National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for higher refining margins

  1. Protein NMR Structures Refined with Rosetta Have Higher Accuracy Relative to Corresponding Xray Crystal Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, David

    refinement of protein NMR structures was also compared with restrained CS-Rosetta calculations. For proteins spectroscopy (NMR). While X-ray crystal structures are derived from electron density data and are often dynamics and has the advantage of not requiring crystallization. Solution NMR structure determination

  2. Higher U.S. Crop Prices Trigger Little Area Expansion so Marginal Land for Biofuel Crops Is Limited

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swinton, S.; Babcock, Bruce; James, Laura; Bandaru, Varaprasad

    2011-06-12

    By expanding energy biomass production on marginal lands that are not currently used for crops, food price increases and indirect climate change effects can be mitigated. Studies of the availability of marginal lands for dedicated bioenergy crops have focused on biophysical land traits, ignoring the human role in decisions to convert marginal land to bioenergy crops. Recent history offers insights about farmer willingness to put non-crop land into crop production. The 2006-09 leap in field crop prices and the attendant 64% gain in typical profitability led to only a 2% increase in crop planted area, mostly in the prairie states

  3. Refiners get petchems help

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, A.; Cornitius, T.

    1997-06-11

    The U.S.Refining Industry is facing hard times. Slow growth, tough environmental regulations, and fierce competition - especially in retail gasoline - have squeezed margins and prompted a series of mergers and acquisitions. The trend has affected the smallest and largest players, and a series of transactions over the past two years has created a new industry lineup. Among the larger companies, Mobil and Amoco are the latest to consider a refining merger. That follows recent plans by Ashland and Marathon to merge their refining businesses, and the decision by Shell, Texaco, and Saudi Aramco to combine some U.S. operations. Many of the leading independent refiners have increased their scale by acquiring refinery capacity. With refining still in the doldrums, more independents are taking a closer look at boosting production of petrochemicals, which offer high growth and, usually, better margins. That is being helped by the shift to refinery processes that favor the increased production of light olefins for alkylation and the removal of aromatics, providing opportunity to extract these materials for the petrochemical market. 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Rietveld Refinement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    profile Chi-squared value 4.944 Progress so far Inverse Modeling Method 2 Fourier Method Data Model Refined Structure 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 0 1000 2000 3000 4000...

  5. Worldwide refining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-18

    Data are presented on refining capacity by country and by company within each country. Capacity data are divided into the following processes: vacuum distillation, thermal operations, catalytic cracking, catalytic reforming, catalytic hydrocracking, catalytic hydrorefining, and catalytic hydrotreating. Production capacity is divided into: alkylation/polymerization/dimerization; aromatics/isomerization; lubricants; oxygenates; hydrogen; petroleum coke; and asphalts.

  6. ITP Petroleum Refining: Profile of the Petroleum Refining Industry...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (November 2007) ITP Petroleum Refining: Energy Efficiency Roadmap for Petroleum Refineries in California ITP Petroleum Refining: Profile of the Petroleum Refining Industry in...

  7. ITP Petroleum Refining: Energy Bandwidth for Petroleum Refining...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bandwidth for Petroleum Refining Processes ITP Petroleum Refining: Energy Bandwidth for Petroleum Refining Processes bandwidth.pdf More Documents & Publications ITP Petroleum...

  8. MECS 2006- Petroleum Refining

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Petroleum Refining (NAICS 324110) Sector with Total Energy Input, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

  9. Refiners trade hydroprocessing experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-04-16

    Hydrogen treating and conversion processes less severe than hydrocracking abound in most refineries and therefore were a subject of high interest at the National Petroleum Refiners Association question and answer session on refining technology. The present paper, which is the second abstract of the transcript of the most recent meeting, covers hydroprocessing and some of its mechanical, process, and catalytic aspects.

  10. Towards automated crystallographic structure refinement with phenix.refine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Afonine, Pavel V., E-mail: pafonine@lbl.gov; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Echols, Nathaniel; Headd, Jeffrey J.; Moriarty, Nigel W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, MS64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Mustyakimov, Marat; Terwilliger, Thomas C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Urzhumtsev, Alexandre [CNRS–INSERM–UdS, 1 Rue Laurent Fries, BP 10142, 67404 Illkirch (France); Université Henri Poincaré, Nancy 1, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Zwart, Peter H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, MS64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Adams, Paul D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, MS64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2012-04-01

    phenix.refine is a program within the PHENIX package that supports crystallographic structure refinement against experimental data with a wide range of upper resolution limits using a large repertoire of model parameterizations. This paper presents an overview of the major phenix.refine features, with extensive literature references for readers interested in more detailed discussions of the methods. phenix.refine is a program within the PHENIX package that supports crystallographic structure refinement against experimental data with a wide range of upper resolution limits using a large repertoire of model parameterizations. It has several automation features and is also highly flexible. Several hundred parameters enable extensive customizations for complex use cases. Multiple user-defined refinement strategies can be applied to specific parts of the model in a single refinement run. An intuitive graphical user interface is available to guide novice users and to assist advanced users in managing refinement projects. X-ray or neutron diffraction data can be used separately or jointly in refinement. phenix.refine is tightly integrated into the PHENIX suite, where it serves as a critical component in automated model building, final structure refinement, structure validation and deposition to the wwPDB. This paper presents an overview of the major phenix.refine features, with extensive literature references for readers interested in more detailed discussions of the methods.

  11. Minimally refined biomass fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pearson, Richard K. (Pleasanton, CA); Hirschfeld, Tomas B. (Livermore, CA)

    1984-01-01

    A minimally refined fluid composition, suitable as a fuel mixture and derived from biomass material, is comprised of one or more water-soluble carbohydrates such as sucrose, one or more alcohols having less than four carbons, and water. The carbohydrate provides the fuel source; water solubilizes the carbohydrates; and the alcohol aids in the combustion of the carbohydrate and reduces the vicosity of the carbohydrate/water solution. Because less energy is required to obtain the carbohydrate from the raw biomass than alcohol, an overall energy savings is realized compared to fuels employing alcohol as the primary fuel.

  12. Higher order integral stark-type conjectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emmons, Caleb J.

    2006-01-01

    D . Popescu. Rubin's integral refinement of the abelianS A N DIEGO Higher Order Integral Stark-Type Conjectures ADISSERTATION Higher Order Integral Stark-Type Conjectures by

  13. ITP Petroleum Refining: Energy Bandwidth for Petroleum Refining...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    refining, metal casting, and steel making. Of these industrial sectors, petroleum refineries are one of the largest consumers of energy and the United States is the largest...

  14. Refines Efficiency Improvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WRI

    2002-05-15

    Refinery processes that convert heavy oils to lighter distillate fuels require heating for distillation, hydrogen addition or carbon rejection (coking). Efficiency is limited by the formation of insoluble carbon-rich coke deposits. Heat exchangers and other refinery units must be shut down for mechanical coke removal, resulting in a significant loss of output and revenue. When a residuum is heated above the temperature at which pyrolysis occurs (340 C, 650 F), there is typically an induction period before coke formation begins (Magaril and Aksenova 1968, Wiehe 1993). To avoid fouling, refiners often stop heating a residuum before coke formation begins, using arbitrary criteria. In many cases, this heating is stopped sooner than need be, resulting in less than maximum product yield. Western Research Institute (WRI) has developed innovative Coking Index concepts (patent pending) which can be used for process control by refiners to heat residua to the threshold, but not beyond the point at which coke formation begins when petroleum residua materials are heated at pyrolysis temperatures (Schabron et al. 2001). The development of this universal predictor solves a long standing problem in petroleum refining. These Coking Indexes have great potential value in improving the efficiency of distillation processes. The Coking Indexes were found to apply to residua in a universal manner, and the theoretical basis for the indexes has been established (Schabron et al. 2001a, 2001b, 2001c). For the first time, a few simple measurements indicates how close undesired coke formation is on the coke formation induction time line. The Coking Indexes can lead to new process controls that can improve refinery distillation efficiency by several percentage points. Petroleum residua consist of an ordered continuum of solvated polar materials usually referred to as asphaltenes dispersed in a lower polarity solvent phase held together by intermediate polarity materials usually referred to as resins. The Coking Indexes focus on the amount of these intermediate polarity species since coke formation begins when these are depleted. Currently the Coking Indexes are determined by either titration or solubility measurements which must be performed in a laboratory. In the current work, various spectral, microscopic, and thermal techniques possibly leading to on-line analysis were explored for measuring the Coking Indexes.

  15. Crystal structure refinement with SHELXL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheldrick, George M., E-mail: gsheldr@shelx.uni-ac.gwdg.de [Department of Structural Chemistry, Georg-August Universität Göttingen, Tammannstraße 4, Göttingen 37077 (Germany)

    2015-01-01

    New features added to the refinement program SHELXL since 2008 are described and explained. The improvements in the crystal structure refinement program SHELXL have been closely coupled with the development and increasing importance of the CIF (Crystallographic Information Framework) format for validating and archiving crystal structures. An important simplification is that now only one file in CIF format (for convenience, referred to simply as ‘a CIF’) containing embedded reflection data and SHELXL instructions is needed for a complete structure archive; the program SHREDCIF can be used to extract the .hkl and .ins files required for further refinement with SHELXL. Recent developments in SHELXL facilitate refinement against neutron diffraction data, the treatment of H atoms, the determination of absolute structure, the input of partial structure factors and the refinement of twinned and disordered structures. SHELXL is available free to academics for the Windows, Linux and Mac OS X operating systems, and is particularly suitable for multiple-core processors.

  16. Fewer Steps to Higher Octane Gasoline in Petroleum Refining ...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Links Center for Gas Separations Relevant to Clean Energy Technologies (CGS) EFRC New Energy and Fuel External link Green Optimistic External link Twitter External link...

  17. Refining the shifted topological vertex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drissi, L. B.; Jehjouh, H.; Saidi, E. H. [Faculte des Sciences, Laboratory/UFR-Physique des Hautes Energies, Rabat, 1014 (Morocco); Groupement National de Physique des Hautes Energies (GNPHE), Siege focal:FS, Rabat, 1014 (Morocco)

    2009-01-15

    We study aspects of the refining and shifting properties of the 3d MacMahon function C{sub 3}(q) used in topological string theory and BKP hierarchy. We derive the explicit expressions of the shifted topological vertex S{sub {lambda}}{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}}(q) and its refined version T{sub {lambda}}{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}}(q,t). These vertices complete results in literature.

  18. Coastal ocean margins program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    The marine research program supported by the Office of Energy Research, Ecological Research Division, is focused to provide scientific information on major environmental issues facing development and expansion of most energy technologies and energy policy. These issues include waste disposal, siting/operations, and possible long term effects on global systems. The research is concentrated along the United States coastal margins where marine waters provide abundant food and resources while assimilating discharges from atmospheric, terrestrial, and aquatic sources. The program focuses on the formation and transport of particles within the waters of the continental shelf and the fate of these particles, whether on the shelf, on the slope, or in the open ocean. The program is conducted with multidisciplinary teams of researchers who investigate water mass movements, biological productivity, and naturally forming particles, as well as contaminant transport, to develop a clear understanding of the exchanges of contaminants and other materials that take place between continental shelf and open ocean waters. Seventy-five percent of the projects are funded to university grantees and twenty-five percent to National Laboratories.

  19. Rapidly-Exploring Roadmaps: Weighing Exploration vs. Refinement in Optimal Motion Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patil, Sachin

    Rapidly-Exploring Roadmaps: Weighing Exploration vs. Refinement in Optimal Motion Planning Ron of already explored regions to find better paths. We present the rapidly- exploring roadmap (RRM), a new to explore further or to refine the explored space by adding edges to the current roadmap to find higher

  20. Influence of Alloy and Solidification Parameters on Grain Refinement in Aluminum Weld Metal due to Inoculation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schempp, Philipp [BAM, Germany; Tang, Z. [BIAS, Germany; Cross, Carl E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Seefeld, T. [BIAS, Germany; Pittner, A. [BAM, Germany; Rethmeier, M. [BAM, Germany

    2012-06-28

    The goals are: (1) Establish how much Ti/B grain refiner is need to completely refine aluminum weld metal for different alloys and different welding conditions; (2) Characterize how alloy composition and solidification parameters affect weld metal grain refinement; and (3) Apply relevant theory to understand observed behavior. Conclusions are: (1) additions of Ti/B grain refiner to weld metal in Alloys 1050, 5083, and 6082 resulted in significant grain refinement; (2) grain refinement was more effective in GTAW than LBW, resulting in finer grains at lower Ti content - reason is limited time available for equiaxed grain growth in LBW (inability to occlude columnar grain growth); (3) welding travel speed did not markedly affect grain size within GTAW and LBW clusters; and (4) application of Hunt CET analysis showed experimental G to be on the order of the critical G{sub CET}; G{sub CET} was consistently higher for GTAW than for LBW.

  1. Reformulated Gasoline Market Affected Refiners Differently, 1995

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1996-01-01

    This article focuses on the costs of producing reformulated gasoline (RFG) as experienced by different types of refiners and on how these refiners fared this past summer, given the prices for RFG at the refinery gate.

  2. Automatic grid refinement criterion for lattice Boltzmann method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lagrava, Daniel; Latt, Joneas; Chopard, Bastien

    2015-01-01

    In all kinds of engineering problems, and in particular in methods for computational fluid dynamics based on regular grids, local grid refinement is of crucial importance. To save on computational expense, many applications require to resolve a wide range of scales present in a numerical simulation by locally adding more mesh points. In general, the need for a higher (or a lower) resolution is not known \\emph{a priori}, and it is therefore difficult to locate areas for which local grid refinement is required. In this paper, we propose a novel algorithm for the lattice Boltzmann method, based on physical concepts, to automatically construct a pattern of local refinement. We apply the idea to the two-dimensional lid-driven cavity and show that the automatically refined grid can lead to results of equal quality with less grid points, thus sparing computational resources and time. The proposed automatic grid refinement strategy has been implemented in the parallel open-source library Palabos.

  3. ITP Petroleum Refining: Energy and Environmental Profile of the...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Profile of the U.S. Petroleum Refining Industry (November 2007) Bandwidth Study U.S. Petroleum Refining ITP Petroleum Refining: Technology Roadmap for the Petroleum Industry...

  4. Firing of pulverized solvent refined coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Derbidge, T. Craig (Sunnyvale, CA); Mulholland, James A. (Chapel Hill, NC); Foster, Edward P. (Macungie, PA)

    1986-01-01

    An air-purged burner for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal is constructed and operated such that the solvent refined coal can be fired without the coking thereof on the burner components. The air-purged burner is designed for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal in a tangentially fired boiler.

  5. A Refined Harmonic Rayleigh--Ritz Procedure and an Explicitly Restarted Refined Harmonic Arnoldi Algorithm #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Zhongxiao

    A Refined Harmonic Rayleigh--Ritz Procedure and an Explicitly Restarted Refined Harmonic Arnoldi Algorithm # Guizhi Chen + Zhongxiao Jia # Abstract The work is fourfold. First, a refined harmonic Rayleigh--Ritz procedure is proposed, some relationships are established between the refined harmonic Ritz vector

  6. IMPROVING EFFICIENT MARGINAL ESTIMATORS IN BIVARIATE MODELS WITH PARAMETRIC MARGINALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schick, Anton

    AND ANTON SCHICK Abstract. Suppose we have data from a bivariate model with parametric marginals. Efficient nonparametric estimators in the presence of a constraint, see e.g. Schick and Wefelmeyer (2008) for a recent = The research of Hanxiang Peng was supported in parts by NSF Grant DMS 0940365. The research of Anton Schick

  7. Higher Education

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    like me to attain challenging and rewarding careers." - Sherry Salas Bachicha Higher Education Resources for Undergraduates, Graduates & Postdocs Opportunities LANL Foundation...

  8. Refiners Increasingly Employing Catalyst Regeneration as Alternative...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    million by the end of 2019. Refiners Benefit from Catalyst Regeneration Technology via Price Reductions and Lower Maintenance Costs The catalyst regeneration technology is the...

  9. Influence of Aluminum Content on Grain Refinement and Strength of AZ31 Magnesium GTA Weld Metal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babu, N. Kishore [Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology; Cross, Carl E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-28

    The goal is to characterize the effect of Al content on AZ31 weld metal, the grain size and strength, and examine role of Al on grain refinement. The approach is to systematically vary the aluminum content of AZ31 weld metal, Measure average grain size in weld metal, and Measure cross-weld tensile properties and hardness. Conclusions are that: (1) increased Al content in AZ31 weld metal results in grain refinement Reason: higher undercooling during solidification; (2) weld metal grain refinement resulted in increased strength & hardness Reason: grain boundary strengthening; and (3) weld metal strength can be raised to wrought base metal levels.

  10. Refining: moods and modes for 1984. [From NPRA meeting, San Antonio, TX 3/84

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-04-11

    Thousands of refining experts met in March in San Antonio, TX at the 82nd meeting of the National Petroleum Refiners Association, including many international oil-industry officials and executives. For major US refiners, the mood was decidedly optimistic, because: (1) for a number of refiners, negative margins on many crude oils that persisted even after the March 1983 price adjustment by OPEC are finally improving as capacities for upgrading residual fuel into more-valuable light products continue to come onstream; and (2) multinational oil companies, while concerned about downstream market penetration by producing countries, nevertheless expressed the feeling that this would probably further reduce the negotiating power of OPEC. For smaller, nonmajor refiners, the mood was one of concern: in the US, 97 refineries have officially closed since 1981, most of them smaller, inefficient facilities. There was optimism by all about environmental and social concerns, specifically acid rain and lead pollution. For the national oil companies of less-developed countries, a vicious circle emerged concerning the economic ramifications of the continuing development of catalysts for cracking heavy feedstock. This issue presents the fuel price/tax series and industrial fuel prices for March 1984 for countries of the Eastern Hemisphere.

  11. Dynamics of the continental margins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    On 18--20 June 1990, over 70 oceanographers conducting research in the ocean margins of North America attended a workshop in Virginia Beach, Virginia. The purpose of the workshop was to provide the Department of Energy with recommendations for future research on the exchange of energy-related materials between the coastal and interior ocean and the relationship between the ocean margins and global change. The workshop was designed to optimize the interaction of scientists from specific research disciplines (biology, chemistry, physics and geology) as they developed hypotheses, research questions and topics and implementation plans. The participants were given few restraints on the research they proposed other than realistic time and monetary limits. The interdisciplinary structure of the meeting promoted lively discussion and creative research plans. The meeting was divided into four working groups based on lateral, vertical, air/sea and sediment/water processes. Working papers were prepared and distributed before the meeting. During the meeting the groups revised the papers and added recommendations that appear in this report, which was reviewed by an Executive Committee.

  12. Firing of pulverized solvent refined coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lennon, Dennis R. (Allentown, PA); Snedden, Richard B. (McKeesport, PA); Foster, Edward P. (Macungie, PA); Bellas, George T. (Library, PA)

    1990-05-15

    A burner for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal is constructed and operated such that the solvent refined coal can be fired successfully without any performance limitations and without the coking of the solvent refined coal on the burner components. The burner is provided with a tangential inlet of primary air and pulverized fuel, a vaned diffusion swirler for the mixture of primary air and fuel, a center water-cooled conical diffuser shielding the incoming fuel from the heat radiation from the flame and deflecting the primary air and fuel steam into the secondary air, and a watercooled annulus located between the primary air and secondary air flows.

  13. North Dakota Refining Capacity Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis Hill; Kurt Swenson; Carl Tuura; Jim Simon; Robert Vermette; Gilberto Marcha; Steve Kelly; David Wells; Ed Palmer; Kuo Yu; Tram Nguyen; Juliam Migliavacca

    2011-01-05

    According to a 2008 report issued by the United States Geological Survey, North Dakota and Montana have an estimated 3.0 to 4.3 billion barrels of undiscovered, technically recoverable oil in an area known as the Bakken Formation. With the size and remoteness of the discovery, the question became 'can a business case be made for increasing refining capacity in North Dakota?' And, if so what is the impact to existing players in the region. To answer the question, a study committee comprised of leaders in the region's petroleum industry were brought together to define the scope of the study, hire a consulting firm and oversee the study. The study committee met frequently to provide input on the findings and modify the course of the study, as needed. The study concluded that the Petroleum Area Defense District II (PADD II) has an oversupply of gasoline. With that in mind, a niche market, naphtha, was identified. Naphtha is used as a diluent used for pipelining the bitumen (heavy crude) from Canada to crude markets. The study predicted there will continue to be an increase in the demand for naphtha through 2030. The study estimated the optimal configuration for the refinery at 34,000 barrels per day (BPD) producing 15,000 BPD of naphtha and a 52 percent refinery charge for jet and diesel yield. The financial modeling assumed the sponsor of a refinery would invest its own capital to pay for construction costs. With this assumption, the internal rate of return is 9.2 percent which is not sufficient to attract traditional investment given the risk factor of the project. With that in mind, those interested in pursuing this niche market will need to identify incentives to improve the rate of return.

  14. Assessment of seismic margin calculation methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, R.P.; Murray, R.C.; Ravindra, M.K.; Reed, J.W.; Stevenson, J.D.

    1989-03-01

    Seismic margin review of nuclear power plants requires that the High Confidence of Low Probability of Failure (HCLPF) capacity be calculated for certain components. The candidate methods for calculating the HCLPF capacity as recommended by the Expert Panel on Quantification of Seismic Margins are the Conservative Deterministic Failure Margin (CDFM) method and the Fragility Analysis (FA) method. The present study evaluated these two methods using some representative components in order to provide further guidance in conducting seismic margin reviews. It is concluded that either of the two methods could be used for calculating HCLPF capacities. 21 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. ITP Petroleum Refining: Impacts of Condition Assessment on Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Effective Fouling Minimization Increases the Efficiency and Productivity of Refineries ITP Petroleum Refining: Profile of the Petroleum Refining Industry in California:...

  16. Energy Efficiency Improvement in the Petroleum Refining Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

    2005-01-01

    and product flows. Energy Use in Petroleum Refining The2. Estimated energy use by petroleum refining process.EIA), 2002. Petroleum Supply Annual 2001, Energy Information

  17. The 1987 refining and petrochemical technology yearbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This annual covers the latest in refining and petrochemical technology written by the experts in the field. Opening with a foreword by Richard Corbett, Refining and Petrochemical Editior of the Oil and Gas Journal. The annual includes nearly 100 articles from the 1986 issues of the Oil and Gas Journal, comprising a collection of new technical information, methods of analysis, forecasts and trends in such subject areas as plants, fuels, gasolines, coking, processing, contents, hydrocracking, equipment, catalysts, and petrochemicals.

  18. Negative margins and OPEC prices: how buyers and sellers are coping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-11-28

    Apparent refining margins are so poor that many US refiners have accelerated their destocking, waiting for market uncertainty to be resolved. Margins based on official OPEC prices continue to be virtually all negative, including very light oils from the Middle East; by now, up to half the world's oil trade may reflect spot marketing, compared to less than 10% a few years ago. In today's buyer's market for crude oil, several sellers are resorting to multi-faceted discounts amounting to as much as US $4.50 or more under official OPEC prices. But meanwhile, US oil importers have learned how not to rely so much on a traditional run of crude oil: they are running reduced crude, resid, cat feed, condensate; and they are blending components for lighter products by importing and swapping whenever even pennies per barrel can be saved. This issue presents: (1) refining netback data, US Gulf and West Coasts, late November 1984 (official/contract vs spot crude prices; (2) asphalt export prices to the US from Canada, N. Antilles, and Venezuela; and (3) the fuel price/tax series and industrial fuel prices as of October 1984 for countries of the Western Hemisphere.

  19. Multivariate Distributions with Proportional Reversed Hazard Marginals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kundu, Debasis

    Multivariate Distributions with Proportional Reversed Hazard Marginals Debasis Kundu1 & Manuel Franco2 & Juana-Maria Vivo3 Abstract Several univariate proportional reversed hazard models have been a class of bivariate models with proportional reversed hazard marginals. It is observed that the proposed

  20. Trends in petroleum refining process technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kowalczyk, D. [Refining Process Services, Cheswick, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    In the 1990`s, the shift toward reformulated fuels and the unrelenting economic pressures on the petroleum refining industry have led to the ongoing development of a series of technological advances to improve fuels quality and industry operating efficiency. In this paper, ten of the most innovative and high impact recent developments in petroleum refining process technology will be highlighted. Process improvements and innovations have occurred in all facets of petroleum refining operations including fluid catalytic cracking, ether production, desulfurization, hydrocracking, gas processing, environmental control and heavy oil processing. Discussed will be the technical and economic impact of each of these new technologies on the petroleum refinery of the late 20th and early 21st century.

  1. Hydrotreating operations discussed at refining meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-12

    At the most recent National Petroleum Refiners Association question and answer session on refining and petrochemical technology, refiners and a panel of experts exchanged experiences on hydrotreater operations. Topics addressed included reactor pressurization, scale basket removal, and the use of antifoulants in effluent exchangers. This article presents comments from the panelists on the following questions. (1) What is the industry practice used to speed up the pressurization of 2.25 Cr/1 Mo reactors during start-up? Is there any relationship between reactor skin temperature and pressure used? (2) Has anyone removed scale baskets from a hydrotreating reactor and compared operations before and after? If so, were there any noticeable differences? Why? (3) What is the industry experience with the use of antifoulants for hydrocracking or hydrotreating reactor effluent exchangers?

  2. Petroleum refining for the nontechnical person

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leffler, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    The second edition of this book remains a straightforward and uncomplicated text setting forth the many technical procedures involved in refining. The author has added a new chapter on simple and complex refineries and a revised chapter on gasoline blending, including current information on alcohol blending components. Contents include: Crude oil characteristics; Distilling; Flashing; The chemistry of petroleum; Catalytic cracking; Refining gas plants; Alkylation; Catalytic reforming; Residue reduction; Hydrocracking; Gasoline blending; Distillate fuels; Asphalt and residual fuel; Hydrogen, hydrotreating, and sulfur plants; Isomerization; Solvent recovery of aromatics; Ethylene plants; Simple and complex refineries; Crude oil, condensate, and natural gas liquids; Fuel values - heating values.

  3. Using supercritical fluids to refine hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yarbro, Stephen Lee

    2015-06-09

    A system and method for reactively refining hydrocarbons, such as heavy oils with API gravities of less than 20 degrees and bitumen-like hydrocarbons with viscosities greater than 1000 cp at standard temperature and pressure, using a selected fluid at supercritical conditions. A reaction portion of the system and method delivers lightweight, volatile hydrocarbons to an associated contacting unit which operates in mixed subcritical/supercritical or supercritical modes. Using thermal diffusion, multiphase contact, or a momentum generating pressure gradient, the contacting unit separates the reaction products into portions that are viable for use or sale without further conventional refining and hydro-processing techniques.

  4. Electromagnetic exploration of the Exmouth and Vøring rifted margins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myer, David Gerard

    2012-01-01

    Haq, B.U. , 1992. Seismic stratigraphy and passive marginHaq, B.U. , 1992. Seismic stratigraphy and passive marginHaq, B.U. , 1992. Seismic stratigraphy and passive margin

  5. Margins, Liquidity and the Cost of Hedging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mello, Antonio S.

    2012-05-21

    Recent financial reforms, such as the Dodd-Frank Act in the U.S. and the European Market Infrastructure Regulation, encourage greater use of clearing and therefore increased margining of derivative trades. They also impose ...

  6. On the quantification of safety margins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pagani, Lorenzo P

    2004-01-01

    The nuclear industry has relied on the concept of Defense in Depth (DID) and traditional safety margins to deal with the uncertainties associated with the design and operation of nuclear facilities. These concepts were ...

  7. Dangerous Liouville Wave -- exactly marginal but non-conformal deformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiu Man Ho; Yu Nakayama

    2008-07-26

    We give a non-trivially interacting field theory example of scale invariant but non-conformal field theory. The model is based on the exactly solvable Liouville field theory coupled with free scalars deformed by an exactly marginal operator. We show non-vanishing of the trace of the energy-momentum tensor by using the quantum Schwinger-Dyson equation for the Liouville field theory, which is a sophistication of the quantum higher equations of motion for the Liouville field theory introduced by Alyosha Zamolodchikov. Possibly dangerous implications for the super-critical string theory will be discussed.

  8. Energy Bandwidth for Petroleum Refining Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2006-10-01

    The petroleum refining energy bandwidth report analyzes the most energy-intensive unit operations used in U.S. refineries: crude oil distillation, fluid catalytic cracking, catalytic hydrotreating, catalytic reforming, and alkylation. The "bandwidth" provides a snapshot of the energy losses that can potentially be recovered through best practices and technology R&D.

  9. Patterns for Refinement Automation Alexei Iliasov1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southampton, University of

    Patterns for Refinement Automation Alexei Iliasov1 , Elena Troubitsyna2 , Linas Laibinis2 in rigorous modelling and design by increasing automation of development steps. We introduce a notion establishes a basis for building a tool that would support formal system development via pattern reuse

  10. Hydrocarbon Processing`s refining processes `96

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    The paper compiles information on the following refining processes: alkylation, benzene reduction, benzene saturation, catalytic cracking, catalytic reforming, coking, crude distillation, deasphalting, deep catalytic cracking, electrical desalting, ethers, fluid catalytic cracking, hydrocracking, hydrogenation, hydrotreating, isomerization, resid catalytic cracking, treating, and visbreaking. The application, products, a description of the process, yield, economics, installation, and licensor are given for each entry.

  11. Solvent dramatically affects protein structure refinement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Summa, Christopher M.

    Solvent dramatically affects protein structure refinement Gaurav Chopraa , Christopher M. Summab, fold and function in aqueous solution in vivo and in vitro. In this work, we study the role of solvent explicit and implicit solvent were performed on a set of 75 native proteins to test the various energy

  12. Transforming and Refining Abstract Constraint Specifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsh, Toby

    Transforming and Refining Abstract Constraint Specifications Alan M. Frisch1 , Brahim Hnich2 , Ian choose model transformations to reduce greatly the amount of effort that is required to solve a problem by systematic search. It is a consid- erable challenge to automate such transformations. A problem may be viewed

  13. The law of demand versus diminishing marginal utility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bettie, Bruce R.; Lafrance, Jeffrey T.

    2006-01-01

    Diminishing marginal utility will provide a negative sloperegularity for u. Thus, this utility function (or a simpleDiminishing Marginal Utility Endnotes References Burt,

  14. Marginal Energy Price Report - July 1999 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report - July 1999 Marginal Energy Price Report - July 1999 Estimated Consumer Marginal Energy Prices for the Commercial and Residental Sectors for use in the Life-Cycle Cost...

  15. Grain Refinement of Permanent Mold Cast Copper Base Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.Sadayappan; J.P.Thomson; M.Elboujdaini; G.Ping Gu; M. Sahoo

    2005-04-01

    Grain refinement is a well established process for many cast and wrought alloys. The mechanical properties of various alloys could be enhanced by reducing the grain size. Refinement is also known to improve casting characteristics such as fluidity and hot tearing. Grain refinement of copper-base alloys is not widely used, especially in sand casting process. However, in permanent mold casting of copper alloys it is now common to use grain refinement to counteract the problem of severe hot tearing which also improves the pressure tightness of plumbing components. The mechanism of grain refinement in copper-base alloys is not well understood. The issues to be studied include the effect of minor alloy additions on the microstructure, their interaction with the grain refiner, effect of cooling rate, and loss of grain refinement (fading). In this investigation, efforts were made to explore and understand grain refinement of copper alloys, especially in permanent mold casting conditions.

  16. Using supercritical fluids to refine hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yarbro, Stephen Lee

    2014-11-25

    This is a method to reactively refine hydrocarbons, such as heavy oils with API gravities of less than 20.degree. and bitumen-like hydrocarbons with viscosities greater than 1000 cp at standard temperature and pressure using a selected fluid at supercritical conditions. The reaction portion of the method delivers lighter weight, more volatile hydrocarbons to an attached contacting device that operates in mixed subcritical or supercritical modes. This separates the reaction products into portions that are viable for use or sale without further conventional refining and hydro-processing techniques. This method produces valuable products with fewer processing steps, lower costs, increased worker safety due to less processing and handling, allow greater opportunity for new oil field development and subsequent positive economic impact, reduce related carbon dioxide, and wastes typical with conventional refineries.

  17. Gasification, polygeneration capture interest of refiners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aalund, L.R.

    1996-12-09

    Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants are moving into the mainstream of international refining. Such plants can turn refinery dregs into the whitest of all products--sparkling electricity--plus hydrogen and synthesis gas. Hydrogen is an indispensable element for cleaning up and improving modern fuels, while syngas is the feedstock for important finished petrochemicals and intermediaries. The status and potential of gasification technologies and projects were covered in a 3 day conference early in October in San Francisco. What made this conference different from others on the subject in the past was recognition that oil and natural gas producers and the international refining industry are becoming major power producers without government subsidies. Such projects can pass the scrutiny of lenders and the test of commerciality. They are not targeted simply for electricity, but also for production of hydrogen, steam, and petrochemical feedstock. The process objective for projects now far exceeds simple cogeneration. It`s now trigeneration, even polygeneration.

  18. Electromagnetic exploration of the Exmouth and Vøring rifted margins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myer, David Gerard

    2012-01-01

    continental margin; seismic interpretation, stratigraphy,CSEM, and seismic interpretation; (c) investigate the effect

  19. Risk Informed Margins Management as part of Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith

    2014-06-01

    The ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin is important to improved decision making about Light Water Reactor (LWR) design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margin management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. In addition, as research and development in the LWR Sustainability (LWRS) Program and other collaborative efforts yield new data, sensors, and improved scientific understanding of physical processes that govern the aging and degradation of plant SSCs needs and opportunities to better optimize plant safety and performance will become known. To support decision making related to economics, readability, and safety, the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway provides methods and tools that enable mitigation options known as risk informed margins management (RIMM) strategies.

  20. Reaping Energy Savings from Petroleum Refining 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, A.; Cascone, R.

    2006-01-01

    balance given in terms of percentages of crude feed for various streams. It is noted that in California, where crude oils processed tend to be heavy, hydrocracking is often used to reduce the molecular weights of the vacuum gas oil and vacuum residual... processes. The REEP leverages Nexant’s refining expertise from its Oil and Gas business unit and DSM program implementation experience from its Energy Management business unit. The Program also fully uses the lengthened duration of the PGC funding...

  1. LOCAL REFINEMENT AND MULTILEVEL PRECONDITIONING: IMPLEMENTATION AND NUMERICAL EXPERIMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holst, Michael J.

    refinement. While standard multilevel methods are effective for uniform refinement- based discretizations refined 2D and 3D meshes based on fairly standard (and easily implementable) red and red-green mesh by the Burroughs Wellcome Fund through the LJIS predoctoral training program at UC San Diego, in part by NSF (ACI

  2. Parallel Triangular Decompositions of an Oil Refining Simulation Xiaodong Zhang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moreno Maza, Marc

    important process in oil refining is to separate the crude oil into various oil products. This process the composition of the various oil products in designed refining columns operated under a given set of conditions and discussions. 1 Introduction One important process in oil refining is to separate the crude oil into various

  3. Deformable elastic network refinement for low-resolution macromolecular crystallography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schröder, Gunnar F.; Levitt, Michael; Brunger, Axel T.

    2014-09-01

    An overview of applications of the deformable elastic network (DEN) refinement method is presented together with recommendations for its optimal usage. Crystals of membrane proteins and protein complexes often diffract to low resolution owing to their intrinsic molecular flexibility, heterogeneity or the mosaic spread of micro-domains. At low resolution, the building and refinement of atomic models is a more challenging task. The deformable elastic network (DEN) refinement method developed previously has been instrumental in the determinion of several structures at low resolution. Here, DEN refinement is reviewed, recommendations for its optimal usage are provided and its limitations are discussed. Representative examples of the application of DEN refinement to challenging cases of refinement at low resolution are presented. These cases include soluble as well as membrane proteins determined at limiting resolutions ranging from 3 to 7 Å. Potential extensions of the DEN refinement technique and future perspectives for the interpretation of low-resolution crystal structures are also discussed.

  4. Alaskan refiner raced against winter to relocate vacuum unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gdula, L.M. [Tesoro Petroleum Corp., Kenai, AK (United States); Wentworth, J.A. [Litwin Engineers and Constructors, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    1995-03-20

    In late November 1994, San Antonio-based Tesoro Petroleum Corp. and Litwin Engineers and Constructors Inc. completed the relocation and refurbishment of a $25 million vacuum unit at Tesoro`s 72,000 b/d Kenai refinery. The addition of the vacuum distillation unit is a critical component in Tesoro`s market-driven strategy to enhance operating profits by maximizing production of higher-margin products such as gasoline and jet fuel. With its new vacuum distillation unit, Tesoro has reduced production of lower-value residual fuel oil while recovering more lighter, high-value material. The paper discusses the economic and strategic merits of purchasing and relocating an existing vacuum unit, the project schedule, new equipment, dismantling and transport, installation, tie-ins and start-up, products, operating changes, corrosion concerns, off gas, steam generation, design changes, environmental issues, reporting requirements, and accomplishments.

  5. A comparative assessment of resource efficiency in petroleum refining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Jeongwoo; Forman, Grant S.; Elgowainy, Amgad; Cai, Hao; Wang, Michael; DiVita, Vincent B.

    2015-03-25

    Because of increasing environmental and energy security concerns, a detailed understanding of energy efficiency and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the petroleum refining industry is critical for fair and equitable energy and environmental policies. To date, this has proved challenging due in part to the complex nature and variability within refineries. In an effort to simplify energy and emissions refinery analysis, we delineated LP modeling results from 60 large refineries from the US and EU into broad categories based on crude density (API gravity) and heavy product (HP) yields. Product-specific efficiencies and process fuel shares derived from this study were incorporated in Argonne National Laboratory’s GREET life-cycle model, along with regional upstream GHG intensities of crude, natural gas and electricity specific to the US and EU regions. The modeling results suggest that refineries that process relatively heavier crude inputs and have lower yields of HPs generally have lower energy efficiencies and higher GHG emissions than refineries that run lighter crudes with lower yields of HPs. The former types of refineries tend to utilize energy-intensive units which are significant consumers of utilities (heat and electricity) and hydrogen. Among the three groups of refineries studied, the major difference in the energy intensities is due to the amount of purchased natural gas for utilities and hydrogen, while the sum of refinery feed inputs are generally constant. These results highlight the GHG emissions cost a refiner pays to process deep into the barrel to produce more of the desirable fuels with low carbon to hydrogen ratio.

  6. A comparative assessment of resource efficiency in petroleum refining

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Han, Jeongwoo; Forman, Grant S.; Elgowainy, Amgad; Cai, Hao; Wang, Michael; DiVita, Vincent B.

    2015-03-25

    Because of increasing environmental and energy security concerns, a detailed understanding of energy efficiency and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the petroleum refining industry is critical for fair and equitable energy and environmental policies. To date, this has proved challenging due in part to the complex nature and variability within refineries. In an effort to simplify energy and emissions refinery analysis, we delineated LP modeling results from 60 large refineries from the US and EU into broad categories based on crude density (API gravity) and heavy product (HP) yields. Product-specific efficiencies and process fuel shares derived from this study weremore »incorporated in Argonne National Laboratory’s GREET life-cycle model, along with regional upstream GHG intensities of crude, natural gas and electricity specific to the US and EU regions. The modeling results suggest that refineries that process relatively heavier crude inputs and have lower yields of HPs generally have lower energy efficiencies and higher GHG emissions than refineries that run lighter crudes with lower yields of HPs. The former types of refineries tend to utilize energy-intensive units which are significant consumers of utilities (heat and electricity) and hydrogen. Among the three groups of refineries studied, the major difference in the energy intensities is due to the amount of purchased natural gas for utilities and hydrogen, while the sum of refinery feed inputs are generally constant. These results highlight the GHG emissions cost a refiner pays to process deep into the barrel to produce more of the desirable fuels with low carbon to hydrogen ratio.« less

  7. Naked Singularities in Higher Dimensional Gravitational Collapse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asit Banerjee; Ujjal Debnath; Subenoy Chakraborty

    2003-02-28

    Spherically symmetric inhomogeneous dust collapse has been studied in higher dimensional space-time and the factors responsible for the appearance of a naked singularity are analyzed in the region close to the centre for the marginally bound case. It is clearly demonstrated that in the former case naked singularities do not appear in the space-time having more than five dimension, which appears to a strong result. The non-marginally bound collapse is also examined in five dimensions and the role of shear in developing naked singularities in this space-time is discussed in details. The five dimensional space-time is chosen in the later case because we have exact solution in closed form only in five dimension and not in any other case.

  8. Refiners react to changes in the pipeline infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giles, K.A.

    1997-06-01

    Petroleum pipelines have long been a critical component in the distribution of crude and refined products in the U.S. Pipelines are typically the most cost efficient mode of transportation for reasonably consistent flow rates. For obvious reasons, inland refineries and consumers are much more dependent on petroleum pipelines to provide supplies of crude and refined products than refineries and consumers located on the coasts. Significant changes in U.S. distribution patterns for crude and refined products are reshaping the pipeline infrastructure and presenting challenges and opportunities for domestic refiners. These changes are discussed.

  9. Table 44. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Formulation, Sales...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    250 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 Table 44. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Formulation, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons...

  10. Bandwidth Study U.S. Petroleum Refining | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (or bandwidth) of potential energy savings opportunities. This bandwidth study examines energy consumption and potential energy savings opportunities in U.S. petroleum refining....

  11. ITP Petroleum Refining: Energy Efficiency Roadmap for Petroleum...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Efficiency Roadmap for Petroleum Refineries in California ITP Petroleum Refining: Energy Efficiency Roadmap for Petroleum Refineries in California refiningroadmap.pdf More...

  12. New Process for Grain Refinement of Aluminum. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Joseph A. Megy

    2000-09-22

    A new method of grain refining aluminum involving in-situ formation of boride nuclei in molten aluminum just prior to casting has been developed in the subject DOE program over the last thirty months by a team consisting of JDC, Inc., Alcoa Technical Center, GRAS, Inc., Touchstone Labs, and GKS Engineering Services. The Manufacturing process to make boron trichloride for grain refining is much simpler than preparing conventional grain refiners, with attendant environmental, capital, and energy savings. The manufacture of boride grain refining nuclei using the fy-Gem process avoids clusters, salt and oxide inclusions that cause quality problems in aluminum today.

