National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for highest peak max

  1. How are flat demand charges based on the highest peak over the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    How are flat demand charges based on the highest peak over the past 12 months designated in the database (LADWP does this) Home > Groups > Utility Rate Submitted by Marcroper on 11...

  2. Max Schulze

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Max Schulze June 9, 2015 Extreme unicycling The unicycle that Los Alamos student intern Max Schulze and his brother had given their dad for Father's Day in 2005 did not get much use until Schulze tried it and got hooked. Today, he is a three-time unicycling world champion, with world wins in New Zealand in 2010, Italy in 2012 and Canada in 2014. "My main competitive unicycling event is 'trials,'" Schulze explains, "which requires riders to navigate technically challenging obstacle

  3. Highest-Resolution Ribosome Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    factors. Two structures of the intact ribosome from the common bacterium Escherichia coli, determined by a Berkeley-Berlin collaboration to a resolution of 3.5 , the highest...

  4. Highest-Resolution Ribosome Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Highest-Resolution Ribosome Structure Highest-Resolution Ribosome Structure Print Wednesday, 26 April 2006 00:00 The last step in converting the genetic information stored in DNA into the major functional parts of cells is protein biosynthesis. Protein synthesis occurs on the ribosome, a cellular factory found in all forms of life. In contrast to most cellular machines, the ribosome contains a functional core of RNA that is enhanced by ribosomal proteins and accessory factors. Two structures of

  5. Highest-Resolution Ribosome Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Highest-Resolution Ribosome Structure Print The last step in converting the genetic information stored in DNA into the major functional parts of cells is protein biosynthesis. Protein synthesis occurs on the ribosome, a cellular factory found in all forms of life. In contrast to most cellular machines, the ribosome contains a functional core of RNA that is enhanced by ribosomal proteins and accessory factors. Two structures of the intact ribosome from the common bacterium Escherichia coli,

  6. Summary Max Total Units

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Summary Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water

  7. Distribute The Highest Selected Textual Recommendation (DTHSTR)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-05-01

    The DTHSTR computer code uses a set of documents as seed documents to recommend documents of interest from a large, target set of documents. The computer code provides results that show the highest recommended documents as well as the terms in common between the recommend document and the corresponding seed document that is most similar.

  8. Unfolding with Maxed and Gravel.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-07-12

    Version: 00 UMG (Unfolding with MAXED and GRAVEL) is a package of seven programs written for the analysis of data measured with spectrometers that require the use of unfolding techniques. See the developers’ website for information on training courses http://www.ptb.de/en/org/6/utc2006/intro.htm. The program MAXED applies the maximum entropy principle to the unfolding problem, and the program GRAVEL uses a modified SAND-II algorithm to do the unfolding. There are two versions of each: MXD_FC33 and GRV_FC33 formore » “few-channel” unfolding (e.g., Bonner sphere spectrometers) and MXD-MC33 and GRV_MC33 for “multi-channel” unfolding (e.g., NE-213). The program IQU can be used to calculate integral quantities for both MAXED and GRAVEL solution spectra and, in the case of MAXED solutions, it can also be used to calculate the uncertainty in these values as well as the uncertainty in the solution spectrum. The uncertainty calculation is handled in the following way: given a solution spectrum generated by MAXED, the program IQU considers variations in the measured data and in the default spectrum and uses standard methods to do sensitivity analysis and uncertainty propagation. There are two versions: IQU_FC33 for “few channel” unfolding and IQU_MC33 for “multi-channel” unfolding. The program UMGPlot can be used to display the results from the unfolding programs MAXED and GRAVEL in graphical form in a quick and easy way.« less

  9. Max Ambiental S A | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ambiental S A Jump to: navigation, search Name: Max Ambiental S.A. Place: Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip: 01452-938 Sector: Carbon Product: Max Ambiental is a company involved in the...

  10. MaxWest Environmental Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MaxWest Environmental Systems Jump to: navigation, search Name: MaxWest Environmental Systems Place: Houston, Texas Zip: 77057 Product: MaxWest Environmental Systems designs,...

  11. Desert Peak EGS Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Desert Peak EGS Project presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

  12. Bandwidth Historical Peak Days

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bandwidth Historical Peak Days Bandwidth Historical Peak Days These plots show yearly peak days from 2000 to the present. BE CAREFUL because the graphs are autoscaling - check the scales on each axis before you compare graphs. Note that the graph for current year shows the data for the year-to-date peak. Transfer Rate vs. Size Transfer Rate vs. Size Transfer Rate vs. Size Transfer Rate vs. Size Transfer Rate vs. Size Transfer Rate vs. Size Transfer Rate vs. Size Transfer Rate vs. Size Transfer

  13. Peak power ratio generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moyer, Robert D.

    1985-01-01

    A peak power ratio generator is described for measuring, in combination with a conventional power meter, the peak power level of extremely narrow pulses in the gigahertz radio frequency bands. The present invention in a preferred embodiment utilizes a tunnel diode and a back diode combination in a detector circuit as the only high speed elements. The high speed tunnel diode provides a bistable signal and serves as a memory device of the input pulses for the remaining, slower components. A hybrid digital and analog loop maintains the peak power level of a reference channel at a known amount. Thus, by measuring the average power levels of the reference signal and the source signal, the peak power level of the source signal can be determined.

  14. Peak power ratio generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moyer, R.D.

    A peak power ratio generator is described for measuring, in combination with a conventional power meter, the peak power level of extremely narrow pulses in the gigahertz radio frequency bands. The present invention in a preferred embodiment utilizes a tunnel diode and a back diode combination in a detector circuit as the only high speed elements. The high speed tunnel diode provides a bistable signal and serves as a memory device of the input pulses for the remaining, slower components. A hybrid digital and analog loop maintains the peak power level of a reference channel at a known amount. Thus, by measuring the average power levels of the reference signal and the source signal, the peak power level of the source signal can be determined.

  15. Max Tech and Beyond Design Competition

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Max Tech and Beyond Design Competition is an annual competition run by the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) that challenges students to design...

  16. SolarMax Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Korea (Republic) Zip: 445-912 Sector: Solar Product: Manufacturer and engineer of solar heating systems and boilers. References: SolarMax Inc1 This article is a stub. You...

  17. max kwh | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    This is likely due to users not understanding the meaning of "Max kWh"--often I see things like: "300, 700, 1000" (derived from "first 300, next 700, greater than 1000") which...

  18. Fact #936: August 1, 2016 California Had the Highest Concentration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    August 1, 2016 California Had the Highest Concentration of Plug-in Vehicles Relative to Population in 2015 Fact 936: August 1, 2016 California Had the Highest Concentration of ...

  19. Savannah River Site Manager Jack Craig Wins Highest Civil Service...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Savannah River Site Manager Jack Craig Wins Highest Civil Service Award Savannah River Site Manager Jack Craig Wins Highest Civil Service Award December 29, 2015 - 1:00pm Addthis ...

  20. monthly_peak_2005.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3a . January Monthly Peak Hour Demand, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Council Region, 2005 and Projected 2006 through 2010 (Megawatts and 2005 Base Year) Projected Monthly Base Year Contiguous U.S. Eastern Power Grid Texas Power Grid Western Power Grid FRCC MRO NPCC RFC SERC SPP ERCOT WECC Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak

  1. PEAK LIMITING AMPLIFIER

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldsworthy, W.W.; Robinson, J.B.

    1959-03-31

    A peak voltage amplitude limiting system adapted for use with a cascade type amplifier is described. In its detailed aspects, the invention includes an amplifier having at least a first triode tube and a second triode tube, the cathode of the second tube being connected to the anode of the first tube. A peak limiter triode tube has its control grid coupled to thc anode of the second tube and its anode connected to the cathode of the second tube. The operation of the limiter is controlled by a bias voltage source connected to the control grid of the limiter tube and the output of the system is taken from the anode of the second tube.

  2. PEAK READING VOLTMETER

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dyer, A.L.

    1958-07-29

    An improvement in peak reading voltmeters is described, which provides for storing an electrical charge representative of the magnitude of a transient voltage pulse and thereafter measuring the stored charge, drawing oniy negligible energy from the storage element. The incoming voltage is rectified and stored in a condenser. The voltage of the capacitor is applied across a piezoelectric crystal between two parallel plates. Amy change in the voltage of the capacitor is reflected in a change in the dielectric constant of the crystal and the capacitance between a second pair of plates affixed to the crystal is altered. The latter capacitor forms part of the frequency determlning circuit of an oscillator and means is provided for indicating the frequency deviation which is a measure of the peak voltage applied to the voltmeter.

  3. REMEDIATE AND RESTORE GROUNDWATER TO HIGHEST BENEFICIAL USE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    REMEDIATE AND RESTORE GROUNDWATER TO HIGHEST BENEFICIAL USE ■ Groundwater is to be cleaned up and restored to the highest bene cial use.* ■ Restoration should be within a reasonable time frame, commensurate with risk and Tri-Party Agreement timelines. ■ Ongoing groundwater remediation activities and review processes should be fully funded. ■ Technology development should continually be pursued to remediate and restore groundwater to highest bene cial use.* ■ The public and tribes must

  4. ORISE: Nuclear engineering degrees at highest ranges since 1980s

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rates for nuclear engineering candidates are still at highest ranges reported since 1980s Report also shows shifts in career opportunities beyond graduation in nuclear utilities ...

  5. NETL Researcher Selected to Receive Nation's Highest Award for...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The PECASE award is the highest honor the U.S. government can bestow on scientists or engineers in the early stages of their research careers. Dr. Ohodnicki was selected for his ...

  6. NETL Researcher Selected to Receive Nation's Highest Award for Young

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Researcher Selected to Receive Nation's Highest Award for Young Scientists Pittsburgh, Pa.-Dr. Paul R. Ohodnicki, a materials scientist at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), has been named by President Obama as a recipient of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE). The PECASE award is the highest honor the U.S. government can bestow on scientists or engineers in the early stages of their research careers. Dr. Ohodnicki was selected for his

  7. Workers Complete Highest Hazard Demolition Preparations at Hanford Site |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Highest Hazard Demolition Preparations at Hanford Site Workers Complete Highest Hazard Demolition Preparations at Hanford Site July 28, 2016 - 1:20pm Addthis Employees in the Americium Recovery Facility remove piping. Employees in the Americium Recovery Facility remove piping. A rendering of the PFP complex. Demolition will start with the 236-Z (Plutonium Reclamation Facility) in green, progress to 242-Z (Americium Recovery Facility) in red, to 234-5Z (main processing

  8. New Mexico Environment Department Presents WIPP Its Highest Recognition for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Excellence | Department of Energy Environment Department Presents WIPP Its Highest Recognition for Environmental Excellence New Mexico Environment Department Presents WIPP Its Highest Recognition for Environmental Excellence April 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Deb Gill, (575) 234-7270 U.S. DOE Carlsbad Field Office www.wipp.energy.gov CARLSBAD, N.M., April 30, 2013 - The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was recognized by the New

  9. monthly_peak_2006.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Released: February 7, 2008 Next Update: October 2008 Table 3a . January Monthly Peak Hour Demand, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region 2006 and Projected 2007 through 2011 (Megawatts and 2006 Base Year) Projected Monthly Base Year Contiguous U.S. Eastern Power Grid Texas Power Grid Western Power Grid FRCC MRO NPCC RFC SERC SPP ERCOT WECC Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak

  10. Rainer Held > Guest Researcher - Max-Planck Institute for Solid...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rainer Held Guest Researcher - Max-Planck Institute for Solid State Research heldrain@gmail.com Formerly a member of the Schlom Group, he joined the Max-Planck Institute for Solid ...

  11. NREL Theorist Recognized for Highest Citation Impact - News Releases | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Theorist Recognized for Highest Citation Impact October 5, 2004 Golden, Colo. - Dr. Alex Zunger, Research Fellow at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is a co-author of one of the 100 physics papers that has the highest citation impact over the past 110 years according to a recent analysis of manuscripts that have appeared in the journal Physical Review from 1893 to 2003. Zunger's work with co-author J.P. Perdew on "Self-interaction Correction

  12. Meet the world's highest-performance single-molecule diode

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Meet the world's highest-performance single-molecule diode Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window) Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window) Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window) This is the world's highest-performance single-molecule diode using a combination of gold electrodes and an ionic solution. (Image: Latha Venkataraman, Columbia University) More » Nanotubes that Assemble Themselves Discover a new way to look at

  13. U.S. gasoline consumption highest in 8 years

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    U.S. gasoline consumption highest in 8 years U.S. gasoline consumption this year is expected to be at the highest level since the record fuel demand seen back in 2007 as lower gasoline prices and more people finding jobs means more sales at the gasoline pump. In its new monthly forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said gasoline consumption increased by 2.7% during the first eight months of 2015 and should rise by an average of 190,000 barrels per day this year to 9.1 million

  14. Aggregate Transfers Historical Yearly Peak

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transfers Historical Yearly Peak Aggregate Transfers Historical Yearly Peak These plots show the yearly peak days from 2000 to the present. BE CAREFUL because the graphs are autoscaling - check the scales on each axis before you compare graphs. Note that the graph for current year shows the data for the year-to-date peak. Daily Aggregate Bandwidth Daily Aggregate Bandwidth Daily Aggregate Bandwidth Daily Aggregate Bandwidth Daily Aggregate Bandwidth Daily Aggregate Bandwidth Daily Aggregate

  15. Concurrent Transfers Historical Yearly Peak

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transfers Historical Yearly Peak Concurrent Transfers Historical Yearly Peak These plots show the yearly peak days from 2000 to present. BE CAREFUL because the graphs are autoscaling - check the scales on each axis before you compare graphs. Note that the graph for current year shows the data for the year-to-date peak. Daily Storage Concurrency Daily Storage Concurrency Daily Storage Concurrency Daily Storage Concurrency Daily Storage Concurrency Daily Storage Concurrency Daily Storage

  16. Three NNSA researchers receive President's highest early-career STEM

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    award | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Three NNSA researchers receive President's highest early-career STEM award Thursday, May 5, 2016 - 10:35am Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz, left, and NNSA Administrator Frank Klotz, right, join physicist Tammy Ma as she celebrates receiving a PECASE award for her work with the National Ignition Facility. Yesterday Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz hosted a special ceremony honoring DOE's 13 recipients of the 2016 Presidential Early

  17. ORISE: Nuclear engineering degrees at highest ranges since 1980s

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ORISE report shows graduation, enrollment rates for nuclear engineering candidates are still at highest ranges reported since 1980s Report also shows shifts in career opportunities beyond graduation in nuclear utilities FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Nov. 2, 2011 FY12-04 OAK RIDGE, Tenn.-After a one-year decline, the number of graduate and undergraduate nuclear engineering degrees earned in the United States bounced back in 2010. A recent report from the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education

  18. Highest-weight representations of Brocherd`s algebras

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slansky, R.

    1997-01-01

    General features of highest-weight representations of Borcherd`s algebras are described. to show their typical features, several representations of Borcherd`s extensions of finite-dimensional algebras are analyzed. Then the example of the extension of affine- su(2) to a Borcherd`s algebra is examined. These algebras provide a natural way to extend a Kac-Moody algebra to include the hamiltonian and number-changing operators in a generalized symmetry structure.

  19. Neutron Damage and MAX Phase Ternary Compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barsoum, Michael; Hoffman, Elizabeth; Sindelar, Robert; Garcua-Duaz, Brenda; Kohse, Gordon

    2014-06-17

    The Demands of Gen IV nuclear power plants for long service life under neutron radiation at high temperature are severe. Advanced materials that would withstand high temperatures (up to 1000+ C) to high doses in a neutron field would be ideal for reactor internal structures and would add to the long service life and reliability of the reactors. The objective of this work is to investigate the response of a new class of machinable, conductive, layered, ternary transition metal carbides and nitrides - the so-called MAX phases - to low and moderate neutron dose levels.

  20. Concurrent Transfers Historical Yearly Peak

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the graph for current year shows the data for the year-to-date peak. Daily Storage Concurrency Daily Storage Concurrency Daily Storage Concurrency Daily Storage Concurrency Daily...

  1. Transfer Activity Historical Yearly Peak

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Activity Historical Yearly Peak Transfer Activity Historical Yearly Peak The plots below show the yearly peak days from 2000 to the present. BE CAREFUL because the graphs are autoscaling - check the scales on each axis before you compare graphs. Note that the graph for the current year shows the data for the year-to-date peak. Transfers Started/In Progress Transfers Started/In Progress Transfers Started/In Progress Transfers Started/In Progress Transfers Started/In Progress Transfers Started/In

  2. monthly_peak_2003.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    O Form EIA-411 for 2005 Released: February 7, 2008 Next Update: October 2007 Table 3a . January Monthly Peak Hour Demand, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Council Region, 1996 through 2003 and Projected 2004 through 2005 (Megawatts and 2003 Base Year) Projected Monthly Base Year Contiguous U.S. Eastern Power Grid Texas Power Grid Western Power Grid ECAR FRCC MAAC MAIN MAPP/MR NPCC SERC SPP ERCOT WECC Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW) Peak Hour Demand (MW)

  3. SolarMax Technology Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technology Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: SolarMax Technology Inc Place: City of Industry, California Zip: 91745 Product: PV module maker and residential and commercial PV...

  4. Incorporating the min-max mesh optimization method within the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Incorporating the min-max mesh optimization method within the Target-Matrix Paradigm. ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Word Cloud More Like This Full ...

  5. Incorporating the min-max mesh optimization method within the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Incorporating the min-max mesh optimization method within the Target-Matrix ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Word Cloud More Like This Full ...

  6. AVTA: 2013 Ford C-MAX HEV Testing Results

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    VTO's National Laboratories have tested and collected both dynamometer and fleet data for the Ford C-MAX HEV (a hybrid electric vehicle).

  7. The MAX facility for CFD code validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lomperski, S.; Merzari, E.; Obabko, A.; Pointer, W. D.; Fischer, P.

    2012-07-01

    ANL has recently completed construction of a fluid dynamics test facility devised to provide validation data for CFD simulation tools used to evaluate various aspects of nuclear power plant design and safety. Experiments with the facility involve mixing air jets within a 1x1x1.7m long glass tank at atmospheric pressure. A particle image velocimetry system measures flow velocity and turbulence quantities within the tank while a high-speed infrared camera records temperatures across the tank lid. The tandem of high fidelity thermal and turbulence data is particularly useful for benchmarking transient heat transfer phenomena such as thermal striping. This paper describes the MAX facility, preliminary data obtained during shakedown tests, and the results of companion CFD calculations employing RANS-based Star-CCM+ and large eddy simulations with Nek 5000. (authors)

  8. summer_peak_2004.xls

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2009 (Megawatts and 2004 Base Year) Summer Noncoincident Peak Contiguous U.S. Eastern Power Grid Texas Power Grid Western Power Grid Projected Year Base Year ECAR FRCC MAAC...

  9. summer_peak_2003.xls

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2008 (Megawatts and 2003 Base Year) Summer Noncoincident Peak Contiguous U.S. Eastern Power Grid Texas Power Grid Western Power Grid Projected Year Base Year ECAR FRCC MAAC...

  10. SEARCHING FOR THE HIGHEST REDSHIFT SOURCES IN 250-500 {mu}m SUBMILLIMETER SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pope, Alexandra; Chary, Ranga-Ram

    2010-06-01

    We explore a technique for identifying the highest redshift (z>4) sources in Herschel/SPIRE and BLAST submillimeter surveys by localizing the position of the far-infrared dust peak. Just as Spitzer/IRAC was used to identify stellar 'bump' sources, the far-IR peak is also a redshift indicator; although the latter also depends on the average dust temperature. We demonstrate the wide range of allowable redshifts for a reasonable range of dust temperatures and show that it is impossible to constraint the redshift of individual objects using solely the position of the far-IR peak. By fitting spectral energy distribution models to simulated Herschel/SPIRE photometry we show the utility of radio and/or far-infrared data in breaking this degeneracy. With prior knowledge of the dust temperature distribution it is possible to obtain statistical samples of high redshift submillimeter galaxy (SMG) candidates. We apply this technique to the BLAST survey of ECDFS to constrain the number of dusty galaxies at z>4. We find 8 {+-} 2 galaxies with flux density ratios of S {sub 500}>S {sub 350}; this sets an upper limit of 17 {+-} 4 deg{sup -2} if we assume all are at z>4. This is <35 % of all 500 {mu}m-selected galaxies down to S {sub 500}>45 mJy (L {sub IR}>2 x 10{sup 13} L {sub sun} for z>4). Modeling with conventional temperature and redshift distributions estimates the percentage of these 500 {mu}m peak galaxies at z>4 to be between 10% and 85%. Our results are consistent with other estimates of the number density of very high redshift SMGs and follow the decline in the star formation rate density at z>4.

  11. Desert Peak Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Desert Peak Geothermal Area (Redirected from Desert Peak Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Desert Peak Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2...

  12. Stochastic acceleration in peaked spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zasenko, V.; Zagorodny, A.; Weiland, J.

    2005-06-15

    Diffusion in velocity space of test particles undergoing external random electric fields with spectra varying from low intensive and broad to high intensive and narrow (peaked) is considered. It is shown that to achieve consistency between simulation and prediction of the microscopic model, which is reduced to Fokker-Planck-type equation, it is necessary, in the case of peaked spectrum, to account for temporal variation of diffusion coefficient occurring in the early stage. An analytical approximation for the solution of the Fokker-Planck equation with a time and velocity dependent diffusion coefficients is proposed.

  13. winter_peak_2003.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ) Form EIA-411 for 2005 Released: February 7, 2008 Next Update: October 2007 Table 2b . Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Council Region, 1990 through 2003 and Projected 2004 through 2008 (Megawatts and 2003 Base Year) Winter Noncoincident Peak Load Contiguous U.S. Eastern Power Grid Texas Power Grid Western Power Grid Projected Year Base Year ECAR FRCC MAAC MAIN MAPP (U.S. NPCC (U.S.) SERC SPP ERCOT WECC (U.S.) 1990/1991 484,231 67,097

  14. winter_peak_2004.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b . Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Council Region, 1990 through 2004 and Projected 2005 through 2009 (Megawatts and 2004 Base Year) Winter Noncoincident Peak Load Contiguous U.S. Eastern Power Grid Texas Power Grid Western Power Grid Projected Year Base Year ECAR FRCC MAAC MAIN MAPP/MRO (U.S.) NPCC (U.S.) SERC SPP ERCOT WECC (U.S.) 1990/1991 484,231 67,097 30,800 36,551 32,461 21,113 40,545 86,648 38,949 35,815 94,252 1991/1992 485,761

  15. winter_peak_2005.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2b . Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Council Region, 2005 and Projected 2006 through 2010 (Megawatts and 2005 Base Year) Winter Noncoincident Peak Load Contiguous U.S. Eastern Power Grid Texas Power Grid Western Power Grid Projected Year Base Year FRCC MRO (U.S.) NPCC (U.S.) RFC SERC SPP ERCOT WECC (U.S.) 2005/2006 626,365 42,657 33,748 46,828 151,600 164,638 31,260 48,141 107,493 Contiguous U.S. Projected FRCC MRO (U.S.) NPCC (U.S.)

  16. Peak finding using biorthogonal wavelets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan, C.Y.

    2000-02-01

    The authors show in this paper how they can find the peaks in the input data if the underlying signal is a sum of Lorentzians. In order to project the data into a space of Lorentzian like functions, they show explicitly the construction of scaling functions which look like Lorentzians. From this construction, they can calculate the biorthogonal filter coefficients for both the analysis and synthesis functions. They then compare their biorthogonal wavelets to the FBI (Federal Bureau of Investigations) wavelets when used for peak finding in noisy data. They will show that in this instance, their filters perform much better than the FBI wavelets.

  17. University of Maryland Wins Max Tech and Beyond Competition for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ultra-Efficient Clothes Dryer | Department of Energy University of Maryland Wins Max Tech and Beyond Competition for Ultra-Efficient Clothes Dryer University of Maryland Wins Max Tech and Beyond Competition for Ultra-Efficient Clothes Dryer September 10, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The Energy Department announced today that the University of Maryland won the second annual Max Tech and Beyond design competition for ultra-low energy use appliances and equipment for the second year in a row. The

  18. METHOD OF PEAK CURRENT MEASUREMENT

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, G.E.

    1959-01-20

    The measurement and recording of peak electrical currents are described, and a method for utilizing the magnetic field of the current to erase a portion of an alternating constant frequency and amplitude signal from a magnetic mediums such as a magnetic tapes is presented. A portion of the flux from the current carrying conductor is concentrated into a magnetic path of defined area on the tape. After the current has been recorded, the tape is played back. The amplitude of the signal from the portion of the tape immediately adjacent the defined flux area and the amplitude of the signal from the portion of the tape within the area are compared with the amplitude of the signal from an unerased portion of the tape to determine the percentage of signal erasure, and thereby obtain the peak value of currents flowing in the conductor.

  19. Silver Peak Innovative Exploration Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objectives: Reduce the high level of risk during the early stages of geothermal project development by conducting a multi-faceted and innovative exploration and drilling program at Silver Peak. Determine the combination of techniques that are most useful and cost-effective in identifying the geothermal resource through a detailed, post-project evaluation of the exploration and drilling program.

  20. Texas Nuclear Profile - Comanche Peak

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Comanche Peak" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 1,"1,209","9,677",91.4,"PWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel"

  1. Max Tech Electric Heat Pump Water Heater with Lower GWP Halogenated...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Max Tech Electric Heat Pump Water Heater with Lower GWP Halogenated Refrigerant Max Tech Electric Heat Pump Water Heater with Lower GWP Halogenated Refrigerant Information flow ...

  2. Zhejiang Max Solar Energy Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solar Energy Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Zhejiang Max Solar Energy Co Ltd Place: Huzhou, Zhejiang Province, China Zip: 313009 Product: A Zhejiang-based PV module...

  3. Subkilovolt response of Kodak T max XUV film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dittmore, C.; Stoering, J.P. ); Gullikson, E. )

    1990-02-08

    A calibration of Kodak T max 100 XUV film at six x-ray energies ranging from 0.27 keV to 1.49 keV has been concluded. The primary purpose was to compare the sensitivity of this film to that of Kodak type 101-07 XUV film in order to appraise the feasibility of replacing the type 101-07 film with the type T max 100 film. In addition to being considerably less expensive, the T max 100 film is less disposed to abrasion from handling. A secondary objective was to provide a base for further response measurements should the T max 100 film prove to be an acceptable substitute for the type 101-07 film. 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Peak Treatment Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Treatment Systems Jump to: navigation, search Name: Peak Treatment Systems Place: Golden, CO Website: www.peaktreatmentsystems.com References: Peak Treatment Systems1 Information...

  5. Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Previous Articles Previous Articles Estimates of Peak Underground Working Gas Storage Capacity in the United States, 2009 Update (Released, 8312009) Estimates of Peak Underground...

  6. peak_load_2010.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2. Noncoincident Peak Load, by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, 1990-2010 Actual, 2011-2015 Projected (Megawatts) Interconnection NERC Regional Assesment Area 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 FRCC 27,266 28,818 30,601 32,823 32,904 34,524 35,444 35,375 38,730 37,493 37,194 39,062 40,696 40,475 42,383 46,396 45,751 46,676 44,836 NPCC 44,116 46,594 43,658 46,706 47,581 47,705 45,094 49,269 49,566 52,855

  7. The interactional foundations of MaxEnt: Open questions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harr, Michael S.

    2014-12-05

    One of the simplest and potentially most useful techniques to be developed in the 20{sup th} century, a century noted for an ever more mathematically sophisticated formulation of the sciences, is that of maximising the entropy of a system in order to generate a descriptive, stochastic model of that system in closed form, often abbreviated to MaxEnt. The extension of MaxEnt to systems beyond the physics from which it originated is hampered by the fact that the microscopic physical interactions that are not justified or justifiable within the MaxEnt framework need to be falsifiably evaluated in each new field of application. It is not obvious that such justification exists for many systems in which the interactions are not directly based on physics. For example what is the justification for the use of MaxEnt in biology, climate modelling or economics? Is it simply a useful heuristic or is there some deeper connection with the foundations of some systems? Without further critical examination of the microscopic foundations that give rise to the success of the MaxEnt principle it is difficult to motivate the use of such techniques in other fields except through theoretically an practically unsatisfying analogical arguments. This article briefly presents the basis of MaxEnt principles as originally introduced in statistical mechanics in the Jaynes form, the Tsallis form and the Rnyi form. Several different applications are introduced including that of ecological diversity where maximising the different diversity measures is equivalent to maximising different entropic functionals.

  8. Paul Blom: Research Director, Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center for Energy Efficient Materials Paul Blom: Research Director, Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research Jan 22, 2014 | 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM Paul Blom Research Director, Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research Transport and Recombination in Polymer:fullerene bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells January 22, 2014 | 2:00pm | ESB 2001 Faculty host: Thuc Quyen-Nguyen >>>Video and Slides available after the presentation* Abstract In solar cells, free charge carriers can recombine both via

  9. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN {nu}{sub max} AND AGE t FROM ZAMS TO RGB-TIP FOR LOW-MASS STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Y. K.; Gai, N. E-mail: ning.gai@hotmail.com

    2013-07-10

    Stellar age is an important quantity in astrophysics, which is useful for many fields both in the universe and galaxies. It cannot be determined by direct measurements, but can only be estimated or inferred. We attempt to find a useful indicator of stellar age, which is accurate from the zero-age main sequence to the tip of red giant branch for low-mass stars. Using the Yale Rotation and Evolution Code (YREC), a grid of stellar models has been constructed. Meanwhile, the frequency of maximum oscillations' power {nu}{sub max} and the large frequency separation {Delta}{nu} are calculated using the scaling relations. For the stars, the masses of which are from 0.8 M{sub Sun} to 2.8 M{sub Sun }, we can obtain the {nu}{sub max} and stellar age by combing the scaling relations with the four sets of grid models (YREC, Dotter et al., Marigo et al., and YY isochrones). We find that {nu}{sub max} is tightly correlated and decreases monotonically with the age of the star from the main sequence to the red giant evolutionary stages. Moreover, we find that the line shapes of the curves in the Age versus {nu}{sub max} diagram, which is plotted by the four sets of grid models, are consistent for red giants with masses from 1.1 M{sub Sun} to 2.8 M{sub Sun }. For red giants, the differences of correlation coefficients between Age and {nu}{sub max} for different grid models are minor and can be ignored. Interestingly, we find two peaks that correspond to the subgiants and bump of red giants in the Age versus {nu}{sub max} diagram. By general linear least-squares, we make the polynomial fitting and deduce the relationship between log(Age) and log({nu}{sub max}) in red giants' evolutionary state.

  10. Mirant: Summary of Monitored SO2 Concentrations During Periods of Highest

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impact | Department of Energy Mirant: Summary of Monitored SO2 Concentrations During Periods of Highest Impact Mirant: Summary of Monitored SO2 Concentrations During Periods of Highest Impact Docket No. EO-05-01: Tables showing a summary of monitored SO2 concentrations during periods of highest impact as well as ERMOD modeling results for SO2 scenarios. Mirant: Summary of Monitored SO2 Concentrations During Periods of Highest Impact (285.92 KB) More Documents & Publications Answer of

  11. SnowPeak Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SnowPeak Energy Place: Reno, Nevada Zip: 89502 Product: Nevada-based concentrator PV module maker. References: SnowPeak Energy1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  12. High temperature ion irradiation effects in MAX phase ceramics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Clark, D. W.; Zinkle, Steven J.; Patel, Maulik K.; Parish, Chad M.

    2015-12-24

    The family of layered carbides and nitrides known as MAX phase ceramics combine many attractive properties of both ceramics and metals due to their nanolaminate crystal structure and are promising potential candidates for application in future nuclear reactors. This research examines the effects of energetic heavy ion (5.8 MeV Ni) irradiations on polycrystalline samples of Ti3SiC2, Ti3AlC2, and Ti2AlC. The irradiation conditions consisted of midrange ion doses between 10 and 30 displacements per atom at temperatures of 400 and 700⁰C, conditions relevant to application in future nuclear reactors and a relatively un-explored regime for this new class of materials. Followingmore » irradiation, a comprehensive analysis of radiation response properties was compiled using grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (XRD), nanoindentation, scanning electron microcopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In all cases, XRD and TEM analyses confirm the materials remain fully crystalline although the intense atomic collisions induce significant damage and disorder into the layered crystalline lattice. X-ray diffraction and nanoindentation show this damage is manifest in anisotropic swelling and hardening at all conditions and in all materials, with the aluminum based MAX phase exhibiting significantly more damage than their silicon counterpart. In all three materials there is little damage dependence on dose, suggesting saturation of radiation damage at levels below 10 displacements per atom, and significantly less retained damage at higher temperatures, suggesting radiation defect annealing. SEM surface analysis showed significant grain boundary cracking and loss of damage tolerance properties in the aluminum-based MAX phase irradiated at 400⁰C, but not in the silicon counterpart. TEM analysis of select samples suggest that interstitials are highly mobile while vacancies are immobile and that all three materials are in the so-called point defect swelling regime

  13. max walltime for "low" queue is increased to 24 hrs on Hopper

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    max walltime for low queue is increased to 24 hrs on Hopper max walltime for low queue is increased to 24 hrs on Hopper May 31, 2012 by Helen He (0 Comments) We have increased the...

  14. WPPI GreenMax-Scheller Residence: Near Zero Energy Monitoring Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-11-19

    This report describes results of GreenMax 2 monitoring project referred to as the GreenMax Net Zero Home, a demonstration home that can provide a wealth of information for the building community.

  15. Passive radio frequency peak power multiplier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farkas, Zoltan D.; Wilson, Perry B.

    1977-01-01

    Peak power multiplication of a radio frequency source by simultaneous charging of two high-Q resonant microwave cavities by applying the source output through a directional coupler to the cavities and then reversing the phase of the source power to the coupler, thereby permitting the power in the cavities to simultaneously discharge through the coupler to the load in combination with power from the source to apply a peak power to the load that is a multiplication of the source peak power.

  16. Monthly Generation System Peak (pbl/generation)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Generation > Generation Hydro Power Wind Power Monthly GSP BPA White Book Dry Year Tools Firstgov Monthly Generation System Peak (GSP) This site is no longer maintained. Page last...

  17. Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Capacity Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity Released: September 3, 2010 for data as of April 2010 Next Release: August 2011 References Methodology Definitions...

  18. Fact #936: August 1, 2016 California Had the Highest Concentration of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plug-in Vehicles Relative to Population in 2015 | Department of Energy 6: August 1, 2016 California Had the Highest Concentration of Plug-in Vehicles Relative to Population in 2015 Fact #936: August 1, 2016 California Had the Highest Concentration of Plug-in Vehicles Relative to Population in 2015 SUBSCRIBE to the Fact of the Week In 2015, there were five states with more than two plug-in vehicles (PEVs) registered per 1,000 people. California had the highest concentration of PEVs with 4.68

  19. Highest Risk Components Safely Removed From K-27 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Highest Risk Components Safely Removed From K-27 Highest Risk Components Safely Removed From K-27 February 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Oak Ridge, Tenn. - Oak Ridge's EM contractor URS | CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC (UCOR) has removed the highest risk components remaining in the East Tennessee Technology Park's (ETTP) K-27 building, with the successful crane removal of six components known as NaF traps. The K-27 building is sister to the mile-long K-25 gaseous diffusion process building, which is now

  20. Graphene-based Electrode Leads to Highest Capacity Lithium-Air...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Graphene-based Electrode Leads to Highest Capacity Lithium-Air Batteries New approach to ... The Impact This study developed a new self-assembly approach to obtain 3-dimensional (3D) ...

  1. Savannah River Site Manager Jack Craig Wins Highest Civil Service Award

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – DOE Savannah River Operations Office Manager Jack Craig recently received the nation’s highest civil service recognition, the Presidential Rank of Distinguished Executive award.

  2. Nominate An Inspirational STEM Teacher for the Nation’s Highest Honors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Nominations are now open for the nation’s highest honors for K-12 mathematics and science teachers. The Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching, or PAEMST, have been...

  3. New Energy Star Initiative Recognizes Cutting-Edge Products with Highest

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Efficiency | Department of Energy Star Initiative Recognizes Cutting-Edge Products with Highest Energy Efficiency New Energy Star Initiative Recognizes Cutting-Edge Products with Highest Energy Efficiency July 14, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today are announcing for the first time products recognized as the most energy-efficient in their categories among those that have earned the Energy Star

  4. Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    not necessarily coincide. As such, the noncoincident peak for any region is at least as big as any monthly volume in the historical record. Data from Form EIA-191M, "Monthly...

  5. QER- Comment of Cloud Peak Energy Inc

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Dear Ms Pickett Please find attached comments from Cloud Peak Energy as input to the Department of Energy’s Quadrennial Energy Review. If possible I would appreciate a confirmation that this email has been received Thank you.

  6. LNG production for peak shaving operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, B.C.

    1999-07-01

    LNG production facilities are being developed as an alternative or in addition to underground storage throughout the US to provide gas supply during peak gas demand periods. These facilities typically involved a small liquefaction unit with a large LNG storage tank and gas sendout facilities capable of responding to peak loads during the winter. Black and Veatch is active in the development of LNG peak shaving projects for clients using a patented mixed refrigerant technology for efficient production of LNG at a low installed cost. The mixed refrigerant technology has been applied in a range of project sizes both with gas turbine and electric motor driven compression systems. This paper will cover peak shaving concepts as well as specific designs and projects which have been completed to meet this market need.

  7. Measured Peak Equipment Loads in Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathew, Paul A.

    2007-09-12

    This technical bulletin documents measured peak equipment load data from 39 laboratory spaces in nine buildings across five institutions. The purpose of these measurements was to obtain data on the actual peak loads in laboratories, which can be used to rightsize the design of HVAC systems in new laboratories. While any given laboratory may have unique loads and other design considerations, these results may be used as a 'sanity check' for design assumptions.

  8. Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX) Operated by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility for the U.S. Department of Energy, the second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) begins its inaugural deployment November 2010 in Steamboat Springs, Colorado, for the Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment, or STORMVEX. For six months, the comprehensive suite of AMF2 instruments will obtain measurements of cloud and aerosol properties at various sites

  9. Peak Dose Assessment for Proposed DOE-PPPO Authorized Limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maldonado, Delis

    2012-06-01

    included increasing the time horizon beyond 1,050 years (yr), and using the radionuclide concentrations provided by the DOE-PPPO as inputs into the codes. The deterministic peak doses were evaluated within time horizons of 70 yr (for the Landfill Worker and Trespasser), 1,050 yr, 10,000 yr and 100,000 yr (for the Resident Farmer [onsite], Resident Gardener, Recreational User, Outdoor Worker and Offsite Resident Farmer) at the request of the DOE-PPPO. The time horizons of 10,000 yr and 100,000 yr were used at the request of the DOE-PPPO for informational purposes only. The probabilistic peak of the mean dose assessment was performed for the Offsite Resident Farmer using Technetium-99 (Tc-99) and a time horizon of 1,050 yr. The results of the deterministic analyses indicate that among all receptors and time horizons evaluated, the highest projected dose, 2,700 mrem/yr, occurred for the Resident Farmer (onsite) at 12,773 yr. The exposure pathways contributing to the peak dose are ingestion of plants, external gamma, and ingestion of milk, meat and soil. However, this receptor is considered an implausible receptor. The only receptors considered plausible are the Landfill Worker, Recreational User, Outdoor Worker and the Offsite Resident Farmer. The maximum projected dose among the plausible receptors is 220 mrem/yr for the Outdoor Worker and it occurs at 19,045 yr. The exposure pathways contributing to the dose for this receptor are external gamma and soil ingestion. The results of the probabilistic peak of the mean dose analysis for the Offsite Resident Farmer indicate that the average (arithmetic mean) of the peak of the mean doses for this receptor is 0.98 mrem/yr and it occurs at 1,050 yr. This dose corresponds to Tc-99 within the time horizon of 1,050 yr.

  10. CEBAF Beam Goes Over the Hump Highest-Energy Beam Ever Delivered at

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jefferson Lab | Jefferson Lab Beam Goes Over the Hump Highest-Energy Beam Ever Delivered at Jefferson Lab CEBAF Beam Goes Over the Hump Highest-Energy Beam Ever Delivered at Jefferson Lab Late in the evening on May 7, Jefferson Lab staff successfully threaded the electron beam up the new beamline toward Hall D for the first time Late in the evening on May 7, Jefferson Lab staff successfully threaded the electron beam up the new beamline toward Hall D for the first time. NEWPORT NEWS, VA, May

  11. The PEAK experience in South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-11-01

    The PEAK Institute was developed to provide a linkage for formal (schoolteachers) and nonformal educators (extension agents) with agricultural scientists of Clemson University`s South Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station System. The goal of the Institute was to enable teams of educators and researchers to develop and provide PEAK science and math learning experiences related to relevant agricultural and environmental issues of local communities for both classroom and 4-H Club experiences. The Peak Institute was conducted through a twenty day residential Institute held in June for middle school and high school teachers who were teamed with an Extension agent from their community. These educators participated in hands-on, minds-on sessions conducted by agricultural researchers and Clemson University Cooperative Extension specialists. Participants were given the opportunity to see frontier science being conducted by scientists from a variety of agricultural laboratories.

  12. ,"Summer Noncoincident Peak Load",,"Contiguous U.S. ","Eastern...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Historical Noncoincident Summer Peak Load, Actual by North American Electric Reliability Council Region, 1990 through 2004 " ,"(Megawatts)" ,,,,," " ,"Summer Noncoincident Peak ...

  13. NETL Researcher Selected to Receive Nation’s Highest Award for Young Scientists

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dr. Paul R. Ohodnicki, a materials scientist at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), has been named by President Obama as a recipient of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientist and Engineers (PECASE). The PECASE award is the highest honor the U.S. government can bestow on scientists or engineers in the early stages of their research careers.

