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1

Essays on the Economics of Higher Education  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3 Does Higher Education Cause Political Participation? 3.1on enrolling into higher education and college. Using 2measures of higher education on the instrument . . . . . .

SOLIS VIVALLOS, ALEX

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Economic Development Project Districts (Indiana) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

may petition legislative bodies to designate economic development project districts in cities with populations between 80,500 and 500,000. Such districts may be established if it...

3

Economic Impact of West Virginia Higher Education Institutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Technology) The economic impacts estimated in this report are for fiscal year (FY) 2008 (July 1, 2007 ­ June West Virginia University May 2010 Funding for this report was provided by the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission. The report includes financial and other data provided by member HEPC

Mohaghegh, Shahab

4

Neighborhood Energy/Economic Development project  

SciTech Connect

Energy costs impact low income communities more than anyone else. Low income residents pay a larger percentage of their incomes for energy costs. In addition, they generally have far less discretionary energy use to eliminate in response to increasing energy prices. Furthermore, with less discretionary income, home energy efficiency improvements are often too expensive. Small neighborhood businesses are in the same situation. Improved efficiency in the use of energy can improve this situation by reducing energy costs for residents and local businesses. More importantly, energy management programs can increase the demand for local goods and services and lead to the creation of new job training and employment opportunities. In this way, neighborhood based energy efficiency programs can support community economic development. The present project, undertaken with the support of the Urban Consortium Energy Task Force, was intended to serve as a demonstration of energy/economic programming at the neighborhood level. The San Francisco Neighborhood Energy/Economic Development (NEED) project was designed to be a visible demonstration of bringing the economic development benefits of energy management home to low-income community members who need it most. To begin, a Community Advisory Committee was established to guide the design of the programs to best meet needs of the community. Subsequently three neighborhood energy/economic development programs were developed: The small business energy assistance program; The youth training and weatherization program; and, The energy review of proposed housing development projects.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

5

Economic Evaluation of Climate Change Adaptation Projects: Approaches...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Economic Evaluation of Climate Change Adaptation Projects: Approaches for the Agricultural Sector and Beyond Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Economic Evaluation of...

6

EIA - Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables 1990-2030  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) International Energy Outlook 2006 Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 13 complete) Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table C1 World Total Primary Energy Consumption by Region, Low Economic Growth Case Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table C2 World Total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel, Low Economic Growth Case

7

EIA - High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables 1990-2030  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) International Energy Outlook 2006 High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 13 complete) High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table B1 World Total Primary Energy Consumption by Region, High Economic Growth Case High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

8

Economic appraisal of small-scale hydro power projects  

SciTech Connect

The report covers (1) preconditions for considering such projects (2) methods of economic appraisal: cost benefit analysis; comparison of present worth of cash flow; internal rate of investment returns; comparison of production costs (3) case study of an economic analysis with reference to a project in Thailand.

Goldsmith, K.

1983-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

9

Economic Evaluation of Climate Change Adaptation Projects: Approaches for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Economic Evaluation of Climate Change Adaptation Projects: Approaches for Economic Evaluation of Climate Change Adaptation Projects: Approaches for the Agricultural Sector and Beyond Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Economic Evaluation of Climate Change Adaptation Projects: Approaches for the Agricultural Sector and Beyond Agency/Company /Organization: Global Environment Facility Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Adaptation, Policies/deployment programs Website: siteresources.worldbank.org/ENVIRONMENT/Resources/DevCC1_Adaptation.pd Economic Evaluation of Climate Change Adaptation Projects: Approaches for the Agricultural Sector and Beyond Screenshot References: Economic Evaluation of Climate Change Adaptation Projects: Approaches for the Agricultural Sector and Beyond[1] Overview "This paper identifies key challenges and solutions for carrying out

10

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007-Low Economic Growth Case Projection  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) International Energy Outlook 2007 Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 12 complete) Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table C1 World Total Energy Consumption by Region Table C1. World Total Energy Consumption by Region. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table C2 World Total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel Table C2. World Total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

11

Economic Impact Analysis for EGS Geothermal Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Impact Analysis for EGS Geothermal Project Impact Analysis for EGS Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Economic Impact Analysis for EGS Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Geothermal Analysis Project Description This proposed study will involve studying the impacts associated with jobs, energy and environment (as a result of investments in geothermal industry and specific EGS technologies) through the creation of a Geothermal Economic Calculator tool (GEC). The study will cover Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), conventional hydrothermal, low temperature geothermal and coproduced fluid technologies resulting in electric power production. The GEC created will be capable of helping end users (public and the industry) perform region specific economic impact analyses using a web platform that will be hosted by EGI for different geothermal technologies under EGS that will be used for electric power production.

12

Integrated Economic and Climate Projections for Impact Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We designed scenarios for impact assessment that explicitly address policy choices and uncertainty in climate response. Economic projections and the resulting greenhouse gas emissions for the “no climate policy” scenario ...

Paltsev, Sergey

13

EIA - Appendix B - High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Data Table Titles (1 to 12 complete) High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Appendix...

14

EIA - Appendix C - Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Data Table Titles (1 to 12 complete) Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Appendix...

15

Economics of the Great Plains coal gasification project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

the Great Plains project will be the Nation's first commercial-scale plant producing synthetic gas from coal. The project's first annual economic report, released in March 1983, was much less optimistic than a similar analysis prepared in January 1982 to justify construction. GAO found that: the main reason for the changed economic outlook was that the assumed synthetic gas prices used in the March analysis were significantly lower than those used previously. Great Plains did not, nor was it required to, consider tax implications to the parent companies of the project's partners. If these implications are considered, the economics could be more optimistic than the March 1983 report indicates. Should the partners end their participation, some tax benefits would have to be repaid. Although the project is a potentially attractive investment, its financial viability is extremely sensitive to the future prices of synthetic gas. Even a small deviation in prices could significantly affect its economics.

Not Available

1983-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

16

The economic impacts of highway widening projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Highway widening is one alternative for increasing capacity on a particular section of roadway. Capacity is the maximum hourly rate at which vehicles can reasonably be expected to traverse a uniform section of a roadway during a given time under prevailing roadway, traffic, and control conditions. Added capacity has economic, environmental, and social impact tradeoffs that must be considered. Economic tradeoffs of land value impacts were considered for this research study. Land scarcity, as related to value, was analyzed with respect to highway widening improvements on abutting land use. Previous literature included several modelling techniques used for measuring economic impacts of highway improvements. The before-and-after study approach was selected for analyzing land values, rather than parallel-area or control-area study approaches. This study involved a before-and-after economic analysis, where the before period d represented economic make-up of land parcels without Improvements, while the after period represented market value on land parcels once construction was completed. A design matrix was developed from data available for two highway types, multilane highway and freeway, on pre-selected sites. Location selection was based on prior knowledge and availability of land value data. Study variables included four design characteristics and four property types. These variables were used to determine whether increases in land value occurred on adjacent properties as a result of widening. A paired data statistical analysis was performed for both facility types. Results of the statistical analysis indicated that property values generally decreased for both facilities. Impacts on abutting property for each location reflected minimal changes in value. Therefore, the results do not suggest an increase in property values because of highway widening. The most important recommendation from this research study includes a combination of two factors.- 1) further research needed to look at areas outside of the construction zone and 2) consideration for lengthening the after study period. The parallel-area or control-area study approach is recommended for further study of economic impacts on land values. In addition, more data for the after construction period, preferably five to ten years, could be applied to better estimate effects.

Jackson, Patricia Ann

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

The Disruptive Dialogue Project: Crafting Critical Space in Higher Education  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

faculty work: Higher education’s strategic imperative. Sanfor the Study of Higher Education, Anaheim, CA. *Carducci,the public agenda for higher education. Symposium presented

Carducci, Rozana; Kuntz, Aaron M.; Gildersleeve, Ryan Evely; Pasque, Penny A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Economic Development Impacts of Community Wind Projects: A Review and Empirical Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Community wind projects have long been touted (both anecdotally and in the literature) to increase the economic development impacts of wind projects, but most analyses of community wind have been based on expected results from hypothetical projects. This report provides a review of previous economic development analyses of community wind projects and compares these projected results with empirical impacts from projects currently in operation. A review of existing literature reveals two primary conclusions. First, construction-period impacts are often thought to be comparable for both community-and absentee-owned facilities. Second, operations-period economic impacts are observed to be greater for community-owned projects. The majority of studies indicate that the range of increased operations-period impact is on the order of 1.5 to 3.4 times. New retrospective analysis of operating community wind projects finds that total employment impacts from completed community wind projects are estimated to be on the order of four to six 1-year jobs per-MW during construction and 0.3 to 0.6 long-term jobs per-MW during operations. In addition, when comparing retrospective results of community wind to hypothetical average absentee projects, construction-period employment impacts are 1.1 to 1.3 times higher and operations-period impacts are 1.1 to 2.8 times higher for community wind. Comparing the average of the completed community wind projects studied here with retrospective analysis of the first 1,000 MW of wind in Colorado and Iowa indicates that construction-period impacts are as much as 3.1 times higher for community wind, and operations-period impacts are as much as 1.8 times higher. Ultimately, wind projects are a source of jobs and economic development, and community wind projects are shown to have increased impact both during the construction and operations-period of a wind power plant. The extent of increased impact is primarily a function of local ownership and return on investment. As such, policies that prioritize higher levels of local ownership are likely to result in increased economic development impacts. Furthermore, the increased economic development impact of community wind shown here should not be undervalued. As the wind industry grows and approaches penetrations in the U.S. electricity market of 20%, social opposition to new wind power projects may increase. Community wind could provide a valuable strategy for building community support of wind power - especially in communities that are new to wind power. This analysis finds that total employment impacts from completed community wind projects are on the order of four to six 1-year jobs per-MW during construction and 0.3 to 0.6 long-term jobs per-MW during operations. Furthermore, when comparing community wind to hypothetical average absentee projects, construction-period employment impacts are 1.1 to 1.3 times higher and operations-period impacts are 1.1 to 2.8 times higher for community wind. Comparing the average of the completed projects studied here with retrospective analysis of the first 1,000 MW of wind in Colorado and Iowa shows construction-period impacts are as much as 3.1 times higher for community wind, and operations-period impacts are as much as 1.8 times higher. As the wind industry has grown, community wind has largely been a peripheral development model. However, this analysis shows that wind projects are a source of jobs and economic development, and that community wind projects have greater economic development impacts than absentee-owned projects. As such, policies that prioritize higher levels of local ownership are likely to result in increased economic development impacts. While the magnitude of increased benefit is primarily a function of local ownership and project profitability, the increased economic development impact of all community wind projects should not be undervalued. The ability of community wind projects to disperse economic impacts within the states and communities where they are built and to engage local community members

Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Economic Analysis of Ilumex, A Project to Promote Energy-Efficient Residential Lighting in Mexico  

SciTech Connect

A higher penetration of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) for household lighting can reduce growth in peak electricity demand, reduce sales of subsidized electricity, and lessen environmental impacts. This paper describes an economic analysis of a project designed to promote high penetration rates of CFLs in two cities in Mexico. Our analysis indicates that the project will bring substantial net economic benefits to Mexico, the utility, and the average customer. In the absence of any subsidy to CFLs, most customers will see a payback period longer than two years. By sharing some of the anticipated net benefit, CFE, the utility company, can reduce the payback period to a maximum of two years for all customers. CFE's role is thus crucial to the successful implementation of the project. Expanding the Ilumex project to a Mexico-wide program would make a significant contribution towards meeting the planned addition of generation capacity by the year 2000.

Sathaye, Jayant A.; Friedmann, R.; Meyers, S.; de Buen, O.; Gadgil, A.J.; Vargas, E.; Saucedo, R.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Distributed Physical and Molecular Separations for Selective Harvest of Higher Value Wheat Straw Components Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wheat straw (Triticum aestivum L.) is an abundant source of plant fiber. It is regenerated, in large quantities, every year. At present, this potentially valuable resource is greatly under-exploited. Most of the excess straw biomass (i.e., tonnage above that required for agronomic cropping system sustainability) is managed through expensive chopping/tillage operations and/or burnt in the field following harvest, resulting in air pollution and associated health problems. Potential applications for wheat straw investigated within this project include energy and composites manufacture. Other methods of straw utilization that will potentially benefit from the findings of this research project include housing and building, pulp and paper, thermal insulation, fuels, and chemicals. This project focused on components of the feedstock assembly system for supplying a higher value small grains straw residue for (1) gasification/combustion and (2) straw-thermoplastic composites. This project was an integrated effort to solve the technological, infrastructural, and economic challenges associated with using straw residue for these bioenergy and bioproducts applications. The objective of the research is to contribute to the development of a low-capital distributed harvesting and engineered storage system for upgrading wheat straw to more desirable feedstocks for combustion and for straw-plastic composites. They investigated two processes for upgrading wheat straw to a more desirable feedstock: (1) an efficient combine-based threshing system for separating the intermodal stems from the leaves, sheaths, nodes, and chaff. (2) An inexpensive biological process using white-rot fungi to improve the composition of the mechanically processed straw stems.

N /A

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher projected economic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Distributed Physical and Molecular Separations for Selective Harvest of Higher Value Wheat Straw Components Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wheat straw (Triticum aestivum L.) is an abundant source of plant fiber. It is regenerated, in large quantities, every year. At present, this potentially valuable resource is greatly under-exploited. Most of the excess straw biomass (i.e., tonnage above that required for agronomic cropping system sustainability) is managed through expensive chopping/tillage operations and/or burnt in the field following harvest, resulting in air pollution and associated health problems. Potential applications for wheat straw investigated within this project include energy and composites manufacture. Other methods of straw utilization that will potentially benefit from the findings of this research project include housing and building, pulp and paper, thermal insulation, fuels, and chemicals. This project focused on components of the feedstock assembly system for supplying a higher value small grains straw residue for (1) gasification/combustion and (2) straw-thermoplastic composites. This project was an integrated effort to solve the technological, infrastructural, and economic challenges associated with using straw residue for these bioenergy and bioproducts applications. The objective of the research is to contribute to the development of a low-capital distributed harvesting and engineered storage system for upgrading wheat straw to more desirable feedstocks for combustion and for straw-plastic composites. We investigated two processes for upgrading wheat straw to a more desirable feedstock: (1) An efficient combine-based threshing system for separating the internodal stems from the leaves, sheaths, nodes, and chaff. (2) An inexpensive biological process using white-rot fungi to improve the composition of the mechanically processed straw stems.

Hess, J.R

2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

22

Project Cost Escalation Standards, document IEAB 2007-2 Page 1 Independent Economic Analysis Board  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Cost Escalation Standards, document IEAB 2007-2 Page 1 Independent Economic Analysis Board Project Cost Escalation Standards Task 115 Council document IEAB 2007-2 March 30, 2007 Summary Project costs as described in project proposals sometimes turn out to be inaccurate. One source of error

23

Project Title Economic Modeling & Unconventional Gas Resource Appraisal Program Line Tough Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

support to assess the economic viability of new tough gas plays (tight gas, shale gas, CBM). Project are illustrated using the US shale gas plays as case templates. Discounted cash flow models are applied1 Project Title Economic Modeling & Unconventional Gas Resource Appraisal Program Line Tough Gas

Santos, Juan

24

EIA - Appendix B - High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) International Energy Outlook 2009 High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 12 complete) High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table B1 World Total Primary Energy Consumption by Region Table B1. World Total Primary energy consumption by Region. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table B2 World Total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel Table B2. World Total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

25

EIA - Appendix C - Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) International Energy Outlook 2009 Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 12 complete) Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table C1 World Total Energy Consumption by Region Table C1. World Total Energy Consumption by Region. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table C2 World Total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel Table C2. World Total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

26

EIA - Appendix C - Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) International Energy Outlook 2008 Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 12 complete) Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table C1 World Total Energy Consumption by Region Table C1. World Total Energy Consumption by Region. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table C2 World Total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel Table C2. World Total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

27

Monetizing stranded gas : economic valuation of GTL and LNG projects.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Globally, there are significant quantities of natural gas reserves that lie economically or physically stranded from markets. Options to monetize such reserves include Gas to… (more)

Black, Brodie Gene, 1986-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1995. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As required by the Romer-Twining Agreement of 1990, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this annual economic impact study for the state of Colorado. This report assesses the economic impacts related to the DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project in Colorado during the state fiscal year (FY) between 1 July 1994 and 30 June 1995. To estimate net economic benefit, employment, salaries and wages, and other related economic benefits are discussed, quantified, and then compared to the state`s 10 percent share of the remedial action costs. Actual data obtained from sites currently undergoing remedial action were used as the basis for analyses. If data were not available, estimates were used to derive economic indicators. This study describes the types of employment associated with the UMTRA Project and estimates of the numbers of people employed by UMTRA Project subcontractors in Colorado during state FY 1995. Employment totals are reported in estimated average annual jobs; however, the actual number of workers at the site fluctuates depending on weather and on the status of remedial action activities. In addition, the actual number of people employed on the Project during the year may be higher than the average annual employment reported due to the temporary nature of some of the jobs.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

College vs. Unemployment: Expanding Access to Higher Education Is the Smart Investment During Economic Downturns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carnegie Commission on Higher Education in the 1960’s andAubrey Douglass, "Higher Education as a National Resource, "Expanding Access to Higher Education Is the Smart Investment

Douglass, John Aubrey

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Markets in Higher Education: Can We Still Learn from Economics' Founding Fathers?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ingredients of markets. ” Higher Education Quarterly 57(2):J. C. Smart (ed. ), Higher Education: Handbook of Theory andinstrument for steering higher education systems, especially

Teixeira, Pedro Nuno

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

EIA - Appendix B - High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 > High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) 8 > High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) International Energy Outlook 2008 High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 12 complete) High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. High World Oil Price Case Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table B1 World Total Primary Energy Consumption by Region Table B1. World Total Primary energy consumption by Region. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table B2 World Total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel Table B2. World Total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

32

Evaluation of economics of hotel/motel solar hot water projects  

SciTech Connect

Experience gained by the Ames Laboratory in managing projects in the Solar Hotel/Motel Hot Water initiative is used to evaluate economic factors. The analysis studies costs and trends from a limited number of projects. Initial analysis, based on cost data presented in the project proposals, shows that cost estimates vary widely for various reasons. Further analysis, based on incurred costs as projects are completed, is a continuing process. These actual costs are normalized to the extent possible to provide consistent comparisons between the systems of various projects. Correlations between proposed costs and actual costs are made to assist future evaluation of similar projects. Several projects, which were offered a grant to participate in these Hotel/Motel demonstrations, have declined to accept the grant on economic grounds. Economic analysis of these projects provides rationale for the apparent cost ineffectiveness. Systems now in operation have provided fuel cost savings data which are presented to show system payback periods. Finally, results of economic analysis of these projects are presented together with initial conclusions regarding cost-effective solar hot water system design.

Struss, R.G.; Brohl, E.C.; Sidles, P.H.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Energy and economic benefits of residential energy conservation RD and D. [Projections to year 2000  

SciTech Connect

The ORNL residential energy model is used to evaluate the energy and direct economic effects of offering new technologies for providing residential services (e.g., space heating, water heating). These new technologies are assumed to be introduced as a consequence of government and private research, development and demonstration (RD and D) programs. The energy savings due to the new technologies considered here increase from 0.1 QBtu in 1980 to 0.9 QBtu in 1990 and 1.9 QBtu in 2000. Present and projected RD and D programs sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) are expected to account for one-third of the cumulative energy saving of 20 QBtu. Because these new systems are more energy-efficient than the conventional systems they replace, household fuel bills are reduced by $20 billion between 1977 and 2000. On the other hand, the higher initial cost of these advanced systems increases consumer costs on new equipment and structures by almost $3 billion. Thus, the net economic benefit to the nation's households is almost $18 billion. The DOE programs account for about 40% of this dollar saving.

Hirst, E.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Job and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: A User-Friendly Tool to Calculate Economic Impacts from Wind Projects; Preprint  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Job and Economic Job and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: A User-Friendly Tool to Calculate Economic Impacts from Wind Projects Preprint March 2004 * NREL/CP-500-35953 M. Goldberg MRG & Associates K. Sinclair and M. Milligan (Consultant) National Renewable Energy Laboratory To be presented at the 2004 Global WINDPOWER Conference Chicago, Illinois March 29-31, 2004 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 NREL is a U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Operated by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Midwest Research Institute (MRI), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-99GO10337. Accordingly, the US

35

Economics of Plant Energy Savings Projects in a Changing Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy prices have exhibited significant volatility in recent years. For example, natural gas prices ranged from $4 to $15 per MM BTU's in calendar years 2005 through 2011. Future prices are uncertain but are likely to retain a high level of volatility. This volatility complicates analysis of potential plant capital investments to reduce energy usage, in particular those that involve consideration of alternate energy sources, since traditional financial investment valuation assumes that future cash flows are known exactly. Yet, this is clearly not the case for many energy saving investments. In addition, future price probability functions may be best characterized as non symmetric and economic objective functions as non-linear further complicating investment analysis. Failure to recognize these effects can result in incorrectly valuing the potential financial return of the investment. In this paper, appropriate techniques to evaluate such investments are presented along with case studies illustrating the approach.

White, D. C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Applying fuzzy engineering economics to evaluate project investment feasibility of wind generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a fuzzy engineering economic decision model is derived to evaluate the investment feasibility of wind generation project. A straightforward vertex parameters' fuzzy mathematics operation using the function principle is derived as an alternative ... Keywords: decision-making, function principle, fuzzy mathematics, fuzzy ranking, mellin transform, wind electricity

J. N. Sheen

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year 1993 (July 1, 1992, through June 30, 1993). To capture employment benefits, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Rifle, and Gunnison, Colorado. An estimated 52 percent of the employees working on the UMTRA Project responded to this information request. Economic data were requested from each site prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are summarized.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Economic Development Impacts of Community Wind Projects: A Review and Empirical Evaluation; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

'Community wind' refers to a class of wind energy ownership structures. The extent of local ownership may range from a small minority share to full ownership by persons in the immediate area surrounding the wind project site. Potential project owners include local farmers, businesses, Native American tribes, universities, cooperatives, or any other local entity seeking to invest in wind energy. The opposite of community wind is an 'absentee' project, in which ownership is completely removed from the state and community surrounding the facility. Thus, there is little or no ongoing direct financial benefit to state and local populations aside from salaries for local repair technicians, local property tax payments, and land lease payments. In recent years, the community wind sector has been inhibited by manufacturers' preference for larger turbine orders. This often puts smaller community wind developers and projects at a competitive disadvantage. However, state policies specifically supporting community wind may become a more influential market factor as turbines are now more readily available given manufacturer ramp-ups and the slow-down in the industry that has accompanied the recent economic and financial crises. This report examines existing literature to provide an overview of economic impacts resulting from community wind projects, compares results, and explains variability.

Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) demonstration project: Volume 2, Project performance and economics. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

The project objective is to demonstrate removal of 90--95% or more of the SO{sub 2} at approximately one-half the cost of conventional scrubbing technology; and to demonstrate significant reduction of space requirements. In this project, Pure Air has built a single SO{sub 2} absorber for a 528-MWe power plant. The absorber performs three functions in a single vessel: prequencher, absorber, and oxidation of sludge to gypsum. Additionally, the absorber is of a co- current design, in which the flue gas and scrubbing slurry move in the same direction and at a relatively high velocity compared to conventional scrubbers. These features all combine to yield a state- of-the-art SO{sub 2} absorber that is more compact and less expensive than conventional scrubbers. The project incorporated a number of technical features including the injection of pulverized limestone directly into the absorber, a device called an air rotary sparger located within the base of the absorber, and a novel wastewater evaporation system. The air rotary sparger combines the functions of agitation and air distribution into one piece of equipment to facilitate the oxidation of calcium sulfite to gypsum. Additionally, wastewater treatment is being demonstrated to minimize water disposal problems inherent in many high-chloride coals. Bituminous coals primarily from the Indiana, Illinois coal basin containing 2--4.5% sulfur were tested during the demonstration. The Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) process has demonstrated removal of 95% or more of the SO{sub 2} while providing a commercial gypsum by-product in lieu of solid waste. A portion of the commercial gypsum is being agglomerated into a product known as PowerChip{reg_sign} gypsum which exhibits improved physical properties, easier flowability and more user friendly handling characteristics to enhance its transportation and marketability to gypsum end-users.

NONE

1996-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

40

Environmental and Economical Evaluation of Integrating NGL Extraction and LNG Liquefaction Technology in Iran LNG Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The combination of changing global markets for natural gas liquids (NGL) with the simultaneous increase in global demand for liquefied natural gas (LNG) has stimulated an interest in the integration of NGL recovery technology with LNG liquefaction technologies. Historically, the removal of “heavy” or high-freezing-point hydrocarbons from the feed to LNG plants has been characterized as “gas conditioning” and achieved using one or more distillation columns. While some attempts to provide reflux to the distillation columns marginally enhanced NGL recovery, little emphasis was placed on maximizing NGL recovery as a product from the LNG process. As such, the integration of the two processes was not a priority. Integrating state-of-the art NGL recovery technology within the CoP LNGSM Process1, formerly the Phillips Optimized Cascade LNG Process, results in a significant reduction in the specific power required to produce LNG, while maximizing NGL recovery. This corresponds to a production increase in both LNG and NGL for comparable compression schemes as compared to stand-alone LNG liquefaction and NGL extraction facilities. In addition, there are potential enhancements to the overall facility availability and project economics and environmental impacts using the integrated concept. This integrated concept has been applied to three ongoing international NGL/LNG projects using the CoP LNG Process in Iran LNG project. In this respect, simulation has been performed in THERMOFLEX software. Moreover, thermo economic analysis has been applied for economic and thermodynamic analysis of base and integrated cases through computer code has been provided here. Finally, the base and integrated case have been evaluated and comprised in view of thermodynamics, economics and environmental impacts.

Manesh, M. H. K.; Mazhari, V.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher projected economic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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41

Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year (FY) 1995 (1 July 1994 through 30 June 1995). To capture employment information, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock, Colorado. Economic data were requested from the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC), the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) and the US Department of Energy (DOE). The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are summarized.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Projected Markets and Preliminary Economics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the potential market for process heat produced by a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), the environmental benefits reduced CO2 emissions will have on these markets, and the typical economics of projects using these applications. It gives examples of HTGR technological applications to industrial processes in the typical co-generation supply of process heat and electricity, the conversion of coal to transportation fuels and chemical process feedstock, and the production of ammonia as a feedstock for the production of ammonia derivatives, including fertilizer. It also demonstrates how uncertainties in capital costs and financial factors affect the economics of HTGR technology by analyzing the use of HTGR technology in the application of HTGR and high temperature steam electrolysis processes to produce hydrogen.

Larry Demick

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado State fiscal year 1994. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year 1994 (1 July 1993 through 30 June 1994). To capture employment information, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Naturita, Gunnison, and Rifle, Colorado. Economic data were requested from each site prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. Information on wages, taxes, and subcontract expenditures in combination with estimates and economic multipliers is used to estimate the dollar economic benefits to Colorado during the state fiscal year. Finally, the fiscal year 1994 estimates are compared to fiscal year 1993 employment and economic information.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Preliminary Analysis of the Jobs and Economic Impacts of Renewable Energy Projects Supported by the ..Section..1603 Treasury Grant Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This analysis responds to a request from the Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to estimate the direct and indirect jobs and economic impacts of projects supported by the Section 1603 Treasury grant program. The analysis employs the Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models to estimate the gross jobs, earnings, and economic output supported by the construction and operation of the large wind (greater than 1 MW) and solar photovoltaic (PV) projects funded by the Section 1603 grant program.

Steinberg, D.; Porro, G.; Goldberg, M.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

An Economic Analysis of the Kilauea Geothermal Development and Inter-Island Cable Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study by NEA completed in April 1987 shows that a large scale (500 MW) geothermal development on the big island of Hawaii and the inter-island power transmission cable is economically infeasible. This updated report, utilizing additional information available since 1987, reaches the same conclusion: (1) The state estimate of $1.7 billion for development cost of the geothermal project is low and extremely optimistic. more realistic development costs are shown to be in the range of $3.4 to $4.3 billion and could go as high as $4.6 billion. (2) Compared to alternative sources of power generation, geothermal can be 1.7 to 2.4 times as costly as oil, and 1.2 to 1.7 times as costly as a solar/oil generating system. (3) yearly operation and maintenance costs for the large scale geothermal project are estimated to be 44.7 million, 72% greater than a solar/oil generating system. (4) Over a 40-year period ratepayers could pay, on average, between 1.3 (17.2%) and 2.4 cents (33%) per kWh per year more for electricity produced by geothermal than they are currently paying (even with oil prices stabilizing at $45 per barrel in 2010). (5) A comparable solar/oil thermal energy development project is technologically feasible, could be island specific, and would cost 20% to 40% less than the proposed geothermal development. (6) Conservation is the cheapest alternative of all, can significantly reduce demand, and provides the greatest return to ratepayers. There are better options than geothermal. Before the State commits the people of Hawaii to future indebtedness and unnecessary electricity rate increases, more specific study should be conducted on the economic feasibility, timing, and magnitude of the geothermal project. The California experience at The Geyers points up the fact that it can be a very risky and disappointing proposition. The state should demand that proponents and developers provide specific answers to geothermals troubling questions before they make an irreversible commitment to it. The state should also more carefully assess the potential risks and hazards of volcanic disturbances, the degree of environmental damage that could occur, the future demand for electricity, and the potential of supplying electricity from alternative energy sources, conservation and small scale power units. As they stated in the April 1987 study, to move ahead with rapid large scale geothermal development on Hawaii without thoroughly studying these aspects of its development is ill-advised and economically unsound.

None

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Economic effects of projected climate change on outdoor recreation in Tennessee.  

SciTech Connect

Climate change projections from three General Circulation Models were used to adjust the temperature and precipitation in 2030 and 2080 in each of five ecological provinces in Tennessee to estimate the direct economic effects of the projected changes on recreation using the Tourism Climatic Index. The indirect effects on recreation were evaluated qualitatively, based on current demand for the unique values associated with current conditions. The results of the direct impact evaluation reveal that climate change will have variable effects on recreational activities in Tennessee. The magnitude and direction of the effects vary by the recreational activity involved, patterns of precipitation and temperature regimes, and specific location in Tennessee. Recreational activities such as rock climbing, winter activities independent of snow, and whitewater boating are likely to benefit from projected climate changes due to increased temperatures in the winter months. Summer-based activities such as lake recreation and camping are likely to decline with increasing seasonal temperatures. The indirect effects of climate change on recreation are likely to have a larger effect than the direct impacts of climatic variables.

Hodges, Donald G. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Fogel, Jonah [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Lannom, Karen O. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Tharp, M Lynn [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Job and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: A User-Friendly Tool to Calculate Economic Impacts from Wind Projects; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Laboratory (DOE/NREL) has developed a spreadsheet-based wind model (Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI)) that incorporates economic multipliers for jobs, income, and output. Originally developed with state-specific parameters, it can also be used to conduct county and regional analyses. NREL has enlisted the Wind Powering America (WPA) State Wind Working Groups (SWWGs) to conduct county-specific economic impact analyses and has encouraged them to use JEDI if they do not have their own economic model. The objective of the analyses is to identify counties within WPA target states, and preferably counties with a significant agricultural sector, that could economically benefit from wind development. These counties could then explore opportunities to tap into the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Farm Bill Section 9006 grants and loans to stimulate wind development. This paper describes the JEDI model and how i t can be used. We will also summarize a series of analyses that were completed to fulfill a General Accounting Office (GAO) request to provide estimates of the economic development benefits of wind power.

Sinclair, K.; Milligan, M.; Goldberg, M.

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Nuclear Energy Research Initiative Project No. 02 103 Innovative Low Cost Approaches to Automating QA/QC of Fuel Particle Production Using On Line Nondestructive Methods for Higher Reliability Final Project Report  

SciTech Connect

This Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) project was tasked with exploring, adapting, developing and demonstrating innovative nondestructive test methods to automate nuclear coated particle fuel inspection so as to provide the United States (US) with necessary improved and economical Quality Assurance and Control (QA/QC) that is needed for the fuels for several reactor concepts being proposed for both near term deployment [DOE NE & NERAC, 2001] and Generation IV nuclear systems. Replacing present day QA/QC methods, done manually and in many cases destructively, with higher speed automated nondestructive methods will make fuel production for advanced reactors economically feasible. For successful deployment of next generation reactors that employ particle fuels, or fuels in the form of pebbles based on particles, extremely large numbers of fuel particles will require inspection at throughput rates that do not significantly impact the proposed manufacturing processes. The focus of the project is nondestructive examination (NDE) technologies that can be automated for production speeds and make either: (I) On Process Measurements or (II) In Line Measurements. The inspection technologies selected will enable particle “quality” qualification as a particle or group of particles passes a sensor. A multiple attribute dependent signature will be measured and used for qualification or process control decisions. A primary task for achieving this objective is to establish standard signatures for both good/acceptable particles and the most problematic types of defects using several nondestructive methods.

Ahmed, Salahuddin; Batishko, Charles R.; Flake, Matthew; Good, Morris S.; Mathews, Royce; Morra, Marino; Panetta, Paul D.; Pardini, Allan F.; Sandness, Gerald A.; Tucker, Brian J.; Weier, Dennis R.; Hockey, Ronald L.; Gray, Joseph N.; Saurwein, John J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Lowden, Richard A.; Miller, James H.

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

49

Wind Energy Finance (WEF): An Online Calculator for Economic Analysis of Wind Projects (Double-Gatefold Brochure)  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

How Does WEF Work? How Does WEF Work? Inputs The user enters data about the project, including: * General assumptions * Capital costs * Operating expenses * Financing assumptions * Tax assumptions * Economic assumptions * Financial constraining assumptions. Extensive help notes describe each input and provide reasonable default values. Outputs * Minimum energy payment to meet financial criteria * Levelized cost of energy * Payback period * Net present value * Internal rate of return * Summary and detailed cash flows. As an alternative option, if the user enters a first-year energy payment, the program will calculate the rate of return, coverage ratios, etc. Wind Energy Finance (WEF): An Online Calculator for Economic Analysis of Wind Projects The National Renewable Energy Laboratory created

50

Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year 1994. To capture employment information, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Naturita, Gunnison, and Rifle, Colorado. Economic data were requested from each site prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are summarized. This study assesses benefits associated with the Grand Junction, Gunnison, Naturita, and Rifle UMTRA Projects sites for the 1-year period under study. Work at the Naturita site was initiated in April 1994 and involved demolition of buildings at the processing site. Actual start-up of remediation of Naturita is planned to begin in the spring of 1995. Work at the Slick Rock and Maybell sites is expected to begin in 1995. The only current economic benefits associated with these sites are related to UMTRA Project support work.

