicon Sponge as an Anti-Pulverization Structure for...

  3. Single Molecule Probes of Lipid Membrane Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Livanec, Philip W.

    2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Biological membranes are highly heterogeneous structures that are thought to use this heterogeneity to organize and modify the function of membrane constituents. Probing membrane organization, structure, and changes therein ...

  4. Structural Genomics and Structural Proteomics: A Global Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussman, Joel L.

    -genome information and the success of high-throughput (HTP) methods in DNA sequencing. It was envisaged that similar HTP methods could be applied to deter- mining the 3-D structures of "all" the proteins (the "proteome, automated technologies for implementing a HTP pipeline approach to structure determination; a focus on novel

  5. Biomimetic synthesis of noble metal nanocrystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiu, Chin-Yi

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    supramolecular pre-organization, demonstrating the full potential of biomolecules in mediating material

  6. 4D printing : towards biomimetic additive manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Elizabeth Yinling

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inherent across all scales in Nature's material systems are multiple design dimensions, the existences of which are products of both evolution and environment. In human manufacturing where design must be preconceived and ...

  7. Biomimetic Whisker Experiments for Tactile Perception

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moeller, Ralf

    on the whisker shaft) or with contact (piezoelectric sensors). Previously we reported that the artificial or antenna to recognize objects. Russell [12] designed a tactile whisker array to obtain surface profile]. The whisker probe system consisting of a piano wire, a sweeping actuator and strain gages has also been tested

  8. Biomimetic bonelike composites and novel bioactive glasscoatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomsia, A.P.; Saiz, E.; Song, J.; Bertozzi, C.R.

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Metallic orthopaedic implants have been successfully used for decades but they have serious shortcomings related to their osseointegration and the fact that their mechanical properties do not match those of bone. This paper reviews recent advances in the fabrication of novel coatings to improve implant osseointegration and in the development of a new generation of hybrid organic-inorganic implant materials specifically designed for orthopaedic applications.

  9. Biomimetic synthesis of noble metal nanocrystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiu, Chin-Yi

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Directed Syntheses of Inorganic Materials. Chem. Rev. 108,synthesis and further investigate the interfaces between biomolecule and inorganic materialssynthesis and has inspired the mechanistic studies on the specific interfacial interactions between biomolecules and inorganic materials.

  10. Biomimetic Dye Molecules for Solar Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    provide opportunities for solid-state physicists and chemists to solve a major challenge: solar cell adoption. Though solar cells can use energy directly from the Sun to produce...

  11. Biomimetic materials for protein storage and transport

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Firestone, Millicent A. (Elmhurst, IL); Laible, Philip D. (Villa Park, IL)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides a method for the insertion of protein in storage vehicles and the recovery of the proteins from the vehicles, the method comprising supplying isolated protein; mixing the isolated protein with a fluid so as to form a mixture, the fluid comprising saturated phospholipids, lipopolymers, and a surfactant; cycling the mixture between a first temperature and a second temperature; maintaining the mixture as a solid for an indefinite period of time; diluting the mixture in detergent buffer so as to disrupt the composition of the mixture, and diluting to disrupt the fluid in its low viscosity state for removal of the guest molecules by, for example, dialysis, filtering or chromatography dialyzing/filtering the emulsified solid.

  12. BIOMIMETIC SURVIVAL HYDRODYNAMICS AND FLOW SENSING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daraio, Chiara

    ;May 2014 5 Robotic Tuna with 3,000 parts #12;May 2014 6 LEFT: Karman street vortices behind an island (Re=1011) f D/U = 0.20 Re=150 BELOW: Reverse Karman street vortices behind a robotic tuna (Re=105) f A is removed leaving a free vortex May 2014 17 #12;"Thought experiment" by Klein (1910): Removing a spoon

  13. Biomimetic Dye Molecules for Solar Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find Find MoreTechnical Report:BiomedicalBiometrics -

  14. Biomimetic Dye Molecules for Solar Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find Find MoreTechnical Report:BiomedicalBiometrics