  14. NETL-Regional University Alliance Researcher to Receive Nation’s Highest Award for Young Scientists

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dr. Brian Anderson, a research fellow of the NETL-Regional University Alliance and associate professor of chemical engineering at West Virginia University, was recognized during a special event at U.S. Department of Energy Headquarters April 14 for receiving the highest honor the U.S. government can bestow on an outstanding scientist in the early stages of his research career.

  15. Peak to Peak Charter Wins Colorado Science Bowl - News Releases | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Peak to Peak Charter Wins Colorado Science Bowl Lafayette School Heads to Washington D.C. to Challenge for National Title February 13, 2010 Students from Peak to Peak Charter School won the Colorado High School Science Bowl today. They will go on to the 20th National Science Bowl in Washington D.C. on April 29 - May 4, where they will compete for the national title against more than 450 students from 68 high schools. The U.S. Department of Energy began the Science Bowl tradition in 1991 as a way

  16. Indications of negative evolution for the sources of the highest energy cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Andrew M.; Ahlers, Markus; Hooper, Dan

    2015-09-14

    Using recent measurements of the spectrum and chemical composition of the highest energy cosmic rays, we consider the sources of these particles. We find that these data strongly prefer models in which the sources of the ultra-high-energy cosmic rays inject predominantly intermediate mass nuclei, with comparatively few protons or heavy nuclei, such as iron or silicon. If the number density of sources per comoving volume does not evolve with redshift, the injected spectrum must be very hard (α≃1) in order to fit the spectrum observed from Earth. Such a hard spectral index would be surprising and difficult to accommodate theoretically. In contrast, much softer spectral indices, consistent with the predictions of Fermi acceleration (α≃2), are favored in models with negative source evolution. Furthermore with this theoretical bias, these observations thus favor models in which the sources of the highest energy cosmic rays are preferentially located within the low-redshift universe.

  17. Indications of negative evolution for the sources of the highest energy cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Andrew M.; Ahlers, Markus; Hooper, Dan

    2015-09-14

    Using recent measurements of the spectrum and chemical composition of the highest energy cosmic rays, we consider the sources of these particles. We find that these data strongly prefer models in which the sources of the ultra-high-energy cosmic rays inject predominantly intermediate mass nuclei, with comparatively few protons or heavy nuclei, such as iron or silicon. If the number density of sources per comoving volume does not evolve with redshift, the injected spectrum must be very hard (??1) in order to fit the spectrum observed from Earth. Such a hard spectral index would be surprising and difficult to accommodate theoretically. In contrast, much softer spectral indices, consistent with the predictions of Fermi acceleration (??2), are favored in models with negative source evolution. Furthermore with this theoretical bias, these observations thus favor models in which the sources of the highest energy cosmic rays are preferentially located within the low-redshift universe.

  18. Mirant: Case 67a: Units 3 & 4 & 5 at Max Load for 12 hours and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Case 67a: Units 3 & 4 & 5 at Max Load for 12 hours and at Min Load for 12 hours Mirant: Case 67a: Units 3 & 4 & 5 at Max Load for 12 hours and at Min Load for 12 hours Docket No. ...

  19. Second highest-ranking U.S. military officer gets classified briefings

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. military officer gets classified briefings Second highest-ranking U.S. military officer gets classified briefings Winnefield was at Los Alamos to receive a wide variety of classified briefings that covered the broad spectrum of national security science at the Lab. November 17, 2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable

  20. summer_peak_1990_2004.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    c . Historical Noncoincident Summer Peak Load, Actual by North American Electric Reliability Council Region, 1990 through 2004 (Megawatts) Summer Noncoincident Peak Contiguous U.S. Eastern Power Grid Texas Power Grid Western Power Grid Year ECAR FRCC MAAC MAIN MAPP/MRO (U.S.) NPCC (U.S.) SERC SPP ERCOT WECC (U.S.) 1990 546,331 79,258 27,266 42,613 40,740 24,994 44,116 94,677 52,541 42,737 97,389 1991 551,418 81,224 28,818 45,937 41,598 25,498 46,594 95,968 51,885 41,870 92,026 1992 548,707

  1. winter_peak_1990_2004.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    d . Historical Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual by North American Electric Reliability Council Region, 1990 through 2004 (Megawatts) Winter Noncoincident Peak Load Contiguous U.S. Eastern Power Grid Texas Power Grid Western Power Grid Year ECAR FRCC MAAC MAIN MAPP/MRO (U.S.) NPCC (U.S.) SERC SPP ERCOT WECC (U.S.) 1990/1991 484,231 67,097 30,800 36,551 32,461 21,113 40,545 86,648 38,949 35,815 94,252 1991/1992 485,761 71,181 31,153 37,983 33,420 21,432 41,866 88,422 38,759 35,448 86,097

  2. Diffusion of Ag, Au and Cs implants in MAX phase Ti3SiC2 (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Diffusion of Ag, Au and Cs implants in MAX phase Ti3SiC2 MAX phases (M: early transition metal; A: elements in group 13 or 14; X: C or N), such as titanium silicon carbide ...

  3. Indications of negative evolution for the sources of the highest energy cosmic rays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Taylor, Andrew M.; Ahlers, Markus; Hooper, Dan

    2015-09-14

    Using recent measurements of the spectrum and chemical composition of the highest energy cosmic rays, we consider the sources of these particles. We find that these data strongly prefer models in which the sources of the ultra-high-energy cosmic rays inject predominantly intermediate mass nuclei, with comparatively few protons or heavy nuclei, such as iron or silicon. If the number density of sources per comoving volume does not evolve with redshift, the injected spectrum must be very hard (α≃1) in order to fit the spectrum observed from Earth. Such a hard spectral index would be surprising and difficult to accommodate theoretically.more » In contrast, much softer spectral indices, consistent with the predictions of Fermi acceleration (α≃2), are favored in models with negative source evolution. Furthermore with this theoretical bias, these observations thus favor models in which the sources of the highest energy cosmic rays are preferentially located within the low-redshift universe.« less

  4. Fact #936: August 1, 2016 California Had the Highest Concentration of Plug-in Vehicles Relative to Population in 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excel file and dataset for California Had the Highest Concentration of Plug-in Vehicles Relative to Population in 2015

  5. Core Analysis At Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration...

  6. Gas Flux Sampling At Desert Peak Area (Lechler And Coolbaugh...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Desert Peak Area (Lechler And Coolbaugh, 2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Desert Peak Area (Lechler And...

  7. Cuttings Analysis At Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Cuttings Analysis At Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration...

  8. Masked Areas in Shear Peak Statistics: A Forward Modeling Approach...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Masked Areas in Shear Peak Statistics: A Forward Modeling Approach Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Masked Areas in Shear Peak Statistics: A Forward ...

  9. Development Wells At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity...

  10. ,"Winter Noncoincident Peak Load",,"Contiguous U.S. ","Eastern...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    f. Historical Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, 2005 through 2010 " ,"(Megawatts)" ,"Winter Noncoincident Peak ...

  11. ,"Winter Noncoincident Peak Load",,"Contiguous U.S. ","Eastern...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    d. Historical Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual by North American Electric Reliability Council Region, 1990 through 2004 " ,"(Megawatts)" ,"Winter Noncoincident Peak ...

  12. Twin Peaks Motel Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Peaks Motel Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Twin Peaks Motel Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Twin...

  13. Magnetotellurics At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Magnetotellurics At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity...

  14. Geothermometry At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity...

  15. Cuttings Analysis At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Cuttings Analysis At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity...

  16. Ground Magnetics At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Magnetics At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity...

  17. Pressure Temperature Log At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Pressure Temperature Log At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Silver Peak...

  18. Emcore/SunPeak Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solar Power Plant Facility EmcoreSunPeak Sector Solar Facility Type Concentrating Photovoltaic Developer SunPeak Solar Location Albuquerque, New Mexico Coordinates 35.0844909,...

  19. ARM - Field Campaign - 2006 MAX-Mex-Megacity Aerosol eXperiment - Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    City 6 MAX-Mex-Megacity Aerosol eXperiment - Mexico City ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : 2006 MAX-Mex-Megacity Aerosol eXperiment - Mexico City 2006.03.03 - 2006.03.28 Lead Scientist : Jeffrey Gaffney For data sets, see below. Abstract A 4-week field campaign was conducted in and downwind of Mexico City during March 2006. The Megacity Aerosol eXperiment - MEXico City (MAX-MEX)

  20. max walltime for low queue is increased to 24 hrs on Hopper

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    max walltime for low queue is increased to 24 hrs on Hopper max walltime for low queue is increased to 24 hrs on Hopper May 31, 2012 by Helen He We have increased the max walltime for the low queue on Hopper from 12 to 24 hrs. Subscribe via RSS Subscribe Browse by Date February 2013 September 2012 August 2012 May 2012 April 2012 March 2012 February 2012 January 2012 November 2011 October 2011 September 2011 August 2011 July 2011 June 2011 May 2011 April 2011 March 2011 February 2011 January 2011

  1. runtime error message: "apsched: request exceeds max nodes, alloc"

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    apsched: request exceeds max nodes, alloc" runtime error message: "apsched: request exceeds max nodes, alloc" September 12, 2014 Symptom: User jobs with single or multiple apruns in a batch script may get this runtime error. "apsched: request exceeds max nodes, alloc". This problem is intermittent, started in April, then mid July, and again since late August. Status: This problem is identified as a problem when Torque/Moab batch scheduler becomes out of sync with the

  2. Correlation of the highest energy cosmic rays with nearby extragalactic objects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Alvarez, C.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; /Balseiro Inst., San Carlos de Bariloche /Buenos Aires, CONICET /CNEA, Buenos Aires /Pierre Auger Observ. /La Plata U. /Natl. Tech. U., San Rafael /Adelaide U. /Catholic U. of Bolivia, La Paz /Bolivia U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Sao Paulo U.

    2007-11-01

    Using data collected at the Pierre Auger Observatory during the past 3.7 years, we demonstrate that there is a correlation between the arrival directions of cosmic rays with energy above {approx} 6 x 10{sup 19} eV and the positions of active galactic nuclei (AGN) lying within {approx} 75 Mpc. We reject the hypothesis of an isotropic distribution of these cosmic rays at over 99% confidence level from a prescribed a priori test. The correlation we observe is compatible with the hypothesis that the highest energy particles originate from nearby extragalactic sources whose flux has not been significantly reduced by interaction with the cosmic background radiation. AGN or objects having a similar spatial distribution are possible sources.

  3. Defect-induced discriminative modulation of the highest occupied molecular orbital energies of graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, Wenjuan E-mail: luojunkink@126.com; Yang, Hongping; Zhu, Jing; Luo, Jun E-mail: luojunkink@126.com

    2015-11-15

    Defects are capable of modulating various properties of graphene, and thus controlling defects is useful in the development of graphene-based devices. Here we present first-principles calculations, which reveal a new avenue for defect engineering of graphene: the modulation by defects on the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) energy of a charged monolayer graphene quantum dot (GQD) is discriminative. When the charge of a GQD increases its HOMO energy also increases. Importantly, when the GQD contains one particular class of defects its HOMO energy is sometimes higher and sometimes lower than that of the corresponding GQD without any defects, but when the GQD contains another class of defects its HOMO energy is always higher or lower than that of the corresponding intact GQD as its excess charge reaches a critical value. This discriminative modulation could allow defect engineering to control secondary electron ejection in graphene, leading to a new way to develop graphene-based devices.

  4. Dose ratio proton radiography using the proximal side of the Bragg peak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doolan, P. J. Royle, G.; Gibson, A.; Lu, H.-M.; Prieels, D.; Bentefour, E. H.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: In recent years, there has been a movement toward single-detector proton radiography, due to its potential ease of implementation within the clinical environment. One such single-detector technique is the dose ratio method in which the dose maps from two pristine Bragg peaks are recorded beyond the patient. To date, this has only been investigated on the distal side of the lower energy Bragg peak, due to the sharp falloff. The authors investigate the limits and applicability of the dose ratio method on the proximal side of the lower energy Bragg peak, which has the potential to allow a much wider range of water-equivalent thicknesses (WET) to be imaged. Comparisons are made with the use of the distal side of the Bragg peak. Methods: Using the analytical approximation for the Bragg peak, the authors generated theoretical dose ratio curves for a range of energy pairs, and then determined how an uncertainty in the dose ratio would translate to a spread in the WET estimate. By defining this spread as the accuracy one could achieve in the WET estimate, the authors were able to generate lookup graphs of the range on the proximal side of the Bragg peak that one could reliably use. These were dependent on the energy pair, noise level in the dose ratio image and the required accuracy in the WET. Using these lookup graphs, the authors investigated the applicability of the technique for a range of patient treatment sites. The authors validated the theoretical approach with experimental measurements using a complementary metal oxide semiconductor active pixel sensor (CMOS APS), by imaging a small sapphire sphere in a high energy proton beam. Results: Provided the noise level in the dose ratio image was 1% or less, a larger spread of WETs could be imaged using the proximal side of the Bragg peak (max 5.31 cm) compared to the distal side (max 2.42 cm). In simulation, it was found that, for a pediatric brain, it is possible to use the technique to image a region with a

  5. monthly_peak_byarea_2010.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    B.1. FRCC Monthly Peak Hour Demand, by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assesment Area, 1996-2010 Actual, 2011-2012 Projected (Megawatts) FRCC Year January February March April May June July August September October November December 1996 39,860 41,896 32,781 28,609 32,059 33,886 35,444 34,341 34,797 30,037 29,033 34,191 1997 37,127 28,144 27,998 28,458 33,859 34,125 35,356 35,375 33,620 31,798 27,669 31,189 1998 27,122 28,116 29,032 28,008 32,879 37,153 36,576 38,730 34,650

  6. monthly_peak_bymonth_2010.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A.1. January Monthly Peak Hour Demand, by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assesment Area, 1996-2010 Actual, 2011-2012 Projected (Megawatts) January NERC Regional Assesment Area 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011E 2012E FRCC 39,860 37,127 27,122 38,581 37,521 40,258 39,675 45,033 35,545 41,247 34,464 38,352 41,705 44,945 53,093 46,839 47,613 NPCC 41,680 41,208 40,009 44,199 45,227 43,553 42,039 45,987 66,215 47,041 43,661 45,002 46,803

  7. Sample distribution in peak mode isotachophoresis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubin, Shimon; Schwartz, Ortal; Bercovici, Moran

    2014-01-15

    We present an analytical study of peak mode isotachophoresis (ITP), and provide closed form solutions for sample distribution and electric field, as well as for leading-, trailing-, and counter-ion concentration profiles. Importantly, the solution we present is valid not only for the case of fully ionized species, but also for systems of weak electrolytes which better represent real buffer systems and for multivalent analytes such as proteins and DNA. The model reveals two major scales which govern the electric field and buffer distributions, and an additional length scale governing analyte distribution. Using well-controlled experiments, and numerical simulations, we verify and validate the model and highlight its key merits as well as its limitations. We demonstrate the use of the model for determining the peak concentration of focused sample based on known buffer and analyte properties, and show it differs significantly from commonly used approximations based on the interface width alone. We further apply our model for studying reactions between multiple species having different effective mobilities yet co-focused at a single ITP interface. We find a closed form expression for an effective-on rate which depends on reactants distributions, and derive the conditions for optimizing such reactions. Interestingly, the model reveals that maximum reaction rate is not necessarily obtained when the concentration profiles of the reacting species perfectly overlap. In addition to the exact solutions, we derive throughout several closed form engineering approximations which are based on elementary functions and are simple to implement, yet maintain the interplay between the important scales. Both the exact and approximate solutions provide insight into sample focusing and can be used to design and optimize ITP-based assays.

  8. Ecloud Build-Up Simulations for the FNAL MI for a Mixed Fill Pattern: Dependence on Peak SEY and Pulse Intensity During the Ramp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furman, M. A.

    2010-12-11

    We present simulation results of the build-up of the electron-cloud density n{sub e} in three regions of the FNAL Main Injector (MI) for a beam fill pattern made up of 5 double booster batches followed by a 6th single batch. We vary the pulse intensity in the range N{sub t} = (2-5) x 10{sup 13}, and the beam kinetic energy in the range E{sub k} = 8-120 GeV. We assume a secondary electron emission model qualitatively corresponding to TiN, except that we let the peak value of the secondary electron yield (SEY) {delta}{sub max} vary as a free parameter in a fairly broad range. Our main conclusions are: (1) At fixed N{sub t} there is a clear threshold behavior of n{sub e} as a function of {delta}{sub max} in the range {approx} 1.1-1.3. (2) At fixed {delta}{sub max}, there is a threshold behavior of n{sub e} as a function of N{sub t} provided {delta}{sub max} is sufficiently high; the threshold value of N{sub t} is a function of the characteristics of the region being simulated. (3) The dependence on E{sub k} is weak except possibly at transition energy. Most of these results were informally presented to the relevant MI personnel in April 2010.

  9. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandRateStructure/Tier5Max | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:OpenEIUtilityRateDemandRateStructureTier5Max&oldid539754...

  10. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/EnergyRateStructure/Tier1Max | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:OpenEIUtilityRateEnergyRateStructureTier1Max&oldid539766...

  11. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandRateStructure/Tier4Max | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:OpenEIUtilityRateDemandRateStructureTier4Max&oldid539751...

  12. text in "Max kWh" fields | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    it should as we are trying to prevent users from writing "less than X", "greater than Y", etc. and follow the intention of the "Max kWh" field. Also there should be a warning...

  13. Max Tech Electric Heat Pump Water Heater with Lower GWP Halogenated

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Refrigerant | Department of Energy Max Tech Electric Heat Pump Water Heater with Lower GWP Halogenated Refrigerant Max Tech Electric Heat Pump Water Heater with Lower GWP Halogenated Refrigerant Information flow schematic for an integrated heat pump design model and wrapped tank model. Image credit: Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Information flow schematic for an integrated heat pump design model and wrapped tank model. Image credit: Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Information flow schematic

  14. Princeton, Max Planck Society launch new research center for plasma physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Princeton, Max Planck Society launch new research center for plasma physics By John Greenwald March 30, 2012 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook (From left to right) Princeton University Professor of Astrophysical Sciences James Stone, Princeton University President Shirley M. Tilghman, Princeton University Dean for Research A. J. Stewart Smith, Max Planck Society President Peter Gruss, and Consul General of the Federal Republic of Germany in New

  15. The highest redshift quasar at z = 7.085: A radio-quiet source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Momjian, E.; Carilli, C. L.; Walter, F.; Venemans, B. E-mail: ccarilli@nrao.edu E-mail: venemans@mpia.de

    2014-01-01

    We present 1-2 GHz Very Large Array A-configuration continuum observations on the highest redshift quasar known to date, the z = 7.085 quasar ULAS J112001.48+064124.3. The results show no radio continuum emission at the optical position of the quasar or its vicinity at a level of ?3? or 23.1 ?Jy beam{sup 1}. This 3? limit corresponds to a rest-frame 1.4 GHz luminosity density limit of L {sub ?,} {sub 1.4} {sub GHz} < 1.76 10{sup 24} W Hz{sup 1} for a spectral index of ? = 0, and L {sub ?,} {sub 1.4} {sub GHz} < 1.42 10{sup 25} W Hz{sup 1} for a spectral index of ? = 1. The rest-frame 1.4 GHz luminosity limits are L {sub rad} < 6.43 10{sup 6} L {sub ?} and L {sub rad} < 5.20 10{sup 7} L {sub ?} for ? = 0 and ? = 1, respectively. The derived limits for the ratio of the rest-frame 1.4 GHz luminosity density to the B-band optical luminosity density are R{sub 1.4}{sup ?}<0.53 and <4.30 for the above noted spectral indices, respectively. Given our upper limits on the radio continuum emission and the radio-to-optical luminosity ratio, we conclude that this quasar is radio-quiet and located at the low end of the radio-quiet distribution of high-redshift (z ? 6) quasars.

  16. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Desert Peak Area (Wisian & Blackwell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Desert Peak Area (Wisian & Blackwell, 2004) Exploration Activity...

  17. ,"Summer Noncoincident Peak Load",,"Contiguous U.S. ","Eastern...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    e. Historical Noncoincident Summer Peak Load, Actual by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, 2005 through 2009 " ,"(Megawatts)" ,,,,," " ,"Summer Noncoincident ...

  18. Band gap estimation from temperature dependent Seebeck measurementDeviations from the 2e|S|{sub max}T{sub max} relation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbs, Zachary M.; Kim, Hyun-Sik; Wang, Heng; Snyder, G. Jeffrey

    2015-01-12

    In characterizing thermoelectric materials, electrical and thermal transport measurements are often used to estimate electronic band structure properties such as the effective mass and band gap. The Goldsmid-Sharp band gap, E{sub g}?=?2e|S|{sub max}T{sub max}, is a tool widely employed to estimate the band gap from temperature dependent Seebeck coefficient measurements. However, significant deviations of more than a factor of two are now known to occur. We find that this is when either the majority-to-minority weighted mobility ratio (A) becomes very different from 1.0 or as the band gap (E{sub g}) becomes significantly smaller than 10 k{sub B}T. For narrow gaps (E{sub g}???6 k{sub B}T), the Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics applied by Goldsmid-Sharp break down and Fermi-Dirac statistics are required. We generate a chart that can be used to quickly estimate the expected correction to the Goldsmid-Sharp band gap depending on A and S{sub max}; however, additional errors can occur for S?

  19. Claire E. Max, 2004 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Claire E. Max, 2004 The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award Lawrence Award Home Nomination & Selection Guidelines Award Laureates 2010's 2000's 1990's 1980's 1970's 1960's Ceremony The Life of Ernest Orlando Lawrence Contact Information The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-2411 E: Email Us 2000's Claire E. Max, 2004 Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Physics: For her contributions to

  20. CORRELATION BETWEEN PEAK ENERGY AND PEAK LUMINOSITY IN SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z. B.; Chen, D. Y. [Department of Physics, College of Sciences, Guizhou University, Guiyang 550025 (China); Huang, Y. F., E-mail: sci.zbzhang@gzu.edu.cn, E-mail: hyf@nju.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2012-08-10

    A correlation between the peak luminosity and the peak energy has been found by Yonetoku et al. as L{sub p} {proportional_to}E{sup 2.0}{sub p,i} for 11 pre-Swift long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In this study, for a greatly expanded sample of 148 long GRBs in the Swift era, we find that the correlation still exists, but most likely with a slightly different power-law index, i.e., L{sub p} {proportional_to} E{sup 1.7}{sub p,i}. In addition, we have collected 17 short GRBs with necessary data. We find that the correlation of L{sub p} {proportional_to} E{sup 1.7}{sub p,i} also exists for this sample of short events. It is argued that the radiation mechanism of both long and short GRBs should be similar, i.e., of quasi-thermal origin caused by the photosphere, with the dissipation occurring very near the central engine. Some key parameters of the process are constrained. Our results suggest that the radiation processes of both long and short bursts may be dominated by thermal emission, rather than by the single synchrotron radiation. This might put strong physical constraints on the theoretical models.

  1. Track B - Critical Guidance for Peak Performance Homes | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy B - Critical Guidance for Peak Performance Homes Track B - Critical Guidance for Peak Performance Homes Presentations from Track B, Critical Guidance for Peak Performance Homes of the U.S. Department of Energy Building America program's 2012 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting are provided below as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. These presentations for this track covered the following topics: Ventilation Strategies in High Performance Homes; Combustion Safety in Tight Houses;

  2. Jiminy Peak Ski Resort Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Developments Energy Purchaser Jiminy Peak Mountain Resort Location Hancock MA Coordinates 42.5554, -73.2898 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservi...

  3. ,"Table 2a. Noncoincident Summer Peak Load, Actual and Projected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Noncoincident Summer Peak Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, " ,"2008 and Projected 2009 through 2013 " ,"(Megawatts and 2008 ...

  4. ,"Table 2a. Noncoincident Summer Peak Load, Actual and Projected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Noncoincident Summer Peak Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, " ,"2009 and Projected 2010 through 2014 " ,"(Megawatts and 2009 ...

  5. ,"Table 2a. Noncoincident Summer Peak Load, Actual and Projected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 and Projected 2004 through 2008 " ,"(Megawatts and 2003 Base Year)",,,," " ,"Summer Noncoincident Peak Load",,"Contiguous U.S. ","Eastern Power Grid",,,..."Texas Power ...

  6. ,"Table 2a. Noncoincident Summer Peak Load, Actual and Projected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a. Noncoincident Summer Peak Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, " ,"2006 and Projected 2007 through 2011 " ,"(Megawatts and 2006 ...

  7. ,"Table 2a. Noncoincident Summer Peak Load, Actual and Projected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 and Projected 2005 through 2009 " ,"(Megawatts and 2004 Base Year)",,,," " ,"Summer Noncoincident Peak Load",,"Contiguous U.S. ","Eastern Power Grid",,,..."Texas Power ...

  8. ,"Table 2b. Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b. Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, " ,"2007 and Projected 2008 through 2012 " ,"(Megawatts and 2007 ...

  9. ,"Table 2a. Noncoincident Summer Peak Load, Actual and Projected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a. Noncoincident Summer Peak Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, " ,"2007 and Projected 2008 through 2012 " ,"(Megawatts and 2007 ...

  10. ,"Table 2b. Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b. Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, " ,"2006 and Projected 2007 through 2011 " ,"(Megawatts and 2006 ...

  11. ,"Table 2b. Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Council Region, " ,"2005 and Projected 2006 through 2010 " ,"(Megawatts and 2005 Base ...

  12. ,"Table 2b. Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2b. Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, " ,"2009 and Projected 2010 through 2014 " ,"(Megawatts and 2009 ...

  13. Multispectral Imaging At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Multispectral Imaging At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details...

  14. Desert Peak East EGS Project; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    East EGS Project; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Desert Peak East EGS Project; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report DOE 2010 Geothermal...

  15. Desert Peak II Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Facility Desert Peak II Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Churchill, Nevada Coordinates 39.753854931241, -118.95378112793 Loading map......

  16. Two density peaks in low magnetic field helicon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Y.; Zhao, G.; Ouyang, J. T. E-mail: lppmchenqiang@hotmail.com; Liu, Z. W.; Chen, Q. E-mail: lppmchenqiang@hotmail.com

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, we report two density peaks in argon helicon plasma under an axial magnetic field from 0 G to 250 G with Boswell-type antenna driven by radio frequency (RF) power of 13.56 MHz. The first peak locates at 40–55 G and the second one at 110–165 G, as the RF power is sustainably increased from 100 W to 250 W at Ar pressure of 0.35 Pa. The absorbed power of two peaks shows a linear relationship with the magnetic field. End views of the discharge taken by intensified charge coupled device reveal that, when the first peak appeared, the discharge luminance moves to the edge of the tube as the magnetic field increases. For the second peak, the strong discharge area is centered at the two antenna legs after the magnetic field reaches a threshold value. Comparing with the simulation, we suggest that the efficient power absorption of two peaks at which the efficient power absorption mainly appears in the near-antenna region is due to the mode conversion in bounded non-uniform helicon plasma. The two low-field peaks are caused, to some extent, by the excitation of Trivelpiece-Gould wave through non-resonance conversion.

  17. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Max Zuckerman and Sons - IL 30

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    - IL 30 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: MAX ZUCKERMAN & SONS (IL.30 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 1925 N. Kenmore Avenue , Chicago , Illinois IL.30-1 Evaluation Year: 1994 IL.30-2 Site Operations: Sample sized quantities of radioactive materials were shipped through this location; broker arranged purchases of materials for third party buyers. IL.30-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination

  18. Max Schulze

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Matty Greene About Us Matty Greene - Former Videographer Matty Greene Matty joined the Department of Energy as a videographer in May 2013, producing, filming and editing online video content for Energy. Prior to joining the Department of Energy, her other video pursuits included interning at the White House in the Office of Digital Strategy, where she filmed the President and First Lady, and making short films that played at festivals including South by Southwest. A native Austinite and avid

  19. ~max0006

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... NNSA Headauarters. 1) For cyber security. direct assessment of NNSA contractors by NASA Ifeadquarters organizations consists of the following: a) Annual revieus of Site Office ...

  20. ,"Table 2b. Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 and Projected 2004 through 2008 " ,"(Megawatts and 2003 Base Year)" ,"Winter Noncoincident Peak Load",,"Contiguous U.S. ","Eastern Power Grid",,,..."Texas Power Grid","Western ...

  1. ,"Table 2b. Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 and Projected 2005 through 2009 " ,"(Megawatts and 2004 Base Year)" ,"Winter Noncoincident Peak Load",,"Contiguous U.S. ","Eastern Power Grid",,,..."Texas Power Grid","Western ...

  2. Silver Peak, Nevada: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Silver Peak is a city in Esmeralda County, Nevada. References USGS GNIS Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  3. SunPeak Solar LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: SunPeak Solar LLC Place: Palm Desert, California Zip: 92260 Product: US project developer and asset manager, focussing on PV projects in the south-west....

  4. Peak Doctor v 1.0.0 Labview Version

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-05-29

    PeakDoctor software works interactively with its user to analyze raw gamma-ray spectroscopic data. The goal of the software is to produce a list of energies and areas of all of the peaks in the spectrum, as accurately as possible. It starts by performing an energy calibration, creating a function that describes how energy can be related to channel number. Next, the software determines which channels in the raw histogram are in the Compton continuum andmore » which channels are parts of a peak. Then the software fits the Compton continuum with cubic polynomials. The last step is to fit all of the peaks with Gaussian functions, thus producing the list.« less

  5. February most likely month for flu season to peak

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    February most likely month for flu season to peak February most likely month for flu season to peak The Los Alamos team's model is an ongoing research project that forecasts the current flu season probabilistically, similar to best-practice forecasts of weather, presidential elections, and sporting events. December 20, 2015 The Los Alamos team's model is an ongoing research project that forecasts the current flu season probabilistically, similar to best-practice forecasts of weather,

  6. Peaking of world oil production: Impacts, mitigation, & risk management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirsch, R.L.; Bezdek, Roger; Wendling, Robert

    2005-02-01

    The peaking of world oil production presents the U.S. and the world with an unprecedented risk management problem. As peaking is approached, liquid fuel prices and price volatility will increase dramatically, and, without timely mitigation, the economic, social, and political costs will be unprecedented. Viable mitigation options exist on both the supply and demand sides, but to have substantial impact, they must be initiated more than a decade in advance of peaking.... The purpose of this analysis was to identify the critical issues surrounding the occurrence and mitigation of world oil production peaking. We simplified many of the complexities in an effort to provide a transparent analysis. Nevertheless, our study is neither simple nor brief. We recognize that when oil prices escalate dramatically, there will be demand and economic impacts that will alter our simplified assumptions. Consideration of those feedbacks will be a daunting task but one that should be undertaken. Our aim in this study is to-- • Summarize the difficulties of oil production forecasting; • Identify the fundamentals that show why world oil production peaking is such a unique challenge; • Show why mitigation will take a decade or more of intense effort; • Examine the potential economic effects of oil peaking; • Describe what might be accomplished under three example mitigation scenarios. • Stimulate serious discussion of the problem, suggest more definitive studies, and engender interest in timely action to mitigate its impacts.

  7. Wavelet Approach for Operational Gamma Spectral Peak Detection - Preliminary Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ,

    2012-02-01

    Gamma spectroscopy for radionuclide identifications typically involves locating spectral peaks and matching the spectral peaks with known nuclides in the knowledge base or database. Wavelet analysis, due to its ability for fitting localized features, offers the potential for automatic detection of spectral peaks. Past studies of wavelet technologies for gamma spectra analysis essentially focused on direct fitting of raw gamma spectra. Although most of those studies demonstrated the potentials of peak detection using wavelets, they often failed to produce new benefits to operational adaptations for radiological surveys. This work presents a different approach with the operational objective being to detect only the nuclides that do not exist in the environment (anomalous nuclides). With this operational objective, the raw-count spectrum collected by a detector is first converted to a count-rate spectrum and is then followed by background subtraction prior to wavelet analysis. The experimental results suggest that this preprocess is independent of detector type and background radiation, and is capable of improving the peak detection rates using wavelets. This process broadens the doors for a practical adaptation of wavelet technologies for gamma spectral surveying devices.

  8. In-situ single-grain peak profile measurements on Ti-7Al during tensile deformation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lienert, U.; Brandes, M. C.; Bernier, J. V.; Weiss, J.; Shastri, S. D.; Mills, M. J.; Miller, M. P.; US Naval Research Lab.; LLNL; Mechanical Solutions, Inc.; Ohio State Univ.; Cornell Univ.

    2009-10-25

    High-energy three-dimensional X-ray diffraction with medium and high reciprocal space resolution was applied to study in situ tensile deformation of Ti-7Al specimens. Samples with planar and random dislocation microstructures were prepared and characterized by electron microscopy. Stress tensors of individual grains were obtained at several loads up to 2% deformation. The stress tensors were found to rotate, and resolved shear stresses were calculated. High-resolution reciprocal space maps of selected grains were recorded. Azimuthal and radial distributions were visualized and discussed in terms of idealized dislocation structures. Heterogeneous grain rotations were observed for the planar microstructure and found to be consistent with activation of the highest stressed basal slip system. Intra-granular strain gradients were detected in excess of the intrinsic radial dislocation peak broadening. The potential of combining the applied techniques with modeling to obtain multiple length-scale information during deformation of bulk specimens is discussed.

  9. Silver Peak Innovative Exploration Project (Ram Power Inc.)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Miller, Clay

    2010-01-01

    Data generated from the Silver Peak Innovative Exploration Project, in Esmeralda County, Nevada, encompasses a deep-circulation (amagmatic) meteoric-geothermal system circulating beneath basin-fill sediments locally blanketed with travertine in western Clayton Valley (lithium-rich brines from which have been mined for several decades). Spring- and shallow-borehole thermal-water geochemistry and geothermometry suggest that a Silver Peak geothermal reservoir is very likely to attain the temperature range 260- 300oF (~125-150oC), and may reach 300-340oF (~150-170oC) or higher (GeothermEx, Inc., 2006). Results of detailed geologic mapping, structural analysis, and conceptual modeling of the prospect (1) support the GeothermEx (op. cit.) assertion that the Silver Peak prospect has good potential for geothermal-power production; and (2) provide a theoretical geologic framework for further exploration and development of the resource. The Silver Peak prospect is situated in the transtensional (regional shearing coupled with extension) Walker Lane structural belt, and squarely within the late Miocene to Pliocene (11 Ma to ~5 Ma) Silver Peak-Lone Mountain metamorphic core complex (SPCC), a feature that accommodated initial displacement transfer between major right-lateral strike- slip fault zones on opposite sides of the Walker Lane. The SPCC consists essentially of a ductiley-deformed lower plate, or core, of Proterozoic metamorphic tectonites and tectonized Mesozoic granitoids separated by a regionally extensive, low-angle detachment fault from an upper plate of severely stretched and fractured structural slices of brittle, Proterozoic to Miocene-age lithologies. From a geothermal perspective, the detachment fault itself and some of the upper-plate structural sheets could function as important, if secondary, subhorizontal thermal-fluid aquifers in a Silver Peak hydrothermal system.

  10. Silver Peak Innovative Exploration Project (Ram Power Inc.)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Clay

    2010-01-01

    Data generated from the Silver Peak Innovative Exploration Project, in Esmeralda County, Nevada, encompasses a “deep-circulation (amagmatic)” meteoric-geothermal system circulating beneath basin-fill sediments locally blanketed with travertine in western Clayton Valley (lithium-rich brines from which have been mined for several decades). Spring- and shallow-borehole thermal-water geochemistry and geothermometry suggest that a Silver Peak geothermal reservoir is very likely to attain the temperature range 260- 300oF (~125-150oC), and may reach 300-340oF (~150-170oC) or higher (GeothermEx, Inc., 2006). Results of detailed geologic mapping, structural analysis, and conceptual modeling of the prospect (1) support the GeothermEx (op. cit.) assertion that the Silver Peak prospect has good potential for geothermal-power production; and (2) provide a theoretical geologic framework for further exploration and development of the resource. The Silver Peak prospect is situated in the transtensional (regional shearing coupled with extension) Walker Lane structural belt, and squarely within the late Miocene to Pliocene (11 Ma to ~5 Ma) Silver Peak-Lone Mountain metamorphic core complex (SPCC), a feature that accommodated initial displacement transfer between major right-lateral strike- slip fault zones on opposite sides of the Walker Lane. The SPCC consists essentially of a ductiley-deformed lower plate, or “core,” of Proterozoic metamorphic tectonites and tectonized Mesozoic granitoids separated by a regionally extensive, low-angle detachment fault from an upper plate of severely stretched and fractured structural slices of brittle, Proterozoic to Miocene-age lithologies. From a geothermal perspective, the detachment fault itself and some of the upper-plate structural sheets could function as important, if secondary, subhorizontal thermal-fluid aquifers in a Silver Peak hydrothermal system.

  11. Silver Peak Innovative Exploration Project (Ram Power Inc.)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Miller, Clay

    Data generated from the Silver Peak Innovative Exploration Project, in Esmeralda County, Nevada, encompasses a deep-circulation (amagmatic) meteoric-geothermal system circulating beneath basin-fill sediments locally blanketed with travertine in western Clayton Valley (lithium-rich brines from which have been mined for several decades). Spring- and shallow-borehole thermal-water geochemistry and geothermometry suggest that a Silver Peak geothermal reservoir is very likely to attain the temperature range 260- 300oF (~125-150oC), and may reach 300-340oF (~150-170oC) or higher (GeothermEx, Inc., 2006). Results of detailed geologic mapping, structural analysis, and conceptual modeling of the prospect (1) support the GeothermEx (op. cit.) assertion that the Silver Peak prospect has good potential for geothermal-power production; and (2) provide a theoretical geologic framework for further exploration and development of the resource. The Silver Peak prospect is situated in the transtensional (regional shearing coupled with extension) Walker Lane structural belt, and squarely within the late Miocene to Pliocene (11 Ma to ~5 Ma) Silver Peak-Lone Mountain metamorphic core complex (SPCC), a feature that accommodated initial displacement transfer between major right-lateral strike- slip fault zones on opposite sides of the Walker Lane. The SPCC consists essentially of a ductiley-deformed lower plate, or core, of Proterozoic metamorphic tectonites and tectonized Mesozoic granitoids separated by a regionally extensive, low-angle detachment fault from an upper plate of severely stretched and fractured structural slices of brittle, Proterozoic to Miocene-age lithologies. From a geothermal perspective, the detachment fault itself and some of the upper-plate structural sheets could function as important, if secondary, subhorizontal thermal-fluid aquifers in a Silver Peak hydrothermal system.

  12. Max Tech and Beyond: Maximizing Appliance and Equipment Efficiency by Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desroches, Louis-Benoit; Garbesi, Karina

    2011-07-20

    It is well established that energy efficiency is most often the lowest cost approach to reducing national energy use and minimizing carbon emissions. National investments in energy efficiency to date have been highly cost-effective. The cumulative impacts (out to 2050) of residential energy efficiency standards are expected to have a benefit-to-cost ratio of 2.71:1. This project examined energy end-uses in the residential, commercial, and in some cases the industrial sectors. The scope is limited to appliances and equipment, and does not include building materials, building envelopes, and system designs. This scope is consistent with the scope of DOE's appliance standards program, although many products considered here are not currently subject to energy efficiency standards. How much energy could the United States save if the most efficient design options currently feasible were adopted universally? What design features could produce those savings? How would the savings from various technologies compare? With an eye toward identifying promising candidates and strategies for potential energy efficiency standards, the Max Tech and Beyond project aims to answer these questions. The analysis attempts to consolidate, in one document, the energy savings potential and design characteristics of best-on-market products, best-engineered products (i.e., hypothetical products produced using best-on-market components and technologies), and emerging technologies in research & development. As defined here, emerging technologies are fundamentally new and are as yet unproven in the market, although laboratory studies and/or emerging niche applications offer persuasive evidence of major energy-savings potential. The term 'max tech' is used to describe both best-engineered and emerging technologies (whichever appears to offer larger savings). Few best-on-market products currently qualify as max tech, since few apply all available best practices and components. The three primary

  13. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Max Zuckerman and Sons Inc - MD 04

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Inc - MD 04 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: MAX ZUCKERMAN & SONS, INC. (MD.04 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Maryland Alloys Corporation MD.04-1 Location: 5245 Fairlawn Avenue , Baltimore , Maryland MD.04-2 Evaluation Year: 1994 MD.04-1 MD.04-3 Site Operations: Scrap metals broker that arranged purchases of materials for third party buyers. MD.04-2 MD.04-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination remote MD.04-3

  14. TESTING THE E {sub peak}-E {sub iso} RELATION FOR GRBs DETECTED BY SWIFT AND SUZAKU-WAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krimm, H. A.; Sakamoto, T.; Yamaoka, K.; Sugita, S.; Ohno, M.; Sato, G.; Hara, R.; Ohmori, N.; Tanaka, H.; Yamauchi, M.; Norris, J. P.; Onda, K.; Tashiro, M.

    2009-10-20

    One of the most prominent, yet controversial associations derived from the ensemble of prompt-phase observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is the apparent correlation in the source frame between the peak energy (E {sub peak}) of the nuF(nu) spectrum and the isotropic radiated energy, E {sub iso}. Since most GRBs have E {sub peak} above the energy range (15-150 keV) of the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on Swift, determining accurate E {sub peak} values for large numbers of Swift bursts has been difficult. However, by combining data from Swift/BAT and the Suzaku Wide-band All-Sky Monitor (WAM), which covers the energy range from 50 to 5000 keV, for bursts which are simultaneously detected, one can accurately fit E {sub peak} and E {sub iso} and test the relationship between them for the Swift sample. Between the launch of Suzaku in 2005 July and the end of 2009 April, there were 48 GRBs that triggered both Swift/BAT and WAM, and an additional 48 bursts that triggered Swift and were detected by WAM, but did not trigger. A BAT-WAM team has cross-calibrated the two instruments using GRBs, and we are now able to perform joint fits on these bursts to determine their spectral parameters. For those bursts with spectroscopic redshifts, we can also calculate the isotropic energy. Here, we present the results of joint Swift/BAT-Suzaku/WAM spectral fits for 91 of the bursts detected by the two instruments. We show that the distribution of spectral fit parameters is consistent with distributions from earlier missions and confirm that Swift bursts are consistent with earlier reported relationships between E {sub peak} and isotropic energy. We show through time-resolved spectroscopy that individual burst pulses are also consistent with this relationship.