Not Available

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Colorado economic impact study on the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year (FY) 1993. To capture employment benefits, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Rifle, and Gunnison, Colorado. An estimated 52 percent of the employees working on the UMTRA Project responded to this information request. Economic data were requested from each prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are: Direct employment was estimated at 894 workers; An estimated 89 percent of all direct employment was local; Secondary employment resulting from remedial action at the active Colorado UMTRA Project sites and the Grand Junction vicinity property program is estimated at 546 workers. Total employment (direct and secondary) is estimated at 1440 workers for the period of study (July 1, 1992, to June 30, 1993). An estimated $24.1 million was paid in wages to UMTRA workers in Colorado during FY1993; Direct and secondary wage earnings were estimated at $39.9 million; Income tax payments to the state of Colorado were estimated at $843,400 during FY1993; The gross economic impact of UMTRA Project activities in the state of Colorado is estimated at $70 million during the 1-year study period; and the net economic benefit to the state of Colorado was estimated at $57.5 million, or $5.90 per dollar of funding provided by Colorado. This figure includes both direct and secondary benefits but does not include the impact of alternative uses of the state funding.

Not Available

1993-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

52

An economic analysis of a large scale ashe juniper clearing project in the Leon River watershed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ashe Juniper (Juniperus ashei) is native to the Edwards Plateau in central Texas. In the past 150 years, however, this species has rapidly increased in abundance within its range. Reduced fire frequency and increased livestock grazing, are two factors attributed to the rapid rate of juniper encroachment. While the losses associated with brush encroachment are recognized, many ranchers lack the funds necessary to implement management practices to reduce juniper densities on their property. The high cost associated with clearing brush has led to the creation of cost-share programs, which help offset the expenses incurred by participating landowners. The Leon River Restoration Project (LRRP), implemented on private lands within Coryell and Hamilton Counties, Texas, is one such cost-share program. Funding for the LRRP is received through non-programmatic sources, in the form of grants, from various state and federal organizations and agencies. The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) provides a second source of funding through the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP). Participants contracted through LRRP funds receive 85% cost-share benefits, up to a maximum of $15,000. Landowners participating in the LRRP under EQIP funds receive 50% cost-share incentives, up to a maximum of $250,000. The purpose of this study was to record changes that occurred on land enrolled in the LRRP, following juniper removal, and the economic benefits recognized by this work. Thirty landowners scheduled to participate in the LRRP were interviewed in 2003, prior to juniper control work. In 2006, 23 of the original 30 landowners participated in a second interview, following their completion of brush removal work. Changes attributed to juniper removal were recorded during these post-clearing interviews. Stocking rate changes were used as the basis for measuring economic benefits recognized by the clearing efforts. Changes in hunting or grazing lease rates resulting from juniper clearing were also used to monitor economic benefits of the brushwork. A second component of the study tested for differences in landowner satisfaction between LRRP participants enrolled under LRRP funds, and those contracted under EQIP funds. Importanceperformance matrixes were created to display satisfaction differences.

Flack, Rebecca Lynn

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 1 (Edinburg) - Curry Main - Final  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a single-component capital renovation project proposed by Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 1 to the Bureau of Reclamation and North American Development Bank. The proposed project involves installing 1 mile of 72" pipeline to replace a segment of the Curry Main canal. Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated 49-year useful life for the proposed project. Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 2,258 ac-ft of water per year and 1,092,823,269 BTUs (320,288 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of water savings is estimated to be $24.68 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost of energy savings is estimated at $0.0000598 per BTU ($0.204 per kwh). In addition, expected real (rather than nominal) values are indicated for the Bureau of Reclamation’s three principal evaluation measures specified in the United States Public Law 106-576 legislation. The initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $27.49 per ac-ft of water savings. The initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0000568 per BTU ($0.194 per kwh). The ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -2.84.

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 1 (Edinburg) - North Branch / East Main - Final  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a single-component capital renovation project proposed by Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 1 to the Bureau of Reclamation and North American Development Bank. The proposed project involves installing 4.83 miles of multi-size pipeline to replace a segment of the North Branch / East Main canal. Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated 48-year useful life for the proposed project. Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 5,838 ac-ft of water per year and 3,293,049,926 BTUs (965,138 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of water savings is estimated to be $15.58 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost of energy savings is estimated at $0.0000392 per BTU ($0.134 per kwh). In addition, expected real (rather than nominal) values are indicated for the Bureau of Reclamation’s three principal evaluation measures specified in the United States Public Law 106-576 legislation. The initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $30.68 per ac-ft of water savings. The initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0000544 per BTU ($0.186 per kwh). The ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -1.58.

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Juan) - Relining Lateral A - Final  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a single-component capital renovation project proposed by Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2, (a.k.a. San Juan) to the North American Development Bank (NADBank) and Bureau of Reclamation. The proposed project involves relining “Lateral A” with a geomembrane and shotcrete cover. Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated useful life for the proposed project. Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 2,542 ac-ft of water per year and 551,738,646 BTUs (161,705 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of water savings is estimated to be $74.49 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost of energy savings is estimated to be $0.0003698 per BTU ($1.262 per kwh). In addition, expected real (vs nominal) values are indicated for the Bureau of Reclamation’s three principal evaluation measures specified in the United States Public Law 106-576 legislation. The initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $57.76 per ac-ft of water savings. The initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0002661 per BTU ($0.908 per kwh). The ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -14.29.

Popp, Michael; Robinson, John; Sturdivant, Allen; Lacewell, Ronald; Rister, Edward

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Brownsville Irrigation District – 72" and 54" Pipeline Replacing Main Canal – Preliminary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a single-component capital renovation project proposed by Brownsville Irrigation District to the North American Development Bank (NADB) and Bureau of Reclamation (BOR). The proposed project involves constructing a 72" and 54" pipeline to replace 2.29 miles of the “Main Canal.” Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated 49-year useful life for the proposed project. Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 1,844 ac-ft of water per year and 313,797,977 BTUs (91,969 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of water savings is estimated to be $24.70 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost of energy savings is estimated at $0.0001740 per BTU ($0.594 per kwh). In addition, expected real (rather than nominal) values are indicated for the Bureau of Reclamation’s three principal evaluation measures specified in the United States Public Law 106-576 legislation. The initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $56.74 per ac-ft of water savings. The initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0003335 per BTU ($1.138 per kwh). The ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -1.46.

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Project: Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Juan) - Relining Lateral A – Preliminary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a single-component capital renovation project proposed by Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2, (a.k.a. San Juan) to the North American Development Bank (NADBank) and Bureau of Reclamation. The proposed project involves relining “Lateral A” with a geomembrane and shotcrete cover. Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated useful life for the proposed project. Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 2,542 ac-ft of water per year and 551,738,646 BTUs (161,705 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of water savings is estimated to be $74.49 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost of energy savings is estimated to be $0.0003698 per BTU ($1.262 per kwh). In addition, expected real (vs nominal) values are indicated for the Bureau of Reclamation’s three principal evaluation measures specified in the United States Public Law 106-576 legislation. The initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $57.76 per ac-ft of water savings. The initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0002661 per BTU ($0.908 per kwh). The ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -14.29.

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Brownsville Irrigation District – 72" and 48" Pipeline Replacing Main Canal – Final  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a single-component capital renovation project proposed by Brownsville Irrigation District to the North American Development Bank (NADB) and Bureau of Reclamation (BOR). The proposed project involves constructing a 72" and 48" pipeline to replace 2.31 miles of the “Main Canal.” Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated 49-year useful life for the proposed project. Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 1,872 ac-ft of water per year and 318,479,103 BTUs (93,341 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of water savings is estimated to be $27.98 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost of energy savings is estimated at $0.0001933 per BTU ($0.660 per kwh). In addition, expected real (rather than nominal) values are indicated for the Bureau of Reclamation’s three principal evaluation measures specified in the United States Public Law 106-576 legislation. The initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $58.60 per ac-ft of water savings. The initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0003444 per BTU ($1.175 per kwh). The ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -1.53.

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Cameron County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Benito) – Infrastructure Rehabilitation – Preliminary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a five-component capital renovation project proposed by Cameron County Irrigation District No. 2, (a.k.a. San Benito) to the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR). The proposed project involves rehabilitating 42+ miles of canals, laterals, and pipelines. Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated useful lives for all five components of the proposed project. Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 19,580 ac-ft of water per year and 2,151,277,209 BTUs (630,503 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of water savings is estimated to be $45.60 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost of energy savings is estimated at $0.0004399 per BTU ($1.501 per kwh). In addition, expected real (vs nominal) values are indicated for the Bureau of Reclamation’s three principal evaluation measures specified in the United States Public Law 106-576 legislation. The aggregate initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $46.98 per ac-ft of water savings. The aggregate initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0004275 per BTU ($1.459 per kwh). The aggregate ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -9.04.

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Cameron County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Benito) - Infrastructure Rehabilitation - Final  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a five-component capital renovation project proposed by Cameron County Irrigation District No. 2, (a.k.a. San Benito) to the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR). The proposed project involves rehabilitating 42+ miles of canals, laterals, and pipelines. Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated useful lives for all five components of the proposed project. Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 19,580 ac-ft of water per year and 2,151,277,209 BTUs (630,503 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of water savings is estimated to be $45.60 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost of energy savings is estimated at $0.0004399 per BTU ($1.501 per kwh). In addition, expected real (vs nominal) values are indicated for the Bureau of Reclamation’s three principal evaluation measures specified in the United States Public Law 106-576 legislation. The aggregate initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $46.98 per ac-ft of water savings. The aggregate initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0004275 per BTU ($1.459 per kwh). The aggregate ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -9.04.

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.; Popp, Michael C.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

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61

1991 New Mexico economic impact study for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, site  

SciTech Connect

The University of New Mexico Bureau of Business and Economic Research completed an abbreviated cost-benefit analysis of the income and employment impact of the US Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor offices in Albuquerque. Since the Project Office will have a significant positive impact on the State`s economy (shown on Table 8), the impact is combined with the impact of remedial actions at the Ambrosia Lake site to highlight the cost-benefit of the entire Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The UMTRA Project at the Ambrosia Lake site will generate $12.509 million in gross labor income in New Mexico between 1989 and 1994. This includes $1.161 million in federal tax revenue, $1.015 million in State personal income tax revenue, and seven thousand in local tax revenue. The UMTRA Project will generate the equivalent of 84 full-time jobs during the peak year of remedial action at Ambrosia Lake site. New Mexico`s total funding requirement for the UMTRA Project is estimated to be $2.963 million. The net economic benefit of the Ambrosia Lake portion of the UMTRA Project to New Mexico after the State`s share of the project`s cost, the federal income tax, and the $0.936 million income impact of the alternate use of the State funding are subtracted, will be $7.451 million between 1990 and 1994. In Fiscal Year 1990 the UMTRA Project DOE and contractor offices in Albuquerque directly employed 163 people. Another 78 jobs were also maintained in support of the industry sector and 166 jobs were also maintained in other sections of the New Mexico economy. It is estimated that $19 million dollars of income was generated and 1.949 million of State and local taxes were collected. The University of New Mexico study shows that for every dollar the State of New Mexico invests in the UMTRA Project, it will realize $95.05 in gross labor income. This corresponds to a net return on the States investment in the Project of $97.20 for every dollar invested.

Not Available

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Economic valuation of energy storage coupled with photovoltaics : current technologies and future projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A practical framework for the economic valuation of current energy storage systems coupled with photovoltaic (PV) systems is presented. The solar-with-storage system's operation is optimized for two different rate schedules: ...

Mosher, Trannon

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

CONDENSING ECONOMIZERS FOR SMALL COAL-FIRED BOILERS AND FURNACES PROJECT REPORT - JANUARY 1994  

SciTech Connect

Condensing economizers increase the thermal efficiency of boilers by recovering sensible and latent heat from exhaust gas. These economizers are currently being used commercially for this purpose in a wide range of applications. Performance is dependent upon application-specific factors affecting the utility of recovered heat. With the addition of a condensing economizer boiler efficiency improvements up to 10% are possible. Condensing economizers can also capture flue gas particulates. In this work, the potential use of condensing economizers for both efficiency improvement and control of particulate emissions from small, coal water slurry-fired boilers was evaluated. Analysis was done to predict heat transfer and particulate capture by mechanisms including: inertial impaction, interception, diffusion, thermophoretic forces, and condensation growth. Shell-and-tube geometries were considered with flue gas on the outside of Teflon-covered tubes. Experimental studies were done with both air- and water-cooled economizers refit to a small boiler. Two experimental arrangements were used including oil-firing with injection of flyash upstream of the economizer and direct coal water slurry firing. Firing rates ranged from 27 to 82 kW (92,000 to 280,000 Btu/hr). Inertial impaction was found to be the most important particulate capture mechanism and removal efficiencies to 95% were achieved. With the addition of water sprays directly on the first row of tubes, removal efficiencies increased to 98%. Use of these sprays adversely affects heat recovery. Primary benefits of the sprays are seen to be the addition of small impaction sites and future design improvements are suggested in which such small impacts are permanently added to the highest velocity regions of the economizer. Predicted effects of these added impactors on particulate removal and pressure drop are presented.

BUTCHER,T.A.

1994-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

64

Selected Area Fishery Evaluation Project Economic Analysis Study Final Report, Final Draft Revision 4: November 10, 2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this Study is to provide an economic review of current and proposed changes to the Select Area Fishery Evaluation Project (SAFE or Project). The Study results are the information requested in comments made on the Project by a joint review dated March 2005 by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC) Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) and Independent Economic Analysis Board (IEAB). North et al. (2006) addressed technical questions about operations and plans, and this report contains the response information for comments concerning Project economics. This report can be considered an economic feasibility review meeting guidelines for cost-effective analysis developed by the IEAB (2003). It also contains other economic measurement descriptions to illustrate the economic effects of SAFE. The SAFE is an expansion of a hatchery project (locally called the Clatsop Economic Development Council Fisheries Project or CEDC) started in 1977 that released an early run coho (COH) stock into the Youngs River. The Youngs River entrance to the Columbia River at River Mile 12 is called Youngs Bay, which is located near Astoria, Oregon. The purpose of the hatchery project was to provide increased fishing opportunities for the in-river commercial fishing gillnet fleet. Instead of just releasing fish at the hatchery, a small scale net pen acclimation project in Youngs Bay was tried in 1987. Hirose et al. (1998) found that 1991-1992 COH broodstock over-wintered at the net pens had double the smolt-to-adult return rate (SAR) of traditional hatchery release, less than one percent stray rates, and 99 percent fishery harvests. It was surmised that smolts from other Columbia River hatcheries could be hauled to the net pens for acclimation and release to take advantage of the SAR's and fishing rates. Proposals were tendered to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and other agencies to fund the expansion for using other hatcheries smolts and other off-channel release sites. The BPA, who had been providing funds to the Project since 1982, greatly increased their financial participation for the experimental expansion of the net pen operations in 1993. Instead of just being a funding partner in CEDC operations, the BPA became a major financing source for other hatchery production operations. The BPA has viewed the 10 plus years of funding since then as an explorative project with two phases: a 'research' phase ending in 1993, and a 'development' phase ending in 2006. The next phase is referred to in proposals to BPA for continued funding as an 'establishment' phase to be started in 2007. There are three components of SAFE: (1) The CEDC owns and operates the net pens in the Columbia River estuary on the Oregon side. The CEDC also owns and operates a hatchery on the South Fork Klaskanine River. (2) There are many other hatcheries contributing smolts to the net pen operations. The present suite of hatcheries are operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW). The WDFW owns and operates the net pens at Deep River on the Washington side of the Columbia River. (3) The monitoring and evaluation (M&E) responsibilities are performed by employees of WDFW and ODFW. BPA provides funding for all three components as part of NPCC Project No. 199306000. The CEDC and other contributing hatcheries have other sources of funds that also support the SAFE. BPA's minor share (less than 10 percent) of CEDC funding in 1982 grew to about 55 percent in 1993 with the beginning of the development phase of the Project. The balance of the CEDC budget over the years has been from other federal, state, and local government programs. It has also included a 10 percent fee assessment (five percent of ex-vessel value received by harvesters plus five percent of purchase value made by processors) on harvests that take place in off-channel locations near the release sites. The CEDC total annual budget in the last several years has been in the $600 to $700 thousand range. The Project over

Bonneville Power Administration; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife; Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Selected Area Fishery Evaluation Project Economic Analysis Study Final Report, Final Draft Revision 4: November 10, 2006.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this Study is to provide an economic review of current and proposed changes to the Select Area Fishery Evaluation Project (SAFE or Project). The Study results are the information requested in comments made on the Project by a joint review dated March 2005 by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC) Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) and Independent Economic Analysis Board (IEAB). North et al. (2006) addressed technical questions about operations and plans, and this report contains the response information for comments concerning Project economics. This report can be considered an economic feasibility review meeting guidelines for cost-effective analysis developed by the IEAB (2003). It also contains other economic measurement descriptions to illustrate the economic effects of SAFE. The SAFE is an expansion of a hatchery project (locally called the Clatsop Economic Development Council Fisheries Project or CEDC) started in 1977 that released an early run coho (COH) stock into the Youngs River. The Youngs River entrance to the Columbia River at River Mile 12 is called Youngs Bay, which is located near Astoria, Oregon. The purpose of the hatchery project was to provide increased fishing opportunities for the in-river commercial fishing gillnet fleet. Instead of just releasing fish at the hatchery, a small scale net pen acclimation project in Youngs Bay was tried in 1987. Hirose et al. (1998) found that 1991-1992 COH broodstock over-wintered at the net pens had double the smolt-to-adult return rate (SAR) of traditional hatchery release, less than one percent stray rates, and 99 percent fishery harvests. It was surmised that smolts from other Columbia River hatcheries could be hauled to the net pens for acclimation and release to take advantage of the SAR's and fishing rates. Proposals were tendered to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and other agencies to fund the expansion for using other hatcheries smolts and other off-channel release sites. The BPA, who had been providing funds to the Project since 1982, greatly increased their financial participation for the experimental expansion of the net pen operations in 1993. Instead of just being a funding partner in CEDC operations, the BPA became a major financing source for other hatchery production operations. The BPA has viewed the 10 plus years of funding since then as an explorative project with two phases: a 'research' phase ending in 1993, and a 'development' phase ending in 2006. The next phase is referred to in proposals to BPA for continued funding as an 'establishment' phase to be started in 2007. There are three components of SAFE: (1) The CEDC owns and operates the net pens in the Columbia River estuary on the Oregon side. The CEDC also owns and operates a hatchery on the South Fork Klaskanine River. (2) There are many other hatcheries contributing smolts to the net pen operations. The present suite of hatcheries are operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW). The WDFW owns and operates the net pens at Deep River on the Washington side of the Columbia River. (3) The monitoring and evaluation (M&E) responsibilities are performed by employees of WDFW and ODFW. BPA provides funding for all three components as part of NPCC Project No. 199306000. The CEDC and other contributing hatcheries have other sources of funds that also support the SAFE. BPA's minor share (less than 10 percent) of CEDC funding in 1982 grew to about 55 percent in 1993 with the beginning of the development phase of the Project. The balance of the CEDC budget over the years has been from other federal, state, and local government programs. It has also included a 10 percent fee assessment (five percent of ex-vessel value received by harvesters plus five percent of purchase value made by processors) on harvests that take place in off-channel locations near the release sites. The CEDC total annual budget in the last several years has been in the $600 to $700 thousand range. The Project over

Bonneville Power Administration; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife; Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Executive summary: Technical and economic feasibility study. Trigeneration project, Shanghai Coking and Chemical Plant. Export trade information  

SciTech Connect

The study, conducted by Bechtel, Inc., was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency. The purpose of the study is to assess the feasibility of establishing a new coal-based Trigeneration Complex as an addition to the existing Shanghai Coking and Chemical Plant. The complex would produce gas for the city of Shanghai, chemicals for domestic consumption and foreign export, and utilities for use within the complex and for export to other facilities. The report presents an in-depth study of the economic and technical aspects of the project, as well as an outline of project implementation phases. The study is divided into the following sections: (1) Introduction; (2) Summary; (3) Study Bases; (4) Process Selection and Rationale; (5) Chemical Selection and Marketing; (6) Definition of Facilities; (7) Site and Plot Plan.

NONE

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor Projected Markets and Scoping Economics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The NGNP Project has the objective of developing the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technology to supply high temperature process heat to industrial processes as a substitute for burning of fossil fuels, such as natural gas. Applications of the HTGR technology that have been evaluated by the NGNP Project for supply of process heat include supply of electricity, steam and high-temperature gas to a wide range of industrial processes, and production of hydrogen and oxygen for use in petrochemical, refining, coal to liquid fuels, chemical, and fertilizer plants.

Larry Demick

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Analysis of Field Development Strategies of CO2 EOR/Capture Projects Using a Reservoir Simulation Economic Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model for the evaluation of CO2-EOR projects has been developed. This model includes both reservoir simulation to handle reservoir properties, fluid flow and injection and production schedules, and a numerical economic model that generates a monthly cash flow stream from the outputs of the reservoir model. This model is general enough to be used with any project and provide a solid common basis to all of them. This model was used to evaluate CO2-EOR injection and production strategies and develop an optimization workflow. Producer constraints (maximum oil and gas production rates) should be optimized first to generate a reference case. Further improvements can then be obtained by optimizing the injection starting date and the injection plateau rate. Investigation of sensitivity of CO2-EOR to the presence of an aquifer showed that CO2 injection can limit water influx in the reservoir and is beneficial to recovery, even with a strong water drive. The influence of some key parameters was evaluated: the producer should be completed in the top part of the reservoir, while the injector should be completed over the entire thickness; it is recommended but not mandatory that the injection should start as early as possible to allow for lower water cut limit. Finally, the sensitivity of the economics of the projects to some key parameters was evaluated. The most influent parameter is by far the oil price, but other parameters such as the CO2 source to field distance, the pipeline cost scenario, the CO2 source type or the CO2 market price have roughly the same influence. It is therefore possible to offset an increase of one of them by reducing another.

Saint-Felix, Martin

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Economic assessment of geothermal direct heat technology: A review of five DOE demonstration projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this report the cost of using low temperature geothermal energy resources for direct heating applications is compared to the costs associated with conventional heating fuels. The projects compared all involved replacing conventional fuels (e.g., natural gas and fuel oils) with geothermal energy in existing heating systems. The cost of using geothermal energy in existing systems was also compared with the cost of new coal-fired equipment.

Hederman, William F. Jr.; Cohen, Laura A.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Environmental and economic effects of subsidence: Category 4, Project 1. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A list of more than 70 subsidence areas was screened to select those areas which seemed to have the best potential for providing reliable data. The screening process is described in an appendix. Nine areas were selected for detailed case studies to collect all available data on the environmental and economic effects of the subsidence. Available information from the subsidence areas not selected as case studies was tabulated for each area and is included in an appendix. The nine case study areas are: Arizona; San Joaquin Valley, California; Baldwin Hills, California; Santa Clara Valley, California; Wilmington, California; Las Vegas Valley, Nevada; Houston-Galveston area, Texas; Mexico City, Mexico; and Wairakei, New Zealand. (MHR)

Viets, V.F.; Vaughan, C.K.; Harding, R.C.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Techno-economic projections for advanced small solar thermal electric power plants to years 1990--2000  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advanced technologies applicable to solar thermal electric power systems in the 1990--2000 time-frame are delineated for power applications that fulfill a wide spectrum of small power needs with primary emphasis on power ratings <10 MWe. Techno-economic projections of power system characteristics (energy and capital costs as a function of capacity factor) are made based on development of identified promising technologies. The key characteristic of advanced technology systems is an efficient low-cost solar energy collection while achieving high temperatures for efficient energy conversion. Two-axis tracking systems such as the central receiver or power tower concept and distributed parabolic dish receivers possess this characteristic. For these two basic concepts, advanced technologies including, e.g., conversion systems such as Stirling engines, Brayton/Rankine combined cycles and storage/transport concepts encompassing liquid metals, and reversible-reaction chemical systems are considered. In addition to techno-economic aspects, technologies are also judged in terms of factors such as developmental risk, relative reliability, and probability of success. Improvements accruing to projected advanced technology systems are measured with respect to current (or pre-1985) steam-Rankine systems, as represented by the central receiver pilot plant being constructed near Barstow, California. These improvements, for both central receivers and parabolic dish systems, indicate that pursuit of advanced technology across a broad front can result in post-1985 solar thermal systems having the potential of approaching the goal of competitiveness with conventional power systems; i.e., capital costs of $600 kWe and energy costs of 50 mills/kWe-hr (1977 dollars).

Fujita, T.; Manvi, R.; Roschke, E.J.; El Gabalawi, N.; Herrera, G.; Kuo, T.J.; Chen, K.H.

1978-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

72

NATURAL GAS HYDRATES STORAGE PROJECT PHASE II. CONCEPTUAL DESIGN AND ECONOMIC STUDY  

SciTech Connect

DOE Contract DE-AC26-97FT33203 studied feasibility of utilizing the natural-gas storage property of gas hydrates, so abundantly demonstrated in nature, as an economical industrial process to allow expanded use of the clean-burning fuel in power plants. The laboratory work achieved breakthroughs: (1) Gas hydrates were found to form orders of magnitude faster in an unstirred system with surfactant-water micellar solutions. (2) Hydrate particles were found to self-pack by adsorption on cold metal surfaces from the micellar solutions. (3) Interstitial micellar-water of the packed particles were found to continue forming hydrates. (4) Aluminum surfaces were found to most actively collect the hydrate particles. These laboratory developments were the bases of a conceptual design for a large-scale process where simplification enhances economy. In the design, hydrates form, store, and decompose in the same tank in which gas is pressurized to 550 psi above unstirred micellar solution, chilled by a brine circulating through a bank of aluminum tubing in the tank employing gas-fired refrigeration. Hydrates form on aluminum plates suspended in the chilled micellar solution. A low-grade heat source, such as 110 F water of a power plant, circulates through the tubing bank to release stored gas. The design allows a formation/storage/decomposition cycle in a 24-hour period of 2,254,000 scf of natural gas; the capability of multiple cycles is an advantage of the process. The development costs and the user costs of storing natural gas in a scaled hydrate process were estimated to be competitive with conventional storage means if multiple cycles of hydrate storage were used. If more than 54 cycles/year were used, hydrate development costs per Mscf would be better than development costs of depleted reservoir storage; above 125 cycles/year, hydrate user costs would be lower than user costs of depleted reservoir storage.

R.E. Rogers

1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

73

What are the economic development impacts on U.S. counties of wind power projects, as defined by growth in per capita income  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of all new electric power capacity. ·Wind power plants are often developed in rural areas where local payments and employment growth during plant construction and operation. ·Wind energy represented 2What are the economic development impacts on U.S. counties of wind power projects, as defined

74

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Maverick County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1 (Eagle Pass) – Lining Main Canal – Preliminary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a capital renovation project proposed by Maverick County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1 to the Bureau of Reclamation and North American Development Bank. The proposed project involves lining 3 miles of the “Main Canal” with a urethane lining and a concrete anchor and ballast system. Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated 49-year useful life for the proposed project. Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 8,084 ac-ft of water per year and 2,041,095,338 BTUs (598,211 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of water savings is estimated to be $33.37 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost of energy savings is estimated to be $0.0001322 per BTU ($0.451 per kwh). In addition, expected real (rather than nominal) values are indicated for the Bureau of Reclamation’s three principal evaluation measures specified in the United States Public Law 106-576 legislation. The initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $25.97 per ac-ft of water savings. The initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0001029 per BTU ($0.351 per kwh). The ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -13.65.

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Juan) - Rehabilitation of Alamo Main Canal - Final  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a two-component capital renovation project proposed by Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2, to the U. S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR). The proposed project primarily consists of relining the Alamo Main canal and installing a flow-management system in the Alamo Main canal. Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated useful life for the proposed project. Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 876 ac-ft of water per year and 331,389,647 BTUs (97,125 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of water savings is estimated to be $201.50 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost of energy savings is estimated to be $0.0005592 per BTU ($1.908 per kwh). In addition, expected real (vs nominal) values are indicated for the USBRs three principal evaluation measures specified in the United States Public Law 106-576 legislation. The aggregate initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $182.98 per ac-ft of water savings. The aggregate initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0004837 per BTU ($1.650 per kwh). The aggregate ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -20.74.

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Juan) – 48" Pipeline Replacing Wisconsin Canal – Preliminary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a single-component capital renovation project proposed by Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2, (a.k.a. San Juan) to the North American Development Bank (NADBank) and Bureau of Reclamation. The proposed project involves constructing a 48" pipeline to replace the “Wisconsin Canal.” Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated useful life for the proposed project. Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 977 ac-ft of water per year and 372,892,700 BTUs (109,289 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of water savings is estimated to be $70.97 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost of energy savings is estimated at $0.0002124 per BTU ($0.725 per kwh). In addition, expected real (vs nominal) values are indicated for the Bureau of Reclamation’s three principal evaluation measures specified in the United States Public Law 106-576 legislation. The initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $75.29 per ac-ft of water savings. The initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0001973 per BTU ($0.673 per kwh). The ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -3.12.

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Maverick County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1 (Eagle Pass) – Lining Main Canal – Final  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a capital renovation project proposed by Maverick County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1 to the Bureau of Reclamation and North American Development Bank. The proposed project involves lining 3 miles of the “Main Canal” with a urethane lining and a concrete anchor and ballast system. Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated 49-year useful life for the proposed project. Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 8,084 ac-ft of water per year and 2,041,095,338 BTUs (598,211 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of water savings is estimated to be $33.37 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost of energy savings is estimated to be $0.0001322 per BTU ($0.451 per kwh). In addition, expected real (rather than nominal) values are indicated for the Bureau of Reclamation’s three principal evaluation measures specified in the United States Public Law 106-576 legislation. The initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $25.97 per ac-ft of water savings. The initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0001029 per BTU ($0.351 per kwh). The ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -13.65.

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Juan) - 48" Pipeline Replacing Wisconsin Canal - Final  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a single-component capital renovation project proposed by Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2, (a.k.a. San Juan) to the North American Development Bank (NADBank) and Bureau of Reclamation. The proposed project involves constructing a 48" pipeline to replace the “Wisconsin Canal.” Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated useful life for the proposed project. Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 977 ac-ft of water per year and 372,892,700 BTUs (109,289 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of water savings is estimated to be $70.97 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost of energy savings is estimated at $0.0002124 per BTU ($0.725 per kwh). In addition, expected real (vs nominal) values are indicated for the Bureau of Reclamation’s three principal evaluation measures specified in the United States Public Law 106-576 legislation. The initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $75.29 per ac-ft of water savings. The initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0001973 per BTU ($0.673 per kwh). The ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -3.12.

Rister, Edward; Lacewell, Ronald; Sturdivant, Allen; Robinson, John; Popp, Michael

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Transportation Economic Assistance Program (Wisconsin)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Transportation Economic Assistance Program provides state grants to private business and local governments to improve transportation to projects improving economic conditions and creating or...

80

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: United Irrigation District of Hidalgo County (United) – Rehabilitation of Main Canal, Laterals, and Diversion Pump Station – Final  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a three-component capital renovation project proposed by the United Irrigation District to the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR). The proposed project involves: installing 4.66 miles of pipeline in the Main Canal and Lateral 7N, installing 13.46 miles of pipeline in several laterals and sub-laterals, and rehabilitating the District’s Rio Grande diversion pumping plant. Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated useful lives for all three components. Sensitivity results for both the cost of saving water and the cost of saving energy are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 1,522 ac-ft of water per year and 3,520,302,471 BTUs (1,031,742 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of saving water is estimated to be $341.51 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost of saving energy is estimated at $0.0001574 per BTU ($0.537 per kwh). In addition, real (vs. nominal) values are estimated for the USBRs three principal evaluation measures specified in the U.S. Public Law 106-576. The aggregate initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $359.42 per ac-ft of water savings. The aggregate initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0003468 per BTU ($1.183 per kwh). The aggregate ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -3.551.

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher projected economic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: United Irrigation District of Hidalgo County (United) - Rehabilitation of Main Canal, Laterals, and Diversion Pump Station - Preliminary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a three-component capital renovation project proposed by the United Irrigation District to the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR). The proposed project involves: installing 4.66 miles of pipeline in the Main Canal and Lateral 7N, installing 13.46 miles of pipeline in several laterals and sub-laterals, and rehabilitating the District’s Rio Grande diversion pumping plant. Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated useful lives for all three components. Sensitivity results for both the cost of saving water and the cost of saving energy are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 1,409 ac-ft of water per year and 4,506,882,727 BTUs (1,320,892 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of saving water is estimated to be $325.20 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost of saving energy is estimated at $0.0001113 per BTU ($0.380 per kwh). In addition, real (vs. nominal) values are estimated for the USBRs three principal evaluation measures specified in the U.S. Public Law 106-576. The aggregate initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $354.30 per ac-ft of water savings. The aggregate initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0003376 per BTU ($1.152 per kwh). The aggregate ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -3.442.

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Project 197  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

will bring economic value to both the industrial customers and to the participating companies. * Complete project by June 2006. Accomplishments A ceramic membrane and seal...

