Sample records for highly insulating glazing

  1. Thermal insulated glazing unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Selkowitz, S.E.; Arasteh, D.K.; Hartmann, J.L.

    1988-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas. 2 figs.

  2. Thermal insulated glazing unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selkowitz, Stephen E. (Piedmont, CA); Arasteh, Dariush K. (Oakland, CA); Hartmann, John L. (Seattle, WA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas.

  3. Highly Insulating Glazing Systems using Non-Structural Center Glazing Layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohler, Christian; Arasteh, Dariush; Goudey, Howdy; Kohler, Christian

    2008-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Three layer insulating glass units with two low-e coatings and an effective gas fill are known to be highly insulating, with center-of-glass U-factors as low as 0.57 W/m{sup 2}-K (0.10 Btu/h-ft{sup 2}- F). Such units have historically been built with center layers of glass or plastic which extend all the way through the spacer system. This paper shows that triple glazing systems with non-structural center layers which do not create a hermetic seal at the edge have the potential to be as thermally efficient as standard designs, while potentially removing some of the production and product integration issues that have discouraged the use of triples.

  4. Long term experience with semi-conductive glaze high voltage post insulators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, A.C.; Maney, J.W.; Szilagyi, Z. (Lapp Insulator Co., LeRoy, NY (US))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Insulators using semi-conductive glaze have long been known for their superior contamination performance. Early glazes for this type however were not stable and successful use of semi-conductive glazed porcelain insulators was delayed many years until tin-antimony oxide glazes were developed. Service experience of eighteen years is now available for line and station post insulators with this type of glaze. Based on this experience, the aging characteristics of tin-antimony oxide semi-conductive glazes are described and quantified. Several different applications of these insulators are also described.

  5. Highly Insulating Glazing Systems using Non-Structural Center Glazing Dariush Arasteh, Howdy Goudey, and Christian Kohler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    units with two low-e coatings and an effective gas fill are known to be highly insulating, with center technological routes have emerged: - Aerogel is a micro-porous insulating material currently under R&D worldwide

  6. Flexible edge seal for vacuum insulating glazing units

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bettger, Kenneth J.; Stark, David H.

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A flexible edge seal is provided for a vacuum insulating glazing unit having a first glass pane and a second glass pane spaced-apart from the first. The edge seal comprises a seal member formed of a hermetically bondable material and having a first end, a second end and a center section disposed therebetween. The first end is hermetically bondable to a first glass pane. The second end is hermetically bondable to a second glass pane. The center section comprises a plurality of convolutes.

  7. Energy Performance and Comfort Level in High Rise and Highly Glazed Office Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bayraktar, M.; Perino, M.; Yilmaz, A. Z.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal and visual comfort in buildings play a significant role on occupants' performance but on the other hand achieving energy savings and high comfort levels can be a quite difficult task especially in high rise buildings with highly glazed...

  8. Energy Performance and Comfort Level in High Rise and Highly Glazed Office Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bayraktar, M.; Perino, M.; Yilmaz, A. Z.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal and visual comfort in buildings play a significant role on occupants' performance but on the other hand achieving energy savings and high comfort levels can be a quite difficult task especially in high rise buildings with highly glazed...

  9. Filament-strung stand-off elements for maintaining pane separation in vacuum insulating glazing units

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bettger, Kenneth J; Stark, David H

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A vacuum insulating glazing unit (VIGU) comprises first and second panes of transparent material, first and second anchors, a plurality of filaments, a plurality of stand-off elements, and seals. The first and second panes of transparent material have edges and inner and outer faces, are disposed with their inner faces substantially opposing one another, and are separated by a gap having a predetermined height. The first and second anchors are disposed at opposite edges of one pane of the VIGU. Each filament is attached at one end to the first anchor and at the other end to the second anchor, and the filaments are collectively disposed between the panes substantially parallel to one another. The stand-off elements are affixed to each filament at predetermined positions along the filament, and have a height substantially equal to the predetermined height of the gap such that the each stand-off element touches the inner surfaces of both panes. The seals are disposed about the edges of the panes, enclosing the stand-off elements within a volume between the panes from which the atmosphere may be evacuated to form a partial vacuum.

  10. Highly Insulating Glazing Systems using Non-Structural Center Glazing Layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arasteh, Dariush

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    low as 0.57 W/m 2 -K (0.10 Btu/h-ft 2 -°F). Such units havevalues Btu/h-ft 2 -°F), windows relatedA 0.57 W/m 2 -K (0.10 Btu/h-ft 2 -°F) window is targeted as

  11. Spectrally selective glazings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectrally selective glazing is window glass that permits some portions of the solar spectrum to enter a building while blocking others. This high-performance glazing admits as much daylight as possible while preventing transmission of as much solar heat as possible. By controlling solar heat gains in summer, preventing loss of interior heat in winter, and allowing occupants to reduce electric lighting use by making maximum use of daylight, spectrally selective glazing significantly reduces building energy consumption and peak demand. Because new spectrally selective glazings can have a virtually clear appearance, they admit more daylight and permit much brighter, more open views to the outside while still providing the solar control of the dark, reflective energy-efficient glass of the past. This Federal Technology Alert provides detailed information and procedures for Federal energy managers to consider spectrally selective glazings. The principle of spectrally selective glazings is explained. Benefits related to energy efficiency and other architectural criteria are delineated. Guidelines are provided for appropriate application of spectrally selective glazing, and step-by-step instructions are given for estimating energy savings. Case studies are also presented to illustrate actual costs and energy savings. Current manufacturers, technology users, and references for further reading are included for users who have questions not fully addressed here.

  12. High temperature structural insulating material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, W.Y.

    1984-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800/sup 0/C), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m/sup 0/C), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800/sup 0/C, a diameter within the range of 20-200 ..mu..m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2 to 4 ..mu..m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

  13. High temperature structural insulating material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Wayne Y. (Munster, IN)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800.degree. C.), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m.degree. C.), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800.degree. C., a diameter within the range of 20-200 .mu.m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2-4 .mu.m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

  14. Establishing the value of advanced glazings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, E; Selkowitz, S.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerous glazing technologies are under development worldwide to improve the performance of building facades. High-performance glazings can provide substantial energy and related environmental benefits, but often at greatly increased first cost when compared to conventional design solutions. To increase market viability, we discuss strategies to reduce the actual and owner-perceived costs associated with developing and producing advanced window systems, specifically switchable electrochromic glazings, and we also suggest marketing strategies designed to appeal to early adopter and mainstream purchasers. These strategies may be applicable to a broad range of advanced glazing materials.

  15. Performance of High-Performance Glazing in IECC Compliant Building Simulation Model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhopadhyay, J.; Haberl, J. S.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    windows with evacuated or low-conductance gas-filled gaps (Carmody et al. 2004), and aerogel windows to reduce the heat loss (V-factor) of windows (Hartman et al. 1987). Technologies to reduce solar heat gain include improvements to existing low-E.../12-04, [CDROM]. College Station, TX: Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A&M University. Hartman, J., M.Rubin, and D. Arasteh. 1987. Thermal and solar-optical properties of silica aerogel for use in insulated windows. Proceedings of the 12th - 138 ? ESL-PA-06...

  16. Gaseous insulators for high voltage electrical equipment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christophorou, Loucas G. (Oak Ridge, TN); James, David R. (Knoxville, TN); Pace, Marshall O. (Knoxville, TN); Pai, Robert Y. (Concord, TN)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gaseous insulators comprise compounds having high attachment cross sections for electrons having energies in the 0-1.3 electron volt range. Multi-component gaseous insulators comprise compounds and mixtures having overall high electron attachment cross sections in the 0-1.3 electron volt range and moderating gases having high cross sections for inelastic interactions with electrons of energies 1-4 electron volts. Suitable electron attachment components include hexafluorobutyne, perfluorobutene-2, perfluorocyclobutane, perfluorodimethylcyclobutane, perfluorocyclohexene, perfluoromethylcyclohexane, hexafluorobutadiene, perfluoroheptene-1 and hexafluoroazomethane. Suitable moderating gases include N.sub.2, CO, CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2. The gaseous insulating mixture can also contain SF.sub.6, perfluoropropane and perfluorobenzene.

  17. Method and apparatus for filling thermal insulating systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arasteh, D.K.

    1992-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for filling insulated glazing units is disclosed. The method utilizes a vacuum chamber in which the insulated glazing units are placed. The insulated glazing units and vacuum chamber are evacuated simultaneously. The units are then refilled with a low conductance gas such as Krypton while the chamber is simultaneously refilled with air. 3 figs.

  18. State-of-the-Art Highly Insulating Window Frames - Research and Market Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavsen, Arild; Jelle, Bjorn Petter; Arasteh, Dariush; Kohler, Christian

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reports the findings of a market and research review related to state-of-the-art highly insulating window frames. The market review focuses on window frames that satisfy the Passivhaus requirements (window U-value less or equal to 0.8 W/m{sup 2}K ), while other examples are also given in order to show the variety of materials and solutions that may be used for constructing window frames with a low thermal transmittance (U-value). The market search shows that several combinations of materials are used in order to obtain window frames with a low U-value. The most common insulating material seems to be Polyurethane (PUR), which is used together with most of the common structural materials such as wood, aluminum, and PVC. The frame research review also shows examples of window frames developed in order to increase the energy efficiency of the frames and the glazings which the frames are to be used together with. The authors find that two main tracks are used in searching for better solutions. The first one is to minimize the heat losses through the frame itself. The result is that conductive materials are replaced by highly thermal insulating materials and air cavities. The other option is to reduce the window frame area to a minimum, which is done by focusing on the net energy gain by the entire window (frame, spacer and glazing). Literature shows that a window with a higher U-value may give a net energy gain to a building that is higher than a window with a smaller U-value. The net energy gain is calculated by subtracting the transmission losses through the window from the solar energy passing through the windows. The net energy gain depends on frame versus glazing area, solar factor, solar irradiance, calculation period and U-value. The frame research review also discusses heat transfer modeling issues related to window frames. Thermal performance increasing measures, surface modeling, and frame cavity modeling are among the topics discussed. The review shows that the current knowledge gives the basis for improving the calculation procedures in the calculation standards. At the same time it is room for improvement within some areas, e.g. to fully understand the natural convection effects inside irregular vertical frame cavities (jambs) and ventilated frame cavities.

  19. High temperature insulation for ceramic matrix composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrill, Gary B. (Monroeville, PA); Morrison, Jay Alan (Orlando, FL)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A ceramic composition is provided to insulate ceramic matrix composites under high temperature, high heat flux environments. The composite comprises a plurality of hollow oxide-based spheres of varios dimentions, a phosphate binder, and at least one oxide filler powder, whereby the phosphate binder partially fills gaps between the spheres and the filler powders. The spheres are situated in the phosphate binder and the filler powders such that each sphere is in contact with at least one other sphere. The spheres may be any combination of Mullite spheres, Alumina spheres, or stabilized Zirconia spheres. The filler powder may be any combination of Alumina, Mullite, Ceria, or Hafnia. Preferably, the phosphate binder is Aluminum Ortho-Phosphate. A method of manufacturing the ceramic insulating composition and its application to CMC substates are also provided.

  20. High temperature insulation for ceramic matrix composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merrill, Gary B.; Morrison, Jay Alan

    2004-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A ceramic composition is provided to insulate ceramic matrix composites under high temperature, high heat flux environments. The composition comprises a plurality of hollow oxide-based spheres of various dimensions, a phosphate binder, and at least one oxide filler powder, whereby the phosphate binder partially fills gaps between the spheres and the filler powders. The spheres are situated in the phosphate binder and the filler powders such that each sphere is in contact with at least one other sphere. The spheres may be any combination of Mullite spheres, Alumina spheres, or stabilized Zirconia spheres. The filler powder may be any combination of Alumina, Mullite, Ceria, or Hafnia. Preferably, the phosphate binder is Aluminum Ortho-Phosphate. A method of manufacturing the ceramic insulating composition and its application to CMC substrates are also provided.

  1. High temperature insulation for ceramic matrix composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrill, Gary B. (Monroeville, PA); Morrison, Jay Alan (Orlando, FL)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A ceramic composition is provided to insulate ceramic matrix composites under high temperature, high heat flux environments. The composition comprises a plurality of hollow oxide-based spheres of various dimensions, a phosphate binder, and at least one oxide filler powder, whereby the phosphate binder partially fills gaps between the spheres and the filler powders. The spheres are situated in the phosphate binder and the filler powders such that each sphere is in contact with at least one other sphere. The spheres may be any combination of Mullite spheres, Alumina spheres, or stabilized Zirconia spheres. The filler powder may be any combination of Alumina, Mullite, Ceria, or Hafnia. Preferably, the phosphate binder is Aluminum Ortho-Phosphate. A method of manufacturing the ceramic insulating composition and its application to CMC substrates are also provided.

  2. Seismic behavior of structural silicone glazing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zarghamee, M.S.; Schwartz, T.A. [Simpson Gumpertz and Heger Inc., Arlington, MA (United States); Gladstone, M. [Dow Corning Corp., Fremont, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In seismic events, glass curtain walls undergo racking deformation, while the flat glass lites do not rack due to their high shear stiffness. If the glass curtain wall is not isolated from the building frame by specifically designed connections that accommodate relative motion, seismic racking motion of the building frame will demand significant resiliency of the sealant that secures the glass to the curtain wall framing. In typical four-sided structural silicone glazing systems used in buildings with unbraced moment frames, the magnitude of seismic racking is likely to stress the sealants significantly beyond the sealant design strength. In this paper, the extent of the expected seismic racking motion, the behavior of the structural silicone glazing when subjected to the expected racking motion, and the field performance of a building with four-sided structural silicone glazing during the Northridge earthquake are discussed. The details of a curtain wall design concept consisting of shop-glazed subframes connected to the building frame and the connections that accommodate seismic motion of the subframe relative to the building frame is developed. Specific recommendations are made for the design of the four-sided structural silicone glazing systems for seismic loads.

  3. Durability of Polymeric Glazing and Absorber Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorgensen, G.; Terwilliger, K.; Bingham, C.; Milbourne, M.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Solar Heating and Lighting Program has set the goal of reducing the cost of solar water heating systems by at least 50%. An attractive approach to such large cost reduction is to replace glass and metal parts with less-expensive, lighter-weight, more-integrated polymeric components. The key challenge with polymers is to maintain performance and assure requisite durability for extended lifetimes. The objective of this task is to quantify lifetimes through measurement of the optical and mechanical stability of candidate polymeric glazing and absorber materials. Polycarbonate sheet glazings, as proposed by two industry partners, have been tested for resistance to UV radiation with three complementary methods. Incorporation of a specific 2-mil thick UV-absorbing screening layer results in glazing lifetimes of at least 15 years; improved screens promise even longer lifetimes. Proposed absorber materials were tested for creep and embrittlement under high temperature, and appear adequate for planned ICS absorbers.

  4. Highly Insulating Windows Volume Purchase Program Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, Graham B.; Mapes, Terry S.; Zalis, WJ

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the Highly Insulating Windows Volume Purchase Program, conduced by PNNL for DOE-BTP, including a summary of outcomes and lessons learned.

  5. Issue 5: Optimizing High Levels of Insulation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was given at the Summer 2012 DOE Building America meeting on July 25, 2012, and addressed the question "How much insulation is too much?"

  6. Rapid field testing of low-emittance coated glazings for product verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, Brent; Kohler, Christian; Goudey, Howdy; Turler, Daniel; Arasteh, Dariush

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper analyzes prospects for developing a test device suitable for field verification of the types of low-emittance (low-e) coatings present on high-performance window products. Test devices are currently available that can simply detect the presence of low-e coatings and that can measure other important characteristics of high-performance windows, such as the thickness of glazing layers or the gap in dual glazings. However, no devices have yet been developed that can measure gas concentrations or distinguish among types of coatings. This paper presents two optical methods for verification of low-e coatings. The first method uses a portable, fiber-optic spectrometer to characterize spectral reflectances from 650 to 1,100 nm for selected surfaces within an insulated glazing unit (IGU). The second method uses an infrared-light-emitting diode and a phototransistor to evaluate the aggregate normal reflectance of an IGU at 940 nm. Both methods measure reflectance in the near (solar) infrared spectrum and are useful for distinguishing between regular and spectrally selective low-e coatings. The infrared-diode/phototransistor method appears promising for use in a low-cost, hand-held field test device.

  7. Expansion Joint Concepts for High Temperature Insulation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, M. R.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As high temperature steam and process piping expands with heat, joints begin to open between the insulation sections, resulting in increased energy loss and possible unsafe surface temperatures. Many different expansion joint designs are presently...

  8. Integrating automated shading and smart glazings with daylight controls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selkowitz, Stephen; Lee, Eleanor

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Automated Shading and Smart Glazings with Daylight Controlsdaylighting, controls, smart glazing, shading, fielddeveloping switchable “smart glazings” for over a decade and

  9. Technology reviews: Glazing systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuman, J.; Rubinstein, F.; Papamichael, K.; Beltran, L.; Lee, E.S.; Selkowitz, S.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a representative review of existing, emerging, and future technology options in each of five hardware and systems areas in envelope and lighting technologies: lighting systems, glazing systems, shading systems, daylighting optical systems, and dynamic curtain wall systems. The term technology is used here to describe any design choice for energy efficiency, ranging from individual components to more complex systems to general design strategies. The purpose of this task is to characterize the state of the art in envelope and lighting technologies in order to identify those with promise for advanced integrated systems, with an emphasis on California commercial buildings. For each technology category, the following activities have been attempted to the extent possible: Identify key performance characteristics and criteria for each technology; determine the performance range of available technologies; identify the most promising technologies and promising trends in technology advances; examine market forces and market trends; and develop a continuously growing in-house database to be used throughout the project. A variety of information sources have been used in these technology characterizations, including miscellaneous periodicals, manufacturer catalogs and cut sheets, other research documents, and data from previous computer simulations. We include these different sources in order to best show the type and variety of data available, however publication here does not imply our guarantee of these data. Within each category, several broad classes are identified, and within each class we examine the generic individual technologies that fag into that class.

  10. (Insulating materials and large high voltage electric systems)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, S.J.

    1990-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The traveler attended the 33rd Session of CIGRE (The International Conference on Large High Voltage Electric Systems in Paris, France) as a US technical expert advisor the Study Committee 15, Insulating Materials. Over 200 papers were discussed, contributed from over 45 countries at the conference on all aspects of electric power generation and transmission. Of special interest was a panel session on superconducting technology for electric power systems and the participation on a new task force on the electrical insulation at cryogenic temperatures. Significant insight was gained into the development of superconducting power technologies in Europe and Japan. CIGRE has set up a committee to follow the development in research on the biological effects of electric and magnetic fields. The traveler also visited the Centre for Electric Power Engineering at the University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scotland and discussed research on degradation of polymeric cable insulation and gas insulated equipment. 5 refs.

  11. Analysis Code for High Gradient Dielectric Insulator Surface Breakdown

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ives, Robert Lawrence [Calabazas Creek Research, Inc.; Verboncoeur, John [University of California - Berkeley; Aldan, Manuel [University of California, Berkeley

    2010-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    High voltage (HV) insulators are critical components in high-energy, accelerator and pulsed power systems that drive diverse applications in the national security, nuclear weapons science, defense and industrial arenas. In these systems, the insulator may separate vacuum/non-vacuum regions or conductors with high electrical field gradients. These insulators will often fail at electric fields over an order of magnitude lower than their intrinsic dielectric strength due to flashover at the dielectric interface. Decades of studies have produced a wealth of information on fundamental processes and mechanisms important for flashover initiation, but only for relatively simple insulator configurations in controlled environments. Accelerator and pulsed power system designers are faced with applying the fundamental knowledge to complex, operational devices with escalating HV requirements. Designers are forced to rely on “best practices” and expensive prototype testing, providing boundaries for successful operation. However, the safety margin is difficult to estimate, and system design must be very conservative for situations where testing is not practicable, or replacement of failed parts is disruptive or expensive. The Phase I program demonstrated the feasibility of developing an advanced code for modeling insulator breakdown. Such a code would be of great interest for a number of applications, including high energy physics, microwave source development, fusion sciences, and other research and industrial applications using high voltage devices.

  12. Fabrication of high gradient insulators by stack compression

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, John Richardson; Sanders, Dave; Hawkins, Steven Anthony; Norona, Marcelo

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Individual layers of a high gradient insulator (HGI) are first pre-cut to their final dimensions. The pre-cut layers are then stacked to form an assembly that is subsequently pressed into an HGI unit with the desired dimension. The individual layers are stacked, and alignment is maintained, using a sacrificial alignment tube that is removed after the stack is hot pressed. The HGI's are used as high voltage vacuum insulators in energy storage and transmission structures or devices, e.g. in particle accelerators and pulsed power systems.

  13. Dynamic measurement of heat loss coefficients through Trombe wall glazing systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Trombe wall presents a unique opportunity to measure the heat-loss coefficient through the glazing system because the wall itself can be used as a heat meter. Since the instantaneous heat flux through the outer wall surface can be determined, the heat loss coefficient at night can be calculated by dividing by the wall surface-to-ambient temperature difference. This technique has been used to determine heat-loss coefficients for Los Alamos test rooms during the winter of 1980-1981. Glazing systems studied include single and double glazing both with and without night insulation used in conjunction with a flat black paint, and both single and double glazing used in conjunction with a selective surface.

  14. State-of-the-Art Highly Insulating Window Frames - Research and Market Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gustavsen, Arild

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    through vacuum and electrochromic vacuum glazed windows,technologies, such as an electrochromic vacuum glazedof rebate depth on an electrochromic vacuum glazed window.

  15. Understanding and Improving High Voltage Vacuum Insulators for Microsecond Pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Javedani, J B; Goerz, D A; Houck, T L; Lauer, E J; Speer, R D; Tully, L K; Vogtlin, G E; White, A D

    2007-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    High voltage insulation is one of the main areas of pulsed power research and development, and dielectric breakdown is usually the limiting factor in attaining the highest possible performance in pulsed power devices. For many applications the delivery of pulsed power into a vacuum region is the most critical aspect of operation. The surface of an insulator exposed to vacuum can fail electrically at an applied field more than an order or magnitude below the bulk dielectric strength of the insulator. This mode of breakdown, called surface flashover, imposes serious limitations on the power flow into a vacuum region. This is especially troublesome for applications where high voltage conditioning of the insulator and electrodes is not practical and for applications where relatively long pulses, on the order of several microseconds, are required. The goal of this project is to establish a sound fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that lead to surface flashover, and then evaluate the most promising techniques to improve vacuum insulators and enable high voltage operation at stress levels near the intrinsic bulk breakdown limits of the material. The approach we proposed and followed was to develop this understanding through a combination of theoretical and computation methods coupled with experiments to validate and quantify expected behaviors. In this report we summarize our modeling and simulation efforts, theoretical studies, and experimental investigations. The computational work began by exploring the limits of commercially available codes and demonstrating methods to examine field enhancements and defect mechanisms at microscopic levels. Plasma simulations with particle codes used in conjunction with circuit models of the experimental apparatus enabled comparisons with experimental measurements. The large scale plasma (LSP) particle-in-cell (PIC) code was run on multiprocessor platforms and used to simulate expanding plasma conditions in vacuum gap regions. Algorithms were incorporated into LSP to handle secondary electron emission from dielectric materials to enable detailed simulations of flashover phenomenon. Theoretical studies were focused on explaining a possible mechanism for anode initiated surface flashover that involves an electron avalanche process starting near the anode, not a mechanism involving bulk dielectric breakdown. Experiments were performed in Engineering's Pulsed Power Lab using an available 100-kV, 10-{micro}s pulse generator and vacuum chamber. The initial experiments were done with polyethylene insulator material in the shape of a truncated cone cut at +45{sup o} angle between flat electrodes with a gap of 1.0 cm. The insulator was sized so there were no flashovers or breakdowns under nominal operating conditions. Insulator flashover or gap closure was induced by introducing a plasma source, a tuft of velvet, in proximity to the insulator or electrode.

  16. High density load bearing insulation peg

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nowobilski, J.J.; Owens, W.J.

    1985-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A high density peg is disclosed which can support a large load and exhibits excellent thermal resistance produced by a method wherein the peg is made in compliance with specified conditions of time, temperature and pressure. 4 figs.

  17. Highly Insulating Windows with a U-value less than 0.6 W/m2K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendell Rhine; Ying Tang; Wenting Dong; Roxana Trifu; Reduane Begag

    2008-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. households rely primarily on three sources of energy: natural gas, electricity, and fuel oil. In the past several decades, electricity consumption by households has grown dramatically, and a significant portion of electricity used in homes is for lighting. Lighting includes both indoor and outdoor lighting and is found in virtually every household in the United States. In 2001, according to the US Energy Information Administration, lighting accounted for 101 billion kWh (8.8 percent) of U.S. household electricity use. Incandescent lamps, which are commonly found in households, are highly inefficient sources of light because about 90 percent of the energy used is lost as heat. For that reason, lighting has been one focus area to increase the efficiency of household electricity consumption. Windows have several functions, and one of the main functions is to provide a view to the outside. Daylighting is another one of windows main functions and determines the distribution of daylight to a space. Daylighting windows do not need to be transparent, and a translucent daylighting window is sufficient, and often desired, to diffuse the light and make the space more environmentally pleasing. In homes, skylights are one source of daylighting, but skylights are not very energy efficient and are inseparably linked to solar heat gain. In some climates, added solar heat gains from daylighting may be welcome; but in other climates, heat gain must be controlled. More energy efficient skylights and daylighting solutions, in general, are desired and can be designed by insulating them with aerogels. Aerogels are a highly insulating and transparent material in its pure form. The overall objective for this project was to prepare an economical, translucent, fiber-reinforced aerogel insulation material for daylighting applications that is durable for manufacturing purposes. This advanced insulation material will increase the thermal performance of daylighting windows, while satisfying constraints such as durability, cost, user acceptance, size limits, and environmental safety concerns. The energy efficient daylighting window will consist of a translucent and resilient aerogel panel sandwiched between glass panes in double glazed windows. Compared to the best windows available today, the double glazed translucent windows with 1/2-inch aerogel inserts will have a U-value of 1.2 W/m{sup 2} K (0.211 BTU/ft{sup 2} h F) without any coating or low conductivity fill gases. These windows will be more effective than the windows with an Energy Star rating of U-2 W/m{sup 2} K and could be made even more efficient by using low-e coated glass glazings and inert gas fills. This report summarizes the work accomplished on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-03NT41950. During this project, Aspen Aerogels made transparent and translucent aerogels from TMOS and TEOS. We characterized the transparency of the aerogels, reinforced the transparent aerogels with fibers and prepared large translucent aerogel panels and blankets. We also conducted an initial market study for energy efficient translucent windows. A lab-scale process was developed that could be scaled-up to manufacture blankets of these translucent aerogels. The large blankets prepared were used to fabricate prototype translucent windows and skylights. The primary goal of this project was to develop transparent, resilient, hydrophobic silica aerogels that have low thermal conductivities (R-10/inch) to be used to produce aerogel insulated double-glazing windows with a U value of 0.6 W/m{sup 2}K. To meet this objective we developed a process and equipment to produce blankets of translucent, hydrophobic aerogel. We focused on silica, organically-modified silica aerogels (Ormosils), and fiber reinforced silica aerogels due to the appreciable expertise in silica sol-gel processing available with the personnel at Aspen Aerogels, and also due to the quantity of knowledge available in the scientific literature. The project was conducted in three budget periods, herein called BP1, BP2 and BP3.

  18. Chapter 19. High Voltage Insulation, Diagnostics and Energetic Electron and Photon Beam Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter 19. High Voltage Insulation, Diagnostics and Energetic Electron and Photon Beam Interactions 19-1 High Voltage Insulation, Diagnostics and Energetic Electron and Photon Beam Interactions 1. DC Properties of Modern Filled Epoxy Insulation Academic and Research Staff Dr. Chathan Cooke Sponsor

  19. High Reliability R-10 Windows Using Vacuum Insulating Glass Units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stark, David

    2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this effort was for EverSealed Windows (“EverSealed” or “ESW”) to design, assemble, thermally and environmentally test and demonstrate a Vacuum Insulating Glass Unit (“VIGU” or “VIG”) that would enable a whole window to meet or exceed the an R-10 insulating value (U-factor ? 0.1). To produce a VIGU that could withstand any North American environment, ESW believed it needed to design, produce and use a flexible edge seal system. This is because a rigid edge seal, used by all other know VIG producers and developers, limits the size and/or thermal environment of the VIG to where the unit is not practical for typical IG sizes and cannot withstand severe outdoor environments. The rigid-sealed VIG’s use would be limited to mild climates where it would not have a reasonable economic payback when compared to traditional double-pane or triple-pane IGs. ESW’s goals, in addition to achieving a sufficiently high R-value to enable a whole window to achieve R-10, included creating a VIG design that could be produced for a cost equal to or lower than a traditional triple-pane IG (low-e, argon filled). ESW achieved these goals. EverSealed produced, tested and demonstrated a flexible edge-seal VIG that had an R-13 insulating value and the edge-seal system durability to operate reliably for at least 40 years in the harshest climates of North America.

  20. Glazing materials for solar and architectural applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lampert, C.M. [ed.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes five collaborative research projects on glazings performed by participants in Subtask C of IEA Solar Heating and Cooling Programme (SHC) Task 10, Materials Research and Testing. The projects include materials characterization, optical and thermal measurements, and durability testing of several types of new glazings Three studies were completed on electrochromic and dispersed liquid crystals for smart windows, and two were completed for low-E coatings and transparent insulation materials for more conventional window and wall applications. In the area of optical switching materials for smart windows, the group developed more uniform characterization parameters that are useful to determine lifetime and performance of electrochromics. The detailed optical properties of an Asahi (Japan) prototype electrochromic window were measured in several laboratories. A one square meter array of prototype devices was tested outdoors and demonstrated significant cooling savings compared to tinted static glazing. Three dispersed liquid crystal window devices from Taliq (USA) were evaluated. In the off state, these liquid crystal windows scatter light greatly. When a voltage of about 100 V ac is applied, these windows become transparent. Undyed devices reduce total visible light transmittance by only .25 when switched, but this can be increased to .50 with the use of dyed liquid crystals. A wide range of solar-optical and emittance measurements were made on low-E coated glass and plastic. Samples of pyrolytic tin oxide from Ford glass (USA) and multilayer metal-dielectric coatings from Interpane (Germany) and Southwall (USA) were evaluated. In addition to optical characterization, the samples were exposure-tested in Switzerland. The thermal and optimal properties of two different types of transparent insulation materials were measured.

  1. Self-monitoring high voltage transmission line suspension insulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stemler, Gary E. (Vancouver, WA); Scott, Donald N. (Vancouver, WA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high voltage transmission line suspension insulator (18 or 22) which monitors its own dielectric integrity. A dielectric rod (10) has one larger diameter end fitting attachable to a transmission line and another larger diameter end fitting attachable to a support tower. The rod is enclosed in a dielectric tube (14) which is hermetically sealed to the rod's end fittings such that a liquidtight space (20) is formed between the rod and the tube. A pressurized dielectric liquid is placed within that space. A discoloring dye placed within this space is used to detect the loss of the pressurized liquid.

  2. Method for improving performance of highly stressed electrical insulating structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilson, Michael J. (Modesto, CA); Goerz, David A. (Brentwood, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Removing the electrical field from the internal volume of high-voltage structures; e.g., bushings, connectors, capacitors, and cables. The electrical field is removed from inherently weak regions of the interconnect, such as between the center conductor and the solid dielectric, and places it in the primary insulation. This is accomplished by providing a conductive surface on the inside surface of the principal solid dielectric insulator surrounding the center conductor and connects the center conductor to this conductive surface. The advantage of removing the electric fields from the weaker dielectric region to a stronger area improves reliability, increases component life and operating levels, reduces noise and losses, and allows for a smaller compact design. This electric field control approach is currently possible on many existing products at a modest cost. Several techniques are available to provide the level of electric field control needed. Choosing the optimum technique depends on material, size, and surface accessibility. The simplest deposition method uses a standard electroless plating technique, but other metalization techniques include vapor and energetic deposition, plasma spraying, conductive painting, and other controlled coating methods.

  3. Round-robin artificial contamination test on high voltage dc insulators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naito, K.; Schneider, H.M.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes the results of a worldwide round-robin test of high voltage dc (HVDC) insulators, which was carried out in six laboratories aiming at standardization of the method for artificial contamination tests on HVDC insulators. Flashover characteristics of three kinds of specimens were evaluated by the clean fog and the salt fog procedures. Sufficient information is now available to allow the preparation of provisional international specifications for artificial contamination testing of HVDC insulators.

  4. Measure Guideline: Three High Performance Mineral Fiber Insulation Board Retrofit Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neuhauser, K.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Measure Guideline describes a high performance enclosure retrofit package that uses mineral fiber insulation board. The Measure Guideline describes retrofit assembly and details for wood frame roof and walls and for cast concrete foundations. This Measure Guideline is intended to serve contractors and designers seeking guidance for non-foam exterior insulation retrofit.

  5. High Performance Polycrystalline SiGe Thin Film Transistors Using Al2O3 Gate Insulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 High Performance Polycrystalline SiGe Thin Film Transistors Using Al2O3 Gate Insulator Zhonghe as the gate insulator for low temperature (SiGe thin film transistors (TFTs) has been between the Al2O3 and the SiGe channel layer is sufficiently passivated to make Al2O3 a better alternative

  6. High constriction ratio continuous insulator based dielectrophoretic particle sorting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Qianru, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low frequency insulator based dielectrophoresis (iDEP) is a promising technique to study cell surface dielectric properties. To date, iDEP has been exploited to distinguish, characterize, and manipulate particles and ...

  7. High-temperature zirconia insulation and method for making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wrenn, Jr., George E. (Clinton, TN); Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN); Lewis, Jr., John (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a highly pure, partially stabilized, fibrous zirconia composite for use as thermal insulation in environments where temperatures up to about 2000.degree. C. are utilized. The composite of the present invention is fabricated into any suitable configuration such as a cone, cylinder, dome or the like by vacuum molding an aqueous slurry of partially stabilized zirconia fibers into a desired configuration on a suitably shaped mandrel. The molded fibers are infiltrated with zirconyl nitrate and the resulting structure is then dried to form a rigid structure which may be removed and placed in a furnace. The structure is then heated in air to a temperature of about 600.degree. C. for driving off the nitrate from the structure and for oxidizing the zirconyl ion to zirconia. Thereafter, the structure is heated to about 950.degree. to 1,250.degree. C. to fuse the zirconia fibers at their nexi in a matrix of zirconia. The composite produced by the present invention is self-supporting and can be readily machined to desired final dimensions. Additional heating to about 1800.degree. to 2000.degree. C. further improves structural rigidity.

  8. High-temperature zirconia insulation and method for making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wrenn, G.E. Jr.; Holcombe, C.E. Jr.; Lewis, J. Jr.

    1988-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a highly pure, partially stabilized, fibrous zirconia composite for use as thermal insulation in environments where temperatures up to about 2,000 C are utilized. The composite of the present invention is fabricated into any suitable configuration such as a cone, cylinder, dome or the like by vacuum molding an aqueous slurry of partially stabilized zirconia fibers into a desired configuration on a suitably shaped mandrel. The molded fibers are infiltrated with zirconyl nitrate and the resulting structure is then dried to form a rigid structure which may be removed and placed in a furnace. The structure is then heated in air to a temperature of about 600 C for driving off the nitrate from the structure and for oxidizing the zirconyl ion to zirconia. Thereafter, the structure is heated to about 950 to 1,250 C to fuse the zirconia fibers at their nexi in a matrix of zirconia. The composite produced by the present invention is self-supporting and can be readily machined to desired final dimensions. Additional heating to about 1,800 to 2,000 C further improves structural rigidity.

  9. Fabricate-on-Demand Vacuum Insulating Glazings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian NuclearandJunetrackEllen|JulyR--FOIA SupportDOE's FY3 CurrentFY55FY 20163

  10. Fabricate-on-Demand Vacuum Insulating Glazings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy Chinaof EnergyImpactOnSTATEMENT OF DAVID GEISEREnergy1 of 3 PPG developed and

  11. Integrating automated shading and smart glazings with daylight controls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selkowitz, Stephen; Lee, Eleanor

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Effect of Venetian Blinds on Daylight Photoelectric Controland Smart Glazings with Daylight Controls Stephen Selkowitzwith the outdoors and daylight to enhance the quality of the

  12. Evaluation of a strengthening and insulation system for high temperature BSCCO-2223 superconducting tape

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, C.; Mantone, A. [GE Medical Systems, Florence, SC (United States); Herd, K.; Laskaris, T. [GE Corp. Research and Development Center, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent advances in BSCCO-2223 superconducting tape quality and length have led to demonstration programs for coil performance. The conductors in these coils need to be insulated without damage to the superconducting properties. A paper insulation process developed at the General Electric Company (GE) for low temperature superconducting Nb{sub 3}Sn tape has been modified to provide the same insulation system to high temperature (HTS) superconducting tapes, such as BSCCO-2223. In this paper, we report on the insulation process and its effect on the tape performance. Several long lengths of conductor have been tested, unwound, insulated and retested to examine any degradation issues. Additionally, it is known that HTS materials are inherently weak in relation to the winding and handling stresses in a manufacturing environment. A system to provide mechanical stabilization to Nb{sub 3}Sn tape through a lamination process has been successfully applied to high temperature superconductors as a method to build a strong, windable composite. The system is described and mechanical and electrical properties of the strengthened tapes are discussed.

  13. Durability of Polymeric Glazing and Absorber Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorgensen, G.; Terwilliger, K.; Bingham, C.; Lindquist, C.; Milbourne, M.

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Solar Heating and Lighting Program has set the goal of reducing the cost of solar water heating systems by at least 50%. An attractive approach to such large cost reduction is to replace glass and metal parts with less-expensive, lighter-weight, more-integrated polymeric components. The key challenge with polymers is to maintain performance and assure requisite durability for extended lifetimes. We have begun evaluation of several new UV-screened polycarbonate sheet glazing constructions. This has involved interactions with several major polymer industry companies to obtain improved candidate samples. Proposed absorber materials were tested for UV resistance, and appear adequate for unglazed ICS absorbers.