  15. Max Phase Materials And Coatings For High Temperature Heat Transfer Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez-Rodriguez, M.; Garcia-Diaz, B.; Olson, L.; Fuentes, R.; Sindelar, R.

    2015-10-19

    Molten salts have been used as heat transfer fluids in a variety of applications within proposed Gen IV nuclear designs and in advanced power system such as Concentrating Solar Power (CSP). However, operating at elevated temperatures can cause corrosion in many materials. This work developed coating technologies for MAX phase materials on Haynes-230 and characterized the corrosion of the coatings in the presence of commercial MgCl2-KCl molten salt. Cold spraying of Ti2AlC and physical vapor deposition (PVD) of Ti2AlC or Zr2AlC were tested to determine the most effective form of coating MAX phases on structural substrates. Corrosion testing at 850°C for 100 hrs showed that 3.9 μm Ti2AlC by PVD was slightly protective while 117 μm Ti2AlC by cold spray and 3.6 μm Zr2AlC by PVD were completely protective. None of the tests showed decomposition of the coating (Ti or Zr) into the salt

  16. Ionoacoustic characterization of the proton Bragg peak with submillimeter accuracy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Assmann, W. Reinhardt, S.; Lehrack, S.; Edlich, A.; Thirolf, P. G.; Parodi, K.; Kellnberger, S.; Omar, M.; Ntziachristos, V.; Moser, M.; Dollinger, G.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Range verification in ion beam therapy relies to date on nuclear imaging techniques which require complex and costly detector systems. A different approach is the detection of thermoacoustic signals that are generated due to localized energy loss of ion beams in tissue (ionoacoustics). Aim of this work was to study experimentally the achievable position resolution of ionoacoustics under idealized conditions using high frequency ultrasonic transducers and a specifically selected probing beam. Methods: A water phantom was irradiated by a pulsed 20 MeV proton beam with varying pulse intensity and length. The acoustic signal of single proton pulses was measured by different PZT-based ultrasound detectors (3.5 and 10 MHz central frequencies). The proton dose distribution in water was calculated by Geant4 and used as input for simulation of the generated acoustic wave by the matlab toolbox k-WAVE. Results: In measurements from this study, a clear signal of the Bragg peak was observed for an energy deposition as low as 10{sup 12} eV. The signal amplitude showed a linear increase with particle number per pulse and thus, dose. Bragg peak position measurements were reproducible within 30 ?m and agreed with Geant4 simulations to better than 100 ?m. The ionoacoustic signal pattern allowed for a detailed analysis of the Bragg peak and could be well reproduced by k-WAVE simulations. Conclusions: The authors have studied the ionoacoustic signal of the Bragg peak in experiments using a 20 MeV proton beam with its correspondingly localized energy deposition, demonstrating submillimeter position resolution and providing a deep insight in the correlation between the acoustic signal and Bragg peak shape. These results, together with earlier experiments and new simulations (including the results in this study) at higher energies, suggest ionoacoustics as a technique for range verification in particle therapy at locations, where the tumor can be localized by ultrasound imaging

  17. Saving Power at Peak Hours (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Piette, Mary Ann

    2011-04-28

    California needs new, responsive, demand-side energy technologies to ensure that periods of tight electricity supply on the grid don't turn into power outages. Led by Berkeley Lab's Mary Ann Piette, the California Energy Commission (through its Public Interest Energy Research Program) has established a Demand Response Research Center that addresses two motivations for adopting demand responsiveness: reducing average electricity prices and preventing future electricity crises. The research seeks to understand factors that influence "what works" in Demand Response. Piette's team is investigating the two types of demand response, load response and price response, that may influence and reduce the use of peak electric power through automated controls, peak pricing, advanced communications, and other strategies.

  18. Site characterization of the highest-priority geologic formations for CO2 storage in Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Surdam, Ronald C.; Bentley, Ramsey; Campbell-Stone, Erin; Dahl, Shanna; Deiss, Allory; Ganshin, Yuri; Jiao, Zunsheng; Kaszuba, John; Mallick, Subhashis; McLaughlin, Fred; Myers, James; Quillinan, Scott

    2013-12-07

    This study, funded by U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory award DE-FE0002142 along with the state of Wyoming, uses outcrop and core observations, a diverse electric log suite, a VSP survey, in-bore testing (DST, injection tests, and fluid sampling), a variety of rock/fluid analyses, and a wide range of seismic attributes derived from a 3-D seismic survey to thoroughly characterize the highest-potential storage reservoirs and confining layers at the premier CO2 geological storage site in Wyoming. An accurate site characterization was essential to assessing the following critical aspects of the storage site: (1) more accurately estimate the CO2 reservoir storage capacity (Madison Limestone and Weber Sandstone at the Rock Springs Uplift (RSU)), (2) evaluate the distribution, long-term integrity, and permanence of the confining layers, (3) manage CO2 injection pressures by removing formation fluids (brine production/treatment), and (4) evaluate potential utilization of the stored CO2

  19. Reducing Peak Demand to Defer Power Plant Construction in Oklahoma

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reducing Peak Demand to Defer Power Plant Construction in Oklahoma Located in the heart of "Tornado Alley," Oklahoma Gas & Electric Company's (OG&E) electric grid faces significant challenges from severe weather, hot summers, and about 2% annual load growth. To better control costs and manage electric reliability under these conditions, OG&E is pursuing demand response strategies made possible by implementation of smart grid technologies, tools, and techniques from

  20. Desert Peak East EGS Project; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Review Report | Department of Energy East EGS Project; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Desert Peak East EGS Project; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report DOE 2010 Geothermal Technologies Program Peer Review egs_008_zemach.pdf (182.67 KB) More Documents & Publications Feasibility of EGS Development at Bradys Hot Springs, Nevada Concept Testing and Development at the Raft River Geothermal Field, Idaho Creation of an Enhanced Geothermal System

  1. EA-2023: Crossman Peak Communications Facility; Mohave County, Arizona

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Western Area Power Administration is preparing an EA that assesses the potential environmental impacts of a proposed new microwave communication facility to be located adjacent to a privately-owned one near Crossman Peak, east of Lake Havasu City in Mohave County, Arizona. The proposal would consist of a microwave communication facility, an access road, and an approximately 8-mile electrical service distribution line across private land and land administered by the Bureau of Land Management.

  2. Material Handling Fuel Cells for Building Electric Peak Shaving Applications

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Material Handling Fuel Cells for Building Electric Peak Shaving Applications U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office August 11, 2015 Presenter: Michael Penev of NREL DOE Host: Pete Devlin 2 Question and Answer * Please type your question into the question box hydrogenandfuelcells.energy.gov 3 Acknowledgments Fuel Cell Technologies Office, DOE EERE For providing funding for this project and for supporting sustainable hydrogen technology development through analysis, demonstration,

  3. Dynamics of N2 and N2O peaks during and after the regeneration of lean NOx trap

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mráček, David; Koci, Petr; Marek, Milos; Choi, Jae-Soon; Pihl, Josh A.; Partridge, Jr., William P.

    2014-12-04

    We study the dynamics and selectivity of N2 and N2O formation during and after the regeneration of a commercial NOx storage catalyst containing Pt, Pd, Rh, Ba on Ce/Zr, Mg/Al and Al oxides was studied with high-speed FTIR and SpaciMS analyzers. The lean/rich cycling experiments (60 s/5 s and 60 s/3 s) were performed in the temperature range 200–400°C, using H2, CO, and C3H6 individually for the reduction of adsorbed NOx. Isotopically labeled 15NO was employed in combination with Ar carrier gas in order to quantify the N2 product by mass spectrometry. N2 and N2O products were formed concurrently. Themore » primary peaks appeared immediately after the rich-phase inception, and tailed off with breakthrough of the reductant front (accompanied by NH3 product). Secondary N2 and N2O peaks appeared at the rich-to-lean transition as a result of reactions between surface-deposited reductants/intermediates (CO, HC, NH3, -NCO) and residual stored NOx. At 200–300 °C, up to 30% of N2 and 50% of N2O products originated from the secondary peaks. The N2O/N2 selectivity ratio as well as the magnitude of secondary peaks decreased with temperature and duration of the rich phase. Among the three reductants, propene generated secondary N2 peak up to the highest temperature. Lastly the primary N2 peak exhibited a broadened shoulder aligned with movement of reduction front from the zone where both NOx and oxygen were stored to the NOx-free zone where only oxygen storage capacity was saturated. N2 formed in the NOx-free zone originated from reaction of NH3 with stored oxygen, while N2O formation in this zone was very low.« less

  4. Deconvolution of mixed gamma emitters using peak parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gadd, Milan S; Garcia, Francisco; Magadalena, Vigil M

    2011-01-14

    When evaluating samples containing mixtures of nuclides using gamma spectroscopy the situation sometimes arises where the nuclides present have photon emissions that cannot be resolved by the detector. An example of this is mixtures of {sup 241}Am and plutonium that have L x-ray emissions with slightly different energies which cannot be resolved using a high-purity germanium detector. It is possible to deconvolute the americium L x-rays from those plutonium based on the {sup 241}Am 59.54 keV photon. However, this requires accurate knowledge of the relative emission yields. Also, it often results in high uncertainties in the plutonium activity estimate due to the americium yields being approximately an order of magnitude greater than those for plutonium. In this work, an alternative method of determining the relative fraction of plutonium in mixtures of {sup 241}Am and {sup 239}Pu based on L x-ray peak location and shape parameters is investigated. The sensitivity and accuracy of the peak parameter method is compared to that for conventional peak decovolution.

  5. Dedicated Max-Planck beamline for the in situ investigation of interfaces and thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stierle, A.; Steinhaeuser, A.; Ruehm, A.; Renner, F.U.; Weigel, R.; Kasper, N.; Dosch, H.

    2004-12-01

    A dedicated beamline for the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Metallforschung was recently taken into operation at the Angstroemquelle Karlsruhe (ANKA). Here we describe the layout of the beamline optics and the experimental end-station, consisting of a heavy duty multiple circle diffractometer. For both a new design was realized, combining a maximum flexibility in the beam properties [white, pink (focused) monochromatic, energy range 6-20 keV] with a special diffractometer for heavy sample environments up to 500 kg, that can be run in different geometrical modes. In addition the angular-reciprocal space transformations for the diffractometer in use are derived, which allows an operation of the instrument in the convenient six circle mode. As an example, results from surface x-ray diffraction on a Cu{sub 3}Au(111) single crystal are presented.

  6. Boride-based nano-laminates with MAX-phase-like behaviour

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Telle, Rainer . E-mail: telle@ghi.rwth-aachen.de; Momozawa, Ai; Music, Denis; Schneider, Jochen M.

    2006-09-15

    MAX-phases being usually composed of transition metals, group A elements and carbon/nitrogen are considered interesting materials for many applications because of their tremendous bulk modulus, 'reversible' plasticity, and machinability. This is mainly due to their unique kind of bonding comprising covalent, ionic as well as metallic bonds providing 'easy' planes of rupture and deformability due to the layered crystal structures. In transition metal boride systems, similar types of bonding are available. In particular the W{sub 2}B{sub 5}-structure type and its stacking variations allow the synthesis of strongly layered crystal structures exhibiting unique delamination phenomena. The paper presents ab initio calculations showing the similarities of bonding between the ternary carbides and the corresponding ternary or quaternary borides. Formation of boride-based nano-laminates from auxiliary liquid phases, from the melt as well as during sintering and precipitation from supersaturated solid solutions will be discussed by means of SEM and TEM studies. The role of impurities weakening the interlayer bonding will be addressed in particular. The pronounced cleavage parallel to the basal plane gives rise for crack deflection and pull-out mechanisms if the laminates are dispersed in brittle matrices such as boron carbide, silicon carbide or other transition metal borides. - Graphical abstract: Some transition metal borides crystallise in a layered structure of alternating stacks of metal and boron atoms giving rise for strongly anisotropic properties. Their preferred cleavage parallel and the deformability perpendicular to the basal plan are similar to the peculiar mechanical behaviour recently described for MAX-phases. Ab initio calculations of the crystal structure prove the weak bonds between the layers for a variety of borides which can be used to reinforce ceramic materials on a nano-scale level.

  7. Fossil fuel-fired peak heating for geothermal greenhouses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rafferty, K.

    1997-01-01

    Greenhouses are a major application of low-temperature geothermal resources. In virtually all operating systems, the geothermal fluid is used in a hot water heating system to meet 100% of both the peak and annual heating requirements of the structure. This strategy is a result of the relatively low costs associated with the development of most US geothermal direct-use resources and past tax credit programs which penalized systems using any conventional fuel sources. Increasingly, greenhouse operations will encounter limitations in available geothermal resource flow due either to production or disposal considerations. As a result, it will be necessary to operate additions at reduced water temperatures reflective of the effluent from the existing operations. Water temperature has a strong influence on heating system design. Greenhouse operators tend to have unequivocal preferences regarding heating system equipment. Many growers, particularly cut flower and bedding plant operators, prefer the {open_quotes}bare tube{close_quotes} type heating system. This system places small diameter plastic tubes under the benches or adjacent to the plants. Hot water is circulated through the tubes providing heat to the plants and the air in the greenhouse. Advantages include the ability to provide the heat directly to the plants, low cost, simple installation and the lack of a requirement for fans to circulate air. The major disadvantage of the system is poor performance at low (<140{degrees}F) water temperatures, particularly in cold climates. Under these conditions, the quantity of tubing required to meet the peak heating load is substantial. In fact, under some conditions, it is simply impractical to install sufficient tubing in the greenhouse to meet the peak heating load.

  8. REGULATION OF THE SPECTRAL PEAK IN GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beloborodov, Andrei M.

    2013-02-20

    Observations indicate that the peak of a gamma-ray burst spectrum forms in the opaque region of an ultrarelativistic jet. Recent radiative transfer calculations support this picture and show that the spectral peak is inherited from initially thermal radiation, which is changed by heating into a broad photon distribution with a high-energy tail. We discuss the processes that regulate the observed position of the spectral peak E {sub pk}. The opaque jet has three radial zones: (1) the Planck zone r < R {sub P} where a blackbody spectrum is enforced; this zone ends where the Thomson optical depth decreases to {tau} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 5}, (2) the Wien zone R {sub P} < r < R {sub W} with a Kompaneets parameter y >> 1 where radiation has a Bose-Einstein spectrum, and (3) the Comptonization zone r > R {sub W} where the radiation spectrum develops a high-energy tail. Besides the initial jet temperature, an important factor regulating E {sub pk} is internal dissipation (of bulk motions and magnetic energy) at large distances from the central engine. Dissipation in the Planck zone reduces E {sub pk}, and dissipation in the Wien zone can increase E {sub pk}. In jets with subdominant magnetic fields, the predicted E {sub pk} varies around 1 MeV up to a maximum value of about 10 MeV. If the jet carries an energetically important magnetic field, E {sub pk} can be additionally increased by dissipation of magnetic energy. This increase is suggested by observations, which show E {sub pk} up to about 20 MeV. We also consider magnetically dominated jets; then a simple model of magnetic dissipation gives E {sub pk} Almost-Equal-To 30 {Gamma}{sub W} keV where {Gamma}{sub W} is the jet Lorentz factor at the Wien radius R {sub W}.

  9. Methods and apparatus for reducing peak wind turbine loads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moroz, Emilian Mieczyslaw

    2007-02-13

    A method for reducing peak loads of wind turbines in a changing wind environment includes measuring or estimating an instantaneous wind speed and direction at the wind turbine and determining a yaw error of the wind turbine relative to the measured instantaneous wind direction. The method further includes comparing the yaw error to a yaw error trigger that has different values at different wind speeds and shutting down the wind turbine when the yaw error exceeds the yaw error trigger corresponding to the measured or estimated instantaneous wind speed.

  10. Gasoline prices peak, expected to fall through end of 2016

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gasoline prices peak, expected to fall through end of 2016 It's all downhill for U.S. drivers at least far as the outlook for gasoline prices is concerned. Gasoline prices are expected to gradually fall through the end of this year. In its new monthly forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said the retail price for regular-grade gasoline averaged $2.37 per gallon in June. That's down 43 cents from the same month last year. The average monthly pump price is expected to drop to $2.01

  11. InSAR At Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    United States by developing basic measurements and interpretations that will assist reservoir management and expansion at Bradys, Desert Peak and the Desert Peak EGS study...

  12. Gamma Log At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gamma Log At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details...

  13. Neutron Log At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Neutron Log At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details...

  14. Slim Holes At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Slim Holes At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details...

  15. Core Analysis At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity...

  16. 2-M Probe At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: 2-M Probe At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Silver Peak...

  17. Flow Test At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Silver Peak Area...

  18. ,"Table 3A.1. January Monthly Peak Hour Demand, by North American...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A.1. January Monthly Peak Hour Demand, by North American Electric Reliability Corporation ... February Monthly Peak Hour Demand, by North American Electric Reliability Corporation ...

  19. ,"Table 3B.1. FRCC Monthly Peak Hour Demand, by North American...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    B.1. FRCC Monthly Peak Hour Demand, by North American Electric Reliability Corporation ... 3B.2. NPCC Monthly Peak Hour Demand, by North American Electric Reliability Corporation ...

  20. Rock Density At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Density At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Silver Peak Area...

  1. Density Log at Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Density Log at Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Silver Peak...

  2. XRD acquisition parameters for detection of weak peaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seabaugh, P.W.; Sullenger, D.B.; Hudgens, C.R.; Nichols, M.C.; Boehme, D.R.; Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM )

    1989-01-01

    The use of high intensity x-ray sources provides opportunities as well as special problems in the detection of minor XRD peaks. Scattering contributions from slits along with other factors can become important and may interfere with the analysis. This further complexity can best be resolved by using nonconventional data collection and analysis strategies. To study these factors, an experimental design plan was formulated and implemented which was used to determine operating parameters for a high intensity x-ray diffraction unit. Major issues studied included the extraction of a weak signal from a noisy background, the reduction of background noise, the volume of data to be collected, the time allocated for background characterization, the control sample, and the impact of the quality'' of the sample. 4 figs.

  3. New runners to boost peak output at Niagara Falls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reason, J.

    1990-01-01

    Retrofitted Francis turbines will improve the value of power generated from Niagara Falls by increasing the peak output of the hydroturbine units at the Robert Moses hydroelectric plant. The computer-designed runners are expected to add 330 MW to the peak capacity of the 28-yr-old plant and significantly increase the efficiency at high flow rates. Next year, the first new runner will be retrofit to the highly instrumented Unit 4. If the retrofit unit meets it increased-performance expectations, the other 12 units will be upgraded between 1993 and 1998. The work is part of an overall expansion of the Niagara Power Project designed to made better use of the power value of Niagara river water, within the constraints of a treaty with Canada and the scenic value of the falls. These constraints, together with varying flows and heads, introduced enormous complexities into the selection and design of the new runners. The alterations being made to Unit 4, in addition to replacing the turbine runner, include modifying the draft tube-liners, increasing the wicket-gate stroke, replacing the turbine discharge ring (to accommodate longer blades), making various electrical modifications to the generator, and replacing the transformer. But the key to the retrofit is the computer-designed runner. Charles Grose, senior project manager, New York Power Authority, White Plains, NY, emphasizes that such computer design techniques were not available a few years ago; neither were the computer-controlled machining techniques necessary to manufacture the new runners. Other aspects of the upgrading that were analyzed include runner stability, resonance, shaft torsional stress, and runaway speed.

  4. BLAZAR 3C 454.3 IN OUTBURST AND QUIESCENCE DURING 2005-2007: TWO VARIABLE SYNCHROTRON EMISSION PEAKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogle, Patrick M.; Wehrle, Ann E.; Balonek, Thomas; Gurwell, Mark A.

    2011-08-01

    We monitored the flaring blazar 3C 454.3 during 2005 June-July with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS: 15 epochs), Infrared Array Camera (IRAC: 12 epochs), and Multiband Imaging Photometer (MIPS: 2 epochs). We also made Spitzer IRS, IRAC, and MIPS observations from 2006 December to 2007 January when the source was in a low state, the latter simultaneous with a single Chandra X-ray observation. In addition, we present optical and submillimeter (sub-mm) monitoring data. The 2005-2007 period saw three major outbursts. We present evidence that the radio-optical spectral energy distribution (SED) actually consists of two variable synchrotron peaks, the primary at IR and the secondary at sub-mm wavelengths. The lag between the optical and sub-mm outbursts may indicate that these two peaks arise from two distinct regions along the jet separated by a distance of 0.9-3 pc. The flux at 5-35 {mu}m varied by a factor of 40 and the IR peak varied in frequency from 4 x 10{sup 12} Hz to 4 x 10{sup 13} Hz between the highest and lowest states in 2005 and 2006, respectively. Variability was well correlated across the mid-IR band, with no measurable lag. Flares that doubled in flux occurred on a timescale of {approx}5 days, yielding a variability size of <0.05 pc. The IR SED peak moved to higher frequency as a flare brightened, then returned to lower frequency as it decayed. The fractional variability amplitude increased with frequency, which we attribute to decreasing synchrotron self-absorption optical depth. Mid-IR flares may signal the re-energization of a shock that runs into inhomogeneities along the pre-existing jet or in the external medium. The synchrotron peak frequencies during each major outburst may depend upon both the distance from the jet apex and the physical conditions in the shocks. Variation of the Doppler parameter along a curved or helical jet is another possibility. Frequency variability of the IR synchrotron peak may have important consequences for the

  5. An In-Depth Look at Ground Source Heat Pumps and Other Electric Loads in Two GreenMax Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puttagunta, Srikanth; Shapiro, Carl

    2012-04-01

    Building America research team Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) partnered with WPPI Energy to answer key research questions on in-field performance of ground-source heat pumps and lighting, appliance, and miscellaneous loads (LAMELs) through extensive field monitoring at two WPPI GreenMax demonstration homes in Wisconsin. These two test home evaluations provided valuable data on the true in-field performance of various building mechanical systems and LAMELs.

  6. Peak Ground Velocities for Seismic Events at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Coppersmith; R. Quittmeyer

    2005-02-16

    This report describes a scientific analysis to bound credible horizontal peak ground velocities (PGV) for the repository waste emplacement level at Yucca Mountain. Results are presented as a probability distribution for horizontal PGV to represent uncertainties in the analysis. The analysis also combines the bound to horizontal PGV with results of ground motion site-response modeling (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170027]) to develop a composite hazard curve for horizontal PGV at the waste emplacement level. This result provides input to an abstraction of seismic consequences (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169183]). The seismic consequence abstraction, in turn, defines the input data and computational algorithms for the seismic scenario class of the total system performance assessment (TSPA). Planning for the analysis is documented in Technical Work Plan TWP-MGR-GS-000001 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171850]). The bound on horizontal PGV at the repository waste emplacement level developed in this analysis complements ground motions developed on the basis of PSHA results. In the PSHA, ground motion experts characterized the epistemic uncertainty and aleatory variability in their ground motion interpretations. To characterize the aleatory variability they used unbounded lognormal distributions. As a consequence of these characterizations, as seismic hazard calculations are extended to lower and lower annual frequencies of being exceeded, the ground motion level increases without bound, eventually reaching levels that are not credible (Corradini 2003 [DIRS 171191]). To provide credible seismic inputs for TSPA, in accordance with 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 63.102(j) [DIRS 156605], this complementary analysis is carried out to determine reasonable bounding values of horizontal PGV at the waste emplacement level for annual frequencies of exceedance as low as 10{sup -8}. For each realization of the TSPA seismic scenario, the results of this analysis provide a constraint on the values sampled from the

  7. Peak fitting applied to low-resolution enrichment measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bracken, D.; McKown, T.; Sprinkle, J.K. Jr.; Gunnink, R.; Kartoshov, M.; Kuropatwinski, J.; Raphina, G.; Sokolov, G.

    1998-12-01

    Materials accounting at bulk processing facilities that handle low enriched uranium consists primarily of weight and uranium enrichment measurements. Most low enriched uranium processing facilities draw separate materials balances for each enrichment handled at the facility. The enrichment measurement determines the isotopic abundance of the {sup 235}U, thereby determining the proper strata for the item, while the weight measurement generates the primary accounting value for the item. Enrichment measurements using the passive gamma radiation from uranium were developed for use in US facilities a few decades ago. In the US, the use of low-resolution detectors was favored because they cost less, are lighter and more robust, and don`t require the use of liquid nitrogen. When these techniques were exported to Europe, however, difficulties were encountered. Two of the possible root causes were discovered to be inaccurate knowledge of the container wall thickness and higher levels of minor isotopes of uranium introduced by the use of reactor returns in the enrichment plants. the minor isotopes cause an increase in the Compton continuum under the 185.7 keV assay peak and the observance of interfering 238.6 keV gamma rays. The solution selected to address these problems was to rely on the slower, more costly, high-resolution gamma ray detectors when the low-resolution method failed. Recently, these gamma ray based enrichment measurement techniques have been applied to Russian origin material. The presence of interfering gamma radiation from minor isotopes was confirmed. However, with the advent of fast portable computers, it is now possible to apply more sophisticated analysis techniques to the low-resolution data in the field. Explicit corrections for Compton background, gamma rays from {sup 236}U daughters, and the attenuation caused by thick containers can be part of the least squares fitting routine. Preliminary results from field measurements in Kazakhstan will be

  8. Nuclear Hydrogen for Peak Electricity Production and Spinning Reserve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsberg, C.W.

    2005-01-20

    Nuclear energy can be used to produce hydrogen. The key strategic question is this: ''What are the early markets for nuclear hydrogen?'' The answer determines (1) whether there are incentives to implement nuclear hydrogen technology today or whether the development of such a technology could be delayed by decades until a hydrogen economy has evolved, (2) the industrial partners required to develop such a technology, and (3) the technological requirements for the hydrogen production system (rate of production, steady-state or variable production, hydrogen purity, etc.). Understanding ''early'' markets for any new product is difficult because the customer may not even recognize that the product could exist. This study is an initial examination of how nuclear hydrogen could be used in two interconnected early markets: the production of electricity for peak and intermediate electrical loads and spinning reserve for the electrical grid. The study is intended to provide an initial description that can then be used to consult with potential customers (utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute, etc.) to better determine the potential real-world viability of this early market for nuclear hydrogen and provide the starting point for a more definitive assessment of the concept. If this set of applications is economically viable, it offers several unique advantages: (1) the market is approximately equivalent in size to the existing nuclear electric enterprise in the United States, (2) the entire market is within the utility industry and does not require development of an external market for hydrogen or a significant hydrogen infrastructure beyond the utility site, (3) the technology and scale match those of nuclear hydrogen production, (4) the market exists today, and (5) the market is sufficient in size to justify development of nuclear hydrogen production techniques independent of the development of any other market for hydrogen. These characteristics make it an ideal

  9. Highest-Resolution Ribosome Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Higher U.S. oil production in 2013 and 2014 means lower oil imports U.S. crude oil production topped 7 million barrels per day in November and December for the first time in 20 years, and production is expected to keep rising over the next two years. The U.S. Energy Information Administration's new monthly forecast sees domestic crude oil output averaging 7.3 million barrels per day this year and climbing to 7.9 million barrels next year. Higher crude oil production means America will need less

  10. Electrodynamics at the highest energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, Spencer R.

    2002-06-17

    At very high energies, the bremsstrahlung and pair production cross sections exhibit complex behavior due to the material in which the interactions occur. The cross sections in dense media can be dramatically different than for isolated atoms. This writeup discusses these in-medium effects, emphasizing how the cross section has different energy and target density dependencies in different regimes. Data from SLAC experiment E-146 will be presented to confirm the energy and density scaling. Finally, QCD analogs of the electrodynamics effects will be discussed.

  11. Highest-Resolution Ribosome Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the intact ribosome showing the small subunit (dark and light blue) and large subunit (grey and magenta). Right: Swiveling of the head of the small ribosomal subunit (blue...

  12. Peak CO2? China's Emissions Trajectories to 2050

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David G.; McNeil, Michael; Zheng, Nina; Ke, Jing; Levine, Mark

    2011-05-01

    As a result of soaring energy demand from a staggering pace of economic growth and the related growth of energy-intensive industry, China overtook the United States to become the world's largest contributor to CO{sub 2} emissions in 2007. At the same time, China has taken serious actions to reduce its energy and carbon intensity by setting both short-term energy intensity reduction goal for 2006 to 2010 as well as long-term carbon intensity reduction goal for 2020. This study focuses on a China Energy Outlook through 2050 that assesses the role of energy efficiency policies in transitioning China to a lower emission trajectory and meeting its intensity reduction goals. In the past years, LBNL has established and significantly enhanced the China End-Use Energy Model based on the diffusion of end-use technologies and other physical drivers of energy demand. This model presents an important new approach for helping understand China's complex and dynamic drivers of energy consumption and implications of energy efficiency policies through scenario analysis. A baseline ('Continued Improvement Scenario') and an alternative energy efficiency scenario ('Accelerated Improvement Scenario') have been developed to assess the impact of actions already taken by the Chinese government as well as planned and potential actions, and to evaluate the potential for China to control energy demand growth and mitigate emissions. It is a common belief that China's CO{sub 2} emissions will continue to grow throughout this century and will dominate global emissions. The findings from this research suggest that this will not likely be the case because of saturation effects in appliances, residential and commercial floor area, roadways, railways, fertilizer use, and urbanization will peak around 2030 with slowing population growth. The baseline and alternative scenarios also demonstrate that the 2020 goals can be met and underscore the significant role that policy-driven energy efficiency

  13. Back-Up/ Peak Shaving Fuel Cell System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staudt, Rhonda L.

    2008-05-28

    This Final Report covers the work executed by Plug Power from 8/11/03 10/31/07 statement of work for Topic 2: advancing the state of the art of fuel cell technology with the development of a new generation of commercially viable, stationary, Back-up/Peak-Shaving fuel cell systems, the GenCore II. The Program cost was $7.2 M with the Department of Energy share being $3.6M and Plug Powers share being $3.6 M. The Program started in August of 2003 and was scheduled to end in January of 2006. The actual program end date was October of 2007. A no cost extension was grated. The Department of Energy barriers addressed as part of this program are: Technical Barriers for Distributed Generation Systems: o Durability o Power Electronics o Start up time Technical Barriers for Fuel Cell Components: o Stack Material and Manufacturing Cost o Durability o Thermal and water management Background The next generation GenCore backup fuel cell system to be designed, developed and tested by Plug Power under the program is the first, mass-manufacturable design implementation of Plug Powers GenCore architected platform targeted for battery and small generator replacement applications in the telecommunications, broadband and UPS markets. The next generation GenCore will be a standalone, H2 in-DC-out system. In designing the next generation GenCore specifically for the telecommunications market, Plug Power is teaming with BellSouth Telecommunications, Inc., a leading industry end user. The final next generation GenCore system is expected to represent a market-entry, mass-manufacturable and economically viable design. The technology will incorporate: A cost-reduced, polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell stack tailored to hydrogen fuel use An advanced electrical energy storage system A modular, scalable power conditioning system tailored to market requirements A scaled-down, cost-reduced balance of plant (BOP) Network Equipment Building Standards (NEBS), UL and CE

  14. Production of Hydrogen at the Forecourt Using Off-Peak Electricity: June 2005 (Milestone Report)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levene, J. I.

    2007-02-01

    This milestone report provides information about the production of hydrogen at the forecourt using off-peak electricity as well as the Hydrogen Off-Peak Electricity (HOPE) model.

  15. HOPE Release 3 Pitch Angle Sneak Peak (Technical Report) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: HOPE Release 3 Pitch Angle Sneak Peak Citation Details In-Document Search Title: HOPE Release 3 Pitch Angle Sneak Peak This report describes how the HOPE ...

  16. Table 8.12a Electric Noncoincident Peak Load and Capacity Margin: Summer Peak Period, 1986-2011 (Megawatts, Except as Noted)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a Electric Noncoincident Peak Load and Capacity Margin: Summer Peak Period, 1986-2011 (Megawatts, Except as Noted) Year Noncoincident Peak Load 1 by North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) 2 Regional Assessment Area Capacity Margin 21 (percent) Eastern Interconnection ERCOT 4 Western Inter- connection All Inter- connections FRCC 5 NPCC 6 Balance of Eastern Region 3 ECAR 7,8 MAAC 8,9 MAIN 8,10 MAPP 11 MISO 12 MRO 13 PJM 14 RFC 8,15 SERC 16 SPP 17 Subtotal TRE 18 WECC 19 Total 20

  17. Offset-free rail-to-rail derandomizing peak detect-and-hold circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeGeronimo, Gianluigi; O'Connor, Paul; Kandasamy, Anand

    2003-01-01

    A peak detect-and-hold circuit eliminates errors introduced by conventional amplifiers, such as common-mode rejection and input voltage offset. The circuit includes an amplifier, three switches, a transistor, and a capacitor. During a detect-and-hold phase, a hold voltage at a non-inverting in put terminal of the amplifier tracks an input voltage signal and when a peak is reached, the transistor is switched off, thereby storing a peak voltage in the capacitor. During a readout phase, the circuit functions as a unity gain buffer, in which the voltage stored in the capacitor is provided as an output voltage. The circuit is able to sense signals rail-to-rail and can readily be modified to sense positive, negative, or peak-to-peak voltages. Derandomization may be achieved by using a plurality of peak detect-and-hold circuits electrically connected in parallel.

  18. Impact of Smart Grid Technologies on Peak Load to 2050 | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    URI: cleanenergysolutions.orgcontentimpact-smart-grid-technologies-peak-l Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations" is not in the list of possible...

  19. RESCHEDULED: Webinar on Material Handling Fuel Cells for Building Electric Peak Shaving Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Fuel Cell Technologies Office will present a live webinar entitled "Material Handling Fuel Cells for Building Electric Peak Shaving Applications".

  20. Webinar August 11: Analysis Using Fuel Cell MHE for Shaving Peak...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on Material Handling Fuel Cells for Building Electric Peak Shaving Applications DOE Announces Webinars on Geography of Alternative Fuels, Wind Siting Considerations, and More...

  1. 2-M Probe At Desert Peak Area (Sladek, Et Al., 2007) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: 2-M Probe At Desert Peak Area (Sladek, Et Al., 2007) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  2. Water Sampling At Silver Peak Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Silver Peak Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details...

  3. Mercury Vapor At Silver Peak Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Mercury Vapor At Silver Peak Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details...

  4. Insights from Smart Meters: The Potential for Peak Hour Savings from

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Behavior-Based Programs | Department of Energy The Potential for Peak Hour Savings from Behavior-Based Programs Insights from Smart Meters: The Potential for Peak Hour Savings from Behavior-Based Programs This report focuses on one example of the value that analysis of this data can provide: insights into whether BB efficiency programs have the potential to provide peak-hour energy savings. This is important because there is increasing interest in using BB programs as a stand-alone peak

  5. Thermal Gradient Holes At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  6. Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details...

  7. Peak picking and the assessment of separation performance in two-dimensional high performance liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guiochon, Georges A; Shalliker, R. Andrew

    2010-01-01

    An algorithm was developed for 2DHPLC that automated the process of peak recognition, measuring their retention times, and then subsequently plotting the information in a two-dimensional retention plane. Following the recognition of peaks, the software then performed a series of statistical assessments of the separation performance, measuring for example, correlation between dimensions, peak capacity and the percentage of usage of the separation space. Peak recognition was achieved by interpreting the first and second derivatives of each respective one-dimensional chromatogram to determine the 1D retention times of each solute and then compiling these retention times for each respective fraction 'cut'. Due to the nature of comprehensive 2DHPLC adjacent cut fractions may contain peaks common to more than one cut fraction. The algorithm determined which components were common in adjacent cuts and subsequently calculated the peak maximum profile by interpolating the space between adjacent peaks. This algorithm was applied to the analysis of a two-dimensional separation of an apple flesh extract separated in a first dimension comprising a cyano stationary phase and an aqueous/THF mobile phase as the first dimension and a second dimension comprising C18-Hydro with an aqueous/MeOH mobile phase. A total of 187 peaks were detected.

  8. Project title: Stimulation at Desert Peak and Bradys reservoirs: modeling

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    with the coupled THM code FEHM | Department of Energy Project title: Stimulation at Desert Peak and Bradys reservoirs: modeling with the coupled THM code FEHM Project title: Stimulation at Desert Peak and Bradys reservoirs: modeling with the coupled THM code FEHM Project title: Stimulation at Desert Peak and Bradys reservoirs: modeling with the coupled THM code FEHM presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado. kelkar_peer2013.pdf (496.77 KB) More

  9. Origin of the narrow, single peak in the fission-fragment mass distribution

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for 258Fm (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Origin of the narrow, single peak in the fission-fragment mass distribution for 258Fm Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Origin of the narrow, single peak in the fission-fragment mass distribution for 258Fm We discuss the origin of the narrowness of the single peak at mass-symmetric division in the fragment mass-yield curve for spontaneous fission of {sup 258}Fm. For this purpose, we employ the macroscopic-microscopic model and calculate

  10. Method of multi-dimensional moment analysis for the characterization of signal peaks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Kent B; Yelton, William G; Kerr, Dayle R; Bouchier, Francis A

    2012-10-23

    A method of multi-dimensional moment analysis for the characterization of signal peaks can be used to optimize the operation of an analytical system. With a two-dimensional Peclet analysis, the quality and signal fidelity of peaks in a two-dimensional experimental space can be analyzed and scored. This method is particularly useful in determining optimum operational parameters for an analytical system which requires the automated analysis of large numbers of analyte data peaks. For example, the method can be used to optimize analytical systems including an ion mobility spectrometer that uses a temperature stepped desorption technique for the detection of explosive mixtures.

  11. NOISY WEAK-LENSING CONVERGENCE PEAK STATISTICS NEAR CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES AND BEYOND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan Zuhui; Shan Huanyuan; Liu Jiayi

    2010-08-20

    Taking into account noise from intrinsic ellipticities of source galaxies, in this paper, we study the peak statistics in weak-lensing convergence maps around clusters of galaxies and beyond. We emphasize how the noise peak statistics is affected by the density distribution of nearby clusters, and also how cluster-peak signals are changed by the existence of noise. These are the important aspects to be thoroughly understood in weak-lensing analyses for individual clusters as well as in cosmological applications of weak-lensing cluster statistics. We adopt Gaussian smoothing with the smoothing scale {theta} {sub G} = 0.5arcmin in our analyses. It is found that the noise peak distribution near a cluster of galaxies sensitively depends on the density profile of the cluster. For a cored isothermal cluster with the core radius R{sub c} , the inner region with R {<=} R{sub c} appears noisy containing on average {approx}2.4 peaks with {nu} {>=} 5 for R{sub c} = 1.7arcmin and the true peak height of the cluster {nu} = 5.6, where {nu} denotes the convergence signal-to-noise ratio. For a Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) cluster of the same mass and the same central {nu}, the average number of peaks with {nu} {>=} 5 within R {<=} R{sub c} is {approx}1.6. Thus a high peak corresponding to the main cluster can be identified more cleanly in the NFW case. In the outer region with R{sub c} < R {<=} 5R{sub c} , the number of high noise peaks is considerably enhanced in comparison with that of the pure noise case without the nearby cluster. For {nu} {>=} 4, depending on the treatment of the mass-sheet degeneracy in weak-lensing analyses, the enhancement factor f is in the range of {approx}5 to {approx}55 for both clusters as their outer density profiles are similar. The properties of the main-cluster-peak identified in convergence maps are also significantly affected by the presence of noise. Scatters as well as a systematic shift for the peak height are present. The height distribution is

  12. Webinar: Analysis Using Fuel Cell MHE for Shaving Peak Building Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Fuel Cell Technologies Office will present a live webinar entitled "Analysis Using Fuel Cell MHE for Shaving Peak Building Energy" on Tuesday, August 11, from 12 to 1 p.m. EDT.

  13. Building America Top Innovations 2012: High-Performance with Solar Electric Reduced Peak Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes Building America solar home research that has demonstrated the ability to reduce peak demand by 75%. Numerous field studies have monitored power production and system effectiveness.

  14. Desert Peak to Humboldt House and Winnemucca, in: Lane, M.A....

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to Humboldt House and Winnemucca, in: Lane, M.A., (ed) Nevada geothermal areas: Desert Peak, Humboldt House, Beoware: Guidebook for field trip Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  15. Method and apparatus for clockless analog-to-digital conversion and peak detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeGeronimo, Gianluigi

    2007-03-06

    An apparatus and method for analog-to-digital conversion and peak detection includes at least one stage, which includes a first switch, second switch, current source or capacitor, and discriminator. The discriminator changes state in response to a current or charge associated with the input signal exceeding a threshold, thereby indicating whether the current or charge associated with the input signal is greater than the threshold. The input signal includes a peak or a charge, and the converter includes a peak or charge detect mode in which a state of the switch is retained in response to a decrease in the current or charge associated with the input signal. The state of the switch represents at least a portion of a value of the peak or of the charge.