83

New England Wind Forum: Determining Factors Influencing Wind Economics in  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Determining Factors Influencing Wind Economics in New England Determining Factors Influencing Wind Economics in New England Figure 1: Installed Wind Project Costs by Region: 2003 through 2006 Projects Only New England's high land values, smaller land parcels, varied terrain, and more moderate wind speeds make for projects of smaller scale and higher unit cost than those likely to be built in Texas or the Great Plains states. Click on the graph to view a larger version. New England's high land values, smaller land parcels, varied terrain, and more moderate wind speeds make for projects of smaller scale and higher unit cost than those likely to be built in Texas or the Great Plains states. View a larger version of the graph. Figure 2: 2006 Project Capacity Factors by Region: 2002 through 2005 Projects Only The chart depicts project capacity factor by region. Click on the graph to view a larger version.

84

How Responsive is Higher Education? The Linkages between Higher Education and the Labor Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

establishment (at the higher education level). Our analysisEconomic Value of Higher Education in Developed Economies: AWeiss. 2008. “From Higher Education to Work: Patterns of

Bardhan, Ashok Deo; Hicks, Daniel; Jaffee, Dwight M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Higher Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Higher Education Higher Education Explore the multiple dimensions of a career at LANL: work with brilliant minds in an inclusive environment rich in intellectual vitality and...

86

Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exploring the Standard Model Exploring the Standard Model       You've heard a lot about the Standard Model and the pieces are hopefully beginning to fall into place. However, even a thorough understanding of the Standard Model is not the end of the story but the beginning. By exploring the structure and details of the Standard Model we encounter new questions. Why do the most fundamental particles have the particular masses we observe? Why aren't they all symmetric? How is the mass of a particle related to the masses of its constituents? Is there any other way of organizing the Standard Model? The activities in this project will elucidate but not answer our questions. The Standard Model tells us how particles behave but not necessarily why they do so. The conversation is only beginning. . . .

87

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Edinburg Irrigation District Hidalgo County No. 1 - 72" Pipeline Replacing Delivery Canal and Multi-Size Pipeline Replacing Delivery Canal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for the capital renovation project proposed by Edinburg Irrigation District Hidalgo County No. 1 to the North American Development Bank (NADBank). Both nominal and real, expected economic and financial costs of water and energy savings are identified throughout the anticipated useful lives for both components of the proposed project (i.e., 72" pipeline replacing a segment of delivery canal along the "Curry Main" and multi-size pipeline replacing a segment of delivery canal along the "North Branch / East Main"). Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Expected cost of water savings and cost of energy savings for both components are aggregated into a composite set of cost measures for the total proposed project. Aggregate cost of water savings is estimated to be $29.87 per ac-ft and energy savings are measured at an aggregate value of $0.0000595 per BTU (i.e., $0.203 per kwh). In addition, expected values are indicated for the Bureau of Reclamation's three principal evaluation measures specified in the United States Public Law 106-576 legislation. The aggregate initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $50.90 per ac-ft of water savings. The aggregate initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0000777 per BTU ($0.265 per kwh). The ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -2.01.

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.; Ellis, John R.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

New England Wind Forum: Wind Power Economics  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

State Activities Projects in New England Building Wind Energy in New England Wind Resource Wind Power Technology Economics Cost Components Determining Factors Influencing Wind Economics in New England How does wind compare to the cost of other electricity options? Markets Siting Policy Technical Challenges Issues Small Wind Large Wind Newsletter Perspectives Events Quick Links to States CT MA ME NH RI VT Bookmark and Share Wind Power Economics Long-Term Cost Trends Since the first major installations of commercial-scale wind turbines in the 1980s, the cost of energy from wind power projects has decreased substantially due to larger turbine generators, towers, and rotor lengths; scale economies associated with larger projects; improvements in manufacturing efficiency, and technological advances in turbine generator and blade design. These technological advances have allowed for higher generating capacities per turbine and more efficient capture of wind, especially at lower wind speeds.

89

Using Net-Zero Energy Projects to Enable Sustainable Economic Redevelopment at the Former Brunswick Air Naval Base  

SciTech Connect

A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites. The Brunswick Naval Air Station is a naval air facility and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Super Fund site that is being cleaned up, and closed down. The objective of this report is not only to look at the economics of individual renewable energy technologies, but also to look at the systemic benefits that can be gained when cost-effective renewable energy technologies are integrated with other systems and businesses in a community; thus multiplying the total monetary, employment, and quality-of-life benefits they can provide to a community.

Huffman, S.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

LIFAC Demonstration at Richmond Power and Light Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2 Volume II: Project Performance and Economics  

SciTech Connect

The C1ean Coal Technology (CCT) Program has been recognized in the National Energy Strategy as a major initiative whereby coal will be able to reach its full potential as a source of energy for the nation and the international marketplace. Attainment of this goal depends upon the development of highly efficient, environmentally sound, competitive coal utilization technologies responsive to diverse energy markets and varied consumer needs. The CCT Program is an effort jointly funded by government and industry whereby the most promising of the advanced coal-based technologies are being moved into the marketplace through demonstration. The CCT Program is being implemented through a total of five competitive solicitations. LIFAC North America, a joint venture partnership of ICF Kaiser Engineers, Inc., and Tampella Power Corporation, is currently demonstrating the LIFAC flue gas desulfurization technology developed by Tampella Power. This technology provides sulfur dioxide emission control for power plants, especially existing facilities with tight space limitations. Sulfur dioxide emissions are expected to be reduced by up to 85% by using limestone as a sorbent. The LIFAC technology is being demonstrated at Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2, a 60-MW coal-fired power plant owned and operated by Richmond Power and Light (RP&L) and located in Richmond, Indiana. The Whitewater plant consumes high-sulfur coals, with sulfur contents ranging from 2.0-2.9 $ZO. The project, co-funded by LIFAC North America and DOE, is being conducted with the participation of Richmond Power and Light, the State of Indiana, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and the Black Beauty Coal Company. The project has a total cost of $21.4 million and a duration of 48 months from the preliminary design phase through the testing program.

None

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Nuclear economics 2000: Deterministic and probabilistic projections of nuclear and coal electric power generation costs for the year 2000  

SciTech Connect

The total busbar electric generating costs were estimated for locations in ten regions of the United States for base-load nuclear and coal-fired power plants with a startup date of January 2000. For the Midwest region a complete data set that specifies each parameter used to obtain the comparative results is supplied. When based on the reference set of input variables, the comparison of power generation costs is found to favor nuclear in most regions of the country. Nuclear power is most favored in the northeast and western regions where coal must be transported over long distances; however, coal-fired generation is most competitive in the north central region where large reserves of cheaply mineable coal exist. In several regions small changes in the reference variables could cause either option to be preferred. The reference data set reflects the better of recent electric utility construction cost experience (BE) for nuclear plants. This study assumes as its reference case a stable regulatory environment and improved planning and construction practices, resulting in nuclear plants typically built at the present BE costs. Today's BE nuclear-plant capital investment cost model is then being used as a surrogate for projected costs for the next generation of light-water reactor plants. An alternative analysis based on today's median experience (ME) nuclear-plant construction cost experience is also included. In this case, coal is favored in all ten regions, implying that typical nuclear capital investment costs must improve for nuclear to be competitive.

Williams, K.A.; Delene, J.G.; Fuller, L.C.; Bowers, H.I.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Development of a Secure, Economic and Environmentally friendly...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a Secure, Economic and Environmentally friendly Modern Power System (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Development of a Secure, Economic and...

93

Higher Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Education » Education » Higher Education Higher Education Explore the multiple dimensions of a career at LANL: work with brilliant minds in an inclusive environment rich in intellectual vitality and opportunities for growth. Contact Education Janelle Vigil-Maestas Community Programs Office (505) 665-4329 Email "The partnership between LANL and regional colleges creates opportunities for students like me to attain challenging and rewarding careers." - Sherry Salas Bachicha Higher Education Resources for Undergraduates, Graduates & Postdocs Opportunities LANL Foundation Scholarships LANL Post Doc Program Programs Certificate in Environmental Monitoring (pdf) Community College Institute (CCI) (pdf) Computer Science and Information Technology Pipeline Program (ADIT/HPC Division) (pdf)

94

EIA - AEO2010 - Comparison With Other Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Comparison With Other Projections Comparison With Other Projections Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Comparison With Other Projections Only IHS Global Insights, Inc. (IHSGI) produces a comprehensive energy projection with a time horizon similar to that of AEO2010. Other organizations, however, address one or more aspects of the U.S. energy market. The most recent projection from IHSGI, as well as others that concentrate on economic growth, international oil prices, energy consumption, electricity, natural gas, petroleum, and coal, are compared here with the AEO2010 projections. Economic growth Projections of the average annual growth rate of real GDP in the United States from 2008 to 2018 range from 2.1 percent to 2.8 percent (Table 9). In the AEO2010 Reference case, real GDP grows by an average of 2.2 percent per year over the period, lower than projected by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), the Congressional Budget Office (CBO), the Social Security Administration (SSA), and the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS)—although none of those projections has been updated since August 2009. The AEO2010 projection is similar to the IHSGI projection and slightly higher than projections by the Interindustry Forecasting Project at the University of Maryland (INFORUM). In March 2009, the consensus Blue Chip projection was for 2.2-percent average annual growth from 2008 to 2018.

95

A GLOBAL TALENT MAGNET: How a San Francisco/Bay Area Higher Education Hub Could Advance California’s Comparative Advantage In Attracting International Talent and Further Build US Economic Competitiveness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chronicle of Higher Education October 13, 2010 http://Re-Imagining California Higher Education,” Center forStudies in Higher Education, Research and Occasional Paper

John Aubrey Douglass, Richard Edelstein and Cecile Hoareau

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Comparison with Other Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Comparison with Other Projections Comparison with Other Projections Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 Comparison with Other Projections Only IHS Global Insight (IHSGI) produces a comprehensive energy projection with a time horizon similar to that of AEO2009. Other organizations, however, address one or more aspects of the U.S. energy market. The most recent projection from IHSGI, as well as others that concentrate on economic growth, international oil prices, energy consumption, electricity, natural gas, petroleum, and coal, are compared here with the AEO2009 projections. Economic Growth Projections of the average annual real GDP growth rate for the United States from 2007 through 2010 range from 0.2 percent to 3.1 percent (Table 15). Real GDP grows at an annual rate of 0.6 percent in the AEO2009 reference case over the period, significantly lower than the projections made by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), and the Social Security Administration (SSA)—although not all of those projections have been updated to take account of the current economic downturn. The AEO2009 projection is slightly lower than the projection by IHSGI and slightly higher than the projection by the Interindustry Forecasting Project at the University of Maryland (INFORUM). In March 2009, the consensus Blue Chip projection was for 2.2-percent average annual growth from 2007 to 2010.

97

Displaying Economic Value  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The distinction between forecast quality and economic value in a cost–loss formulation is well known. Also well known is their complex relationship, even with some instances of a reversal between the two, where higher quality is associated with ...

Caren Marzban

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Energy Service Company (ESCO) Project Performance Benchmarking...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

universities, colleges, and K-12 schools. The values reported represent typical project costs, savings, and economics for ESCO projects in the LBNLNAESCO project...

99

Development of an Energy Conservation Voluntary Agreement, Pilot Project in the Steel Sector in Shandong Province. Project Report to the State Economic and Trade Commission, People's Republic of China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the comparable energy intensity indicator especiallyenergy intensity of different process steps into one indicator.Energy Intensity in the Iron and Steel Industry: A Comparison of Physical and Economic Indicators,”

Price, Lynn; Yun, Jiang; Worrell, Ernst; Wenwei, Du; Sinton, Jonathan E.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Model The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Coal model allows the user to estimate economic development impacts from coal power generation projects. Applying a...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher projected economic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Model The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Photovoltaics (PV) model allows users to estimate economic development impacts from PV projects. JEDI PV has default...

102

The Societal, Social, and Economic Impacts of the World Weather Research Programme Sydney 2000 Forecast Demonstration Project (WWRP S2000 FDP)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sydney 2000 (S2000) Forecast Demonstration Project (FDP) was initiated by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) World Weather Research Programme (WWRP) to enable the world meteorological community to cooperatively demonstrate advanced ...

Linda Anderson-Berry; Tom Keenan; John Bally; Roger Pielke Jr.; Roy Leigh; David King

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Opportunity and Economic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-feet powered by green energy. This could include heating with wood pellet-fired boilers, putting solar panels of projects related to wood pellet emissions, operations, economics, and applications. The facility would research partnerships, and be an architectural prototype for natural materials, innovative wood products

Northern British Columbia, University of

104

Publications Agricultural Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. (2012). Economics of IPM Decisions. Stored Product Protection (1- 9). Manhattan, KS: Kansas State (1-11). Manhattan, KS: Kansas State. http://entomology.k-state.edu/doc/finished- chapters/s156-ch-27 of Food and Agriculture­ Conservation Effects Assessment Project. How to Build Better Agricultural

105

Development of an Energy Conservation Voluntary Agreement, Pilot Project in the Steel Sector in Shandong Province. Project Report to the State Economic and Trade Commission, People's Republic of China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Policy Instruments: Description of Selected Countries, Denmark: AKF, Institute of Local Governmentin government policies and measures to improve energyPolicies for the Energy Conservation Voluntary Agreement on Pilot Project The government

Price, Lynn; Yun, Jiang; Worrell, Ernst; Wenwei, Du; Sinton, Jonathan E.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

DOE Connects with Higher Education Community  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

EDUconnections is a year old project, and through it we celebrate our university partners, spotlighting a different higher education institution every month.

107

Economic Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transmitted to the Congress February 2008 Transmitted to the Congress February 2008 Together with the Annual Report of the Council of Economic Advisers Economic Report of the President Economic Report of the President For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office Internet: bookstore.gpo.gov Phone: (866) 512-1800; DC area (202) 512-1800 ISBN 978-0-16-079822-1 Transmitted to the Congress February 2008 together with THE ANNUAL REPORT of the COUNCIL OF ECONOMIC ADVISERS UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE WASHINGTON : 2008 Fax: (202) 512-2104 Mail Stop: IDCC, Washington, DC 20402-0001 C O N T E N T S ECONOMIC REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT ............................................. ANNUAL REPORT OF THE COUNCIL OF ECONOMIC ADVISERS* ...

108

Competitive economics of nuclear power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some 12 components of a valid study of the competitive economics of a newly ordered nuclear power plant are identified and explicated. These are then used to adjust the original cost projections of four authoritative studies of nuclear and coal power economics.

Hellman, R.

1981-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

109

Renewable Energy Project Refinement Webinar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Energy Project Refinement Webinar Renewable Energy Project Refinement Webinar Renewable Energy Project Refinement Webinar May 28, 2014 11:00AM MDT Attendees will become familiar with the three components of project refinement: project financing strategies, off-taker agreements, and vendor selection. Project refinement obstacles, particularly financing, can deter the deployment of renewable energy projects on tribal lands. Attendees will learn about the financial resources and ownership options available-including venture capital and innovative financing-that can help Tribes overcome longstanding barriers and attract higher levels of private investment. Finally, attendees will learn how project refinement can accelerate renewable energy development and, with it, tribal economic and community development. There is no cost to attend the webinar, but

110

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Harlingen Irrigation District Cameron County No. 1 Canal Meters and Telemetry Equipment, Impervious-Lining of Delivery Canals, Pipelines Replacing Delivery Canals, and On-Farm Delivery-Site Meters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for the capital renovation project proposed by Harlingen Irrigation District Cameron County No. 1 to the North American Development Bank (NADBank). Both nominal and real, expected economic and financial costs of water and energy savings are identified throughout the anticipated useful lives for each of the four components of the proposed project (i.e., canal meters and telemetry equipment, impervious-lining of delivery canals, 24" pipelines replacing delivery canals, and on-farm delivery-site meters). Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Expected cost of water savings and cost of energy savings for each of the four components are aggregated into a composite set of cost measures for the total proposed project. Aggregate cost of water savings is estimated to be $31.37 per ac-ft and energy savings are measured at an aggregate value of $0.0002253 per BTU (i.e., $0.769 per kwh). In addition, expected values are indicated for the Bureau of Reclamation’s three principal evaluation measures specified in the Public Law 106-576 legislation. The aggregate initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $26.87 per ac-ft of water savings. The aggregate initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0001603 per BTU ($0.547 per kwh). The amount of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -1.30.

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.; Ellis, John R.

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Cameron County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Benito) – Interconnect Between Canals 39 and 13-A1 and Replacement of Rio Grande Diversion Pumping Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for the capital renovation project proposed by the Cameron County Irrigation District No. 2 (a.k.a. San Benito) to the North American Development Bank (NADBank) and Bureau of Reclamation. Both nominal and real, expected economic and financial costs of water and energy savings are identified throughout the anticipated useful lives for both components of the proposed project (i.e., a lined interconnect between Canals 39 and 13-A1 and replacement of the Rio Grande diversion pumping plant). Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Expected cost of water savings and cost of energy savings for both components are aggregated into a composite set of cost measures for the total proposed project. Aggregate cost of water savings is estimated to be $41.26 per ac-ft and energy savings are measured at an aggregate value of $0.0001586 per BTU (i.e., $0.541 per kwh). In addition, expected values are indicated for the Bureau of Reclamation’s three principal evaluation measures specified in the United States Public Law 106-576 legislation. The aggregate initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $157.07 per ac-ft of water savings. The aggregate initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0001777 per BTU ($0.606 per kwh). The ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -3.80.

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.; Ellis, John R.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Economic analysis of a candidate 50 cents/Wpk flat-plate photovoltaic manufacturing technology. Low-Cost Solar Array Project 5101-94  

SciTech Connect

The SAMICS methodology was used to analyze the first candidate manufacturing sequence that could meet the LSA Projects's 1986 price goal. That goal represents a reduction in photovoltaic prices by a factor of a hundred over a 10-year period, from approximately 50 $/Wpk in 1975 to 50 cents/Wpk in 1986. The results of analysis which has occurred since the original presentation of the 5 cents/Wpk candidate factory at the 10th LSA Project Integration Meeting are described. Briefly, if a number of events occur, such as a high cell efficiency (14% for this technology), vertical industry integration, long periods of amortizing the initial capital investment, and full utilization of a large plant, then a price of 39.9 cents/Wpk is possible. Non-optimal circumstances will increase this required price, and several of these circumstances are addressed.

Aster, R.W.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

The Google Library Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is an economic analysis of the Google Library project. I describe the project and outline why it is consistent with the legal doctrine of fair use. I go on to examine the transactions costs associated with optin and opt-out models for publisher participation. I conclude that the Google Library Project is legally sound and economically sensible. In particular, an opt-in model would incur very substantial transactions costs, making the entire undertaking problematic.

Hal R. Varian

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

New Mexico State University campus geothermal demonstration project: an engineering construction design and economic evaluation. Final technical report, February 25, 1980-April 24, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed engineering construction cost estimate and economic evaluation of low temperature geothermal energy application for the New Mexico State University Campus are provided. Included are results from controlled experiments to acquire design data, design calculations and parameters, detailed cost estimates, and a comprehensive cost and benefit analysis. Detailed designs are given for a system using 140 to 145{sup 0}F geothermal water to displace 79 billion Btu per year of natural gas now being burned to generate steam. This savings represents a displacement of 44 to 46 percent of NMSU central plant natural gas consumption, or 32 to 35 percent of total NMSU natural gas consumption. The report forms the basis for the system construction phase with work scheduled to commence in July 1981, and target on-stream data of February 1982.

Cunniff, R.A.; Ferguson, E.; Archey, J.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Power Economic Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CRSP Management Center CRSP Management Center Western Area Power Administration January 2011 Power Economic Analysis of Operational Restrictions at Glen Canyon Dam In February, 1997, the operating criteria for Glen Canyon Dam were changed. Operation was restricted to a Modified Low Fluctuating Flow as described in the Operation of Glen Canyon Dam, Colorado River Storage Project, Arizona, Final Environmental Impact Statement, March, 1995. These restrictions reduced the operating flexibility of the hydroelectric power plant and therefore the economic value of the electricity it produced. The Environmental Impact Statement provided impact information to support the Record of Decision governing dam operations. The impact

116

1.011 Project Evaluation, Spring 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methodologies for evaluating civil engineering projects, which typically are large-scale, long-lived projects involving many economic, financial, social, and environmental factors. Basic techniques of engineering economics, ...

Martland, Carl D. (Carl Douglas)

117

Cogeneration Project Analysis Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Not long ago, to evaluate the feasibility of a cogeneration project, a simple economic analysis, that considered capital required, operations and maintenance savings, was sufficient. However, under present economic uncertainties (and highly competitive business environment) the situation has changed dramatically. It is now essential to do an in-depth evaluation to insure that very diverse and applicable factors are determined and properly evaluated. This paper will go beyond the "nuts and bolts" analysis of cogeneration economics. It will enumerate and discuss diverse factors, such as, but not limited to: Fuel Considerations, Heat System Analysis, Electric Power Considerations, Key Technical Project Considerations, and Economic Analysis.

Robinson, A. M.; Garcia, L. N.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

ECONOMIC DISPATCH  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ECONOMIC DISPATCH ECONOMIC DISPATCH OF ELECTRIC GENERATION CAPACITY A REPORT TO CONGRESS AND THE STATES PURSUANT TO SECTIONS 1234 AND 1832 OF THE ENERGY POLICY ACT OF 2005 United States Department of Energy February 2007 ECONOMIC DISPATCH OF ELECTRIC GENERATION CAPACITY A REPORT TO CONGRESS AND THE STATES PURSUANT TO SECTIONS 1234 AND 1832 OF THE ENERGY POLICY ACT OF 2005 Sections 1234 and 1832 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct) 1 direct the U.S. Department of Energy (the Department, or DOE) to: 1) Study the procedures currently used by electric utilities to perform economic dispatch; 2) Identify possible revisions to those procedures to improve the ability of non-utility generation resources to offer their output for sale for the purpose of inclusion in

119

Project information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Information Amistad Project (Texas) Collbran Project (Colorado) Colorado River Storage Project Dolores Project (Colorado) Falcon Project (Texas) Provo River Project (Utah)...

120

International Energy Outlook 2006 - World Energy and Economic Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1: World Energy and Economic Outlook 1: World Energy and Economic Outlook The IEO2006 projections indicate continued growth in world energy use, despite world oil prices that are 35 percent higher in 2025 than projected in last year’s outlook. Energy resources are thought to be adequate to support the growth expected through 2030. Figure 7. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 8. World Marketed Energy Use: OECD and Non-OECD, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Table 1. World Marketed Energy Consumption by Country Grouping, 2003-2030 (Quadrillion Btu) Printer friendly version Region 2003 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 Average Annual Percent Change, 2003-2030

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher projected economic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Higher Yields Can Be Achieved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Notes: While the current forecast is showing higher distillate production than last year, there is room for yet more volume through refiners switching to higher yields than those being forecast. This will only happen if economic incentives evolve to encourage this change. Current high spreads indicate those incentives may occur. This graph shows the distillate yield pattern over the last few years. Generally yields rise in the fall to build stocks for winter distillate use. On average, the yield increase during the fourth quarter is about 2% higher than the yield average of the lowest yield months of June, July and August. (Recognize that a 1% change in yield is about a 150 MB/D change in distillate production, which is about 4% of winter demand.) During the fall of 1996, the winter season began with very low

122

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Acknowledgments Dave Harris, Kentucky Geological Survey Dave Barnes, Western Michigan University John Rupp, Indiana Geological Survey Scott Marsteller, Schlumberger Carbon Services John McBride, Brigham Young University * Project is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy through the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and by a cost share agreement with the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity, Office of Coal Development through the Illinois Clean Coal Institute * ConocoPhillips: in-kind match * Western Kentucky Carbon Storage Foundation: matching funding * SeisRes 2020, Houston: VSP acquisition and processing

123

Economic impact  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In federal fiscal year 2000 (FY00), Berkeley Lab had 4,347 full- and part-time employees. In addition, at any given time of the year, there were more than 1,000 Laboratory guests. These guests, who also reside locally, have an important economic impact on the nine-county Bay Area. However, Berkeley Lab's total economic impact transcends the direct effects of payroll and purchasing. The direct dollars paid to the Lab's employees in the form of wages, salaries, and benefits, and payments made to contractors for goods and services, are respent by employees and contractors again and again in the local and greater economy. Further, while Berkeley Lab has a strong reputation for basic scientific research, many of the Lab's scientific discoveries and inventions have had direct application in industry, spawning new businesses and creating new opportunities for existing firms. This analysis updates the Economic Impact Analysis done in 1996, and its purpose is to describe the economic and geographic impact of Laboratory expenditures and to provide a qualitative understanding of how Berkeley Lab impacts and supports the local community. It is intended as a guide for state, local, and national policy makers as well as local community members. Unless otherwise noted, this analysis uses data from FY00, the most recent year for which full data are available.

Technology Transfer Department

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

UJ)."'DEPARTJ\\.iIENT OF-ENERGY EERE PROJECT MAN AG EMENT CENTER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dept. of Commerce & Economic Opportunity STATE: IL PROJECT Galesburg Water Plant Solar Photovoltaic Project TITLE: Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement...

125

Project Status  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hybrid Generation Simulator Hybrid Generation Simulator HybSim© 1.0 DAVID TRUJILLO SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORY Presented by Joshua Bartlett - University of Michigan Introduction * HybSim© 1.0 copyrighted 2006 * First license to University of Michigan Introduction HybSim© Model What - "Hybrid Simulator"; Tool designed to evaluate the economic and environmental benefits of adding renewable energy to the fossil fuel generation mix in remote and difficult-accessible locations. Why - Benefits of energy storage, decision analysis, risk analysis, load growth issues, load management, economic analysis, planning (what-ifs) Who - Availability to coops, field techs, project managers, administrative personnel Where - Remote villages, military installations, remote industrial systems; any climate

126

Cogeneration project evaluation manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a guide for evaluating and implementing cogeneration projects in North Carolina. It emphasizes economic assessment and describes cogeneration technologies and legal guidelines. Included are hypothetical projects to illustrate tax and cash flow calculations and a discussion of cogeneration/utility system interconnection. In addition, the manual contains utility rate schedules and regulations, sources of financing, equipment information, and consulting assistance.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Retrofit Air Preheat Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Retrofit air preheat systems are the most reliable and efficient means to effect significant energy conservation for large existing industrial furnaces. Units can be quickly installed without a lengthy shutdown, and the furnace efficiency can be increased to a range of 89% to 92%. The economic justification for the addition of this equipment is presented in new total investment curves and simple payout curves for a range of fuel cost. This will enable the owner to quickly determine the preliminary feasibility and conceptual requirements for his project before proceeding with more vigorous work.

Goolsbee, J. A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Project 307  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INTEGRATING MONO ETHANOL AMINE (MEA) INTEGRATING MONO ETHANOL AMINE (MEA) REGENERATION WITH CO 2 COMPRESSION AND PEAKING TO REDUCE CO 2 CAPTURE COSTS Background In Phase I, Trimeric Corporation, in collaboration with the University of Texas at Austin, performed engineering and economic analyses necessary to determine the feasibility of novel MEA processing schemes aimed at reducing the cost of CO 2 capture from flue gas. These novel MEA-based CO 2 capture schemes are designed for integration into coal-fired power plants with the aim of reducing costs and improving efficiency. Primary Project Goal The primary goal of this project was to reduce the cost of MEA scrubbing for the recovery of CO 2 from flue gas by improved process integration. CONTACTS Sean I. Plasynski Sequestration Technology Manager

129

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brian Turk Research Triangle Institute U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Project benefits and objectives * Carbon gasification * Carbon reactivity studies * Catalyst development * Techno-economic analysis * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goal: Reduce CO 2 emissions by developing beneficial uses that meet the DOE net cost metric of $10/MT for captured CO 2 that will mitigate CO 2 emissions in areas where geological storage may not be an optimal solution * Benefits statement: Development of a commercial process for converting CO 2 and a carbon source into a commodity chemical at a

130

Renewable Power Options for Electrical Generation on Kaua'i: Economics and Performance Modeling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI) is working with a team led by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to assess the economic and technical feasibility of increasing the contribution of renewable energy in Hawaii. This part of the HCEI project focuses on working with Kaua'i Island Utility Cooperative (KIUC) to understand how to integrate higher levels of renewable energy into the electric power system of the island of Kaua'i. NREL partnered with KIUC to perform an economic and technical analysis and discussed how to model PV inverters in the electrical grid.

Burman, K.; Keller, J.; Kroposki, B.; Lilienthal, P.; Slaughter, R.; Glassmire, J.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

On economic bicameralism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) for both economic profitability and democratic justice, is explored after the roots of the idea of economic bicameralism in socio-economic history and existing socio-economic institutions (such as Works Councils) ...

Ferreras, Isabelle, 1975-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Preliminary Analysis of the Jobs and Economic Impacts of Renewable...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of the Jobs and Economic Impacts of Renewable Energy Projects Supported by the 1603 Treasury Grant Program Daniel Steinberg and Gian Porro National Renewable Energy...

133

Economic Analysis of a Representative Deep-Water Gas Production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration Natural Gas 1998: Issues and Trends 181 Appendix C Economic Analysis of a Representative Deep-Water Gas Production Project

134

Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: Offshore Wind...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

be interpreted. Based on project-specific inputs from the user, the model estimates job creation, earning, and output (total economic activity) for a given power generation...

135

RECIPIENT:MI Department of Energy, Labor & Economic Growth STATE...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MI Department of Energy, Labor & Economic Growth STATE: MI PROJECT TITLE: SEP - Farm Audit Implementation Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA...

136

Economic Sustainability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report is part of a series of research studies into alternative energy and resource pathways for the global economy. In addition to disseminating original research findings, these studies are intended to contribute to policy dialog and public awareness about environment-economy linkages and sustainable growth. All opinions expressed here are those of the author and should not be attributed to their affiliated institutions. For this project on Energy Pathways, we express thanks to Next 10, who recognized the importance of this issue for California’s sustainable growth agenda and provided conceptual impetus and financial support. Thanks are also due for outstanding research assistance by the following:

David Roland-holst; Fredrich Kahrl; Jennifer Baranoff; Alex Cheng; Adrian Li; Jennifer Ly; Cristy Sanada; Lawrence Shing; Sam Beckerman; Billie Chow; Deal Shelley Jiang; Tom Lueker; Xian Ming Li; Mehmet Seflek; F. Noel Perry; Morrow Cater; Sarah Henry; Adam Rose; John A. “skip

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

PERI Green Economics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PERI Green Economics PERI Green Economics Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: PERI Green Economics Agency/Company /Organization: Political Economy Research Institute Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency, Buildings Phase: Create a Vision, "Evaluate Options and Determine Feasibility" is not in the list of possible values (Bring the Right People Together, Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Get Feedback, Develop Finance and Implement Projects, Create Early Successes, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed) for this property., Prepare a Plan Resource Type: Publications, Lessons learned/best practices User Interface: Website Website: www.peri.umass.edu/green_economics0/

138

Project 143  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

George Rizeq George Rizeq Principal Investigator GE Global Research 18A Mason Irvine, CA 92618 949-330-8973 rizeq@research.ge.com FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF HYDROGEN AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CARBON DIOXIDE Description Projections of increased demands for energy worldwide, coupled with increasing environmental concerns have given rise to the need for new and innovative technologies for coal-based energy plants. Incremental improvements in existing plants will likely fall short of meeting future capacity and environmental needs economically. Thus, the implementation of new technologies at large scale is vital. In order to prepare for this inevitable paradigm shift, it is necessary to have viable alternatives that have been proven both theoretically and experimentally

139

Project311  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lang Lang Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-4881 david.lang@netl.doe.gov John Bowser Principal Investigator Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. 325 Water Street Wilmington, DE 19804 302-999-7996 john.bowser@compactmembrane.com Sequestration CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM LARGE POINT SOURCES Background Capture of carbon dioxide at the source of its emission has been a major focus in greenhouse gas emission control. Current technologies used for capturing CO 2 suffer from inefficient mass transfer and economics. In Phase I, Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. will fabricate and test a membrane-based absorption system for the removal of carbon dioxide from a simulated power-plant flue gas. The stability of the membrane system under various operating conditions

140

Beowawe Bottoming Binary Project Geothermal Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Beowawe Bottoming Binary Project Geothermal Project Beowawe Bottoming Binary Project Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Beowawe Bottoming Binary Project Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Geothermal Energy Production from Low Temperature Resources, Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells, and Geopressured Resources Project Type / Topic 3 Low Temperature Resources Project Description The proposed two-year project supports the DOE GTP's goal of promoting the development and commercial application of energy production from low-temperature geothermal fluids, i.e., between 150°F and 300°F. State Nevada Objectives Demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of electricity generation from nonconventional geothermal resources of 205°F using the first commercial use of a cycle at a geothermal power plant inlet temperature of less than 300°F.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher projected economic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Simulation demonstrates economics of minnelusa polymer floods  

SciTech Connect

Defining some variables with a probability distribution can establish more precisely the economic value of such projects as polymer flooding in the Minnelusa formation. An enhanced-oil-recovery (EOR) project often presents a difficult investment decision. The substantial risks and performance uncertainties must be carefully weighted against the investment costs. a Monte Carlo simulation model was used to characterize the incremental economics of a Minnelusa polymer flood. The principal questions addressed in this paper are: What is the likelihood of the EOR project being an economic success What is the expected economic benefit of the polymer flood With representative field parameters and price projections, the typical Minnelusa polymer flood was found to have a 93% chance of economic success. The expected monetary value (EMV) for the project is $1.6 million. This expected net gain results from the incremental cost of about $50,000 for additional surface equipment and about $480,000 for chemicals. Although each project must be evaluated on its own merits, these results present a strong case of considering polymer-augmented floods in the Minnelusa.

Hochanadel, S.M. (Tiorco Inc., Englewood, CO (US)); Schuyler, J.R.

1991-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

142

1.011 Project Evaluation, Spring 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.011 examines methodologies for evaluating civil engineering projects, which typically are large-scale, long-lived projects involving many economic, financial, social, and environmental factors. Topics covered include: ...

Martland, Carl D.