  15. Biomimetic Dye Molecules for Solar Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find Find MoreTechnical

  16. Biomimetic Dye Molecules for Solar Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess Stories Site Map Printable Version

  17. 2014 GRADUATE STUDIES STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuhang

    , the response of tall buildings to earthquake and wind; steel connection design and behavior; and structural engineering and mechanics · Advanced Applied Mathematics in Engineering · Advanced Dynamics and Smart Environments · High-performance Concrete and Steel · Horizontally Curved Bridges · Industrial Buildings

  18. Electronic structure of superconductivity refined

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on a little understood aspect of the electronic structure in high-temperature superconductors. July 10, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa...

  19. Deployable structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernández Merchan, Carlos Henrique

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis has the purpose of describing the meaning and applications of deployable structures (making emphasis in the scissor-hinged and sliding mechanisms.) and the development of new geometries, details, and mechanisms ...

  20. Dependence of liquefaction behavior on coal characteristics. Part VI. Relationship of liquefaction behavior of a set of high sulfur coals to chemical structural characteristics. Final technical report, March 1981 to February 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neill, P. H.; Given, P. H.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The initial aim of this research was to use empirical mathematical relationships to formulate a better understanding of the processes involved in the liquefaction of a set of medium rank high sulfur coals. In all, just over 50 structural parameters and yields of product classes were determined. In order to gain a more complete understanding of the empirical relationships between the various properties, a number of relatively complex statistical procedures and tests were applied to the data, mostly selected from the field of multivariate analysis. These can be broken down into two groups. The first group included grouping techniques such as non-linear mapping, hierarchical and tree clustering, and linear discriminant analyses. These techniques were utilized in determining if more than one statistical population was present in the data set; it was concluded that there was not. The second group of techniques included factor analysis and stepwise multivariate linear regressions. Linear discriminant analyses were able to show that five distinct groups of coals were represented in the data set. However only seven of the properties seemed to follow this trend. The chemical property that appeared to follow the trend most closely was the aromaticity, where a series of five parallel straight lines was observed for a plot of f/sub a/ versus carbon content. The factor patterns for each of the product classes indicated that although each of the individual product classes tended to load on factors defined by specific chemical properties, the yields of the broader product classes, such as total conversion to liquids + gases and conversion to asphaltenes, tended to load largely on factors defined by rank. The variance explained and the communalities tended to be relatively low. Evidently important sources of variance have still to be found.

  1. Regulatory Dynamics of Natural and Artificial Photosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaks, Julia

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    photosynthesis and in artificial systems. X* Y - Z + High-been implemented in an artificial biomimetic system [18]. Anphotosynthesis and in artificial systems. Chapters 1, 2, and

  2. Heat pipe wick with structural enhancement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andraka, Charles E.; Adkins, Douglas R.; Moreno, James B.; Rawlinson, K. Scott; Showalter, Steven K.; Moss, Timothy A.

    2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat pipe wick structure wherein a stout sheet of perforated material overlays a high performance wick material such as stainless steel felt affixed to a substrate. The inventive structure provides a good flow path for working fluid while maintaining durability and structural stability independent of the structure (or lack of structure) associated with the wick material. In one described embodiment, a wick of randomly laid .about.8 micron thickness stainless steel fibers is sintered to a metal substrate and a perforated metal overlay.

  3. Investigations of Interfacial Structure in Thermoelectric Tellurides...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Thermoelectric Materials by Design, Computational Theory and Structure Strategies for High Thermoelectric zT in Bulk Materials Strategies for...

  4. High performance polymeric foams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gargiulo, M.; Sorrentino, L. [Institute for Composite and Biomedical Materials (IMCB)-CNR, P.le Tecchio 80, 80125 Naples (Italy); Iannace, S. [Institute for Composite and Biomedical Materials (IMCB)-CNR, P.le Tecchio 80, 80125 Naples (Italy) and Technological District on Polymeric and Composite Materials Engineering and Structures (IMAST), P.le E.Fermi 1, location Porto del Granatello, 80055 Portici (Naples)

    2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this work was to investigate the foamability of high-performance polymers (polyethersulfone, polyphenylsulfone, polyetherimide and polyethylenenaphtalate). Two different methods have been used to prepare the foam samples: high temperature expansion and two-stage batch process. The effects of processing parameters (saturation time and pressure, foaming temperature) on the densities and microcellular structures of these foams were analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy.