  16. Mask effects on cosmological studies with weak-lensing peak statistics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Xiangkun; Pan, Chuzhong; Fan, Zuhui; Wang, Qiao

    2014-03-20

    With numerical simulations, we analyze in detail how the bad data removal, i.e., the mask effect, can influence the peak statistics of the weak-lensing convergence field reconstructed from the shear measurement of background galaxies. It is found that high peak fractions are systematically enhanced because of the presence of masks; the larger the masked area is, the higher the enhancement is. In the case where the total masked area is about 13% of the survey area, the fraction of peaks with signal-to-noise ratio ? ? 3 is ?11% of the total number of peaks, compared with ?7% of the mask-free case in our considered cosmological model. This can have significant effects on cosmological studies with weak-lensing convergence peak statistics, inducing a large bias in the parameter constraints if the effects are not taken into account properly. Even for a survey area of 9 deg{sup 2}, the bias in (? {sub m}, ?{sub 8}) is already intolerably large and close to 3?. It is noted that most of the affected peaks are close to the masked regions. Therefore, excluding peaks in those regions in the peak statistics can reduce the bias effect but at the expense of losing usable survey areas. Further investigations find that the enhancement of the number of high peaks around the masked regions can be largely attributed to the smaller number of galaxies usable in the weak-lensing convergence reconstruction, leading to higher noise than that of the areas away from the masks. We thus develop a model in which we exclude only those very large masks with radius larger than 3' but keep all the other masked regions in peak counting statistics. For the remaining part, we treat the areas close to and away from the masked regions separately with different noise levels. It is shown that this two-noise-level model can account for the mask effect on peak statistics very well, and the bias in cosmological parameters is significantly reduced if this model is applied in the parameter fitting.

  17. Multispecies density peaking in gyrokinetic turbulence simulations of low collisionality Alcator C-Mod plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mikkelsen, D. R. Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Hill, K. W.; Greenwald, M.; Howard, N. T.; Hughes, J. W.; Rice, J. E.; Reinke, M. L.; Podpaly, Y.; Ma, Y.; Candy, J.; Waltz, R. E.

    2015-06-15

    Peaked density profiles in low-collisionality AUG and JET H-mode plasmas are probably caused by a turbulently driven particle pinch, and Alcator C-Mod experiments confirmed that collisionality is a critical parameter. Density peaking in reactors could produce a number of important effects, some beneficial, such as enhanced fusion power and transport of fuel ions from the edge to the core, while others are undesirable, such as lower beta limits, reduced radiation from the plasma edge, and consequently higher divertor heat loads. Fundamental understanding of the pinch will enable planning to optimize these impacts. We show that density peaking is predicted by nonlinear gyrokinetic turbulence simulations based on measured profile data from low collisionality H-mode plasma in Alcator C-Mod. Multiple ion species are included to determine whether hydrogenic density peaking has an isotope dependence or is influenced by typical levels of low-Z impurities, and whether impurity density peaking depends on the species. We find that the deuterium density profile is slightly more peaked than that of hydrogen, and that experimentally relevant levels of boron have no appreciable effect on hydrogenic density peaking. The ratio of density at r/a = 0.44 to that at r/a = 0.74 is 1.2 for the majority D and minority H ions (and for electrons), and increases with impurity Z: 1.1 for helium, 1.15 for boron, 1.3 for neon, 1.4 for argon, and 1.5 for molybdenum. The ion temperature profile is varied to match better the predicted heat flux with the experimental transport analysis, but the resulting factor of two change in heat transport has only a weak effect on the predicted density peaking.

  18. Borehole SASW testing to evaluate log(G{sub max}) - log({sigma}{prime}) relationships in situ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalinski, M.E.; Stokoe, K.H. II; Young, Y.L.; Roesset, J.M.

    1999-07-01

    A new method is being developed for the in-situ measurement of shear wave velocity, V{sub s}, in the soil surrounding a borehole. The method involves the measurement of axially propagating surface waves inside an uncased borehole using the Spectral-Analysis-of-Surface-Waves (SASW) approach. Testing if performed with instrumentation housed inside an inflatable tool. Inflation pressures applied by the tool are used to vary radial stresses in the soil surrounding the borehole. Surface wave velocities over a range of frequencies are measured at each inflation pressure. These measurements are then theoretically modeled so that the variation in V{sub s} (an hence small-strain shear module, G{sub max}) with distance behind the borehole wall is determined at each pressure. The results of field tests with the borehole SASW tool at two sites composed of unsaturated clayey soil are presented. These results are compared with independent field seismic measurements and with laboratory tests on intact specimens using the torsional resonant column to assess the validity of the new field method.

  19. Bent Diamond Crystals and Multilayer Based Optics at the new 5-Station Protein Crystallography Beamline 'Cassiopeia' at MAX-lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mammen, Christian B.; Als-Nielsen, Jens; Ursby, Thomas; Thunnissen, Marjolein

    2004-05-12

    A new 5-station beamline for protein crystallography is being commissioned at the Swedish synchrotron light source MAX-II at Lund University. Of the 2K/{gamma} = 14 mrad horizontal wiggler fan, the central 2 mrad are used and split in three parts. The central 1 mrad will be used for a station optimized for MAD experiments and on each side of the central fan, from 0.5 mrad to 1 mrad, there are two fixed energy stations using different energies of the same part of the beam. These, in total five stations, can be used simultaneously and independently for diffraction data collection. The two upstream monochromators for the side stations are meridionally bent asymmetric diamond(111) crystals in Laue transmission geometry. The monochromators for the downstream side stations are bent Ge(111) crystals in asymmetric Bragg reflection geometry. Curved multilayer mirrors inserted in the monochromatic beams provide focusing in the vertical plane. The first side station is under commissioning, and a preliminary test protein data set has been collected.

  20. Inelastic neutron scattering study on boson peaks of imidazolium-based ionic liquids

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kofu, Maiko; Inamura, Yasuhiro; Podlesnyak, Andrey A.; Ehlers, Georg; Yamamuro, Osamu; Moriya, Yosuke

    2015-07-26

    Low energy excitations of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium ionic liquids (ILs) have been investigated by means of neutron spectroscopy. In the spectra of inelastic scattering, a broad excitation peak referred to as a “boson peak” appeared at 1–3 meV in all of the ILs measured. The intensity of the boson peak was enhanced at the Q positions corresponding to the diffraction peaks, reflecting the in-phase vibrational nature of the boson peak. Furthermore the boson peak energy (EBP) was insensitive to the length of the alkyl-chain but changed depending on the radius of the anion. From the correlation among EBP, the anion radius, andmore » the glass transition temperature Tg, we conclude that both EBP and Tg in ILs are predominantly governed by the inter-ionic Coulomb interaction which is less influenced by the alkyl-chain length. Furthermore, we also found that the EBP is proportional to the inverse square root of the molecular weight as observed in molecular glasses.« less

  1. Estimating coal production peak and trends of coal imports in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bo-qiang Lin; Jiang-hua Liu

    2010-01-15

    More than 20 countries in the world have already reached a maximum capacity in their coal production (peak coal production) such as Japan, the United Kingdom and Germany. China, home to the third largest coal reserves in the world, is the world's largest coal producer and consumer, making it part of the Big Six. At present, however, China's coal production has not yet reached its peak. In this article, logistic curves and Gaussian curves are used to predict China's coal peak and the results show that it will be between the late 2020s and the early 2030s. Based on the predictions of coal production and consumption, China's net coal import could be estimated for coming years. This article also analyzes the impact of China's net coal import on the international coal market, especially the Asian market, and on China's economic development and energy security. 16 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. Measurements of ion stopping around the Bragg peak in high-energy-density plasmas

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Frenje, J. A.; Grabowski, P. E.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu; Sangster, T. C.

    2015-11-09

    For the first time, quantitative measurements of ion stopping at energies about the Bragg peak (or peak ion stopping, which occurs at an ion velocity comparable to the average thermal electron velocity), and its dependence on electron temperature (Te) and electron number density (ne) in the range of 0.5 – 4.0 keV and 3 × 1022 – 3 × 1023 cm-3 have been conducted, respectively. It is experimentally demonstrated that the position and amplitude of the Bragg peak varies strongly with Te with ne. As a result, the importance of including quantum diffraction is also demonstrated in the stopping-power modelingmore » of High-Energy-Density Plasmas.« less

  3. Measurements of ion stopping around the Bragg peak in high-energy-density plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frenje, J. A.; Grabowski, P. E.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu; Sangster, T. C.

    2015-11-09

    For the first time, quantitative measurements of ion stopping at energies about the Bragg peak (or peak ion stopping, which occurs at an ion velocity comparable to the average thermal electron velocity), and its dependence on electron temperature (Te) and electron number density (ne) in the range of 0.5 – 4.0 keV and 3 × 1022 – 3 × 1023 cm-3 have been conducted, respectively. It is experimentally demonstrated that the position and amplitude of the Bragg peak varies strongly with Te with ne. As a result, the importance of including quantum diffraction is also demonstrated in the stopping-power modeling of High-Energy-Density Plasmas.

  4. EVIDENCE FOR POLAR X-RAY JETS AS SOURCES OF MICROSTREAM PEAKS IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neugebauer, Marcia

    2012-05-01

    It is proposed that the interplanetary manifestations of X-ray jets observed in solar polar coronal holes during periods of low solar activity are the peaks of the so-called microstreams observed in the fast polar solar wind. These microstreams exhibit velocity fluctuations of {+-}35 km s{sup -1}, higher kinetic temperatures, slightly higher proton fluxes, and slightly higher abundances of the low-first-ionization-potential element iron relative to oxygen ions than the average polar wind. Those properties can all be explained if the fast microstreams result from the magnetic reconnection of bright-point loops, which leads to X-ray jets which, in turn, result in solar polar plumes. Because most of the microstream peaks are bounded by discontinuities of solar origin, jets are favored over plumes for the majority of the microstream peaks.

  5. A DOUBLE-PEAKED OUTBURST OF A 0535+26 OBSERVED WITH INTEGRAL, RXTE, AND SUZAKU

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caballero, I.; Barragan, L.; Wilms, J.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Ferrigno, C.; Klochkov, D.; Suchy, S.; Santangelo, A.; Staubert, R.; Zurita Heras, J. A.; Kretschmar, P.; Fuerst, F.; Rothschild, R.; Finger, M. H.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Makishima, K.; Enoto, T.; Iwakiri, W.; and others

    2013-02-20

    The Be/X-ray binary A 0535+26 showed a normal (type I) outburst in 2009 August. It is the fourth in a series of normal outbursts associated with the periastron, but is unusual because it presented a double-peaked light curve. The two peaks reached a flux of {approx}450 mCrab in the 15-50 keV range. We present results of the timing and spectral analysis of INTEGRAL, RXTE, and Suzaku observations of the outburst. The energy-dependent pulse profiles and their evolution during the outburst are studied. No significant differences with respect to other normal outbursts are observed. The centroid energy of the fundamental cyclotron line shows no significant variation during the outburst. A spectral hardening with increasing luminosity is observed. We conclude that the source is accreting in the sub-critical regime. We discuss possible explanations for the double-peaked outburst.

  6. Electron-Beam Switches For A High Peak Power Sled-II Pulse Compressor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirshfield, Jay, L.

    2015-12-02

    Omega-P demonstrated triggered electron-beam switches on the L=2 m dual-delay-line X-band pulse compressor at Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). In those experiments, with input pulses of up to 9 MW from the Omega-P/NRL X-band magnicon, output pulses having peak powers of 140-165 MW and durations of 16-20 ns were produced, with record peak power gains M of 18-20. Switch designs are described based on the successful results that should be suitable for use with the existing SLAC SLED-II delay line system, to demonstrate C=9, M=7, and n>>78%, yielding 173ns compressed pulses with peak powers up to 350MW with input of a single 50-MW.

  7. Reducing Residential Peak Electricity Demand with Mechanical Pre-Cooling of Building Thermal Mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, Will; Walker, Iain; Roux, Jordan

    2014-08-01

    This study uses an advanced airflow, energy and humidity modelling tool to evaluate the potential for residential mechanical pre-cooling of building thermal mass to shift electricity loads away from the peak electricity demand period. The focus of this study is residential buildings with low thermal mass, such as timber-frame houses typical to the US. Simulations were performed for homes in 12 US DOE climate zones. The results show that the effectiveness of mechanical pre-cooling is highly dependent on climate zone and the selected pre-cooling strategy. The expected energy trade-off between cooling peak energy savings and increased off-peak energy use is also shown.

  8. Development and Production of a 201 MHz, 5.0 MW Peak Power Klystron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aymar, Galen; Eisen, Edward; Stockwell, Brad; Begum, rasheda; Lenci, Steve; Eisner, Rick; Cesca, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Communications & Power Industries LLC has designed and manufactured the VKP-8201A, a high peak power, high gain, VHF band klystron. The klystron operates at 201.25 MHz, with 5.0 MW peak output power, 34 kW average output power, and a gain of 36 dB. The klystron is designed to operate between 1.0 MW and 4.5 MW in the linear range of the transfer curve. The klystron utilizes a unique magnetic field which enables the use of a proven electron gun design with a larger electron beam requirement. Experimental and predicted performance data are compared.

  9. Microsoft Word - BUGS_The Next Smart Grid Peak Resource Final 4_19.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 15, 2010 DOE/NETL-2010/1406 Backup Generators (BUGS): The Next Smart Grid Peak Resource Backup Generators (BUGS): The Next Smart Grid Peak Resource v1.0 ii DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness

  10. Solar photochemical production of HBr for off-peak electrolytic hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heaton, H.

    1996-10-01

    Progress is reported on the development of a unique and innovative hydrogen production concept utilizing renewable (Solar) energy and incorporating energy storage. The concept is based on a solar-electrolytic system for production of hydrogen and oxygen. It employs water, bromine, solar energy, and supplemental electrical power. The process consumes only water, sunlight and off-peak electricity, and produces only hydrogen, oxygen, and peaking electrical power. No pollutants are emitted, and fossil fuels are not consumed. The concept is being developed by Solar Reactor Technologies, Inc., (SRT) under the auspices of a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

  11. Fact #864: March 16, 2015 Imports of Primary Energy have Declined Sharply Since the Peak Reached in 2007

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excel file and dataset for Imports of Primary Energy have Declined Sharply Since the Peak Reached in 2007

  12. Webinar August 11: Analysis Using Fuel Cell MHE for Shaving Peak Building Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Fuel Cell Technologies Office will present a live webinar entitled "Analysis Using Fuel Cell MHE for Shaving Peak Building Energy" on Tuesday, August 11, from 12 to 1 p.m. EDT. This webinar will explore the synergy between a facility's use of hydrogen fuel cell forklifts and its reduction of electric grid time of use energy charges.

  13. First Tracer Test After Circulation in Desert Peak 27-15

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Rose, Peter

    Following the successful stimulation of Desert Peak target EGS well 27-15, a circulation test was initiated by injecting a conservative tracer (1,5-nds) in combination with a reactive tracer (7-amino-1,3-naphthalene disulfonate). The closest production well 74-21 was monitored over the subsequent several months.

  14. First Tracer Test After Circulation in Desert Peak 27-15

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Rose, Peter

    2013-11-16

    Following the successful stimulation of Desert Peak target EGS well 27-15, a circulation test was initiated by injecting a conservative tracer (1,5-nds) in combination with a reactive tracer (7-amino-1,3-naphthalene disulfonate). The closest production well 74-21 was monitored over the subsequent several months.

  15. Stimulation at Desert Peak -modeling with the coupled THM code FEHM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    kelkar, sharad

    2013-04-30

    Numerical modeling of the 2011 shear stimulation at the Desert Peak well 27-15. This submission contains the FEHM executable code for a 64-bit PC Windows-7 machine, and the input and output files for the results presented in the included paper from ARMA-213 meeting.

  16. Stimulation at Desert Peak -modeling with the coupled THM code FEHM

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    kelkar, sharad

    Numerical modeling of the 2011 shear stimulation at the Desert Peak well 27-15. This submission contains the FEHM executable code for a 64-bit PC Windows-7 machine, and the input and output files for the results presented in the included paper from ARMA-213 meeting.

  17. Cosmology Constraints from the Weak Lensing Peak Counts and the Power Spectrum in CFHTLenS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jia; May, Morgan; Petri, Andrea; Haiman, Zoltan; Hui, Lam; Kratochvil, Jan M.

    2015-03-04

    Lensing peaks have been proposed as a useful statistic, containing cosmological information from non-Gaussianities that is inaccessible from traditional two-point statistics such as the power spectrum or two-point correlation functions. Here we examine constraints on cosmological parameters from weak lensing peak counts, using the publicly available data from the 154 deg2 CFHTLenS survey. We utilize a new suite of ray-tracing N-body simulations on a grid of 91 cosmological models, covering broad ranges of the three parameters Ωm, σ8, and w, and replicating the galaxy sky positions, redshifts, and shape noise in the CFHTLenS observations. We then build an emulator that interpolates the power spectrum and the peak counts to an accuracy of ≤ 5%, and compute the likelihood in the three-dimensional parameter space (Ωm, σ8, w) from both observables. We find that constraints from peak counts are comparable to those from the power spectrum, and somewhat tighter when different smoothing scales are combined. Neither observable can constrain w without external data. When the power spectrum and peak counts are combined, the area of the error “banana” in the (Ωm, σ8) plane reduces by a factor of ≈ two, compared to using the power spectrum alone. For a flat Λ cold dark matter model, combining both statistics, we obtain the constraint σ8m/0.27)0.63 = 0.85+0.03-0.03.

  18. Cosmology Constraints from the Weak Lensing Peak Counts and the Power Spectrum in CFHTLenS

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Jia; May, Morgan; Petri, Andrea; Haiman, Zoltan; Hui, Lam; Kratochvil, Jan M.

    2015-03-04

    Lensing peaks have been proposed as a useful statistic, containing cosmological information from non-Gaussianities that is inaccessible from traditional two-point statistics such as the power spectrum or two-point correlation functions. Here we examine constraints on cosmological parameters from weak lensing peak counts, using the publicly available data from the 154 deg2 CFHTLenS survey. We utilize a new suite of ray-tracing N-body simulations on a grid of 91 cosmological models, covering broad ranges of the three parameters Ωm, σ8, and w, and replicating the galaxy sky positions, redshifts, and shape noise in the CFHTLenS observations. We then build an emulator thatmore » interpolates the power spectrum and the peak counts to an accuracy of ≤ 5%, and compute the likelihood in the three-dimensional parameter space (Ωm, σ8, w) from both observables. We find that constraints from peak counts are comparable to those from the power spectrum, and somewhat tighter when different smoothing scales are combined. Neither observable can constrain w without external data. When the power spectrum and peak counts are combined, the area of the error “banana” in the (Ωm, σ8) plane reduces by a factor of ≈ two, compared to using the power spectrum alone. For a flat Λ cold dark matter model, combining both statistics, we obtain the constraint σ8(Ωm/0.27)0.63 = 0.85+0.03-0.03.« less

  19. Cost-effective retrofit technology for reducing peak power demand in small and medium commercial buildings

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nutaro, James J.; Fugate, David L.; Kuruganti, Teja; Sanyal, Jibonananda; Starke, Michael R.

    2015-05-27

    We describe a cost-effective retrofit technology that uses collective control of multiple rooftop air conditioning units to reduce the peak power consumption of small and medium commercial buildings. The proposed control uses a model of the building and air conditioning units to select an operating schedule for the air conditioning units that maintains a temperature set point subject to a constraint on the number of units that may operate simultaneously. A prototype of this new control system was built and deployed in a large gymnasium to coordinate four rooftop air conditioning units. Based on data collected while operating this prototype,more » we estimate that the cost savings achieved by reducing peak power consumption is sufficient to repay the cost of the prototype within a year.« less

  20. AlphaSpectrum ASPECT analysis code for background correction & peak integration

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-04-13

    The ASPECT code provides a means for rapid analysis of energy-resolved spectra obtained by multi-channel pulse-height analysis (MCA) during (or after) counting of alpha-emissions from a filter air sample (or other suitably prepared sample) utilizing a solid-state detector, or other detector having sufficient energy resolution indiviual radioisotope peaks indentified in a spectrum are fitted using a peak shape algorithm by non-linear least-square fitting procedures that minimize Chi-square differences between the data and a fitted peakmore » function. The code accomplishes the identification of all significant peaks present in the spectrum with automatic recalibration to the 7.68 Po-214 alpha peak from the Radon-222 decay chain, the subtraction of all radon progeny interference overlaps with lower energy peaks in the energy range of Pu-238, Am-241, Pu-239, and U-234/Th-232, and the integration of the counts in any peak identified for these transuranic radionuclides. The output is therefore in the form of isotope specific net transuranic CPM, DPM or concentration, available in near real-time during air sampling. In this "copyright" version, the assumption is made that the alpha spectra to be analyzed have been stored by unique name in sequential form: "FileName(i)", where "FileName" can be any name and i is the index number of the file saved (e.g., i = 1,2, ..., n). this format is one automatically generated by the alpha Environmental Continuous Air Monitor (ECAM), developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory, and manufactured by Canberra Industries, a Laboratory Industrial Partner for this technology. It is assumed in this version of the code that the alpha spectrum data are stored in a 256 channel spectrum, although a larger num ber of channels could be easily accommodated by small code changes. The ECAM data output format is RADNET compliant (an inidustry standard developed at Los Alamos), and include, in addition to a 256-channel alpha spectrum, data on the

  1. Momentum-resolved photoemission of the Kondo peak in an ordered Ce-containing alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garnier, M.; Purdie, D.; Breuer, K.; Hengsberger, M.; Baer, Y.

    1997-11-01

    A comparison of uv-photoemission spectra recorded from the surface alloys Pt(111)({radical}(3){times}{radical}(3))R30{degree}Ce and Pt(111)(2{times}2)La allows the contribution from the 4f electrons to be seen easily. The valence-band structure of these two surfaces is very similar, and the most obvious 4f contribution in high-resolution photoemission spectra of the Ce-containing alloy is the tail of the Kondo peak cut at E{sub F}. Within the limits of our measurement, no dispersion of this feature in the occupied regime is detected. The Kondo peak displays a marked intensity dependence on the emission angle, suggesting that hybridization is present in only a limited part of reciprocal space. The temperature dependence of this near-E{sub F} feature supports this interpretation. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Cost-effective retrofit technology for reducing peak power demand in small and medium commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nutaro, James J.; Fugate, David L.; Kuruganti, Teja; Sanyal, Jibonananda; Starke, Michael R.

    2015-05-27

    We describe a cost-effective retrofit technology that uses collective control of multiple rooftop air conditioning units to reduce the peak power consumption of small and medium commercial buildings. The proposed control uses a model of the building and air conditioning units to select an operating schedule for the air conditioning units that maintains a temperature set point subject to a constraint on the number of units that may operate simultaneously. A prototype of this new control system was built and deployed in a large gymnasium to coordinate four rooftop air conditioning units. Based on data collected while operating this prototype, we estimate that the cost savings achieved by reducing peak power consumption is sufficient to repay the cost of the prototype within a year.

  3. STORMVEX: The Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment Science and Operations Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mace, J; Matrosov, S; Shupe, M; Lawson, P; Hallar, G; McCubbin, I; Marchand, R; Orr, B; Coulter, R; Sedlacek, A; Avallone, L; Long, C

    2010-09-29

    During the Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX), a substantial correlative data set of remote sensing observations and direct in situ measurements from fixed and airborne platforms will be created in a winter season, mountainous environment. This will be accomplished by combining mountaintop observations at Storm Peak Laboratory and the airborne National Science Foundation-supported Colorado Airborne Multi-Phase Cloud Study campaign with collocated measurements from the second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2). We describe in this document the operational plans and motivating science for this experiment, which includes deployment of AMF2 to Steamboat Springs, Colorado. The intensive STORMVEX field phase will begin nominally on 1 November 2010 and extend to approximately early April 2011.

  4. SUPERVISORY CONTROL FOR PEAK REDUCTION IN COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS WHILE MAINTAINING COMFORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nutaro, James J; Olama, Mohammed M; Kuruganti, Teja

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a supervisory control strategy for limiting peak power demand by small and medium commercial buildings while still meeting the business needs of the occupants. This control strategy has two features that make it relevant to new and existing buildings. First, it is designed to operate with building equipment, such as air conditioning and refrigeration systems, as they are presently installed in most small and medium commercial buildings. Because of this, the supervisory control could be realized as a software-only retrofit to existing building management systems. Second, the proposed control acts as a supervisory management layer over existing control systems, rather than replacing them outright. The primary idea of this approach is that the controls for individual building equipment request energy resources for a control action and the supervisory control examines the requests and decides which control actions to allow while satisfying a limit on peak power demand.

  5. AlphaSpectrum ASPECT analysis code for background correction & peak integration

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-04-13

    The ASPECT code provides a means for rapid analysis of energy-resolved spectra obtained by multi-channel pulse-height analysis (MCA) during (or after) counting of alpha-emissions from a filter air sample (or other suitably prepared sample) utilizing a solid-state detector, or other detector having sufficient energy resolution indiviual radioisotope peaks indentified in a spectrum are fitted using a peak shape algorithm by non-linear least-square fitting procedures that minimize Chi-square differences between the data and a fitted peakmorefunction. The code accomplishes the identification of all significant peaks present in the spectrum with automatic recalibration to the 7.68 Po-214 alpha peak from the Radon-222 decay chain, the subtraction of all radon progeny interference overlaps with lower energy peaks in the energy range of Pu-238, Am-241, Pu-239, and U-234/Th-232, and the integration of the counts in any peak identified for these transuranic radionuclides. The output is therefore in the form of isotope specific net transuranic CPM, DPM or concentration, available in near real-time during air sampling. In this "copyright" version, the assumption is made that the alpha spectra to be analyzed have been stored by unique name in sequential form: "FileName(i)", where "FileName" can be any name and i is the index number of the file saved (e.g., i = 1,2, ..., n). this format is one automatically generated by the alpha Environmental Continuous Air Monitor (ECAM), developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory, and manufactured by Canberra Industries, a Laboratory Industrial Partner for this technology. It is assumed in this version of the code that the alpha spectrum data are stored in a 256 channel spectrum, although a larger num ber of channels could be easily accommodated by small code changes. The ECAM data output format is RADNET compliant (an inidustry standard developed at Los Alamos), and include, in addition to a 256-channel alpha spectrum, data on the count

  6. Plant data comparisons for Comanche Peak 1/2 main feedwater pump trip transient

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boatwright, W.J.; Choe, W.G; Hiltbrand, D.W.

    1995-09-01

    A RETRAN-02 MOD5 model of Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station was developed by TU Electric for the purpose of performing core reload safety analyses. In order to qualify this model, comparisons against plant transient data from a partial loss of main feedwater flow were performed. These comparisons demonstrated that good representations of the plant response could be obtained with RETRAN-02 and the user-developed models of the primary-to-secondary heat transfer and plant control systems.

  7. Method for the Production of Ultrashort Peak Power Laser Pulses and System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    For Putting Into Practice This Method Inventors Gerard Mourou, Nathaniel J. Fisch, Vladimir M. Malkin, and Zeev Toroker | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Method for the Production of Ultrashort Peak Power Laser Pulses and System For Putting Into Practice This Method Inventors Gerard Mourou, Nathaniel J. Fisch, Vladimir M. Malkin, and Zeev Toroker Laser-pulse intensities have grown remarkably in recent years, primarily through the method of chirped pulse amplification. Much higher powers are

  8. Method and apparatus for reducing rotor blade deflections, loads, and/or peak rotational speed

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moroz, Emilian Mieczyslaw; Pierce, Kirk Gee

    2006-10-17

    A method for reducing at least one of loads, deflections of rotor blades, or peak rotational speed of a wind turbine includes storing recent historical pitch related data, wind related data, or both. The stored recent historical data is analyzed to determine at least one of whether rapid pitching is occurring or whether wind speed decreases are occurring. A minimum pitch, a pitch rate limit, or both are imposed on pitch angle controls of the rotor blades conditioned upon results of the analysis.

  9. High fat diet promotes achievement of peak bone mass in young rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malvi, Parmanand; Piprode, Vikrant; Chaube, Balkrishna; Pote, Satish T.; Mittal, Monika; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya; Wani, Mohan R.; Bhat, Manoj Kumar

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • High fat diet helps in achieving peak bone mass at younger age. • Shifting from high fat to normal diet normalizes obese parameters. • Bone parameters are sustained even after withdrawal of high fat diet. - Abstract: The relationship between obesity and bone is complex. Epidemiological studies demonstrate positive as well as negative correlation between obesity and bone health. In the present study, we investigated the impact of high fat diet-induced obesity on peak bone mass. After 9 months of feeding young rats with high fat diet, we observed obesity phenotype in rats with increased body weight, fat mass, serum triglycerides and cholesterol. There were significant increases in serum total alkaline phosphatase, bone mineral density and bone mineral content. By micro-computed tomography (μ-CT), we observed a trend of better trabecular bones with respect to their microarchitecture and geometry. This indicated that high fat diet helps in achieving peak bone mass and microstructure at younger age. We subsequently shifted rats from high fat diet to normal diet for 6 months and evaluated bone/obesity parameters. It was observed that after shifting rats from high fat diet to normal diet, fat mass, serum triglycerides and cholesterol were significantly decreased. Interestingly, the gain in bone mineral density, bone mineral content and trabecular bone parameters by HFD was retained even after body weight and obesity were normalized. These results suggest that fat rich diet during growth could accelerate achievement of peak bone mass that is sustainable even after withdrawal of high fat diet.

  10. CONSTRAINING PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF TYPE IIn SUPERNOVAE THROUGH RISE TIMES AND PEAK LUMINOSITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moriya, Takashi J.; Maeda, Keiichi

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the diversity in the wind density, supernova ejecta energy, and ejecta mass in Type IIn supernovae based on their rise times and peak luminosities. We show that the wind density and supernova ejecta properties can be estimated independently if both the rise time and peak luminosity are observed. The peak luminosity is mostly determined by the supernova properties and the rise time can be used to estimate the wind density. We find that the ejecta energies of Type IIn supernovae need to vary by factors of 0.2-5 from the average if their ejecta masses are similar. The diversity in the observed rise times indicates that their wind densities vary by factors of 0.2-2 from the average. We show that Type IIn superluminous supernovae should have not only large wind density but also large ejecta energy and/or small ejecta mass to explain their large luminosities and the rise times at the same time. We also note that shock breakout does not necessarily occur in the wind even if it is optically thick, except for the case of superluminous supernovae, and we analyze the observational data both with and without assuming that the shock breakout occurs in the dense wind of Type IIn supernovae.

  11. Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Rongxin; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Parrish, Kristen

    2010-05-14

    This paper reports on the potential impact of demand response (DR) strategies in commercial buildings in California based on the Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool (DRQAT), which uses EnergyPlus simulation prototypes for office and retail buildings. The study describes the potential impact of building size, thermal mass, climate, and DR strategies on demand savings in commercial buildings. Sensitivity analyses are performed to evaluate how these factors influence the demand shift and shed during the peak period. The whole-building peak demand of a commercial building with high thermal mass in a hot climate zone can be reduced by 30percent using an optimized demand response strategy. Results are summarized for various simulation scenarios designed to help owners and managers understand the potential savings for demand response deployment. Simulated demand savings under various scenarios were compared to field-measured data in numerous climate zones, allowing calibration of the prototype models. The simulation results are compared to the peak demand data from the Commercial End-Use Survey for commercial buildings in California. On the economic side, a set of electricity rates are used to evaluate the impact of the DR strategies on economic savings for different thermal mass and climate conditions. Our comparison of recent simulation to field test results provides an understanding of the DR potential in commercial buildings.

  12. Ice Thermal Storage Systems for LWR Supplemental Cooling and Peak Power Shifting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Phil Sharpe; Blaise Hamanaka; Wei Yan; WoonSeong Jeong

    2010-06-01

    Availability of enough cooling water has been one of the major issues for the nuclear power plant site selection. Cooling water issues have frequently disrupted the normal operation at some nuclear power plants during heat waves and long draught. The issues become more severe due to the new round of nuclear power expansion and global warming. During hot summer days, cooling water leaving a power plant may become too hot to threaten aquatic life so that environmental regulations may force the plant to reduce power output or even temporarily to be shutdown. For new nuclear power plants to be built at areas without enough cooling water, dry cooling can be used to remove waste heat directly into the atmosphere. However, dry cooling will result in much lower thermal efficiency when the weather is hot. One potential solution for the above mentioned issues is to use ice thermal storage systems (ITS) that reduce cooling water requirements and boost the plant’s thermal efficiency in hot hours. ITS uses cheap off-peak electricity to make ice and uses those ice for supplemental cooling during peak demand time. ITS is suitable for supplemental cooling storage due to its very high energy storage density. ITS also provides a way to shift large amount of electricity from off peak time to peak time. Some gas turbine plants already use ITS to increase thermal efficiency during peak hours in summer. ITSs have also been widely used for building cooling to save energy cost. Among three cooling methods for LWR applications: once-through, wet cooling tower, and dry cooling tower, once-through cooling plants near a large water body like an ocean or a large lake and wet cooling plants can maintain the designed turbine backpressure (or condensation temperature) during 99% of the time; therefore, adding ITS to those plants will not generate large benefits. For once-through cooling plants near a limited water body like a river or a small lake, adding ITS can bring significant economic

  13. Have We Run Out of Oil Yet? Oil Peaking Analysis from an Optimist's Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, David L; Hopson, Dr Janet L; Li, Jia

    2005-01-01

    This study addresses several questions concerning the peaking of conventional oil production from an optimist's perspective. Is the oil peak imminent? What is the range of uncertainty? What are the key determining factors? Will a transition to unconventional oil undermine or strengthen OPEC's influence over world oil markets? These issues are explored using a model combining alternative world energy scenarios with an accounting of resource depletion and a market-based simulation of transition to unconventional oil resources. No political or environmental constraints are allowed to hinder oil production, geological constraints on the rates at which oil can be produced are not represented, and when USGS resource estimates are used, more than the mean estimate of ultimately recoverable resources is assumed to exist. The issue is framed not as a question of "running out" of conventional oil, but in terms of the timing and rate of transition from conventional to unconventional oil resources. Unconventional oil is chosen because production from Venezuela's heavy-oil fields and Canada's Athabascan oil sands is already underway on a significant scale and unconventional oil is most consistent with the existing infrastructure for producing, refining, distributing and consuming petroleum. However, natural gas or even coal might also prove to be economical sources of liquid hydrocarbon fuels. These results indicate a high probability that production of conventional oil from outside of the Middle East region will peak, or that the rate of increase of production will become highly constrained before 2025. If world consumption of hydrocarbon fuels is to continue growing, massive development of unconventional resources will be required. While there are grounds for pessimism and optimism, it is certainly not too soon for extensive, detailed analysis of transitions to alternative energy sources.

  14. Calculating survival curves in spread-peaks of heavy ion beams and comparison with experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, S.B.; Chu, W.T.; Llacer, J.; Renner, T.R.; Rodriguez, A.; Yang, T.C.H.

    1995-08-01

    In preparing for treating patients with high-energy ion beams, it is important first to determine the composition of the beam, that is, the relative mixes of the various primary and secondary particles and their LET spectra, and secondly to estimate the cell killing expected during a treatment schedule. This requires measurements of the beam composition at various depths through the spread-peak region, and a calculation of cell survival using a cell-killing model designed to accommodate the mixed LET nature of the beam in the spread-peak region. This talk presents results of an experiment in which a particle identification telescope, the BEPKLET, was used to measure the LET spectra of the primary and secondary particles at two positions in a 12-cm-spread-peak of a 585 MeV/amu neon ion beam at the Bevalac. Cell survival measurements were made at the same positions at which the LET-spectra were measured. The survival curves obtained were compared with calculations using the LPL (Lethal, Potentially Lethal) model of cell-killing. Results agree quite well at doses up to about 4 Gy. A quantity proportional to the RBE at 10% survival, when plotted against dose-averaged LET for a number of different beams and energies, appears to be a fairly good predictor of biological effect. This would not be expected if the difference in biological effect due to differences in track structure between various ions at the same LET played a significant role in modifying cell-killing in the range of LETs covered by this experiment.

  15. AVTA: EVSE Charging Protocol for On and Off-Peak Demand

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following report is a description of development of a charge protocol to take advantage of off and on-peak demand economics at facilities, as informed by the AVTA's testing on plug-in electric vehicle charging equipment. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

  16. OG&E Uses Time-Based Rate Program to Reduce Peak Demand

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 OG&E Uses Time-Based Rate Program to Reduce Peak Demand As part of its Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) project for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE), Oklahoma Gas and Electric Company (OG&E) has successfully tested over a two-year period a new time-based rate, which provided about 4,670 participating customers with pric es that varied daily in order to induce a change in their patterns of electricity consumption and a

  17. Department of Energy Receives Highest Transportation Industry...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today received the Transportation Community Awareness and Emergency Response (TRANSCAER) Chairman's Award, one of industry's ...

  18. Geothermal California: California Claims the World's Highest...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Power Output with Potential for Even More Production With Advanced Techniques Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article:...

  19. Petrology and geochemistry of Alto Peak, a vapor-cored hydrothermal system, Leyte Province, Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reyes, A.G.; Giggenbach, W.F.; Saleras, J.R.M.; Salonga, N.D.; Vergara, M.C.

    1993-10-01

    Based on detailed petrological information on secondary mineral assemblages and the composition of fluids trapped in inclusions and discharged from five wells, the Alto Peak geothermal field was found to represent a combined vapor and liquid-dominated system. A central core or chimney, with a diameter of about 1 km, a height of some 3 km and occupied by a high gas vapor (1.1 to 5.6 molal CO{sub 2}), is surrounded by an envelope of intermediate salinity water (7,000 mg/kg Cl) with temperatures between 250 and 350 C. The transition from purely vapor-dominated to liquid-dominated zones takes place via two-phase zones occupied by fluid mixtures of highly variable compositions. Much of the lower temperature, mature neutral pH Cl water is likely to have formed during an earlier stage in the evolution of the system. High temperatures of > 300 C, and associated alteration, are limited to wells AP-1D and the lower parts of AP-2D and are ascribed to re-heating by recent magmatic intrusions. The isotopic composition of the well discharges suggests that they contain some 40 to 50% of magmatic water. Alto Peak is considered a typical example of hydrothermal systems associated with many dormant volcanoes.

  20. X{sub max}{sup μ} vs. N{sup μ} from extensive air showers as estimator for the mass of primary UHECR's. Application for the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arsene, Nicusor; Sima, Octavian

    2015-02-24

    We study the possibility of primary mass estimation for Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR's) using the X{sub max}{sup μ} (the height where the number of muons produced on the core of Extensive Air Showers (EAS) is maximum) and the number N{sup μ} of muons detected on ground. We use the 2D distribution - X{sub max}{sup μ} against N{sup μ} in order to find its sensitivity to the mass of the primary particle. For that, we construct a 2D Probability Function Prob(p,Fe | X{sub max}{sup μ}, N{sup μ}) which estimates the probability that a certain point from the plane (X{sub max}{sup μ}, N{sup μ}) corresponds to a shower induced by a proton, respectively an iron nucleus. To test the procedure, we analyze a set of simulated EAS induced by protons and iron nuclei at energies of 10{sup 19}eV and 20° zenith angle with CORSIKA. Using the Bayesian approach and taking into account the geometry of the infill detectors from the Pierre Auger Observatory, we observe an improvement in the accuracy of the primary mass reconstruction in comparison with the results obtained using only the X{sub max}{sup μ} distributions.

  1. Control system analysis for off-peak auxiliary heating of passive solar systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, H.S.; Melsa, J.L.; Balcomb, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    A computer simulation method is presented for the design of an electrical auxiliary energy system for passive solar heated structures. The system consists of electrical mats buried in the ground underneath the structure. Energy is stored in the ground during utility off-peak hours and released passively to the heated enclosure. An optimal control strategy is used to determine the system design parameters of depth of mat placement and minimum instaled electrical heating capacity. The optimal control applies combinations of fixed duration energy pulses to the heater, which minimize the room temperature error-squared for each day, assuming advance knowledge of the day's weather. Various realizable control schemes are investigated in an attempt to find a system that approaches the performance of the optimal control system.

  2. Table 9. U.S. photovoltaic module shipments by state/territory, 2014 (peak kilow

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    photovoltaic module shipments by state/territory, 2014 (peak kilowatts)" "State","Total","Percent of U.S. total" "Alabama",482,0 "Alaska",81,0 "Arizona",194476,0.033 "Arkansas",336,0 "California",3163120,0.53 "Colorado",47240,0.008 "Connecticut",50745,0.009 "Delaware",6600,0.001 "District of Columbia",751,0 "Florida",18593,0.003 "Georgia",47660,0.008

  3. High peak-power kilohertz laser system employing single-stage multi-pass amplification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shan, Bing; Wang, Chun; Chang, Zenghu

    2006-05-23

    The present invention describes a technique for achieving high peak power output in a laser employing single-stage, multi-pass amplification. High gain is achieved by employing a very small "seed" beam diameter in gain medium, and maintaining the small beam diameter for multiple high-gain pre-amplification passes through a pumped gain medium, then leading the beam out of the amplifier cavity, changing the beam diameter and sending it back to the amplifier cavity for additional, high-power amplification passes through the gain medium. In these power amplification passes, the beam diameter in gain medium is increased and carefully matched to the pump laser's beam diameter for high efficiency extraction of energy from the pumped gain medium. A method of "grooming" the beam by means of a far-field spatial filter in the process of changing the beam size within the single-stage amplifier is also described.

  4. Generalized Fokker-Planck Approximations of Particle Transport with Highly Forward-Peaked Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leakeas, Christopher L.; Larsen, Edward W.

    2001-03-15

    The Fokker-Planck equation is often used to approximate the description of particle transport processes with highly forward-peaked scattering. Pomraning has shown that if the physical scattering kernel is sufficiently dominated by small-angle scattering, then the Fokker-Planck equation is an asymptotic approximation to the linear Boltzmann equation. However, most physically-meaningful scattering kernels contain a sufficient amount of large-angle scattering that the asymptotic criterion is not met. Thus, in many physical problems, solutions of the Fokker-Planck equation are substantially in error. In this paper, Pomraning's asymptotic results are generalized and a new generalized Fokker-Planck (GFP) theory that robustly incorporates large-angle scattering is developed. Numerical experiments demonstrate that the resulting GFP equations are much more accurate than the standard Fokker-Planck equation.

  5. Method and device for remotely monitoring an area using a low peak power optical pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woodruff, Steven D.; Mcintyre, Dustin L.; Jain, Jinesh C.