143

AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report studies the economic impacts of energy policies and climate adaptation generally, and particularly as this relates to employment and innovation. In addition to disseminating original research findings, this study is intended to contribute to policy dialogue and public awareness about environment-economy linkages and sustainable growth. All opinions expressed here are those of the authors and should not be attributed to their affiliated institutions. For this project on Energy Efficiency, Innovation, and Job Creation in California, we express thanks to Next 10, who recognized the importance of this issue for California’s economy and provided essential intellectual impetus and financial support. Thanks are also due for outstanding research assistance by Elliott Deal,

David Roland-holst; Dave Graham-squire; Maryam Kabiri; Fredrich Kahrl; Mehmet Seflek; F. Noel Perry; Morrow Cater; Sarah Henry

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Project 301  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2006 2006 Combustion Technologies CONTACTS Robert R. Romanosky Advanced Research Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-4721 robert.romanosky@netl.doe.gov Arun C. Bose Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-4467 arun.bose@netl.doe.gov ADVANCED, LOW/ZERO EMISSION BOILER DESIGN AND OPERATION Background Over the past years, environmental concerns regarding pollutants have grown dramatically. Current annual greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are 12% higher than they were in 1992. In addition, carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions are projected to increase by an additional 34% over the next 20 years. About one third of carbon emissions in the

145

U. S. energy and economic growth, 1975--2010  

SciTech Connect

This study projects economic growth (GNP) and energy demand for the U.S. to the year 2010. The main finding is that both GNP and total energy demand are likely to grow significantly more slowly than has been assumed in most analyses of energy policy. Projections of energy, GNP, and electricity (total and per capita) are summarized, with electricity demand expected to grow more rapidly than total energy demand. Two scenarios designated ''high'' and ''low'' were developed in this study. However, even the ''high'' scenario, 126 quads (q; 1 q equals 10/sup 15/ Btu) in 2000, is much lower than most previous estimates. It is felt that this raises serious questions about fundamental energy and energy R and D policies which, generally, have been based on perceptions of more lavish energy futures. Although the aggregate demands and GNP are projected to increase rather modestly, the energy demands per capita and GNP per capita increase at rates comparable to or even higher than historic rates. The authors believe that the projections developed in this study represent a logical culmination of many trends toward lower growth. These trends have not yet been factored into the older energy projections upon which so much energy policy is based. 136 references.

Allen, E.L.; Cooper, C.L.; Edmonds, F.C.; Edmonds, J.A.; Reister, D.B.; Weinberg, A.M.; Whittle, C.E.; Zelby, L.W.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Uncertainty, information and project evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a practical method for project evaluation using techniques of financial economics which were developed originally for valuing stock options and other financial assets. It is based on the formulation and ...

Jacoby, Henry D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Great Plains gasification project  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes organizational and research work on a coal gasification project which is based on North Dakota lignite. Many design changes have been incorporated into this plant, which is now being built after years of delay due to environmental, financial, and regulatory problems. Engineering and operational details are given for a project designed for conversion of 22,000 tons/day of liquid into fuel gas and several by products. Economic considerations are included.

Kuhn, A.K.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Overview Overview Annual Energy Outlook 2004 with Projections to 2025 Overview Index (click to jump links) Key Energy Issues to 2025 Economic Growth Energy Prices Energy Consumption Energy Intensity Electricity Generation Energy Production and Imports Carbon Dioxide Emissions Key Energy Issues to 2025 For almost 4 years, natural gas prices have remained at levels substantially higher than those of the 1990s. This has led to a reevaluation of expectations about future trends in natural gas markets, the economics of exploration and production, and the size of the natural gas resource. The Annual Energy Outlook 2004 (AEO2004) forecast reflects such revised expectations, projecting greater dependence on more costly alternative supplies of natural gas, such as imports of liquefied natural gas (LNG), with expansion of existing terminals and development of new facilities, and remote resources from Alaska and from the Mackenzie Delta in Canada, with completion of the Alaska Natural Gas Transportation System and the Mackenzie Delta pipeline.

149

Magnetic fusion reactor economics  

SciTech Connect

An almost primordial trend in the conversion and use of energy is an increased complexity and cost of conversion systems designed to utilize cheaper and more-abundant fuels; this trend is exemplified by the progression fossil fission {yields} fusion. The present projections of the latter indicate that capital costs of the fusion ``burner`` far exceed any commensurate savings associated with the cheapest and most-abundant of fuels. These projections suggest competitive fusion power only if internal costs associate with the use of fossil or fission fuels emerge to make them either uneconomic, unacceptable, or both with respect to expensive fusion systems. This ``implementation-by-default`` plan for fusion is re-examined by identifying in general terms fusion power-plant embodiments that might compete favorably under conditions where internal costs (both economic and environmental) of fossil and/or fission are not as great as is needed to justify the contemporary vision for fusion power. Competitive fusion power in this context will require a significant broadening of an overly focused program to explore the physics and simbiotic technologies leading to more compact, simplified, and efficient plasma-confinement configurations that reside at the heart of an attractive fusion power plant.

Krakowski, R.A.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

The Google Library Project Hal R. Varian  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Google Library Project Hal R. Varian January 2006 Revised: February 10, 2006 Abstract This is an economic analysis of the Google Library project. I describe the project and outline why it is consistent-out models for publisher participation. I conclude that the Google Library Project is legally sound

Varian, Hal R.

151

Economic assessment of nine geothermal direct use applications. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides an economic analysis of nine federally-supported geothermal direct heat applications which were part of DOE's Program Opportunity Notice (PON) program. Three of the projects analyzed were user-owned systems, and six were district heating systems. Five of the nine projects are successful from an economic standpoint and the majority of these projects are in areas where geothermal energy has long been used for heating. The results of this analysis indicate that geothermal energy projects can be economic under certain conditions, but these conditions may not be very widespread.

Gordon, L.C.; Breton, T.R.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chart: project timeline - Project Milestones - Budget - Bibliography * Thank you 29 30 Organization Chart * Project team: Purdue University - Dr. Brenda B. Bowen: PI, student...

153

Financial and Economic Terms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication lists and defines many financial and economic terms with which producers should be familiar.

McCorkle, Dean; Klinefelter, Danny A.

2008-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

154

Higher powers in gravitation  

SciTech Connect

We consider the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmologies of theories of gravity that generalize the Einstein-Hilbert action by replacing the Ricci scalar R with some function f(R). The general asymptotic behavior of these cosmologies is found, at both early and late times, and the effects of adding higher and lower powers of R to the Einstein-Hilbert action is investigated. The assumption that the highest powers of R should dominate the Universe's early history, and that the lowest powers should dominate its future is found to be inaccurate. The behavior of the general solution is complicated, and while it can be the case that single powers of R dominate the dynamics at late times, it can be either the higher or lower powers that do so. It is also shown that it is often the lowest powers of R that dominate at early times, when approach to a bounce or a Tolman solution are generic possibilities. Various examples are considered, and both vacuum and perfect fluid solutions are investigated.

Clifton, Timothy [Department of Astrophysics, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

Science Taking Higher  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4, 1997 4, 1997 Number 7 f Science Taking Higher Profile in Capital continued on page 8 INSIDE 2 Computers and Accelerators 4 Inventions 6 Sloan Digital Sky Survey upon the Clinton Administration and the 105th Congress to increase the nation's investment in scientific research and education. This awareness of science issues emanating from the nation's capital has heartened many of those toiling in the country's laboratories and universities; however, researchers interviewed for this article also said they are closely observing how the rhetoric translates into increased funding as the appropriations process plays out. "I see these [initiatives] as demonstrations of the underlying support of basic science in the community and in Congress," said Jeffrey Photo courtesy

156

HTGR Application Economic Model Users' Manual  

SciTech Connect

The High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Application Economic Model was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. The HTGR Application Economic Model calculates either the required selling price of power and/or heat for a given internal rate of return (IRR) or the IRR for power and/or heat being sold at the market price. The user can generate these economic results for a range of reactor outlet temperatures; with and without power cycles, including either a Brayton or Rankine cycle; for the demonstration plant, first of a kind, or nth of a kind project phases; for up to 16 reactor modules; and for module ratings of 200, 350, or 600 MWt. This users manual contains the mathematical models and operating instructions for the HTGR Application Economic Model. Instructions, screenshots, and examples are provided to guide the user through the HTGR Application Economic Model. This model was designed for users who are familiar with the HTGR design and Excel and engineering economics. Modification of the HTGR Application Economic Model should only be performed by users familiar with the HTGR and its applications, Excel, and Visual Basic.

A.M. Gandrik

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

The economical production of alcohol fuels from coal-derived synthesis gas: Case studies, design, and economics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project is a combination of process simulation and catalyst development aimed at identifying the most economical method for converting coal to syngas to linear higher alcohols to be used as oxygenated fuel additives. There are two tasks. The goal of Task 1 is to discover, study, and evaluate novel heterogeneous catalytic systems for the production of oxygenated fuel enhancers from synthesis gas, and to explore, analytically and on the bench scale, novel reactor and process concepts for use in converting syngas to liquid fuel products. The goal of Task 2 is to simulate, by computer, energy efficient and economically efficient processes for converting coal to energy (fuel alcohols and/or power). The primary focus is to convert syngas to fuel alcohols. This report contains results from Task 2. The first step for Task 2 was to develop computer simulations of alternative coal to syngas to linear higher alcohol processes, to evaluate and compare the economics and energy efficiency of these alternative processes, and to make a preliminary determination as to the most attractive process configuration. A benefit of this approach is that simulations will be debugged and available for use when Task 1 results are available. Seven cases were developed using different gasifier technologies, different methods for altering the H{sub 2}/CO ratio of the syngas to the desired 1.1/1, and with the higher alcohol fuel additives as primary products and as by-products of a power generation facility. Texaco, Shell, and Lurgi gasifier designs were used to test gasifying coal. Steam reforming of natural gas, sour gas shift conversion, or pressure swing adsorption were used to alter the H{sub 2}/CO ratio of the syngas. In addition, a case using only natural gas was prepared to compare coal and natural gas as a source of syngas.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Fueling Station Economics Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fueling Station Economics Model Fueling Station Economics Model Project Summary Full Title: Hydrogen Fueling Station Economics Model Project ID: 193 Principal Investigator: Bill Liss Brief Description: The Gas Technology Institute developed a hydrogen fueling station economics model as part of their project to develop a natural gas to hydrogen fuel station. Keywords: Compressed gas; vehicle; refueling station; cost; natural gas Purpose Calculate hydrogen fueling station costs, including capital, operating, and maintenance costs. Performer Principal Investigator: Bill Liss Organization: Gas Technology Institute Address: 1700 South Mount Prospect Road Des Plains, IL 60018-1804 Telephone: 847-768-0530 Email: william.liss@gastechnology.org Project Description Type of Project: Model Category: Hydrogen Fuel Pathways

159

Wind for Schools Project Curriculum Brief (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) 20% Wind Energy by 2030 report recommends expanding education to ensure a trained workforce to meet the projected growth of the wind industry and deployment. Although a few U.S. higher education institutions offer wind technology education programs, most are found in community and technical colleges, resulting in a shortage of programs preparing highly skilled graduates for wind industry careers. Further, the United States lags behind Europe (which has more graduate programs in wind technology design and manufacturing) and is in danger of relinquishing the economic benefits of domestic production of wind turbines and related components and services to European countries. DOE's Wind Powering America initiative launched the Wind for Schools project to develop a wind energy knowledge base among future leaders of our communities, states, and nation while raising awareness about wind energy's benefits. This fact sheet provides an overview of wind energy curricula as it relates to the Wind for Schools project.

Not Available

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Project 258  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MONITORING POWER PLANT EFFICIENCY USING MONITORING POWER PLANT EFFICIENCY USING THE MICROWAVE-EXCITED PHOTOACOUSTIC EFFECT TO MEASURE UNBURNED CARBON Objective The objective of this project is to explore the use of the microwave-excited photoacoustic (MEPA) effect for quantitative analysis of unburned carbon in fly ash, an extremely important parameter to the electric utility industry. Specific objectives include: * Determine factors that influence accuracy and precision of the MEPA effect; * Evaluate the microwave spectra of fly ash and other divided solids of importance to the power industry; and * Determine the feasibility of an on-line carbon-in-ash monitor based on the MEPA effect. Benefits High carbon levels in coal ash indicate poor combustion efficiency, resulting in additional fuel requirements and higher emissions of pollutants, such as acid-rain

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher projected economic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Technical-Economic Calculation of Gas Pipeline Network Based on Value Engineering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By technical-economic calculation of the gas pipeline network, the economic diameter can be determined and the project investment can be saved. According to the principle of value engineering, a mathematical model is constructed for technical-economic ... Keywords: value engineering, gas pipeline network, function analysis, technical-economic calculation

Liu Jiayou; Zhao Yanxin

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Relations between Higher Education and the Labour Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A high quality and socially responsive higher education is crucial for social equity, economic and social development and the existence of a vibrant democracy and civil society. Without higher education producing knowledgeable, competent and skilled graduates, research and knowledge and being responsive to economic and social needs, equity, democracy and development will all be constrained. The challenges of reconstruction, social transformation and development are tremendous. Higher education must not fail in meeting the new priorities and needs of South Africa The Council on Higher Education (CHE) is an independent statutory body established by the Higher Education Act of 1997. Its mandate is to advise the Minister of Education on all matters of higher education so that the system becomes characterised by equity, quality, responsiveness to economic and social development needs, and effective and efficient provision and management and also contributes to the public good. The CHE is also responsible, through its Higher Education Quality Committee (HEQC), for quality assurance in higher education. One specific responsibility allocated to the CHE is to advise the Minister of Education on stimulating greater responsiveness on the part of higher education to societal needs, especially those

The Tramshed

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

NETL: 2013 Gasification Systems Project Portfolio  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reference Shelf > Project Portfolio Reference Shelf > Project Portfolio Gasification Systems 2013 Gasification Systems Project Portfolio Gasifier Optimization Gas Separation Gas Separation Gasifier Optimization Gasifier Optimization Gas Cleaning Gasifier Optimization Gas Cleaning Gas Separation U.S. Economic Competitiveness Gas Separation Gasifier Optimization U.S. Economic Competitiveness Gasifier Optimization U.S. Economic Competitiveness Gas Cleaning Gasifier Optimization Gas Cleaning Gasifier Optimization Gas Separation U.S. Economic Competitiveness Gas Separation U.S. Economic Competitiveness U.S. Economic Competitiveness Gas Cleaning Gas Cleaning Gas Separation Gas Cleaning Gas Separation Global Environmental Benefits Gas Separation Global Environmental Benefits Global Environmental Benefits Gas Cleaning Gas Separation Systems Analyses Global Environmental Benefits Gas Separation Systems Analyses Global Environmental Benefits Systems Analyses Global Environmental Benefits Gas Cleaning Systems Analyses Gas Cleaning Gas Separation Systems Analyses Systems Analyses Gas Cleaning Systems Analyses Systems Analyses Systems Analyses

164

Higher oil prices: Can OPEC raise prices by cutting production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OPEC's ability to raise prices is evaluated with a model that projects the supply and demand. As part of the model, a new methodology to forecast for the rate of production by non-OPEC nations is developed. A literature review of techniques for estimating oil supply and annual rates of production indicates a new methodology is needed. The new technique incorporates the geological, engineering, and economic aspects of the oil industry by synthesizing curve fitting and econometric techniques. It is used to analyze data for eight regions for non-OPEC oil production: the lower 48 states, Alaska, Canada, Mexico, non-OPEC South America, Western Europe, non-OPEC Africa, and non-OPEC Asia. OPEC's ability to raise prices is examined by tracking the percentage oil US oil demand supplied by imports, the portion of oil demand in Western Europe supplied by local production, the percentage of WOCA oil demand supplied by OPEC and Real OPEC revenues. Results of the model indicate that OPEC can raise oil prices in the early 1990s. OPEC can raise and sustain oil prices near $25 (1982 dollars). Higher oil prices ($35) are not sustainable before 2000 because reduced demand and increased non-OPEC production shrink OPEC revenues below acceptable levels. After 2000, $35 prices are sustainable.

Kaufmann, R.K.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Annual energy outlook 1999, with projections to 2020  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Annual Energy Outlook 1999 (AEO99) presents midterm forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2020 prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The projections are based on results from EIA`s National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The report begins with an Overview summarizing the AEO99 reference case. The next section, Legislation and Regulations, describes the assumptions made with regard to laws that affect energy markets and discusses evolving legislative and regulatory issues. Issues in Focus discusses current energy issues--the economic decline in East Asia, growth in demand for natural gas, vehicle emissions standards, competitive electricity pricing, renewable portfolio standards, and carbon emissions. It is followed by the analysis of energy market trends. The analysis in AEO99 focuses primarily on a reference case and four other cases that assume higher and lower economic growth and higher and lower world oil prices than in the reference case. Forecast tables for these cases are provided in Appendixes A through C. Appendixes D and E present a summary of the reference case forecasts in units of oil equivalence and household energy expenditures. The AEO99 projections are based on Federal, State, and local laws and regulations in effect on July 1, 1998. Pending legislation and sections of existing legislation for which funds have not been appropriated are not reflected in the forecasts. Historical data used for the AEOI99 projections were the most current available as of July 31, 1998, when most 1997 data but only partial 1998 data were available.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Project Accounts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

» Project Accounts » Project Accounts Project Accounts Overview Project accounts are designed to facilitate collaborative computing by allowing multiple users to use the same account. All actions performed by the project account are traceable back to the individual who used the project account to perform those actions via gsisshd accounting logs. Requesting a Project Account PI's, PI proxies and project managers are allowed to request a project account. In NIM do "Actions->Request a Project Account" and fill in the form. Select the repository that the Project Account is to use from the drop-down menu, "Sponsoring Repository". Enter the name you want for the account (8 characters maximum) and a description of what you will use the account for and then click on the "Request Project Account" button. You

167

Economics of natural gas upgrading  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas could be an important alternative energy source in meeting some of the market demand presently met by liquid products from crude oil. This study was initiated to analyze three energy markets to determine if greater use could be made of natural gas or natural gas derived products and if those products could be provided on an economically competitive basis. The three markets targeted for possible increases in gas use were motor fuels, power generation, and the chemical feedstocks market. The economics of processes to convert natural gas to transportation fuels, chemical products, and power were analyzed. The economic analysis was accomplished by drawing on a variety of detailed economic studies, updating them and bringing the results to a common basis. The processes analyzed included production of methanol, MTBE, higher alcohols, gasoline, CNG, and LNG for the transportation market. Production and use of methanol and ammonia in the chemical feedstock market and use of natural gas for power generation were also assessed. Use of both high and low quality gas as a process feed stream was evaluated. The analysis also explored the impact of various gas price growth rates and process facility locations, including remote gas areas. In assessing the transportation fuels market the analysis examined production and use of both conventional and new alternative motor fuels.

Hackworth, J.H.; Koch, R.W.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Economic Evaluation Guide for alternative transportation fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The production of this Economic Evaluation Guide is one activity of AVFCAP. The guide is intended for use by project managers and fleet operators in the public sector. Public fleets have been identified as one of the most likely areas where ATFs will first gain widespread use, because of existing and impending state and federal legislative mandates, as well as for practical reasons such as centralized servicing and refueling. The purpose of this guide is to provide balanced decision-support information to project managers who are considering conducting, or currently managing, ATF demonstration programs. Information for this guide was gathered as part of a related AVFCAP activity, the development of an Information Resource Database. Economic issues related to the development and implementation of ATF programs at the local government level are extremely complex, and require an analysis of federal policies and national and international economics that is generally beyond the scope of local government project managers. The intent of this guide is to examine the information available on the economic evaluation of ATFs, and identify key elements that will help local governments realistically assess the potential costs and savings of an ATF program. The guide also discusses how these various economic factors are related, and how local government priorities affect how different factors are weighed.

de Percin, D.; Werner, J.F. Jr.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

169

Economic Evaluation Guide for alternative transportation fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The production of this Economic Evaluation Guide is one activity of AVFCAP. The guide is intended for use by project managers and fleet operators in the public sector. Public fleets have been identified as one of the most likely areas where ATFs will first gain widespread use, because of existing and impending state and federal legislative mandates, as well as for practical reasons such as centralized servicing and refueling. The purpose of this guide is to provide balanced decision-support information to project managers who are considering conducting, or currently managing, ATF demonstration programs. Information for this guide was gathered as part of a related AVFCAP activity, the development of an Information Resource Database. Economic issues related to the development and implementation of ATF programs at the local government level are extremely complex, and require an analysis of federal policies and national and international economics that is generally beyond the scope of local government project managers. The intent of this guide is to examine the information available on the economic evaluation of ATFs, and identify key elements that will help local governments realistically assess the potential costs and savings of an ATF program. The guide also discusses how these various economic factors are related, and how local government priorities affect how different factors are weighed.

de Percin, D.; Werner, J.F. Jr.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Environmentally and Economically Beneficial Practices on Federal Landscaped  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmentally and Economically Beneficial Practices on Federal Environmentally and Economically Beneficial Practices on Federal Landscaped Grounds Environmentally and Economically Beneficial Practices on Federal Landscaped Grounds This Environmental Protection Agency report contains recommendations for a series of environmental actions, including those to increase environmental and economically beneficial landscaping practices at Federal facilities and federally funded projects. Environmentally and Economically Beneficial Practices on Federal Landscaped Grounds More Documents & Publications Pollution Prevention - Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists for NEPA/309 Reviewers Memorandum to Heads of Federal Departments and Agencies Regarding Pollution Prevention and the National Environmental Policy Act Executive Order 13148-Greening the Government Through Leadership in

171

Grid Renewable Energy-Economic and Financial Analysis | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Economic and Financial Analysis Economic and Financial Analysis Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Grid Renewable Energy-Economic and Financial Analysis Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Finance, Implementation, Market analysis Website: web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/TOPICS/EXTENERGY2/EXTRENENERGYTK/0,, References: Grid Renewable Energy-Economic and Financial Analysis[1] Resources South Africa: Renewable Energy Market Transformation (REMT) Project, Draft Report, Economic and Financial Analysis Due Diligence Estimating Air Pollution Emissions from Fossil Fuel Use in the Electricity Sector in Mexico, North American Commission for Environmental Cooperation New Energy for America, The Apollo Jobs Report: Good Jobs & Energy

172

Kentucky Economic Opportunity Zone Program (KEOZ) (Kentucky) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Economic Opportunity Zone Program (KEOZ) (Kentucky) Economic Opportunity Zone Program (KEOZ) (Kentucky) Kentucky Economic Opportunity Zone Program (KEOZ) (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive Provider Kentucky Cabinet for Economic Development Department of Financial Incentives The Kentucky Economic Opportunity Zone Program (KEOZ) focuses on the development of areas with high unemployment and poverty levels. The program provides an income tax credit of up to 100% of the Kentucky income tax liability on income generated by or arising out of the project. The approved company may require each qualified statewide employee, as

173

Environmentally and Economically Beneficial Practices on Federal Landscaped  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmentally and Economically Beneficial Practices on Federal Environmentally and Economically Beneficial Practices on Federal Landscaped Grounds Environmentally and Economically Beneficial Practices on Federal Landscaped Grounds This Environmental Protection Agency report contains recommendations for a series of environmental actions, including those to increase environmental and economically beneficial landscaping practices at Federal facilities and federally funded projects. Environmentally and Economically Beneficial Practices on Federal Landscaped Grounds More Documents & Publications Pollution Prevention - Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists for NEPA/309 Reviewers Memorandum to Heads of Federal Departments and Agencies Regarding Pollution Prevention and the National Environmental Policy Act EIS-0488: EPA Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact

174

Projects | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Conferences Supporting Organizations Supercomputing and Computation Home | Science & Discovery | Supercomputing and Computation | Projects Projects 1-10 of 180 Results Prev...

175

Project 244  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PROJECT PARTNER Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. Pittsburgh, PA PROJECT PARTNERS Ohio University Athens, OH Texas A&M University-Kingsville Kingsville, TX WEBSITES http:...

176

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits to the program * Project overall objectives * Technical status * Project summary * Conclusions and future plans 3 Benefit...

177

Unconventional gas outlook: resources, economics, and technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report explains the current and potential of the unconventional gas market including country profiles, major project case studies, and new technology research. It identifies the major players in the market and reports their current and forecasted projects, as well as current volume and anticipated output for specific projects. Contents are: Overview of unconventional gas; Global natural gas market; Drivers of unconventional gas sources; Forecast; Types of unconventional gas; Major producing regions Overall market trends; Production technology research; Economics of unconventional gas production; Barriers and challenges; Key regions: Australia, Canada, China, Russia, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States; Major Projects; Industry Initiatives; Major players. Uneconomic or marginally economic resources such as tight (low permeability) sandstones, shale gas, and coalbed methane are considered unconventional. However, due to continued research and favorable gas prices, many previously uneconomic or marginally economic gas resources are now economically viable, and may not be considered unconventional by some companies. Unconventional gas resources are geologically distinct in that conventional gas resources are buoyancy-driven deposits, occurring as discrete accumulations in structural or stratigraphic traps, whereas unconventional gas resources are generally not buoyancy-driven deposits. The unconventional natural gas category (CAM, gas shales, tight sands, and landfill) is expected to continue at double-digit growth levels in the near term. Until 2008, demand for unconventional natural gas is likely to increase at an AAR corresponding to 10.7% from 2003, aided by prioritized research and development efforts. 1 app.

Drazga, B. (ed.)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

Paradoxes and Dilemmas in Managing E-Learning in Higher Education  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M.C. (2002) The Role of US Higher Education in the Global E-Paper Series: Center for Studies in Higher Education.1.02, Higher Education in the Digital Age Project,

Guri-Rosenblit, Sarah

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Roxboro Integrated Automation Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI, Carolina Power & Light (CP&L), and ASEA Brown Boveri (ABB) formed an alliance to develop and demonstrate automation technologies at CP&LOs Roxboro Plant. This alliance is governed by a Memorandum of Understanding that allows all parties to share in the success of the products developed, and to contribute to their commercialization. This research project is intended to demonstrate the economic benefits of efficient and useful plant-wide automation technologies for the utility industry. Successful im...

1997-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

180

Technical and economic feasibility of salt-gradient solar ponds at the Truscott Brine Lake of the Red River Chloride Control Project. A report to the House-Senate Committee on Appropriations of the Ninety-Seventh Congress  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Truscott Brine Lake is being constructed to impound highly brackish water from a number of sources which would normally flow into the Wichita River, a tributary of the Red River in Knox County, Texas. A 35.4-km (22-mile) pipeline is being constructed to carry the brines from their primary source to the Truscott Brine Lake site. The reservoir is designed to contain 100 years of brine emissions from three chloride emission areas in the Wichita River Basin. The solar ponds and power generating facilities would be located in the Bluff Creek Arm of Truscott Brine Lake. The Truscott Brine Lake study includes: survey of suitability of Truscott Lake site, review of solar pond technology, preconceptual design of solar salt pond power plant, and economic evaluation.

Not Available

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher projected economic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Trends in Economic Activity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Trends in Economic Activity Trends in Economic Activity Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Trends in Economic Activity Figure 32. Average annual growth rates fo real GDP, labor force, and productivity, 2006-2030 (percent per year). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 33. Average annual inflation, interest, and unemployment rates, 2006-2030 (percent per year). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data AEO2008 Presents Three Views of Economic Growth AEO2008 presents three views of economic growth for the 2006-2030 projection period. Economic growth depends mainly on growth in the labor force and productivity. In the reference case, the labor force grows by an average of 0.7 percent per year; labor productivity in the nonfarm business

182

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Jobs and Economic Development Impact  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model Resources & Tools Policy Public Lands Public Power Regional Activities State Activities State Lands Siting Jobs and Economic Development Impact Models JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model Fact Sheet Thumbnail of the JEDI fact sheet. The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models are user-friendly tools that estimate the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation at the local and state levels. Based on project-specific or default inputs (derived from industry norms), JEDI estimates the number of jobs and economic impacts to a local area that could reasonably be supported by a power generation project. For example, JEDI estimates the number of in-state construction jobs from a new wind

183

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007-High Economic Growth Case  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 > High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) 7 > High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) International Energy Outlook 2007 High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 12 complete) High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. High World Oil Price Case Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table B1 World Total Primary Energy Consumption by Region Table B1. World Total Primary energy consumption by Region. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table B2 World Total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel Table B2. World Total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

184

Global Health and Economic Impacts of Future Ozone Pollution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We assess the human health and economic impacts of projected 2000-2050 changes in ozone pollution using the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis-Health Effects (EPPA-HE) model, in combination with results from the ...

Webster, Mort D.

185

EIA-Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review-Evaluation of Projections in  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review: Evaluation of Projections in Past Editions (1982-2006)* Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review: Evaluation of Projections in Past Editions (1982-2006)* The Energy Information Administration (EIA) produces projections of energy supply and demand each year in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO). The projections in the AEO are not statements of what will happen but of what might happen, given the assumptions and methodologies used. The projections are business-as-usual trend projections, given known technology, technological and demographic trends, and current laws and regulations. The potential impacts of pending or proposed legislation, regulations, and standards-or of sections of legislation that have been enacted but that require implementing regulations or appropriation of funds that are not provided or specified in the legislation itself-are not reflected in the projections, although there are a few exceptions. It is assumed that current laws and regulations that have sunset dates, but which are regularly renewed, are extended for modeling purposes. Thus, the AEO generally provides a policy-neutral reference case that can be used to analyze policy initiatives. While the analyses in the AEO focus primarily on a reference case, lower and higher economic growth cases, and lower and higher energy price cases; more than 30 alternative cases are generally included in the AEO. Readers are encouraged to review the full range of cases, which address many of the uncertainties inherent in long-term projections.

186

EIA - AEO2010 - Trends in Economic Activity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Trends in Economic Activity Trends in Economic Activity Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Trends in Economic Activity Real gross domestic product returns to its pre-recession level by 2011 AEO2010 presents three views of economic growth (Figure 31). The rate of growth in real GDP depends on assumptions about labor force growth and productivity. In the Reference case, growth in real GDP averages 2.4 percent per year. Figure 31. Average annual growth rates of real GDP, labot force, and productivity in three cases, 2008-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 32. Average annual inflation, interest, and unemployment rates in three cases, 2008-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 33. Sectoral composition of industrial output growth rates in three cases, 2008-2035

187

Tucson Solar Village: Project management  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Tucson Solar Village is a Design/Build Project In Sustainable Community Development which responds to a broad spectrum of energy, environmental, and economic challenges. This project is designed for 820 acres of undeveloped State Trust Land within the Tucson city limits; residential population will be five to six thousand persons with internal employment provided for 1200. This is a 15 year project (for complete buildout and sales) with an estimated cost of $500 million. Details of the project are addressed with emphasis on the process and comments on its transferability.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

ULCOS scenarios and economic modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling activities and scenario building are at the heart of the economic analysis delivered by the ULCOS program. Two main objectives were followed in the framework of SP9. First the modeling team had to provide a set of coherent energy economic scenarios using POLES model. Second, the economic conditions for the emergence of the ULCOS technologies were analyzed. ULCOS contributes to the elaboration of contrasted scenarios that the steel industry could face in the long term. To aim at these objectives specific tools have been used: POLES model for the global energy system modeling and ISIM model for the steel sector based prospective ([1] Hidalgo, 2003). The most promising steel production technologies identified in ULCOS Phase 1 have been introduced into ISIM as generic technologies. ISIM was then integrated as a module into POLES modeling system. The main model outputs are the energy prices and mixes and the steel sector balances with a focus on the technology mix. Actually the climate policy scenarios developped in project allow making recommendations to the steel industry in terms of sustainable development but also in terms of business strategy.

Elie Bellevrat

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

NETL: News Release - Large-Scale Industrial CCS Projects Selected...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

project team includes Leucadia Energy, Denbury, General Electric, Haldor Topsoe, Black & Veatch, Turner Industries, and The University of Texas Bureau of Economic Geology. (DOE...

190

Guide to Clean Development Mechanism Projects Related to Municipal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name A Guide to Clean Development Mechanism Projects Related to Municipal Solid Waste Management AgencyCompany Organization United Nations Economic and Social Commission for...

191

IEA and EIA: Similarities and Differences in Projections and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Thoughts on Energy Projections Used in Climate Change Analysis for Workshop on Methods to Address Uncertainty in Forecasting Future Values of Key Social, Economic ...

192

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Capacity Estimation and Uncertainty Quantification DE-FE0009301 Presenter: Alex Sun Bureau of Economic Geology, University of Texas at Austin U.S. Department of Energy...

193

Renewable Energy Policy Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Policy Project Policy Project Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Renewable Energy Policy Project Agency/Company /Organization: Renewable Energy Policy Project Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Industry Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Policies/deployment programs Website: www.repp.org/ References: http://www.repp.org/ The Renewable Energy Policy Project is an initiative to capture the manufacturing benefits of renewable energy. They have several detailed reports of the economic benefits found in renewable energy for over 20 states. They also offer additional information about technologies and projects currently underway. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Renewable_Energy_Policy_Project&oldid=383512"

194

Distributed Wind - Economical, Clean Energy for Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distributed wind energy works for industrial clients. Corporations and other organizations are choosing to add Distributed Wind energy to their corporate goals for a numerous reasons: economic, environmental, marketing, values, and attracting new employees to name a few. The energy and economic impact of these projects can vary widely and be difficult to demonstrate. This paper and presentation will explore the appropriate application and bottom line economics of distributed wind energy through the review of two case studies.

Trapanese, A.; James, F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Economic Development | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Economic Development Carbon Fiber Cluster Strategy Additive Manufacturing Cluster Strategy Entrepreneurial Development Programs Oak Ridge Science and Technology Park Economic...

196

Experimental economics and experimental computer science: a survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In surprisingly many computer science research projects, system outcomes may be influenced by computerized or human agents with different economic incentives. Such studies include P2P networks, routing protocols, agent systems, and attacker-defender ... Keywords: experimental economics, experimental methodology, human subjects

Jens Grossklags

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

JEDI II: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts from Coal, Naural Gas and Wind Power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Poster for WindPower 2006 held June 4-7, 2006, in Pittsburgh, PA, describing how JEDI II calculates economic impacts from wind projects.

