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1

Asymptotic Cellular Growth Rate as the Effective Information Utilization Rate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the average asymptotic growth rate of cells in randomly fluctuating environments. Using a game-theoretic perspective, we show that any response strategy has an asymptotic growth rate, which is the sum of: (i) the maximal growth rate at the worst possible distribution of environments, (ii) relative information between the actual distribution of environments to the worst one, and (iii) information utilization rate which is the information rate of the sensory devices minus the "information dissipation rate", the amount of information not utilized by the cell for growth. In non-stationary environments, the optimal strategy is the time average of the instantaneous optimal strategy and the optimal switching times are evenly spaced in the statistical (Fisher) metric.

Pugatch, Rami; Tlusty, Tsvi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

The Chern-Simons diffusion rate from higher curvature gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An important transport coefficient in the study of non-Abelian plasmas is the Chern-Simons diffusion rate, which parameterizes the rate of transition among the degenerate vacua of a gauge theory. We compute this quantity at strong coupling, via holography, using two theories of gravity with higher curvature corrections, namely Gauss-Bonnet gravity and quasi-topological gravity. We find that these corrections may either increase or decrease the result obtained from Einstein's gravity, depending on the value of the couplings. The Chern-Simons diffusion rate for Gauss-Bonnet gravity decreases as the shear viscosity over entropy ratio is increased.

Viktor Jahnke; Anderson Seigo Misobuchi; Diego Trancanelli

2014-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

3

Estimating phytoplankton growth rates from compositional data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I build on the deterministic phytoplankton growth model of Sosik et al. by introducing process error, which simulates real variation in population growth and inaccuracies in the structure of the matrix model. Adding a ...

Thomas, Lorraine (Lorraine Marie)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Nonlinear stochastic growth rates and redshift space distortions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The linear growth rate is commonly defined through a simple deterministic relation between the velocity divergence and the matter overdensity in the linear regime. Here we introduce a formalism that extends this to a nonlinear, stochastic relation between $\\theta = \

Jennings, Elise

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

E-Print Network 3.0 - algal growth rate Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

growth rate was limited by organic C or inorganic P. The algal density... growth rate was energy limited. However, above that light intensity. algal density increased... of...

6

Apparatus for silicon web growth of higher output and improved growth stability  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This disclosure describes an apparatus to improve the web growth attainable from prior web growth configurations. This apparatus modifies the heat loss at the growth interface in a manner that minimizes thickness variations across the web, especially regions of the web adjacent to the two bounding dendrites. In the unmodified configuration, thinned regions of web, adjacent to the dendrites, were found to be the origin of crystal degradation which ultimately led to termination of the web growth. According to the present invention, thinning adjacent to the dendrites is reduced and the incidence of crystal degradation is similarly reduced.

Duncan, Charles S. (Penn Hills, PA); Piotrowski, Paul A. (Monroeville, PA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Upscaling Calcite Growth Rates From the Mesoscale to the Macroscale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantitative prediction of mineral reaction rates in the subsurface remains a daunting task partly because a key parameter for macroscopic models, the reactive site density, is poorly constrained. Here we report atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements on the calcite surface of monomolecular step densities, treated as equivalent to the reactive site density, as a function of aqueous calcium-to-carbonate ratio and saturation index. Data for the obtuse step orientation are combined with existing step velocity measurements to generate a model that predicts overall macroscopic calcite growth rates. The model is quantitatively consistent with several published macroscopic rates under a range of alkaline solution conditions, particularly for two of the most comprehensive data sets without the need for additional fit parameters. The model reproduces peak growth rates and its functional form is simple enough to be incorporated into reactive transport or other macroscopic models designed for predictions in porous media. However, it currently cannot model equilibrium, pH effects, and may overestimate rates at high aqueous calcium-to-carbonate ratios. The discrepancies in rates at high calcium-to-carbonate ratios may be due to differences in pre-treatment, such as exposing the seed material to SI 1.0 to generate/develop growth hillocks, or other factors.

Bracco, Jacquelyn N [ORNL; Stack, Andrew G [ORNL; Steefel, Carl I [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Wall recession rates in cavity-growth modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The predictions of resource utilization obtained from cavity-growth models depend on the methods used to represent the recession rates of the walls of the cavity. Under many circumstances the cavity is largely filled with a bed char rubble. Examination of the mechanisms for recession at walls adjacent to these char beds indicates that the recession rates are controlled by convective heat transfer from the bed to the walls coupled with the thermomechanical breakdown of the walls. A recession-rate representation has been developed, based on this concept, for use in cavity-growth simulation programs. This representation characterizes wall breakdown by either a failure temperature or by a thickness of char layer at failure, and determines rates from a model of heat transfer under these conditions. It gives recession rates that are functions of gas temperature and mass flow rate in the cavity, and depend on effective particle size in the char bed. Wall recession rates calculated for WIDCO, Hoe Creek, and Hanna coals are in the range of 0.1 to 0.8 m/day at a 1300 K cavity temperature, and are consistent with the general rates observed for field tests. 27 references, 10 figures, 1 table.

Grens, E.A. II; Thorsness, C.B.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

FERC allows higher rate of return for independent projects: the Ocean State power project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission ruling last February to allow a private owners of a powerplant to receive a higher rate of return than normal electric utilities if they assumed the risks of cogeneration without qualifying under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act also leaves an out for unusual situations. The key to the decisions was an acknowledgement that those assuming higher risk deserve higher compensation. The incentive package is unique in the way it handles cost recovery and availability contracts.

Not Available

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Dispersion relation and growth rate in a Cherenkov free electron laser: Finite axial magnetic field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A theoretical analysis is presented for dispersion relation and growth rate in a Cherenkov free electron laser with finite axial magnetic field. It is shown that the growth rate and the resonance frequency of Cherenkov free electron laser increase with increasing axial magnetic field for low axial magnetic fields, while for high axial magnetic fields, they go to a saturation value. The growth rate and resonance frequency saturation values are exactly the same as those for infinite axial magnetic field approximation. The effects of electron beam self-fields on growth rate are investigated, and it is shown that the growth rate decreases in the presence of self-fields. It is found that there is an optimum value for electron beam density and Lorentz relativistic factor at which the maximum growth rate can take place. Also, the effects of velocity spread of electron beam are studied and it is found that the growth rate decreases due to the electron velocity spread.

Kheiri, Golshad; Esmaeilzadeh, Mahdi [Department of Physics, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran 16844 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Physics, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran 16844 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

11

Long-run growth rate in a random multiplicative model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We consider the long-run growth rate of the average value of a random multiplicative process x{sub i+1} = a{sub i}x{sub i} where the multipliers a{sub i}=1+?exp(?W{sub i}?1/2 ?{sup 2}t{sub i}) have Markovian dependence given by the exponential of a standard Brownian motion W{sub i}. The average value ?x{sub n}? is given by the grand partition function of a one-dimensional lattice gas with two-body linear attractive interactions placed in a uniform field. We study the Lyapunov exponent ?=lim{sub n??}1/n log?x{sub n}?, at fixed ?=1/2 ?{sup 2}t{sub n}n, and show that it is given by the equation of state of the lattice gas in thermodynamical equilibrium. The Lyapunov exponent has discontinuous partial derivatives along a curve in the (?, ?) plane ending at a critical point (?{sub C}, ?{sub C}) which is related to a phase transition in the equivalent lattice gas. Using the equivalence of the lattice gas with a bosonic system, we obtain the exact solution for the equation of state in the thermodynamical limit n ? ?.

Pirjol, Dan [Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, 077125 Bucharest (Romania)

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

12

Driving Smart Growth: Electric Vehicle Adoption and OffPeak Electricity Rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Driving Smart Growth: Electric Vehicle Adoption and OffPeak Electricity Rates Peter Driving Smart Growth: Electric Vehicle Adoption Page 2 Executive Summary Reducing our dependence to electric vehicles (EVs)1 is core to reducing reliance on fossil fuels and driving smart growth

Holsinger, Kent

13

Nuclear photonics at ultra-high counting rates and higher multipole excitations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Next-generation {gamma} beams from laser Compton-backscattering facilities like ELI-NP (Bucharest)] or MEGa-Ray (Livermore) will drastically exceed the photon flux presently available at existing facilities, reaching or even exceeding 10{sup 13}{gamma}/sec. The beam structure as presently foreseen for MEGa-Ray and ELI-NP builds upon a structure of macro-pulses ({approx}120 Hz) for the electron beam, accelerated with X-band technology at 11.5 GHz, resulting in a micro structure of 87 ps distance between the electron pulses acting as mirrors for a counterpropagating intense laser. In total each 8.3 ms a {gamma} pulse series with a duration of about 100 ns will impinge on the target, resulting in an instantaneous photon flux of about 10{sup 18}{gamma}/s, thus introducing major challenges in view of pile-up. Novel {gamma} optics will be applied to monochromatize the {gamma} beam to ultimately {Delta}E/E{approx}10{sup -6}. Thus level-selective spectroscopy of higher multipole excitations will become accessible with good contrast for the first time. Fast responding {gamma} detectors, e.g. based on advanced scintillator technology (e.g. LaBr{sub 3}(Ce)) allow for measurements with count rates as high as 10{sup 6}-10{sup 7}{gamma}/s without significant drop of performance. Data handling adapted to the beam conditions could be performed by fast digitizing electronics, able to sample data traces during the micro-pulse duration, while the subsequent macro-pulse gap of ca. 8 ms leaves ample time for data readout. A ball of LaBr{sub 3} detectors with digital readout appears to best suited for this novel type of nuclear photonics at ultra-high counting rates.

Thirolf, P. G.; Habs, D.; Filipescu, D.; Gernhaeuser, R.; Guenther, M. M.; Jentschel, M.; Marginean, N.; Pietralla, N. [Fakultaet f. Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Fakultaet f. Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Garching, Germany and Max-Planck-Institute f. Quantum Optics, Garching (Germany); IFIN-HH, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Physik Department E12,Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Max-Planck-Institute f. Quantum Optics, Garching (Germany); Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble (France); Physik Department E12,Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Institut f. Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany)

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

14

Dynamic estimation of specific growth rates of bacteria for a wastewater treatment process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamic estimation of specific growth rates of bacteria for a wastewater treatment process S. Diop1 for specific growth rates for a wastewater treatment process. A 2-stage model of 6 dynamic states is assumed. Steyer, Dynamic model develop- ment and parameter identification for an anaerobic wastewater treatment

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

15

A dynamic estimation scheme of specific growth rates of bacteria for an anaerobic wastewater treatment process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A dynamic estimation scheme of specific growth rates of bacteria for an anaerobic wastewater anal- ysis and estimation schemes for specific growth rates for an anaerobic wastewater treatment the organic and inorganic materials) of municipal or industrial wastewater often needs to be highly reduced

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

16

The effect of density gradient on the growth rate of relativistic Weibel instability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, the effect of density gradient on the Weibel instability growth rate is investigated. The density perturbations in the near corona fuel, where temperature anisotropy, ?, is larger than the critical temperature anisotropy, ?{sub c}, (??>??{sub c}), enhances the growth rate of Weibel instability due to the sidebands coupled with the electron oscillatory velocity. But for ??growth rate. Also, the growth rate can be reduced if the relativistic parameter (Lorentz factor) is sufficiently large, ??>?2. The analysis shows that relativistic effects and density gradient tend to stabilize the Weibel instability. The growth rate can be reduced by 88% by reducing ? by a factor of 100 and increasing relativistic parameter by a factor of 3.

Mahdavi, M., E-mail: m.mahdavi@umz.ac.ir [Physics Department, University of Mazandaran, P.O. Box 47415-416, Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khodadadi Azadboni, F., E-mail: f.khodadadi@stu.umz.ac.ir [Physics Department, University of Mazandaran, P.O. Box 47415-416, Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Young Researchers Club, Sari Branch, Islamic Azad University, P.O. Box 48161-194, Sari (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

Capping layer growth rate and the optical and structural properties of GaAsSbN-capped InAs/GaAs quantum dots  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Changing the growth rate during the heteroepitaxial capping of InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) with a 5?nm-thick GaAsSbN capping layer (CL) strongly modifies the QD structural and optical properties. A size and shape transition from taller pyramids to flatter lens-shaped QDs is observed when the CL growth rate is decreased from 1.5 to 0.5 ML/s. This indicates that the QD dissolution processes taking place during capping can be controlled to some extent by the GaAsSbN CL growth rate, with high growth rates allowing a complete preservation of the QDs. However, the dissolution processes are shown to have a leveling effect on the QD height, giving rise to a narrower size distribution for lower growth rates. Contrary to what could be expected, these effects are opposite to the strong blue-shift and improvement of the photoluminescence (PL) observed for higher growth rates. Nevertheless, the PL results can be understood in terms of the strong impact of the growth rate on the Sb and N incorporation into the CL, which results in lower Sb and N contents at higher growth rates. Besides the QD-CL band offsets and QD strain, the different CL composition alters the band alignment of the system, which can be transformed to type-II at low growth rates. These results show the key role of the alloyed CL growth parameters on the resulting QD properties and demonstrate an intricate correlation between the PL spectra and the sample morphology in complex QD-CL structures.

Ulloa, J. M., E-mail: jmulloa@isom.upm.es; Utrilla, A. D.; Guzman, A.; Hierro, A. [Institute for Systems based on Optoelectronics and Microtechnology (ISOM) and Dpto. Ingeniera Electrnica, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Reyes, D. F.; Ben, T.; Gonzlez, D. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e IM y QI, Universidad de Cdiz, 11510 Puerto Real (Cdiz) (Spain)

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

18

Field Study of Growth and Calcification Rates of Three Species of Articulated Coralline Algae in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Field Study of Growth and Calcification Rates of Three Species of Articulated Coralline Algae of coralline algae. Decreases in coralline abundance may have cascading effects on marine ecosys- tems- mon species of articulated coralline algae (Bossiella plu- mosa, Calliarthron tuberculosum

Martone, Patrick T.

19

Scales, Growth Rates, and Spectral Fluxes of Baroclinic Instability in the Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An observational, modeling, and theoretical study of the scales, growth rates, and spectral fluxes of baroclinic instability in the ocean is presented, permitting a discussion of the relation between the local instability ...

Tulloch, Ross

20

Crack growth rates of nickel alloy welds in a PWR environment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In light water reactors (LWRs), vessel internal components made of nickel-base alloys are susceptible to environmentally assisted cracking. A better understanding of the causes and mechanisms of this cracking may permit less conservative estimates of damage accumulation and requirements on inspection intervals. A program is being conducted at Argonne National Laboratory to evaluate the resistance of Ni alloys and their welds to environmentally assisted cracking in simulated LWR coolant environments. This report presents crack growth rate (CGR) results for Alloy 182 shielded-metal-arc weld metal in a simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) environment at 320 C. Crack growth tests were conducted on 1-T compact tension specimens with different weld orientations from both double-J and deep-groove welds. The results indicate little or no environmental enhancement of fatigue CGRs of Alloy 182 weld metal in the PWR environment. The CGRs of Alloy 182 in the PWR environment are a factor of {approx}5 higher than those of Alloy 600 in air under the same loading conditions. The stress corrosion cracking for the Alloy 182 weld is close to the average behavior of Alloy 600 in the PWR environment. The weld orientation was found to have a profound effect on the magnitude of crack growth: cracking was found to propagate faster along the dendrites than across them. The existing CGR data for Ni-alloy weld metals have been compiled and evaluated to establish the effects of key material, loading, and environmental parameters on CGRs in PWR environments. The results from the present study are compared with the existing CGR data for Ni-alloy welds to determine the relative susceptibility of the specific Ni-alloy weld to environmentally enhanced cracking.

Alexandreanu, B.; Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher growth rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Growth rate and mortality of Australian bass, Macquaria novemaculeata, in four freshwater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Growth rate and mortality of Australian bass, Macquaria novemaculeata, in four freshwater, Queensland, Australia Abstract Growth and total mortality of Australian bass, Macquaria novemaculeata impoundments, ranging from 5.0 to 7.8 cm yr)1 among fish 20-cm total length (TL) and 1.7 to 4.9 cm yr)1 among

Wilde, Gene

22

Calcite growth rates as a function of aqueous calcium-to-carbonate ratio, saturation index and strontium concentration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using in situ atomic force microscopy, the growth rates of the obtuse and acute step orientations on the calcite surface were measured at two saturation indices as a function of the aqueous calcium-to-carbonate ratio and aqueous strontium concentration. The amount of strontium required to inhibit growth was found to correlate with the aqueous calcium concentration, but did not correlate with carbonate. This suggests that strontium inhibits attachment of calcium ions to the reactive sites on the calcite surface. Strontium/calcium cation exchange selectivity coefficients for those sites, Kex, of 1.09 0.09 and 1.44 0.19 are estimated for the obtuse and acute step orientations, respectively. The implication of this finding is that to avoid poisoning calcite growth, the concentration of calcium should be higher than the quotient of the strontium concentration and Kex, regardless of saturation state. Additionally, analytical models of nucleation and propagation of steps are expanded from previous work to capture growth rates of these steps at multiple saturation indices and the effect of strontium. This work will have broader implications for naturally occurring or engineered calcite growth, such as to sequester subsurface strontium contamination.

Bracco, Jacquelyn N [ORNL; Grantham, Ms. Meg [Georgia Institute of Technology; Stack, Andrew G [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Edge-Enriched Graphitic Anodes by KOH Activation for Higher Rate Capability Lithium Ion Batteries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lithium Ion Batteries D. Zakhidov,1,2 R. Sugamata,3 T. Yasue,3 T. Hayashi,3 Y. A. Kim,3 and M. Endo4 1 successful anode for lithium ion batteries due to its low cost, safety, and ease of fabrication, but higher are expected to surpass conventional graphite anodes due to larger number of edges for lithium ion

24

Systems Level Regulation of Rhythmic Growth Rate and Biomass Accumulation in Grasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several breakthroughs have been recently made in our understanding of plant growth and biomass accumulation. It was found that plant growth is rhythmically controlled throughout the day by the circadian clock through a complex interplay of light and phytohormone signaling pathways. While plants such as the C4 energy crop sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) and possibly the C3 grass (Brachypodium distachyon) also exhibit daily rhythms in growth rate, the molecular details of its regulation remain to be explored. A better understanding of diurnally regulated growth behavior in grasses may lead to species-specific mechanisms highly relevant to future strategies to optimize energy crop biomass yield. Here we propose to devise a systems approach to identify, in parallel, regulatory hubs associated with rhythmic growth in C3 and C4 plants. We propose to use rhythmicity in daily growth patterns to drive the discovery of regulatory network modules controlling biomass accumulation.

Kay, Steve A. [University of California San Diego

2013-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

25

Rate-dependent morphology of Li2O2 growth in Li-O2 batteries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compact solid discharge products enable energy storage devices with high gravimetric and volumetric energy densities, but solid deposits on active surfaces can disturb charge transport and induce mechanical stress. In this Letter we develop a nanoscale continuum model for the growth of Li2O2 crystals in lithium-oxygen batteries with organic electrolytes, based on a theory of electrochemical non-equilibrium thermodynamics originally applied to Li-ion batteries. As in the case of lithium insertion in phase-separating LiFePO4 nanoparticles, the theory predicts a transition from complex to uniform morphologies of Li2O2 with increasing current. Discrete particle growth at low discharge rates becomes suppressed at high rates, resulting in a film of electronically insulating Li2O2 that limits cell performance. We predict that the transition between these surface growth modes occurs at current densities close to the exchange current density of the cathode reaction, consistent with experimental observations.

Horstmann, B; Mitchell, R; Bessler, W G; Shao-Horn, Y; Bazant, M Z

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Influence of three types of treated straw on intake and growth rate in beef cattle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Influence of three types of treated straw on intake and growth rate in beef cattle WX Zhang JK Yuan treated wheat straw (AS), an untreated wheat straw (US), and a microbe-fermented wheat straw (MS). Thirty.544 (AS), 0.479 (US) and 0.551 (MS). It is concluded that both urea and microbe treated straw can

Boyer, Edmond

27

Coccolith Sr/Ca as a new indicator of coccolithophorid calcification and growth rate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coccolith Sr/Ca as a new indicator of coccolithophorid calcification and growth rate Heather M in the eastern equatorial Pacific show variations of $ 15% in Sr/Ca ratios across the equatorial upwelling zone, with Sr/Ca highest at the equator and decreasing off-axis. These variations cannot be due to changes

Schrag, Daniel

28

Real-time growth rate metrology for a tungsten chemical vapor deposition process by acoustic sensing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to a production-scale tungsten chemical vapor deposition cluster tool for in situ process sensing. Process gasesReal-time growth rate metrology for a tungsten chemical vapor deposition process by acoustic to achieve run-to-run process control of the deposited tungsten film thickness. 2001 American Vacuum

Rubloff, Gary W.

29

Growth response, photosynthate assimilation rate and carbon partitioning patterns in imidazolinone treated soybeans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GROWTH RESPONSE, PHOTOS YNTHATE ASSIMILATION RATE AND CARBON PARTITIONING PATTERNS IN IMIDAZOLINONE TREATED SOYBEANS A Thesis by PATRICK A. MILLER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... patience, guidance and friendship during the course of study and manuscript preparation; thanks for being there. In addition, appreciation is extended to Dr, Morris Merkle and Dr. Rodney Bovey for their participation as members of the author...

Miller, Patrick A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

A Bioreactor for Growth of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria: Online Estimation of Specific Growth Rate and Biomass for the Deep-Sea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Specific Growth Rate and Biomass for the Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent Thermophile Thermodesulfatator indicus, a chemolithotrophic, thermophilic, sulfate-reducing bac- terium recently isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent donor and CO2 as primary carbon source. These experiments were designed to measure growth kinetics under

Reysenbach, Anna-Louise

31

Prediction of PWSCC in nickel base alloys using crack growth rate models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ford/Andresen slip-dissolution SCC model, originally developed for stainless steel components in BWR environments, has been applied to Alloy 600 and Alloy X-750 tested in deaerated pure water chemistry. A method is described whereby the crack growth rates measured in compact tension specimens can be used to estimate crack growth in a component. Good agreement was found between model prediction and measured SCC in X-750 threaded fasteners over a wide range of temperatures, stresses, and material conditions. Most data support the basic assumption of this model that cracks initiate early in life. The evidence supporting a particular SCC mechanism is mixed. Electrochemical repassivation data and estimates of oxide fracture strain indicate that the slip-dissolution model can account for the observed crack growth rates, provided primary rather than secondary creep rates are used. However, approximately 100 cross-sectional TEM foils of SCC cracks including crack tips reveal no evidence of enhanced plasticity or unique dislocation patterns at the crack tip or along the crack to support a classic slip-dissolution mechanism. No voids, hydrides, or microcracks are found in the vicinity of the crack tips creating doubt about classic hydrogen related mechanisms. The bulk oxide films exhibit a surface oxide which is often different than the oxides found within a crack. Although bulk chromium concentration affects the rate of SCC, analytical data indicates the mechanism does not result from chromium depletion at the grain boundaries. The overall findings support a corrosion/dissolution mechanism but not one necessarily related to slip at the crack tip.