  14. Side-by-Side Field Evaluation of Highly Insulating Windows in the PNNL Lab Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widder, Sarah H.; Parker, Graham B.; Baechler, Michael C.; Bauman, Nathan N.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To examine the energy, air leakage, and thermal performance of highly insulating windows, a field evaluation was undertaken in a matched pair of all-electric, factory-built “Lab Homes” located on the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) campus in Richland, Washington. The “baseline” Lab Home B was retrofitted with “standard” double-pane clear aluminum-frame slider windows and patio doors, while the “experimental” Lab Home A was retrofitted with Jeld-Wen® triple-pane vinyl-frame slider windows and patio doors with a U-factor of 0.2 and solar heat gain coefficient of 0.19. To assess the window, the building shell air leakage, energy use, and interior temperatures of each home were compared during the 2012 winter heating and summer cooling seasons. The measured energy savings in Lab Home B averaged 5,821 watt-hours per day (Wh/day) during the heating season and 6,518 Wh/day during the cooling season. The overall whole-house energy savings of Lab Home B compared to Lab Home A are 11.6% ± 1.53% for the heating season and 18.4 ± 2.06% for the cooling season for identical occupancy conditions with no window coverings deployed. Extrapolating these energy savings numbers based on typical average heating degree days and cooling degree days per year yields an estimated annual energy savings of 12.2%, or 1,784 kWh/yr. The data suggest that highly insulating windows are an effective energy-saving measure that should be considered for high-performance new homes and in existing retrofits. However, the cost effectiveness of the measure, as determined by the simple payback period, suggests that highly insulating window costs continue to make windows difficult to justify on a cost basis alone. Additional reductions in costs via improvements in manufacturing and/or market penetration that continue to drive down costs will make highly insulating windows much more viable as a cost-effective energy efficiency measure. This study also illustrates that highly insulating windows have important impacts on peak load, occupant comfort, and condensation potential, which are not captured in the energy savings calculation. More consistent and uniform interior temperature distributions suggest that highly insulated windows, as part of a high performance building envelope, may enable more centralized duct design and downsized HVAC systems. Shorter, more centralized duct systems and smaller HVAC systems to yield additional cost savings, making highly insulating windows more cost effective as part of a package of new construction or retrofit measures which achieve significant reductions in home energy use.

  15. Method of preparing thermal insulation for high temperature microwave sintering operations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, C.E.; Dykes, N.L.; Morrow, M.S.

    1996-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Superior microwave transparent thermal insulations for high temperature microwave sintering operations were prepared. One embodiment of the thermal insulation comprises granules of boron nitride coated with a very thin layer of glassy carbon made by preparing a glassy carbon precursor and blending it with boron nitride powder to form a mixture. The blended mixture is granulated to form a grit which is dried and heated to form the granules of boron nitride coated with a glassy carbon. Alternatively, grains of glassy carbon are coated with boron nitride by blending a mixture of a slurry comprising boron nitride, boric acid binder, and methyl alcohol with glassy carbon grains to form a blended mixture. The blended mixture is dried to form grains of glassy carbon coated with boron nitride. In addition, a physical mixture of boron nitride powder and glassy carbon grains has also been shown to be an excellent thermal insulation material for microwave processing and sintering. 1 fig.

  16. Method of preparing thermal insulation for high temperature microwave sintering operations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN); Dykes, Norman L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Morrow, Marvin S. (Kingston, TN)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Superior microwave transparent thermal insulations for high temperature microwave sintering operations were prepared. One embodiment of the thermal insulation comprises granules of boron nitride coated with a very thin layer of glassy carbon made by preparing a glassy carbon precursor and blending it with boron nitride powder to form a mixture. The blended mixture is granulated to form a grit which is dried and heated to form the granules of boron nitride coated with a glassy carbon. Alternatively, grains of glassy carbon are coated with boron nitride by blending a mixture of a slurry comprising boron nitride, boric acid binder, and methyl alcohol with glassy carbon grains to form a blended mixture. The blended mixture is dried to form grains of glassy carbon coated with boron nitride. In addition, a physical mixture of boron nitride powder and glassy carbon grains has also been shown to be an excellent thermal insulation material for microwave processing and sintering.

  17. Thermal insulation for high temperature microwave sintering operations and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN); Dykes, Norman L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Morrow, Marvin S. (Kingston, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Superior microwave transparent thermal insulations for high temperature microwave sintering operations were prepared. One embodiment of the thermal insulation comprises granules of boron nitride coated with a very thin layer of glassy carbon made by preparing a glassy carbon precursor and blending it with boron nitride powder to form a mixture. The blended mixture is granulated to form a grit which is dried and heated to form the granules of boron nitride coated with a glassy carbon. Alternatively, grains of glassy carbon are coated with boron nitride by blending a mixture of a slurry comprising boron nitride, boric acid binder, and methyl alcohol with glassy carbon grains to form a blended mixture. The blended mixture is dried to form grains of glassy carbon coated with boron nitride. In addition, a physical mixture of boron nitride powder and glassy carbon grains has also been shown to be an excellent thermal insulation material for microwave processing and sintering.

  18. Thermal insulation for high temperature microwave sintering operations and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, C.E.; Dykes, N.L.; Morrow, M.S.

    1995-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Superior microwave transparent thermal insulations for high temperature microwave sintering operations were prepared. One embodiment of the thermal insulation comprises granules of boron nitride coated with a very thin layer of glassy carbon made by preparing a glassy carbon precursor and blending it with boron nitride powder to form a mixture. The blended mixture is granulated to form a grit which is dried and heated to form the granules of boron nitride coated with a glassy carbon. Alternatively, grains of glassy carbon are coated with boron nitride by blending a mixture of a slurry comprising boron nitride, boric acid binder, and methyl alcohol with glassy carbon grains to form a blended mixture. The blended mixture is dried to form grains of glassy carbon coated with boron nitride. In addition, a physical mixture of boron nitride powder and glassy carbon grains has also been shown to be an excellent thermal insulation material for microwave processing and sintering. 1 fig.

  19. Pulsed laser deposition of high-quality thin films of the insulating ferromagnet EuS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Qi I., E-mail: qiyang@stanford.edu [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Zhao, Jinfeng; Risbud, Subhash H. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Zhang, Li; Dolev, Merav [Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Fried, Alexander D. [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Marshall, Ann F. [Stanford Nanocharacterization Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Kapitulnik, Aharon [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    High-quality thin films of the ferromagnetic insulator europium(II) sulfide (EuS) were fabricated by pulsed laser deposition on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (0001) and Si (100) substrates. A single orientation was obtained with the [100] planes parallel to the substrates, with atomic-scale smoothness indicates a near-ideal surface topography. The films exhibit uniform ferromagnetism below 15.9?K, with a substantial component of the magnetization perpendicular to the plane of the films. Optimization of the growth condition also yielded truly insulating films with immeasurably large resistance. This combination of magnetic and electric properties opens the gate for future devices that require a true ferromagnetic insulator.

  20. STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING OF HIGH VOLTAGE ELECTRICAL SWITCH CERAMIC INSULATORS IN SEISMIC AREAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING OF HIGH VOLTAGE ELECTRICAL SWITCH CERAMIC INSULATORS IN SEISMIC AREAS damage. 7th European Workshop on Structural Health Monitoring July 8-11, 2014. La Cité, Nantes, France European Workshop on Structural Health Monitoring (2014)" #12;(a) (b) Figure 1 : a) Elect

  1. Calcium silicate insulation structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kollie, Thomas G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An insulative structure including a powder-filled evacuated casing utilizes a quantity of finely divided synthetic calcium silicate having a relatively high surface area. The resultant structure-provides superior thermal insulating characteristics over a broad temperature range and is particularly well-suited as a panel for a refrigerator or freezer or the insulative barrier for a cooler or a insulated bottle.

  2. A high-speed, low-power analog-to-digital converter in fully depleted silicon-on-insulator technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lundberg, Kent Howard

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis demonstrates a one-volt, high-speed, ultra-low-power, six-bit flash analog-to-digital converter fabricated in a fully depleted silicon-on-insulator CMOS technology. Silicon-on-insulator CMOS technology provides ...

  3. High-Voltage Insulators and Components - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football High School footballHigh-Pressure

  4. Electronic properties of doped Mott insulators and high temperature superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribeiro, Tiago Castro

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-temperature superconducting cuprates, which are the quintessential example of a strongly correlated system and the most extensively studied materials after semiconductors, spurred the development in the fields of ...

  5. Boson topological insulators: A window into highly entangled quantum phases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chong

    We study several aspects of the realization of global symmetries in highly entangled phases of quantum matter. Examples include gapped topological ordered phases, gapless quantum spin liquids, and non-Fermi liquid phases. ...

  6. "Flexible aerogel as a superior thermal insulation for high temperature superconductor cable applications"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Shannon O. [Aspen Aerogel, Inc.; Demko, Jonathan A [ORNL; Tomich, A. [Aspen Aerogel, Inc.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High temperature superconducting (HTS) cables are an advanced technology that can both strengthen and improve the national electrical distribution infrastructure. HTS cables require sufficient cooling to overcome inherent low temperature heat loading. Heat loads are minimized by the use of cryogenic envelopes or cryostats. Cryostats require improvement in efficiency, reliability, and cost reduction to meet the demanding needs of HTS conductors (1G and 2G wires). Aspen Aerogels has developed a compression resistant aerogel thermal insulation package to replace compression sensitive multi-layer insulation (MLI), the incumbent thermal insulation, in flexible cryostats for HTS cables. Oak Ridge National Laboratory tested a prototype aerogel package in a lab-scale pipe apparatus to measure the rate of heat invasion. The lab-scale pipe test results of the aerogel solution will be presented and directly compared to MLI. A compatibility assessment of the aerogel material with HTS system components will also be presented. The aerogel thermal insulation solution presented will meet the demanding needs of HTS cables.

  7. Field Evaluation of Highly Insulating Windows in the Lab Homes: Winter Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, Graham B.; Widder, Sarah H.; Bauman, Nathan N.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This field evaluation of highly insulating windows was undertaken in a matched pair of 'Lab Homes' located on the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) campus during the 2012 winter heating season. Improving the insulation and solar heat gain characteristics of a home's windows has the potential to significantly improve the home's building envelope and overall thermal performance by reducing heat loss (in the winter), and cooling loss and solar heat gain (in the summer) through the windows. A high quality installation and/or window retrofit will also minimize or reduce air leakage through the window cavity and thus also contribute to reduced heat loss in the winter and cooling loss in the summer. These improvements all contribute to decreasing overall annual home energy use. Occupant comfort (non-quantifiable) can also be increased by minimizing or eliminating the cold 'draft' (temperature) many residents experience at or near window surfaces that are at a noticeably lower temperature than the room air temperature. Lastly, although not measured in this experiment, highly insulating windows (triple-pane in this experiment) also have the potential to significantly reduce the noise transmittance through windows compared to standard double-pane windows. The metered data taken in the Lab Homes and data analysis presented here represent 70 days of data taken during the 2012 heating season. As such, the savings from highly insulating windows in the experimental home (Lab Home B) compared to the standard double-pane clear glass windows in the baseline home (Lab Home A) are only a portion of the energy savings expected from a year-long experiment that would include a cooling season. The cooling season experiment will take place in the homes in the summer of 2012, and results of that experiment will be reported in a subsequent report available to all stakeholders.

  8. Highly insulating Residential Windows Using Smart Automated Shading

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEND D e e p p a a rDepartment|EnergytheHighly

  9. Chromogenic switchable glazing: Towards the development of the smart window

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lampert, C.M.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The science and technology of chromogenic materials for switchable glazings in building applications is discussed. These glazings can be used for dynamic control of solar and visible energy. Currently many researchers and engineers are involved with the development of products in this field. A summary of activities in Japan, Europe, Australia, USA and Canada is made. The activities of the International Energy Agency are included. Both non-electrically activated and electrically activated glazings are discussed. Technologies covered in the first category are photochromics, and thermochromics and thermotropics. A discussion of electrically activated chromogenic glazings includes dispersed liquid crystals, dispersed particles and electrochromics. A selection of device structures and performance characteristics are compared. A discussion of transparent conductors is presented. Technical issues concerning large-area development of smart windows are discussed.

  10. Development of high performance refractory fibers with enhanced insulating properties and longer service lifetimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, P.C.; DePoorter, G.L.; Munoz, D.R.

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have initiated a three phase investigation of the development of high performance refractory fibers with enhanced insulating properties and longer usable lifetimes. This report presents the results of the first phase of the study, performed from Aug. 1989 through Feb. 1991, which shows that significant energy saving are possible through the use of high temperature insulating fibers that better retain their efficient insulating properties during the service lifetime of the fibers. The remaining phases of this program include the pilot scale development and then full scale production feasibility development and evaluation of enhanced high temperature refractory insulting fibers. This first proof of principle phase of the program presents a summary of the current use patterns of refractory fibers, a laboratory evaluation of the high temperature performance characteristics of selected typical refractory fibers and an analysis of the potential energy savings through the use of enhanced refractory fibers. The current use patterns of refractory fibers span a wide range of industries and high temperature furnaces within those industries. The majority of high temperature fiber applications are in furnaces operating between 2000 and 26000{degrees}F. The fibers used in furnaces operating within this range provide attractive thermal resistance and low thermal storage at reasonable cost. A series of heat treatment studies performed for this phase of the program has shown that the refractory fibers, as initially manufactured, have attractive thermal conductivities for high temperature applications but the fibers go through rapid devitrification and subsequent crystal growth upon high temperature exposure. Development of improved fibers, maintaining the favorable characteristics of the existing as-manufactured fibers, could save between 1 and 4% of the energy consumed in high temperature furnaces using refractory fibers.

  11. Visual quality assessment of electrochromic and conventional glazings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moeck, M.; Lee, E.S.; Rubin, M.D.; Sullivan, R.; Selkowitz, S.E.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Variable transmission, ``switchable`` electrochromic glazings are compared to conventional static glazings using computer simulations to assess the daylighting quality of a commercial office environment where paper and computer tasks are performed. RADIANCE simulations were made for a west-facing commercial office space under clear and overcast sky conditions. This visualization tool was used to model different glazing types, to compute luminance and illuminance levels, and to generate a parametric set of photorealistic images of typical interior views at various times of the day and year. Privacy and visual display terminal (VDT) visibility is explored. Electrochromic glazings result in a more consistent glare-free daylit environment compared to their static counterparts. However, if the glazing is controlled to minimize glare or to maintain low interior daylight levels for critical visual tasks (e.g, VDT), occupants may object to the diminished quality of the outdoor view due to its low transmission (Tv = 0.08) during those hours. RADIANCE proved to be a very powerful tool to better understand some of the design tradeoffs of this emerging glazing technology. The ability to draw specific conclusions about the relative value of different technologies or control strategies is limited by the lack of agreed upon criteria or standards for lighting quality and visibility.

  12. Shrink Tube Insulation Apparatus for Rebco Superconducting Tapes for Use in High Field Magnets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whittington, Andrew

    An increasing number of applications require the use of high temperature superconductors (HTS) such as (RE=Rare Earth) Ba2Cu3O7-x (REBCO) coated conductors [1]. HTS conductors show particularly great potential for high field magnets applications [1] due to their high upper critical fields [2], But several groups have shown that REBCO coated conductors are prone to delamination failure [3] [4] [5]. Under relatively low transverse stress the HTS film separates from the substrate and the conductor degrades [6]. This is problematic due to high transverse stresses that occur in fully epoxy impregnated solenoids wound with this conductor. Application of thin walled heat shrink tubing introduces a weak plane around the conductor, preventing delamination degradation [7]. However, manual application of the shrink tubing is impractical, requiring three operators limited to insulating 100 m lengths or less of REBCO conductor. The high risk of damage to the conductor, also associated with this process, shows the need for...

  13. Espinosa Glaze Polychrome Bowl New Mexico Cultural Assets Digital Repository

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maccabe, Barney

    Espinosa Glaze Polychrome Bowl NM CADRe New Mexico Cultural Assets Digital Repository and e for Advanced Research Computing; thomas@phys.unm.edu) Led by the University of New Mexico Maxwell Museum of Anthropology (MMA), the New Mexico Cultural Assets Digital Repository and efacility is being established

  14. Electrical wire insulation and electromagnetic coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bich, George J. (Penn Hills, PA); Gupta, Tapan K. (Monroeville, PA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electromagnetic coil for high temperature and high radiation application in which glass is used to insulate the electrical wire. A process for applying the insulation to the wire is disclosed which results in improved insulation properties.

  15. Investigation of a high impedance magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator with hollow load

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou Heng; Shu Ting; Li Zhiqiang [College of Opto-electric Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Hunan 410073 (China)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel high-impedance magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator (MILO) with greatly restrained power deposition on the anode has been investigated. Methods to increase the MILO impedance and decrease the anode current are discussed. A MILO with impedance of 30 {Omega} and power conversion efficiency of 25% is presented by particle-in-cell simulations. Compared with the previous MILO in our lab, the anode current of the proposed MILO is reduced about 50%, the power conversion efficiency doubles, and the power deposition on anode is reduced nearly one half. Furthermore, considerations for reducing the power deposition on load have also been carried out in MILO design, and the load current is reduced to 4.6 kA, only 17% of the total anode current. Finally, a hollow load was introduced to reduce the power deposition density on the load, without decreasing the power conversion efficiency.

  16. Peg supported thermal insulation panel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nowobilski, Jeffert J. (Orchard Park, NY); Owens, William J. (Kenmore, NY)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal insulation panel which is lightweight, load bearing, accommodates thermal stress, and has excellent high temperature insulation capability comprising high performance insulation between thin metal walls supported by high density, high strength glass pegs made in compliance with specified conditions of time, temperature and pressure.

  17. Peg supported thermal insulation panel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nowobilski, J.J.; Owens, W.J.

    1985-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal insulation panel which is lightweight, load bearing, accommodates thermal stress, and has excellent high temperature insulation capability comprises high performance insulation between thin metal walls supported by high density, high strength glass pegs made in compliance with specified conditions of time, temperature and pressure. 2 figs.

  18. High voltage capability electrical coils insulated with materials containing SF.sub.6 gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lanoue, Thomas J. (Muncie, IN); Zeise, Clarence L. (Penn Township, Allegheny County, PA); Wagenaar, Loren (Muncie, IN); Westervelt, Dean C. (Acme, PA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A coil is made having a plurality of layers of adjacent metal conductor windings subject to voltage stress, where the windings have insulation therebetween containing a small number of minute disposed throughout its cross-section, where the voids are voids filled with SF.sub.6 gas to substitute for air or other gaseous materials in from about 60% to about 95% of the cross-sectional void volume in the insulation, thus incorporating an amount of SF.sub.6 gas in the cross-section of the insulation effective to substantially increase corona inception voltages.

  19. A search model for topological insulators with high-throughput robustness descriptors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Kesong; Setyawan, Wahyu; Wang, Shidong; Nardelli, Marco B.; Curtarolo, Stephano

    2012-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Topological insulators (TI) are becoming one of the most studied classes of novel materials because of their great potential for applications ranging from spintronics to quantum computers. To fully integrate TI materials in electronic devices, high-quality epitaxial single-crystalline phases with sufficiently large bulk bandgaps are necessary. Current efforts have relied mostly on costly and time-consuming trial-and-error procedures. Here we show that by defining a reliable and accessible descriptor {cflx X}TI, which represents the topological robustness or feasibility of the candidate, and by searching the quantum materials repository aflowlib.org, we have automatically discovered 28 TIs (some of them already known) in five different symmetry families. These include peculiar ternary halides, Cs{l_brace}Sn,Pb,Ge{r_brace}{l_brace}Cl,Br,I{r_brace}{sub 3}, which could have been hardly anticipated without high-throughput means. Our search model, by relying on the significance of repositories in materials development, opens new avenues for the discovery of more TIs in different and unexplored classes of systems.

  20. Fourier analysis of conductive heat transfer for glazed roofing materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roslan, Nurhana Lyana; Bahaman, Nurfaradila; Almanan, Raja Noorliyana Raja; Ismail, Razidah [Faculty of Computer and Mathematical Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Zakaria, Nor Zaini [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    For low-rise buildings, roof is the most exposed surface to solar radiation. The main mode of heat transfer from outdoor via the roof is conduction. The rate of heat transfer and the thermal impact is dependent on the thermophysical properties of roofing materials. Thus, it is important to analyze the heat distribution for the various types of roofing materials. The objectives of this paper are to obtain the Fourier series for the conductive heat transfer for two types of glazed roofing materials, namely polycarbonate and polyfilled, and also to determine the relationship between the ambient temperature and the conductive heat transfer for these materials. Ambient and surface temperature data were collected from an empirical field investigation in the campus of Universiti Teknologi MARA Shah Alam. The roofing materials were installed on free-standing structures in natural ventilation. Since the temperature data are generally periodic, Fourier series and numerical harmonic analysis are applied. Based on the 24-point harmonic analysis, the eleventh order harmonics is found to generate an adequate Fourier series expansion for both glazed roofing materials. In addition, there exists a linear relationship between the ambient temperature and the conductive heat transfer for both glazed roofing materials. Based on the gradient of the graphs, lower heat transfer is indicated through polyfilled. Thus polyfilled would have a lower thermal impact compared to polycarbonate.

  1. Experimental Investigation on Thermal Properties of a Steel-jacketed Steam Heating Pipeline with Vacuum Insulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Na, W.; Zou, P.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Vacuum insulation panel [J]. Vacuum. v46,1995: 839?842 [4] R. E. COLLINS, T. M. SIMKO. Current status of the science and technology of vacuum glazing [J]. Solar Energy. V62, 1998(3):189?213 [5] Douglas M. Smith, Alok Maskar, Ulrich Boes. Aerogel...

  2. Key Elements of and Materials Performance Targets for Highly Insulating Window Frames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavsen, Arild; Grynning, Steinar; Arasteh, Dariush; Jelle, Bjorn Petter; Goudey, Howdy

    2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal performance of windows is important for energy efficient buildings. Windows typically account for about 30-50 percent of the transmission losses though the building envelope, even if their area fraction of the envelope is far less. The reason for this can be found by comparing the thermal transmittance (U-factor) of windows to the U-factor of their opaque counterparts (wall, roof and floor constructions). In well insulated buildings the U-factor of walls, roofs an floors can be between 0.1-0.2 W/(m2K). The best windows have U-values of about 0.7-1.0. It is therefore obvious that the U-factor of windows needs to be reduced, even though looking at the whole energy balance for windows (i.e. solar gains minus transmission losses) makes the picture more complex.In high performance windows the frame design and material use is of utmost importance, as the frame performance is usually the limiting factor for reducing the total window U-factor further. This paper describes simulation studies analyzing the effects on frame and edge-of-glass U-factors of different surface emissivities as well as frame material and spacer conductivities. The goal of this work is to define materials research targets for window frame components that will result in better frame thermal performance than is exhibited by the best products available on the market today.

  3. Evidence for a new excitation at the interface between a high-Tc superconductor and a topological insulator

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zareapour, Parisa; Xu, Zhijun; Hayat, Alex; Zhao, Shu Yang F.; Kreshchuk, Michael; Lee, Yong Kiat; Reijnders, Anjan A.; Jain, Achint; Liu, T. S.; Gu, G. D.; et al

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-temperature superconductors exhibit a wide variety of novel excitations. If contacted with a topological insulator, the lifting of spin rotation symmetry in the surface states can lead to the emergence of unconventional superconductivity and novel particles. In pursuit of this possibility, we fabricated high critical-temperature (Tc ~ 85 K) superconductor/topological insulator (Bi?Sr?CaCu?O???/Bi?Te?Se) junctions. Below 75 K, a zero-bias conductance peak (ZBCP) emerges in the differential conductance spectra of this junction. The magnitude of the ZBCP is suppressed at the same rate for magnetic fields applied parallel or perpendicular to the junction. Furthermore, it can still be observed and does notmore »split up to at least 8.5 T. The temperature and magnetic field dependence of the excitation we observe appears to fall outside the known paradigms for a ZBCP.« less

  4. Evidence for a new excitation at the interface between a high-Tc superconductor and a topological insulator

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zareapour, Parisa [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Xu, Zhijun [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hayat, Alex [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Zhao, Shu Yang F. [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Kreshchuk, Michael [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Lee, Yong Kiat [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Reijnders, Anjan A. [Montana Instruments, Bozeman, MT (United States); Jain, Achint [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Liu, T. S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); North Univ. of China (China); Gu, G. D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Jia, Shuang [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Cava, Robert J. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Burch, Kenneth S. [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA (United States)

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-temperature superconductors exhibit a wide variety of novel excitations. If contacted with a topological insulator, the lifting of spin rotation symmetry in the surface states can lead to the emergence of unconventional superconductivity and novel particles. In pursuit of this possibility, we fabricated high critical-temperature (Tc ~ 85 K) superconductor/topological insulator (Bi?Sr?CaCu?O???/Bi?Te?Se) junctions. Below 75 K, a zero-bias conductance peak (ZBCP) emerges in the differential conductance spectra of this junction. The magnitude of the ZBCP is suppressed at the same rate for magnetic fields applied parallel or perpendicular to the junction. Furthermore, it can still be observed and does not split up to at least 8.5 T. The temperature and magnetic field dependence of the excitation we observe appears to fall outside the known paradigms for a ZBCP.

  5. International Symposium on Daylighting Buildings (IEA SHC TASK 31) Integrating Automated Shading and Smart Glazings with Daylight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Symposium on Daylighting Buildings (IEA SHC TASK 31) Integrating Automated Shading and Smart Glazings with Daylight Controls Stephen Selkowitz Eleanor Lee Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Keywords: daylighting, controls, smart glazing, shading, field testing, IEA31 1. INTRODUCTION Most

  6. Durability of Polymeric Glazing Materials for Solar Applications: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorgensen, G.; Brunold, S.; Carlsson, B.; Heck, M.; Kohl, M.; Moller, K.

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The economic viability of solar collector systems for domestic hot water (DHW) generation is strongly linked to the cost of such systems. Installation and hardware costs must be reduced by 50% to allow significant market penetration[1]. An attractive approach to cost reduction is to replace glass and metal parts with less expensive, lighter-weight polymeric components. Weight reduction decreases the cost of shipping, handling, and installation. The use of polymeric materials also allows the benefits and cost savings associated with well established manufacturing processes, along with savings associated with improved fastening, reduced part count, and overall assembly refinements. A key challenge is to maintain adequate system performance and assure requisite durability for extended lifetimes. Results of preliminary and ongoing screening tests for a large number of candidate polymeric glazing materials are presented. Based on these results, two specific glazings are selected to demonstrate how a service lifetime methodology can be applied to accurately predict the optical performance of these materials during in-service use.

  7. Thermal Insulation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, T. F.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal insulation systems are receiving a high degree of attention in view of increasing energy cost. Industrial, commercial and residential energy users are all well aware of energy cost increases and great emphasis is being directed to energy...

  8. Vacuum insulation of the high energy negative ion source for fusion application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kojima, A.; Hanada, M.; Inoue, T.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, M.; Kashiwagi, M.; Umeda, N.; Tobari, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Hilmi, A.; Kobayashi, S.; Yamano, Y. [Saitama University, Saitama, Saitama-ken, 338-8570 (Japan); Grisham, L. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Vacuum insulation on a large size negative ion accelerator with multiple extraction apertures and acceleration grids for fusion application was experimentally examined and designed. In the experiment, vacuum insulation characteristics were investigated in the JT-60 negative ion source with >1000 apertures on the grid with the surface area of {approx}2 m{sup 2}. The sustainable voltages varied with a square root of the gap lengths between the grids, and decreased with number of the apertures and with the surface area of the grids. Based on the obtained results, the JT-60SA (super advanced) negative ion source is designed to produce 22 A, 500 keV D{sup -} ion beams for 100 s.

  9. Method for minimizing contaminant particle effects in gas-insulated electrical apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pace, Marshall O. (Knoxville, TN); Adcock, James L. (Knoxville, TN); Christophorou, Loucas G. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrical breakdown of a gas insulator in high voltage apparatus is preved by placing an electrical insulative coating on contaminant particles in the gas insulator.

  10. Use of high temperature insulation for ceramic matrix composites in gas turbines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrison, Jay Alan (Orlando, FL); Merrill, Gary Brian (Pittsburgh, PA); Ludeman, Evan McNeil (New Boston, NH); Lane, Jay Edgar (Murrysville, PA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A ceramic composition for insulating components, made of ceramic matrix composites, of gas turbines is provided. The composition comprises a plurality of hollow oxide-based spheres of various dimensions, a phosphate binder, and at least one oxide filler powder, whereby the phosphate binder partially fills gaps between the spheres and the filler powders. The spheres are situated in the phosphate binder and the filler powders such that each sphere is in contact with at least one other sphere and the arrangement of spheres is such that the composition is dimensionally stable and chemically stable at a temperature of approximately 1600.degree. C. A stationary vane of a gas turbine comprising the composition of the present invention bonded to the outer surface of the vane is provided. A combustor comprising the composition bonded to the inner surface of the combustor is provided. A transition duct comprising the insulating coating bonded to the inner surface of the transition is provided. Because of abradable properties of the composition, a gas turbine blade tip seal comprising the composition also is provided. The composition is bonded to the inside surface of a shroud so that a blade tip carves grooves in the composition so as to create a customized seal for the turbine blade tip.

  11. Cooper Pairs in Insulators?!

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    James Valles

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Nearly 50 years elapsed between the discovery of superconductivity and the emergence of the microscopic theory describing this zero resistance state. The explanation required a novel phase of matter in which conduction electrons joined in weakly bound pairs and condensed with other pairs into a single quantum state. Surprisingly, this Cooper pair formation has also been invoked to account for recently uncovered high-resistance or insulating phases of matter. To address this possibility, we have used nanotechnology to create an insulating system that we can probe directly for Cooper pairs. I will present the evidence that Cooper pairs exist and dominate the electrical transport in these insulators and I will discuss how these findings provide new insight into superconductor to insulator quantum phase transitions. 

  12. Recovery Act: Electrochromic Glazing Technology: Improved Performance, Lower Price

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burdis, Mark; Sbar, Neil

    2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The growing dependency of the US on energy imports and anticipated further increases in energy prices reinforce the concerns about meeting the energy demand in the future and one element of a secure energy future is conservation. It is estimated that the buildings sector represents 40% of the US's total energy consumption. And buildings produce as much as one third of the greenhouse gas emissions primarily through fossil fuel usage during their operational phase. A significant fraction of this energy usage is simply due to inefficient window technology. Electrochromic (EC) windows allow electronic control of their optical properties so that the transparency to light can be adjusted from clear to dark. This ability to control the amount of solar energy allowed into the building can be advantageously used to minimize lighting, heating and air conditioning costs. Currently, the penetration of EC windows into the marketplace is extremely small, and consequently there is a huge opportunity for energy savings if this market can be expanded. In order to increase the potential energy savings it is necessary to increase the quantity of EC windows in operation. Additionally, any incremental improvement in the energy performance of each window will add to the potential energy savings. The overall goals of this project were therefore to improve the energy performance and lower the cost of dynamic (EC) smart windows for residential and commercial building applications. This project is obviously of benefit to the public by addressing two major areas: lowering the cost and improving the energy performance of EC glazings. The high level goals for these activities were: (i) to improve the range between the clear and the tinted state, (ii) reduce the price of EC windows by utilizing lower cost materials, (iii) lowering the U-Value1 SAGE Electrochromics Inc. is the only company in the US which has a track record of producing EC windows, and presently has a small operational factory in Faribault MN which is shipping products throughout the world. There is a much larger factory currently under construction close by. This project was targeted specifically to address the issues outlined above, with a view to implementation on the new high volume manufacturing facility. Each of the Tasks which were addressed in this project is relatively straightforward to implement in this new facility and so the benefits of the work will be realized quickly. , and (iv) ensure the proposed changes have no detrimental effect to the proven durability of the window. The research described here has helped to understand and provide solutions to several interesting and previously unresolved issues of the technology as well as make progress in areas which will have a significant impact on energy saving. In particular several materials improvements have been made, and tasks related to throughput and yield improvements have been completed. All of this has been accomplished without any detrimental effect on the proven durability of the SageGlass EC device. The project was divided into four main areas: 1. Improvement of the Properties of the EC device by material enhancements (Task 2); 2. Reduce the cost of production by improving the efficiency and yields of some key manufacturing processes (Task 3); 3. Further reduce the cost by significant modifications to the structure of the device (Task 4); 4. Ensure the durability of the EC device is not affected by any of the changes resulting from these activities (Task 5). A detailed description of the activities carried out in these areas is given in the following report, along with the aims and goals of the work. We will see that we have completed Tasks 2 and 3 fully, and the durability of the resulting device structure has been unaffected. Some of Task 4 was not carried out because of difficulties with integrating the installation of the required targets into the production coater due to external constraints not related to this project. We will also see that the durability of the devices produced as a result of this work was

  13. Chemical vapour deposition of thermochromic vanadium dioxide thin films for energy efficient glazing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warwick, Michael E.A. [Department of Chemistry, University College London, Christopher Ingold Laboratories, 20 Gordon Street, London, WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); UCL Energy Institute, Central House, 14 Upper Woburn Place, London, WC1H 0NN (United Kingdom); Binions, Russell, E-mail: r.binions@qmul.ac.uk [School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London, E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vanadium dioxide is a thermochromic material that undergoes a semiconductor to metal transitions at a critical temperature of 68 °C. This phase change from a low temperature monoclinic structure to a higher temperature rutile structure is accompanied by a marked change in infrared reflectivity and change in resistivity. This ability to have a temperature-modulated film that can limit solar heat gain makes vanadium dioxide an ideal candidate for thermochromic energy efficient glazing. In this review we detail the current challenges to such glazing becoming a commercial reality and describe the key chemical vapour deposition technologies being employed in the latest research. - Graphical abstract: Schematic demonstration of the effect of thermochromic glazing on solar radiation (red arrow represents IR radiation, black arrow represents all other solar radiation). - Highlights: • Vanadium dioxide thin films for energy efficient glazing. • Reviews chemical vapour deposition techniques. • Latest results for thin film deposition for vanadium dioxide.

  14. Insulator damage endangers public, power reliability; ratepayers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for tips about multiple incidents of insulators damaged by firearms on its high-voltage power line near Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Tacoma, Wash. Damaged insulators can put...

  15. High aspect ratio iridescent three-dimensional metal–insulator–metal capacitors using atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burke, Micheal, E-mail: micheal.burke@tyndall.ie; Blake, Alan; Djara, Vladimir; O'Connell, Dan; Povey, Ian M.; Cherkaoui, Karim; Monaghan, Scott; Scully, Jim; Murphy, Richard; Hurley, Paul K.; Pemble, Martyn E.; Quinn, Aidan J., E-mail: aidan.quinn@tyndall.ie [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors report on the structural and electrical properties of TiN/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiN metal–insulator–metal (MIM) capacitor structures in submicron three-dimensional (3D) trench geometries with an aspect ratio of ?30. A simplified process route was employed where the three layers for the MIM stack were deposited using atomic layer deposition (ALD) in a single run at a process temperature of 250?°C. The TiN top and bottom electrodes were deposited via plasma-enhanced ALD using a tetrakis(dimethylamino)titanium precursor. 3D trench devices yielded capacitance densities of 36 fF/?m{sup 2} and quality factors >65 at low frequency (200?Hz), with low leakage current densities (<3 nA/cm{sup 2} at 1 V). These devices also show strong optical iridescence which, when combined with the covert embedded capacitance, show potential for system in package (SiP) anticounterfeiting applications.

  16. Superconducting Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Superconducting Topological Insulators Superconducting Topological Insulators Print Wednesday, 26 January 2011 00:00 Three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs), discovered...

  17. Simulation of complex glazing products; from optical data measurements to model based predictive controls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohler, Christian

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Complex glazing systems such as venetian blinds, fritted glass and woven shades require more detailed optical and thermal input data for their components than specular non light-redirecting glazing systems. Various methods for measuring these data sets are described in this paper. These data sets are used in multiple simulation tools to model the thermal and optical properties of complex glazing systems. The output from these tools can be used to generate simplified rating values or as an input to other simulation tools such as whole building annual energy programs, or lighting analysis tools. I also describe some of the challenges of creating a rating system for these products and which factors affect this rating. A potential future direction of simulation and building operations is model based predictive controls, where detailed computer models are run in real-time, receiving data for an actual building and providing control input to building elements such as shades.

  18. Thermal properties of granular silica aerogel for high-performance insulation systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neugebauer, Adam (Adam Halbert)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on mounting evidence in support of anthropogenic global climate change, there is an urgency for developments in high-performance building techniques and technologies. New construction projects provide substantial ...

  19. A cost and benefit analysis of future end-of-life vehicle glazing recycling in France: a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and aluminum, and not minor wastes such as glazing (Gerrard and Kandlikar 2007). The new recycling target (95 and polluted with organic material. The treatment and recycling of glass does however become difficult1 A cost and benefit analysis of future end-of- life vehicle glazing recycling in France

  20. Dielectric-wall linear accelerator with a high voltage fast rise time switch that includes a pair of electrodes between which are laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caporaso, G.J.; Sampayan, S.E.; Kirbie, H.C.

    1998-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A dielectric-wall linear accelerator is improved by a high-voltage, fast rise-time switch that includes a pair of electrodes between which are laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators. A high voltage is placed between the electrodes sufficient to stress the voltage breakdown of the insulator on command. A light trigger, such as a laser, is focused along at least one line along the edge surface of the laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators extending between the electrodes. The laser is energized to initiate a surface breakdown by a fluence of photons, thus causing the electrical switch to close very promptly. Such insulators and lasers are incorporated in a dielectric wall linear accelerator with Blumlein modules, and phasing is controlled by adjusting the length of fiber optic cables that carry the laser light to the insulator surface. 12 figs.

  1. The optimal thermo-optical properties and energy saving potential of adaptive glazing technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Favoino, Fabio; Overend, Mauro; Jin, Quian

    2015-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    is plotted in Fig. 2 by a black dashed line. 142 143 Fig 2. Tvis and g-value of smart glazing technologies compared to commercially available static DGUs. 144 3. The ideal adaptive glazed façade 145 An ideal adaptive façade can be defined as a façade... are identified. Of these one of the most important 24 findings is that a unique optimized technology, varying its thermo-optical properties between a limited number 25 of states could be effective in different climates and orientations. 26 Keywords: smart...

  2. Evidence for a new excitation at the interface between a high-Tc superconductor and a topological insulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zareapour, Parisa [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Xu, Zhijun [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hayat, Alex [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Zhao, Shu Yang F. [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Kreshchuk, Michael [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Lee, Yong Kiat [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Reijnders, Anjan A. [Montana Instruments, Bozeman, MT (United States); Jain, Achint [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Liu, T. S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); North Univ. of China (China); Gu, G. D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Jia, Shuang [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Cava, Robert J. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Burch, Kenneth S. [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA (United States)

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-temperature superconductors exhibit a wide variety of novel excitations. If contacted with a topological insulator, the lifting of spin rotation symmetry in the surface states can lead to the emergence of unconventional superconductivity and novel particles. In pursuit of this possibility, we fabricated high critical-temperature (Tc ~ 85 K) superconductor/topological insulator (Bi?Sr?CaCu?O???/Bi?Te?Se) junctions. Below 75 K, a zero-bias conductance peak (ZBCP) emerges in the differential conductance spectra of this junction. The magnitude of the ZBCP is suppressed at the same rate for magnetic fields applied parallel or perpendicular to the junction. Furthermore, it can still be observed and does not split up to at least 8.5 T. The temperature and magnetic field dependence of the excitation we observe appears to fall outside the known paradigms for a ZBCP.

  3. Strained-Si-on-Insulator (SSOI) and SiGe-on-Insulator (SGOI): Fabrication Obstacles and Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strained-Si-on-Insulator (SSOI) and SiGe-on-Insulator (SGOI): Fabrication Obstacles and Solutions-Si and SiGe-on-insulator were fabricated, combining both the benefits of high-mobility strained-Si and SOI) to oxidized handle wafers. Layer transfer onto insulating handle wafers can be accomplished using grind

  4. High-pressure dielectric-strength tests on PPP (PPLP) insulation. Final report. [Paper-polypropylene film-paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hata, R.; Hirose, M.; Nagai, T.