  5. Structured Finance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solid ... Strengthening aStructure ofof the CompleteStructure

  6. Air cathode structure manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Momyer, William R. (Palo Alto, CA); Littauer, Ernest L. (Los Altos Hills, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved air cathode structure for use in primary batteries and the like. The cathode structure includes a matrix active layer, a current collector grid on one face of the matrix active layer, and a porous, nonelectrically conductive separator on the opposite face of the matrix active layer, the collector grid and separator being permanently bonded to the matrix active layer. The separator has a preselected porosity providing low IR losses and high resistance to air flow through the matrix active layer to maintain high bubble pressure during operation of the battery. In the illustrated embodiment, the separator was formed of porous polypropylene. A thin hydrophobic film is provided, in the preferred embodiment, on the current collecting metal grid.

  7. New framework hydrous silicate K{sub 3}Sc[Si{sub 3}O{sub 9}] {center_dot} H{sub 2}O related to the high-temperature anhydrous silicate K{sub 3}Ho[Si{sub 3}O{sub 9}] and symmetry analysis of a phase transition with prediction of structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belokoneva, E. L., E-mail: elbel@geol.msu.ru; Zorina, A. P.; Dimitrova, O. V. [Moscow State University, Faculty of Geology (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Crystals of a new framework silicate K{sub 3}Sc[Si{sub 3}O{sub 9}] {center_dot} H{sub 2}O, space group Pm2{sub 1}n (nonstandard setting of space group Pmn2{sub 1} = C{sub 2v}{sup 7}), are obtained under hydrothermal conditions. The structure is determined without preliminary knowledge of the chemical formula. The absolute configuration is determined. The structure is close to that of the high-temperature K{sub 3}Ho[Si{sub 3}O{sub 9}] phase, which was obtained upon the heating of K{sub 3}HoSi{sub 3}O{sub 8}(OH){sub 2}. This structural similarity is due to the specific conditions of synthesis and an analogous formula, where holmium is replaced by scandium. A symmetry analysis shows that the high local symmetry of a block (rod) is responsible for the first-order phase transition of both the order-disorder (OD) and displacement type. The number of structures in which the simplest and high-symmetry layers are multiplied by different symmetry elements are predicted.

  8. High Energy Photoproduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. M. Butterworth; M. Wing

    2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The experimental and phenomenological status of high energy photoproduction is reviewed. Topics covered include the structure of the photon, production of jets, heavy flavours and prompt photons, rapidity gaps, energy flow and underlying events. The results are placed in the context of the current understanding of QCD, with particular application to present and future hadron and lepton colliders.

  9. Highly oxidized superconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morris, Donald E. (Kensington, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel superconducting materials in the form of compounds, structures or phases are formed by performing otherwise known syntheses in a highly oxidizing atmosphere rather than that created by molecular oxygen at atmospheric pressure or below. This leads to the successful synthesis of novel superconducting compounds which are thermodynamically stable at the conditions under which they are formed.

  10. Highly oxidized superconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morris, D.E.

    1994-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel superconducting materials in the form of compounds, structures or phases are formed by performing otherwise known synthesis in a highly oxidizing atmosphere rather than that created by molecular oxygen at atmospheric pressure or below. This leads to the successful synthesis of novel superconducting compounds which are thermodynamically stable at the conditions under which they are formed. 16 figs.

  11. Nanocrystal structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eisler, Hans J. (Stoneham, MA); Sundar, Vikram C. (Stoneham, MA); Walsh, Michael E. (Everett, MA); Klimov, Victor I. (Los Alamos, NM); Bawendi, Moungi G. (Cambridge, MA); Smith, Henry I. (Sudbury, MA)

    2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A structure including a grating and a semiconductor nanocrystal layer on the grating, can be a laser. The semiconductor nanocrystal layer can include a plurality of semiconductor nanocrystals including a Group II-VI compound, the nanocrystals being distributed in a metal oxide matrix. The grating can have a periodicity from 200 nm to 500 nm.