Thompson, C.D.; Krasodomski, H.T.; Lewis, N.; Makar, G.L. [Knolls Atomic Power Lab., Schenectady, NY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

32

Crack growth rates of irradiated austenitic stainless steel weld heat affected zone in BWR environments.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Austenitic stainless steels (SSs) are used extensively as structural alloys in the internal components of reactor pressure vessels because of their superior fracture toughness. However, exposure to high levels of neutron irradiation for extended periods can exacerbate the corrosion fatigue and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of these steels by affecting the material microchemistry, material microstructure, and water chemistry. Experimental data are presented on crack growth rates of the heat affected zone (HAZ) in Types 304L and 304 SS weld specimens before and after they were irradiated to a fluence of 5.0 x 10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 1 MeV) ({approx} 0.75 dpa) at {approx}288 C. Crack growth tests were conducted under cycling loading and long hold time trapezoidal loading in simulated boiling water reactor environments on Type 304L SS HAZ of the H5 weld from the Grand Gulf reactor core shroud and on Type 304 SS HAZ of a laboratory-prepared weld. The effects of material composition, irradiation, and water chemistry on growth rates are discussed.

Chopra, O. K.; Alexandreanu, B.; Gruber, E. E.; Daum, R. S.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

33

The influence of prey consumption and demographic stochasticity on population growth rate of Isle Royale wolves Canis lupus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are often expressed as functions of per capita rate of consumption (Beddington et al. 1976), availability, or demographic stochasticity. To the extent that per capita consumption and population growth rate: 309/320, 2004 OIKOS 107:2 (2004) 309 #12;the relationship between per capita kill rate (consump- tion

34

Influence of finite radial geometry on the growth rate of ion-channel free electron laser  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of finite radial geometry on the instability of a tenuous relativistic electron beam propagating in an ion-channel in a waveguide is investigated. The instability analysis is based on the linearized Vlasov-Maxwell equations for the perturbation about a self-consistent beam equilibrium. With the help of characteristic method the dispersion relation for the TE-mode is derived and analyzed through the numerical solutions. It is found that the positioning of the beam radius R{sub b} relative to the waveguide radius R{sub c}, and the ion-channel frequency can have a large influence on the maximum growth rate and corresponding wave number.

Bahmani, Mohammad; Hamzehpour, Hossein [Department of Physics, K.N. Toosi University of Technology, Tehran 15875-4416 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Physics, K.N. Toosi University of Technology, Tehran 15875-4416 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hasanbeigi, Ali [Department of Physics and Institute for Plasma Research, Kharazmi University, 49 Dr. Mofateh Avenue, Tehran 15614 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Physics and Institute for Plasma Research, Kharazmi University, 49 Dr. Mofateh Avenue, Tehran 15614 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

35

Intra-canopy variability of fruit growth rate in peach trees grafted on rootstocks with different vigour-control capacity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intra-canopy variability of fruit growth rate in peach trees grafted on rootstocks with different research was to study intra-canopy variability in fruit growth under conditions of low fruit-to- fruit vertically into five layers.The diameter of 12 fruit per canopy layer was measured early in the growing

DeJong, Theodore

36

NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-44 ICE-COVER GROWTH RATES AT NEARSHORE LOCATIONS IN THE GREAT LAKES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-44 ICE-COVER GROWTH RATES AT NEARSHORE LOCATIONS IN THE GREAT of such products is not authorized. ii #12;CONTENTS Abstract 1. INTRODUCTION 2. THE THEORETICAL BASIS OF THE ICE GROWTH EQUATION 3. THE INFLUENCE OF SNOW COVER 4. THE DEGREE-DAY LINEAR MODEL 5. THE DATA SETS 5.1 Ice

37

Desiccation resistance and root growth rate of St. Augustinegrass (Stenotaphrum secundatum (Walt.) Kuntze 'Floratam') as influenced by potassium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and turfgrass quality of Floratam St. Augustinegrass were investigated in both field and greenhouse experiments. Both studies evaluated the influence of potassium on root growth and turfgrass quality from the establishment of sod, through an imposed water... in the fall field experiment, while no improvement was noted in the spring greenhouse study. The daily root growth rates were not influenced by potassium in the field study, while increased potassium fertilization rates resulted in greater daily root...

DiPaola, J. M

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Effects of ion abundances on electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave growth rate in the vicinity of the plasmapause  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves in multi-ion species plasmas propagate in branches. Except for the branch corresponding to the heaviest ion species, which has only a resonance at its gyrofrequency, these branches are bounded below by a cutoff frequency and above by a resonant gyrofrequency. The condition for wave growth is determined by the thermal anisotropies of each ion species, j, which sets an upper bound, ?{sub j}{sup ?}, on the wave frequency below which that ion species contributes positively to the growth rate. It follows that the relative positions of the cutoffs and the critical frequencies ?{sub j}{sup ?} play a crucial role in determining whether a particular wave branch will be unstable. The effect of the magnetospheric ion abundances on the growth rate of each branch of the EMIC instability in a model where all the ion species have kappa velocity distributions is investigated by appealing to the above ideas. Using the variation of the cutoff frequencies predicted by cold plasma theory as a guide, optimal ion abundances that maximise the EMIC instability growth rate are sought. When the ring current is comprised predominantly of H{sup +} ions, all branches of the EMIC wave are destabilised, with the proton branch having the maximum growth rate. When the O{sup +} ion abundance in the ring current is increased, a decrease in the growth rate of the proton branch and cyclotron damping of the helium branch are observed. The oxygen branch, on the other hand, experiences an increase in the maximum growth rate with an increase in the O{sup +} ion abundance. When the ring current is comprised predominantly of He{sup +} ions, only the helium and oxygen branches of the EMIC wave are destabilised, with the helium branch having the maximum growth rate.

Henning, F. D., E-mail: farranalfonso@gmail.com; Mace, R. L., E-mail: macer@ukzn.ac.za [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Westville Campus, Private Bag X54001, Durban 4000 (South Africa)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

39

Effect of flow rate of ethanol on growth dynamics of VA-SWNT -Transition from no-flow CVD to normal ACCVD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of flow rate of ethanol on growth dynamics of VA-SWNT - Transition from no-flow CVD a growth model [2]. In this study, the flow rate of ethanol during the CVD was controlled precisely. Figure 1 shows the growth curve of VA-SWNT film for various ethanol flow rates. In the figure, "No

Maruyama, Shigeo

40

Effect of mono- and dichromatic light quality on growth rates and photosynthetic performance of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 was grown to steady state in optically thin turbidostat cultures under conditions for which light quantity and quality was systematically varied by modulating the output of narrow-band LEDs. Cells were provided photons absorbed primarily by chlorophyll (680 nm) or phycocyanin (630 nm) as the organism was subjected to four distinct mono- and dichromatic regimes. During cultivation with dichromatic light, growth rates displayed by Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 were generally proportional to the total incident irradiance at values < 275 mol photons m-2 s-1 and were not affected by the ratio of 630:680 nm wavelengths. Notably, under monochromatic light conditions, cultures exhibited similar growth rates only when they were irradiated with 630 nm light; cultures irradiated with only 680 nm light grew at rates that were 60 70% of those under other light quality regimes at equivalent irradiances. The functionality of photosystem II and associated processes such as maximum rate of photosynthetic electron transport, rate of cyclic electron flow, and rate of dark respiration generally increased as a function of growth rate. Nonetheless, some of the photophysiological parameters measured here displayed distinct patterns with respect to growth rate of cultures adapted to a single wavelength including phycobiliprotein content, which increased under severely light-limited growth conditions. Additionally, the ratio of photosystem II to photosystem I increased approximately 40% over the range of growth rates, although cells grown with 680 nm light only had the highest ratios. These results suggest the presence of effective mechanisms which allow acclimation of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 acclimation to different irradiance conditions.

Bernstein, Hans C.; Konopka, Allan; Melnicki, Matthew R.; Hill, Eric A.; Kucek, Leo A.; Zhang, Shuyi; Shen, Gaozhong; Bryant, Donald A.; Beliaev, Alex S.

2014-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher growth rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

E-Print Network 3.0 - activity growth rate Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Medicine 23 Population Growth, (Per Capita) Economic Growth, and Poverty Reduction in Uganda: A brief Summary of Theory and Evidence Summary: that Uganda has one of the highest...

42

Mathematically strong subsystems of analysis with low rate of growth of provably recursive functionals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Habilitationsschrift [22] which are devoted to determine the growth in proofs of standard parts of analysis to determine the growth in proofs of standard parts of analysis. Let U be a complete separable metric space, K

Kohlenbach, Ulrich

43

Mathematically strong subsystems of analysis with low rate of growth of provably recursive functionals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Habilitationsschrift [22] which are devoted to determine the growth in proofs of standard parts of analysis Habilitationsschrift [22] which are devoted to determine the growth in proofs of standard parts of analysis. Let U

Haller-Dintelmann, Robert

44

Crack growth rates and fracture toughness of irradiated austenitic stainless steels in BWR environments.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In light water reactors, austenitic stainless steels (SSs) are used extensively as structural alloys in reactor core internal components because of their high strength, ductility, and fracture toughness. However, exposure to high levels of neutron irradiation for extended periods degrades the fracture properties of these steels by changing the material microstructure (e.g., radiation hardening) and microchemistry (e.g., radiation-induced segregation). Experimental data are presented on the fracture toughness and crack growth rates (CGRs) of wrought and cast austenitic SSs, including weld heat-affected-zone materials, that were irradiated to fluence levels as high as {approx} 2x 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 1 MeV) ({approx} 3 dpa) in a light water reactor at 288-300 C. The results are compared with the data available in the literature. The effects of material composition, irradiation dose, and water chemistry on CGRs under cyclic and stress corrosion cracking conditions were determined. A superposition model was used to represent the cyclic CGRs of austenitic SSs. The effects of neutron irradiation on the fracture toughness of these steels, as well as the effects of material and irradiation conditions and test temperature, have been evaluated. A fracture toughness trend curve that bounds the existing data has been defined. The synergistic effects of thermal and radiation embrittlement of cast austenitic SS internal components have also been evaluated.

Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

45

Generation and growth rates of nonlinear distortions in a traveling wave tube John G. Wohlbier, Ian Dobson, and John H. Booske  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generation and growth rates of nonlinear distortions in a traveling wave tube John G. Wo the generation of intermodulation frequencies and calculate their growth rates. The model describes the evolution rates is derived and compared to simulation results. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevE.66.056504 PACS number s : 52

Dobson, Ian

46

Control of the specific growth rate of Bacillus subtilis for the production of biosurfactant lipopeptides in bioreactors with foam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

]. However, the foam also entraps some biomass quantity and consequently reduces the biomass quantity to extract it by foaming. The control law is designed to maintain a constant specific biomass growth rate of biomass induced by the foaming. Previous experiments have provided a model of the process and values

Boyer, Edmond

47

Summary We compared radiation-use efficiency of growth (), defined as rate of biomass accumulation per unit of ab-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and ocean ecosystems. Photosynthetically active radiation (PAR, 400­700 nm) ab- sorbed by plant canopies canSummary We compared radiation-use efficiency of growth (), defined as rate of biomass accumulation per unit of ab- sorbed photosynthetically active radiation, of forest plots ex- posed to ambient (~360

DeLucia, Evan H.

48

The Stress Corrosion Crack Growth Rate of Alloy 600 Heat Affected Zones Exposed to High Purity Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Grain boundary chromium carbides improve the resistance of nickel based alloys to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC). However, in weld heat affected zones (HAZ's), thermal cycles from fusion welding can solutionize beneficial grain boundary carbides, produce locally high residual stresses and strains, and promote PWSCC. The present research investigates the crack growth rate of an A600 HAZ as a function of test temperature. The A600 HAZ was fabricated by building up a gas-tungsten-arc-weld deposit of EN82H filler metal onto a mill-annealed A600 plate. Fracture mechanics based, stress corrosion crack growth rate testing was performed in high purity water between 600 F and 680 F at an initial stress intensity factor of 40 ksi {radical}in and at a constant electrochemical potential. The HAZ samples exhibited significant SCC, entirely within the HAZ at all temperatures tested. While the HAZ samples showed the same temperature dependence for SCC as the base material (HAZ: 29.8 {+-} 11.2{sub 95%} kcal/mol vs A600 Base: 35.3 {+-} 2.58{sub 95%} kcal/mol), the crack growth rates were {approx} 30X faster than the A600 base material tested at the same conditions. The increased crack growth rates of the HAZ is attributed to fewer intergranular chromium rich carbides and to increased plastic strain in the HAZ as compared to the unaffected base material.

George A. Young; Nathan Lewis

2003-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

49

Influence of Specimen Size on the SCC Growth Rate of Ni-Alloys Exposed to High Temperature Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tests were conducted on a single heat of Alloy 600 using compact tension specimens ranging from 50.80 mm (2 inches) in gross thickness (2T) to 10.16 mm (0.4 inches, 0.4T) in gross thickness. Results indicated that at stress intensity factor (K) levels above 55 MPa{radical}m, the growth rate is affected by specimen size in deaerated primary water. The growth rate can be significantly faster in 0.4T and 0.6T (15.24 mm = 0.6 inches in gross thickness) specimens at these elevated K levels compared to 2T specimens. Stress corrosion crack (SCC) growth rates > 6 x 10{sup -7} mm/s were observed at 338 C and 40 cc/kg H{sub 2} in 0.6T and 0.4T specimens at these elevated K levels, although the fracture mode was not significantly affected by the specimen size. The SCC growth rate of 2T specimens under comparable test conditions was {approx}6 x 10{sup -8} mm/s. All of the specimens examined that were tested at K > 55 MPa{radical}m exhibited intergranular failure, although ductile dimples and cracked grains were observed in the 0.4T specimens loaded to the elevated K levels. The effect of specimen size on the crack growth behavior indicated by electric potential drop (EPD) monitoring at K > 55 MPa{radical}m was also reviewed. EPD indicated steady state crack growth during the tests conducted on 1T (25.4 mm = 1.0 inches in gross thickness) and 2T specimens. Steady state crack growth was not indicated by EPD for the 0.4T and 0.6T specimens loaded at K > 55 MPa{radical}m. EPD indicated large jumps in the crack length at discrete points. Initially, it was believed that these large, rapid increases in the crack length corresponded to ductile tearing of uncracked ligaments in the crack wake as the SCC crack advanced. However, examination of the fracture surfaces did not reveal any evidence of isolated regions of ductile tearing in the crack wake. The large increases in the EPD signal were due to strain bursts. These results highlight the need to base SCC growth rates on destructive examination of the specimen.

E Richey; D Morton; W Moshier

2005-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

50

Catalyst proximity effects on the growth rate of Si nanowires S. T. Boles,1,a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and a silane precursor in a cold-wall chemical vapor deposition CVD system, where the precursor decomposition and experimental design, we have identified a fundamental aspect of growth of Si nanowires using the VLS mechanism

51

The genetic control of growth rate: a systems biology study in yeast.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the fermentor. If the culture is growing faster than the rate imposed by the current dilution rate, then the biomass concentration will rise as a result of the positive difference between the biomass production rate and the rate of removal of cells from... and the cell pellet from two 20 ml samples was stored at 80oC until further processing. Fermentations Ten ml of the preculture was used to inoculate 1L of FPM or nitrogen-limited F1 medium in the sterilized fermentor vessels. The composition of FPM [4...

Pir, Pinar; Gutteridge, Alex; Wu, Jian; Rash, Bharat; Kell, Douglas B; Zhang, Nianshu; Oliver, Stephen G

2012-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

52

Dynamic estimation of specific growth rates and concentrations of bacteria for the anaerobic digestion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by microorganisms into biogas (methane and carbon dioxide) and digestate (natural manure) in the absence of oxygen digestion S. Diop1 and I. Simeonov2 Abstract-- The paper proposes an observability anal- ysis and estimation measured quantities ­ the dilution rate and the flow rates of methane and carbon dioxide in the biogas

Boyer, Edmond

53

The Effects of Test Temperature, Temper, and Alloyed Copper on the Hydrogen-Controlled Crack Growth Rate of an Al-Zn-Mg-(Cu) Alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hydrogen embrittlement controlled stage II crack growth rate of AA 7050 (6.09 wt.% Zn, 2.14 wt% Mg, 2.19 wt.% Cu) was investigated as a function of temper and alloyed copper level in a humid air environment at various temperatures. Three tempers representing the underaged, peak aged, and overaged conditions were tested in 90% relative humidity (RH) air at temperatures between 25 and 90 C. At all test temperatures, an increased degree of aging (from underaged to overaged) produced slower stage II crack growth rates. The stage II crack growth rate of each alloy and temper displayed Arrhenius-type temperature dependence with activation energies between 58 and 99 kJ/mol. For both the normal copper and low copper alloys, the fracture path was predominantly intergranular at all test temperatures (25-90 C) in each temper investigated. Comparison of the stage II crack growth rates for normal (2.19 wt.%) and low (0.06 wt.%) copper alloys in the peak aged and overaged tempers showed the beneficial effect of copper additions on stage II crack growth rate in humid air. In the 2.19 wt.% copper alloy, the significant decrease ({approx} 10 times at 25 C) in stage II crack growth rate upon overaging is attributed to an increase in the apparent activation energy for crack growth. IN the 0.06 wt.% copper alloy, overaging did not increase the activation energy for crack growth but did lower the pre-exponential factor, {nu}{sub 0}, resulting in a modest ({approx} 2.5 times at 25 C) decrease in crack growth rate. These results indicate that alloyed copper and thermal aging affect the kinetic factors that govern stage II crack growth rate. Overaged, copper bearing alloys are not intrinsically immune to hydrogen environment assisted cracking but are more resistant due to an increased apparent activation energy for stage II crack growth.

G.A. Young, Jr.; J.R. Scully

2000-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

54

Crack growth rates and metallographic examinations of Alloy 600 and Alloy 82/182 from field components and laboratory materials tested in PWR environments.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In light water reactors, components made of nickel-base alloys are susceptible to environmentally assisted cracking. This report summarizes the crack growth rate results and related metallography for field and laboratory-procured Alloy 600 and its weld alloys tested in pressurized water reactor (PWR) environments. The report also presents crack growth rate (CGR) results for a shielded-metal-arc weld of Alloy 182 in a simulated PWR environment as a function of temperature between 290 C and 350 C. These data were used to determine the activation energy for crack growth in Alloy 182 welds. The tests were performed by measuring the changes in the stress corrosion CGR as the temperatures were varied during the test. The difference in electrochemical potential between the specimen and the Ni/NiO line was maintained constant at each temperature by adjusting the hydrogen overpressure on the water supply tank. The CGR data as a function of temperature yielded activation energies of 252 kJ/mol for a double-J weld and 189 kJ/mol for a deep-groove weld. These values are in good agreement with the data reported in the literature. The data reported here and those in the literature suggest that the average activation energy for Alloy 182 welds is on the order of 220-230 kJ/mol, higher than the 130 kJ/mol commonly used for Alloy 600. The consequences of using a larger value of activation energy for SCC CGR data analysis are discussed.

Alexandreanu, B.; Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.

2008-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

55

Prediction of pure water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in nickel base alloys using crack growth rate models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ford/Andresen slip dissolution SCC model, originally developed for stainless steel components in BWR environments, has been applied to Alloy 600 and Alloy X-750 tested in deaerated pure water chemistry. A method is described whereby the crack growth rates measured in compact tension specimens can be used to estimate crack growth in a component. Good agreement was found between model prediction and measured SCC in X-750 threaded fasteners over a wide range of temperatures, stresses, and material condition. Most data support the basic assumption of this model that cracks initiate early in life. The evidence supporting a particular SCC mechanism is mixed. Electrochemical repassivation data and estimates of oxide fracture strain indicate that the slip dissolution model can account for the observed crack growth rates, provided primary rather than secondary creep rates are used. However, approximately 100 cross-sectional TEM foils of SCC cracks including crack tips reveal no evidence of enhanced plasticity or unique dislocation patterns at the crack tip or along the crack to support a classic slip dissolution mechanism. No voids, hydrides, or microcracks are found in the vicinity of the crack tips creating doubt about classic hydrogen related mechanisms. The bulk oxide films exhibit a surface oxide which is often different than the oxides found within a crack. Although bulk chromium concentration affects the rate of SCC, analytical data indicates the mechanism does not result from chromium depletion at the grain boundaries. The overall findings support a corrosion/dissolution mechanism but not one necessarily related to slip at the crack tip.

Thompson, C.D.; Krasodomski, H.T.; Lewis, N.; Makar, G.L.

1995-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

56

Grain growth behavior and high-temperature high-strain-rate tensile ductility of iridium alloy DOP-26  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes results of studies conducted to date under the Iridium Alloy Characterization and Development subtask of the Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program to characterize the properties of the new-process iridium-based DOP-26 alloy used for the Cassini space mission. This alloy was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the early 1980`s and is currently used by NASA for cladding and post-impact containment of the radioactive fuel in radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) heat sources which provide electric power for interplanetary spacecraft. Included within this report are data generated on grain growth in vacuum or low-pressure oxygen environments; a comparison of grain growth in vacuum of the clad vent set cup material with sheet material; effect of grain size, test temperature, and oxygen exposure on high-temperature high-strain-rate tensile ductility; and grain growth in vacuum and high-temperature high-strain-rate tensile ductility of welded DOP-26. The data for the new-process material is compared to available old-process data.