    2014-07-22

    A method and device for remotely monitoring an area using a low peak power optical pump comprising one or more pumping sources, one or more lasers; and an optical response analyzer. Each pumping source creates a pumping energy. The lasers each comprise a high reflectivity mirror, a laser media, an output coupler, and an output lens. Each laser media is made of a material that emits a lasing power when exposed to pumping energy. Each laser media is optically connected to and positioned between a corresponding high reflectivity mirror and output coupler along a pumping axis. Each output coupler is optically connected to a corresponding output lens along the pumping axis. The high reflectivity mirror of each laser is optically connected to an optical pumping source from the one or more optical pumping sources via an optical connection comprising one or more first optical fibers.

  6. Impacts of Climate Change on Energy Consumption and Peak Demand in Buildings: A Detailed Regional Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dirks, James A.; Gorrissen, Willy J.; Hathaway, John E.; Skorski, Daniel C.; Scott, Michael J.; Pulsipher, Trenton C.; Huang, Maoyi; Liu, Ying; Rice, Jennie S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of numerous commercial and residential building simulations, with the purpose of examining the impact of climate change on peak and annual building energy consumption over the portion of the Eastern Interconnection (EIC) located in the United States. The climate change scenario considered (IPCC A2 scenario as downscaled from the CASCaDE data set) has changes in mean climate characteristics as well as changes in the frequency and duration of intense weather events. This investigation examines building energy demand for three annual periods representative of climate trends in the CASCaDE data set at the beginning, middle, and end of the century--2004, 2052, and 2089. Simulations were performed using the Building ENergy Demand (BEND) model which is a detailed simulation platform built around EnergyPlus. BEND was developed in collaboration with the Platform for Regional Integrated Modeling and Analysis (PRIMA), a modeling framework designed to simulate the complex interactions among climate, energy, water, and land at decision-relevant spatial scales. Over 26,000 building configurations of different types, sizes, vintages, and, characteristics which represent the population of buildings within the EIC, are modeled across the 3 EIC time zones using the future climate from 100 locations within the target region, resulting in nearly 180,000 spatially relevant simulated demand profiles for each of the 3 years. In this study, the building stock characteristics are held constant based on the 2005 building stock in order to isolate and present results that highlight the impact of the climate signal on commercial and residential energy demand. Results of this analysis compare well with other analyses at their finest level of specificity. This approach, however, provides a heretofore unprecedented level of specificity across multiple spectrums including spatial, temporal, and building characteristics. This capability enables the ability to

  7. Structural geology of the French Peak accommodation zone, Nevada Test Site, southwestern Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudson, M.R.

    1997-12-31

    The French Peak accommodation zone (FPAZ) forms an east-trending bedrock structural high in the Nevada Test Site region of southwestern Nevada that formed during Cenozoic Basin and Range extension. The zone separates areas of opposing directions of tilt and downthrow on faults in the Yucca Flat and Frenchman Flat areas. Paleomagnetic data show that rocks within the accommodation zone adjacent to Yucca Flat were not strongly affected by vertical-axis rotation and thus that the transverse strikes of fault and strata formed near their present orientation. Both normal- and oblique strike-slip faulting in the FPAZ largely occurred under a normal-fault stress regime, with least principal stress oriented west-northwest. The normal and sinistral faults in the Puddle Peka segment transfers extension between the Plutonium Valley normal fault zone and the Cane Spring sinistral fault. Recognition of sinistral shear across the Puddle Peak segment allows the Frenchman Flat basin to be interpreted as an asymmetric pull-apart basin developed between the FPAZ and a zone of east-northeast-striking faults to the south that include the Rock Valley fault. The FPAZ has the potential to influence ground-water flow in the region in several ways. Fracture density and thus probably fracture conductivity is high within the FPAZ due to the abundant fault splays present. Moreover,, fractures oriented transversely to the general southward flow of ground water through Yucca Flat area are significant and have potential to laterally divert ground water. Finally, the FPAZ forms a faulted structural high whose northern and southern flanks may permit intermixing of ground waters from different aquifer levels, namely the lower carbonate, welded tuff, and alluvial aquifers. 42 refs.

  8. Modeling of GE Appliances in GridLAB-D: Peak Demand Reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuller, Jason C.; Vyakaranam, Bharat GNVSR; Prakash Kumar, Nirupama; Leistritz, Sean M.; Parker, Graham B.

    2012-04-29

    The widespread adoption of demand response enabled appliances and thermostats can result in significant reduction to peak electrical demand and provide potential grid stabilization benefits. GE has developed a line of appliances that will have the capability of offering several levels of demand reduction actions based on information from the utility grid, often in the form of price. However due to a number of factors, including the number of demand response enabled appliances available at any given time, the reduction of diversity factor due to the synchronizing control signal, and the percentage of consumers who may override the utility signal, it can be difficult to predict the aggregate response of a large number of residences. The effects of these behaviors can be modeled and simulated in open-source software, GridLAB-D, including evaluation of appliance controls, improvement to current algorithms, and development of aggregate control methodologies. This report is the first in a series of three reports describing the potential of GE's demand response enabled appliances to provide benefits to the utility grid. The first report will describe the modeling methodology used to represent the GE appliances in the GridLAB-D simulation environment and the estimated potential for peak demand reduction at various deployment levels. The second and third reports will explore the potential of aggregated group actions to positively impact grid stability, including frequency and voltage regulation and spinning reserves, and the impacts on distribution feeder voltage regulation, including mitigation of fluctuations caused by high penetration of photovoltaic distributed generation and the effects on volt-var control schemes.

  9. Supernovae with two peaks in the optical light curve and the signature of progenitors with low-mass extended envelopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakar, Ehud; Piro, Anthony L.

    2014-06-20

    Early observations of supernova light curves are powerful tools for shedding light on the pre-explosion structures of their progenitors and their mass-loss histories just prior to explosion. Some core-collapse supernovae that are detected during the first days after the explosion prominently show two peaks in the optical bands, including the R and I bands, where the first peak appears to be powered by the cooling of shocked surface material and the second peak is clearly powered by radioactive decay. Such light curves have been explored in detail theoretically for SN 1993J and 2011dh, where it was found that they may be explained by progenitors with extended, low-mass envelopes. Here, we generalize these results. We first explore whether any double-peaked light curve of this type can be generated by a progenitor with a 'standard' density profile, such as a red supergiant or a Wolf-Rayet star. We show that a standard progenitor (1) cannot produce a double-peaked light curve in the R and I bands and (2) cannot exhibit a fast drop in the bolometric luminosity as is seen after the first peak. We then explore the signature of a progenitor with a compact core surrounded by extended, low-mass material. This may be a hydrostatic low-mass envelope or material ejected just prior to the explosion. We show that it naturally produces both of these features. We use this result to provide simple formulae to estimate (1) the mass of the extended material from the time of the first peak, (2) the extended material radius from the luminosity of the first peak, and (3) an upper limit on the core radius from the luminosity minimum between the two peaks.

  10. Peaks, plateaus, numerical instabilities, and achievable accuracy in Galerkin and norm minimizing procedures for solving Ax=b

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cullum, J.

    1994-12-31

    Plots of the residual norms generated by Galerkin procedures for solving Ax = b often exhibit strings of irregular peaks. At seemingly erratic stages in the iterations, peaks appear in the residual norm plot, intervals of iterations over which the norms initially increase and then decrease. Plots of the residual norms generated by related norm minimizing procedures often exhibit long plateaus, sequences of iterations over which reductions in the size of the residual norm are unacceptably small. In an earlier paper the author discussed and derived relationships between such peaks and plateaus within corresponding Galerkin/Norm Minimizing pairs of such methods. In this paper, through a set of numerical experiments, the author examines connections between peaks, plateaus, numerical instabilities, and the achievable accuracy for such pairs of iterative methods. Three pairs of methods, GMRES/Arnoldi, QMR/BCG, and two bidiagonalization methods are studied.

  11. High-Performance with Solar Electric Reduced Peak Demand: Premier Homes Rancho Cordoba, CA- Building America Top Innovation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Building America Innovations profile describes Building America solar home research that has demonstrated the ability to reduce peak demand by 75%. Numerous field studies have monitored power production and system effectiveness.

  12. Methods, systems and apparatus for approximation of peak summed fundamental and third harmonic voltages in a multi-phase machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ransom, Ray M.; Gallegos-Lopez, Gabriel; Kinoshita, Michael H.

    2012-07-31

    Methods, system and apparatus are provided for quickly approximating a peak summed magnitude (A) of a phase voltage (Vph) waveform in a multi-phase system that implements third harmonic injection.

  13. A NEW DISCRIMINATOR FOR GAMMA-RAY BURST CLASSIFICATION: THE E{sub peak}-FLUENCE ENERGY RATIO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldstein, Adam; Preece, Robert D.; Briggs, Michael S.

    2010-10-01

    Using the derived gamma-ray burst (GRB) E{sub peak} and fluences from the complete BATSE 5B Spectral Catalog, we study the ensemble characteristics of the E{sub peak}-fluence relation for GRBs. This relation appears to be a physically meaningful and insightful fundamental discriminator between long and short bursts. We discuss the results of the lower limit test of the E{sub peak}-E{sub iso} relations in the E{sub peak}-fluence plane for Burst And Transient Source Experiment bursts with no observed redshift. Our results confirm the presence of two GRB classes as well as heavily suggesting two different GRB progenitor types.

  14. Pressure Effect on the Boson Peak in Deeply Cooled Confined Water: Evidence of a Liquid-Liquid Transition

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Zhe; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Ito, Kanae; Podlesnyak, Andrey; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2015-12-03

    We studied the boson peak in deeply cooled water confined in nanopores in order to examine the liquid-liquid transition (LLT). Below ~180 K, the boson peaks at pressures P higher than ~3.5 kbar are evidently distinct from those at low pressures by higher mean frequencies and lower heights. Moreover, the higher-P boson peaks can be rescaled to a master curve while the lower-P boson peaks can be rescaled to a different one. Moreover, these phenomena agree with the existence of two liquid phases with different densities and local structures and the associated LLT in the measured (P, T) region. Additionally,more » the P dependence of the librational band also agrees with the above conclusion.« less

  15. Light, alpha, and Fe-peak element abundances in the galactic bulge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Christian I.; Rich, R. Michael; Kobayashi, Chiaki; Kunder, Andrea; Koch, Andreas E-mail: rmr@astro.ucla.edu E-mail: akunder@aip.de

    2014-10-01

    We present radial velocities and chemical abundances of O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu for a sample of 156 red giant branch stars in two Galactic bulge fields centered near (l, b) = (+5.25,3.02) and (0,12). The (+5.25,3.02) field also includes observations of the bulge globular cluster NGC 6553. The results are based on high-resolution (R ? 20,000), high signal-to-noise ration (S/N ? 70) FLAMES-GIRAFFE spectra obtained through the European Southern Observatory archive. However, we only selected a subset of the original observations that included spectra with both high S/N and that did not show strong TiO absorption bands. This work extends previous analyses of this data set beyond Fe and the ?-elements Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti. While we find reasonable agreement with past work, the data presented here indicate that the bulge may exhibit a different chemical composition than the local thick disk, especially at [Fe/H] ? 0.5. In particular, the bulge [?/Fe] ratios may remain enhanced to a slightly higher [Fe/H] than the thick disk, and the Fe-peak elements Co, Ni, and Cu appear enhanced compared to the disk. There is also some evidence that the [Na/Fe] (but not [Al/Fe]) trends between the bulge and local disk may be different at low and high metallicity. We also find that the velocity dispersion decreases as a function of increasing [Fe/H] for both fields, and do not detect any significant cold, high-velocity populations. A comparison with chemical enrichment models indicates that a significant fraction of hypernovae may be required to explain the bulge abundance trends, and that initial mass functions that are steep, top-heavy (and do not include strong outflow), or truncated to avoid including contributions from stars >40 M {sub ?} are ruled out, in particular because of disagreement with the Fe-peak abundance data. For most elements, the NGC 6553 stars exhibit abundance trends nearly identical to comparable metallicity bulge field stars. However, the

  16. Insights from Smart Meters: The Potential for Peak-Hour Savings from Behavior-Based Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd, Annika; Perry, Michael; Smith, Brian; Sullivan, Michael; Cappers, Peter; Goldman, Charles

    2014-03-25

    The rollout of smart meters in the last several years has opened up new forms of previously unavailable energy data. Many utilities are now able in real-time to capture granular, household level interval usage data at very high-frequency levels for a large proportion of their residential and small commercial customer population. This can be linked to other time and locationspecific information, providing vast, constantly growing streams of rich data (sometimes referred to by the recently popular buzz word, “big data”). Within the energy industry there is increasing interest in tapping into the opportunities that these data can provide. What can we do with all of these data? The richness and granularity of these data enable many types of creative and cutting-edge analytics. Technically sophisticated and rigorous statistical techniques can be used to pull interesting insights out of this highfrequency, human-focused data. We at LBNL are calling this “behavior analytics”. This kind of analytics has the potential to provide tremendous value to a wide range of energy programs. For example, highly disaggregated and heterogeneous information about actual energy use would allow energy efficiency (EE) and/or demand response (DR) program implementers to target specific programs to specific households; would enable evaluation, measurement and verification (EM&V) of energy efficiency programs to be performed on a much shorter time horizon than was previously possible; and would provide better insights in to the energy and peak hour savings associated with specifics types of EE and DR programs (e.g., behavior-based (BB) programs). In this series, “Insights from Smart Meters”, we will present concrete, illustrative examples of the type of value that insights from behavior analytics of these data can provide (as well as pointing out its limitations). We will supply several types of key findings, including: • Novel results, which answer questions the industry

  17. Microsoft Word - Chemetall Foote_Kings Mountain and Silver Peak Final EA 9-15-10-1 _3_

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Final Environmental Assessment For Chemetall Foote Corporation Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative Kings Mountain, NC and Silver Peak, NV September 2010 Prepared for: Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory This page intentionally left blank. Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and DOE/EA-1715 Component Manufacturing Initiative Project Environmental Assessment Chemetall Foote Corporation, Kings Mountain, NC and Silver Peak, NV September 2010

  18. Implications of 'peak oil' for atmospheric CO{sub 2} and climate - article no. GB3012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kharecha, P.A.; Hansen, J.E.

    2008-08-15

    Unconstrained CO{sub 2} emission from fossil fuel burning has been the dominant cause of observed anthropogenic global warming. The amounts of 'proven' and potential fossil fuel reserves are uncertain and debated. Regardless of the true values, society has flexibility in the degree to which it chooses to exploit these reserves, especially unconventional fossil fuels and those located in extreme or pristine environments. If conventional oil production peaks within the next few decades, it may have a large effect on future atmospheric CO{sub 2} and climate change, depending upon subsequent energy choices. Assuming that proven oil and gas reserves do not greatly exceed estimates of the Energy Information Administration, and recent trends are toward lower estimates, we show that it is feasible to keep atmospheric CO{sub 2} from exceeding about 450 ppm by 2100, provided that emissions from coal, unconventional fossil fuels, and land use are constrained. Coal-fired power plants without sequestration must be phased out before midcentury to achieve this CO{sub 2} limit. It is also important to 'stretch' conventional oil reserves via energy conservation and efficiency, thus averting strong pressures to extract liquid fuels from coal or unconventional fossil fuels while clean technologies are being developed for the era 'beyond fossil fuels'. We argue that a rising price on carbon emissions is needed to discourage conversion of the vast fossil resources into usable reserves, and to keep CO{sub 2} beneath the 450 ppm ceiling.

  19. Flux harmonics in large SFR cores in relation with core characteristics such as power peaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rimpault, G.; Buiron, L.; Fontaine, B.; Sciora, P.; Tommasi, J.

    2013-07-01

    Designing future Sodium Fast Reactors (SFR) requires enhancing their operational performance and reducing the probability to go into core disruption. As a consequence of these constraints, these novel reactors exhibit rather unusual features compared to past designs. The cores are much larger with rather flat shape. The consequences of that shape on the core characteristics deserve to be studied. The approach taken in this paper is to calculate the eigenvalue associated to the first harmonic and its associated flux. It is demonstrated that these values are linked to some core features, in particular, those sensitive to spatial effects such as power peaks induced by the movement of control rods. The uncertainty associated to these characteristics is being tentatively studied and guidelines for further studied are being identified. In the development strategy of these new SFR designs, a first demonstration plant of limited installed power (around 1500 MWth) will have to be built first. Identifying the possibility of going later to higher power plants (around 3600 MWth) without facing new challenges is an important criterion for designing such a plant. That strategy is being studied, in this paper, focusing on some rather frequent initiator such as the inadvertent control rod withdrawal for different core sizes with the help of the perturbation theory and the flux harmonics. (authors)

  20. EIS No. 20100312 EIS Comanche Peak Nuclear Power Plant Units 3 and 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjornstad, David J

    2010-08-01

    In accordance with Section 309(a) of the Clean Air Act, EPA is required to make its comments on EISs issued by other Federal agencies public. Historically, EPA has met this mandate by publishing weekly notices of availability of EPA comments, which includes a brief summary of EPA's comment letters, in the Federal Register. Since February 2008, EPA has been including its comment letters on EISs on its Web site at: http://www.epa.gov/compliance/nepa/eisdata.html. Including the entire EIS comment letters on the Web site satisfies the Section 309(a) requirement to make EPA's comments on EISs available to the public. Accordingly, on March 31, 2010, EPA discontinued the publication of the notice of availability of EPA comments in the Federal Register. EIS No. 20100312, Draft EIS, NRC, TX, Comanche Peak Nuclear Power Plant Units 3 and 4, Application for Combined Licenses (COLs) for Construction Permits and Operating Licenses, (NUREG-1943), Hood and Somervell Counties, TX, Comment Period Ends: 10/26/2010.

  1. Daily air pollution effects on children's respiratory symptoms and peak expiratory flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vedal, S.; Schenker, M.B.; Munoz, A.; Samet, J.M.; Batterman, S.; Speizer, F.E.

    1987-06-01

    To identify acute respiratory health effects associated with air pollution due to coal combustion, a subgroup of elementary school-aged children was selected from a large cross-sectional study and followed daily for eight months. Children were selected to obtain three equal-sized groups: one without respiratory symptoms, one with symptoms of persistent wheeze, and one with cough or phlegm production but without persistent wheeze. Parents completed a daily diary of symptoms from which illness constellations of upper respiratory illness (URI) and lower respiratory illness (LRI) and the symptom of wheeze were derived. Peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) was measured daily for nine consecutive weeks during the eight-month study period. Maximum hourly concentrations of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, and coefficient of haze for each 24-hour period, as well as minimum hourly temperature, were correlated with daily URI, LRI, wheeze, and PEFR using multiple regression models adjusting for illness occurrence or level of PEFR on the immediately preceding day. Respiratory illness on the preceding day was the most important predictor of current illness. A drop in temperature was associated with increased URI and LRI but not with increased wheeze or with a decrease in level of PEFR. No air pollutant was strongly associated with respiratory illness or with level of PEFR, either in the group of children as a whole, or in either of the symptomatic subgroups; the pollutant concentrations observed, however, were uniformly lower than current ambient air quality standards.

  2. Development of a Dispatchable PV Peak Shainv System. PV: Bonus Program - Phase 1 Report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-01

    This report summarizes the work performed by Delmarva Power and Light and its subcontractors in Phase 1 of the US Department of Energy's PV:BONUS Program. The purpose of the program is to develop products and systems for buildings which utilize photovoltaic (N) technology. Beginning with a cooperative research effort with the University of Delaware's Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research Delmarva Power developed and demonstrated the concept of Dispatchable PV Peak Shaving. This concept and the system which resulted horn the development work are unique from other grid-connected PV systems because it combines a PV, battery energy storage, power conversion and control technologies into an integrated package. Phase 1 began in July 1993 with the installation of a test and demonstration system at Delmarva's Northern Division General Office building near Newark, Delaware. Following initial testing throughout the summer and fall of 1993, significant modifications were made under an amendment to the DOE contract. Work on Phase 1 concluded in the early spring of 1995. Significant progress towards the goal of commercializing the system was made during Phase 1, and is summarized. Based on progress in Phase 1, a proposal to continue the work in Phase 2 was submitted to the US DOE in May 1995. A contract amendment and providing funds for the Phase 2 work is expected in July 1995.

  3. DES14X3taz: A type I superluminous supernova showing a luminous, rapidly cooling initial pre-peak bump

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Smith, M.

    2016-02-03

    Here, we present DES14X3taz, a new hydrogen-poor superluminous supernova (SLSN-I) discovered by the Dark Energy Survey (DES) supernova program, with additional photometric data provided by the Survey Using DECam for Superluminous Supernovae. Spectra obtained using Optical System for Imaging and low-Intermediate-Resolution Integrated Spectroscopy on the Gran Telescopio CANARIAS show DES14X3taz is an SLSN-I at z = 0.608. Multi-color photometry reveals a double-peaked light curve: a blue and relatively bright initial peak that fades rapidly prior to the slower rise of the main light curve. Our multi-color photometry allows us, for the first time, to show that the initial peak cools from 22,000more » to 8000 K over 15 rest-frame days, and is faster and brighter than any published core-collapse supernova, reaching 30% of the bolometric luminosity of the main peak. No physical (56)Ni-powered model can fit this initial peak. We show that a shock-cooling model followed by a magnetar driving the second phase of the light curve can adequately explain the entire light curve of DES14X3taz. Models involving the shock-cooling of extended circumstellar material at a distance of ≃400 R⊙ are preferred over the cooling of shock-heated surface layers of a stellar envelope. We compare DES14X3taz to the few double-peaked SLSN-I events in the literature. Although the rise times and characteristics of these initial peaks differ, there exists the tantalizing possibility that they can be explained by one physical interpretation.« less

  4. Multiple current peaks in room-temperature atmospheric pressure homogenous dielectric barrier discharge plasma excited by high-voltage tunable nanosecond pulse in air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, De-Zheng; Wang, Wen-Chun; Zhang, Shuai; Tang, Kai; Liu, Zhi-jie; Wang, Sen

    2013-05-13

    Room temperature homogenous dielectric barrier discharge plasma with high instantaneous energy efficiency is acquired by using nanosecond pulse voltage with 20-200 ns tunable pulse width. Increasing the voltage pulse width can lead to the generation of regular and stable multiple current peaks in each discharge sequence. When the voltage pulse width is 200 ns, more than 5 organized current peaks can be observed under 26 kV peak voltage. Investigation also shows that the organized multiple current peaks only appear in homogenous discharge mode. When the discharge is filament mode, organized multiple current peaks are replaced by chaotic filament current peaks.

  5. VLBI IMAGING OF THE DOUBLE PEAKED EMISSION LINE SEYFERT KISSR 1494

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kharb, P.; Das, M.; Subramanian, S.; Chitta, L. P.; Paragi, Z.

    2015-02-01

    We present here the results from dual-frequency phase-referenced Very Long Baseline Interferometry observations of the Seyfert galaxy KISSR 1494, which exhibits double peaked emission lines in its Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectrum. We detect a single radio component at 1.6 GHz, but not at 5 GHz, implying a spectral index steeper than –1.5 ± 0.5 (S {sub ν}∝ν{sup α}). The high brightness temperature of the radio component (∼1.4 × 10{sup 7} K) and the steep radio spectrum support a non-thermal synchrotron origin. A crude estimate of the black hole mass derived from the M {sub BH}-σ{sub *} relation is ∼1.4 ± 1.0 × 10{sup 8} M {sub ☉}; it is accreting at an Eddington rate of ∼0.02. The radio data are consistent with either the radio emission coming from the parsec-scale base of a synchrotron wind originating in the magnetized corona above the accretion disk, or from the inner ionized edge of the accretion disk or torus. In the former case, the narrow line region (NLR) clouds may form a part of the broad outflow, while in the latter, the NLR clouds may form a part of an extended disk beyond the torus. The radio and NLR emission may also be decoupled so that the radio emission originates in an outflow while the NLR is in a disk and vice versa. While with the present data it is not possible to clearly distinguish between these scenarios, there appears to be greater circumstantial evidence supporting the coronal wind picture in KISSR 1494. From the kiloparsec-scale radio emission, the time-averaged kinetic power of this outflow is estimated to be Q ≈ 1.5 × 10{sup 42} erg s{sup –1}, which is typical of radio outflows in low-luminosity active galactic nuclei. This supports the idea that radio ''jets'' and outflowing coronal winds are indistinguishable in Seyfert galaxies.

  6. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Steamboat Springs, Colorado, for the Storm Peak Laboratory Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    In October 2010, the initial deployment of the second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) took place at Steamboat Springs, Colorado, for the Storm Peak Laboratory Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX). The objective of this field campaign was to obtain data about liquid and mixed-phase clouds using AMF2 instruments in conjunction with Storm Peak Laboratory (located at an elevation of 3220 meters on Mt. Werner), a cloud and aerosol research facility operated by the Desert Research Institute. STORMVEX datasets are freely available for viewing and download. Users are asked to register with the ARM Archive; the user's email address is used from that time forward as the login name.

  7. Method for reducing peak phase current and decreasing staring time for an internal combustion engine having an induction machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Amey, David L.; Degner, Michael W.

    2002-01-01

    A method for reducing the starting time and reducing the peak phase currents for an internal combustion engine that is started using an induction machine starter/alternator. The starting time is reduced by pre-fluxing the induction machine and the peak phase currents are reduced by reducing the flux current command after a predetermined period of time has elapsed and concurrent to the application of the torque current command. The method of the present invention also provides a strategy for anticipating the start command for an internal combustion engine and determines a start strategy based on the start command and the operating state of the internal combustion engine.

  8. Technical Basis for Peak Reactivity Burnup Credit for BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel in Storage and Transportation Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, William BJ J; Ade, Brian J; Bowman, Stephen M; Gauld, Ian C; Ilas, Germina; Mertyurek, Ugur; Radulescu, Georgeta

    2015-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission have initiated a multiyear project to investigate application of burnup credit for boiling-water reactor (BWR) fuel in storage and transportation casks. This project includes two phases. The first phase (1) investigates applicability of peak reactivity methods currently used in spent fuel pools (SFPs) to storage and transportation systems and (2) evaluates validation of both reactivity (keff) calculations and burnup credit nuclide concentrations within these methods. The second phase will focus on extending burnup credit beyond peak reactivity. This paper documents the first phase, including an analysis of lattice design parameters and depletion effects, as well as both validation components. Initial efforts related to extended burnup credit are discussed in a companion paper. Peak reactivity analyses have been used in criticality analyses for licensing of BWR fuel in SFPs over the last 20 years. These analyses typically combine credit for the gadolinium burnable absorber present in the fuel with a modest amount of burnup credit. Gadolinium burnable absorbers are used in BWR assemblies to control core reactivity. The burnable absorber significantly reduces assembly reactivity at beginning of life, potentially leading to significant increases in assembly reactivity for burnups less than 15–20 GWd/MTU. The reactivity of each fuel lattice is dependent on gadolinium loading. The number of gadolinium-bearing fuel pins lowers initial lattice reactivity, but it has a small impact on the burnup and reactivity of the peak. The gadolinium concentration in each pin has a small impact on initial lattice reactivity but a significant effect on the reactivity of the peak and the burnup at which the peak occurs. The importance of the lattice parameters and depletion conditions are primarily determined by their impact on the gadolinium depletion. Criticality code validation for BWR burnup

  9. Automated setup for magnetic hysteresis characterization based on a voltage controlled current source with 500 kHz full power bandwidth and 10 A peak-to-peak current

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calabrese, G.; Capineri, L.; Granato, M.; Frattini, G.

    2015-04-15

    This paper describes the design of a system for the characterization of magnetic hysteresis behavior in soft ferrite magnetic cores. The proposed setup can test magnetic materials exciting them with controlled arbitrary magnetic field waveforms, including the capability of providing a DC bias, in a frequency bandwidth up to 500 kHz, with voltages up to 32 V peak-to-peak, and currents up to 10 A peak-to-peak. In order to have an accurate control of the magnetic field waveform, the system is based on a voltage controlled current source. The electronic design is described focusing on closed loop feedback stabilization and passive components choice. The system has real-time hysteretic loop acquisition and visualization. The comparisons between measured hysteresis loops of sample magnetic materials and datasheet available ones are shown. Results showing frequency and thermal behavior of the hysteresis of a test sample prove the system capabilities. Moreover, the B-H loops obtained with a multiple waveforms excitation signal, including DC bias, are reported. The proposal is a low-cost and replicable solution for hysteresis characterization of magnetic materials used in power electronics.

  10. Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peak-demand Mitigation: A Solution in Developing and Developed World Alike

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeForest, Nicholas; Mendes, Goncalo; Stadler, Michael; Feng, Wei; Lai, Judy; Marnay, Chris

    2013-06-02

    In much of the developed world, air-conditioning in buildings is the dominant driver of summer peak electricity demand. In the developing world a steadily increasing utilization of air-conditioning places additional strain on already-congested grids. This common thread represents a large and growing threat to the reliable delivery of electricity around the world, requiring capital-intensive expansion of capacity and draining available investment resources. Thermal energy storage (TES), in the form of ice or chilled water, may be one of the few technologies currently capable of mitigating this problem cost effectively and at scale. The installation of TES capacity allows a building to meet its on-peak air conditioning load without interruption using electricity purchased off-peak and operating with improved thermodynamic efficiency. In this way, TES has the potential to fundamentally alter consumption dynamics and reduce impacts of air conditioning. This investigation presents a simulation study of a large office building in four distinct geographical contexts: Miami, Lisbon, Shanghai, and Mumbai. The optimization tool DER-CAM (Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model) is applied to optimally size TES systems for each location. Summer load profiles are investigated to assess the effectiveness and consistency in reducing peak electricity demand. Additionally, annual energy requirements are used to determine system cost feasibility, payback periods and customer savings under local utility tariffs.

  11. WE-D-BRF-02: Acoustic Signal From the Bragg Peak for Range Verification in Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reinhardt, S; Assmann, W; Fink, A; Thirolf, P; Parodi, K; Kellnberger, S; Omar, M; Ntziachristos, V; Gaebisch, C; Moser, M; Dollinger, G; Sergiadis, G

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Range verification in ion beam therapy relies to date on nuclear imaging techniques which require complex and costly detector systems. A different approach is the detection of thermoacoustic signals that are generated due to localized energy loss of ion beams. Aim of this work is to study the feasibility of determining the ion range with sub-mm accuracy by use of high frequency ultrasonic (US) transducers and to image the Bragg peak by tomography. Methods: A water phantom was irradiated by a pulsed 20 MeV proton beam with varying pulse intensity, length and repetition rate. The acoustic signal of single proton pulses was measured by different PZT-based US detectors (3.5 MHz and 10 MHz central frequencies). For tomography a 64 channel US detector array was used and moved along the ion track by a remotely controlled motor stage. Results: A clear signal of the Bragg peak was visible for an energy deposition as low as 10{sup 12} eV. The signal amplitude showed a linear increase with particle number per pulse and thus, dose. Range measurements were reproducible within +/? 20 micrometer and agreed well with Geant4 simulations. The tomographic reconstruction does not only allow to measure the ion range but also the beam spot size at the Bragg peak position. Conclusion: Range verification by acoustic means is a promising new technique for treatment modalities where the tumor can be localized by US imaging. Further improvement of sensitivity is required to account for higher attenuation of the US signal in tissue, as well as lower energy density in the Bragg peak in realistic treatment cases due to higher particle energy and larger spot sizes. Nevertheless, the acoustic range verification approach could offer the possibility of combining anatomical US imaging with Bragg Peak imaging in the near future. The work was funded by the DFG cluster of excellence Munich Centre for Advanced Photonics (MAP)

  12. Validation Methodology to Allow Simulated Peak Reduction and Energy Performance Analysis of Residential Building Envelope with Phase Change Materials: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tabares-Velasco, P. C.; Christensen, C.; Bianchi, M.

    2012-08-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) represent a potential technology to reduce peak loads and HVAC energy consumption in residential buildings. This paper summarizes NREL efforts to obtain accurate energy simulations when PCMs are modeled in residential buildings: the overall methodology to verify and validate Conduction Finite Difference (CondFD) and PCM algorithms in EnergyPlus is presented in this study. It also shows preliminary results of three residential building enclosure technologies containing PCM: PCM-enhanced insulation, PCM impregnated drywall and thin PCM layers. The results are compared based on predicted peak reduction and energy savings using two algorithms in EnergyPlus: the PCM and Conduction Finite Difference (CondFD) algorithms.

  13. Interaction-powered supernovae: rise-time versus peak-luminosity correlation and the shock-breakout velocity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ofek, Eran O.; Arcavi, Iair; Tal, David; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Ben-Ami, Sagi; De Cia, Annalisa; Yaron, Ofer; Sullivan, Mark; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Cao, Yi; Nugent, Peter E.; Bersier, David; Cenko, S. Bradley; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Fransson, Claes; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Laher, Russ; Surace, Jason; Quimby, Robert

    2014-06-20

    Interaction of supernova (SN) ejecta with the optically thick circumstellar medium (CSM) of a progenitor star can result in a bright, long-lived shock-breakout event. Candidates for such SNe include Type IIn and superluminous SNe. If some of these SNe are powered by interaction, then there should be a specific relation between their peak luminosity, bolometric light-curve rise time, and shock-breakout velocity. Given that the shock velocity during shock breakout is not measured, we expect a correlation, with a significant spread, between the rise time and the peak luminosity of these SNe. Here, we present a sample of 15 SNe IIn for which we have good constraints on their rise time and peak luminosity from observations obtained using the Palomar Transient Factory. We report on a possible correlation between the R-band rise time and peak luminosity of these SNe, with a false-alarm probability of 3%. Assuming that these SNe are powered by interaction, combining these observables and theory allows us to deduce lower limits on the shock-breakout velocity. The lower limits on the shock velocity we find are consistent with what is expected for SNe (i.e., ∼10{sup 4} km s{sup –1}). This supports the suggestion that the early-time light curves of SNe IIn are caused by shock breakout in a dense CSM. We note that such a correlation can arise from other physical mechanisms. Performing such a test on other classes of SNe (e.g., superluminous SNe) can be used to rule out the interaction model for a class of events.

  14. Raman spectroscopy of titanomagnetites: Calibration of the intensity of Raman peaks as a sensitive indicator for their Ti content

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zinin, Pavel; Tatsumi-Petrochilos, Lisa; Bonal, Lydie; Acosta, Tayro; Hammer, Julia; Gilder, Stuart; Fuller, Mike

    2015-10-15

    A systematic study of the Raman spectra of the titanomagnetite solid-solution series (Fe{sub 3-x}Ti{sub x}O{sub 4}) for x = {approx}0.0, 0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 has been conducted. The samples showed combinations of five previously predicted Raman peaks at {approx}190, 310, 460, 540, and 670 cm{sup -1} that correspond to vibrational modes with T{sub 2g}(1), E{sub g}, T{sub 2g}(3), T{sub 2g}(2), and A{sub 1g}, respectively. The calibration of Raman spectra for titanomagnetite with known values of Ti concentrations reveals a strong dependence of relative intensity for the T{sub 2g}(2) and T{sub 2g}(3) modes on Ti concentration. The most prominent feature is the appearance and increase in the relative intensity of a T{sub 2g}(3) peak above x = {approx}0.2. On the other hand, the Raman peak for the T{sub 2g}(2) mode gradually diminishes as Ti increases and nearly disappears at x = {approx}0.6. Combining the two relative intensities potentially provides a sensitive indicator of Ti content. The technique was applied to study titanomagnetite in grains from Hana Volcanics and melatroctolite from Rhode Island.

  15. Observed Temperature Effects on Hourly Residential Electric LoadReduction in Response to an Experimental Critical Peak PricingTariff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herter, Karen B.; McAuliffe, Patrick K.; Rosenfeld, Arthur H.

    2005-11-14

    The goal of this investigation was to characterize themanual and automated response of residential customers to high-price"critical" events dispatched under critical peak pricing tariffs testedin the 2003-2004 California Statewide Pricing Pilot. The 15-monthexperimental tariff gave customers a discounted two-price time-of-userate on 430 days in exchange for 27 critical days, during which the peakperiod price (2 p.m. to 7 p.m.) was increased to about three times thenormal time-of-use peak price. We calculated response by five-degreetemperature bins as the difference between peak usage on normal andcritical weekdays. Results indicatedthat manual response to criticalperiods reached -0.23 kW per home (-13 percent) in hot weather(95-104.9oF), -0.03 kW per home (-4 percent) in mild weather (60-94.9oF),and -0.07 kW per home (-9 percent) during cold weather (50-59.9oF).Separately, we analyzed response enhanced by programmable communicatingthermostats in high-use homes with air-conditioning. Between 90oF and94.9oF, the response of this group reached -0.56 kW per home (-25percent) for five-hour critical periods and -0.89 kW/home (-41 percent)for two-hour critical periods.

  16. Base-Load and Peak Electricity from a Combined Nuclear Heat and Fossil Combined-Cycle Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conklin, James C.; Forsberg, Charles W.

    2007-07-01

    A combined-cycle power plant is proposed that uses heat from a high-temperature reactor and fossil fuel to meet base-load and peak electrical demands. The high temperature gas turbine produces shaft power to turn an electric generator. The hot exhaust is then fed to a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) that provides steam to a steam turbine for added electrical power production. A simplified computational model of the thermal power conversion system was developed in order to parametrically investigate two different steady-state operation conditions: base load nuclear heat only from an Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR), and combined nuclear heat with fossil heat to increase the turbine inlet temperature. These two cases bracket the expected range of power levels, where any intermediate power level can result during electrical load following. The computed results indicate that combined nuclear-fossil systems have the potential to offer both low-cost base-load electricity and lower-cost peak power relative to the existing combination of base-load nuclear plants and separate fossil-fired peak-electricity production units. In addition, electric grid stability, reduced greenhouse gases, and operational flexibility can also result with using the conventional technology presented here for the thermal power conversion system coupled with the AHTR. (authors)

  17. Base-Load and Peak Electricity from a Combined Nuclear Heat and Fossil Combined-Cycle Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conklin, Jim; Forsberg, Charles W

    2007-01-01

    A combined-cycle power plant is proposed that uses heat from a high-temperature reactor and fossil fuel to meet base-load and peak electrical demands. The high-temperature gas turbine produces shaft power to turn an electric generator. The hot exhaust is then fed to a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) that provides steam to a steam turbine for added electrical power production. A simplified computational model of the thermal power conversion system was developed in order to parametrically investigate two different steady-state operation conditions: base load nuclear heat only from an Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR), and combined nuclear heat with fossil heat to increase the turbine inlet temperature. These two cases bracket the expected range of power levels, where any intermediate power level can result during electrical load following. The computed results indicate that combined nuclear-fossil systems have the potential to offer both low-cost base-load electricity and lower-cost peak power relative to the existing combination of base-load nuclear plants and separate fossil-fired peak-electricity production units. In addition, electric grid stability, reduced greenhouse gases, and operational flexibility can also result with using the conventional technology presented here for the thermal power conversion system coupled with the AHTR.

  18. Hydrogen-or-Fossil-Combustion Nuclear Combined-Cycle Systems for Base- and Peak-Load Electricity Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsberg, Charles W; Conklin, Jim

    2007-09-01

    A combined-cycle power plant is described that uses (1) heat from a high-temperature nuclear reactor to meet base-load electrical demands and (2) heat from the same high-temperature reactor and burning natural gas, jet fuel, or hydrogen to meet peak-load electrical demands. For base-load electricity production, fresh air is compressed; then flows through a heat exchanger, where it is heated to between 700 and 900 C by heat provided by a high-temperature nuclear reactor via an intermediate heat-transport loop; and finally exits through a high-temperature gas turbine to produce electricity. The hot exhaust from the Brayton-cycle gas turbine is then fed to a heat recovery steam generator that provides steam to a steam turbine for added electrical power production. To meet peak electricity demand, the air is first compressed and then heated with the heat from a high-temperature reactor. Natural gas, jet fuel, or hydrogen is then injected into the hot air in a combustion chamber, combusts, and heats the air to 1300 C-the operating conditions for a standard natural-gas-fired combined-cycle plant. The hot gas then flows through a gas turbine and a heat recovery steam generator before being sent to the exhaust stack. The higher temperatures increase the plant efficiency and power output. If hydrogen is used, it can be produced at night using energy from the nuclear reactor and stored until needed. With hydrogen serving as the auxiliary fuel for peak power production, the electricity output to the electric grid can vary from zero (i.e., when hydrogen is being produced) to the maximum peak power while the nuclear reactor operates at constant load. Because nuclear heat raises air temperatures above the auto-ignition temperatures of the various fuels and powers the air compressor, the power output can be varied rapidly (compared with the capabilities of fossil-fired turbines) to meet spinning reserve requirements and stabilize the electric grid. This combined cycle uses the

  19. NREL's Energy-Saving Technology for Air Conditioning Cuts Peak Power Loads Without Using Harmful Refrigerants (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-07-01

    This fact sheet describes how the DEVAP air conditioner was invented, explains how the technology works, and why it won an R&D 100 Award. Desiccant-enhanced evaporative (DEVAP) air-conditioning will provide superior comfort for commercial buildings in any climate at a small fraction of the electricity costs of conventional air-conditioning equipment, releasing far less carbon dioxide and cutting costly peak electrical demand by an estimated 80%. Air conditioning currently consumes about 15% of the electricity generated in the United States and is a major contributor to peak electrical demand on hot summer days, which can lead to escalating power costs, brownouts, and rolling blackouts. DEVAP employs an innovative combination of air-cooling technologies to reduce energy use by up to 81%. DEVAP also shifts most of the energy needs to thermal energy sources, reducing annual electricity use by up to 90%. In doing so, DEVAP is estimated to cut peak electrical demand by nearly 80% in all climates. Widespread use of this cooling cycle would dramatically cut peak electrical loads throughout the country, saving billions of dollars in investments and operating costs for our nation's electrical utilities. Water is already used as a refrigerant in evaporative coolers, a common and widely used energy-saving technology for arid regions. The technology cools incoming hot, dry air by evaporating water into it. The energy absorbed by the water as it evaporates, known as the latent heat of vaporization, cools the air while humidifying it. However, evaporative coolers only function when the air is dry, and they deliver humid air that can lower the comfort level for building occupants. And even many dry climates like Phoenix, Arizona, have a humid season when evaporative cooling won't work well. DEVAP extends the applicability of evaporative cooling by first using a liquid desiccant-a water-absorbing material-to dry the air. The dry air is then passed to an indirect evaporative

  20. Desert Peak EGS Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Ethan Chabora GeothermEx, a Schlumberger Company Ezra Zemach Ormat Nevada Inc. ... Collaborations * Project Leader: Ormat Nevada, Inc. - Co-Management: GeothermEx, Inc. - ...