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project were to establish the effects of fluid pressure on the impulse and ac breakdown strengths of PPP (PPLP) (paper-polypropylene film-paper) insulation. Two thicknesses of PPP (PPLP), which was developed jointly by Sumitomo Electric Industries, Ltd. and Tomoegawa Paper Co., Ltd. and produced by the latter company, were tested with dodecylebenzene (DDB) of the alkylbenzene family as dielectric fluid. Appropriate flat/model cells as employed for previous breakdown tests on paper-oil insulation were used, suitable for test pressures up to 20 kg/cm/sup 2/ abs. (2.0 MN/m/sup 2/ or 284 psi). Impulse and ac breakdown tests were performed at a series of applied pressures, at room temperature and 90/sup 0/C. The results were analyzed and are presented in comparison with previously published data on paper-oil cable insulation.

  5. IEA-SHC Task 27: Environmental Performance Assessment of glazing and windows: context, overview, main concerns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IEA-SHC Task 27: Environmental Performance Assessment of glazing and windows: context, overview, environmental quality criteria will just widen the actual scope of the technical assessment of building products. The first question is a double one : Who will use environmental criteria related to the building products

  6. Finding best practices for automotive glazing recycling: a network optimization model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    : a network optimization model," Journal of Cleaner Production, vol. Xx, 2013 DOI : 10.1016/J.JCLEPRO.2013.02.022 hal-00796046,version1-1Mar2013 Author manuscript, published in "Journal of Cleaner Production (2013 for transport glazing from store s to treatment unit r Unit cost for treatment in unit r Production coefficient

  7. Topological insulators/Isolants topologiques An introduction to topological insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Topological insulators/Isolants topologiques An introduction to topological insulators Introduction topology, the insulator is called a topological insulator. We introduce this notion of topological order sont finalement discutées. Keywords: topological insulator, topological band theory, quantum anomalous

  8. Fully synthetic taped insulation cables

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsyth, Eric B. (Brookhaven, NY); Muller, Albert C. (Center Moriches, NY)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high voltage oil-impregnated electrical cable with fully polymer taped insulation operable to 765 kV. Biaxially oriented, specially processed, polyethylene, polybutene or polypropylene tape with an embossed pattern is wound in multiple layers over a conductive core with a permeable screen around the insulation. Conventional oil which closely matches the dielectric constant of the tape is used, and the cable can be impregnated after field installation because of its excellent impregnation characteristics.

  9. Gas filled panel insulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griffith, B.T.; Arasteh, D.K.; Selkowitz, S.E.

    1993-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A structural or flexible highly insulative panel which may be translucent, is formed from multi-layer polymeric material in the form of an envelope surrounding a baffle. The baffle is designed so as to minimize heat transfer across the panel, by using material which forms substantially closed spaces to suppress convection of the low conductivity gas fill. At least a portion of the baffle carries a low emissivity surface for suppression of infrared radiation. 18 figures.

  10. Enhancement of Topological Insulators Surface Conduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Xinxin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Enhancement of Topological Insulators Surface Conduction AEnhancement of Topological Insulators Surface Conduction byTopological Insulator

  11. The use of coated micropowders to reduce radiation heat transfer in foam insulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marge, Arlene Lanciani

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polyurethane foam is the most effective insulation currently available for buildings. Chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) blowing agents, which have low thermal conductivities, contribute highly to the effectiveness of this insulation. ...

  12. Exploring the possibility of low temperature glazing in faience from the Djoser Step Pyramid through compositional analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whisenant, Lawrence A

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Egyptian faience, a glazed, non-clay based ceramic material, is found throughout Egypt in a time range pre-dating the Predynastic Period (5500 - 3100 BCE) and extending well beyond the Roman Period (30 BCE - 641 CE). One ...

  13. Multiple density layered insulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alger, Terry W. (Tracy, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple density layered insulator for use with a laser is disclosed wh provides at least two different insulation materials for a laser discharge tube, where the two insulation materials have different thermoconductivities. The multiple layer insulation materials provide for improved thermoconductivity capability for improved laser operation.

  14. Multiple density layered insulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alger, T.W.

    1994-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple density layered insulator for use with a laser is disclosed which provides at least two different insulation materials for a laser discharge tube, where the two insulation materials have different thermoconductivities. The multiple layer insulation materials provide for improved thermoconductivity capability for improved laser operation. 4 figs.

  15. Exposure of Polymeric Glazing Materials Using NREL's Ultra-Accelerated Weathering System (UAWS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bingham, C.; Jorgensen, G.; Wylie, A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL's Ultra-Accelerated Weathering System (UAWS) selectively reflects and concentrates natural sunlight ultraviolet irradiance below 475 nm onto exposed samples to provide accelerated weathering of materials while keeping samples within realistic temperature limits. This paper will explain the design and implementation of the UAWS which allow it to simulate the effect of years of weathering in weeks of exposure. Exposure chamber design and instrumentation will be discussed for both a prototype UAWS used to test glazing samples as well as a commercial version of UAWS. Candidate polymeric glazing materials have been subjected to accelerated exposure testing at a light intensity level of up to 50 UV suns for an equivalent outdoor exposure in Miami, FL exceeding 15 years. Samples include an impact modified acrylic, fiberglass, and polycarbonate having several thin UV-screening coatings. Concurrent exposure is carried out for identical sample sets at two different temperatures to allow thermal effects to be quantified along with resistance to UV.

  16. Sierra Designs 20 degrees F Wild Bill Climashield Sleeping Bag ClimashieldTM HL, a high-loft continuous filament insulation, offers excellent thermal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    -loft continuous filament insulation, offers excellent thermal efficiency, durability and water resistance Chest to create a pillow; no need for a pillow to take up valuable space in your backpack Insulated draft tube

  17. The significance of bolts in the thermal performance of curtain-wall frames for glazed facades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, B.; Finlayson, E.; Yazdanian, M.; Arasteh, D.K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Curtain walls are assemblies of glazings and metal frames that commonly form the exterior glass facades of commercial buildings. Evaluating the thermal performance of the bolts that hold curtain wall glazings in place is necessary to accurately rate the overall thermal performance of curtain walls. Using laboratory tests and computer simulations, the authors assessed the thermal performance of several different configurations of bolts and glazings. Curtain-wall samples were tested at an infrared thermography laboratory. Experimental results were compared to two-dimensional simulations approximating the thermal effect of the bolts using the parallel path and the isothermal planes calculation methods. It is concluded that stainless steel bolts minimally affect curtain-wall thermal performance ({approximately}18%) when spaced at least 230 mm apart, which is the industry standard. Performance is increasingly compromised when there is less than 230 mm between bolts or when steel bolts are used. The authors also show that the isothermal planes method of approximating curtain wall thermal performance can be used with two-dimensional heat transfer software typical of that used in the window industry to give conservative results for the thermal bridging effect caused by bolts.

  18. INCREASING YIELDS AND BROADENING MARKETS: PROCESS INNOVATIONS IN THE MANUFACTURING OF ENERGY-SAVING WINDOW GLAZINGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Burdis; Neil Sbar

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project was to develop and implement advanced thin film process technology which would significantly improve the manufacturability of both static and dynamic high performance energy saving coatings for windows. The work done has been aimed at improvements to the process that will result in increases in yield, and this was divided into four main areas, dealing with improvements in substrate preparation methods, reductions in the incidence of problems caused by particulate contamination, use of in-situ optical monitoring to improve process control, and overall system integration to enable simplified, and therefore lower cost operation. Significant progress has been made in each of the areas. In the area of substrate preparation, the enhanced washing techniques which have been developed, in combination with a new inspection technique, have resulted in significant reductions in the number of EC devices which are rejected because of substrate problems. Microscopic inspection of different defects in electrochromic devices showed that many were centered on particles. As a result, process improvements aimed at reducing the incidence of particles throughout the entire process have been implemented. As a result, the average number of defects occurring per unit area has been significantly reduced over the period of this project. The in-situ monitoring techniques developed during this project have become an indispensable part of the processing for EC devices. The deposition of several key layers is controlled as a result of in-situ monitoring, and this has facilitated significant improvements in uniformity and repeatability. Overall system integration has progressed to the stage where the goal of a closed-loop monitoring and control system in within reach, and it is anticipated that this will be achieved during the scale-up phase. There has been a clear increase in the yield occurring over the period of this project (Sept 1999 to September 2003), which is attributable to a range of process improvements implemented as a result of this work. It is anticipated that the yield will increase further as a result of these ongoing programs. The manufacturability of these advanced glazing systems has also been significantly improved, by a variety of different measures such as in-situ monitoring, system integration, and measurements taken to reduce the incidence of defects caused by contamination. It is therefore anticipated that the transfer of this performance to the new coating equipment to be introduced during scale-up to the first manufacturing plant will be reasonably straightforward.

  19. ITER Central Solenoid Coil Insulation Qualification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martovetsky, Nicolai N [ORNL] [ORNL; Mann Jr, Thomas Latta [ORNL] [ORNL; Miller, John L [ORNL] [ORNL; Freudenberg, Kevin D [ORNL] [ORNL; Reed, Richard P [Cryogenic Materials, Inc.] [Cryogenic Materials, Inc.; Walsh, Robert P [Florida State University] [Florida State University; McColskey, J D [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder] [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder; Evans, D [Advanced Cryogenic Materials] [Advanced Cryogenic Materials

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An insulation system for ITER Central Solenoid must have sufficiently high electrical and structural strength. Design efforts to bring stresses in the turn and layer insulation within allowables failed. It turned out to be impossible to eliminate high local tensile stresses in the winding pack. When high local stresses can not be designed out, the qualification procedure requires verification of the acceptable structural and electrical strength by testing. We built two 4x4 arrays of the conductor jacket with two options of the CS insulation and subjected the arrays to 1.2 million compressive cycles at 60 MPa and at 76 K. Such conditions simulated stresses in the CS insulation. We performed voltage withstand tests and after end of cycling we measured the breakdown voltages between in the arrays. After that we dissectioned the arrays and studied micro cracks in the insulation. We report details of the specimens preparation, test procedures and test results.

  20. ITER CENTRAL SOLENOID COIL INSULATION QUALIFICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martovetsky, N N; Mann, T L; Miller, J R; Freudenberg, K D; Reed, R P; Walsh, R P; McColskey, J D; Evans, D

    2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An insulation system for ITER Central Solenoid must have sufficiently high electrical and structural strength. Design efforts to bring stresses in the turn and layer insulation within allowables failed. It turned out to be impossible to eliminate high local tensile stresses in the winding pack. When high local stresses can not be designed out, the qualification procedure requires verification of the acceptable structural and electrical strength by testing. We built two 4 x 4 arrays of the conductor jacket with two options of the CS insulation and subjected the arrays to 1.2 million compressive cycles at 60 MPa and at 76 K. Such conditions simulated stresses in the CS insulation. We performed voltage withstand tests and after end of cycling we measured the breakdown voltages between in the arrays. After that we dissectioned the arrays and studied micro cracks in the insulation. We report details of the specimens preparation, test procedures and test results.

  1. Inner surface flash-over of insulator of low-inductance high-voltage self-breakdown gas switch and its application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Hong-bo, E-mail: walkman67@163.com; Liu, Jin-liang [College of Opto-electronic Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, Hunan 410073 (China)] [College of Opto-electronic Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, Hunan 410073 (China)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the inner surface flash-over of high-voltage self-breakdown switch, which is used as a main switch of pulse modulator, is analyzed in theory by employing the method of distributed element equivalent circuit. Moreover, the field distortion of the switch is simulated by using software. The results of theoretical analysis and simulation by software show that the inner surface flash-over usually starts at the junction points among the stainless steel, insulator, and insulation gas in the switch. A switch with improved structure is designed and fabricated according to the theoretical analysis and simulation results. Several methods to avoid inner surface flash-over are used to improve the structure of switch. In experiment, the inductance of the switch is no more than 100 nH, the working voltage of the switch is about 600 kV, and the output voltage and current of the accelerator is about 500 kV and 50 kA, respectively. And the zero-to-peak rise time of output voltage at matched load is less than 30 ns due to the small inductance of switch. The original switch was broken-down after dozens of experiments, and the improved switch has been worked more than 200 times stably.

  2. Membranes Improve Insulation Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bullock, C. A.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    No Clear White Alum Temp Mem Mem Mem Foil FIGURE 7 Temperature Inside Room and Temperature Next to Top of Sheetrock Under Various insulation Configurations. It should be noted that after this test was completed, the fiber insulation was inspected...

  3. Insulating polymer concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schorr, H. Peter (Douglaston, NY); Fontana, Jack J. (Shirley, NY); Steinberg, Meyer (Melville, NY)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A lightweight insulating polymer concrete formed from a lightweight closed cell aggregate and a water resistance polymeric binder.

  4. Vacuum insulation tandem accelerator for B. Bayanov1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taskaev, Sergey Yur'evich

    273 Vacuum insulation tandem accelerator for NCT B. Bayanov1 , Yu. Belchenko1 , V. Belov1 , G of high current hydrogen negative ions by special geometry of potential electrodes with vacuum insulation. Fig. 1 shows the construction of vacuum insulation tandem accelerator developed at BINP, as a base

  5. Topological Insulators & Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Topological Insulators & Superconductors New Frontiers in Low-Dimensional Systems Program 3-5 November 2010 Jadwin Hall, Fourth Floor, Room 407 Topological Insulators and Superconductors have quickly Insulators and Superconductors will gather the world- leading researchers in this field to present recent

  6. Process for making ceramic insulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Akash, Akash (Salt Lake City, UT); Balakrishnan, G. Nair (Sandy, UT)

    2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is provided for producing insulation materials and insulation for high temperature applications using novel castable and powder-based ceramics. The ceramic components produced using the proposed process offers (i) a fine porosity (from nano-to micro scale); (ii) a superior strength-to-weight ratio; and (iii) flexibility in designing multilayered features offering multifunctionality which will increase the service lifetime of insulation and refractory components used in the solid oxide fuel cell, direct carbon fuel cell, furnace, metal melting, glass, chemical, paper/pulp, automobile, industrial heating, coal, and power generation industries. Further, the ceramic components made using this method may have net-shape and/or net-size advantages with minimum post machining requirements.

  7. Thermal performance analysis of an electrochromic vacuum glazing with low emittance coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Yueping; Hyde, Trevor; Hewitt, Neil [Centre for Sustainable Technologies, School of the Built Environment, University of Ulster, Newtownabbey, BT37 0QB N. Ireland (United Kingdom); Eames, Philip C. [Centre for Research in Renewable Energy Science and Technology, University of Loughborough (United Kingdom); Norton, Brian [Dublin Energy Lab, Dublin Institute of Technology, Aungier Street, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal performance of an electrochromic (EC) vacuum glazing (VG) was modelled under ASTM standard winter conditions. The EC VG comprised three 0.5 m by 0.5 m glass panes with a 0.12 mm wide evacuated space between two 4 mm thick panes sealed contiguously by a 6 mm wide indium based edge seal with either one or two low-emittance (low-e) coatings supported by a 0.32 mm diameter square pillar grid spaced at 25 mm. The third glass pane on which the 0.1 mm thick EC layer was deposited was sealed to the evacuated glass unit. The whole unit was rebated by 10 mm within a solid wood frame. The low-e coating absorbed 10% of solar energy incident on it. With the EC VG installed with the EC component facing the outdoor environment, for an incident solar radiation of 300 W m{sup -2}, simulations demonstrated that when the EC layer is opaque for winter conditions, the temperature of the inside glass pane is higher than the indoor air temperature, due to solar radiation absorbed by the low-e coatings and the EC layer, the EC VG is a heat source with heat transferred from the glazing to the interior environment. When the emittance was lower to 0.02, the outdoor and indoor glass pane temperatures of the glazing with single and two low-e coatings are very close to each other. For an insolation of 1000 W m{sup -2}, the outdoor glass pane temperature exceeds the indoor glass pane temperature, consequentially the outdoor glass pane transfers heat to the indoor glass pane. (author)

  8. High performance organic field-effect transistors with ultra-thin HfO{sub 2} gate insulator deposited directly onto the organic semiconductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ono, S., E-mail: shimpei@criepi.denken.or.jp [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan); Häusermann, R. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan) [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan); Laboratory for Solid State Physics, ETH Zurich, Zurich 8093 (Switzerland); Chiba, D. [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan) [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 4-1-8 Honcho Kawaguchi, Saitama 322-0012 (Japan); Department of Applied Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Shimamura, K.; Ono, T. [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)] [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Batlogg, B. [Laboratory for Solid State Physics, ETH Zurich, Zurich 8093 (Switzerland)] [Laboratory for Solid State Physics, ETH Zurich, Zurich 8093 (Switzerland)

    2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We have produced stable organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) with an ultra-thin HfO{sub 2} gate insulator deposited directly on top of rubrene single crystals by atomic layer deposition (ALD). We find that ALD is a gentle deposition process to grow thin films without damaging rubrene single crystals, as results these devices have a negligibly small threshold voltage and are very stable against gate-bias-stress, and the mobility exceeds 1 cm{sup 2}/V s. Moreover, the devices show very little degradation even when kept in air for more than 2 months. These results demonstrate thin HfO{sub 2} layers deposited by ALD to be well suited as high capacitance gate dielectrics in OFETs operating at small gate voltage. In addition, the dielectric layer acts as an effective passivation layer to protect the organic semiconductor.

  9. Highly strain-relaxed ultrathin SiGe-on-insulator structure by Ge condensation process combined with H{sup +} irradiation and postannealing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyao, Masanobu; Tanaka, Masanori; Tsunoda, Isao; Sadoh, Taizoh; Enokida, Toyotsugu; Hagino, Hiroyasu; Ninomiya, Masaharu; Nakamae, Masahiko [Department of Electronics, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Analysis and Evaluation Center, Fukuryo Semicon Engineering Corporation, 1-1-1 Imajuku-Higashi, Fukuoka 819-0192 (Japan); SUMCO Corporation, 314 Nishisangao, Noda, Chiba 278-0015 (Japan); SUMCO Corporation, 2201 Oaza Kamioda, Kohoku-cho, Kishima-gun, Saga 849-0597 (Japan)

    2006-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Strain-relaxation process of SiGe-on-insulator (SGOI) structures in the oxidation induced Ge condensation method has been investigated as a function of the SiGe thickness. Complete relaxation was obtained for thick SGOI layers (>100 nm). However, the relaxation rates abruptly decreased with decreasing SiGe thickness below 50 nm, i.e., the relaxation rate of 30% at 30 nm SiGe thickness. In order to improve this phenomenon, a method combined with H{sup +} irradiation with a medium dose (5x10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}) and postannealing (1200 deg. C) has been developed. This successfully achieved the high relaxation rate (70%) in the ultrathin SGOI (30 nm)

  10. Insulated laser tube structure and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dittbenner, Gerald R. (4353 Findlay Way, Livermore, CA 94550)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An insulated high temperature ceramic laser tube having substantially uniform insulation along the length of the tube is disclosed having particulate ceramic insulation positioned between the outer wall of the ceramic laser tube and the inner surface of tubular ceramic fiber insulation which surrounds the ceramic laser tube. The particulate ceramic insulation is preferably a ceramic capable of sintering to the outer surface of the ceramic laser tube and to the inner surface of the tubular ceramic fiber insulation. The addition of the particulate ceramic insulation to fill all the voids between the ceramic laser tube and the fibrous ceramic insulation permits the laser tube to be operated at a substantially uniform temperature throughout the length of the laser tube.

  11. Vacuum Insulator Development for the Dielectric Wall Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, J R; Blackfield, D; Caporaso, G J; Chen, Y; Hawkins, S; Kendig, M; Poole, B; Sanders, D M; Krogh, M; Managan, J E

    2008-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we are developing a new type of accelerator, known as a Dielectric Wall Accelerator, in which compact pulse forming lines directly apply an accelerating field to the beam through an insulating vacuum boundary. The electrical strength of this insulator may define the maximum gradient achievable in these machines. To increase the system gradient, we are using 'High Gradient Insulators' composed of alternating layers of dielectric and metal for the vacuum insulator. In this paper, we present our recent results from experiment and simulation, including the first test of a High Gradient Insulator in a functioning Dielectric Wall Accelerator cell.

  12. KSI's Cross Insulated Core Transformer Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uhmeyer, Uwe [Kaiser Systems, Inc, 126 Sohier Road, Beverly, MA 01915 (United States)

    2009-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Cross Insulated Core Transformer (CCT) technology improves on Insulated Core Transformer (ICT) implementations. ICT systems are widely used in very high voltage, high power, power supply systems. In an ICT transformer ferrite core sections are insulated from their neighboring ferrite cores. Flux leakage is present at each of these insulated gaps. The flux loss is raised to the power of stages in the ICT design causing output voltage efficiency to taper off with increasing stages. KSI's CCT technology utilizes a patented technique to compensate the flux loss at each stage of an ICT system. Design equations to calculate the flux compensation capacitor value are presented. CCT provides corona free operation of the HV stack. KSI's CCT based High Voltage power supply systems offer high efficiency operation, high frequency switching, low stored energy and smaller size over comparable ICT systems.

  13. Technology Advancements to Lower Costs of Electrochromic Window Glazing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Burdis; Neil Sbar

    2008-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An Electrochromic (EC) Window is a solar control device that can electronically regulate the flow of sunlight and heat. In the case of the SageGlass{reg_sign} EC window, this property derives from a proprietary all-ceramic, intrinsically durable thin-film stack applied to an inner surface of a glass double-pane window. As solar irradiation and temperatures change, the window can be set to an appropriate level of tint to optimize the comfort and productivity of the occupants as well as to minimize building energy usage as a result of HVAC and lighting optimization. The primary goal of this project is to replace certain batch processes for EC thin film deposition resulting in a complete in-line vacuum process that will reduce future capital and labor coats, while increasing throughput and yields. This will require key technology developments to replace the offline processes. This project has enabled development of the next generation of electrochromic devices suitable for large-scale production. Specifically, the requirements to produce large area devices cost effectively require processes amenable to mass production, using a variety of different substrate materials, having minimal handling and capable of being run at high yield. The present SageGlass{reg_sign} production process consists of two vacuum steps separated by an atmospheric process. This means that the glass goes through several additional handling steps, including venting and pumping down to go from vacuum to atmosphere and back, which can only serve to introduce additional defects associated with such processes. The aim of this project therefore was to develop a process which would eliminate the need for the atmospheric process. The overall project was divided into several logical tasks which would result in a process ready to be implemented in the present SAGE facility. Tasks 2 and 3 were devoted to development and the optimization of a new thin film material process. These tasks are more complicated than would be expected, as it has been determined in the past that there are a number of interactions between the new material and the layers beneath, which have an important effect on the behavior of the device. The effects of these interactions needed to be understood in order for this task to be successful. Tasks 4 and 5 were devoted to production of devices using the novel technology developed in the previous tasks. In addition, characterization tests were required to ensure the devices would perform adequately as replacements for the existing technology. Each of these tasks has been achieved successfully. In task 2, a series of potential materials were surveyed, and ranked in order of desirability. Prototype device structures were produced and characterized in order to do this. This satisfied the requirements for Task 2. From the results of this relatively extensive survey, the number of candidate materials was reduced to one or two. Small devices were made in order to test the functionality of such samples, and a series of optimization experiments were carried out with encouraging results. Devices were fabricated, and some room temperature cycling carried out showing that there are no fundamental problems with this technology. This series of achievements satisfied the requirements for Tasks 3 and 4. The results obtained from Task 3 naturally led to scale-up of the process, so a large cathode was obtained and installed in a spare slot in the production coater, and a series of large devices fabricated. In particular, devices with dimensions of 60-inch x 34-inch were produced, using processes which are fully compatible with mass production. Testing followed, satisfying the requirements for Task 5. As can be seen from this discussion, all the requirements of the project have therefore been successfully achieved. The devices produced using the newly developed technology showed excellent optical properties, often exceeding the performance of the existing technology, equivalent durability results, and promise a significantly simplified manufacturing approach, the

  14. Irradiation requirements of Nb3Sn based SC magnets electrical insulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Irradiation requirements of Nb3Sn based SC magnets electrical insulation developed within the Eu electrical insulation candidates · EuCARD insulators certification conditions · Post irradiation tests and neutrino factories will be subjected to very high radiation doses. · The electrical insulation employed

  15. A Simple Holographic Insulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric Mefford; Gary T. Horowitz

    2014-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a simple holographic model of an insulator. Unlike most previous holographic insulators, the zero temperature infrared geometry is completely nonsingular. Both the low temperature DC conductivity and the optical conductivity at zero temperature satisfy power laws with the same exponent, given by the scaling dimension of an operator in the IR. Changing a parameter in the model converts it from an insulator to a conductor with a standard Drude peak.

  16. Pipe Insulation Economies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schilling, R. E.

    PIPE INSULATION ECONOMIES Robert E. Schilling, P.E. Eaton Corporation Aurora, Ohio ABSTRACT Pipe Insulation Economies is a computer pro gram written in IBM basic to simplify the economic insulation thickness for an insulated pipe. Many... ECONOMIES" 30 LOCATE 10,29:PRINT"ROBERT E. SCHILLING,P.E." 40 LOCATE l2,3l:PRINT"EATON CORPORATION" 50 LOCATE l3,26:PRINT"119 Q SOUTH CHILLICOTHE ROAD" 598 ESL-IE-86-06-97 Proceedings from the Eighth Annual Industrial Energy Technology Conference...

  17. Load responsive multilayer insulation performance testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dye, S.; Kopelove, A. [Quest Thermal Group, 6452 Fig Street Suite A, Arvada, CO 80004 (United States); Mills, G. L. [Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corp, 1600 Commerce Street, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Cryogenic insulation designed to operate at various pressures from one atmosphere to vacuum, with high thermal performance and light weight, is needed for cryogenically fueled space launch vehicles and aircraft. Multilayer insulation (MLI) performs well in a high vacuum, but the required vacuum shell for use in the atmosphere is heavy. Spray-on foam insulation (SOFI) is often used in these systems because of its light weight, but can have a higher heat flux than desired. We report on the continued development of Load Responsive Multilayer Insulation (LRMLI), an advanced thermal insulation system that uses dynamic beam discrete spacers that provide high thermal performance both in atmosphere and vacuum. LRMLI consists of layers of thermal radiation barriers separated and supported by micromolded polymer spacers. The spacers have low thermal conductance, and self-support a thin, lightweight vacuum shell that provides internal high vacuum in the insulation. The dynamic load responsive spacers compress to support the external load of a vacuum shell in one atmosphere, and decompress under reduced atmospheric pressure for lower heat leak. Structural load testing was performed on the spacers with various configurations. LRMLI was installed on a 400 liter tank and boil off testing with liquid nitrogen performed at various chamber pressures from one atmosphere to high vacuum. Testing was also performed with an MLI blanket on the outside of the LRMLI.

  18. A New Generation of Building Insulation by Foaming Polymer Blend...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    insulation technologies available on the market. Instead of hydroflurocarbon, it uses carbon dioxide as the blowing agent. This technology represents a highly valuable market...

  19. CALIFORNIA ENERGY Ceiling Insulation Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Ceiling Insulation Report: Effectiveness of Lay-In Ceiling Insulation Effectiveness of Lay-In Insulation (product 5.2.6) TECHNICALREPORT October 2003 500-03-082-A-14 Gray Davis

  20. Measure Guideline: Internal Insulation of Masonry Walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Straube, J. F.; Ueno, K.; Schumacher, C. J.

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This measure guideline provides recommendations for interior insulation assemblies that control interstitial condensation and durability risks; recommendations for acceptable thermal performance are also provided. An illustrated guide of high-risk exterior details (which concentrate bulk water), and recommended remediation details is provided. This is followed by a recommended methodology for risk assessment of a masonry interior insulation project: a series of steps are suggested to assess the risks associated with this retrofit, with greater certainty with added steps.

  1. Integrating advanced facades into high performance buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selkowitz, Stephen E.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that the emergence of smart glazings will ultimately fillswitchable coating. These “smart glazings” can change solarfor use in buildings. Smart glazings can be divided into two

  2. Highly tunable electron transport in epitaxial topological insulator (Bi{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x}){sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He Xiaoyue; Guan Tong; Wang Xiuxia; Feng Baojie; Cheng Peng; Chen Lan; Li Yongqing; Wu Kehui [Institute of Physics, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomically smooth, single crystalline (Bi{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x}){sub 2}Te{sub 3} films have been grown on SrTiO{sub 3}(111) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. A full range of Sb-Bi compositions have been studied in order to obtain the lowest possible bulk conductivity. For the samples with optimized Sb compositions (x=0.5{+-}0.1), the carrier type can be tuned from n-type to p-type across the whole thickness with the help of a back-gate. Linear magnetoresistance has been observed at gate voltages close to the maximum in the longitudinal resistance of a (Bi{sub 0.5}Sb{sub 0.5}){sub 2}Te{sub 3} sample. These highly tunable (Bi{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x}){sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin films provide an excellent platform to explore the intrinsic transport properties of the three-dimensional topological insulators.

  3. Cooper-Pair Injection into Topological Insulators and Helical Wires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sato, Koji

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Topological Insulator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .phenomena : Topological Insulators and Superconductors. ”Colloquium : Topological insulators. ” Rev. Mod. Phys. , 82:

  4. Application of Target Value Design to Energy Efficiency Investments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hyun Woo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar Heat Gain Coefficient Glazing Visible Transmittance Glazing Ratio Lighting HVAC Window Overhangs Wall Insulation/Mass Lighting Power Density

  5. Insulator for laser housing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duncan, David B. (Auburn, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a heat-resistant electrical insulator adapted for joining laser housing portions, which insulator comprises: an annulus; a channel in the annulus traversing the circumference and length of the housing; at least two ports, each communicating with the channel and an outer surface of the housing; and an attachment for securely attaching each end of the annulus to a laser housing member.

  6. Design Tool for Cryogenic Thermal Insulation Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demko, Jonathan A [ORNL] [ORNL; Fesmire, J. E. [NASA Kennedy Space Center, Kennedy Space Center, Florida] [NASA Kennedy Space Center, Kennedy Space Center, Florida; Augustynowicz, S. D. [Sierra Lobo Inc., Kennedy Space Center, Florida] [Sierra Lobo Inc., Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal isolation of low-temperature systems from ambient environments is a constant issue faced by practitioners of cryogenics. For energy-efficient systems and processes to be realized, thermal insulation must be considered as an integrated system, not merely an add-on element. A design tool to determine the performance of insulation systems for comparative trade-off studies of different available material options was developed. The approach is to apply thermal analysis to standard shapes (plane walls, cylinders, spheres) that are relatively simple to characterize with a one-dimensional analytical or numerical model. The user describes the system hot and cold boundary geometry and the operating environment. Basic outputs such as heat load and temperature profiles are determined. The user can select from a built-in insulation material database or input user defined materials. Existing information has been combined with the new experimental thermal conductivity data produced by the Cryogenics Test Laboratory for cryogenic and vacuum environments, including high vacuum, soft vacuum, and no vacuum. Materials in the design tool include multilayer insulation, aerogel blankets, aerogel bulk-fill, foams, powders, composites, and other insulation system constructions. A comparison of the design tool to a specific composite thermal insulation system is given.

  7. Investigations on field optimization of insulator geometries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daumling, H.H.; Singer, H.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today computer methods become more and more a useful help for the constructor of any high voltage components, because stresses on dielectric materials have become increasingly high. The paper describes new algorithms based on the CAD concept for optimizing insulator contours according to a given field distribution along their surfaces. These algorithms were applied to some examples of insulators. By means of experimental investigations it was found that it is not sufficient to achieve a low tangential field strength component but that it is necessary to reduce the maximum values of the total field strength as far as possible, especially in the case of high air humidities.

  8. 1998 IEEE Int. Symp. on Electrical Insulation (Washington) page 1 of 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Judd, Martin

    1998 IEEE Int. Symp. on Electrical Insulation (Washington) page 1 of 4 HIGH BANDWIDTH MEASUREMENT. These pulses are of interest because when they occur in gas insulated substations they generate UHF signals of particle generated pulses under conditions similar to those present in high voltage gas insulated apparatus

  9. Sheath insulator final test report, TFE Verification Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The sheath insulator in a thermionic cell has two functions. First, the sheath insulator must electrically isolate the collector form the outer containment sheath tube that is in contact with the reactor liquid metal coolant. Second, The sheath insulator must provide for high uniform thermal conductance between the collector and the reactor coolant to remove away waste heat. The goals of the sheath insulator test program were to demonstrate that suitable ceramic materials and fabrication processes were available, and to validate the performance of the sheath insulator for TFE-VP requirements. This report discusses the objectives of the test program, fabrication development, ex-reactor test program, in-reactor test program, and the insulator seal specifications.

  10. Development of large-capacity gas-insulated transformer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takahashi, E.; Tanaka, K. [Tokyo Electric Power Co., Ltd. (Japan)] [Tokyo Electric Power Co., Ltd. (Japan); Toda, K.; Ikeda, M.; Teranishi, T.; Inaba, M.; Yanari, T. [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki (Japan)] [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki (Japan)

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concentrations of population and business activities result in high electricity demand in urban areas. This requires the construction of large-capacity underground substations. Oilless, non-flammable and non-explosive equipment is recommended for underground substations. Therefore, several types of large-capacity gas-insulated transformer have been developed. Because the gas forced cooling type was considered to be available up to approximately 60 MVA, all of these gas-insulated transformers are liquid cooled. But the liquid cooling type has the disadvantage of a complex structure for liquid cooling. For this reason, the authors have been studying the development of a simple design for a gas forced cooling, large-capacity gas-insulated transformer. This paper discusses research and development of cooling and insulation technology for a large-capacity gas-insulated transformer and the development of a 275 kV, 300 MVA gas-insulated transformer.

  11. Electoral Competition, Political Uncertainty and Policy Insulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Figueiredo, Rui J. P. Jr.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uncertainty and Policy Insulation Horn, Murray. 1995. TheUncertainty and Policy Insulation United States Congress.UNCERTAINTY AND POLICY INSULATION Rui J. P. de Figueiredo,

  12. Performance of High-Performance Glazing in IECC Compliant Building Simulation Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhopadhyay, J.; Haberl, J. S.

    windows with evacuated or low-conductance gas-filled gaps (Carmody et al. 2004), and aerogel windows to reduce the heat loss (V-factor) of windows (Hartman et al. 1987). Technologies to reduce solar heat gain include improvements to existing low...-E coatings, light redirecting layers, and self-shading windows (Apte et al. 2003). More recent developments include investigating advanced fac;ade systems which are designed to manage energy flows, view and comfort (Carmody et aI., 2004...

  13. Fully synthetic taped insulation cables

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsyth, E.B.; Muller, A.C.

    1983-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a cable which, although constructed from inexpensive polyolefin tapes and using typical impregnating oils, furnishes high voltage capability up to 765 kV, and has such excellent dielectric characteristics and heat transfer properties that it is capable of operation at capacities equal to or higher than presently available cables at a given voltage. This is accomplished by using polyethylene, polybutene or polypropylene insulating tape which has been specially processed to attain properties which are not generally found in these materials, but are required for their use in impregnated electrical cables. Chief among these properties is compatibility with impregnating oil.

  14. Notes on topological insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dan Li; Ralph M. Kaufmann; Birgit Wehefritz-Kaufmann

    2015-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is a survey of the $\\mathbb{Z}/\\mathbb{Z}_2$-valued invariants of topological insulators in condensed matter physics. The $\\mathbb{Z}$-valued topological invariant was originally called the TKNN invariant in physics, which has been fully understood as the first Chern number. The $\\mathbb{Z}_2$ invariant is more mysterious, we will devote our efforts to reviewing its equivalent descriptions from different point of views. We emphasize that both invariants are realizations of the Atiyah--Singer index theorem in condensed matter physics. The topological K-theory also plays an important role in the classification of topological insulators with different symmetries.

  15. Topological Mott Insulators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raghu, S.

    2010-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider extended Hubbard models with repulsive interactions on a honeycomb lattice, and the transitions from the semimetal to Mott insulating phases at half-filling. Because of the frustrated nature of the second-neighbor interactions, topological Mott phases displaying the quantum Hall and the quantum spin Hall effects are found for spinless and spin fermion models, respectively. The mean-field phase diagram is presented and the fluctuations are treated within the random phase approximation. Renormalization group analysis shows that these states can be favored over the topologically trivial Mott insulating states.

  16. Insulation | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,39732on ArmedManufacturing | Department ofInsulation Insulation

  17. Contaminant trap for gas-insulated apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adcock, J.L.; Pace, M.O.; Christophorou, L.G.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A resinous body is placed in gas-insulated electrical apparatus to remove particulate material from the insulating gas.

  18. The Insulator Binding Protein CTCF Positions 20 Nucleosomes around Its Binding Sites across the Human

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weng, Zhiping

    The Insulator Binding Protein CTCF Positions 20 Nucleosomes around Its Binding Sites across occupied by the insulator binding protein CTCF across the human genome. These nucleosomes are highly of CTCF function. Citation: Fu Y, Sinha M, Peterson CL, Weng Z (2008) The Insulator Binding Protein CTCF

  19. Radiative Heat Transfer Analysis of Fibrous Insulation Materials Using the ZonalGEF Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuen, Walter W.

    Radiative Heat Transfer Analysis of Fibrous Insulation Materials Using the Zonal­GEF Method Walter to analyze radiative heat transfer in high porosity insulation materials which have a large scattering for LI900, a material used in the insulation tile for the space shuttle. Comparisons are presented

  20. A pulser for medium-frequency modulated direct-current reactive sputter deposition of insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Hui

    for medium-frequency modulated direct-current dc reactive sputter deposition of electrical insulators at the target surface inherent to high- deposition-rate reactive sputtering of electrical insulators. TypicallyA pulser for medium-frequency modulated direct-current reactive sputter deposition of insulators G

  1. Science and technology of building seals, sealants, glazing, and waterproofing: Seventh volume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klosowski, J.M. [ed.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This book captures papers from the Charles J. Parise Seventh Symposium on the Science and Technology of Building Seals. Sealants, Glazing, and Waterproofing. The overriding theme behind the papers is durability. This topic is fundamental to all users and specifiers of sealants. The first set of papers in this book addresses the topic of stress and fatigue. Joint designs vary from the square section to exaggerated hour-glass shapes. The joint designs are factors in the longevity of a sealant in the joint. The available work on accelerated weathering tests and how that relates to the damage caused by real weathering is summarized. Acrylic latex sealants can come in many qualities and some can be formulated to have properties that approach and in some cases match some of the chemically curing sealants. The unique sealant applications in roofs and doing the old fashion listing of the performance needed for each application is addressed. Destruction of a joint can be more than a failed sealant. It can be a fine sealant in a joint that is picked clean by birds. Destruction of weather protection offered by sealant, the diagnosis of the cause and solutions, especially in EIFS systems, was discussed in several papers. The esthetic concerns of fluid migration from sealants and sealant staining potential were addressed. Relative to sealant testing, the paper of work done at V.P.I. on adhesion testing is a landmark paper. Papers on finite element analysis are presented. These show where the stress concentration starts and maximizes in various joint designs and provides the basis for better joint design and better joint geometry. There is a concluding series of papers that address the adhesion of waterproofing membranes; firestopping from a latex viewpoint; polysulfide sealants for chemical containment; and a final paper looks at the myriad of places sealants are used in modern buildings and spaceframe structures.