McKamey, C.G.; Gubbi, A.N.; Lin, Y.; Cohron, J.W.; Lee, E.H.; George, E.P.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

The effect of pulse duration on the growth rate of laser-induced damage sites at 351 nm on fused silica surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Past work in the area of laser-induced damage growth has shown growth rates to be primarily dependent on the laser fluence and wavelength. More recent studies suggest that growth rate, similar to the damage initiation process, is affected by a number of additional parameters including pulse duration, pulse shape, site size, and internal structure. In this study, we focus on the effect of pulse duration on the growth rate of laser damage sites located on the exit surface of fused silica optics. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, a significant dependence of growth rate at 351 nm on pulse duration from 1 ns to 15 ns as {tau}{sup 0.3} for sites in the 50-100 {micro}m size range.

Negres, R A; Norton, M A; Liao, Z M; Cross, D A; Bude, J D; Carr, C W

2009-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

58

The effect of threadfin shad introduction on growth rates of largemouth bass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Nat. Hist. Surv. 24(3):377-412. Carlander, K. D. 1956. Fish growth studies: techniques and roles in surveys and management. Trans . N . Am . Wi ldl . Conf . 21: 262-274. 1973. Handbook of freshwater fishery biology, Yol. 2, tecgemo th h ss, ~Mic o... of fishery science. Cornell Univ. Press. Ithaca. 288 pp. Grizzell, R. A. , Jr. 1965. Diuron as an aquatic herbicide. Proc. Annu . Conf . Southeastern Assoc . Game and Fish Comm . 19: 194-197 . Neman, N. L. , R. S. Campbell, and L. C. Redmond. 1969...

Bivings, Albert Eugene

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Growth-Rate Induced Epitaxial Orientation of CeO2 on Al2O3(0001). | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky LearningGetGraphene'sEMSL bariumGrowth-Rate Induced

60

ENHANCED GROWTH RATE AND SILANE UTILIZATION IN AMORPHOUS SILICON AND NANOCRYSTALLINE-SILICON SOLAR CELL DEPOSITION VIA GAS PHASE ADDITIVES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air Products set out to investigate the impact of additives on the deposition rate of both ???µCSi and ???±Si-H films. One criterion for additives was that they could be used in conventional PECVD processing, which would require sufficient vapor pressure to deliver material to the process chamber at the required flow rates. The flow rate required would depend on the size of the substrate onto which silicon films were being deposited, potentially ranging from 200 mm diameter wafers to the 5.7 m2 glass substrates used in GEN 8.5 flat-panel display tools. In choosing higher-order silanes, both disilane and trisilane had sufficient vapor pressure to withdraw gas at the required flow rates of up to 120 sccm. This report presents results obtained from testing at Air Products?¢???? electronic technology laboratories, located in Allentown, PA, which focused on developing processes on a commercial IC reactor using silane and mixtures of silane plus additives. These processes were deployed to compare deposition rates and film properties with and without additives, with a goal of maximizing the deposition rate while maintaining or improving film properties.

Ridgeway, R.G.; Hegedus, S.S.; Podraza, N.J.

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher growth rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Effect of nutritional programs on growth rate and body fat of broilers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was in the form of abdominal fat in the female. In experiment two, 2750 day-old Hubbard/Hubbard broiler chicks were fed diets containing 24%, 27% and 30% protein and 2860 kcal ME/kg (no supplemental energy for the first seven days), 2860 kcal ME/kg, and 3080... kcal ME/kg from 0-49 days of age. Feeding no supplemental energy in the diet for the first seven days resulted in a decrease in the percent abdominal fat at 49 days of age. Higher protein levels were found to be beneficial in maximizing performance...

Hargis, Phillip Herbert

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Growth rate of late passage sarcoma cells is independent of epigenetic events but dependent on the amount of chromosomal aberrations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soft tissue sarcomas (STS) are characterized by co-participation of several epigenetic and genetic events during tumorigenesis. Having bypassed cellular senescence barriers during oncogenic transformation, the factors further affecting growth rate of STS cells remain poorly understood. Therefore, we investigated the role of gene silencing (DNA promoter methylation of LINE-1, PTEN), genetic aberrations (karyotype, KRAS and BRAF mutations) as well as their contribution to the proliferation rate and migratory potential that underlies initial and final passage sarcoma cells. Three different cell lines were used, SW982 (synovial sarcoma), U2197 (malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH)) and HT1080 (fibrosarcoma). Increased proliferative potential of final passage STS cells was not associated with significant differences in methylation (LINE-1, PTEN) and mutation status (KRAS, BRAF), but it was dependent on the amount of chromosomal aberrations. Collectively, our data demonstrate that these fairly differentiated/advanced cancer cell lines have still the potential to gain an additional spontaneous growth benefit without external influences and that maintenance of increased proliferative potential towards longevity of STS cells (having crossed senescence barriers) may be independent of overt epigenetic alterations. -- Highlights: Increased proliferative potential of late passage STS cells was: Not associated with epigenetic changes (methylation changes at LINE-1, PTEN). Not associated with mutation status of KRAS, BRAF. Dependent on presence/absence of chromosomal aberrations.

Becerikli, Mustafa; Jacobsen, Frank; Rittig, Andrea; Khne, Wiebke [Department of Plastic Surgery, BG University Hospital Bergmannsheil, Ruhr-University Bochum (Germany); Nambiar, Sandeep; Mirmohammadsadegh, Alireza; Stricker, Ingo; Tannapfel, Andrea [Institute of Pathology, Ruhr-University Bochum (Germany); Wieczorek, Stefan; Epplen, Joerg Thomas [Department of Human Genetics, Ruhr-University Bochum (Germany); Tilkorn, Daniel [Department of Plastic Surgery, BG University Hospital Bergmannsheil, Ruhr-University Bochum (Germany); Steinstraesser, Lars, E-mail: lars.steinstraesser@rub.de [Department of Plastic Surgery, BG University Hospital Bergmannsheil, Ruhr-University Bochum (Germany)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

Measurements of Ice Crystal Growth Rates in Air at -5C and -10C K. G. Libbrecht and H. M. Arnold  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements of Ice Crystal Growth Rates in Air at -5C and -10C K. G. Libbrecht and H. M. Arnold to: kgl@caltech.edu Abstract. We present experiments investigating the growth of ice crystals from produce large morphological changes at all scales. One popular example of this phenomenon is the formation

Libbrecht, Kenneth G.

64

Time growth rate and field profiles of hybrid modes excited by a relativistic elliptical electron beam in an elliptical metallic waveguide with dielectric rod  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dispersion relation of guided electromagnetic waves propagating in an elliptical metallic waveguide with a dielectric rod driven by relativistic elliptical electron beam (REEB) is investigated. The electric field profiles and the growth rates of the waves are numerically calculated by using Mathieu functions. The effects of relative permittivity constant of dielectric rod, accelerating voltage, and current density of REEB on the growth rate are presented.

Jazi, B.; Rahmani, Z.; Abdoli-Arani, A. [Faculty of Physics, Department of Laser and Photonics, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Heidari-Semiromi, E. [Faculty of Physics, Department of Condense Matter, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

65

arXiv:1308.0623v1[physics.bio-ph]2Aug2013 Asymptotic Cellular Growth Rate as the Effective Information Utilization Rate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Information Utilization Rate R. Pugatch,1 N. Barkai,2 and T. Tlusty1 1 School of Natural Sciences, Simons

Tlusty, Tsvi

66

Derivation of a Langmuir type of model to describe the intrinsic growth rate of gas hydrates during crystallization from gas mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Derivation of a Langmuir type of model to describe the intrinsic growth rate of gas hydrates during crystallization from gas mixtures Jean-Michel Herri* and Matthias Kwaterski Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne, 158 Cours Fauriel, 42023 Saint- Etienne, France Abstract Gas Hydrates

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

67

Seeding rate and seed size as management techniques for ryegrass (Lolium Multiflorum, Lam) in winter wheat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Higher seeding rates and larger seed sizes could enhance the competitiveness of wheat with ryegrass. Growth room and field research evaluated the effects of wheat seeding rates and seed size in competition with Italian ryegrass. Winter wheat seeds...

Cook, Casey Lee

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

68

SCC INITIATION AND GROWTH RATE STUDIES ON TITANIUM GRADE 7 AND BASE METAL, WELDED, AND AGED ALLOY 22 IN CONCENTRATED GROUNDWATER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The stress corrosion crack initiation and growth rate response was evaluated on as-received, as-welded, cold worked and aged Alloy 22 (UNS N06022) and titanium Grades 7 (UNS R52400), 28 (UNS R55323) and 29 (UNS R56404) at 105-165 C in various aerated, concentrated groundwater environments. Time-to-failure experiments on actively-loaded tensile specimens at 105 C evaluated the effects of applied stress, welding, surface finish, shot peening, cold work, crevicing, and aging treatments in Alloy 22 (UNS N06022), and found these materials to be highly resistant to SCC (none observed). Long-term U-bend data at 165 C corroborated these findings. Titanium Grade 7 and stainless steels were also included in the 105 C test matrix. Long term crack growth rate data showed stable crack growth in titanium Grade 7. Recent creep tests in air confirm literature data that these alloys are quite susceptible to creep failure, even below the yield stress, and it is unclear whether cracking in SCC tests is only accelerated by the creep response, or whether creep is responsible for cracking. Alloy 22 exhibited stable growth rates under ''gentle'' cyclic loading, but was prone to crack arrest at fully static loading. No effect of Pb additions was observed.

J.H. Payer

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

From Ultrananocrystalline Diamond to Single Crystal Diamond Growth in Hot Filament and Microwave Plasma-Enhanced CVD Reactors: a Unified Model for Growth Rates and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From Ultrananocrystalline Diamond to Single Crystal Diamond Growth in Hot Filament and Microwave, Moscow State UniVersity, 119991 Moscow, Russia ReceiVed: April 29, 2008 CVD Diamond can now be deposited either in the form of single crystal homoepitaxial layers, or as polycrystalline films with crystal sizes

Bristol, University of

70

The effect of cover crop and fertilizer rate on the growth and survival of loblolly pine in East Texas mine spoil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of these studies was to determine the effect of cover crop and N and P fertil- izer rates, used to prevent soil erosion, on the survival and growth of loblolly pine planted in mine spoil. Coastal bermudagrass, fertilized with 0, 50 or 100 kg N/ha/year, was used.../ha/year, fertilized with 0, 25 or 50 kg P/ha, were evaluated in the P study. CcnIpetition between cover crops and trees for light, water and nutrients influenced survival and growth of trees. Tree survival, after three years, was greatest in the subterranean...

Kee, David Dwayne

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

71

The effect of water content, cooling rate, and growth temperature on the freezing temperature of 4 Tillandsia species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the exotherm initiation temperatures (EIT) of leaf sections. The effect of 2 growth temperatures (5 and 25oC) on the absolute water content and EIT of T. recurvata and T. usneoides was also determined. All p * * pt T. mb'1 ', f o t ld temperatures at 80... used to detect ice formation in plant tissues by exotherm detection. An electronic device is used to measure the heat released (exotherm) when water freezes. From this information, the freezing and supercooling temperatures of plant tissues can...

Hagar, Christopher Flint

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Beyond the growth rate of cosmic structure: Testing modified gravity models with an extra degree of freedom  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In 'modified' gravity the observed acceleration of the universe is explained by changing the gravitational force law or the number of degrees of freedom in the gravitational sector. Both possibilities can be tested by measurements of cosmological structure formation. In this paper we elaborate the details of such tests using the Galileon model as a case study. We pay attention to the possibility that each new degree of freedom may have stochastically independent initial conditions, generating different types of potential well in the early universe and breaking complete correlation between density and velocity power spectra. This 'stochastic bias' can confuse schemes to parametrize the predictions of modified gravity models, such as the use of the growth parameter f alone. Using data from the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey we show that it will be possible to obtain constraints using information about the cosmological-scale force law embedded in the multipole power spectra of redshift-space distortions. As an examp...

Burrage, Clare; Seery, David

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Effect of rates and frequencies of nitrogen fertilization on yield, growth pattern and crude protein content of bermudagrass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the greenhouse ~ ~. . . . . . 28 INTRODUCTION Increasing costs of grain force the cattle industry to use pastures for a larger proportion of total nutrients used in cattle production. At the same time increasing costs of fertilizers require a more efficient... of the forage (Perry and Batensperger (1979), Ramos et al. (1981), Sibm and Alberda (1980 ), Villanueva (1974 ). Farnworth and Ruxton (1976) found that nitrogen rates did not affect crude protein content of rhodesgrass. It has been shown by many authors...

Uribe-Rivas, Juan Carlos

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Study of the combined effect of temperature, pH and water activity on the radial growth rate of the white-rot basidiomycete Physisporinus vitreus by using a hyphal growth model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The present work investigates environmental effects on the growth of fungal colonies of P. vitreus by using a lattice-free discrete modelling approach called FGM (Fuhr et al. (2010), arXiv:1101.1747), in which hyphae and nutrients are considered as discrete structures. A discrete modelling approach allows studying the underlying mechanistic rule concerning the basic architecture and dynamic of fungal networks on the scale of a single colony. By comparing simulations of the FGM with laboratory experiments of growing fungal colonies on malt extract agar we show that combined effect of temperature, pH and water activity on the radial growth rate of a fungal colony on a macroscopic scale may be explained by a power law for the growth costs of hyphal expansion on a microscopic scale. The information about the response of the fungal mycelium on a microscopic scale to environmental conditions is essential to simulate its behavior in complex structure substrates such as wood, where the impact of the fungus to the woo...

Fuhr, M J; Schubert, M; Schwarze, F W M R; Herrmann, H J

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Siting algae cultivation facilities for biofuel production in the United States: trade-offs between growth rate, site constructability, water availability, and infrastructure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Locating sites for new algae cultivation facilities is a complex task. The climate must support high growth rates, and cultivation ponds require appropriate land and water resources as well as key utility and transportation infrastructure. We employ our spatiotemporal Biomass Assessment Tool (BAT) to select promising locations based on the open-pond cultivation of Arthrospira sp. and a strain of the order Desmidiales. 64,000 potential sites across the southern United States were evaluated. We progressively apply a range of screening criteria and track their impact on the number of selected sites, geographic location, and biomass productivity. Both strains demonstrate maximum productivity along the Gulf of Mexico coast, with the highest values on the Florida peninsula. In contrast, sites meeting all selection criteria for Arthrospira were located along the southern coast of Texas and for Desmidiales were located in Louisiana and southern Arkansas. Site selection was driven mainly by the lack of oil pipeline access in Florida and elevated groundwater salinity in southern Texas. The requirement for low salinity freshwater (<400 mg L-1) constrained Desmidiales locations; siting flexibility is greater for salt-tolerant species such as Arthrospira. Combined siting factors can result in significant departures from regions of maximum productivity but are within the expected range of site-specific process improvements.

Venteris, Erik R.; McBride, Robert; Coleman, Andre M.; Skaggs, Richard; Wigmosta, Mark S.

2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

76

Rate schedule  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, andEpidermal Growth Factor. |INCIDENCET3PACI-T3Rate

77

Rate-Dependent Morphology of Li2O2 Growth in Li-O2 Batteries Birger Horstmann,1, 2, 3, 4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-generation batteries that can replace conventional combustion technologies [16­21]. Although the stability of oxygen Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA 2 German Aerospace Center continuum model for the growth of Li2O2 crystals in lithium-oxygen batteries with organic electrolytes

Bazant, Martin Z.

78

Higher Education in Scandinavia.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Higher education systems around the world have been undergoing fundamental changes through the last 50 years from more narrow self-sustaining universities for the elite and (more)

Birch Andreasen, Lars

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Higher Education Masterof Education  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.ttu.edu Effective Fall 2013, Updated 12/09/13 #12;3 Higher Education Masters of Education Program Overview2 Higher Education Masterof Education (M.Ed.) Program Handbook College of Education Graduate Education and Research Texas Tech University

Rock, Chris

80

Higher Dimensional Elko Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that the so called Elko equation can be derived from a 5-dimensional Dirac equation. We argue that this result can be relevant for dark matter and cosmological scenarios. We generalize our procedure to higher dimensions.

J. A. Nieto

2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher growth rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Method for enhancing microbial utilization rates of gases using perfluorocarbons  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of enhancing the bacterial reduction of industrial gases using perfluorocarbons (PFCs) is disclosed. Because perfluorocarbons (PFCs) allow for a much greater solubility of gases than water does, PFCs have the potential to deliver gases in higher concentrations to microorganisms when used as an additive to microbial growth media thereby increasing the rate of the industrial gas conversion to economically viable chemicals and gases.

Turick, Charles E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Method for enhancing microbial utilization rates of gases using perfluorocarbons  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of enhancing the bacterial reduction of industrial gases using perfluorocarbons (PFCs) is disclosed. Because perfluorocarbons (PFCs) allow for a much greater solubility of gases than water does, PFCs have the potential to deliver gases in higher concentrations to microorganisms when used as an additive to microbial growth media thereby increasing the rate of the industrial gas conversion to economically viable chemicals and gases. 3 figs.

Turick, C.E.

1997-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

83

Growth Rates, Stable Oxygen Isotopes (18O), and Strontium (Sr/Ca) Composition in Two Species of Pacific Sclerosponges (Acanthocheatetes wellsi and Astrosclera willeyana) with 18O Calibration and Application to Paleoceanography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The isotopic and elemental composition of sclerosponge skeletons is used to reconstruct paleoceanographic records. Yet few studies have systematically examined the natural variability in sclerosponge skeletal {delta}{sup 18}O, growth, and Sr/Ca, and how that may influence the interpretation of sclerosponge proxy records. Here, we analyzed short records in seven specimens of Acanthocheatetes wellsi (high-Mg calcite, 21 mol% Mg) from Palau, four A. wellsi (high-Mg calcite, 21 mol% Mg) from Saipan, and three Astrosclera willeyana (aragonite) sclerosponges from Saipan, as well as one long record in an A. wellsi specimen from Palau spanning 1945-2001.5. In Saipan, species-specific and mineralogical effects appear to have a negligible effect on sclerosponge {delta}{sup 18}O, facilitating the direct comparison of {delta}{sup 18}O records between species at a given location. At both sites, A. wellsi {delta}{sup 18}O and growth rates were sensitive to environmental conditions, but Sr/Ca was not sensitive to the same conditions. High-resolution {delta}{sup 18}O analyses confirmed this finding as both A. wellsi and A. willeyana deposited their skeleton in accordance with the trends in isotopic equilibrium with seawater, though with a 0.27{per_thousand} offset in the case of A. willeyana. In the high-Mg-calcite species A. wellsi, Mg may be interfering with Sr incorporation into the skeleton. On multidecadal timescales, A. wellsi sclerosponge {delta}{sup 18}O in Palau tracked the Southern Oscillation Index variability post-1977, but not pre-1977, coincident with the switch in the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) at {approx}1976. This suggests that water mass circulation in the region is influenced by El Nino-Southern Oscillation variability during positive PDO phases, but not during negative ones.

Grottoli, A.; Adkins, J; Panero, W; Reaman, D; Moots, K

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

ARM - Lesson Plans: Rate of Coral Growth  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Related InformationAcid Rain OutreachMoving

85

Rate Schedules  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

One of the major responsibilities of Southeastern is to design, formulate, and justify rate schedules. Repayment studies prepared by the agency determine revenue requirements and appropriate rate...

86

A mechanical model of early salt dome growth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Department) December 1988 A Mechanical Analysis of Early Salt Dome Growth. (December 1988) Frank Albert Irwin, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Raymond C. Fletcher A two-layer superposition model, the lower layer representing... of the sediments results in growth rates much higher than those observed. Analysis of the case with a diffusivity of 104m2/Ka agrees with all observa- tions. A range of diffusivities which will produce a realistic salt dome model is then determined. The lower...

Irwin, Frank Albert

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Energy Rating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Consistent, accurate, and uniform ratings based on a single statewide rating scale Reasonable estimates of potential utility bill savings and reliable recommendations on cost-effective measures to improve energy efficiency Training and certification procedures for home raters and quality assurance procedures to promote accurate ratings and to protect consumers Labeling procedures that will meet the needs of home buyers, homeowners, renters, the real estate industry, and mortgage lenders with an interest in home energy ratings

Cabec Conference; Rashid Mir P. E

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Terrace housing : providing quality in higher-density housing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The higher demand of higher-density housing in Bangkok due to the rapid growth of the economy and the use of high-performance materials and modern construction methods has changed the forms of housing from low-rise buildings ...

Atthakor, Songpol

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Rates Meetings and Workshops (pbl/rates)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, andEpidermal Growth Factor. |INCIDENCET3PACI-T3Rate

90

Rates and Repayment Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, andEpidermal Growth Factor.Tariff Rates FY 2015 Rates

91

Growth & Development / Parental Care  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

participate; if one parents is lost, fledging rates usually drop #12;Winkler reduced clutch size from 5 to 3Growth & Development / Parental Care #12;Embryonic Development Although the sequence of 42 stages the egg The hatching muscle helps the chick break out of the egg Parents typically dispose of the egg

Butler, Christopher J.

92

Higher Education Tuition Assistance And  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and West Virginia Higher Education Grant Recipients October 2009 Revised: November 2009 Prepared ..................................5 3. Work Participation And Wages For W.Va. Public Higher Education Graduates Receiving PROMISE........................................................................11 5. Work Participation In 2008 Of Graduates From West Virginia Public Higher Education Institutions

Mohaghegh, Shahab

93

Original article Genetic influences on growth and partition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The Hubbard had significantly higher relative rates of fat deposi- tion in the thigh, drumstick, breast

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

94

Effects of depositon rate on Bi[sub 2]Sr[sub 2]CaCu[sub 2]O[sub 8+x] and Bi[sub 2]Sr[sub 1. 6]La[sub 0. 4]CuO[sub 6+x] epitaxial thin film growth by pulsed-laser ablation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bi[sub 2]Sr[sub 2]CaCu[sub 2]O[sub 8+x] and Bi[sub 2]Sr[sub 1.6]La[sub 0.4]CuO[sub 6+x] epitaxial films have been grown on (001) MgO and SrTiO[sub 3] substrates at different deposition rates by pulsed-laser ablation(PLA). Surface morphology, crystallinity and superconducting critical temperature of the films depend sensitively on deposition rate even though ablation target composition and substrate temperature were kept almost constant. Scanning election microscopy showed that density of particles generated by PLA is reduced by decreasing the deposition rate. Results show that the highest quality films of the highly anisotropic Bi-based materials are deposited by PLA at a low deposition rate, which results in film growth in a near-equilibrium state. 9 refs, 1 tab, 3 figs.