Tegen, S.; Goldberg, M.; Milligan, M.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Economic Development and Pollutants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The purpose of this paper is to investigate the correlation of economic development and pollutants in Brazil from 1960 to 2008. This investigation is… (more)

Törnros, Sara

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

One: California Economic Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE CALIFORNIA ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: AN IMPROVED POWER SITUATIONwas sluggish. An improved outlook for consumer spending inforecast compared with the outlook of UCLA's Anderson

Lieser, Tom K

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Higher Education Tuition Assistance And  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Tables 1. Summary Statistics for W.Va. Public Higher Education Graduates Receiving PROMISE and HEGP .................................................................................................1 Summary Data For PROMISE Scholarship And West Virginia Higher Education Grant Recipients................................................................................................................13 Appendix I: Detailed Description Of Employment Data .........................................14

Mohaghegh, Shahab

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher projected economic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Economic Forecast Report Economic Outlook and Forecasts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

volatile prices such as food and energy, is even softer, averaging around 1% for the year. Inflation should in our last report, the rebound in economic activity has been weak and uninspiring with below-trend formation is far below desired level, the overall trend is positive. Despite these improve- ments, we fear

de Lijser, Peter

202

Using simulation analysis for mining project risk management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a result of the current economic crisis, which led to metal prices fall, mining company managers have been encouraged to cut costs. Thus, improvement projects to reduce cost has become major interest in the Mongolian mining industry. Mining projects ...

Undram Chinbat; Soemon Takakuwa

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Verification, Monitoring, and Certification of Clean Energy Project (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Railroad Commission of Texas has the authority to certify a project as a clean energy project. An applicant is responsible for contracting with the Bureau of Economic Geology of The University...

204

NREL: Water Power Research - Economic and Power System Modeling and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Economic and Power System Modeling and Analysis Economic and Power System Modeling and Analysis NREL has a long history of successful research to understand and improve the cost of renewable energy technologies, their possible deployment scenarios, and the economic impacts of this deployment. As a research laboratory, NREL is a neutral third party and can provide an unbiased perspective of methodologies and approaches used to estimate direct and indirect economic impacts of offshore renewable energy projects. Deployment and Economic Impact NREL's economic analysis team is working to provide stakeholders with the tools necessary to understand potential deployment scenarios of water power technologies and the economic impacts of this deployment. The team is working to improve the representation of marine and

205

Ghana-GTZ Sustainable Economic Development | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Economic Development Economic Development Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Ghana-GTZ Sustainable Economic Development Name Ghana-GTZ Sustainable Economic Development Agency/Company /Organization Deutsche Gesellschaft fĂŒr Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Partner German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) Sector Energy Topics Background analysis, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access Website http://www.gtz.de/en/weltweit/ Program Start 2006 Program End 2013 Country Ghana Western Africa References Sustainable Economic Development in Ghana[1] GTZ is working with Ghana on this project with the following objective: "The judicial, economic and institutional framework conditions and the access to energy as well as to financial and non-financial services has

206

Initial Economic Analysis of Utility-Scale Wind Integration in Hawaii  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes an analysis, conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in May 2010, of the economic characteristics of a particular utility-scale wind configuration project that has been referred to as the 'Big Wind' project.

Not Available

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Sustaining the natural and economical resources of the Lac Courte Oreilles, Leslie Isham; Jason Weaver  

SciTech Connect

The Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians, located in northwest Wisconsin has developed a project, entitled Sustaining the Natural and Economic Resources of the LCO Ojibwe. This technical report is a summary of the project.

Isham, Leslie; Weaver, Jason

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

208

River Protection Project (RPP) Project Management Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Office of River Protection (ORP) Project Management Plan (PMP) for the River Protection Project (RPP) describes the process for developing and operating a Waste Treatment Complex (WTC) to clean up Hanford Site tank waste. The Plan describes the scope of the project, the institutional setting within which the project must be completed, and the management processes and structure planned for implementation. The Plan is written from the perspective of the ORP as the taxpayers' representative. The Hanford Site, in southeastern Washington State, has one of the largest concentrations of radioactive waste in the world, as a result of producing plutonium for national defense for more than 40 years. Approximately 53 million gallons of waste stored in 177 aging underground tanks represent major environmental, social, and political challenges for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). These challenges require numerous interfaces with state and federal environmental officials, Tribal Nations, stakeholders, Congress, and the US Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ). The cleanup of the Site's tank waste is a national issue with the potential for environmental and economic impacts to the region and the nation.

NAVARRO, J.E.

2001-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

209

HIGHER EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT The Evolving Role of Higher Education  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Higher, especially university level, education has a distinctly important role in the education system and in the knowledge acquisition system in general. However, the deteriorating state of higher education in Arab countries, particularly in quality, has become one of the hallmarks of underdevelopment by contemporary criteria. If such deterioration were to continue, it is feared that higher education would become a mechanism for perpetuating the backwardness of Arab countries in the 21 st century.

Nader Fergany

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Economic Value of Veterinary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

laboratories such as TVMDL. Without TVMDL's services, Texas would experience both a health and a fiscal crisis Diagnostic Laboratory (TVMDL) works to protect animal and human health through diagnostic testing of samplesEconomic Value of Veterinary Diagnostics Public Investment in Animal Health Testing Yields Economic

211

Wind Economic Development (Postcard)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America initiative provides information on the economic development benefits of wind energy. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to the economic development benefits section on the Wind Powering America website.

Not Available

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Science Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne Argonne Science Project Ideas! Our Science Project section provides you with sample classroom projects and experiments, online aids for learning about science, as well as ideas for Science Fair Projects. Please select any project below to continue. Also, if you have an idea for a great project or experiment that we could share, please click our Ideas page. We would love to hear from you! Science Fair Ideas Science Fair Ideas! The best ideas for science projects are learning about and investigating something in science that interests you. NEWTON has a list of Science Fair linkd that can help you find the right topic. Toothpick Bridge Web Sites Toothpick Bridge Sites! Building a toothpick bridge is a great class project for physics and engineering students. Here are some sites that we recommend to get you started!

213

Economic evaluation of smart well technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The demand of oil and gas resources is high and the forecasts show a trend for higher requirements in the future. More unconventional resource exploitation along with an increase in the total recovery in current producing fields is required. At this pivotal time the role of emerging technologies is of at most importance. Smart or intelligent well technology is one of the up and coming technologies that have been developed to assist improvements in field development outcome. In this paper a comprehensive review of this technology has been discussed. The possible reservoir environments in which smart well technology could be used and also, the possible benefits that could be realized by utilizing smart well technology has been discussed. The economic impact of smart well technology has been studied thoroughly. Five field cases were used to evaluate the economics of smart well technology in various production environments. Real field data along with best estimate of smart well technology pricings were used in this research. I have used different comparisons between smart well cases and conventional completion to illustrate the economic differences between the different completion scenarios. Based on the research, I have realized that all the smart well cases showed a better economic return than conventional completions. The offshore cases showed a good economic environment for smart well technology. Large onshore developments with smart well technology can also provide a lucrative economic return. These situations can increase the overall economic return and ultimate recovery which will assist in meeting some of the oil demand around the globe.

Al Omair, Abdullatif A.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Wind Economic Development  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Development Development This page provides software applications and publications to help individuals, developers, local governments, and utilities make decisions about wind power. Projecting costs and benefits of new installations, including the economic development impacts created, is a key element in looking at potential wind applications. Communities, states, regions, jobs (i.e., construction, operations and maintenance), the tax base, tax revenues, and others can be positively affected. These benefits are in addition to the impacts for the owner or developer. Wind, A Montana County's Plan to Reverse a Declining Tax Base and Expand Economic Opportunities Thumbnail of the Cascade County Wind Power brochure. Cascade County, Montana, Commissioner Peggy Beltrone, initiated an

215

Coke gasification costs, economics, and commercial applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The disposition of petroleum coke remains a problem for modern high conversion refineries. Market uncertainty and the price for coke can prevent the implementation of otherwise attractive projects. The commercially proven Texaco Gasification Process remains an excellent option for clean, cost effective coke disposition as demonstrated by the new coke gasification units coming on-line and under design. Previous papers, have discussed the coke market and general economics of coke gasification. This paper updates the current market situation and economics, and provide more details on cost and performance based on recent studies for commercial plants.

Jahnke, F.C.; Falsetti, J.S.; Wilson, R.F. [Texaco, Inc., White Plains, NY (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

PMC·F.F2. u.s. DEPARTlVlENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department of Commerce & Economic Opportunity STATE: IL PROJECT Illinois SEP Additional Solar Project for Cornerstone Church TITLE: Funding Opportunity Announcement Number...

217

Temperature Shocks and Economic Growth: Evidence from the Last Half Century  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper uses historical fluctuations in temperature within countries to identify its effects on aggregate economic outcomes. We find three primary results. First, higher temperatures substantially reduce economic growth ...

Dell, Melissa Lynne

218

Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Issues Issues in Focus Introduction This section of the AEO provides in-depth discussions on topics of special interest that may affect the projec- tions, including significant changes in assumptions and recent developments in technologies for energy production, energy consumption, and emissions con- trols. With world oil prices escalating in recent years, this year's discussions place special emphasis on world oil prices, including a discussion of EIA's world oil price outlook, the impact of higher world oil prices on economic growth, and changing trends in the U.S. refinery industry. AEO2006 extends the AEO projections to 2030 for the first time. An important uncertainty with a longer projection time horizon concerns the development and implementation of various technologies. Accord- ingly, this section includes a discussion of those tech- nologies that, if successful, could

219

The Castle Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of the Castle project was to provide a parallel programming environment that enables the construction of high performance applications that run portably across many platforms. The authors approach was to design and implement a multilayered architecture, with higher levels building on lower ones to ensure portability, but with care taken not to introduce abstractions that sacrifice performance.

Tom Anderson; David Culler; James Demmel; Jerry Feldman; Susan Graham; Paul Hilfinger; Katherine Yelick

2000-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

220

Economic Development for a Growing Economy Tax Credit (Indiana) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Economic Development for a Growing Economy Tax Credit (Indiana) Economic Development for a Growing Economy Tax Credit (Indiana) Economic Development for a Growing Economy Tax Credit (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Agricultural Industrial Construction Retail Supplier Fuel Distributor Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Indiana Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive Provider Indiana Economic Development Corporation The Economic Development for a Growing Economy Tax Credit is awarded to businesses with projects that result in net new jobs. The tax credit must be a major factor in the company's decision to move forward with the project in Indiana. The refundable tax credit is calculated as a percentage of the expected increased tax withholdings generated from the new jobs. The

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher projected economic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Job and Economic Development Impact Models (JEDI) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Job and Economic Development Impact Models (JEDI) Job and Economic Development Impact Models (JEDI) Jump to: navigation, search Site head analysis jedi.jpg Overview Originally developed in 2002 for the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America project, the Job and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) model was designed to be an easy-to-use, excel based calculator which uses IMPLAN's economic multipliers to estimate the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation and biofuel plants at the local and state levels. It comes as a separate model for wind, PV, natural gas, CSP, coal, and biofuels. Job's, earnings, and impact are outputs. Inputs are construction costs, equipment costs, O&M costs, financing parameters and any other costs associated with the project. With its success in

222

Performance Funding of State Public Higher Education: Has it Delivered the Desired External Accountability and Institutional Improvement?.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In today’s economic climate, state public institutions of higher education face challenges on multiple fronts. This applies particularly to state funding as it relates to… (more)

Polatajko, Mark M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Power Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Projects Power Projects Contact SN Customers Environmental Review-NEPA Operations & Maintenance Planning & Projects Power Marketing Rates You are here: SN Home page > About SNR Power Projects Central Valley: In California's Central Valley, 18 dams create reservoirs that can store 13 million acre-feet of water. The project's 615 miles of canals irrigate an area 400 miles long and 45 miles wide--almost one third of California. Powerplants at the dams have an installed capacity of 2,099 megawatts and provide enough energy for 650,000 people. Transmission lines total about 865 circuit-miles. Washoe: This project in west-central Nevada and east-central California was designed to improve the regulation of runoff from the Truckee and Carson river systems and to provide supplemental irrigation water and drainage, as well as water for municipal, industrial and fishery use. The project's Stampede Powerplant has a maximum capacity of 4 MW.

224

Pyramid Lake Renewable Energy Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe is a federally recognized Tribe residing on the Pyramid Lake Reservation in western Nevada. The funding for this project was used to identify blind geothermal systems disconnected from geothermal sacred sites and develop a Tribal energy corporation for evaluating potential economic development for profit.

John Jackson

2008-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

225

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Characterization Mega Transect DE-FE0001941 Ramon Trevino Texas Bureau of Economic Geology U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D...

226

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

gas migration which are not documented or mentioned in literature. 2. The natural gas storage industry has a strong economic incentive not to lose gas. Yet it does not...

227

The Economic Value Of Ensemble-Based Weather Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential economic benefit associated with the use of an ensemble of forecasts versus anequivalent or higher-resolution control forecast is discussed. Neither forecast systems are post-processed,except a simple calibration that is applied to ...

Yuejian Zhu; Zoltan Toth; Richard Wobus; David Richardson; Kenneth Mylne

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

The Wind Project Development Process  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Wind Project Wind Project Development Process Developed for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory by Dale Osborn Distributed Generation Systems, Inc. September 1998 The Wind Project Development Process Site Selection Land Agreements Wind Assessment Environmental Review Economic Modeling Interconnection Studies Financing Permitting Sales Agreements Turbine Procurement Construction Contracting Operations & Maintenance Site Selection Evidence of Significant Wind Preferably Privately Owned Remote Land Proximity to Transmission Lines Reasonable Road Access Few Environmental Concerns Receptive Community Land Agreements Term: Expected Life of the Turbine Assignable Indemnification Rights Compensation: Percentage of Revenues Reclamation Provision Wind Rights, Ingress/Egress Rights, Transmission Rights

229

The Biocatalytic Desulfurization Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The material in this report summarizes the Diversa technical effort in development of a biocatalyst for the biodesulfurization of Petro Star diesel as well as an economic report of standalone and combined desulfurization options, prepared by Pelorus and Anvil, to support and inform the development of a commercially viable process. We will discuss goals of the projected as originally stated and their modification as guided by parallel efforts to evaluate commercialization economics and process parameters. We describe efforts to identify novel genes and hosts for the generation of an optimal biocatalyst, analysis of diesel fuels (untreated, chemically oxidized and hydrotreated) for organosulfur compound composition and directed evolution of enzymes central to the biodesulfurization pathway to optimize properties important for their use in a biocatalyst. Finally we will summarize the challenges and issues that are central to successful development of a viable biodesulfurization process.

David Nunn; James Boltz; Philip M. DiGrazia; Larry Nace

2006-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

230

Essays in financial economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis consists of three essays in financial economics. Chapter 1 is entitled "Inside Debt." Existing theories advocate the use of cash and equity in executive compensation. However, recent empirical studies have ...

Edmans, Alex

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

PNNL: Economic Development Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

business looking for a door to the Laboratory? The Economic Development Office at PNNL is here to help you start, grow, or relocate your business. We help you tap into...

232

PART ONE: ECONOMIC REVIEW  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I Policy Environment 1.1 During the year 1999-2000, the Indian economy exhibited a good degree of resilience. Economic growth continued to be in line with the trend in the post 1991 period, notwithstanding

unknown authors

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

2020 Vision Project Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the 2020 Vision project began in 1996, students from participating schools have completed and submitted a variety of scenarios describing potential world and regional conditions in the year 2020 and their possible effect on US national security. This report summarizes the students' views and describes trends observed over the course of the 2020 Vision project's five years. It also highlights the main organizational features of the project. An analysis of thematic trends among the scenarios showed interesting shifts in students' thinking, particularly in their views of computer technology, US relations with China, and globalization. In 1996, most students perceived computer technology as highly beneficial to society, but as the year 2000 approached, this technology was viewed with fear and suspicion, even personified as a malicious, uncontrollable being. Yet, after New Year's passed with little disruption, students generally again perceived computer technology as beneficial. Also in 1996, students tended to see US relations with China as potentially positive, with economic interaction proving favorable to both countries. By 2000, this view had transformed into a perception of China emerging as the US' main rival and ''enemy'' in the global geopolitical realm. Regarding globalization, students in the first two years of the project tended to perceive world events as dependent on US action. However, by the end of the project, they saw the US as having little control over world events and therefore, we Americans would need to cooperate and compromise with other nations in order to maintain our own well-being.

Gordon, K.W.; Scott, K.P.

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

A global perspective on energy markets and economic integration.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

What will be the effect of Iraqi domestic instability on Iraqi oil production Negotiations for Iranian nuclear technology on Iranian oil supplies Saudi commitment to expanded oil production President Putin's policies on Russian oil and natural gas supplies President Chavez's policies on Venezuelan oil supplies Instability in Nigeria Higher oil prices on world economic growth Effect of economic growth on oil demand in China, India, U.S., etc. Higher oil prices on non-OPEC oil supplies

Baker, Arnold Barry

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CCS CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits to the program * Project overall objectives * Technical status * Project summary * Conclusions and future plans 3 Benefit to the Program * Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30 percent. * Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones. * This research project develops a reservoir scale CO 2 plume migration model at the Sleipner project, Norway. The Sleipner project in the Norwegian North Sea is the world's first commercial scale geological carbon storage project. 4D seismic data have delineated the CO 2 plume migration history. The relatively long history and high fidelity data make

236

Why Cogeneration Development Projects Fail  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration projects that are organized by developers fail to reach fruition for reasons other than the basic economical or technical soundness of the opportunity. Cogeneration development projects fail because of misunderstanding by the host or other participants of their obligations, inadequate management support by the host organization, regulatory changes, environmental difficulties, overly high expectations of profit, changes in fuel economics, utility policy changes, changing financial markets, and a variety of other issues. Each of these potential problem areas will be discussed briefly, examples will be given, and remedies will be suggested. Most of these potential problems then can be either avoided or attenuated by advanced provisions so that they will not become fatal flaws to project completion.

Greenwood, R. W.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Costilla County Biodiesel Pilot Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Costilla County Biodiesel Pilot Project has demonstrated the compatibility of biodiesel technology and economics on a local scale. The project has been committed to making homegrown biodiesel a viable form of community economic development. The project has benefited by reducing risks by building the facility gradually and avoiding large initial outlays of money for facilities and technologies. A primary advantage of this type of community-scale biodiesel production is that it allows for a relatively independent, local solution to fuel production. Successfully using locally sourced feedstocks and putting the fuel into local use emphasizes the feasibility of different business models under the biodiesel tent and that there is more than just a one size fits all template for successful biodiesel production.

Doon, Ben; Quintana, Dan

2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

238

Center for Economic and Environmental Partnership Inc | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Economic and Environmental Partnership Inc Economic and Environmental Partnership Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Center for Economic and Environmental Partnership Inc Place Albany, New York Zip NY 12207-1 Sector Renewable Energy Product US-based non-profit organisation sponsored by New York State Government. It takes initiatives in many projects in the field of renewable energy as a coordinator. References Center for Economic and Environmental Partnership Inc[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Center for Economic and Environmental Partnership Inc is a company located in Albany, New York . References ↑ "Center for Economic and Environmental Partnership Inc" Retrieved from

239

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Test and Evaluation of Test and Evaluation of Engineered Biomineralization Technology for Sealing Existing wells Project Number: FE0009599 Robin Gerlach Al Cunningham, Lee H Spangler Montana State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Presentation Outline * Motivation & Benefit to the Program (required) * Benefit to the Program and Project Overview (required) * Background information - Project Concept (MICP) - Ureolytic Biomineralization, Biomineralization Sealing * Accomplishments to Date - Site Characterization - Site Preparation - Experimentation and Modeling - Field Deployable Injection Strategy Development * Summary

240

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBNL's Consolidated Sequestration Research Program (CSRP) Project Number FWP ESD09-056 Barry Freifeld Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits and Goals of GEO-SEQ * Technical Status - Otway Project (CO2CRC) - In Salah (BP, Sonatrach and Statoil) - Ketzin Project (GFZ, Potsdam) - Aquistore (PTRC) * Accomplishments and Summary * Future Plans 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed: - Develop technologies to improve reservoir storage capacity estimation - Develop and validate technologies to ensure 99 percent storage permanence.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher projected economic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1-23, 2012 1-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline I. Benefits II. Project Overview III. Technical Status A. Background B. Results IV. Accomplishments V. Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals. - Prediction of CO 2 storage capacity. * Project benefits. - Workforce/Student Training: Support of 3 student GAs in use of multiphase flow and geochemical models simulating CO 2 injection. - Support of Missouri DGLS Sequestration Program. 4 Project Overview: Goals and Objectives Project Goals and Objectives. 1. Training graduate students in use of multi-phase flow models related to CO 2 sequestration. 2. Training graduate students in use of geochemical models to assess interaction of CO

242

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center for Coal's Center for Coal's FY10 Carbon Sequestration Peer Review February 8 - 12, 2010 2 Collaborators * Tissa Illangasekare (Colorado School of Mines) * Michael Plampin (Colorado School of Mines) * Jeri Sullivan (LANL) * Shaoping Chu (LANL) * Jacob Bauman (LANL) * Mark Porter (LANL) 3 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the program * Project overview * Project technical status * Accomplishments to date * Future Plans * Appendix 4 Benefit to the program * Program goals being addressed (2011 TPP): - Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones. * Project benefit: - This project is developing system modeling capabilities that can be used to address challenges associated with infrastructure development, integration, permanence &

243

Project 364  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

765-494-5623 lucht@purdue.edu DEVELOPMENT OF NEW OPTICAL SENSORS FOR MEASUREMENT OF MERCURY CONCENTRATIONS, SPECIATION, AND CHEMISTRY Project Description The feasibility of...

244

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Test and Evaluation of Engineered Biomineralization Technology for Sealing Existing wells Project Number: FE0009599 Robin Gerlach Al Cunningham, Lee H Spangler Montana State...

245

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impact of CO 2 Injection on the Subsurface Microbial Community in an Illinois Basin CCS Reservoir: Integrated Student Training in Geoscience and Geomicrobiology Project Number...

246

Project 283  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NJ 07039 973-535 2328 ArchieRobertson@fwc.com Sequestration ADVANCED CO 2 CYCLE POWER GENERATION Background This project will develop a conceptual power plant design...

247

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for...

248

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Concrete products in this project * Standard 8" concrete blocks * Standard 4' x 8' fiber-cement boards CO 2 The Goals * Maximizing carbon uptake by carbonation (at least...

249

Project 252  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stanford Global Climate Energy Project Terralog Technologies TransAlta University of Alaska Fairbanks Washington State Department of Natural Resources Western Interstate...

250

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

research partnership to improve the understanding of CO 2 within coal and shale reservoirs. 2 2 3 Presentation Outline * Program Goal and Benefits Statement * Project...

251

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mechanistic insights 5 Project Overview: Scope of work * Task 1 - Pipeline and Casing Steel Corrosion Studies * Evaluate corrosion behavior of pipeline steels in CO 2 mixtures...

252

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

20-22, 2013 2 Acknowledgements * NETL * Shell * Tri-State * Trapper Mining * State of Colorado 3 Presentation Outline * Program Benefits * Project Program Goals * Technical...

253

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Evaluating Potential Groundwater Impacts and Natural Geochemical...

254

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Introduction * Organization * Benefit to Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date...

255

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* This project pinpoints the critical catalyst features necessary to promote carbon dioxide conversion to acrylate, validate the chemical catalysis approach, and develop an...

256

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scale CO 2 Injection and Optimization of Storage Capacity in the Southeastern United States Project Number: DE-FE0010554 George J. Koperna, Jr. Shawna Cyphers Advanced Resources...

257

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CCUS Pittsburgh,...

258

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interdisciplinary Investigation of the CO 2 Sequestration in Depleted Shale Gas Formations Project Number DE-FE-0004731 Jennifer Wilcox, Tony Kovscek, Mark Zoback Stanford...

259

Economic Policy Rationales and Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... on Economic Growth. Brief No. 13-3: The Economic Benefits from Improved Cyber Security Infrastructure. Brief No. 13-4: Beyond ...

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

260

On Impacts of Economic Growth.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis presents four papers on impacts of economic growth. The results indicate that faster economic growth improves the short-run political survival prospects of national… (more)

Burke, Paul John

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher projected economic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Boiler Stack Economizer Tube Failure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Boiler Stack Economizer Tube Failure ... performed to investigate the failure of a type 304 stainless steel tube from a boiler stack economizer.

262

Argonne TDC: Regional Economic Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional Economic Development Argonne participates in economic development activities with State of Illinois agencies and programs, business and industrial organizations, and...

263

West Virginia Higher Education Graduate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1. Work Participation And Annualized Wages Of West Virginia Public Higher Education Graduates From This report analyzes the West Virginia industry of employment (and wages) of graduates from state public .................................................................................................1 Results By Industry And Summary Degree

Mohaghegh, Shahab

264

Jobs and Economic Development from New Transmission and Generation in Wyoming  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is intended to inform policymakers, local government officials, and Wyoming residents about the jobs and economic development activity that could occur should new infrastructure investments in Wyoming move forward. The report and analysis presented is not a projection or a forecast of what will happen. Instead, the report uses a hypothetical deployment scenario and economic modeling tools to estimate the jobs and economic activity likely associated with these projects if or when they are built.

Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Minority Economic Impact | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Minority Economic Impact Minority Economic Impact Diversity and Inclusion Supporting Small Businesses Minority Economic Impact Partnering with Minority Serving Institutions...

266

Essays in Applied Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data. Topical Report RTI Project Number 0212005.001.001.008,Prepared for Florida Department of Health by RTI Interna-tional, RTI International, 3040 Cornwallis Road, Research

Rider, Jessica Kristin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

EIA-Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review-Evaluation of Projections in  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8) 8) The Energy Information Administration (EIA) produces projections of energy supply and demand each year in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO). The projections in the AEO are not statements of what will happen but of what might happen, given the assumptions and methodologies used. The projections are business-as-usual trend projections, given known technology, technological and demographic trends, and current laws and regulations. The potential impacts of pending or proposed legislation, regulations, and standards-or of sections of legislation that have been enacted but that require implementing regulations or appropriation of funds that are not provided or specified in the legislation itself-are not reflected in the projections. The AEO is based on only then current Federal and State laws and regulations. Thus, the AEO provides a policy-neutral reference case that can be used to analyze policy initiatives. The analyses in the AEO primarily focuses on a reference case, lower and higher economic growth cases, and lower and higher energy price cases. However, more than 30 alternative cases are generally included in the AEO. Readers are encouraged to review the full range of cases, which address many of the uncertainties inherent in long-term projections.

268

Economizer Applications in Dual-Duct Air-Handling Units  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper provides analytical tools and engineering methods to evaluate the feasibility of the economizer for dual-duct air-handling units. The results show that the economizer decreases cooling energy consumption without heating energy penalties for dual-fan, dual-duct air-handling units. The economizer has significant heating energy penalties for single-fan, dual-duct air-handling units. The penalties are higher than the cooling energy savings when the cold airflow is less than the hot airflow. Detailed engineering analyses are required to evaluate the feasibility of the economizer for single-fan, dual-duct systems.

Joo, I.; Liu, M.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Sensitivity Analysis of Factors Effecting the Financial Viability of Cogeneration Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration represents an alternative available for industry to take advantage of energy conservation through simultaneous generation of thermal energy and electricity. A positive regulatory climate can further contribute to economic viability. However, the economic viability can be impacted by different variables. Presented are a series of sensitivity analyses which were developed for cogeneration projects which indicate the relative impact on project economics.

Clunie, J. F.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

A Compilation and Review of Alaska Energy Projects  

SciTech Connect

There have been many energy projects proposed in Alaska over the past several decades, from large scale hydro projects that have never been built to small scale village power projects to use local alternative energy sources, many of which have also not been built. This project was initially intended to review these rejected projects to evaluate the economic feasibility of these ideas in the light of current economics. This review included contacting the agencies responsible for reviewing and funding these projects in Alaska, including the Alaska Energy Authority, the Denali Commission, and the Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory, obtaining available information about these projects, and analyzing the economic data. Unfortunately, the most apparent result of this effort was that the data associated with these projects was not collected in a systematic way that allowed this information to be analyzed.

Arlon Tussing; Steve Colt

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

271

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SnĂžhvit CO SnĂžhvit CO 2 Storage Project Project Number: FWP-FEW0174 Task 4 Principal Investigators: L. Chiaramonte, *J.A. White Team Members: Y. Hao, J. Wagoner, S. Walsh Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Outline * Benefit to Program * Project Goals and Objectives * Technical Status * Summary & Accomplishments * Appendix 3 Benefit to the Program * The research project is focused on mechanical

272

Project title:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project title: Roseville Elverta (RSC-ELV) OPGW Replacement Project Project title: Roseville Elverta (RSC-ELV) OPGW Replacement Project Requested By: David Young Mail Code : N1410 Phone: 916-353-4542 Date Submitted: 5/4/2011 Date Required: 5/7/2011 Description of the Project: Purpose and Need The Western Area Power Administration (Western), Sierra Nevada Region (SNR), is responsible for the operation and maintenance (O&M) of federally owned and operated transmission lines, Switchyards, and facilities throughout California. Western and Reclamation must comply with the National Electric Safety Code, Western States Coordinating Council (WECC), and internal directives for protecting human safety, the physical environment, and maintaining the reliable operation of the transmission system. There is an existing OPGW communications fiber on the transmission towers between Roseville and Elverta

273

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

InSalah CO InSalah CO 2 Storage Project Project Number: FWP-FEW0174 Task 2 Principal Investigator: W. McNab Team Members: L. Chiaramonte, S. Ezzedine, W. Foxall, Y. Hao, A. Ramirez, *J.A. White Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Outline * Benefit to Program * Project Goals and Objectives * Technical Status * Accomplishments * Summary * Appendix 3 Benefit to the Program * The research project is combining sophisticated

274

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Space Geodesy, Seismology, Space Geodesy, Seismology, and Geochemistry for Monitoring Verification and Accounting of CO 2 in Sequestration Sites DE-FE0001580 Tim Dixon, University of South Florida Peter Swart, University of Miami U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to program * Goals & objectives * Preliminary InSAR results (site selection phase) * Project location * Project installed equipment * Specific project results * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Focused on monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) * If successful, our project will demonstrate the utility of low cost, surface

275

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 DE-FE0001159 Advanced Technologies for Monitoring CO 2 Saturation and Pore Pressure in Geologic Formations Gary Mavko Rock Physics Project/Stanford University 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Motivating technical challenge * Approach * Technical Status - Laboratory results - Theoretical modeling * Summary Mavko: Stanford University 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed. - Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations. - Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99% of injected CO 2 remains in injection zones. * Project benefits statement.

276

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Large Volume Injection of CO Large Volume Injection of CO 2 to Assess Commercial Scale Geological Sequestration in Saline Formations in the Big Sky Region Project Number: DE-FC26-05NT42587 Dr. Lee Spangler Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Montana State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Goals and Objectives * Project overview * Kevin Dome characteristics * Project design philosophy * Infrastructure * Modeling * Monitoring * Project Opportunities 3 Benefit to the Program Program goals being addressed. * Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO

277

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Research on Probabilistic and Research on Probabilistic Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical (HTM) Modeling of CO 2 Geological Sequestration (GS) in Fractured Porous Rocks Project DE-FE0002058 Marte Gutierrez, Ph.D. Colorado School of Mines U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the program (Program goals addressed and Project benefits) * Project goals and objectives * Technical status - Project tasks * Technical status - Key findings * Lessons learned * Summary - Accomplishments to date 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed. - Develop technologies that will support industries'

278

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Complexity and Choice of Complexity and Choice of Model Approaches for Practical Simulations of CO 2 Injection, Migration, Leakage, and Long- term Fate Karl W. Bandilla Princeton University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Project Number DE-FE0009563 2 Presentation Outline * Project Goals and Objectives * Project overview * Accomplishments * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * The aim of the project is to develop criteria for the selection of the appropriate level of model complexity for CO 2 sequestration modeling at a given site. This will increase the confidence in modeling results, and reduce computational cost when appropriate.

279

Cogeneration Economics and Financial Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration has received much attention as a way to improve the efficiency of energy generation and conversion. This interest has been stimulated by higher energy costs for fuel and electricity as well as economic incentives granted by the federal government for industrial cogeneration. This paper discusses a variety of cogeneration systems applied at specific sites drawn from the major industrial sectors - food, textiles, pulp and paper, chemicals, and petroleum refining. Various technologies are considered. Capital and operating cost estimates are developed for the most promising systems to calculate cash flows and determine return on investment for a industrial ownership options of these facilities. Conclusions summarize the relation between technology, relative electric energy costs, and fuel costs.