  2. Physics World Archive Topological insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johannesson, Henrik

    Physics World Archive Topological insulators Charles Kane, Joel Moore From Physics World February, how- ever, now uncovered a new electronic phase called a topological insulator. Putting the name; this "spin current" is a milestone in the realization of practical "spintronics". Topological insulators have

  3. Topological Insulator Nanowires and Nanoribbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    Topological Insulator Nanowires and Nanoribbons Desheng Kong, Jason C. Randel,,| Hailin Peng,, Judy material show that it is a three-dimensional topological insulator possessing conductive surface states topological insulator materials have a large surface-to-volume ratio that can manifest the conductive surface

  4. Electrical insulator assembly with oxygen permeation barrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van Der Beck, Roland R. (Lansdale, PA); Bond, James A. (Exton, PA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-voltage electrical insulator (21) for electrically insulating a thermoelectric module (17) in a spacecraft from a niobium-1% zirconium alloy wall (11) of a heat exchanger (13) filled with liquid lithium (16) while providing good thermal conductivity between the heat exchanger and the thermoelectric module. The insulator (21) has a single crystal alumina layer (SxAl.sub.2 O.sub.3, sapphire) with a niobium foil layer (32) bonded thereto on the surface of the alumina crystal (26) facing the heat exchanger wall (11), and a molybdenum layer (31) bonded to the niobium layer (32) to act as an oxygen permeation barrier to preclude the oxygen depleting effects of the lithium from causing undesirable niobium-aluminum intermetallic layers near the alumina-niobium interface.

  5. Electrical insulator assembly with oxygen permeation barrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van Der Beck, R.R.; Bond, J.A.

    1994-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-voltage electrical insulator for electrically insulating a thermoelectric module in a spacecraft from a niobium-1% zirconium alloy wall of a heat exchanger filled with liquid lithium while providing good thermal conductivity between the heat exchanger and the thermoelectric module. The insulator has a single crystal alumina layer (SxAl[sub 2]O[sub 3], sapphire) with a niobium foil layer bonded thereto on the surface of the alumina crystal facing the heat exchanger wall, and a molybdenum layer bonded to the niobium layer to act as an oxygen permeation barrier to preclude the oxygen depleting effects of the lithium from causing undesirable niobium-aluminum intermetallic layers near the alumina-niobium interface. 3 figures.

  6. Holographic fractional topological insulators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoyos, Carlos; Jensen, Kristan; Karch, Andreas [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1560 (United States)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a holographic realization of the recently proposed low-energy effective action describing a fractional topological insulator. In particular we verify that the surface of this hypothetical material supports a fractional quantum Hall current corresponding to half that of a Laughlin state.

  7. 2D Dirac Materials: From Graphene to Topological Insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teweldebrhan, Desalegne Bekuretsion

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2D Topological Insulators. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .structure for a topological insulator. The Dirac cone fallsband structure for topological insulators. With the Fermi

  8. Process for forming transparent aerogel insulating arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tewari, P.H.; Hunt, A.J.

    1985-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved supercritical drying process for forming transparent silica aerogel arrays is described. The process is of the type utilizing the steps of hydrolyzing and condensing aloxides to form alcogels. A subsequent step removes the alcohol to form aerogels. The improvement includes the additional step, after alcogels are formed, of substituting a solvent, such as CO/sub 2/, for the alcohol in the alcogels, the solvent having a critical temperature less than the critical temperature of the alcohol. The resulting gels are dried at a supercritical temperature for the selected solvent, such as CO/sub 2/, to thereby provide a transparent aerogel array within a substantially reduced (days-to-hours) time period. The supercritical drying occurs at about 40/sup 0/C instead of at about 270/sup 0/C. The improved process provides increased yields of large scale, structurally sound arrays. The transparent aerogel array, formed in sheets or slabs, as made in accordance with the improved process, can replace the air gap within a double glazed window, for example, to provide a substantial reduction in heat transfer. The thus formed transparent aerogel arrays may also be utilized, for example, in windows of refrigerators and ovens, or in the walls and doors thereof or as the active material in detectors for analyzing high energy elementary particles or cosmic rays.

  9. Process for forming transparent aerogel insulating arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tewari, Param H. (Milpitas, CA); Hunt, Arlon J. (Oakland, CA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved supercritical drying process for forming transparent silica aerogel arrays is described. The process is of the type utilizing the steps of hydrolyzing and condensing aloxides to form alcogels. A subsequent step removes the alcohol to form aerogels. The improvement includes the additional step, after alcogels are formed, of substituting a solvent, such as CO.sub.2, for the alcohol in the alcogels, the solvent having a critical temperature less than the critical temperature of the alcohol. The resulting gels are dried at a supercritical temperature for the selected solvent, such as CO.sub.2, to thereby provide a transparent aerogel array within a substantially reduced (days-to-hours) time period. The supercritical drying occurs at about 40.degree. C. instead of at about 270.degree. C. The improved process provides increased yields of large scale, structurally sound arrays. The transparent aerogel array, formed in sheets or slabs, as made in accordance with the improved process, can replace the air gap within a double glazed window, for example, to provide a substantial reduction in heat transfer. The thus formed transparent aerogel arrays may also be utilized, for example, in windows of refrigerators and ovens, or in the walls and doors thereof or as the active material in detectors for analyzing high energy elementry particles or cosmic rays.

  10. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point' or line' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included. 26 figs.

  11. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Potter, Thomas F. (Denver, CO)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  12. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1993-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point'' or line'' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line'' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point'' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  13. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Potter, Thomas F. (Denver, CO)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  14. Interfacial Coatings for Inorganic Composite Insulation Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooker, M. W.; Fabian, P. E.; Stewart, M. W.; Grandlienard, S. D.; Kano, K. S. [Composite Technology Development, Inc., Lafayette, CO, 80026 (United States)

    2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Inorganic (ceramic) insulation materials are known to have good radiation resistance and desirable electrical and mechanical properties at cryogenic and elevated temperatures. In addition, ceramic materials can withstand the high-temperature reaction cycle used with Nb3Sn superconductor materials, allowing the insulation to be co-processed with the superconductor in a wind-and-react fabrication process. A critical aspect in the manufacture of ceramic-based insulation systems is the deposition of suitable fiber-coating materials that prevent chemical reaction of the fiber and matrix materials, and thus provide a compliant interface between the fiber and matrix, which minimizes the impact of brittle failure of the ceramic matrix. Ceramic insulation produced with CTD-FI-202 fiber interfaces have been found to exhibit very high shear and compressive strengths. However, this material is costly to produce. Thus, the goal of the present work is to evaluate alternative, lower-cost materials and processes. A variety of oxide and polyimide coatings were evaluated, and one commercially available polyimide coating has been shown to provide some improvement as compared to uncoated and de-sized S2 glass.

  15. Using fiberglass volumes for VPI of superconductive magnetic systems’ insulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreev, I. S.; Bezrukov, A. A.; Pischugin, A. B. [Sredne-Nevskiy Shipyard (SNSZ), 10 Zavodskaya str., c. Pontonniy, Saint-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Bursikov, A. S.; Klimchenko, Y. A.; Marushin, E. L.; Mednikov, A. A.; Rodin, I. Y.; Stepanov, D. B. [The D.V. Efremov Scientific Research Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus (NIIEFA), 3 Doroga na Metallostroy, Metallostroy, Saint-Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper describes the method of manufacturing fiberglass molds for vacuum pressure impregnation (VPI) of high-voltage insulation of superconductive magnetic systems (SMS) with epoxidian hot-setting compounds. The basic advantages of using such vacuum volumes are improved quality of insulation impregnation in complex-shaped areas, and considerable cost-saving of preparing VPI of large-sized components due to dispensing with the stage of fabricating a metal impregnating volume. Such fiberglass vacuum molds were used for VPI of high-voltage insulation samples of an ITER reactor’s PF1 poloidal coil. Electric insulation of these samples has successfully undergone a wide range of high-voltage and mechanical tests at room and cryogenic temperatures. Some results of the tests are also given in this paper.

  16. Analysis and testing of multilayer and aerogel insulation configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, W L [NASA Kennedy Space Center, Kennedy Space Center, Florida; Demko, Jonathan A [ORNL; Fesmire, J. E. [NASA Kennedy Space Center, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multilayer insulation systems that have robust operational characteristics have long been a goal of many research projects. Such thermal insulation systems may need to offer some degree of structural support and/or mechanical integrity during loss of vacuum scenarios while continuing to provide insulative value to the vessel. Aerogel-based composite blankets can be the best insulation materials in ambient pressure environments; in high vacuum, the thermal performance of aerogel improves by about one order of magnitude. Standard multilayer insulation (MLI) is typically 50% worse at ambient pressure and at soft vacuum, but as much as two or three orders of magnitude better at high vacuum. Different combinations of aerogel blanket and multilayer insulation materials have been tested at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory of NASA Kennedy Space Center. Analysis performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory showed an importance to the relative location of the MLI and aerogel blankets. Apparent thermal conductivity testing under cryogenicvacuum conditions was performed to verify the analytical conclusion. Tests results are shown to be in agreement with the analysis which indicated that the best performance is obtained with aerogel layers located in the middle of the blanket insulation system.

  17. Thermal insulations using vacuum panels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glicksman, Leon R. (Lynnfield, MA); Burke, Melissa S. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal insulation vacuum panels are formed of an inner core of compressed low thermal conductivity powders enclosed by a ceramic/glass envelope evaluated to a low pressure.

  18. Hydrogen in semiconductors and insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van de Walle, Chris G.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    level in two different semiconductors, illustrating the06-01999R1 Hydrogen in semiconductors and insulators SpecialA. oxide materials; A. semiconductors; C. electronic

  19. Insulation | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The Energy Materials Center at CornellOf NSECAtomInsulation

  20. Insulation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of BlytheDepartment ofEnergy1EnergyEnergy InsulateandInsulation

  1. Superconducting ``metals'' and ``insulators'' Smitha Vishveshwara

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Superconducting ``metals'' and ``insulators'' Smitha Vishveshwara Department of Physics, University to the distinction between normal metals and insulators: the superconducting ``metal'' with delocalized qua- siparticle excitations and the superconducting ``insulator'' with localized quasiparticles. We describe

  2. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases there between are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and various laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels. 35 figs.

  3. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Potter, Thomas F. (Denver, CO)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases therebetween are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and variious laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels.

  4. Aerogel Impregnated Polyurethane Piping and Duct Insulation ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Aerogel Impregnated Polyurethane Piping and Duct Insulation Aerogel Impregnated Polyurethane Piping and Duct Insulation Emerging Technologies Project for the 2013 Building...

  5. Flipping Photoelectron Spins in Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Flipping Photoelectron Spins in Topological Insulators Flipping Photoelectron Spins in Topological Insulators Print Tuesday, 23 April 2013 10:00 Inherently strange crystalline...

  6. Flipping Photoelectron Spins in Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Flipping Photoelectron Spins in Topological Insulators Print Inherently strange crystalline materials called 3D topological insulators (TIs) are all the rage in materials science....

  7. Insulation Mechanisms of in vivo Biomolecular Circuits Kayzad S. Nilgiriwala, Phillip M. Rivera and Domitilla Del Vecchio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Del Vecchio, Domitilla

    Insulation Mechanisms of in vivo Biomolecular Circuits Kayzad S. Nilgiriwala, Phillip M. Rivera,2,3). It has been theoretically shown that a system can be insulated from retroactivity by using high gain, effectively insulating the cycle from retroactivity by downstream DNA targets. Hence, phosphorylation cycles

  8. Identification of building applications for a variable-conductance insulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potter, T.F. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Tuluca, A. [Winter (Steven) Associates, Inc., New York, NY (United States)

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent experiments have confirmed the feasibility of controllable, reversible disabling of a vacuum insulation panel, which may result in the development of energy-efficient building envelope components. These components could extend the managed energy exchange through the building envelope from about 30% (typical with fenestration systems in commercial buildings), to as much as 90% of the gross wall and roof areas. Further investigation will be required to optimized the thermal response and the magnitude of the R-value swing (from a difference between insulating and conducting insulating values of 4 to as high as a factor of 100). The potential for energy reduction by using the variable-conductance insulation in the building envelope is discussed, and other potential building applications are mentioned.

  9. Multiple layer insulation cover

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farrell, James J. (Livingston Manor, NY); Donohoe, Anthony J. (Ovid, NY)

    1981-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple layer insulation cover for preventing heat loss in, for example, a greenhouse, is disclosed. The cover is comprised of spaced layers of thin foil covered fabric separated from each other by air spaces. The spacing is accomplished by the inflation of spaced air bladders which are integrally formed in the cover and to which the layers of the cover are secured. The bladders are inflated after the cover has been deployed in its intended use to separate the layers of the foil material. The sizes of the material layers are selected to compensate for sagging across the width of the cover so that the desired spacing is uniformly maintained when the cover has been deployed. The bladders are deflated as the cover is stored thereby expediting the storage process and reducing the amount of storage space required.

  10. Density Matrix Topological Insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Rivas; O. Viyuela; M. A. Martin-Delgado

    2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal noise can destroy topological insulators (TI). However we demonstrate how TIs can be made stable in dissipative systems. To that aim, we introduce the notion of band Liouvillian as the dissipative counterpart of band Hamiltonian, and show a method to evaluate the topological order of its steady state. This is based on a generalization of the Chern number valid for general mixed states (referred to as density matrix Chern value), which witnesses topological order in a system coupled to external noise. Additionally, we study its relation with the electrical conductivity at finite temperature, which is not a topological property. Nonetheless, the density matrix Chern value represents the part of the conductivity which is topological due to the presence of quantum mixed edge states at finite temperature. To make our formalism concrete, we apply these concepts to the two-dimensional Haldane model in the presence of thermal dissipation, but our results hold for arbitrary dimensions and density matrices.

  11. Ceramic electrical insulation for electrical coils, transformers, and magnets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rice, John A. (Longmont, CO); Hazelton, Craig S. (Lafayette, CO); Fabian, Paul E. (Broomfield, CO)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high temperature electrical insulation is described, which is suitable for electrical windings for any number of applications. The inventive insulation comprises a cured preceramic polymer resin, which is preferably a polysiloxane resin. A method for insulating electrical windings, which are intended for use in high temperature environments, such as superconductors and the like, advantageously comprises the steps of, first, applying a preceramic polymer layer to a conductor core, to function as an insulation layer, and second, curing the preceramic polymer layer. The conductor core preferably comprises a metallic wire, which may be wound into a coil. In the preferred method, the applying step comprises a step of wrapping the conductor core with a sleeve or tape of glass or ceramic fabric which has been impregnated by a preceramic polymer resin. The inventive insulation system allows conducting coils and magnets to be fabricated using existing processing equipment, and maximizes the mechanical and thermal performance at both elevated and cryogenic temperatures. It also permits co-processing of the wire and the insulation to increase production efficiencies and reduce overall costs, while still remarkably enhancing performance.

  12. STATE OF CALIFORNIA INSULATION STAGE CHECKLIST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA INSULATION STAGE CHECKLIST CEC-CF-6R-ENV-22 (Revised 05/12) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION INSTALLATION CERTIFICATE CF-6R-ENV-22 Quality Insulation Installation (QII) - Insulation Stage be insulated in a manner that resists thermal bridging of the assembly separating conditioned from

  13. Chromatin insulators: lessons from the fly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corces, Victor G.

    Chromatin insulators: lessons from the fly B.V.Gurudatta and Victor G.Corces Abstract Chromatin insulators are DNA^protein complexes with broad functions in nuclear biology. Drosophila has at least five different types of insulators; recent results suggest that these different insulators share some components

  14. Solar Decathlon Technology Spotlight: Structural Insulated Panels

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Structural insulated panels (SIPs) are prefabricated structural elements used to build walls, ceilings, floors, and roofs.

  15. Tunable Dirac Fermion Dynamics in Topological Insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wei Hua

    Tunable Dirac Fermion Dynamics in Topological Insulators Chaoyu Chen1 , Zhuojin Xie1 , Ya Feng1, Beijing 100190, China. Three-dimensional topological insulators are characterized by insulating bulk state topological insulators. We have directly revealed signatures of the electron-phonon coupling and found

  16. Cost-Effective Cable Insulation: Nanoclay Reinforced Ethylene-Propylene-Rubber for Low-Cost HVDC Cabling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    GENI Project: GE is developing new, low-cost insulation for high-voltage direct current (HVDC) electricity transmission cables. The current material used to insulate HVDC transmission cables is very expensive and can account for as much as 1/3 of the total cost of a high-voltage transmission system. GE is embedding nanomaterials into specialty rubber to create its insulation. Not only are these materials less expensive than those used in conventional HVDC insulation, but also they will help suppress excess charge accumulation. The excess charge left behind on a cable poses a major challenge for high-voltage insulation—if it’s not kept to a low level, it could ultimately lead the insulation to fail. GE’s low-cost insulation is compatible with existing U.S. cable manufacturing processes, further enhancing its cost effectiveness.

  17. Correlation effects on topological insulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiong-Jun Liu; Yang Liu; Xin Liu

    2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The strong correlation effects on topological insulator are studied in a two-sublattice system with an onsite single-particle energy difference $\\Delta$ between two sublattices. At $\\Delta=0$, increasing the onsite interaction strength $U$ drives the transition from the quantum spin Hall insulating state to the non-topological antiferromagnetic Mott-insulating (AFMI) state. When $\\Delta$ is larger than a certain value, a topologically trivial band insulator or AFMI at small values of $U$ may change into a quantum anomalous Hall state with antiferromagnetic ordering at intermediate values of $U$. Further increasing $U$ drives the system back into the topologically trivial state of AFMI. The corresponding phenomena is observable in the solid state and cold atom systems. We also propose a scheme to realize and detect these effects in cold atom systems.

  18. Measure Guideline: Basement Insulation Basics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldrich, R.; Mantha, P.; Puttagunta, S.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This guideline is intended to describe good practices for insulating basements in new and existing homes, and is intended to be a practical resources for building contractors, designers, and also to homeowners.

  19. Variable pressure thermal insulating jacket

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, P.A.; Malecha, R.F.; Chilenskas, A.A.

    1994-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for controlled insulation of a thermal device is disclosed. The device includes a thermal jacket with a closed volume able to be evacuated to form an insulating jacket around the thermal source. A getter material is in communication with the closed volume of the thermal jacket. The getter material can absorb and desorb a control gas to control gas pressure in the volume of the thermal jacket to control thermal conductivity in the thermal jacket. 10 figs.

  20. Vertically aligned gas-insulated transmission line having particle traps at the inner conductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dale, Steinar J. (Monroeville, PA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas insulated electrical apparatus having first and second conductors separated by an insulating support within an insulating gas environment, and particle traps disposed along the surface of the high potential conductor for trapping and inactivating foreign particles which may be present within the insulating gas medium. Several embodiments of the invention were developed which are particularly suited for vertically aligned gas insulated transmission lines. The particle traps are grooves or cavities formed into the walls of the tubular inner conductor, without extending into the hollow portion of the conductor. In other embodiments, the traps are appendages or insert flanges extending from the inner conductor, with the insulator supports contacting the appendages instead of the inner conductor.

  1. GROUND PLANE INSULATION FAILURE IN THE FIRST TPC SUPERCONDUCTING COIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, M.A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is WIUUTEO GROUND PLANE INSULATION FAILURE IN THE FIRST TPCOn August 27, 1980, an insulation failure occurred dt-ringby a failure uf ground plane insulation. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The

  2. Typical Clothing Ensemble Insulation Levels for Sixteen Body Parts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Juyoun; Zhang, Hui; Arens, Edward

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal Comfort.1994 CLO Insulation Levels For Sixteen Bodya mesh arm chair whose insulation level was measured. FigureExperimental Conditions. CLO Insulation Levels For Sixteen

  3. Electrical Insulation Paper and Its Physical Properties at Cryogenic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuncer, Enis [ORNL] [ORNL; Polyzos, Georgios [ORNL] [ORNL; Sauers, Isidor [ORNL] [ORNL; James, David Randy [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paper is widely used in various engineering applications due to its physical properties and ease of manufacture. As a result paper has been selected or designed as an electrical insulation material for parts and components in high voltage technology. In the current study we select a paper employed in conventional transformers as the electrical insulation material. The potential of this paper is investigated at cryogenic temperatures to determine its physical properties for high temperature superconducting power applications. Dielectric measurements were performed using impedance spectroscopy at a constant frequency. Dielectric breakdown tests were performed on samples at 77 K using a liquid nitrogen bath.

  4. Approximating Metal-Insulator Transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Danieli; K. Rayanov; B. Pavlov; G. Martin; S. Flach

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider quantum wave propagation in one-dimensional quasiperiodic lattices. We propose an iterative construction of quasiperiodic potentials from sequences of potentials with increasing spatial period. At each finite iteration step the eigenstates reflect the properties of the limiting quasiperiodic potential properties up to a controlled maximum system size. We then observe approximate metal-insulator transitions (MIT) at the finite iteration steps. We also report evidence on mobility edges which are at variance to the celebrated Aubry-Andre model. The dynamics near the MIT shows a critical slowing down of the ballistic group velocity in the metallic phase similar to the divergence of the localization length in the insulating phase.

  5. Insulation board and process of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nowobilski, Jeffert J. (Orchard Park, NY); Owens, William J. (Kenmore, NY)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Insulation board capable of bearing a load without significant loss of insulating capacity due to compression, produced by a method wherein the board is made in compliance with specified conditions of time, temperature and pressure.

  6. Degradation of Structural Alloys Under Thermal Insulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McIntyre, D. R.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wet thermal insulation may actively degrade steel and stainless steel structures by general corrosion or stress-corrosion cracking. Two different mechanisms of water ingress into insulation are discussed; flooding from external sources...

  7. STATE OF CALIFORNIA ENVELOPE INSULATION; ROOFING; FENESTRATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA ENVELOPE ­ INSULATION; ROOFING; FENESTRATION CEC-CF-6R-ENV-01 (Revised 08/09) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION INSTALLATION CERTIFICATE CF-6R-ENV-01 Envelope ­ Insulation; Roofing:__________________________________ Brand Name:_______________________________ Thickness (inches):_________________________ Thermal

  8. Degradation of Structural Alloys Under Thermal Insulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McIntyre, D. R.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wet thermal insulation may actively degrade steel and stainless steel structures by general corrosion or stress-corrosion cracking. Two different mechanisms of water ingress into insulation are discussed; flooding from external sources...

  9. Dynamics of Dirac Fermions in Topological Insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Anton

    Dynamics of Dirac Fermions in Topological Insulators R. Hammer1 , C. Ertler1 , W. P¨otz1 , and A.hammer@uni-graz.at Abstract We study the coherent dynamics of Dirac fermions on the surface of topological insulators in one topological insulators (TI) we investigate theoretically the dynamics of Dirac fermion wave packets on their 2

  10. Insulation condition monitoring and testing for large electrical machines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Y.; Dix, G.I.; Quaife, P.W. [Industrial Research Ltd., Christchurch (New Zealand)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An efficient method to assess the insulation condition of rotating machines is on-line partial discharge monitoring. Difficulties in on-line monitoring result from various noise sources associated with the machine and from the power system. The paper introduces and discusses the theories, different testing techniques and monitoring methods currently used by Industrial Research Limited and other laboratories. The design and testing of high frequency current transformers for partial discharge on-line monitoring are introduced. Laboratory and field tests on electrical machines are presented. A database has been developed for efficient insulation monitoring and maintenance. The database allows intra and inter comparisons of partial discharge, tan delta, capacitance between phases in a machine and with other machines easily. The functions of the database enhance the efficiency and provide more information for effective insulation condition assessment.

  11. Vacuum-insulated catalytic converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, David K. (Golden, CO)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A catalytic converter has an inner canister that contains catalyst-coated substrates and an outer canister that encloses an annular, variable vacuum insulation chamber surrounding the inner canister. An annular tank containing phase-change material for heat storage and release is positioned in the variable vacuum insulation chamber a distance spaced part from the inner canister. A reversible hydrogen getter in the variable vacuum insulation chamber, preferably on a surface of the heat storage tank, releases hydrogen into the variable vacuum insulation chamber to conduct heat when the phase-change material is hot and absorbs the hydrogen to limit heat transfer to radiation when the phase-change material is cool. A porous zeolite trap in the inner canister absorbs and retains hydrocarbons from the exhaust gases when the catalyst-coated substrates and zeolite trap are cold and releases the hydrocarbons for reaction on the catalyst-coated substrate when the zeolite trap and catalyst-coated substrate get hot.

  12. Impact of Thermally Insulated Floors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alghimlas, F.; Omar, E. A.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of insulated floors. It was found that using an R- 10 floors in multi-story apartment buildings greatly reduce both the peak cooling demand as well as the energy consumption by about 15%, whereas only minimal savings (about 4%) were detected in the case...

  13. A Holographic Fractional Topological Insulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlos Hoyos-Badajoz; Kristan Jensen; Andreas Karch

    2010-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a holographic realization of the recently proposed low energy effective action describing a fractional topological insulator. In particular we verify that the surface of this hypothetical material supports a fractional quantum Hall current corresponding to half that of a Laughlin state.

  14. Metal-insulator transition in Na{sub x}WO{sub 3}: Photoemission spectromicroscopy study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, Sanhita, E-mail: raj@iiserkol.ac.in; Ghosh, Anirudha, E-mail: raj@iiserkol.ac.in; Raj, Satyabrata, E-mail: raj@iiserkol.ac.in [Department of Physical Sciences, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research - Kolkata, Mohanpur Campus, Nadia -741252, West Bengal (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated the validity of percolation model, which is quite often invoked to explain the metal-insulator transition in sodium tungsten bronzes, Na{sub x}WO{sub 3} by photoelectron spectromicroscopy. The spatially resolved direct spectromicroscopic probing on both the insulating and metallic phases of high quality single crystals of Na{sub x}WO{sub 3} reveals the absence of any microscopic inhomogeneities embedded in the system within the experimental limit. Neither any metallic domains in the insulating host nor any insulating domains in the metallic host have been found to support the validity of percolation model to explain the metal-insulator transition in Na{sub x}WO{sub 3}.

  15. Radiation-controlled dynamic vacuum insulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Potter, Thomas F. (Denver, CO)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact vacuum insulation panel comprising a chamber enclosed by two sheets of metal, glass-like spaces disposed in the chamber between the sidewalls, and a high-grade vacuum in the chamber that includes apparatus and methods for enabling and disabling, or turning "on" and "off" the thermal insulating capability of the panel. One type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes a metal hydride for releasing hydrogen gas into the chamber in response to heat, and a hydrogen grate between the metal hydride and the chamber for selectively preventing and allowing return of the hydrogen gas to the metal hydride. Another type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes a variable emissivity coating on the sheets of metal in which the emissivity is controllably variable by heat or electricity. Still another type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes metal-to-metal contact devices that can be actuated to establish or break metal-to-metal heat paths or thermal short circuits between the metal sidewalls.

  16. Variably insulating portable heater/cooler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Potter, Thomas F. (Denver, CO)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact vacuum insulation panel comprising a chamber enclosed by two sheets of metal, glass-like spaces disposed in the chamber between the sidewalls, and a high-grade vacuum in the chamber includes apparatus and methods for enabling and disabling, or turning "on" and "off" the thermal insulating capability of the panel. One type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes a metal hydride for releasing hydrogen gas into the chamber in response to heat, and a hydrogen grate between the metal hydride and the chamber for selectively preventing and allowing return of the hydrogen gas to the metal hydride. Another type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes a variable emissivity coating on the sheets of metal in which the emissivity is controllably variable by heat or electricity. Still another type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes metal-to-metal contact devices that can be actuated to establish or break metal-to-metal heat paths or thermal short circuits between the metal sidewalls.

  17. Material-controlled dynamic vacuum insulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, David K. (14154 W. First Dr., Golden, CO 80401); Potter, Thomas F. (515 S. Magnolia La., Denver, CO 80224)

    1996-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact vacuum insulation panel comprising a chamber enclosed by two sheets of metal, glass-like spaces disposed in the chamber between the sidewalls, and a high-grade vacuum in the chamber includes apparatus and methods for enabling and disabling, or turning "on" and "off" the thermal insulating capability of the panel. One type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes a metal hydride for releasing hydrogen gas into the chamber in response to heat, and a hydrogen grate between the metal hydride and the chamber for selectively preventing and allowing return of the hydrogen gas to the metal hydride. Another type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes a variable emissivity coating on the sheets of metal in which the emissivity is controllably variable by heat or electricity. Still another type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes metal-to-metal contact devices that can be actuated to establish or break metal-to-metal heat paths or thermal short circuits between the metal sidewalls.

  18. Variably insulating portable heater/cooler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Potter, T.F.

    1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact vacuum insulation panel is described comprising a chamber enclosed by two sheets of metal, glass-like spaces disposed in the chamber between the sidewalls, and a high-grade vacuum in the chamber includes apparatus and methods for enabling and disabling, or turning ``on`` and ``off`` the thermal insulating capability of the panel. One type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes a metal hydride for releasing hydrogen gas into the chamber in response to heat, and a hydrogen grate between the metal hydride and the chamber for selectively preventing and allowing return of the hydrogen gas to the metal hydride. Another type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes a variable emissivity coating on the sheets of metal in which the emissivity is controllably variable by heat or electricity. Still another type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes metal-to-metal contact devices that can be actuated to establish or break metal-to-metal heat paths or thermal short circuits between the metal sidewalls. 25 figs.

  19. Material-controlled dynamic vacuum insulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1996-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact vacuum insulation panel is described comprising a chamber enclosed by two sheets of metal, glass-like spaces disposed in the chamber between the sidewalls, and a high-grade vacuum in the chamber includes apparatus and methods for enabling and disabling, or turning ``on`` and ``off`` the thermal insulating capability of the panel. One type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes a metal hydride for releasing hydrogen gas into the chamber in response to heat, and a hydrogen grate between the metal hydride and the chamber for selectively preventing and allowing return of the hydrogen gas to the metal hydride. Another type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes a variable emissivity coating on the sheets of metal in which the emissivity is controllably variable by heat or electricity. Still another type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes metal-to-metal contact devices that can be actuated to establish or break metal-to-metal heat paths or thermal short circuits between the metal sidewalls. 25 figs.

  20. Radiation-controlled dynamic vacuum insulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1995-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact vacuum insulation panel is described comprising a chamber enclosed by two sheets of metal, glass-like spaces disposed in the chamber between the sidewalls, and a high-grade vacuum in the chamber that includes apparatus and methods for enabling and disabling, or turning ``on`` and ``off`` the thermal insulating capability of the panel. One type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes a metal hydride for releasing hydrogen gas into the chamber in response to heat, and a hydrogen grate between the metal hydride and the chamber for selectively preventing and allowing return of the hydrogen gas to the metal hydride. Another type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes a variable emissivity coating on the sheets of metal in which the emissivity is controllably variable by heat or electricity. Still another type of enabling and disabling apparatus and method includes metal-to-metal contact devices that can be actuated to establish or break metal-to-metal heat paths or thermal short circuits between the metal sidewalls. 25 figs.

  1. HYDROPHOBIC CHARACTERISTICS OF COMPOSITE INSULATORS IN SIMULATED INLAND ARID DESERT ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Yasin; Al-Arainy, Abdulrehman Ali; Malik, Nazar Hussain; Qureshi, Muhammad Iqbal [Department of Electrical Engineering, College of Engineering, King Saud University, Riyadh 11421 (Saudi Arabia)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Presently along with traditional insulators i.e. glass and porcelain, etc., the polymeric insulators are also used world widely. These polymeric insulators are very sensitive to various environmental parameters e.g. UV radiations, heat, etc. The UV radiation level in the central region of Saudi Arabia is high as compared to the recommended IEC-61109 standard for the accelerated aging of the composite insulators. In this study, thermoplastic elastomer (TPE) and Ethylene Propylene Diene Monomer (EPDM) insulators were subjected to accelerated aging stress as per IEC standard as well as modified IEC standard simulating the inland arid desert's atmospheric conditions. The hydrophobic characteristics were studied by measuring the contact angle along the insulator surface before and after the accelerated aging of the samples. It was found that TPE loses its hydrophobic properties more as compared to EPDM insulator. This loss was proportional to the intensity of UV irradiation. The rate of recovery is also low for both the tested materials as compared to Silicone Rubber insulators.

  2. High Tc superconductivity in doped Mott insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    ) and unpublished. A.Paramekanti, MR & N. Trivedi, PRL 87, 217002 (2001); PRB 69, 144509 (2004); PRB 70, 054504 (2004); PRB 71, 069505 (2005). 6 #12;Hubbard model: Minimal Model for CuO2 planes · neutron · Raman

  3. Insulation assembly for electric machine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhoads, Frederick W.; Titmuss, David F.; Parish, Harold; Campbell, John D.

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An insulation assembly is provided that includes a generally annularly-shaped main body and at least two spaced-apart fingers extending radially inwards from the main body. The spaced-apart fingers define a gap between the fingers. A slot liner may be inserted within the gap. The main body may include a plurality of circumferentially distributed segments. Each one of the plurality of segments may be operatively connected to another of the plurality of segments to form the continuous main body. The slot liner may be formed as a single extruded piece defining a plurality of cavities. A plurality of conductors (extendable from the stator assembly) may be axially inserted within a respective one of the plurality of cavities. The insulation assembly electrically isolates the conductors in the electric motor from the stator stack and from other conductors.

  4. Magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bacon, Larry D. (Albuquerque, NM); Ballard, William P. (Albuquerque, NM); Clark, M. Collins (Albuquerque, NM); Marder, Barry M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator employs self-generated magnetic fields to generate microwave energy. An anode of the oscillator includes slow-wave structures which are formed of a plurality of thin conductive vanes defining cavities therebetween, and a gap is formed between the anode and a cathode of the oscillator. In response to a pulsed voltage applied to the anode and cathode, self-generated magnetic fields arfe produced in a cross-field orientation with respect to the orientation of the electric field between the anode and the cathode. The cross-field magnetic fields insulate the flow of electrons in the gap and confine the flow of electrons within the gap.

  5. Topological Insulators at Room Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Haijun; /Beijing, Inst. Phys.; Liu, Chao-Xing; /Tsinghua U., Beijing; Qi, Xiao-Liang; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Dai, Xi; Fang, Zhong; /Beijing, Inst. Phys.; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Topological insulators are new states of quantum matter with surface states protected by the time-reversal symmetry. In this work, we perform first-principle electronic structure calculations for Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3}, Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} crystals. Our calculations predict that Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, Bi{sub 2}T e{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} are topological insulators, while Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} is not. In particular, Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} has a topologically non-trivial energy gap of 0.3eV , suitable for room temperature applications. We present a simple and unified continuum model which captures the salient topological features of this class of materials. These topological insulators have robust surface states consisting of a single Dirac cone at the {Lambda} point.

  6. Insulation Fact Sheet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn Other NewsSpin and FrameinstitutionalDOE/CE-0180 2008

  7. Insulation and Heat Treatment of Bi-2212 Wire for Wind-and-React Coils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter K. F. Hwang

    2007-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Higher Field Magnets demand higher field materials such as Bi-2212 round superconducting wire. The Bi-2212 wire manufacture process depends on the coil fabrication method and wire insulation material. Considering the wind-and-react method, the coil must unifirmly heated to the melt temperature and uniformly cooled to the solidification temperature. During heat treat cycle for tightly wound coils, the leakage melt from conductor can chemically react with insulation on the conductor and creat short turns in the coils. In this research project, conductor, insulation, and coils are made to systemically study the suitable insulation materials, coil fabrication method, and heat treatment cycles. In this phase I study, 800 meters Bi-2212 wire with 3 different insulation materials have been produced. Best insulation material has been identified after testing six small coils for insulation integrity and critical current at 4.2 K. Four larger coils (2" dia) have been also made with Bi-2212 wrapped with best insulation and with different heattreatment cycle. These coils were tested for Ic in a 6T background field and at 4.2 K. The test result shows that Ic from 4 coils are very close to short samples (1 meter) result. It demonstrates that HTS coils can be made with Bi-2212 wire with best insulation consistently. Better wire insulation, improving coil winding technique, and wire manufacture process can be used for a wide range of high field magnet application including acclerators such as Muon Collider, fusion energy research, NMR spectroscopy, MRI, and other industrial magnets.

  8. Floating insulated conductors for heating subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burns, David; Goodwin, Charles R.

    2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a conduit located in a first opening in the subsurface formation. Three electrical conductors are located in the conduit. A return conductor is located inside the conduit. The return conductor is electrically coupled to the ends of the electrical conductors distal from the surface of the formation. Insulation is located inside the conduit. The insulation electrically insulates the three electrical conductors, the return conductor, and the conduit from each other.

  9. T-Duality of Topological Insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varghese Mathai; Guo Chuan Thiang

    2015-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Topological insulators and D-brane charges in string theory can both be classified by the same family of groups. In this letter, we extend this connection via a geometric transform, giving a novel duality of topological insulators which can be viewed as a condensed matter analog of T-duality in string theory. For 2D Chern insulators, this duality exchanges the rank and Chern number of the valence bands.

  10. From topological insulators to superconductors and Confinement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Cristina Diamantini; Pasquale Sodano; Carlo A. Trugenberger

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Topological matter in 3D is characterized by the presence of a topological BF term in its long-distance effective action. We show that, in 3D, there is another marginal term that must be added to the action in order to fully determine the physical content of the model. The quantum phase structure is governed by three parameters that drive the condensation of topological defects: the BF coupling, the electric permittivity and the magnetic permeability of the material. For intermediate levels of electric permittivity and magnetic permeability the material is a topological insulator. We predict, however, new states of matter when these parameters cross critical values: a topological superconductor when electric permittivity is increased and magnetic permeability is lowered and a charge confinement phase in the opposite case of low electric permittivity and high magnetic permeability. Synthetic topological matter may be fabricated as 3D arrays of Josephson junctions.

  11. Building America Expert Meeting: Interior Insulation Retrofit...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Building Science Corporation team held an Expert Meeting on Interior Insulation Retrofit of Mass Masonry Wall Assemblies on July 30, 2011, at the Westford Regency Hotel in...

  12. Farmers RECC- Residential Insulation Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Farmers Rural Electric Cooperative (RECC) Button-Up Program provides free energy audits and rebates for insulation upgrades to its residential customers. Farmers RECC's energy advisor will...

  13. How Much Insulation is Too Much?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was given at the Summer 2012 DOE Building America meeting on July 25, 2012, and addressed the question "How much insulation is too much?"

  14. Studies Bolster Promise of Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Studies Bolster Promise of Topological Insulators Print A few years ago, a strange new material began to drive research in condensed-matter physics around the world. First...

  15. On Holographic Insulators and Supersolids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiritsis, Elias

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We obtain holographic realisations for systems that have strong similarities to Mott insulators and supersolids, after examining the ground states of Einstein-Maxwell-scalar systems. The real part of the AC conductivity has a hard gap and a discrete spectrum only. We add momentum dissipation to resolve the delta function in the conductivity due to translational invariance. We develop tools to directly calculate the Drude weight for a large class of solutions and to support our claims. Numerical RG flows are also constructed to verify that such saddle points are IR fixed points of asymptotically AdS_4 geometries.