  1. FEMAXI-V benchmarking study on peak temperature and fission gas release prediction of PWR rod fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suwardi; Dewayatna, W.; Briyatmoko, B.

    2012-06-06

    The present paper reports a study of FEMAXI-V code and related report on code benchmarking. Capabilities of the FEMAXI-V code to predict the thermal and fission gas release have been tested on MOX fuels in LWRs which has been done in SCK{center_dot}CEN and Belgonucleaire by using PRIMO MOX rod BD8 irradiation experiment after V Sobolev as reported O. J. Ott. Base irradiation in the BR3 reactor, the BD8 rod was transported to CEA-Saclay for irradiation in the OSIRIS reactor (ramp power excursion). The irradiation device used for the PRIMO ramps was the ISABELLE 1 loop, installed on a movable structure of the core periphery. The power variations were obtained by inwards/backwards movements of the loop in the core water. The preconditioning phase for rod BD8 occurred at a peak power level of 189 W/cm with a hold time of 27 hours. The subsequent power excursion rate amounted to 77 W/ (cm.min), reaching a terminal peak power level of 395 W/cm that lasted for 20 hours.

  2. Load controller and method to enhance effective capacity of a photovotaic power supply using a dynamically determined expected peak loading

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard

    2003-04-01

    A load controller and method are provided for maximizing effective capacity of a non-controllable, renewable power supply coupled to a variable electrical load also coupled to a conventional power grid. Effective capacity is enhanced by monitoring power output of the renewable supply and loading, and comparing the loading against the power output and a load adjustment threshold determined from an expected peak loading. A value for a load adjustment parameter is calculated by subtracting the renewable supply output and the load adjustment parameter from the current load. This value is then employed to control the variable load in an amount proportional to the value of the load control parameter when the parameter is within a predefined range. By so controlling the load, the effective capacity of the non-controllable, renewable power supply is increased without any attempt at operational feedback control of the renewable supply. The expected peak loading of the variable load can be dynamically determined within a defined time interval with reference to variations in the variable load.

  3. Relative Economic Merits of Storage and Combustion Turbines for Meeting Peak Capacity Requirements under Increased Penetration of Solar Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, Paul; Diakov, Victor; Margolis, Robert

    2015-09-01

    Batteries with several hours of capacity provide an alternative to combustion turbines for meeting peak capacity requirements. Even when compared to state-of-the-art highly flexible combustion turbines, batteries can provide a greater operational value, which is reflected in a lower system-wide production cost. By shifting load and providing operating reserves, batteries can reduce the cost of operating the power system to a traditional electric utility. This added value means that, depending on battery life, batteries can have a higher cost than a combustion turbine of equal capacity and still produce a system with equal or lower overall life-cycle cost. For a utility considering investing in new capacity, the cost premium for batteries is highly sensitive to a variety of factors, including lifetime, natural gas costs, PV penetration, and grid generation mix. In addition, as PV penetration increases, the net electricity demand profile changes, which may reduce the amount of battery energy capacity needed to reliably meet peak demand.

  4. The development of a charge protocol to take advantage of off- and on-peak demand economics at facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey Wishart

    2012-02-01

    This document reports the work performed under Task 1.2.1.1: 'The development of a charge protocol to take advantage of off- and on-peak demand economics at facilities'. The work involved in this task included understanding the experimental results of the other tasks of SOW-5799 in order to take advantage of the economics of electricity pricing differences between on- and off-peak hours and the demonstrated charging and facility energy demand profiles. To undertake this task and to demonstrate the feasibility of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) and electric vehicle (EV) bi-directional electricity exchange potential, BEA has subcontracted Electric Transportation Applications (now known as ECOtality North America and hereafter ECOtality NA) to use the data from the demand and energy study to focus on reducing the electrical power demand of the charging facility. The use of delayed charging as well as vehicle-to-grid (V2G) and vehicle-to-building (V2B) operations were to be considered.

  5. Chapter 10, Peak Demand and Time-Differentiated Energy Savings Cross-Cutting Protocols: The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0: Peak Demand and Time-Differentiated Energy Savings Cross-Cutting Protocols Frank Stern, Navigant Consulting Subcontract Report NREL/SR-7A30-53827 April 2013 The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures 10 - 1 Chapter 10 - Table of Contents 1 Introduction .............................................................................................................................2 2 Purpose of Peak Demand and Time-differentiated Energy

  6. Use of Residential Smart Appliances for Peak-Load Shifting and Spinning Reserves Cost/Benefit Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sastry, Chellury; Pratt, Robert G.; Srivastava, Viraj; Li, Shun

    2010-12-01

    In this report, we present the results of an analytical cost/benefit study of residential smart appliances from a utility/grid perspective in support of a joint stakeholder petition to the ENERGY STAR program within the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Department of Energy (DOE). The goal of the petition is in part to provide appliance manufacturers incentives to hasten the production of smart appliances. The underlying hypothesis is that smart appliances can play a critical role in addressing some of the societal challenges, such as anthropogenic global warming, associated with increased electricity demand, and facilitate increased penetration of renewable sources of power. The appliances we consider include refrigerator/freezers, clothes washers, clothes dryers, room air-conditioners, and dishwashers. The petition requests the recognition that providing an appliance with smart grid capability, i.e., products that meet the definition of a smart appliance, is at least equivalent to a corresponding five percent in operational machine efficiencies. It is then expected that given sufficient incentives and value propositions, and suitable automation capabilities built into smart appliances, residential consumers will be adopting these smart appliances and will be willing participants in addressing the aforementioned societal challenges by more effectively managing their home electricity consumption. The analytical model we utilize in our cost/benefit analysis consists of a set of user-definable assumptions such as the definition of on-peak (hours of day, days of week, months of year), the expected percentage of normal consumer electricity consumption (also referred to as appliance loads) that can shifted from peak hours to off-peak hours, the average power rating of each appliance, etc. Based on these assumptions, we then formulate what the wholesale grid operating-cost savings, or benefits, would be if the smart capabilities of appliances were invoked, and

  7. Table 10.9 Photovoltaic Cell and Module Shipments by Sector and End Use, 1989-2010 (Peak Kilowatts )

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Photovoltaic Cell and Module Shipments by Sector and End Use, 1989-2010 (Peak Kilowatts 1 ) Year By Sector By End Use Total Residential Commercial 3 Industrial 4 Electric Power 5 Other 6 Grid-Connected 2 Off-Grid 2 Centralized 7 Distributed 8 Domestic 9 Non-Domestic 10 Total Shipments of Photovoltaic Cells and Modules 11<//td> 1989 1,439 6,057 [R] 3,993 785 551 [12] 1,251 [12] 2,620 8,954 12,825 1990 1,701 8,062 [R] 2,817 826 432 [12] 469 [12] 3,097 10,271 13,837 1991 3,624 5,715 [R] 3,947

  8. Coincidence of collective relaxation anomaly and specific heat peak in a bulk metallic glass-forming liquid

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jaiswal, Abhishek; Podlesynak, Andrey; Ehlers, Georg; Mills, Rebecca; O'Keeffe, Stephanie; Stevick, Joseph; Kempton, James; Jelbert, Glenton; Dmowski, Wojciech; Lokshin, Konstantin; et al

    2015-07-21

    The study of multicomponent metallic liquids' relaxational behavior is still the key to understanding and improving the glass-forming abilities of bulk metallic glasses. Here, we report measurements of the collective relaxation times in a melted bulk metallic glass (LM601Zr51Cu36Ni4Al9) in the kinetic regime (Q: 1.5–4.0Å–1) using quasielastic neutron scattering. The results reveal an unusual slope change in the Angell plots of this metallic liquid's collective relaxation time around 950°C, beyond the material's melting point. Measurement of specific heat capacity also reveals a peak around the same temperature. Adams-Gibbs theory is used to rationalize the coincidence, which motivates more careful experimentalmore » and computational studies of the metallic liquids in the future.« less

  9. Coincidence of collective relaxation anomaly and specific heat peak in a bulk metallic glass-forming liquid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaiswal, Abhishek; Podlesynak, Andrey; Ehlers, Georg; Mills, Rebecca; O'Keeffe, Stephanie; Stevick, Joseph; Kempton, James; Jelbert, Glenton; Dmowski, Wojciech; Lokshin, Konstantin; Egami, Takeshi; Zhang, Yang

    2015-07-21

    The study of multicomponent metallic liquids' relaxational behavior is still the key to understanding and improving the glass-forming abilities of bulk metallic glasses. Here, we report measurements of the collective relaxation times in a melted bulk metallic glass (LM601Zr51Cu36Ni4Al9) in the kinetic regime (Q: 1.5–4.0Å–1) using quasielastic neutron scattering. The results reveal an unusual slope change in the Angell plots of this metallic liquid's collective relaxation time around 950°C, beyond the material's melting point. Measurement of specific heat capacity also reveals a peak around the same temperature. Adams-Gibbs theory is used to rationalize the coincidence, which motivates more careful experimental and computational studies of the metallic liquids in the future.

  10. Load controller and method to enhance effective capacity of a photovoltaic power supply using a dynamically determined expected peak loading

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard

    2005-05-03

    A load controller and method are provided for maximizing effective capacity of a non-controllable, renewable power supply coupled to a variable electrical load also coupled to a conventional power grid. Effective capacity is enhanced by monitoring power output of the renewable supply and loading, and comparing the loading against the power output and a load adjustment threshold determined from an expected peak loading. A value for a load adjustment parameter is calculated by subtracting the renewable supply output and the load adjustment parameter from the current load. This value is then employed to control the variable load in an amount proportional to the value of the load control parameter when the parameter is within a predefined range. By so controlling the load, the effective capacity of the non-controllable, renewable power supply is increased without any attempt at operational feedback control of the renewable supply.

  11. An investigation of the accuracy and the characteristics of the Peak-Shaving Method applied to production cost calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, R.N.; Lee, T.H.; Hill, E.F.

    1989-08-01

    The Peak-Shaving Method (PSM) has been applied in many well-known commercial software packages for hydrothermal scheduling to minimize the system production cost. These packages are frequently applied by government agencies and utilities for rate hearings, energy import/export licensing, generation capacity expansion planning, and hourly production scheduling for a weekly system operation planning, etc. The accuracy and the characteristics of the PSM however have not yet been carefully investigated. This work presents an extensive study of the PSM. A wide range of load factors and hydro ratio systems have been tested and compared with the results of the rigorous Coordination-Equation Method (CEM). It has been found that the PSM always scheduled more water in the high load period than the CEM. The PSM, therefore, is more likely to swing the hydro plants and may thus avoid frequent on/off operation of thermal units.

  12. DO RADIO MAGNETARS PSR J1550-5418 AND J1622-4950 HAVE GIGAHERTZ-PEAKED SPECTRA?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kijak, J.; Tarczewski, L.; Lewandowski, W.; Melikidze, G.

    2013-07-20

    We study the radio spectra of two magnetars, PSR J1550-5418 and J1622-4950. We argue that they are good candidates for pulsars with gigahertz-peaked spectra (GPS), as their observed flux density decreases at frequencies below 7 GHz. We suggest that this behavior is due to the influence of the pulsars' environments on radio waves. Both of the magnetars are associated with supernova remnants and thus are surrounded by hot, ionized gas, which can be responsible for the free-free absorption of radio waves. We conclude that the GPS feature of both magnetars and typical pulsars are formed by similar processes in the surrounding media rather than by different radio-emission mechanisms. Thus, the radio magnetars PSR J1550-5418 and J1622-4950 can be included in the class of GPS pulsars.

  13. Resonant tunneling with high peak to valley current ratio in SiO{sub 2}/nc-Si/SiO{sub 2} multi-layers at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, D. Y.; Sun, Y.; He, Y. J.; Xu, L.; Xu, J.

    2014-01-28

    We have investigated carrier transport in SiO{sub 2}/nc-Si/SiO{sub 2} multi-layers by room temperature current-voltage measurements. Resonant tunneling signatures accompanied by current peaks are observed. Carrier transport in the multi-layers were analyzed by plots of ln(I/V{sup 2}) as a function of 1/V and ln(I) as a function of V{sup 1/2}. Results suggest that besides films quality, nc-Si and barrier sub-layer thicknesses are important parameters that restrict carrier transport. When thicknesses are both small, direct tunneling dominates carrier transport, resonant tunneling occurs only at certain voltages and multi-resonant tunneling related current peaks can be observed but with peak to valley current ratio (PVCR) values smaller than 1.5. When barrier thickness is increased, trap-related and even high field related tunneling is excited, causing that multi-current peaks cannot be observed clearly, only one current peak with higher PVCR value of 7.7 can be observed. While if the thickness of nc-Si is large enough, quantum confinement is not so strong, a broad current peak with PVCR value as high as 60 can be measured, which may be due to small energy difference between the splitting energy levels in the quantum dots of nc-Si. Size distribution in a wide range may cause un-controllability of the peak voltages.

  14. The bonding, charge distribution, spin ordering, optical, and elastic properties of four MAX phases Cr{sub 2}AX (A = Al or Ge, X = C or N): From density functional theory study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Neng; Mo, Yuxiang; Ching, Wai-Yim

    2013-11-14

    In this work, we assess a full spectrum of properties (chemical bonding, charge distribution, spin ordering, optical, and elastic properties) of Cr{sub 2}AC (A = Al, Ge) and their hypothetical nitride counterparts Cr{sub 2}AN (A = Al, Ge) based on density functional theory calculations. The calculated total energy values indicate that a variety of spin ordering of these four compounds depending on interlayer-interactions between M-A and M-X within the sublattice, which is supported by bonding analysis. MAX phase materials are discovered to possess exotic magnetic properties which indicates that these materials could serve as promising candidates for novel layered magnetic materials for various electronic and spintronic applications. Further analysis of optical properties for two polarization vectors of Cr{sub 2}AX shows that the reflectivity is high in the visible-ultraviolet region up to ∼15 eV suggesting Cr{sub 2}AX as a promising candidate for use as a coating material. The elastic coefficients (C{sub ij}) and bulk mechanical properties [bulk modulus (K), shear modulus (G), Young's modulus (E), Poisson's ratio (η), and Pugh ratio (G/K)] of these four Cr{sub 2}AX compounds are also calculated and analyzed, which pave the way to predict or design new MAX phases that are less brittle or tougher by having a lower G/K value or higher η.

  15. Sample-morphology effects on x-ray photoelectron peak intensities. III. Simulated spectra of model core–shell nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, Cedric J.; Chudzicki, Maksymilian; Werner, Wolfgang S. M.; Smekal, Werner

    2015-09-15

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology database for the simulation of electron spectra for surface analysis has been used to simulate Cu 2p photoelectron spectra for four types of spherical copper–gold nanoparticles (NPs). These simulations were made to extend the work of Tougaard [J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 14, 1415 (1996)] and of Powell et al. [J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 31, 021402 (2013)] who performed similar simulations for four types of planar copper–gold films. The Cu 2p spectra for the NPs were compared and contrasted with analogous results for the planar films and the effects of elastic scattering were investigated. The new simulations were made for a monolayer of three types of Cu/Au core–shell NPs on a Si substrate: (1) an Au shell of variable thickness on a Cu core with diameters of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 5.0, and 10.0 nm; (2) a Cu shell of variable thickness on an Au core with diameters of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 5.0, and 10.0 nm; and (3) an Au shell of variable thickness on a 1 nm Cu shell on an Au core with diameters of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 5.0, and 10.0 nm. For these three morphologies, the outer-shell thickness was varied until the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} peak intensity was the same (within 2%) as that found in our previous work with planar Cu/Au morphologies. The authors also performed similar simulations for a monolayer of spherical NPs consisting of a CuAu{sub x} alloy (also on a Si substrate) with diameters of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 5.0, and 10.0 nm. In the latter simulations, the relative Au concentration (x) was varied to give the same Cu 2p{sub 3/2} peak intensity (within 2%) as that found previously. For each morphology, the authors performed simulations with elastic scattering switched on and off. The authors found that elastic-scattering effects were generally strong for the Cu-core/Au-shell and weak for the Au-core/Cu-shell NPs; intermediate elastic-scattering effects were found for the Au-core/Cu-shell/Au-shell NPs. The shell thicknesses required to give

  16. Using Plasmon Peaks in Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy to Determine the Physical and Mechanical Properties of Nanoscale Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howe, James M.

    2013-05-09

    In this program, we developed new theoretical and experimental insights into understanding the relationships among fundamental universality and scaling phenomena, the solid-state physical and mechanical properties of materials, and the volume plasmon energy as measured by electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). Particular achievements in these areas are summarized as follows: (i) Using a previously proposed physical model based on the universal binding-energy relation (UBER), we established close phenomenological connections regarding the influence of the valence electrons in materials on the longitudinal plasma oscillations (plasmons) and various solid-state properties such as the optical constants (including absorption and dispersion), elastic constants, cohesive energy, etc. (ii) We found that carbon materials, e.g., diamond, graphite, diamond-like carbons, hydrogenated and amorphous carbon films, exhibit strong correlations in density vs. Ep (or maximum of the volume plasmon peak) and density vs. hardness, both from available experimental data and ab initio DFT calculations. This allowed us to derive a three-dimensional relationship between hardness and the plasmon energy, that can be used to determine experimentally both hardness and density of carbon materials based on measurements of the plasmon peak position. (iii) As major experimental accomplishments, we demonstrated the possibility of in-situ monitoring of changes in the physical properties of materials with conditions, e.g., temperature, and we also applied a new plasmon ratio-imaging technique to map multiple physical properties of materials, such as the elastic moduli, cohesive energy and bonding electron density, with a sub-nanometer lateral resolution. This presents new capability for understanding material behavior. (iv) Lastly, we demonstrated a new physical phenomenon - electron-beam trapping, or ?¢????electron tweezers?¢??? - of a solid metal nanoparticle inside a liquid metal

  17. The CU 2-D-MAX-DOAS instrument – Part 2: Raman scattering probability measurements and retrieval of aerosol optical properties

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ortega, Ivan; Coburn, Sean; Berg, Larry K.; Lantz, Kathy; Michalsky, Joseph; Ferrare, Richard A.; Hair, Johnathan W.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Volkamer, Rainer

    2016-08-23

    The multiannual global mean of aerosol optical depth at 550 nm (AOD550) over land is ∼ 0.19, and that over oceans is ∼ 0.13. About 45 % of the Earth surface shows AOD550 smaller than 0.1. There is a need for measurement techniques that are optimized to measure aerosol optical properties under low AOD conditions. We present an inherently calibrated retrieval (i.e., no need for radiance calibration) to simultaneously measure AOD and the aerosol phase function parameter, g, based on measurements of azimuth distributions of the Raman scattering probability (RSP), the near-absolute rotational Raman scattering (RRS) intensity. We employ radiative transfer model simulations tomore » show that for solar azimuth RSP measurements at solar elevation and solar zenith angle (SZA) smaller than 80°, RSP is insensitive to the vertical distribution of aerosols and maximally sensitive to changes in AOD and g under near-molecular scattering conditions. The University of Colorado two-dimensional Multi-AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU 2-D-MAX-DOAS) instrument was deployed as part of the Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) at Cape Cod, MA, during the summer of 2012 to measure direct sun spectra and RSP from scattered light spectra at solar relative azimuth angles (SRAAs) between 5 and 170°. During two case study days with (1) high aerosol load (17 July, 0.3  <  AOD430 < 0.6) and (2) near-molecular scattering conditions (22 July, AOD430 < 0.13) we compare RSP-based retrievals of AOD430 and g with data from a co-located CIMEL sun photometer, Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR), and an airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-2). The average difference (relative to DOAS) for AOD430 is +0.012 ± 0.023 (CIMEL), −0.012 ± 0.024 (MFRSR), −0.011 ± 0.014 (HSRL-2), and +0.023 ± 0.013 (CIMELAOD − MFRSRAOD) and yields the following expressions for correlations between different instruments

  18. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 84-427-1613, Pikes Peak Dialysis Center, Colorado Springs, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pryor, P.

    1985-08-01

    Environmental and breathing zone samples were analyzed for formaldehyde at the Pikes Peak Dialysis Center, Colorado Springs, Colorado in August, 1984 and February, 1985. The evaluation was requested by a representative of the Center to determine if there was a health hazard due to formaldehyde. Eight employees were interviewed. The ventilation systems were investigated. Personal protective clothing was inspected. Breathing-zone samples contained 0 28 to 1.0 (mg/m/sup 3/) formaldehyde. The OSHA standard for formaldehyde is 3.7 mg/m/sup 3/. Area formaldehyde concentrations ranged from nondetectable to 0.75 mg/m/sup 3/. Health complaints reported included sore throat, congestion, cough, and eye, nose and throat irritation. Most of the complaints originated from employees in the formalin mixing, reuse sterilization, and dialysis unit packing sections. The exhaust system in the reuse sterilization area was not working efficiently. A variety of personal protective clothing was available including lab coats, protective goggles, aprons, respirators, and gloves. The author concludes that a health hazard from formaldehyde exposure exists at the facility. Recommendations include improving local exhaust ventilation in areas where formaldehyde is used extensively, avoiding skin and eye contact with formaldehyde, and training and educating employees in safe work practices.

  19. Improvements to the RELAP5/MOD3 reflood model and uncertainty quantification of reflood peak clad temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, Bub Dong; Lee, Young Lee; Park, Chan Eok; Lee, Sang Yong

    1996-10-01

    Assessment of the original REAP/N4OD3.1 code against the FLECHT SEASET series of experiments has identified some weaknesses of the reflood model, such as the lack of a quenching temperature model, the shortcoming of the Chen transition boiling model, and the incorrect prediction of droplet size and interfacial heat transfer. Also, high temperature spikes during the reflood calculation resulted in high steam flow oscillation and liquid carryover. An effort had been made to improve the code with respect to the above weakness, and the necessary model for the wall heat transfer package and the numerical scheme had been modified. Some important FLECHT-SEASET experiments were assessed using the improved version and standard version. The result from the improved REAP/MOD3.1 shows the weaknesses of REAP/N4OD3.1 were much improved when compared to the standard MOD3.1 code. The prediction of void profile and cladding temperature agreed better with test data, especially for the gravity feed test. The scatter diagram of peak cladding temperatures (PCTs) is made from the comparison of all the calculated PCTs and the corresponding experimental values. The deviation between experimental and calculated PCTs were calculated for 2793 data points. The deviations are shown to be normally distributed, and used to quantify statistically the PCT uncertainty of the code. The upper limit of PCT uncertainty at 95% confidence level is evaluated to be about 99K.

  20. Geochemical reconnaissance for uranium in middle tertiary ash-flow tuffs of the Morey Peak Quadrangle, northern Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, K.C.

    1981-01-01

    Rock and water samples were collected from the Morey Peak 15' quadrangle in the northern Hot Creek Range, Nye County, Nevada. The water was analyzed for trace element content. The rock samples were analyzed for oxide composition, selected trace element composition, and K-U-Th content. Water sampled from springs, hot springs, and creeks had temperatures ranging between 8 and 60/sup 0/C, conductance between 100 and 1800 mhos, pH between 5.4 and 8.7, and Eh between -106 and -301 mv. Factor analysis of the sample set reveals a U-Li-Se association and also identifies oxidized galena in solution. This analysis suggests that water need only be analyzed for copper, lithium, selenium, uranium, and vanadium in an uranium exploration program. Oxide analyses of these samples show gross similarities to other volcanic suites in central Nevada. Correlation coefficients indicate that in this area uranium is independent of any of the tested variables. Factor analyses suggest that there is an association between beryllium and uranium, arsenic and uranium, and selenium and uranium. The K-U-Th analyses yielded a wide variance of measurements. Potassium content ranges between 0 and 7.66%, thorium between 0 and 39.09 ppM, and uranium between 0.04 and 1744 ppM. Disequilibrium plots suggest that the mineralization present in the Corral Canyon area is late.

  1. Reference air kerma and kerma-area product as estimators of peak skin dose for fluoroscopically guided interventions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwon, Deukwoo; Little, Mark P.; Miller, Donald L.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To determine more accurate regression formulas for estimating peak skin dose (PSD) from reference air kerma (RAK) or kerma-area product (KAP). Methods: After grouping of the data from 21 procedures into 13 clinically similar groups, assessments were made of optimal clustering using the Bayesian information criterion to obtain the optimal linear regressions of (log-transformed) PSD vs RAK, PSD vs KAP, and PSD vs RAK and KAP. Results: Three clusters of clinical groups were optimal in regression of PSD vs RAK, seven clusters of clinical groups were optimal in regression of PSD vs KAP, and six clusters of clinical groups were optimal in regression of PSD vs RAK and KAP. Prediction of PSD using both RAK and KAP is significantly better than prediction of PSD with either RAK or KAP alone. The regression of PSD vs RAK provided better predictions of PSD than the regression of PSD vs KAP. The partial-pooling (clustered) method yields smaller mean squared errors compared with the complete-pooling method.Conclusion: PSD distributions for interventional radiology procedures are log-normal. Estimates of PSD derived from RAK and KAP jointly are most accurate, followed closely by estimates derived from RAK alone. Estimates of PSD derived from KAP alone are the least accurate. Using a stochastic search approach, it is possible to cluster together certain dissimilar types of procedures to minimize the total error sum of squares.

  2. B_c Meson Production Around the Z^0 Peak at a High Luminosity e^+ e^- Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhi; Wu, Xing-Gang; Chen, Gu; Liao, Qi-Li; Zhang, Jia-Wei; /Chongqing U.

    2012-05-22

    Considering the possibility to build an e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the energies around the Z{sup 0}-boson resonance with a planned luminosity so high as L {proportional_to} 10{sup 34} {approx} 10{sup 36} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} (super Z-factory), we make a detailed discussion on the (c{bar b})-quarkonium production through e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} (c{bar b})[n] + b + {bar c} within the framework of non-relativistic QCD. Here [n] stands for the Fock-states |(c{sub b}){sub 1}[{sup 1}S{sub 0}]>, |(c{bar b})8[{sup 1}S{sub 0}]g>, |(c{bar b} ){sub 1}[{sup 3}S{sub 1}]>, |(c{bar b}){sub 8}[{sup 3}S{sub 1}]g>, |(c{bar b}){sub 1}[{sup 1}P{sub 1}]> and |(c{bar b}){sub 1}[{sup 3}P{sub J}]> (with J = (1, 2, 3)) respectively. To simplify the hard-scattering amplitude as much as possible and to derive analytic expressions for the purpose of future events simulation, we adopt the 'improved trace technology' to do our calculation, which deals with the hard scattering amplitude directly at the amplitude level other than the conventional way at the squared-amplitude level. Total cross-section uncertainties caused by the quark masses are predicted by taking m{sub c} = 1.50 {+-} 0.30 GeV and m{sub b} = 4.90 {+-} 0.40 GeV. If all higher (c{bar b})-quarkonium states decay to the ground state B{sub c} (|(c{bar b}){sub 1}[{sup 1}S{sub 0}]>) with 100% efficiency, we obtain {sigma}{sub e{sup +}+e{sup -}{yields}B{sub c}+b+{bar c}} = 5.190{sub -2.419}{sup +6.222} pb, which shows that about 10{sup 5} {approx} 10{sup 7} B{sub c} events per operation year can be accumulated in the super Z-factory. If taking the collider energy runs slightly off the Z{sup 0}-peak, i.e. {radical}S = (1.00 {+-} 0.05)m{sub Z}, the total cross-section shall be lowered by about one-order from its peak value. Such a super Z-factory shall provide another useful platform to study the properties of B{sub c} meson, or even the properties of its excited P-wave states, in addition to its production at the hadronic colliders

  3. X-Ray Emitting GHz-Peaked Spectrum Galaxies: Testing a Dynamical-Radiative Model with Broad-Band Spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ostorero, L.; Moderski, R.; Stawarz, L.; Diaferio, A.; Kowalska, I.; Cheung, C.C.; Kataoka, J.; Begelman, M.C.; Wagner, S.J.; ,

    2010-06-07

    In a dynamical-radiative model we recently developed to describe the physics of compact, GHz-Peaked-Spectrum (GPS) sources, the relativistic jets propagate across the inner, kpc-sized region of the host galaxy, while the electron population of the expanding lobes evolves and emits synchrotron and inverse-Compton (IC) radiation. Interstellar-medium gas clouds engulfed by the expanding lobes, and photoionized by the active nucleus, are responsible for the radio spectral turnover through free-free absorption (FFA) of the synchrotron photons. The model provides a description of the evolution of the GPS spectral energy distribution (SED) with the source expansion, predicting significant and complex high-energy emission, from the X-ray to the {gamma}-ray frequency domain. Here, we test this model with the broad-band SEDs of a sample of eleven X-ray emitting GPS galaxies with Compact-Symmetric-Object (CSO) morphology, and show that: (i) the shape of the radio continuum at frequencies lower than the spectral turnover is indeed well accounted for by the FFA mechanism; (ii) the observed X-ray spectra can be interpreted as non-thermal radiation produced via IC scattering of the local radiation fields off the lobe particles, providing a viable alternative to the thermal, accretion-disk dominated scenario. We also show that the relation between the hydrogen column densities derived from the X-ray (N{sub H}) and radio (N{sub HI}) data of the sources is suggestive of a positive correlation, which, if confirmed by future observations, would provide further support to our scenario of high-energy emitting lobes.

  4. THE QUASAR SDSS J153636.22+044127.0: A DOUBLE-PEAKED EMITTER IN A CANDIDATE BINARY BLACK HOLE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang Sumin; Grindlay, Jonathan

    2009-10-20

    Double-peaked emission lines are believed to be originated from accretion disks around supermassive black holes (SMBHs), and about 3% of z < 0.33 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are found to be double-peaked emitters. The quasar SDSS J153636.22+044127.0 has recently been identified with peculiar broad-line emission systems exhibiting multiple redshifts. We decompose the Halpha and Hbeta profiles into a circular Keplerian disk-line component and other Gaussian components. We propose that the system is both a double-peaked emitter and a binary SMBH system, where the extra flux in the blue peaks of the broad lines comes from the region around the secondary black hole. We suggest that such black hole binary systems might also exist in many known double-peaked emitters, where the tidal torques from the secondary black hole clear the outer region of the disk around the primary black hole, similar to the gap in a protostellar disk due to the process of planetary migration, and might also stimulate the formation of a vertical extended source in the inner region around the primary which illuminates the disk. However, most secondary SMBHs in such systems might be too small to maintain a detectable broad-line region (BLR), so that the disk line from the primary dominates.

  5. Verification of maximum radial power peaking factor due to insertion of FPM-LEU target in the core of RSG-GAS reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Setyawan, Daddy; Rohman, Budi

    2014-09-30

    Verification of Maximum Radial Power Peaking Factor due to insertion of FPM-LEU target in the core of RSG-GAS Reactor. Radial Power Peaking Factor in RSG-GAS Reactor is a very important parameter for the safety of RSG-GAS reactor during operation. Data of radial power peaking factor due to the insertion of Fission Product Molybdenum with Low Enriched Uranium (FPM-LEU) was reported by PRSG to BAPETEN through the Safety Analysis Report RSG-GAS for FPM-LEU target irradiation. In order to support the evaluation of the Safety Analysis Report incorporated in the submission, the assessment unit of BAPETEN is carrying out independent assessment in order to verify safety related parameters in the SAR including neutronic aspect. The work includes verification to the maximum radial power peaking factor change due to the insertion of FPM-LEU target in RSG-GAS Reactor by computational method using MCNP5and ORIGEN2. From the results of calculations, the new maximum value of the radial power peaking factor due to the insertion of FPM-LEU target is 1.27. The results of calculations in this study showed a smaller value than 1.4 the limit allowed in the SAR.

  6. Wisconsin Public Service Corp's Weston 4 earns Power's highest honor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peltier, R.

    2008-08-15

    Wisconsin Public Service Corp. placed its world-class Weston 4 into commercial service on June 30 and is now enjoying the benefits of coal-fired supercritical technology's inherently higher efficiency, operating flexibility and lower CO{sub 2} emissions. For its unequalled environmental protection credentials, well-integrated project team, and employing the most advanced coal-fired steam generation technology in the US today, Weston 4 is awarded Power magazine's 2008 Plant of the Year Award. 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Three NNSA researchers receive President's highest early-career...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Three of the PECASE researchers were nominated for the award by NNSA: Jonathan Hopkins of the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), a former post-doctoral researcher at ...

  8. Stellar chemical abundances: in pursuit of the highest achievable precision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bedell, Megan; Bean, Jacob L.; Meléndez, Jorge; Leite, Paulo; Asplund, Martin

    2014-11-01

    The achievable level of precision on photospheric abundances of stars is a major limiting factor on investigations of exoplanet host star characteristics, the chemical histories of star clusters, and the evolution of the Milky Way and other galaxies. While model-induced errors can be minimized through the differential analysis of spectrally similar stars, the maximum achievable precision of this technique has been debated. As a test, we derive differential abundances of 19 elements from high-quality asteroid-reflected solar spectra taken using a variety of instruments and conditions. We treat the solar spectra as being from unknown stars and use the resulting differential abundances, which are expected to be zero, as a diagnostic of the error in our measurements. Our results indicate that the relative resolution of the target and reference spectra is a major consideration, with use of different instruments to obtain the two spectra leading to errors up to 0.04 dex. Use of the same instrument at different epochs for the two spectra has a much smaller effect (∼0.007 dex). The asteroid used to obtain the solar standard also has a negligible effect (∼0.006 dex). Assuming that systematic errors from the stellar model atmospheres have been minimized, as in the case of solar twins, we confirm that differential chemical abundances can be obtained at sub-0.01 dex precision with due care in the observations, data reduction, and abundance analysis.

  9. Stantec Receives Engineering Industry's Highest Honor for DOE...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The 64 million, 222,000 sq. ft office building was recognized as a showcase for energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. The RSF was designed so that its 800 occupants ...

  10. New Mexico Environment Department Presents WIPP Its Highest Recognitio...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Environment Department (NMED) with Green Zia Environmental Leadership Program (GZELP) Gold Level membership for excellence. The GZELP annually recognizes organizations and...

  11. Fact #936: August 1, 2016 California Had the Highest Concentration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0.54 Mississippi 0.09 Missouri 0.39 Montana 0.37 Nebraska 0.37 Nevada 0.80 New Hampshire 0.71 New Jersey 0.88 New Mexico 0.40 New York 0.69 North Carolina 0.43 North ...

  12. Program Design Analysis using BEopt Building Energy Optimization Software: Defining a Technology Pathway Leading to New Homes with Zero Peak Cooling Demand; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, R.; Christensen, C.; Horowitz, S.

    2006-08-01

    An optimization method based on the evaluation of a broad range of different combinations of specific energy efficiency and renewable-energy options is used to determine the least-cost pathway to the development of new homes with zero peak cooling demand. The optimization approach conducts a sequential search of a large number of possible option combinations and uses the most cost-effective alternatives to generate a least-cost curve to achieve home-performance levels ranging from a Title 24-compliant home to a home that uses zero net source energy on an annual basis. By evaluating peak cooling load reductions on the least-cost curve, it is then possible to determine the most cost-effective combination of energy efficiency and renewable-energy options that both maximize annual energy savings and minimize peak-cooling demand.

  13. Ionization-induced effects in the soliton dynamics of high-peak-power femtosecond pulses in hollow photonic-crystal fibers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serebryannikov, E. E.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2007-07-15

    Ionization phenomena are shown to modify the soliton propagation dynamics of high-peak-power laser pulses in hollow-core photonic-crystal fibers (PCFs). Based on the numerical solution of the pulse-evolution equation for a high-peak-power laser field in an ionizing gas medium in a hollow PCF, we demonstrate that hollow PCFs filled with gases having high ionization potentials I{sub p} can support soliton transmission regimes for gigawatt femtosecond laser pulses. In hollow PCFs filled with low-I{sub p} gases, on the other hand, the ionization-induced change in the refractive index of the gas leads to a blueshifting of soliton transients, pushing their spectrum beyond the point of zero group-velocity dispersion, thus preventing the formation of stable high-peak-power solitons.

  14. SU-E-T-354: Peak Temperature Ratio of TLD Glow Curves to Investigate the Spatial Dependence of LET in a Clinical Proton Beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reft, C [UniversityChicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Pankuch, M; Ramirez, H [ProCure Treatment Centers, Warrenville, IL (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Use the ratio of the two high temperature peaks (HTR) in TLD 700 glow curves to investigate spatial dependence of the linear energy transfer (LET) in proton beams. Studies show that the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) depends upon the physical dose as well as its spatial distribution. Although proton therapy uses a spatially invariant RBE of 1.1, studies suggest that the RBE increases in the distal edge of a spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) due to the increased LET. Methods: Glow curve studies in TLD 700 show that the 280 C temperature peak is more sensitive to LET radiation than the 210 C temperature peak. Therefore, the areas under the individual temperature peaks for TLDs irradiated in a proton beam normalized to the peak ratio for 6 MV photons are used to determine the HTR to obtain information on its LET. TLD 700 chips with dimensions 0.310.310.038 cc are irradiated with 90 MeV protons at varying depths in a specially designed blue wax phantom to investigate LET spatial dependence. Results: Five TLDs were placed at five different depths of the percent depth dose curve (PDD) of range 16.2 cm: center of the SOPB and approximately at the 99% distal edge, 90%, 75% and 25% of the PDD, respectively. HTR was 1.3 at the center of the SOBP and varied from 2.2 to 3.9 which can be related to an LET variation from 0.5 to 18 KeV/? via calibration with radiation beams of varying LET. Conclusion: HTR data show a spatially invariant LET slightly greater than the 6 MV radiations in the SOBP, but a rapidly increasing LET at the end of the proton range. These results indicate a spatial variation in RBE with potential treatment consequences when selecting treatment margins to minimize the uncertainties in proton RBE.

  15. The spectral variability of the GHZ-Peaked spectrum radio source PKS 1718-649 and a comparison of absorption models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tingay, S. J.; Macquart, J.-P.; Wayth, R. B.; Trott, C. M.; Emrich, D.; Collier, J. D.; Wong, G. F.; Rees, G.; Stevens, J.; Carretti, E.; Callingham, J. R.; Gaensler, B. M.; McKinley, B.; Briggs, F.; Bernardi, G.; Bowman, J. D.; Cappallo, R. J.; Corey, B. E.; Deshpande, A. A.; Goeke, R.; and others

    2015-02-01

    Using the new wideband capabilities of the ATCA, we obtain spectra for PKS 1718-649, a well-known gigahertz-peaked spectrum radio source. The observations, between approximately 1 and 10 GHz over 3 epochs spanning approximately 21 months, reveal variability both above the spectral peak at ∼3 GHz and below the peak. The combination of the low- and high-frequency variability cannot be easily explained using a single absorption mechanism, such as free–free absorption or synchrotron self-absorption. We find that the PKS 1718-649 spectrum and its variability are best explained by variations in the free–free optical depth on our line of sight to the radio source at low frequencies (below the spectral peak) and the adiabatic expansion of the radio source itself at high frequencies (above the spectral peak). The optical depth variations are found to be plausible when X-ray continuum absorption variability seen in samples of active galactic nuclei is considered. We find that the cause of the peaked spectrum in PKS 1718-649 is most likely due to free–free absorption. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the spectrum at each epoch of observation is best fit by a free–free absorption model characterized by a power-law distribution of free–free absorbing clouds. This agreement is extended to frequencies below the 1 GHz lower limit of the ATCA by considering new observations with Parkes at 725 MHz and 199 MHz observations with the newly operational Murchison Widefield Array. These lower frequency observations argue against families of absorption models (both free–free and synchrotron self-absorption) that are based on simple homogenous structures.

  16. EA-1863: Vegetation Management on the Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak Transmission Lines Spanning the Coconino National Forest, Coconino County, Arizona

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s Western Area Power Administration is preparing this EA to evaluate the environmental impacts of updating the vegetation management and right-of-way maintenance program for Western’s Glen Canyon to Pinnacle Peak 345-kV transmission lines, which cross the Coconino National Forest, Coconino County, Arizona.

  17. Minimization of Impact from Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment to the Electric Grid Using a Dynamically Controlled Battery Bank for Peak Load Shaving

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castello, Charles C

    2013-01-01

    This research presents a comparison of two control systems for peak load shaving using local solar power generation (i.e., photovoltaic array) and local energy storage (i.e., battery bank). The purpose is to minimize load demand of electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) on the electric grid. A static and dynamic control system is compared to decrease demand from EVSE. Static control of the battery bank is based on charging and discharging to the electric grid at fixed times. Dynamic control, with 15-minute resolution, forecasts EVSE load based on data analysis of collected data. In the proposed dynamic control system, the sigmoid function is used to shave peak loads while limiting scenarios that can quickly drain the battery bank. These control systems are applied to Oak Ridge National Laboratory s (ORNL) solar-assisted electric vehicle (EV) charging stations. This installation is composed of three independently grid-tied sub-systems: (1) 25 EVSE; (2) 47 kW photovoltaic (PV) array; and (3) 60 kWh battery bank. The dynamic control system achieved the greatest peak load shaving, up to 34% on a cloudy day and 38% on a sunny day. The static control system was not ideal; peak load shaving was 14.6% on a cloudy day and 12.7% on a sunny day. Simulations based on ORNL data shows solar-assisted EV charging stations combined with the proposed dynamic battery control system can negate up to 89% of EVSE load demand on sunny days.