  13. ITP Petroleum Refining: Petroleum Technology Vision 2020 | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Petroleum Technology Vision 2020 ITP Petroleum Refining: Petroleum Technology Vision 2020 techvision.pdf More Documents & Publications Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint...

  14. Table 35. Refiner Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    of table. 134 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 Table 35. Refiner Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Cents per...

  15. Refined knot invariants and Hilbert schemes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eugene Gorsky; Andrei Negu?

    2015-02-13

    We consider the construction of refined Chern-Simons torus knot invariants by M. Aganagic and S. Shakirov from the DAHA viewpoint of I. Cherednik. We give a proof of Cherednik's conjecture on the stabilization of superpolynomials, and then use the results of O. Schiffmann and E. Vasserot to relate knot invariants to the Hilbert scheme of points on the plane. Then we use the methods of the second author to compute these invariants explicitly in the uncolored case. We also propose a conjecture relating these constructions to the rational Cherednik algebra, as in the work of the first author, A. Oblomkov, J. Rasmussen and V. Shende. Among the combinatorial consequences of this work is a statement of the m/n shuffle conjecture.

  16. Unitary-process discrimination with error margin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Hashimoto; A. Hayashi; M. Hayashi; M. Horibe

    2010-06-10

    We investigate a discrimination scheme between unitary processes. By introducing a margin for the probability of erroneous guess, this scheme interpolates the two standard discrimination schemes: minimum-error and unambiguous discrimination. We present solutions for two cases. One is the case of two unitary processes with general prior probabilities. The other is the case with a group symmetry: the processes comprise a projective representation of a finite group. In the latter case, we found that unambiguous discrimination is a kind of "all or nothing": the maximum success probability is either 0 or 1. We also closely analyze how entanglement with an auxiliary system improves discrimination performance.

  17. Caldera Rim Margins | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank, Maine:Kansas: Energy ResourcesParish,Caldera Rim Margins Jump to:

  18. Marginal Energy Prices - RECS97 Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOE Safetyof Energy ThisSites |and theDepartment ofMarchMarginal

  19. On Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Atmospheric Pollution Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandu, Adrian

    On Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Atmospheric Pollution Models Emil M. Constantinescu and Adrian res- olution system for modeling regional air pollution based on the chemical transport model STEM. Keywords: Air Pollution Modeling, Adaptive Mesh Refinement. 1 Introduction Inadequate grid resolution can

  20. Specification and Refinement of a RealTime Control System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Graeme

    such approach via the specification and refinement of the well­known Steam Boiler Control Problem. The case calculus [Fidge et al., 1998] through the specifi­ cation and refinement of the well­known Steam Boiler. These features, although not central to the Steam Boiler Control Problem, are typical of features which must

  1. Refining and End Use Study of Coal Liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-10-01

    This report summarizes revisions to the design basis for the linear programing refining model that is being used in the Refining and End Use Study of Coal Liquids. This revision primarily reflects the addition of data for the upgrading of direct coal liquids.

  2. Hydroprocessing of solvent-refined coal: catalyst-screening results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stiegel, G.J.; Tischer, R.E.; Polinski, L.M.

    1982-03-01

    This report presents the results of screening four catalysts for hydroprocessing a 50 wt% mixture of SRC-I in a prehydrogenated creosote oil using a continuous flow unit. All catalysts employed were nickel-molybdates with varying properties. Reaction conditions were 2000 psi, 8 SCFH of hydrogen, volume hourly space velocity of 0.6 to 1.0 cc of SRC-I/hr/cc of catalyst, and 48 hours at 750/sup 0/F followed by 72 hours at 780/sup 0/F. The results indicate that the Shell 324 catalyst is best for hydrogenation of the feedstock but only marginally better than CB 81-44 for denitrogenation. The CB 81-44 catalyst may be slightly better than Shell 324 for the conversion of the +850/sup 0/F fraction of the feedstock. Desulfurization was uniformly high for all catalysts. Catalysts with a bimodal pore size distribution (i.e., SMR7-6137(1)) appear to be better for denitrogenation than unimodal catalysts (i.e., SMR7-6137(4)) containing the same metals loading. Unimodal catalysts (i.e., Shell 324) with higher metals loadings are comparable to bimodal catalysts (i.e., CB 81-44) containing less metals. The results indicate that pore size distribution and metals loading are important parameters for high activity. Catalysts with a unimodal pore volume distribution are capable of being restored to their original state, while bimodal ones experience a loss in surface area and pore volume and an increase in pellet density. This is attributed to the more efficient use of the interior surface area of the catalyst, which results in higher accumulation of coke and metals. Since coke can be removed via controlled oxidation, the irreversible loss is due to the higher concentrations of metals in the catalyst.

  3. Changing System Interfaces Consistently: a New Refinement Strategy for CSP B

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doran, Simon J.

    Changing System Interfaces Consistently: a New Refinement Strategy for CSP B Steve Schneider refinement in the context of CSP B. Our motivation to include this notion of refinement within the CSP B to change the events of a CSP process and the B machines when refining a system. Notions of refinement based

  4. Steel refining with an electrochemical cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blander, M.; Cook, G.M.

    1988-05-17

    Apparatus is described for processing a metallic fluid containing iron oxide, container for a molten metal including an electrically conductive refractory disposed for contact with the molten metal which contains iron oxide, an electrolyte in the form of a basic slag on top of the molten metal, an electrode in the container in contact with the slag electrically separated from the refractory, and means for establishing a voltage across the refractory and the electrode to reduce iron oxide to iron at the surface of the refractory in contact with the iron oxide containing fluid. A process is disclosed for refining an iron product containing not more than about 10% by weight oxygen and not more than about 10% by weight sulfur, comprising providing an electrolyte of a slag containing one or more of calcium oxide, magnesium oxide, silica or alumina, providing a cathode of the iron product in contact with the electrolyte, providing an anode in contact with the electrolyte electrically separated from the cathode, and operating an electrochemical cell formed by the anode, the cathode and the electrolyte to separate oxygen or sulfur present in the iron product therefrom. 2 figs.

  5. Steel refining with an electrochemical cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blander, M.; Cook, G.M.

    1985-05-21

    Disclosed is an apparatus for processing a metallic fluid containing iron oxide, container for a molten metal including an electrically conductive refractory disposed for contact with the molten metal which contains iron oxide, an electrolyte in the form of a basic slag on top of the molten metal, an electrode in the container in contact with the slag electrically separated from the refractory, and means for establishing a voltage across the refractory and the electrode to reduce iron oxide to iron at the surface of the refractory in contact with the iron oxide containing fluid. A process is disclosed for refining an iron product containing not more than about 10% by weight sulfur, comprising providing an electrolyte of a slag containing one or more of calcium oxide, magnesium oxide, silica or alumina, providing a cathode of the iron product in contact with the electrolyte, providing an anode in contact with the electrolyte electrically separated from the cathode, and operating an electrochemical cell formed by the anode, the cathode and the electrolyte to separate oxygen or sulfur present in the iron product therefrom.

  6. GRChombo : Numerical Relativity with Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clough, Katy; Finkel, Hal; Kunesch, Markus; Lim, Eugene A; Tunyasuvunakool, Saran

    2015-01-01

    Numerical relativity has undergone a revolution in the past decade. With a well-understood mathematical formalism, and full control over the gauge modes, it is now entering an era in which the science can be properly explored. In this work, we introduce GRChombo, a new numerical relativity code written to take full advantage of modern parallel computing techniques. GRChombo's features include full adaptive mesh refinement with block structured Berger-Rigoutsos grid generation which supports non-trivial "many-boxes-in-many-boxes" meshing hierarchies, and massive parallelism through the Message Passing Interface (MPI). GRChombo evolves the Einstein equation with the standard BSSN formalism, with an option to turn on CCZ4 constraint damping if required. We show that GRChombo passes all the standard "Apples-to-Apples" code comparison tests. We also show that it can stably and accurately evolve vacuum black hole spacetimes such as binary black hole mergers, and non-vacuum spacetimes such as scalar collapses into b...

  7. MARGINAL EXPENSE OIL WELL WIRELESS SURVEILLANCE MEOWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason M. Medizade; John R. Ridgely; Donald G. Nelson

    2004-11-01

    A marginal expense oil well wireless surveillance system to monitor system performance and production from rod-pumped wells in real time from wells operated by Vaquero Energy in the Edison Field, Main Area of Kern County in California has been successfully designed and field tested. The surveillance system includes a proprietary flow sensor, a programmable transmitting unit, a base receiver and receiving antenna, and a base station computer equipped with software to interpret the data. First, the system design is presented. Second, field data obtained from three wells is shown. Results of the study show that an effective, cost competitive, real-time wireless surveillance system can be introduced to oil fields across the United States and the world.

  8. Regnar -- Development of a marginal field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thalund, K.M.; Brodersen, F.P.; Roigaard-Petersen, B.

    1994-12-31

    Regnar is a small marginal field located some 13 km from the main Dan F complex and is the first subsea completion in Danish waters, operated by Maersk Olie og Gas AS. A short lifetime has been predicted for the field which therefore has been developed as a low cost project, using a combination of subsea technology and minimum topside facilities. Regnar consists of a subsea x-mas tree producing through a 6 inch pipeline with a 2 1/2 inch chemical piggyback line to Dan F. The x-mas tree and the subsea choke valve are controlled from a buoy moored nearby the well. The buoy is radio linked to Dan F. The Regnar field was brought on stream on September 26, 1993.

  9. Multigrid elliptic equation solver with adaptive mesh refinement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. David Brown; Lisa L. Lowe

    2005-03-22

    In this paper we describe in detail the computational algorithm used by our parallel multigrid elliptic equation solver with adaptive mesh refinement. Our code uses truncation error estimates to adaptively refine the grid as part of the solution process. The presentation includes a discussion of the orders of accuracy that we use for prolongation and restriction operators to ensure second order accurate results and to minimize computational work. Code tests are presented that confirm the overall second order accuracy and demonstrate the savings in computational resources provided by adaptive mesh refinement.

  10. Integrated process for the solvent refining of coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garg, Diwakar (Macungie, PA)

    1983-01-01

    A process is set forth for the integrated liquefaction of coal by the catalytic solvent refining of a feed coal in a first stage to liquid and solid products and the catalytic hydrogenation of the solid product in a second stage to produce additional liquid product. A fresh inexpensive, throw-away catalyst is utilized in the second stage hydrogenation of the solid product and this catalyst is recovered and recycled for catalyst duty in the solvent refining stage without any activation steps performed on the used catalyst prior to its use in the solvent refining of feed coal.

  11. Reitveld refinement study of PLZT ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Rakesh; Bavbande, D. V.; Bafna, V. H.; Mohan, D.; Kothiyal, G. P.; Mishra, R.

    2013-02-05

    PLZT ceramics of composition Pb{sub 0.93}La{sub 0.07}(Zr{sub 0.60}Ti{sub 0.40})O{sub 3}, have been milled for 6hrs and 24hrs were prepared by solid state synthesis route. The 6hrs milled and 24hrs milled samples are represented as PLZT-6 and PLZT-24 ceramics respectively. X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern was recorded at room temperature. The XRD pattern has been analyzed by employing Rietveld refinement method. Phase identification shows that all the peaks observed in PLZT-6 and PLZT-24 ceramics could be indexed to P4mm space group with tetragonal symmetry. The unit cell parameters of 6hrs milled PLZT ceramics are found to be a=b=4.0781(5)A and c=4.0938(7)A and for 24hrs milled PLZT ceramics unit cell parameters are a=b=4.0679(4)A and c=4.1010(5)A . The axial ratio c/a and unit cell volume of PLZT-6 are 1.0038 and 68.09(2)A{sup 3} respectively. In PLZT-24 samples, the axial ratio c/a value is 1.0080 which is little more than that of the 6hr milled PLZT sample whereas the unit cell volume decrease to 67.88 (1) A{sup 3}. An average crystallite size was estimated by using Scherrer's formula. Dielectric properties were obtained by measuring the capacitance and tand loss using Stanford LCR meter.

  12. Optimized planning target volume margin in helical tomotherapy for prostate cancer: is there a preferred method?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Yuan Jie; Chang, Kyung Hwan; Shim, Jang Bo; Kim, Kwang Hyeon; Jang, Min Sun; Yoon, Won Sup; Yang, Dae Sik; Park, Young Je; Kim, Chul Yong

    2015-01-01

    To compare the dosimetrical differences between plans generated by helical tomotherapy using 2D or 3D margining technique in in prostate cancer. Ten prostate cancer patients were included in this study. For 2D plans, planning target volume (PTV) was created by adding 5 mm (lateral/anterior-posterior) to clinical target volume (CTV). For 3D plans, 5 mm margin was added not only in lateral/anterior-posterior, but also in superior-inferior to CTV. Various dosimetrical indices, including the prescription isodose to target volume (PITV) ratio, conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), target coverage index (TCI), modified dose homogeneity index (MHI), conformation number (CN), critical organ scoring index (COSI), and quality factor (QF) were determined to compare the different treatment plans. Differences between 2D and 3D PTV indices were not significant except for CI (p = 0.023). 3D margin plans (11195 MUs) resulted in higher (13.0%) monitor units than 2D margin plans (9728 MUs). There were no significant d...

  13. Sandia Energy - NASA Award for Marginal Ice Zone Observations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NASA Award for Marginal Ice Zone Observations and Process Experiment (MIZOPEX) Home Climate Office of Science News News & Events Research & Capabilities Monitoring Analysis...

  14. The Law of Demand versus Diminishing Marginal Utility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beattie, Bruce R.; LaFrance, Jeffrey T

    2006-01-01

    not guarantee DSD. This form of utility function generates aHausman). This type of utility model is commonplace amongversus Diminishing Marginal Utility References Burt, O.R.

  15. The Law of Demand Versus Diminishing Marginal Utility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beattie, Bruce R.; LaFrance, Jeffrey T.

    2006-01-01

    not guarantee DSD. This form of utility function generates aHausman). This type of utility model is commonplace amongversus Diminishing Marginal Utility References Burt, O.R.

  16. CATALYTIC CONVERSION OF SOLVENT REFINED COAL TO LIQUID PRODUCTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanner, K.I.

    2010-01-01

    I. Solvent Refined Coal II. Catalysts III. Purpose andSondreal, E.A. , "Viscosity of Coal Liquids - The Effect ofAnthraxylon - Kinetics of Coal Hydrogenation," Ind. and Eng.

  17. Error estimation and adaptive mesh refinement for aerodynamic flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartmann, Ralf

    Error estimation and adaptive mesh refinement for aerodynamic flows Ralf Hartmann1 and Paul Houston, 38108 Braunschweig, Germany Ralf.Hartmann@dlr.de 2 School of Mathematical Sciences University

  18. Error estimation and adaptive mesh refinement for aerodynamic flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartmann, Ralf

    Error estimation and adaptive mesh refinement for aerodynamic flows Ralf Hartmann, Joachim Held), Lilien- thalplatz 7, 38108 Braunschweig, Germany, e-mail: Ralf.Hartmann@dlr.de 1 #12;2 Ralf Hartmann

  19. Europe`s refining industry woes detailed at London meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhodes, A.

    1996-12-09

    Refiners, catalyst producers, engineering firms, and process licensers discussed Europe`s refining industry at the first-ever European Refining Technology Conference, October 28--30, London. Some 400 attendees heard presentations on European Union (EU) environmental legislation, and a variety of processing and catalyst options available to help refiners comply with the regulations. The conference consisted of two parallel sessions: one covering heavy-ends conversion and a second covering hydroprocessing and other light-ends processes. Each session included nine technical presentations, and a panel discussion in which 12 panelists answered presubmitted questions. The heavy-ends technical presentations covered topics including: fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) technology and catalysts, bottoms upgrading options, deep-cut distillation techniques, and gasification. The light-ends papers discussed: European air and fuels qualities, catalytic reforming, hydrotreating, biocatalytic desulfurization, hydrocracking, dewaxing, alkylation, and etherification.

  20. CATALYTIC CONVERSION OF SOLVENT REFINED COAL TO LIQUID PRODUCTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanner, K.I.

    2010-01-01

    E.A. , "Viscosity of Coal Liquids - The Effect of CharacterOF SOLVENT REFINED COAL TO LIQUID PRODUCTS Kylan I. Tanner*for Conversion of Coal to Liquid Fuels: Basic and Ex-

  1. Assessment of Biomass Resources from Marginal Lands in APEC Economies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milbrandt, A.; Overend, R. P.

    2009-08-01

    The goal of this study is to examine the marginal lands in Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) economies and evaluate their biomass productivity potential. Twelve categories of marginal lands are identified using the Global Agro-Ecological Zones system of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization.

  2. A risk-informed approach to safety margins analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith; Diego Mandelli

    2013-07-01

    The Risk Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) Pathway is a systematic approach developed to characterize and quantify safety margins of nuclear power plant structures, systems and components. The model has been tested on the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Lab.

  3. INTRODUCTION Margin evolution and plate-reconstruction models require a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Dietmar

    ­243 Formation and evolution of Australian passive margins: implications for locating the boundary between. STAGG2 AND P. A. SYMONDS2 1 Division of Geology and Geophysics, Building F05, School of Geosciences. Australian passive margins display a large variety of styles, including narrow, wide, volcanic and non

  4. On Higher Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nils A. Baas

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we discuss various philosophical aspects of the hyperstructure concept extending networks and higher categories. By this discussion we hope to pave the way for applications and further developments of the mathematical theory of hyperstructures.

  5. Radiotherapy margin design with particular consideration of high curvature CTVs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herschtal, Alan; Kron, Tomas; Fox, Chris [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, St. Andrews Place, E. Melbourne, Victoria 3002 (Australia)

    2009-03-15

    In applying 3D conformal radiation therapy to a tumor clinical target volume (CTV), a margin is added around the CTV to account for any sources of error in the application of treatment which may result in misalignment between the CTV and the dose distribution actually delivered. The volume enclosed within the CTV plus the margin is known as the PTV, or planning target volume. The larger the errors are anticipated to be, the wider the margin will need to be to accommodate those errors. Based on the approach of van Herk et al. [''The probability of correct target dosage: Dose-population histograms for deriving treatment margins in radiotherapy,'' Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol., Phys. 47(4), 1121-1135 (2000)] this paper develops the mathematical theory behind the calculation of the margin width required to ensure that the entire CTV receives sufficiently high dose with sufficiently high probability. The margin recipe developed not only considers the magnitude of the errors but also includes a term to adjust for curved CTV surfaces. In doing so, the accuracy of the margin recipe is enhanced yet remains mathematically concise enough to be readily implemented in the clinical setting. The results are particularly relevant for clinical situations in which the uncertainties in treatment are large relative to the size of the CTV.

  6. Marginal erg facies: A trial approach toward a descriptive classification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caputo, M.V. ); Langford, R.P. )

    1991-03-01

    During the late 1970s and early 1980s, sedimentologists began recognizing the margins of eolian sand seas as separate, components which differed from interior sand seas in geometry, extent, and facies. Stratigraphers have now observed these differences in eolian rocks. Erg margins may be grouped in five ways: (1) by associations with extradunal environments-coastal plain, lacustrine, periglacial, marine (tidal flat, coastal sabkha, beach, and lagoon), and arid alluvial (alluvial fan, fluvial, playa, inland sabkha); (2) by allocyclic controls-eustasy, plate tectonism, and climate; (3) by autocyclic controls-local tectonism, topography, vegetation, hydrology, structure, sediment source and supply, and wind regime; (4) by geographic position-upwind, downwind, and along-wind margins; and (5) by sedimentary facies-texture and architecture. In contrast with erg interiors, erg margins are characterized by smaller, less complex dune-forms related to thinner sand accumulation; elementary dune architecture; more vegetation and bioturbation; high occurrence of sand sheet, zibar, and serir facies; expansive, low-relief interdunes with widely distributed dunes; and a greater proportion of interbedded extradunal deposits. Some of the published studies on ancient eolian systems have identified erg margin facies that have been influences by marine and arid alluvial processes. Few reports have described lacustrine-eolian and periglacial-eolian interactions. This study is an attempt to organize known features of modern and ancient erg margins into a scheme based on erg margin controls.

  7. Subsets of Women With Close or Positive Margins After Breast-Conserving Surgery With High Local Recurrence Risk Despite Breast Plus Boost Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lupe, Krystine; Truong, Pauline T.; Alexander, Cheryl; Lesperance, Mary; Speers, Caroline; Tyldesley, Scott

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: (1) To examine the effect of surgical margin status on local recurrence (LR) and survival following breast-conserving therapy; (2) To identify subsets with close or positive margins with high LR risk despite whole breast radiotherapy (RT) plus boost. Methods and Materials: Subjects were 2,264 women with pT1-3, any N, M0 invasive breast cancer, treated with breast-conserving surgery and whole breast {+-} boost RT. Five-year Kaplan-Meier (KM) LR, breast cancer-specific and overall survival (BCSS and OS) were compared between cohorts with negative (n = 1,980), close (n = 222), and positive (n = 62) margins. LR rates were analyzed according to clinicopathologic characteristics. Multivariable Cox regression modeling and matched analysis of close/positive margin cases and negative margin controls were performed. Results: Median follow-up was 5.2 years. Boost RT was used in 92% of patients with close or positive margins. Five-year KM LR rates in the negative, close and positive margin cohorts were 1.3%, 4.0%, and 5.2%, respectively (p = 0.001). BCSS and OS were similar in the three margin subgroups. In the close/positive margin cohort, LR rates were 10.2% with age <45 years, 11.8% with Grade III, 11.3% with lymphovascular invasion (LVI), and 26.3% with {>=}4 positive nodes. Corresponding rates in the negative margin cohort were 2.3%, 2.4%, 1.0%, and 2.4%, respectively. On Cox regression analysis of the entire cohort, close or positive margin, Grade III histology, {>=}4 positive nodes, and lack of systemic therapy were significantly associated with higher LR risk. When close/positive margin cases were matched to negative margin controls, the difference in 5-year LR remained significant (4.25% vs. 0.7%, p < 0.001). Conclusions: On univariable analysis, subsets with close or positive margins, in combination with age <45 years, Grade III, LVI, and {>=}4 positive nodes, have 5-year LR >10% despite whole breast plus boost RT. These patients should be considered for more definitive surgery.

  8. The US petroleum refining industry in the 1980's

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-11

    As part of the EIA program on petroleum, The US Petroleum Refining Industry in the 1980's, presents a historical analysis of the changes that took place in the US petroleum refining industry during the 1980's. It is intended to be of interest to analysts in the petroleum industry, state and federal government officials, Congress, and the general public. The report consists of six chapters and four appendices. Included is a detailed description of the major events and factors that affected the domestic refining industry during this period. Some of the changes that took place in the 1980's are the result of events that started in the 1970's. The impact of these events on US refinery configuration, operations, economics, and company ownership are examined. 23 figs., 11 tabs.

  9. Survey shows over 1,000 refining catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhodes, A.K.

    1991-10-14

    The Journal's latest survey of worldwide refining catalysts reveals that there are more than 1,040 unique catalyst designations in commercial use in 19 processing categories - an increase of some 140 since the compilation of refining catalysts was last published. As a matter of interest, some 700 catalysts were determined during the first survey. The processing categories surveyed in this paper are: Catalytic naphtha reforming. Dimerization, Isomerization (C{sub 4}), Isomerization (C{sub 5} and C{sub 6}), Isomerization (xylenes), Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC), Hydrocracking, Mild hydrocracking, hydrotreating/hydrogenation/ saturation, Hydrorefining, Polymerization, Sulfur (elemental) recovery, Steam hydrocarbon reforming, Sweetening, Clause unit tail gas treatment, Oxygenates, Combustion promoters (FCC), Sulfur oxides reduction (FCC), and Other refining processes.

  10. Trends in heavy oil production and refining in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Ramzel, E.B.; Pendergrass, R.A. II.

    1992-07-01

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production and is part of a study being conducted for the US Department of Energy. This report summarizes trends in oil production and refining in Canada. Heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity) production in California has increased from 20% of the state's total oil production in the early 1940s to 70% in the late 1980s. In each of the three principal petroleum producing districts (Los Angeles Basin, Coastal Basin, and San Joaquin Valley) oil production has peaked then declined at different times throughout the past 30 years. Thermal production of heavy oil has contributed to making California the largest producer of oil by enhanced oil recovery processes in spite of low oil prices for heavy oil and stringent environmental regulation. Opening of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Elk Hills (CA) field in 1976, brought about a major new source of light oil at a time when light oil production had greatly declined. Although California is a major petroleum-consuming state, in 1989 the state used 13.3 billion gallons of gasoline or 11.5% of US demand but it contributed substantially to the Nation's energy production and refining capability. California is the recipient and refines most of Alaska's 1.7 million barrel per day oil production. With California production, Alaskan oil, and imports brought into California for refining, California has an excess of oil and refined products and is a net exporter to other states. The local surplus of oil inhibits exploitation of California heavy oil resources even though the heavy oil resources exist. Transportation, refining, and competition in the market limit full development of California heavy oil resources.

  11. Trends in heavy oil production and refining in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Ramzel, E.B.; Pendergrass, R.A. II

    1992-07-01

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production and is part of a study being conducted for the US Department of Energy. This report summarizes trends in oil production and refining in Canada. Heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity) production in California has increased from 20% of the state`s total oil production in the early 1940s to 70% in the late 1980s. In each of the three principal petroleum producing districts (Los Angeles Basin, Coastal Basin, and San Joaquin Valley) oil production has peaked then declined at different times throughout the past 30 years. Thermal production of heavy oil has contributed to making California the largest producer of oil by enhanced oil recovery processes in spite of low oil prices for heavy oil and stringent environmental regulation. Opening of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Elk Hills (CA) field in 1976, brought about a major new source of light oil at a time when light oil production had greatly declined. Although California is a major petroleum-consuming state, in 1989 the state used 13.3 billion gallons of gasoline or 11.5% of US demand but it contributed substantially to the Nation`s energy production and refining capability. California is the recipient and refines most of Alaska`s 1.7 million barrel per day oil production. With California production, Alaskan oil, and imports brought into California for refining, California has an excess of oil and refined products and is a net exporter to other states. The local surplus of oil inhibits exploitation of California heavy oil resources even though the heavy oil resources exist. Transportation, refining, and competition in the market limit full development of California heavy oil resources.

  12. Global-local Structural Optimization Using Response Surfaces of Local Optimization Margins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumaier, Arnold

    1 Global-local Structural Optimization Using Response Surfaces of Local Optimization Margins Boyang optimization problems. First, a large number of component optimizations for maximization of margins are performed. Response surface approximations (RSA) for maximum margins of component optimization

  13. Design of miniature floating platform for marginal fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miao, Sha, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01

    This thesis presents the design of a novel type of miniature floating offshore platforms with a heave plate attached at the keel, suitable for developing deep-water marginal fields. This design features a small displacement, ...

  14. Making In-Class Competitions Desirable For Marginalized Groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGovern, Amy

    with and hinder other opponents (e.g. a stock car race or boxing match). Students using Spacewar were com- peting may also appeal other groups of students who can be marginalized in engineering. Our results indicate

  15. Geotechnical characterization of sediments from Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia Continental Margin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Brian B. (Brian Bautista), 1979-

    2004-01-01

    Eight whole core sediment samples were obtained from ODP Site 1244, Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia Continental Margin with the goal of understanding the stress history, consolidation behavior and strength characteristics of the ...

  16. The value of marginal analysis in electric power system operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katzman, M.T.; Shelton, R.B.

    1989-01-01

    Electric utilities have traditionally based their calculation of costs and derived prices on the basis of averages. Marginal analysis provides an alternative method of costing and price setting. Not only does marginal analysis yield different computations, it can lead to different and more efficient decisions. This point is illustrated by the evaluation of biomass cogeneration to a utility and the costing of rural extensions. 7 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Electricity Prices in a Competitive Environment: Marginal Cost Pricing

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1997-01-01

    Presents the results of an analysis that focuses on two questions: (1) How are prices for competitive generation services likely to differ from regulated prices if competitive prices are based on marginal costs rather than regulated cost-of-service pricing? (2) What impacts will the competitive pricing of generation services (based on marginal costs) have on electricity consumption patterns, production costs, and the financial integrity of electricity suppliers?

  18. Transverse extension of Guatemala active margin: implications for accretion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMillen, K.J.

    1987-05-01

    The inner trench wall of the Middle America Trench off Guatemala does not show evidence of accretion, based on DSDP Legs 67 and 84. The presence of normal faults on the lower inner trench slope has resulted in various subsidence models for the margin. Fault traces would be expected to trend parallel to the margin (northwest-southeast) if margin subsidence had occurred. Instead, the faults trend north-south and occur in groups of faults downdropped to the east and to the west. The faults do not seem to be related to margin subsidence but rather to previously proposed Cenozoic Central American rifting. The rifting resulted from crustal bending as the Central American block rounded southern Mexico during differential North American/Caribbean plate motion. The rifts, which extend nearly to the trench axis, underlie the San Jose submarine canyon and align with the Guatemala City graben. Possible east-west accommodation zones, between fault zones that dip in opposite directions, exist near the shelf edge. These accommodation zones may have formed along lines of weakness where oceanic crust was previously emplaced into the margin during or prior to the Eocene. These rifts show that compressional and extension features can occur simultaneously with underthrusting on active margins.

  19. HigherDimensional Categories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Eugenia

    ­dimensional categories are like a vast mountain that many people are trying to conquer. Some intrepid explorers have made, are we even climbing the same mountain? This work is an illustrated guide book to the world of higher to give visitors their bearings but not so much that they need a magnifying glass to find what they

  20. Higher-Dimensional Categories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Eugenia

    -dimensional categories are like a vast mountain that many people are trying to conquer. Some intrepid explorers have made, are we even climbing the same mountain? This work is an illustrated guide book to the world of higher to give visitors their bearings but not so much that they need a magnifying glass to find what they

  1. Bed radar reflectivity across the north margin of Whillans Ice Stream, West Antarctica, and implications for margin processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raymond, C. F.; Catania, Ginny A.; Nereson, Nadine; van der Veen, Cornelis J.

    2006-01-01

    the margin is mediated by processes other than deformation of thick dilated till that is the source of lubrication allowing fast motion in the interior of the ice stream....

  2. Marginal Abatement Costs and Marginal Welfare Costs for Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reductions: Results from the EPPA Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, Jennifer

    Marginal abatement cost (MAC) curves, relationships between tons of emissions abated and the CO2 (or GHG) price, have been widely used as pedagogic devices to illustrate simple economic concepts such as the benefits of ...

  3. Interval methods for computing various refinements of Nash equilibria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sainudiin, Raazesh

    Interval methods for computing various refinements of Nash equilibria Bartlomiej Jacek Kubica, assumptions on their knowledge, ... Concepts: Dominant strategy equilibrium. The Nash equilibrium. The core of a game (for cooperative games). ... #12;Nash equilibrium Let the game (X1 ,...,Xn ;q1 ,...,qn

  4. UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY Refined Freeman-Durden for Harvest Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    detection in rice paddy fields. However, harvest detection for other crops without a smooth underlying water#12;UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY Refined Freeman-Durden for Harvest Detection using PolSAR data by Sina is one of the main challenges of the current century. Harvest detection, as an input for decision making

  5. Refinement of Hybrid Systems from Formal Models to Design Languages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cengarle, María Victoria

    of high-level design of a control system, it is highly desirable to use representations that accuratelyRefinement of Hybrid Systems from Formal Models to Design Languages Jan Romberg Systems & Software Abstract System-level design for discrete-continuous embedded systems is a complex and error- prone task

  6. routing, Internet, BGP Internet Expansion, Refinement and Churn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    routing, Internet, BGP Internet Expansion, Refinement and Churn ANDRE BROIDO, EVI NEMETH, KC CLAFFY measures reflect contributions of opposite sign, and that true measure of variation, or churn, is the sum a standalone prefix to a root prefix) are instances of routing system churn. One advantage of using our notion

  7. routing, Internet, BGP Internet Expansion, Refinement and Churn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    routing, Internet, BGP Internet Expansion, Refinement and Churn ANDRE BROIDO, EVI NEMETH, KC CLAFFY contributions of opposite sign, and that true measure of variation, or churn, is the sum of their absolute a standalone prefix to a root prefix) are instances of routing system churn. One advantage of using our notion

  8. Department of Computing Stepwise Refinement in Event-B||CSP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doran, Simon J.

    in Event-B||CSP Part 1: Safety Steve Schneider, Helen Treharne and Heike Wehrheim March 12th 2011 #12;Stepwise Refinement in Event-B CSP Part 1: Safety Steve Schneider1 Helen Treharne1 Heike Wehrheim2 1, 2011 Contents 1 Introduction 3 2 CSP 3 2.1 Notation

  9. TOPICAL PAPER Potential Synergies and Challenges in Refining Cellulosic Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    TOPICAL PAPER Potential Synergies and Challenges in Refining Cellulosic Biomass to Fuels, Chemicals Hampshire 03755 Lignocellulosic biomass such as agricultural and forestry residues and dedicated crops that outweigh increased biomass transport costs for facilities processing less than about 10,000 dry tons per

  10. Stereotactic Radiosurgery of the Postoperative Resection Cavity for Brain Metastases: Prospective Evaluation of Target Margin on Tumor Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Clara Y.H.; Chang, Steven D.; Gibbs, Iris C.; Adler, John R.; Harsh, Griffith R.; Lieberson, Robert E.; Soltys, Scott G.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: Given the neurocognitive toxicity associated with whole-brain irradiation (WBRT), approaches to defer or avoid WBRT after surgical resection of brain metastases are desirable. Our initial experience with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) targeting the resection cavity showed promising results. We examined the outcomes of postoperative resection cavity SRS to determine the effect of adding a 2-mm margin around the resection cavity on local failure (LF) and toxicity. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 120 cavities in 112 patients treated from 1998-2009. Factors associated with LF and distant brain failure (DF) were analyzed using competing risks analysis, with death as a competing risk. The overall survival (OS) rate was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier product-limit method; variables associated with OS were evaluated using the Cox proportional hazards and log rank tests. Results: The 12-month cumulative incidence rates of LF and DF, with death as a competing risk, were 9.5% and 54%, respectively. On univariate analysis, expansion of the cavity with a 2-mm margin was associated with decreased LF; the 12-month cumulative incidence rates of LF with and without margin were 3% and 16%, respectively (P=.042). The 12-month toxicity rates with and without margin were 3% and 8%, respectively (P=.27). On multivariate analysis, melanoma histology (P=.038) and number of brain metastases (P=.0097) were associated with higher DF. The median OS time was 17 months (range, 2-114 months), with a 12-month OS rate of 62%. Overall, WBRT was avoided in 72% of the patients. Conclusion: Adjuvant SRS targeting the resection cavity of brain metastases results in excellent local control and allows WBRT to be avoided in a majority of patients. A 2-mm margin around the resection cavity improved local control without increasing toxicity compared with our prior technique with no margin.

  11. SU-E-J-88: Margin Reduction of Level II/III Planning Target Volume for Image-Guided Simultaneous Integrated Boost Head-And-Neck Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Can, S; Neylon, J; Qi, S; Santhanam, A; Low, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of improved normal tissue sparing for head-and-neck (H'N) image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) by employing tighter CTV-to-PTV margins for target level II/III though a GPU-based deformable image registration and dose accumulation framework. Methods: Ten H'N simultaneous integrated boost cases treated on TomoTherapy were retrospectively analyzed. Weekly kVCT scans in addition to daily MVCT scans were acquired for each patient. Reduced margin plans were generated with 0- mm margin for level II and III PTV (while 3-5 mm margin for PTV1) and compared with the standard margin plan using 3-5mm margin to all CTV1-3 (reference plan). An in-house developed GPU-based 3D image deformation tool was used to register and deform the weekly KVCTs with the planning CT and determine the delivered mean/minimum/maximum dose, dose volume histograms (DVHs), etc. Results: Compared with the reference plans, the averaged cord maximum, the right and left parotid doses reduced by 22.7 %, 16.5 %, and 9 % respectively in the reduced margin plans. The V95 for PTV2 and PTV3 were found within 2 and 5% between the reference and tighter margin plans. For the reduced margin plans, the averaged cumulative mean doses were consistent with the planned dose for PTV1, PTV2 and PTV3 within 1.5%, 1.7% and 1.4%. Similar dose variations of the delivered dose were seen for the reference and tighter margin plans. The delivered maximum and mean doses for the cord were 3.55 % and 2.37% higher than the planned doses; a 5 % higher cumulative mean dose for the parotids was also observed for the delivered dose than the planned doses in both plans. Conclusion: By imposing tighter CTV-to-PTV margins for level II and III targets for H'N irradiation, acceptable cumulative doses were achievable when coupled with weekly kVCT guidance while improving normal structure sparing.

  12. RFA-14-0001 - In the Matter of Commonwealth Oil Refining Company...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    RFA-14-0001 - In the Matter of Commonwealth Oil Refining Company, Inc.Commonwealth of Puerto Rico RFA-14-0001 - In the Matter of Commonwealth Oil Refining Company, Inc....

  13. Abstraction and Counterexample-Guided Refinement in Model Checking of Hybrid Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Formal Verification, Abstraction, Model Checking, Hybrid Systems, Refinement, Counterexamples #12Abstraction and Counterexample-Guided Refinement in Model Checking of Hybrid Systems Edmund Clarke a counterexample generated by the model checker. For hybrid systems, analysis of the counterexample requires

  14. New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear Plants New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear Plants January 31, 2012 - 2:09pm Addthis The...

  15. Development of miscella refining process for cottonseed oil-isopropyl alcohol system: laboratory-scale evaluations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chau, Chi-Fai

    1994-01-01

    A technologically feasible cottonseed oil-isopropyl alcohol (IPA) miscella refining process was developed to produce high quality cottonseed oil. Individual steps necessary to refine cottonseed oil-IPA miscella were determined and improved...

  16. Bioenergy crop productivity and potential climate change mitigation from marginal lands in the United States: An

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Qianlai

    ÀChampaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA Abstract Growing biomass feedstocks from marginal lands is becoming an increasingly

  17. State discrimination with error margin and its locality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Hayashi; T. Hashimoto; M. Horibe

    2008-07-10

    There are two common settings in a quantum-state discrimination problem. One is minimum-error discrimination where a wrong guess (error) is allowed and the discrimination success probability is maximized. The other is unambiguous discrimination where errors are not allowed but the inconclusive result "I don't know" is possible. We investigate discrimination problem with a finite margin imposed on the error probability. The two common settings correspond to the error margins 1 and 0. For arbitrary error margin, we determine the optimal discrimination probability for two pure states with equal occurrence probabilities. We also consider the case where the states to be discriminated are multipartite, and show that the optimal discrimination probability can be achieved by local operations and classical communication.

  18. Evidence of OPEC pricing power: raw materials or refined products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-09-30

    For eight years, US petroleum and consumer sectors have argued for or against a free-market policy where international trade is concerned. Briefly, between 1982 and 1985, the argument against importation of refined products was almost as heated as the argument against importation of crude. But since the 1986 crude oil price crash, much has changed. Some contemporary thinking is that as long as the US can count on low crude prices, the benefits will outweigh the detriment to the US crude producing sector. This issue also contains the following: (1) ED refining netback data series for the US Gulf and West Coasts, Rotterdam, and Singapore for late September 1988; and (2) ED fuel price/tax series for countries of the Eastern Hemisphere, September 1988 edition. 8 figures, 5 tables.

  19. Canadian refiner finds simple route to reformulated gasoline production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, B. [North Atlantic Refining Ltd., Come By Chance, Newfoundland (Canada); McDonald, G.W.G. [IONA Ltd., Sarasota, FL (United States); Perkins, J.D. [United Catalysts Inc., Louisville, KY (United States)

    1997-03-17

    North Atlantic Refining Ltd. (NARL) operates a 105,000 b/sd hydrocracking refinery at Come By Chance, Newfoundland. NARL sells gasoline into markets in Newfoundland and the northeastern US. When the US Environmental Protection Agency instituted reformulated gasoline (RFG) requirements as part of the Clean Air Act amendments of 1990, NARL had to find a way to meet the specifications, even though the refinery is not within US territory. The refiner chose to add a small hydrogenation unit to treat the portion of the reformate stream containing benzene precursors. Since start-up of the unit in late 1995, it has achieved 100% benzene hydrogenation, thus allowing NARL to easily produce RFG containing less than 1.0 vol% benzene. The paper discusses procurement, hydrogen supply, catalyst, special features, start-up, operations, and process control.

  20. Astrophysical hydrodynamics with a high-order discontinuous Galerkin scheme and adaptive mesh refinement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaal, Kevin; Chandrashekar, Praveen; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Klingenberg, Christian; Springel, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Solving the Euler equations of ideal hydrodynamics as accurately and efficiently as possible is a key requirement in many astrophysical simulations. It is therefore important to continuously advance the numerical methods implemented in current astrophysical codes, especially also in light of evolving computer technology, which favours certain computational approaches over others. Here we introduce the new adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) code TENET, which employs a high-order Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) scheme for hydrodynamics. The Euler equations in this method are solved in a weak formulation with a polynomial basis by means of explicit Runge-Kutta time integration and Gauss-Legendre quadrature. This approach offers significant advantages over commonly employed finite volume (FV) solvers. In particular, the higher order capability renders it computationally more efficient, in the sense that the same precision can be obtained at significantly less computational cost. Also, the DG scheme inherently conserves a...

  1. REFINING AND END USE STUDY OF COAL LIQUIDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2002-01-01

    This document summarizes all of the work conducted as part of the Refining and End Use Study of Coal Liquids. There were several distinct objectives set, as the study developed over time: (1) Demonstration of a Refinery Accepting Coal Liquids; (2) Emissions Screening of Indirect Diesel; (3) Biomass Gasification F-T Modeling; and (4) Updated Gas to Liquids (GTL) Baseline Design/Economic Study.