  12. Nanocrystal structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eisler, Hans J.; Sundar, Vikram C.; Walsh, Michael E.; Klimov, Victor I.; Bawendi, Moungi G.; Smith, Henry I.

    2006-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A structure including a grating and a semiconductor nanocrystal layer on the grating, can be a laser. The semiconductor nanocrystal layer can include a plurality of semiconductor nanocrystals including a Group II–VI compound, the nanocrystals being distributed in a metal oxide matrix. The grating can have a periodicity from 200 nm to 500 nm.

  13. Assessment of the Contemporary Population Structure and Admixture of Atlantic Swordfish (Xiphias gladius L.) via Mixed Stock Analysis and Bayesian Clustering of Multiple Nuclear SNPS Genotyped through High Resolution Melting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Brad 1979-

    2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    North Atlantic and South Atlantic swordfish (Xiphias gladius L.) are currently managed as two stocks separated at 5°N. While previous studies of genetic population structure using both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA confirm two genetically distinct...

  14. Superconducting structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kwon, Chuhee (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconductive structure including a dielectric oxide substrate, a thin buffer layer of a superconducting material thereon; and, a layer of a rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film thereon the thin layer of yttrium-barium-copper oxide, the rare earth selected from the group consisting of samarium, gadolinium, ytterbium, erbium, neodymium, dysprosium, holmium, lutetium, a combination of more than one element from the rare earth group and a combination of one or more elements from the rare earth group with yttrium, the buffer layer of superconducting material characterized as having chemical and structural compatibility with the dielectric oxide substrate and the rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film is provided.

  15. Terminal structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Frank (Langenhagen, DE); Allais, Arnaud (Hannover, DE); Mirebeau, Pierre (Villebon sur Yvette, FR); Ganhungu, Francois (Vieux-Reng, FR); Lallouet, Nicolas (Saint Martin Boulogne, FR)

    2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A terminal structure (2) for a superconducting cable (1) is described. It consists of a conductor (2a) and an insulator (2b) that surrounds the conductor (2a), wherein the superconducting cable (1) has a core with a superconducting conductor (5) and a layer of insulation that surrounds the conductor (5), and wherein the core is arranged in such a way that it can move longitudinally in a cryostat. The conductor (2a) of the terminal structure (2) is electrically connected with the superconducting conductor (5) or with a normal conductor (6) that is connected with the superconducting conductor (5) by means of a tubular part (7) made of an electrically conductive material, wherein the superconducting conductor (5) or the normal conductor (6) can slide in the part (7) in the direction of the superconductor.

  16. Superconducting Structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kwon, Chuhee (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2005-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconductive structure including a dielectric oxide substrate, a thin buffer layer of a superconducting material thereon; and, a layer of a rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film thereon the thin layer of yttrium-barium-copper oxide, the rare earth selected from the group consisting of samarium, gadolinium, ytterbium, erbium, neodymium, dysprosium, holmium, lutetium, a combination of more than one element from the rare earth group and a combination of one or more elements from the rare earth group with yttrium, the buffer layer of superconducting material characterized as having chemical and structural compatibility with the dielectric oxide substrate and the rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film is provided.

  17. Design and Evaluation of High Capacity Cathodes

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    improve and evaluate the electrochemical properties and surface stability of composite electrode structures with a high Mn content - on going Evaluate processes for...

  18. Highly cross-linked nanoporous polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steckle, Jr., Warren P. (Los Alamos, NM); Apen, Paul G. (Los Alamos, NM); Mitchell, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Condensation polymerization followed by a supercritical extraction step can be used to obtain highly cross-linked nanoporous polymers with high surface area, controlled pore sizes and rigid structural integrity. The invention polymers are useful for applications requiring separation membranes.