  16. Insulation Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of BlytheDepartment ofEnergy1EnergyEnergy Insulate

  17. Modular cell biology: retroactivity and insulation Domitilla Del Vecchio1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sontag, Eduardo

    Modular cell biology: retroactivity and insulation Domitilla Del Vecchio1, *, Alexander J Ninfa2 a remarkable insulation property, due to the fast timescales of the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation: computational methods; metabolic and regulatory networks Keywords: feedback; insulation; modularity; singular

  18. Low-cost exterior insulation process and structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vohra, Arun (Bethesda, MD)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A low-cost exterior insulation process of stacking bags of insulating material against a wall and covering them with wire mesh and stucco provides a durable structure with good insulating value.

  19. Topological insulators of bosons/spins T. Senthil (MIT)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Topological insulators of bosons/spins T. Senthil (MIT) Thanks: X.-G.Wen, M.P.A. Fisher Trivial phases Eg: Band insulators, superfluids, antiferromagnets, ......... Gapped `topologically ordered phases Eg: Band insulators, superfluids, antiferromagnets, ......... Gapped `topologically ordered

  20. Classification and characterization of topological insulators and superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mong, Roger

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Antiferromagnetic topological insulators 5.1 Z 2 topological1.3 Topological insulators in 3D . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.3.1 Strong topological insulators (STI) . . . . . 1.3.2

  1. Widespread spin polarizationeffects in photoemission from topological insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jozwiak, C.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    photoemission from topological insulators C. Jozwiak, 1, ?approach in the 3D topological insulators. [1] D. Hsieh, D.three-dimensional topological insulator Bi 2 Se 3 using a

  2. Low-cost exterior insulation process and structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vohra, A.

    1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A low-cost exterior insulation process of stacking bags of insulating material against a wall and covering them with wire mesh and stucco provides a durable structure with good insulating value. 2 figs.

  3. Measurement of Exterior Foundation Insulation to Assess Durability in Energy-Saving Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kehrer, Manfred [ORNL; Christian, Jeff [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The foundation of a house is a sometimes ignored component of the building because of its low visibility. It is increasingly evident, however, that attention to good foundation design and construction significantly benefits the homeowner and the builder by mitigating future problems. Good foundation design and construction practice involves not only insulating to save energy but also providing effective structural design as well as moisture, termite, and radon control techniques as appropriate. Energy efficiency in housing is augmented by use of exterior slab and basement insulation, but high moisture content in the insulation material has led to concerns about its durability. The activity under this task was to extract six different exterior insulation systems that were characterized at installation and have been in the ground for 9 months to 15 years. R-value and moisture content were measured and inspections conducted for evidence of termite intrusion or deterioration. Based on the results, the durability of the various systems has been documented and assessments made of which systems appear to be best practice. Heat flux and temperature measurement data had been archived for some of the exterior insulation tests, thereby providing a unique opportunity to assess energy-saving performance and durability over the long term. The results show that the durability of foundation insulation systems depends on insulation type as well as on foundation type and local boundary conditions, the latter of which may have a marked influence on the durability of energy-saving performance.

  4. Charge and spin topological insulators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopaev, Yu. V., E-mail: kopaev@sci.lebedev.ru; Gorbatsevich, A. A.; Belyavskii, V. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The topologically nontrivial states of matter-charge and spin topological insulators, which exhibit, respectively, properties of the integer quantum Hall effect and the quantum spin Hall effect-are discussed. The topological characteristics (invariant with respect to weak adiabatic changes in the Hamiltonian parameters) which lead to such states are considered. The model of a 2D hexagonal lattice having symmetries broken with respect to time reversal and spatial inversion which was proposed by Haldane and marked the beginning of unprecedented activity in the study of topologically nontrivial states is discussed. This model relates the microscopic nature of the symmetry breaking with respect to the time reversal to the occurrence of spontaneous orbital currents which circulate within a unit cell. Such currents become zero upon summation over the unit cell, but they may form spreading current states at the surface which are similar to the edge current states under the quantum Hall effect. The first model of spontaneous currents (exciton insulator model) is considered, and the possibility of implementing new topologically nontrivial states in this model is discussed.

  5. Fabrication of heterojunction solar cells by improved tin oxide deposition on insulating layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feng, Tom (Morris Plains, NJ); Ghosh, Amal K. (New Providence, NJ)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Highly efficient tin oxide-silicon heterojunction solar cells are prepared by heating a silicon substrate, having an insulating layer thereon, to provide a substrate temperature in the range of about 300.degree. C. to about 400.degree. C. and thereafter spraying the so-heated substrate with a solution of tin tetrachloride in a organic ester boiling below about 250.degree. C. Preferably the insulating layer is naturally grown silicon oxide layer.

  6. Uniform insulation applied-B ion diode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seidel, David B. (Albuquerque, NM); Slutz, Stephen A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An applied-B field extraction ion diode has uniform insulation over an anode surface for increased efficiency. When the uniform insulation is accomplished with anode coils, and a charge-exchange foil is properly placed, the ions may be focused at a point on the z axis.

  7. Kingspan Insulated Panels: Order (2013-CE-5353)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Kingspan Insulated Panels, Inc. to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Kingspan Insulated Panels had failed to certify that any basic models of walk-in cooler and freezer components comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  8. Surprising Control over Photoelectrons from a Topological Insulator

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Surprising Control over Photoelectrons from a Topological Insulator Surprising Control over Photoelectrons from a Topological Insulator Print Tuesday, 12 March 2013 00:00...

  9. Graphene physics and insulator-metal transition in compressed...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Graphene physics and insulator-metal transition in compressed hydrogen Citation Details Title: Graphene physics and insulator-metal transition in compressed hydrogen Authors:...

  10. Materials - Next-generation insulation ... | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials - Next-generation insulation ... A composite foam insulation panel being developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and partners could reduce wall-generated heating and...

  11. Exterior Rigid Insulation Best Practices - Building America Top...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exterior Rigid Insulation Best Practices - Building America Top Innovation Exterior Rigid Insulation Best Practices - Building America Top Innovation Effec guid-exterior rigid...

  12. Building America Expert Meeting Report: Interior Insulation Retrofit...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Interior Insulation Retrofit of Mass Masonry Wall Assembliesessment of risk factors for premature building deterioration due to interior insulation retrofits, and methods to reduce...

  13. Sensitivity of forced air distribution system efficiency to climate, duct location, air leakage and insulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Iain

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Location, Air Leakage and Insulation Iain S. Walker Energy4 Duct Insulation, Location and Leakageinsulation

  14. Thermal Performance of Exterior Insulation and Finish Systems Containing Vacuum Insulation Panels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Kenneth W [ORNL; Stovall, Therese K [ORNL; Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL; Carbary, Lawrence D [Dow Corning Corporation, Midland, MI

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-performance wall system is under development to improve wall thermal performance to a level of U-factor of 0.19 W/(m2 K) (R-30 [h ft2 F]/Btu) in a standard wall thickness by incorporating vacuum insulation panels (VIPs) into an exterior insulation finish system (EIFS). Such a system would be applicable to new construction and will offer a solution to more challenging retrofit situations as well. Multiple design options were considered to balance the need to protect theVIPs during construction and building operation, while minimizing heat transfer through the wall system. The results reported here encompass an indepth assessment of potential system performances including thermal modeling, detailed laboratory measurements under controlled conditions on the component, and system levels according to ASTM C518 (ASTM 2010). The results demonstrate the importance of maximizing the VIP coverage over the wall face. The results also reveal the impact of both the design and execution of system details, such as the joints between adjacent VIPs. The test results include an explicit modeled evaluation of the system performance in a clear wall.

  15. Automatic insulation resistance testing apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wyant, Francis J.; Nowlen, Steven P.; Luker, Spencer M.

    2005-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for automatic measurement of insulation resistances of a multi-conductor cable. In one embodiment of the invention, the apparatus comprises a power supply source, an input measuring means, an output measuring means, a plurality of input relay controlled contacts, a plurality of output relay controlled contacts, a relay controller and a computer. In another embodiment of the invention the apparatus comprises a power supply source, an input measuring means, an output measuring means, an input switching unit, an output switching unit and a control unit/data logger. Embodiments of the apparatus of the invention may also incorporate cable fire testing means. The apparatus and methods of the present invention use either voltage or current for input and output measured variables.

  16. Slab edge insulating form system and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Brain E. (Corral de Tierra, CA); Barsun, Stephan K. (Davis, CA); Bourne, Richard C. (Davis, CA); Hoeschele, Marc A. (Davis, CA); Springer, David A. (Winters, CA)

    2009-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of forming an insulated concrete foundation is provided comprising constructing a foundation frame, the frame comprising an insulating form having an opening, inserting a pocket former into the opening; placing concrete inside the foundation frame; and removing the pocket former after the placed concrete has set, wherein the concrete forms a pocket in the placed concrete that is accessible through the opening. The method may further comprise sealing the opening by placing a sealing plug or sealing material in the opening. A system for forming an insulated concrete foundation is provided comprising a plurality of interconnected insulating forms, the insulating forms having a rigid outer member protecting and encasing an insulating material, and at least one gripping lip extending outwardly from the outer member to provide a pest barrier. At least one insulating form has an opening into which a removable pocket former is inserted. The system may also provide a tension anchor positioned in the pocket former and a tendon connected to the tension anchor.

  17. Excavationless Exterior Foundation Insulation Field Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schirber, T.; Mosiman, G.; Ojczyk, C.

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building science research supports installing exterior (soil side) foundation insulation as the optimal method to enhance the hygrothermal performance of new homes. With exterior foundation insulation, water management strategies are maximized while insulating the basement space and ensuring a more even temperature at the foundation wall. However, such an approach can be very costly and disruptive when applied to an existing home, requiring deep excavation around the entire house. The NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership team implemented an innovative, minimally invasive foundation insulation upgrade technique on an existing home. The approach consisted of using hydrovac excavation technology combined with a liquid insulating foam. The team was able to excavate a continuous 4" wide by 4' to 5' deep trench around the entire house, 128 linear feet, except for one small part under the stoop that was obstructed with concrete debris. The combination pressure washer and vacuum extraction technology also enabled the elimination of large trenches and soil stockpiles normally produced by backhoe excavation. The resulting trench was filled with liquid insulating foam, which also served as a water-control layer of the assembly. The insulation was brought above grade using a liquid foam/rigid foam hybrid system and terminated at the top of the rim joist. Cost savings over the traditional excavation process ranged from 23% to 50%. The excavationless process could result in even greater savings since replacement of building structures, exterior features, utility meters, and landscaping would be minimal or non-existent in an excavationless process.

  18. Advanced insulations for refrigerator/freezers: The potential for new shell designs incorporating polymer barrier construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, B.T.; Arasteh, D.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impending phase-out of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) used to expand foam insulation, combined with requirements for increased energy efficiency, make the use of non-CFC-based high performance insulation technologies increasingly attractive. The majority of current efforts are directed at using advanced insulations in the form of thin, flat low-conductivity gas-filled or evacuated orthogonal panels, which we refer to as Advanced Insulation Panels (AIPs). AIPs can be used in composite with blown polymer foams to improve insulation performance in refrigerator/freezers (R/Fs) of conventional design and manufacture. This AIP/foam composite approach is appealing because it appears to be a feasible, near-term method for incorporating advanced insulations into R/Fs without substantial redesign or retooling. However, the requirements for adequate flow of foam during the foam-in-place operation impose limitations on the allowable thickness and coverage area of AIPs. This report examines design alternatives which may offer a greater increase in overall thermal resistance than is possible with the use of AIP/foam composites in current R/F design. These design alternatives generally involve a basic redesign of the R/F taking into account the unique requirements of advanced insulations and the importance of minimizing thermal bridging with high thermal resistance insulations. The focus here is on R/F doors because they are relatively simple and independent R/F components and are therefore good candidates for development of alterative designs. R/F doors have significant thermal bridging problems due to the steel outer shell construction. A three dimensional finite difference computer modeling exercise of a R/F door geometry was used to compare the overall levels of thermal resistance (R-value) for various design configurations.

  19. Measure Guideline: Hybrid Foundation Insulation Retrofits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ueno, K.; Lstiburek, J.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This measure guideline provides recommendations for designs and variations for retrofit hybrid assemblies in improving interior foundation insulation and water management of basements. Variations include closed cell spray foam (ccSPF) with membrane waterproofing or air gap membrane drainage layers, rigid board foam insulation at flat walls (cast concrete or CMU block), a 'partial drainage' detail making use of the bulk water drainage that occurs through the field of a rubble stone wall, and non-drained spray foam assemblies (including slab insulation).

  20. 1 Introduction 3 2 Topological insulators -Overview 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johannesson, Henrik

    Contents 1 Introduction 3 2 Topological insulators - Overview 5 2.1 Introduction quantum spin Hall insulator . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 2.4 Three dimensional topological insulator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 3 Bulk band structure in a 2D spin orbit induced topological insulator 11 3.1 Introduction

  1. Silicon on insulator achieved using electrochemical etching

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Anthony M. (Menlo Park, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bulk crystalline silicon wafers are transferred after the completion of circuit fabrication to form thin films of crystalline circuitry on almost any support, such as metal, semiconductor, plastic, polymer, glass, wood, and paper. In particular, this technique is suitable to form silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers, whereby the devices and circuits formed exhibit superior performance after transfer due to the removal of the silicon substrate. The added cost of the transfer process to conventional silicon fabrication is insignificant. No epitaxial, lift-off, release or buried oxide layers are needed to perform the transfer of single or multiple wafers onto support members. The transfer process may be performed at temperatures of 50.degree. C. or less, permits transparency around the circuits and does not require post-transfer patterning. Consequently, the technique opens up new avenues for the use of integrated circuit devices in high-brightness, high-resolution video-speed color displays, reduced-thickness increased-flexibility intelligent cards, flexible electronics on ultrathin support members, adhesive electronics, touch screen electronics, items requiring low weight materials, smart cards, intelligent keys for encryption systems, toys, large area circuits, flexible supports, and other applications. The added process flexibility also permits a cheap technique for increasing circuit speed of market driven technologies such as microprocessors at little added expense.

  2. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 83, 165440 (2011) Electron interaction-driven insulating ground state in Bi2Se3 topological insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wei Hua

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    topological insulators in the two-dimensional limit Minhao Liu,1 Cui-Zu Chang,1,2 Zuocheng Zhang,1 Yi Zhang,2 of ultrathin Bi2Se3 topological insulators with thickness from one quintuple layer to six quintuple layers that this unusual insulating ground state in the two-dimensional limit of topological insulators is induced

  3. Ultrathin Strained Si-on-Insulator and SiGe-on-Insulator Created using Low Temperature Wafer Bonding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ultrathin Strained Si-on-Insulator and SiGe-on-Insulator Created using Low Temperature Wafer, uniform thickness, low defect density, monocrystalline SiGe alloys and strained Si on any desired substrate was developed, allowing for the creation of SiGe-on-insulator and strained Si-on-insulator. After

  4. Nonlinear boundary value problem of magnetic insulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Sinitsyn

    2000-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    On the basis of generalization of upper and lower solution method to the singular two point boundary value problems, the existence theorem of solutions for the system, which models a process of magnetic insulation in plasma is proved.

  5. Metal-insulator transition in holography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aristomenis Donos; Sean A. Hartnoll

    2013-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We exhibit an interaction-driven metal-insulator quantum phase transition in a holographic model. Use of a helical lattice enables us to break translation invariance while preserving homogeneity. The metallic phase is characterized by a sharp Drude peak and a d.c. resistivity that increases with temperature. In the insulating phase the Drude spectral weight is transferred into a `mid-infrared' peak and to energy scales of order the chemical potential. The d.c. resistivity now decreases with temperature. In the metallic phase, operators breaking translation invariance are irrelevant at low energy scales. In the insulating phase, translation symmetry breaking effects are present at low energies. We find the near horizon extremal geometry that captures the insulating physics.

  6. Phosphorylation based insulation devices design and implementation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivera Ortiz, Phillip M. (Phillip Michael)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the analysis of a phosphorylation based insulation device implemented in Saccharomyces cerevisae and the minimization of the retroactivity to the input and retroactivity to the output of a single cycle ...

  7. Install Removable Insulation on Valves and Fittings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This revised ITP tip sheet on installing removable insulation on valves and fittings provides how-to advice for improving the system using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

  8. Saving Energy and Money with Aerogel Insulation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department is investing in an innovative insulation material that saves energy and money for industrial facilities while also helping to support 50 full-time clean energy jobs for Americans.

  9. Thermal conductivity of thermal-battery insulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guidotti, R.A.; Moss, M.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal conductivities of a variety of insulating materials used in thermal batteries were measured in atmospheres of argon and helium using several techniques. (Helium was used to simulate the hydrogen atmosphere that results when a Li(Si)/FeS{sub 2} thermal battery ages.) The guarded-hot-plate method was used with the Min-K insulation because of its extremely low thermal conductivity. For comparison purposes, the thermal conductivity of the Min-K insulating board was also measured using the hot-probe method. The thermal-comparator method was used for the rigid Fiberfrax board and Fiberfrax paper. The thermal conductivity of the paper was measured under several levels of compression to simulate the conditions of the insulating wrap used on the stack in a thermal battery. The results of preliminary thermal-characterization tests with several silica aerogel materials are also presented.

  10. Probing the topology in band insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Kuang-Ting, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Topological Insulator is a newly found state of matter. Unlike phases described by the traditional Landau theory of symmetry breaking, the topological phases do not break symmetry, and it is not obvious in which measurable ...

  11. Air leakage of Insulated Concrete Form houses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durschlag, Hannah (Hanna Rebekah)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Air leakage has been shown to increase building energy use due to additional heating and cooling loads. Although many construction types have been examined for leakage, an exploration of a large number of Insulated Concrete ...

  12. A Guide to Insulation Selection for Industrial Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, M. R.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of new insulations on th mar ket, it is important that the insulation selection process be upgraded. Insulation peci fications need to be reviewed in terms of new products and installation techniques. Also, the specific application or end use should... be critically analyzed to determine whic~ pro f ducts are best suited for that application. INSULATION MATERIAL SELECTION The selection and specification of insulation materials can be broken down int two I separate but interrelated activities. The first...

  13. Panelized wall system with foam core insulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kosny, Jan (Oak Ridge, TN); Gaskin, Sally (Houston, TX)

    2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A wall system includes a plurality of wall members, the wall members having a first metal panel, a second metal panel, and an insulating core between the first panel and the second panel. At least one of the first panel and the second panel include ridge portions. The insulating core can be a foam, such as a polyurethane foam. The foam can include at least one opacifier to improve the k-factor of the foam.

  14. T-Duality and Topological Insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathai, Varghese

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well known that topological insulators are classified by a family of groups, which coincidentally also classifies D-brane charges on orientifolds in string theory. In this letter, we extend this correlation via a geometric analog of the real Fourier transform to obtain a novel duality of topological insulators that can be viewed as a condensed matter analog of T-duality in string theory.

  15. Status of surface conduction in topological insulators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barua, Sourabh, E-mail: sbarua@iitk.ac.in; Rajeev, K. P. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India)] [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, we scrutinize the thickness dependent resistivity data from the recent literature on electrical transport measurements in topological insulators. A linear increase in resistivity with increase in thickness is expected in the case of these materials since they have an insulating bulk and a conducting surface. However, such a trend is not seen in the resistivity versus thickness data for all the cases examined, except for some samples, where it holds for a range of thickness.

  16. BOA: Pipe-asbestos insulation removal robot system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schempf, H.; Bares, J.; Mutschler, E. [and others

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the BOA system, a mobile pipe-external crawler used to remotely strip and bag (possibly contaminated) asbestos-containing lagging and insulation materials (ACLIM) from various diameter pipes in (primarily) industrial installations across the DOE weapons complex. The mechanical removal of ACLIM is very cost-effective due to the relatively low productivity and high cost involved in human removal scenarios. BOA, a mechanical system capable of removing most forms of lagging (paper, plaster, aluminum sheet, clamps, screws and chicken-wire), and insulation (paper, tar, asbestos fiber, mag-block) uses a circular cutter and compression paddles to cut and strip the insulation off the pipe through compression, while a HEPA-filter and encapsulant system maintain a certifiable vacuum and moisture content inside the system and on the pipe, respectively. The crawler system has been built and is currently undergoing testing. Key design parameters and performance parameters are developed and used in performance testing. Since the current system is a testbed, we also discuss future enhancements and outline two deployment scenarios (robotic and manual) for the final system to be designed and completed by the end of FY `95. An on-site demonstration is currently planned for Fernald in Ohio and Oak Ridge in Tennessee.

  17. Method for forming fibrous silicon carbide insulating material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wei, G.C.

    1983-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method whereby silicon carbide-bonded SiC fiber composites are prepared from carbon-bonded C fiber composites is disclosed. Carbon-bonded C fiber composite material is treated with gaseous silicon monoxide generated from the reaction of a mixture of colloidal silica and carbon black at an elevated temperature in an argon atmosphere. The carbon in the carbon bond and fiber is thus chemically converted to SiC resulting in a silicon carbide-bonded SiC fiber composite that can be used for fabricating dense, high-strength high-toughness SiC composites or as thermal insulating materials in oxidizing environments.

  18. Method for forming fibrous silicon carbide insulating material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wei, George C. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method whereby silicon carbide-bonded SiC fiber composites are prepared from carbon-bonded C fiber composites is disclosed. Carbon-bonded C fiber composite material is treated with gaseous silicon monoxide generated from the reaction of a mixture of colloidal silica and carbon black at an elevated temperature in an argon atmosphere. The carbon in the carbon bond and fiber is thus chemically converted to SiC resulting in a silicon carbide-bonded SiC fiber composite that can be used for fabricating dense, high-strength high-toughness SiC composites or as thermal insulating materials in oxidizing environments.

  19. Topological insulators and superconductors from string theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryu, Shinsei; Takayanagi, Tadashi [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU), University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Topological insulators and superconductors in different spatial dimensions and with different discrete symmetries have been fully classified recently, revealing a periodic structure for the pattern of possible types of topological insulators and superconductors, both in terms of spatial dimensions and in terms of symmetry classes. It was proposed that K theory is behind the periodicity. On the other hand, D-branes, a solitonic object in string theory, are also known to be classified by K theory. In this paper, by inspecting low-energy effective field theories realized by two parallel D-branes, we establish a one-to-one correspondence between the K-theory classification of topological insulators/superconductors and D-brane charges. In addition, the string theory realization of topological insulators and superconductors comes naturally with gauge interactions, and the Wess-Zumino term of the D-branes gives rise to a gauge field theory of topological nature, such as ones with the Chern-Simons term or the {theta} term in various dimensions. This sheds light on topological insulators and superconductors beyond noninteracting systems, and the underlying topological field theory description thereof. In particular, our string theory realization includes the honeycomb lattice Kitaev model in two spatial dimensions, and its higher-dimensional extensions. Increasing the number of D-branes naturally leads to a realization of topological insulators and superconductors in terms of holography (AdS/CFT).

  20. Topological Insulators and Superconductors from String Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinsei Ryu; Tadashi Takayanagi

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Topological insulators and superconductors in different spatial dimensions and with different discrete symmetries have been fully classified recently, revealing a periodic structure for the pattern of possible types of topological insulators and supercondutors, both in terms of spatial dimensions and in terms of symmetry classes. It was proposed that K-theory is behind the periodicity. On the other hand, D-branes, a solitonic object in string theory, are also known to be classified by K-theory. In this paper, by inspecting low-energy effective field theories realized by two parallel D-branes, we establish a one-to-one correspondence between the K-theory classification of topological insulators/superconductors and D-brane charges. In addition, the string theory realization of topological insulators and superconductors comes naturally with gauge interactions, and the Wess-Zumino term of the D-branes gives rise to a gauge field theory of topological nature, such as ones with the Chern-Simons term or the $\\theta$-term in various dimensions. This sheds light on topological insulators and superconductors beyond non-interacting systems, and the underlying topological field theory description thereof. In particular, our string theory realization includes the honeycomb lattice Kitaev model in two spatial dimensions, and its higher-dimensional extensions. Increasing the number of D-branes naturally leads to a realization of topological insulators and superconductors in terms of holography (AdS/CFT).

  1. Magnetic insulation at finite temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goedecke, G. H.; Davis, Brian T.; Chen, Chiping [Physics Department, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico 88003 and Raytheon Missile Systems, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, Arizona 85706 (United States); Intense Beam Theoretical Research Group, Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 and Raytheon Missile Systems, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, Arizona 85706 (United States)

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A finite-temperature non-neutral plasma (FTNNP) theory of magnetically insulated (MI) electron flows in crossed-field vacuum devices is developed and applied in planar geometry. It is shown that, in contrast to the single type of MI flow predicted by traditional cold-plasma treatments, the nonlinear FTNNP equations admit five types of steady flow, of which three types are MI flows, including flows in which the electric field and/or the tangential velocity at the cathode may be zero or nonzero. It is also shown that finite-temperature Vlasov-Poisson treatments yield solutions for electron number densities and electrostatic potentials that are a subset of the FTNNP solutions. The algorithms that are used to solve the FTNNP equations numerically are discussed, and the numerical results are presented for several examples of the three types of MI flow. Results include prediction of the existence, boundaries, number density profiles, and other properties of sheaths of electrons in the anode-cathode gap.

  2. Dynamic predictive clothing insulation models based on outdoor air and indoor operative temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiavon, Stefano; Lee, Kwang Ho

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    predictive clothing insulation models based on outdoor airrange of the clothing insulation calculated for eachbuilding). Figure 8 Clothing insulation versus dress code [

  3. Influence of two dynamic predictive clothing insulation models on building energy performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Kwang Ho; Schiavon, Stefano

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Predictive Clothing Insulation Models on Building Energyunnecessarily higher clothing insulation and lower heatingthat the constant clothing insulation assumption lead to the

  4. Predictive clothing insulation model based on outdoor air and indoor operative temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiavon, Stefano; Lee, Kwang Ho

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2012) Predictive clothing insulation model based on outdoorPredictive clothing insulation model based on outdoor airpredictive models of clothing insulation have been developed

  5. Versatile Indian sari: Clothing insulation with different drapes of typical sari ensembles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indraganti, Madhavi; Lee, Juyoun; Zhang, Hui; Arens, Edward

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extension of the Clothing Insulation Database for Standardand air movement on that insulation. , s.l. : s.n. Havenith,Estimation of the thermal insulation and evaporative

  6. Insulating Structural Ceramics Program, Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, Mark J.; Tandon, Raj; Ott, Eric; Hind, Abi Akar; Long, Mike; Jensen, Robert; Wheat, Leonard; Cusac, Dave; Lin, H. T.; Wereszczak, Andrew A.; Ferber, Mattison K.; Lee, Sun Kun; Yoon, Hyung K.; Moreti, James; Park, Paul; Rockwood, Jill; Boyer, Carrie; Ragle, Christie; Balmer-Millar, Marilou; Aardahl, Chris; Habeger, Craig; Rappe, Ken; Tran, Diana; Koshkarian, Kent; Readey, Michael; ,

    2005-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    New materials and corresponding manufacturing processes are likely candidates for diesel engine components as society and customers demand lower emission engines without sacrificing power and fuel efficiency. Strategies for improving thermal efficiency directly compete with methodologies for reducing emissions, and so the technical challenge becomes an optimization of controlling parameters to achieve both goals. Approaches being considered to increase overall thermal efficiency are to insulate certain diesel engine components in the combustion chamber, thereby increasing the brake mean effective pressure ratings (BMEP). Achieving higher BMEP rating by insulating the combustion chamber, in turn, requires advances in material technologies for engine components such as pistons, port liners, valves, and cylinder heads. A series of characterization tests were performed to establish the material properties of ceramic powder. Mechanical chacterizations were also obtained from the selected materials as a function of temperature utilizing ASTM standards: fast fracture strength, fatique resistance, corrosion resistance, thermal shock, and fracture toughness. All ceramic materials examined showed excellent wear properties and resistance to the corrosive diesel engine environments. The study concluded that the ceramics examined did not meet all of the cylinder head insert structural design requirements. Therefore we do not recommend at this time their use for this application. The potential for increased stresses and temperatures in the hot section of the diesel engine combined with the highly corrosive combustion products and residues has driven the need for expanded materials capability for hot section engine components. Corrosion and strength requirements necessitate the examination of more advanced high temperture alloys. Alloy developments and the understanding of processing, structure, and properties of supperalloy materials have been driven, in large part, by the gas turbine community over the last fifty years. Characterization of these high temperature materials has, consequently, concentrated heavily upon application conditions similiar to to that encountered in the turbine engine environment. Significantly less work has been performed on hot corrosion degradation of these materials in a diesel engine environment. This report examines both the current high temperature alloy capability and examines the capability of advanced nickle-based alloys and methods to improve production costs. Microstructures, mechanical properties, and the oxidation/corrosion behavior of commercially available silicon nitride ceramics were investigated for diesel engine valve train applications. Contact, sliding, and scratch damage mechanisms of commercially available silicon nitride ceramics were investigated as a function of microstructure. The silicon nitrides with a course microstructure showed a higher material removal rate that agrees with a higher wear volume in the sliding contact tests. The overall objective of this program is to develop catalyst materials systems for an advanced Lean-NOx aftertreatment system that will provide high NOx reduction with minimum engine fuel efficiency penalty. With Government regulations on diesel engine NOx emissions increasingly becoming more restrictive, engine manufacturers are finding it difficult to meet the regulations solely with engine design strategies (i.e. improved combustion, retarded timing, exhaust gas recirculation, etc.). Aftertreatment is the logical technical approach that will be necessary to achieve the required emission levels while at the same time minimally impacting the engine design and its associated reliability and durability concerns.

  7. An Insulating Glass Knowledge Base

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael L. Doll; Gerald Hendrickson; Gerard Lagos; Russell Pylkki; Chris Christensen; Charlie Cureija

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report will discuss issues relevant to Insulating Glass (IG) durability performance by presenting the observations and developed conclusions in a logical sequential format. This concluding effort discusses Phase II activities and focuses on beginning to quantifying IG durability issues while continuing the approach presented in the Phase I activities (Appendix 1) which discuss a qualitative assessment of durability issues. Phase II developed a focus around two specific IG design classes previously presented in Phase I of this project. The typical box spacer and thermoplastic spacer design including their Failure Modes and Effect Analysis (FMEA) and Fault Tree diagrams were chosen to address two currently used IG design options with varying components and failure modes. The system failures occur due to failures of components or their interfaces. Efforts to begin quantifying the durability issues focused on the development and delivery of an included computer based IG durability simulation program. The focus/effort to deliver the foundation for a comprehensive IG durability simulation tool is necessary to address advancements needed to meet current and future building envelope energy performance goals. This need is based upon the current lack of IG field failure data and the lengthy field observation time necessary for this data collection. Ultimately, the simulation program is intended to be used by designers throughout the current and future industry supply chain. Its use is intended to advance IG durability as expectations grow around energy conservation and with the growth of embedded technologies as required to meet energy needs. In addition the tool has the immediate benefit of providing insight for research and improvement prioritization. Included in the simulation model presentation are elements and/or methods to address IG materials, design, process, quality, induced stress (environmental and other factors), validation, etc. In addition, acquired data is presented in support of project and model assumptions. Finally, current and suggested testing protocol and procedure for future model validation and IG physical testing are discussed.

  8. Radio-transparent multi-layer insulation for radiowave receivers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, J. [Korea University, Anam-dong Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)] [Korea University, Anam-dong Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Ishitsuka, H. [Department of Particle and Nuclear Physics, School of High Energy Accelerator Science, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), Shonan Village, Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan)] [Department of Particle and Nuclear Physics, School of High Energy Accelerator Science, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), Shonan Village, Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan); Mima, S. [Terahertz Sensing and Imaging Team, Terahertz-wave Research Group, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)] [Terahertz Sensing and Imaging Team, Terahertz-wave Research Group, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Oguri, S., E-mail: shugo@post.kek.jp [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Takahashi, K. [Terahertz Sensing and Imaging Team, Terahertz-wave Research Group, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan) [Terahertz Sensing and Imaging Team, Terahertz-wave Research Group, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Tajima, O. [Department of Particle and Nuclear Physics, School of High Energy Accelerator Science, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), Shonan Village, Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan) [Department of Particle and Nuclear Physics, School of High Energy Accelerator Science, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), Shonan Village, Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan); Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the field of radiowave detection, enlarging the receiver aperture to enhance the amount of light detected is essential for greater scientific achievements. One challenge in using radio transmittable apertures is keeping the detectors cool. This is because transparency to thermal radiation above the radio frequency range increases the thermal load. In shielding from thermal radiation, a general strategy is to install thermal filters in the light path between aperture and detectors. However, there is difficulty in fabricating metal mesh filters of large diameters. It is also difficult to maintain large diameter absorptive-type filters in cold because of their limited thermal conductance. A technology that maintains cold conditions while allowing larger apertures has been long-awaited. We propose radio-transparent multi-layer insulation (RT-MLI) composed from a set of stacked insulating layers. The insulator is transparent to radio frequencies, but not transparent to infrared radiation. The basic idea for cooling is similar to conventional multi-layer insulation. It leads to a reduction in thermal radiation while maintaining a uniform surface temperature. The advantage of this technique over other filter types is that no thermal links are required. As insulator material, we used foamed polystyrene; its low index of refraction makes an anti-reflection coating unnecessary. We measured the basic performance of RT-MLI to confirm that thermal loads are lowered with more layers. We also confirmed that our RT-MLI has high transmittance to radiowaves, but blocks infrared radiation. For example, RT-MLI with 12 layers has a transmittance greater than 95% (lower than 1%) below 200 GHz (above 4 THz). We demonstrated its effects in a system with absorptive-type filters, where aperture diameters were 200 mm. Low temperatures were successfully maintained for the filters. We conclude that this technology significantly enhances the cooling of radiowave receivers, and is particularly suitable for large-aperture systems. This technology is expected to be applicable to various fields, including radio astronomy, geo-environmental assessment, and radar systems.

  9. Topological insulators and topological nonlinear {sigma} models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yao Hong; Lee, Dung-Hai [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) and Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we link the physics of topological nonlinear {sigma} models with that of Chern-Simons insulators. We show that corresponding to every 2n-dimensional Chern-Simons insulator there is a (n-1)-dimensional topological nonlinear {sigma} model with the Wess-Zumino-Witten term. Breaking internal symmetry in these nonlinear {sigma} models leads to nonlinear {sigma} models with the {theta} term. [This is analogous to the dimension reduction leading from 2n-dimensional Chern-Simons insulators to (2n-1) and (2n-2)-dimensional topological insulators protected by discrete symmetries.] The correspondence described in this paper allows one to derive the topological term in a theory involving fermions and order parameters (we shall referred to them as ''fermion-{sigma} models'') when the conventional gradient-expansion method fails. We also discuss the quantum number of solitons in topological nonlinear {sigma} model and the electromagnetic action of the (2n-1)-dimensional topological insulators. Throughout the paper we use a simple model to illustrate how things work.

  10. Development of New Generation of Thermally-Enhanced Fiber Glass Insulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosny, Jan [ORNL; Yarbrough, David W [ORNL; Childs, Phillip W [ORNL; Miller, William A [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL; Shrestha, Som S [ORNL

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents experimental and numerical results from thermal performance studies. The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC and John s Manville was to design a basic concept of a new generation of thermally-enhanced fiber glass insulation. Different types of Phase Change Materials (PCMs) have been tested as dynamic components in buildings during the last 4 decades. Most historical studies have found that PCMs enhance building energy performance. Some PCM-enhanced building materials, like PCM-gypsum boards or PCM-impregnated concretes have already found their limited applications in different countries. Today, continued improvements in building envelope technologies suggest that throughout Southern and Central U.S. climates, residences may soon be routinely constructed with PCM in order to maximize insulation effectiveness and maintain low heating and cooling loads. The proposed thermally-enhanced fiber glass insulation will maximize this integration by utilizing a highly-efficient building envelope with high-R thermal insulation, active thermal mass and superior air-tightness. Improved thermal resistance will come from modifications in infrared internal characteristics of the fiber glass insulation. Thermal mass effect can be provided by proprietary thermally-active microencapsulated phase change material (PCM). Work carried out at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on the CRADA is described in this report.

  11. Casimir repulsion between Topological Insulators in the diluted regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pablo Rodriguez-Lopez

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pairwise Summation Approximation (PSA) of Casimir energy is applied to a system of two dielectrics with magnetoelectric coupling. In particular, the case of Topological Insulators (TI) is studied in detail. Depending on the the optical response of the TI, we obtain a stable equilibrium distance, atraction for all distances, or repulsion for all distances at zero temperature. This equilibrium distance disappears in the high temperature limit. These results are independent on the geometry of the TI, but are only valid in the diluted approximation.

  12. Performance of Titanium-Oxide/Polymer Insulation in Bi-2212/Ag-alloy Round Wire Wound Superconducting Coils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng Chen; Ulf P Trociewitz; Matthieu Dalban-Canassy; Jianyi Jiang; Eric E Hellstrom; David C Larbalestier

    2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Conductor insulation is one of the key components needed to make Ag-alloy clad Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+x (Bi-2212/Ag) superconducting round wire (RW) successful for high field magnet applications as dielectric standoff and high winding current densities (Jw) directly depend on it. In this study, a TiO2/polymer insulation coating developed by nGimat LLC was applied to test samples and a high field test coil. The insulation was investigated by differential thermal analysis (DTA), thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dielectric properties measurement, and transport critical current (Ic) properties measurement. About 29% of the insulation by weight is polymer. When the Bi-2212/Ag wire is full heat treated, this decomposes with slow heating to 400{\\deg}C in pure O2. After the full reaction, we found that the TiO2 did not degrade the critical current properties, adhered well to the conductor, and provided a breakdown voltage of >100 V, which allowed the test coil to survive quenching in 31.2 T background field, while providing a 2.6 T field increment. For Bi-2212/Ag RW with a typical diameter of 1.0-1.5 mm, this ~15 um thick insulation allows a very high coil packing factor of ~0.74, whereas earlier alumino-silicate braid insulation only allows packing factors of 0.38-0.48.

  13. Multilayer insulation blanket, fabricating apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonczy, John D. (Oak Lawn, IL); Niemann, Ralph C. (Downers Grove, IL); Boroski, William N. (Aurora, IL)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved multilayer insulation blanket for insulating cryogenic structures operating at very low temperatures is disclosed. An apparatus and method for fabricating the improved blanket are also disclosed. In the improved blanket, each successive layer of insulating material is greater in length and width than the preceding layer so as to accommodate thermal contraction of the layers closest to the cryogenic structure. The fabricating apparatus has a rotatable cylindrical mandrel having an outer surface of fixed radius that is substantially arcuate, preferably convex, in cross-section. The method of fabricating the improved blanket comprises (a) winding a continuous sheet of thermally reflective material around the circumference of the mandrel to form multiple layers, (b) binding the layers along two lines substantially parallel to the edges of the circumference of the mandrel, (c) cutting the layers along a line parallel to the axle of the mandrel, and (d) removing the bound layers from the mandrel.