Kusik, C. L.; Golden, W. J.; Fox, L. K.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Data Center Economizer Contamination and Humidity Study  

SciTech Connect

Data centers require continuous air conditioning to address high internal heat loads (heat release from equipment) and maintain indoor temperatures within recommended operating levels for computers. Air economizer cycles, which bring in large amounts of outside air to cool internal loads when weather conditions are favorable, could save cooling energy. There is reluctance from many data center owners to use this common cooling technique, however, due to fear of introducing pollutants and potential loss of humidity control. Concerns about equipment failure from airborne pollutants lead to specifying as little outside air as permissible for human occupants. To investigate contamination levels, particle monitoring was conducted at 8 data centers in Northern California. Particle counters were placed at 3 to 4 different locations within and outside of each data center evaluated in this study. Humidity was also monitored at many of the sites to determine how economizers affect humidity control. Results from this study indicate that economizers do increase the outdoor concentration in data centers, but this concentration, when averaged annually, is still below current particle concentration limits. Study results are summarized below: (1) The average particle concentrations measured at each location, both outside and at the servers, are shown in Table 1. Measurements show low particle concentrations at all data centers without economizers, regardless of outdoor particle concentrations. Particle concentrations were typically an order of magnitude below both outside particle concentrations and recently published ASHRAE standards. (2) Economizer use caused sharp increases in particle concentrations when the economizer vents were open. The particle concentration in the data centers, however, quickly dropped back to pre-economizer levels when the vents closed. Since economizers only allow outside air part of the time, the annual average concentrations still met the ASHRAE standards. However, concentration were still above the levels measured in data centers that do not use economizers (3) Current filtration in data centers is minimal (ASHRAE 40%) since most air is typically recycled. When using economizers, modest improvements in filtration (ASHRAE 85%) can reduce particle concentrations to nearly match the level found in data centers that do not use economizers. The extra cost associated with improve filters was not determined in this study. (4) Humidity was consistent and within the ASHRAE recommended levels for all data centers without economizers. Results show that, while slightly less steady, humidity in data centers with economizers can also be controlled within the ASHRAE recommended levels. However, this control of humidity reduces energy savings by limiting the hours the economizer vents are open. (5) The potential energy savings from economizer use has been measured in one data center. When economizers were active, mechanical cooling power dropped by approximately 30%. Annual savings at this center is estimated within the range of 60-80 MWh/year, representing approximately a 5% savings off the mechanical energy load of the data center. Incoming temperatures and humidity at this data center were conservative relative to the ASHRAE acceptable temperature and humidity ranges. Greater savings may be available if higher temperature humidity levels in the data center area were permitted. The average particle concentrations measured at each of the eight data center locations are shown in Table 1. The data centers ranged in size from approximately 5,000 ft{sup 2} to 20,000 ft{sup 2}. The indoor concentrations and humidity in Table 1 represents measurements taken at the server rack. Temperature measurements at the server rack consistently fell between 65-70 F. The Findings section contains a discussion of the individual findings from each center. Data centers currently operate under very low contamination levels. Economizers can be expected to increase the particle concentration in data centers, but the increase appears to still be

Shehabi, Arman; Tschudi, William; Gadgil, Ashok

2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher projected economic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Jobs Creation Economic Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

determinations to the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, for DOE EERE ARRA projects Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) has issued nine (9) Buy American waivers (e of waivers apply to all projects using EERE ARRA funds for the construction, alteration, maintenance

282

Comparing Efficiency Projections (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Realized improvements in energy efficiency generally rely on a combination of technology and economics [47]. The figure below illustrates the role of technology assumptions in the AEO2010 projections for energy efficiency in the residential and commercial buildings sector. Projected energy consumption in the Reference case is compared with projections in the Best Available Technology, High Technology, and 2009 Technology cases and an estimate based on an assumption of no change in efficiency for building shells and equipment.

Information Center

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

283

Strategic and Flexible Transmission Planning: Balancing Reliability and Economics in Transmission Planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Projects that improve reliability can also improve economics and vice versa. The challenge is in achieving the reliability goals with as much economic benefit as possible, that is, to balance the reliability and economic goals without compromising either. A method to balance the reliability and economic needs when planning transmission is outlined here with examples given for its usage.BackgroundThe goal of bulk power system planning is to ensure that ...

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

284

Interaction between economic dynamical systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper considers economic dynamical systems, the state spaces being the Riemannian manifolds. Between two economic dynamical systems, global feedforward and the feedback interaction is defined and the connection between their linearization and prolongation ... Keywords: economic dynamical system, economic flow, feedback, feedforward, linearization, prolongation by derivation

Constantin Patrascoiu

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Western LNG project - Project summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Western LNG Project is a major new undertaking involving the liquefaction of conventional natural gas from the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin at a plant on the British Columbia north coast. The gas in its liquid form will be shipped to Japan for consumption by utility companies. The Project represents a new era in gas processing and marketing for the Canadian natural gas industry.

Forgues, E.L.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Complex higher order derivative theories  

SciTech Connect

In this work is considered a complex scalar field theory with higher order derivative terms and interactions. A procedure is developed to quantize consistently this system avoiding the presence of negative norm states. In order to achieve this goal the original real scalar high order field theory is extended to a complex space attaching a complex total derivative to the theory. Next, by imposing reality conditions the complex theory is mapped to a pair of interacting real scalar field theories without the presence of higher derivative terms.

Margalli, Carlos A.; Vergara, J. David [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-543, Mexico 04510 DF (Mexico)

2012-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

287

Alternative Energy for Higher Education  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project provides educational opportunities creating both a teaching facility and center for public outreach. The facility is the largest solar array in Nebraska. It was designed to allow students to experience a variety of technologies and provide the public with opportunities for exposure to the implementation of an alternative energy installation designed for an urban setting. The project integrates products from 5 panel manufacturers (including monocrystalline, polycrystalline and thin film technologies) mounted on both fixed and tracking structures. The facility uses both micro and high power inverters. The majority of the system was constructed to serve as an outdoor classroom where panels can be monitored, tested, removed and replaced by students. As an educational facility it primarily serves students in the Creighton University and Metropolitan Community College, but it also provides broader educational opportunities. The project includes a real-time â??dashboardâ? and a historical database of the output of individual inverters and the corresponding meteorological data for researcher and student use. This allows the evaluation of both panel types and the feasibility of installation types in a region of the country subject to significant temperature, wind and precipitation variation.

Michael Cherney, PhD

2012-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

288

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CCS: CCS: Life Cycle Water Consumption for Carbon Capture and Storage Project Number 49607 Christopher Harto Argonne National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed. - Develop technologies to improve reservoir storage efficiency while ensuring containment effectiveness. * Project benefits statement. - This work supports the development of active reservoir management approaches by identifying cost effective and environmentally benign strategies for managing extracted brines (Tasks 1 + 2). - This work will help identify water related constraints

289

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leakage Mitigation Leakage Mitigation using Engineered Biomineralized Sealing Technologies Project Number: FE0004478 Robin Gerlach Al Cunningham, Lee H Spangler Montana State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Motivation & Benefit to the Program (required) * Benefit to the Program and Project Overview (required) * Background Information * Accomplishments to Date - Injection strategy development (control and prediction) - Large core tests - ambient pressure - Large core tests - high pressure - Small core tests - high pressure - MCDP, permeability and porosity assessments * Progress Assessment and Summary

290

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Leakage Mitigation CO2 Leakage Mitigation using Engineered Biomineralized Sealing Technologies Project Number FE0004478 Lee H Spangler, Al Cunningham, Robin Gerlach Energy Research Institute Montana State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Motivation * Background information * Large core tests - ambient pressure * Large core tests - high pressure 3 Benefit to the Program Program goals being addressed. Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones. Project benefits statement. The Engineered Biomineralized Sealing Technologies

291

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CCS CCS Project Number 49607 Christopher Harto Argonne National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed. - Increased control of reservoir pressure, reduced risk of CO2 migration, and expanded formation storage capacity. * Project benefits statement. - This work supports the development of active reservoir management approaches by identifying cost effective and environmentally benign strategies for managing extracted brines (Tasks 1 + 2). - This work will help identify water related constraints on CCS deployment and provide insight into

292

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Multiphase of Multiphase Flow for Improved Injectivity and Trapping 4000.4.641.251.002 Dustin Crandall, URS PI: Grant Bromhal, NETL ORD Morgantown, West Virginia U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the program * Project overview * Breakdown of FY12 project tasks * Facilities and personnel * Task progress to date * Planned task successes * Tech transfer and summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goal being addressed - Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO

293

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Resources International, Inc. Advanced Resources International, Inc. U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary * Appendix 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goal being addressed: - Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30 percent. * Project benefits statement: - This research seeks to develop a set of robust mathematical modules to predict how coal and shale permeability and

294

United Nations Economic and Social Council | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Council Council Jump to: navigation, search Name United Nations Economic and Social Council Website http://www.un.org/en/ecosoc/in References United Nations Economic and Social Council[1] LinkedIn Connections Background "ECOSOC was established under the United Nations Charter as the principal organ to coordinate economic, social, and related work of the 14 UN specialized agencies, functional commissions and five regional commissions. The Council also receives reports from 11 UN funds and programmes. The Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) serves as the central forum for discussing international economic and social issues, and for formulating policy recommendations addressed to Member States and the United Nations system. It is responsible for: promoting higher standards of living, full employment, and economic

295

Economic Development Loan Fund (Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Economic Development Loan Fund (Virginia) Economic Development Loan Fund (Virginia) Economic Development Loan Fund (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Virginia Program Type Loan Program Provider Virginia Department of Business Assistance The Economic Development Loan Fund helps to fill the financing gap between private debt financing and private equity. Up to $1 million is available for each project and can be used for the acquisition of land or facilities, or the purchase of machinery or equipment. Projects must create new jobs or

296

DOE Announces Webinars on an Offshore Wind Economic Impacts Model,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

an Offshore Wind Economic Impacts Model, an Offshore Wind Economic Impacts Model, Resources for Tribal Energy Efficiency Projects, and More DOE Announces Webinars on an Offshore Wind Economic Impacts Model, Resources for Tribal Energy Efficiency Projects, and More November 20, 2013 - 11:54am Addthis EERE offers webinars to the public on a range of subjects, from adopting the latest energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies to training for the clean energy workforce. Webinars are free; however, advanced registration is typically required. You can also watch archived webinars and browse previously aired videos, slides, and transcripts. Upcoming Webinars November 20: Live Webinar on Jobs and Economic Development Impacts of Offshore Wind Webinar Sponsor: EERE's Wind and Water Power Technologies Office

297

Simplified economic screening models for enhanced oil recovery processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effective screening of reservoirs for implementation of enhanced oil recovery processes is critical to the financial success of a proposed project. Screening techniques that have been used in the past normally consisted of comparing individual reservoir and fluid properties with tables of the preferred values of these properties. The shortcoming of this procedure is that it does not account for interactions among the technical parameters, nor does it provide a measure of the economic attractiveness of the project. Intercomp has developed, under the sponsorship of the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center of DOE, a set of economic screening models for micellar-polymer, steam drive and CO/sub 2/ miscible EOR processes. These models include accurate oil production predictive algorithms and routines which provide measures of economic attractiveness based on time value of money economics. The formulation of these models is presented with examples of their use.

Paul, G.W.; Ford, M.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

SOLERAS solar cooling project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In view of the increasing demand for cooling in both the United States and Saudi Arabia, solar cooling systems are being considered as serious alternatives to the energy intensive conventional systems, especially when confronted with rising fossil fuel costs. Saudi Arabia and the hot, southern regions of the United States, having abundant sunshine and high cooling demand, are obvious candidates for solar active cooling systems and passive cooling design. Solar active cooling has yet to be shown to be either technologically mature or economically feasible, but efforts have been, and are presently being made within the United States National Solar Cooling Program to develop reliable systems which can compete economically with conventional cooling systems. Currently, the program is funding research and development projects in the areas of absorption, Rankine, dessicant, and advanced technologies. Saudi Arabia has a long and successful tradition of building cooling using passive architectural designs. Combining these past achievements with a program of research and development in both active and passive solar cooling should permit an early economical introduction of entirely solar cooled buildings to Saudi Arabia and the southern United States.

Corcoleotes, G.; Williamson, J.S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Projecting net incomes for Texas crop producers: an application of probabilistic forecasting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agricultural policy changes directly affect the economic viability of Texas crop producers because government payments make up a significant portion of their net farm income (NFI). NFI projections benefit producers, agribusinesses and policy makers, but an economic model making these projections for Texas did not previously exist. The objective of this study was to develop a model to project annual NFI for producers of major crops in Texas. The Texas crop model was developed to achieve this objective, estimating state prices, yields and production costs as a function of their national counterparts. Five hundred iterations of national price and yield projections from the Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI), along with FAPRIù��s average production cost projections, were used as input to the Texas crop model. The stochastic FAPRI Baseline and residuals for Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) equations relating Texas variables to national variables were used to incorporate the risk left unexplained by OLS equations between Texas and U.S. variables. Deterministic and probabilistic NFI projections for Texas crops were compared under the January 2005 and January 2006 FAPRI Baseline projections. With production costs increasing considerably and prices rising moderately in the January 2006 Baseline, deterministic projections of 2006-2014 Texas NFI decreased by an average of 26 percent for corn, 3 percent for cotton, 15 percent for peanuts, and 12 percent for rice, and were negative for sorghum and wheat. Probability distributions of projected NFI fell for all program crops, especially sorghum and wheat. Higher hay price projections caused deterministic projections of NFI for hay to rise roughly 13 percent, and increased the probability distributions of projected hay NFI. Deterministic and probabilistic projections of total NFI decreased for each year, especially for 2006-2008 when fuel price projections were the highest. The Texas crop model can be used to simulate NFI for Texas crop producers under alternative FAPRI baselines. The model shows the impact of baseline changes on probability distributions of NFI for each crop and for Texas as a whole. It can also be useful as a policy analysis tool to compare impacts of alternative farm and macroeconomic policies on NFI.

Eggerman, Christopher Ryan

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Economics of ALMR deployment  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) has the potential to extend the economic life of the nuclear option and of reducing the number of high level waste repositories which will eventually be needed in an expanding nuclear economy. This paper reports on an analysis which models and evaluates the economics of the use of ALMRs as a component of this country`s future electricity generation mix. The ALMR concept has the ability to utilize as fuel the fissile material contained in previously irradiated nuclear fuel (i.e., spent fuel) or from surplus weapons grade material. While not a requirement for the successful deployment of ALMR power plant technology, the reprocessing of spent fuel from light water reactors (LWR) is necessary for any rapid introduction of ALMR power plants. In addition, the reprocessing of LWR spent fuel may reduce the number of high level waste repositories needed in the future by burning the long-lived actinides produced in the fission process. With this study, the relative economics of a number of potential scenarios related to these issues are evaluated. While not encompassing the full range of all possibilities, the cases reported here provide an indication of the potential costs, timings, and relative economic attractiveness of ALMR deployment.

Delene, J.G.; Fuller, L.C.; Hudson, C.R.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher projected economic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Programming Languages in Economics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Young economists sometimes ask which computer programming languages they should learn. This paper answers that question by suggesting that they begin with a high level language like GAUSS, GAMS, Mathematica, Maple or MATLAB depending on their field ... Keywords: computational economics, computer languages, programming languages, software

David A. Kendrick; Hans M. Amman

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

behavior of shales as behavior of shales as seals and storage reservoirs for CO2 Project Number: Car Stor_FY131415 Daniel J. Soeder USDOE/NETL/ORD U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Project Overview: Goals and Objectives * Program Goals - Support industry's ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30 percent. - Develop technologies to improve reservoir storage efficiency while ensuring containment effectiveness * Project Objectives - Assess how shales behave as caprocks in contact with CO 2 under a variety of conditions - Assess the viability of depleted gas shales to serve as storage reservoirs for sequestered CO

303

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 leakage and cap rock remediation DE-FE0001132 Runar Nygaard Missouri University of Science and Technology U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the program * Project overview * Technical status * Accomplishments to date * Summary 2 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed. - Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones. * Project benefits statement. - The project develops a coupled reservoir and geomechanical modeling approach to simulate cap rock leakage and simulate the success of remediation

304

LUCF Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RZWR'HVLJQDQG RZWR'HVLJQDQG +RZWR'HVLJQDQG ,PSOHPHQW&DUERQ ,PSOHPHQW&DUERQ 0HDVXULQJDQG0RQLWRULQJ 0HDVXULQJDQG0RQLWRULQJ $.WLYLWLHVIRU/8&) $.WLYLWLHVIRU/8&) 3URMH.WV 3URMH.WV Sandra Brown Winrock International sbrown@winrock.org Winrock International 2 3URMH.WGHVLJQLVVXHV 3URMH.WGHVLJQLVVXHV z Baselines and additionality z Leakage z Permanence z Measuring and monitoring z Issues vary with projects in developed versus developing countries Winrock International 3 /HDNDJH /HDNDJH z Leakage is the unanticipated loss or gain in carbon benefits outside of the project's boundary as a result of the project activities-divide into two types: - Primary leakage or activity shifting outside project area - Secondary leakage or market effects due to

305

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Web-based CO Web-based CO 2 Subsurface Modeling Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Project Number DE-FE0002069 Christopher Paolini San Diego State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Project benefits and goals. * Web interface for simulating water-rock interaction. * Development of, and experience teaching, a new Carbon Capture and Sequestration course at San Diego State University. * Some noteworthy results of student research and training in CCS oriented geochemistry. * Status of active student geochemical and geomechancal modeling projects.

306

Project Title:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Repair flowline 61-66-SX-3 Repair flowline 61-66-SX-3 DOE Code: Project Lead: Wes Riesland NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY # 291 Project Information Date: 3/1 1/2010 Contractor Code: Project Overview In order to repair this line it was decided to trench a line aproximately 100 feet and tie it into the line at 71-3- 1. What are the environmental sx-3. This will get us out of the old flow line which has been repaired 5-6 times. this will mitigate the chances impacts? of having spills in the future. 2. What is the legal location? This flowline runs from the well77-s-1 0 to the B-2-10 manifold.+ "/-,~?X3 3. What is the duration of the project? Approximately 10 hours(1 day) to complete 4. What major equipment will be used backhoe and operator and one hand if any (work over rig. drilling rig.

307

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Co-Sequestration Co-Sequestration Studies Project Number 58159 Task 2 B. Peter McGrail Pacific Northwest National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Program Focus Area and DOE Connections * Goals and Objectives * Scope of Work * Technical Discussion * Accomplishments to Date * Project Wrap-up * Appendix (Organization Chart, Gantt Chart, and Bibliography 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals addressed: - Technology development to predict CO 2 and mixed gas storage capacity in various geologic settings - Demonstrate fate of injected mixed gases * Project benefits statement:

308

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Model Complexity in Geological Carbon Model Complexity in Geological Carbon Sequestration: A Design of Experiment (DoE) & Response Surface (RS) Uncertainty Analysis Project Number: DE-FE-0009238 Mingkan Zhang 1 , Ye Zhang 1 , Peter Lichtner 2 1. Dept. of Geology & Geophysics, University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming 2. OFM Research, Inc., Santa Fe, New Mexico U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Project major goals and benefits; * Detailed project objectives & success criteria; * Accomplishments to date; * Summary of results; * Appendix (organization chart; Gantt chart; additional results). Dept. of Geology & Geophysics, University of Wyoming

309

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Region Region DE-FE0001812 Brian J. McPherson University of Utah U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Acknowledgements * NETL * Shell * Tri-State * Trapper Mining * State of Colorado 3 Presentation Outline * Program Benefits * Project / Program Goals * Technical Status: Finalizing 10-Point Protocol for CO 2 Storage Site Characterization * Key Accomplishments * Summary 4 Presentation Outline * Program Benefits * Project / Program Goals * Technical Status: Finalizing 10-Point Protocol for CO 2 Storage Site Characterization * Key Accomplishments * Summary 5 Benefit to the Program Program Goals Being Addressed by this Project

310

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of CO 2 Exposed Wells to Predict Long Term Leakage through the Development of an Integrated Neural- Genetic Algorithm Project DE FE0009284 Boyun Guo, Ph.D. University of...

311

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"Carbonsheds" as a Framework for Optimizing US CCS Pipeline Transport on a Regional to National Scale DOE-ARRA Project Number DE-FE0001943 Lincoln Pratson Nicholas School of the...

312

Project 134  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Goal To demonstrate a "whole plant" approach using by-products from a coal-fired power plant to sequester carbon in an easily quantifiable and verifiable form. Objectives...

313

MANHATTAN PROJECT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy traces its origins to World War II and  the Manhattan Project effort to build the first atomic bomb. As the direct descendent of the Manhattan Engineer District, the...

314

Project 265  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The goal of this project is to develop an on-line instrument using multi- wavelength lasers that is capable of characterizing particulate matter (PM) generated in fossil energy...

315

Project 310  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

carbohydrate generated from agricultural enterprises in the U.S., such as corn wet-milling. This project is studying the production of a suite of specialty chemicals by...

316

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

G., 2011, Design and package of a 14CO2 field analyzer: the Global Monitor Platform (GMP). Proceedings of SPIE, v 8156, p. 81560E 17 DOE-NETL PROJECT REVIEW MEETING 08-21-2012...

317

Project 114  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prototech Company SRI International Kellogg, Brown, and Root ChevronTexaco Sd-Chemie, Inc. COST Total Project Value 20,320,372 DOENon-DOE Share 15,326,608 4,993,764...

318

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23,...

319

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23,...

320

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SUMNER SUMNER COUNTY, KANSAS Project Number DE-FE0006821 W. Lynn Watney Kansas Geological Survey Lawrence, KS U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 Fountainview Wednesday 8-21-12 1:10-1:35 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary Small Scale Field Test Wellington Field Regional Assessment of deep saline Arbuckle aquifer Acknowledgements & Disclaimer Acknowledgements * The work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under Grant DE-FE0002056 and DE- FE0006821, W.L. Watney and Jason Rush, Joint PIs. Project is managed and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher projected economic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0-22, 2013 0-22, 2013 Collaborators Zhengrong Wang, Yale University Kevin Johnson, University of Hawaii 2 Presentation Outline * Program Focus Area and DOE Connections * Goals and Objectives * Scope of Work * Technical Discussion * Accomplishments to Date * Project Wrap-up * Appendix (Organization Chart, Gantt Chart, and Bibliography 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals addressed: - Technology development to predict CO 2 storage capacity - Demonstrate fate of injected CO 2 and most common contaminants * Project benefits statement: This research project conducts modeling, laboratory studies, and pilot-scale research aimed at developing new technologies and new systems for utilization of basalt formations for long term subsurface storage of CO 2 . Findings from this project

322

Project 297  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of this project is to utilize pure oxygen at a feed rate of less than 10% of the stoichiometric requirement in demonstrating the use of oxygen-enhanced combustion in meeting...

323

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Project Number DE-FE0009562 John Stormont, Mahmoud Reda Taha University of New Mexico U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D...

324

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Research on Probabilistic Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical (HTM) Modeling of CO 2 Geological Sequestration (GS) in Fractured Porous Rocks Project DE-FE0002058 Marte Gutierrez, Ph.D....

325

Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030 - Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030 The Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO2006), prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), presents long-term forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2030. The projections are based on results from EIA’s National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The report begins with an “Overview” summarizing the AEO2006 reference case and comparing it with the AEO2005 reference case. The next section, “Legislation and Regulations,” discusses evolving legislation and regulatory issues, including recently enacted legislation and regulation, such as the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and some that are proposed. “Issues in Focus” includes a discussion of the basis of EIA’s substantial revision of the world oil price trend used in the projections. It also examines the following topics: implications of higher oil price expectations for economic growth; differences among types of crude oil available on world markets; energy technologies on the cusp of being introduced; nonconventional liquids technologies beginning to play a larger role in energy markets; advanced vehicle technologies included in AEO2006; mercury emissions control technologies; and U.S. greenhouse gas intensity. “Issues in Focus” is followed by “Energy Market Trends,” which provides a summary of the AEO2006 projections for energy markets.

326

Economics of Energy Metering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the past 10 years energy costs at Union Carbide's Texas City Plant have risen tremendously. Most of this increase can be related to the rapid escalation in fuel prices. Because of the large cost increases and impact on product flow, it has become necessary to accurately measure energy usage (primarily fuel and steam) throughout the plant. There are currently several projects in the million dollar range to upgrade and add new metering to these flows. This paper will discuss the justification of one of these projects and give a brief overview of the project status.

Duncan, J. D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Economic Redevelopment and Growth Program (New Jersey) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Redevelopment and Growth Program (New Jersey) Redevelopment and Growth Program (New Jersey) Economic Redevelopment and Growth Program (New Jersey) < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State New Jersey Program Type Grant Program Provider New Jersey Economic Development Authority Economic Redevelopment and Growth program (ERG) is an incentive for real estate development projects that have a financing gap, defined as having insufficient revenues to support the project debt service under a standard financing scenario. It can also apply to projects that have a below market development margin or rate of return. The grant is not meant to be a substitute for conventional debt and equity financing, and applicants

328

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-World Energy Demand and Economic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy and Economic Outlook World Energy and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 1 - World Energy Demand and Economic Outlook In the IEO2009 projections, total world consumption of marketed energy is projected to increase by 44 percent from 2006 to 2030. The largest projected increase in energy demand is for the non-OECD economies. Figure 10. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 11. World Marketed Energy Consumption: OECD and Non-OECD, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 12. Marketed Energy Use by Region, 1990-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

329

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Energy Station Concepts Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Energy Station Concepts Project Summary Full Title: Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Energy Station Concepts: Are 'H2E-Stations' a Key Link to a Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Infrastructure? Project ID: 244 Principal Investigator: Timothy Lipman Brief Description: This project expands on a previously conducted, preliminary H2E-Station analysis in a number of important directions. Purpose This analysis, based on an integrated Excel/MATLAB/Simulink fuel cell system cost and performance model called CETEEM, includes the following: several energy station designs based on different sizes of fuel cell systems and hydrogen storage and delivery systems for service station and office building settings; characterization of a typical year of operation

330

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-World Energy Demand and Economic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy and Economic Outlook World Energy and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2008 Chapter 1 - World Energy Demand and Economic Outlook In the IEO2008 projections, total world consumption of marketed energy is projected to increase by 50 percent from 2005 to 2030. The largest projected increase in energy demand is for the non-OECD economies. Figure 9. World Marketed EnergyConsumption, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 10. World Marketed Energy Consumption: OECD and Non-OECD, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 11. Marketed Energy Use in the Non-OECD Economies by Region, 1990-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

331

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About JEDI  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transmission Line Model Transmission Line Model The Transmission Line Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model allows the user to estimate economic development impacts associated with transmission line projects. Applying a similar user interface as other JEDI models, Transmission Line JEDI requires a few additional user inputs such as: Transmission Line Type Line Length Terrain Type Right-of-Way Characteristics. Results are presented in the same manner as those in other JEDI models. This allows the transmission line JEDI model to be used by itself or in conjunction with electricity generation JEDI models. As with all JEDI models, reasonable default values are provided. Individual projects may vary and when possible project specific data should be used to obtain the best estimate of economic development impacts.

332

How Responsive is Higher Education? The Linkages between Higher Education and the Labor Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Economics to the Labor Market” Journal of EconomicUnemployment and Labor Market Rigidities: Europe versusEducation and the Labour Market: A Broader Perspective. ”

Bardhan, Ashok Deo; Hicks, Daniel; Jaffee, Dwight M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Projected National Economic and Energy Savings from Water Heater...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Analysis Appliance Energy Standards China Electricity Markets Energy Policy India Industrial Energy International Energy Studies Public Sector Energy Efficiency...

334

Small Packages, Big Benefits: Economic Advantages of Local Wind Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sun heats the earth’s surface unevenly creating areas of high and low pressure. Air molecules flow away from areas of high pressure towards areas of low pressure. We know this phenomenon by sight, sound and touch as wind. The speed and duration of wind are unpredictable, but what is predictable is that in many places the wind will eventually blow with enough force to be a significant power source. This fact has been relied on and wind’s kinetic energy has been harnessed for centuries to do things such as pump water and grind grain. Windmills that helped Americans from settlement times until the 1930s are still visible on much of the nation’s rural landscape – including Iowa’syet they are now found in various states of disrepair. Today the relic sentinels of the countryside are being joined in their towering positions by sleek new wind turbines. These modern machines and the clean power they generate are a sign of the prosperity they can bring to their landowners and communities. Although wind power only accounted for one-tenth of 1 percent of the nation’s total electric power generation capacity in 2003, this is four times the capacity that was in place in 1990. From 1999 to 2003, wind power capacity had an average annual growth rate of 28 percent, a

Teresa Welsh; Teresa Welsh

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

2011 Project Management Workshop | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Management Workshop Project Management Workshop 2011 Project Management Workshop 2011 DOE Project Management Workshop Paul Bosco, The New DOE O 413.3B Jeff Baker, EERE's Research Support Facility Patrick Ferraro, Contract Management/ Project Management Summit Outbrief Anirban Basu, Construction Economic Forecast John Curran, LED Lighting Michael Deane, Construction and Demolition Debris Recycle Mark Fallon, Leadership & Safety Cost Estimating Panel, The Science and Art of Cost Estimating Tom Fox, Leading in Tough Times Bob Raines, Project Management Update Tony Cannon, Nuclear Quality Assurance Issues Peer Review Panel, Peer Reviews 101 Terry Cooke-Davies, Project Complexity Rod Rimando, EM Project Management Framework PMCDP Panel, PMCDP CRB CRB Panel Questions & Answers Chad Henderson, FPD's Perspective

336

Integrated Development Projects Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development Projects Ltd Development Projects Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Integrated Development Projects Ltd Place Devon, United Kingdom Zip EX18 7BL Sector Biomass Product The company's emphasis is placed on economic development in rural areas, and deplying biomass and municipal waste for electricity and CHP both in the UK and overseas. Their foundation project in North Devon includes a 40MWe biomass electricity plant. References Integrated Development Projects Ltd[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Integrated Development Projects Ltd is a company located in Devon, United Kingdom . References ↑ "Integrated Development Projects Ltd" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Integrated_Development_Projects_Ltd&oldid=347004"

337

Super Projects (Arkansas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Super Projects (Arkansas) Super Projects (Arkansas) Super Projects (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Construction Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Bond Program Provider Department of Economic Develoment A 2004 amendment to the state constitution authorizes the state to attract super projects by issuing bonds to fund a project's infrastructure, limited to 5% of the net general revenues during the most recent fiscal year. Super projects are defined as ones that create at least 500 new jobs and invest more than $500 million. Examples of the type of projects that might meet the criteria for a super project and have infrastructure needs

338

FUEL CELLS IN SHIPPING: HIGHER CAPITAL COSTS AND REDUCED FLEXIBILITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: The paper discusses some main economic characteristics of fuel cell power production technology applied to shipping. Whenever competitive fuel cell systems enter the market, they are likely to have higher capital costs and lower operating costs than systems based on traditional combustion technology. Implications of the difference are investigated with respect to investment flexibility by the use of a real options model of ship investment, lay-up and scrapping decisions under freight rate uncertainty. A higher capital share of total expected costs can represent a significant opportunity cost in uncertain markets. The paper highlights the significance of accounting properly for value of flexibility prior to investment in new technology.

Sigbjűrn Sűdal

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Annual Energy Outlook 2007: With Projections to 2030  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Only Only Global Insights, Inc. (GII) produces a compre- hensive energy projection with a time horizon similar to that of AEO2007. Other organizations, however, address one or more aspects of the energy markets. The most recent projection from GII, as well as others that concentrate on economic growth, international oil prices, energy consumption, electricity, natural gas, petroleum, and coal, are compared here with the AEO2007 projections. Economic Growth In the AEO2007 reference case, the projected growth in real GDP, based on 2000 chain-weighted dollars, is 2.9 percent per year from 2005 to 2030. The AEO2007 projections for economic growth are based on the Au- gust short-term projection of GII, extended by EIA through 2030 and modified to reflect EIA's view on energy prices, demand, and production. Projections of the average annual GDP growth rate for the United States from 2005

340

Applicant DOE Award Project Location Project Focus Feasibility Study  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

buildings and assist the Tribe's efforts to buildings and assist the Tribe's efforts to reduce the amount of energy used in their buildings. The Sea Lion Corporation $200,000 Hooper Bay, AK The project will train staff members to become energy assessors and weatherization technicians who specialize in energy efficient building construction and energy saving technologies. A feasibility study will also be conducted to determine how to achieve a 30 percent reduction in residential and commercial energy use and show the economic benefits of energy efficiency. Coeur d'Alene Tribe $163,952 Plummer, ID This project will assess and determine the technical and economic feasibility of energy efficiency improvements to existing Tribally-owned buildings. The goal is to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher projected economic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Valuation of wind energy projects and statistical analysis of wind power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As energy becomes an increasingly important issue for generations to come, it is crucial to develop tools for valuing and understanding energy projects from an economic perspective since ultimately only economically viable ...

Nanopoulos, Andrew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

NREL: Water Power Research - Economic and Power System Modeling and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Economic and Power System Modeling and Analysis Economic and Power System Modeling and Analysis NREL's Economic Analysis and power system modeling integrates data from device deployment and programmatic research into deployment and scenario models to quantify the economic and societal benefits of developing cost-competitive marine and hydrokinetic systems. It also identifies policy mechanisms, market designs, and supply chain needs to support various deployment scenarios, provide information and training to potential members of the marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) industry and effectively collaborate with all associated stakeholders. JEDI Modeling NREL worked with industry members to develop and provide public access to an easy-to-use input-output model that estimates the jobs and economic development impacts (JEDI) of MHK projects in the United States. The JEDI

343

EIA-Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review-Evaluation of Projections in  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9) 9) The Energy Information Administration (EIA) produces projections of energy supply and demand each year in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO). The projections in the AEO are not statements of what will happen but of what might happen, given the assumptions and methodologies. The Reference case projection assumes trends that are consistent with historical and current market behavior, technological and demographic changes, and current laws and regulations. The potential impacts of pending or proposed legislation, regulations, and standards-or of sections of legislation that have been enacted but that require implementing regulations or appropriation of funds that are not provided or specified in the legislation itself-are not reflected in the projections. Thus, the AEO Reference case provides an impartial baseline that can be used to analyze potential new policies or legislative initiatives. The analysis in the AEO primarily focuses on a Reference case, lower and higher economic growth cases, and lower and higher oil price cases. However, approximately 30 alternative cases are generally included in the AEO. Readers are encouraged to review the full range of cases, which address many of the uncertainties inherent in long-term projections.

344

RE-IMAGINING CALIFORNIA HIGHER EDUCATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Re-Imagining California Higher Education * October 2010 Johnfamed Master Plan for Higher Education, arguably the singlethe future of a system of higher education in the annals of

John Aubrey Douglass

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Class, Race, and Higher Education in America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

many more questions for higher education, but at the leastthey overcome. But higher education in America has already1989), Review of Higher Education Policy In California,

Trow, Martin

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

WHAT FUTURE FOR UK HIGHER EDUCATION?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009) “Students ask if higher education is really worth itrising social costs of higher education are not matched bystandards? ” Times Higher Education 17 July. Alderman, G.