  2. Off-balance-sheet financing to the refining industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins, J.H. [Pace Consultants Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Off-balance-sheet lending, or project finance, is becoming an increasingly popular means of capital formation in the refining and petrochemical industries. However, these transactions are substantially different from traditional corporate lending, and the demands placed on the borrower to examine, substantiate, and support the project are far greater. The following paper examines ways in which international banks and other lenders evaluate off-balance-sheet refinery projects and suggests ways to better structure financial representations.

  3. Refining Bio-Oil alongside Petroleum | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram: Report Appendices |ProjectKnowRedox Shuttle Additive, WinsRefining

  4. Emergent Properties Do Not Refine Fiona Polack, Susan Stepney1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stepney, Susan

    Emergent Properties Do Not Refine Fiona Polack, Susan Stepney1,2 Department of Computer Science a demonstrably-correct development from an abstract specification. Emergent systems present an interesting to the traditional model of refinement. Keywords: Emergence, Refinement, Systems Engineering. 1 Introduction Our

  5. Refinement and verification of concurrent systems specified in ObjectZ and CSP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Graeme

    Refinement and verification of concurrent systems specified in Object­Z and CSP Graeme Smith­Z and CSP. A common semantic basis for the two languages enables a unified method of refinement to be used, based upon CSP refinement. To enable state­based techniques to be used for the Object­Z components

  6. Adaptive Mesh Refinement Solution Techniques for the Multigroup SN Transport Equation Using a Higher-Order Discontinuous Finite Element Method 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yaqi

    2010-01-16

    appreciated. Thanks also to my wife Qun Shi. Her patience and care are the best gift to me. vii NOMENCLATURE Abbreviations CSEWG The Cross Section Evaluation Working Group keff Multiplication factor AMPX A Nuclear Data Processing System developed at ORNL... Numerical Spectral Radius NSTD The Nuclear Science and Technology Division of ORNL ORNL Oak Ridge National Laboratory P1C P1 Conforming P1M Mixed P1 form PCG Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient pcm per cent mille 10?5 PD Positive Definite PDE Partial...

  7. Lattice refining loop quantum cosmology, anisotropic models, and stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bojowald, Martin; Cartin, Daniel; Khanna, Gaurav [Institute for Gravitation and the Cosmos, Pennsylvania State University, 104 Davey Lab, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Naval Academy Preparatory School, 197 Elliot Street, Newport, Rhode Island 02841 (United States); Physics Department, University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth, North Dartmouth, Massachusetts 02747 (United States)

    2007-09-15

    A general class of loop quantizations for anisotropic models is introduced and discussed, which enhances loop quantum cosmology by relevant features seen in inhomogeneous situations. The main new effect is an underlying lattice which is being refined during dynamical changes of the volume. In general, this leads to a new feature of dynamical difference equations which may not have constant step-size, posing new mathematical problems. It is discussed how such models can be evaluated and what lattice refinements imply for semiclassical behavior. Two detailed examples illustrate that stability conditions can put strong constraints on suitable refinement models, even in the absence of a fundamental Hamiltonian which defines changes of the underlying lattice. Thus, a large class of consistency tests of loop quantum gravity becomes available. In this context, it will also be seen that quantum corrections due to inverse powers of metric components in a constraint are much larger than they appeared recently in more special treatments of isotropic, free scalar models where they were artificially suppressed.

  8. Parallel Block Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement on Graphics Processing Units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beckingsale, D. A. [Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE), Aldermaston (United Kingdom); Gaudin, W. P. [Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE), Aldermaston (United Kingdom); Hornung, R. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gunney, B. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gamblin, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Herdman, J. A. [Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE), Aldermaston (United Kingdom); Jarvis, S. A. [Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE), Aldermaston (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-17

    Block-structured adaptive mesh refinement is a technique that can be used when solving partial differential equations to reduce the number of zones necessary to achieve the required accuracy in areas of interest. These areas (shock fronts, material interfaces, etc.) are recursively covered with finer mesh patches that are grouped into a hierarchy of refinement levels. Despite the potential for large savings in computational requirements and memory usage without a corresponding reduction in accuracy, AMR adds overhead in managing the mesh hierarchy, adding complex communication and data movement requirements to a simulation. In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of a native GPU-based AMR library, including: the classes used to manage data on a mesh patch, the routines used for transferring data between GPUs on different nodes, and the data-parallel operators developed to coarsen and refine mesh data. We validate the performance and accuracy of our implementation using three test problems and two architectures: an eight-node cluster, and over four thousand nodes of Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Titan supercomputer. Our GPU-based AMR hydrodynamics code performs up to 4.87× faster than the CPU-based implementation, and has been scaled to over four thousand GPUs using a combination of MPI and CUDA.

  9. Higher Education Doctor of Philosophy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    service to the practice of higher education. The program delivers teaching, research, and professional services to students, institutions of higher education, and other academic disciplines. The doctoralHigher Education Doctor of Philosophy Program Handbook College of Education Graduate Education

  10. Economics and Policies for Carbon Capture and Sequestration in the Western United States: A Marginal Cost Analysis of Potential Power Plant Deployment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : A Marginal Cost Analysis of Potential Power Plant Deployment by Gary Shu B.S., Electrical Engineering Analysis of Potential Power Plant Deployment by Gary Shu Submitted to the Engineering Systems Division from coal-fired power plants. CCS technology is currently in development and requires higher

  11. RADIO EMISSION FROM INSTABILITIES IN SPACE PLASMAS: MARGINAL STABILITY,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melrose, Don

    I t RADIO EMISSION FROM INSTABILITIES IN SPACE PLASMAS: MARGINAL STABILITY, 4TOCHASTIC GROWTH emission, hich is an indirect emission process first discussed by Ginaburg and Zhe/eznyakoe, 9581, and electron cyclotron maser emission (ECME), which is a direct emission ess first discussed in the presently

  12. Large Margin Taxonomy Embedding with an Application to Document Categorization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinberger, Kilian

    Large Margin Taxonomy Embedding with an Application to Document Categorization Kilian Weinberger that the topics are not just discrete classes, but are nodes in a complex taxonomy with rich inter-topic relationships. For example, web pages can be categorized into the Yahoo! web taxonomy or medical journals can

  13. Derivation of Locational Marginal Prices for Restructured Wholesale Power Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    the performance of these markets. In this paper, different AC and DC optimal power flow (OPF) models are presented Operator (MISO). Keywords: Locational marginal pricing, wholesale power market, AC optimal power flow, DC optimal power flow, U.S. Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO). #12;3 1 INTRODUCTION In an April 2003

  14. The Marginalized Particle Filter for Automotive Tracking Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gustafsson, Fredrik

    1 The Marginalized Particle Filter for Automotive Tracking Applications Andreas Eidehall Thomas Sch surroundings (lane geometry and the position of other vehicles), which is needed for intelligent automotive in a nonlinear estimation problem. For automotive tracking systems, these problems are traditionally handled

  15. The Marginalized Particle Filter for Automotive Tracking Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schön, Thomas

    The Marginalized Particle Filter for Automotive Tracking Applications Andreas Eidehall Thomas B surroundings (lane geometry and the position of other vehicles), which is needed for intelligent automotive in a nonlinear estimation problem. For automotive tracking systems, these problems are traditionally handled

  16. Sustainable bioenergy production from marginal lands in the US Midwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelfand, Ilya; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Zhang, Xuesong; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Gross, Katherine L.; Robertson, G. P.

    2013-01-24

    Long-term measurements of global warming impact coupled with spatially explicit modeling suggests that both climate benefits and the production potential of cellulosic crops grown on marginal lands of the US North Central region are substantial but will be insufficient to meet long-term biofuel needs.

  17. Building a "Margin of Safety" Into Renewable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Building a "Margin of Safety" Into Renewable Energy Procurements: A Review of Experience purchasers and electricity regulators must confront the reality that signed renewable energy contracts will not always yield operational projects on the timeline given in the contracts themselves. Renewable energy

  18. Tectonic evolution of the southwestern Black Sea margin, offshore Turkey 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Can, Emrah

    1996-01-01

    to the Srednogorie intra-arc zone in Bulgaria. Following back-arc extension, the whole margin was affected by a compressional tectonic regime during Paleocene-early Eocene time. Under this regime, a series of thrust faults formed, which were connected to the Stara...

  19. ITP Steel: Steel Industry Marginal Opportunity Study September 2005

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls21,Equipment:Petroleum Refining Industryof

  20. On Higher Derivative Terms in Tachyon Effective Actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. D. Lambert; I. Sachs

    2001-05-08

    We reconstruct the tachyon effective action for unstable D-branes in superstring theory by examining its behaviour near exactly marginal deformations, where the ambigous higher derivative terms can be eliminated. We then compare this action with that obtained in boundary string field theory and find remarkable agreement. In particular, the tension for lower dimensional branes and the BI-action for the centre of mass motion are reprodued exactly. We also comment on the action for tachyons on the kink in a D-brane/anti-D-brane system and on bosonic string theory.

  1. ,"Weekly Refiner Net Production"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price to fall to $3.43U.S.longecReformulated GasolineSalesBlender NetRefiner

  2. Changing Trends in the Refining Industry (released in AEO2006)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01

    There have been some major changes in the U.S. refining industry recently, prompted in part by a significant decline in the quality of imported crude oil and by increasing restrictions on the quality of finished products. As a result, high-quality crudes, such as the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude that serves as a benchmark for oil futures on the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), have been trading at record premiums to the OPEC (Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries) Basket price.

  3. Cogeneration handbook for the petroleum refining industry. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fassbender, L.L.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Moore, N.L.; Fassbender, A.G.; Eakin, D.E.; Gorges, H.A.

    1984-03-01

    The decision of whether to cogenerate involves several considerations, including technical, economic, environmental, legal, and regulatory issues. Each of these issues is addressed separately in this handbook. In addition, a chapter is included on preparing a three-phase work statement, which is needed to guide the design of a cogeneration system. In addition, an annotated bibliography and a glossary of terminology are provided. Appendix A provides an energy-use profile of the petroleum refining industry. Appendices B through O provide specific information that will be called out in subsequent chapters.

  4. Bandwidth Study U.S. Petroleum Refining | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels Researchof Energy and Forest ServicePower andPetroleum Refining

  5. Midcourse Refinements of Financing Strategies | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOE SafetyofDepartment. "National Midcourse Refinements of

  6. Genealogy of major U.S. refiners - Energy Information Administration

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets See full Genealogy of Major U.S. Refiners

  7. Petroleum refining industry of developed capitalist countries in the 1990s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prokhorova, A.A.

    1994-07-01

    Crude oil is the principal source of energy today and in the immediate future. The increases in the consumption of crude oil (1.7% per year up to 2005) will be offset mainly by additional supplies from the countries of the Near East. Data on the imports of oil by the developed capitalists countries are presented in Table 2. In the United States, according to a projection made by Conoco, by the year 2000 the volume of imports will be twice the volume of domestic production; according to another prediction, the amount of Near East crude will increase from 34% in 1990 to 42% in 2000. Since the mid-1980s, the energy policy of the USA has been based on importing so-called cheap crude. Laws have been passed to mandate not only energy saving, but also cuts in the oil and gas production on U.S. territory. The volume of U.S. oil production will be 20% lower in 2000 than in 1990. Some 90% of the worldwide demand for oil is met by light and medium-density crudes, but such crudes account for only 25% of the oil resources. Projections indicate that the oil supplied to refiners in the future will be heavier and will have higher sulfur contents. The U.S. production of low-sulfur crude will drop off sharply in the next 10-15 years. The drop in oil production of the CIS [former USSR] and the consequent drop in exports from these countries will have a destabilizing effect on the world market. The average price of the {open_quotes}market basket{close_quotes} of OPEC crudes in 1991 was $149/ton (in 1990 $178/ton), in comparison with a 1992 price of $148/ton. This report presents data on refining process capacities and the ratio of secondary capacity to primary distillation capacity.

  8. Victorian Queer: Marginality and Money in Nineteenth-Century Literature 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Jung Sun

    2013-05-01

    , in that their voices are taken to be insignificant, and they are constantly queered even by the marginal group. In his book Enforcing Normalcy: Disability, Deafness and the Body, Lennard J. Davis focuses on the word ?normal? to understand the historical process... and problems that society and culture have faced. He defines a group of chosen words, called ?Keywords,? as ?significant indicative words in certain forms of thought? and ?certain uses [of these words] bound together certain ways of seeing culture and society...

  9. R E V I E W Functionality and the evolution of marginal stability in proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollock, David

    R E V I E W Functionality and the evolution of marginal stability in proteins: Inferences from proteins are marginally stable. This has inspired several explanations. Having noted that the functionality that marginally stable proteins should have an evolutionary advantage over proteins of differing stability. Others

  10. Passive margins getting squeezed in the mantle convection vice Philippe Yamato,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Thorsten W.

    Passive margins getting squeezed in the mantle convection vice Philippe Yamato,1 Laurent Husson,1 2013. [1] Passive margins often exhibit uplift, exhumation, and tectonic inversion. We speculate passive margins. In order to address this issue, we design a 2-D viscous numerical model wherein

  11. Impact of Environmental Compliance Costs on U.S. Refining Profitability 1995-2001

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2003-01-01

    This report assesses the effects of pollution abatement requirements on the financial performance of U.S. petroleum refining and marketing operations during the 1995 to 2001 period. This study is a follow-up to the October 1997 publication entitled The Impact of Environmental Compliance Costs on U.S. Refining Profitability, that focused on the financial impacts of U.S. refining pollution abatement investment requirements in the 1988 to1995 period.

  12. Linkages between the markets for crude oil and the markets for refined products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Didziulis, V.S.

    1990-01-01

    To understand the crude oil price determination process it is necessary to extend the analysis beyond the markets for petroleum. Crude oil prices are determined in two closely related markets: the markets for crude oil and the markets for refined products. An econometric-linear programming model was developed to capture the linkages between the markets for crude oil and refined products. In the LP refiners maximize profits given crude oil supplies, refining capacities, and prices of refined products. The objective function is profit maximization net of crude oil prices. The shadow price on crude oil gives the netback price. Refined product prices are obtained from the econometric models. The model covers the free world divided in five regions. The model is used to analyze the impacts on the markets of policies that affect crude oil supplies, the demands for refined products, and the refining industry. For each scenario analyzed the demand for crude oil is derived from the equilibrium conditions in the markets for products. The demand curve is confronted with a supply curve which maximizes revenues providing an equilibrium solution for both crude oil and product markets. The model also captures crude oil price differentials by quality. The results show that the demands for crude oil are different across regions due to the structure of the refining industries and the characteristics of the demands for refined products. Changes in the demands for products have a larger impact on the markets than changes in the refining industry. Since markets for refined products and crude oil are interrelated they can't be analyzed individually if an accurate and complete assessment of a policy is to be made. Changes in only one product market in one region affect the other product markets and the prices of crude oil.

  13. Table 6. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 Table 6. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued...

  14. Table 10. U.S. Refiner Oxygenated Motor Gasoline Prices by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 Table 10. U.S. Refiner Oxygenated Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Year Month...

  15. Table 6. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 Table 6. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued...

  16. Table 7. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 Table 7. U.S. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type (Million Gallons per Day) - Continued Year...

  17. Table 2. U.S. Refiner Prices of Petroleum Products to End Users

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    fuel. Note: Motor gasoline averages and totals prior to October 1993 include leaded gasoline. Sources: Energy Information Administration Form EIA-782A, "Refiners'Gas Plant...

  18. Counterexample-Guided Abstraction Refinement for POND Planning Jonas Thiem and Robert Mattmuller and Manuela Ortlieb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teschner, Matthias

    Counterexample-Guided Abstraction Refinement for POND Planning Jonas Thiem and Robert Mattm to define abstractions (guar- anteeing over-approximations). A straightforward way for POND planning

  19. Refining and Extending the Business Model with Information Technology: Dell Computer Corporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraemer, Kenneth L; Dedrick, Jason; Yamashiro, Sandra

    1999-01-01

    of Dell’s Direct Business Model Fuels Fifteenth ConsecutiveAND EXTENDING THE REFINING AND EXTENDING THE BUSINESS MODELBUSINESS MODEL CENTER FOR RESEARCH ON INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

  20. Table A3. Refiner/Reseller Prices of Distillate and Residual...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 441 Table A3. RefinerReseller Prices of Distillate and Residual Fuel Oils, by PAD District, 1983-Present (Cents per Gallon...

  1. Table A1. Refiner/Reseller Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, PAD...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Petroleum Marketing Annual 1999 401 Table A1. RefinerReseller Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, PAD District and State, 1984-Present (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) -...

  2. Table A2. Refiner/Reseller Prices of Aviation Fuels, Propane...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 421 Table A2. RefinerReseller Prices of Aviation Fuels, Propane, and Kerosene, by PAD District, 1983-Present (Cents per...

  3. Table 46. Refiner No. 2 Distillate, Diesel Fuel, and Fuel Oil...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Petroleum Marketing Annual 1998 295 Table 46. Refiner No. 2 Distillate, Diesel Fuel, and Fuel Oil Volumes by PAD District and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) - Continued...

  4. Table 46. Refiner No. 2 Distillate, Diesel Fuel, and Fuel Oil...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Petroleum Marketing Annual 1999 295 Table 46. Refiner No. 2 Distillate, Diesel Fuel, and Fuel Oil Volumes by PAD District and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) - Continued...

  5. Refining and classifying finite-time Lyapunov exponent ridges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allshouse, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    While more rigorous and sophisticated methods for identifying Lagrangian based coherent structures exist, the finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) field remains a straightforward and popular method for gaining some insight into transport by complex, time-dependent two-dimensional flows. In light of its enduring appeal, and in support of good practice, we begin by investigating the effects of discretization and noise on two numerical approaches for calculating the FTLE field. A practical method to extract and refine FTLE ridges in two-dimensional flows, which builds on previous methods, is then presented. Seeking to better ascertain the role of an FTLE ridge in flow transport, we adapt an existing classification scheme and provide a thorough treatment of the challenges of classifying the types of deformation represented by an FTLE ridge. As a practical demonstration, the methods are applied to an ocean surface velocity field data set generated by a numerical model.

  6. Fuel and oxygen addition for metal smelting or refining process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schlichting, M.R.

    1994-11-22

    A furnace for smelting iron ore and/or refining molten iron is equipped with an overhead pneumatic lance, through which a center stream of particulate coal is ejected at high velocity into a slag layer. An annular stream of nitrogen or argon enshrouds the coal stream. Oxygen is simultaneously ejected in an annular stream encircling the inert gas stream. The interposition of the inert gas stream between the coal and oxygen streams prevents the volatile matter in the coal from combusting before it reaches the slag layer. Heat of combustion is thus more efficiently delivered to the slag, where it is needed to sustain the desired reactions occurring there. A second stream of lower velocity oxygen can be delivered through an outermost annulus to react with carbon monoxide gas rising from slag layer, thereby adding still more heat to the furnace. 7 figs.

  7. Fuel and oxygen addition for metal smelting or refining process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schlichting, Mark R. (Chesterton, IN)

    1994-01-01

    A furnace 10 for smelting iron ore and/or refining molten iron 20 is equipped with an overhead pneumatic lance 40, through which a center stream of particulate coal 53 is ejected at high velocity into a slag layer 30. An annular stream of nitrogen or argon 51 enshrouds the coal stream. Oxygen 52 is simultaneously ejected in an annular stream encircling the inert gas stream 51. The interposition of the inert gas stream between the coal and oxygen streams prevents the volatile matter in the coal from combusting before it reaches the slag layer. Heat of combustion is thus more efficiently delivered to the slag, where it is needed to sustain the desired reactions occurring there. A second stream of lower velocity oxygen can be delivered through an outermost annulus 84 to react with carbon monoxide gas rising from slag layer 30, thereby adding still more heat to the furnace.

  8. ENZO: AN ADAPTIVE MESH REFINEMENT CODE FOR ASTROPHYSICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, Greg L.; Turk, Matthew J. [Columbia University, Department of Astronomy, New York, NY 10025 (United States); Norman, Michael L.; Bordner, James; Xu, Hao; Kritsuk, Alexei G. [CASS, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, CA 92093-0424 (United States); O'Shea, Brian W.; Smith, Britton [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Abel, Tom; Wang, Peng; Skillman, Samuel W. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Wise, John H. [Center for Relativistic Astrophysics, School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, 837 State Street, Atlanta, GA (United States); Reynolds, Daniel R. [Department of Mathematics, Southern Methodist University, Box 750156, Dallas, TX 75205-0156 (United States); Collins, David C. [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States); Harkness, Robert P. [NICS, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Kim, Ji-hoon [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Kuhlen, Michael [Theoretical Astrophysics Center, University of California Berkeley, Hearst Field Annex, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Goldbaum, Nathan [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Hummels, Cameron [Department of Astronomy/Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Tasker, Elizabeth [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Kita-10 Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Collaboration: Enzo Collaboration; and others

    2014-04-01

    This paper describes the open-source code Enzo, which uses block-structured adaptive mesh refinement to provide high spatial and temporal resolution for modeling astrophysical fluid flows. The code is Cartesian, can be run in one, two, and three dimensions, and supports a wide variety of physics including hydrodynamics, ideal and non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics, N-body dynamics (and, more broadly, self-gravity of fluids and particles), primordial gas chemistry, optically thin radiative cooling of primordial and metal-enriched plasmas (as well as some optically-thick cooling models), radiation transport, cosmological expansion, and models for star formation and feedback in a cosmological context. In addition to explaining the algorithms implemented, we present solutions for a wide range of test problems, demonstrate the code's parallel performance, and discuss the Enzo collaboration's code development methodology.

  9. Research Higher Degrees at the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wapstra, Erik

    Research Higher Degrees at the University of Tasmania ChooseYour Adventure #12;Unique research.The University of Tasmania is more than a place to study. Exciting research A Research Higher Degree at the University of Tasmania will place you in a unique research environment, working with the best in the field

  10. SU-E-T-573: The Robustness of a Combined Margin Recipe for Uncertainties During Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stroom, J; Vieira, S; Greco, C [Champalimaud Foundation, Lisbon, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the variability of a safety margin recipe that combines CTV and PTV margins quadratically, with several tumor, treatment, and user related factors. Methods: Margin recipes were calculated by monte-carlo simulations in 5 steps. 1. A spherical tumor with or without isotropic microscopic was irradiated with a 5 field dose plan2. PTV: Geometric uncertainties were introduced using systematic (Sgeo) and random (sgeo) standard deviations. CTV: Microscopic disease distribution was modelled by semi-gaussian (Smicro) with varying number of islets (Ni)3. For a specific uncertainty set (Sgeo, sgeo, Smicro(Ni)), margins were varied until pre-defined decrease in TCP or dose coverage was fulfilled. 4. First, margin recipes were calculated for each of the three uncertainties separately. CTV and PTV recipes were then combined quadratically to yield a final recipe M(Sgeo, sgeo, Smicro(Ni)).5. The final M was verified by simultaneous simulations of the uncertainties.Now, M has been calculated for various changing parameters like margin criteria, penumbra steepness, islet radio-sensitivity, dose conformity, and number of fractions. We subsequently investigated A: whether the combined recipe still holds in all these situations, and B: what the margin variation was in all these cases. Results: We found that the accuracy of the combined margin recipes remains on average within 1mm for all situations, confirming the correctness of the quadratic addition. Depending on the specific parameter, margin factors could change such that margins change over 50%. Especially margin recipes based on TCP-criteria are more sensitive to more parameters than those based on purely geometric Dmin-criteria. Interestingly, measures taken to minimize treatment field sizes (by e.g. optimizing dose conformity) are counteracted by the requirement of larger margins to get the same tumor coverage. Conclusion: Margin recipes combining geometric and microscopic uncertainties quadratically are accurate under varying circumstances. However margins can change up to 50% for different situations.

  11. Aspects of Western Refining, Inc.'s Proposed Acquisition of Giant Industries, Inc.

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01

    Presentation of company-level, non-proprietary data and relevant aggregate data for U.S. refinery capacity and gasoline marketing of Western Refining and Giant Industries to inform discussions of Western Refining Inc.'s proposed acquisition of Giant Industries Inc. for a total of $1.5 billion, which was announced August 28, 2006.

  12. Abstraction and CounterexampleGuided Refinement in Model Checking of Hybrid Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Formal Verification, Abstraction, Model Checking, Hybrid Systems, Refinement, Counterexamples #12; 1Abstraction and Counterexample­Guided Refinement in Model Checking of Hybrid Systems Edmund Clarke a counterexample generated by the model checker. For hybrid systems, analysis of the counterexample requires

  13. Perspectives on Sustainable Materials, Instructor Susan Kaplan Fall 2014 Syllabus (subject to refining/updating)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolberg, George

    Perspectives on Sustainable Materials, Instructor Susan Kaplan Fall 2014 Syllabus (subject to refining/updating) 1 SUS 7600A: Perspectives on Sustainable Materials Instructor: Susan Kaplan, LEED AP, Instructor Susan Kaplan Fall 2014 Syllabus (subject to refining/updating) 2 Primary Assignments: Basic

  14. Orientation Refinement of Virus Structures with Unknown Symmetry Yongchang Ji, Dan C. Marinescu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Timothy S.

    Orientation Refinement of Virus Structures with Unknown Symmetry Yongchang Ji, Dan C. Marinescu, in particular the structure determina- tion of viruses and other large macromolecular complexes leads to data determina- tion of viruses, the orientation refinement. 1. Introduction and Motivation Viruses are large

  15. To appear in EPTCS. A CSP account of Event-B refinement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doran, Simon J.

    To appear in EPTCS. A CSP account of Event-B refinement Steve Schneider Department of Computing a CSP account of Event-B refinement, with a treatment for the first time of splitting events and of anticipated events. To this end, we define a CSP seman- tics for Event-B and show how the different forms

  16. FDR3 --A Modern Refinement Checker for CSP Thomas Gibson-Robinson, Philip Armstrong,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    FDR3 -- A Modern Refinement Checker for CSP Thomas Gibson-Robinson, Philip Armstrong, Alexandre.roscoe}@cs.ox.ac.uk Abstract. FDR3 is a complete rewrite of the CSP refinement checker FDR2, incorporating a significant number describe the new algorithm that FDR3 uses to construct its internal representation of CSP processes

  17. FDR3 --A Modern Refinement Checker for CSP Thomas Gibson-Robinson, Philip Armstrong,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    FDR3 -- A Modern Refinement Checker for CSP Thomas Gibson-Robinson, Philip Armstrong, Alexandre.roscoe}@cs.ox.ac.uk Abstract. FDR3 is a complete rewrite of the CSP refinement checker FDR2, incorporating a significant number describe the new algorithm that FDR3 uses to construct its in- ternal representation of CSP processes

  18. Pattern of Failure After Limited Margin Radiotherapy and Temozolomide for Glioblastoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, Mark W.; Shu, Hui-Kuo G.; Curran, Walter J.; Crocker, Ian R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the pattern of failure after limited margin radiotherapy for glioblastoma. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 62 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma treated between 2006 and 2008 with standard fractionation to a total dose of 60Gy with concurrent temozolomide (97%) or arsenic trioxide (3%). The initial clinical target volume included postoperative T2 abnormality with a median margin of 0.7cm. The boost clinical target volume included residual T1-enhancing tumor and resection cavity with a median margin of 0.5cm. Planning target volumes added a 0.3- or 0.5-cm margin to clinical target volumes. The total boost planning target volume (PTV{sub boost}) margin was 1cm or less in 92% of patients. The volume of recurrent tumor (new T1 enhancement) was categorized by the percent within the 60-Gy isodose line as central (>95%), infield (81-95%), marginal (20-80%), or distant (<20%). For comparison, an initial planning target volume with a 2-cm margin and PTV{sub boost} with a 2.5-cm margin were created for each patient. Results: With a median follow-up of 12 months, radiographic tumor progression developed in 43 of 62 patients. Imaging was available for analysis in 41: 38 (93%) had central or infield failure, 2 (5%) had marginal failure, and 1 (2%) had distant failure relative to the 60-Gy isodose line. The treated PTV{sub boost} (median, 140cm{sup 3}) was, on average, 70% less than the PTV{sub boost} with a 2.5-cm margin (median, 477cm{sup 3}) (p < 0.001). Conclusions: A PTV{sub boost} margin of 1cm or less did not appear to increase the risk of marginal and/or distant tumor failures compared with other published series. With careful radiation planning and delivery, it appears that treatment margins for glioblastoma can be reduced.

  19. Cosmos++: Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamics on Unstructured Grids with Local Adaptive Refinement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Anninos; P. Chris Fragile; Jay D. Salmonson

    2005-09-09

    A new code and methodology are introduced for solving the general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) equations in fixed background spacetimes using time-explicit, finite-volume discretization. The code has options for solving the GRMHD equations using traditional artificial-viscosity (AV) or non-oscillatory central difference (NOCD) methods, or a new extended AV (eAV) scheme using artificial-viscosity together with a dual energy-flux-conserving formulation. The dual energy approach allows for accurate modeling of highly relativistic flows at boost factors well beyond what has been achieved to date by standard artificial viscosity methods. It provides the benefit of Godunov methods in capturing high Lorentz boosted flows but without complicated Riemann solvers, and the advantages of traditional artificial viscosity methods in their speed and flexibility. Additionally, the GRMHD equations are solved on an unstructured grid that supports local adaptive mesh refinement using a fully threaded oct-tree (in three dimensions) network to traverse the grid hierarchy across levels and immediate neighbors. A number of tests are presented to demonstrate robustness of the numerical algorithms and adaptive mesh framework over a wide spectrum of problems, boosts, and astrophysical applications, including relativistic shock tubes, shock collisions, magnetosonic shocks, Alfven wave propagation, blast waves, magnetized Bondi flow, and the magneto-rotational instability in Kerr black hole spacetimes.

  20. Refining a relativistic, hydrodynamic solver: Admitting ultra-relativistic flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. P. Bernstein; P. A. Hughes

    2009-07-23

    We have undertaken the simulation of hydrodynamic flows with bulk Lorentz factors in the range 10^2--10^6. We discuss the application of an existing relativistic, hydrodynamic primitive-variable recovery algorithm to a study of pulsar winds, and, in particular, the refinement made to admit such ultra-relativistic flows. We show that an iterative quartic root finder breaks down for Lorentz factors above 10^2 and employ an analytic root finder as a solution. We find that the former, which is known to be robust for Lorentz factors up to at least 50, offers a 24% speed advantage. We demonstrate the existence of a simple diagnostic allowing for a hybrid primitives recovery algorithm that includes an automatic, real-time toggle between the iterative and analytical methods. We further determine the accuracy of the iterative and hybrid algorithms for a comprehensive selection of input parameters and demonstrate the latter's capability to elucidate the internal structure of ultra-relativistic plasmas. In particular, we discuss simulations showing that the interaction of a light, ultra-relativistic pulsar wind with a slow, dense ambient medium can give rise to asymmetry reminiscent of the Guitar nebula leading to the formation of a relativistic backflow harboring a series of internal shockwaves. The shockwaves provide thermalized energy that is available for the continued inflation of the PWN bubble. In turn, the bubble enhances the asymmetry, thereby providing positive feedback to the backflow.

  1. Solvent refined coal (SRC) process. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1980-March 1980. [In process streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) project at the SRC Pilot Plant in Fort Lewis, Wahsington, and the Process Development Unit (P-99) in Harmarville, Pennsylvania. After the remaining runs of the slurry preheater survey test program were completed January 14, the Fort Lewis Pilot Plant was shut down to inspect Slurry Preheater B and to insulate the coil for future testing at higher rates of heat flux. Radiographic inspection of the coil showed that the welds at the pressure taps and the immersion thermowells did not meet design specifications. Slurry Preheater A was used during the first 12 days of February while weld repairs and modifications to Slurry Preheater B were completed. Two attempts to complete a material balance run on Powhatan No. 6 Mine coal were attempted but neither was successful. Slurry Preheater B was in service the remainder of the quarter. The start of a series of runs at higher heat flux was delayed because of plugging in both the slurry and the hydrogen flow metering systems. Three baseline runs and three slurry runs of the high heat flux program were completed before the plant was shut down March 12 for repair of the Inert Gas Unit. Attempts to complete a fourth slurry run at high heat flux were unsuccessful because of problems with the coal feed handling and the vortex mix systems. Process Development Unit (P-99) completed three of the four runs designed to study the effect of dissolver L/D ratio. The fourth was under way at the end of the period. SRC yield correlations have been developed that include coal properties as independent variables. A preliminary ranking of coals according to their reactivity in PDU P-99 has been made. Techniques for studying coking phenomenona are now in place.

  2. Postoperative Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the External Auditory Canal and Middle Ear: Treatment Outcomes, Marginal Misses, and Perspective on Target Delineation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Wan-Yu [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Kuo, Sung-Hsin [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yu-Hsuan; Lu, Szu-Huai; Tsai, Chiao-Ling [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chia-Hsien Cheng, Jason [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Oncology, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hong, Ruey-Long [Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Ya-Fang [Department of Medical Imaging, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Chuan-Jen; Lin, Kai-Nan; Ko, Jenq-Yuh; Lou, Pei-Jen; Wang, Cheng-Ping [Department of Otolaryngology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chong, Fok-Ching [Graduate Institute of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chun-Wei, E-mail: cwwang@ntuh.gov.tw [Graduate Institute of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To report outcomes of the rare disease of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the external auditory canal (EAC) and middle ear treated with surgery and postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Failure patterns related to spatial dose distribution were also analyzed to provide insight into target delineation. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was conducted of the records of 11 consecutive patients with SCC of the EAC and middle ear who were treated with curative surgery and postoperative IMRT at one institution between January 2007 and February 2010. The prescribed IMRT dose was 60 to 66 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction. Three patients also received concurrent cisplatin-based chemotherapy, and 1 patient received concurrent oral tegafur/uracil. The median follow-up time was 19 months (range, 6-33 months). Results: Four patients had locoregional recurrence, yielding an estimated 2-year locoregional control rate of 70.7%. Among them, 1 patient had persistent disease after treatment, and 3 had marginal recurrence. Distant metastasis occurred in 1 patient after extensive locoregional recurrence, yielding an estimated 2-year distant control rate of 85.7%. The estimated 2-year overall survival was 67.5%. The three cases of marginal recurrence were near the preauricular space and glenoid fossa of the temporomandibular joint, adjacent to the apex of the ear canal and glenoid fossa of the temporomandibular joint, and in the postauricular subcutaneous area and ipsilateral parotid nodes, respectively. Conclusions: Marginal misses should be recognized to improve target delineation. When treating SCC of the EAC and middle ear, care should be taken to cover the glenoid fossa of the temporomandibular joint and periauricular soft tissue. Elective ipsilateral parotid irradiation should be considered. The treatment planning procedure should also be refined to balance subcutaneous soft-tissue dosimetry and toxicity.

  3. Process to Continuously Melt, Refine, and Cast High Quality Steel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This factsheet describes a project to conduct research and development targeted at designing an innovative steelmaking process to produce higher quality steel faster than traditional batch processes while consuming less energy and other resources.

  4. Phytologia (December 2009) 91(3) 571 VARIATION AMONG THE SMOOTH-LEAF MARGINED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Robert P.

    -coumarate: CoA Ligase, Abscisic acid-insensitive 3, petN, psbM, SNPs, taxonomy. The smooth-leaf margined

  5. "Do It Again": Comic Repetition, Participatory Reception and Gendered Identity on Musical Comedy's Margins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baltimore, Samuel Dworkin

    2013-01-01

    Oz Before the Rainbow. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Universityby Samuel Dworkin Baltimore ABSTRACT OF THE DISSERTATION “DoMargins by Samuel Dworkin Baltimore Doctor of Philosophy in

  6. Treatment of Passive Component Reliability in Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization FY 2010 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert W Youngblood

    2010-09-01

    The Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) pathway is a set of activities defined under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. The overarching objective of RISMC is to support plant life-extension decision-making by providing a state-of-knowledge characterization of safety margins in key systems, structures, and components (SSCs). A technical challenge at the core of this effort is to establish the conceptual and technical feasibility of analyzing safety margin in a risk-informed way, which, unlike conventionally defined deterministic margin analysis, is founded on probabilistic characterizations of SSC performance.

  7. A margin based approach to determining sample sizes via tolerance bounds.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newcomer, Justin T.; Freeland, Katherine Elizabeth

    2013-09-01

    This paper proposes a tolerance bound approach for determining sample sizes. With this new methodology we begin to think of sample size in the context of uncertainty exceeding margin. As the sample size decreases the uncertainty in the estimate of margin increases. This can be problematic when the margin is small and only a few units are available for testing. In this case there may be a true underlying positive margin to requirements but the uncertainty may be too large to conclude we have sufficient margin to those requirements with a high level of statistical confidence. Therefore, we provide a methodology for choosing a sample size large enough such that an estimated QMU uncertainty based on the tolerance bound approach will be smaller than the estimated margin (assuming there is positive margin). This ensures that the estimated tolerance bound will be within performance requirements and the tolerance ratio will be greater than one, supporting a conclusion that we have sufficient margin to the performance requirements. In addition, this paper explores the relationship between margin, uncertainty, and sample size and provides an approach and recommendations for quantifying risk when sample sizes are limited.

  8. J4.3 LARGE-EDDY SIMULATION ACROSS A GRID REFINEMENT INTERFACE USING EXPLICIT FILTERING AND RECONSTRUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chow, Fotini Katopodes

    reflect off grid refinement interfaces, specifically on the outflow boundary from a fine to a coarse grid reflection off grid refinement interfaces by forcing the filter-resolved scale on a fine grid to equalJ4.3 LARGE-EDDY SIMULATION ACROSS A GRID REFINEMENT INTERFACE USING EXPLICIT FILTERING

  9. RAM: a Relativistic Adaptive Mesh Refinement Hydrodynamics Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Wei-Qun; MacFadyen, Andrew I.; /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study

    2005-06-06

    The authors have developed a new computer code, RAM, to solve the conservative equations of special relativistic hydrodynamics (SRHD) using adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) on parallel computers. They have implemented a characteristic-wise, finite difference, weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme using the full characteristic decomposition of the SRHD equations to achieve fifth-order accuracy in space. For time integration they use the method of lines with a third-order total variation diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta scheme. They have also implemented fourth and fifth order Runge-Kutta time integration schemes for comparison. The implementation of AMR and parallelization is based on the FLASH code. RAM is modular and includes the capability to easily swap hydrodynamics solvers, reconstruction methods and physics modules. In addition to WENO they have implemented a finite volume module with the piecewise parabolic method (PPM) for reconstruction and the modified Marquina approximate Riemann solver to work with TVD Runge-Kutta time integration. They examine the difficulty of accurately simulating shear flows in numerical relativistic hydrodynamics codes. They show that under-resolved simulations of simple test problems with transverse velocity components produce incorrect results and demonstrate the ability of RAM to correctly solve these problems. RAM has been tested in one, two and three dimensions and in Cartesian, cylindrical and spherical coordinates. they have demonstrated fifth-order accuracy for WENO in one and two dimensions and performed detailed comparison with other schemes for which they show significantly lower convergence rates. Extensive testing is presented demonstrating the ability of RAM to address challenging open questions in relativistic astrophysics.

  10. Higher order anisotropies in hydrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Csanad; A. Szabo; S. Lokos; A. Bagoly

    2015-04-29

    In the last years it has been revealed that if measuring relative to higher order event planes $\\Psi_n$, higher order flow coefficients $v_n$ for $n>2$ can be measured. It also turned out that Bose-Einstein (HBT) correlation radii also show 3rd order oscillations if measured versus the third order event plane $\\Psi_3$. In this paper we investigate how these observables can be described via analytic hydro solutions and hydro parameterizations. We also investigate the time evolution of asymmetry coefficients and the mixing of velocity field asymmetries and density asymmetries.

  11. Higher order anisotropies in hydrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Csanad, M; Lokos, S; Bagoly, A

    2015-01-01

    In the last years it has been revealed that if measuring relative to higher order event planes $\\Psi_n$, higher order flow coefficients $v_n$ for $n>2$ can be measured. It also turned out that Bose-Einstein (HBT) correlation radii also show 3rd order oscillations if measured versus the third order event plane $\\Psi_3$. In this paper we investigate how these observables can be described via analytic hydro solutions and hydro parameterizations. We also investigate the time evolution of asymmetry coefficients and the mixing of velocity field asymmetries and density asymmetries.

  12. Higher-derivative Schwinger model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amaral, R.L.P.G.; Belvedere, L.V.; Lemos, N.A. (Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Outeiro de Sao Joao Batista s/n, 24020 Centro, Niteroi, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)); Natividade, C.P. (Departamento de Matematica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Campus de Guaratingueta, 12500 Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil))

    1993-04-15

    Using the operator formalism, we obtain the bosonic representation for the free fermion field satisfying an equation of motion with higher-order derivatives. Then, we consider the operator solution of a generalized Schwinger model with higher-derivative coupling. Since the increasing of the derivative order implies the introduction of an equivalent number of extra fermionic degrees of freedom, the mass acquired by the gauge field is bigger than the one for the standard two-dimensional QED. An analysis of the problem from the functional integration point of view corroborates the findings of canonical quantization, and corrects certain results previously announced in the literature on the basis of Fujikawa's technique.

  13. Particle Creation by Naked Singularities in Higher Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Umpei Miyamoto; Hiroya Nemoto; Masahiro Shimano

    2011-03-28

    Recently, the possibility was pointed out by one of the present authors and his collaborators that an effective naked singularity referred to as "a visible border of spacetime" is generated by high-energy particle collision in the context of large extra dimensions or TeV-scale gravity. In this paper, we investigate the particle creation by a naked singularity in general dimensions, while adopting a model in which a marginally naked singularity forms in the collapse of a homothetic lightlike pressureless fluid. We find that the spectrum deviates from that of Hawking radiation due to scattering near the singularity but can be recast in quasi-thermal form. The temperature is always higher than that of Hawking radiation of a same-mass black hole, and can be arbitrarily high depending on a parameter in the model. This implies that, in principle, the naked singularity may be distinguished from a black hole in collider experiments.