  19. Highly cross-linked nanoporous polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steckle, Jr., Warren P. (Los Alamos, NM); Apen, Paul G. (Los Alamos, NM); Mitchell, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Condensation polymerization followed by a supercritical extraction step can be used to obtain highly cross-linked nanoporous polymers with high surface area, controlled pore sizes and rigid structural integrity. The invention polymers are useful for applications requiring separation membranes.

  20. Airfoil structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frey, G.A.; Twardochleb, C.Z.

    1998-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Past airfoil configurations have been used to improve aerodynamic performance and engine efficiencies. The present airfoil configuration further increases component life and reduces maintenance by reducing internal stress within the airfoil itself. The airfoil includes a chord and a span. Each of the chord and the span has a bow being summed to form a generally ``C`` configuration of the airfoil. The generally ``C`` configuration includes a compound bow in which internal stresses resulting from a thermal temperature gradient are reduced. The structural configuration reduces internal stresses resulting from thermal expansion. 6 figs.

  1. Airfoil structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frey, Gary A. (Poway, CA); Twardochleb, Christopher Z. (Alpine, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Past airfoil configurations have been used to improve aerodynamic performance and engine efficiencies. The present airfoil configuration further increases component life and reduces maintenance by reducing internal stress within the airfoil itself. The airfoil includes a chord and a span. Each of the chord and the span has a bow being summed to form a generally "C" configuration of the airfoil. The generally "C" configuration includes a compound bow in which internal stresses resulting from a thermal temperature gradient are reduced. The structural configuration reduces internal stresses resulting from thermal expansion.

  2. Studies of block copolypeptide synthesis, self-assembly, and structure-directing ability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan, Jeng-Shiung

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    (Porosimetry) .............................................................31 2.6. Circular Dichroism (CD) ..............................................................37 III BIOMIMETIC SYNTHESIS OF INORGANIC NANOSPHERES .........40 3... diameter as measured by DLS...................................................................................................55 3.3 Hydrodynamic diameter of AgBr and AgBr/silica core-shell nanospheres measured by DLS...

  3. 2009 Spring : Highly Distinguished Honors Highly Distinguished

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasman, Alex

    Highly Distinguished Bowers Michelle Diane Highly Distinguished Bowling Joseph David Highly Distinguished Ashley Highly Distinguished Bryant Catherine Clancy Highly Distinguished Buckheister Elaine A Highly

  4. High PRF high current switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moran, Stuart L. (Fredericksburg, VA); Hutcherson, R. Kenneth (College Park, MD)

    1990-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A triggerable, high voltage, high current, spark gap switch for use in pu power systems. The device comprises a pair of electrodes in a high pressure hydrogen environment that is triggered by introducing an arc between one electrode and a trigger pin. Unusually high repetition rates may be obtained by undervolting the switch, i.e., operating the trigger at voltages much below the self-breakdown voltage of the device.

  5. 2011 Spring : Highly Distinguished Honors Highly Distinguished

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasman, Alex

    Elizabeth Campbell Highly Distinguished Bowker Ripley Eden Highly Distinguished Brandfass Lara Rose Highly Distinguished Brotherton Cara Price Highly Distinguished Brown Anna Laughlin Highly Distinguished Brown Chloe Alix Highly Distinguished Brown Kelsey Michelle Highly Distinguished Brown Kyle Truman Highly

  6. Phase-space structures II: Hierarchical Structure Finder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Maciejewski; S. Colombi; V. Springel; C. Alard; F. R. Bouchet