  18. Effects of Fusion Zone Size and Failure Mode on Peak Load and Energy Absorption of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds under Lap Shear Loading Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2008-06-01

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS) under lap shear loading condition. DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. Static weld strength tests using lap shear samples were performed on the joint populations with various fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied for all the weld populations using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that AHSS spot welds with conventionally required fusion zone size of can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 welds under lap shear loading. Moreover, failure mode has strong influence on weld peak load and energy absorption for all the DP800 welds and the TRIP800 small welds: welds failed in pullout mode have statistically higher strength and energy absorption than those failed in interfacial fracture mode. For TRIP800 welds above the critical fusion zone level, the influence of weld failure modes on peak load and energy absorption diminishes. Scatter plots of peak load and energy absorption versus weld fusion zone size were then constructed, and the results indicate that fusion zone size is the most critical factor in weld quality in terms of peak load and energy absorption for both DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds.

  19. ,"Table 3a. January Monthly Peak Hour Demand, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Council Region, "

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3a. January Monthly Peak Hour Demand, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Council Region, " ,"2005 and Projected 2006 through 2010 " ,"(Megawatts and 2005 Base Year)" ,"Projected Monthly Base","Year","Contiguous U.S.","Eastern Power Grid",,,,,,"Texas Power Grid","Western Power Grid"

  20. Zircon and apatite fission-track evidence for an Early Permian thermal peak and relatively rapid Late Permian cooling in the Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roden, M.K. . Dept. of Earth and Environmental Science); Wintsch, R.P. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    New zircon fission-track ages compliment published apatite fission-track ages in the Appalachian Basin to narrowly constrain its thermal history. Geologic evidence can only constrain timing of the thermal peak to be younger than late Pennsylvanian sediments ([approximately] 300 Ma) and older than Mesozoic sediments in the Newark and Gettysburg Basins ([approximately] 210 Ma). Apatite fission-track ages as old as 246 Ma require the Alleghanian thermal peak to have been pre-Triassic. Preliminary data on reset zircon fission-track ages from middle Paleozoic sediments range from 255 to 290 Ma. Zircon fission-track apparent ages from samples younger and structurally higher than these are not reset. Thus, the oldest reset zircon fission-track age constraints the time of the Alleghanian thermal peak to be earliest Permian. Rates of post-Alleghanian cooling have not been well-constrained by geologic data and could be very slow. The difference between apatite and zircon fission-track ages for most of the samples range from 100--120 m.y. reflecting Permo-Triassic cooling of only 1 C/m.y. However, one sample with one of the oldest apatite ages, 245 Ma, yields one of the younger zircon ages of 255 Ma. This requires cooling rates of 10 C/m.y. and uplift rates of [approximately] 0.5 mm/yr. Collectively, these data support an early Permian thermal peak and a two-stage cooling history, consisting of > 100 C cooling (> 8 km denundation) in the Permian followed by relatively slow cooling and exhumation throughout the Mesozoic.

  1. Inhomogeneous broadening and peak shift of the 7.6 eV optical absorption band of oxygen vacancies in SiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kajihara, Koichi; Skuja, Linards; Hosono, Hideo

    2014-10-21

    The peak parameters of radiation-induced 7.6 eV optical absorption band of oxygen vacancies (Si-Si bonds) were examined for high-purity synthetic α-quartz and amorphous SiO{sub 2} (a‐SiO{sub 2}) exposed to {sup 60}Co γ-rays. The peak shape is asymmetric with the steeper edge at the lower energy side both in α-quartz and a‐SiO{sub 2}, and the peak energy is larger for α-quartz than that for a‐SiO{sub 2}. The full width at half maximum for a‐SiO{sub 2} is larger by ∼40-60% than that for α-quartz, and it increases with an increase in the disorder of the a‐SiO{sub 2} network, which is enhanced by raising the temperature of preannealing before irradiation, i.e., fictive temperature. These data are interpreted from the viewpoint of the site-to-site distribution of the Si-Si bond length in a‐SiO{sub 2}.

  2. Determination of the bias in LOFT fuel peak cladding temperature data from the blowdown phase of large-break LOCA experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berta, V.T.; Hanson, R.G.; Johnsen, G.W.; Schultz, R.R.

    1993-05-01

    Data from the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) Program help quantify the margin of safety inherent in pressurized water reactors during postulated loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). As early as 1979, questions arose concerning the accuracy of LOFT fuel rod cladding temperature data during several large-break LOCA experiments. This report analyzes how well externally-mounted fuel rod cladding thermocouples in LOFT accurately reflected actual cladding surface temperature during large-break LOCA experiments. In particular, the validity of the apparent core-wide fuel rod cladding quench exhibited during blowdown in LOFT Experiments L2-2 and L2-3 is studied. Also addressed is the question of whether the externally-mounted thermocouples might have influenced cladding temperature. The analysis makes use of data and information from several sources, including later, similar LOFT Experiments in which fuel centerline temperature measurements were made, experiments in other facilities, and results from a detailed FRAP-T6 model of the LOFT fuel rod. The analysis shows that there can be a significant difference (referred to as bias) between the surface-mounted thermocouple reading and the actual cladding temperature, and that the magnitude of this bias depends on the rate of heat transfer between the fuel rod cladding and coolant. The results of the analysis demonstrate clearly that a core-wide cladding quench did occur in Experiments L2-2 and L2-3. Further, it is shown that, in terms of peak cladding temperature recording during LOFT large-break LOCA experiments, the mean bias is 11.4 {plus_minus} 16.2K (20.5 {plus_minus} 29.2{degrees} F). The best-estimate value of peak cladding temperature for LOFT LP-02-6 is 1,104.8 K. The best-estimate peak cladding temperature for LOFT LP-LB-1 is 1284.0 K.

  3. MaxPower Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Product: Pennsylvania-based firm offering research, development and production of lithium ion batteries. Coordinates: 40.281201, -75.393534 Show Map Loading map......

  4. Max Tech and Beyond: Fluorescent Lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scholand, Michael

    2012-04-01

    Fluorescent lamps are the most widely used artificial light source today, responsible for approximately 70% of the lumens delivered to our living spaces globally. The technology was originally commercialized in the 1930's, and manufacturers have been steadily improving the efficacy of these lamps over the years through modifications to the phosphors, cathodes, fill-gas, operating frequency, tube diameter and other design attributes. The most efficient commercially available fluorescent lamp is the 25 Watt T5 lamp. This lamp operates at 114-116 lumens per watt while also providing good color rendering and more than 20,000 hours of operating life. Industry experts interviewed indicated that while this lamp is the most efficient in the market today, there is still a further 10 to 14% of potential improvements that may be introduced to the market over the next 2 to 5 years. These improvements include further developments in phosphors, fill-gas, cathode coatings and ultraviolet (UV) reflective glass coatings. The commercialization of these technology improvements will combine to bring about efficacy improvements that will push the technology up to a maximum 125 to 130 lumens per watt. One critical issue raised by researchers that may present a barrier to the realization of these improvements is the fact that technology investment in fluorescent lamps is being reduced in order to prioritize research into light emitting diodes (LEDs) and ceramic metal halide high intensity discharge (HID) lamps. Thus, it is uncertain whether these potential efficacy improvements will be developed, patented and commercialized. The emphasis for premium efficacy will continue to focus on T5 lamps, which are expected to continue to be marketed along with the T8 lamp. Industry experts highlighted the fact that an advantage of the T5 lamp is the fact that it is 40% smaller and yet provides an equivalent lumen output to that of a T8 or T12 lamp. Due to its smaller form factor, the T5 lamp contains less material (i.e., glass, fill gas and phosphor), and has a higher luminance, enabling fixtures to take advantage of the smaller lamp size to improve the optics and provide more efficient overall system illuminance. In addition to offering the market a high-quality efficacious light source, another strong value proposition of fluorescent lighting is its long operating life. In today's market, one manufacturer is offering fluorescent lamps that have a rated life of 79,000 hours - which represents 18 years of service at 12 hours per day, 365 days per year. These lamps, operated using a long-life ballast specified by the manufacturer, take advantage of improvements in cathode coatings, fill gas chemistry and pressure to extend service life by a factor of four over conventional fluorescent lamps. It should be noted that this service life is also longer (approximately twice as long) as today's high-quality LED products. The fluorescent market is currently focused on the T5 and T8 lamp diameters, and it is not expected that other diameters would be introduced. Although T8 is a more optimal diameter from an efficacy perspective, the premium efficiency and optimization effort has been focused on T5 lamps because they are 40% smaller than T8, and are designed to operate at a higher temperature using high-frequency electronic ballasts. The T5 lamp offers savings in terms of materials, packaging and shipping, as well as smaller fixtures with improved optical performance. Manufacturers are actively researching improvements in four critical areas that are expected to yield additional efficacy improvements of approximately 10 to 14 percent over the next five years, ultimately achieving approximately 130 lumens per watt by 2015. The active areas of research where these improvements are anticipated include: (1) Improved phosphors which continue to be developed and patented, enabling higher efficacies as well as better color rendering and lumen maintenance; (2) Enhanced fill gas - adjusting proportions of argon, krypton, neon and xenon to optimize performance, while also minimizing the mercury dose; (3) Improved cathode coatings to enhance electron emissivity and extend lamp life; and (4) UV-reflective glass coatings deposited between the layer of phosphor and the glass tube, to reflect any UV light back into the phosphor layer for down-conversion.

  5. T10K Change Max Capacity

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-08-16

    This command line utility will enable/disable the Oracle StorageTek T10000 tape drive's maximum capacity feature.

  6. A Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and Energy Use of Buildings Using 30-Year Actual Weather Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Tianzhen; Chang, Wen-Kuei; Lin, Hung-Wen

    2013-05-01

    Buildings consume more than one third of the world?s total primary energy. Weather plays a unique and significant role as it directly affects the thermal loads and thus energy performance of buildings. The traditional simulated energy performance using Typical Meteorological Year (TMY) weather data represents the building performance for a typical year, but not necessarily the average or typical long-term performance as buildings with different energy systems and designs respond differently to weather changes. Furthermore, the single-year TMY simulations do not provide a range of results that capture yearly variations due to changing weather, which is important for building energy management, and for performing risk assessments of energy efficiency investments. This paper employs large-scale building simulation (a total of 3162 runs) to study the weather impact on peak electricity demand and energy use with the 30-year (1980 to 2009) Actual Meteorological Year (AMY) weather data for three types of office buildings at two design efficiency levels, across all 17 ASHRAE climate zones. The simulated results using the AMY data are compared to those from the TMY3 data to determine and analyze the differences. Besides further demonstration, as done by other studies, that actual weather has a significant impact on both the peak electricity demand and energy use of buildings, the main findings from the current study include: 1) annual weather variation has a greater impact on the peak electricity demand than it does on energy use in buildings; 2) the simulated energy use using the TMY3 weather data is not necessarily representative of the average energy use over a long period, and the TMY3 results can be significantly higher or lower than those from the AMY data; 3) the weather impact is greater for buildings in colder climates than warmer climates; 4) the weather impact on the medium-sized office building was the greatest, followed by the large office and then the small

  7. ,"Table 3a. January Monthly Peak Hour Demand, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, "

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6" ,"Released: February 7, 2008" ,"Next Update: October 2008" ,"Table 3a. January Monthly Peak Hour Demand, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, " ,"2006 and Projected 2007 through 2011 " ,"(Megawatts and 2006 Base Year)" ,"Projected Monthly Base","Year","Contiguous U.S.","Eastern Power Grid",,,,,,"Texas Power Grid","Western Power Grid"

  8. Offsets between the X-ray and the Sunyaev-Zel'Dovich-effect peaks in merging galaxy clusters and their cosmological implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Congyao; Yu, Qingjuan; Lu, Youjun

    2014-12-01

    Observations reveal that the peaks of the X-ray map and the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect map of some galaxy clusters are offset from each other. In this paper, we perform a set of hydrodynamical simulations of mergers of two galaxy clusters to investigate the spatial offset between the maxima of the X-ray and the SZ surface brightness of the merging clusters. We find that significantly large SZ-X-ray offsets (>100 kpc) can be produced during the major mergers of galaxy clusters (with mass > 1 10{sup 14} M {sub ?}). The significantly large offsets are mainly caused by a 'jump effect' that occurs between the primary and secondary pericentric passages of the two merging clusters, during which the X-ray peak may jump to the densest gas region located near the center of the small cluster, but the SZ peak remains near the center of the large one. Our simulations show that merging systems with higher masses and larger initial relative velocities may result in larger offset sizes and longer offset time durations; and only nearly head-on mergers are likely to produce significantly large offsets. We further investigate the statistical distribution of the SZ-X-ray offset sizes and find that (1) the number distribution of the offset sizes is bimodal with one peak located at low offsets ?0 and the other at large offsets ?350-450 h {sup 1} kpc, but the objects with intermediate offsets are scarce; and (2) the probabilities of the clusters in the mass range higher than 2 10{sup 14} h {sup 1} M {sub ?} that have offsets larger than 20, 50, 200, 300, and 500 h {sup 1} kpc are 34.0%, 11.1%, 8.0%, 6.5%, and 2.0%, respectively, at z = 0.7. The probability is sensitive to the underlying pairwise velocity distribution and the merger rate of clusters. We suggest that the SZ-X-ray offsets provide a probe to the cosmic velocity fields on the cluster scale and the cluster merger rate, and future observations on the SZ-X-ray offsets for a large number of clusters may put strong

  9. summer_peak_2005.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Area Power Pool (MAPP) to Midwest Reliability Organization (MRO). * The MRO, SERC, and SPP regional boundaries were altered as utilities changed reliability organizations. ...

  10. monthly_peak_2004.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    83,670 37,521 42,442 39,238 22,995 45,227 132,964 26,415 39,075 95,673 2001 573,509 ... 80,476 34,073 38,812 38,157 21,241 41,544 132,318 28,191 43,837 93,195 2003 551,505 ...

  11. winter_peak_2006.xls

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    entity that oversee electric reliability. * NERC Regional names may be found on the EIA web page for electric reliability. * Regional name has changed from Mid-Continent Area Power ...

  12. summer_peak_2006.xls

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    entity that oversee electric reliability. * NERC Regional names may be found on the EIA web page for electric reliability. * Regional name has changed from Mid-Continent Area Power ...

  13. WISE J233237.05–505643.5: A double-peaked, broad-lined active galactic nucleus with a spiral-shaped radio morphology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, Chao-Wei; Jarrett, T. H.; Stern, Daniel; Assef, Roberto J.; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Wu, Jingwen; Emonts, Bjorn; Barrows, R. Scott; Norris, Ray P.; Lonsdale, Carol; Blain, Andrew W.; Benford, Dominic J.; Stalder, Brian; Stubbs, Christopher W.; High, F. William; Li, K. L.; Kong, Albert K. H.

    2013-12-10

    We present radio continuum mapping, optical imaging, and spectroscopy of the newly discovered double-peaked, broad-lined active galactic nucleus (AGN) WISE J233237.05–505643.5 at redshift z = 0.3447. This source exhibits an FR-I and FR-II hybrid morphology, characterized by a bright core, jet, and Doppler-boosted lobe structures in Australian Telescope Compact Array continuum maps at 1.5, 5.6, and 9 GHz. Unlike most FR-II objects, W2332–5056 is hosted by a disk-like galaxy. The core has a projected 5'' linear radio feature that is perpendicular to the curved primary jet, hinting at unusual and complex activity within the inner 25 kpc. The multi-epoch, optical-near-IR photometric measurements indicate significant variability over a 3-20 yr baseline from the AGN component. Gemini South optical data show unusual double-peaked emission-line features: the centroids of the broad-lined components of Hα and Hβ are blueshifted with respect to the narrow lines and host galaxy by ∼3800 km s{sup –1}. We examine possible cases that involve single or double supermassive black holes in the system and discuss the required future investigations to disentangle the mysterious nature of this system.

  14. Rate and peak concentrations of off-gas emissions in stored wood pellets sensitivities to temperature, relative humidity, and headspace volume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuang, Xingya; Shankar, T.J.; Bi, X.T.; Lim, C. Jim; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine; Melin, Staffan

    2009-08-01

    Wood pellets emit CO, CO2, CH4 and other volatiles during storage. Increased concentration of these gases in a sealed storage causes depletion of concentration of oxygen. The storage environment becomes toxic to those who operate in and around these storages. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of temperature, moisture and storage headspace on emissions from wood pellets in an enclosed space. Twelve 10-liter plastic containers were used to study the effects of headspace ratio (25%, 50%, and 75% of container volume) and temperatures (10-50oC). Another eight containers were set in uncontrolled storage relative humidity and temperature. Concentrations of CO2, CO and CH4 were measured by a gas chromatography (GC). The results showed that emissions of CO2, CO and CH4 from stored wood pellets are most sensitive to storage temperature. Higher peak emission factors are associated with higher temperatures. Increased headspace volume ratio increases peak off-gas emissions because of the availability of oxygen for pellet decomposition. Increased relative humidity in the enclosed container increases the rate of off-gas emissions of CO2, CO and CH4 and oxygen depletion.

  15. Thickness-dependent blue shift in the excitonic peak of conformally grown ZnO:Al on ion-beam fabricated self-organized Si ripples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, T.; Kumar, M.; Som, T.; Nandy, S.; Satpati, B.; Saini, C. P.; Kanjilal, A.

    2015-09-14

    Al-doped ZnO (AZO) thin films of thicknesses 5,10, 15, 20, and 30 nm were deposited on 500 eV argon ion-beam fabricated nanoscale self-organized rippled-Si substrates at room temperature and are compared with similar films deposited on pristine-Si substrates (without ripples). It is observed that morphology of self-organized AZO films is driven by the underlying substrate morphology. For instance, for pristine-Si substrates, a granular morphology evolves for all AZO films. On the other hand, for rippled-Si substrates, morphologies having chain-like arrangement (anisotropic in nature) are observed up to a thickness of 20 nm, while a granular morphology evolves (isotropic in nature) for 30 nm-thick film. Photoluminescence studies reveal that excitonic peaks corresponding to 5–15 nm-thick AZO films, grown on rippled-Si templates, show a blue shift of 8 nm and 3 nm, respectively, whereas the peak shift is negligible for 20-nm thick film (with respect to their pristine counter parts). The observed blue shifts are substantiated by diffuse reflectance study and attributed to quantum confinement effect, associated with the size of the AZO grains and their spatial arrangements driven by the anisotropic morphology of underlying rippled-Si templates. The present findings will be useful for making tunable AZO-based light-emitting devices.

  16. W28 and 3C 400. 2 - Two shell-like radio supernova remnants with centrally peaked X-ray morphologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, K.S.; Blair, W.P.; Matsui, Yutaka; White, R.L. Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD )

    1991-06-01

    The paper describes X-ray and optical observations with the Einstein Observatory of two SNRs which are examples of a group of SNRs that have centrally peaked X-ray surface brightness distributions and limb-brightened radio morphologies. X-ray and optical spectra confirm that they are located along lines of sight with substantial intervening absorption, as is the case of other objects that have these morphological characteristics. The hydrogen column density along the line of sight to both remnants is established at (7-11) x 10 to the 21st/sq cm. A thermal origin is proposed as the most likely explanation for the X-ray morphology. It is demonstrated that these SNRs do not have a density and temperature distribution which resembles that of a point explosion in a uniform-density medium, even when the overburden of absorption is considered. 46 refs.

  17. Sample-morphology effects on x-ray photoelectron peak intensities. II. Estimation of detection limits for thin-film materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, Cedric J.; Werner, Wolfgang S. M.; Smekal, Werner

    2014-09-01

    The authors show that the National Institute of Standards and Technology database for the simulation of electron spectra for surface analysis (SESSA) can be used to determine detection limits for thin-film materials such as a thin film on a substrate or buried at varying depths in another material for common x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurement conditions. Illustrative simulations were made for a W film on or in a Ru matrix and for a Ru film on or in a W matrix. In the former case, the thickness of a W film at a given depth in the Ru matrix was varied so that the intensity of the W 4d{sub 5/2} peak was essentially the same as that for a homogeneous RuW{sub 0.001} alloy. Similarly, the thickness of a Ru film at a selected depth in the W matrix was varied so that the intensity of the Ru 3p{sub 3/2} peak matched that from a homogeneous WRu{sub 0.01} alloy. These film thicknesses correspond to the detection limits of each minor component for measurement conditions where the detection limits for a homogeneous sample varied between 0.1 at.?% (for the RuW{sub 0.001} alloy) and 1 at.?% (for the WRu{sub 0.01} alloy). SESSA can be similarly used to convert estimates of XPS detection limits for a minor species in a homogeneous solid to the corresponding XPS detection limits for that species as a thin film on or buried in the chosen solid.

  18. Magnetic Nature of the 500 meV peak in La2−xSrxCuO4 Observed with Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering at the Cu K-edge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, J.P.; Ellis, D.S.; Kim, J.; Wakimoto, S.; Birgeneau, R.J.; Shvyd’ko, Y.; Casa, D.; Gog, T.; Ishii, K.; Ikeuchi, K.; Paramekanti, A.; Kim, Y.-J.

    2010-02-15

    We present a comprehensive study of the temperature and doping dependence of the 500 meV peak observed at q = ({pi},0) in resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) experiments on La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}. The intensity of this peak persists above the Neel temperature (T{sub N} = 320 K), but decreases gradually with increasing temperature, reaching zero at around T = 500 K. The peak energy decreases with temperature in close quantitative accord with the behavior of the two-magnon B{sub 1g} Raman peak in La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} and, with suitable rescaling, agrees with the Raman peak shifts in EuBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6} and K{sub 2}NiF{sub 4}. The overall dispersion of this excitation in the Brillouin zone is found to be in agreement with theoretical calculations for a two-magnon excitation. Upon doping, the peak intensity decreases analogous to the Raman mode intensity and appears to track the doping dependence of the spin-correlation length. Taken together, these observations strongly suggest that the 500 meV mode is magnetic in character and is likely a two-magnon excitation.

  19. Exploring Valleys without Climbing Every Peak: More Efficient and Forgiving Metabasin Metadynamics via Robust On-the-Fly Bias Domain Restriction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dama, James F.; Hocky, Glen M.; Sun, Rui; Voth, Gregory A.

    2015-11-03

    Metadynamics is an enhanced sampling method designed to flatten free energy surfaces uniformly. However, the highest-energy regions are often irrelevant to study and dangerous to explore because systems often respond irreversibly in unforeseen ways in response to driving forces in these regions, spoiling the sampling. Introducing an on-the-fly domain restriction allows metadynamics to flatten only up to a specified energy level and no further, improving efficiency and safety while decreasing the pressure on practitioners to design collective variables that are robust to otherwise irrelevant high energy driving. Here this paper describes a new method that achieves this using sequential on-the-flymore » estimation of energy wells and redefinition of the metadynamics hill shape, termed metabasin metadynamics. The energy level may be defined a priori or relative to unknown barrier energies estimated on the fly. Altering only the hill ensures that the method is compatible with many other advances in metadynamics methodology. The hill shape has a natural interpretation in terms of multiscale dynamics and the computational overhead in simulation is minimal when studying systems of any reasonable size, for instance proteins or other macromolecules. Ultimately, three example applications show that the formula is accurate and robust to complex dynamics, making metadynamics significantly more forgiving with respect to CV quality and thus more feasible to apply to the most challenging biomolecular systems.« less

  20. Exploring Valleys without Climbing Every Peak: More Efficient and Forgiving Metabasin Metadynamics via Robust On-the-Fly Bias Domain Restriction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dama, James F.; Hocky, Glen M.; Sun, Rui; Voth, Gregory A.

    2015-11-03

    Metadynamics is an enhanced sampling method designed to flatten free energy surfaces uniformly. However, the highest-energy regions are often irrelevant to study and dangerous to explore because systems often respond irreversibly in unforeseen ways in response to driving forces in these regions, spoiling the sampling. Introducing an on-the-fly domain restriction allows metadynamics to flatten only up to a specified energy level and no further, improving efficiency and safety while decreasing the pressure on practitioners to design collective variables that are robust to otherwise irrelevant high energy driving. Here this paper describes a new method that achieves this using sequential on-the-fly estimation of energy wells and redefinition of the metadynamics hill shape, termed metabasin metadynamics. The energy level may be defined a priori or relative to unknown barrier energies estimated on the fly. Altering only the hill ensures that the method is compatible with many other advances in metadynamics methodology. The hill shape has a natural interpretation in terms of multiscale dynamics and the computational overhead in simulation is minimal when studying systems of any reasonable size, for instance proteins or other macromolecules. Ultimately, three example applications show that the formula is accurate and robust to complex dynamics, making metadynamics significantly more forgiving with respect to CV quality and thus more feasible to apply to the most challenging biomolecular systems.

  1. Effects of Fusion Zone Size and Failure Mode on Peak Load and Energy Absorption of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS). DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. The critical fusion zone sizes to ensure nugget pull-out failure mode are developed for both DP800 and TRIP800 using limit load based analytical model and micro-hardness measurements of the weld cross sections. Static weld strength tests using cross tension samples were performed on the joint populations with controlled fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied for all the weld populations using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that AHSS spot welds with fusion zone size of can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 materials examined. The critical fusion zone size for nugget pullout shall be derived for individual materials based on different base metal properties as well as different heat affected zone (HAZ) and weld properties resulted from different welding parameters.

  2. Manipulation of polystyrene nanoparticles on a silicon wafer in the peak force tapping mode in water: pH-dependent friction and adhesion force

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schiwek, Simon; Stark, Robert W. E-mail: dietz@csi.tu-darmstadt.de; Dietz, Christian E-mail: dietz@csi.tu-darmstadt.de; Heim, Lars-Oliver

    2015-03-14

    The friction force between nanoparticles and a silicon wafer is a crucial parameter for cleaning processes in the semiconductor industry. However, little is known about the pH-dependency of the friction forces and the shear strength at the interface. Here, we push polystyrene nanoparticles, 100 nm in diameter, with the tip of an atomic force microscope and measure the pH-dependency of the friction, adhesion, and normal forces on a silicon substrate covered with a native silicon dioxide layer. The peak force tapping mode was applied to control the vertical force on these particles. We successively increased the applied load until the particles started to move. The main advantage of this technique over single manipulation processes is the achievement of a large number of manipulation events in short time and in a straightforward manner. Geometrical considerations of the interaction forces at the tip-particle interface allowed us to calculate the friction force and shear strength from the applied normal force depending on the pH of an aqueous solution. The results clearly demonstrated that particle removal should be performed with a basic solution at pH 9 because of the low interaction forces between particle and substrate.

  3. MO-F-16A-04: Case Study: Estimation of Peak Skin Dose Following a Physician Reported “High Dose” Case and Sentinel Event Considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Supanich, M; Chu, J; Wehmeyer, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: This work offers as a teaching example a reported high dose fluoroscopy case and the workflow the institution followed to self-report a radiation overdose sentinel event to the Joint Commission. Methods: Following the completion of a clinical case in a hybrid OR room with a reported air kerma of >18 Gy at the Interventional Reference Point (IRP) the physicians involved in the case referred study to the institution's Radiation Safety Committee (RSC) for review. The RSC assigned a Diagnostic Medical Physicist (DMP) to estimate the patient's Peak Skin Dose (PSD) and analyze the case. Following the DMP's analysis and estimate of a PSD of >15 Gy the institution's adverse event committee was convened to discuss the case and to self-report the case as a radiation overdose sentinel event to the Joint Commission. The committee assigned a subgroup to perform the root cause analysis and develop institutional responses to the event. Results: The self-reporting of the sentinel event and the associated root cause analysis resulted in several institutional action items that are designed to improve process and safety. A formal reporting and analysis mechanism was adopted to review fluoroscopy cases with air kerma greater than 6 Gy at the IRP. An improved and formalized radiation safety training program for physicians using fluoroscopy equipment was implemented. Additionally efforts already under way to monitor radiation exposure in the Radiology department were expanded to include all fluoroscopy equipment capable of automated dose reporting. Conclusion: The adverse event review process and the root cause analysis following the self-reporting of the sentinel event resulted in policies and procedures that are expected to improve the quality and safe usage of fluoroscopy throughout the institution.

  4. The effect of head size/shape, miscentering, and bowtie filter on peak patient tissue doses from modern brain perfusion 256-slice CT: How can we minimize the risk for deterministic effects?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perisinakis, Kostas; Seimenis, Ioannis; Tzedakis, Antonis; Papadakis, Antonios E.; Damilakis, John

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To determine patient-specific absorbed peak doses to skin, eye lens, brain parenchyma, and cranial red bone marrow (RBM) of adult individuals subjected to low-dose brain perfusion CT studies on a 256-slice CT scanner, and investigate the effect of patient head size/shape, head position during the examination and bowtie filter used on peak tissue doses. Methods: The peak doses to eye lens, skin, brain, and RBM were measured in 106 individual-specific adult head phantoms subjected to the standard low-dose brain perfusion CT on a 256-slice CT scanner using a novel Monte Carlo simulation software dedicated for patient CT dosimetry. Peak tissue doses were compared to corresponding thresholds for induction of cataract, erythema, cerebrovascular disease, and depression of hematopoiesis, respectively. The effects of patient head size/shape, head position during acquisition and bowtie filter used on resulting peak patient tissue doses were investigated. The effect of eye-lens position in the scanned head region was also investigated. The effect of miscentering and use of narrow bowtie filter on image quality was assessed. Results: The mean peak doses to eye lens, skin, brain, and RBM were found to be 124, 120, 95, and 163 mGy, respectively. The effect of patient head size and shape on peak tissue doses was found to be minimal since maximum differences were less than 7%. Patient head miscentering and bowtie filter selection were found to have a considerable effect on peak tissue doses. The peak eye-lens dose saving achieved by elevating head by 4 cm with respect to isocenter and using a narrow wedge filter was found to approach 50%. When the eye lies outside of the primarily irradiated head region, the dose to eye lens was found to drop to less than 20% of the corresponding dose measured when the eye lens was located in the middle of the x-ray beam. Positioning head phantom off-isocenter by 4 cm and employing a narrow wedge filter results in a moderate reduction of

  5. Controlled peak wavelength shift of Ca{sub 1-} {sub x} Sr {sub x} (S {sub y} Se{sub 1-} {sub y} ):Eu{sup 2+} phosphor for LED application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nazarov, Mihail . E-mail: nazarov.mihail@samsung.com; Yoon, Chulsoo

    2006-08-15

    The highly efficient red-orange-yellow-emitting phosphor (Ca{sub 1-} {sub x} Sr {sub x} )(S{sub 1-} {sub y} Se {sub y} ):Eu{sup 2+} in combination with commercial green phosphor SrGa{sub 2}S{sub 4}:Eu{sup 2+} and blue LED are proposed for a three-band white LED. The luminescence mechanism and optimization parameters are discussed on the basis of proposed peak wavelength diagram. - Graphical abstract: 'Peak wavelength diagram for (Ca{sub 1-} {sub x} Sr {sub x} )(S{sub 1-} {sub y} Se {sub y} ):Eu{sup 2+}'.

  6. Summary of the Special Analysis of Savannah River Depleted Uranium Trioxide Demonstrating the Before and After Impacts on the DOE Order 435.1 Performance Objective and the Peak Dose

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shott, G.J.

    2011-01-15

    This report summarizes the special analysis (SA) of the Savannah River Depleted Uranium Trioxide waste stream (SVRSURANIUM03, Revision 1) demonstrating the before and after impacts of the waste stream to the DOE Order 435.1 performance objective at the disposal facility, and the peak dose. The Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) requested this SA and asked the Nevada Site Office (NSO) to run the SA deterministically and assume that all the model conditions remain the same regardless of the length of time to the peak dose. Although the NDEP accepts that DOE Order 435.1 requires a compliance period of 1,000 years, it also requested to know what year, if any, the specific DOE performance objectives will be exceeded. Given the NDEP’s requested model conditions, the SA demonstrates the Rn-222 peak dose will occur in about 2 million years and will exceed the performance objective in about 6,000 years. The 0.25 mSv y-1 all-pathway performance objective was not exceeded for the resident scenario after reaching the 4 million year peak dose.

  7. PV String to 3-Phase Inverter with Highest Voltage Capabilities, Highest Efficiency and 25 Year Lifetime: Final Technical Report, November 7, 2011 - November 6, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, R.

    2012-12-01

    Final report for Renewable Power Conversion. The overall objective of this project was to develop a prototype PV inverter which enables a new utility-scale PV system approach where the cost, performance, reliability and safety benefits of this new approach have the potential to make all others obsolete.

  8. Porterfield named ASTM Fellow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Nuclear Fuel Cycle International Committee may bestow on an individual; and the Max Hecht Award, the highest award the Water International Committee can bestow on an - 2 -...

  9. Porterfield named ASTM Fellow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Nuclear Fuel Cycle International Committee may bestow on an individual; and the Max Hecht Award, the highest award the Water International Committee can bestow on an...

  10. Concentrating Solar Panels: Bringing the Highest Power and Lowest Cost to the Rooftop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Deck; Rick Russell

    2010-01-05

    Soliant Energy is a venture-capital-backed startup focused on bringing advanced concentrating solar panels to market. Our fundamental innovation is that we are the first company to develop a racking solar concentrator specifically for commercial rooftop applications, resulting in the lowest LCOE for rooftop electricity generation. Today, the commercial rooftop segment is the largest and fastest-growing market in the solar industry. Our concentrating panels can make a major contribution to the SAI's objectives: reducing the cost of solar electricity and rapidly deploying capacity. Our commercialization focus was re-shaped in 2009, shifting from an emphasis solely on panel efficiency to LCOE. Since the inception of the SAI program, LCOE has become the de facto standard for comparing commercial photovoltaic systems. While estimation and prediction models still differ, the emergence of performance-based incentive (PBI) and feed-in tariff (FIT) systems, as well as power purchase agreement (PPA) financing structures make LCOE the natural metric for photovoltaic systems. Soliant Energy has designed and demonstrated lower-cost, higher-power solar panels that consists of 6 (500X) PV module assemblies utilizing multi-junction cells and an integrated two-axis tracker. In addition, we have designed and demonstrated a prototype 1000X panel assembly with 8. Cost reductions relative to conventional flat panel PV systems were realized by (1) reducing the amount of costly semiconductor material and (2) developing strategies and processes to reduce the manufacturing costs of the entire system. Performance gains against conventional benchmarks were realized with (1) two-axis tracking and (2) higher-efficiency multi-junction PV cells capable of operating at a solar concentration ratio of 1000X (1000 kW/m2). The program objectives are: (1) Develop a tracking/concentrating solar module that has the same geometric form factor as a conventional flat, roof mounted photovoltaic (PV) panel - the Soliant module will produce more power and cost less than conventional panels of the same size; (2) Target LCOE: $0.079/kWh in 2010; (3) Target efficiency - 26% in 2010 (22% for 2008 prototype, 24% for 2009 pilot); and (4) Target performance - equivalent to 650Wp in 2010 (490W for 2008 prototype, 540W for 2009 pilot).

  11. Experimental Investigation of Hadron Collisions at the Highest Center-of-Mass Energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marc, Baarmand; Hohlmann, Marcus

    2012-05-31

    In this report, we summarize the research in physics of elementary particles conducted by the Florida Tech DOE supported group at the CMS experiment at CERN, during the last 3-year cycle under this grant.

  12. Update on the correlation of the highest energy cosmic rays with nearby extragalactic matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E.J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; /Wisconsin U., Milwaukee /Lisbon, IST

    2010-06-01

    Data collected by the Pierre Auger Observatory through 31 August 2007 showed evidence for anisotropy in the arrival directions of cosmic rays above the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin energy threshold, 6 x 10{sup 19} eV. The anisotropy was measured by the fraction of arrival directions that are less than 3.1{sup o} from the position of an active galactic nucleus within 75 Mpc (using the Veron-Cetty and Veron 12th catalog). An updated measurement of this fraction is reported here using the arrival directions of cosmic rays recorded above the same energy threshold through 31 December 2009. The number of arrival directions has increased from 27 to 69, allowing a more precise measurement. The correlating fraction is (38{sub -6}{sup +7})%, compared with 21% expected for isotropic cosmic rays. This is down from the early estimate of (69{sub -13}{sup +11})%. The enlarged set of arrival directions is examined also in relation to other populations of nearby extragalactic objects: galaxies in the 2 Microns All Sky Survey and active galactic nuclei detected in hard X-rays by the Swift Burst Alert Telescope. A celestial region around the position of the radiogalaxy Cen A has the largest excess of arrival directions relative to isotropic expectations. The 2-point autocorrelation function is shown for the enlarged set of arrival directions and compared to the isotropic expectation.

  13. Graphene-based Electrode Leads to Highest Capacity Lithium-Air...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Functionalized graphene sheets are self-assembled in oil-water emulsions to produce a ... By employing self-assembly at the oil-water interface in oil-water emulsions, an unusual ...

  14. The largest and highest powered magnet lab in the world - MagLab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnet Time Search Staff Search Publications Search Site The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory Main Menu User Facilities DC Field Electron Magnetic Resonance High BT Ion...

  15. U.S. oil reserves highest since 1975, natural gas reserves set...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Most of that came from the state's Eagle Ford shale play and other tight oil formations in the Permian Basin. Proved reserves are those volumes of oil natural gas that analysis of ...

  16. North Dakota and Texas help boost U.S. oil reserves to highest...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Most of that came from the state's Eagle Ford shale play and other tight oil formations in the Permian Basin. The other states that rounded out the top 5 increases in proved oil ...

  17. U.S. crude oil production in July was the highest in more than...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    EIA's new monthly forecast expects average crude oil production next year will climb to 8.2 million barrels per day....about 800,000 barrels per day higher than this year. Drilling ...

  18. Silver Peak Innovative Exploration Project Geothermal Project...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Institute; William Cumming, Cumming Geoscience; Jerry Hamblin Subsurface Excellence; Stephen Hallinan, Western Geco; John Deymonaz Targets Milestones - Reduce the high level of...

  19. Multispecies density peaking in gyrokinetic turbulence simulations...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex 5 ; Candy, J. ; Waltz, R. E. 6 + Show Author Affiliations Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box ...

  20. Silver Peak Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (Reservoir): Depth to Top of Reservoir: Depth to Bottom of Reservoir: Average Depth to Reservoir: Use the "Edit with Form" button at the top of the page to add a Well Field...

  1. Silver Peak Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sanyal Classification (Reservoir): Depth to Top of Reservoir: Depth to Bottom of Reservoir: Average Depth to Reservoir: Use the "Edit with Form" button at the top of the...

  2. Desert Peak EGS Project | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Objective to stimulate permeability in tight well 27-15 and improve connection to rest of the field; improve overall productivity or injectivity. Successful stimulation yields more ...

  3. Pilot Peak Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  4. Silver Peak Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  5. Peak Sun Silicon Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    e,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.60396,"lon":-100.641609,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""...

  6. HOPE Release 3 Pitch Angle Sneak Peak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, Brian Arthur; Skoug, Ruth M.

    2015-12-04

    This report describes how the HOPE instrument is used to measure subatomic particles in the Van Allen belts.

  7. TruePeak Process Laser Analyzer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Current chemical process controls use few in-situ sensors, relying instead on analytic techniques that require sample conditioning and transport, and significant turnaround time. With few...

  8. Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    of capacity that may understate the amount that can actually be stored. Working Gas Design Capacity: This measure estimates a natural gas facility's working gas capacity, as...

  9. GeoPeak Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    285 Davidson Avenue Place: Somerset, New Jersey Zip: 08873 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Solar Product: Residential and Commercial PV Solar Installations Phone...

  10. Desert Peak Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    No.: P500-04-051. Contract No.: 500-04-051. Benjamin Matek. Geo-energy Internet. Geothermal Energy Association. updated 20150428;cited 20150428. Available from:...

  11. China's coal market: is peak demand insight?

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a slight recovery by 2020. * Coal-fired generation will continue to be squeezed by non-fossil generation resources. * Renewable, nuclear, and gas plant additions will remain ...

  12. monthly_peak_1996_2004.xls

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Regional Council names may be found on the web site page and in the form and instructions. ... Regional Council names may be found on the Web Site page and in the form and instructions. ...

  13. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic-weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 1. 6. Blast measurements. Part 2. Free-air peak-pressure measurements. Section 2. Telemetering from moored balloons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frolich, A.J.

    1985-09-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to determine the free-air peak-pressure as a function of distance from an atomic explosion. In this report, free-air peak-pressure is defined as the pressure at the head of the blast wave in regions where it has not been reinforced by a reflected wave. Operation in the test area was more difficult than anticipated. Heavy winds made balloon handling very difficult. On the whole, the radio link performed satisfactorily on all occasions and appears to be a reliable method. For some unknown reason, blast switches closer than 1,500 feet failed to give satisfactory signals. Pressures were computed using the Rankine-Hugoniot relation, which is based on the shock wave being a definite discontinuity in pressure. Since the pressures measured on the ground showed relatively long times, there has been some speculation that a true shock wave may not exist in free air. If a true shock wave does not exist in the free-air region, pressures as computed are not correct, and the method of this experiment cannot be used.

  14. runtime error message: "apsched: request exceeds max nodes, alloc...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This problem is intermittent, started in April, then mid July, and again since late August. Status: This problem is identified as a problem when TorqueMoab batch scheduler becomes ...

  15. Max Data Report Jet Stability versus Inlet Geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lomperski, S.; Bremer, N.

    2015-09-01

    This document describes experiments investigating the effect of inlet geometry on the flow field within a glass tank where two jets mix and impinge upon the lid. The setup mimics the outlet plenum of a fast reactor where core exit flows of different temperatures can mix in ways that induce thermal cycling in neighboring structures.