  14. Particle creation by naked singularities in higher dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyamoto, Umpei; Nemoto, Hiroya; Shimano, Masahiro

    2011-04-15

    Recently, the possibility was pointed out by one of the present authors and his collaborators that an effective naked singularity referred to as ''a visible border of spacetime'' is generated by high-energy particle collision in the context of large extra dimensions or TeV-scale gravity. In this paper, we investigate the particle creation by a naked singularity in general dimensions, while adopting a model in which a marginally naked singularity forms in the collapse of a homothetic lightlike pressureless fluid. We find that the spectrum deviates from that of Hawking radiation due to scattering near the singularity but can be recast in quasithermal form. The temperature is always higher than that of Hawking radiation of a same-mass black hole, and can be arbitrarily high depending on a parameter in the model. This implies that, in principle, the naked singularity may be distinguished from a black hole in collider experiments.

  15. Higher Education Erasmus+ Student Charter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peletier, Reynier

    points and information sources in the inter-institutional agreement signed between your sending highlights your rights and obligations and informs you about what you can expect from your sending and receiving organisation at each step of your mobility. Higher education institutions participating

  16. Extremal Higher Spin Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Máximo Bañados; Alejandra Castro; Alberto Faraggi; Juan I. Jottar

    2015-11-30

    The gauge sector of three-dimensional higher spin gravities can be formulated as a Chern-Simons theory. In this context, a higher spin black hole corresponds to a flat connection with suitable holonomy (smoothness) conditions which are consistent with the properties of a generalized thermal ensemble. Building on these ideas, we discuss a definition of black hole extremality which is appropriate to the topological character of 3d higher spin theories. Our definition can be phrased in terms of the Jordan class of the holonomy around a non-contractible (angular) cycle, and we show that it is compatible with the zero-temperature limit of smooth black hole solutions. While this notion of extremality does not require nor implies the existence of supersymmetry, we exemplify its consequences in the context of sl(3|2) + sl(3|2) Chern-Simons theory. Remarkably, while as usual not all extremal solutions preserve supersymmetries, we find that the higher spin setup allows for non-extremal supersymmetric black hole solutions as well. Furthermore, we discuss our results from the perspective of the holographic duality between sl(3|2) + sl(3|2) Chern-Simons theory and two-dimensional CFTs with W_{(3|2)} symmetry, the simplest higher spin extension of the N=2 super-Virasoro algebra. In particular, we compute W_{(3|2)} BPS bounds at the full quantum level, and relate their semiclassical limit to extremal black hole or conical defect solutions in the 3d bulk. Along the way, we discuss the role of the spectral flow automorphism and provide a conjecture for the form of the semiclassical BPS bounds in general N=2 two-dimensional CFTs with extended symmetry algebras.

  17. Marginal Contribution Nets: A Compact Representation Scheme for Coalitional Games

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandholm, Tuomas W.

    from some set of suppliers, and that the suppliers offer higher discount with more purchases of suppliers cheaper, and facilitates formation of coalitions to bargain with the suppliers. De- pending on the set of suppliers and how much f

  18. Process for solvent refining of coal using a denitrogenated and dephenolated solvent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garg, Diwakar (Macungie, PA); Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA); Schweighardt, Frank K. (Allentown, PA)

    1984-01-01

    A process is disclosed for the solvent refining of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures and pressure in a hydrogen atmosphere using a hydrocarbon solvent which before being recycled in the solvent refining process is subjected to chemical treatment to extract substantially all nitrogenous and phenolic constituents from the solvent so as to improve the conversion of coal and the production of oil in the solvent refining process. The solvent refining process can be either thermal or catalytic. The extraction of nitrogenous compounds can be performed by acid contact such as hydrogen chloride or fluoride treatment, while phenolic extraction can be performed by caustic contact or contact with a mixture of silica and alumina.

  19. Adjustable Speed Drives in the U.S. Petroleum Refining, Petrochemical, and Chemical Industries 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foley, D. J.; Chodorowski, A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes applications and incentives for the use of variable frequency drivers (VFD) in the petroleum refining, petrochemical, and chemical industries. VFDs are a particular type of adjustable speed driver (ASD) found prevalently...

  20. Grain refinement and texture development of cast bi90sb10 alloy via severe plastic deformation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Im, Jae-taek

    2009-05-15

    The purpose of this work was to study learn about grain refinement mechanisms and texture development in cast n-type Bi90Sb10 alloy caused by severe plastic deformation. The practical objective is to produce a fine grained ...

  1. An Assessment of carbon reduction technology opportunities in the petroleum refining industry.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrick, M.

    1998-09-14

    The refining industry is a major source of CO{sub 2} emissions in the industrial sector and therefore in the future can expect to face increasing pressures to reduce emission levels. The energy used in refining is impacted by market dictates, crude quality, and environmental regulations. While the industry is technologically advanced and relatively efficient opportunities nevertheless exist to reduce energy usage and CO{sub 2} emissions. The opportunities will vary from refinery to refinery and will necessarily have to be economically viable and compatible with each refiner's strategic plans. Recognizing the many factors involved, a target of 15-20% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions from the refining sector does not appear to be unreasonable, assuming a favorable investment climate.

  2. Impact of Environmental Compliance Costs on U.S. Refining Profitability

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1997-01-01

    Assesses the effects of pollution abatement requirements on the financial performance of U.S. petroleum refining and marketing operations. The analysis draws heavily on financial and operating data from the Energy Information Administration's Financial Reporting System (FRS).

  3. Economic impact of the European Union Emission Trading Scheme : evidence from the refining sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lacombe, Romain H

    2008-01-01

    I study the economic impact of the European Union Emission Trading Scheme (EU ETS) on the refining industry in Europe. I contrast previous ex-ante studies with the lessons from a series of interviews I conducted with ...

  4. Classical descriptive set theory as a refinement of effective descriptive set theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moschovakis, Yiannis N.

    as a refinement of the classical theory of definability (on Polish spaces) developed in the first half of the 20th the notions I need, as well as (condensed) outlines of the required arguments. 1. Recursion in Baire space We

  5. Refinement of light-responsive transcript lists using rice oligonucleotide arrays: evaluation of gene-redundancy.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    Refinement of Light-Responsive Transcript Lists Using Riceleaves of two-week old plants grown in a natural light-darkcycle (light-grown) in comparison to RNA from October 2008 |

  6. Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Petroleum Refining Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pellegrino, Joan; Brueske, Sabine; Carole, Tracy; Andres, Howard

    2007-11-01

    This 2007 report provides an overview of the U.S. petroleum refining industry, including new data on market trends and energy and material consumption, as well as information on environmental performance.

  7. Hazard/Risk Assessment A REFINED AQUATIC ECOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENT FOR A PYRETHROID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Robert K. D.

    Hazard/Risk Assessment A REFINED AQUATIC ECOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENT FOR A PYRETHROID INSECTICIDE risk assessments, the authors performed a probabilistic aquatic ecological risk assessment. The present study is the first ecological risk assessment for pyrethroids to quantitatively integrate

  8. Refine your search Select options from the menu on the left hand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yener, Aylin

    ://psu.summon.serialssolutions.comhttp://psu.summon.serialssolutions.com F I N A L LY : RESEARCH AS EASYAS 1-2-3 #12;1 Enter search term into search box. 2 Refine results relevant articles were published in that year. Include or Exclude subject terms from your searchRefine your search Select options from the menu on the left hand side of the results screen

  9. A comparison of the performance of waterfloods using similar refined and crude oils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walton, Daylon Lynn

    1960-01-01

    A COMPARISON OF THE PERFORMANCE OF WATERFI, GODS USING SIMILAR REFINED AND CRUDE OILS A Thesis By DAYLON L. WALTON Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August, 1960 Major Subject: PETROLEUM ENGINEERING A COMPARISON OF THE PERFORMANCE OF WATERFLOODS USING SIMILAR REFINED AND CRUDE OILS A Thesis By DAYLON L. WALTON Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman f...

  10. Scattered light images of spiral arms in marginally gravitationally unstable discs with an embedded planet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pohl, A; Benisty, M; Ataiee, S; Juhasz, A; Dullemond, C P; Van Boekel, R; Henning, T

    2015-01-01

    Scattered light images of transition discs in the near-infrared often show non-axisymmetric structures in the form of wide-open spiral arms in addition to their characteristic low-opacity inner gap region. We study self-gravitating discs and investigate the influence of gravitational instability on the shape and contrast of spiral arms induced by planet-disc interactions. Two-dimensional non-isothermal hydrodynamical simulations including viscous heating and a cooling prescription are combined with three-dimensional dust continuum radiative transfer models for direct comparison to observations. We find that the resulting contrast between the spirals and the surrounding disc in scattered light is by far higher for pressure scale height variations, i.e. thermal perturbations, than for pure surface density variations. Self-gravity effects suppress any vortex modes and tend to reduce the opening angle of planet-induced spirals, making them more tightly wound. If the disc is only marginally gravitationally stable ...

  11. Binary Join Trees for Computing Marginals in the Shenoy-Shafer Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shenoy, Prakash P.

    1997-08-01

    -2003, USA pshenoy@ku.edu http://lark.cc.ku.edu/~pshenoy ? Appeared in International Journal of Approximate Reasoning, 17(2-3), 1997, 239?263. ii Binary Join Trees for Computing Marginals in the Shenoy... NETWORK FRAMEWORK .................................................2 3 AXIOMS FOR LOCAL COMPUTATION..........................................................5 4 COMPUTING A MARGINAL USING THE FUSION ALGORITHM ........................6 5 FUSION...

  12. Faunal responses to oxygen gradients on the Pakistan margin: A comparison of foraminiferans, macrofauna and megafauna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Lisa

    Faunal responses to oxygen gradients on the Pakistan margin: A comparison of foraminiferans Oxygen minimum zone Benthos Arabian Sea Biodiversity Deep sea a b s t r a c t The Pakistan Margin where oxygen levels were lowest. The rarity of larger animals between 300 and 700 m on the Pakistan

  13. Wind speed influence on phytoplankton bloom dynamics in the Southern Ocean Marginal Ice Zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Keith

    Wind speed influence on phytoplankton bloom dynamics in the Southern Ocean Marginal Ice Zone Dillon; published 7 August 2007. [1] Analysis of satellite ocean color and wind speed data within the seasonal ice. Moore (2007), Wind speed influence on phytoplankton bloom dynamics in the Southern Ocean Marginal Ice

  14. Ranking Structured Documents: A Large Margin Based Approach for Patent Prior Art Search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomes, Carla P.

    Ranking Structured Documents: A Large Margin Based Approach for Patent Prior Art Search Yunsong Guo propose an approach for automatically rank- ing structured documents applied to patent prior art search. Our model, SVM Patent Ranking (SVMP R) incorporates margin constraints that di- rectly capture

  15. From Camp Dwellers to Urban Refugees?: Urbanization and Marginalization of Refugee Camps in Lebanon.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    - 1 - From Camp Dwellers to Urban Refugees?: Urbanization and Marginalization of Refugee Camps villes invisibles 1. Introduction Palestinian refugees in Lebanon are marginalized in their host society with the relationship between the refugees' own socio-political dynamic, political actors, and space. The migrations

  16. The Case for Increasing Enrollment and Leveraging Marginal Costs: CSUN Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shubin, Carol

    The Case for Increasing Enrollment and Leveraging Marginal Costs: CSUN Case Study H. Hellenbrand1 will estimate the marginal cost for increasing enrollment from a theoretical point of view. This analysis will use data from the IPEDS data base and formulae for replacement costs suggested by the Legislative

  17. The Continental Margin is a Key Source of Iron to the HNLC North Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Continental Margin is a Key Source of Iron to the HNLC North Pacific Ocean Phoebe J. Lam1 concentrations in the upper 500m of the Western Subarctic Pacific, an iron-limited High Nutrient Low Chlorophyll a key source of bioavailable Fe to the HNLC North Pacific. Keywords: iron, continental margin, HNLC 1

  18. Produce through coiled tubing to keep marginal wells unloaded

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-12-01

    The use of coiled tubing as an alternate production tubing string has been attempted or considered by numerous operators in the past. However, its use has been tempered due to several problems known to be inherent with coiled tubing recompletions. Some of the problems encountered are: Killing the well to allow for tubing installation always carries the risk of formation damage; Candidate wells normally are marginal producers and may not produce sufficient revenue to justify the cost of a major workover; Procedures followed to install surface equipment may be hazardous; Previous installation designs required running the coiled tubing to the top of the tree, affecting the functional loss of all existing wellhead equipment; Often substandard modifications were required to reconnect into existing production facilities. However, a prototype spool and tubing hanger that incorporated modifications designed to solve these problems has been developed jointly by Reeled Tubing, Inc., and Well-head Control Systems. The solution is a new concept in the coiled tubing hanger. The design incorporates a floating element, which is a combination slip bowl, seal element and retaining sub. The entire assembly is installed and activated in the bore of a specially designed spool installed between the primary and secondary master valves of the existing wellhead.

  19. ORBITAL MIGRATION OF PROTOPLANETS IN A MARGINALLY GRAVITATIONALLY UNSTABLE DISK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boss, Alan P.

    2013-02-20

    Core accretion and disk instability require giant protoplanets to form in the presence of disk gas. Protoplanet migration models generally assume disk masses low enough that the disk's self-gravity can be neglected. However, disk instability requires a disk massive enough to be marginally gravitationally unstable (MGU). Even for core accretion, an FU Orionis outburst may require a brief MGU disk phase. We present a new set of three-dimensional, gravitational radiation hydrodynamics models of MGU disks with multiple protoplanets, which interact gravitationally with the disk and with each other, including disk gas mass accretion. Initial protoplanet masses are 0.01 to 10 M {sub Circled-Plus} for core accretion models, and 0.1 to 3 M {sub Jup} for Nice scenario models, starting on circular orbits with radii of 6, 8, 10, or 12 AU, inside a 0.091 M {sub Sun} disk extending from 4 to 20 AU around a 1 M {sub Sun} protostar. Evolutions are followed for up to {approx}4000 yr and involve phases of relative stability (e {approx} 0.1) interspersed with chaotic phases (e {approx} 0.4) of orbital interchanges. The 0.01 to 10 M {sub Circled-Plus} cores can orbit stably for {approx}1000 yr: monotonic inward or outward orbital migration of the type seen in low mass disks does not occur. A system with giant planet masses similar to our solar system (1.0, 0.33, 0.1, 0.1 M {sub Jup}) was stable for over 1000 yr, and a Jupiter-Saturn-like system was stable for over 3800 yr, implying that our giant planets might well survive an MGU disk phase.

  20. Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization Methods Development Work

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Curtis L; Ma, Zhegang; Tom Riley; Mandelli, Diego; Nielsen, Joseph W; Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian

    2014-09-01

    This report summarizes the research activity developed during the Fiscal year 2014 within the Risk Informed Safety Margin and Characterization (RISMC) pathway within the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) campaign. This research activity is complementary to the one presented in the INL/EXT-??? report which shows advances Probabilistic Risk Assessment Analysis using RAVEN and RELAP-7 in conjunction to novel flooding simulation tools. Here we present several analyses that prove the values of the RISMC approach in order to assess risk associated to nuclear power plants (NPPs). We focus on simulation based PRA which, in contrast to classical PRA, heavily employs system simulator codes. Firstly we compare, these two types of analyses, classical and RISMC, for a Boiling water reactor (BWR) station black out (SBO) initiating event. Secondly we present an extended BWR SBO analysis using RAVEN and RELAP-5 which address the comments and suggestions received about he original analysis presented in INL/EXT-???. This time we focus more on the stochastic analysis such probability of core damage and on the determination of the most risk-relevant factors. We also show some preliminary results regarding the comparison between RELAP5-3D and the new code RELAP-7 for a simplified Pressurized Water Reactors system. Lastly we present some conceptual ideas regarding the possibility to extended the RISMC capabilities from an off-line tool (i.e., as PRA analysis tool) to an online-tool. In this new configuration, RISMC capabilities can be used to assist and inform reactor operator during real accident scenarios.

  1. Hydrogen milestone could help lower fossil fuel refining costs

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McGraw, Jennifer

    2013-05-28

    Hydrogen researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho National Laboratory have reached another milestone on the road to reducing carbon emissions and protecting the nation against the effects of peaking world oil production. Stephen Herring, laboratory fellow and technical director of the INL High Temperature Electrolysis team, today announced that the latest fuel cell modification has set a new mark in endurance. The group's Integrated Laboratory Scale experiment has now operated continuously for 2,583 hours at higher efficiencies than previously attained. Learn more about INL research at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  2. Anisotropic Margin Expansions in 6 Anatomic Directions for Oropharyngeal Image Guided Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yock, Adam D. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas (United States); Garden, Adam S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Court, Laurence E. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas (United States); Beadle, Beth M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhang, Lifei [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Dong, Lei, E-mail: dong.lei@scrippshealth.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to determine the expansions in 6 anatomic directions that produced optimal margins considering nonrigid setup errors and tissue deformation for patients receiving image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) of the oropharynx. Methods and Materials: For 20 patients who had received IGRT to the head and neck, we deformably registered each patient's daily images acquired with a computed tomography (CT)-on-rails system to his or her planning CT. By use of the resulting vector fields, the positions of volume elements within the clinical target volume (CTV) (target voxels) or within a 1-cm shell surrounding the CTV (normal tissue voxels) on the planning CT were identified on each daily CT. We generated a total of 15,625 margins by dilating the CTV by 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5 mm in the posterior, anterior, lateral, medial, inferior, and superior directions. The optimal margins were those that minimized the relative volume of normal tissue voxels positioned within the margin while satisfying 1 of 4 geometric target coverage criteria and 1 of 3 population criteria. Results: Each pair of geometric target coverage and population criteria resulted in a unique, anisotropic, optimal margin. The optimal margin expansions ranged in magnitude from 1 to 5 mm depending on the anatomic direction of the expansion and on the geometric target coverage and population criteria. Typically, the expansions were largest in the medial direction, were smallest in the lateral direction, and increased with the demand of the criteria. The anisotropic margin resulting from the optimal set of expansions always included less normal tissue than did any isotropic margin that satisfied the same pair of criteria. Conclusions: We demonstrated the potential of anisotropic margins to reduce normal tissue exposure without compromising target coverage in IGRT to the head and neck.

  3. Benthic biological and biogeochemical patterns and processes across an oxygen minimum zone (Pakistan margin, NE Arabian Sea)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Lisa

    (Pakistan margin, NE Arabian Sea) Gregory L. Cowie a,Ã, Lisa A. Levin b a The Sir John Murray Laboratories), and organic matter (OM) availability on benthic communities and processes across the Pakistan Margin

  4. Supplementary Materials Table 1: Simulated log-normal survival data marginal posterior probability of inclusion of relevant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vannucci, Marina

    .1835 Table 1: Simulated log-normal survival data: Marginal posterior probabilities of inclusion of rele- vant: Marginal posterior probabilities of inclusion of rele- vant variables under different maximum correlation

  5. An adaptive grid refinement strategy for the simulation of negative streamers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montijn, C. . E-mail: carolynne.montijn@cwi.nl; Hundsdorfer, W. . E-mail: willem.hundsdorfer@cwi.nl; Ebert, U. . E-mail: ute.ebert@cwi.nl

    2006-12-10

    The evolution of negative streamers during electric breakdown of a non-attaching gas can be described by a two-fluid model for electrons and positive ions. It consists of continuity equations for the charged particles including drift, diffusion and reaction in the local electric field, coupled to the Poisson equation for the electric potential. The model generates field enhancement and steep propagating ionization fronts at the tip of growing ionized filaments. An adaptive grid refinement method for the simulation of these structures is presented. It uses finite volume spatial discretizations and explicit time stepping, which allows the decoupling of the grids for the continuity equations from those for the Poisson equation. Standard refinement methods in which the refinement criterion is based on local error monitors fail due to the pulled character of the streamer front that propagates into a linearly unstable state. We present a refinement method which deals with all these features. Tests on one-dimensional streamer fronts as well as on three-dimensional streamers with cylindrical symmetry (hence effectively 2D for numerical purposes) are carried out successfully. Results on fine grids are presented, they show that such an adaptive grid method is needed to capture the streamer characteristics well. This refinement strategy enables us to adequately compute negative streamers in pure gases in the parameter regime where a physical instability appears: branching streamers.

  6. Oxygen and organic matter thresholds for benthic faunal activity on the Pakistan margin oxygen minimum zone (7001100 m)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Lisa

    Oxygen and organic matter thresholds for benthic faunal activity on the Pakistan margin oxygen) on the bathyal Pakistan margin, where sediments grade from fully laminated sediment at 700 m (0.12 mL LÀ1 O2 [5 m matter to generate abrupt faunal transitions on the Pakistan margin. & 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  7. Automating crystallographic structure solution and refinement of protein–ligand complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Echols, Nathaniel, E-mail: nechols@lbl.gov; Moriarty, Nigel W., E-mail: nechols@lbl.gov; Klei, Herbert E.; Afonine, Pavel V. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720-8235 (United States); Bunkóczi, Gábor [University of Cambridge, Cambridge Institute for Medical Research, Wellcome Trust/MRC Building, Cambridge CB2 0XY (United Kingdom); Headd, Jeffrey J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720-8235 (United States); McCoy, Airlie J.; Oeffner, Robert D.; Read, Randy J. [University of Cambridge, Cambridge Institute for Medical Research, Wellcome Trust/MRC Building, Cambridge CB2 0XY (United Kingdom); Terwilliger, Thomas C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545-0001 (United States); Adams, Paul D., E-mail: nechols@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720-8235 (United States); University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-1762 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    A software system for automated protein–ligand crystallography has been implemented in the Phenix suite. This significantly reduces the manual effort required in high-throughput crystallographic studies. High-throughput drug-discovery and mechanistic studies often require the determination of multiple related crystal structures that only differ in the bound ligands, point mutations in the protein sequence and minor conformational changes. If performed manually, solution and refinement requires extensive repetition of the same tasks for each structure. To accelerate this process and minimize manual effort, a pipeline encompassing all stages of ligand building and refinement, starting from integrated and scaled diffraction intensities, has been implemented in Phenix. The resulting system is able to successfully solve and refine large collections of structures in parallel without extensive user intervention prior to the final stages of model completion and validation.

  8. Understanding the Zongo : processes of socio-spatial marginalization in Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williamson, Emily Anne

    2014-01-01

    The spatial processes of marginalization and ghettoization have been described, labeled, and theorized extensively in the United States and Europe, yet there has been little research dedicated to these processes in the ...

  9. Analysis of post-Kyoto CO? emissions trading using marginal abatement curves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellerman, A. Denny.; Decaux, Annelène.

    Marginal abatement curves (MACs) are often used heuristically to demonstrate the advantages of emissions trading. In this paper, the authors derive MACs from EPPA, the MIT Joint Program's computable general equilibrium ...

  10. Storytelling on the margins : a theoretical framework for imagining a fashion innovation center in Tuscany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Alexa (Alexa Timeaus)

    2008-01-01

    The importance of the margin has long been deemed important in creative processes. At both the level of the individual and the level of the city, research shows that creativity tends to flourish on the philosophical and ...

  11. Some Improvements to the Shenoy-Shafer and Hugin Architectures for Computing Marginals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Tuija; Shenoy, Prakash P.

    1998-01-01

    The main aim of this paper is to describe two modifications to the Shenoy–Shafer architecture with the goal of making it computationally more efficient in computing marginals of the joint valuation. We also describe a ...

  12. The evolution of lithospheric deformation and crustal structure from continental margins to oceanic spreading centers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behn, Mark Dietrich, 1974-

    2002-01-01

    This thesis investigates the evolution of lithospheric deformation and crustal structure from continental margins to mid-ocean ridges. The first part (Ch. 2) examines the style of segmentation along the U.S. East Coast ...

  13. Experimental validation of the van Herk margin formula for lung radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ecclestone, Gillian; Heath, Emily; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To validate the van Herk margin formula for lung radiation therapy using realistic dose calculation algorithms and respiratory motion modeling. The robustness of the margin formula against variations in lesion size, peak-to-peak motion amplitude, tissue density, treatment technique, and plan conformity was assessed, along with the margin formula assumption of a homogeneous dose distribution with perfect plan conformity.Methods: 3DCRT and IMRT lung treatment plans were generated within the ORBIT treatment planning platform (RaySearch Laboratories, Sweden) on 4DCT datasets of virtual phantoms. Random and systematic respiratory motion induced errors were simulated using deformable registration and dose accumulation tools available within ORBIT for simulated cases of varying lesion sizes, peak-to-peak motion amplitudes, tissue densities, and plan conformities. A detailed comparison between the margin formula dose profile model, the planned dose profiles, and penumbra widths was also conducted to test the assumptions of the margin formula. Finally, a correction to account for imperfect plan conformity was tested as well as a novel application of the margin formula that accounts for the patient-specific motion trajectory.Results: The van Herk margin formula ensured full clinical target volume coverage for all 3DCRT and IMRT plans of all conformities with the exception of small lesions in soft tissue. No dosimetric trends with respect to plan technique or lesion size were observed for the systematic and random error simulations. However, accumulated plans showed that plan conformity decreased with increasing tumor motion amplitude. When comparing dose profiles assumed in the margin formula model to the treatment plans, discrepancies in the low dose regions were observed for the random and systematic error simulations. However, the margin formula respected, in all experiments, the 95% dose coverage required for planning target volume (PTV) margin derivation, as defined by the ICRU; thus, suitable PTV margins were estimated. The penumbra widths calculated in lung tissue for each plan were found to be very similar to the 6.4 mm value assumed by the margin formula model. The plan conformity correction yielded inconsistent results which were largely affected by image and dose grid resolution while the trajectory modified PTV plans yielded a dosimetric benefit over the standard internal target volumes approach with up to a 5% decrease in the V20 value.Conclusions: The margin formula showed to be robust against variations in tumor size and motion, treatment technique, plan conformity, as well as low tissue density. This was validated by maintaining coverage of all of the derived PTVs by 95% dose level, as required by the formal definition of the PTV. However, the assumption of perfect plan conformity in the margin formula derivation yields conservative margin estimation. Future modifications to the margin formula will require a correction for plan conformity. Plan conformity can also be improved by using the proposed trajectory modified PTV planning approach. This proves especially beneficial for tumors with a large anterior–posterior component of respiratory motion.

  14. Subsidence history, crustal structure, and evolution of the Somaliland-Yemen conjugate margin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali, Mohammed

    seismic refraction data and process-oriented gravity and flexure modeling. The margin is asymmetric et al., 2001; Dauteuil et al., 2001; Hebert et al., 2001; Manighetti et al., 1997]. Seismic and well

  15. A reference time scale for Site U1385 (Shackleton Site) on the SW Iberian Margin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hodell, D.; Lourens, L.; Crowhurst, S.; Konijnendijk, T.; Tjallingii, R.; Jimenez-Espejo, F.; Skinner, L.; Tzedakis, P. C.

    2015-07-16

    ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT 5 fidelity of the sediments on the SW Iberian Margin make this region a prime target for ocean drilling. In 2011, an Ancillary Program Letter (APL 763) was submitted to the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) requesting four...

  16. Estimating Marginal Returns to Medical Care: Evidence from At-Risk Newborns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almond, Douglas

    A key policy question is whether the benefits of additional medical expenditures exceed their costs. We propose a new approach for estimating marginal returns to medical spending based on variation in medical inputs generated ...

  17. Free kick instead of cross-validation in maximum-likelihood refinement of macromolecular crystal structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pražnikar, Jure [Institute Jožef Stefan, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); University of Primorska, (Slovenia); Turk, Dušan, E-mail: dusan.turk@ijs.si [Institute Jožef Stefan, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Center of Excellence for Integrated Approaches in Chemistry and Biology of Proteins, (Slovenia)

    2014-12-01

    The maximum-likelihood free-kick target, which calculates model error estimates from the work set and a randomly displaced model, proved superior in the accuracy and consistency of refinement of crystal structures compared with the maximum-likelihood cross-validation target, which calculates error estimates from the test set and the unperturbed model. The refinement of a molecular model is a computational procedure by which the atomic model is fitted to the diffraction data. The commonly used target in the refinement of macromolecular structures is the maximum-likelihood (ML) function, which relies on the assessment of model errors. The current ML functions rely on cross-validation. They utilize phase-error estimates that are calculated from a small fraction of diffraction data, called the test set, that are not used to fit the model. An approach has been developed that uses the work set to calculate the phase-error estimates in the ML refinement from simulating the model errors via the random displacement of atomic coordinates. It is called ML free-kick refinement as it uses the ML formulation of the target function and is based on the idea of freeing the model from the model bias imposed by the chemical energy restraints used in refinement. This approach for the calculation of error estimates is superior to the cross-validation approach: it reduces the phase error and increases the accuracy of molecular models, is more robust, provides clearer maps and may use a smaller portion of data for the test set for the calculation of R{sub free} or may leave it out completely.

  18. Studies on design of a process for organo-refining of coal to obtain super clean coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, C.S.; Sharma, D.K. [Indian Inst. of Tech., New Delhi (India). Centre for Energy Studies

    1999-08-01

    Organo-refining of coal results in refining the coal to obtain super clean coal and residual coal. Super clean coal may be used to obtain value added chemicals, products, and cleaner fuels from coal. In the present work, studies on the design of a semicontinuous process for organo-refining of one ton of coal have been made. The results are reported. This is only a cursory attempt for the design, and further studies may be required for designing this process for use in the development of a scaled-up process of organo-refining of coal.

  19. The atomic structure of the cleaved Si(111)-(2x1) surface refined by dynamical LEED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01

    Surface Crystallography by LEED”, p.30, Spinger-Verlag, Bby automated tensor LEED (the number of optimized parametersSurface Refined by Dynamical LEED Geng Xu, Bingcheng Deng,*

  20. An Enhanced In-Vessel Core Catcher for Improving In-Vessel Retention Margins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joy L. Rempe

    2005-11-01

    In-vessel retention (IVR) of core melt that may relocate to the lower head of a reactor vessel is a key severe accident management strategy adopted by some operating nuclear power plants and proposed for several advanced light water reactors. A U.S.-Korean International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative project has been initiated to explore design enhancements that could increase the margin for IVR for advanced reactors with higher power levels [up to 1500 MW(electric)]. As part of this effort, an enhanced in-vessel core catcher is being designed and evaluated. To reduce cost and simplify manufacture and installation, this new core catcher design consists of several interlocking sections that are machined to fit together when inserted into the lower head. If needed, the core catcher can be manufactured with holes to accommodate lower head penetrations. Each section of the core catcher consists of two material layers with an option to add a third layer (if deemed necessary). The first is a base material that has the capability to support and contain the mass of core materials that may relocate during a severe accident; the second is an oxide coating on top of the base material, which resists interactions with high-temperature core materials; and the third is an optional coating on the bottom side of the base material to protect it from oxidation during the lifetime of the reactor. This paper summarizes results from the invessel core catcher design and evaluation efforts, focusing on recently obtained results from materials interaction tests and prototypic testing activities.

  1. Development of an Enhanced Core Catcher for Improving In-Vessel Retention Margins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rempe, J.L. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (United States); Condie, K.G. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (United States); Knudson, D.L. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (United States); Suh, K.Y. [Seoul National University (Korea, Republic of); Cheung, F.B. [The Pennsylvania State University (United States); Kim, S.B. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-11-15

    In-vessel retention (IVR) of core melt that may relocate to the lower head of a reactor vessel is a key severe accident management strategy adopted by some operating nuclear power plants and proposed for several advanced light water reactors. A U.S.-Korean International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative project has been initiated to explore design enhancements that could increase the margin for IVR for advanced reactors with higher power levels [up to 1500 MW(electric)]. As part of this effort, an enhanced in-vessel core catcher is being designed and evaluated. To reduce cost and simplify manufacture and installation, this new core catcher design consists of several interlocking sections that are machined to fit together when inserted into the lower head. If needed, the core catcher can be manufactured with holes to accommodate lower head penetrations. Each section of the core catcher consists of two material layers with an option to add a third layer (if deemed necessary). The first is a base material that has the capability to support and contain the mass of core materials that may relocate during a severe accident; the second is an oxide coating on top of the base material, which resists interactions with high-temperature core materials; and the third is an optional coating on the bottom side of the base material to protect it from oxidation during the lifetime of the reactor. This paper summarizes results from the in-vessel core catcher design and evaluation efforts, focusing on recently obtained results from materials interaction tests and prototypic testing activities.

  2. Liquid-liquid extraction as the means of refining cottonseed oil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Manubhai Chunibhai

    1956-01-01

    LIBRARY A 4 AI CvLLEGE OF TEXAS LIOVID-LIQUID EXTRACTION AS THE MEANS OI REFINING CCTTONSEFZ OIL A Thesis By 1'RVUBHAI CHIINIBHAI PATEL a 0 U z A R 0 Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Auuust 1996 Major Subject Chemical ineeri LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION AS THE MEANS OF REFINING COTTONSEED OIL A Thesis By MANUBHAI CHUNIBHAI PATEL Approved as to style...

  3. SUESS ET AL.: SEA FLOOR METHANE HYDRATES AT HYDRATE RIDGE, CASCADIA MARGIN Sea Floor Methane Hydrates at Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia Margin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldfinger, Chris

    SUESS ET AL.: SEA FLOOR METHANE HYDRATES AT HYDRATE RIDGE, CASCADIA MARGIN 1 Sea Floor Methane are exposed at the sea floor. A methane-oxidizing bacterial consortium populates the exposures of hydrate; colonies of vent macro-fauna are abundant as well. Discharge of methane from destabilized hydrate

  4. Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization Case Study: Selection of Electrical Equipment To Be Subjected to Environmental Qualification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Blanchard; R. Youngblood

    2012-04-01

    In general, the margins-based safety case helps the decision-maker manage plant margins most effectively. It tells the plant decision-maker such things as what margin is present (at the plant level, at the functional level, at the barrier level, at the component level), and where margin is thin or perhaps just degrading. If the plant is safe, it tells the decision-maker why the plant is safe and where margin needs to be maintained, and perhaps where the plant can afford to relax.

  5. Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization Case Study: Selection of Electrical Equipment To Be Subjected to Environmental Qualification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Youngblood; D. Blanchard

    2011-09-01

    In general, the margins-based safety case helps the decision-maker manage plant margins most effectively. It tells the plant decision-maker such things as what margin is present (at the plant level, at the functional level, at the barrier level, at the component level), and where margin is thin or perhaps just degrading. If the plant is safe, it tells the decision-maker why the plant is safe and where margin needs to be maintained, and perhaps where the plant can afford to relax.

  6. Classification of remotely sensed imagery using stochastic gradient boosting as a refinement of classification tree analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    trees) are increasingly being used for analysis and classification of remotely sensed digital imageryClassification of remotely sensed imagery using stochastic gradient boosting as a refinement of classification tree analysis Rick Lawrencea,*, Andrew Bunna , Scott Powellb , Michael Zambona a Department

  7. Iterative model building, structure refinement and density modification with the PHENIX AutoBuild wizard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mailstop M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Afonine, Pavel V.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Zwart, Peter H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Building 64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hung, Li-Wei [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mailstop M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Read, Randy J. [Department of Haematology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0XY (United Kingdom); Adams, Paul D., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Building 64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mailstop M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The highly automated PHENIX AutoBuild wizard is described. The procedure can be applied equally well to phases derived from isomorphous/anomalous and molecular-replacement methods. The PHENIX AutoBuild wizard is a highly automated tool for iterative model building, structure refinement and density modification using RESOLVE model building, RESOLVE statistical density modification and phenix.refine structure refinement. Recent advances in the AutoBuild wizard and phenix.refine include automated detection and application of NCS from models as they are built, extensive model-completion algorithms and automated solvent-molecule picking. Model-completion algorithms in the AutoBuild wizard include loop building, crossovers between chains in different models of a structure and side-chain optimization. The AutoBuild wizard has been applied to a set of 48 structures at resolutions ranging from 1.1 to 3.2 Å, resulting in a mean R factor of 0.24 and a mean free R factor of 0.29. The R factor of the final model is dependent on the quality of the starting electron density and is relatively independent of resolution.

  8. Iterative model-building, structure refinement, and density modification with the PHENIX AutoBuild Wizard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mailstop M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545, USA; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Building 64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA; Department of Haematology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0XY, England; Terwilliger, Thomas; Terwilliger, T.C.; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf Wilhelm; Afonine, P.V.; Moriarty, N.W.; Zwart, P.H.; Hung, L.-W.; Read, R.J.; Adams, P.D.

    2007-04-29

    The PHENIX AutoBuild Wizard is a highly automated tool for iterative model-building, structure refinement and density modification using RESOLVE or TEXTAL model-building, RESOLVE statistical density modification, and phenix.refine structure refinement. Recent advances in the AutoBuild Wizard and phenix.refine include automated detection and application of NCS from models as they are built, extensive model completion algorithms, and automated solvent molecule picking. Model completion algorithms in the AutoBuild Wizard include loop-building, crossovers between chains in different models of a structure, and side-chain optimization. The AutoBuild Wizard has been applied to a set of 48 structures at resolutions ranging from 1.1 {angstrom} to 3.2 {angstrom}, resulting in a mean R-factor of 0.24 and a mean free R factor of 0.29. The R-factor of the final model is dependent on the quality of the starting electron density, and relatively independent of resolution.

  9. OPERATOR INTERACTION WITH MODEL-BASED PREDICTIVE CONTROLLERS IN PETROCHEMICAL REFINING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia, University of

    OPERATOR INTERACTION WITH MODEL-BASED PREDICTIVE CONTROLLERS IN PETROCHEMICAL REFINING Greg A in process control to the more thoroughly studied Flight Management System (FMS) employed in airline cockpits and challenging task. Keywords: Cognitive task analysis; Process control; Predictive control; Optimization

  10. Industrial Ecology and LCA, Instructor Iddo Wernick Fall 2014 Syllabus (subject to refinement/updating)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolberg, George

    Industrial Ecology and LCA, Instructor Iddo Wernick Fall 2014 Syllabus (subject to refinement/updating) 1 SUS-7300C INDUSTRIAL ECOLOGY AND LIFE CYCLE ANALYSIS Description: Students will be introduced to the purpose, philosophy, and applications of Industrial Ecology as they affect environmental and urban

  11. A TWODIMENSIONAL MOVING FINITE ELEMENT METHOD WITH LOCAL REFINEMENT BASED ON A POSTERIORI ERROR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Weiming

    and Flaherty [1] to the two­dimensional case, where clusters of mesh points are built up and moved (middle), and rh­refinement with N = 541 yields e L2() = 1.57E-2 (right). While the r­method wastes too

  12. The Nekrasov-Okounkov hook length formula: refinement, elementary proof, extension and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2008/05/09 The Nekrasov-Okounkov hook length formula: refinement, elementary proof, extension and applications Guo-Niu HAN ABSTRACT. -- The paper is devoted to the derivation of the expan- sion formula function for t-cores. Several applications are derived, including the "marked hook formula". 1

  13. Three Dimensional Adaptive Mesh Refinement on a Spherical Shell for Atmospheric Models with Lagrangian Coordinates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jablonowski, Christiane

    Three Dimensional Adaptive Mesh Refinement on a Spherical Shell for Atmospheric Models for Atmospheric Research 1. Introduction One of the most important advances needed in global climate models of this project is a parallel adaptive grid library, which is currently under development at the University

  14. An Incremental Refining Spatial Join Algorithm for Estimating Query Results in GIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leutenegger, Scott T.

    An Incremental Refining Spatial Join Algorithm for Estimating Query Results in GIS Wan D. Bae systems (GIS) must support large georeferenced data sets. Due to the size of these data sets finding ex this is the first work using this approach in GIS. We investigate different sampling method- ologies and evaluate

  15. Sustainable Soil and Water, Adjunct Professor Marcha Johnson Spring 2014 Syllabus (subject to refinement/updating)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolberg, George

    Sustainable Soil and Water, Adjunct Professor Marcha Johnson Spring 2014 Syllabus (subject to refinement/updating) 1 Spring 2014 SUS- 7700A: SUSTAINABLE SOIL AND WATER Course: Sustainable Soil and Water water, and groundwater in urban settings; understanding floodplains; treating polluted brownfields

  16. Environmental Regulations and Changes in Petroleum Refining Operations (Released in the STEO June 1998)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1998-01-01

    Changes in domestic refining operations are identified and related to the summer Reid vapor pressure (RVP) restrictions and oxygenate blending requirements. This analysis uses published Energy Information Administration survey data and linear regression equations from the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS). The STIFS model is used for producing forecasts appearing in the Short-Term Energy Outlook.

  17. Verification of Hybrid Systems Based on Counterexample-Guided Abstraction Refinement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, Edmund M.

    verification, abstraction transforms the inherently infinite state system into a finite-state model [7Verification of Hybrid Systems Based on Counterexample-Guided Abstraction Refinement Edmund Clarke1 generated by the model checker. For hybrid systems, analysis of the counterexample requires the computation

  18. Verification of Hybrid Systems Based on CounterexampleGuided Abstraction Refinement ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theobald, Michael

    verification, abstraction transforms the inherently infinite state system into a finite­state model [7, 8Verification of Hybrid Systems Based on Counterexample­Guided Abstraction Refinement ? Edmund that eliminates a counterexample generated by the model checker. For hybrid systems, analy­ sis

  19. Federal/Industry Development of Energy-Conserving Technologies for the Chemical and Petroleum Refining Industries 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alston, T. G.; Humphrey, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has started a program to identify future RD&D projects that (i) promise cost-effective savings of scarce fuels in the chemical and petroleum refining industries, (ii) are not likely to be pursued by industry alone...