Zhu, S. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); Lowndes, D.H.; Chakoumakos, B.C.; Christen, D.K.; Budai, J.D.; Zheng, X.Y.; Warmack, R.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Effects of depositon rate on Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+x} and Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 1.6}La{sub 0.4}CuO{sub 6+x} epitaxial thin film growth by pulsed-laser ablation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+x} and Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 1.6}La{sub 0.4}CuO{sub 6+x} epitaxial films have been grown on (001) MgO and SrTiO{sub 3} substrates at different deposition rates by pulsed-laser ablation(PLA). Surface morphology, crystallinity and superconducting critical temperature of the films depend sensitively on deposition rate even though ablation target composition and substrate temperature were kept almost constant. Scanning election microscopy showed that density of particles generated by PLA is reduced by decreasing the deposition rate. Results show that the highest quality films of the highly anisotropic Bi-based materials are deposited by PLA at a low deposition rate, which results in film growth in a near-equilibrium state. 9 refs, 1 tab, 3 figs.

Zhu, S. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Lowndes, D.H.; Chakoumakos, B.C.; Christen, D.K.; Budai, J.D.; Zheng, X.Y.; Warmack, R.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

E-Print Network 3.0 - assisted crack growth Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cal crack growth by stress... for the first time in sapphire for both modes of subcritical cracking. It was found that growth rates were... growth rates could be closely...

97

Diffusion-driven precipitate growth and ripening of oxygen precipitates in boron doped silicon by dynamical x-ray diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray Pendellsung fringes from three silicon single crystals measured at 900?C are analyzed with respect to density and size of oxygen precipitates within a diffusion-driven growth model and compared with TEM investigations. It appears that boron doped (p+) material shows a higher precipitate density and a higher strain than moderately (p-) boron crystals. In-situ diffraction reveals a diffusion-driven precipitate growth followed by a second growth regime in both materials. An interpretation of the second growth regime in terms of Ostwald ripening yields surface energy values (around 70?erg/cm{sup 2}) similar to published data. Further, an increased nucleation rate by a factor of ?13 is found in the p+ sample as compared to a p- sample at a nucleation temperature of 450?C.

Will, J., E-mail: will@krist.uni-erlangen.de; Grschel, A.; Bergmann, C.; Magerl, A. [Crystallography and Structural Physics, University of Erlangen-Nrnberg, Staudtstr. 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Spiecker, E. [Center for Nanoanalysis and Electron Microscopy, University of Erlangen-Nrnberg, Cauerstr. 6, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

98

Rating Agency Reports  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, andEpidermal Growth Factor.Tariff Rates FY 2015

99

The Swedish Higher Education System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EDUCATION Higher education within all cycles has two strata of entry requirements: general and (additional) specific requirements. General eligibility to the first cycle is the same for all higher education. General and courses. DEGREE-AWARDING POWERS Universities have the general right to award first-, second- and third-cycle

Zhao, Yuxiao

100

West Virginia Higher Education Graduate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

West Virginia Higher Education Graduate Employment And Wage Trends: 2003-2010 Summary Results October 2011 Prepared for the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission By George W. Hammond and Economic Research College of Business and Economics West Virginia University © Copyright 2011 WVU Research

Mohaghegh, Shahab

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher growth rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

West Virginia Higher Education Graduate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

West Virginia Higher Education Graduate Employment By Industry 2009 July 2010 Prepared for the West Research Assistant Bureau of Business and Economic Research College of Business and Economics West Virginia 1. Work Participation And Annualized Wages Of West Virginia Public Higher Education Graduates From

Mohaghegh, Shahab

102

BIOTIC INFLUENCES AFFECTING POPULATION GROWTH OF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Chlorella and Nitz8chia _ Growth curve and division rate of Chlorella _ Growth curve and division rate in conditioned media _ Inhibitory effect o~ Chlorella of Nitz8chia-conditioned medium _ Inhibitory effect on Nitz8chia of Chlorella-condit,ioned medium _ Inhibitory effects of filtrate from conditioned media

103

Higher Education Energy Loan Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Oklahoma Department of Commerce has established a loan/lease fund for institutes of higher education to improve energy efficiency. Two categories of funding are available for schools to reduce...

104

EXPLAINING OUTCROSSING RATE IN CAMPANULASTRUM AMERICANUM (CAMPANULACEAE): GEITONOGAMY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SELF-INCOMPATIBILITY Leah J. Kruszewski and Laura F. Galloway1 Department of Biology, University, the high outcrossing rate could result from cryptic self-incompatibility, a mechanism that favors outcross differential growth rates of self and outcross pollen tubes produce cryptic self-incompatibility. Growth rates

Galloway, Laura F.

105

Eucalyptus kraft black liquor enhances growth and productivity of Spirulina in outdoor cultures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mass cultivation of microalgae for commercial applications suffers from poor productivities when measured against laboratory results or theoretical projections. In an effort to reduce this gap it was discovered that addition of eucalyptus kraft black liquor (BL) enhanced biomass productivity in outdoor cultures of Spirulina by increasing growth rate by 38% and biomass yield by 43%. BL treatment resulted in elevation of nitrogen assimilating enzyme activities and efficiency of phosphate utilization. Analyses of forenoon and afternoon oxygen production rates (OPRs) indicated higher photosynthetic and respiratory activity in BL-treated cultures compared to untreated cultures. 20 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Chauhan, V.S.; Singh, G.; Ramamurthy, V. [Thapar Institute of Engineering and Technology, Patiala (India)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

What can we learn from higher multipole power spectra of galaxy distribution in redshift space?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate a potential of the higher multipole power spectra of the galaxy distribution in redshift space as a cosmological probe on halo scales. Based on the fact that a halo model explains well the multipole power spectra of the luminous red galaxy (LRG) sample in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), we focus our investigation on the random motions of the satellite LRGs that determine the higher multipole spectra at large wavenumbers. We show that our theoretical model fits the higher multipole spectra at large wave numbers from N-body numerical simulations and we apply these results for testing the gravity theory and the velocity structure of galaxies on the halo scales. In this analysis, we use the multipole spectra P_4(k) and P_6(k) on the small scales of the range of wavenumber 0.3growth rate on very large scales. We demonstrate that our method could be useful for testing gravity on the ha...

Kanemaru, Tatsuro; Huetsi, Gert; Terukina, Ayumu; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Population Growth, (Per Capita) Economic Growth, and Poverty Reduction in Uganda: A brief Summary of Theory and Evidence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Population Growth, (Per Capita) Economic Growth, and Poverty Reduction in Uganda: A brief Summary: This note examines the link between population and per capita economic growth in Uganda. After showing that Uganda has one of the highest population growth rates in the world which, due to the inherent demographic

Krivobokova, Tatyana

108

On higher spin partition functions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We observe that the partition function of the set of all free massless higher spins s=0,1,2,3,... in flat space is equal to one: the ghost determinants cancel against the "physical" ones or, equivalently, the (regularized) total number of degrees of freedom vanishes. This reflects large underlying gauge symmetry and suggests analogy with supersymmetric or topological theory. The Z=1 property extends also to the AdS background, i.e. the 1-loop vacuum partition function of Vasiliev theory is equal to 1 (assuming a particular regularization of the sum over spins); this was noticed earlier as a consistency requirement for the vectorial AdS/CFT duality. We find that Z=1 is also true in the conformal higher spin theory (with higher-derivative d^{2s} kinetic terms) expanded near flat or conformally flat S^4 background. We also consider the partition function of free conformal theory of symmetric traceless rank s tensor field which has 2-derivative kinetic term but only scalar gauge invariance in flat space. This non...

Beccaria, M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Economic Growth Policies & Economic Growth Theory Influences.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The aim of this thesis is to describe the presence of theories for economic growth in municipalities economic growth strategies, and to compare the (more)

Hallden, Sophie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

The higher spin Laplace operator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper deals with a certain class of second-order conformally invariant operators acting on functions taking values in particular (finite-dimensional) irreducible representations of the orthogonal group. These operators can be seen as a generalisation of the Laplace operator to higher spin as well as a second order analogue of the Rarita-Schwinger operator. To construct these operators, we will use the framework of Clifford analysis, a multivariate function theory in which arbitrary irreducible representations for the orthogonal group can be realised in terms of polynomials satisfying a system of differential equations. As a consequence, the functions on which this particular class of operators act are functions taking values in the space of harmonics homogeneous of degree k. We prove the ellipticity of these operators and use this to investigate their kernel, focusing on both polynomial solutions and the fundamental solution.

Hendrik De Bie; David Eelbode; Matthias Roels

2015-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

111

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Sustainable syntrophic growth of Dehalococcoides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the capabilities of DVH to ferment lactate to provide H2 and acetate for growth, along with potential benefits from proton translocation, cobalamin-salvaging and amino acid biosynthesis, whereas MC in the tri). They exhibit low growth rates, specific obligate nutrient requirements (hydrogen as electron donor, acetate

Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

112

affect yeast growth: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

were carried out under fixed dilution rate after batch growth in YPD as described... Pir, Pinar; Gutteridge, Alex; Wu, Jian; Rash, Bharat; Kell, Douglas B; Zhang, Nianshu;...

113

Photosynthetic pigment concentrations, gas exchange and vegetative growth for selected monocots and dicots treated with two contrasting coal fly ashes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is uncertainty as to the rates of coal fly ash needed for optimum physiological processes and growth. In the current study we tested the hyothesis that photosynthetic pigments concentrations and CO{sub 2} assimilation (A) are more sensitive than dry weights in plants grown on media amended with coal fly ash. We applied the Terrestrial Plant Growth Test (Guideline 208) protocols of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to monocots (barley (Hordeum vulgare) and ryegrass (Secale cereale)) and dicots (canola (Brasica napus), radish (Raphanus sativus), field peas (Pisum sativum), and lucerne (Medicago sativa)) on media amended with fly ashes derived from semi-bituminous (gray ash) or lignite (red ash) coals at rates of 0, 2.5, 5.0, 10, or 20 Mg ha(-1). The red ash had higher elemental concentrations and salinity than the gray ash. Fly ash addition had no significant effect on germination by any of the six species. At moderate rates ({<=}10 Mg ha{sup -1}) both ashes increased (P < 0.05) growth rates and concentrations of chlorophylls a and b, but reduced carotenoid concentrations. Addition of either ash increased A in radish and transpiration in barley. Growth rates and final dry weights were reduced for all of the six test species when addition rates exceeded 10 Mg ha{sup -1} for gray ash and 5 Mg ha{sup -1} for red ash. We concluded that plant dry weights, rather than pigment concentrations and/or instantaneous rates of photosynthesis, are more consistent for assessing subsequent growth in plants supplied with fly ash.

Yunusa, I.A.M.; Burchett, M.D.; Manoharan, V.; DeSilva, D.L.; Eamus, D.; Skilbeck, C.G. [University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia). Dept. of Environmental Science

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

114

From Higher Education To Work In West  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From Higher Education To Work In West Virginia 2009 Summary Results For Work Participation Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission By George W. Hammond, Associate Director Adam Hoffer, Graduate Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission. Opinions expressed herein are the responsibility

Mohaghegh, Shahab

115

Academe Today: The Chronicle of Higher Education  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Academe Today: The Chronicle of Higher Education. The Chronicle of Higher Education Date: March 1, 1996. Section: Opinion Page: B1...

116

GALAXY GROWTH BY MERGING IN THE NEARBY UNIVERSE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We measure the mass growth rate by merging for a wide range of galaxy types. We present the small-scale (0.014 h {sup -1} {sub 70} Mpc < r < 11 h {sub 70} {sup -1} Mpc) projected cross-correlation functions w(r {sub p}) of galaxy subsamples from the spectroscopic sample of the NYU Value-Added Galaxy Catalog (5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} galaxies of redshifts 0.03 < z < 0.15) with galaxy subsamples from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging (4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} galaxies). We use smooth fits to de-project the two-dimensional functions w(r {sub p}) to obtain smooth three-dimensional real-space cross-correlation functions {xi}(r) for each of several spectroscopic subsamples with each of several imaging subsamples. Because close pairs are expected to merge, the three-space functions and dynamical evolution time estimates provide galaxy accretion rates. We find that the accretion onto massive blue galaxies and onto red galaxies is dominated by red companions, and that onto small-mass blue galaxies, red and blue galaxies make comparable contributions. We integrate over all types of companions and find that at fixed stellar mass, the total fractional accretion rates onto red galaxies ({approx}3 h {sub 70} percent per Gyr) are greater than that onto blue galaxies ({approx}1 h {sub 70} percent per Gyr). These rates are almost certainly overestimates because we have assumed that all close pairs merge as quickly as the merger time that we used. One conclusion of this work is that if the total growth of red galaxies from z = 1 to z = 0 is mainly due to merging, the merger rates must have been higher in the past.

Jiang Tao; Hogg, David W.; Blanton, Michael R., E-mail: david.hogg@nyu.edu [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

117

Chlorite Dissolution Rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spreadsheets provides measured chlorite rate data from 100 to 300C at elevated CO2. Spreadsheet includes derived rate equation.

Carroll, Susan

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Chlorite Dissolution Rates  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Spreadsheets provides measured chlorite rate data from 100 to 300C at elevated CO2. Spreadsheet includes derived rate equation.

Carroll, Susan

119

The Interest Rate Conundrum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flows and US Interest Rates, NBER Working Paper No 12560. [Working Paper # 2008 -03 The Interest Rate Conundrum Roger

Craine, Roger; Martin, Vance L.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Incentive Rates- At What Cost?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with interruptible services. Instead, I filed "ISB" which was priced slightly above the marginal fuel cost on a time of use basis. Many of the periods of the year the first year that I proposed that rate, the cost of interruptible would have been higher than... forms centers on four issues; cost scope of the topic, so let me describe what I feel based pricing, discrimination, competition between is an incentive rate. My view is likely to strike utilities, and effectiveness. You've already some of you...

Schaeffer, S. C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher growth rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Supernova rates and stellar populations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the results about the nature of type Ia Supernovae that can be derived by studying their rates in different stellar populations. While the evolution of SN photometry and spectra can constrain the explosion mechanism, the SN rate depends on the progenitor system. We review the current available data on rates as a function of parent galaxy color, morphology, star formation rate, radio luminosity and environment. By studying the variation of the rates with the color of the parent galaxy, a strong evidence was established that type Ia SNe come from both young and old stars. The dependence of the rates with the radio power of the parent galaxy is best reproduced by a bimodal distribution of delay time between the formation of the progenitor and its explosion as a SN. Cluster early-type galaxies show higher type Ia SN rate with respect to field galaxies, and this effect can be due either to traces of young stars or to differences in the delay time distribution.

F. Mannucci

2007-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

122

Rate Adjustments and Public Involvement  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, andEpidermal Growth Factor. | EMSLusingRate

123

Some factors influencing digestion and growth rates of beef steers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~K 20i49 34. 78 '2221 20+49 26. 81 mgs 20i49 26, 81 19i92 66i51 KlI 19a92 ~38. 7 21i10 ~0+9 Oi93 Oe93 0. 93 0, 90 8. 5T 98 e9 0 94 8. 63 98. 9 Oi94 Oi94 5. 23 li03 7. 49 4 01 KGF 1 i03 4il2 li22 lg ilHSUL')S kg... of the steers under the ccnditicns cf this oxparincnt? Dttssttss trials Tho results of tbo digestion tria1s aro a~ed in Table 5. Ths addition of cny supple+mt to tbo basal ration u ed throughout tlaso studies very signifioantIy (p (0. 01) inprcved ths...

Gossett, John Warren

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

124

Lasalocid effects on growth rates of grazing heifers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of five treatments and individually fed 454 g/hd/d of a ground sorghum grain carrier containing lasalocid at levels of: (1) 0, (2) 50, (3) 100, (4) 200 ot' (5) 300 mg/hd/d. ADC (kg) for the five treatments wes (1) '. 53, (2) . 61, (3) . 59, (4) . 58... AVERAGE SUPPLEMENT INTAKE PER HEIFER (KG/HD/D). 2 LASALOCID EFFECTS ON INTAKE AND WEIGHT GAIN OF GRAZING HEIFERS ~ ~. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 3 INTAKE LEVEL AND PERFORMANCE BY TREATMENT ~ 14 4 LASALOCID EFFECTS ON AVERAGE...

May, Ray Alton

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

125

Final Report: " Growth Rates of Freshly Nucleated Particles"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report lists of archival journal articles that were written with support from this grant. Research objectives from the original proposal are given, along with papers that were written to meet each of those objectives. The papers are all available in the archival literature.

McMurry, Peter H; Smith, James N

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

126

Influence of growth rate on the epitaxial orientation and crystalline  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinementEtching.348ASSEMBLYInfluence of TopologicalPore-Scalequality

127

Florida Growth Fund (Florida)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Florida Growth Fund can provide investments in technology and growth-related companies through co-investments with other institutional investors. The Fund awards preference to companies...

128

Association of automobile passenger transportation and economic growth in Japan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) (Nember) January 1969 ABSTRACT Association cf Automobile Passenger Transportation and Economic Growth in Japan. (January 1969) Teruhiko Boric, B. A. , &faseda University Directed by: Dr. ~felvin L. Greenhut In order to evaluate the growth... of Japanese post-war passenger transportation, a comparative study of the U. S. passenger transporta- ti. on development between 1910 and 1940 has been made. The growth rate of automobile ownership prior to the Great Depression is larger than the rate...

Horie, Teruhiko

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Transgenic algae engineered for higher performance  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present disclosure relates to transgenic algae having increased growth characteristics, and methods of increasing growth characteristics of algae. In particular, the disclosure relates to transgenic algae comprising a glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase transgene and to transgenic algae comprising a glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase transgene and a glutamine synthetase.

Unkefer, Pat J; Anderson, Penelope S; Knight, Thomas J

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

130

States & Energy Efficiency in Higher Education  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation, given through the DOE's Technical Assitance Program (TAP), provides information on States & Energy Efficiency in Higher Education.

131

Firm Size And Higher Education Graduate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Firm Size And Higher Education Graduate Employment In West Virginia 2010 Summary Results For Work 2012 Prepared for the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission By George W. Hammond, Associate Corporation Funding for this research was provided by the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission

Mohaghegh, Shahab

132

From Higher Education To Work In West  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From Higher Education To Work In West Virginia 2008 Summary Results For Work Participation Achievement, Tuition Assistance, and Nearby States March 2010 Prepared for the West Virginia Higher Education Higher Education Policy Commission. Opinions expressed herein are the responsibility of the authors. #12

Mohaghegh, Shahab

133

From Higher Education To Work In West  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From Higher Education To Work In West Virginia 2007 Summary Results For Work Participation Prepared for the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission By George W. Hammond, Associate Director This research was conducted under contract with the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission. Opinions

Mohaghegh, Shahab

134

County Employment Of West Virginia Higher  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

County Employment Of West Virginia Higher Education Graduates 2009 December 2010 Prepared for the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission By George W. Hammond, Associate Director Adam Hoffer with the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission. Opinions expressed herein are the responsibility

Mohaghegh, Shahab

135

Effective Rate Period  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the FY Mid-Year Change 10012013 - 03312014 04012014 - 09302014 Power Rates Annual Revenue Requirement Rate Schedule Power Revenue Requirement 73,441,557...

136

Generalized structure of higher order nonclassicality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A generalized notion of higher order nonclassicality (in terms of higher order moments) is introduced. Under this generalized framework of higher order nonclassicality, conditions of higher order squeezing and higher order subpoissonian photon statistics are derived. A simpler form of the Hong-Mandel higher order squeezing criterion is derived under this framework by using an operator ordering theorem introduced by us in [J. Phys. A. 33 (2000) 5607]. It is also generalized for multi-photon Bose operators of Brandt and Greenberg. Similarly, condition for higher order subpoissonian photon statistics is derived by normal ordering of higher powers of number operator. Further, with the help of simple density matrices, it is shown that the higher order antibunching (HOA) and higher order subpoissonian photon statistics (HOSPS) are not the manifestation of the same phenomenon and consequently it is incorrect to use the condition of HOA as a test of HOSPS. It is also shown that the HOA and HOSPS may exist even in absence of the corresponding lower order phenomenon. Binomial state, nonlinear first order excited squeezed state (NLESS) and nonlinear vacuum squeezed state (NLVSS) are used as examples of quantum state and it is shown that these states may show higher order nonclssical characteristics. It is observed that the Binomial state which is always antibunched, is not always higher order squeezed and NLVSS which shows higher order squeezing does not show HOSPS and HOA. The opposite is observed in NLESS and consequently it is established that the HOSPS and HOS are two independent signatures of higher order nonclassicality

Amit Verma; Anirban Pathak

2009-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

137

HIGHER EDUCATION FACILITIES MANAGEMENT: READY FOR INTERNATIONALIZATION?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The last ten years has seen dramatic growth in Facilities Management (FM) activities worldwide, including Malaysia. Facilities Management is responsible for coordinating all efforts related to planning, designing and managing physical structure...

Aizuddin, N.; Yahya, M.

138

Community College Responses to Calls for Higher Completion Rates: The Cases of Three Community Colleges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

would need time and energy to complete my dissertation in a timely manner. She has excused me from work for writing when deadlines loomed, and has excused occasionally brainless errors because she knew my mind was busy trying to rewrite a section... this goal (Moltz, 2010c, p. 2). In 2000, long before other states began focusing on completion, Texas introduced Closing the Gaps, aiming to increase certificate, associate, and bachelor degree completion to 210,000 by 2015. The initiative sets a...

Smock, Elizabeth Spencer

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

139

Growth and nucleation regimes in boron doped silicon by dynamical x-ray diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The oxygen precipitation of highly (17.5 m? cm) and moderately (4.5 ? cm) boron (B) doped silicon (Si) crystals at 780?C is investigated by following in-situ the evolution of diffraction Pendellsung oscillations. All samples show an initial diffusion-driven growth process which may change over into Ostwald ripening. For the highly doped sample and involving a nucleation step at 450?C for 30?h, the precipitate density ? is enhanced by a factor of 8 as compared to the moderately doped sample. The influence of a high B concentration on ? is dramatically higher for the samples directly heated to 780?C, where an enhancement factor of 80 is found. Considering Ostwald ripening as a second growth regime reveals consistent ripening rates and surface energies ? with those found at 900?C in a previous publication.