  14. Method of fabricating a multilayer insulation blanket

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonczy, John D. (Oak Lawn, IL); Niemann, Ralph C. (Downers Grove, IL); Boroski, William N. (Aurora, IL)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved multilayer insulation blanket for insulating cryogenic structures operating at very low temperatures is disclosed. An apparatus and method for fabricating the improved blanket are also disclosed. In the improved blanket, each successive layer of insulating material is greater in length and width than the preceding layer so as to accommodate thermal contraction of the layers closest to the cryogenic structure. The fabricating apparatus has a rotatable cylindrical mandrel having an outer surface of fixed radius that is substantially arcuate, preferably convex, in cross-section. The method of fabricating the improved blanket comprises (a) winding a continuous sheet of thermally reflective material around the circumference of the mandrel to form multiple layers, (b) binding the layers along two lines substantially parallel to the edges of the circumference of the mandrel, (c) cutting the layers along a line parallel to the axle of the mandrel, and (d) removing the bound layers from the mandrel.

  15. Electrically insulated MLI and thermal anchor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamiya, Koji; Furukawa, Masato; Murakami, Haruyuki; Kizu, Kaname; Tsuchiya, Katsuhiko; Koidea, Yoshihiko; Yoshida, Kiyoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukoyama, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Hatakenaka, Ryuta; Miyakita, Takeshi [Japan Aerospace Exploration and Agency, 2-1-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8505 (Japan)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal shield of JT-60SA is kept at 80 K and will use the multilayer insulation (MLI) to reduce radiation heat load to the superconducting coils at 4.4 K from the cryostat at 300 K. Due to plasma pulse operation, the MLI is affected by eddy current in toroidal direction. The MLI is designed to suppress the current by electrically insulating every 20 degree in the toroidal direction by covering the MLI with polyimide films. In this paper, two kinds of designs for the MLI system are proposed, focusing on a way to overlap the layers. A boil-off calorimeter method and temperature measurement has been performed to determine the thermal performance of the MLI system. The design of the electrical insulated thermal anchor between the toroidal field (TF) coil and the thermal shield is also explained.

  16. Is graphene in vacuum an insulator?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joaquín E. Drut; Timo A. Lähde

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present evidence, from Lattice Monte Carlo simulations of the phase diagram of graphene as a function of the Coulomb coupling between quasiparticles, that graphene in vacuum is likely to be an insulator. We find a semimetal-insulator transition at $\\alpha_g^\\text{crit} = 1.11 \\pm 0.06$, where $\\alpha_g^{} \\simeq 2.16$ in vacuum, and $\\alpha_g^{} \\simeq 0.79$ on a SiO$_2^{}$ substrate. Our analysis uses the logarithmic derivative of the order parameter, supplemented by an equation of state. The insulating phase disappears above a critical number of four-component fermion flavors $4 < N_f^{\\text{crit}} < 6$. Our data are consistent with a second-order transition.

  17. Constraints on topological order in Mott Insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael P. Zaletel; Ashvin Vishwanath

    2015-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We point out certain symmetry induced constraints on topological order in Mott Insulators (quantum magnets with an odd number of spin $\\tfrac{1}{2}$ per unit cell). We show, for example, that the double semion topological order is incompatible with time reversal and translation symmetry in Mott insulators. This sharpens the Hastings-Oshikawa-Lieb-Schultz-Mattis theorem for 2D quantum magnets, which guarantees that a fully symmetric gapped Mott insulator must be topologically ordered, but is silent on which topological order is permitted. An application of our result is the Kagome lattice quantum antiferromagnet where recent numerical calculations of entanglement entropy indicate a ground state compatible with either toric code or double semion topological order. Our result rules out the latter possibility.

  18. Nuclear reactor vessel fuel thermal insulating barrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keegan, C. Patrick; Scobel, James H.; Wright, Richard F.

    2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel that has a hemispherical lower section that increases in volume from the center line of the reactor to the outer extent of the diameter of the thermal insulating barrier and smoothly transitions up the side walls of the vessel. The space between the thermal insulating harrier and the reactor vessel forms a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive inlet valve for the cooling water includes a buoyant door that is normally maintained sealed under its own weight and floats open when the cavity is Hooded. Passively opening steam vents are also provided.

  19. Insulation spacer eliminates electric shorts between lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colaizzi, J.F.; Rockafellow, G.B.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design criteria incorporated into the pipeline insulating spacer were: spacer material selected must have a very large compressive and tensile strength in order to withstand the weight and stress resulting on the pipelines; provide the necessary abrasive resistance, dielectric strength, and will not decay underground; must not soften with heat when used around or near stream lines or will not cold flow under pressure; minimum length and circumference to reduce ''Shielding Effects'' from any cathodic protection system; and provide a material that incorporates a maximum strength at a minimum thickness. Explains that electric shorts are caused by 2 or more metallic structures in contact with each other. Notes that the insulating spacer's use has been expanded to provide electrical and physical insulation between carrier pipe and casing, supports for piping in compressing stations, and for pipelines that are suspended on bridges.

  20. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Anthony M. (Menlo Park, CA)

    1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors.

  1. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCarthy, A.M.

    1996-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors. 10 figs.

  2. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Anthony M. (Menlo Park, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors.

  3. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCarthy, A.M.

    1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors. 10 figs.

  4. Thermal performance measurements of insulated roof systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Courville, G.E.; Childs, K.W.; Walukas, D.J.; Childs, P.W.; Griggs, E.I.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory has established a Roof Thermal Researcch Apparatus for carrying out thermal and hygric experiments on sections of low-sloped roofs. Test panels are exposed to a controlled temperature interior space and to the prevailing East Tennessee exterior environment. They are well instrumented and all data are stored and aided in the analysis by computer systems. Current experiments include studies of the effect of wet insulation on membrane temperature, thermal storage phenomena in built-up roof insulation, and the effects of varying surface reflectance on roof thermal performance.

  5. Experience with 113 Retrofit Insulation Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webber, W. O.

    EXPERIENCE WITH 113 RETROFIT INSULATION SURVEYS W. O. Webber Energy Conservation Consultants Baytown, Texas ABSTRACT We have surveyed 113 plants for thirteen clie~ts. The results of 21 recent surveys, at today s avera&e fuel price, show...,000 for $3.00 fuel up to $80,000 for $6.00 fuel. When this happens, the project return will increase from 100% up to 165% per year. The main problem that we have found with retrofit insulation surveys is the processing of detail in existing plants...

  6. Edge modes in band topological insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lukasz Fidkowski; T. S. Jackson; Israel Klich

    2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We characterize gapless edge modes in translation invariant topological insulators. We show that the edge mode spectrum is a continuous deformation of the spectrum of a certain gluing function defining the occupied state bundle over the Brillouin zone (BZ). Topologically non-trivial gluing functions, corresponding to non-trivial bundles, then yield edge modes exhibiting spectral flow. We illustrate our results for the case of chiral edge states in two dimensional Chern insulators, as well as helical edges in quantum spin Hall states.

  7. Rolling up SiGe on insulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cavallo, F.; Songmuang, R.; Ulrich, C.; Schmidt, O. G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 1, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    SiGe on insulator films of 10-50 nm thickness are fabricated by Ge condensation applying different oxidation times. The layers are released from the substrate by selectively etching the insulator film. Due to the varying Ge composition, the layers bend downward toward the substrate surface and roll up into microtubes. Depending on the Ge condensation, the strain distribution in the SiGe layers varies and allows a scaling of the tube diameters between 1 and 4 {mu}m. Assuming pseudomorphic SiGe layers, the tube diameters are smaller than expected from continuum mechanical theory. This suggests the occurrence of additional strain in the oxidized films.

  8. Development and laboratory testing of a 138-kV PPP-insulated joint for commercial application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walldorf, S.P. (MAC Products, Inc., Kearny, NJ (US)); Chu, H.; Elbadaly, H. (Consolidated Edison Co. of New York, Inc., New York, NY (USA))

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the design, development and laboratory testing of a high voltage PPP (paper polypropylene/paper laminate) insulated joint for commercial application on 138-kV PPP-insulated cable. The design approach taken is conservative and addresses the typical variations in field conditions and in skill and workmanship of the splicing. Joint construction details, including choice of connector, taping structure, and joint mechanical reinforcement, are discussed. The test criteria are described and results are presented.

  9. Evaluation of Magnetic Insulation in SF6 Filled Regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houck, T; Ferriera, T; Goerz, D; Javedani, J; Speer, R; Tully, L; Vogtlin, G

    2009-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of magnetic fields perpendicular to quasistatic electric fields to deter electrical breakdown in vacuum, referred to as magnetic insulation, is well understood and used in numerous applications. Here we define quasi-static as applied high-voltage pulse widths much longer than the transit time of light across the electrode gap. For this report we extend the concept of magnetic insulation to include the inhibition of electrical breakdown in gases. Ionization and electrical breakdown of gases in crossed electric and magnetic fields is only a moderately explored research area. For sufficiently large magnetic fields an electron does not gain sufficient energy over a single cycloidal path to ionize the gas molecules. However, it may be possible for the electron to gain sufficient energy for ionization over a number of collisions. To study breakdown in a gas, the collective behavior of an avalanche of electrons in the formation of a streamer in the gas is required. Effective reduced electric field (EREF) theory, which considers the bulk properties of an electron avalanche, has been successful at describing the influence of a crossed magnetic field on the electric field required for breakdown in gases; however, available data to verify the theory has been limited to low gas pressures and weak electronegative gases. High power devices, for example explosively driven magnetic flux compressors, operate at electrical field stresses, magnetic fields, and insulating gas pressures nearly two orders of magnitude greater than published research for crossed fields in gases. The primary limitation of conducting experiments at higher pressures, e.g. atmospheric, is generating the large magnetic fields, 10's Tesla, and electric fields, >100 kV/cm, required to see a significant effect. In this paper we describe measurements made with a coaxial geometry diode, form factor of 1.2, operating at peak electrical field stress of 220 kV/cm, maximum magnetic field of 20 Tesla, and SF{sub 6} pressure of 760 torr.

  10. An analytical and experimental investigation for an interstitial insulation technology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Dong Keun

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An insulation technique has been developed which contains a single or combination of materials to help minimize heat loss in actual industrial applications. For the petroleum industry, insulation for deep sea piping is one of the greatest challenges...

  11. Tuning of the Metal-Insulator Transition via Alkali Adsorption

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tuning of the Metal-Insulator Transition via Alkali Adsorption Print Turning a material from an insulator to a metal, or vice versa, by light irradiation, exposure to electric or...

  12. Tuning of the Metal-Insulator Transition via Alkali Adsorption

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tuning of the Metal-Insulator Transition via Alkali Adsorption Tuning of the Metal-Insulator Transition via Alkali Adsorption Print Wednesday, 29 March 2006 00:00 Turning a...

  13. Moisture Durability of Vapor Permeable Insulating Sheathing (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this project, Building America team Building Science Corporation researched some of the ramifications of using exterior, vapor permeable insulation on retrofit walls with vapor permeable cavity insulation. Retrofit strategies are a key factor in reducing exterior building stock consumption.

  14. An analytical and experimental investigation for an interstitial insulation technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Dong Keun

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An insulation technique has been developed which contains a single or combination of materials to help minimize heat loss in actual industrial applications. For the petroleum industry, insulation for deep sea piping is one of the greatest challenges...

  15. Observation of a Macroscopically Quantum-Entangled Insulator

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Insulator Print Wednesday, 27 May 2009 00:00 It has recently been proposed that insulators with large band gaps and strong spin-orbit coupling can host a new phase of...

  16. Observation of a Macroscopically Quantum-Entangled Insulator

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of a Macroscopically Quantum-Entangled Insulator Print It has recently been proposed that insulators with large band gaps and strong spin-orbit coupling can host a new phase of...

  17. Gapped symmetry preserving surface state for the electron topological insulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chong

    It is well known that the three-dimensional (3D) electronic topological insulator (TI) with charge-conservation and time-reversal symmetry cannot have a trivial insulating surface that preserves symmetry. It is often ...

  18. antisolar insulated roof: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A&M University - TxSpace Summary: PIPE INSULATION ECONOMIES Robert E. Schilling, P.E. Eaton Corporation Aurora, Ohio ABSTRACT Pipe Insulation Economies is a computer pro gram...

  19. airborne sound insulation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A&M University - TxSpace Summary: PIPE INSULATION ECONOMIES Robert E. Schilling, P.E. Eaton Corporation Aurora, Ohio ABSTRACT Pipe Insulation Economies is a computer pro gram...

  20. affordable window insulation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A&M University - TxSpace Summary: PIPE INSULATION ECONOMIES Robert E. Schilling, P.E. Eaton Corporation Aurora, Ohio ABSTRACT Pipe Insulation Economies is a computer pro gram...

  1. antiferromagnetic mott insulator: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A&M University - TxSpace Summary: PIPE INSULATION ECONOMIES Robert E. Schilling, P.E. Eaton Corporation Aurora, Ohio ABSTRACT Pipe Insulation Economies is a computer pro gram...

  2. atomic mott insulator: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A&M University - TxSpace Summary: PIPE INSULATION ECONOMIES Robert E. Schilling, P.E. Eaton Corporation Aurora, Ohio ABSTRACT Pipe Insulation Economies is a computer pro gram...

  3. alumina fibrous insulation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A&M University - TxSpace Summary: PIPE INSULATION ECONOMIES Robert E. Schilling, P.E. Eaton Corporation Aurora, Ohio ABSTRACT Pipe Insulation Economies is a computer pro gram...

  4. Classification and characterization of topological insulators and superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mong, Roger

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Weak topological insulators (WTI) . . . . . 1.4 Topologicalweak topological insulators (WTI). The surfaces of STIs haveSTI STM TI TRIM/TRIMs TRS TKNN VPT WTI one-dimension, two-

  5. Mechanics of Insulator Behavior in Concrete Crosstie Fastening Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    of Insulator Behavior Analysis of failure modes and causes · Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) used

  6. Molecular Cell Mode of Regulation and the Insulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molecular Cell Article Mode of Regulation and the Insulation of Bacterial Gene Expression Vered.molcel.2012.04.032 SUMMARY A gene can be said to be insulated from environ- mental variations if its the insulation of the lac promoter of E. coli and of synthetic constructs in which the transcription factor CRP

  7. MOTT INSULATORS, SPIN LIQUIDS AND QUANTUM DISORDERED SUPERCONDUCTIVITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COURSE 7 MOTT INSULATORS, SPIN LIQUIDS AND QUANTUM DISORDERED SUPERCONDUCTIVITY MATTHEW P.A. FISHER insulators and quantum magnetism 583 3.1 Spin models and quantum magnetism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 637 #12;MOTT INSULATORS, SPIN LIQUIDS AND QUANTUM DISORDERED SUPERCONDUCTIVITY Matthew P.A. Fisher

  8. Topological insulators and superconductors Xiao-Liang Qi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Zhigang

    Topological insulators and superconductors Xiao-Liang Qi Microsoft Research, Station Q, Elings Hall, California 94305, USA (Received 2 August 2010; published 14 October 2011) Topological insulators are new-dimensional and three-dimensional topological insulators are reviewed, and both the topological band theory

  9. A Novel Method for Transport and Cooling of a Muon Beam Based on Magnetic Insulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stratakis, Diktys; Gallardo, Juan C.; Palmer, Robert B. [Department of Physics, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2010-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Unwanted field emission is a well known problem for high-gradient accelerating structures as it can cause damage and initiate breakdown. Recent experiments indicated that the deleterious effects of field-emission are greatly enhanced in the presence of external magnetic fields. In the context of designing a muon accelerator this imposes numerous constraints since rf cavities need to operate within strong magnetic fields in order to successfully transport the beam. Here, a novel design of a magnetically insulated cavity in which the walls are parallel to the magnetic field lines is presented. We show that with magnetic insulation, damage from field emission can be significantly suppressed. Effects of coil positioning errors on the cavity performance are discussed and the required magnetic field strength to achieve insulation is estimated. We present a conceptual design of a muon collider cooling lattice with magnetic insulated cavities and cross-check its performance to the one with pillbox cavities. Finally an experiment to test magnetic insulation is described.

  10. Specific features of the photoconductivity of semi-insulating cadmium telluride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golubyatnikov, V. A.; Grigor’ev, F. I.; Lysenko, A. P., E-mail: aplysenko@hse.ru; Strogankova, N. I.; Shadov, M. B. [National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow Institute of Electronics and Mathematics (Russian Federation); Belov, A. G. [OAO GIREDMET State Research and Design Institute of the Rare-Metal Industry (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of local illumination providing a high level of free-carrier injection on the conductivity of a sample of semi-insulating cadmium telluride and on the properties of ohmic contacts to the sample is studied. It is found that, irrespective of the illumination region, the contact resistance of ohmic contacts decreases and the concentration of majority carriers in the sample grows in proportion to the illumination intensity. It is shown that inherent heterogeneities in crystals of semi-insulating semiconductors can be studied by scanning with a light probe.

  11. The Insulation Energy Appraisal Assessing the True Value of Insulated System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schell, S.

    Insulation remains a seriously under-utilized technology in the manufacturing and industrial sectors of the economy even though its role in energy efficiency and environmental preservation is clear. The objective of the presentation is to educate...

  12. ASBESTOS PIPE-INSULATION REMOVAL ROBOT SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2000-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This final topical report details the development, experimentation and field-testing activities for a robotic asbestos pipe-insulation removal robot system developed for use within the DOE's weapon complex as part of their ER and WM program, as well as in industrial abatement. The engineering development, regulatory compliance, cost-benefit and field-trial experiences gathered through this program are summarized.

  13. Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Insulating Sheathing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, P.; Eng, P.; Lepage, R.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The addition of insulation to the exterior of buildings is an effective means of increasing the thermal resistance of both wood framed walls as well as mass masonry wall assemblies. For thick layers of exterior insulation (levels greater than 1.5 inches), the use of wood furring strips attached through the insulation back to the structure has been used by many contractors and designers as a means to provide a convenient cladding attachment location (Straube and Smegal 2009, Pettit 2009, Joyce 2009, Ueno 2010). The research presented in this report is intended to help develop a better understanding of the system mechanics involved and the potential for environmental exposure induced movement between the furring strip and the framing. BSC sought to address the following research questions: 1. What are the relative roles of the mechanisms and the magnitudes of the force that influence the vertical displacement resistance of the system? 2. Can the capacity at a specified deflection be reliably calculated using mechanics based equations? 3. What are the impacts of environmental exposure on the vertical displacement of furring strips attached directly through insulation back to a wood structure?

  14. Tunable Chern insulator with shaken optical lattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albert Verdeny; Florian Mintert

    2015-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Driven optical lattices permit the engineering of effective dynamics with well-controllable tunneling properties. We describe the realization of a tunable a Chern insulator by driving particles on a shaken hexagonal lattice with optimally designed polychromatic driving forces. Its implementation does not require shallow lattices, which favors the study of strongly-correlated phases with non-trivial topology.

  15. TRANSITION DE MOTT METAL-INSULATOR TRANSITIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    TRANSITION DE MOTT METAL-INSULATOR TRANSITIONS IN TRANSITION METAL OXIDES by D. B. McWHAN, A. MENTH oxydes de metaux de transition on observe une transition d'isolant a metal puis de metal a isolant de type Mott lorsque l'on augmentelenombre d'electrons d. Danslesysthe(V1-~Cr~)203une transition de Mott

  16. D-Algebra Structure of Topological Insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Estienne; N. Regnault; B. A. Bernevig

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the quantum Hall effect, the density operators at different wave-vectors generally do not commute and give rise to the Girvin MacDonald Plazmann (GMP) algebra with important consequences such as ground-state center of mass degeneracy at fractional filling fraction, and W_{1 + \\infty} symmetry of the filled Landau levels. We show that the natural generalization of the GMP algebra to higher dimensional topological insulators involves the concept of a D-algebra formed by using the fully anti-symmetric tensor in D-dimensions. For insulators in even dimensional space, the D-algebra is isotropic and closes for the case of constant non-Abelian F(k) ^ F(k) ... ^ F(k) connection (D-Berry curvature), and its structure factors are proportional to the D/2-Chern number. In odd dimensions, the algebra is not isotropic, contains the weak topological insulator index (layers of the topological insulator in one less dimension) and does not contain the Chern-Simons \\theta form (F ^ A - 2/3 A ^ A ^ A in 3 dimensions). The Chern-Simons form appears in a certain combination of the parallel transport and simple translation operator which is not an algebra. The possible relation to D-dimensional volume preserving diffeomorphisms and parallel transport of extended objects is also discussed.

  17. Laminated insulators having heat dissipation means

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Niemann, R.C.; Mataya, K.F.; Gonczy, J.D.

    1980-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A laminated body is provided with heat dissipation capabilities. The insulator body is formed by dielectric layers interleaved with heat conductive layers, and bonded by an adhesive to form a composite structure. The heat conductive layers include provision for connection to an external thermal circuit.

  18. Tubing carried perforating gun with insulation jacket

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donovan, J.F.; Yates, D.N.

    1991-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a method of insulating a tubing carried perforating gun which is run through a subterranean wellbore. It includes making up at the well surface a tubing string for introduction within the well, the tubing string carrying a perforating gun assembly.

  19. Dielectric breakdown model for conductor-loaded and insulator-loaded composite materials P. Bergero,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peruani, Fernando

    Dielectric breakdown model for conductor-loaded and insulator-loaded composite materials P. Bergero strength is highly desirable, and in the past years composite materials such as resin matrix filled- tors, and composites containing carbon black and titanium dioxide have recently been tested

  20. Thermoelectric Effect across the Metal-Insulator Domain Walls in VO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Junqiao

    Thermoelectric Effect across the Metal-Insulator Domain Walls in VO2 Microbeams J. Cao,,, W. Fan-performance thermoelectric materials are currently one of the focuses in materials research for energy conversion technologies.1-4 A good thermoelectric material should have a relatively high thermopower (Seebeck coefficient

  1. Intrinsic ultrathin topological insulators grown via molecular beam epitaxy characterized by in-situ angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J. J.; Vishik, I. M.; Ma, Y.; Shen, Z. X. [Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials, Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Schmitt, F. T.; Moore, R. G. [Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials, Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2012-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the capability of growing high quality ultrathin (10 or fewer quintuple layers) films of the topological insulators Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} using molecular beam epitaxy. Unlike previous growth techniques, which often pin the Fermi energy in the conduction band for ultrathin samples, our samples remain intrinsic bulk insulators. We characterize these films using in-situ angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy, which is a direct probe of bandstructure, and ex-situ atomic force microscopy. We find that the conduction band lies above the Fermi energy, indicating bulk insulating behavior with only the surface states crossing the Fermi energy. The use of a thermal cracker allows for more stoichiometric flux rates during growth, while still creating intrinsically doped films, paving the way for future improvements in growth of topological insulators.

  2. Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies: Part II, New Construction - August 13, 2014 - Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Rigid Insulation Building America Webinar:...

  3. Pipeline system insulation: Thermal insulation and corrosion prevention. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations concerning thermal and corrosion insulation of pipeline systems used to transport liquids and gases. Topics include thermal aging of polyurethane used for foam heating pipes, extrusion film pipeline insulation materials and processes, flexible expanded nitrile rubber pipeline insulation with Class 1 fire rating, and underground fiberglass reinforced polyester insulated pipeline systems. Applications in solar heating systems; underground water, oil, and gas pipelines; interior hot and cold water lines under seawater; and chemical plant pipeline system insulation are included. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  4. Molecular Beam Epitaxial Growth of Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3 Topological Insulators on GaAs (111) Substrates: A Potential Route to Fabricate Topological Insulator p-n Junction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhaoquan Zeng; Timothy A. Morgan; Dongsheng Fan; Chen Li; Yusuke Hirono; Xian Hu; Yanfei Zhao; Joon Sue Lee; Zhiming M. Wang; Jian Wang; Shuiqing Yu; Michael E. Hawkridge; Mourad Benamara; Gregory J. Salamo

    2013-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    High quality Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3 topological insulators films were epitaxially grown on GaAs (111) substrate using solid source molecular beam epitaxy. Their growth and behavior on both vicinal and non-vicinal GaAs (111) substrates were investigated by reflection high-energy electron diffraction, atomic force microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. It is found that non-vicinal GaAs (111) substrate is better than a vicinal substrate to provide high quality Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3 films. Hall and magnetoresistance measurements indicate that p type Sb2Te3 and n type Bi2Te3 topological insulator films can be directly grown on a GaAs (111) substrate, which may pave a way to fabricate topological insulator p-n junction on the same substrate, compatible with the fabrication process of present semiconductor optoelectronic devices.

  5. Particle trap for compressed gas insulated transmission systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cookson, A.H.

    1984-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A particle trap is provided for gas insulated transmission lines having a central high voltage conductor supported within an outer coaxial conductive sheath by a dielectric support member. A cavity between the inner conductor and outer sheath is filled with a dielectric insulating gas. A cone-like particle deflector, mounted to the inner conductor, deflects moving particles away from the support member, to radially outer portions of the cavity. A conductive shield is disposed adjacent the outer sheath to form a field-free region in radially outer portions of the cavity, between the shield and the sheath. Particles traveling along the cavity are deflected by the cone-like deflector into the field-free region where they are held immobile. In a vertical embodiment, particles enter the field-free region through an upper end of a gap formed between shield and sheath members. In a horizontal embodiment, the deflector cone has a base which is terminated radially internally of the shield. Apertures in the shield located adjacent the deflector allow passage of deflected particles into the field-free region. The dielectric support member is thereby protected from contaminating particles that may otherwise come to rest thereon.

  6. Particle trap for compressed gas insulated transmission systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cookson, Alan H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A particle trap is provided for gas insulated transmission lines having a central high voltage conductor supported within an outer coaxial conductive sheath by a dielectric support member. A cavity between the inner conductor and outer sheath is filled with a dielectric insulating gas. A cone-like particle deflector, mounted to the inner conductor, deflects moving particles away from the support member, to radially outer portions of the cavity. A conductive shield is disposed adjacent the outer sheath to form a field-free region in radially outer portions of the cavity, between the shield and the sheath. Particles traveling along the cavity are deflected by the cone-like deflector into the field-free region where they are held immobile. In a vertical embodiment, particles enter the field-free region through an upper end of a gap formed between shield and sheath members. In a horizontal embodiment, the deflector cone has a base which is terminated radially internally of the shield. Apertures in the shield located adjacent the deflector allow passage of deflected particles into the field-free region. The dielectric support member is thereby protected from contaminating particles that may otherwise come to rest thereon.

  7. Apparatus for improving performance of electrical insulating structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilson, Michael J. (Modesto, CA); Goerz, David A. (Brentwood, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Removing the electrical field from the internal volume of high-voltage structures; e.g., bushings, connectors, capacitors, and cables. The electrical field is removed from inherently weak regions of the interconnect, such as between the center conductor and the solid dielectric, and places it in the primary insulation. This is accomplished by providing a conductive surface on the inside surface of the principal solid dielectric insulator surrounding the center conductor and connects the center conductor to this conductive surface. The advantage of removing the electric fields from the weaker dielectric region to a stronger area improves reliability, increases component life and operating levels, reduces noise and losses, and allows for a smaller compact design. This electric field control approach is currently possible on many existing products at a modest cost. Several techniques are available to provide the level of electric field control needed. Choosing the optimum technique depends on material, size, and surface accessibility. The simplest deposition method uses a standard electroless plating technique, but other metalization techniques include vapor and energetic deposition, plasma spraying, conductive painting, and other controlled coating methods.

  8. Apparatus for improving performance of electrical insulating structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilson, Michael J.; Goerz, David A.

    2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Removing the electrical field from the internal volume of high-voltage structures; e.g., bushings, connectors, capacitors, and cables. The electrical field is removed from inherently weak regions of the interconnect, such as between the center conductor and the solid dielectric, and places it in the primary insulation. This is accomplished by providing a conductive surface on the inside surface of the principal solid dielectric insulator surrounding the center conductor and connects the center conductor to this conductive surface. The advantage of removing the electric fields from the weaker dielectric region to a stronger area improves reliability, increases component life and operating levels, reduces noise and losses, and allows for a smaller compact design. This electric field control approach is currently possible on many existing products at a modest cost. Several techniques are available to provide the level of electric field control needed. Choosing the optimum technique depends on material, size, and surface accessibility. The simplest deposition method uses a standard electroless plating technique, but other metalization techniques include vapor and energetic deposition, plasma spraying, conductive painting, and other controlled coating methods.

  9. Affordable Window Insulation with R-10/inch Rating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenifer Marchesi Redouane Begag; Je Kyun Lee; Danny Ou; Jong Ho Sonn; George Gould; Wendell Rhine

    2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    During the performance of contract DE-FC26-00-NT40998, entitled ''Affordable Window Insulation with R-10/inch Value'', research was conducted at Aspen Aerogels, Inc. to develop new transparent aerogel materials suitable for window insulation applications. The project requirements were to develop a formulation or multiple formulations that have high transparency (85-90%) in the visible region, are hydrophobic (will not opacify with exposure to water vapor or liquid), and have at least 2% resiliency (interpreted as recoverable 2% strain and better than 5% strain to failure in compression). Results from an unrelated project showed that silica aerogels covalently bonded to organic polymers exhibit excellent mechanical properties. At the outset of this project, we believed that such a route is the best to improve mechanical properties. We have applied Design of Experiment (DOE) techniques to optimize formulations including both silica aerogels and organically modified silica aerogels (''Ormosils''). We used these DOE results to optimize formulations around the local/global optimization points. This report documents that we succeeded in developing a number of formulations that meet all of the stated criteria. We successfully developed formulations utilizing a two-step approach where the first step involves acid catalyzed hydrolysis and the second step involves base catalyzed condensation to make the gels. The gels were dried using supercritical CO{sub 2} and we were able to make 1 foot x 1 foot x 0.5 inch panels that met the criteria established.

  10. Numerical analysis of heat transfer by conduction and natural convection in loose-fill fiberglass insulation--effects of convection on thermal performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delmas, A.A.; Wilkes, K.E.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-dimensional code for solving equations of convective heat transfer in porous media is used to analyze heat transfer by conduction and convection in the attic insulation configuration. The particular cases treated correspond to loose-fill fiberglass insulation, which is characterized by high porosity and air permeability. The effects of natural convection on the thermal performance of the insulation are analyzed for various densities, permeabilities, and thicknesses of insulation. With convection increasing the total heat transfer through the insulation, the thermal resistance was found to decrease as the temperature difference across the insulating material increases. The predicted results for the thermal resistance are compared with data obtained in the large-scale climate simulator at the Roof Research Center using the attic test module, where the same phenomenon has already been observed. The way the wood joists within the insulation influence the start of convection is studied for differing thermophysical and dynamic properties of the insulating material. The presence of wood joists induces convection at a lower temperature difference.

  11. Apparatus for thermal performance measurements of insulated roof systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Courville, G.E.; Childs, K.W.; Walukas, D.J.; Childs, P.W.; Griggs, E.I.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy conducted thermal performance measurements on low-slope roofs with a recently developed field test apparatus at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The apparatus accommodates four 4 ft x 8 ft test specimens and includes the measurement capabilities for specimen temperatures, temperature gradients, heat flows and moisture content. A weather station characterizes outdoor weather conditions. Tests underway include (1) validation of a roof surface temperature model developed to study the effects of wet insulation; (2) measurement of temperature distributions and heat transfer in high R-value roofs; and (3) validation of an analysis of the effectiveness of high reflectance surfaces. Preliminary experimental results are presented and correlations between experiment and modeling are discussed.

  12. Widespread spin polarization effects in photoemission from topological insulators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jozwiak, C.; Chen, Y. L.; Fedorov, A. V.; Analytis, J. G.; Rotundu, C. R.; Schmid, A. K.; Denlinger, J. D.; Chuang, Y.-D.; Lee, D.-H.; Fisher, I. R.; Birgeneau, R. J.; Shen, Z.-X.; Hussain, Z.; Lanzara, A.

    2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    High-resolution spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (spin-ARPES) was performed on the three-dimensional topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} using a recently developed high-efficiency spectrometer. The topological surface state's helical spin structure is observed, in agreement with theoretical prediction. Spin textures of both chiralities, at energies above and below the Dirac point, are observed, and the spin structure is found to persist at room temperature. The measurements reveal additional unexpected spin polarization effects, which also originate from the spin-orbit interaction, but are well differentiated from topological physics by contrasting momentum and photon energy and polarization dependencies. These observations demonstrate significant deviations of photoelectron and quasiparticle spin polarizations. Our findings illustrate the inherent complexity of spin-resolved ARPES and demonstrate key considerations for interpreting experimental results.

  13. Apparatus for insulating windows and the like

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mitchell, R.A.

    1984-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for insulating window openings through walls and the like includes a thermal shutter, a rail for mounting the shutter adjacent to the window opening and a coupling for connecting the shutter to the rail. The thermal shutter includes an insulated panel adhered to frame members which surround the periphery of the panel. The frame members include a hard portion for providing the frame and a soft portion for providing a seal with that portion of the wall adjacent to the periphery of the opening. The coupling means is preferably integral with the attachment rail. According to a preferred embodiment, the coupling means includes a continuous hinge of reduced thickness. The thermal shutter can be permanently attached, hinged, bi-folded, or sliding with respect to the window and wall. A distribution method is to market the apparatus in kit'' form. 11 figs.

  14. Contaminant trap for gas-insulated apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adcock, James L. (Knoxville, TN); Pace, Marshall O. (Knoxville, TN); Christophorou, Loucas G. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A contaminant trap for a gas-insulated electrical conductor is provided. A resinous dielectric body such as Kel-F wax, grease or other sticky polymeric or oligomeric compound is disposed on the inside wall of the outer housing for the conductor. The resinous body is sufficiently sticky at ambient temperatures to immobilize contaminant particles in the insulating gas on the exposed surfaces thereof. An electric resistance heating element is disposed in the resinous body to selectively raise the temperature of the resinous body to a molten state so that the contaminant particles collected on the surface of the body sink into the body so that the surface of the resinous body is renewed to a particle-less condition and, when cooled, returns to a sticky collecting surface.

  15. Multiterminal Conductance of a Floquet Topological Insulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. E. F. Foa Torres; P. M. Perez-Piskunow; C. A. Balseiro; G. Usaj

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on simulations of the dc conductance and quantum Hall response of a Floquet topological insulator using Floquet scattering theory. Our results reveal that laser-induced edge states in graphene lead to quantum Hall plateaus once imperfect matching with the non-illuminated leads is lessened. But the magnitude of the Hall plateaus is not directly related to the number and chirality of all the edge states at a given energy as usual. Instead, the plateaus are dominated only by those edge states adding to the dc density of states. Therefore, the dc quantum Hall conductance of a Floquet topological insulator is not directly linked to topological invariants of the full the Floquet bands.

  16. Electric-Magnetic Duality and Topological Insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas Karch

    2009-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We work out the action of the SL(2,Z) electric-magnetic duality group for an insulator with a non-trivial permittivity, permeability and theta-angle. This theory has recently been proposed to be the correct low-energy effective action for topological insulators. As applications, we give manifestly SL(2,Z) covariant expressions for the Faraday rotation at orthogonal incidence at the interface of two such materials, as well as for the induced magnetic and electric charges, slightly clarifying the meaning of expressions previously derived in the literature. We also use electric-magnetic duality to find a gravitational dual for a strongly coupled version of this theory using the AdS/CFT correspondence.

  17. Fractional topological insulators in three dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph Maciejko; Xiao-Liang Qi; Andreas Karch; Shou-Cheng Zhang

    2010-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Topological insulators can be generally defined by a topological field theory with an axion angle theta of 0 or pi. In this work, we introduce the concept of fractional topological insulator defined by a fractional axion angle and show that it can be consistent with time reversal (T) invariance if ground state degeneracies are present. The fractional axion angle can be measured experimentally by the quantized fractional bulk magnetoelectric polarization P_3, and a `halved' fractional quantum Hall effect on the surface with Hall conductance of the form (p/q)(e^2/2h) with p,q odd. In the simplest of these states the electron behaves as a bound state of three fractionally charged `quarks' coupled to a deconfined non-Abelian SU(3) `color' gauge field, where the fractional charge of the quarks changes the quantization condition of P_3 and allows fractional values consistent with T-invariance.

  18. Electric-Magnetic Duality and Topological Insulators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karch, A. [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1560 (United States)

    2009-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We work out the action of the SL(2,Z) electric-magnetic duality group for an insulator with a nontrivial permittivity, permeability, and theta angle. This theory has recently been proposed to be the correct low-energy effective action for topological insulators. As applications, we give manifestly SL(2,Z) covariant expressions for the Faraday rotation at orthogonal incidence at the interface of two such materials, as well as for the induced magnetic and electric charges, slightly clarifying the meaning of expressions previously derived in the literature. We also use electric-magnetic duality to find a gravitational dual for a strongly coupled version of this theory using the gauge/gravity correspondence.

  19. Fractional Topological Insulators in Three Dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maciejko, Joseph; Zhang Shoucheng [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Qi Xiaoliang [Microsoft Research, Station Q, Elings Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Karch, Andreas [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1560 (United States)

    2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Topological insulators can be generally defined by a topological field theory with an axion angle {theta} of 0 or {pi}. In this work, we introduce the concept of fractional topological insulator defined by a fractional axion angle and show that it can be consistent with time reversal T invariance if ground state degeneracies are present. The fractional axion angle can be measured experimentally by the quantized fractional bulk magnetoelectric polarization P{sub 3}, and a 'halved' fractional quantum Hall effect on the surface with Hall conductance of the form {sigma}{sub H}=(p/q)(e{sup 2}/2h) with p, q odd. In the simplest of these states the electron behaves as a bound state of three fractionally charged 'quarks' coupled to a deconfined non-Abelian SU(3) 'color' gauge field, where the fractional charge of the quarks changes the quantization condition of P{sub 3} and allows fractional values consistent with T invariance.

  20. Transgression field theory for interacting topological insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aç?k, Özgür

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider effective topological field theories of quantum Hall systems and time-reversal invariant topological insulators that are Chern-Simons and BF field theories. The edge states of these systems are related to the gauge invariance of the effective actions. For the edge states at the interface of two topological insulators, transgression field theory is proposed as a gauge invariant effective action. Transgression actions of Chern-Simons theories for (2+1)D and (4+1)D and BF theories for (3+1)D are constructed. By using transgression actions, the edge states are written in terms of the bulk connections of effective Chern-Simons and BF theories.

  1. The topological insulator in a fractal space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Zhi-Gang; Zhang, Yan-Yang; Li, Shu-Shen [SKLSM, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the band structures and transport properties of a two-dimensional model of topological insulator, with a fractal edge or a fractal bulk. A fractal edge does not affect the robust transport even when the fractal pattern has reached the resolution of the atomic-scale, because the bulk is still well insulating against backscattering. On the other hand, a fractal bulk can support the robust transport only when the fractal resolution is much larger than a critical size. Smaller resolution of bulk fractal pattern will lead to remarkable backscattering and localization, due to strong couplings of opposite edge states on narrow sub-edges which appear almost everywhere in the fractal bulk.