  20. Abstracting and Refining Authorization in SQL Arnon Rosenthal, Edward Sciore1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sciore, Edward

    Abstracting and Refining Authorization in SQL Arnon Rosenthal, Edward Sciore1 Abstract. The SQL and dangerous to change. To make the model easier to work with, we formalize the implicit principles behind SQL solve several administrative problems with existing SQL security. This sort of abstraction is also

  1. Tools for macromolecular model building and refinement into electron cryo-microscopy reconstructions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Alan; Long, Fei; Nicholls, Robert A.; Toots, Jaan; Emsley, Paul; Murshudov, Garib, E-mail: garib@mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk [MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Francis Crick Avenue, Cambridge CB2 0QH (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01

    A description is given of new tools to facilitate model building and refinement into electron cryo-microscopy reconstructions. The recent rapid development of single-particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) now allows structures to be solved by this method at resolutions close to 3 Å. Here, a number of tools to facilitate the interpretation of EM reconstructions with stereochemically reasonable all-atom models are described. The BALBES database has been repurposed as a tool for identifying protein folds from density maps. Modifications to Coot, including new Jiggle Fit and morphing tools and improved handling of nucleic acids, enhance its functionality for interpreting EM maps. REFMAC has been modified for optimal fitting of atomic models into EM maps. As external structural information can enhance the reliability of the derived atomic models, stabilize refinement and reduce overfitting, ProSMART has been extended to generate interatomic distance restraints from nucleic acid reference structures, and a new tool, LIBG, has been developed to generate nucleic acid base-pair and parallel-plane restraints. Furthermore, restraint generation has been integrated with visualization and editing in Coot, and these restraints have been applied to both real-space refinement in Coot and reciprocal-space refinement in REFMAC.

  2. Refinement of weed risk assessments for biofuels using Camelina sativa as a model species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    Refinement of weed risk assessments for biofuels using Camelina sativa as a model species Philip B and Environmental Sciences, Montana State University, PO Box 173120, Bozeman, MT 59717-3120, USA Summary 1. Biofuel. However, concerns have been raised on the invasiveness of biofuel feedstocks. Estimating invasion

  3. EIS-0069: Solvent Refined Coal-II Demonstration Project, Fort Martin, Monongalia County, West Virginia

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed this statement to assess the potential environmental, economic and social impacts associated with the construction and short-term operation of a 6,000-tons-per-stream-day-capacity facility that will demonstrate the technical operability, economic viability, and environmental acceptability of the solvent refined coal process at Fort Martin, West Virginia.

  4. Nonrigid Motion Analysis Based on Dynamic Refinement of Finite Element Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkar, Sudeep

    Nonrigid Motion Analysis Based on Dynamic Refinement of Finite Element Models Leonid V. Tsap finite element models. The method is based on the iterative analysis of the differences betweenÐPhysically-based vision, deformable models, nonrigid motion analysis, biomedical applications, finite element analysis. æ

  5. Quantitative Methods for Strategic and Investment Planning in the Oil-Refining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Quantitative Methods for Strategic and Investment Planning in the Oil-Refining Brenno C(ng ­ March 2013 What, Where, When to Invest? Only op*mize streams transfers (fuel;Current Investment Planning Methodology in PETROBRAS Strategy - Increase the supply

  6. JOURNAL OF COMPUTATIONAL PHYSICS accepted Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Singular Current Sheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grauer, Rainer

    with simple scaling assumptions. As expected, adaptive mesh refinement shows to be very efficient for studying community. Since mathemat­ ically only very little is known [1], one has to rely on numerical simulations treatment is limited very soon by the computer memory available, resulting in a resolution of less than 512

  7. 356 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SOFTWARE ENGINEERING, VOL. 21, NO. 4, APRIL 1995 Correct Architecture Refinement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Hoek, André

    356 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SOFTWARE ENGINEERING, VOL. 21, NO. 4, APRIL 1995 Correct Architecture for the stepwise refinement of an abstract architecture into a relatively correct lower level architecture that provides a routine solution to a standard architectural design problem. A pattern contains an abstract

  8. A Refined Model of the Prototypical Salmonella SPI-1 T3SS Basal Body Reveals the Molecular Basis for Its

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, David

    A Refined Model of the Prototypical Salmonella SPI-1 T3SS Basal Body Reveals the Molecular Basis report the crystal structures of three domains of the prototypical Salmonella SPI-1 basal body, and use) A Refined Model of the Prototypical Salmonella SPI-1 T3SS Basal Body Reveals the Molecular Basis for Its

  9. States & Energy Efficiency in Higher Education

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation, given through the DOE's Technical Assitance Program (TAP), provides information on States & Energy Efficiency in Higher Education.

  10. States & Energy Efficiency in Higher Education

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation, given through the DOE's Technical Assistance Program (TAP), provides information on States & Energy Efficiency in Higher Education.

  11. TWISTING COCHAINS AND HIGHER TORSION KIYOSHI IGUSA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Igusa, Kiyoshi

    of them is a higher algebraic K-theory class measured by higher FR torsion. Flat superconnections are also-theory 8 4. Higher FR torsion 10 5. Flat superconnections 12 6. Forms as operators 15 7. Chen's iterated) It is a combinatorial flat Z graded superconnection. 2000 Mathematics Subject Classification. Primary 57R22, Secondary

  12. Quantification of the Variability of Diaphragm Motion and Implications for Treatment Margin Construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rit, Simon; Herk, Marcel van; Zijp, Lambert [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sonke, Jan-Jakob, E-mail: j.sonke@nki.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To quantify the variability of diaphragm motion during free-breathing radiotherapy of lung patients and its effect on treatment margins to account for geometric uncertainties. Methods and Materials: Thirty-three lung cancer patients were analyzed. Each patient had 5-19 cone-beam scans acquired during different treatment fractions. The craniocaudal position of the diaphragm dome on the same side as the tumor was tracked over 2 min in the projection images, because it is both easily visible and a suitable surrogate to study the variability of the tumor motion and its impact on treatment margins. Intra-acquisition, inter-acquisition, and inter-patient variability of the respiratory cycles were quantified separately, as were the probability density functions (PDFs) of the diaphragm position over each cycle, each acquisition, and each patient. Asymmetric margins were simulated using each patient PDF and compared to symmetric margins computed from a margin recipe. Results: The peak-to-peak amplitude variability (1 SD) was 3.3 mm, 2.4 mm, and 6.1 mm for the intra-acquisition, inter-acquisition, and inter-patient variability, respectively. The average PDF of each cycle was similar to the sin{sup 4} function but the PDF of each acquisition was closer to a skew-normal distribution because of the motion variability. Despite large interfraction baseline variability, the PDF of each patient was generally asymmetric with a longer end-inhale tail because the end-exhale position was more stable than the end-inhale position. The asymmetry of the PDF required asymmetric margins around the time-averaged position to account for the position uncertainty but the average difference was 1.0 mm (range, 0.0-4.4 mm) for a sharp penumbra and an idealized online setup correction protocol. Conclusion: The respiratory motion is more irregular during the fractions than between the fractions. The PDF of the respiratory motion is asymmetrically distributed. Both the intra-acquisition variability and the PDF asymmetry have a limited impact on dose distributions and inferred margins. The use of a margin recipe to account for respiratory motion with an estimate of the average motion amplitude was adequate in almost all patients.

  13. Integrating Safety Assessment Methods using the Risk Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith; Diego Mandelli

    2013-03-01

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of nuclear power plants (NPPs). As the current light water reactor (LWR) NPPs age beyond 60 years, there are possibilities for increased frequency of systems, structures, and components (SSC) degradations or failures that initiate safety significant events, reduce existing accident mitigation capabilities, or create new failure modes. Plant designers commonly “over-design” portions of NPPs and provide robustness in the form of redundant and diverse engineered safety features to ensure that, even in the case of well-beyond design basis scenarios, public health and safety will be protected with a very high degree of assurance. This form of defense-in-depth is a reasoned response to uncertainties and is often referred to generically as “safety margin.” Historically, specific safety margin provisions have been formulated primarily based on engineering judgment backed by a set of conservative engineering calculations. The ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin is important to improved decision making about LWR design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margin management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. In addition, as research and development (R&D) in the LWR Sustainability (LWRS) Program and other collaborative efforts yield new data, sensors, and improved scientific understanding of physical processes that govern the aging and degradation of plant SSCs needs and opportunities to better optimize plant safety and performance will become known. To support decision making related to economics, readability, and safety, the RISMC Pathway provides methods and tools that enable mitigation options known as margins management strategies. The purpose of the RISMC Pathway R&D is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margin management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain safety of current NPPs. As the lead Department of Energy (DOE) Laboratory for this Pathway, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is tasked with developing and deploying methods and tools that support the quantification and management of safety margin and uncertainty.

  14. Changing structure of the world refining industry: implications for the United States and other major consuming regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-02-01

    There are five chapters in this publication. Chapter I on refining industry in transition covers refining history highlights, and OPEC's downstream operations. Chapter II on demand for oil and oil products discusses supply and demand for OPEC oil, demand for oil products, historical growth trends, future growth trends and the case of East Asia - emergence of a fuel oil glut. Chapter III on the US and other traditional refining centers begins with an introduction on the structure of refining and continues on to cover the refining industry in OECD countries, USA, Western Europe, Japan, Singapore and Caribbean and closes with some conclusions. Chapter IV is on refining expansions in OPEC and the third World Nations. The following are covered: (1) nations of the Gulf (Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Iran, Iraq, Bahrain, Qatar, Oman, United Arab Emirates); (2) OPEC members beyond the Gulf (Indonesia, Africa, Libya, Algeria, Nigeria and Gabon, South America, Venezuela); (3) other major exporters (China, Egypt, Malaysia, Mexico); (4) non-OPEC developing countries - trends in the refining sector. The chapter ends with a short summary on capacity prospects and comparative economics. The final chapter has conclusions and recommendations on: price interactions between crude and products; product exports - impact on OPEC's internal; prices and market influence; importers and exporters - decisions; and course of action of the United States. 18 figures, 40 tables.

  15. Iterative-build OMIT maps: map improvement by iterative model building and refinement without model bias

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Afonine, Pavel V.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Adams, Paul D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Building 64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Read, Randy J. [Department of Haematology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0XY (United Kingdom); Zwart, Peter H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Building 64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hung, Li-Wei [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2008-05-01

    An OMIT procedure is presented that has the benefits of iterative model building density modification and refinement yet is essentially unbiased by the atomic model that is built. A procedure for carrying out iterative model building, density modification and refinement is presented in which the density in an OMIT region is essentially unbiased by an atomic model. Density from a set of overlapping OMIT regions can be combined to create a composite ‘iterative-build’ OMIT map that is everywhere unbiased by an atomic model but also everywhere benefiting from the model-based information present elsewhere in the unit cell. The procedure may have applications in the validation of specific features in atomic models as well as in overall model validation. The procedure is demonstrated with a molecular-replacement structure and with an experimentally phased structure and a variation on the method is demonstrated by removing model bias from a structure from the Protein Data Bank.

  16. The effects of air pollution regulations on the US refining industry. Task 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    Numerous air pollution regulations affecting petroleum refineries recently have been promulgated, have been proposed, or are under consideration at the federal, state, and local level. As shown in Figure ES-1, all of these environmental regulations are intended to take effect over the relatively short time period from 1989 through 1995. In the aggregate these regulatory activities have significant implications for the US refining industry and the Nation, including: Major investment requirements; changes in industry profitability; potential closure of some refineries; and potential changes in crude oil or product import dependence. At issue is whether the cumulative effect of these regulations could so adversely affect the US refining industry that US national security would be affected. In addition to the regulations outlined in Figure ES-1, President Bush recently presented a major new plan to improve the nation`s air quality. The aspects of the President`s plan that could strongly affect US refineries are summarized below.

  17. Report to the Congress on the storage of refined petroleum products and on regional supply interruptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-06-01

    This report describes petroleum and petroleum products storage and supply disruption. Information is presented under the following topics: Historical Perspective; Current Patterns of Supply and Disposition of Petroleum Products in the Primary Distribution System; PADD I Clean Products Supply/Demand; 1990 Regional Petroleum Reserve Annual Computation; Market Infrastructure and Commercial Practices in the California Motor Gasoline Market, as Related to Potential Refined Petroleum Product Reserve Structures and Sales Procedures; Infrastructure and Commercial Practices in the Northeast Distillate Market, as Related to Potential Refined Petroleum Product Reserve Structures and Sales Procedures; Storage Stability Characteristics of Petroleum Products and Crude Oil; Effect of 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments on Demand for Petroleum Product Storage Capacity; and Environmental Regulations on Tanks.

  18. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor Demonstration Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith; David Schwieder; Cherie Phelan; Anh Bui; Paul Bayless

    2012-08-01

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about LWR design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the RISMC Pathway R&D is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain safety of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced “RISMC toolkit” that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. This report describes the RISMC methodology demonstration where the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) was used as a test-bed for purposes of determining safety margins. As part of the demonstration, we describe how both the thermal-hydraulics and probabilistic safety calculations are integrated and used to quantify margin management strategies.

  19. Mapping the Potential for Biofuel Production on Marginal Lands: Differences in Definitions, Data and Models across Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Sarah M

    2014-01-01

    D. Land availability for biofuel production. Environ. Sci.of land available for biofuel production. Environ. Sci.so marginal land for biofuel crops is limited. Energy Policy

  20. Mapping the Potential for Biofuel Production on Marginal Lands: Differences in Definitions, Data and Models across Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Sarah M

    2014-01-01

    availability for biofuel production. Environ. Sci. Technol.of land available for biofuel production. Environ. Sci.the Potential for Biofuel Production on Marginal Lands:

  1. ,"U.S. Reformulated, Average Refiner Gasoline Prices"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price to fall to $3.43U.S.longecReformulated Gasoline Refiner

  2. A refined r-factor algorithm for TVD schemes on arbitrary unstructured meshes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Di; Jiang, Chunbo; Cheng, Liang; Liang, Dongfang

    2015-07-03

    and Offshore Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024, China 4Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Trumpington Street, Cambridge CB2 1PZ, UK SUMMARY A refined r-factor algorithm for implementing TVD schemes... ’s and Hou’s algorithms also require different formulations for boundary cells in order to be applicable in all situations. To ensure the physical boundedness of Uq , all the neighboring cells and boundary faces of the up-wind cell C are considered except...

  3. Application of a catalyst deactivation model for hydrotreating solvent refined coal feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nalitham, R.V.

    1983-10-01

    A simple kinetic model, including a first-order catalyst deactivation rate, is applied to upgrading of coal-derived feedstocks prepared from two solvent refined coal fractions. A catalyst deactivation mechanism is proposed which involves the adsorption and surface reaction of coke precursors on catalytic active sites. The effect of feedstock composition, temperature and pressure on kinetic parameters, and in particular the catalyst deactivation rate, is determined.

  4. Petroleum Refining Sector (NAICS 324110) Energy and GHG Combustion Emissions Profile, November 2012

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills andOrder 422.1, CONDUCTCritical Materials Use |Petroleum Refining69

  5. ITP Petroleum Refining: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls21,Equipment:Petroleum Refining Industry (November

  6. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: CONTINUOUS DYNAMIC GRID ADAPTATION IN A GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC MODEL: APPLICATION AND REFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutowski, William J.; Prusa, Joseph M.; Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K.

    2012-05-08

    This project had goals of advancing the performance capabilities of the numerical general circulation model EULAG and using it to produce a fully operational atmospheric global climate model (AGCM) that can employ either static or dynamic grid stretching for targeted phenomena. The resulting AGCM combined EULAG's advanced dynamics core with the "physics" of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM). Effort discussed below shows how we improved model performance and tested both EULAG and the coupled CAM-EULAG in several ways to demonstrate the grid stretching and ability to simulate very well a wide range of scales, that is, multi-scale capability. We leveraged our effort through interaction with an international EULAG community that has collectively developed new features and applications of EULAG, which we exploited for our own work summarized here. Overall, the work contributed to over 40 peer-reviewed publications and over 70 conference/workshop/seminar presentations, many of them invited. 3a. EULAG Advances EULAG is a non-hydrostatic, parallel computational model for all-scale geophysical flows. EULAG's name derives from its two computational options: EULerian (flux form) or semi-LAGrangian (advective form). The model combines nonoscillatory forward-in-time (NFT) numerical algorithms with a robust elliptic Krylov solver. A signature feature of EULAG is that it is formulated in generalized time-dependent curvilinear coordinates. In particular, this enables grid adaptivity. In total, these features give EULAG novel advantages over many existing dynamical cores. For EULAG itself, numerical advances included refining boundary conditions and filters for optimizing model performance in polar regions. We also added flexibility to the model's underlying formulation, allowing it to work with the pseudo-compressible equation set of Durran in addition to EULAG's standard anelastic formulation. Work in collaboration with others also extended the demonstrated range of validity of soundproof models, showing that they are more broadly applicable than some had previously thought. Substantial testing of EULAG included application and extension of the Jablonowski-Williamson baroclinic wave test - an archetype of planetary weather - and further analysis of multi-scale interactions arising from collapse of temperature fronts in both the baroclinic wave test and simulations of the Held-Suarez idealized climate. These analyses revealed properties of atmospheric gravity waves not seen in previous work and further demonstrated the ability of EULAG to simulate realistic behavior over several orders of magnitude of length scales. Additional collaborative work enhanced capability for modeling atmospheric flows with adaptive moving meshes and demonstrated the ability of EULAG to move into petascale computing. 3b. CAM-EULAG Advances We have developed CAM-EULAG in collaboration with former project postdoc, now University of Cape Town Assistant Professor, Babatunde Abiodun. Initial study documented good model performance in aqua-planet simulations. In particular, we showed that the grid adaptivity (stretching) implemented in CAM-EULAG allows higher resolution in selected regions without causing anomalous behavior such as spurious wave reflection. We then used the stretched-grid version to analyze simulated extreme precipitation events in West Africa, comparing the precipitation and event environment with observed behavior. The model simulates fairly well the spatial scale and the interannual and intraseasonal variability of the extreme events, although its extreme precipitation intensity is weaker than observed. In addition, both observations and the simulations show possible forcing of extreme events by African easterly waves. 3c. Other Contributions Through our collaborations, we have made contributions to a wide range of outcomes. For research focused on terrestrial behavior, these have included (1) upwind schemes for gas dynamics, (2) a nonlinear perspective on the dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation, (3) numerical realism of thermal co

  7. Inseparability Criterion Using Higher-Order Schrödinger-Robertson Uncertainty Relation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang-Woo Lee; Junghee Ryu; Jeongho Bang; Hyunchul Nha

    2014-03-10

    We formulate an inseparability criterion based on the recently derived generalized Schr\\"odinger-Robertson uncertainty relation (SRUR) [Ivan {\\it et al.} J. Phys. A :Math. Theor. {\\bf 45}, 195305 (2012)] together with the negativity of partial transpose (PT). This generalized SRUR systematically deals with two orthogonal quadrature amplitudes to higher-orders, so is relevant to characterize non-Gaussian quantum statistics. We first present a method that relies on the single-mode marginal distribution of two-mode fields under PT followed by beam-splitting operation. We then extend the SRUR to two-mode cases and develop a full two-mode version of inseparability criterion. We find that our formulation can be useful to detect entanglement of non-Gaussian states even when, e.g., the entropic criterion that also involves higher-order moments fails.

  8. Improved crystallographic models through iterated local density-guided model deformation and reciprocal-space refinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Read, Randy J. [University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0XY (United Kingdom); Adams, Paul D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Building 64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Brunger, Axel T. [Stanford University, 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305-5432 (United States); Afonine, Pavel V.; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Building 64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hung, Li-Wei [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    A density-based procedure is described for improving a homology model that is locally accurate but differs globally. The model is deformed to match the map and refined, yielding an improved starting point for density modification and further model-building. An approach is presented for addressing the challenge of model rebuilding after molecular replacement in cases where the placed template is very different from the structure to be determined. The approach takes advantage of the observation that a template and target structure may have local structures that can be superimposed much more closely than can their complete structures. A density-guided procedure for deformation of a properly placed template is introduced. A shift in the coordinates of each residue in the structure is calculated based on optimizing the match of model density within a 6 Å radius of the center of that residue with a prime-and-switch electron-density map. The shifts are smoothed and applied to the atoms in each residue, leading to local deformation of the template that improves the match of map and model. The model is then refined to improve the geometry and the fit of model to the structure-factor data. A new map is then calculated and the process is repeated until convergence. The procedure can extend the routine applicability of automated molecular replacement, model building and refinement to search models with over 2 Å r.m.s.d. representing 65–100% of the structure.

  9. Worldwide refining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williamson, M.

    1994-12-19

    The paper consists of several tables compiling data on refinery capacities by country, by state, and by company. The capacity data are given by process as well as by final product. Processes include vacuum distillation, thermal operations, catalytic cracking, catalytic reforming, catalytic hydrocracking, catalytic hydrorefining, and catalytic hydrotreating. Products include alkylates, polymers, and dimers; aromatics and isomers; oxygenates; hydrogen; asphalts; and coke.

  10. Petroleum refining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary, J.H. (Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)); Handwerk, G.E.

    1991-01-01

    This report is on the following topics: Refinery Products; Refinery Feedstocks; Crude Distillation; Coking and Thermal Processes; Catalytic Reforming and Isomerization; Catalytic Cracking; Hydrotreating Catalytic Hydrocracking and Hydroprocessing Alkylation and Polymerization; Product Blending; Supporting Processes; Lubricating Oils; Petrochemical Feedstocks; Cost Estimation; and Economic Evaluation.

  11. Worldwide refining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, L.

    1993-12-20

    The paper presents compiled data on operating refineries worldwide by country and by company within these countries. Data are presented on charge capacity for the following processes: vacuum distillation, thermal operations, catalytic cracking, catalytic reforming, cat-hydrocracking, cat hydrorefining, and cat hydrotreating. Data are also presented on the production capacity for the following products: alkylates and polymers, aromatics and isomers, lubricating oils, asphalt, hydrogen, and coke.

  12. Universal Lie formulas for higher antibrackets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manetti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    We prove that the hierachy of higher antibrackets (aka higher Koszul brackets, aka Koszul braces) of a linear operator D on a commutative superalgebra can be defined by some universal formulas involving iterated Nijenhuis-Richardson brackets having as arguments D and the multiplication operators. As a byproduct we can immediately extend higher antibrackets to noncommutative algebras in a way preserving the validity of generalized Jacobi identities.

  13. MOTIVIC STRUCTURES ON HIGHER HOMOTOPY GROUPS OF ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-31

    In this note, we show the existence of motivic structures on certain objects arising from ... Motivic structure on higher homotopy of the nilpotent spaces. 14. 4.3.

  14. The politics of marginality in Wallowa County, Oregon: Contesting the production of landscapes of consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    The politics of marginality in Wallowa County, Oregon: Contesting the production of landscapes of consumption Jesse B. Abrams a,b,*, Hannah Gosnell c a Department of Sociology, Whitman College, 345 Boyer Ave not only technical issues of land productivity, but also broader community contestations over

  15. Wilson cycles, tectonic inheritance, and rifting of the North American Gulf of Mexico continental margin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huerta, Audrey D.

    Wilson cycles, tectonic inheritance, and rifting of the North American Gulf of Mexico continental, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523, USA ABSTRACT The tectonic evolution of the North Amer- ican Gulf of Mexico margin, including the Interior Salt Basin, outboard unextended Wiggins arch, and an unusually

  16. Anomalous Tectonic Subsidence of the Southern Australian Passive Margin: Response to Cretaceous Dynamic Topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Dietmar

    Anomalous Tectonic Subsidence of the Southern Australian Passive Margin: Response to Cretaceous that formed over and orthogonal to a Mesozoic subducted slab in the mantle. The tectonic subsidence pattern, enhancing initial subsidence. Subsequent lithospheric rebound coincides with post-rift thermal subsidence

  17. Coral reef evolution on rapidly subsiding margins Jody M. Webster a,b,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riding, Robert

    Coral reef evolution on rapidly subsiding margins Jody M. Webster a,b, , Juan Carlos Braga d regions have experienced rapid subsidence (2­6 m/ka) over the last 500 ka. Rapid subsidence, combined sea-level changes, subsidence rates, accretion rates, basement substrates, and paleobathymetry

  18. Cenozoic stratigraphyand subsidence historyof the South China Sea margin in theTaiwan region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Andrew Tien-Shun

    Cenozoic stratigraphyand subsidence historyof the South China Sea margin in theTaiwan region A. T, together with the subsidence analysis of deep wells, show that during rifting (B58^37Ma post-breakup subsidence (B30^18Ma) possibly as the inferred induced convection abated following initial

  19. Re-Dispatching Generation to Increase Power System Security Margin and Support Low Voltage Bus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Re-Dispatching Generation to Increase Power System Security Margin and Support Low Voltage Bus by re-dispatching generator outputs, using a normal vector found at a voltage collapse boundary or a low voltage boundary (LVB). This method uses the normal vector as an indicator to change the generation

  20. The spiny lobster, Panulirus margin-atus, is endemic to the Hawaiian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    birds, monk seals, and reef fishes (Polo- vina et al., 1994). After the recruit- ment collapse132 The spiny lobster, Panulirus margin- atus, is endemic to the Hawaiian Archipelago and Johnston in the northwestern portion of the archipelago known as the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (NWHI). From the early 1980s

  1. Leverage and Beliefs: Personal Experience and Risk Taking in Margin Lending*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Straight, Aaron

    Leverage and Beliefs: Personal Experience and Risk Taking in Margin Lending* Peter Koudijs+ Hans of financial distress to address this question. An investor syndicate speculating in English stocks went times, and declining when asset prices fall (Adrian and Shin 2010). For example, when the stock market

  2. Abstract--Although Locational Marginal Pricing (LMP) plays an important role in many restructured wholesale power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    the performance of these markets. In this paper, different AC and DC optimal power flow (OPF) models are presented Terms-- Locational marginal pricing, wholesale power market, AC optimal power flow, DC optimal power to distinct local conditions (e.g., hydroelectric power in the northwest). Even in regions adopting the design

  3. Proceedings of the Combustion Institute, Volume 28, 2000/pp. 757763 EXPERIMENTAL DETERMINATION OF THE STABILITY MARGIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lieuwen, Timothy C.

    757 Proceedings of the Combustion Institute, Volume 28, 2000/pp. 757­763 EXPERIMENTAL DETERMINATION the response of the combustion process heat release to driven flow oscillations and the response determine the stability margin of combustors. Such an approach would enable combustion engi- neers

  4. Between-ness: Theory and Practice within the Margins of Cathy Smith

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd, Colin

    Between-ness: Theory and Practice within the Margins of Excess Cathy Smith Queensland University framework developed in a doctoral program of research concerned with connecting philosophies of between-ness between- ness; that which is neither one state nor the other but a zone of blurring in-between. An example

  5. Geologic hazards on the Atlantic continental margin of the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folger, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    Although 46 exploratory holes have failed to reveal commercial hydrocarbon accumulations on the US Atlantic margin, about twice that number were drilled on the contiguous Canadian margin before large reserves were discovered. Thus, despite the initial results, exploration on the US margin will probably continue and additional information will be needed to augment the extensive environmental data base acquired over the past 10 years. The extent, timing, causes, and importance of sediment instability of the Continental Slopes of Georges Bank, Baltimore Canyon Trough and Carolina Trough--where future exploration will take place--remain controversial. Many question remain to be answered regarding such phenomena as creep on the upper slope, mass wasting in canyons and gullies, and slumping associated with faults and salt diapirs. Along the southeastern margin, the distribution of cavernous porosity below the shelf is only broadly known. Caverns pose a potential threat to drilling operations ranging from collapse of rigs to circulation loss and sheared drill strings. In deeper waters of the Continental Slope (700-2000 m), clathrates or frozen gas hydrates are common. The potential hazard of blow-outs from gas trapped beneath this layer are unknown. Additional information is needed to assess the bottom stresses imposed by tidal, storm, and geostrophically-driven currents on offshore rigs and structures, particularly in such areas as Georges Bank, the Carolina Trough, and the Blake Plateau.

  6. Marginal costs of freeway traffic congestion with on-road pollution exposure externality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Marginal costs of freeway traffic congestion with on-road pollution exposure externality Alexander August 2012 Received in revised form 6 March 2013 Accepted 23 September 2013 Keywords: External costs Traffic congestion On-road In-vehicle Pollution exposure Vehicle emissions a b s t r a c t The health cost

  7. Continuous Contour Monte Carlo for Marginal Density Estimation With an Application to a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Faming

    ; Gelman and Meng 1998), reverse logistic regression (Geyer 1994), marginal likelihood (Chib 1995; Chib; Reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo; Stochastic approximation; Wang-Landau algorithm. 1. INTRODUCTION;Continuous Contour Monte Carlo 609 variety of approaches including reversible jump MCMC (Green 1995; Green

  8. Water and energy footprints of bioenergy crop production on marginal lands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    of Zoology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA Abstract Water and energy demandsWater and energy footprints of bioenergy crop production on marginal lands A . K . B H A R D WA J and S . K . H A M I LT O N *w} *Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, Michigan State University, East

  9. Systematic destruction of K-Feldspar in deeply buried rift and passive margin sandstones 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkinson, Mark; Milliken, Kitty; Haszeldine, Stuart

    2001-01-01

    Systematic patterns of detrital K-feldspar decline with increasing burial depth are revealed during deep burial (2.5-4.5km) of sandstones in diverse sedimentary basins from three rift and two passive margin setings in the North Sea and USA gulf...

  10. Fact #676: May 23, 2011 U.S. Refiners Produce about 19 Gallons of Gasoline from a Barrel of Oil

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A standard U.S. barrel contains 42 gallons of crude oil which yields about 44 gallons of petroleum products. The additional 2 gallons of petroleum products come from refiner gains which result in...

  11. Steam system opportunity assessment for the pulp and paper, chemical manufacturing, and petroleum refining industries: Main report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2002-10-01

    This report assesses steam generation and use in the pulp and paper, chemical, and petroleum refining industries, and estimates the potential for energy savings from implementation of steam system performance and efficiency improvements.

  12. Emerging National Concerns for Higher Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emerging National Concerns for Higher Education (and Welcome Back) 2014 Annual Faculty Conference old news The STEM tide has been kind to us The Energy boom plays to our strengths #12;7 Public debt capacity for campuses July 2014, Moody's "negative outlook for US Higher Education What

  13. Timing and magnitude of Miocene eustasy derived from the mixed siliciclastic-carbonate stratigraphic record of the northeastern Australian margin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leckie, Mark

    amplitude of sea-level change ice volume sequence stratigraphy Heterozoan carbonates Miocene ODP Leg 194 Eustasy is a key parameter to understand sedimentary sequences on continental margins and to reconstruct and timing of sequence formation on mixed carbonate-siliciclastic margins, and to estimate the amplitude

  14. Natural Hazards and Effects on Local Populations: Applications of NSF MARGINS research to hazards mitigation in Central America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, Jeffrey S.

    Natural Hazards and Effects on Local Populations: Applications of NSF MARGINS research to hazards (Co-chair: NSF MARGINS Central American Geologic Hazards Working Group, 2001) In: Silver, E. and Dixon Zone and Subduction Factory Initiatives, 15 p., 2001. Natural Hazards & Effects on Local Populations

  15. Self-Tuning PI TCP Flow Controller for AQM Routers With Interval Gain and Phase Margin Assignment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Changcheng

    -tuning proportional-integral (PI) controller for Active Queue Management (AQM) in the Internet. Classical control to achieve good AQM performance while adapting the AQM control system to great traffic load changes very well Queue Management, PI Control, Gain Margin, Phase Margin, Self-Tune 1. INTRODUCTION Congestion control

  16. Shelf sedimentation on a tectonically active margin: A modern sediment budget for Poverty continental shelf, New Zealand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrizio, Mary C.

    Shelf sedimentation on a tectonically active margin: A modern sediment budget for Poverty Available online xxxx Keywords: Waipaoa River continental margin shelf sedimentation 210 Pb geochronology 239,240 Pu geochronology sediment budget The combination of high sediment yields and the prevalence

  17. Resonant radiation from oscillating higher order solitons

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Driben, R.; Yulin, A. V.; Efimov, A.

    2015-07-15

    We present radiation mechanism exhibited by a higher order soliton. In a course of its evolution the higher-order soliton emits polychromatic radiation resulting in formation of multipeak frequency comb-like spectral band. The shape and spectral position of this band can be effectively controlled by the relative strength of the third order dispersion. An analytical description is corroborated by numerical simulations. Research showed that for longer pulses the described effect persists also under the action of higher order perturbations such as Raman and self-steepening.

  18. seismic margin

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnicalInformation4563 LLNL Small-scale Friction Sensitivityv b, iNOTICE OF OPEN CHANGE

  19. Ensemble refinement shows conformational flexibility in crystal structures of human complement factor D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forneris, Federico; Burnley, B. Tom; Gros, Piet, E-mail: p.gros@uu.nl [Utrecht University, Padualaan 8, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2014-03-01

    Ensemble-refinement analysis of native and mutant factor D (FD) crystal structures indicates a dynamical transition in FD from a self-inhibited inactive conformation to a substrate-bound active conformation that is reminiscent of the allostery in thrombin. Comparison with previously observed dynamics in thrombin using NMR data supports the crystallographic ensembles. Human factor D (FD) is a self-inhibited thrombin-like serine proteinase that is critical for amplification of the complement immune response. FD is activated by its substrate through interactions outside the active site. The substrate-binding, or ‘exosite’, region displays a well defined and rigid conformation in FD. In contrast, remarkable flexibility is observed in thrombin and related proteinases, in which Na{sup +} and ligand binding is implied in allosteric regulation of enzymatic activity through protein dynamics. Here, ensemble refinement (ER) of FD and thrombin crystal structures is used to evaluate structure and dynamics simultaneously. A comparison with previously published NMR data for thrombin supports the ER analysis. The R202A FD variant has enhanced activity towards artificial peptides and simultaneously displays active and inactive conformations of the active site. ER revealed pronounced disorder in the exosite loops for this FD variant, reminiscent of thrombin in the absence of the stabilizing Na{sup +} ion. These data indicate that FD exhibits conformational dynamics like thrombin, but unlike in thrombin a mechanism has evolved in FD that locks the unbound native state into an ordered inactive conformation via the self-inhibitory loop. Thus, ensemble refinement of X-ray crystal structures may represent an approach alternative to spectroscopy to explore protein dynamics in atomic detail.

  20. Proof Transformations in Higher-Order Logic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spirtes, Peter

    is given and its partial correctness is proven. Strong termination of this al- gorithm remains a conjectureProof Transformations in Higher-Order Logic Frank Pfenning January 1987 Submitted in partial

  1. ,"No. 2 Diesel Fuel Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price to fall to $3.43U.S.longec 188 U.S.1Sales to End Users Refiner Sales

  2. ,"No. 2 Distillate Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price to fall to $3.43U.S.longec 188 U.S.1Sales to End Users Refiner

  3. ,"U.S. Reformulated Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price to fall to $3.43U.S.longecReformulated Gasoline Refiner Sales

  4. ,"U.S. Sales for Resale, Total Refiner Motor Gasoline Sales Volumes"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price to fall to $3.43U.S.longecReformulated Gasoline RefinerResidualResale,

  5. HASSP and HEAVY: Tools for automated heavy atom searches and refinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, T.T.

    1994-06-01

    In this tutorial, a simple example using model data for one derivative with anomalous information will be used to demonstrate the use of HASSP and HEAVY in heavy atom determination and refinement. The data used here will actually be based on model MAD data that has been converted to MIR format using MADMRG, but the treatment is identical to that for any other SIR+anomalous data. The data nd most of the programs discussed here can be obtained by e-mail from ``terwil @prov2.lanl.gov`` along with VAX-specific command files to run the data through.

  6. European refiners must seek creative processes to justify heavy-ends projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, P. [Chem Systems Ltd., London (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-09

    There are strong reasons for wanting to upgrade the bottom of the crude oil barrel. But European refiners will not find it easy to get approval and funding for major capital investment projects. In most cases, investment justification will have to be creative and may need to rely on factors traditionally considered to be outside the conventional refinery fence. Examples of such creative upgrading schemes are those employed in four gasification projects planned for refineries in Italy. It is clear that the major obstacles to heavy residue processing are not technical, but economic. A review of these obstacles will set the stage for European investment in bottom-of-the-barrel processing.

  7. Methods of refining and producing dibasic esters and acids from natural oil feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snead, Thomas E; Cohen, Steven A; Gildon, Demond L

    2015-04-07

    Methods are provided for refining natural oil feedstocks and producing dibasic esters and/or dibasic acids. The methods comprise reacting a terminal olefin with an internal olefin in the presence of a metathesis catalyst to form a dibasic ester and/or dibasic acid. In certain embodiments, the olefin esters are formed by reacting the feedstock in the presence of a metathesis catalyst under conditions sufficient to form a metathesized product comprising olefins and esters, separating the olefins from the esters in the metathesized product, and transesterifying the esters in the presence of an alcohol to form a transesterified product having olefin esters.

  8. Quantitative phase analysis of Mg:ZrO{sub 2} nanoparticles by Rietveld refinement method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balaji, V. Senthilkumaran, S. Thangadurai, P.

    2014-04-24

    To quantify the structural phases of nanocrystalline ZrO{sub 2} doped with Mg ions of varying concentrations (3, 5, 10, 15 and 20%) and annealed at different temperatures. Magnesia doped zirconia was prepared by chemical co-precipitation method and annealed up to 1000°C. The monoclinic and tetragonal phases present in Mg:ZrO{sub 2} were quantified using Rietveld refinement analysis of the X-ray diffraction data and compared with the Direct method based on peak intensity calculations. Tetragonal phase was dominant in the 600°C annealed Mg:ZrO{sub 2} for all Mg concentrations.

  9. Table 3a. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price toStocks 2009CubicAnalysisYearArkansas"a. Imported Refiner

  10. Primordial nucleosynthesis in higher dimensional cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Chatterjee

    2009-11-13

    We investigate nucleosynthesis and element formation in the early universe in the framework of higher dimensional cosmology. For this purpose we utilize a previous solution of the present author, which may be termed as the generalized Friedmann-Robertson-Walker model. We find that temperature decays less rapidly in higher dimensional cosmology, which we believe may have nontrivial consequences \\emph{vis-a-vis} primordial physics.

  11. Discrimination with error margin between two states - Case of general occurrence probabilities -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Sugimoto; T. Hashimoto; M. Horibe; A. Hayashi

    2009-11-18

    We investigate a state discrimination problem which interpolates minimum-error and unambiguous discrimination by introducing a margin for the probability of error. We closely analyze discrimination of two pure states with general occurrence probabilities. The optimal measurements are classified into three types. One of the three types of measurement is optimal depending on parameters (occurrence probabilities and error margin). We determine the three domains in the parameter space and the optimal discrimination success probability in each domain in a fully analytic form. It is also shown that when the states to be discriminated are multipartite, the optimal success probability can be attained by local operations and classical communication. For discrimination of two mixed states, an upper bound of the optimal success probability is obtained.

  12. Workshop on Program for Elimination of Requirements Marginal to Safety: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dey, M. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Safety Issue Resolution; Arsenault, F.; Patterson, M.; Gaal, M. [SCIENTECH, Inc., Rockville, MD (United States)

    1993-09-01

    These are the proceedings of the Public Workshop on the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Program for Elimination of Requirements Marginal to Safety. The workshop was held at the Holiday Inn, Bethesda, on April 27 and 28, 1993. The purpose of the workshop was to provide an opportunity for public and industry input to the program. The workshop addressed the institutionalization of the program to review regulations with the purpose of eliminating those that are marginal. The objective is to avoid the dilution of safety efforts. One session was devoted to discussion of the framework for a performance-based regulatory approach. In addition, panelists and attendees discussed scope, schedules and status of specific regulatory items: containment leakage testing requirements, fire protection requirements, requirements for environmental qualification of electrical equipment, requests for information under 10CFR50.54(f), requirements for combustible gas control systems, and quality assurance requirements.

  13. On the marginal instability threshold condition of the aperiodic ordinary mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlickeiser, R.; Yoon, P. H.

    2014-07-15

    The purely growing ordinary (O) mode instability has recently received renewed attention owing to its potential applicability to the solar wind plasma. Here, an analytical marginal instability condition is derived for counter-streaming bi-Maxwellian plasma particle distribution functions. The derived marginal instability condition as a function of the temperature anisotropy and plasma beta agrees remarkably well with the numerically determined instability condition. The existence of a new instability domain of the O-mode at small plasma beta values is confirmed with the leading A??{sub ?}{sup ?1}-dependence, if the counter-stream parameter P{sub e} exceeds a critical value. At small plasma beta values at large enough counter-stream parameter, the O-mode also operates for temperature anisotropies A?=?T{sub ?}/T{sub ?}?>?1 even larger than unity, as the parallel counter-stream free energy exceeds the perpendicular bi-Maxwellian free energy.

  14. Economic Recovery of Oil Trapped at Fan Margins Using High Angle Wells and Multiple Hydraulic Fractures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike L. Laue

    1997-05-30

    The distal fan margin in the northeast portion of the Yowlumne field contains significant reserves but is not economical to develop using vertical wells. Numerous interbedded shales and deteriorating rock properties limit producibility. In addition, extreme depths (13,000 ft) present a challenging environment for hydraulic fracturing and artificial lift. Lastly, a mature waterflood increases risk because of the uncertainty with size and location of flood fronts. This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting the distal fan margin of this slope-basin clastic reservoir through the use of a high-angle well completed with multiple hydraulic-fracture treatments. The combination of a high-angle (or horizontal) well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore. The equivalent production rate and reserves of three vertical wells are anticipated at one-half to two-thirds the cost.

  15. Recursive Pathways to Marginal Likelihood Estimation with Prior-Sensitivity Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cameron, Ewan

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the utility to contemporary Bayesian studies of recursive, Gauss-Seidel-type pathways to marginal likelihood estimation characterized by reverse logistic regression and the density of states. Through a pair of illustrative, numerical examples (including mixture modeling of the well-known 'galaxy dataset') we highlight both the remarkable diversity of bridging schemes amenable to recursive normalization and the notable efficiency of the resulting pseudo-mixture densities for gauging prior-sensitivity in the model selection context. Our key theoretical contributions show the connection between the nested sampling identity and the density of states. Further, we introduce a novel heuristic ('thermodynamic integration via importance sampling') for qualifying the role of the bridging sequence in marginal likelihood estimation. An efficient pseudo-mixture density scheme for harnessing the information content of otherwise discarded draws in ellipse-based nested sampling is also introduced.