Roger Brown

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Market Trends - Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Market Drivers Market Drivers Annual Energy Outlook 2004 with Projections to 2025 Market Trends - Market Drivers Index (click to jump links) Trends in Economic Activity International Oil Markets Figure 38. Average annual growth rates of real GDP and economic factors, 1995-2025 (percent). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure data Trends in Economic Activity Strong Economic Growth Is Expected To Continue The output of the Nation's economy, measured by gross domestic product (GDP), is projected to grow by 3.0 percent per year between 2002 and 2025 (with GDP based on 1996 chain-weighted dollars) (Figure 38). The projected growth rate is slightly lower than the 3.1-percent rate projected in AEO2003. The labor force is projected to increase by 0.9 percent per year

348

Economic Impact & Diversity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ECONOMIC IMPACT AND DIVERSITY ECONOMIC IMPACT AND DIVERSITY FOURTH QUARTER STATUS (As of August 10, 2006) Executive Summary: ED is responsible for managing the department's on-going small business programs, Affirmative Action programs, Employee Concerns program, EEO programs, and the Department's Minority Education program. ED serves as the support office for department-wide efforts to broaden and/or diversify the Department's base as it relates to employment, contracting and financial assistance awards. Where we are today: ED finalized the reorganization/restructuring process which reduced the offices within ED from five to three. Along with this process, ED moved the Employee Concerns and Special Emphasis activities and personnel to the Office of Civil Rights and Diversity

349

Comparative economics of passive and active systems  

SciTech Connect

As the interest in solar energy applications for residential space heating grows, it becomes imperative to evaluate the economic performance of alternative designs. One passive design is concentrated on--the thermal mass storage wall. The economic performance of this design is examined and subsequently contrasted with one active design--the air collector/rock storage system. Architectural design criteria, solar performance characteristics, and the incremental solar cost of each design is briefly reviewed. Projections of conventional energy prices are discussed, along with the optimal sizing/feasibility criterion employed in the economic performance analysis. In addition, the effects of two incentive proposals--income tax credits and low interest loans--upon each design are examined. Results are reported on a state-by-state basis for the U.S., with major conclusions summarized for each design. It is generally the case that incentives greatly enhance the economics of both system designs, although the contrast is greater for the passive design. Also, against the less expensive conventional fuels (natural gas and heating oil) the passive design was shown to offer a more cost effective alternative than the active system for most states.

Roach, F.; Noll, S.; Ben-David, S.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Economics of geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A selected summary is presented of the resource, technical, and financial considerations which influence the economics of geothermal energy in the US. Estimates of resource base and levelized busbar cost of base load power for several types of geothermal resources are compared with similar estimates for more conventional energy resources. Current geothermal electric power plants planned, under construction, and on-line in the US are noted.

Morris, G.E.; Tester, J.W.; Graves, G.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring Geological CO Monitoring Geological CO 2 Sequestration using Perfluorocarbon and Stable Isotope Tracers Project Number FEAA-045 Tommy J. Phelps and David R. Cole* Oak Ridge National Laboratory Phone: 865-574-7290 email: phelpstj@ornl.gov (*The Ohio State University) U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 22, 2013 2 Project Overview: Goals and Objectives Goal: Develop methods to interrogate subsurface for improved CO 2 sequestration, field test characterization and MVA, demonstrate CO 2 remains in zone, and tech transfer. Objectives: 1. Assessment of injections in field. PFT gas tracers are analyzed by GC-ECD to

352

Project Homepage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Middle School Home Energy Audit Middle School Home Energy Audit Project Homepage NTEP Home - Project Homepage - Teacher Homepage - Student Pages Abstract: This set of lessons provides an opportunity for midlevel students to gain a basic understanding of how energy is turned into power, how power is measured using a meter, the costs of those units and the eventual reduction of energy consumption and cost to the consumer. Introduction to Research: By conducting energy audits of their own homes and completing exercises to gain baclground information, students begin to see the importance of energy in their daily lives. By using the Internet as a research tool, students gain develop research skills as they gain knowledge for their project. They use e-mail to collaborate with energy experts and share results with other

353

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Title: DEVELOPING A Title: DEVELOPING A COMPREHENSIVE RISK ASSESMENT FRAMEWORK FOR GEOLOGICAL STORAGE OF CO2 Ian Duncan University of Texas U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline 1. Benefit to the Program 2. Goals and Objectives 3. Technical Status Project 4. Accomplishments to Date 5. Summary 3 Benefit to the Program The research project is developing a comprehensive understanding of the programmatic (business), and technical risks associated with CCS particularly the likelihood of leakage and its potential consequences. This contributes to the Carbon Storage Program's effort of ensuring 99 percent CO

354

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Analyze Spatial and Temporal to Analyze Spatial and Temporal Heterogeneities in Reservoir and Seal Petrology, Mineralogy, and Geochemistry: Implications for CO 2 Sequestration Prediction, Simulation, and Monitoring Project Number DE-FE0001852 Dr. Brenda B. Bowen Purdue University (now at the University of Utah) U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Introduction to the project * Tasks * Student training * Student research successes * Lessons learned and future plans 3 Benefit to the Program * Addresses Carbon Storage Program major goals: - Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO

355

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigation of the CO Investigation of the CO 2 Sequestration in Depleted Shale Gas Formations Project Number DE-FE-0004731 Jennifer Wilcox, Tony Kovscek, Mark Zoback Stanford University, School of Earth Sciences U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Outline * Project Benefits * Technical Status * Imaging at mm- to micron-scales using CT - Permeability measurements and application of the Klinkenberg effect - Molecular Dynamics simulations for permeability and viscosity estimates * Accomplishments to Date * Summary Stanford University 3 Benefit to the Program * Carbon Storage Program major goals

356

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fidelity Computational Analysis of Fidelity Computational Analysis of CO2 Trappings at Pore-scales Project Number: DE-FE0002407 Vinod Kumar (vkumar@utep.edu) & Paul Delgado (pmdelgado2@utep.edu) University of Texas at El Paso U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 Collaborators: Dr. C. Harris (Shell Oil Company/Imperial College), Dr. G. Bromhal (NETL), Dr. M. Ferer (WVU/NETL), Dr. D. Crandall (NETL-Ctr), and Dr. D. McIntyre (NETL). 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status - Pore-network modeling - Conductance derivation for irregular geom. - Pore-to-CFD Computations

357

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Number (DE-FE0002056) W. Lynn Watney & Jason Rush (Joint PIs) Kansas Geological Survey Lawrence, KS 66047 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY Bittersweet Energy Inc. Partners FE0002056 Devilbiss Coring Service Basic Energy Services Wellington Field Operator Industrial and Electrical Power Sources of CO 2 Southwest Kansas CO 2 -EOR Initiative Industry Partners (modeling 4 Chester/Morrowan oil fields to make CO2 ready) +drilling and seismic contractors TBN

358

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Number (DE-FE0002056) U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 W. Lynn Watney & Jason Rush (Joint PIs) Kansas Geological Survey Lawrence, KS 66047 Brighton 1&2 2:40 August 20, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE Modeling CO 2 Sequestration in Saline A quifer and Depleted Oil Reservoir to Evaluate Regional CO 2 Sequestration Potential of Ozark Plateau A quifer System, South-Central Kansas Co-Principal Investigators Co-Principal Investigators Kerry D. Newell -- stratigraphy, geochemistry

359

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tracer for Tracking Permanent CO 2 Storage in Basaltic Rocks DE-FE0004847 Jennifer Hall Columbia University in the City of New York U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Conservative and Reactive Tracer Techniques * Accomplishments to Date * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * The goal of the project is to develop and test novel geochemical tracer techniques for quantitative monitoring, verification and accounting of stored CO 2 . These techniques contribute to the Carbon Storage Program's

360

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Geotechnical Site and Geotechnical Site Investigations for the Design of a CO 2 Rich Flue Gas Direct Injection Facility Project Number DOE Grant FE0001833 Paul Metz Department of Mining & Geological Engineering University of Alaska Fairbanks U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview: Goals and Objectives * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary * Appendix: Not Included in Presentation 3 Benefit to the Program * Carbon Storage Program Major Goals: - Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher projected economic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scale CO Scale CO 2 Injection and Optimization of Storage Capacity in the Southeastern United States Project Number: DE-FE0010554 George J. Koperna, Jr. Shawna Cyphers Advanced Resources International U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Presentation Outline * Program Goals * Benefits Statement * Project Overview - Goals - Objectives * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary * Appendix USDOE/NETL Program Goals * Support industry's ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30 percent. * Develop and validate technologies to ensure 99 percent storage permanence. * Develop technologies to improve reservoir storage

362

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SUMNER COUNTY, KANSAS DE-FE0006821 W. Lynn Watney, Jason Rush, Joint PIs Kansas Geological Survey The University of Kansas Lawrence, KS U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Brighton 1&2 Wednesday 8-21-13 1:10-1:35 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary 2 Small Scale Field Test Wellington Field Regional Assessment of deep saline Arbuckle aquifer Project Team DOE-NETL Contract #FE0006821 KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY 3 L. Watney (Joint PI), J. Rush (Joint PI), J. Doveton, E. Holubnyak, M. Fazelalavi, R. Miller, D. Newell, J. Raney

363

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seal Repair Using Seal Repair Using Nanocomposite Materials Project Number DE-FE0009562 John Stormont, Mahmoud Reda Taha University of New Mexico U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Ed Matteo, Thomas Dewers Sandia National Laboratories 2 Presentation Outline * Introduction and overview * Materials synthesis * Materials testing and characterization * Annular seal system testing * Numerical simulation * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * BENEFITS STATEMENT: The project involves the development and testing of polymer-cement nanocomposites for repairing flaws in annular wellbore seals. These materials will have superior characteristics compared to conventional

364

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wyoming: MVA Techniques for Determining Gas Transport and Caprock Integrity Project Number DE-FE0002112 PIs Drs. John Kaszuba and Kenneth Sims Virginia Marcon University of Wyoming U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status - Results - Conclusions - Next Steps * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goal being addressed. - Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones. - Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA). MVA technologies seek to monitor, verify, and

365

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impact of CO Impact of CO 2 Injection on the Subsurface Microbial Community in an Illinois Basin CCS Reservoir: Integrated Student Training in Geoscience and Geomicrobiology Project Number (DEFE0002421) Dr. Yiran Dong Drs. Bruce W. Fouke, Robert A. Sanford, Stephen Marshak University of Illinois-Urbana Champaign U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Technical status * Results and discussion * Summary * Appendix 3 Benefit to the Program This research project has developed scientific, technical and institutional collaborations for the development of

366

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mohammad Piri and Felipe Pereira Mohammad Piri and Felipe Pereira University of Wyoming U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status o Experimentation: core-flooding and IFT/CA o Pore-scale modeling modeling * Accomplishments to Date * Summary University of Wyoming 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goal: o 'Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30 percent.' * Benefits statement: o The research project is focused on performing reservoir conditions experiments to measure steady-state relative permeabilities,

367

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MVA Tools MVA Tools Sam Clegg, Kristy Nowak-Lovato, Ron Martinez, Julianna Fessenden, Thom Rahn, & Lianjie Huang Los Alamos National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview - Goals and Objectives * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary * Appendix - Organization Chart - Bibliography 3 Project Overview: Goals and Objectives * Surface MVA - Frequency Modulated Spectroscopy - Quantitatively identify CO2, H2S and CH4 seepage from geologic sequestration sites - Distinguish anthropogenic CO2 from natural CO2 emissions * CO2 carbon stable isotope measurements

368

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Results from Simulation Project Results from Simulation Framework for Regional Geologic CO 2 Storage Infrastructure along Arches Province of Midwest United States DOE Award No. DE-FE0001034 Ohio Dept. of Dev. Grant CDO/D-10-03 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting August 21-23, 2012 Joel Sminchak and Neeraj Gupta Battelle Energy Systems sminchak@battelle.org, 614-424-7392 gupta@battelle.org, 614-424-3820 BUSINESS SENSITIVE 2 Presentation Outline 1. Technical Status 2. Background (CO 2 Sources, Geologic Setting) 3. Injection Well history 4. Geocellular Model Development 5. Geological Data (Geological dataset, Geostatistics) 6. Geocellular porosity/permeability model development 7. Pipeline Routing Analysis

369

Research projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Yuan » Research projects Yuan » Research projects Research projects Research Interests Scientific computing, domain decomposition methods Linear solvers for sparse matrices Computational plasma physics Grid generation techniques GPU computing Current Research PDSLin: A hybrid linear solver for large-scale highly-indefinite linear systems The Parallel Domain decomposition Schur complement based Linear solver (PDSLin), which implements a hybrid (direct and iterative) linear solver based on a non-overlapping domain decomposition technique called chur complement method, and it has two levels of parallelism: a) to solve independent subdomains in parallel and b) to apply multiple processors per subdomain. In such a framework, load imbalance and excessive communication lead to the performance bottlenecks, and several techniques are developed

370

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SECARB Anthropogenic Test: SECARB Anthropogenic Test: CO 2 Capture/Transportation/Storage Project # DE-FC26-05NT42590 Jerry Hill, Southern Sates Energy Board Richard A. Esposito, Southern Company U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status - CO 2 Capture - CO 2 Transportation - CO 2 Storage * Accomplishments to Date * Organization Chart * Gantt Chart * Bibliography * Summary Benefit to the Program 1. Predict storage capacities within +/- 30% * Conducted high resolution reservoir characterization of the Paluxy saline formation key

371

Residential energy use to the year 2000: conservation and economics  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates the energy and direct economic effects of implementing various residential energy conservation programs. These evaluations are conducted using a detailed engineering-economic model that simulates residential energy use on an annual basis for 1970 through 2000. These programs include several authorized by the 94th Congress and expanded upon by the present administration: appliance-efficiency standards, thermal standards for construction of new residences and weatherization of existing housing units. In addition to these Federal programs that are being (or will be) implemented in some form, we consider two additional measures to save energy: large fuel-price increases and elimination of all market imperfections associated with production and purchase of new equipment and homes. Altogether, nine different residential energy ''futures'' are considered. The highest projection, which assumes constant real fuel prices from 1976-2000, shows residential energy use growing from 16 QBtu in 1976 to 28 QBtu in 2000, with an average annual growth rate of 2.3 percent. The baseline, which assumes rising fuel prices, yields an energy use estimate of 24 QBtu in 2000. Implementing all the Federal programs listed above would cut energy use in 2000 by 11 percent, to 22 QBtu. Adopting these programs also reduces energy-related costs to households by $27 billion. Raising fuel prices by 50 percent after 1984 and eliminating all market imperfections yields essentially zero energy growth in the residential sector. However, the cost to households of higher fuel prices amounts to about $60 billion.

Hirst, E.; Carney, J.

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Comparing Statewide Economic Impacts of New Generation from Wind, Coal, and Natural Gas in Arizona, Colorado, and Michigan  

SciTech Connect

With increasing concerns about energy independence, job outsourcing, and risks of global climate change, it is important for policy makers to understand all impacts from their decisions about energy resources. This paper assesses one aspect of the impacts: direct economic effects. The paper compares impacts to states from equivalent new electrical generation from wind, natural gas, and coal. Economic impacts include materials and labor for construction, operations, maintenance, fuel extraction, and fuel transport, as well as project financing, property tax, and landowner revenues. We examine spending on plant construction during construction years, in addition to all other operational expenditures over a 20-year span. Initial results indicate that adding new wind power can be more economically effective than adding new gas or coal power and that a higher percentage of dollars spent on coal and gas will leave the state. For this report, we interviewed industry representatives and energy experts, in addition to consulting government documents, models, and existing literature. The methodology for this research can be adapted to other contexts for determining economic effects of new power generation in other states and regions.

Tegen, S.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Comparing Statewide Economic Impacts of New Generation from Wind, Coal, and Natural Gas in Arizona, Colorado, and Michigan: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

With increasing concerns about energy independence, job outsourcing, and risks of global climate change, it is important for policy makers to understand all impacts from their decisions about energy resources. This paper assesses one aspect of the impacts: direct economic effects. The paper compares impacts to states from equivalent new electrical generation from wind, natural gas, and coal. Economic impacts include materials and labor for construction, operations, maintenance, fuel extraction, and fuel transport, as well as project financing, property tax, and landowner revenues. We examine spending on plant construction during construction years, in addition to all other operational expenditures over a 20-year span. Initial results indicate that adding new wind power can be more economically effective than adding new gas or coal power, and that a higher percentage of dollars spent on coal and gas will leave the state. For this report, we interviewed industry representatives and energy experts, in addition to consulting government documents, models, and existing literature. The methodology for this research can be adapted to other contexts for determining economic effects of new power generation in other states and regions.

Tegen, S.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 BROWN 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits & overview of deriving acrylates from coupling carbon dioxide and ethylene * Chemical catalysis approach: background and battles left to fight * Experimental assessment of the viability of thermochemical acrylate production * Perspectives for the future BROWN 3 Benefit to the Program * This project identifies the critical catalyst features necessary to promote carbon dioxide coupling with ethylene to acrylate at molybdenum catalysts. This research demonstrates the viability of acrylate production

375

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Proof-of-Feasibility of Using Wellbore Deformation as a Diagnostic Tool to Improve CO2 Sequestration DE FE0004542 Larry Murdoch, Clemson University Stephen Moysey, Clemson University Leonid Germanovich, Georgia Tech Cem Ozan, Baker Hughes Sihyun Kim, Georgia Tech Glenn Skawski, Clemson University Alex Hanna, Clemson University Johnathan Ebenhack, Clemson University Josh Smith, Clemson University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Proof-of-Feasibility of Using Wellbore Deformation as a Diagnostic Tool, Larry Murdoch Project Review Meeting, 23 Aug. 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Preliminaries

376

Hallmark Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Project Commercialization of the Secure SCADA Communications Protocol, a cryptographic security solution for device-to-device communication Increased connectivity and automation in the control systems that manage the nation's energy infrastructure have improved system functionality, but left systems more vulnerable to cyber attack. Intruders could severely disrupt control system operation by sending fabricated information or commands to control system devices. To ensure message integrity, supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems require a method to validate device-to- device communication and verify that information has come from a trusted source and not been altered in transit. The Secure SCADA Communications Protocol (SSCP) provides message

377

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DE-FE0002225: DE-FE0002225: Actualistic and geochemical modeling of reservoir rock, CO 2 and formation fluid interaction, Citronelle oil field, Alabama West Virginia University & University of Alabama Presenter: Dr. Amy Weislogel (WVU) Co-PI: Dr. Rona Donahoe (UA) U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits * Overview & Project Map * Reservoir Geochemical Characterization * Formation Fluid Geochemistry * Geochemical Modeling * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Develop technologies that will support industries'

378

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DE-FE0001836: DE-FE0001836: Numerical modeling of geomechanical processes related to CO 2 injection within generic reservoirs Andreas Eckert & Runar Nygaard Missouri University of Science & Technology U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Objectives, Benefits and Outcomes * Technical status: Project summary - Teaching - Reservoir scale (Geomechanics & Fluid flow simulation) - Borehole scale (Wellbore integrity & wellbore trajectory planning) * Conclusions * Appendix 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed. - Develop technologies that will support industries'

379

Assessment and economic analysis of the MOD III Stirling-engine driven chiller system. Final report, October 1989-July 1990  

SciTech Connect

The Stirling engine is an inherently clean and efficient engine. With the requirements for environmentally benign emissions and high energy efficiency, the Stirling engine is an attractive alternative to both internal combustion (IC) engines and electric motors. The study evaluated a Stirling-engine-driven chiller package. Technically, the Stirling engine is a good selection as a compressor drive, with inherently low vibrations, quiet operation, long life, and low maintenance. Exhaust emissions are below the projected 1995 stringent California standards. Economically, the Stirling-engine-driven chiller is a viable alternative to both IV-engine and electric-driven chillers, trading off slightly higher installed cost against lower total operating expenses. The penetration of a small portion of the projected near-term stationary engine market opportunity will provide the volume production basis to achieve competitively priced engines.

Moryl, J.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Electricity economics: essays and case studies  

SciTech Connect

These studies deal with the economic theory and practice of pricing and investment in electricity supply. There are seven chapters on applications, five on principles, and the final four clear up some deficiencies in existing theory. The chapters following an introductory chapter are Economics, Finance, and Equity in Tariff Policy; Electricity Tariffs in Thailand; Electricity Tariffs in Tunisia; Electricity Tariffs in Sudan; An American Tariff Structure; Rural Electrification in Developing Countries; Electricity Development in Turkey: A Case Study Using Linear Programming; How to Study Tariffs; The Rate of Return on Projects--and Relations between Pricing and Investments; The Willingness-to-Pay Criterion; a Layman's Guide to Shadow Pricing; Investment Planning Models; Optimal Electricity Pricing Under Uncertainty; Cost Structure in Hydro and Hydro-Thermal Systems; Tariff Structures with Simple Metering; and A Note on Optimal Pricing and Indivisibilities. (MCW)

Turvey, R.; Anderson, D.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher projected economic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Energy, Environmental & Economic Systems Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy, Environmental & Economic Systems Analysis GTMax: A New Deregulated Power Market Analysis Tool Opportunity Decision and Information Sciences Division Center for Energy, Environmental & Economic hourly energy transactions, costs, and revenues. GTMax has a user-friendly geographical information

Kemner, Ken

382

TRANSPORTATION POLICY AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TRANSPORTATION POLICY AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT: OUR CHOICE FOR THE FUTURE Proceedings from PROCEEDINGS North Dakota's Transportation Network: Our Choice for the Future Program Biographical Sketches PROCEEDINGS Transportation and Economic Development: Our Choice for the Future Program Biographical Sketches

Levinson, David M.

383

Refund for Economic Development (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Refund for Economic Development under the Tax Code for state tax refunds for economic development. Some Texas property owners may be eligible to receive refunds of state sales and use taxes and...

384

Engineering and Economic Evaluation of Municipal Solid Waste Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2006, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) initiated a project to conduct engineering and economic evaluations of renewable energy technologies, including wind, biomass, solar, geothermal, hydro, and ocean tidal and wave (Program 84). The goal of the evaluations is to develop an objective and consistent assessment of the current performance and project the future performance of the technologies with regard to thermal efficiency, capital and operation and maintenance costs, resource requirement...

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

385

Rural Electrification in India: Economic and Industrial Aspects of Renewables  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

turbines can be economically appealing. Decreasing capital costs as well as government incentives strengthen the viability of wind-hybrid systems. However difficulties in siting of turbines, combined with often undocumented local wind-speed variations... phase programmes with effective strategies in place. For initial projects, financing can represent the single largest barrier to entry. High capital costs of DDG projects exclude many smaller NGOs from considering such initiatives and government...

Cust, J; Singh, Anoop; Neuhoff, Karsten

386

Engineering and Economic Evaluation of Offshore Wind Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2006, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) initiated a new project to conduct engineering and economic evaluations of renewable energy technologies, including wind, biomass, solar, geothermal, hydro, ocean tidal and wave, and others (Program 84). The goal of the evaluations is to develop an objective and consistent assessment of the current and projected future performance of the technologies with regard to thermal efficiency, capital and operations and maintenance costs, resource requirements...

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

387

One: The California Economic Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE CALIFORNIA ECONOMIC OUTLOOK Christopher Thornberg,signs of having peaked. The outlook for 2006 is dominated by

Thornberg, Christopher

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Small-Scale Hydroelectric Power Demonstration Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy Field Office, Idaho, Small-Scale Hydroelectric Power Program was initiated in conjunction with the restoration of three power generating plants in Idaho Falls, Idaho, following damage caused by the Teton Dam failure on June 5, 1976. There were many parties interested in this project, including the state and environmental groups, with different concerns. This report was prepared by the developer and describes the design alternatives the applicant provided in an attempt to secure the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission license. Also included are correspondence between the related parties concerning the project, major design alternatives/project plan diagrams, the license, and energy and project economics.

Gleeson, L.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Economic doctrines and network policy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Disagreements over how to craft Internet policy have become more and more contentious and political. Beyond the technical and engineering aspects are economic questions, and the points of view of various stakeholders and participants on such network ... Keywords: Broadband, Copyright, Doctrines, Economic ideology, Neoclassical economics, Net neutrality, Privacy

Robert D. Atkinson

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Fuel used in electricity generation is projected to shift over the ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Projected fuel prices and economic growth are key factors influencing the future electricity generation mix. The price of natural gas, coal's chief competitor, ...

391

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RECIPIENT:I L Dept. of Commerce & Economic Opportunity PROJECT TITLE; Center Ethanol Company, LLC Page I of2 STATE: IL Funding Opportunity ADDOUDcmeDt Number Procurement...

392

U.S. energy use projected to grow slowly and become less carbon ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Both energy consumption and energy-related carbon dioxide emissions fell during the recent economic recession. Projections contained in the Early Release Reference ...

393

IEAB Independent Economic Analysis Board  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The focus of the review is cost-effectiveness of the project, which requires that we compare the project involve the MVID project itself. Some costs are still being determined. Instream flow amounts and triggers considering the MVID project? At the very least, cost-effectiveness of the MVID project can be considered

394

Gas hydrate reservoir characteristics and economics  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the DOE-funded USGS Gas Hydrate Program is to assess the production characteristics and economic potential of gas hydrates in northern Alaska. The objectives of this project for FY-1992 will include the following: (1) Utilize industry seismic data to assess the distribution of gas hydrates within the nearshore Alaskan continental shelf between Harrison Bay and Prudhoe Bay; (2) Further characterize and quantify the well-log characteristics of gas hydrates; and (3) Establish gas monitoring stations over the Eileen fault zone in northern Alaska, which will be used to measure gas flux from destabilized hydrates.

Collett, T.S.; Bird, K.J.; Burruss, R.C.; Lee, Myung W.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Gas hydrate reservoir characteristics and economics  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the DOE-funded USGS Gas Hydrate Program is to assess the production characteristics and economic potential of gas hydrates in northern Alaska. The objectives of this project for FY-1992 will include the following: (1) Utilize industry seismic data to assess the distribution of gas hydrates within the nearshore Alaskan continental shelf between Harrison Bay and Prudhoe Bay; (2) Further characterize and quantify the well-log characteristics of gas hydrates; and (3) Establish gas monitoring stations over the Eileen fault zone in northern Alaska, which will be used to measure gas flux from destabilized hydrates.

Collett, T.S.; Bird, K.J.; Burruss, R.C.; Lee, Myung W.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Economic benefits of decarbonising the global electricity sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conventional economic analyses of stringent climate change mitigation have generally concluded that economic austerity would result from carbon austerity. These analyses however rely critically on the assumption of an economic equilibrium, which dismisses established notions on behavioural heterogeneity, path dependence and technology transitions. Here we show that on the contrary, the decarbonisation of the electricity sector globally can lead to improvements in economic performance. By modelling the process of innovation-diffusion and non-equilibrium dynamics, we establish how climate policy instruments for emissions reductions alter economic activity through energy prices, government spending, enhanced investment and tax revenues. While higher electricity prices reduce income and output, this is over-compensated by enhanced employment generated by investments in new technology. We stress that the current dialogue on the impacts of climate policies must be revisited to reflect the real complex dynamics invo...

Mercure, J F; Foley, A; Chewpreecha, U; Pollitt, H; Holden, P B; Edwards, N R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Feasibility and economics of existing PWR transition to a higher power core using annular fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The internally and externally cooled annular fuel is a new type of fuel for PWRs that enables an increase in core power density by 50% within the same or better safety margins as the traditional solid fuel. Each annular ...

Beccherle, Julien

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Estimation, Economic methodology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper I analyse the main strengths and weaknesses of agent-based computational models. I first describe how agent-based simulations can complement more traditional modelling techniques. Then, I rationalise the main theoretical critiques against the use of simulation, which point to the following problematic areas: (i) interpretation of the simulation dynamics, (ii) estimation of the simulation model, and (iii) generalisation of the results. I show that there exist solutions for all these issues. Along the way, I clarify some confounding differences in terminology between the computer science and the economic literature.

Matteo Richiardi; Laboratorio Riccardo; Revelli Centre; Employment Studies; I’m Indebted Francesco Devicienti; Roberto Leombruni; Bruno Contini For Their

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Air Pollution Project: Scenario  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scenario Scenario HELP Index Summary Scenario Internet Links Student Pages Oak Park and River Forest High School in Oak Park, IL, is a four-year (9-12) comprehensive high school with an enrollment of approximately 2800 students. The communities of Oak Park and River Forest are located just west of Chicago. Student backgrounds vary greatly socio-economically, ethnically (63% Caucasian, 28% African-American, 4% Hispanic, 4% Asian) and culturally. Average student standardized test scores are above the state and national averages. The chemistry class is a cross section of the lower 70% of the school community. Students in Ms. Bardeen's regular chemistry class, grades 10, 11 & 12 enter the computer lab, access the Internet on their computers, and begin to work with their teams on their current project. Students are busy talking with

400

Economic feasibility of solar-thermal industrial applications and selected case studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The economic feasibility is assessed of utilizing solar energy to augment an existing fossil fuel system to generate industrial process heat. Several case studies in the textile and food processing industries in the southern United States were analyzed. Sensitivity analyses were performed, and comparisons illustrating the effects of the Economic Recovery Tax Act of 1981 were made. The economic desirability of the proposed solar systems varied with the type of system selected, location of the facility, state tax credits, and type of fuel displaced. For those systems presently not economical, the projected time to economic feasibility was ascertained.

Montelione, A.; Boyd, D.; Branz, M.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher projected economic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigating the Fundamental Investigating the Fundamental Scientific Issues Affecting the Long-term Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide Project Number DE-FE0000397 Lee H Spangler Energy Research Institute Montana State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Computational tool development * Laboratory studies to understand subsurface CO 2 behavior * Analog studies to inform risk analysis * Near surface detection technologies / testing * Mitigation method development 3 Benefit to the Program Program goals being addressed. * Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO

402

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FE/NETL CTS Cost Models and FE/NETL CTS Cost Models and Benefits Assessment of Carbon Storage R&D Program David Morgan Benefits Division Office of Program Planning and Analysis National Energy Technology Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 OFFICE OF FOSSIL ENERGY 2 Presentation Outline * Overview of benefits assessment * Overview of FE/NETL models used to assess benefits of CO 2 capture and storage * Benefits evaluation of Storage Program's R&D projects using a model to estimate costs of CO 2 storage in a saline aquifer * Description of model used to estimate costs of

403

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1-23, 2012 1-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the program * Project overview: Why 14 C for MVA? * Technical status: Cartridges, injections, lasers * Summary * Organizational chart * Collaborators 3 Benefit to the Program * Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones. Permanent storage of CO 2 can be demonstrated by adding carbon-14 ( 14 C) prior to injection. This research project aims to demonstrate this by tagging fossil CO 2 with 14 C at a field site. When completed, this system will show that 14 C can be a safe and effective tracer for sequestered CO 2 . A laser-based 14 C measurement method is being adapted for continuous monitoring. This technology contributes to the Carbon Storage Program's effort of ensuring 99 percent

404

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leakage Pathways and Leakage Pathways and Mineralization within Caprocks for Geologic Storage of CO 2 Project DE-FC26-0xNT4 FE0001786 James P. Evans Utah State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits * Goals and Objectives * Relationship to overall program goals * Overview of seal bypass * Technical status; bypass systems - Field based studies - Technological advances * Accomplishments and Summary * Appendices 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals addressed * Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30 percent.