Will, J., E-mail: johannes.will@fau.de; Grschel, A.; Bergmann, C.; Weier, M.; Magerl, A. [Crystallography and Structural Physics, University of Erlangen-Nrnberg, Staudtstr. 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

Holographic Representation of Higher Spin Gauge Fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extending the results of \\cite{Heem}, \\cite{KLRS} on the holographic representation of local gauge field operators in anti de Sitter space, here we construct the bulk operators for higher spin gauge fields in the leading order of $\\frac{1}{N}$ expansion. Working in holographic gauge for higher spin gauge fields, we show that gauge field operators with integer spin $s>1$ can be represented by an integration over a ball region, which is the interior region of the spacelike bulk lightcone on the boundary. The construction is shown to be AdS-covariant up to gauge transformations, and the two-point function between higher spin gauge fields and boundary higher spin current exhibit singularities on both bulk and boundary lightcones. We also comment on possible extension to the level of three-point functions and carry out a causal construction for higher spin fields in de Sitter spacetime.

Debajyoti Sarkar; Xiao Xiao

2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher growth rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Fast and slow crystal growth kinetics in glass-forming melts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Published values of crystal growth rates are compared for supercooled glass-forming liquids undergoing congruent freezing at a planar crystal-liquid interface. For the purposes of comparison pure metals are considered to be glass-forming systems, using data from molecular-dynamics simulations. For each system, the growth rate has a maximum value U{sub max} at a temperature T{sub max} that lies between the glass-transition temperature T{sub g} and the melting temperature T{sub m}. A classification is suggested, based on the lability (specifically, the propensity for fast crystallization), of the liquid. High-lability systems show fast growth characterized by a high U{sub max}, a low T{sub max}?/?T{sub m}, and a very broad peak in U vs. T?/?T{sub m}. In contrast, systems showing slow growth have a low U{sub max}, a high T{sub max}?/?T{sub m}, and a sharp peak in U vs. T?/?T{sub m}. Despite the difference of more than 11 orders of magnitude in U{sub max} seen in pure metals and in silica, the range of glass-forming systems surveyed fit into a common pattern in which the lability increases with lower reduced glass-transition temperature (T{sub g}?/?T{sub m}) and higher fragility of the liquid. A single parameter, a linear combination of T{sub g}?/?T{sub m} and fragility, can show a good correlation with U{sub max}. For all the systems, growth at U{sub max} is coupled to the atomic/molecular mobility in the liquid. It is found that, across the diversity of glass-forming systems, T{sub max}?/?T{sub g} = 1.48 0.15.

Orava, J.; Greer, A. L., E-mail: alg13@cam.ac.uk [WPI-Advanced Institute for Materials Research (WPI-AIMR), Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577, Japan and Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, 27 Charles Babbage Road, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

2014-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

142

An Evolutionary Reduction Principle for Mutation Rates at Multiple Loci  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Evolutionary Reduction Principle for Mutation Rates at Multiple Loci Lee Altenberg altenber of the reduction principle is found: reduction results at individual loci combine topologically to produce to the reduction principle, and under fine tuning of mutation rates would be expected to have higher mutation rates

Altenberg, Lee

143

Higher levels of the transmon qubit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis discusses recent experimental work in measuring the properties of higher levels in transmon qubit systems. The first part includes a thorough overview of transmon devices, explaining the principles of the device ...

Bader, Samuel James

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Holographic Superconductors and Higher Curvature Corrections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study a fully backreacted holographic model of a four-dimensional superconductor by including a higher curvature interaction in the bulk action. We study how the critical temperature and the field theory condensate vary in this model and conclude that positive higher curvature couplings make the condensation harder. We also compute the conductivity, finding significant deviations from the conjectured universal frequency gap to critical temperature ratio.

Massimo Siani

2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

145

The Deng algorithm in higher dimensions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We extend an algorithm of Deng in spherically symmetric spacetimes to higher dimensions. We show that it is possible to integrate the generalised condition of pressure isotropy and generate exact solutions to the Einstein field equations for a shear-free cosmological model with heat flow in higher dimensions. Three new metrics are identified which contain results of four dimensions as special cases. We show graphically that the matter variables are well behaved and the speed of sound is causal.

Y. Nyonyi; S. D. Maharaj; K. S. Govinder

2014-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

146

Growth Versus Government Management Improvement During  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, we find that the growth rate of GDP per capita, g, decreases with p, and increases with DGCI. Further 33% of govern- ment employees has increased its GDP per capita by approximately 4% (corrected and Thermal Energy Science, School of Physical Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 200092, Shanghai

Podobnik, Boris

147

Solidification at the High and Low Rate Extreme  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The microstructures formed upon solidification are strongly influenced by the imposed growth rates on an alloy system. Depending on the characteristics of the solidification process, a wide range of growth rates is accessible. The prevailing solidification mechanisms, and thus the final microstructure of the alloy, are governed by these imposed growth rates. At the high rate extreme, for instance, one can have access to novel microstructures that are unattainable at low growth rates. While the low growth rates can be utilized for the study of the intrinsic growth behavior of a certain phase growing from the melt. Although the length scales associated with certain processes, such as capillarity, and the diffusion of heat and solute, are different at low and high rate extremes, the phenomena that govern the selection of a certain microstructural length scale or a growth mode are the same. Consequently, one can analyze the solidification phenomena at both high and low rates by using the same governing principles. In this study, we examined the microstructural control at both low and high extremes. For the high rate extreme, the formation of crystalline products and factors that control the microstructure during rapid solidification by free-jet melt spinning are examined in Fe-Si-B system. Particular attention was given to the behavior of the melt pool at different quench-wheel speeds. Since the solidification process takes place within the melt-pool that forms on the rotating quench-wheel, we examined the influence of melt-pool dynamics on nucleation and growth of crystalline solidification products and glass formation. High-speed imaging of the melt-pool, analysis of ribbon microstructure, and measurement of ribbon geometry and surface character all indicate upper and lower limits for melt-spinning rates for which nucleation can be avoided, and fully amorphous ribbons can be achieved. Comparison of the relevant time scales reveals that surface-controlled melt-pool oscillation may be the dominant factor governing the onset of unsteady thermal conditions accompanied by varying amounts of crystalline nucleation observed near the lower limit. At high quench-wheel velocities, the influence of these oscillations is minimal due to very short melt-pool residence times. However, microstructural evidence suggests that the entrapment of gas pockets at the wheel-metal interface plays a critical role in establishing the upper rate limit. An observed transition in wheel-side surface character with increasing melt-spinning rate supports this conclusion.

Halim Meco

2004-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

148

Effect of Process Parameters on Abnormal Grain Growth during Friction Stir Processing of a Cast Al Alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of process parameters and friction stir processing (FSP) run configurations on the stability of nugget microstructure at elevated temperatures were evaluated. Cast plates of an Al-7Si- 0.6Mg alloy were friction stir processed using a combination of tool rotation rates and tool traverse speeds. All single pass runs showed some extent of abnormal grain growth (AGG), whereas multi-pass runs were more resistant to AGG. Additionally, higher tool rpm was found to be beneficial for controlling AGG. These effects were analyzed by comparing the result of this work with other published results and AGG models.

Jana, Saumyadeep; Mishra, Rajiv S.; Baumann, John A.; Grant, Glenn J.

2010-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

149

An experimental study on the effects of compressive stress on the fatigue crack growth of low-alloy steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of fatigue crack growth rate tests was conducted in order to study effects of negative stress ratio on fatigue crack growth rate of low-alloy steel in air. Four-point bend specimens were used to simulate linear stress distributions typical of pressure vessel applications. This type of testing adds to knowledge on negative stress ratio effects for low-alloy steels obtained in the past from uniform tension-compression tests. Applied bending stress range was varied over twice the yield strength. Load control was used for tests for which the stress range was less than twice the yield strength and deflection control was used for the higher stress range tests. Crack geometries were both short and long fatigue cracks started at notches and tight fatigue cracks for which crack closure could occur over the full crack face. Results are presented in terms of the stress intensity factor ratio R = K{sub MIN}/K{sub MAX}. The negative R-ratio test results were correlated to an equation of the form da/dN = C[{Delta}K/(A-R)]{sup n}, where A, C, and n are curve fitting parameters. It was found that effects of negative R-ratio on fatigue crack growth rates for even the high stress range tests could be bounded by correlating the above equation to only positive R-ratio test results and extending the resulting equation into the negative R-ratio regime.

Jones, D.P.; Hoppe, R.G. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., West Mifflin, PA (United States). Bettis Atomic Power Lab.; Hechmer, J.L. [Babcock and Wilcox Co., Barberton, OH (United States); James, B.A. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Dept. of Metallurgy

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Heart Rate Artifact Suppression.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Motion artifact strongly corrupts heart rate measurements in current pulse oximetry systems. In many, almost any motion will greatly diminish the systems ability to extract (more)

Dickson, Christopher

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Residential Solar Valuation Rates  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Residential Solar Valuation Rates Karl R. Rbago Rbago Energy LLC 1 The Ideal Residential Solar Tariff Fair to the utility and non-solar customers Fair compensation to...

152

Effective Rate Period  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

charges or credits associated with the creation, termination, or modification to any tariff, contract, or rate schedule accepted or approved by the Federal Energy Regulatory...

153

LCC Guidance Rates  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Notepad text file provides the LCC guidance rates in a numbered format for the various regions throughout the U.S.

154

Release of extracellular ATP by bacteria during growth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

virulence locus by an ATP-sensing leader messenger RNA.between growth rate and ATP concentration in Escherichiafor available cellular ATP. J Biol Chem 2004, 279(9):8262

Mempin, Roberto; Tran, Helen; Chen, Connie; Gong, Hao; Kim Ho, Katharina; Lu, Sangwei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

affects growth chemotaxis: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plants and the Growth Rate, University of Kuopio, P.O. Box 1627, FIN-70211 Kuopio, Finland Cabbage, Brassica oleracea subsp. capitata (cv Reddy, Gadi VP 45 An agarose-based...

156

antibodies affect growth: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plants and the Growth Rate, University of Kuopio, P.O. Box 1627, FIN-70211 Kuopio, Finland Cabbage, Brassica oleracea subsp. capitata (cv Reddy, Gadi VP 26 Seven in Absentia...

157

Previous Power Rates (rates/current)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar Home DesignPresentations Presentations SortConferences PreviousRates

158

Power Rate Cases (pbl/rates)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006PhotovoltaicSeptember 22,ReactorAbout Power > FinancialPowerRates

159

Power Rates Announcements (pbl/rates)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006PhotovoltaicSeptember 22,ReactorAbout Power > FinancialPowerRates

160

Spinning particles and higher spin field equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Relativistic particles with higher spin can be described in first quantization using actions with local supersymmetry on the worldline. First, we present a brief review of these actions and their use in first quantization. In a Dirac quantization scheme the field equations emerge as Dirac constraints on the Hilbert space, and we outline how they lead to the description of higher spin fields in terms of the more standard Fronsdal-Labastida equations. Then, we describe how these actions can be extended so that the propagating particle is allowed to take different values of the spin, i.e. carry a reducible representation of the Poincar\\'e group. This way one may identify a four dimensional model that carries the same degrees of freedom of the minimal Vasiliev's interacting higher spin field theory. Extensions to massive particles and to propagation on (A)dS spaces are also briefly commented upon.

Bastianelli, Fiorenzo; Corradini, Olindo; Latini, Emanuele

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher growth rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

BLACK HOLE ENTROPY IN HIGHER CURVATURE GRAVITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss some recent results on black hole thermodynamics within the context of effective gravitational actions including higher-curvature interactions. Wald's derivation of the First Law demonstrates that black hole entropy can always be expressed as a local geometric density integrated over a space-like cross-section of the horizon. In certain cases, it can also be shown that these entropy expressions satisfy a Second Law. One such simple example is considered from the class of higher curvature theories where the Lagrangian consists of a polynomial in the Ricci scalar.

TED JACOBSON; GUNGWON KANG; ROBERT C. MYERS

1995-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

162

Thermalization with chemical potentials, and higher spin black holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the long time behaviour of local observables following a quantum quench in 1+1 dimensional conformal field theories possessing additional conserved charges besides the energy. We show that the expectation value of an arbitrary string of {\\it local} observables supported on a finite interval exponentially approaches an equilibrium value. The equilibrium is characterized by a temperature and chemical potentials defined in terms of the quenched state. For an infinite number of commuting conserved charges, the equilibrium ensemble is a generalized Gibbs ensemble (GGE). We compute the thermalization rate in a systematic perturbation in the chemical potentials, using a new technique to sum over an infinite number of Feynman diagrams. The above technique also allows us to compute relaxation times for thermal Green's functions in the presence of an arbitrary number of chemical potentials. In the context of a higher spin (hs[\\lambda]) holography, the partition function of the final equilibrium GGE is known to agree with that of a higher spin black hole. The thermalization rate from the CFT computed in our paper agrees with the quasinormal frequency of a scalar field in this black hole.

Gautam Mandal; Ritam Sinha; Nilakash Sorokhaibam

2015-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

163

Thermalization with chemical potentials, and higher spin black holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the long time behaviour of local observables following a quantum quench in 1+1 dimensional conformal field theories possessing additional conserved charges besides the energy. We show that the expectation value of an arbitrary string of {\\it local} observables supported on a finite interval exponentially approaches an equilibrium value. The equilibrium is characterized by a temperature and chemical potentials defined in terms of the quenched state. For an infinite number of commuting conserved charges, the equilibrium ensemble is a generalized Gibbs ensemble (GGE). We compute the thermalization rate in a systematic perturbation in the chemical potentials, using a new technique to sum over an infinite number of Feynman diagrams. The above technique also allows us to compute relaxation times for thermal Green's functions in the presence of an arbitrary number of chemical potentials. In the context of a higher spin (hs[\\lambda]) holography, the partition function of the final equilibrium GGE is known to agree with that of a higher spin black hole. The thermalization rate from the CFT computed in our paper agrees with the quasinormal frequency of a scalar field in this black hole.

Gautam Mandal; Ritam Sinha; Nilakash Sorokhaibam

2015-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

164

Sorghum Growth and Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sorghum is well adapted to Texas, and its ability to yield consistently makes it popular with growers. This publication discusses sorghum plant biology and growth....

Gerik, Tom; Bean, Brent W.; Vanderlip, Richard

2003-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

165

Strategic Growth Initiative (Michigan)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A joint venture between Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (MDARD) and the Michigan Economic Development Corporation (MEDC), the Strategic Growth Initiative Grant Program was...

166

Tomography increases key rates of quantum-key-distribution protocols  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We construct a practically implementable classical processing for the BB84 protocol and the six-state protocol that fully utilizes the accurate channel estimation method, which is also known as the quantum tomography. Our proposed processing yields at least as high key rate as the standard processing by Shor and Preskill. We show two examples of quantum channels over which the key rate of our proposed processing is strictly higher than the standard processing. In the second example, the BB84 protocol with our proposed processing yields a positive key rate even though the so-called error rate is higher than the 25% limit.

Shun Watanabe; Ryutaroh Matsumoto; Tomohiko Uyematsu

2008-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

167

Task and Machine Heterogeneities: Higher Moments Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Task and Machine Heterogeneities: Higher Moments Matter Abdulla M. Al-Qawasmeh 1 , Anthony A.potter}@colostate.edu jtsmith@digitalglobe.com Abstract - One type of heterogeneous computing (HC) systems consists of machines in this matrix represents the ETC of a specific task on a specific machine when executed exclusively. Heuristics

Maciejewski, Anthony A.

168

Higher Derivative D-brane Couplings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

supersymmetry. In the third part, we obtain the higher derivative D-brane action by using both linearized T-duality and string disc amplitude computation. We evaluate disc amplitude of one R-R field C^(p-3) and two NS-NS fields in the presence of a single Dp...

Guo, Guangyu

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

169

Dashboards in Higher UMACRAO/WACRAO Joint  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dashboards in Higher Education UMACRAO/WACRAO Joint Conference November 1-3, 2006 Phil Hull charts, pie charts and gauges are usually set in a portal-like environment that is often role for Short Term Decision Making Transactional Current, Unit Record Level Data Used for Daily Operational

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

170

Broadband, Higher Education and Rural New Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Broadband, Higher Education and Rural New Mexico Gil Gonzales, Ph.D., Chief Information Officer University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 E mail: gonzgil@unm.edu Background UNM students enjoy the country do. New Mexico is also home to two national laboratories in Los Alamos (Los Alamos National

Maccabe, Barney

171

Materials Science Under Extreme Conditions of Pressure and Strain Rate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. I. INTRODUCTION HIGH-STRAIN-RATE materials dynamics and solid-state experiments to much higher pressures, P 103 GPa (10 Mbar), on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser

Zhigilei, Leonid V.

172

Theoretical cosmic Type Ia supernova rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The aim of this work is the computation of the cosmic Type Ia supernova rates at very high redshifts (z>2). We adopt various progenitor models in order to predict the number of explosions in different scenarios for galaxy formation and to check whether it is possible to select the best delay time distribution model, on the basis of the available observations of Type Ia supernovae. We also computed the Type Ia supernova rate in typical elliptical galaxies of different initial luminous masses and the total amount of iron produced by Type Ia supernovae in each case. It emerges that: it is not easy to select the best delay time distribution scenario from the observational data and this is because the cosmic star formation rate dominates over the distribution function of the delay times; the monolithic collapse scenario predicts an increasing trend of the SN Ia rate at high redshifts whereas the predicted rate in the hierarchical scheme drops dramatically at high redshift; for the elliptical galaxies we note that the predicted maximum of the Type Ia supernova rate depends on the initial galactic mass. The maximum occurs earlier (at about 0.3 Gyr) in the most massive ellipticals, as a consequence of downsizing in star formation. We find that different delay time distributions predict different relations between the Type Ia supernova rate per unit mass at the present time and the color of the parent galaxies and that bluer ellipticals present higher supernova Type Ia rates at the present time.

R. Valiante; F. Matteucci; S. Recchi; F. Calura

2009-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

173

On Thermonuclear Reaction Rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear reactions govern major aspects of the chemical evolution od galaxies and stars. Analytic study of the reaction rates and reaction probability integrals is attempted here. Exact expressions for the reaction rates and reaction probability integrals for nuclear reactions in the case of nonresonant, modified nonresonant, screened nonresonant and resonant cases are given. These are expressed in terms of H-functions, G-functions and in computable series forms. Computational aspects are also discussed.

H. J. Haubold; A. M. Mathai

1996-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

174

Weathering rates of marble in laboratory and outdoor conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the modern urban atmosphere SO{sub 2} and NO{sub 2} attack calcite (CaCO{sub 3}) in marble exposed at rain-sheltered surfaces creating largely gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O) crusts that eventually exfoliate. In combination with CO{sub 2} these gases erode the marble at unsheltered surfaces. the authors report the development of mathematical models to predict the rate of growth of crust and the rate of surface recession. To determine the rate of growth of crust the kinetic rate constant, diffusion rate, and the order of reaction were determined by the application of the shrinking-core model applied to data generated in laboratory experiments. Based on these parameters /and average ambient levels of 10 parts per billion (ppb) SO{sub 2} and 25 ppb NO{sub 2} in Louisville, Ky., the rate of crust formation for this metro area was calculated to be 1.8 {micro}m in the first year. However, the rate of recession was modeled from data obtained by exposing marble slabs to rainfalls. A surface recession of 15 {micro}m/yr was calculated. The models predicted well the rate of growth of crust observed at several sites in Louisville and the predicted surface recession compared well with values reported in the literature.

Yerrapragada, S.S.; Chirra, S.R.; Jaynes, J.H.; Bandyopadhyay, J.K.; Gauri, K.L. [Univ of Louisville, KY (United States); Li, S. [Metro Services Lab., Louisville, KY (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Material dynamics under extreme conditions of pressure and strain rate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid state experiments at extreme pressures (10-100 GPa) and strain rates ({approx}10{sup 6}-10{sup 8}s{sup -1}) are being developed on high-energy laser facilities, and offer the possibility for exploring new regimes of materials science. These extreme solid-state conditions can be accessed with either shock loading or with a quasi-isentropic ramped pressure drive. Velocity interferometer measurements establish the high pressure conditions. Constitutive models for solid-state strength under these conditions are tested by comparing 2D continuum simulations with experiments measuring perturbation growth due to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in solid-state samples. Lattice compression, phase, and temperature are deduced from extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements, from which the shock-induced {alpha}-{omega} phase transition in Ti and the {alpha}-{var_epsilon} phase transition in Fe are inferred to occur on sub-nanosec time scales. Time resolved lattice response and phase can also be measured with dynamic x-ray diffraction measurements, where the elastic-plastic (1D-3D) lattice relaxation in shocked Cu is shown to occur promptly (< 1 ns). Subsequent large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations elucidate the microscopic dynamics that underlie the 3D lattice relaxation. Deformation mechanisms are identified by examining the residual microstructure in recovered samples. The slip-twinning threshold in single-crystal Cu shocked along the [001] direction is shown to occur at shock strengths of {approx}20 GPa, whereas the corresponding transition for Cu shocked along the [134] direction occurs at higher shock strengths. This slip-twinning threshold also depends on the stacking fault energy (SFE), being lower for low SFE materials. Designs have been developed for achieving much higher pressures, P > 1000 GPa, in the solid state on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser.

Remington, B A; Allen, P; Bringa, E; Hawreliak, J; Ho, D; Lorenz, K T; Lorenzana, H; Meyers, M A; Pollaine, S W; Rosolankova, K; Sadik, B; Schneider, M S; Swift, D; Wark, J; Yaakobi, B

2005-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

176

Why electric-power growth will not resume  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Basic structural changes now occurring in the US economy have irrevocably broken previously existing links between gross national product and the growth of sales of electricity. The author contends that the extent of the macroeconomic changes presently taking place are underestimated by many electric-utility planners and, as a result, forecasts projecting electricity growth rates about even with gross national product growth levels when the economy recovers are too high. The article states that electric-utility companies are entering an indefinite period of stagnant sales growth. But it closes on the positive note that electric-utility managements can take certain steps to make their businesses grow again. 8 figures.

Johnson, C.R.

1983-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

177

Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles. 2 figs.

Bauman, B.D.; Williams, M.A.; Bagheri, R.

1997-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

178

Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles.

Bauman, Bernard D. (Emmaus, PA); Williams, Mark A. (Souderton, PA); Bagheri, Reza (Bethlehem, PA)

1997-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

179

Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles.