  16. AVTA: 2013 Ford C-Max Energi PHEV Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road....

  17. Populations Voss, R.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE; Ajello...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    study the populations of X-ray sources in the Milky Way in the 15-55 keV band using a deep survey with the BAT instrument aboard the Swift observatory. We present the logN-logS...

  18. Princeton, Max Planck Society launch new research center for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    General of the Federal Republic of Germany in New York Busso von Alvensleben meet to ... General of the Federal Republic of Germany in New York Busso von Alvensleben meet to ...

  19. Cover option 1 presentation title two lines max

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Powder atomization Low Cobalt 5 2015 General ... Eliminating post treatment cost from HIP ... process: 1. high local temperature 2. extremely fast ...

  20. Max Tech and Beyond: High-Intensity Discharge Lamps (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... MH lamps, and more specifically, ceramic MH lamps are continuing to improve in efficacy as well as light quality, manufacturability and lamp life. Within an HID lamp, the ...

  1. Microsoft Word - Draft Annncmnt of Max Aggregate Payments 11...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6, 2012 Announcement of Estimated Maximum Amount of Aggregate Payments BPA will Accept for the 2012 Prepayment Program Background The Bonneville Power Administration ("BPA") issued...

  2. Max Tech and Beyond: High-Intensity Discharge Lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scholand, Michael

    2012-04-01

    High-intensity discharge (HID) lamps are most often found in industrial and commercial applications, and are the light source of choice in street and area lighting, and sports stadium illumination. HID lamps are produced in three types - mercury vapor (MV), high pressure sodium (HPS) and metal halide (MH). Of these, MV and MH are considered white-light sources (although the MV exhibits poor color rendering) and HPS produces a yellow-orange color light. A fourth lamp, low-pressure sodium (LPS), is not a HID lamp by definition, but it is used in similar applications and thus is often grouped with HID lamps. With the notable exception of MV which is comparatively inefficient and in decline in the US from both a sales and installed stock point of view; HPS, LPS and MH all have efficacies over 100 lumens per watt. The figure below presents the efficacy trends over time for commercially available HID lamps and LPS, starting with MV and LPS in 1930's followed by the development of HPS and MH in the 1960's. In HID lamps, light is generated by creating an electric arc between two electrodes in an arc tube. The particles in the arc are partially ionized, making them electrically conductive, and a light-emitting 'plasma' is created. This arc occurs within the arc tube, which for most HID lamps is enclosed within an evacuated outer bulb that thermally isolates and protects the hot arc tube from the surroundings. Unlike a fluorescent lamp that produces visible light through down-converting UV light with phosphors, the arc itself is the light source in an HID lamp, emitting visible radiation that is characteristic of the elements present in the plasma. Thus, the mixture of elements included in the arc tube is one critical factor determining the quality of the light emitted from the lamp, including its correlated color temperature (CCT) and color rendering index (CRI). Similar to fluorescent lamps, HID lamps require a ballast to start and maintain stable operating conditions, and this necessitates additional power beyond that used by the lamp itself. HID lamps offer important advantages compared to other lighting technologies, making them well suited for certain applications. HID lamps can be very efficient, have long operating lives, are relatively temperature-insensitive and produce a large quantity of light from a small package. For these reasons, HID lamps are often used when high levels of illumination are required over large areas and where operating and maintenance costs must be kept to a minimum. Furthermore, if the installation has a significant mounting height, high-power HID lamps can offer superior optical performance luminaires, reducing the number of lamps required to illuminate a given area. The indoor environments best suited to HID lamps are those with high ceilings, such as those commonly found in industrial spaces, warehouses, large retail spaces, sports halls and large public areas. Research into efficacy improvements for HID lighting technologies has generally followed market demand for these lamps, which is in decline for MV and LPS, has reached a plateau for HPS and is growing for MH. Several manufacturers interviewed for this study indicated that although solid-state lighting was now receiving the bulk of their company's R&D investment, there are still strong HID lamp research programs, which concentrate on MH technologies, with some limited amount of investment in HPS for specific niche applications (e.g., agricultural greenhouses). LPS and MV lamps are no longer being researched or improved in terms of efficacy or other performance attributes, although some consider MH HID lamps to be the next-generation MV lamp. Thus, the efficacy values of commercially available MV, LPS and HPS lamps are not expected to increase in the next 5 to 10 years. MH lamps, and more specifically, ceramic MH lamps are continuing to improve in efficacy as well as light quality, manufacturability and lamp life. Within an HID lamp, the light-producing plasma must be heated to sufficiently high temperatures to achieve high efficiencies, without melting the electrodes or altering the operating conditions of the lamp. The research in ceramic MH has focused on the arc tube, the electrodes and the plasma, resulting in an innovation announced by Philips Lighting in 2009 called the 'unsaturated lamp.' The unsaturated lamp addresses a problem experienced by standard ceramic MH lamps where a pool of liquid salt develops in the arc tube while the lamp is operating. This pool of liquid salt limits the light characteristics of the lamp such as the efficacy and color quality, and reduces lamp lifetime. By making modifications to the arc tube, the pressure and the operating temperature, the unsaturated ceramic MH lamp resolves this issue by keeping all the halide salts in the gaseous phase, even while the lamp is dimming (down to 50%).

  3. Is a 'Mad Max' apocalypse possible? | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Is Your Home as Ready for Summer as You Are? Is Your Home as Ready for Summer as You Are? June 2, 2014 - 4:09pm Addthis Learn about home energy audits in this Energy 101 video. Harris Walker Communications Specialist, Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program What does this mean for me? You can save money this summer by checking your home for air leaks and seeing if it has sufficient insulation and energy-saving lightbulbs. It took longer than expected, but the harsh winter is finally over

  4. The Max Tech and Beyond Competition | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    | Department of Energy 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT). deer07_gallant.pdf (310.76 KB) More Documents & Publications Cetane Performance and Chemistry Comparing Conventional Fuels and Fuels Derived from Heavy Crude Sources Effect of the Composition of Hydrocarbon Streams on HCCI Performance Fuels For

  5. Max Tech Electric HPWH with Lower GWP Halogenated Refrigerant...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    an integrated heat pump design model and wrapped tank model. Image credit: Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Information flow schematic for an integrated heat pump design model and ...

  6. Property:Incentive/MaxInc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + 20% of the annual C&I Standard Offer Program budget AEP SWEPCO - SMART Source Solar PV Program (Texas) + Residential: 15,000
    Non-residential: 30,000 AEP Texas Central...

  7. Crivelli, Silvia; Kreylos, Oliver; Max, Nelson; Hamann, Bernd...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and steer a protein structure prediction process that may be running on a remote machine. ProteinShop was used to create initial configurations for a protein structure...

  8. Property:Incentive/WindResPercMax | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    I Independence Light & Power - Renewable Energy Rebates (Iowa) + 25% + L Local Small Wind Rebate Programs (Colorado) + 50% + M Maquoketa Municipal Electric Utility - Renewable...

  9. Property:Incentive/PVPbiFitMaxKW | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    P Palmetto Clean Energy (PaCE) Program (South Carolina) + 6 + Preston Municipal Electric Utility - Renewable Energy Rebates (Iowa) + 20 + Progress Energy Carolinas - SunSense...

  10. Peak Travel, Peak Car and the Future of Mobility: Evidence, Unresolved...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the appraisal of large scale transport infrastructure projects, service Provision, pricing, the allocation of risk, and initiatives to reduce car dependence, in the context...

  11. Searches for anisotropies in the arrival directions of the highest energy cosmic rays detected by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aab, Alexander

    2015-05-01

    We analyze the distribution of arrival directions of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays recorded at the Pierre Auger Observatory in 10 years of operation. The data set, about three times larger than that used in earlier studies, includes arrival directions with zenith angles up to 80°, thus covering from -90° to +45° in declination. After updating the fraction of events correlating with the active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the Véron-Cetty and Véron catalog, we subject the arrival directions of the data with energies in excess of 40 EeV to different tests for anisotropy. We search for localized excess fluxes, self-clustering of event directions at angular scales up to 30°, and different threshold energies between 40 and 80 EeV. We then look for correlations of cosmic rays with celestial structures both in the Galaxy (the Galactic Center and Galactic Plane) and in the local universe (the Super-Galactic Plane). We also examine their correlation with different populations of nearby extragalactic objects: galaxies in the 2MRS catalog, AGNs detected by Swift-BAT, radio galaxies with jets, and the Centaurus A (Cen A) galaxy. None of the tests show statistically significant evidence of anisotropy. As a result, the strongest departures from isotropy (post-trial probabilitymore » $$\\sim 1.4$$%) are obtained for cosmic rays with $$E\\gt 58$$ EeV in rather large windows around Swift AGNs closer than 130 Mpc and brighter than 1044 erg s-1 (18° radius), and around the direction of Cen A (15° radius).« less

  12. Searches for anisotropies in the arrival directions of the highest energy cosmic rays detected by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Samarai, I. Al; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Castillo, J. Alvarez; Alvarez-Muiz, J.; Batista, R. Alves; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Aranda, V. M.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Awal, N.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Buml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blaess, S. G.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blmer, H.; Boh?ov, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bridgeman, A.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceio, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; Almeida, R. M. de; Domenico, M. De; Jong, S. J. de; Neto, J. R. T. de Mello; Mitri, I. De; Oliveira, J. de; Souza, V. de; Peral, L. del; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Giulio, C. Di; Matteo, A. Di; Diaz, J. C.; Castro, M. L. Daz; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; DOlivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; Hasankiadeh, Q. Dorosti; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Luis, P. Facal San; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filip?i?, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Freire, M. M.; Frhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fujii, T.; Gaior, R.; Garca, B.; Gamez, D. Garcia-; Pinto, D. Garcia-; Garilli, G.; Bravo, A. Gascon; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Berisso, M. Gmez; Vitale, P. F. Gmez; Gonalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gonzlez, N.; Gookin, B.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Hartmann, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hrandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovsk, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kp, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kgl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Krmer, O.; Hansen, D. Kruppke-; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Coz, S. Le; Leo, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lpez, R.; Louedec, K.; Bahilo, J. Lozano; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Mallamaci, M.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mari?, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Bravo, O. Martnez; Martraire, D.; Meza, J. J. Masas; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Tanco, G. Medina-; Meissner, R.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Mi?anovi?, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Bueno, L. Molina-; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Ragaigne, D. Monnier; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostaf, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Mller, G.; Mller, S.; Mnchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nguyen, P. H.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Noka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Oikonomou, F.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Pacheco, N.; Dei, D. Pakk Selmi-; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; P?kala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrov, Y.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.

    2015-04-24

    In this study, we analyze the distribution of arrival directions of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays recorded at the Pierre Auger Observatory in 10 years of operation. The data set, about three times larger than that used in earlier studies, includes arrival directions with zenith angles up to 80, thus covering from $-90{}^\\circ $ to $+45{}^\\circ $ in declination. After updating the fraction of events correlating with the active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the Vron-Cetty and Vron catalog, we subject the arrival directions of the data with energies in excess of 40 EeV to different tests for anisotropy. We search for localized excess fluxes, self-clustering of event directions at angular scales up to 30, and different threshold energies between 40 and 80 EeV. We then look for correlations of cosmic rays with celestial structures both in the Galaxy (the Galactic Center and Galactic Plane) and in the local universe (the Super-Galactic Plane). We also examine their correlation with different populations of nearby extragalactic objects: galaxies in the 2MRS catalog, AGNs detected by Swift-BAT, radio galaxies with jets, and the Centaurus A (Cen A) galaxy. None of the tests show statistically significant evidence of anisotropy. The strongest departures from isotropy (post-trial probability $\\sim 1.4$%) are obtained for cosmic rays with $E\\gt 58$ EeV in rather large windows around Swift AGNs closer than 130 Mpc and brighter than 1044 erg/s (18 radius), and around the direction of Centaurus A (15 radius).

  13. Searches for anisotropies in the arrival directions of the highest energy cosmic rays detected by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aab, Alexander

    2015-05-01

    We analyze the distribution of arrival directions of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays recorded at the Pierre Auger Observatory in 10 years of operation. The data set, about three times larger than that used in earlier studies, includes arrival directions with zenith angles up to 80°, thus covering from -90° to +45° in declination. After updating the fraction of events correlating with the active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the Véron-Cetty and Véron catalog, we subject the arrival directions of the data with energies in excess of 40 EeV to different tests for anisotropy. We search for localized excess fluxes, self-clustering of event directions at angular scales up to 30°, and different threshold energies between 40 and 80 EeV. We then look for correlations of cosmic rays with celestial structures both in the Galaxy (the Galactic Center and Galactic Plane) and in the local universe (the Super-Galactic Plane). We also examine their correlation with different populations of nearby extragalactic objects: galaxies in the 2MRS catalog, AGNs detected by Swift-BAT, radio galaxies with jets, and the Centaurus A (Cen A) galaxy. None of the tests show statistically significant evidence of anisotropy. As a result, the strongest departures from isotropy (post-trial probability $\\sim 1.4$%) are obtained for cosmic rays with $E\\gt 58$ EeV in rather large windows around Swift AGNs closer than 130 Mpc and brighter than 1044 erg s-1 (18° radius), and around the direction of Cen A (15° radius).

  14. Searches for anisotropies in the arrival directions of the highest energy cosmic rays detected by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Samarai, I. Al; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; et al

    2015-04-24

    In this study, we analyze the distribution of arrival directions of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays recorded at the Pierre Auger Observatory in 10 years of operation. The data set, about three times larger than that used in earlier studies, includes arrival directions with zenith angles up to 80, thus covering from $-90{}^\\circ $ to $+45{}^\\circ $ in declination. After updating the fraction of events correlating with the active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the Vron-Cetty and Vron catalog, we subject the arrival directions of the data with energies in excess of 40 EeV to different tests for anisotropy. We search for localizedmoreexcess fluxes, self-clustering of event directions at angular scales up to 30, and different threshold energies between 40 and 80 EeV. We then look for correlations of cosmic rays with celestial structures both in the Galaxy (the Galactic Center and Galactic Plane) and in the local universe (the Super-Galactic Plane). We also examine their correlation with different populations of nearby extragalactic objects: galaxies in the 2MRS catalog, AGNs detected by Swift-BAT, radio galaxies with jets, and the Centaurus A (Cen A) galaxy. None of the tests show statistically significant evidence of anisotropy. The strongest departures from isotropy (post-trial probability $\\sim 1.4$%) are obtained for cosmic rays with $E\\gt 58$ EeV in rather large windows around Swift AGNs closer than 130 Mpc and brighter than 1044 erg/s (18 radius), and around the direction of Centaurus A (15 radius).less

  15. High Power Co-Axial Coupler (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Excellent progress has been made on this R&D project, so we propose an extension of this development to build a very high power coax coupler (MW level peak power and a max duty ...

  16. Backup Generators (BUGS): The Next Smart Grid Peak Resource?...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    URI: cleanenergysolutions.orgcontentbackup-generators-bugs-next-smart-gri Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Financial Incentives,Regulations" is not in...

  17. Structural Analysis of the Desert Peak-Brady Geothermal Fields...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Structures and Geothermal Reservoirs in the Humboldt Structural Zone Citation James E. Faulds,Larry J. Garside,Gary L. Oppliger. 2003. Structural Analysis of the Desert...

  18. Progress in Understanding Iron Peak Elements in Young Supernova...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory Rutgers Univeristy University of Pittspurgh Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Publication Date: 2013-09-13 OSTI Identifier: 1093345 Report ...

  19. New Method Shows Promise for Turning Energy Peaks into Valleys...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    buildings to continuously exchange electricity consumption and price information and negotiate ... with different types of end uses," Woohyun Kim, a PNNL controls engineer, says. ...

  20. Masked Areas in Shear Peak Statistics: A Forward Modeling Approach...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sponsoring Org: US DOE Office of Science (DOE SC) Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: ASTRO Word Cloud More Like This Full Text preview image File size ...

  1. Stimulation at Desert Peak -modeling with the coupled THM code...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Data Type: Specialized Mix Research Org: DOE Geothermal Data Repository; Los Alamos ... Sponsoring Org: USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Geothermal ...

  2. The positron peak puzzle - recent results from APEX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmad, I.; Back, B.B.; Kutschera, W.

    1995-12-31

    Results are presented from a new experiment, APEX, designed to study the previously reported sharp lines in sum-energy spectra of positrons and electrons produced in collisions of very heavy ions. Data have been collected for {sup 238}U+{sup 181}Ta and {sup 238}U+{sup 232}Th. No evidence is found for narrow structures similar to those previously reported. For the specific case of the isolated decay of a neutral particle of mass 1.4-2.1 MeV/c{sup 2}, the upper limits on cross sections obtained are significantly less than previously reported. Data are also presented for internal pair conversion in {sup 206}Pb. These results are used to set limits for the possible contribution to the pair yield of a 1780 keV transition in {sup 238}U observed in heavy-ion gamma-ray coincidence measurements.

  3. Progress in Understanding Iron Peak Elements in Young Supernova...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Relation: Conference: AtomDB Work Week and Workshop 2013 ; 2013-08-19 - 2013-08-23 ; Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States Research Org: Los Alamos National Laboratory ...

  4. Reducing Peak Demand to Defer Power Plant Construction in Oklahoma

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    To better control costs and manage electric reliability under these conditions, OG&E is pursuing demand response strategies made possible by implementation of smart grid ...

  5. EA-2023: Crossman Peak Communications Facility; Mohave County...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Summary Western Area Power Administration is preparing an EA ... proposed new microwave communication facility to be located ... service distribution line across private land and ...

  6. K2 Energy Solutions formerly Peak Energy Solutions | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place: Henderson, Nevada Zip: 89074 Product: Nevada-based designer and fabricator of Lithium Iron Phosphate (LFP) batteries for such applications as EVs, power tools and...

  7. ,"Table 2b. Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    NERC regions into the " ,"new industry organization entity that oversee electric ... associated with regional transmission organization." ," * Regional name has changed from ...

  8. ,"Table 2a. Noncoincident Summer Peak Load, Actual and Projected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Area Power Pool (MAPP) to Midwest Reliability Organization (MRO)." ," * The MRO, SERC, and SPP regional boundaries were altered as utilities changed reliability organizations. ...

  9. Cosmology constraints from shear peak statistics in Dark Energy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    varying Omegarm m and sigma8, fixing w -1, Omegarm b 0.04, h 0.7 and ns1, to which we have applied the DES SV mask and redshift distribution. ...

  10. Evidence is growing on demand side of an oil peak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-07-15

    After years of continued growth, the number of miles driven by Americans started falling in December 2007. Not only are the number of miles driven falling, but as cars become more fuel efficient, they go further on fewer gallons - further reducing demand for gasoline. This trend is expected to accelerate. Drivers include, along with higher-efficiency cars, mass transit, reversal in urban sprawl, biofuels, and plug-in hybrid vehicles.

  11. Global Analysis Peak Fitting for Imaging NEXAFS Data. (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Applied Surface Analysis held June 2-5, 2014 in Albuquerque, NM.; Related Information: Proposed for presentation at the The 36th Annual Symposium on Applied Surface Analysis held ...

  12. Multispectral Imaging At Silver Peak Area (Laney, 2005) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    geothermal field. References Patrick Laney (2005) Federal Geothermal Research Program Update - Fiscal Year 2004 Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  13. Quasi-isentropic drive development for peak pressures > 10 Mbar...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Prisbrey, S T ; Park, H S ; Remington, B A ; May, M ; Cavallo, R ; Comley, A ; Blobaum, K ; Swift, D ; Satcher, J ; Perry, T Publication Date: 2012-10-24 OSTI Identifier: ...

  14. ARM - Field Campaign - Colorado: The Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the potential to create a correlative data set equivalent to between 200 and 300 ... of the algorithm results. 2. The data set was collected in a region of complex terrain. ...

  15. Flexible Coal: Evolution from Baseload to Peaking Plant (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochran, J.; Lew, D.; Kumar, N.

    2013-12-01

    Twenty-first century power systems, with higher penetration levels of low-carbon energy, smart grids, and other emerging technologies, will favor resources that have low marginal costs and provide system flexibility (e.g., the ability to cycle on and off to follow changes in variable renewable energy plant output). Questions remain about both the fate of coal plants in this scenario and whether they can cost-effectively continue to operate if they cycle routinely. The experience from the CGS plant demonstrates that coal plants can become flexible resources. This flexibility - namely the ability to cycle on and off and run at lower output (below 40% of capacity) - requires limited hardware modifications but extensive modifications to operational practice. Cycling does damage the plant and impact its life expectancy compared to baseload operations. Nevertheless, strategic modifications, proactive inspections and training programs, among other operational changes to accommodate cycling, can minimize the extent of damage and optimize the cost of maintenance. CGS's cycling, but not necessarily the associated price tag, is replicable. Context - namely, power market opportunities and composition of the generation fleet - will help determine for other coal plants the optimal balance between the level of cycling-related forced outages and the level of capital investment required to minimize those outages. Replicating CGS's experience elsewhere will likely require a higher acceptance of forced outages than regulators and plant operators are accustomed to; however, an increase in strategic maintenance can minimize the impact on outage rates.

  16. Preliminary Geologic Map of the Redondo Peak Quadrangle, Sandoval...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and stratigraphy have been previously published by Griggs (1964), Bailey et al. (1969), Smith et al. (1970), Kelley (1978), Gardner (1985), Gardner and Goff (1984) and Gardner et...

  17. Wavelet Approach for Operational Gamma Spectral Peak Detection - Preliminary Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, M.; Glass, D.

    2010-04-01

    NSTec completed a VarFrame camera design and deployed it at the Nevada Test Site. The camera design achieves several technologically competitive goals, having a maximum frame rate of 6.6 million frames per second, a low inter-frame time of 100 nsec, and a variable frame count of 1 to 25 frames.

  18. Micro-Earthquake At Desert Peak Geothermal Area (2011) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rock, D.; Peterson, J.; Jarpe, S. (1 January 2011) DOE REAL-TIME SEISMIC MONITORING AT ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM SITES Additional References Retrieved from "http:...

  19. Fossil Fuel-fired Peak Heating for Geothermal Greenhouses | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    18(1):1-4. Related Geothermal Exploration Activities Activities (1) Geothermal Literature Review At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Rafferty, 1997) Areas (1) Lightning Dock...

  20. How Technology Keeps Beating Peak Oil Predictions | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Small Businesses Support the Department of Energy How Small Businesses Support the Department of Energy July 23, 2013 - 4:02pm Addthis Energy Department Small Business Partner Success Stories Dot Harris Dot Harris Director, Office of Economic Impact and Diversity What are the key facts? Almost half of the subcontracts that come from our Management and Operations contractors and other large prime contractors go to small businesses. In Fiscal Year 2012, $1.3 billion prime contracts and

  1. Mercury Vapor At Desert Peak Area (Varekamp & Buseck, 1983) ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References J. C. Varekamp, P. R. Buseck (1983) Hg Anomalies In Soils- A Geochemical Exploration Method For Geothermal Areas Additional...

  2. SEPARATION OF OVERLAPPED ELECTROCHEMICAL PEAKS USING THE KALMAN...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Analytical Chemistry; Journal Volume: ... CA (US) Sponsoring Org: Materials Sciences Division Country of ...

  3. ,"Table 2. Noncoincident Peak Load, by North American Electric...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...4,60554,60262,61277,61958,62579,63058 ,,"Balance of Eastern Region",334823,342110,332624,3...4,45712,46788,47058,47271,47440,47578 ,,"Balance of Eastern Region",282819,291197,292085,3...

  4. Flexible Coal: Evolution from Baseload to Peaking Plant (Brochure...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    power market opportunities and composition of the generation fleet-will help determine for other coal plants the optimal balance between the level of cycling-related forced outages ...

  5. Radiometrics At Silver Peak Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    References William R. Henkle Jr., Wayne C. Gundersen, Thomas D. Gundersen (2005) Mercury Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical Signatures At Three...

  6. High-Performance with Solar Electric Reduced Peak Demand: Premier...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Builder Business Case: CaliforniaFlorida Production Builders - Building America Top Innovation Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile - Zero Energy-Ready Single-Family ...

  7. Insights from Smart Meters: The Potential for Peak Hour Savings...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Technical Report Technical Report Appendix More Documents & Publications Insights from Smart Meters: Identifying Specific Actions, Behaviors, and Characteristics That Drive Savings ...

  8. Quasi-isentropic drive development for peak pressures > 10 Mbar...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Language: English Subject: 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUMM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 42 ENGINEERING; 70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION; 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, ...

  9. Wanxiang Silicon Peak Electronics Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    silicon ingots and wafers and subsidiary of the Wanxiang Group which includes solar cell and module maker Wanxiang Solar. Coordinates: 29.140209, 118.405113 Show...

  10. Property:WinterPeakNetCpcty | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + 28.6 + N Navy I Geothermal Facility + 81.7 + Navy II Geothermal Facility + 86 + R Raft River Geothermal Facility + 12 + Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  11. Property:SummerPeakNetCpcty | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + 20.2 + N Navy I Geothermal Facility + 81.2 + Navy II Geothermal Facility + 80.3 + R Raft River Geothermal Facility + 10.5 + Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  12. SEPARATION OF OVERLAPPED ELECTROCHEMICAL PEAKS USING THE KALMAN...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... uses the Kalman filter, a recursive digital filtering algorithm for linear parameter ... The scans were controlled with either a PAR 175 ramp generator or a 16-bit digital-to-anal...

  13. Next Update: December 2011 Table 2a. Noncoincident Summer Peak...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    found on the EIA web page for electric reliability. * Regional name and function has changed from Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) to Texas Reliability Entity (TRE). ...

  14. Next Update: December 2011 Table 2b. Noncoincident Winter Peak...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    found on the EIA web page for electric reliability. * Regional name and function has changed from Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) to Texas Reliability Entity (TRE). ...

  15. DOE-CX-00009_WiMAX_Upgrades_on_Gable_Mountain.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  16. Webinar: Max Tech and Beyond Design Competition for Ultra-Low-Energy-Use Appliances & Equipment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The competition invited twelve University faculty-led student engineering teams to participate in a year long effort to design, build and test their original energy savings technologies and prototypes.

  17. Max Tech Appliance Design: Potential for Maximizing U.S. Energy Savings through Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garbesi, Karina; Desroches, Louis-Benoit; Bolduc, Christopher; Burch, Gabriel; Hosseinzadeh, Griffin; Saltiel, Seth

    2011-05-06

    This study surveyed the technical potential for efficiency improvements in 150 categories of appliances and equipment representing 33 quads of primary energy use across the US economy in 2010 and (1) documented efficient product designs, (2) identified the most promising cross-cutting strategies, and (3) ranked national energy savings potential by end use. Savings were estimated using a method modeled after US Department of Energy priority-setting reports - simplified versions of the full technical and economic analyses performed for rulemakings. This study demonstrates that large savings are possible by replacing products at the end-of-life with ultra-efficient models that use existing technology. Replacing the 50 top energy-saving end-uses (constituting 30 quads of primary energy consumption in 2010) with today's best-on-market equivalents would save {approx}200 quads of US primary energy over 30 years (25% of consumption anticipated there from). For the 29 products for maximum feasible savings potential could be estimated, the savings were twice as high. These results demonstrate that pushing ultra-efficient products to market could significantly escalate carbon emission reductions and is a viable strategy for sustaining large emissions reductions through standards. The results of this analysis were used by DOE for new coverage prioritization, to identify key opportunities for product prototyping and market development, and will leverage future standards rulemakings by identifying the full scope of maximum feasible technology options. High leverage products include advances lighting systems, HVAC, and televisions. High leverage technologies include electronic lighting, heat pumps, variable speed motors, and a host of controls-related technologies.

  18. Max Tech and Beyond: Fluorescent Lamps (Technical Report) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In addition to offering the market a high-quality efficacious light source, another strong value proposition of fluorescent lighting is its long operating life. In today's market, ...

  19. Onshore wind max capacity 50.4% - what wind farm, what year?...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    willing to learn.) Submitted by Bob Wallace on 15 June, 2013 - 00:23 1 answer Points: 0 Hi Bob- Thank you for posting your question. It seems that your question developed after...

  20. THE MASS-RICHNESS RELATION OF MaxBCG CLUSTERS FROM QUASAR LENSING...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    with other methods is not due to a shear-related systematic measurement error. We study the dependence of the ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English ...

  1. Index of /datasets/files/41/pub/PUBID8_0001/MaxTech

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Size DIR Parent Directory - DIR Sim1 18-Apr-2012 11:06 - 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 653191376 Varnish...

  2. AVTA: 2013 Ford C-Max Energi Fleet PHEV Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    VTO's National Laboratories have tested and collected both dynamometer and fleet data for the Ford CMAX Energi (a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle).

  3. Time resolved spectroscopy of SGR J15505418 bursts detected with Fermi/gamma-ray burst monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Younes, G. [Universities Space Research Association, 6767 Old Madison Pike, Suite 450, Huntsville, AL 35806 (United States); Kouveliotou, C.; Collazzi, A. [Astrophysics Office, ZP 12, NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Van der Horst, A. J.; Watts, A. L.; Huppenkothen, D.; Van der Klis, M.; Van Putten, T. [Astronomical Institute "Anton Pannekoek," University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Baring, M. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Granot, J. [Department of Natural Sciences, The Open University of Israel, 1 University Road, P.O. Box 808, Ranana 43537 (Israel); Bhat, P. N.; Gorgone, N. [University of Alabama in Huntsville CSPAR, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Gehrels, N.; Mcenery, J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); G??, E.; Kaneko, Y.; Lin, L. [Sabanc? University, Orhanl?-Tuzla, ?stanbul 34956 (Turkey); Gruber, D.; Von Kienlin, A. [Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstrasse, Postfach 1312, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Grunblatt, S. [University of Hawaii at Manoa, 2500 Campus Road, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); and others

    2014-04-10

    We report on a time-resolved spectroscopy of the 63 brightest bursts of SGR J15505418, detected with the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor during its 2008-2009 intense bursting episode. We performed spectral analysis down to 4 ms timescales to characterize the spectral evolution of the bursts. Using a Comptonized model, we find that the peak energy, E {sub peak}, anti-correlates with flux, while the low-energy photon index remains constant at ? 0.8 up to a flux limit F ? 10{sup 5} erg s{sup 1} cm{sup 2}. Above this flux value, the E {sub peak}flux correlation changes sign, and the index positively correlates with the flux reaching ?1 at the highest fluxes. Using a two blackbody model, we find that the areas and fluxes of the two emitting regions correlate positively. Further, we study here for the first time the evolution of the temperatures and areas as a function of flux. We find that the areakT relation follows the lines of constant luminosity at the lowest fluxes, R {sup 2}?kT {sup 4}, with a break at the higher fluxes (F > 10{sup 5.5} erg s{sup 1} cm{sup 2}). The area of the high-kT component increases with the flux while its temperature decreases, which we interpret as being due to an adiabatic cooling process. The area of the low-kT component, on the other hand, appears to saturate at the highest fluxes, toward R {sub max} ? 30 km. Assuming that crust quakes are responsible for soft gamma repeater (SGR) bursts and considering R {sub max} as the maximum radius of the emitting photon-pair plasma fireball, we relate this saturation radius to a minimum excitation radius of the magnetosphere, and we put a lower limit on the internal magnetic field of SGR J15505418, B {sub int} ? 4.5 10{sup 15} G.

  4. Solving The Long-Standing Problem Of Low-Energy Nuclear Reactions At The Highest Microscopic Level. Annual Continuation And Progress Report, August 15, 2014 -- August 14, 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quaglioni, Sofia

    2015-03-19

    The aim of this project is to develop a comprehensive framework that will lead to a fundamental description of both structural properties and reactions of light nuclei in terms of constituent protons and neutrons interacting through nucleon-nucleon (NN) and three-nucleon (3N) forces. This project will provide the research community with the theoretical and computational tools what will enable: an accurate prediction for fusion reactions that power stars and Earth-based fusion facilities; an improved description of the spectroscopy of exotic nuclei, including light Borromean systems; and, a fundamental understanding of the three-nucleon force in nuclear reaction and nuclei at the drip line.

  5. Confronting X-Ray Emission Models with theHighest-Redshift Kiloparsec-Scale Jets: The z = 3.89 Jet in Quasar 1745+624

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheung, C.C.; Stawarz, L.; Siemiginowska, A.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2006-06-28

    A newly identified kiloparsec-scale X-ray jet in the high-redshift z=3.89 quasar 1745+624 is studied with multi-frequency Very Large Array, Hubble Space Telescope, and Chandra X-ray imaging data. This is only the third large-scale X-ray jet beyond z > 3 known and is further distinguished as being the most luminous relativistic jet observed at any redshift, exceeding 10{sup 45} erg/s in both the radio and X-ray bands. Apart from the jet's extreme redshift, luminosity, and high inferred equipartition magnetic field (in comparison to local analogues), its basic properties such as X-ray/radio morphology and radio polarization are similar to lower-redshift examples. Its resolved linear structure and the convex broad-band spectral energy distributions of three distinct knots are also a common feature among known powerful X-ray jets at lower-redshift. Relativistically beamed inverse Compton and ''non-standard'' synchrotron models have been considered to account for such excess X-ray emission in other jets; both models are applicable to this high-redshift example but with differing requirements for the underlying jet physical properties, such as velocity, energetics, and electron acceleration processes. One potentially very important distinguishing characteristic between the two models is their strongly diverging predictions for the X-ray/radio emission with increasing redshift. This is considered, though with the limited sample of three z > 3 jets it is apparent that future studies targeted at very high-redshift jets are required for further elucidation of this issue. Finally, from the broad-band jet emission we estimate the jet kinetic power to be no less than 10{sup 46} erg/s, which is about 10% of the Eddington luminosity corresponding to this galaxy's central supermassive black hole mass M{sub BH} {approx}> 10{sup 9} M{sub {circle_dot}} estimated here via the virial relation. The optical luminosity of the quasar core is about ten times over Eddington, hence the inferred jet power seems to be much less than that available from mass accretion. The apparent super-Eddington accretion rate may however suggest contribution of the unresolved jet emission to the observed optical flux of the nucleus.

  6. Thermal nature of charmonium transverse momentum spectra from Au-Au collisions at the highest energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akkelin, S. V.; Sinyukov, Yu. M.; Braun-Munzinger, P.

    2010-03-15

    We analyze the transverse momentum distribution of J/psi mesons produced in Au+Au collisions at the top RHIC energy within a blast-wave model that accounts for a possible inhomogeneity of the charmonium distribution and/or flow fluctuations. The results imply that the transverse momentum spectra of J/psi, phi, and OMEGA hadrons measured at the RHIC can be described well if kinetic freeze-out takes place just after chemical freeze-out for these particles.

  7. Kaon and pion femtoscopy at the highest energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in a hydrokinetic model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karpenko, Iu. A.; Sinyukov, Yu. M.

    2010-05-15

    The hydrokinetic approach that incorporates hydrodynamic expansion of the systems formed in A+A collisions and their dynamical decoupling is applied to restore the initial conditions and space-time picture of the matter evolution in central Au+Au collisions at the top Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider energy. The analysis is based on the detailed reproduction of the pion and kaon momentum spectra and femtoscopic data in whole interval of the transverse momenta studied by both the STAR and the PHENIX collaborations. The fitting procedure utilizes the two parameters: the maximal energy density at supposed thermalization time 1 fm/c and the strength of the prethermal flows developed to this time. The quark-gluon plasma and hadronic gas is supposed to be in complete local equilibrium above the chemical freeze-out temperature T{sub ch}=165 MeV with the equation of states (EoS) at high temperatures as in the lattice QCD. Below T{sub ch} the EoS in the expanding and gradually decoupling fluid depends on the composition of the hadron-resonance gas at each space-time point and accounts for decays of resonances into the nonequilibrated medium. A good description of the pion and kaon transverse momentum spectra and interferometry radii is reached at both used initial energy density profiles motivated by the Glauber and color glass condensate models, however, at different initial energy densities. The discussion as for the approximate pion and kaon m{sub T} scaling for the interferometry radii is based on a comparison of the emission functions for these particles.

  8. China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan; Ke, Jing; Hasanbeigi, Ali; Morrow, Bill; Price, Lynn

    2011-01-14

    After over two decades of staggering economic growth and soaring energy demand, China has started taking serious actions to reduce its economic energy and carbon intensity by setting short and medium-term intensity reduction targets, renewable generation targets and various supporting policies and programs. In better understanding how further policies and actions can be taken to shape China's future energy and emissions trajectory, it is important to first identify where the largest opportunities for efficiency gains and emission reduction lie from sectoral and end-use perspectives. Besides contextualizing China's progress towards reaching the highest possible efficiency levels through the adoption of the most advanced technologies from a bottom-up perspective, the actual economic costs and benefits of adopting efficiency measures are also assessed in this study. This study presents two modeling methodologies that evaluate both the technical and economic potential of raising China's efficiency levels to the technical maximum across sectors and the subsequent carbon and energy emission implications through 2030. The technical savings potential by efficiency measure and remaining gap for improvements are identified by comparing a reference scenario in which China continues the current pace of with a Max Tech scenario in which the highest technically feasible efficiencies and advanced technologies are adopted irrespective of costs. In addition, from an economic perspective, a cost analysis of selected measures in the key industries of cement and iron and steel help quantify the actual costs and benefits of achieving the highest efficiency levels through the development of cost of conserved energy curves for the sectors. The results of this study show that total annual energy savings potential of over one billion tonne of coal equivalent exists beyond the expected reference pathway under Max Tech pathway in 2030. CO2 emissions will also peak earlier under Max Tech

  9. 1663_24_WEB-FINAL.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1663 May 2015 1663 May 2015 13 ON THE SLOPES OF PICO DE ORIZABA, the highest peak in Mexico and third highest in North America, lies the newest addition to the astronomical...

  10. Gain and tuning characteristics of mid-infrared InSb quantum dot diode lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Q.; Zhuang, Q.; Hayton, J.; Yin, M.; Krier, A.

    2014-07-21

    There have been relatively few reports of lasing from InSb quantum dots (QDs). In this work, type II InSb/InAs QD laser diodes emitting in the mid-infrared at 3.1??m have been demonstrated and characterized. The gain was determined to be 2.9?cm{sup ?1} per QD layer, and the waveguide loss was ?15?cm{sup ?1} at 4?K. Spontaneous emission measurements below threshold revealed a blue shift of the peak wavelength with increasing current, indicating filling of ground state heavy hole levels in the QDs. The characteristic temperature, T{sub 0}?=?101?K below 50?K, but decreased to 48?K at higher temperatures. The emission wavelength of these lasers showed first a blue shift followed by a red shift with increasing temperature. A hybrid structure was used to fabricate the laser by combining a liquid phase epitaxy grown p-InAs{sub 0.61}Sb{sub 0.13}P{sub 0.26} lower cladding layer and an upper n{sup +} InAs plasmon cladding layer which resulted in a maximum operating temperature (T{sub max}) of 120?K in pulsed mode, which is the highest reported to date.

  11. Diffusion of Ag, Au and Cs implants in MAX phase Ti3SiC2 (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 462; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0022-3115 Publisher: Elsevier Sponsoring Org: USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and ...

  12. Coolerado Cooler Helps to Save Cooling Energy and Dollars: New Cooling Technology Targets Peak Load Reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robichaud, R.

    2007-06-01

    This document is about a new evaporative cooling technology that can deliver cooler supply air temperatures than either direct or indirect evaporative cooling systems, without increasing humidity. The Coolerado Cooler technology can help Federal agencies reach the energy-use reduction goals of EPAct 2005, particularly in the western United States.

  13. EA-1921: Silver Peak Area Geothermal Exploration Project Environmental Assessment, Esmeralda County, Nevada

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bureau of Land Management (BLM)(lead agency) and DOE are jointly preparing this EA, which evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a project proposed by Rockwood Lithium Inc (Rockwood), formerly doing business as Chemetall Foote Corporation.

  14. Origin of the narrow, single peak in the fission-fragment mass...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    fission-fragment mass distribution for 258Fm We discuss ... obtained from the single-particle wave-function densities. ... Full Text preview image File size NAView Full Text View ...

  15. Search for peak structure in e{sup +}-e{sup -} spectra from APEX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolanski, M.

    1995-10-01

    APEX, a solenoidal positron-electron pair spectrometer located at Argonne National Laboratorv, was used to collect e{sup +}-e{sup -} events from quasi-elastic collisions of {sup 238}U{sup 232}Th and {sup 238}U+{sup 181}Ta at energies near the Coulomb barrier. We have analyzed the data to test the hypothesis that a light neutral particle(s) or composite object(s), with mass {approximately}1.8 MeV/c{sup 2}, results from these collisions. Such an object(s) could account for two of the narrow e{sup +}-e{sup -} lines reported in the literature if produced at close to the center-of-mass.

  16. New Methods In Exploration At The Socorro Peak Kgra- A Gred Iii...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NW-SE through M-mountain as well as blind faults projected through the alluvial fan. IR remote sensing has also located elevated surface temperatures (<12 C above background)...

  17. Reaching for Peak Performance in Existing Homes A Cold Climate Study With Synergy Construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gates, C.; Osser, R.

    2011-12-01

    Two test homes located in Millbury and Somerville, MA, are examined with the goal of providing case studies that could be applied to other similar New England homes. The retrofit process for the enclosure and mechanical systems are examined in detail and the decision-making process is discussed.

  18. Insights from Smart Meters: The Potential for Peak-Hour Savings...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Authors: Todd, Annika ; Perry, Michael ; Smith, Brian ; Sullivan, Michael ; Cappers, Peter ; Goldman, Charles Publication Date: 2014-03-25 OSTI Identifier: 1129523 Report ...

  19. NRELs Energy-Saving Technology for Air Conditioning Cuts Peak...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How DEVAP Works Water is already used as a refrigerant in evaporative coolers, a common and widely used energy-saving technology for arid regions. The technology cools incoming ...

  20. ,"Table 3a. January Monthly Peak Hour Demand, Actual and Projected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    which oversees electric reliability. * NERC Regional names may be found on the EIA web page for electric reliability. " ," * Regional name and function has changed from ...