  16. Conformation-dependent backbone geometry restraints set a new standard for protein crystallographic refinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moriarty, Nigel W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Tronrud, Dale E. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Biophysics; Adams, Paul D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Bioengineering; Karplus, P. Andrew [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Biophysics

    2014-09-01

    Ideal values of bond angles and lengths used as external restraints are crucial for the successful refinement of protein crystal structures at all but the highest of resolutions. The restraints in common usage today have been designed based on the assumption that each type of bond or angle has a single ideal value independent of context. However, recent work has shown that the ideal values are, in fact, sensitive to local conformation, and as a first step toward using such information to build more accurate models, ultra-high resolution protein crystal structures have been used to derive a conformation-dependent library (CDL) of restraints for the protein backbone (Berkholz et al. 2009. Structure. 17, 1316). Here, we report the introduction of this CDL into the Phenix package and the results of test refinements of thousands of structures across a wide range of resolutions. These tests show that use of the conformation dependent library yields models that have substantially better agreement with ideal main-chain bond angles and lengths and, on average, a slightly enhanced fit to the X-ray data. No disadvantages of using the backbone CDL are apparent. In Phenix usage of the CDL can be selected by simply specifying the cdl=True option. This successful implementation paves the way for further aspects of the context-dependence of ideal geometry to be characterized and applied to improve experimental and predictive modelling accuracy.

  17. US imports. Part II. Refined product market shares, then and now

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-07-08

    Unlike imports of crude oil to the US, which were up 45.7% between 1977 and 1986, imports of petroleum products have fallen by about 8.6% during the same period. The crude oil price crash of 1986 deepened US dependency on imports of crude, from 21.4% in 1977 to 25.4% in 1986, but reduced the dependency in the case of total refined products from 11.32% in 1977 to 11.13% in 1986. Comparing the first four months of 1987 with 1986, US dependency on imported petroleum products is down 2.73 percentage points; import dependency on OPEC petroleum products is down 4.60 percentage points; dependency on Arab OPEC countries product imports is down 1.88 percentage points; and for Eastern Hemisphere exporters, that dependency has fallen 2.17 percentage points. This issue also contains: (1) ED refining netback data from the US Gulf and West coasts, Rotterdam, and Singapore for early July 1987; and (2) ED fuel price/tax series for countries of the Western Hemisphere, July 1987 edition. 4 figures, 5 tables.

  18. A new approach to oil refining with allowance for ecological requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nasirov, R.K.; Serikov, P.Yu.; Barsukov, O.V. [and others

    1994-12-01

    More stringent quality requirements are being imposed on oil fuels because of the deteriorating ecological situation. At the same time the new ecological constraints have slightly reduced the supplies of light crudes on the world market because the oil-producing countries have been forced to consume more of their best crudes and only heavier and sour crudes are sent to other countries for refining. In view of this, in recent years work has been focused on thorough refining of oil distillates and residues in a medium of hydrogen-containing gas in the presence of catalysts for hydrorefining and hydrocracking. Hydrorefining destroys sulfur-, nitrogen-, and oxygen-containing compounds of the stock, removes organometallic components, improves the ecological characteristics of the products, reduces the corrosion of the refinery equipment, and reduces atmospheric pollution. Hydrorefining units have been built at almost all refineries, with allowance for the above and the fact that the hydroprocesses are highly technologically suitable and controllable and produce almost no waste. A number of problems pertaining to hydroprocesses, interesting scientific results, and developed theoretical approaches to intensify hydrorefining processes are described.

  19. Projected refined product balances in key Latin American countries: A preliminary examination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    Over the years, the East-West Center (EWC) has developed considerable expertise in refinery modeling, especially in the area of forecasting product balances for countries, given planned capacity changes, changes in product demand, changes in crude slates, and changes in product specifications. This expertise has been applied on an ongoing basis to the major refiners in the Middle East and the Asia-Pacific region, along with the US West Coast as region in its own right. Refinery modeling in these three areas has been ongoing for nearly 15 years at the Center, and the tools and information sources are now well developed. To date, the EWC has not applied these tools to Latin America. Although research on Latin America has been an ongoing area of concern at the Center in recent years, the information gathered to date is still not of the level of detail nor quality available for other areas. The modeling efforts undertaken in this report are of a ``baseline`` nature, designed to outline the major issues, attempt a first cut at emerging product balances, and, above all, to elicit commentary from those directly involved in the oil industry in the key countries modeled. Our experience in other regions has shown that it takes a few years dialogue with refiners and government planner in individual countries to develop a reliable database, as well as the insights into operational constraints and practices that make accurate modeling possible. This report is no more than a first step down the road.

  20. Conformation-dependent backbone geometry restraints set a new standard for protein crystallographic refinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moriarty, Nigel W.; Tronrud, Dale E.; Adams, Paul D.; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2014-06-17

    Ideal values of bond angles and lengths used as external restraints are crucial for the successful refinement of protein crystal structures at all but the highest of resolutions. The restraints in common usage today have been designed based on the assumption that each type of bond or angle has a single ideal value independent of context. However, recent work has shown that the ideal values are, in fact, sensitive to local conformation, and as a first step toward using such information to build more accurate models, ultra-high resolution protein crystal structures have been used to derive a conformation-dependent library (CDL) of restraints for the protein backbone (Berkholz et al. 2009. Structure. 17, 1316). Here, we report the introduction of this CDL into the Phenix package and the results of test refinements of thousands of structures across a wide range of resolutions. These tests show that use of the conformation dependent library yields models that have substantially better agreement with ideal main-chain bond angles and lengths and, on average, a slightly enhanced fit to the X-ray data. No disadvantages of using the backbone CDL are apparent. In Phenix usage of the CDL can be selected by simply specifying the cdl=True option. This successful implementation paves the way for further aspects of the context-dependence of ideal geometry to be characterized and applied to improve experimental and predictive modelling accuracy.

  1. Refined Holographic Entanglement Entropy for the AdS Solitons and AdS black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masafumi Ishihara; Feng-Li Lin; Bo Ning

    2013-04-04

    We consider the refinement of the holographic entanglement entropy for the holographic dual theories to the AdS solitons and AdS black holes, including the corrected ones by the Gauss-Bonnet term. The refinement is obtained by extracting the UV-independent piece of the holographic entanglement entropy, the so-called renormalized entanglement entropy which is independent of the choices of UV cutoff. Our main results are (i) the renormalized entanglement entropies of the AdS$_{d+1}$ soliton for $d=4,5$ are neither monotonically decreasing along the RG flow nor positive definite, especially around the deconfinement/confinement phase transition; (ii) there is no topological entanglement entropy for AdS$_5$ soliton even with Gauss-Bonnet correction; (iii) for the AdS black holes, the renormalized entanglement entropy obeys an expected volume law at IR regime, and the transition between UV and IR regimes is a smooth crossover even with Gauss-Bonnet correction; (iv) based on AdS/MERA conjecture, we postulate that the IR fixed-point state for the non-extremal AdS soliton is a trivial product state.

  2. Conformation-dependent backbone geometry restraints set a new standard for protein crystallographic refinement

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moriarty, Nigel W.; Tronrud, Dale E.; Adams, Paul D.; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2014-06-17

    Ideal values of bond angles and lengths used as external restraints are crucial for the successful refinement of protein crystal structures at all but the highest of resolutions. The restraints in common usage today have been designed based on the assumption that each type of bond or angle has a single ideal value independent of context. However, recent work has shown that the ideal values are, in fact, sensitive to local conformation, and as a first step toward using such information to build more accurate models, ultra-high resolution protein crystal structures have been used to derive a conformation-dependent library (CDL)more »of restraints for the protein backbone (Berkholz et al. 2009. Structure. 17, 1316). Here, we report the introduction of this CDL into the Phenix package and the results of test refinements of thousands of structures across a wide range of resolutions. These tests show that use of the conformation dependent library yields models that have substantially better agreement with ideal main-chain bond angles and lengths and, on average, a slightly enhanced fit to the X-ray data. No disadvantages of using the backbone CDL are apparent. In Phenix usage of the CDL can be selected by simply specifying the cdl=True option. This successful implementation paves the way for further aspects of the context-dependence of ideal geometry to be characterized and applied to improve experimental and predictive modelling accuracy.« less

  3. National Geo-Database for Biofuel Simulations and Regional Analysis of Biorefinery Siting Based on Cellulosic Feedstock Grown on Marginal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Zhang, Xuesong; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Manowitz, David H.

    2012-04-01

    The goal of this project undertaken by GLBRC (Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center) Area 4 (Sustainability) modelers is to develop a national capability to model feedstock supply, ethanol production, and biogeochemical impacts of cellulosic biofuels. The results of this project contribute to sustainability goals of the GLBRC; i.e. to contribute to developing a sustainable bioenergy economy: one that is profitable to farmers and refiners, acceptable to society, and environmentally sound. A sustainable bioenergy economy will also contribute, in a fundamental way, to meeting national objectives on energy security and climate mitigation. The specific objectives of this study are to: (1) develop a spatially explicit national geodatabase for conducting biofuel simulation studies and (4) locate possible sites for the establishment of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries. To address the first objective, we developed SENGBEM (Spatially Explicit National Geodatabase for Biofuel and Environmental Modeling), a 60-m resolution geodatabase of the conterminous USA containing data on: (1) climate, (2) soils, (3) topography, (4) hydrography, (5) land cover/ land use (LCLU), and (6) ancillary data (e.g., road networks, federal and state lands, national and state parks, etc.). A unique feature of SENGBEM is its 2008-2010 crop rotation data, a crucially important component for simulating productivity and biogeochemical cycles as well as land-use changes associated with biofuel cropping. ARRA support for this project and to the PNNL Joint Global Change Research Institute enabled us to create an advanced computing infrastructure to execute millions of simulations, conduct post-processing calculations, store input and output data, and visualize results. These computing resources included two components installed at the Research Data Center of the University of Maryland. The first resource was 'deltac': an 8-core Linux server, dedicated to county-level and state-level simulations and PostgreSQL database hosting. The second resource was the DOE-JGCRI 'Evergreen' cluster, capable of executing millions of simulations in relatively short periods. ARRA funding also supported a PhD student from UMD who worked on creating the geodatabases and executing some of the simulations in this study. Using a physically based classification of marginal lands, we simulated production of cellulosic feedstocks from perennial mixtures grown on these lands in the US Midwest. Marginal lands in the western states of the US Midwest appear to have significant potential to supply feedstocks to a cellulosic biofuel industry. Similar results were obtained with simulations of N-fertilized perennial mixtures. A detailed spatial analysis allowed for the identification of possible locations for the establishment of 34 cellulosic ethanol biorefineries with an annual production capacity of 5.6 billion gallons. In summary, we have reported on the development of a spatially explicit national geodatabase to conduct biofuel simulation studies and provided simulation results on the potential of perennial cropping systems to serve as feedstocks for the production of cellulosic ethanol. To accomplish this, we have employed sophisticated spatial analysis methods in combination with the process-based biogeochemical model EPIC. The results of this study will be submitted to the USDOE Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework as a way to contribute to the development of a sustainable bioenergy industry. This work provided the opportunity to test the hypothesis that marginal lands can serve as sources of cellulosic feedstocks and thus contribute to avoid potential conflicts between bioenergy and food production systems. This work, we believe, opens the door for further analysis on the characteristics of cellulosic feedstocks as major contributors to the development of a sustainable bioenergy economy.

  4. The marginal leakage of some dental cements in humans: a PIXE-microbeam approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zadro, A.; Passi, P. [Dental School, Department of Dental Materials, University of Padua (Italy); Cavalleri, G. [Dental School, Department of Restorative Dentistry, University of Verona (Italy); Galassini, S.; Moschini, G.; Rossi, P. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (Italy)

    1999-06-10

    The marginal leakage and water absorption of dental cements and restorative materials has been investigated by many authors with several techniques, some of which led to valid results. However, no technique could give, by itself, information both on leakage and water absorption, as these measurements usually need different investigations. PIXE micro beam offers the possibility of investigating these two aspects at the same time, since it is possible to map a proper marker element. In the present study, cavities were made on 50 extracted human molars, then filled with five different temporary cements (IRM, Cavit W, Kalsogen, Fermit N, SuperEBA). The filled teeth were placed into a 5% silver nitrate solution, and after three days, one, two, three and four weeks were examined. The samples for microPIXE were prepared after embedding the teeth in epoxy resin, and sectioning and grinding them down to a thickness of about 1 mm. The sections were placed on metal holders, and examined with a scanning proton {mu}beam, in Legnaro (Italy) at the AN2000 LAB of INFN National Laboratories. The beam consisted of 2.4 MeV protons, it had a cross section of 1.5 micron in diameter and typical currents of the order of some {mu}A were used. The maps were obtained by an 'ad hoc' software with a McIntosh personal computer. Mapping of silver allowed to evaluate both the marginal leakage and the water absorption for each cement. The samples filled with Cavit W showed a great infiltration, as the tracing element was found in the cement bulk, along the margins and inside the cavity, while those filled with IRM and Kalsogen presented only a deposition of the tracing solution on the cement surface. SuperEBA showed a poor resistance against microleakage, because the marker element was only detected along the cavity margins. Fermit N showed the best marginal integrity, and on its surface no traces of siver were found. In this case the better resistance may be due to the resin present in the composition of the material.

  5. Self-consistent QM/MM methodologies for structural refinement of photosystem II and other macromolecules of biological interest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batista, Enrique R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sproviero, Eduardo M [YALE UNIV; Newcomer, Michael [YALE UNIV; Gascon, Jose A [YALE UNIV; Batista, Victor S [YALE UNIV

    2008-01-01

    The combination of quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) is one of the most promising approaches to study the structure, function, and properties of proteins and nucleic acids. However, there some instances in which the limitations of either the MM (lack of a proper electronic description) or QM (limited to a few number of atoms) methods prevent a proper description of the system. To address this issue, we review here our approach to fine-tune the structure of biological systems using post-QM/MM refinements. These protocols are based on spectroscopy data, and/or partitioning of the system to extend the QM description to a larger region of a protein. We illustrate these methodologies through applications to several biomolecules, which were pre-optimized at the QM/MM level and then further refined using postQM/MM refinement methodologies: mod(QM/MM), which refines the atomic charges of the residues included in the MM region accounting for polarization effects; mod(QM/MM)-opt that partition the MM region in smaller parts and optimizes each part in an iterative. self-consistent way, and the Polarized-Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (P-EXAFS) fitting procedure, which fine-tune the atomic coordinates to reproduce experimental polarized EXAFS spectra. The first two techniques were applied to the guanine quadruplex. while the P-EXAFS refinement was applied to the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II.

  6. Abstract The natural gas price surged in 2004. As a result, the marginal cost of some generators burning gas also rose sharply.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolbert, Leon M.

    Abstract ­ The natural gas price surged in 2004. As a result, the marginal cost of some generators marginal cost, which is closely related to the natural gas price. Since gas units are usually the marginal the sensitivity of Var benefit with respect to generation cost. The U.S. natural gas industry has been

  7. Task and Machine Heterogeneities: Higher Moments Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maciejewski, Anthony A. "Tony"

    Task and Machine Heterogeneities: Higher Moments Matter Abdulla M. Al-Qawasmeh 1 , Anthony A.potter}@colostate.edu jtsmith@digitalglobe.com Abstract - One type of heterogeneous computing (HC) systems consists of machines in this matrix represents the ETC of a specific task on a specific machine when executed exclusively. Heuristics

  8. Constraining Higher Derivative Supergravity with Scattering Amplitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yifan Wang; Xi Yin

    2015-03-05

    We study supersymmetry constraints on higher derivative deformations of type IIB supergravity by consideration of superamplitudes. Combining constraints of on-shell supervertices and basic results from string perturbation theory, we give a simple argument for the non-renormalization theorem of Green and Sethi, and some of its generalizations.

  9. Higher-order closures and cloud parameterizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Higher-order closures and cloud parameterizations Jean-Christophe Golaz National Research Council moments directly. These prognostic equations introduce new terms that must be closed. #12;What't know whether to transport smoke up or down at the next timestep. Larson 1999 #12;Outline · What

  10. Broadband, Higher Education and Rural New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maccabe, Barney

    Broadband, Higher Education and Rural New Mexico Gil Gonzales, Ph.D., Chief Information Officer University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 E mail: gonzgil@unm.edu Background UNM students enjoy the country do. New Mexico is also home to two national laboratories in Los Alamos (Los Alamos National

  11. Regulation XVIII: GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR HIGHER DEGREES,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Regulation XVIII: GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR HIGHER DEGREES, POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMAS AND POSTGRADUATE CERTIFICATES SCOPE OF THESE REGULATIONS 1. These Regulations apply to the Degree of PhD in all Faculties in all Faculties Postgraduate Certificates in all Faculties. 2. These Regulations are subject

  12. Higher Derivative D-brane Couplings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Guangyu

    2012-10-19

    supersymmetry. In the third part, we obtain the higher derivative D-brane action by using both linearized T-duality and string disc amplitude computation. We evaluate disc amplitude of one R-R field C^(p-3) and two NS-NS fields in the presence of a single Dp...

  13. Seismic imaging using higher order statistics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, Karthik

    1999-01-01

    the resulting algorithm is a cross-correlation (second order statistics) operation whose region of support is limited to the bandwidth of the source signal. This is not the case for non-vanishing higher order cumulates where the support region can be extended...

  14. Construction of Higher Order Finite Element with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kern, Michel

    ' & $ % Construction of Higher Order Finite Element with Mass Lumping Using Computer Algebra. (3D, combinatorial analysis, new third order element) 2 #12; ' & $ % Guidelines for the construction of nodes must be ~ P k unisolvent. 2. Finite element must be continuous. 3. Quadrature formula must satisfy

  15. Dissecting the eastern margin of the Tibetan plateau : a study of landslides, erosion and river incision in a transient landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ouimet, William Burke

    2007-01-01

    The eastern margin of the Tibetan plateau is characterized by large rivers dissecting regional topography that has been uplifted in association with the continued convergence of the Indian subcontinent and Eurasia. In this ...

  16. Portable Optical Fiber Probe-Based Spectroscopic Scanner for Rapid Cancer Diagnosis: A New Tool for Intraoperative Margin Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Chung-Chieh

    There continues to be a significant clinical need for rapid and reliable intraoperative margin assessment during cancer surgery. Here we describe a portable, quantitative, optical fiber probe-based, spectroscopic tissue ...

  17. Guaranteed margins and performance for an adaptive flight control system and application on the X-15 research airplane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dydek, Zachary Thompson

    2007-01-01

    The design tools developed for use with linear controllers such as gain and phase margins do not apply to nonlinear control architectures such as adaptive control. For decades, flight control engineers have used these tools ...

  18. Upgrading of substandard housing in Portugal : planning strategies for the technical improvement of marginal settlements, case study, the Casal Ventoso

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Castello-Branco, Fernando N. B

    1983-01-01

    The primary scope of this thesis is to deal, from a technical standpoint, with the implementation of the upgrading concept in marginal settlements in Portugal. It consists mainly of two parts: The rationale of the concept, ...

  19. Evolution of oceanic margins : rifting in the Gulf of California and sediment diapirism and mantle hydration during subduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Nathaniel Clark

    2013-01-01

    This thesis investigates three processes that control the evolution of oceanic margins. Chapter 2 presents seismic images of a ~2-km-thick evaporite body in Guaymas Basin, central Gulf of California. In rifts, evaporites ...

  20. A comparison of the marginal adaptation of cathode-arc vapor-deposited titanium and cast base metal copings.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jean C; Lai, Li-Chung; Sheets, Cherilyn G; Earthman, James; Newcomb, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Marginal fit of gold inlay castings. J Prosthet Dent 1966;filling and porosity in castings of titanium. Dent Matera b Wu et al alloy types, casting procedures, por- celain

  1. Improving macromolecular atomic models at moderate resolution by automated iterative model building, statistical density modification and refinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2003-07-01

    A procedure for iterative model-building, statistical density modification and refinement at moderate resolution (up to about 2.8 Å) is described. An iterative process for improving the completeness and quality of atomic models automatically built at moderate resolution (up to about 2.8 Å) is described. The process consists of cycles of model building interspersed with cycles of refinement and combining phase information from the model with experimental phase information (if any) using statistical density modification. The process can lead to substantial improvements in both the accuracy and completeness of the model compared with a single cycle of model building. For eight test cases solved by MAD or SAD at resolutions ranging from 2.0 to 2.8 Å, the fraction of models built and assigned to sequence was 46–91% (mean of 65%) after the first cycle of building and refinement, and 78-95% (mean of 87%) after 20 cycles. In an additional test case, an incorrect model of gene 5 protein (PDB code 2gn5; r.m.s.d. of main-chain atoms from the more recent refined structure 1vqb at 1.56 Å) was rebuilt using only structure-factor amplitude information at varying resolutions from 2.0 to 3.0 Å. Rebuilding was effective at resolutions up to about 2.5 Å. The resulting models had 60-80% of the residues built and an r.m.s.d. of main-chain atoms from the refined structure of 0.20 to 0.62 Å. The algorithm is useful for building preliminary models of macromolecules suitable for an experienced crystallographer to extend, correct and fully refine.

  2. The Moho: Boundary above upper mantle peridotites or lower crustal eclogites? A global review and new interpretations for passive margins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Dietmar

    and new interpretations for passive margins Rolf Mjelde a, , Alexey Goncharov b , R. Dietmar Müller c, Building F05, NSW 2006, Australia a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 21 July: Eclogites Moho Wide-angle seismic Passive margins We have performed a global study of 2D crustal scale wide

  3. Iterative build OMIT maps: Map improvement by iterative model-building and refinement without model bias

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mailstop M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545, USA; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Building 64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA; Department of Haematology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0XY, England; Terwilliger, Thomas; Terwilliger, T.C.; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf Wilhelm; Afonine, P.V.; Moriarty, N.W.; Zwart, P.H.; Hung, L.-W.; Read, R.J.; Adams, P.D.

    2008-02-12

    A procedure for carrying out iterative model-building, density modification and refinement is presented in which the density in an OMIT region is essentially unbiased by an atomic model. Density from a set of overlapping OMIT regions can be combined to create a composite 'Iterative-Build' OMIT map that is everywhere unbiased by an atomic model but also everywhere benefiting from the model-based information present elsewhere in the unit cell. The procedure may have applications in the validation of specific features in atomic models as well as in overall model validation. The procedure is demonstrated with a molecular replacement structure and with an experimentally-phased structure, and a variation on the method is demonstrated by removing model bias from a structure from the Protein Data Bank.

  4. Refining the classification of the irreps of the 1D N-Extended Supersymmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuznetsova, Z; Kuznetsova, Zhanna; Toppan, Francesco

    2007-01-01

    In hep-th/0511274 the classification of the fields content of the linear finite irreducible representations of the algebra of the 1D N-Extended Supersymmetric Quantum Mechanics was given. In hep-th/0611060 it was pointed out that certain irreps with the same fields content can be regarded as inequivalent. This result can be understood in terms of the "connectivity" properties of the graphs associated to the irreps. We present here a classification of the connectivity of the irreps, refining the hep-th/0511274 classification based on fields content. As a byproduct, we find a counterexample to the hep-th/0611060 claim that the connectivity is uniquely specified by the "sources" and "targets" of an irrep graph. We produce one pair of N=5 irreps and three pairs of N=6 irreps with the same number of sources and targets which, nevertheless, differ in connectivity.

  5. Lance for fuel and oxygen injection into smelting or refining furnace

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schlichting, Mark R. (Chesterton, IN)

    1994-01-01

    A furnace 10 for smelting iron ore and/or refining molten iron 20 is equipped with an overhead pneumatic lance 40, through which a center stream of particulate coal 53 is ejected at high velocity into a slag layer 30. An annular stream of nitrogen or argon 51 enshrouds the coal stream. Oxygen 52 is simultaneously ejected in an annular stream encircling the inert gas stream 51. The interposition of the inert gas stream between the coal and oxygen streams prevents the volatile matter in the coal from combusting before it reaches the slag layer. Heat of combustion is thus more efficiently delivered to the slag, where it is needed to sustain the desired reactions occurring there. A second stream of lower velocity oxygen can be delivered through an outermost annulus 84 to react with carbon monoxide gas rising from slag layer 30, thereby adding still more heat to the furnace.

  6. Methods of refining natural oils and methods of producing fuel compositions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firth, Bruce E; Kirk, Sharon E; Gavaskar, Vasudeo S

    2015-11-04

    A method of refining a natural oil includes: (a) providing a feedstock that includes a natural oil; (b) reacting the feedstock in the presence of a metathesis catalyst to form a metathesized product that includes olefins and esters; (c) passivating residual metathesis catalyst with an agent selected from the group consisting of phosphorous acid, phosphinic acid, and a combination thereof; (d) separating the olefins in the metathesized product from the esters in the metathesized product; and (e) transesterifying the esters in the presence of an alcohol to form a transesterified product and/or hydrogenating the olefins to form a fully or partially saturated hydrogenated product. Methods for suppressing isomerization of olefin metathesis products produced in a metathesis reaction, and methods of producing fuel compositions are described.

  7. Methods of refining natural oils, and methods of producing fuel compositions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firth, Bruce E.; Kirk, Sharon E.

    2015-10-27

    A method of refining a natural oil includes: (a) providing a feedstock that includes a natural oil; (b) reacting the feedstock in the presence of a metathesis catalyst to form a metathesized product that includes olefins and esters; (c) passivating residual metathesis catalyst with an agent that comprises nitric acid; (d) separating the olefins in the metathesized product from the esters in the metathesized product; and (e) transesterifying the esters in the presence of an alcohol to form a transesterified product and/or hydrogenating the olefins to form a fully or partially saturated hydrogenated product. Methods for suppressing isomerization of olefin metathesis products produced in a metathesis reaction, and methods of producing fuel compositions are described.

  8. Lance for fuel and oxygen injection into smelting or refining furnace

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schlichting, M.R.

    1994-12-20

    A furnace for smelting iron ore and/or refining molten iron is equipped with an overhead pneumatic lance, through which a center stream of particulate coal is ejected at high velocity into a slag layer. An annular stream of nitrogen or argon enshrouds the coal stream. Oxygen is simultaneously ejected in an annular stream encircling the inert gas stream. The interposition of the inert gas stream between the coal and oxygen streams prevents the volatile matter in the coal from combusting before it reaches the slag layer. Heat of combustion is thus more efficiently delivered to the slag, where it is needed to sustain the desired reactions occurring there. A second stream of lower velocity oxygen can be delivered through an outermost annulus to react with carbon monoxide gas rising from slag layer, thereby adding still more heat to the furnace. 7 figures.

  9. Early F-type stars - refined classification, confrontation with Stromgren photometry, and the effects of rotation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, R.O.; Garrison, R.F.

    1989-02-01

    The classification for early F-type stars in the MK spectral classification system presented by Gray and Garrison (1987) is refined. The effect of rotation on spectral classification and ubvy-beta photometry of early F-type stars is examined. It is found that the classical luminosity criterion, the 4417 A/4481 A ratio gives inconsistent results. It is shown that most of the stars in the Delta Delphini class of metallic-line stars are either normal or are indistinguishable from proto-Am stars. It is suggested that the designation Delta Delphini should be dropped. The classifications are compared with Stromgren photometry. The effects of rotation on the delta-c sub 1 index in the early-F field dwarfs is demonstrated. 55 references.

  10. A node-centered local refinement algorithm for poisson's equation in complex geometries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCorquodale, Peter; Colella, Phillip; Grote, David P.; Vay, Jean-Luc

    2004-05-04

    This paper presents a method for solving Poisson's equation with Dirichlet boundary conditions on an irregular bounded three-dimensional region. The method uses a nodal-point discretization and adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) on Cartesian grids, and the AMR multigrid solver of Almgren. The discrete Laplacian operator at internal boundaries comes from either linear or quadratic (Shortley-Weller) extrapolation, and the two methods are compared. It is shown that either way, solution error is second order in the mesh spacing. Error in the gradient of the solution is first order with linear extrapolation, but second order with Shortley-Weller. Examples are given with comparison with the exact solution. The method is also applied to a heavy-ion fusion accelerator problem, showing the advantage of adaptivity.

  11. 3D Adaptive Mesh Refinement Simulations of Pellet Injection in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Samtaney; S.C. Jardin; P. Colella; D.F. Martin

    2003-10-20

    We present results of Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) simulations of the pellet injection process, a proven method of refueling tokamaks. AMR is a computationally efficient way to provide the resolution required to simulate realistic pellet sizes relative to device dimensions. The mathematical model comprises of single-fluid MHD equations with source terms in the continuity equation along with a pellet ablation rate model. The numerical method developed is an explicit unsplit upwinding treatment of the 8-wave formulation, coupled with a MAC projection method to enforce the solenoidal property of the magnetic field. The Chombo framework is used for AMR. The role of the E x B drift in mass redistribution during inside and outside pellet injections is emphasized.

  12. Petroleum geology of Pacific margin of Central America and northern South America, from Guatemala to Ecuador

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scrutton, M.E.; Escalante, G.F.

    1986-07-01

    Exploration for hydrocarbons along the Pacific margin of Central America and northern South America has been limited and spasmodic. Less than 100 exploration wells have been drilled, with nearly 50 of these being in the Santa Elena, Progreso, and Guayas basins in Ecuador. Shows have been reported in some wells, and a few oil seeps are known. The only commercial production established to date has been from the Santa Elena Peninsula in Ecuador in the extreme south of the study area. Understanding of the geology in this part of the continental margin is incomplete at best. This paper reviews present-day knowledge in an attempt to define the sedimentary basins better, to characterize their structure and stratigraphy, and to assess their petroleum prospects. The area of continental margin reviewed is to the north, located northwest of the trench system where oceanic crust of the Cocos plate subducts under the Caribbean plate, and to the south, where the northern part of the Nazca plate collides with the South American plate. This plate tectonic setting forms the framework on which local structural and sedimentary events have created a series of relatively small trench-slope and forearc basins in what is now the coastal plain and adjacent offshore area of Central and South America, south or west of a line of mountain ranges with active volcanism. Sedimentary fill is generally of Tertiary age. The basins and subbasins recognized and described include: in Ecuador - Guayas, Santa Elena, Progreso, Valdivia, Bajo Grande, Manta, Muisne-Esmeraldas, and Borbon; in Colombia - Choco-Pacific; in Panama - Gulf of Panama basin complex (Santiago, Tonosi, Sambu), and Burica-Chiriqui; in Costa Rica - Terraba and Coronado/Tempisque; in Nicaragua - San Juan del Sur; and in the Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala - the Pacific coastal basin.

  13. Errors Characteristics of Two Grid Refinement Approaches in Aquaplanet Simulations: MPAS-A and WRF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Rauscher, Sara; Ringler, Todd

    2013-09-01

    This study compares the error characteristics associated with two grid refinement approaches including global variable resolution and nesting for high resolution regional climate modeling. The global variable resolution model, Model for Prediction Across Scales-Atmosphere (MPAS-A), and the limited area model, Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, are compared in an idealized aqua-planet context. For MPAS-A, simulations have been performed with a quasi-uniform resolution global domain at coarse (1°) and high (0.25°) resolution, and a variable resolution domain with a high resolution region at 0.25° configured inside a coarse resolution global domain at 1° resolution. Similarly, WRF has been configured to run on a coarse (1°) and high (0.25°) tropical channel domain as well as a nested domain with a high resolution region at 0.25° nested two-way inside the coarse resolution (1°) tropical channel. The variable resolution or nested simulations are compared against the high resolution simulations. Both models respond to increased resolution with enhanced precipitation. Limited and significant reduction in the ratio of convective to non-convective precipitation. The limited area grid refinement induces zonal asymmetry in precipitation (heating), accompanied by zonal anomalous Walker like circulations and standing Rossby wave signals. Within the high resolution limited area, the zonal distribution of precipitation is affected by advection in MPAS-A and by the nesting strategy in WRF. In both models, 20 day Kelvin waves propagate through the high-resolution domains fairly unaffected by the change in resolution (and the presence of a boundary in WRF) but increased resolution strengthens eastward propagating inertio-gravity waves.

  14. Marginal Cost of Steam and Power from Cogeneration Systems Using a Rational Value-Allocation Procedure 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumana, J. D.; Al-Gwaiz, M. M.

    2004-01-01

    operate in either modes 1a or 2a, as electric utility companies are loathe to purchase surplus power from a cogenerator unless it is priced substantially below the utility?s own cheapest marginal cost of production. Usually, the cogenerator cannot... will invariably be positive. Can we be assured that the foregoing conclusion is correct? Not really. For example, one could argue that the decision to hold electrical power prices fixed is arbitrary, and that it is equally valid to fix the steam price...

  15. Economic Recovery of Oil Trapped at Fan Margins Using Hig Angle Wells Multiple Hydraulic Fractures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laue, M.L.

    1997-11-21

    The Yowlumne field is a giant field in the southern San Joaquin basin, Kern County, California. It is a deep (13,000 ft) waterflood operation that produces from the Miocene- aged Stevens Sand. The reservoir is interpreted as a layered, fan-shaped, prograding turbidite complex containing several lobe-shaped sand bodies that represent distinct flow units. A high ultimate recovery factor is expected, yet significant quantities of undrained oil remain at the fan margins. The fan margins are not economic to develop using vertical wells because of thinning pay, deteriorating rock quality, and depth. This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting the northeast distal fan margin through the use of a high- angle well completed with multiple hydraulic- fracture treatments. A high-angle well offers greater pay exposure than can be achieved with a vertical well. Hydraulic-fracture treatments will establish vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore. The equivalent production rate and reserves of three vertical wells are anticipated at a cost of approximately two vertical wells. The near-horizontal well penetrated the Yowlumne sand; a Stevens sand equivalent, in the distal fan margin in the northeast area of the field. The well was drilled in a predominately westerly direction towards the interior of the field, in the direction of improving rock quality. Drilling and completion operations proved to be very challenging, leading to a number of adjustments to original plans. Hole conditions resulted in obtaining less core material than desired and setting intermediate casing 1200 ft too high. The 7 in. production liner stuck 1000 ft off bottom, requiring a 5 in. liner to be run the rest of the way. The cement job on the 5 in. liner resulted in a very poor bond, which precluded one of three hydraulic fracture treatments originally planned for the well. Openhole logs confirmed most expectations going into the project about basic rock properties: the formation was shaly with low porosities, and water saturations were in line with expectations, including the presence of some intervals swept out by the waterflood. High water saturations at the bottom of the well eliminated one of the originally planned hydraulic fracture treatments. Although porosities proved to be low, they were more uniform across the formation than expected. Permeabilities of the various intervals continue to be evaluated, but appear to be better than expected from the porosity log model derived in Budget Period One. The well was perforated in all pay sections behind the 5 in. liner. Production rates and phases agree nicely with log calculations, fractional flow calculations, and an analytical technique used to predict the rate performance of the well.

  16. Higher rank stable pairs and virtual localization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Artan Sheshmani

    2015-02-08

    We introduce a higher rank analog of the Pandharipande-Thomas theory of stable pairs on a Calabi-Yau threefold $X$. More precisely, we develop a moduli theory for frozen triples given by the data $O^r(-n)\\rightarrow F$ where $F$ is a sheaf of pure dimension 1. The moduli space of such objects does not naturally determine an enumerative theory: that is, it does not naturally possess a perfect symmetric obstruction theory. Instead, we build a zero-dimensional virtual fundamental class by hand, by truncating a deformation-obstruction theory coming from the moduli of objects in the derived category of $X$. This yields the first deformation-theoretic construction of a higher-rank enumerative theory for Calabi-Yau threefolds. We calculate this enumerative theory for local $\\mathbb{P}^1$ using the Graber-Pandharipande virtual localization technique.

  17. Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McInnis, E.L.; Scharff, R.P.; Bauman, B.D.; Williams, M.A.

    1995-01-17

    Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles. 2 figures.

  18. Enhanced Coset Symmetries and Higher Derivative Corrections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neil Lambert; Peter West

    2006-08-17

    After dimensional reduction to three dimensions, the lowest order effective actions for pure gravity, M-theory and the Bosonic string admit an enhanced symmetry group. In this paper we initiate study of how this enhancement is affected by the inclusion of higher derivative terms. In particular we show that the coefficients of the scalar fields associated to the Cartan subalgebra are given by weights of the enhanced symmetry group.

  19. Higher Efficiency HVAC Motors | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls - Building America Topa HighHigher Efficiency HVAC

  20. A new formulation of higher parallel transport in higher gauge theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emanuele Soncini; Roberto Zucchini

    2014-10-03

    In this technical paper, we present a new formulation of higher parallel transport in strict higher gauge theory required for the rigorous construction of Wilson lines and surfaces. Our approach is based on an original notion of Lie crossed module cocycle and cocycle 1- and 2-gauge transformation with a non standard double category theoretic interpretation. We show its equivalence to earlier formulations.

  1. Marginal Misses After Postoperative Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Allen M.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Luu, Quang; Chen, Leon M.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Purdy, James A.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To describe the spatial distribution of local-regional recurrence (LRR) among patients treated postoperatively with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 90 consecutive patients treated by gross total resection and postoperative IMRT for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck from January 2003 to July 2009 were reviewed. Sites of disease were the oral cavity (43 patients), oropharynx (20 patients), larynx (15 patients), and hypopharynx (12 patients). Fifty patients (56%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Seventeen of 90 patients treated with postoperative IMRT experienced LRR, yielding a 2-year estimate of local regional control of 80%. Among the LRR patients, 11 patients were classified as in-field recurrences, occurring within the physician-designated clinical target volume, and 6 patients were categorized as marginal recurrences. There were no out-of-field geographical misses. Sites of marginal LRRs included the contralateral neck adjacent to the spared parotid gland (3 patients), the dermal/subcutaneous surface (2 patients), and the retropharyngeal/retrostyloid lymph node region (1 patient). Conclusions: Although the incidence of geographical misses was relatively low, the possibility of this phenomenon should be considered in the design of target volumes among patients treated by postoperative IMRT for head and neck cancer.

  2. Energy-conserving perennial agriculture for marginal land in southern Appalachia. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, G.

    1982-01-30

    USDA economists predict the end of surplus farm production in the US within this decade. More and more marginal land will be cropped to provide feed for the growing world population and to produce energy. Much of this potential cropland in Southern Appalachia is poorly suited to annual crops, such as corn. Perennial crops are much better suited to steep, rocky, and wet sites. Research was undertaken on the theoretical potentials of perennial species with high predicted yields of protein, carbohydrates, or oils. Several candidate staple perennial crops for marginal land in Southern Appalachia were identified, and estimates were made of their yields, energy input requirements, and general suitabilities. Cropping systems incorporating honeylocust, persimmon, mulberry, jujube, and beech were compared with corn cropping systems. It appears that these candidate staple perennials show distinct advantages for energy conservation and environmental preservation. Detailed economic analyses must await actual demonstration trials, but preliminary indications for ethanol conversion systems with honeylocust are encouraging. It is suggested that short-term loans to farmers undertaking this new type of agriculture would be appropriate to solve cash-flow problems.

  3. Using Knowledge-Based Neural Networks to Improve Algorithms: Refining the Chou-Fasman Algorithm for Protein Folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maclin, Rich

    for Protein Folding Richard Maclin Jude W. Shavlik Computer Sciences Dept. University of Wisconsin 1210 W learning Theory refinement Neural networks Finite-state automata Protein folding Chou-Fasman algorithm-Fasman algorithm, a method for predicting how globular proteins fold. Empirical evidence shows

  4. Neutron and X-ray diffraction and empirical potential structure refinement modelling of magnesium stabilised amorphous calcium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benning, Liane G.

    Neutron and X-ray diffraction and empirical potential structure refinement modelling of magnesium online xxxx Keywords: Amorphous calcium carbonate; EPSR modelling; Neutron diffraction; X-ray diffraction Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) plays a key role in biomineralisation processes in sea organisms. Neutron

  5. Margin Size is an Independent Predictor of Local Tumor Progression After Ablation of Colon Cancer Liver Metastases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Xiaodong; Sofocleous, Constantinos T., E-mail: sofoclec@mskcc.org; Erinjeri, Joseph P.; Petre, Elena N. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Section of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States)] [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Section of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States); Gonen, Mithat [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics (United States)] [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics (United States); Do, Kinh G. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States)] [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States); Brown, Karen T.; Covey, Anne M.; Brody, Lynn A.; Alago, William; Thornton, Raymond H. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Section of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States)] [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Section of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States); Kemeny, Nancy E. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medicine (United States)] [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medicine (United States); Solomon, Stephen B. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Section of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States)] [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Section of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2013-02-15

    This study was designed to evaluate the relationship between the minimal margin size and local tumor progression (LTP) following CT-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of colorectal cancer liver metastases (CLM). An institutional review board-approved, HIPPA-compliant review identified 73 patients with 94 previously untreated CLM that underwent RFA between March 2003 and May 2010, resulting in an ablation zone completely covering the tumor 4-8 weeks after RFA dynamic CT. Comparing the pre- with the post-RFA CT, the minimal margin size was categorized to 0, 1-5, 6-10, and 11-15 mm. Follow-up included CT every 2-4 months. Kaplan-Meier methodology and Cox regression analysis were used to evaluate the effect of the minimal margin size, tumor location, size, and proximity to a vessel on LTP. Forty-five of 94 (47.9 %) CLM progressed locally. Median LTP-free survival (LPFS) was 16 months. Two-year LPFS rates for ablated CLM with minimal margin of 0, 1-5 mm, 6-10 mm, 11-15 mm were 26, 46, 74, and 80 % (p < 0.011). Minimal margin (p = 0.002) and tumor size (p = 0.028) were independent risk factors for LTP. The risk for LTP decreased by 46 % for each 5-mm increase in minimal margin size, whereas each additional 5-mm increase in tumor size increased the risk of LTP by 22 %. An ablation zone with a minimal margin uniformly larger than 5 mm 4-8 weeks postablation CT is associated with the best local tumor control.

  6. Cast Stone Formulation At Higher Sodium Concentrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, K. M.; Roberts, K. A.; Edwards, T. B.