McInnis, Edwin L. (Allentown, PA); Scharff, Robert P. (Louisville, KY); Bauman, Bernard D. (Emmaus, PA); Williams, Mark A. (Souderton, PA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles. 2 figures.

McInnis, E.L.; Scharff, R.P.; Bauman, B.D.; Williams, M.A.

1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher growth rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles.

McInnis, Edwin L. (Allentown, PA); Bauman, Bernard D. (Emmaus, PA); Williams, Mark A. (Souderton, PA)

1996-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

182

Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles. 2 figs.

McInnis, E.L.; Bauman, B.D.; Williams, M.A.

1996-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

183

CONTROLLED GROWTH OF CARBON NANOTUBES ON CONDUCTIVE METAL SUBSTRATES FOR ENERGY STORAGE APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The impressive mechanical and electronic properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) make them ideally suited for use in a variety of nanostructured devices, especially in the realm of energy production and storage. In particular, vertically-aligned CNT forests have been the focus of increasing investigation for use in supercapacitor electrodes and as hydrogen adsorption substrates. Vertically-aligned CNT growth was attempted on metal substrates by waterassisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD). CNT growth was catalyzed by iron-molybdenum (FeMo) nanoparticle catalysts synthesized by a colloidal method, which were then spin-coated onto Inconel foils. The substrates were loaded into a custom-built CVD apparatus, where CNT growth was initiated by heating the substrates to 750 C under the fl ow of He, H2, C2H4 and a controlled amount of water vapor. The resultant CNTs were characterized by a variety of methods including Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the growth parameters were varied in an attempt to optimize the purity and growth yield of the CNTs. The surface area and hydrogen adsorption characteristics of the CNTs were quantifi ed by the Brunauer- Emmett-Teller (BET) and Sieverts methods, and their capacitance was measured via cyclic voltammetry. While vertically-aligned CNT growth could not be verifi ed, TEM and SEM analysis indicated that CNT growth was still obtained, resulting in multiwalled CNTs of a wide range in diameter along with some amorphous carbon impurities. These microscopy fi ndings were reinforced by Raman spectroscopy, which resulted in a G/D ratio ranging from 1.5 to 3 across different samples, suggestive of multiwalled CNTs. Changes in gas fl ow rates and water concentration during CNT growth were not found to have a discernable effect on the purity of the CNTs. The specifi c capacitance of a CNT/FeMo/Inconel electrode was found to be 3.2 F/g, and the BET surface area of a characteristic CNT sample was measured to be 232 m2/g with a cryogenic (77K) hydrogen storage of 0.85 wt%. This level of hydrogen adsorption is slightly higher than that predicted by the Chahine rule, indicating that these CNTs may bind hydrogen more strongly than other carbonaceous materials. More work is needed to confi rm and determine the reason for increased hydrogen adsorption in these CNTs, and to test them for use as catalyst support networks. This study demonstrates the feasibility of producing CNTs for energy storage applications using water-assisted CVD.

Brown, P.; Engtrakul, C.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Rate Case Elements  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, andEpidermal Growth Factor. |

185

Rate Design and Renewables  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, andEpidermal Growth Factor. |INCIDENCE OF AN OIL

186

Rate Schedule CPP-2  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, andEpidermal Growth Factor. |INCIDENCE OF ANCPP-2

187

Rates and Repayment Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, andEpidermal Growth Factor.

188

Cast Stone Formulation At Higher Sodium Concentrations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium concentration in the salt solution reduced the time to peak heat flow, and reducing the amount of slag in the premix increased the time to peak heat flow. These observations may help to describe some of the cured properties of the samples, in particular the differences in compressive strength observed after 28 and 90 days of curing. Samples were cured for at least 28 days at ambient temperature in the laboratory prior to cured properties analyses. The low activity waste form for disposal at the Hanford Site is required to have a compressive strength of at least 500 psi. After 28 days of curing, several of the test mixes had mean compressive strengths that were below the 500 psi requirement. Higher sodium concentrations and higher water to premix ratios led to reduced compressive strength. Higher fly ash concentrations decreased the compressive strength after 28 days of curing. This may be explained in that the cementitious phases matured more quickly in the mixes with higher concentrations of slag, as evidenced by the data for the time to peak heat generation. All of the test mixes exhibited higher mean compressive strengths after 90 days of curing, with only one composition having a mean compressive strength of less than 500 psi. Leachability indices were determined for the test mixes for contaminants of interest. The leaching performance of the mixes evaluated in this study was not particularly sensitive to the factors used in the experimental design. This may be beneficial in demonstrating that the performance of the waste form is robust with respect to changes in the mix composition. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to achieve significantly higher waste loadings in Cast Stone and other low temperature, cementitious waste forms. Additional work is needed to elucidate the hydration mechanisms occurring in Cast Stone formulated with highly concentrated salt solutions since these reactions are responsible for determining the performance of the cured waste form. The thermal analyses completed in this study provide some preliminary insight, although the l

Fox, K. M.; Roberts, K. A.; Edwards, T. B.

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

189

Cast Stone Formulation At Higher Sodium Concentrations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium concentration in the salt solution reduced the time to peak heat flow, and reducing the amount of slag in the premix increased the time to peak heat flow. These observations may help to describe some of the cured properties of the samples, in particular the differences in compressive strength observed after 28 and 90 days of curing. Samples were cured for at least 28 days at ambient temperature in the laboratory prior to cured properties analyses. The low activity waste form for disposal at the Hanford Site is required to have a compressive strength of at least 500 psi. After 28 days of curing, several of the test mixes had mean compressive strengths that were below the 500 psi requirement. Higher sodium concentrations and higher water to premix ratios led to reduced compressive strength. Higher fly ash concentrations decreased the compressive strength after 28 days of curing. This may be explained in that the cementitious phases matured more quickly in the mixes with higher concentrations of slag, as evidenced by the data for the time to peak heat generation. All of the test mixes exhibited higher mean compressive strengths after 90 days of curing, with only one composition having a mean compressive strength of less than 500 psi. Leach indices were determined for the test mixes for contaminants of interest. The leaching performance of the mixes evaluated in this study was not particularly sensitive to the factors used in the experimental design. This may be beneficial in demonstrating that the performance of the waste form is robust with respect to changes in the mix composition. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to achieve significantly higher waste loadings in Cast Stone and other low temperature, cementitious waste forms. Additional work is needed to elucidate the hydration mechanisms occurring in Cast Stone formulated with highly concentrated salt solutions since these reactions are responsible for determining the performance of the cured waste form. The thermal analyses completed in this study provide some preliminary insight, although the limited

Fox, K. M.; Roberts, K. A.; Edwards, T. B.

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

190

Cast Stone Formulation At Higher Sodium Concentrations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium concentration in the salt solution reduced the time to peak heat flow, and reducing the amount of slag in the premix increased the time to peak heat flow. These observations may help to describe some of the cured properties of the samples, in particular the differences in compressive strength observed after 28 and 90 days of curing. Samples were cured for at least 28 days at ambient temperature in the laboratory prior to cured properties analyses. The low activity waste form for disposal at the Hanford Site is required to have a compressive strength of at least 500 psi. After 28 days of curing, several of the test mixes had mean compressive strengths that were below the 500 psi requirement. Higher sodium concentrations and higher water to premix ratios led to reduced compressive strength. Higher fly ash concentrations decreased the compressive strength after 28 days of curing. This may be explained in that the cementitious phases matured more quickly in the mixes with higher concentrations of slag, as evidenced by the data for the time to peak heat generation. All of the test mixes exhibited higher mean compressive strengths after 90 days of curing, with only one composition having a mean compressive strength of less than 500 psi. Leach indices were determined for the test mixes for contaminants of interest. The leaching performance of the mixes evaluated in this study was not particularly sensitive to the factors used in the experimental design. This may be beneficial in demonstrating that the performance of the waste form is robust with respect to changes in the mix composition. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to achieve significantly higher waste loadings in Cast Stone and other low temperature, cementitious waste forms. Additional work is needed to elucidate the hydration mechanisms occurring in Cast Stone formulated with highly concentrated salt solutions since these reactions are responsible for determining the performance of the cured waste form. The thermal analyses completed in this study provide some preliminary insight, although the limited

Fox, K. M.; Edwards, T. A.; Roberts, K. B.

2013-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

191

On conformal higher spin wave operators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze free conformal higher spin actions and the corresponding wave operators in arbitrary even dimensions and backgrounds. We show that the wave operators do not factorize in general, and identify the Weyl tensor and its derivatives as the obstruction to factorization. We give a manifestly factorized form for them on (A)dS backgrounds for arbitrary spin and on Einstein backgrounds for spin 2. We are also able to fix the conformal wave operator in d=4 for s=3 up to linear order in the Riemann tensor on generic Bach-flat backgrounds.

Teake Nutma; Massimo Taronna

2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

192

Improved Superlinks for Higher Spin Operators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Traditional smearing or blocking techniques serve well to increase the overlap of operators onto physical states but allow for links orientated only along lattice axes. Recent attempts to construct more general propagators have shown promise at resolving the higher spin states but still rely on iterative smearing. We present a new method of superlink construction which creates meared links from (sparse) matrix multiplications, allowing for gluonic propagation in arbitrary directions. As an application and example, we compute the positive-parity, even-spin glueball spectrum up to spin 6 for pure gauge SU(2) at beta = 6, L = 16, in D = 2+1 dimensions.

Robert W. Johnson

2007-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

193

A note on the higher Atiyah-Patodi-Singer index theorem on Galois coverings.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Let $\\Gamma$ be a finitely generated discrete group satisfying the rapid decay condition. We give a new proof of the higher Atiyah-Patodi-Singer theorem on a Galois $\\Gamma$-coverings, thus providing an explicit formula for the higher index associated to a group cocycle $c\\in Z^k (\\Gamma;\\mathbb{C})$ which is of polynomial growth with respect to a word-metric. Our new proof employs relative K-theory and relative cyclic cohomology in an essential way.

Alexander Gorokhovsky; Hitoshi Moriyoshi; Paolo Piazza

194

Thermalization with chemical potentials, and higher spin black holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the long time behaviour of local observables following a quantum quench in 1+1 dimensional conformal field theories possessing additional conserved charges besides the energy. We show that the expectation value of an arbitrary string of {\\it local} observables supported on a finite interval exponentially approaches an equilibrium value. The equilibrium is characterized by a temperature and chemical potentials defined in terms of the quenched state. For an infinite number of commuting conserved charges, the equilibrium ensemble is a generalized Gibbs ensemble (GGE). We compute the thermalization rate in a systematic perturbation in the chemical potentials, using a new technique to sum over an infinite number of Feynman diagrams. The above technique also allows us to compute relaxation times for thermal Green's functions in the presence of an arbitrary number of chemical potentials. In the context of a higher spin (hs[\\lambda]) holography, the partition function of the final equilibrium GGE is known to...

Mandal, Gautam; Sorokhaibam, Nilakash

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Modeling tin whisker growth.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tin, lead, and lead-tin solders are the most commonly used solders due to their low melting temperatures. However, due to the toxicity problems, lead must now be removed from solder materials. This has lead to the re-emergence of the issue of tin whisker growth. Tin whiskers are a microelectronic packaging issue because they can lead to shorts if they grow to sufficient length. However, the cause of tin whisker growth is still not well understood and there is lack of robust methods to determine when and if whiskering will be a problem. This report summarizes some of the leading theories on whisker growth and attempts to provide some ideas towards establishing the role microstructure plays in whisker growth.

Weinberger, Christopher Robert

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Planar elliptic growth  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The planar elliptic extension of the Laplacian growth is, after a proper parametrization, given in a form of a solution to the equation for areapreserving diffeomorphisms. The infinite set of conservation laws associated with such elliptic growth is interpreted in terms of potential theory, and the relations between two major forms of the elliptic growth are analyzed. The constants of integration for closed form solutions are identified as the singularities of the Schwarz function, which are located both inside and outside the moving contour. Well-posedness of the recovery of the elliptic operator governing the process from the continuum of interfaces parametrized by time is addressed and two examples of exact solutions of elliptic growth are presented.

Mineev, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Strategic Rate Design: The Role of Industrial Tariffs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

utilities have as a primary objective the goal of setting rates that fully reflect costs. Even within this constraint, alternative pricing mechanisms are available to allow the utility to engage in strategic rate design. For example, time-of-use rates... to the same MW made up of several smaller-sized units, the larger-sized contracts are charged at a higher rate. The rate for the energy charge depends on time of use and a liberal tilt of the capacity costs into the energy charge provides the customer a...

Rosenblum, J. I.; House, R.

198

Brief review on higher spin black holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review some relevant results in the context of higher spin black holes in three-dimensional spacetimes, focusing on their asymptotic behaviour and thermodynamic properties. For simplicity, we mainly discuss the case of gravity nonminimally coupled to spin-3 fields, being nonperturbatively described by a Chern-Simons theory of two independent sl(3,R) gauge fields. Since the analysis is particularly transparent in the Hamiltonian formalism, we provide a concise discussion of their basic aspects in this context; and as a warming up exercise, we briefly analyze the asymptotic behaviour of pure gravity, as well as the BTZ black hole and its thermodynamics, exclusively in terms of gauge fields. The discussion is then extended to the case of black holes endowed with higher spin fields, briefly signaling the agreements and discrepancies found through different approaches. We conclude explaining how the puzzles become resolved once the fall off of the fields is precisely specified and extended to include chemical potentials, in a way that it is compatible with the asymptotic symmetries. Hence, the global charges become completely identified in an unambiguous way, so that different sets of asymptotic conditions turn out to contain inequivalent classes of black hole solutions being characterized by a different set of global charges.

Alfredo Perez; David Tempo; Ricardo Troncoso

2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

199

FGF growth factor analogs  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the formula: ##STR00001## where R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, X, Y and Z are as defined, pharmaceutical compositions, coating compositions and medical devices including the fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the foregoing formula, and methods and uses thereof.

Zamora, Paul O. (Gaithersburg, MD); Pena, Louis A. (Poquott, NY); Lin, Xinhua (Plainview, NY); Takahashi, Kazuyuki (Germantown, MD)

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

200

E-Print Network 3.0 - accuracy rates obtained Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and branch lengths both increased with a higher substitution rate. For ... Source: Goldberg, Tony L. - Department of Pathobiological Sciences, University of Wisconsin at...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher growth rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Ashland puts emphasis on higher technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is reported that Ashland will be switching away from commodity-type petroleum projects, such as gasoline, and toward high-technology items, such as synthetic fuels, lubricants and speciality petrochemicals. New projects involved in the shift toward higher technology include a 5,000 bbl/day lubricating-oil plant at Rabigh, Saudi Arabia, the startup of the big new ethanol plant at South Point, Ohio, and the proposed $260 million acquisition of U.S. Filter. Ashland plans to sell some of the ethanol to be produced in the 3,500 bbl/day corn-based plant in Ohio, but will use the ethanol as an octane-boosting component in premium unleaded gasoline.

Not Available

1980-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

202

Naked Singularities in Higher Dimensional Gravitational Collapse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spherically symmetric inhomogeneous dust collapse has been studied in higher dimensional space-time and the factors responsible for the appearance of a naked singularity are analyzed in the region close to the centre for the marginally bound case. It is clearly demonstrated that in the former case naked singularities do not appear in the space-time having more than five dimension, which appears to a strong result. The non-marginally bound collapse is also examined in five dimensions and the role of shear in developing naked singularities in this space-time is discussed in details. The five dimensional space-time is chosen in the later case because we have exact solution in closed form only in five dimension and not in any other case.

Asit Banerjee; Ujjal Debnath; Subenoy Chakraborty

2003-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

203

Conformal higher-order viscoelastic fluid mechanics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a generally covariant formulation of conformal higher-order viscoelastic fluid mechanics with strain allowed to take arbitrarily large values. We give a general prescription to determine the dynamics of a relativistic viscoelastic fluid in a way consistent with the hypothesis of local thermodynamic equilibrium and the second law of thermodynamics. We then elaborately study the transient time scales at which the strain almost relaxes and becomes proportional to the gradients of velocity. We particularly show that a conformal second-order fluid with all possible parameters in the constitutive equations can be obtained without breaking the hypothesis of local thermodynamic equilibrium, if the conformal fluid is defined as the long time limit of a conformal second-order viscoelastic system. We also discuss how local thermodynamic equilibrium could be understood in the context of the fluid/gravity correspondence.

Masafumi Fukuma; Yuho Sakatani

2012-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

204

Entanglement entropy in higher derivative holography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider holographic entanglement entropy in higher derivative gravity theories. Recently Lewkowycz and Maldacena arXiv:1304.4926 have provided a method to derive the equations for the entangling surface from first principles. We use this method to compute the entangling surface in four derivative gravity. Certain interesting differences compared to the two derivative case are pointed out. For Gauss-Bonnet gravity, we show that in the regime where this method is applicable, the resulting equations coincide with proposals in the literature as well as with what follows from considerations of the stress tensor on the entangling surface. Finally we demonstrate that the area functional in Gauss-Bonnet holography arises as a counterterm needed to make the Euclidean action free of power law divergences.

Arpan Bhattacharyya; Apratim Kaviraj; Aninda Sinha

2013-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

205

Generalized Holographic Superconductors with Higher Derivative Couplings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce and study generalized holographic superconductors with higher derivative couplings between the field strength tensor and a complex scalar field, in four dimensional AdS black hole backgrounds. We study this theory in the probe limit, as well as with backreaction. There are multiple tuning parameters in the theory, and with two non-zero parameters, we show that the theory has a rich phase structure, and in particular, the transition from the normal to the superconducting phase can be tuned to be of first order or of second order within a window of one of these. This is established numerically as well as by computing the free energy of the boundary theory. We further present analytical results for the critical temperature of the model, and compare these with numerical analysis. Optical properties of this system are also studied numerically in the probe limit, and our results show evidence for negative refraction at low frequencies.

Anshuman Dey; Subhash Mahapatra; Tapobrata Sarkar

2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

206

QTL and Candidate Genes for Growth Traits in Pinus Taeda L  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reason for the project is to find the genetic factors which control growth at ages closer to commercial harvest (also known as QTL detection). To date, efforts to find genetic factors which control growth have been limited to seedlings. Because tree breeders want to find molecular markers which are linked to traits of direct economic value, finding linkage to factors controlling older-tree growth is more critical than seedling growth. Our current research interest includes both absolute height at ages 10-13 years but also growth trajectory or the rate of growth from seedling to half-rotation.

Claire G. Williams

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

10. China's Emergence, Real Exchange Rates, and Implications for East Asian Regional Trade and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10. China's Emergence, Real Exchange Rates, and Implications for East Asian Regional Trade arena is China, whose economic reforms have led it to record growth rates, dramatically accelerating results of sustained trade surpluses and managed exchange rate policies, China now holds the world

Kammen, Daniel M.

208

Ratios of heavy hadron semileptonic decay rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ratios of charmed meson and baryon semileptonic decay rates appear to be satisfactorily described by considering only the lowest-lying (S-wave) hadronic final states and assuming the kinematic factor describing phase space suppression is the same as that for free quarks. For example, the rate for $D_s$ semileptonic decay is known to be $(17.0 \\pm 5.3)%$ lower than those for $D^0$ or $D^+$, and the model accounts for this difference. When applied to hadrons containing $b$ quarks, this method implies that the $B_s$ semileptonic decay rate is about 1% higher than that of the nonstrange $B$ mesons. This small difference thus suggests surprisingly good local quark-hadron duality for $B$ semileptonic decays, complementing the expectation based on inclusive quark-hadron duality that these differences in rates should not exceed a few tenths of a percent. For $\\Lambda_b$ semileptonic decay, however, the inclusive rate is predicted to be about 13% greater than that of the nonstrange $B$ mesons. This value, representing a considerable departure from a calculation using a heavy quark expansion, is close to the corresponding experimental ratio $\\Gamma(\\Lambda_b)/ \\bar \\Gamma(B) = 1.13 \\pm 0.03$ of total decay rates.

Michael Gronau; Jonathan L. Rosner

2010-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

209

Short GRBs: Rates and luminosity function implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compare the luminosity function and rate inferred from the BATSE short hard bursts (SHBs) peak flux distribution with the redshift and luminosity distributions of SHBs observed by Swift/HETE II. The Swift/HETE II SHB sample is incompatible with SHB population that follows the star formation rate. However, it is compatible with a distribution of delay times after the SFR. This would be the case if SHBs are associated with the mergers of double neutron star (DNS) systems. DNS may be ``primordial'' or can form dynamically by binary exchange interaction in globular clusters during core collapse. The implied SHB rates that we find range from \\sim 8 to \\sim 30h_(70)^3 Gpc^(-3)yr^(-1). This rate is a much higher than what was previously estimated and, when beaming is taken into account, it is comparable to the rate of neutron star mergers estimated from statistics of binary pulsars. If GRBs are produced in mergers the implied rate practically guarantees detection by LIGO II and possibly even by LIGO I.

Dafne Guetta

2006-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

210

Critical reaction rates in hypersonic combustion chemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High Mach number flight requires that the scramjet propulsion system operate at a relatively low static inlet pressure and a high inlet temperature. These two constraints can lead to extremely high temperatures in the combustor, yielding high densities of radical species and correspondingly poor chemical combustion efficiency. As the temperature drops in the nozzle expansion, recombination of these excess radicals can produce more product species, higher heat yield, and potentially more thrust. The extent to which the chemical efficiency can be enhanced in the nozzle expansion depends directly on the rate of the radical recombination reactions. A comprehensive assessment of the important chemical processes and an experimental validation of the critical rate parameters is therefore required if accurate predictions of scramjet performance are to be obtained. This report covers the identification of critical reactions, and the critical reaction rates in hypersonic combustion chemistry. 4 refs., 2 figs.

Oldenborg, R.C.; Harradine, D.M.; Loge, G.W.; Lyman, J.L.; Schott, G.L.; Winn, K.R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Graduate Kentucky Metropolitan Rate Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graduate Kentucky Metropolitan Rate Application REGISTRAR'S OFFICE University of Cincinnati PO Box Kentucky counties are able to attend UC at an established metropolitan tuition rate. Non Kentucky residency, these students are not eligible for the graduate metropolitan rate. Kentucky counties

Franco, John

212

Optimizing Architectural and Structural Aspects of Buildings towards Higher Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. INTRODUCTION The continuous rising of energy consumption is a current and global concern. On the one hand for the most important energy consumption rate, estimated at around 40% of the total energy used worldwideOptimizing Architectural and Structural Aspects of Buildings towards Higher Energy Efficiency

Boyer, Edmond

213

Rates and Repayment Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising Science for1PrincipalRare Iron Oxide in AncientRates and

214

Rates and Repayment Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising Science for1PrincipalRare Iron Oxide in AncientRates

215

BCP Annual Rate Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience Program CumulusA t i o nLiquids Reserve2015 BCP Annual Rate

216

Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy Density Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy Density 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and...