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new multi-dimensional Hierarchical Structure Finder (HSF) to study the phase-space structure of dark matter in N-body cosmological simulations is presented. The algorithm depends mainly on two parameters, which control the level of connectivity of the detected structures and their significance compared to Poisson noise. By working in 6D phase-space, where contrasts are much more pronounced than in 3D position space, our HSF algorithm is capable of detecting subhaloes including their tidal tails, and can recognise other phase-space structures such as pure streams and candidate caustics. If an additional unbinding criterion is added, the algorithm can be used as a self-consistent halo and subhalo finder. As a test, we apply it to a large halo of the Millennium Simulation, where 19 % of the halo mass are found to belong to bound substructures, which is more than what is detected with conventional 3D substructure finders, and an additional 23-36 % of the total mass belongs to unbound HSF structures. The distribution of identified phase-space density peaks is clearly bimodal: high peaks are dominated by the bound structures and low peaks belong mostly to tidal streams. In order to better understand what HSF provides, we examine the time evolution of structures, based on the merger tree history. Bound structures typically make only up to 6 orbits inside the main halo. Still, HSF can identify at the present time at least 80 % of the original content of structures with a redshift of infall as high as z space.

  7. Process to make structured particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knapp, Angela Michelle; Richard, Monique N; Luhrs, Claudia; Blada, Timothy; Phillips, Jonathan

    2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a process for making a composite material that contains structured particles. The process includes providing a first precursor in the form of a dry precursor powder, a precursor liquid, a precursor vapor of a liquid and/or a precursor gas. The process also includes providing a plasma that has a high field zone and passing the first precursor through the high field zone of the plasma. As the first precursor passes through the high field zone of the plasma, at least part of the first precursor is decomposed. An aerosol having a second precursor is provided downstream of the high field zone of the plasma and the decomposed first material is allowed to condense onto the second precursor to from structured particles.

  8. Experimental data confronts nuclear structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrett, J.D.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The physical content of experimental data for a variety of excitation energies and angular momenta is summarized. The specific nuclear structure questions which these data address are considered. The specific regions discussed are: low-spin data near the particle separation thresholds; low-spin data at intermediate excitation energies; high-spin, near-yrast data and high-spin data at larger excitation energies. 63 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Maps of protein structure space reveal a fundamental relationship between protein structure and function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolodny, Rachel

    with many of the structures solved in the high-throughput pipeline of the Structural Genomics projects (1, 2 in a high- dimensional space and project these points to three dimensions. It was recently shown can replace MDS with a more effi- cient procedure, Principal Component Analysis (PCA) (9). Thus, we

  10. Incommensurate Structure of Phosphorus Phase IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujihisa, Hiroshi; Gotoh, Yoshito; Yamawaki, Hiroshi; Sakashita, Mami; Takeya, Satoshi; Honda, Kazumasa [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), AIST Tsukuba Central 5, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan); Akahama, Yuichi; Kawamura, Haruki [Graduate School of Material Science, University of Hyogo, 3-2-1 Kouto, Kamigori, Ako-gun, Hyogo 678-1297 (Japan); Ohishi, Yasuo [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), 1-1-1 Kouto, Mikazuki, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2007-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    There are six known phases for phosphorus at room temperature under high pressure. Only the structure of phase IV, which exists from 107 GPa to 137 GPa, remains unsolved. We performed a powder x-ray diffraction experiment and a Rietveld analysis and successfully determined its structure to be an incommensurately modulated structure by only 1 site of atomic position. High-pressure phases of halogens and chalcogens have previously been shown to have a similar modulated structure; however, phosphorus phase IV is different from them and was shown to be the third case.

  11. Ab initio time-dependent density-functional-theory study of the frequency comb structure, coherence, and dephasing of multielectron systems in the vuv-xuv regimes via high-order harmonic generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Shih-I; Carrera, Juan J.

    2009-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    stabilized narrow-band continuous-wave #1;cw#2; laser used for the actual spectroscopy. However, suitable narrow-band-width cw sources rarely exist at high frequencies #3;10#4;, such as vacuum-ultraviolet #1;vuv#2; and extreme-ultraviolet #1;xuv#2; radiations...;. If the high-frequency comb laser can be generated successfully, there will be a number of applications such as vuv-xuv holography, nanolithography, x-ray atomic clocks, and for the testing of fundamental theories such as quantum electrodynamics. However...