405

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Michael G. Waddell Earth Sciences and Resources Institute University of South Carolina U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Project goals and benefits * Overview of the geology of the South Georgia Rift basin in SC * Results of petrographic and core analysis from the Rizer #1 * Future investigations in the SGR * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program Program Goals: * Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30 percent. * Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected

406

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Micro-Structured Sapphire Fiber Sensors for Micro-Structured Sapphire Fiber Sensors for Simultaneous Measurements of High-T and Dynamic Gas Pressure in Harsh Environments DE-FE0001127 Investigators: Hai Xiao, Hai-Lung Tsai, Missouri University of Science and Technology Junhang Dong, University of Cincinnati Program Manager: Norm Popkie, Gasification Division, NETL DOE Project Kickoff Meeting in the NETL Pittsburgh December 15, 2009 Outline * Background * Objectives * Project Elements * Management Plan * Research Plan and Approaches * Risk Management * Summary Background * Demands: High-performance, reliable, in situ sensors are highly demanded for advanced process control and lifecycle management in existing and future advanced power and fuel systems - Improved efficiency/safety/reliability/availability/maintainability

407

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mart Oostrom Mart Oostrom Pacific Northwest National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline  Project overview  Sub-Task 1: Investigation of CO 2 migration in heterogeneous porous media  Sub-Task 2: Modeling CCUS deployment in China  Summary Collaboration with China on Clean Energy Research 3 Benefit to the Program The Clean Energy Partnership was established by a memorandum of understanding between the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the National Energy Technology Laboratory and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in May of 2009 with the goal of significantly reducing the environmental emissions and improving the efficiency of

408

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Evaluation of Geophysical Methods for Monitoring and Tracking CO 2 Migration in the Subsurface PI: Jeffrey Daniels Co-PI: Robert Burns & Franklin Schwartz Students: Michael Murphy & Kyle Shalek The Ohio State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 FOA Number: DE-FOA-0000032 NETL Award Number: DE-FE0002441 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Program Goal: Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones

409

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

capillary trapping (FE0004956), Bryant, UT-Austin capillary trapping (FE0004956), Bryant, UT-Austin Influence of Local Capillary Trapping on Containment System Effectiveness DE-FE0004956 Steven Bryant The University of Texas at Austin U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 Local capillary trapping (FE0004956), Bryant, UT-Austin Local capillary trapping (FE0004956), Bryant, UT-Austin 2 Presentation Outline * Motivation and relevance to Program * Project goals * Technical status * Accomplishments * Summary * Future plans Local capillary trapping (FE0004956), Bryant, UT-Austin Local capillary trapping (FE0004956), Bryant, UT-Austin

410

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improved Caprock Integrity and Improved Caprock Integrity and Risk Assessment Techniques Project Number (FE0009168) Michael Bruno, PhD, PE GeoMechanics Technologies U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Introduction and Motivation 2 A primary requirement for long-term geologic storage and containment of carbon dioxide is ensuring caprock integrity. Large-scale CO2 injection requires improved and advanced simulation tools and risk assessment techniques to better predict and help control system failures, and to enhance performance of geologic storage. GeoMechanics Technologies is developing enhanced simulation and risk analysis approaches to assess and

411

Irene Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Irene Station, African Weather Bureau Irene Station, African Weather Bureau The photos on this site come from the Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) project. Additional photos can be found on the SHADOZ Project Web Site. Photo of the Dobson 89 Instrument The Irene Weather Office Agnes Phahlane sits behind the Dobson and collects Total Ozone Data The lab at the Irene station Cal Archer Prepares an ozonesonde Flight Preparations The balloon is readied The release Back to the SAFARI 2000 Photo Page Index Other Sites: Skukuza, MISR Validation Site | Skukuza, Eddy Covariance Site | C-130 Flight Photos | Sua Pan Site | Irene Weather Station | Fire Studies | Kalahari Transect | Kalahari Transect Sites for Canopy Structure Data | ORNL DAAC Home || ORNL Home || NASA || Privacy, Security, Notices || Data

412

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

plume monitoring (FE0004962), Bryant and Srinivasan, UT-Austin Inexpensive plume monitoring (FE0004962), Bryant and Srinivasan, UT-Austin plume monitoring (FE0004962), Bryant and Srinivasan, UT-Austin Inexpensive plume monitoring (FE0004962), Bryant and Srinivasan, UT-Austin Inexpensive Monitoring and Uncertainty Assessment of CO 2 Plume Migration DOE-FE0004962 Steven Bryant The University of Texas at Austin U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 Inexpensive plume monitoring (FE0004962), Bryant and Srinivasan, UT-Austin 2 Presentation Outline * Motivation and relevance to Program * Project goals * Technical status * Accomplishments * Summary * Future plans Inexpensive plume monitoring (FE0004962), Bryant and Srinivasan, UT-Austin

413

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basin-Scale Leakage Risks from Basin-Scale Leakage Risks from Geologic Carbon Sequestration: Impact on CCS Energy Market Competitiveness Catherine A. Peters Jeffery P. Fitts Michael A. Celia Princeton University Paul D. Kalb Vatsal Bhatt Brookhaven National Laboratory Elizabeth J. Wilson Jeffrey M. Bielicki Melisa Pollak University of Minnesota DOE Award DE-FE0000749 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits to CCUS research program * Project Goals & Objectives * Technical Status  Thrust I - Reservoir-scale simulations of leakage potential with permeability evolution

414

Project Description  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Description Project Description The Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA 2007), and Presidential Executive Order 13423 all contain requirements for Federal facilities to decrease energy consumption and increase the use of renewable energy by the year 2015. To provide leadership in meeting these requirements, DOE, in partnership with the General Services Administration (GSA), has installed a rooftop solar electric, or PV, system on the roof of DOE's headquarters in Washington, D.C. The 205 kilowatt (kW) installation is one of the largest of its kind in the Nation's capital. A display in the For- restal building will show the power output of the PV system during the day and the energy produced over

415

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Modeling CO for Modeling CO 2 Processes: Pressure Management, Basin-Scale Models, Model Comparison, and Stochastic Inversion ESD09-056 Jens T. Birkholzer with Abdullah Cihan, Marco Bianchi, Quanlin Zhou, Xiaoyi Liu, Sumit Mukhopadhyay, Dorothee Rebscher, Barbara Fialeix Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview and Technical Status - Task 1: Optimization of Brine Extraction for Pressure Management and Mitigation - Task 2: Basin-scale Simulation of CO 2 Storage in the Northern Plains - Prairie Basal Aquifer - Task 3: Sim-SEQ Model Comparison

416

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beneficial Use of CO Beneficial Use of CO 2 in Precast Concrete Production DE-FE0004285 Yixin Shao, Yaodong Jia Liang Hu McGill University 3H Company U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 Presentation outline * Goals and objectives * Benefits to the program * Project overview * Technical status * Accomplishment to date * Summary 2 Objective Masonry blocks Fiber-cement panels Prefabricated buildings Concrete pipes To develop a carbonation process to replace steam curing in precast concrete production for energy reduction, and carbon storage and utilization. Goals * CO 2 sequestration capacity by cement:

417

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University of Kansas Center for Research University of Kansas Center for Research Kansas Geological Survey U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 20-22, 2013 Presentation Outline * Benefits, objectives, overview * Methods * Background & setting * Technical status * Accomplishments * Summary Benefit to the Program * Program goal addressed: Develop technologies that will support the industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ± 30 percent. * Program goal addressed: This project will confirm - via a horizontal test boring - whether fracture attributes derived from 3-D seismic PSDM Volumetric Curvature (VC) processing are real. If

418

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brian Turk Research Triangle Institute U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Project benefits and objectives * Carbon reactivity studies * Catalyst mechanism studies * Catalyst development * Test results * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goal: Reduce CO 2 emissions by developing beneficial uses that meet the DOE net cost metric of $10/MT for captured CO 2 that will mitigate CO 2 emissions in areas where geological storage may not be an optimal solution * Benefits statement: Development of a commercial process for converting CO 2 and a carbon source into a commodity chemical at a

419

FUSRAP Project  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Project Project 23b 14501 FUSRAP TECHNICAL BULLETIN N O . - R 3 v . L DATE: 1.2 9-99 SUBJECT : Pr.pec.d BY T r m L u d Approval Summary of the results for the Springdale characterization activities performed per WI-94-015, Rev. 0. TUO separate radiological characterization surveys and a limited cherical characterization survey were performed on the Springdale Site in Octcjer and December, 1993. The design of the radiological surveys were to supplement and define existing ORNL surveys. The limited cher.ica1 characterization survey was performed to assist in the completion of waste disposal paperwork. Radiological contamination is primarily ir. the 'belt cutting and belt fabrication'areas of the building with a small erea of contamination in the south end of the building. The chemiccl sac~le

420

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0-22, 2013 0-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview: Goals and Objectives * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary * Appendix 3 Benefit to the Program * Advanced simulation tool for quantifying transport in porous and fractured geological formations during CO 2 sequestration that includes all mechanisms: convection, diffusion, dissolution and chemical reactions * A simulator that can fully model these processes does not currently exist * Simulator will contribute to our ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations, to within ±30 percent 4 Project Overview: Goals and Objectives Comprehensive reservoir simulator for investigation of CO 2 non-isothermal, multiphase flow and long-term storage in

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher projected economic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thomas J. Wolery Thomas J. Wolery Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 LLNL-PRES-574632 2 Team Members * Roger Aines * Bill Bourcier * Tom Wolery * Tom Buscheck * Tom Wolfe (consultant) * Mike DiFilippo (consultant) * Larry Lien (Membrane Development Specialists) 3 Presentation Outline * Overview of Active CO 2 Reservoir Management (ACRM) * Subsurface Reservoir Management: Made Possible by Brine Production, Yielding Many Benefits * Brine Disposal Options - What brines are out there? - What are the treatment options? 4 Benefit to the Program * This project is identifying and evaluating

422

Is Demand-Side Management Economically Justified?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Is Demand-Side Management Economically Justified? With billions of dollars being spent on demand-side management programs in the U.S. every year, the rationale for and performance of these programs are coming under increasing scrutiny. Three projects in the Energy Analysis Program are making significant contributions to the DSM debate. *Total Resource Cost Test Ratio = ratio of utility avoided costs (i.e., benefits) divided by total cost of program (i.e., Administrative Cost + Incentive Cost + Consumer Cost) In May, Joe Eto, Ed Vine, Leslie Shown, Chris Payne, and I released the first in a series of reports we authored from the Database on Energy Efficiency Programs (DEEP) project. The objective of DEEP is to document the measured cost and performance of utility-sponsored energy-efficiency

423

Economic enhancement of Western shale oil upgrading  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A proof-of-concept study for a novel shale oil refining process was undertaken. This project promises reduced upgrading costs, thereby making shale oil development more feasible for commercialization. The process consists of distillation of raw shale oil into a distillate and residue portion, cracking of the residue by hydropyrolysis, and selective hydrotreating of narrow boiling cuts from the total distillate. Based on models and experimental data, the end product slate is projected to be 34% naphtha, 57% middle distillate, and 10.3% atm residue + coke. Hydrogen addition is 1.3% or 800 scf/bbl. These results are considerably improved over conventional processing, which gives 14% naphtha, 41% middle distillate, and 48.2% residue + coke and hydrogen addition of 3.2% or 2000 scf/bbl. More quantitative data and preliminary economics will be obtained in the next phase of study. 13 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

Bunger, J. W.; Ryu, H.; Jeong, S. Y.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Project Payette  

SciTech Connect

This is the concept for Project Payette, a nuclear event in the Seismic Detection Research Program. For this experiment, a nuclear explosive in the range of 5 to 10 kt will be detonated at a depth of 2000 to 3000 ft in an underground cavity of sufficient size that the walls of the cavity experience only elastic motion. The site will be located in a salt dome. Project Payette has been divided into three phases. Phase I will include site evaluation and engineering design of the construction of the cavity. It is estimated to require about 1 year. Phase II will include construction of the cavity and emplacement hole. It is estimated to require about 2 years. Phase III will include emplacement of instruments and the device, the detonation and the post-shot program including cavity re-entry. This is estimated to require about 1 year. The scope of this concept is intended to define Project Payette sufficiently will that Phase I work may proceed.

Warner, D.

1966-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Development of a Secure, Economic and Environmentally friendly Modern Power  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Secure, Economic and Environmentally friendly Modern Power Secure, Economic and Environmentally friendly Modern Power System (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Development of a Secure, Economic and Environmentally friendly Modern Power System Country Denmark Coordinates 56.26392°, 9.501785° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":56.26392,"lon":9.501785,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

426

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007 - World Energy and Economic Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy and Economic Outlook World Energy and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2007 Chapter 1 - World Energy and Economic Outlook In the IEO2007 reference case, total world consumption of marketed energy is projected to increase by 57 percent from 2004 to 2030. The largest projected increase in energy demand is for the non-OECD region. Figure 8. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 9. World Marketed Energy Use; OECD and Non-OECD, 2004-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 10. Marketed Energy Use in the NON-OECD Economies by Region, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

427

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Models - Interpreting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interpreting Results Interpreting Results Sample Results from JEDI. Download a text-version (MS Excel 44 KB) The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models estimate the number of jobs and economic impacts associated with power generation, fuel production, and other projects. Economic activity in input-output models is typically assessed in three categories. NREL's JEDI models classify the first category of results-on-site labor and professional services results-as dollars spent on labor from companies engaged in development and on-site construction and operation of power generation and transmission. These results include labor only-no materials. Companies or businesses that fall into this category of results include project developers, environmental and permitting consultants, road builders, concrete-pouring

428

Economic regulation and the commercialization of synthetic gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The history of the Great Plains coal-gasification plant (proposed for Mercer Co., N.D.) illuminates the role of economic regulation in commercializing new energy technologies. Even though sponsors of such projects seek to ensure cost recovery and profit in advance via the regulatory process, the regulators are reluctant to provide more than partial assurance. Future economic-regulatory entities will have to develop better criteria for deciding which synthetic-gas projects will have access to rolled-in pricing. At least in the near term, most high-Btu manufactured gas will require cross-subsidization by other lower priced gas sources in order to be competitive economically; this makes advance approval of rolled-in pricing crucial to the pace and extent of syngas's market penetration. Regulatory agencies must also address the structure of escalation clauses and price ceilings.

Hall, G.R.

1981-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

429

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 with Projections to 2025 5 with Projections to 2025 Report #: DOE/EIA-0383(2005) Release date full report: January 2005 Next release date full report: January 2006 Early Release Reference Case date: December 2005 The Annual Energy Outlook presents a midterm forecast and analysis of US energy supply, demand, and prices through 2025. The projections are based on results from the Energy Information Administration's National Energy Modeling System. AEO2005 includes a reference case and over 30 sensitivities. Data Tables Summary Tables Adobe Acrobat Logo Yearly Tables Excel logo Regional and other detailed tables Excel logo (Supplemental) Contents Overview Market Drivers Trends in Economic Activity Economic Growth Cases International Oil Markets Energy Demand Projections Buildings Sector

430

Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this collaborative project between NREL and industry is: (1) provide high quality solar measurements in support of deploying Concentrating Solar Thermal projects; and (2) provide NREL with research-quality data sets for refining solar models and developing solar forecasting capabilities. The benefits of this project are: (1) lends NREL credibility to data sets used for economic analyses and commercial justification; (2) helps minimize costly mistakes in estimating capacity and economic return on investment; (3) helps maximize the development of projects for which adequate solar resources exist; (4) provides data to NREL for research to improve/validate models and explore RA innovations; and (5) helps maintain collaborative channels between NREL and industry.

Wilcox, S.

2008-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

431

Bank financing of secondary recovery projects  

SciTech Connect

Investment requirements of the average independent oil operator desiring to develop a secondary recovery project usually are sought from a lending institution. The criteria by which The Chase Manhattan Bank judges such an application are discussed: managerial competence of the operator, the engineering information and program, and an economic analysis of the project and proposed financing. The application of these principles to the case of a successful waterflood in the Mid-Continent area is presented. Some problems are presented to illustrate the importance of the bank's standards in considering the financing of a secondary recovery project. Good management and competent, continuing engineering guidance are considered essential to a financeable secondary recovery project. The quality of the properties must be proven by comparison of laboratory data and engineering studies with pilot flood performance. The amount of financing the bank will be willing to undertake is determined by an economic analysis and valuation method as described.

Brown, C.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Wind for Schools Project Curriculum Brief (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) 20% Wind Energy by 2030 report recommends expanding education to ensure a trained workforce to meet the projected growth of the wind industry and deployment. Although a few U.S. higher education institutions offer wind technology education programs, most are found in community and technical colleges, resulting in a shortage of programs preparing highly skilled graduates for wind industry careers. Further, the United States lags behind Europe (which has more graduate programs in wind technology design and manufacturing) and is in danger of relinquishing the economic benefits of domestic production of wind turbines and related components and services to European countries. DOE's Wind Powering America initiative launched the Wind for Schools project to develop a wind energy knowledge base among future leaders of our communities, states, and nation while raising awareness about wind energy's benefits. This fact sheet provides an overview of wind energy curricula as it relates to the Wind for Schools project.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Feasibility study of geothermal heating, Modoc Lassen housing project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study evaluates the feasibility of using geothermal water for space and domestic water heating systems at the elderly housing project now ready for construction at the Modoc Lassen Indian Reservation. For the six units considered, the space heating load is four times the domestic water heating load. Since the geothermal water temperature is uncertain, two scenarios were evaluated. In the first, which assumes 160/sup 0/F supply temperature, the geothermal system is assumed to satisfy the entire space and domestic water heating loads. In the second, which assumes the supply temperature to be less than 120/sup 0/F at the wellhead only space heating is provided. The economics of the first scenario are quite favorable. The additional expenditure of $15,630 is projected to save $3522 annually at current energy costs, and the life cycle cost study projects a discounted rate of return on the investment of 44.4%. Surprisingly, the investment is even more favorable for the second scenario, due to the higher cost and lower resultant savings for the domestic water components. Forced air space heating from geothermal is recommended. Domestic water heating is recommended pending additional information on supply water temperature.

Not Available

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 - Comparison with  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Comparison with Other Projections Comparison with Other Projections Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 Comparison with Other Projections Only Global Insights, Inc. (GII) produces a comprehensive energy projection with a time horizon similar to that of AEO2007. Other organizations, however, address one or more aspects of the energy markets. The most recent projection from GII, as well as others that concentrate on economic growth, international oil prices, energy consumption, electricity, natural gas, petroleum, and coal, are compared here with the AEO2007 projections. Economic Growth In the AEO2007 reference case, the projected growth in real GDP, based on 2000 chain-weighted dollars, is 2.9 percent per year from 2005 to 2030. The AEO2007 projections for economic growth are based on the August short-term projection of GII, extended by EIA through 2030 and modified to reflect EIA’s view on energy prices, demand, and production.

435

Ownership of Carbon Dioxide Captured by Clean Coal Project (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation stipulates that the Railroad Commission of Texas automatically acquires the title to any carbon dioxide captured by a clean coal project in the state. The Bureau of Economic...

436

and IR-4 Project Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In both tables, erroneous industry direct effects were reported that do not impact the overall findings of this report. The direct effect numbers previously reported in Tables 4 and 5 were not used in the calculations of overall impacts. The corrected tables in this document do reflect the estimates, as described in the text of the original report. October 22, 2012Executive Summary The Interregional Research Project Number 4 (IR-4 Project) has been a pivotal resource in providing U.S. residents a plentiful and low-cost array of vegetables, fruits, berries and tree nuts since 1963 by facilitating the registration of newer, lower-toxic pest control products with the EPA for application on specialty crops. Specialty crop growers often are at a disadvantage relative to program crop growers in having access to effective crop loss mitigation options against common agricultural pests. Specialty crops make up about 40 percent of the total value of U.S. crop production and include both food and ornamental crops that afford insufficient economic incentive for a pesticide companies to support initial or continuing registration of commercial pesticides. As all agricultural uses of pesticides are regulated by the EPA, each use must be registered or exempted before applied. Such registration is costly, making only registration for uses on any but large acreage crops unprofitable for pesticide companies. The IR-4 Project leverages resources to pursue registration for such uses. Along with supporting the use of reduced-toxicity pesticides, with its Biological and Organic Support program, the IR-4 Project is able to direct necessary resources to meet the U.S. goal of substantially decreasing the environmental and health impacts of agricultural pesticide use following the passage of the Food Quality Protection Act of 1996. This report assesses the economic impact of the IR-4 Project on the U.S. economy. The assessment assumes a long-run presence of the IR-4 Project, such that relevant decision makers recognize and

Steven R. Miller; Andrea Leschewski

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

NREL Report Highlights Positive Economic Impact and Job Creation from 1603  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NREL Report Highlights Positive Economic Impact and Job Creation NREL Report Highlights Positive Economic Impact and Job Creation from 1603 Renewable Energy Grant Program NREL Report Highlights Positive Economic Impact and Job Creation from 1603 Renewable Energy Grant Program April 6, 2012 - 10:26am Addthis Table: Estimates of the Direct and Indirect Jobs, Earnings, and Economic Output Supported by PV and Large Wind Projects Funded Under the §1603 Grant Program. Table: Estimates of the Direct and Indirect Jobs, Earnings, and Economic Output Supported by PV and Large Wind Projects Funded Under the §1603 Grant Program. Dan Leistikow Dan Leistikow Former Director, Office of Public Affairs The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado, issued a study on Friday estimating the economic impact

438

Economic Development from Gigawatt-Scale Wind Deployment in Wyoming (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation provides an overview of economic development in Wyoming from gigawatt-scale wind development and includes a discussion of project context, definitions and caveats, a deployment scenario, modeling inputs, results, and conclusions.

Lantz, E.

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

439

OTEC as an Economic Engine Barry R. Cole, Executive Vice President  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· www.OTECI.com 1 #12;Annual Average Spot Price for Brent Crude 1990- 2040 (US Dept of Energy Projection dependence on foreign oil · Increased economic security 9 September 2013 7APCESE and OTEC Symposium 2013

440

Nepal-Sectoral Climate Impacts Economic Assessment | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nepal-Sectoral Climate Impacts Economic Assessment Nepal-Sectoral Climate Impacts Economic Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Name Nepal Sectoral Climate impacts Economic Assessment Agency/Company /Organization Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN), United Kingdom Department for International Development Partner Ministry of Environment for Government of Nepal Sector Climate Focus Area Agriculture, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, People and Policy, Water Conservation Topics Low emission development planning Website http://cdkn.org/2011/11/call-f Country Nepal Southern Asia References Nepal Sectoral Climate impacts Economic Assessment[1] CDKN is providing support to the GoN through a number of projects to design and deliver climate compatible development (CCD) plans and policies. To

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441

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Trends in Economic Activity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Trends in Economic Activity Trends in Economic Activity Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 Trends in Economic Activity AEO2009 Presents Three Views of Economic Growth Figure 27. Average annual growth rates of real GDP, labor force, and productivity in three cases, 2007-2030 (percent per year). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 28. Average annual inflation, interest, and unemployment rates in three cases, 2007-2030 (percent per year). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 29. Sectoral composition of industrial output growth rates in three cases, 2007-2030 (percent per year). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

442

Nepal Sectoral Climate impacts Economic Assessment | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sectoral Climate impacts Economic Assessment Sectoral Climate impacts Economic Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Name Nepal Sectoral Climate impacts Economic Assessment Agency/Company /Organization Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN), United Kingdom Department for International Development Partner Ministry of Environment for Government of Nepal Sector Climate Focus Area Agriculture, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, People and Policy, Water Conservation Topics Low emission development planning Website http://cdkn.org/2011/11/call-f Country Nepal Southern Asia References Nepal Sectoral Climate impacts Economic Assessment[1] CDKN is providing support to the GoN through a number of projects to design and deliver climate compatible development (CCD) plans and policies. To

443

Regional Economic Models, Inc. (REMI) Model | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Regional Economic Models, Inc. (REMI) Model Regional Economic Models, Inc. (REMI) Model Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: REMI Agency/Company /Organization: Regional Economic Models Inc. Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Phase: Determine Baseline, Develop Goals Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.remi.com/ Cost: Paid References: http://www.remi.com/index.php?page=overview&hl=en_US Related Tools Job and Economic Development Impact Models (JEDI) The Integrated Environmental Strategies Handbook: A Resource Guide for Air Quality Planning

444

MTBE Production Economics  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

MTBE Production MTBE Production Economics Tancred C. M. Lidderdale Contents 1. Summary 2. MTBE Production Costs 3. Relationship between price of MTBE and Reformulated Gasoline 4. Influence of Natural Gas Prices on the Gasoline Market 5. Regression Results 6. Data Sources 7. End Notes 1. Summary Last year the price of MTBE (methyl tertiary butyl ether) increased dramatically on two occasions (Figure 1) (see Data Sources at end of article.): 1. Between April and June 2000, the price (U.S. Gulf Coast waterborne market) of MTBE rose from $1.00 per gallon to over $1.60 per gallon. This represented an increase in the price premium for MTBE over the wholesale price of conventional gasoline from its normal (1995 though 2000 average) $0.26 per gallon to $0.60 per gallon. The MTBE

445

PNNL: Economic Development Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Events Calendar Events Calendar left arrow January 2014 right arrow Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Scheduled events for January 4, 2014 Calendar contains no events. Past Events 2013 September 20, 2013 - Startup Weekend Tri-Cities January 29, 2013 - PTAC Class: Developing Your Capability Statement January 24, 2013 - Economic Outlook Summit January 23, 2013 - Women in Business Conference January 10, 2013 - Venture Investment and Partnering Forum January 07, 2013 - New Routes for U.S.-Japan Collaboration / Ambassadorial Outreach Tour 2012 November 29, 2012 - Innovation Summit October 18, 2012 - Funding for Startups from the National Cancer Institute October 11, 2012 - Career Fair October 09, 2012 - Understanding Government Contracting Solicitations

446

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

William Bourcier William Bourcier Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Saline Aquifer Brine Production Well Brine Injection Well Chiller Pretreatment Desalination Brine Permeate To power plant or other use Storage pump CO 2 injection Concept is to extract and desalinate aquifer brines to create fresh water and space for CO 2 storage cap-rock 3 Presentation Outline * Overview, Purpose, Goals and Benefits * Technical status - Brine treatment and disposition - Reservoir management * Accomplishments * Summary and Planned work Goals and Objectives Technical Goals Potential advantages of brine

447

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Metrics for Screening CO Metrics for Screening CO 2 Utilization Processes Peter Kabatek Energy Sector Planning and Analysis (ESPA) Services / WorleyParsons U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * NETL's Carbon Storage Program * Introduction of the metrics * Review of the case study technology * Application of metrics to the case study technology * Discussion of metrics interpretation and grouping 3 NETL Carbon Storage Program * The Carbon Storage Program contains three key elements: - Infrastructure - Global Collaborations - Core Research and Development: * Monitoring, Verification and Accounting (MVA) * Geologic Storage

448

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Introduction * Reservoir Simulation Model * Intelligent Leakage Detection System (ILDS) * Accomplishments * Summary Objective * Develop an in-situ CO 2 leak detection technology based on the concept of Smart Fields. - Using real-time pressure data from permanent downhole gauges to estimate the location and the rate of CO 2 leakage. CO2 Leakage(X,Y,Q) Artificial Intelligence & Data Mining Industrial Advisory Committee (IAC) * Project goes through continuous peer-review by an Industrial Review Committee. * Meetings: - November 6 th 2009 : * Conference call * Site selection criteria - November 17 th 2009: * A meeting during the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Meeting in Pittsburgh

449

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Training and Research Peter M. Walsh University of Alabama at Birmingham U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CCUS Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania August 21-23, 2012 DE-FE0002224 * Evaluation of the sealing capacity of caprocks serving as barriers to upward migration of CO 2 sequestered in geologic formations. * Education and training of undergraduate and graduate students, through independent research on geologic sequestration. * Education, through an advanced undergraduate/graduate level course on coal combustion and gasification, climate change, and carbon sequestration. * Simulation of CO 2 migration and trapping in storage

450

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building the Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Introduction - Objective - Industrial Review Committee - Background * Steps Involved - Geological and Reservoir Simulation Modeling - Leakage Modeling & Real-Time Data Processing - Pattern Recognition & Intelligent Leakage Detection System (ILDS) * Accomplishments to Date * Summary Objective * Develop an in-situ CO 2 leak detection technology based on the concept of Smart Fields. - Using real-time pressure data from permanent downhole gauges to estimate the location and the rate of CO 2 leakage. Industrial Advisory Committee (IAC) * Project goes through continuous peer-review by an Industrial Review Committee. * Meetings: - November 6 th 2009 :

451

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Introduction * Organization * Benefit to Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary * Appendix Introduction * Most storage modeling studies assume a discrete reservoir/caprock interface with simple (uniform) flow conditions. * We address the question of whether or not heterogeneities at the interface influence transmission of CO 2 into the caprock 3 4 Reservoir Caprock Reservoir Introduction The nature of reservoir/caprock interfaces 4 Organization 5 Peter Mozley (PD/PI) NMT Sedimentology James Evans (Co-PI) USU Structure Thomas Dewers (Co-I) Jason Heath (Staff) SNL Modeling Mark Person (Cooperating Scientist) NMT Modeling Stefan Raduha NMT Sedimentology

452

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Factors Influencing Factors Influencing CO 2 Storage Capacity and Injectivity in Eastern Gas Shales Contract No. DE-FE0004633 Michael Godec, Vice President Advanced Resources International mgodec@adv-res.com U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Program Benefits * Goals and Objectives * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary * Appendix 3 Benefits to the Program * Program Goals Addressed - Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within ±30 percent.

453

Current Transformations in Norwegian Higher Education  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from Thatcher's higher education reforms in the early 1980'Idea and American Higher Education: 1850 to the 1960 MasterIN NORWEGIAN HIGHER EDUCATION 1 March 2002 Kim Gunnar

Helsvig, Kim Gunnar

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Wind Energy for Rural Economic Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The wind industry contributes to the economies of 46 states, and the outlook for regional economic growth from wind energy is heartening. Wind energy projects provide new jobs, a new source of revenue to farmers and ranchers, and an increased local tax base for rural communities. And wind energy is homegrown energy that helps secure our energy future during uncertain times while reducing pollution emissions and preserving our precious water resources. In fact, achieving the goals of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America initiative during the next 20 years will create$60 billion in capital investment in rural America, provide$1.2 billion in new income for farmers and rural landowners, and create 80,000 new jobs. Wind energy is the fastest-growing energy source in the world, and rural communities are poised to reap the benefits. This brochure provides rural stakeholders with information about wind energy projects and rural economic development, including case studies an d resources for those interested in bringing wind energy to their communities.

Not Available

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

DOE Energy Challenge Project  

SciTech Connect

Project Objectives: 1. Promote energy efficiency concepts in undergraduate and graduate education. 2. Stimulate and interest in pulp and paper industrial processes, which promote and encourage activities in the area of manufacturing design efficiency. 3. Attract both industrial and media attention. Background and executive Summary: In 1997, the Institute of Paper Science and Technology in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Energy developed a university design competition with an orientation to the Forest Products Industry. This university design competition is in direct alignment with DOE’s interests in instilling in undergraduate education the concepts of developing energy efficient processes, minimizing waste, and providing environmental benefits and in maintaining and enhancing the economic competitiveness of the U.S. forest products industry in a global environment. The primary focus of the competition is projects, which are aligned with the existing DOE Agenda 2020 program for the industry and the lines of research being established with the colleges comprising the Pulp and Paper Education and Research Alliance (PPERA). The six design competitions were held annually for the period 1999 through 2004.

Frank Murray; Michael Schaepe

2009-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

456

The Economic Impact of Marcellus Shale Gas Drilling What Have We Learned? What are the Limitations?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary: What is the issue? Several studies have projected large positive economic impacts of shale gas development in the Marcellus region. To make informed choices for their communities, policy makers need to understand the strengths and limitations of these studies. Most importantly, they need to understand that there is a tenuous relationship between positive economic impacts in the short run and long term economic development based on an extractive, exhaustible natural resource. In addressing the relationship, proactive policy can make a difference.

David Kay

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

FEED SYSTEM INNOVATION FOR GASIFICATION OF LOCALLY ECONOMICAL ALTERNATIVE FUELS (FIGLEAF)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Feed System Innovation for Gasification of Locally Economical Alternative Fuels (FIGLEAF) project was conducted by the Energy & Environmental Research Center and Gasification Engineering Corporation of Houston, Texas (a subsidiary of Global Energy Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio), with 80% cofunding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The goal of the project was to identify and evaluate low-value fuels that could serve as alternative feedstocks and to develop a feed system to facilitate their use in integrated gasification combined-cycle and gasification coproduction facilities. The long-term goal, to be accomplished in a subsequent project, is to install a feed system for the selected fuel(s) at Global Energy's commercial-scale 262-MW Wabash River Coal Gasification Facility in West Terre Haute, Indiana. The feasibility study undertaken for the project consisted of identifying and evaluating the economic feasibility of potential fuel sources, developing a feed system design capable of providing a fuel at 400 psig to the second stage of the E-Gas (Destec) gasifier to be cogasified with coal, performing bench- and pilot-scale testing to verify concepts and clarify decision-based options, reviewing information on high-pressure feed system designs, and determining the economics of cofeeding alternative feedstocks with the conceptual feed system design. A preliminary assessment of feedstock availability within Indiana and Illinois was conducted. Feedstocks evaluated included those with potential tipping fees to offset processing cost: sewage sludge, municipal solid waste, used railroad ties, urban wood waste (UWW), and used tires/tire-derived fuel. Agricultural residues and dedicated energy crop fuels were not considered since they would have a net positive cost to the plant. Based on the feedstock assessment, sewage sludge was selected as the primary feedstock for consideration at the Wabash River Plant. Because of the limited waste heat available for drying and the ability of the gasifier to operate with alternative feedstocks at up to 80% moisture, a decision was made to investigate a pumping system for delivering the as-received fuel across the pressure boundary into the second stage of the gasifier. A high-pressure feed pump and fuel dispersion nozzles were tested for their ability to cross the pressure boundary and adequately disperse the sludge into the second stage of the gasifier. These results suggest that it is technically feasible to get the sludge dispersed to an appropriate size into the second stage of the gasifier although the recycle syngas pressure needed to disperse the sludge would be higher than originally desired. A preliminary design was prepared for a sludge-receiving, storage, and high-pressure feeding system at the Wabash River Plant. The installed capital costs were estimated at approximately $9.7 million, within an accuracy of {+-}10%. An economic analysis using DOE's IGCC Model, Version 3 spreadsheet indicates that in order to justify the additional capital cost of the system, Global Energy would have to receive a tipping fee of $12.40 per wet ton of municipal sludge delivered. This is based on operation with petroleum coke as the primary fuel. Similarly, with coal as the primary fuel, a minimum tipping of $16.70 would be required. The availability of delivered sludge from Indianapolis, Indiana, in this tipping-fee range is unlikely; however, given the higher treatment costs associated with sludge treatment in Chicago, Illinois, delivery of sludge from Chicago, given adequate rail access, might be economically viable.

Michael L. Swanson; Mark A. Musich; Darren D. Schmidt; Joseph K. Schultz

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Annual Progress Report Fish Research Project Oregon : Project title, Evaluation of Habitat Improvements -- John Day River.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes data collected in 1983 to evaluate habitat improvements in Deer, Camp, and Clear creeks, tributaries of the John Day River. The studies are designed to evaluate changes in abundance of spring chinook and summer steelhead due to habitat improvement projects and to contrast fishery benefits with costs of construction and maintenance of each project. Structure types being evaluated are: (1) log weirs, rock weirs, log deflectors, and in stream boulders in Deer Creek; (2) log weirs in Camp Creek; and (3) log weir-boulder combinations and introduced spawning gravel in Clear Creek. Abundance of juvenile steelhead ranged from 16% to 119% higher in the improved (treatment) area than in the unimproved (control) area of Deer Creek. However, abundance of steelhead in Camp Creek was not significantly different between treatment and control areas. Chinook and steelhead abundance in Clear Creek was 50% and 25% lower, respectively in 1983, than the mean abundance estimated in three previous years. The age structure of steelhead was similar between treatment and control areas in Deer and Clear creeks. The treatment area in Camp Creek, however, had a higher percentage of age 2 and older steelhead than the control. Steelhead redd counts in Camp Creek were 36% lower in 1983 than the previous five year average. Steelhead redd counts in Deer Creek were not made in 1983 because of high streamflows. Chinook redds counted in Clear Creek were 64% lower than the five year average. Surface area, volume, cover, and spawning gravel were the same or higher than the corresponding control in each stream except in Deer Creek where there was less available cover and spawning gravel in sections with rock weirs and in those with log deflectors, respectively. Pool:riffle ratios ranged from 57:43 in sections in upper Clear Creek with log weirs to 9:91 in sections in Deer Creek with rock weirs. Smolt production following habitat improvements is estimated for each stream. Preliminary cost estimates are summarized for each habitat project and economic benefits are calculated for Deer Creek.

Olsen, Erik A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Community Economic Development Business Program (Prince Edward...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Community Economic Development Business Program (Prince Edward Island, Canada) Community Economic Development Business Program (Prince Edward Island, Canada) Eligibility...