217

Recovery Act: Wind Energy Consortia between Institutions of Higher...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Recovery Act: Wind Energy Consortia between Institutions of Higher Learning and Industry Recovery Act: Wind Energy Consortia between Institutions of Higher Learning and Industry A...

218

african higher education: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

counterfactual Danforth, Bryan Nicholas 134 Application for Higher Education Internship City: Zip Code Mathematics Websites Summary: Application for Higher Education Internship...

219

Research District Seeing Growth  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monthly economic diversity column for the Tri-City Herald (May 2012) - excerpt follows: Its been a while since Ive updated you on the Tri-Cities Research District, most certainly not for lack of new activity over the past several months. In fact, much has happened, and theres more to come. I think many of us see new land development and construction as indicative of current or impending economic growth. So those of you who have ventured into North Richland either via Stevens Drive or George Washington Way lately have probably begun sensing and anticipating that such growth is afoot.

Madison, Alison L.

2012-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

220

Modelling of InGaP nanowires morphology and composition on molecular beam epitaxy growth conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An analytical kinetic model has been developed within this framework to describe the growth of ternary III-V semiconductor nanowires. The key to apply the model is to divide the ternary system into two separate binary systems and model each binary system separately. The model is used to describe the growth of InGaP nanowires. The growth conditions were varied among several samples, and the model was able to predict the temperature and growth rate behaviors. The model predicts the axial and radial elemental distribution along the nanowires and the dependence of the elemental distribution on the nanowire's diameter size for all growth rates. The model reveals the limitations of In incorporation into the nanowires for high temperatures or low growth rates and the effects of the group-V elements on the In incorporation.

Fakhr, A., E-mail: fakhrad@mcmaster.ca; Haddara, Y. M. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1 (Canada)

2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher growth rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Electromagnetic Casimir piston in higher dimensional spacetimes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the Casimir effect of the electromagnetic field in a higher dimensional spacetime of the form $M\\times \\mathcal{N}$, where $M$ is the 4-dimensional Minkowski spacetime and $\\mathcal{N}$ is an $n$-dimensional compact manifold. The Casimir force acting on a planar piston that can move freely inside a closed cylinder with the same cross section is investigated. Different combinations of perfectly conducting boundary conditions and infinitely permeable boundary conditions are imposed on the cylinder and the piston. It is verified that if the piston and the cylinder have the same boundary conditions, the piston is always going to be pulled towards the closer end of the cylinder. However, if the piston and the cylinder have different boundary conditions, the piston is always going to be pushed to the middle of the cylinder. By taking the limit where one end of the cylinder tends to infinity, one obtains the Casimir force acting between two parallel plates inside an infinitely long cylinder. The asymptotic behavior of this Casimir force in the high temperature regime and the low temperature regime are investigated for the case where the cross section of the cylinder in $M$ is large. It is found that if the separation between the plates is much smaller than the size of $\\mathcal{N}$, the leading term of the Casimir force is the same as the Casimir force on a pair of large parallel plates in the $(4+n)$-dimensional Minkowski spacetime. However, if the size of $\\mathcal{N}$ is much smaller than the separation between the plates, the leading term of the Casimir force is $1+h/2$ times the Casimir force on a pair of large parallel plates in the 4-dimensional Minkowski spacetime, where $h$ is the first Betti number of $\\mathcal{N}$. In the limit the manifold $\\mathcal{N}$ vanishes, one does not obtain the Casimir force in the 4-dimensional Minkowski spacetime if $h$ is nonzero.

L. P. Teo

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

222

Arch.Hydrobiol. 167 1-4 467-487 Stuttgart.September2006 Stoichiometry and growth kinetics in the "smallest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

growth rate is predicted to vary with both food quantity and quality (in terms of nutrient element). The rate at which consumers produce new biomass through growth and reproduction is then simply related in stored nutrients, in terms of both identity and quantity, and their subsequent use in growth

Chrzanowski, Thomas H.

223

Energy Management Through Innovative Rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of energy efficiency in the industrial sector and specific rate design alternatives for doing so....

Williams, M. L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Kinetics of monolayer graphene growth by segregation on Pd(111)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using in situ low-energy electron microscopy and density functional theory calculations, we follow the growth of monolayer graphene on Pd(111) via surface segregation of bulk-dissolved carbon. Upon lowering the substrate temperature, nucleation of graphene begins on graphene-free Pd surface and continues to occur during graphene growth. Measurements of graphene growth rates and Pd surface work functions establish that this continued nucleation is due to increasing C adatom concentration on the Pd surface with time. We attribute this anomalous phenomenon to a large barrier for attachment of C adatoms to graphene coupled with a strong binding of the non-graphitic C to the Pd surface.

Mok, H. S.; Murata, Y.; Kodambaka, S., E-mail: kodambaka@ucla.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Ebnonnasir, A.; Ciobanu, C. V. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science Program, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Nie, S.; McCarty, K. F. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

225

ORIGINAL PAPER Determining the rate of change in a mixed deciduous forest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, growth, and mortality rate of the different species. Moreover, the type, frequen- cy, and intensity of the disturbance, e.g., wind, fire, avalanches, or flooding and the sensitivity of the present trees

Boyer, Edmond

226

Real-time variable rate Pix application system using a plant height sensor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this study was to develop a chemical application system that could measure plant size, determine the optimum chemical rate to apply and control that application. A plant height sensor, the MEPRT growth relationship software...

Beck, Andy Dwayne

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

227

Effects of Temperature on Rates of Herbivory and Predation: Consequences for a Trophic Cascade?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Undergraduates Program Cold Water and Kelp Growth ·Cold water upwelling associated with increased kelp growth- controlled rooms at 10°C and 15°C ·Measurement of grazing rates on giant kelp, Macrocystis ·Two trials, each, Strongylocentrotus Kelp crab, Pugettia Brown turban snail, Tegula Methods Water bath chilled to 10°C Tanks

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

228

Structural Change, the Real Exchange Rate, and the Balance of Payments Constraint in Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structural Change, the Real Exchange Rate, and the Balance of Payments Constraint in Mexico Carlos of a model of balance-of-payments-constrained growth for Mexico, with disaggregated exports (manufactured for the slowdown in Mexico's actual growth during the early phase of trade liberalization and macro stabilization

Lansky, Joshua

229

Water-Splitting Photoelectrolysis Reaction Rate via Microscopic Imaging of Evolved Oxygen Bubbles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to directly split water in a semiconductor photoelectrochemical cell is a promising source of carbon-free fuel Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA Bubble formation and growth on a water of the gas-evolving reaction rate. Optical microscopy was used to record the bubble growth on single

Atwater, Harry

230

Nanoparticle growth Controlled Growth of Platinum Nanoparticles on Strontium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanoparticle growth Controlled Growth of Platinum Nanoparticles on Strontium Titanate Nanocubes nanoparticles platinum strontium titanate X-ray analysis 750 ? 2009 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGa

Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R.

231

Higher Order Squeezing and Higher Order Subpoissonian Photon Statistics in Intermediate States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recently simpler criteria for the Hong-Mandel higher order squeezing (HOS) and higher order subpossonian photon statistics (HOSPS) are provided by us [Phys. Lett. A 374 (2010) 1009]. Here we have used these simplified criteria to study the possibilities of observing HOSPS and HOS in different intermediate states, such as generalized binomial state, hypergeometric state, negative binomial state and photon added coherent state. It is shown that these states may satisfy the condition of HOS and HOSPS. It is also shown that the depth and region of nonclassicality can be controlled by controlling various parameters related to intermediate states. Further, we have analyzed the mutual relationship between different signatures of higher order nonclassicality with reference to these intermediate states. We have observed that the generalized binomial state may show signature of HOSPS in absence of HOS. Earlier we have shown that NLVSS shows HOS in absence of HOSPS. Consequently it is established that the HOSPS and HOS of same order are independent phenomenon.

Amit Verma; Anirban Pathak

2010-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

232

Was Brazil's recent growth acceleration the world's most overrated boom?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lower revenue on one side and higher bad debt charges on the other. (http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/d208d83c-2769-11e2-abcb-00144feabdc0. html#axzz2BWN 3I99x). The difficulty in sustaining periods of productivity growth is also evident in the four Latin...

Palma, Jose Gabriel

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Extractive Economies, Growth, and the Poor Graham A. Davis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, poverty, or per capita gross domestic product (GDP) relative to the level of that same indicator in a group of peer economies; and their growth in human devel- opment, poverty, or per capita GDP relative development. Some stud- ies find that mineral- and energy-intensive economies have higher levels of develop

234

Promoting Sustainable Economic Growth in Mexico (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mexico is the second largest economy in Latin America, with rapid growth occurring in the industrial and services sectors. A forward-thinking country on climate change, the nation recognizes that the threat of higher temperatures, changes in precipitation patterns, and more frequent weather-related disasters could pose a substantial risk to its expanding economy.

Watson, A.; Butheau, M.; Sandor, D.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

National Utility Rate Database: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When modeling solar energy technologies and other distributed energy systems, using high-quality expansive electricity rates is essential. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a utility rate platform for entering, storing, updating, and accessing a large collection of utility rates from around the United States. This utility rate platform lives on the Open Energy Information (OpenEI) website, OpenEI.org, allowing the data to be programmatically accessed from a web browser, using an application programming interface (API). The semantic-based utility rate platform currently has record of 1,885 utility rates and covers over 85% of the electricity consumption in the United States.

Ong, S.; McKeel, R.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Feedbacks between inundation, root production, and shoot growth in a rapidly submerging brackish marsh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. To understand the relationships between sea level rise and marsh survival, we measured root and shoot growth at low sea level rise rates), we propose that an acceleration in the rate of sea level rise will lead at rapid sea level rise rates and/or low sediment supply), increases in the water level will lead

Newman, Michael C.

237

Binary Capture Rates for Massive Protostars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The high multiplicity of massive stars in dense, young clusters is established early in their evolution. The mechanism behind this remains unresolved. Recent results suggest that massive protostars may capture companions through disk interactions with much higher efficiency than their solar mass counterparts. However, this conclusion is based on analytic determinations of capture rates and estimates of the robustness of the resulting binaries. We present the results of coupled n-body and SPH simulations of star-disk encounters to further test the idea that disk-captured binaries contribute to the observed multiplicity of massive stars.

Nickolas Moeckel; John Bally

2007-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

238

A general higher-order remap algorithm for ALE calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A numerical technique for solving the equations of fluid dynamics with arbitrary mesh motion is presented. The three phases of the Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) methodology are outlined: the Lagrangian phase, grid relaxation phase and remap phase. The Lagrangian phase follows a well known approach from the HEMP code; in addition the strain rate andflow divergence are calculated in a consistent manner according to Margolin. A donor cell method from the SALE code forms the basis of the remap step, but unlike SALE a higher order correction based on monotone gradients is also added to the remap. Four test problems were explored to evaluate the fidelity of these numerical techniques, as implemented in a simple test code, written in the C programming language, called Cercion. Novel cell-centered data structures are used in Cercion to reduce the complexity of the programming and maximize the efficiency of memory usage. The locations of the shock and contact discontinuity in the Riemann shock tube problem are well captured. Cercion demonstrates a high degree of symmetry when calculating the Sedov blast wave solution, with a peak density at the shock front that is similar to the value determined by the RAGE code. For a flyer plate test problem both Cercion and FLAG give virtually the same velocity temporal profile at the target-vacuum interface. When calculating a cylindrical implosion of a steel shell, Cercion and FLAG agree well and the Cercion results are insensitive to the use of ALE.

Chiravalle, Vincent P [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

239

Small Enterprise Growth Fund (Maine)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Small Enterprise Growth Fund is a professionally-managed venture capital fund that invests in Maine companies which demonstrate high potential for growth and public benefit. The fund has...

240

2007 Wholesale Power Rate Case Initial Proposal : Wholesale Power Rate Development Study.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Wholesale Power Rate Development Study (WPRDS) calculates BPA proposed rates based on information either developed in the WPRDS or supplied by the other studies that comprise the BPA rate proposal. All of these studies, and accompanying documentation, provide the details of computations and assumptions. In general, information about loads and resources is provided by the Load Resource Study (LRS), WP-07-E-BPA-01, and the LRS Documentation, WP-07-E-BPA-01A. Revenue requirements information, as well as the Planned Net Revenues for Risk (PNNR), is provided in the Revenue Requirement Study, WP-07-E-BPA-02, and its accompanying Revenue Requirement Study Documentation, WP-07-E-BPA-02A and WP-07-E-BPA-02B. The Market Price Forecast Study (MPFS), WP-07-E-BPA-03, and the MPFS Documentation, WP-07-E-BPA-03A, provide the WPRDS with information regarding seasonal and diurnal differentiation of energy rates, as well information regarding monthly market prices for Demand Rates. In addition, this study provides information for the pricing of unbundled power products. The Risk Analysis Study, WP-07-E-BPA-04, and the Risk Analysis Study Documentation, WP-07-E-BPA-04A, provide short-term balancing purchases as well as secondary energy sales and revenue. The Section 7(b)(2) Rate Test Study, WP-07-E-BPA-06, and the Section 7(b)(2) Rate Test Study Documentation, WP-07-E-BPA-06A, implement Section 7(b)(2) of the Northwest Power Act to ensure that BPA preference customers firm power rates applied to their general requirements are no higher than rates calculated using specific assumptions in the Northwest Power Act.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher growth rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Economic Growth, Poverty and Inequality: Indian Experience of Reforms and Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economic Growth, Poverty and Inequality: Indian Experience of Reforms and Development Panchanan Das economy since the 1970s has affected the incidence of poverty at the regional level and income suggest that the faster economic growth causes higher incidence of poverty and inequality. Income

Krivobokova, Tatyana

242

Method for accurate growth of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

We report a method for accurate growth of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs). The method uses a single reflectivity spectrum measurement to determine the structure of the partially completed VCSEL at a critical point of growth. This information, along with the extracted growth rates, allows imprecisions in growth parameters to be compensated for during growth of the remaining structure, which can then be completed with very accurate critical dimensions. Using this method, we can now routinely grow lasing VCSELs with Fabry-Perot cavity resonance wavelengths controlled to within 0.5%.

Chalmers, Scott A. (Albuquerque, NM); Killeen, Kevin P. (Albuquerque, NM); Lear, Kevin L. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Method for accurate growth of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The authors report a method for accurate growth of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs). The method uses a single reflectivity spectrum measurement to determine the structure of the partially completed VCSEL at a critical point of growth. This information, along with the extracted growth rates, allows imprecisions in growth parameters to be compensated for during growth of the remaining structure, which can then be completed with very accurate critical dimensions. Using this method, they can now routinely grow lasing VCSELs with Fabry-Perot cavity resonance wavelengths controlled to within 0.5%. 4 figs.

Chalmers, S.A.; Killeen, K.P.; Lear, K.L.

1995-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

244

High rate pulse processing algorithms for microcalorimeters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been demonstrated that microcalorimeter spectrometers based on superconducting transition-edge-sensor can readily achieve sub-100 eV energy resolution near 100 keV. However, the active volume of a single microcalorimeter has to be small to maintain good energy resolution, and pulse decay times are normally in the order of milliseconds due to slow thermal relaxation. Consequently, spectrometers are typically built with an array of microcalorimeters to increase detection efficiency and count rate. Large arrays, however, require as much pulse processing as possible to be performed at the front end of the readout electronics to avoid transferring large amounts of waveform data to a host computer for processing. In this paper, they present digital filtering algorithms for processing microcalorimeter pulses in real time at high count rates. The goal for these algorithms, which are being implemented in the readout electronics that they are also currently developing, is to achieve sufficiently good energy resolution for most applications while being (a) simple enough to be implemented in the readout electronics and (b) capable of processing overlapping pulses and thus achieving much higher output count rates than the rates that existing algorithms are currently achieving. Details of these algorithms are presented, and their performance was compared to that of the 'optimal filter' that is the dominant pulse processing algorithm in the cryogenic-detector community.

Rabin, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hoover, Andrew S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bacrania, Mnesh K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tan, Hui [XIA-LLC; Breus, Dimitry [XIA-LLC; Henning, Wolfgang [XIA-LLC; Sabourov, Konstantin [XIA-LLC; Collins, Jeff [XAI-LLC; Warburton, William K [XIA-LLC; Dorise, Bertrand [NIST; Ullom, Joel N [NIST; [NON LANL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

2007 Wholesale Power Rate Schedules : 2007 General Rate Schedule Provisions.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This schedule is available for the contract purchase of Firm Power to be used within the Pacific Northwest (PNW). Priority Firm (PF) Power may be purchased by public bodies, cooperatives, and Federal agencies for resale to ultimate consumers, for direct consumption, and for Construction, Test and Start-Up, and Station Service. Rates in this schedule are in effect beginning October 1, 2006, and apply to purchases under requirements Firm Power sales contracts for a three-year period. The Slice Product is only available for public bodies and cooperatives who have signed Slice contracts for the FY 2002-2011 period. Utilities participating in the Residential Exchange Program (REP) under Section 5(c) of the Northwest Power Act may purchase Priority Firm Power pursuant to the Residential Exchange Program. Rates under contracts that contain charges that escalate based on BPA's Priority Firm Power rates shall be based on the three-year rates listed in this rate schedule in addition to applicable transmission charges. This rate schedule supersedes the PF-02 rate schedule, which went into effect October 1, 2001. Sales under the PF-07 rate schedule are subject to BPA's 2007 General Rate Schedule Provisions (2007 GRSPs). Products available under this rate schedule are defined in the 2007 GRSPs. For sales under this rate schedule, bills shall be rendered and payments due pursuant to BPA's 2007 GRSPs and billing process.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

The critical role of growth temperature on the structural and electrical properties of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor heterostructures grown on Si(111)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work is dedicated to the study of the growth by ammonia source molecular beam epitaxy of Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N/GaN high electron mobility transistors on (111) oriented silicon substrates. The effect of growth conditions on the structural and electrical properties of the heterostructures was investigated. It is shown that even a slight variation in the growth temperature of the thick GaN buffer on AlN/GaN stress mitigating layers has a drastic influence on these properties via a counterintuitive effect on the dislocation density. Both in situ curvature measurements and ex situ transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction experiments indicate that the relaxation rate of the lattice mismatch stress increases with the growth temperature but finally results in a higher dislocations density. Furthermore, a general trend appears between the final wafer curvature at room temperature and the threading dislocation density. Finally, the influence of the dislocation density on the GaN buffer insulating properties and the two-dimensional electron gas transport properties at the Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N/GaN interface is discussed.

Baron, N. [CRHEA-CNRS, rue Bernard Gregory, Parc de Sophia Antipolis, 06560 Valbonne (France); PICOGIGA International, Place Marcel Rebuffat, Parc de Villejust, 91971 Courtaboeuf (France); Cordier, Y.; Chenot, S.; Vennegues, P.; Tottereau, O.; Leroux, M.; Semond, F.; Massies, J. [CRHEA-CNRS, rue Bernard Gregory, Parc de Sophia Antipolis, 06560 Valbonne (France)

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

UPGRADING THE CEBAF INJECTOR WITH A NEW BOOSTER, HIGHER VOLTAGE GUN, AND HIGHER FINAL ENERGY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) accelerator at Jefferson Lab will be upgraded from 6 GeV to 12 GeV in the next few years. To meet the requirement of the new machine and to take the opportunity to improve the beam quality, the CEBAF injector will be upgraded with a higher voltage gun, a new booster, and a new accelerating RF module. The CEBAF injector creates and accelerates three beams at different currents simultaneously. The beams are interleaved, each at one third of the RF frequency, traveling through the same beam line. The higher voltage gun will lower the space charge effects. The new booster with optimized beam dynamics will complete the bunching process and provide initial acceleration matched to the new gun voltage. Using our latest SRF design, the new booster has significantly lower x/y coupling effects that should improve our beam setup and operation for the highly sensitive parity experiments scheduled for the CEBAF's future. Finally, the new accelerating RF module will roughly double the injector final energy to match the rest of the 12 GeV accelerator. In this paper we will provide more detail about this upgrade.

Reza Kazimi, Arne Freyberger, Alicia Hofler, Andrew Hutton, Fay Hannon

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy Density Exceeding 500WhL Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy Density Exceeding 500WhL 2012 DOE...

249

Logical Effort of Higher Valency Adders David Harris  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Logical Effort of Higher Valency Adders David Harris Harvey Mudd College 301 E. Twelfth St. Claremont, CA 91711 David_Harris@hmc.edu Abstract ­ Higher valency parallel prefix adders reduce the number

Harris, David Money

250

Growth curve analysis of Rambouillet ewes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for this study. However, most of the results were reported for 152 observations; a subset of the 283 records that contained the smst complete set of weighted' Type of birth and rearing was the single most significant source of variation for preweaning body... weights and growth rates. Estimation of mature weight obtained for 184 records was 59. 6 + . 77 kilograms. Based upon analysis of yearly weights, ewes had reached maturity by 42 months of age. Birth and 120-day weight were lower than those reported...

Mathenge, James Mwai

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Higher order antibunching is not a rare phenomenon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since the introduction of higher order nonclassical effects, higher order squeezing has been reported in a number of different physical systems but higher order antibunching is predicted only in three particular cases. In the present work, we have shown that the higher order antibunching is not a rare phenomenon rather it can be seen in many simple optical processes. To establish our claim, we have shown it in six wave mixing process, four wave mixing process and in second harmonic generation process.