  2. Apparatus for insulating windows and the like

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Robert A. (R.D. #1, Box 462-A, Voorheesville, NY 12186)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for insulating window openings through walls and the like includes a thermal shutter, a rail for mounting the shutter adjacent to the window opening and a coupling for connecting the shutter to the rail. The thermal shutter includes an insulated panel adhered to frame members which surround the periphery of the panel. The frame members include a hard portion for providing the frame and a soft portion for providing a seal with that portion of the wall adjacent to the periphery of the opening. The coupling means is preferably integral with the attachment rail. According to a preferred embodiment, the coupling means includes a continuous hinge of reduced thickness. The thermal shutter can be permanently attached, hinged, bi-folded, or sliding with respect to the window and wall. A distribution method is to market the apparatus in "kit" form.

  3. Excavationless Exterior Foundation Insulation Exploratory Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosiman, G.; Wagner, R.; Schirber, T.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The key objective of this exploratory study was to investigate the feasibility of the development or adoption of technologies that would enable a large percentage of existing homes in cold climates to apply a combination 'excavationless' soil removal process with appropriate insulation and water management on the exterior of existing foundations at a low cost. Our approach was to explore existing excavation and material technologies and systems to discover whether potential successful combinations existed.

  4. Correctly specify insulation for process equipment and piping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, C. [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Insulation serves as a thermal barrier to resist the flow of heat. When insulation is installed over piping or equipment to minimize heat losses, the insulation is categorized as heat conservation. Software programs for determining heat losses are based on ASTM C 680. If heat conservation insulation is calculated to determine the most cost-effective thickness for piping or equipment, then the insulation is categorized as economic insulation. Methods for manually determining economic thicknesses using various graphs and precalculated charts are given in Turner and Malloy. However, modern software programs available from industrial associations calculate economic thicknesses based on after-tax annual costs. Costs associated with owning insulation are expressed on an equivalent uniform annual cost basis. The thickness with the lowest annual cost is reported as the economic thickness. Some of the economic data needed to calculate economic thicknesses are fuel cost, depreciation period, annual fuel inflation rate, annual hours of operation, return on investment, effective income tax rate, annual insulation maintenance costs, and installed costs. To obtain accurate economical thicknesses, it is best to solicit installed costs from a local contractor likely to bid on the work. This paper covers the most suitable insulation materials for certain applications, the most economic material and thickness to use, and how the total insulation system should be designed.

  5. Affordable Cold Climate Infill Housing with Hybrid Insulation Approach, Wyandotte, Michigan (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metzger, C.; Lukachko, A.; Grin, A.; Bergey, D.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Even builders who are relatively new to energy-efficient construction can consistently reach a target whole house airtightness of 1.5 air changes per hour at 50 Pascals (ACH50) with high R-value enclosures that use a hybrid insulation approach. The City of Wyandotte, Michigan, started a construction program in 2010 to build affordable, energy-efficient homes on lots in existing neighborhoods. A goal of the program was to engage local builders in energy-efficient construction and be able to deliver the new houses for less than $100/ft2. By the end of 2012, approximately 25 new houses were built by five local builders under this program. To help builders consistently achieve the airtightness target, a local architect worked with researchers from Building Science Corporation, a U.S. Department of Energy Building America team, to develop a technology specification with several key pieces. A high R-value wall and roof assembly made use of 2 ?6 advanced framing and a hybrid insulation approach that included insulating sheathing to control thermal bridging and closed cell spray polyurethane foam insulation (ccSPF) for its airtightness and vapor control benefits. This approach allows the air barrier to be completed and tested before any finishing work occurs, ensuring that problems are spotted and corrected early in the construction process.

  6. Thermal balance of a wall with PCM-enhanced thermal insulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosny, Jan [ORNL] [ORNL; Kossecka, Elizabeth [Institute of Fundamental Technological Research, Polish Academy of Sciences] [Institute of Fundamental Technological Research, Polish Academy of Sciences; Williams, Teresa [ORNL] [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT: PCM insulation mixtures function as lightweight thermal mass components. It is expected that these types of dynamic insulation systems will contribute to the objective of reducing energy use in buildings. In this paper, dynamic thermal properties of a material in which phase hange occurs are analyzed, using the temperature-dependent specific heat model. Integral formula for the total heat flow in finite time interval, across the surface of a slab of the phase change material, was derived. Simulations have been performed to analyze heat transfer through a light-weight wall assembly with PCM-enhanced insulation, in different external climate thermal conditions. Results of simulations indicate that for cyclic processes, the effect of PCM in an insulation layer results rather in time shifting of the heat flux extreme values than in reduction of the total heat flow. The heat gains maxima, resulting in high cooling loads, are shifted in time by about two hours and reduced about 15% to 30% for not very high external sol-air temperatures.

  7. Humidity effects on wire insulation breakdown strength.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appelhans, Leah

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for the testing of the dielectric breakdown strength of insulation on metal wires under variable humidity conditions were developed. Two methods, an ASTM method and the twisted pair method, were compared to determine if the twisted pair method could be used for determination of breakdown strength under variable humidity conditions. It was concluded that, although there were small differences in outcomes between the two testing methods, the non-standard method (twisted pair) would be appropriate to use for further testing of the effects of humidity on breakdown performance. The dielectric breakdown strength of 34G copper wire insulated with double layer Poly-Thermaleze/Polyamide-imide insulation was measured using the twisted pair method under a variety of relative humidity (RH) conditions and exposure times. Humidity at 50% RH and below was not found to affect the dielectric breakdown strength. At 80% RH the dielectric breakdown strength was significantly diminished. No effect for exposure time up to 140 hours was observed at 50 or 80%RH.

  8. Witten effect in a crystalline topological insulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberg, G.; Franz, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been noted a long time ago that a term of the form theta(e{sup 2}/2pih)Bcentre dotE may be added to the standard Maxwell Lagrangian without modifying the familiar laws of electricity and magnetism. theta is known to particle physicists as the 'axion' field and whether or not it has a nonzero expectation value in vacuum remains a fundamental open question of the standard model. A key manifestation of the axion term is the Witten effect: a unit magnetic monopole placed inside a medium with thetanot =0 is predicted to bind a (generally fractional) electric charge -e(theta/2pi+n) with n integer. Here we conduct a test of the Witten effect based on the recently established fact that the axion term with theta=pi emerges naturally in the description of the electromagnetic response of a class of crystalline solids called topological insulators--materials distinguished by strong spin-orbit coupling and nontrivial band structures. Using a simple physical model for a topological insulator we demonstrate the existence of a fractional charge bound to a monopole by an explicit numerical calculation. We also propose a scheme for generating an 'artificial' magnetic monopole in a topological insulator film that may be used to facilitate an experimental test of Witten's prediction.

  9. Topological insulators with arbitrarily tunable entanglement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. C. Budich; J. Eisert; E. J. Bergholtz

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We elucidate how Chern and topological insulators fulfill an area law for the entanglement entropy. By explicit construction of a family of lattice Hamiltonians, we are able to demonstrate that the area law contribution can be tuned to an arbitrarily small value, but is topologically protected from vanishing exactly. We prove this by introducing novel methods to bound entanglement entropies from correlations using perturbation bounds, drawing intuition from ideas of quantum information theory. This rigorous approach is complemented by an intuitive understanding in terms of entanglement edge states. These insights have a number of important consequences: The area law has no universal component, no matter how small, and the entanglement scaling cannot be used as a faithful diagnostic of topological insulators. This holds for all Renyi entropies which uniquely determine the entanglement spectrum which is hence also non-universal. The existence of arbitrarily weakly entangled topological insulators furthermore opens up possibilities of devising correlated topological phases in which the entanglement entropy is small and which are thereby numerically tractable, specifically in tensor network approaches.

  10. Smoldering combustion hazards of thermal insulation materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohlemiller, T.J.; Rogers, F.E.

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Work on the smolder ignitability in cellulosic insulation and on thermal analytical characterization of the oxidation of this material is presented. Thermal analysis (TGA and DSC) shows that both retarded and unretarded cellulosic insulation oxidizes in two overall stages, both of which are exothermic. The second stage (oxidation of the char left as a residue of the first stage) is much more energetic on a unit mass basis than the first. However, kinetics and a sufficient exothermicity make the first stage responsible for ignition in most realistic circumstances. Existing smolder retardants such as boric acid have their major effect on the kinetics of the second oxidation stage and thus produce only a rather small (20/sup 0/C) increase in smolder ignition temperature. Several simplified analogs of attic insulations have been tested to determine the variability of minimum smolder ignition temperature. These employed planar or tubular constant temperature heat sources in a thermal environment quite similar to a realistic attic application. Go/no-go tests provided the borderline (minimum) ignition temperature for each configuration. The wide range (150/sup 0/C) of minimum ignition temperatures confirmed the predominant dependence of smolder ignition on heat flow geometry. Other factors (bulk density, retardants) produced much less effect on ignitability.

  11. Influence Of Three Dynamic Predictive Clothing Insulation Models On Building Energy Use, HVAC Sizing And Thermal Comfort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiavon, Stefano; Lee, Kwang Ho

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Predictive Clothing Insulation Models based on Outdoor AirPREDICTIVE CLOTHING INSULATION MODELS ON BUILDING ENERGYthat the clothing insulation is equal to a constant value of

  12. Compact gas-insulated transformer. Fourteenth quarterly report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Objective is to develop a compact, more efficient, quieter transformer which does not rely on mineral oil insulation. Compressed SF/sub 6/ is used as the external insulation and polymer film as the insulation between turns. A separate liquid cooling system is also provided. This document reports progress made in design, mechanical, dielectric, short circuit, thermal, materials, prototype, accessories, commercialization, and system studies. (DLC)

  13. Thermal Insulation Performance in the Process Industries: Facts and Fallacies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tye, R. P.

    Guarded Hot Box Study on Thermal Performance of Fibrous Insulations Used in Lofts," private com munication. 295 ESL-IE-85-05-54 Proceedings from the Seventh National Industrial Energy Technology Conference, Houston, TX, May 12-15, 1985 ...THERMAL INSULATION PERFORMANCE IN 'mE PROCESS INDUSTRIES: FACTS AND FALLACIES R.P. Tye Dynatech RID Company, Cambridge, MA, U.S.A. ABSTRACT The efficient use of thermal insulation materials and systems for design of cryogenic and elevated...

  14. Explosion resistant insulator and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meyer, Jeffry R. (Penn Hills, PA); Billings, Jr., John S. (Trafford, PA); Spindle, Harvey E. (Wilkins Township, Allegheny County, PA); Hofmann, Charles F. (Export, PA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrical insulator assembly and method of manufacturing same, having a generally cylindrical or conical body portion formed of a breakable cast solid insulation system and a reinforcing member having a corrugated configuration and formed of a web or mesh type reinforcing fabric. When the breakable body member has been broken, the corrugated configured reinforcing web member provides a path of escape for pressurized insulating fluid while limiting the movement of body member fragments in the direction of escape of the pressurized fluid.

  15. A Guide to Insulation Selection for Industrial Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, M. R.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the system, degrade the insulation further and reduce the thermal effic iency. There is no question that rigid insulations such as calcium silicate are preferred in any application where abuse will occur. Some specifications call for all horizontal pip..., the owners are requiring more effic ient plant operations in both new and existing facilities. Thermal insulation will always playa major role in achieving those efficiencies, so its proper selection and application is of the utmost importance. 1012 ESL...

  16. Gas-controlled dynamic vacuum insulation with gas gate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Potter, Thomas F. (Denver, CO)

    1994-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a dynamic vacuum insulation comprising sidewalls enclosing an evacuated chamber and gas control means for releasing hydrogen gas into a chamber to increase gas molecule conduction of heat across the chamber and retrieving hydrogen gas from the chamber. The gas control means includes a metal hydride that absorbs and retains hydrogen gas at cooler temperatures and releases hydrogen gas at hotter temperatures; a hydride heating means for selectively heating the metal hydride to temperatures high enough to release hydrogen gas from the metal hydride; and gate means positioned between the metal hydride and the chamber for selectively allowing hydrogen to flow or not to flow between said metal hydride and said chamber.

  17. Cooling design of large capacity gas insulated transformer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawano, Koichiro; Biswas, Debasis; Ishizuka, Masaru; Muramatsu, Koji; Nakadate, Masumi; Toda, Katsutoshi [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki (Japan)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    From the view point of safety and maintenance simplicity, the development of large capacity gas insulated transformer has been desirable. In this type of transformer, the coolant gas is circulated in the gap between the coils to cool it. The flow pattern of coolant in the flow path strongly depend on its configuration formed by the coil. Therefore, in order to achieve high cooling efficiency of coils and at the same time to reduce the pressure loss, it is important to have sufficient knowledge about the flow behavior in the coil flow path. In the present work, in order to improve the coil cooling efficiency, appropriate flow path configuration were decided on the basis of numerical simulation using various coil configuration and validity of the computed results were tested by comparing with experimental data.

  18. Gas-controlled dynamic vacuum insulation with gas gate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1994-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a dynamic vacuum insulation comprising sidewalls enclosing an evacuated chamber and gas control means for releasing hydrogen gas into a chamber to increase gas molecule conduction of heat across the chamber and retrieving hydrogen gas from the chamber. The gas control means includes a metal hydride that absorbs and retains hydrogen gas at cooler temperatures and releases hydrogen gas at hotter temperatures; a hydride heating means for selectively heating the metal hydride to temperatures high enough to release hydrogen gas from the metal hydride; and gate means positioned between the metal hydride and the chamber for selectively allowing hydrogen to flow or not to flow between said metal hydride and said chamber. 25 figs.

  19. Electrical spin injection in 2D semiconductors and topological insulators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golub, L. E.; Ivchenko, E. L. [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a theory of spin orientation by electric current in 2D semiconductors. It is shown that the spin depends on the relation between the energy and spin relaxation times and can vary by a factor of two for the limiting cases of fast and slow energy relaxation. For symmetrically-doped (110)-grown semiconductor quantum wells the effect of current-induced spin orientation is shown to exist due to random spatial variation of the Rashba spin-orbit splitting. We demonstrate that the spin depends strongly on the correlation length of this random spin-orbit field. We calculate the spin orientation degree in two-dimensional topological insulators. In high electric fields when the “streaming” regime is realized, the spin orientation degree weakly depends on the electric field and can reach values about 5%.

  20. Metal-Insulator Photocathode Heterojunction for Directed Electron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and low-intrinsic emittance electron pulses have been predicted for hybrid metal-insulator photocathode designs constructed from three to four monolayer MgO films on...

  1. Irradiation imposed degradation of the mechanical and electrical properties of electrical insulation for future accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polinski, J.; Chorowski, M.; Bogdan, P.; Strychalski, M. [Wroclaw University of Technology, Wyb. Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland); Rijk, G. de [European Organization for Nuclear Research CERN, 1211 Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Future accelerators will make extensive use of superconductors made of Nb{sub 3}Sn, which allows higher magnetic fields than NbTi. However, the wind-and-react technology of Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting magnet production makes polyimide Kapton® non applicable for the coils' electrical insulation. A Nb{sub 3}Sn technology compatible insulation material should be characterized by high radiation resistivity, good thermal conductivity, and excellent mechanical properties. Candidate materials for the electrical insulation of future accelerator's magnet coils have to be radiation certified with respect to potential degradation of their electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties. This contribution presents procedures and results of tests of the electrical and mechanical properties of DGEBA epoxy + D400 hardener, which is one of the candidates for the electrical insulation of future magnets. Two test sample types have been used to determine the material degradation due to irradiation: a untreated one (unirradiated) and irradiated at 77 K with 11 kGy/min intense, 4MeV energy electrons beam to a total dose of 50 MGy.

  2. A stock water solar heating system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nydahl, J.; Carlson, B.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on the progress in the development of an inexpensive but rugged solar system to heat stock water. Insulation encased in fiber reinforced concrete is the main structural component for the collector and the partition between the unheated stock tank and the heated section. A fully wetted, drain-back collector was designed to produce a high optical efficiency and to permit its water passage to be opened for cleaning. A unique double-glazed design is used in which the inner glazing is a film with a large thermal expansion coefficient. This causes a significant drop in the stagnation temperatures since a single glazed configuration is approached at high temperatures. The collector and the partially covered insulated tank prevented freezing, and held the average water temperature at 6.4 C (44 F) during the day while the mean daily ambient temperature was {minus}5.4 C (22 F) over a nine day test.

  3. Objective: Determine the energy use of two greenhouse insulation technologies (a bubble insulation system and an energy/shade screen) retrofitted into plastic covered greenhouses, and compare the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    Objective: Determine the energy use of two greenhouse insulation technologies (a bubble insulation structures. 1. Unimproved standard double-layer poly inflated greenhouse (control) 2. Bubble insulation is around 1-2, compared to an estimated 30 for the bubble system. What did we learn? The bubble insulation

  4. Insulating conduction in Sn/Si(111): Possibility of a Mott insulating ground state and metallization/localization induced by carrier doping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasegawa, Shuji

    Insulating conduction in Sn/Si(111): Possibility of a Mott insulating ground state measurements. The temperature dependence of the surface-state conductivity showed an insulating behavior from is insulating with a very small energy gap, which is consistent with a recent theoretical study G. Profeta and E

  5. Novel metals and insulators from holography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aristomenis Donos; Jerome P. Gauntlett

    2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Using simple holographic models in $D=4$ spacetime dimensions we construct black hole solutions dual to $d=3$ CFTs at finite charge density with a Q-lattice deformation. At zero temperature we find new ground state solutions with broken translation invariance, either in one or both spatial directions, which exhibit insulating or metallic behaviour depending on the parameters of the holographic theory. For low temperatures and small frequencies, the real part of the optical conductivity has a power-law behaviour, with the exponent determined by the ground state. We also obtain an expression for the the DC conductivity at finite temperature in terms of horizon data of the black hole solutions.

  6. Holographic Metals and Insulators with Helical Symmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aristomenis Donos; Blaise Goutéraux; Elias Kiritsis

    2014-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Homogeneous, zero temperature scaling solutions with Bianchi VII spatial geometry are constructed in Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton theory. They correspond to quantum critical saddle points with helical symmetry at finite density. Assuming $AdS_{5}$ UV asymptotics, the small frequency/(temperature) dependence of the AC/(DC) electric conductivity along the director of the helix are computed. A large class of insulating and conducting anisotropic phases is found, as well as isotropic, metallic phases. Conduction can be dominated by dissipation due to weak breaking of translation symmetry or by a quantum critical current.

  7. Topological insulators with SU(2) Landau levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi Li; Shou-Cheng Zhang; Congjun Wu

    2013-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct continuum models of 3D and 4D topological insulators by coupling spin-1/2 fermions to an SU(2) background gauge field, which is equivalent to a spatially dependent spin-orbit coupling. Higher dimensional generalizations of flat Landau levels are obtained in the Landau-like gauge. The 2D helical Dirac modes with opposite helicities and 3D Weyl modes with opposite chiralities are spatially separated along the third and fourth dimensions, respectively. Stable 2D helical Fermi surfaces and 3D chiral Fermi surfaces appear on open boundaries, respectively. The charge pumping in 4D Landau level systems shows quantized 4D quantum Hall effect.

  8. Möbius Graphene Strip as Topological Insulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. L. Guo; Z. R. Gong; H. Dong; C. P. Sun

    2009-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the electronic properties of M\\"{o}bius graphene strip with a zigzag edge. We show that such graphene strip behaves as a topological insulator with a gapped bulk and a robust metallic surface, which enjoys some features due to its nontrivial topology of the spatial configuration, such as the existence of edge states and the non-Abelian induced gauge field. We predict that the topological properties of the M\\"{o}bius graphene strip can be experimentally displayed by the destructive interference in the transmission spectrum, and the robustness of edge states under certain perturbations.

  9. Sensitivity of Forced Air Distribution System Efficiency to Climate, Duct Location, Air Leakage and Insulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Air Leakage and Insulation Iain S. Walker Energy Performance of Buildings Group Indoor Environment ................................................................................................................................................ 4 Duct Insulation, Location and Leakage Examples............................................................... 4 Figure 2. Sheet metal ducts in a basement insulated with asbestos

  10. Electrical Transport of Topological Insulator-Bi2Se3 and Thermoelectric Properties of Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WEI, PENG

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hall effect and topological insulators. Phys Today Klitzing,L. & Mele, E. J. Topological insulators in three dimensions.Zhang, H. J. et al. Topological insulators in Bi 2 Se 3 , Bi

  11. Scattering of Dirac Fermions in Barrier Geometries on the Surface of Topological Insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torquato, Salvatore

    Scattering of Dirac Fermions in Barrier Geometries on the Surface of Topological Insulators Lindsay Fleischer 1 Introduction Predicted theoretically and discovered experimentally, the topological insulators topological in- sulators and the trivial insulating vacuum have wavefunctions which are not smoothly

  12. Polarization dependent photocurrents in thin films of the topological insulator Bi?Se?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lau, Claudia (Claudia M.)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Topological insulators are a new class of three-dimensional quantum materials whose interior or bulk is an insulator but whose surface is a conductor. Bi?Se? is a prototypical topological insulator that physicists at MIT ...

  13. Process for manufacturing hollow fused-silica insulator cylinder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sampayan, Stephen E. (Manteca, CA); Krogh, Michael L. (Lee's Summit, MO); Davis, Steven C. (Lee's Summit, MO); Decker, Derek E. (Discovery Bay, CA); Rosenblum, Ben Z. (Overland Park, KS); Sanders, David M. (Livermore, CA); Elizondo-Decanini, Juan M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for building hollow insulator cylinders that can have each end closed off with a high voltage electrode to contain a vacuum. A series of fused-silica round flat plates are fabricated with a large central hole and equal inside and outside diameters. The thickness of each is related to the electron orbit diameter of electrons that escape the material surface, loop, and return back. Electrons in such electron orbits can support avalanche mechanisms that result in surface flashover. For example, the thickness of each of the fused-silica round flat plates is about 0.5 millimeter. In general, the thinner the better. Metal, such as gold, is deposited onto each top and bottom surface of the fused-silica round flat plates using chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Eutectic metals can also be used with one alloy constituent on the top and the other on the bottom. The CVD, or a separate diffusion step, can be used to defuse the deposited metal deep into each fused-silica round flat plate. The conductive layer may also be applied by ion implantation or gas diffusion into the surface. The resulting structure may then be fused together into an insulator stack. The coated plates are aligned and then stacked, head-to-toe. Such stack is heated and pressed together enough to cause the metal interfaces to fuse, e.g., by welding, brazing or eutectic bonding. Such fusing is preferably complete enough to maintain a vacuum within the inner core of the assembled structure. A hollow cylinder structure results that can be used as a core liner in a dielectric wall accelerator and as a vacuum envelope for a vacuum tube device where the voltage gradients exceed 150 kV/cm.

  14. Insulation of Pipe Bends Improves Efficiency of Hot Oil Furnaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haseltine, D. M.; Laffitte, R. D.

    of the convective sections. Consultation with the furnace manufacturer then revealed that furnaces made in the 1960's tended to not insulate the pipe bends in the convective section. When insulation was added within the covers of the pipe bends on one furnace...

  15. Topological Field Theory of Time-Reversal Invariant Insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao-Liang Qi; Taylor Hughes; Shou-Cheng Zhang

    2008-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the fundamental time reversal invariant (TRI) insulator exists in 4+1 dimensions, where the effective field theory is described by the 4+1 dimensional Chern-Simons theory and the topological properties of the electronic structure is classified by the second Chern number. These topological properties are the natural generalizations of the time reversal breaking (TRB) quantum Hall insulator in 2+1 dimensions. The TRI quantum spin Hall insulator in 2+1 dimensions and the topological insulator in 3+1 dimension can be obtained as descendants from the fundamental TRI insulator in 4+1 dimensions through a dimensional reduction procedure. The effective topological field theory, and the $Z_2$ topological classification for the TRI insulators in 2+1 and 3+1 dimensions are naturally obtained from this procedure. All physically measurable topological response functions of the TRI insulators are completely described by the effective topological field theory. Our effective topological field theory predicts a number of novel and measurable phenomena, the most striking of which is the topological magneto-electric effect, where an electric field generates a magnetic field in the same direction, with an universal constant of proportionality quantized in odd multiples of the fine structure constant $\\alpha=e^2/\\hbar c$. Finally, we present a general classification of all topological insulators in various dimensions, and describe them in terms of a unified topological Chern-Simons field theory in phase space.

  16. Bosonic Topological Insulators and Paramagnets: a view from cobordisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anton Kapustin

    2014-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We classify Bosonic Topological Insulators and Paramagnets in DTopological Insulator protected by time-reversal symmetry whose surface admits an all-fermion topologically ordered state. For D=4 there is a unique "beyond group cohomology" phase. It is protected by gravitational anomalies of the boundary theory and is stable without any additional symmetry.

  17. Topological Field Theory of Time-Reversal Invariant Insulators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qi, Xiao-Liang; Hughes, Taylor; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the fundamental time reversal invariant (TRI) insulator exists in 4 + 1 dimensions, where the effective field theory is described by the 4 + 1 dimensional Chern-Simons theory and the topological properties of the electronic structure is classified by the second Chern number. These topological properties are the natural generalizations of the time reversal breaking (TRB) quantum Hall insulator in 2 + 1 dimensions. The TRI quantum spin Hall insulator in 2 + 1 dimensions and the topological insulator in 3 + 1 dimension can be obtained as descendants from the fundamental TRI insulator in 4 + 1 dimensions through a dimensional reduction procedure. The effective topological field theory, and the Z{sub 2} topological classification for the TRI insulators in 2+1 and 3+1 dimensions are naturally obtained from this procedure. All physically measurable topological response functions of the TRI insulators are completely described by the effective topological field theory. Our effective topological field theory predicts a number of novel and measurable phenomena, the most striking of which is the topological magneto-electric effect, where an electric field generates a magnetic field in the same direction, with an universal constant of proportionality quantized in odd multiples of the fine structure constant {alpha} = e{sup 2}/hc. Finally, we present a general classification of all topological insulators in various dimensions, and describe them in terms of a unified topological Chern-Simons field theory in phase space.

  18. Gas cooling performance in disc winding of large-capacity gas-insulated transformer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakadate, M.; Toda, K.; Sato, K.; Biswas, D.; Nakagawa, C.; Yanari, T. [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki (Japan)] [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki (Japan)

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have developed the gas-cooling system of a 275 kV, 300 MVA class gas-insulated transformer. In this study model experiments in which gas flow was substituted by water flow equivalently and 2-dimensional numerical flow analyses and network analyses were conducted. In this paper the outline of the development and optimization condition to get high cooling performance in SF{sub 6} gas-disc winding system of the transformer are presented.

  19. Correlated topological insulators and the fractional magnetoelectric effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swingle, B.; Barkeshli, M.; McGreevy, J.; Senthil, T. [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Topological insulators are characterized by the presence of gapless surface modes protected by time-reversal symmetry. In three space dimensions the magnetoelectric response is described in terms of a bulk {theta} term for the electromagnetic field. Here we construct theoretical examples of such phases that cannot be smoothly connected to any band insulator. Such correlated topological insulators admit the possibility of fractional magnetoelectric response described by fractional {theta}/{pi}. We show that fractional {theta}/{pi} is only possible in a gapped time-reversal-invariant system of bosons or fermions if the system also has deconfined fractional excitations and associated degenerate ground states on topologically nontrivial spaces. We illustrate this result with a concrete example of a time-reversal-symmetric topological insulator of correlated bosons with {theta}=({pi}/4). Extensions to electronic fractional topological insulators are briefly described.

  20. Correlated Topological Insulators and the Fractional Magnetoelectric Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brian Swingle; Maissam Barkeshli; John McGreevy; T. Senthil

    2010-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Topological insulators are characterized by the presence of gapless surface modes protected by time-reversal symmetry. In three space dimensions the magnetoelectric response is described in terms of a bulk theta term for the electromagnetic field. Here we construct theoretical examples of such phases that cannot be smoothly connected to any band insulator. Such correlated topological insulators admit the possibility of fractional magnetoelectric response described by fractional theta/pi. We show that fractional theta/pi is only possible in a gapped time reversal invariant system of bosons or fermions if the system also has deconfined fractional excitations and associated degenerate ground states on topologically non-trivial spaces. We illustrate this result with a concrete example of a time reversal symmetric topological insulator of correlated bosons with theta = pi/4. Extensions to electronic fractional topological insulators are briefly described.

  1. Development of a Process to Build Polyimide Insulated Magnets For Operation at 350C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zatz, Irving J.

    2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An extensive R&D program has been conducted that has confirmed the feasibility of designing and fabricating copper alloy magnets that can successfully operate at temperatures as high as 350C. The process, originally developed for the possibility of manufacturing in-vessel resonant magnetic field perturbation (RMP) coils for JET, has been optimized for insulated magnet (and, potentially, other high temperature component) applications. One of the benefits of high temperature operation is that active cooling may no longer be required, greatly simplifying magnet/component design. These elevated temperatures are beyond the safe operating limits of conventional OFHC copper and the epoxies that bond and insulate the turns of typical magnets. This would necessitate the use an alternative copper alloy conductor such as C18150 (CuCrZr). Coil manufacture with polyimide is very similar to conventional epoxy bonded coils. Conductors would be dry wound then impregnated with polyimide of low enough viscosity to permit saturation, then cured; similar to the vacuum pressure impregnation process used for conventional epoxy bonded coils. Representative polyimide insulated coils were mechanically tested at both room temperature and 350C. Mechanical tests included turn-to-turn shear bond strength and overall polyimide adhesion strength, as well as the flexural strength of a 48-turn polyimide-bonded coil bundle. This paper will detail the results of the testing program on coil samples. These results demonstrate mechanical properties as good, or better than epoxy bonded magnets, even at 350C.

  2. Secondary Containment Design for a High Speed Centrifuge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, K.W.

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Secondary containment for high speed rotating machinery, such as a centrifuge, is extremely important for operating personnel safety. Containment techniques can be very costly, ungainly and time consuming to construct. A novel containment concept is introduced which is fabricated out of modular sections of polycarbonate glazed into a Unistrut metal frame. A containment study for a high speed centrifuge is performed which includes the development of parameters for secondary containment design. The Unistrut/polycarbonate shield framing concept is presented including design details and proof testing procedures. The economical fabrication and modularity of the design indicates a usefulness for this shielding system in a wide variety of containment scenarios.

  3. Characterization of the pentacene thin-film transistors with an epoxy resin-based polymeric gate insulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Characterization of the pentacene thin-film transistors with an epoxy resin-based polymeric gate seeking desirable semi- conductor/insulator combinations [3]. In this study, we adopted an epoxy resin fabricated and characterized. SU-8, a reliable epoxy-based pho- toresist, is tested as a potential highly

  4. Scattering theory of topological insulators and superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. C. Fulga; F. Hassler; A. R. Akhmerov

    2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The topological invariant of a topological insulator (or superconductor) is given by the number of symmetry-protected edge states present at the Fermi level. Despite this fact, established expressions for the topological invariant require knowledge of all states below the Fermi energy. Here, we propose a way to calculate the topological invariant employing solely its scattering matrix at the Fermi level without knowledge of the full spectrum. Since the approach based on scattering matrices requires much less information than the Hamiltonian-based approaches (surface versus bulk), it is numerically more efficient. In particular, is better-suited for studying disordered systems. Moreover, it directly connects the topological invariant to transport properties potentially providing a new way to probe topological phases.

  5. Electromagnetic Scattering by Spheres of Topological Insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ge, Lixin; Zi, Jian

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The electromagnetic scattering properties of topological insulator (TI) spheres are systematically studied in this paper. Unconventional backward scattering caused by the topological magneto-electric (TME) effect of TIs are found in both Rayleigh and Mie scattering regimes. This enhanced backward scattering can be achieved by introducing an impedance-matched background which can suppress the bulk scattering. For the cross-polarized scattering coefficients, interesting antiresonances are found in the Mie scattering regime, wherein the cross-polarized electromagnetic fields induced by the TME effect are trapped inside TI spheres. In the Rayleigh limit, the quantized TME effect of TIs can be determined by measuring the electric-field components of scattered waves in the far field.

  6. Photonic spin Hall effect in topological insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Xinxing; Ling, Xiaohui; Chen, Shizhen; Luo, Hailu; Wen, Shuangchun

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we theoretically investigate the photonic spin Hall effect (SHE) of a Gaussian beam reflected from the interface between air and topological insulators (TIs). The photonic SHE is attributed to spin-orbit coupling and manifests itself as in-plane and transverse spin-dependent splitting. We reveal that the spin-orbit coupling effect in TIs can be routed by adjusting the axion angle variations. Unlike the transverse spin-dependent splitting, we find that the in-plane one is sensitive to the axion angle. It is shown that the polarization structure in magneto-optical Kerr effect is significantly altered due to the spin-dependent splitting in photonic SHE. We theoretically propose a weak measurement method to determine the strength of axion coupling by probing the in-plane splitting of photonic SHE.

  7. Topological Insulators Avoid the Parity Anomaly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Mulligan; F. J. Burnell

    2013-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The surface of a 3+1d topological insulator hosts an odd number of gapless Dirac fermions when charge conjugation and time-reversal symmetries are preserved. Viewed as a purely 2+1d system, this surface theory would necessarily explicitly break parity and time-reversal when coupled to a fluctuating gauge field. Here we explain why such a state can exist on the boundary of a 3+1d system without breaking these symmetries, even if the number of boundary components is odd. This is accomplished from two complementary perspectives: topological quantization conditions and regularization. We first discuss the conditions under which (continuous) large gauge transformations may exist when the theory lives on a boundary of a higher-dimensional spacetime. Next, we show how the higher-dimensional bulk theory is essential in providing a parity-invariant regularization of the theory living on the lower-dimensional boundary or defect.

  8. Highly Insulating Residential Windows Using Smart Automated Shading...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Smart Window with integrated sensors, control logic and a motorized shade between glass panes. Image: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 2 of 3 Residential Smart Window...

  9. Highly Insulating Residential Windows Using Smart Automated Shading...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The windows will function autonomously and in a networked configuration. Project Impact LBNL is aiming toward a mature market cost increment of 12ft2 of window. LBNL will also...

  10. Highly Insulating Residential Windows Using Smart Automated Shading |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 RussianBy: Thomas P. D'Agostino,GlenLearning andDesignDepartment of Energy

  11. Highly Insulating Residential Windows Using Smart Automated Shading |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department of EnergySeacrist, SeniorVolume 6DepartmentOakDepartment

  12. Highly insulating Residential Windows Using Smart Automated Shading

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEND D e e p p a a rDepartment|Energythe

  13. Aerogel-Based Insulation for High-Temperature Industrial Processes |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic InputRudolph A. Marcus andAchievements of structuralSystemsSciTech

  14. Experimental Realization of a Three-Dimensional Topological Insulator, Bi 2Te3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siemons, W.

    2010-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Three-dimensional topological insulators are a new state of quantum matter with a bulk gap and odd number of relativistic Dirac fermions on the surface. By investigating the surface state of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} with angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we demonstrate that the surface state consists of a single nondegenerate Dirac cone. Furthermore, with appropriate hole doping, the Fermi level can be tuned to intersect only the surface states, indicating a full energy gap for the bulk states. Our results establish that Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} is a simple model system for the three-dimensional topological insulator with a single Dirac cone on the surface. The large bulk gap of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} also points to promising potential for high-temperature spintronics applications.

  15. Storage tank insulation panels that offer fire protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stancroff, M. [Pittsburgh Corning Corp., Houston, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Many fluids require storage temperatures of over several hundred degrees above ambient. As a result of these elevated storage temperatures many storage tanks require insulation to help in both energy conservation and in maintaining a uniform fluid temperature distribution. Since these fluids are typically flammable these storage tanks also often require some sort of fire protection. One of the most commonly used methods of fire protection is a deluge system. Actively operated deluge systems, although effective when working properly, have several drawbacks. A cellular glass insulation panel system can provide not only excellent insulation value but also passive fire protection without the concern of an active system failure.

  16. Life-cycle energy costs of thermal insulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chinneck, J.W.; Chandrashekar, M.; Hahn, C.K.G.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A set of calculations is presented which compare the magnitude of the energy costs of insulation with the heating energy savings over the expected lifetime of a model dwelling. A representative city is examined in each of four different levels of Canadian climatic severity. The energy cost of insulation was found to be insignificant relative to the heating energy savings caused by its use. The proposed minimum insulation standards for Canada were found to be significantly better than the existing standards although not optimum from an energy viewpoint.

  17. Holographic classification of Topological Insulators and its 8-fold periodicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    André LeClair; Denis Bernard

    2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Using generic properties of Clifford algebras in any spatial dimension, we explicitly classify Dirac hamiltonians with zero modes protected by the discrete symmetries of time-reversal, particle-hole symmetry, and chirality. Assuming the boundary states of topological insulators are Dirac fermions, we thereby holographically reproduce the Periodic Table of topological insulators found by Kitaev and Ryu. et. al, without using topological invariants nor K-theory. In addition we find candidate Z_2 topological insulators in classes AI, AII in dimensions 0,4 mod 8 and in classes C, D in dimensions 2,6 mod 8.

  18. Torsional Response and Dissipationless Viscosity in Topological Insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor L. Hughes; Robert G. Leigh; Eduardo Fradkin

    2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the visco-elastic response of the electronic degrees of freedom in 2D and 3D topological insulators (TI). Our primary focus is on the 2D Chern insulator which exhibits a bulk dissipationless viscosity analogous to the quantum Hall viscosity predicted in integer and fractional quantum Hall states. We show that the dissipationless viscosity is the response of a TI to torsional deformations of the underlying lattice geometry. The visco-elastic response also indicates that crystal dislocations in Chern insulators will carry momentum density. We briefly discuss generalizations to 3D which imply that time-reversal invariant TI's will exhibit a quantum Hall viscosity on their surfaces.

  19. Outdoor polymeric insulators long-term exposed to HVDC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soerqvist, T.; Vlastos, A.E. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden)] [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field experience from outdoor polymeric insulators exposed to HVDC under natural contamination conditions is presented. This paper summarizes the peak leakage current statistics, the hydrophobicity and the surface material conditions studied by electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. The results show a strong interrelation between the surface conditions and the performance with respect to leakage currents. Moreover, the results show that the surface conditions and the performance of the insulators exposed to HVDC are rather similar to those of the insulators exposed to HVAC.

  20. Fabrication of strained silicon on insulator by strain transfer process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin Bo; Wang Xi; Chen Jing; Cheng Xinli; Chen Zhijun [Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fabrication of ultrathin strained silicon layer directly on insulator is demonstrated. 50 nm strained silicon on insulator layers were fabricated by a method which includes four steps: Epitaxial growth of strained SiGe on ultrathin silicon on insulator (SOI) substrates, ion implantation, postannealing process, and etch-back process. Strain of the layer was observed by Raman spectroscopy. 0.72% tensile strain was maintained in the strained silicon layer even after removing the SiGe film. The strained layer was the result of strain equalization and transfer process between the SiGe film and top silicon layer.