  12. Passive Apaptive Damping for High Stiffness-low Mass Materials Incorporating Negative Stiffness Elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cha, Gene

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    High stiffness / low mass materials or structures reduce structure weight in transportation, but show little inherent damping. A new composite material that exhibits high stiffness and high damping might reduce issues with vibration in mechanical...

  13. 2012 Spring : Highly Distinguished Honors Highly Distinguished

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasman, Alex

    Highly Distinguished Beck Misty Nicole Highly Distinguished Beckett Ethan Patrick Highly Distinguished Sara Nicole Highly Distinguished Borland Kelly Nicole Highly Distinguished Bosshardt Zachary Michael

  14. Plasma-based accelerator structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, Carl B.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma-based accelerators have the ability to sustain extremely large accelerating gradients, with possible high-energy physics applications. This dissertation further develops the theory of plasma-based accelerators by addressing three topics: the performance of a hollow plasma channel as an accelerating structure, the generation of ultrashort electron bunches, and the propagation of laser pulses is underdense plasmas.

  15. Hyperons: Insights into baryon structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lach, J.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The baryon octet is composed mainly of hyperons. Modern high energy hyperon beams provide a tool for the study of hyperon static properties and interactions. Experiments with these beams have provided new insights into hyperon rare decays, magnetic moments, and interactions. These experiments provide us with insights into the strong, weak, and electromagnetic structure of the baryons. 65 refs., 45 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Experimental Study of Nucleon Structure and QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jian-Ping Chen

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Overview of Experimental Study of Nucleon Structure and QCD, with focus on the spin structure. Nucleon (spin) Structure provides valuable information on QCD dynamics. A decade of experiments from JLab yields these exciting results: (1) valence spin structure, duality; (2) spin sum rules and polarizabilities; (3) precision measurements of g{sub 2} - high-twist; and (4) first neutron transverse spin results - Collins/Sivers/A{sub LT}. There is a bright future as the 12 GeV Upgrade will greatly enhance our capability: (1) Precision determination of the valence quark spin structure flavor separation; and (2) Precision extraction of transversity/tensor charge/TMDs.

  17. 2012 Fall : Highly Distinguished Honors Highly Distinguished

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasman, Alex

    Distinguished Andersen Meredith Esther Highly Distinguished Anderson Anna Kathleen Highly Distinguished Anderson Leah Ellen Highly Distinguished Anderson Lucy Paige Highly Distinguished Andrews James Matheson Highly Distinguished Aquino Jeri-Lynn Highly Distinguished Armistead Mary Chandler Highly Distinguished Armstrong Jessa

  18. New Crystal Structures Lift Fog around Protein Folding

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Crystal Structures Lift Fog around Protein Folding New Crystal Structures Lift Fog around Protein Folding Print Wednesday, 25 July 2012 00:00 Nature's proteins set a high bar...

  19. Structure and function of Pseudomonas aeruginosa protein PA1324 (21170)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powers, Robert

    Northwest National Laboratory, Biological Sciences Division, Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium and Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio 45056 Received 12 June 2008 aeruginosa PA1324; NMR; functional genomics; NMR high-throughput screens; protein-ligand binding; protein

  20. Momentum-space electronic structures and charge orders of the high-temperature superconductors Ca2-xNaxCuO?Cl? and Bi?Sr?CaCu?O8+?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Meng, Jian-Qiao; Brunner, M.; Kim, K.-H.; Lee, H.-G.; Lee, S.-I.; Wen, J. S.; Xu, Z. J.; Gu, G. D.; Gweon, G.-H.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the electronic structure of Ca2-xNaxCuO?Cl? and Bi?Sr?CaCu?O8+? samples in a wide range of doping, using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, with emphasis on the Fermi surface (FS) in the near antinodal region. The “nesting wave vector,” i.e., the wave vector that connects two nearly flat pieces of the FS in the antinodal region, reveals a universal monotonic decrease in magnitude as a function of doping. Comparing our results to the charge order recently observed by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS), we conclude that the FS nesting and the charge order pattern seen in STS do not have a direct relationship. Therefore, the charge order likely arises due to strong-correlation physics rather than FS nesting physics