    2014-02-28

    A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium concentration in the salt solution reduced the time to peak heat flow, and reducing the amount of slag in the premix increased the time to peak heat flow. These observations may help to describe some of the cured properties of the samples, in particular the differences in compressive strength observed after 28 and 90 days of curing. Samples were cured for at least 28 days at ambient temperature in the laboratory prior to cured properties analyses. The low activity waste form for disposal at the Hanford Site is required to have a compressive strength of at least 500 psi. After 28 days of curing, several of the test mixes had mean compressive strengths that were below the 500 psi requirement. Higher sodium concentrations and higher water to premix ratios led to reduced compressive strength. Higher fly ash concentrations decreased the compressive strength after 28 days of curing. This may be explained in that the cementitious phases matured more quickly in the mixes with higher concentrations of slag, as evidenced by the data for the time to peak heat generation. All of the test mixes exhibited higher mean compressive strengths after 90 days of curing, with only one composition having a mean compressive strength of less than 500 psi. Leachability indices were determined for the test mixes for contaminants of interest. The leaching performance of the mixes evaluated in this study was not particularly sensitive to the factors used in the experimental design. This may be beneficial in demonstrating that the performance of the waste form is robust with respect to changes in the mix composition. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to achieve significantly higher waste loadings in Cast Stone and other low temperature, cementitious waste forms. Additional work is needed to elucidate the hydration mechanisms occurring in Cast Stone formulated with highly concentrated salt solutions since these reactions are responsible for determining the performance of the cured waste form. The thermal analyses completed in this study provide some preliminary insight, although the l

  7. Cast Stone Formulation At Higher Sodium Concentrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, K. M.; Edwards, T. A.; Roberts, K. B.

    2013-10-02

    A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium concentration in the salt solution reduced the time to peak heat flow, and reducing the amount of slag in the premix increased the time to peak heat flow. These observations may help to describe some of the cured properties of the samples, in particular the differences in compressive strength observed after 28 and 90 days of curing. Samples were cured for at least 28 days at ambient temperature in the laboratory prior to cured properties analyses. The low activity waste form for disposal at the Hanford Site is required to have a compressive strength of at least 500 psi. After 28 days of curing, several of the test mixes had mean compressive strengths that were below the 500 psi requirement. Higher sodium concentrations and higher water to premix ratios led to reduced compressive strength. Higher fly ash concentrations decreased the compressive strength after 28 days of curing. This may be explained in that the cementitious phases matured more quickly in the mixes with higher concentrations of slag, as evidenced by the data for the time to peak heat generation. All of the test mixes exhibited higher mean compressive strengths after 90 days of curing, with only one composition having a mean compressive strength of less than 500 psi. Leach indices were determined for the test mixes for contaminants of interest. The leaching performance of the mixes evaluated in this study was not particularly sensitive to the factors used in the experimental design. This may be beneficial in demonstrating that the performance of the waste form is robust with respect to changes in the mix composition. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to achieve significantly higher waste loadings in Cast Stone and other low temperature, cementitious waste forms. Additional work is needed to elucidate the hydration mechanisms occurring in Cast Stone formulated with highly concentrated salt solutions since these reactions are responsible for determining the performance of the cured waste form. The thermal analyses completed in this study provide some preliminary insight, although the limited

  8. Cast Stone Formulation At Higher Sodium Concentrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, K. M.; Roberts, K. A.; Edwards, T. B.

    2013-09-17

    A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium concentration in the salt solution reduced the time to peak heat flow, and reducing the amount of slag in the premix increased the time to peak heat flow. These observations may help to describe some of the cured properties of the samples, in particular the differences in compressive strength observed after 28 and 90 days of curing. Samples were cured for at least 28 days at ambient temperature in the laboratory prior to cured properties analyses. The low activity waste form for disposal at the Hanford Site is required to have a compressive strength of at least 500 psi. After 28 days of curing, several of the test mixes had mean compressive strengths that were below the 500 psi requirement. Higher sodium concentrations and higher water to premix ratios led to reduced compressive strength. Higher fly ash concentrations decreased the compressive strength after 28 days of curing. This may be explained in that the cementitious phases matured more quickly in the mixes with higher concentrations of slag, as evidenced by the data for the time to peak heat generation. All of the test mixes exhibited higher mean compressive strengths after 90 days of curing, with only one composition having a mean compressive strength of less than 500 psi. Leach indices were determined for the test mixes for contaminants of interest. The leaching performance of the mixes evaluated in this study was not particularly sensitive to the factors used in the experimental design. This may be beneficial in demonstrating that the performance of the waste form is robust with respect to changes in the mix composition. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to achieve significantly higher waste loadings in Cast Stone and other low temperature, cementitious waste forms. Additional work is needed to elucidate the hydration mechanisms occurring in Cast Stone formulated with highly concentrated salt solutions since these reactions are responsible for determining the performance of the cured waste form. The thermal analyses completed in this study provide some preliminary insight, although the limited

  9. Understanding the Cost of Higher Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McPherson, Peter; Shulenburger, David E.

    2010-01-01

    Index as a cost measure, the annual real increase is still just 0.84 percent per year.13 To repeat, the substantial increase in tuition revenue over the last decade, and in fact over the last two decades, was only slightly more than the real... methods of deflating figures to account for inflation. Wellman used the Consumer Price Index while SHEEO utilizes its own cost index, the Higher Education Cost Adjustment (HECA) for deflation. The SHEEO index is a combination of the BLS’s Employment...

  10. Higher Order Deformations of Complex Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric D'Hoker; Duong H. Phong

    2015-06-23

    Deformations of complex structures by finite Beltrami differentials are considered on general Riemann surfaces. Exact formulas to any fixed order are derived for the corresponding deformations of the period matrix, Green's functions, and correlation functions in conformal field theories with vanishing total central charge. The stress tensor is shown to give a simple representation of these deformations valid to all orders. Such deformation formulas naturally enter into the evaluation of superstring amplitudes at two-loop order with Ramond punctures, and at higher loop order, in the supergravity formulation of the RNS superstring.

  11. Higher Order Deformations of Complex Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Hoker, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Deformations of complex structures by finite Beltrami differentials are considered on general Riemann surfaces. Exact formulas to any fixed order are derived for the corresponding deformations of the period matrix, Green's functions, and correlation functions in conformal field theories with vanishing total central charge. The stress tensor is shown to give a simple representation of these deformations valid to all orders. Such deformation formulas naturally enter into the evaluation of superstring amplitudes at two-loop order with Ramond punctures, and at higher loop order, in the supergravity formulation of the RNS superstring.

  12. Higher-Spin Geometry and String Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Francia; A. Sagnotti

    2006-02-14

    The theory of freely-propagating massless higher spins is usually formulated via gauge fields and parameters subject to trace constraints. We summarize a proposal allowing to forego them by introducing only a pair of additional fields in the Lagrangians. In this setting, external currents satisfy usual Noether-like conservation laws, the field equations can be nicely related to those emerging from Open String Field Theory in the low-tension limit, and if the additional fields are eliminated without reintroducing the constraints a geometric, non-local description of the theory manifests itself.

  13. Universality in higher order spin noise spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Fuxiang

    2015-01-01

    Higher order time-correlators of spontaneous spin fluctuations reveal the information about spin interactions. We argue that in a broad class of spin systems one can justify a phenomenological approach to explore such correlators. Thus, we predict that the 3rd and 4th order spin cumulants are described by a universal function that can be parametrized by a small set of parameters. We show that the fluctuation theorem constrains this function so that such correlators are fully determined by lowest nonlinear corrections to the free energy and the mean and variance of microscopic spin currents. We also provide an example of microscopic calculations for conduction electrons.

  14. Brief review on higher spin black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alfredo Perez; David Tempo; Ricardo Troncoso

    2014-05-12

    We review some relevant results in the context of higher spin black holes in three-dimensional spacetimes, focusing on their asymptotic behaviour and thermodynamic properties. For simplicity, we mainly discuss the case of gravity nonminimally coupled to spin-3 fields, being nonperturbatively described by a Chern-Simons theory of two independent sl(3,R) gauge fields. Since the analysis is particularly transparent in the Hamiltonian formalism, we provide a concise discussion of their basic aspects in this context; and as a warming up exercise, we briefly analyze the asymptotic behaviour of pure gravity, as well as the BTZ black hole and its thermodynamics, exclusively in terms of gauge fields. The discussion is then extended to the case of black holes endowed with higher spin fields, briefly signaling the agreements and discrepancies found through different approaches. We conclude explaining how the puzzles become resolved once the fall off of the fields is precisely specified and extended to include chemical potentials, in a way that it is compatible with the asymptotic symmetries. Hence, the global charges become completely identified in an unambiguous way, so that different sets of asymptotic conditions turn out to contain inequivalent classes of black hole solutions being characterized by a different set of global charges.

  15. Higher Spins in Hyper-Superspace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ioannis Florakis; Dmitri Sorokin; Mirian Tsulaia

    2014-12-04

    We extend the results of arXiv:1401.1645 on the generalized conformal Sp(2n)-structure of infinite multiplets of higher spin fields, formulated in spaces with extra tensorial directions (hyperspaces), to the description of OSp(1|2n)-invariant infinite-dimensional higher-spin supermultiplets formulated in terms of scalar superfields on flat hyper-superspaces and on OSp(1|n) supergroup manifolds. We find generalized superconformal transformations relating the superfields and their equations of motion in flat hyper-superspace with those on the OSp(1|n) supermanifold. We then use these transformations to relate the two-, three- and four-point correlation functions of the scalar superfields on flat hyperspace, derived by requiring the OSp(1|2n) invariance of the correlators, to correlation functions on the OSp(1|n) group manifold. As a byproduct, for the simplest particular case of a conventional N=1, D=3 superconformal theory of scalar superfields, we also derive correlation functions of component fields of the scalar supermultiplet including those of auxiliary fields.

  16. Electro-autotrophic synthesis of higher alcohols

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liao, James C.; Cho, Kwang Myung

    2015-10-06

    The disclosure provides a process that converts CO.sub.2 to higher alcohols (e.g. isobutanol) using electricity as the energy source. This process stores electricity (e.g. from solar energy, nuclear energy, and the like) in liquid fuels that can be used as high octane number gasoline substitutes. Instead of deriving reducing power from photosynthesis, this process derives reducing power from electrically generated mediators, either H.sub.2 or formate. H.sub.2 can be derived from electrolysis of water. Formate can be generated by electrochemical reduction of CO.sub.2. After delivering the reducing power in the cell, formate becomes CO.sub.2 and recycles back. Therefore, the biological CO.sub.2 fixation process can occur in the dark.

  17. Conformal higher-order viscoelastic fluid mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masafumi Fukuma; Yuho Sakatani

    2012-05-28

    We present a generally covariant formulation of conformal higher-order viscoelastic fluid mechanics with strain allowed to take arbitrarily large values. We give a general prescription to determine the dynamics of a relativistic viscoelastic fluid in a way consistent with the hypothesis of local thermodynamic equilibrium and the second law of thermodynamics. We then elaborately study the transient time scales at which the strain almost relaxes and becomes proportional to the gradients of velocity. We particularly show that a conformal second-order fluid with all possible parameters in the constitutive equations can be obtained without breaking the hypothesis of local thermodynamic equilibrium, if the conformal fluid is defined as the long time limit of a conformal second-order viscoelastic system. We also discuss how local thermodynamic equilibrium could be understood in the context of the fluid/gravity correspondence.

  18. Gravitational Interactions of Higher-Spin Fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marc Henneaux; Gustavo Lucena Gomez; Rakibur Rahman

    2014-09-14

    We investigate the cubic interactions of a massless higher-spin fermion with gravity in flat space and present covariant 2-s-s vertices, compatible with the gauge symmetries of the system, preserving parity. This explicit construction relies on the BRST deformation scheme that assumes locality and Poincare invariance. Consistent nontrivial cubic deformations exclude minimal gravitational coupling and may appear only with a number of derivatives constrained in a given range. Derived in an independent manner, our results do agree with those obtained from the light-cone formulation or inspired by string theory. We also show that none of the Abelian vertices deform the gauge transformations, while all the non-Abelian ones are obstructed in a local theory beyond the cubic order.

  19. Phase Structure of Higher Spin Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhishek Chowdhury; Arunabha Saha

    2015-02-12

    We revisit the study of the phase structure of higher spin black holes carried out in arXiv$:1210.0284$ using the "canonical formalism". In particular we study the low as well as high temperature regimes. We show that the Hawking-Page transition takes place in the low temperature regime. The thermodynamically favoured phase changes from conical surplus to black holes and then again to conical surplus as we increase temperature. We then show that in the high temperature regime the diagonal embedding gives the appropriate description. We also give a map between the parameters of the theory near the IR and UV fixed points. This makes the "good" solutions near one end map to the "bad" solutions near the other end and vice versa.

  20. Chemical coal cleaning process and costs refinement for coal-water slurry manufacture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhasin, A.K.; Berggren, M.H.; Ronzio, N.J.; Smit, F.J.

    1985-12-31

    This report describes the results of process and cost refinement studies for the manufacture of ultra-clean coal-slurry fuel for direct-fired gas turbines. The work was performed as an extension to an earlier contract in which AMAX R and D supplied METC with two lots of highly beneficiated coal slurry fuel for use in the Heat Engines program. A conceptual design study and cost estimate supplied to METC at that time indicated that a combined physical and chemical cleaning process could produce ultra-clean fuel at a competitive price. Laboratory and pilot plant studies performed for the contract extension further defined the process conditions and operating and capital costs to prepare coals containing from 0.2 to 1.0% ash as slurry fuels. A base-case fuel containing coal cleaned to 0.5% ash in a 1000 cp slurry containing 55% coal was $4.16 per million Btu when produced in quantities required to fuel a 500 MW gas-turbine generating station. Coal slurry fuel production costs as low as $3.66 per million Btu were projected for coals cleaned to 1.0% ash. 12 refs., 23 figs., 63 tabs.

  1. Staggered grid lagrangian method with local structured adaptive mesh refinement for modeling shock hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, R W; Pember, R B; Elliot, N S

    2000-09-26

    A new method for the solution of the unsteady Euler equations has been developed. The method combines staggered grid Lagrangian techniques with structured local adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). This method is a precursor to a more general adaptive arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE-AMR) algorithm under development, which will facilitate the solution of problems currently at and beyond the boundary of soluble problems by traditional ALE methods by focusing computational resources where they are required. Many of the core issues involved in the development of the ALE-AMR method hinge upon the integration of AMR with a Lagrange step, which is the focus of the work described here. The novel components of the method are mainly driven by the need to reconcile traditional AMR techniques, which are typically employed on stationary meshes with cell-centered quantities, with the staggered grids and grid motion employed by Lagrangian methods. These new algorithmic components are first developed in one dimension and are then generalized to two dimensions. Solutions of several model problems involving shock hydrodynamics are presented and discussed.

  2. Refinement, Validation and Application of Cloud-Radiation Parameterization in a GCM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Graeme L. Stephens

    2009-04-30

    The research performed under this award was conducted along 3 related fronts: (1) Refinement and assessment of parameterizations of sub-grid scale radiative transport in GCMs. (2) Diagnostic studies that use ARM observations of clouds and convection in an effort to understand the effects of moist convection on its environment, including how convection influences clouds and radiation. This aspect focuses on developing and testing methodologies designed to use ARM data more effectively for use in atmospheric models, both at the cloud resolving model scale and the global climate model scale. (3) Use (1) and (2) in combination with both models and observations of varying complexity to study key radiation feedback Our work toward these objectives thus involved three corresponding efforts. First, novel diagnostic techniques were developed and applied to ARM observations to understand and characterize the effects of moist convection on the dynamical and thermodynamical environment in which it occurs. Second, an in house GCM radiative transfer algorithm (BUGSrad) was employed along with an optimal estimation cloud retrieval algorithm to evaluate the ability to reproduce cloudy-sky radiative flux observations. Assessments using a range of GCMs with various moist convective parameterizations to evaluate the fidelity with which the parameterizations reproduce key observable features of the environment were also started in the final year of this award. The third study area involved the study of cloud radiation feedbacks and we examined these in both cloud resolving and global climate models.

  3. Dimensional reduction as a tool for mesh refinement and trackingsingularities of PDEs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stinis, Panagiotis

    2007-06-10

    We present a collection of algorithms which utilizedimensional reduction to perform mesh refinement and study possiblysingular solutions of time-dependent partial differential equations. Thealgorithms are inspired by constructions used in statistical mechanics toevaluate the properties of a system near a critical point. The firstalgorithm allows the accurate determination of the time of occurrence ofa possible singularity. The second algorithm is an adaptive meshrefinement scheme which can be used to approach efficiently the possiblesingularity. Finally, the third algorithm uses the second algorithm untilthe available resolution is exhausted (as we approach the possiblesingularity) and then switches to a dimensionally reduced model which,when accurate, can follow faithfully the solution beyond the time ofoccurrence of the purported singularity. An accurate dimensionallyreduced model should dissipate energy at the right rate. We construct twovariants of each algorithm. The first variant assumes that we have actualknowledge of the reduced model. The second variant assumes that we knowthe form of the reduced model, i.e., the terms appearing in the reducedmodel, but not necessarily their coefficients. In this case, we alsoprovide a way of determining the coefficients. We present numericalresults for the Burgers equation with zero and nonzero viscosity toillustrate the use of the algorithms.

  4. Refined rotational period, pole solution, and shape model for (3200) Phaethon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ansdell, Megan; Meech, Karen J.; Kaluna, Heather; Hainaut, Olivier; Buie, Marc W.; Bauer, James; Dundon, Luke

    2014-09-20

    (3200) Phaethon exhibits both comet- and asteroid-like properties, suggesting it could be a rare transitional object such as a dormant comet or previously volatile-rich asteroid. This justifies detailed study of (3200) Phaethon's physical properties as a better understanding of asteroid-comet transition objects can provide insight into minor body evolution. We therefore acquired time series photometry of (3200) Phaethon over 15 nights from 1994 to 2013, primarily using the Tektronix 2048 × 2048 pixel CCD on the University of Hawaii 2.2 m telescope. We utilized light curve inversion to (1) refine (3200) Phaethon's rotational period to P = 3.6032 ± 0.0008 hr; (2) estimate a rotational pole orientation of ? = +85° ± 13° and ? = –20° ± 10°; and (3) derive a shape model. We also used our extensive light curve data set to estimate the slope parameter of (3200) Phaethon's phase curve as G ? 0.06, consistent with C-type asteroids. We discuss how this highly oblique pole orientation with a negative ecliptic latitude supports previous evidence for (3200) Phaethon's origin in the inner main asteroid belt as well as the potential for deeply buried volatiles fueling impulsive yet rare cometary outbursts.

  5. Synthesis and Rietveld refinement of the small-pore zeolite SSZ-16

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lobo, R.F.; Zones, S.I.; Medrud, R.C.

    1996-10-01

    Recent research efforts invested in the synthesis of new high-silica zeolites have yielded several novel materials with medium ({approximately}5.6 {Angstrom}) and large ({approximately}7.2 {Angstrom}) pores. Examples include new zeolites with intersecting 10 and 12 member rings-i.e., pores bounded by 10 and 12 tetrahedral (T) atoms respectively-like SSZ-26, NU-87, SSZ-37, SSZ-25, MCM-22, CIT-1 (CON), and the aluminophosphate-based DAF-1 (DFO). However, except for the zeolites SSZ-28 (DDR) and SSZ-13 (CHA), no new high-silica zeolites with small pores have been reported. High-silica small-pore zeolites could be potentially useful for several catalytic reactions including the synthesis of dimethylamine, the reduction of NO{sub x} from combustion gases and the dewaxing of fuels for octane upgrading. The authors present here the synthesis and structural characterization using Rietveld refinement of synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data of the zeolite SSZ-16. 27 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Refinement of a formula for decay after weak coherent excitation of a sphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedberg, R., E-mail: rfriedberg1@nyc.rr.co [Barnard College, Columbia University, 452 Riverside Drive, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    A new formula has been given recently by A.A. Svidzinsky and M.O. Scully to describe the temporal evolution of the excitation function beta(t,r{sup -}>) in a large sphere satisfying the Markov condition after excitation by a single photon. This formula is based on a physically reasonable Ansatz from which differential equations are inferred for the undetermined radial functions in the Ansatz. The solution to these differential equations leads to the formula for beta. Numerical calculations from this formula yield a value approx10% for the maximum probability of occupancy of secondary excited states. In this paper, we refine the formula of Svidzinsky and Scully by allowing the radial functions in the Ansatz to depend on the angular index l of the spherical Bessel functions. By using the Debye formula for the asymptotic behavior of j{sub l}(u) for large l as well as u, we obtain differential equations in each angular sector, similar to theirs but with a dependence on l. The solution to these equations yields our improved formula, from which we calculate 17.1% for the maximum probability of secondary excited states.

  7. Dynamic implicit 3D adaptive mesh refinement for non-equilibrium radiation diffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Philip; Z. Wang; M.A. Berrill; M. Birke; M. Pernice

    2014-04-01

    The time dependent non-equilibrium radiation diffusion equations are important for solving the transport of energy through radiation in optically thick regimes and find applications in several fields including astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion. The associated initial boundary value problems that are encountered often exhibit a wide range of scales in space and time and are extremely challenging to solve. To efficiently and accurately simulate these systems we describe our research on combining techniques that will also find use more broadly for long term time integration of nonlinear multi-physics systems: implicit time integration for efficient long term time integration of stiff multi-physics systems, local control theory based step size control to minimize the required global number of time steps while controlling accuracy, dynamic 3D adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to minimize memory and computational costs, Jacobian Free Newton–Krylov methods on AMR grids for efficient nonlinear solution, and optimal multilevel preconditioner components that provide level independent solver convergence.

  8. A Predictive Model of Fragmentation using Adaptive Mesh Refinement and a Hierarchical Material Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koniges, A E; Masters, N D; Fisher, A C; Anderson, R W; Eder, D C; Benson, D; Kaiser, T B; Gunney, B T; Wang, P; Maddox, B R; Hansen, J F; Kalantar, D H; Dixit, P; Jarmakani, H; Meyers, M A

    2009-03-03

    Fragmentation is a fundamental material process that naturally spans spatial scales from microscopic to macroscopic. We developed a mathematical framework using an innovative combination of hierarchical material modeling (HMM) and adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to connect the continuum to microstructural regimes. This framework has been implemented in a new multi-physics, multi-scale, 3D simulation code, NIF ALE-AMR. New multi-material volume fraction and interface reconstruction algorithms were developed for this new code, which is leading the world effort in hydrodynamic simulations that combine AMR with ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) techniques. The interface reconstruction algorithm is also used to produce fragments following material failure. In general, the material strength and failure models have history vector components that must be advected along with other properties of the mesh during remap stage of the ALE hydrodynamics. The fragmentation models are validated against an electromagnetically driven expanding ring experiment and dedicated laser-based fragmentation experiments conducted at the Jupiter Laser Facility. As part of the exit plan, the NIF ALE-AMR code was applied to a number of fragmentation problems of interest to the National Ignition Facility (NIF). One example shows the added benefit of multi-material ALE-AMR that relaxes the requirement that material boundaries must be along mesh boundaries.

  9. Ly{alpha} RADIATIVE TRANSFER IN COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS USING ADAPTIVE MESH REFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laursen, Peter [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100, Copenhagen Oe (Denmark); Razoumov, Alexei O. [Institute for Computational Astrophysics, Department of Astronomy and Physics, Saint Mary's University, Halifax, NS, B3H3C3 (Canada); Sommer-Larsen, Jesper [Excellence Cluster Universe, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)], E-mail: pela@dark-cosmology.dk, E-mail: razoumov@ap.smu.ca, E-mail: jslarsen@astro.ku.dk

    2009-05-01

    A numerical code for solving various Ly{alpha} radiative transfer (RT) problems is presented. The code is suitable for an arbitrary, three-dimensional distribution of Ly{alpha} emissivity, gas temperature, density, and velocity field. Capable of handling Ly{alpha} RT in an adaptively refined grid-based structure, it enables detailed investigation of the effects of clumpiness of the interstellar (or intergalactic) medium. The code is tested against various geometrically and physically idealized configurations for which analytical solutions exist, and subsequently applied to three different simulated high-resolution 'Lyman-break galaxies', extracted from high-resolution cosmological simulations at redshift z = 3.6. Proper treatment of the Ly{alpha} scattering reveals a diversity of surface brightness (SB) and line profiles. Specifically, for a given galaxy the maximum observed SB can vary by an order of magnitude, and the total flux by a factor of 3-6, depending on the viewing angle. This may provide an explanation for differences in observed properties of high-redshift galaxies, and in particular a possible physical link between Lyman-break galaxies and regular Ly{alpha} emitters.

  10. Relativistic Hydrodynamic Flows Using Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Structured Mesh Refinement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng Wang; Tom Abel; Weiqun Zhang

    2007-12-31

    Astrophysical relativistic flow problems require high resolution three-dimensional numerical simulations. In this paper, we describe a new parallel three-dimensional code for simulations of special relativistic hydrodynamics (SRHD) using both spatially and temporally structured adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). We used the method of lines to discretize the SRHD equations spatially and a total variation diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta scheme for time integration. For spatial reconstruction, we have implemented piecewise linear method (PLM), piecewise parabolic method (PPM), third order convex essentially non-oscillatory (CENO) and third and fifth order weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) schemes. Flux is computed using either direct flux reconstruction or approximate Riemann solvers including HLL, modified Marquina flux, local Lax-Friedrichs flux formulas and HLLC. The AMR part of the code is built on top of the cosmological Eulerian AMR code {\\sl enzo}. We discuss the coupling of the AMR framework with the relativistic solvers. Via various test problems, we emphasize the importance of resolution studies in relativistic flow simulations because extremely high resolution is required especially when shear flows are present in the problem. We also present the results of two 3d simulations of astrophysical jets: AGN jets and GRB jets. Resolution study of those two cases further highlights the need of high resolutions to calculate accurately relativistic flow problems.

  11. Aluminum doped zirconia nanopowders: Wet-chemical synthesis and structural analysis by Rietveld refinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srdic, Vladimir V. Rakic, Srdan; Cvejic, Zeljka

    2008-10-02

    Alumina/zirconia nanopowders, with up to 20 mol% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, were prepared by wet-chemical synthesis technique, using controlled hydrolysis of alkoxides. The as-synthesized powders are amorphous, have very high specific surface area and the corresponding particle size smaller than 4 nm. Amorphous powders with 0, 10 and 20 mol% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystallize at 460, 692 and 749 deg. C, respectively, as a single-phase tetragonal zirconia, without any traces of alumina phases. Rietvled refinement of X-ray diffraction data, used for the detailed structural analysis of annealed nanopowders, showed that the high-temperature zirconia phase is stabilized due to the formation of ZrO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} solid solutions. High solubility of alumina in the tetragonal zirconia (up to 28.6 at% Al{sup 3+}) and stabilization of tetragonal zirconia solid solution up to high temperature (as high as 1150 deg. C) were also confirmed.

  12. On the global economic potentials and marginal costs of non-renewable resources and the price dynamics of energy commodities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mercure, Jean-Francois

    2013-01-01

    A model is presented in this work for simulating endogenously the evolution of the marginal costs of production of energy carriers from non-renewable resources, their consumption, depletion pathways and timescales. Such marginal costs can be used to simulate the long term average price formation of energy commodities. Drawing on previous work where a global database of energy resource economic potentials was constructed, this work uses cost distributions of non-renewable resources in order to evaluate global flows of energy commodities. A mathematical framework is given to calculate endogenous flows of energy resources given an exogenous commodity price path. This framework can be used in reverse in order to calculate an exogenous marginal cost of production of energy carriers given an exogenous carrier demand. Using rigid price inelastic assumptions independent of the economy, these two approaches generate limiting scenarios that depict extreme use of natural resources. This is useful to characterise the cur...

  13. Marginal cost of natural gas in developing countries: concepts and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mashayekhi, A.

    1983-01-01

    Many developing nations are facing complex questions regarding the best strategy for developing their domestic gas reserves. The World Bank has addressed these questions in studies on the cost and prices of gas and its optimal allocation among different markets. Based on the average incremental method, an estimate of the marginal cost of natural gas in 10 developing countries proved to be $0.61-1.79/1000 CF or $3.59-10.54/bbl of oil equivalent, far below the border prices of competing fuels in these nations. Moreover, the cost of gas is not expected to rise in these countries within the next 20 years while the reserves/production ratios remain high. The sample involves a variety of gas compositions and production conditions among the countries of Bangladesh, Cameroon, Egypt, India, Morocco, Nigeria, Pakistan, Tanzania, Thailand, and Tunisia.

  14. Ideas underlying quantification of margins and uncertainties(QMU): a white paper.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helton, Jon Craig; Trucano, Timothy Guy; Pilch, Martin M.

    2006-09-01

    This report describes key ideas underlying the application of Quantification of Margins and Uncertainties (QMU) to nuclear weapons stockpile lifecycle decisions at Sandia National Laboratories. While QMU is a broad process and methodology for generating critical technical information to be used in stockpile management, this paper emphasizes one component, which is information produced by computational modeling and simulation. In particular, we discuss the key principles of developing QMU information in the form of Best Estimate Plus Uncertainty, the need to separate aleatory and epistemic uncertainty in QMU, and the risk-informed decision making that is best suited for decisive application of QMU. The paper is written at a high level, but provides a systematic bibliography of useful papers for the interested reader to deepen their understanding of these ideas.

  15. MNSR transient analyses and thermal-hydraulic safety margins for HEU and LEU cores using PARET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, Arne P. [RERTR Program, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Jonah, S.A. [Centre for Energy Research and Training, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, P.M.B. 1014 (Nigeria)

    2008-07-15

    Thermal-hydraulic performance characteristics of Miniature Neutron Source Reactors under long-term steady-state and transient conditions are investigated. Safety margins and limiting conditions attained during these events are determined. Modeling extensions are presented that enable the PARET/ANL code to realistically track primary loop heatup, heat exchange to the pool, and heat loss from the pool to air over the pool. Comparisons are made of temperature predictions for HEU and LEU fueled cores under transient conditions. Results are obtained using three different natural convection heat transfer correlations: the original (PARET/ANL version 5), Churchill-Chu, and an experiment- based correlation from the China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). The MNSR, either fueled by HEU or by LEU, satisfies the design limits for long-term transient operation. (author)

  16. Marginal instability threshold condition of the aperiodic ordinary mode in equal-mass plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vafin, S.; Schlickeiser, R.; Yoon, P. H.

    2014-10-15

    The purely growing ordinary (O) mode instability for counter-streaming bi-Maxwellian plasma particle distribution functions has recently received renewed attention due to its importance for the solar wind plasma. Here, the analytical marginal instability condition is derived for magnetized plasmas consisting of equal-mass charged particles, distributed in counter-streams with equal temperatures. The equal-mass composition assumption enormously facilitates the theoretical analysis due to the equality of the values of the electron and positron (positive and negative ion) plasma and gyrofrequencies. The existence of a new instability domain of the O-mode at small plasma beta values is confirmed, when the parallel counter-stream free energy exceeds the perpendicular bi-Maxwellian free energy.

  17. RECONSTRUCTING PALEO-SMT POSITIONS ON THE CASCADIA MARGIN USING MAGNETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Joel; Phillips, Stephen

    2014-09-30

    Magnetic susceptibility (?) is a mixed signal in marine sediments, representing primary depositional and secondary diagenetic processes. Production of hydrogen sulfide via anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) at the sulfate-methane transition (SMT) and organoclastic sulfate reduction above the SMT can result in the dissolution of iron oxides, altering ? in sediments in methane gas and gas hydrate bearing regions. We investigated records of ? on the Cascadia margin (ODP Sites 1249 and 1252; IODP Site 1325) using a Zr/Rb heavy mineral proxy from XRF core scanning to identify intervals of primary detrital magnetic susceptibility and intervals and predict intervals affected by magnetite dissolutions. We also measured total sulfur content, grain size distributions, total organic carbon (TOC) content, and magnetic mineral assemblage. The upper 100 m of Site 1252 contains a short interval of ? driven by primary magnetite, with multiple intervals (> 90 m total) of decreased ? correlated with elevated sulfur content, consistent with dissolution of magnetite and re-precipitation of pyrite. In the upper 90 m of Site 1249, ? is almost entirely altered by diagenetic processes, with much of the low ? explained by a high degree of pyritization, and some intervals affected by the precipitation of magnetic iron sulfides. At Site 1325, ? between 0-20 and 51-73 mbsf represents primary mineralogy, and in the interval 24-51 mbsf, ? may be reduced due to pyritization. This integrated approach allows for a prediction of primary ? and the amount of ? loss at each site when compared to actual ? measurements. In the case of magnetite dissolution and full pyritization, these drawdowns in ? are supported by sulfur measurements, and the exposure times of magnetite to hydrogen sulfide can be modeled. The presence of methane and methane hydrates at these sites, as well as large variations in TOC content, suggest that the past migration rates of the SMT and variation in sulfate reduction rates may influence ? alteration along the Cascadia margin.

  18. SU-E-T-36: An Investigation of the Margin From CTV to PTV Using Retraction Method for Cervical Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, D; Chen, J; Hao, Y; Liao, C; Huang, Y; Mo, Y; Wei, Y [The People's Hospital of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, Nanning, Guangxi (China)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This work employs the retraction method to compute and evaluate the margin from CTV to PTV based on the influence of target dosimetry of setup errors during cervical carcinoma patients treatment. Methods: Sixteen patients with cervical cancer were treated by Elekta synergy and received a total of 305 KV-CBCT images. The iso-center of the initial plans were changed according to the setup errors to simulate radiotherapy and then recalculated the dose distribution using leaf sequences and MUs for individual plans. The margin from CTV to PTV will be concluded both by the method of retracting (Fixed the PTV of the original plan, and retract PTV a certain distance defined as simulative organization CTVnx. The minimum distance value from PTV to CTVnx which get specified doses, namely guarantee at least 99% CTV volume can receive the dose of 95%, is the margin CTV to PTV we found) and the former formula method. Results: (1)The setup errors of 16 patients in X, Y and Z directions were(1.13±2.94) mm,(?1.63±7.13) mm,(?0.65±2.25) mm. (2) The distance between CTVx and PTV was 5, 9 and 3mm in X, Y and Z directions According to 2.5+0.7?. (3) Transplantation plans displayed 99% of CTVx10- CTVx7 and received 95% of prescription dose, but CTVx6- CTVx3 departed from standard of clinic.In order to protect normal tissues, we selected 7mm as the minimum value of the margin from CTV to PTV. Conclusion: We have test an retraction method for the margin from CTV to PTV evaluation. The retraction method is more reliable than the formula method for calculating the margin from the CTV to the PTV, because it represented practice of treatment, and increasing a new method in this field.

  19. The effects of a marginal intake of magnesium with soy protein concentrate on growth, gestation, and lactation in the rat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLaughlin, Cynthia Anne

    1986-01-01

    THE EFFECTS OF A MARGINAL INTAKE OF MAGNESIUM WITH SOY PROTEIN CONCENTRATE ON GROWTH, GESTATION, AND LACTATION IN THE RAT A Thesis by CYNTHIA ANNE MCLAUGHLIN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 19B6 Major Subject: Nutrrtion THE EFFECTS OF A MARGINAL INTAKE OF MAGNESIUM WITH SOY PROTEIN CONCENTRATE ON GROWTH, GESTATION, AND LACTATION IN THE RAT A Thesis by CYNTHIA ANNE MCLAUGHLIN Approved...

  20. Energy Department Announces Funding to Access Higher Quality...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Department Announces Funding to Access Higher Quality Wind Resources and Lower Costs Energy Department Announces Funding to Access Higher Quality Wind Resources and Lower...

  1. Projections of the impact of expansion of domestic heavy oil production on the U.S. refining industry from 1990 to 2010. Topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Ramzel, E.B.; Strycker, A.R.; Guariguata, G.; Salmen, F.G.

    1994-12-01

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity) production. This report provides a compendium of the United States refining industry and analyzes the industry by Petroleum Administration for Defense District (PADD) and by ten smaller refining areas. The refining capacity, oil source and oil quality are analyzed, and projections are made for the U.S. refining industry for the years 1990 to 2010. The study used publicly available data as background. A linear program model of the U.S. refining industry was constructed and validated using 1990 U.S. refinery performance. Projections of domestic oil production (decline) and import of crude oil (increases) were balanced to meet anticipated demand to establish a base case for years 1990 through 2010. The impact of additional domestic heavy oil production, (300 MB/D to 900 MB/D, originating in select areas of the U.S.) on the U.S. refining complex was evaluated. This heavy oil could reduce the import rate and the balance of payments by displacing some imported, principally Mid-east, medium crude. The construction cost for refining units to accommodate this additional domestic heavy oil production in both the low and high volume scenarios is about 7 billion dollars for bottoms conversion capacity (delayed coking) with about 50% of the cost attributed to compliance with the Clean Air Act Amendment of 1990.

  2. Study of deactivation and regeneration of catalysts used in the LC-fining of solvent refined coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, C.W. (Auburn Univ., AL); Guin, J.A.; Nalitham, R.; mohsin, A.; Tarrer, A.R.; Potts, J.D.; Hastings, K.E.

    1981-03-29

    Batch experiments as well as results from LC-Fining catalytic upgrading of coal extracts indicate deactivation of the Shell 324 Ni/Mo catalyst in the presence of solvent refined coal (SRC). At increased levels of SRC loading, deactivation increases. The chief cause of catalyst deactivation appears to be coking. The Shell 324 catalyst can be substantially regenerated after the upgrading reaction by medium temperature ashing followed by presulfiding.

  3. Innovated Higher Criticism for Detecting Sparse Signals in Correlated Noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Jiashun

    - though first proposed in cases where the noise variables are independent, Higher Criti- cism also has

  4. Algebra+Homotopy=Higher structures Operadic homotopical algebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallette, Bruno

    Algebra+Homotopy=Higher structures Operadic homotopical algebra Rewriting method Higher Algebra via-Louis Curien (Venezia, September 10, 2013) Bruno Vallette (Universit´e Nice Sophia-Antipolis) Higher Algebra via Rewriting of Trees #12;Algebra+Homotopy=Higher structures Operadic homotopical algebra Rewriting

  5. Analysis of Post-Kyoto CO2 Emissions Trading Using Marginal Abatement Curves A. Denny Ellerman and Annelne Decaux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Analysis of Post-Kyoto CO2 Emissions Trading Using Marginal Abatement Curves A. Denny Ellerman the advantages of emissions trading. In this paper, the authors derive MACs from EPPA, the MIT Joint Program the benefits of emissions trading in achieving the emission reduction targets implied by the Kyoto Protocol

  6. Surface uplift, fluvial incision, and geodynamics of plateau evolution, from the western margin of the Central Andean plateau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schildgen, Taylor F. (Taylor Frances)

    2008-01-01

    The Colca-Majes and Cotahuasi-Ocona rivers in southwest Peru that cut through the western margin of the Andean plateau en route to the Pacific Ocean incised canyons over 3 km deep in response to late Cenozoic surface uplift. ...

  7. Late-Pliocene timing of Corinth (Greece) rift-margin fault migration M.R. Leeder a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Late-Pliocene timing of Corinth (Greece) rift-margin fault migration M.R. Leeder a, , G.H. Mack b Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003, USA c NERC Isotope Geosciences Laboratory, Kingsley Dunham Centre, Keyworth, Nottingham, NG12 5GG, UK d Geochronology Research Laboratory, New Mexico Bureau

  8. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, VOL. 29, NO. 1, JANUARY 2014 203 Distribution Locational Marginal Pricing for Optimal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oren, Shmuel S.

    Marginal Pricing for Optimal Electric Vehicle Charging Management Ruoyang Li, Student Member, IEEE, Qiuwei Wu, Member, IEEE, and Shmuel S. Oren, Fellow, IEEE Abstract--This paper presents an integrated vehicle (EV) loads in future power systems. In the proposed approach, the distribution system op- erator

  9. Project Overview and Motivation Given the burgeoning interest in the Cascadia margin from a variety of NSF-supported

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holbrook, W. Steven

    accessible to the Langseth seismic system on the margin, (3) well-constrained site selection for the future 3D MCS box, (4) a timely "test run" of the open-participation, open-access model for Langseth to the lack of such regional 2-D data. Finally, the sole research vessel capable of completing this work

  10. Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization Case Study: Selection of Electrical Equipment to Be Subjected to Environmental Qualification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. P. Blanchard; R. W. Youngblood

    2014-06-01

    The Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) pathway of the DOE’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program focuses on advancing the state of the art in safety analysis and risk assessment to support decision-making on nuclear power plant operation well beyond the originally designed lifetime of the plants (i.e., beyond 60 years). Among the issues being addressed in RISMC is the significance of SSC aging and how confident we are about our understanding of its impact on the margin between the loads SSCs are expected to see during normal operation and accident conditions, and the SSC capacities (their ability to resist those loads) as the SSCs age. In this paper, a summary is provided of a case study that examines SSC aging from an environmental qualification (EQ) perspective. The case study illustrates how the state of knowledge regarding SSC margin can be characterized given the overall integrated plant design, and was developed to demonstrate a method for deciding on which cables to focus, which cables are not so important from an environmental qualification margin standpoint, and what plant design features or operating characteristics determine the role that environmental qualification plays in establishing a safety case on which decisions regarding margin can be made. The selection of cables for which demonstration of margin with respect to aging and environmental challenges uses a technique known as Prevention Analysis. Prevention Analysis is a Boolean method for optimal selection of SSCs (that is, those combinations of SSCs both necessary and sufficient to meet a predetermined selection criterion) in a manner that allows demonstration that plant-level safety can be demonstrated by the collection of selected SSCs alone. Choosing the set of SSCs that is necessary and sufficient to satisfy the safety objectives, and demonstrating that the safety objectives can be met effectively, determines where resources are best allocated to assure SSC performance margin. The paper describes the resulting component types that were selected by Prevention Analysis and identifies the accident sequence characteristics that cause these component types to be important from an EQ and aging perspective (and, hence, worthwhile evaluating the extent of safety margin). In addition, component types not selected as needing significant margin from an EQ and aging perspective are discussed and an engineering rationale is developed justifying the lack of need to apply resources to demonstrating margin for these component types. This rationale is in terms of design features of the plant and operating characteristics that make these component types less important from an EQ and aging perspective. While the case study focuses on EQ and aging of equipment and cables located inside the containment of this PWR, the prevention analysis method is demonstrated to be an effective technique for identification of minimal collections of components that would be effective in managing safety for a variety of issues associated with aging and long-term operation of the fleet of plants.