  1. Performance of Titanium-Oxide/Polymer Insulation in Bi-2212/Ag-alloy Round Wire Wound Superconducting Coils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Peng; Dalban-Canassy, Matthieu; Jiang, Jianyi; Hellstrom, Eric E; Larbalestier, David C

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conductor insulation is one of the key components needed to make Ag-alloy clad Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+x (Bi-2212/Ag) superconducting round wire (RW) successful for high field magnet applications as dielectric standoff and high winding current densities (Jw) directly depend on it. In this study, a TiO2/polymer insulation coating developed by nGimat LLC was applied to test samples and a high field test coil. The insulation was investigated by differential thermal analysis (DTA), thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dielectric properties measurement, and transport critical current (Ic) properties measurement. About 29% of the insulation by weight is polymer. When the Bi-2212/Ag wire is full heat treated, this decomposes with slow heating to 400{\\deg}C in pure O2. After the full reaction, we found that the TiO2 did not degrade the critical current properties, adhered well to the conductor, and provided a breakdown voltage of >100 V, which allowed the test coil to survive quenching in 31.2...

  2. Sound-insulation layers low-frequency modeling, using the fuzzy structure theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    09NVC-0163 Sound-insulation layers low-frequency modeling, using the fuzzy structure theory Laurent [20,200] Hz, sound-insulation layer modeling remains a critical topic. Recent work allows- insulation layer. Nevertheless, such an approach requires a FE model of sound-insulation layer, which may

  3. Key-Insulated Signcryption (Science and Technology on Communication Security Laboratory,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Yuliang

    Key-Insulated Signcryption Jia Fan 1 (Science and Technology on Communication Security Laboratory addresses the issue of key exposure by proposing a key-insulated signcryption technique. We define a security model for key-insulated signcryption and prove that the key- insulated signcryption technique

  4. Science Highlight August 2010 New State of Topological Insulators Offers New Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    Science Highlight ­ August 2010 New State of Topological Insulators Offers New Opportunities Three dimensional topological insulators are a new state of quantum matter with a bulk gap and odd number insulator enters the insulating masive Dirac fermion state, a state that harbors striking topological

  5. Topological Insulators with Ultracold Atoms Indubala I. Satija and Erhai Zhao

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satija, Indu

    Chapter 12 Topological Insulators with Ultracold Atoms Indubala I. Satija and Erhai Zhao Abstract- tance is topological insulators, materials that are insulating in the interior but con- duct along of matter known as Topological Insulators. I.I. Satija (B) · E. Zhao School of Physics, Astronomy

  6. Fermi-level tuning of topological insulator thin films Masaki Aitani,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasegawa, Shuji

    Fermi-level tuning of topological insulator thin films Masaki Aitani,1 Yusuke Sakamoto,1 Toru Topological insulators are insulating materials but have metallic edge states with peculiar prop- erties properties of topological insulator ultrathin Bi2Te3 films by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

  7. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 85, 115415 (2012) Smooth gauge for topological insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanderbilt, David

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHYSICAL REVIEW B 85, 115415 (2012) Smooth gauge for topological insulators Alexey A. Soluyanov polarization3,4 and the anomalous Hall conductance.5,6 The recent discovery of topological insulators7,8 has-like functions for 2D Z2 insulators (i.e., quantum spin- Hall insulators) that are smooth functions of k

  8. Topological Insulators with Ultracold Atoms Indubala I Satija and Erhai Zhao

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satija, Indu

    Topological Insulators with Ultracold Atoms Indubala I Satija and Erhai Zhao School of Physics is topological insulators, materials that are insulating in the interior but conduct along the edges. Quantum to the family of exotic states of matter known as Topological Insulators. QH and QSH effect usually requires

  9. Thermal Effects of Moisture in Rigid Insulation Board

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crow, G. W.

    The impact of moisture in rigid roof insulation upon energy consumption is often assumed to be a simple function of the conductance. This paper will show that there are complex interactions between conductance, thermal mass, and climate. The energy...

  10. Aerogel Insulation: The Materials Science of Empty Space

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Empty space can be good, like a blank canvas for an artist, or it can be bad, like an attic without insulation for a homeowner.  But when a technological breakthrough provides just the right amount...

  11. Aerogel-Based Insulation for Industrial Steam Distribution Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Williams

    2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal losses in industrial steam distribution systems account for 977 trillion Btu/year in the US, more than 1% of total domestic energy consumption. Aspen Aerogels worked with Department of Energy’s Industrial Technologies Program to specify, develop, scale-up, demonstrate, and deliver Pyrogel XT®, an aerogel-based pipe insulation, to market to reduce energy losses in industrial steam systems. The product developed has become Aspen’s best selling flexible aerogel blanket insulation and has led to over 60 new jobs. Additionally, this product has delivered more than ~0.7 TBTU of domestic energy savings to date, and could produce annual energy savings of 149 TBTU by 2030. Pyrogel XT’s commercial success has been driven by it’s 2-4X better thermal performance, improved durability, greater resistance to corrosion under insulation (CUI), and faster installation times than incumbent insulation materials.

  12. Static electric field in one-dimensional insulators without boundaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Kuang-Ting

    In this brief report, we show that in a one-dimensional insulating system with periodic boundary conditions, the coefficient of the ? term in the effective theory is not only determined by the topological index ?i?[superscript ...

  13. A Comprehensive Map of Insulator Elements for the Drosophila Genome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Kevin P.

    Insulators are DNA sequences that control the interactions among genomic regulatory elements and act as chromatin boundaries. A thorough understanding of their location and function is necessary to address the complexities ...

  14. Design of a variable-conductance vacuum insulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, D K; Potter, T F; Tracy, C E

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes one approach to the design of a variable-conductance vacuum insulation. In this design, the vacuum insulation consists of a permanently sealed, thin sheet steel, evacuated envelope of whatever geometry is required for the application. The steel envelope is supported internally against the atmospheric pressure loads by an array of discrete, low-conductance, ceramic supports, and radiative heat transfer is blocked by layers of thin metal radiation shields. Thermal conductance through this insulation is controlled electronically by changing the temperature of a small metal hydride connected to the vacuum envelope. The hydride reversibly absorbs/desorbs hydrogen to produce a hydrogen pressure typically within the range from less than 10{sup {minus}6} to as much as 1 torr. Design calculations are compared with results from laboratory tests of bench scale samples, and some possible automotive applications for this variable-conductance vacuum insulation are suggested.

  15. Radiative transfer and thermal performance levels in foam insulation boardstocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moreno, John David

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The validity of predictive models for the thermal conductivity of foam insulation is established based on the fundamental geometry of the closed-cell foam. The extinction coefficient is experimentally and theoretically ...

  16. An Investigation of Insulator Proteins in Mosquito Genomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johanson, Michael

    2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    of transgenes in mosquito species. The use of insulator sequences to flank transgenes may have the ability to overcome position effects caused by the genomic environment surrounding the insertion site. CTCF is a multifunctional protein, conserved from humans...

  17. Kingspan Insulated Panels: Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-5353)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Kingspan Insulated Panels, Inc. failed to certify a variety of walk-in cooler or freezer components as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  18. Exchange-Coupling-Induced Symmetry Breaking in Topological Insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Peng

    An exchange gap in the Dirac surface states of a topological insulator (TI) is necessary for observing the predicted unique features such as the topological magnetoelectric effect as well as to confine Majorana fermions. ...

  19. Correlated topological insulators and the fractional magnetoelectric effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swingle, Brian Gordon

    Topological insulators are characterized by the presence of gapless surface modes protected by time-reversal symmetry. In three space dimensions the magnetoelectric response is described in terms of a bulk ? [theta] term ...

  20. Topological crystalline insulators and Dirac octets in antiperovskites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Junwei

    We predict a class of topological crystalline insulators in the antiperovskite material family with the chemical formula A[subscript 3]BX. Here the nontrivial topology arises from band inversion between two J = 3/2 quartets, ...

  1. Classification of Interacting Electronic Topological Insulators in Three Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chong

    A fundamental open problem in condensed-matter physics is how the dichotomy between conventional and topological band insulators is modified in the presence of strong electron interactions. We show that there are six ...

  2. Driven electronic states at the surface of a topological insulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fregoso, Benjamin M.

    Motivated by recent photoemission experiments on the surface of topological insulators we compute the spectrum of driven topological surface excitations in the presence of an external light source. We completely characterize ...

  3. Interacting fermionic topological insulators/superconductors in three dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chong

    Symmetry protected topological (SPT) phases are a minimal generalization of the concept of topological insulators to interacting systems. In this paper, we describe the classification and properties of such phases for ...

  4. Topological Crystalline Insulators in the SnTe Material Class

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsieh, Timothy Hwa-wei

    Topological crystalline insulators are new states of matter in which the topological nature of electronic structures arises from crystal symmetries. Here we predict the first material realization of topological crystalline ...

  5. Homotopy Theory of Strong and Weak Topological Insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricardo Kennedy; Charles Guggenheim

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We use homotopy theory to extend the notion of strong and weak topological insulators to the non-stable regime (low numbers of occupied/empty energy bands). We show that for strong topological insulators in d spatial dimensions to be "truly d-dimensional", i.e. not realizable by stacking lower-dimensional insulators, a more restrictive definition of "strong" is required. However, this does not exclude weak topological insulators from being "truly d-dimensional", which we demonstrate by an example. Additionally, we prove some useful technical results, including the homotopy theoretic derivation of the factorization of invariants over the torus into invariants over spheres in the stable regime, as well as the rigorous justification of replacing $T^d$ by $S^d$ and $T^{d_k}\\times S^{d_x}$ by $S^{d_k+d_x}$ as is common in the current literature.

  6. Microscopic Realization of Two-Dimensional Bosonic Topological Insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Zheng-Xin

    It is well known that a bosonic Mott insulator can be realized by condensing vortices of a boson condensate. Usually, a vortex becomes an antivortex (and vice versa) under time reversal symmetry, and the condensation of ...

  7. Condition Monitoring of In-Service Nonceramic Insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    about PSERC can be found at the Center's website: http://www.pserc.wisc.edu. For additional information nonceramic insulators that do not have any manufacturing or design defects. The next phase of the project

  8. Thermal Effects of Moisture in Rigid Insulation Board 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crow, G. W.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of moisture in rigid roof insulation upon energy consumption is often assumed to be a simple function of the conductance. This paper will show that there are complex interactions between conductance, thermal mass, and climate. The energy...

  9. Energy and Emissions Savings through Insulation Upgrade Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lettich, M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presentation demonstrates the value of including insulation system assessment, repairs and upgrades on a facility's physical function and its importance in the overall energy and environmental management program. Financial and environmental...

  10. Linear particle accelerator with seal structure between electrodes and insulators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Broadhurst, John H. (Golden Valley, MN)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrostatic linear accelerator includes an electrode stack comprised of primary electrodes formed or Kovar and supported by annular glass insulators having the same thermal expansion rate as the electrodes. Each glass insulator is provided with a pair of fused-in Kovar ring inserts which are bonded to the electrodes. Each electrode is designed to define a concavo-convex particle trap so that secondary charged particles generated within the accelerated beam area cannot reach the inner surface of an insulator. Each insulator has a generated inner surface profile which is so configured that the electrical field at this surface contains no significant tangential component. A spark gap trigger assembly is provided, which energizes spark gaps protecting the electrodes affected by over voltage to prevent excessive energy dissipation in the electrode stack.

  11. Measure Guideline: Sealing and Insulating of Ducts in Existing Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldrich, R.; Puttagunta, S.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document begins with a discussion on potential cost and performance benefits of duct sealing and insulating. It continues with a review of typical duct materials and components and the overall procedures for assessing and improving the duct system.

  12. Manipulation of bacteria using three dimensional insulator based dielectrophoresis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braff, William Allan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Insulator-based dielectrophoresis (iDEP) is a very promising technique for sorting microparticles based on their electrical properties. By using constrictions in a microchannel to generate large electric field gradients, ...

  13. SiGe-On-Insulator (SGOI) Technology and MOSFET Fabrication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Zhiyuan

    In this work, we have developed two different fabrication processes for relaxed Si??xGex-on-insulator (SGOI) substrates: (1) SGOI fabrication by etch-back approach, and (2) by "smart-cut" approach utilizing ...

  14. aluminum nitride insulator: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    K-r grown by a modified Bridgman tech- nique,r6 Rollins, Andrew M. 27 Low-voltage organic thin film transistors with hydrophobic aluminum nitride film as gate insulator Materials...

  15. Investigation of the fire performance of building insulation in full-scale and laboratory fire tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kleinfelder, W.A.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Twenty-two insulations are exposed to fire tests including the 25 ft Tunnel test, the Attic Floor Radiant Panel test and actual fire conditions of a simulated attic configuration. The insulations consisted of a number of cellulose fiber insulations, utilizing various chemical treatments, glass fiber and mineral fiber insulations. The fire performance characteristics of the insulations were measured in each of the three test scenarios and the report compares their results.

  16. Experimental Verification of the Van Vleck Nature of Long-Range Ferromagnetic Order in the Vanadium-Doped Three-Dimensional Topological Insulator Sb[subscript 2]Te[subscript 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mingda

    We demonstrate by high resolution low temperature electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) measurements that the long range ferromagnetic (FM) order in the vanadium- (V-)doped topological insulator Sb[subscript 2]Te[subscript ...

  17. Direct observation of spin-polarized surface states in the parent compound of a topological insulator using spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy in a Mott-polarimetry mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsieh, David

    We report high-resolution spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (spin-ARPES) measurements on the parent compound Sb of the recently discovered three-dimensional topological insulator Bi1?xSbx (Hsieh et al 2008 Nature ...

  18. Performance of MHD insulating materials in a potassium environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Natesan, K.; Park, J.H.; Rink, D.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Thomas, C.A. (USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States))

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this study are to evaluate the compatibility of the MHD insulating materials boron nitride and silicon nitride in a potassium environment at temperatures of 1000 and 1400{degrees}F (538 and 760{degrees}C, respectively) and to measure the electrical conductivities of the specimens before and after exposure to potassium. Based on the test results, an assessment is to be made of the suitability of these materials for application as insulator materials in an MHD channel.

  19. Topological insulators/superconductors: Potential future electronic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hor, Y. S. [Department of Physics, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States)

    2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A new material called topological insulator has been discovered and becomes one of the fastest growing field in condensed matter physics. Topological insulator is a new quantum phase of matter which has Dirac-like conductivity on its surface, but bulk insulator through its interior. It is considered a challenging problem for the surface transport measurements because of dominant internal conductance due to imperfections of the existing crystals of topological insulators. By a proper method, the internal bulk conduction can be suppressed in a topological insulator, and permit the detection of the surface currents which is necessary for future fault-tolerant quantum computing applications. Doped topological insulators have depicted a large variety of bulk physical properties ranging from magnetic to superconducting behaviors. By chemical doping, a TI can change into a bulk superconductor. Nb{sub x}Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} is shown to be a superconductor with T{sub c} ? 3.2 K, which could be a potential candidate for a topological superconductor.

  20. External Insulation of Masonry Walls and Wood Framed Walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, P.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of exterior insulation on a building is an accepted and effective means to increase the overall thermal resistance of the assembly that also has other advantages of improved water management and often increased air tightness of building assemblies. For thin layers of insulation (1" to 1 1/2"), the cladding can typically be attached directly through the insulation back to the structure. For thicker insulation layers, furring strips have been added as a cladding attachment location. This approach has been used in the past on numerous Building America test homes and communities (both new and retrofit applications), and has been proven to be an effective and durable means to provide cladding attachment. However, the lack of engineering data has been a problem for many designers, contractors, and code officials. This research project developed baseline engineering analysis to support the installation of thick layers of exterior insulation on existing masonry and frame walls. Furthermore, water management details necessary to integrate windows, doors, decks, balconies and roofs were created to provide guidance on the integration of exterior insulation strategies with other enclosure elements.

  1. Advanced insulated gate bipolar transistor gate drive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Short, James Evans (Monongahela, PA); West, Shawn Michael (West Mifflin, PA); Fabean, Robert J. (Donora, PA)

    2009-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A gate drive for an insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) includes a control and protection module coupled to a collector terminal of the IGBT, an optical communications module coupled to the control and protection module, a power supply module coupled to the control and protection module and an output power stage module with inputs coupled to the power supply module and the control and protection module, and outputs coupled to a gate terminal and an emitter terminal of the IGBT. The optical communications module is configured to send control signals to the control and protection module. The power supply module is configured to distribute inputted power to the control and protection module. The control and protection module outputs on/off, soft turn-off and/or soft turn-on signals to the output power stage module, which, in turn, supplies a current based on the signal(s) from the control and protection module for charging or discharging an input capacitance of the IGBT.

  2. Topology of crystalline insulators and superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ken Shiozaki; Masatoshi Sato

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We complete a classification of topological phases and their topological defects in crystalline insulators and superconductors. We consider topological phases and defects described by non-interacting Bloch and Bogoliubov de Gennes Hamiltonians that support additional order-two spatial symmetry, besides any of ten classes of symmetries defined by time-reversal symmetry and particle-hole symmetry. The additional order-two spatial symmetry we consider is general and it includes $Z_2$ global symmetry, mirror reflection, two-fold rotation, inversion, and their magnetic point group symmetries. We find that the topological periodic table shows a novel periodicity in the number of flipped coordinates under the order-two spatial symmetry, in addition to the Bott-periodicity in the space dimensions. Various symmetry protected topological phases and gapless modes will be identified and discussed in a unified framework. We also present topological classification of symmetry protected Fermi points. The bulk classification and the surface Fermi point classification provide a novel realization of the bulk-boundary correspondence in terms of the K-theory.

  3. CERTIFICATE OF FIELD VERIFICATION AND DIAGNOSTIC TESTING CF-4R-ENV-22 Quality Insulation Installation (QII) -Insulation Stage Checklist (Page 1 of 3)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CERTIFICATE OF FIELD VERIFICATION AND DIAGNOSTIC TESTING CF-4R-ENV-22 Quality Insulation Installation (QII) - Insulation Stage Checklist (Page 1 of 3) Site Address: Enforcement Agency: Permit Number: ____________ 2008 Residential Compliance Forms May 2012 All structural framing areas shall be insulated in a manner

  4. Large anomalous Hall effect in ferromagnetic insulator-topological insulator heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alegria, L. D.; Petta, J. R. [Department of Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Ji, H.; Cava, R. J. [Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Yao, N. [Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Clarke, J. J. [Hitachi High Technologies America, Inc., Clarksburg, Maryland 20871 (United States)

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the van der Waals epitaxy of the topological insulator compound Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} on the ferromagnetic insulator Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6}. The layers are oriented with (001)Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}||(001)Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6} and (110)Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}||(100)Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6}. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy indicates the formation of a sharp interface. At low temperatures, bilayers consisting of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} on Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6} exhibit a large anomalous Hall effect (AHE). Tilted field studies of the AHE indicate that the easy axis lies along the c-axis of the heterostructure, consistent with magnetization measurements in bulk Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6}. The 61?K Curie temperature of Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6} and the use of near-stoichiometric materials may lead to the development of spintronic devices based on the AHE.

  5. Cellular glass insulation keeps liquefied gas from vaporizing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The North West Shelf Project, located on the Burrup Peninsula in Western Australia, supplies much of that vast state with natural gas for domestic and industrial applications. Some of the gas is also exported to Japan as liquefied natural gas (LNG). While awaiting shipment to Japan, the LNG is stored at {minus}322 F in four storage tanks, each with a capacity of 2.5 million ft{sup 3}. When Woodside Offshore Petroleum Pty Ltd., operator of the LNG facility, selected insulation material for the storage tanks, it went in search of a material with more than just insulating value. Since the insulation is installed inside the tanks, it must be able to resist wicking or absorbing the LNG. Also, it had to have sufficient strength to withstand the weight of the 2.5 million ft{sup 3} of LNG without being crushed or losing its insulting properties. And, as a safety precaution, the selected materials should neither burn nor support combustion. Ultimately, Woodside selected a cellular glass insulation called Foamglas, from Pittsburgh Corning Corp., that met all the performance criteria and was cost competitive with the lesser-performing alternatives. Foamglas is produced from strong, inert borosilicate glass. Its insulating capability is provided by the tiny, closed cells of air encapsulated within the foam-like structure of the glass. Since the cells are closed,neither liquid nor vapor can enter the structure of the insulation. The inert glass itself will not absorb or react with LNG, nor will it burn or support a fire. The cellular structure provides effective insulation in both not and cold applications, and offers a fire barrier.

  6. Supporting documentation for the 1997 revision to the DOE Insulation Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stovall, T.K.

    1997-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Insulation Fact Sheet has been revised to reflect developments in energy conservation technology and the insulation market. A nationwide insulation cost survey was made by polling insulation contractors and builders, and the results are reported here. These costs, along with regional weather data, regional fuel costs, and fuel-specific system efficiencies were used to produce recommended insulation levels for new and existing houses. This report contains all of the methodology, algorithms, assumptions, references, and data resources that were used to produce the 1997 DOE Insulation Fact Sheet.

  7. UConn LEEDs the Way on Green Case Study for the NCAA's First LEED Athletic Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holsinger, Kent

    Envelope (Higher Insulation Levels) · Window Glazing ­ Increased Natural Lighting, Reduced Solar Heat Certification #12;Smart & Sustainable Growth Next Steps · Continue to Apply UConn Sustainable Design

  8. Window Spacers and Edge Seals in Insulating Glass Units: A State-of-the-Art Review and Future Perspectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergh, Sofie Van Den

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uvslokk, A. Gustavsen, Vacuum insulation panels for buildingThis excludes vacuum insulation panels (VIPs), which, whenmW/(mK) [50], and vacuum insulation panels (VIPs) with ? as

  9. Mode stabilized terrace InGaAsP lasers on semi-insulating InP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, T.R.; Yu, K.L.; Koren, U.; Hasson, A.; Margalit, S.; Yariv, A.

    1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mode stabilized terrace InGaAsP lasers have been fabricated on semi-insulating InP substrates. The fabrication involves a selective, single-step liquid phase epitaxial growth process, and a lateral Zn diffusion. Two versions of the terrace lasers are fabricated, and threshold currents as low as 35 mA and 50 mA respectively are obtained. The lasers operate with a stable single lateral mode. High power performance is observed. These lasers are suitable for monolithic integration with other optoelectronic devices.

  10. Surface state dominated transport in topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamdou, Bacel, E-mail: bhamdou@physnet.uni-hamburg.de; Gooth, Johannes; Dorn, August; Nielsch, Kornelius, E-mail: knielsch@physnet.uni-hamburg.de [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Hamburg, Jungiusstrasse 11, 20355 Hamburg (Germany)] [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Hamburg, Jungiusstrasse 11, 20355 Hamburg (Germany); Pippel, Eckhard [Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2, 06120 Halle (Germany)] [Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2, 06120 Halle (Germany)

    2013-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on low temperature magnetoresistance measurements on single-crystalline Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanowires synthesized via catalytic growth and post-annealing in a Te-rich atmosphere. The observation of Aharonov-Bohm oscillations indicates the presence of topological surface states. Analyses of Subnikov-de Haas oscillations in perpendicular magnetoresistance yield extremely low two-dimensional carrier concentrations and effective electron masses, and very high carrier mobilities. All our findings are in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions of massless Dirac fermions at the surfaces of topological insulators.

  11. Chiral Topological Insulator on Nambu 3-Algebraic Geometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazuki Hasebe

    2014-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Chiral topological insulator (AIII-class) with Landau levels is constructed based on the Nambu 3-algebraic geometry. We clarify the geometric origin of the chiral symmetry of the AIII-class topological insulator in the context of non-commutative geometry of 4D quantum Hall effect. The many-body groundstate wavefunction is explicitly derived as a $(l,l,l-1)$ Laughlin-Halperin type wavefunction with unique $K$-matrix structure. Fundamental excitation is identified with anyonic string-like object with fractional charge ${1}/({1+2(l-1)^2})$. The Hall effect of the chiral topological insulators turns out be a color version of Hall effect, which exhibits a dual property of the Hall and spin-Hall effects.

  12. Plasmon-phonon interactions in topological insulator rings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Autore, Marta; Di Gaspare, Alessandra; Giliberti, Valeria; Limaj, Odeta; Roy, Pascale; Brahlek, Matthew; Koirala, Nikesh; Oh, Seongshik; de Abajo, Francisco Javier Garcìa; Lupi, Stefano

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The great potential of Dirac electrons for plasmonics and photonics has been readily recognized after their discovery in graphene, followed by applications to smart optical devices. Dirac carriers are also found in topological insulators (TI) --quantum systems having an insulating gap in the bulk and intrinsic Dirac metallic states at the surface--. Here, we investigate the plasmonic response of ring structures patterned in Bi$_2$Se$_3$ TI films, which we investigate through terahertz (THz) spectroscopy. The rings are observed to exhibit a bonding and an antibonding plasmon modes, which we tune in frequency by varying their diameter. We develop an analytical theory based on the THz conductivity of unpatterned films, which accurately describes the strong plasmon-phonon hybridization and Fano interference experimentally observed as the bonding plasmon is swiped across the promineng 2\\,THz phonon exhibited by this material. This work opens the road for the investigation of plasmons in topological insulators and ...

  13. Hermetically sealed electrical feedthrough for high temperature secondary cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knoedler, Reinhard (Nussloch, DE); Nelson, Paul A. (Wheaton, IL); Shimotake, Hiroshi (Hinsdale, IL); Battles, James E. (Oak Forest, IL)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A passthrough seal is disclosed for electrically isolating the terminal in a lithium/metal sulfide cell from the structural cell housing. The seal has spaced upper and lower insulator rings fitted snuggly between the terminal and an annularly disposed upstanding wall, and outwardly of a powdered insulator also confined between the upstanding wall and terminal. The adjacent surfaces of the upper insulator ring and the respective upstanding wall and terminal are conically tapered, diverging in the axial direction away from the cell interior, and a sealing ring is located between each pair of the adjacent surfaces. The components are sized so that upon appropriate movement of the upper insulator ring toward the lower insulator ring the powdered insulator and sealing rings are each compressed to a high degree. This compacts the powdered insulator thereby rendering the same highly impervious and moreover fuses the sealing rings to and between the adjacent surfaces. The upper and lower insulator rings might be formed of beryllium oxide and/or alumina, the powdered insulator might be formed of boron nitride, and the sealing rings might be formed of aluminum.

  14. Hermetically sealed electrical feedthrough for high temperature secondary cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knoedler, R.; Nelson, P.A.; Shimotake, H.; Battles, J.E.

    1983-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A passthrough seal is disclosed for electrically isolating the terminal in a lithium/metal sulfide cell from the structural cell housing. The seal has spaced upper and lower insulator rings fitted snuggly between the terminal and an annularly disposed upstanding wall, and outwardly of a powdered insulator also confined between the upstanding wall and terminal. The adjacent surfaces of the upper insulator ring and the respective upstanding wall and terminal are conically tapered, diverging in the axial direction away from the cell interior, and a sealing ring is located between each pair of the adjacent surfaces. The components are sized so that upon appropriate movement of the upper insulator ring toward the lower insulator ring the powdered insulator and sealing rings are each compressed to a high degree. This compacts the powdered insulator thereby rendering the same highly impervious and moreover fuses the sealing rings to and between the adjacent surfaces. The upper and lower insulator rings might be formed of beryllium oxide and/or alumina, the powdered insulator might be formed of boron nitride, and the sealing rings might be formed of aluminum.

  15. Methodology for evaluation of insulation-debris effects. Containment emergency sump performance-unresolved safety issue A-43

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wysocki, J.; Kolbe, R.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The postulated failure of high energy piping within a light water reactor containment has raised safety questions related to the generation of insulation debris, the migration of such debris to the containment emergency sump screens and the potential for severe screen blockages. High, or total, screen blockages could result in impairment of the long term RHR recirculation systems. Debris considerations are an integral part of the unresolved Safety Issue A-43, Containment Emergency Sump Performance. This report develops calculational methods and debris transport models which can be used for estimating the quantities of debris that might be generated by a LOCA, the transport of such debris, methods for estimating screen blockages and attendant pressure losses. Five operating plants were analyzed using this debris evaluation methodology. These calculations show the dependency on plant containment layout, sump location and design, and types and quantities of insulation employed. 9 figures, 6 tables.

  16. Spin connection and boundary states in a topological insulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Parente; P. Lucignano; P. Vitale; A. Tagliacozzo; F. Guinea

    2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the surface resistivity of a three-dimensional topological insulator when the boundaries exhibit a non trivial curvature. We obtain an analytical solution for a spherical topological insulator, and we show that a non trivial quantum spin connection emerges from the three dimensional band structure. We analyze the effect of the spin connection on the scattering by a bump on a flat surface. Quantum effects induced by the geometry lead to resonances when the electron wavelength is comparable to the size of the bump.

  17. Characterization of 3d topological insulators by 2d invariants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahul Roy

    2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The prediction of non-trivial topological phases in Bloch insulators in three dimensions has recently been experimentally verified. Here, I provide a picture for obtaining the $Z_{2}$ invariants for a three dimensional topological insulator by deforming suitable 2d planes in momentum space and by using a formula for the 2d $Z_{2}$ invariant based on the Chern number. The physical interpretation of this formula is also clarified through the connection between this formulation of the $Z_{2}$ invariant and the quantization of spin Hall conductance in two dimensions.

  18. Investigation of single unit flashovers in HVDC insulator strings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishikawa, Kouichi; Kageyama, Hiroshi; Yamada, Yasuhiro [Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Osaka (Japan)] [Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Osaka (Japan); Matsuoka, Ryosuke; Ito, Susumu; Sakanishi, Kenji [NGK Insulators, Ltd., Nagoya (Japan)] [NGK Insulators, Ltd., Nagoya (Japan)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In HVDC transmission lines, a special phenomenon, so called single unit flashover, is observed under some special conditions. Only one or two insulator units repeat flashovers, not resulting in an overall flashover along the string. However, higher magnitudes of audible noise, radio and television interferences, may give a serious problem. Based on the investigation on {+-}500-kV full scale insulator strings, higher occurrence probability of single unit flashovers under cold-wet-switch-on conditions was clarified compared with normal continuous operating voltage conditions. Effectiveness of the newly proposed countermeasures to prevent single unit flashovers was demonstrated by experiments in laboratory and in field.

  19. Composition and process for making an insulating refractory material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearson, Alan (Murrysville, PA); Swansiger, Thomas G. (Apollo, PA)

    1998-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition and process for making an insulating refractory material. The composition includes calcined alumina powder, flash activated alumina powder, an organic polymeric binder and a liquid vehicle which is preferably water. Starch or modified starch may also be added. A preferred insulating refractory material made with the composition has a density of about 2.4-2.6 g/cm.sup.3 with reduced thermal conductivity, compared with tabular alumina. Of importance, the formulation has good abrasion resistance and crush strength during intermediate processing (commercial sintering) to attain full strength and refractoriness, good abrasion resistance and crush strength.

  20. Tunable THz surface plasmon polariton based on a topological insulator/layered superconductor hybrid structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mingda

    We theoretically investigate the surface plasmon polariton (SPP) at the interface between a three-dimensional strong topological insulator (TI) and a layered superconductor/magnetic insulator structure, within the random ...

  1. EI2 Insulation Helps Anxious Pooch Find Calm in the Storm | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EI2 Insulation Helps Anxious Pooch Find Calm in the Storm EI2 Insulation Helps Anxious Pooch Find Calm in the Storm Photo of a dog sitting on a bed or couch with a stuffed toy in...

  2. Development of a methodology to discriminate incipient insulator faults from distribution system load

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards, Christopher Scott

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Insulator failure has long plagued transmission and distribution system power quality. The failure process begins when airborne contamination combines with moisture from atmospheric wetting to form a conductive pollution layer on the insulator...

  3. Industrial Insulation: An Energy Efficient Technology That Saves Money and Reduces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brayman, B.

    -but no one knew exactly just how much. Everyone understands that insulation protects people from hot surfaces and that it prevents condensation. Until recently, however no one could quantify the emissions saved for the insulation investment incurred. In fact...

  4. The Analysis of Dynamic Thermal Performance of Insulated Wall and Building Cooling Energy Consumption in Guangzhou

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, L.; Li, X.; Li, L.; Gao, Y.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ST. The simulation predictions indicate that reductions in the cooling load and maximum cooling demand are obtained when the insulation is added in the wall, but the potential of energy saving is quite limited when the wall only is insulated....

  5. Experimental Investigation on Thermal Properties of a Steel-jacketed Steam Heating Pipeline with Vacuum Insulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Na, W.; Zou, P.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The steel-jacketed steam heating pipeline employs vacuum insulation to improve the insulating effect and reduce the corrosion, and hence increases the heat transfer efficiency of the heating network and building energy efficiency. It is important...

  6. asbestos pipe-insulation removal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A&M University - TxSpace Summary: PIPE INSULATION ECONOMIES Robert E. Schilling, P.E. Eaton Corporation Aurora, Ohio ABSTRACT Pipe Insulation Economies is a computer pro gram...

  7. Graphene-on-Insulator Transistors Made Using C on Ni Chemical-Vapor Deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keast, Craig L.

    Graphene transistors are made by transferring a thin graphene film grown on Ni onto an insulating SiO[subscript 2] substrate. The properties and integration of these graphene-on-insulator transistors are presented and ...

  8. A Survey of High Performance Office Buildings in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, S.; Haberl, J. S.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2000 2 36,000 ASHRAE 90.1 - 2001 DOE-2 Simulation 37 40 Wall Insulation, Ground-coupled Systems, Daylighting for Energy Efficiency, Photovoltaics, Lamp Ballasts, High- performance Windows and Doors, Ventilation Systems, Lighting Controls, Roof... Cooling Loads, Daylighting for Energy Efficiency, Non-solar Cooling Loads, Interior Design for Light, Photovoltaics, Foundation Insulation, High- performance Windows and Doors, Heating Systems, Lighting Controls, Roof Insulation, PV providing 5...

  9. Characterization of Min-K TE-1400 Thermal Insulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemrick, James Gordon [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL; King, James [ORNL

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Min-K 1400TE insulation material was characterized at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for use in structural applications under gradient temperature conditions. Initial compression testing was performed at room temperature at various loading rates ranging between 5 and 500 psi/hour (?35 and 3500 kPa/hour) to determine the effect of sample size and test specimen geometry on the compressive strength of Min-K. To determine the loading rates that would be used for stress relaxation testing, compression tests were next carried out at various levels followed by stress relaxation under constant strain at temperatures of 650, 850, and 900oC. Additional high temperature compression testing was performed with samples loaded at a rate of 53 psi/hour (365 kPa/hour) in three load steps of 50, 100 and 200 psi (345, 690, and 1380 kPa) with quick unload/load cycles between steps and followed by a hold period in load control (3 to 100 hours) to allow for sample creep. Testing was carried out at 190, 382, 813, and 850oC. Isothermal stress relaxation testing was performed at temperatures of 190, 382, 813, and 850oC and initial loads of 100 and 200 psi (690 and 1380 kPa). Gradient stress relaxation testing was intended to be performed at temperatures of 850/450oC and 450/190oC with initial loads of 100 or 200 psi (690 and 1380 kPa) performed under constant strain utilizing a twelve-step loading scheme with loading every half hour at a rate of 5.56% strain/hour.

  10. Particle trap with dielectric barrier for use in gas insulated transmission lines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dale, Steinar J. (Monroeville, PA)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas-insulated transmission line includes an outer sheath, an inner conductor within the outer sheath, insulating supports supporting the inner conductor within the outer sheath, and an insulating gas electrically insulating the inner conductor from the outer sheath. An apertured particle trapping electrode is disposed within the outer sheath, and the electrode has a pair of dielectric members secured at each longitudinal end thereof, with the dielectric members extending outwardly from the apertured electrode.

  11. Particle trap with dielectric barrier for use in gas insulated transmission lines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dale, S.J.

    1982-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas-insulated transmission line includes an outer sheath, an inner conductor within the outer sheath, insulating supports supporting the inner conductor within the outer sheath, and an insulating gas electrically insulating the inner conductor from the outer sheath. An apertured particle trapping electrode is disposed within the outer sheath, and the electrode has a pair of dielectric members secured at each longitudinal end thereof, with the dielectric members extending outwardly from the apertured electrode. 7 figs.

  12. Sustainable wall construction and exterior insulation retrofit technology process and structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vohra, Arun (Bethesda, MD)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A low-cost process for exterior wall insulation retrofit, or new wall construction by stacking layers of fabric tube filled with insulating material against a wall and covering them with mesh and stucco provides a durable structure with good insulating value.

  13. Mathematical models of magnetic insulation Naoufel BEN ABDALLAH 1 , Pierre DEGOND 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Méhats, Florian

    Mathematical models of magnetic insulation Naoufel BEN ABDALLAH 1 , Pierre DEGOND 1 and Florian M Palaiseau Cedex, France Abstract The problem of magnetic insulation in a plane diode is discussed. Starting We study the stationary self­consistent problem of magnetic insulation under space­charge lim

  14. Design and characterization of a signal insulation coreless transformer integrated in a CMOS gate driver chip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Design and characterization of a signal insulation coreless transformer integrated in a CMOS gate the implementation of numerous distinct power transistor gate drivers, the control signal insulation is becoming more results will be shown in order to validate the functionality. I. INTRODUCTION An insulation system

  15. Identification of a sound-insulation layer modelled by fuzzy structure theory -Experimental validation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Identification of a sound-insulation layer modelled by fuzzy structure theory - Experimental.fernandez@univ-paris-est.fr Abstract One proposes a novel approach to model sound-insulation layers based on the use of the fuzzy in computational models. The keypoint of the method is the construction of a mean elastoacoustic sound-insulation

  16. Key-Insulated Symmetric Key Cryptography and Mitigating Attacks against Cryptographic Cloud Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dodis, Yevgeniy

    Key-Insulated Symmetric Key Cryptography and Mitigating Attacks against Cryptographic Cloud- sociated cryptographic keys in their entirety. In this paper, we investigate key-insulated symmetric key. To illustrate the feasibility of key-insulated symmetric key cryptography, we also report a proof

  17. AIP/123-QED Fuzzy structure theory modeling of sound-insulation layers in complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    AIP/123-QED Fuzzy structure theory modeling of sound-insulation layers in complex vibroacoustic France (Dated: September 11, 2008) Fuzzy structure theory for sound-insulation layers 1 hal-00684495 is proposed in developing an elas- toacoustic element useful to model sound-insulation layers for compu

  18. Semi-insulating crystalline silicon formed by oxygen doping during low-temperature chemical vapor deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semi-insulating crystalline silicon formed by oxygen doping during low-temperature chemical vapor) In this letter we demonstrate the use of oxygen as a dopant in silicon to create semi-insulating, crystalline of the films exhibit classical characteristics of space-charge-limited current associated with insulators

  19. Insulators for cold urban areas: The problem of Road Salt Ravi Gorur and Sreeram Venkataraman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Insulators for cold urban areas: The problem of Road Salt Ravi Gorur and Sreeram Venkataraman of insulators in winter due to road salt. We have started a research project at Arizona State University are more concerned with the effect that the road salts have on insulators, both ceramic and composite

  20. Energy Efficient Process Heating: Insulation and Thermal Mass Kevin Carpenter and Kelly Kissock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kissock, Kelly

    1 Energy Efficient Process Heating: Insulation and Thermal Mass Kevin Carpenter and Kelly Kissock/or evaporation. A practical way of reducing heat loss is by insulating or covering the surfaces. This paper presents methods to quantify heat loss and energy savings from insulating hot surfaces and open tanks