  11. Journal of the Geological Society, London, Vol. 162, 2005, pp. 135146. Printed in Great Britain. Subsidence history of the north Indian continental margin, ZanskarLadakh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, A. B. "Tony"

    . 135 Subsidence history of the north Indian continental margin, Zanskar­Ladakh Himalaya, NW India R. I of the tectonic subsidence and uplift through the pre- collisional history of the margin have been constructed.2. This model accounts for the general exponential decrease in the backstripped tectonic subsidence. The model

  12. New Views of the U.S. Atlantic Margin Mapped for UNCLOS Applications. James V. Gardner, Larry A. Mayer, Andy Armstrong, University of New Hampshire,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    areas of the lower slope. The large-area mapping required to support an UNCLOS submission, generates for the next generation of continental-margin studies. As part of the U.S. UNCLOS effort, the entire U to channels farther upslope. #12;Failures are common in the northern 80\\% of the margin. Some failures

  13. Stochastic modeling and survival analysis of marginally trapped neutrons for a magnetic trapping neutron lifetime experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. J. Coakley; M. S. Dewey; M. G. Huber; P. R. Huffman; C. R. Huffer; D. E. Marley; H. P. Mumm; C. M. O'Shaughnessy; K. W. Schelhammer; A. K. Thompson; A. T. Yue

    2015-08-10

    In a variety of neutron lifetime experiments, in addition to $\\beta-$decay, neutrons can be lost by other mechanisms including wall losses. Failure to account for these other loss mechanisms produces systematic measurement error and associated systematic uncertainties in neutron lifetime measurements. In this work, we develop a physical model for neutron wall losses and construct a competing risks survival analysis model to account for losses due to the joint effect of $\\beta-$decay losses, wall losses of marginally trapped neutrons, and an additional absorption mechanism. We determine the survival probability function associated with the wall loss mechanism by a Monte Carlo method. Based on a fit of the competing risks model to a subset of the NIST experimental data, we determine the mean lifetime of trapped neutrons to be approximately 700 s -- considerably less than the current best estimate of (880.1 $\\pm$ 1.1) s promulgated by the Particle Data Group [1]. Currently, experimental studies are underway to determine if this discrepancy can be explained by neutron capture by ${}^3$He impurities in the trapping volume. Analysis of the full NIST data will be presented in a later publication.

  14. Shutdown Margin for High Conversion BWRs Operating in Th-233U Fuel Cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaniv Shaposhnik; Eugene Shwageraus; Ezra Elias

    2013-09-27

    Several reactivity control system design options are explored in order to satisfy shutdown margin (SDM) requirements in a high conversion BWRs operating in Th-233U fuel cycle (Th-RBWR). The studied has an axially heterogeneous fuel assembly structure with a single fissile zone sandwiched between two fertile blanket zones. The utilization of an originally suggested RBWR Y-shape control rod in Th-RBWR is shown to be insufficient for maintaining adequate SDM to balance the high negative reactivity feedbacks, while maintaining fuel breeding potential, core power rating, and minimum Critical Power Ratio (CPR). Instead, an alternative assembly design, also relying on heterogeneous fuel zoning, is proposed for achieving fissile inventory ratio (FIR) above unity, adequate SDM and meeting minimum CPR limit at thermal core output matching the ABWR power. The new concept was modeled as a single 3-dimensional fuel assembly having reflective radial boundaries, using the BGCore system, which consists of the MCNP code coupled with fuel depletion and thermo-hydraulic feedback modules.

  15. Margin of Safety Definition and Examples Used in Safety Basis Documents and the USQ Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beaulieu, R. A.

    2013-10-03

    The Nuclear Safety Management final rule, 10 CFR 830, provides an undefined term, margin of safety (MOS). Safe harbors listed in 10 CFR 830, Table 2, such as DOE?STD?3009 use but do not define the term. This lack of definition has created the need for the definition. This paper provides a definition of MOS and documents examples of MOS as applied in a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) approved safety basis for an existing nuclear facility. If we understand what MOS looks like regarding Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) parameters, then it helps us compare against other parameters that do not involve a MOS. This paper also documents parameters that are not MOS. These criteria could be used to determine if an MOS exists in safety basis documents. This paper helps DOE, including the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and its contractors responsible for the safety basis improve safety basis documents and the unreviewed safety question (USQ) process with respect to MOS.

  16. Heat Flow and Gas Hydrates on the Continental Margin of India: Building on Results from NGHP Expedition 01

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trehu, Anne; Kannberg, Peter

    2011-06-30

    The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Expedition 01 presented the unique opportunity to constrain regional heat flow derived from seismic observations by using drilling data in three regions on the continental margin of India. The seismic bottom simulating reflection (BSR) is a well-documented feature in hydrate bearing sediments, and can serve as a proxy for apparent heat flow if data are available to estimate acoustic velocity and density in water and sediments, thermal conductivity, and seafloor temperature. Direct observations of temperature at depth and physical properties of the sediment obtained from drilling can be used to calibrate the seismic observations, decreasing the uncertainty of the seismically-derived estimates. Anomalies in apparent heat flow can result from a variety of sources, including sedimentation, erosion, topographic refraction and fluid flow. We constructed apparent heat flow maps for portions of the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin, the Mahanadi basin, and the Andaman basin and modeled anomalies using 1-D conductive thermal models. Apparent heat flow values in the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin and Mahanadi basin are generally 0.035 to 0.055 watts per square meter (W/m2). The borehole data show an increase in apparent heat flow as water depth increases from 900 to 1500 m. In the SW part of the seismic grid, 1D modeling of the effect of sedimentation on heat flow shows that ~50% of the observed increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth can be attributed to trapping of sediments behind a "toe-thrust" ridge that is forming along the seaward edge of a thick, rapidly accumulating deltaic sediment pile. The remainder of the anomaly can be explained either by a decrease in thermal conductivity of the sediments filling the slope basin or by lateral advection of heat through fluid flow along stratigraphic horizons within the basin and through flexural faults in the crest of the anticline. Such flow probably plays a role in bringing methane into the ridge formed by the toe-thrust. Because of the small anomaly due to this process and the uncertainty in thermal conductivity, we did not model this process explicitly. In the NE part of the K-G basin seismic grid, a number of local heat flow lows and highs are observed, which can be attributed to topographic refraction and to local fluid flow along faults, respectively. No regional anomaly can be resolved. Because of lack of continuity between the K-G basin sites within the seismic grid and those ~70 km to the NE in water depths of 1200 to 1500 m, we do not speculate on the reason for higher heat flow at these depths. The Mahanadi basin results, while limited in geographic extent, are similar to those for the KG basin. The Andaman basin exhibits much lower apparent heat flow values, ranging from 0.015 to 0.025 W/m2. Heat flow here also appears to increase with increasing water depth. The very low heat flow here is among the lowest heat flow observed anywhere and gives rise to a very thick hydrate stability zone in the sediments. Through 1D models of sedimentation (with extremely high sedimentation rates as a proxy for tectonic thickening), we concluded that the very low heat flow can probably be attributed to the combined effects of high sedimentation rate, low thermal conductivity, tectonic thickening of sediments and the cooling effect of a subducting plate in a subduction zone forearc. Like for the K-G basin, much of the local variability can be attributed to topography. The regional increase in heat flow with water depth remains unexplained because the seismic grid available to us did not extend far enough to define the local tectonic setting of the slope basin controlling this observational pattern. The results are compared to results from other margins, both active and passive. While an increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth is widely observed, it is likely a result of different processes in different places. The very low heat flow due to sedimentation and tectonics in the Andaman basin is at the low end of glob

  17. Heat Flow and Gas Hydrates on the Continental Margin of India: Building on Results from NGHP Expedition 01

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anne Trehu; Peter Kannberg

    2011-06-30

    The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Expedition 01 presented the unique opportunity to constrain regional heat flow derived from seismic observations by using drilling data in three regions on the continental margin of India. The seismic bottom simulating reflection (BSR) is a well-documented feature in hydrate bearing sediments, and can serve as a proxy for apparent heat flow if data are available to estimate acoustic velocity and density in water and sediments, thermal conductivity, and seafloor temperature. Direct observations of temperature at depth and physical properties of the sediment obtained from drilling can be used to calibrate the seismic observations, decreasing the uncertainty of the seismically-derived estimates. Anomalies in apparent heat flow can result from a variety of sources, including sedimentation, erosion, topographic refraction and fluid flow. We constructed apparent heat flow maps for portions of the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin, the Mahanadi basin, and the Andaman basin and modeled anomalies using 1-D conductive thermal models. Apparent heat flow values in the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin and Mahanadi basin are generally 0.035 to 0.055 watts per square meter (W/m{sup 2}). The borehole data show an increase in apparent heat flow as water depth increases from 900 to 1500 m. In the SW part of the seismic grid, 1D modeling of the effect of sedimentation on heat flow shows that {approx}50% of the observed increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth can be attributed to trapping of sediments behind a 'toe-thrust' ridge that is forming along the seaward edge of a thick, rapidly accumulating deltaic sediment pile. The remainder of the anomaly can be explained either by a decrease in thermal conductivity of the sediments filling the slope basin or by lateral advection of heat through fluid flow along stratigraphic horizons within the basin and through flexural faults in the crest of the anticline. Such flow probably plays a role in bringing methane into the ridge formed by the toe-thrust. Because of the small anomaly due to this process and the uncertainty in thermal conductivity, we did not model this process explicitly. In the NE part of the K-G basin seismic grid, a number of local heat flow lows and highs are observed, which can be attributed to topographic refraction and to local fluid flow along faults, respectively. No regional anomaly can be resolved. Because of lack of continuity between the K-G basin sites within the seismic grid and those {approx}70 km to the NE in water depths of 1200 to 1500 m, we do not speculate on the reason for higher heat flow at these depths. The Mahanadi basin results, while limited in geographic extent, are similar to those for the K-G basin. The Andaman basin exhibits much lower apparent heat flow values, ranging from 0.015 to 0.025 W/m{sup 2}. Heat flow here also appears to increase with increasing water depth. The very low heat flow here is among the lowest heat flow observed anywhere and gives rise to a very thick hydrate stability zone in the sediments. Through 1D models of sedimentation (with extremely high sedimentation rates as a proxy for tectonic thickening), we concluded that the very low heat flow can probably be attributed to the combined effects of high sedimentation rate, low thermal conductivity, tectonic thickening of sediments and the cooling effect of a subducting plate in a subduction zone forearc. Like for the K-G basin, much of the local variability can be attributed to topography. The regional increase in heat flow with water depth remains unexplained because the seismic grid available to us did not extend far enough to define the local tectonic setting of the slope basin controlling this observational pattern. The results are compared to results from other margins, both active and passive. While an increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth is widely observed, it is likely a result of different processes in different places. The very low heat flow due to sedimentation and tectonics in the Andaman basi

  18. SUPERCONNECTIONS AND HIGHER INDEX THEORY Department of Mathematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lott, John

    SUPERCONNECTIONS AND HIGHER INDEX THEORY John Lott Department of Mathematics University of Michigan of the "higher" index of a Dirac-type operator on M. Using superconnections, we give a heat equation proof

  19. Higher Derivative Corrections to O-Plane Actions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhao

    2014-11-17

    Higher derivative corrections to effective actions are very important and of great interest in string theory. The aim of this dissertation is to develop a method to constrain the higher derivative corrections to O-plane ...

  20. Learning to Grow? Connecting Higher Education and Economic Development 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutchinson, Annabelle

    2014-09-19

    Across the United States today, various groups of people are asking similar questions regarding the state of higher education policy. Policy makers at state capitals are questioning the value of higher education in their ...

  1. Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy Density Exceeding 500WhL Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy Density Exceeding 500WhL 2012 DOE...

  2. NEURODYNAMIC CORRELATES OF HIGHER COGNITION AND CONSCIOUSNESS — EDITORIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kozma, Robert; Caulfield, H John

    2009-01-01

    Higher Cognitive Functions was provided by World Scientific.Access to World Scientific is possible through the

  3. UPGRADING THE CEBAF INJECTOR WITH A NEW BOOSTER, HIGHER VOLTAGE GUN, AND HIGHER FINAL ENERGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reza Kazimi, Arne Freyberger, Alicia Hofler, Andrew Hutton, Fay Hannon

    2012-07-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) accelerator at Jefferson Lab will be upgraded from 6 GeV to 12 GeV in the next few years. To meet the requirement of the new machine and to take the opportunity to improve the beam quality, the CEBAF injector will be upgraded with a higher voltage gun, a new booster, and a new accelerating RF module. The CEBAF injector creates and accelerates three beams at different currents simultaneously. The beams are interleaved, each at one third of the RF frequency, traveling through the same beam line. The higher voltage gun will lower the space charge effects. The new booster with optimized beam dynamics will complete the bunching process and provide initial acceleration matched to the new gun voltage. Using our latest SRF design, the new booster has significantly lower x/y coupling effects that should improve our beam setup and operation for the highly sensitive parity experiments scheduled for the CEBAF's future. Finally, the new accelerating RF module will roughly double the injector final energy to match the rest of the 12 GeV accelerator. In this paper we will provide more detail about this upgrade.

  4. The North American Atlantic outer continental margin landslides data base: Summary and observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booth, J.S.; O'Leary, D.W. (Geological Survey, Woods Hole, MA (USA))

    1990-06-01

    A compilation of published data from 179 Quaternary mass movement features was analyzed to determine the common attributes of the slides, to reveal general trends, and to classify and compare slide types. The data set was derived primarily from high-resolution, seismic-reflection data and sidescan-sonar images. In general, evidence of slope failure is found throughout the length of the margin and in all water depths. Slides have occurred on slope angles ranging from 1{degree} to 30{degree} (avg.{approximately}5{degree}); they vary in width from 0.2 to 50 km (avg. {approximately}4 km) and in length from 0.3 to 380 km (avg. {approximately}10 km) and have been reported to be as thick as 650 m. They are slightly more prevalent on open slopes than in other physiographic settings (e.g., canyons, ridges, spurs) and more commonly translational than rotational (i.e., slumps). The slides show no striking affinity for a particular depth range, either in the data set as a whole or when analyzed in terms of physiographic setting, size, slope angle, or other basis for classification. Comparison of slides found on the open slope with those found within canyons shows that the average open slope slide tends to occur at lower slope angles and is much larger (by an order of magnitude) than the average canyon slide. Regardless of the physiographic setting or other characteristic, large-scale slides (area >100 km{sup 2}) rather than small-scale slides (area <10 km{sup 2}) tend to be associated with gentle slopes ({approximately}3-4{degree}) Similarly, slides generated on steep slopes ({>=}10{degree}), regardless of other attributes, tend to be small (avg. area <5 km{sup 2}). With few exceptions, comparisons between slide categories show only minor differences.

  5. Quantification of margins and uncertainty for risk-informed decision analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvin, Kenneth Fredrick

    2010-09-01

    QMU stands for 'Quantification of Margins and Uncertainties'. QMU is a basic framework for consistency in integrating simulation, data, and/or subject matter expertise to provide input into a risk-informed decision-making process. QMU is being applied to a wide range of NNSA stockpile issues, from performance to safety. The implementation of QMU varies with lab and application focus. The Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Program develops validated computational simulation tools to be applied in the context of QMU. QMU provides input into a risk-informed decision making process. The completeness aspect of QMU can benefit from the structured methodology and discipline of quantitative risk assessment (QRA)/probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). In characterizing uncertainties it is important to pay attention to the distinction between those arising from incomplete knowledge ('epistemic' or systematic), and those arising from device-to-device variation ('aleatory' or random). The national security labs should investigate the utility of a probability of frequency (PoF) approach in presenting uncertainties in the stockpile. A QMU methodology is connected if the interactions between failure modes are included. The design labs should continue to focus attention on quantifying uncertainties that arise from epistemic uncertainties such as poorly-modeled phenomena, numerical errors, coding errors, and systematic uncertainties in experiment. The NNSA and design labs should ensure that the certification plan for any RRW is supported by strong, timely peer review and by an ongoing, transparent QMU-based documentation and analysis in order to permit a confidence level necessary for eventual certification.

  6. Fresh Water Increased temperature means higher proportion of water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houston, Paul L.

    Fresh Water Increased temperature means higher proportion of water falling on surface higher evaporation higher rainfall greater intensity of floods and droughts. Water use has grown four on How much storage compared to average flow Demand as percentage of supply How much ground water is used

  7. Page 1 of 3 South Carolina Commission on Higher Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunkle, Tom

    Page 1 of 3 South Carolina Commission on Higher Education Nonpublic Postsecondary Institution the South Carolina Commission on Higher Education. The school director will provide the students with the necessary form. #12;Page 3 of 3 South Carolina Commission on Higher Education Nonpublic Postsecondary

  8. ,"U.S. Sales for Resale Refiner Residual Fuel Oil and No. 4 Fuel Sales Volumes"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price to fall to $3.43U.S.longecReformulated Gasoline RefinerResidual Fuel

  9. Liver segmentation in contrast enhanced CT data using graph cuts and interactive 3D segmentation refinement methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beichel, Reinhard; Bornik, Alexander; Bauer, Christian; Sorantin, Erich [Departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Internal Medicine, Iowa Institute for Biomedical Imaging, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Institute for Computer Graphics and Vision, Graz University of Technology, Inffeldgasse 16, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Iowa Institute for Biomedical Imaging, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Department of Radiology, Medical University Graz, Auenbruggerplatz 34, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Liver segmentation is an important prerequisite for the assessment of liver cancer treatment options like tumor resection, image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT), radiofrequency ablation, etc. The purpose of this work was to evaluate a new approach for liver segmentation. Methods: A graph cuts segmentation method was combined with a three-dimensional virtual reality based segmentation refinement approach. The developed interactive segmentation system allowed the user to manipulate volume chunks and/or surfaces instead of 2D contours in cross-sectional images (i.e, slice-by-slice). The method was evaluated on twenty routinely acquired portal-phase contrast enhanced multislice computed tomography (CT) data sets. An independent reference was generated by utilizing a currently clinically utilized slice-by-slice segmentation method. After 1 h of introduction to the developed segmentation system, three experts were asked to segment all twenty data sets with the proposed method. Results: Compared to the independent standard, the relative volumetric segmentation overlap error averaged over all three experts and all twenty data sets was 3.74%. Liver segmentation required on average 16 min of user interaction per case. The calculated relative volumetric overlap errors were not found to be significantly different [analysis of variance (ANOVA) test, p = 0.82] between experts who utilized the proposed 3D system. In contrast, the time required by each expert for segmentation was found to be significantly different (ANOVA test, p = 0.0009). Major differences between generated segmentations and independent references were observed in areas were vessels enter or leave the liver and no accepted criteria for defining liver boundaries exist. In comparison, slice-by-slice based generation of the independent standard utilizing a live wire tool took 70.1 min on average. A standard 2D segmentation refinement approach applied to all twenty data sets required on average 38.2 min of user interaction and resulted in statistically not significantly different segmentation error indices (ANOVA test, significance level of 0.05). Conclusions: All three experts were able to produce liver segmentations with low error rates. User interaction time savings of up to 71% compared to a 2D refinement approach demonstrate the utility and potential of our approach. The system offers a range of different tools to manipulate segmentation results, and some users might benefit from a longer learning phase to develop efficient segmentation refinement strategies. The presented approach represents a generally applicable segmentation approach that can be applied to many medical image segmentation problems.

  10. A Freestream-Preserving High-Order Finite-Volume Method for Mapped Grids with Adaptive-Mesh Refinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guzik, S; McCorquodale, P; Colella, P

    2011-12-16

    A fourth-order accurate finite-volume method is presented for solving time-dependent hyperbolic systems of conservation laws on mapped grids that are adaptively refined in space and time. Novel considerations for formulating the semi-discrete system of equations in computational space combined with detailed mechanisms for accommodating the adapting grids ensure that conservation is maintained and that the divergence of a constant vector field is always zero (freestream-preservation property). Advancement in time is achieved with a fourth-order Runge-Kutta method.

  11. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Technical Basis Guide Describing How to Perform Safety Margin Configuration Risk Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith; James Knudsen; Bentley Harwood

    2013-08-01

    The INL has carried out a demonstration of the RISMC approach for the purpose of configuration risk management. We have shown how improved accuracy and realism can be achieved by simulating changes in risk – as a function of different configurations – in order to determine safety margins as the plant is modified. We described the various technical issues that play a role in these configuration-based calculations with the intent that future applications can take advantage of the analysis benefits while avoiding some of the technical pitfalls that are found for these types of calculations. Specific recommendations have been provided on a variety of topics aimed at improving the safety margin analysis and strengthening the technical basis behind the analysis process.

  12. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Risk-Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) PathwayTechnical Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith; Cristian Rabiti; Richard Martineau

    2012-11-01

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). As the current Light Water Reactor (LWR) NPPs age beyond 60 years, there are possibilities for increased frequency of Systems, Structures, and Components (SSCs) degradations or failures that initiate safety-significant events, reduce existing accident mitigation capabilities, or create new failure modes. Plant designers commonly “over-design” portions of NPPs and provide robustness in the form of redundant and diverse engineered safety features to ensure that, even in the case of well-beyond design basis scenarios, public health and safety will be protected with a very high degree of assurance. This form of defense-in-depth is a reasoned response to uncertainties and is often referred to generically as “safety margin.” Historically, specific safety margin provisions have been formulated, primarily based on “engineering judgment.”

  13. Soil Carbon Change and Net Energy Associated with Biofuel Production on Marginal Lands: A Regional Modeling Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandaru, Varaprasad; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Manowitz, David H.; Link, Robert P.; Zhang, Xuesong; Post, W. M.

    2013-12-01

    The use of marginal lands (MLs) for biofuel production has been contemplated as a promising solution for meeting biofuel demands. However, there have been concerns with spatial location of MLs, their inherent biofuel potential, and possible environmental consequences with the cultivation of energy crops. Here, we developed a new quantitative approach that integrates high-resolution land cover and land productivity maps and uses conditional probability density functions for analyzing land use patterns as a function of land productivity to classify the agricultural lands. We subsequently applied this method to determine available productive croplands (P-CLs) and non-crop marginal lands (NC-MLs) in a nine-county Southern Michigan. Furthermore, Spatially Explicit Integrated Modeling Framework (SEIMF) using EPIC (Environmental Policy Integrated Climate) was used to understand the net energy (NE) and soil organic carbon (SOC) implications of cultivating different annual and perennial production systems.

  14. Study on Evaluation of Project Management Data for Decommissioning of Uranium Refining and Conversion Plant - 12234

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Usui, Hideo; Izumo, Sari; Tachibana, Mitsuo; Shibahara, Yuji; Morimoto, Yasuyuki; Tokuyasu, Takashi; Takahashi, Nobuo; Tanaka, Yoshio; Sugitsue, Noritake

    2012-07-01

    Some of nuclear facilities that would no longer be required have been decommissioned in JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency). A lot of nuclear facilities have to be decommissioned in JAEA in near future. To implement decommissioning of nuclear facilities, it was important to make a rational decommissioning plan. Therefore, project management data evaluation system for dismantling activities (PRODIA code) has been developed, and will be useful for making a detailed decommissioning plan for an object facility. Dismantling of dry conversion facility in the uranium refining and conversion plant (URCP) at Ningyo-toge began in 2008. During dismantling activities, project management data such as manpower and amount of waste generation have been collected. Such collected project management data has been evaluated and used to establish a calculation formula to calculate manpower for dismantling equipment of chemical process and calculate manpower for using a green house (GH) which was a temporary structure for preventing the spread of contaminants during dismantling. In the calculation formula to calculate project management data related to dismantling of equipment, the relation of dismantling manpower to each piece of equipment was evaluated. Furthermore, the relation of dismantling manpower to each chemical process was evaluated. The results showed promise for evaluating dismantling manpower with respect to each chemical process. In the calculation formula to calculate project management data related to use of the GH, relations of GH installation manpower and removal manpower to GH footprint were evaluated. Furthermore, the calculation formula for secondary waste generation was established. In this study, project management data related to dismantling of equipment and use of the GH were evaluated and analyzed. The project management data, manpower for dismantling of equipment, manpower for installation and removal of GH, and secondary waste generation from GH were considered. Establishment of the calculation formula for dismantling of each kind of equipment makes it possible to evaluate manpower for dismantling the whole facility. However, it is not easy to prepare calculation formula for all kinds of equipment that exist in the facility. Therefore, a simpler evaluation method was considered to calculate manpower based on facility characteristics. The results showed promise for evaluating dismantling manpower with respect to each chemical process. For dismantling of contaminated equipment, a GH has been used for protection of the spread of contamination. The use of a GH increases manpower for installation and removal of GH etc. Moreover, structural materials of the GH such as plastic sheets, adhesive tape become a burnable secondary waste. To create an effective dismantling plan, it is necessary to carefully consider use of a GH preliminarily. Thus, an evaluation method of project management data such as manpower and secondary waste generation was considered. The results showed promise for evaluating project management data of GH by using established calculation formula. (authors)

  15. Deseos de comunidad en el personaje intersticial y marginal: en la novela y el cine de los noventa en México

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moreno, Jose Antonio

    2010-05-31

    tomar soluciones ante contextos cruciales como son los efectos de los medios de comunicación, las enfermedades pandémicas como el SIDA, la migración y la violencia. Así, el personaje intersticial-marginal proporciona en cada escena cultural una visión... aceptarse, sin caer en contradicción, que el personaje intersticial propone con sus actos deseos utópicos en tiempos que son difíciles de advertirlos. De los efectos ocasionados por el neoliberalismo económico que causaron—en toda América Latina—el peor de...

  16. A high-order finite-volume method for hyperbolic conservation laws on locally-refined grids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCorquodale, Peter; Colella, Phillip

    2011-01-28

    We present a fourth-order accurate finite-volume method for solving time-dependent hyperbolic systems of conservation laws on Cartesian grids with multiple levels of refinement. The underlying method is a generalization of that in [5] to nonlinear systems, and is based on using fourth-order accurate quadratures for computing fluxes on faces, combined with fourth-order accurate Runge?Kutta discretization in time. To interpolate boundary conditions at refinement boundaries, we interpolate in time in a manner consistent with the individual stages of the Runge-Kutta method, and interpolate in space by solving a least-squares problem over a neighborhood of each target cell for the coefficients of a cubic polynomial. The method also uses a variation on the extremum-preserving limiter in [8], as well as slope flattening and a fourth-order accurate artificial viscosity for strong shocks. We show that the resulting method is fourth-order accurate for smooth solutions, and is robust in the presence of complex combinations of shocks and smooth flows.

  17. Crystal-structure refinement of zirconium-rich eudialyte and its place among calcium-poor eudialyte-group minerals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aksenov, S. M., E-mail: aks.crys@gmail.com; Rastsvetaeva, R. K. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-15

    The repeated refinement of the crystal structure of zirconium-rich eudialyte based on the X-ray diffraction data set collected earlier revealed new structural features. The trigonal unit-cell parameters are a = 14.222(3) A, c = 30.165(5) A, V = 5283.9 A{sup 3}. The refinement resulted in the reduction of the R factor from 0.045 (2347F > 4{sigma}(F)) to 0.035 (3124F > 3{sigma}(F)). It was found that the ordering of Ca and Fe in six-membered rings leads to the lowering of the symmetry to R3. An excess amount of zirconium (more than three atoms per symmetrically independent unit) is located in the M2 microregion in square and five-vertex polyhedral positions. However, this amount is insufficient to be dominant, and the deficiency of zirconium is compensated for by sodium atoms. Based on the new data, zirconium-rich eudialyte can be assigned to the oneillite subtype, being a zirconium-rich and aluminum variety of raslakite.

  18. A model of the methane cycle, permafrost, and hydrology of the Siberian continental margin

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Archer, D.

    2014-06-03

    A two-dimensional model of a passive continental margin was adapted to the simulation of the methane cycle on Siberian continental shelf and slope, attempting to account for the impacts of glacial/interglacial cycles in sea level, alternately exposing the continental shelf to freezing conditions with deep permafrost formation during glacial times, and immersion in the ocean in interglacial times. The model is used to gauge the impact of the glacial cycles, and potential anthropogenic warming in the deep future, on the atmospheric methane emission flux, and the sensitivities of that flux to processes such as permafrost formation and terrestrial organic carbonmore »(Yedoma) deposition. Hydrological forcing drives a freshening and ventilation of pore waters in areas exposed to the atmosphere, which is not quickly reversed by invasion of seawater upon submergence, since there is no analogous saltwater pump. This hydrological pump changes the salinity enough to affect the stability of permafrost and methane hydrates on the shelf. Permafrost formation inhibits bubble transport through the sediment column, by construction in the model. The impact of permafrost on the methane budget is to replace the bubble flux by offshore groundwater flow containing dissolved methane, rather than accumulating methane for catastrophic release when the permafrost seal fails during warming. By far the largest impact of the glacial/interglacial cycles on the atmospheric methane flux is attenuation by dissolution of bubbles in the ocean when sea level is high. Methane emissions are highest during the regression (soil freezing) part of the cycle, rather than during transgression (thawing). The model-predicted methane flux to the atmosphere in response to a warming climate is small, relative to the global methane production rate, because of the ongoing flooding of the continental shelf. A slight increase due to warming could be completely counteracted by sea level rise on geologic time scales, decreasing the efficiency of bubble transit through the water column. The methane cycle on the shelf responds to climate change on a long time constant of thousands of years, because hydrate is excluded thermodynamically from the permafrost zone by water limitation, leaving the hydrate stability zone at least 300 m below the sediment surface.« less

  19. Rapid assessment of redevelopment potential in marginal oil fields, application to the cut bank field 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chavez Ballesteros, Luis Eladio

    2005-02-17

    Incremental oil, MSTB 34 We attribute these observed waterflood performance characteristics to gravity segregation combined with generally higher permeability at the base of the Cut Bank sand, neither of which are captured in the single-layer synthetic model.... Infill predictions on a single-phase synthetic case showed greater accuracy than results from statistical techniques. The methodology successfully identified infill well locations iv on a synthetic case derived from Cut Bank field, a water-flooded oil...

  20. Massive Gravity from Higher Derivative Gravity with Boundary Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minjoon Park; Lorenzo Sorbo

    2012-10-29

    With an appropriate choice of parameters, a higher derivative theory of gravity can describe a normal massive sector and a ghost massless sector. We show that, when defined on an asymptotically de Sitter spacetime with Dirichlet boundary conditions, such a higher derivative gravity can provide a framework for a unitary theory of massive gravity in four spacetime dimensions. The resulting theory is free not only of higher derivative ghosts but also of the Boulware-Deser mode.

  1. Surface expression of eastern Mediterranean slab dynamics: Neogene topographic and structural evolution of the southwest margin of the Central Anatolian Plateau, Turkey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schildgen, T. F.

    he southwest margin of the Central Anatolian Plateau has experienced multiple phases of topographic growth, including the formation of localized highs prior to the Late Miocene that were later affected by wholesale uplift ...

  2. The Effect of Digital Die Spacer on the Marginal Fit of Cad Pressed Lithium Disilicate Complete Coverage Copings: An SEM Assessment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, James

    2015-04-24

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the marginal fit of pressed IPS e.max copings fabricated from a computer-aided designed and milled PMMA acrylic resin burnout coping of various cement spacer thicknesses. ...

  3. Fostering Academic Success among Latino Men in Higher Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davila Jr., Omar; Berumen, Juan G.; Baquedano-López, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    California Department of Education. (2014). Enrollment byCalifornia’s future: Higher education. San Francisco, CA:report.pdf National Center for Education Statistics. (2015).

  4. Rutgers University in Newark ACenturyofReachingHigher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neimark, Alexander V.

    of Reaching Higher #12;The beer brewery is gone, as are the stables and razor-blade factory. In their places

  5. Subject Benchmark UK Quality Code for Higher Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haase, Markus

    Subject Benchmark Statement UK Quality Code for Higher Education Part A: Setting and maintaining About Subject Benchmark Statements.................................................................................. 2 About this Subject Benchmark Statement

  6. Analysis and correlation of volcanic ash in marine sediments from the Peru Margin, Ocean Drilling Program Leg 201: explosive volcanic cycles of the north-central Andes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Shirley Dawn

    2007-04-25

    -1 ANALYSIS AND CORRELATION OF VOLCANIC ASH IN MARINE SEDIMENTS FROM THE PERU MARGIN, OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 201: EXPLOSIVE VOLCANIC CYCLES OF THE NORTH-CENTRAL ANDES A Thesis by SHIRLEY DAWN HART Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies... MARGIN, OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 201: EXPLOSIVE VOLCANIC CYCLES OF THE NORTH-CENTRAL ANDES A Thesis by SHIRLEY DAWN HART Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  7. Entrainment of marginally stable excitation waves by spatially extended sub-threshold periodic forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph M. Starobin; Vivek Varadarajan

    2011-06-02

    We analyze the effects of spatially extended periodic forcing on the dynamics of one-dimensional excitation waves. Entrainment of unstable primary waves has been studied numerically for different amplitudes and frequencies of additional sub-threshold stimuli. We determined entrainment regimes under which excitation blocks were transformed into consistent 1:1 responses. These responses were spatially homogeneous and synchronized in the entire excitable medium. Compared to primary pulses, pulses entrained by secondary stimulations were stable at considerably shorter periods which decreased at higher amplitudes and greater number of secondary stimuli. Our results suggest a practical methodology for stabilization of excitation in reaction-diffusion media with regions of reduced excitability.

  8. Terrace housing : providing quality in higher-density housing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atthakor, Songpol

    1992-01-01

    The higher demand of higher-density housing in Bangkok due to the rapid growth of the economy and the use of high-performance materials and modern construction methods has changed the forms of housing from low-rise buildings ...

  9. Drivers and Barriers for Implementing Sustainable Development in Higher Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svenningsson, Josef

    #12;Drivers and Barriers for Implementing Sustainable Development in Higher Education Göteborg for Sustainable Development through Higher Education. The authors are responsible for the choice and presentation.unesco.org/education/desd Education for Sustainable Development in Action Technical Paper N° 3 - 2006 Cover design: Helmut Langer (ED

  10. Termination and Reduction Checking for Higher-Order Logic Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pientka, Brigitte

    Termination and Reduction Checking for Higher-Order Logic Programs Brigitte Pientka Department, we present a syntax-directed termination and reduction checker for higher-order logic programs and output of well-moded predicates. These reduction con- straints are exploited during termination checking

  11. Termination and Reduction Checking for HigherOrder Logic Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pientka, Brigitte

    Termination and Reduction Checking for Higher­Order Logic Programs Brigitte Pientka Department, we present a syntax­directed termination and reduction checker for higher­order logic programs and output of well­moded predicates. These reduction con­ straints are exploited during termination checking

  12. Priming the Pump 2015: Higher Education Video Game Alliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferris, Michael C.

    Priming the Pump 2015: Higher Education Video Game Alliance Survey of Program Graduates #12;From in March 2015 ­ Higher Education Video Game Alliance Survey 2014-15: Our State of Play ­ we now release our Game Alliance Survey of Program Graduates. This " rst-of-its-kind" survey reveals the value that our

  13. Higher Prices from Entry: Pricing of Brand-Name Drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perloff, Jeffrey M.

    Higher Prices from Entry: Pricing of Brand-Name Drugs Jeffrey M. Perloffa Valerie Y. Suslowb,* Paul product, the prices of existing and new products may be higher than the incumbent's original price due to a better match between consumers and products. In other words, the average price in the market can rise

  14. Chemical class fractionation and thermophysical property measurements of solvent refined coal liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hewitt, J.D.; Rodgers, B.R.

    1980-01-01

    Coal liquids are a potpourri of organic molecules and inorganic particles; they cannot be considered as a single entity because of variations in coals and processing conditions during conversion to liquids. A method of solubility class fractionation originally developed for petroleum asphalts was adapted to coal liquids. The component classes - asphaltols, asphaltenes, resins, and oils - were separated according to their solubilities in benzene, pentane, and propane. Important physical and thermodynamic properties (viscosity, density, dielectric constant, and conductivity) of these fractions were determined as a function of temperature. In many cases these are the only values currently available to other investigators and are much in demand. We observed that density was most affected by the solids, as expected; however, the dielectric constant was most affected by the asphaltols, the viscosity by the resins (closely followed by the asphaltenes), and the conductivity by the resins. This led to the conclusion that the asphaltols contain the most polarizable material and the resins the most ionizable material. The conductivity remaining after all these materials were removed (10/sup -9/ mho/cm) and the dielectric constant (4.5) are still significantly higher than the corresponding values for most pure hydrocarbons and are important characteristics of these materials.

  15. Third-Party Evaluation of Petro Tex Hydrocarbons, LLC, ReGen Lubricating Oil Re-refining Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Compere, A L; Griffith, William {Bill} L

    2009-04-01

    This report presents an assessment of market, energy impact, and utility of the PetroTex Hydrocarbons, LLC., ReGen process for re-refining used lubricating oil to produce Group I, II, and III base oils, diesel fuel, and asphalt. PetroTex Hydrocarbons, LLC., has performed extensive pilot scale evaluations, computer simulations, and market studies of this process and is presently evaluating construction of a 23 million gallon per year industrial-scale plant. PetroTex has obtained a 30 acre site in the Texas Industries RailPark in Midlothian Texas. The environmental and civil engineering assessments of the site are completed, and the company has been granted a special use permit from the City of Midlothian and air emissions permits for the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality.

  16. SPCDC: A user-friendly computational tool for the design and refinement of practical pulse combustion systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barr, P.K.; Keller, J.O. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kezerle, J.A. [Gas Research Institute (United States)

    1995-07-01

    This paper reports on the development and use of a user-friendly, PC-executable computer code that can assist engineers in designing pulse combustors for specific applications and in refining existing units. This code represents the culmination of over 10 years of research and development in the field of pulse combustion. The Sandia Pulse Combustor Design Code, or SPCDC, couples both the fuel-air injection and the energy release to the time-varying pressure wave. Because the injection and combustion processes both drive and are driven by the wave dynamics, this model couples the major processes that occur in a pulse combustor. SPCDC can supplement the time-proven method of actually building and testing a prototype unit, and significantly reduce the number of units that must be tested. It will help produce a superior pulse combustion system tailored to a specific application and should help widen the range of successful applications.

  17. Enhancing adaptive sparse grid approximations and improving refinement strategies using adjoint-based a posteriori error estimates

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jakeman, J. D.; Wildey, T.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present an algorithm for adaptive sparse grid approximations of quantities of interest computed from discretized partial differential equations. We use adjoint-based a posteriori error estimates of the interpolation error in the sparse grid to enhance the sparse grid approximation and to drive adaptivity. We show that utilizing these error estimates provides significantly more accurate functional values for random samples of the sparse grid approximation. We also demonstrate that alternative refinement strategies based upon a posteriori error estimates can lead to further increases in accuracy in the approximation over traditional hierarchical surplus based strategies. Throughout this papermore »we also provide and test a framework for balancing the physical discretization error with the stochastic interpolation error of the enhanced sparse grid approximation.« less

  18. Higher Spin Currents in Wolf Space: Part III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Changhyun Ahn

    2015-04-01

    The large N=4 linear superconformal algebra (generated by four spin-1/2 currents, seven spin-1 currents, four spin-3/2 currents and one spin-2 current) found by Sevrin, Troost and Van Proeyen (and other groups) was realized in the N=4 superconformal coset SU(5)/SU(3) theory previously. The lowest 16 higher spin currents of spins (1, 3/2, 3/2, 2), (3/2, 2, 2, 5/2), (3/2, 2, 2, 5/2) and (2, 5/2, 5/2, 3) are obtained by starting with the operator product expansions (OPEs) between the four spin-3/2 currents from the above large N=4 linear superconformal algebra and the lowest higher spin-1 current which is the same as the one in the Wolf space coset SU(5)/[SU(3) x SU(2) x U(1)] theory. These OPEs determine the four higher spin-3/2 currents and the next six higher spin-2 currents are obtained from the OPEs between the above four spin-3/2 currents associated with the N=4 supersymmetry and these four higher spin-3/2 currents. The four higher spin-5/2 currents can be determined by calculating the OPEs between the above four spin-3/2 currents and the higher spin-2 currents. Similarly, the higher spin-3 current is obtained from the OPEs between the four spin-3/2 currents and the higher spin-5/2 currents. The explicit relations between the above 16 higher spin currents and the corresponding 16 higher spin currents which were found in the extension of large N=4 nonlinear superconformal algebra previously are given. By examining the OPEs between the 16 currents from the large N=4 linear superconformal algebra and the 16 higher spin currents, the match with the findings of Beccaria, Candu and Gaberdiel is also given. The next 16 higher spin currents of spins (2, 5/2, 5/2, 3), (5/2, 3, 3, 7/2), (5/2, 3, 3, 7/2) and (3, 7/2, 7/2, 4) occur from the OPEs between the above lowest 16 higher spin currents.

  19. Sedimentary and faunal analysis of a marginal marine section, the Stone City Member (middle eocene), Crockett Formation, Burleson County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelms, Katherine Currier

    1979-01-01

    Diagram relating Miliolina-Rotaliina-Textulariina abundance to deltaic and other marginal marine environments 98 LIST OF FIGURES - Cont1nued F1 gure 15 Ratio of Textulari1na-Rotaliina-Nil1olina in samples from the Stone C1ty beds 16 Vertical... sediment packages and faunal assemblages may still be recognized. W. L. F1sher (1964) describes transgressive and regressive sediments from the Eocene of the Gulf Coast and characterizes dist1nctive groups of sediments which tend to occur in typical...

  20. Philip Henry Wicksteed's marginal productivity theory of distribution and an investigation of those factors which influenced its formulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garner, Joseph Key

    1970-01-01

    their impoverished state. From these forces Hicksteed conceived the idea of a Labour Church that. would be dedicated to the working man and be the core of his religious activity. The Labour Church only enjoyed a short popularity. From Jevons, Hic'ksteed found... to the development oZ the marginal productivity theory of distribution and those factors that influenced its formulation, but berore turning to these topics, it is necessary to digress into two related discussions. First, a brief sketch will be made of Wicksteed...