Prakash Gupta; Pratap Narayan Pandey; Anirban Pathak

2005-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

252

The Inverted Block Rate:The Inverted Block Rate: An Alternative to Flat Rate BillingAn Alternative to Flat Rate Billing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Inverted Block Rate:The Inverted Block Rate: An Alternative to Flat Rate BillingAn Alternative;Inverted Block RateInverted Block Rate 22 IntroductionIntroduction ·· Modern societies rely on electrical collectionMetering and Rate Models facilitate collection #12;Inverted Block RateInverted Block Rate 33 Rate

Hughes, Larry

253

Quantum Gravity in Three Dimensions from Higher-Spin Holography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Higher Spin Anti-de Sitter Gravity, JHEP 1012, 007 (2010)gravity in three dimensions from the per- spective of higher-spin holography in anti-gravity in three dimen- sions in the framework of higher-spin holography in anti-

Tan, Hai Siong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Fresh Water Increased temperature means higher proportion of water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fresh Water Increased temperature means higher proportion of water falling on surface higher evaporation higher rainfall greater intensity of floods and droughts. Water use has grown four on How much storage compared to average flow Demand as percentage of supply How much ground water is used

Houston, Paul L.

255

Regional companies eye growth  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising ScienceRecentRegional companies eye growth Regional

256

Growth, microstructure, and luminescent  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky LearningGetGraphene'sEMSL barium oxideGrowth,

257

Supporting Photovoltaics in Market-Rate Residential New Construction: A Summary of Programmatic Experience to Date and Lessons Learned  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Renewable Energy Pass-Through of Incentives to thefor Renewable Energy program offered a higher incentive rateRenewable Energy Program, which provides buy-down incentives

Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Exponential growth, energetic Hubbert cycles, and the advancement of technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

peak as of this writing in April 2008. The multi-Hubbert cycle analysis of oil and gas production exponentially in the near future, given the declining oil and gas produc- tion rates and the high prices of bothExponential growth, energetic Hubbert cycles, and the advancement of technology Tad W. Patzek

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

259

Decelerating growth in tropical forest trees Kenneth J. Feeley,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

significantly at both forests regardless of initial size or organizational level (species, community or stand poorly understood. We examined changes in tree growth rates over the past two decades for all species productivity caused by rising concentrations of atmospheric CO2 and carbon fertilization (Melillo et al. 1993

Bermingham, Eldredge

260

The effects of NH4 on growth, resource  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Phragmites australis and Glyceria maxima Edita Tylova-Munzarova a,*, Bent Lorenzen b , Hans Brix b , Olga kinetics of two common helophytes Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steudel and Glyceria maxima (Hartm of 34 mM the growth rate of Phragmites was not affected by the N form (mean RGR = 35.4 mg g?1 d?1

Brix, Hans

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher growth rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Spherical collapse of a heat conducting fluid in higher dimensions without horizon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a scenario where the interior spacetime,described by a heat conducting fluid sphere is matched to a Vaidya metric in higher dimensions.Interestingly we get a class of solutions, where following heat radiation the boundary surface collapses without the appearance of an event horizon at any stage and this happens with reasonable properties of matter field.The non-occurrence of a horizon is due to the fact that the rate of mass loss exactly counterbalanced by the fall of boundary radius.Evidently this poses a counter example to the so-called cosmic censorship hypothesis.Two explicit examples of this class of solutions are also given and it is observed that the rate of collapse is delayed with the introduction of extra dimensions.The work extends to higher dimensions our previous investigation in 4D.

A. banerjee; S. Chatterjee

2004-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

262

On higher derivatives in 3D gravity and higher-spin gauge theories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The general second-order massive field equations for arbitrary positive integer spin in three spacetime dimensions, and their 'self-dual' limit to first-order equations, are shown to be equivalent to gauge-invariant higher-derivative field equations. We recover most known equivalences for spins 1 and 2, and find some new ones. In particular, we find a non-unitary massive 3D gravity theory with a 5th order term obtained by contraction of the Ricci and Cotton tensors; this term is part of an N=2 super-invariant that includes the 'extended Chern-Simons' term of 3D electrodynamics. We also find a new unitary 6th order gauge theory for 'self-dual' spin 3.

Bergshoeff, Eric A. [Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands)], E-mail: E.A.Bergshoeff@rug.nl; Hohm, Olaf [Centre for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)], E-mail: ohohm@mit.edu; Townsend, Paul K. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)], E-mail: P.K.Townsend@damtp.cam.ac.uk

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

263

Shallow Melt Apparatus for Semicontinuous Czochralski Crystal Growth  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a single crystal pulling apparatus for providing a Czochralski crystal growth process, the improvement of a shallow melt crucible (20) to eliminate the necessity supplying a large quantity of feed stock materials that had to be preloaded in a deep crucible to grow a large ingot, comprising a gas tight container a crucible with a deepened periphery (25) to prevent snapping of a shallow melt and reduce turbulent melt convection; source supply means for adding source material to the semiconductor melt; a double barrier (23) to minimize heat transfer between the deepened periphery (25) and the shallow melt in the growth compartment; offset holes (24) in the double barrier (23) to increase melt travel length between the deepened periphery (25) and the shallow growth compartment; and the interface heater/heat sink (22) to control the interface shape and crystal growth rate.

Wang, T.; Ciszek, T. F.

2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

264

AGE AND GROWTH OF SKIPJACK TUNA, KATSUWONUS PELAMIS, AND YELLOWFIN TUNA, THUNNUS ALBACARES, AS INDICATED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(1971), Marcille and Stequert (1976a), and Diaz3 determined growth rate and estimated the age et al. (1969), Le Guen and Sakagawa (1973), and Marcille and Stequert (1976b) have estimated age

265

Effect of oxygen potential on high temperature crack growth in alloy 617  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effect of oxygen partial pressure on crack growth rates in Alloy 617 has been studied using both static and fatigue loading at 650C. Tests were conducted at a constant stress intensity factor, K, for static loading ...

Benz, Julian K

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Combating the growth of slums using for-profit social business models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With 1 billion people living in the slums of cities today and no signs of a decrease in the rate of urbanization and population growth, it is obvious that new approaches to combating poverty and the global housing crisis ...

Fusaro, Kurtis C

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Density Dependent Growth and Size Specific Competitive Interactions in Young Pr Bystrm; Emili Garca-Berthou  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Eurasian perch (Percufluviatilis) and roach (Rutilus rutilus). The size dependence of the attack rate with the results from similar experiments for roach. At equal body sizes, roach always had a higher attack rate requirements at the same size were higher for perch than for roach. Based on the above data we were able

García-Berthou, Emili

268

Hexagonal Growth Spirals on GaN Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy: Kinetics vs Thermodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

prepared, Ga-polar GaN(0001) templates. The surface morphology was studied using reflection high-energy-edge energy of 0.26 eV/?. They suggest that local conditions at step edges dominate the growth. 1 conducted ex situ using AFM. Desorption mass spectrometry (DMS) was used to measure the GaN growth rate. Our

Cohen, Philip I.

269

Entropy production rate as a constraint for collisionless fluid closures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel method is proposed to construct collisionless fluid closures accounting for some kinetic properties. The first dropped fluid moment is assumed to be a linear function of the lower order ones. Optimizing the agreement between the fluid and kinetic entropy production rates is used to constrain the coefficients of the linear development. This procedure is applied to a reduced version of the interchange instability. The closure, involving the absolute value of the wave vector, is non-local in real space. In this case, the linear instability thresholds are the same, and the linear growth rates exhibit similar characteristics. Such a method is applicable to other models and classes of instabilities.

Fleurence, E.; Sarazin, Y.; Garbet, X.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Grandgirard, V.; Ottaviani, M. [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

270

Argentina: export-biased growth versus import-biased growth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARGENTINA. : EXPORT-BIASED GROWTH VERSUS IMPORT-BIASED GROWTH A Thesis by MICHAEL PAGE BRADLEY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1972... Major Subject: Economics ARGENTINA: EXPORT-BIASED GROWTH VERSUS IMPORT-BIASED GROWTH A Thesis by MICHAEL PAGE BRADLEY Approved as to style and content by: rman o omit ee ea o Depar men em er Mem er May 1&72 ABSTRACT Argentina: Export...

Bradley, Michael Page

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Crosstalk Compensation for a Rapid, Higher Resolution Impedance Spectrum Measurement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Batteries and other energy storage devices are playing larger roles in various industries (e.g., military, automotive, electric utilities, etc.) as the U.S. seeks to reduce its dependence on foreign energy resources. As such, there exists a significant need for accurate, robust state-of-health assessment techniques. Present techniques tend to focus on simple, passive monitoring of voltage and current at a given ambient temperature. However, this approach has the disadvantage of ignoring key elements of health, that is, changes in resistance growth and power fade. Impedance spectroscopy is considered a useful laboratory tool in gauging changes in the resistance and power performance, but it has not been widely considered as an onboard diagnostic tool due to the length of time required to complete the measurement. Cross-Talk Compensation (CTC) is a novel approach that enables rapid, high resolution impedance spectra measurements using a hardware platform that could be designed as an embedded system. This input signal consists of a sum-of-sines excitation current that has a known frequency spread and a duration of one period of the lowest frequency. The voltage response is then captured at a sufficiently fast sample rate. Previously developed rapid impedance spectrum measurement techniques either required a longer excitation signal or a sum-of-sines signal that was separated by harmonic frequencies to reduce or eliminate, respectively, the cross-talk interference in the calculated results. The distinct advantage of CTC, however, is that non-harmonic frequencies can now be included within the excitation signal while still keeping the signal duration at one period of the lowest frequency. Since the frequency spread of the input signal is known, the crosstalk interference between sinusoidal signals within the sum-of-sines at a given frequency of interest can be pre-determined and assigned to an error matrix. Consequently, the real and imaginary components of the impedance at each frequency of interest can be calculated using simple linear algebra based on the error matrix and measured response from the energy storage device given the excitation signal. Analytical validation of CTC over a frequency range between 2000 and 0.1 Hz (i.e., a ten-second input signal duration) was performed using a standardized battery lumped parameter model. The results indicated that the CTC was able to successfully resolve more than 45 frequencies within a sum-of-sines excitation signal, whereas previous techniques could only resolve up to 15 frequencies. A simplified derivation of the CTC technique and its corresponding analytical validation studies using the lumped-parameter model will be presented.

Jon P. Christophersen; John L. Morrison; David M. Rose; William H. Morrison; Chester G. Motloch

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Sustainable Building Rating Systems Summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to offer information that could be used to compare and contrast sustainable building rating systems.

Fowler, Kimberly M.; Rauch, Emily M.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Robust Growth-Optimal Portfolios  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

May 24, 2014 ... Adopting standard terminology, we refer to the portfolio managed under the Kelly strategy as the growth-optimal portfolio. This portfolio displays...

2014-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

274

Strain rate sensitive constitutive equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Computed Constants For Far'ous . Baterials 47 LIST OF FIGURFS Pace Figure I Comparison of Rate Data For Commercially Pure Aluminum Figure 2 Dynamic Loading Regimes 17 Figure 3 Yield Criteria 32 Figure 4 Uni-axial Stress-Strain Rate...

Nelson, Charles Edward

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

RECYCLING RATE STUDY Prepared by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATIONAL RECYCLING RATE STUDY Prepared by: Smith, Bucklin and Associates, Inc. Market Research and Statistics Division Chicago, Illinois July 2003 PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER #12;BCI RECYCLING RATE STUDY TABLE ....................................................................................................1 II. METHODOLOGY A. Total Pounds of Lead Recycled from Batteries

Laughlin, Robert B.

276

Rate making for Electric Utilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a given size in Texas may be dif ferent from that of a same size town in Massachusetts. This growing demand depends upon two factors: The educating of the people to the use of electricity for light and power, and the probable growth...

Hanson, Carl Falster

1911-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Massive Gravity from Higher Derivative Gravity with Boundary Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With an appropriate choice of parameters, a higher derivative theory of gravity can describe a normal massive sector and a ghost massless sector. We show that, when defined on an asymptotically de Sitter spacetime with Dirichlet boundary conditions, such a higher derivative gravity can provide a framework for a unitary theory of massive gravity in four spacetime dimensions. The resulting theory is free not only of higher derivative ghosts but also of the Boulware-Deser mode.

Minjoon Park; Lorenzo Sorbo

2012-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

278

The chemistry of halogens on diamond: effects on growth and electron emission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Diamond growth using halogenated precursors was studied in several diamond growth reactors. In a conventionao plasma reactor, diamond growth using the following gas mixtures was studied: CF{sub 4}/H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}F/H{sub 2}, and CH{sub 3}CL/H{sub 2}. Both the diamond growth measurements demonstrated ineffective transport of halogen radicals to the diamond surface during the growth process. In order to transport radical halogen species to the diamond surface during growth, a flow-tube reactor was constructed which minimized gas phase reactions. Also, the flow-tube reactor enabled pulsed gs transport to the diamond surface by fast-acting valves. Molecular beam mass spectroscopy was used to find condition which resulted in atomic hydrogen and/or atomic fluorine transport to the growing diamond surface. Although such conditions were found, they required very low pressures (0.5 Torr and below); these low pressures produce radical fluxes which are too low to sustain a reasonable diamond growth rate. The sequential reactor at Stanford was modified to add a halogen-growth step to the conventinoal atomic hydrogen/atomic carbon diamond growth cycle. Since the atomic fluorine, hydrogen and carbon environments are independent in the sequential reactor, the effect of fluorine on diamond growth could be studied independently of gas phase reactions. Although the diamond growth rate was increased by the use of fluorine, the film quality was seen to deteriorate as well as the substrate surface. Moreover, materials incompatibilities with fluorine significantly limited the use of fluorine in this reactor. A diamond growth model incorporating both gas phase and surface reactions was developed for the halocarbon system concurrent with the film growth efforts. In this report, we review the results of the growth experiments, the modeling, and additional experiments done to understand fluorine with diamond surfaces.

Hsu, W.L.; Pan, L.S.; Brown, L.A. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)] [and others

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Innovative Rates Program. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Title II of the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA) as amended by the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) provided financial assistance to state utility regulatory commissions, nonregulated electric utilities, and the Tennessee Valley Authority through the Innovative Rates Program. The financial assistance was to be used to plan or carry out electric utility regulatory rate reform initiatives relating to innovative rate structures that encourage conservation of energy, electric utility efficiency and reduced costs, and equitable rates to consumers. The Federal and local objectives of the project are described. Activities planned and accomplishments are summarized for the following: project management, data collection, utility bill evaluation, billing enclosure/mailing evaluation, media program evaluation, display evaluation, rate study sessions evaluation, speakers bureau evaluation, and individual customer contacts. A timetable/milestone chart and financial information are included. (MHR)

Not Available

1982-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

280

Elucidating the Higher Stability of Vanadium (V) Cations in Mixed...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Elucidating the Higher Stability of Vanadium (V) Cations in Mixed Acid Based Redox Flow Battery Electrolytes. Abstract: The Vanadium (V) cation structures in mixed acid based...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher growth rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Developing a Lower Cost and Higher Energy Density Alternative...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

for Advanced Batteries ADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE Developing a Lower Cost and Higher Energy Density Alternative to Lithium-Ion Batteries Introduction As the world moves toward...

282

affects higher education: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mathematics Websites Summary: Application for Higher Education Internship Name: Address: City: Zip Code: Country: Phone Number: E supervising faculty? Name: E-mail: Phone Number:...

283

RATES  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising Science for1 20115, 2001 Media Contact: Rick FordMarketing

284

RATES  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising Science for1 20115, 2001 Media Contact: Rick FordMarketing

285

RATES  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, and 323 K.Office ofMay 8, 2012IndustrialRAPIDDRATES

286

CALIFORNIA SMART GROWTH ENERGY SAVINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(particularly autos) comprises a large share of total energy consumption, its reduction through more compact in transportation energy consumption resulting from Smart Growth planning. Since energy consumed by transportationCALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CALIFORNIA SMART GROWTH ENERGY SAVINGS MPO SURVEY FINDINGS SEPTEMBER

287

The importance of population growth in future commercial energy consumption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper estimates the contribution of population growth to commercial energy consumption, which is considered a major cause of increases in air pollution and greenhouse gases. This paper first summarizes some of the recent estimates of future energy use developed by well-known models. It then develops several alternative scenarios that use different assumptions about population growth and energy use per capita for 122 countries for the years 2020 and 2050. It calculates the relative contribution of population growth to the change in total commercial energy use and demonstrates the sensitivity of the results to different assumptions. Individual country data are separately summed to totals for more-developed countries (MDCs) and less-developed countries (LDCs). Under a business as usual scenario for both MDCs and LDCs, population growth is important, but not the most important factor, in future increases in global energy consumption. Analysis of other scenarios shows that while slower population growth always contributes to a slowing of future global energy consumption, such changes are not as effective as reductions in per capita commercial energy use. Calculations on a global basis are made in two ways: from global aggregates and by summing individual country data. Comparison of the results shows that the first method is misleading because of the heterogeneity of population growth rates and energy consumption rates of individual countries. The tentative conclusions reached in this paper are only small pieces of a much larger puzzle. More work needs to be done to better understand the dynamics of these relationships before the analysis is extended to the broader questions of population growth and environmental change.

Kolsrud, G. [Congress, Washington, DC (United States); Torrey, B.B. [Bureau of the Census, Washington, DC (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

288

EVALUATION OF REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DWPF HIGHER CAPACITY CANISTER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is considering the option to increase canister glass capacity by reducing the wall thickness of the current production canister. This design has been designated as the DWPF Higher Capacity Canister (HCC). A significant decrease in the number of canisters processed during the life of the facility would be achieved if the HCC were implemented leading to a reduced overall reduction in life cycle costs. Prior to implementation of the change, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to conduct an evaluation of the potential impacts. The specific areas of interest included loading and deformation of the canister during the filling process. Additionally, the effect of the reduced wall thickness on corrosion and material compatibility needed to be addressed. Finally the integrity of the canister during decontamination and other handling steps needed to be determined. The initial request regarding canister fabrication was later addressed in an alternate study. A preliminary review of canister requirements and previous testing was conducted prior to determining the testing approach. Thermal and stress models were developed to predict the forces on the canister during the pouring and cooling process. The thermal model shows the HCC increasing and decreasing in temperature at a slightly faster rate than the original. The HCC is shown to have a 3F ?T between the internal and outer surfaces versus a 5F ?T for the original design. The stress model indicates strain values ranging from 1.9% to 2.9% for the standard canister and 2.5% to 3.1% for the HCC. These values are dependent on the glass level relative to the thickness transition between the top head and the canister wall. This information, along with field readings, was used to set up environmental test conditions for corrosion studies. Small 304-L canisters were filled with glass and subjected to accelerated environmental testing for 3 months. No evidence of stress corrosion cracking was indicated on either the canisters or U-bend coupons. Calculations and finite element modeling were used to determine forces over a range of handling conditions along with possible forces during decontamination. While expected reductions in some physical characteristics were found in the HCC, none were found to be significant when compared to the required values necessary to perform its intended function. Based on this study and a review of successful testing of thinner canisters at West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP), the mechanical properties obtained with the thinner wall do not significantly undermine the ability of the canister to perform its intended function.

Miller, D.; Estochen, E.; Jordan, J.; Kesterson, M.; Mckeel, C.

2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

289

Termination and Reduction Checking for HigherOrder Logic Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Termination and Reduction Checking for Higher­Order Logic Programs Brigitte Pientka Department, we present a syntax­directed termination and reduction checker for higher­order logic programs and output of well­moded predicates. These reduction con­ straints are exploited during termination checking

Pientka, Brigitte

290

Termination and Reduction Checking for Higher-Order Logic Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Termination and Reduction Checking for Higher-Order Logic Programs Brigitte Pientka Department, we present a syntax-directed termination and reduction checker for higher-order logic programs and output of well-moded predicates. These reduction con- straints are exploited during termination checking

Pientka, Brigitte

291

After several tough years, Colorado's public higher education institutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

education -- toward zero sometime in the next 10 to 12 years. We're not alone. Thomas Mortenson, in his fiscal support for higher education will reach zero by 2059, al- though it could happen much sooner in years -- the total budget for higher education will be about $543 million. That's still a net decrease

Rutledge, Steven

292

HigherOrder Colored Unification: A Linguistic Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In sentence (1) for instance, the meaning of the elliptical verb phrase (VP) does is the property of "likingRECHERCHE Higher­Order Colored Unification: A Linguistic Application Claire Gardent Michael the last decade, Higher-Order unification (HOU) has become a popular tool for constructing the semantic

Kohlhase, Michael

293

Optical absorption spectra and geometric e ects in higher fullerenes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optical absorption spectra and geometric e ects in higher fullerenes (Running head: Optical absorption in higher fullerenes) Kikuo Harigaya and Shuji Abe Physical Science Division, Electrotechnical of their amplitudes at the pentagons. The oscillator strengths of projected absorption almost accord with those

Harigaya, Kikuo

294

HIGHER-ORDER MODELING AND AUTOMATED DESIGN-SPACE EXPLORATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the second requires the exis- tence of an automated process for design space exploration. There are many waysHIGHER-ORDER MODELING AND AUTOMATED DESIGN-SPACE EXPLORATION J¨orn W. Janneck EECS Department exploration, exploratory simula- tion, performance evaluation, higher-order models ABSTRACT An important part

Esser, Robert

295

STATE OF COLORADO DEPARTMENT OF HIGHER EDUCATION John Hickenlooper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STATE OF COLORADO DEPARTMENT OF HIGHER EDUCATION John Hickenlooper Governor Lt. Gov. Joseph A. Garcia Executive Director 1560 Broadway, Suite 1600, Denver, Colorado 80202 (303) 866-2723 fax (303) 866-4266 http://highered.colorado.gov STATEWIDE TRANSFER ARTICULATION AGREEMENT for a Bachelor of Arts

296

STATE OF COLORADO DEPARTMENT OF HIGHER EDUCATION John Hickenlooper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STATE OF COLORADO DEPARTMENT OF HIGHER EDUCATION John Hickenlooper Governor Lt. Gov. Joseph A. Garcia Executive Director 1560 Broadway, Suite 1600, Denver, Colorado 80202 (303) 866-2723 fax (303) 866-4266 http://highered.colorado.gov STATEWIDE TRANSFER ARTICULATION AGREEMENT for a Bachelor

297

High repetition rate fiber lasers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis reports work in high repetition rate femtosecond fiber lasers. Driven by the applications including optical arbitrary waveform generation, high speed optical sampling, frequency metrology, and timing and frequency ...

Chen, Jian, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Electric Rate Alternatives to Cogeneration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"ELECTRIC RATE ALTERNATIVES TO COGENERATION" K. R. SANDBERG, JR. INDUSTRIAL ACCOUNTS MANAGER - TEXAS GULF STATES UTILITIES COMPANY BEAUMONT, TEXAS ABSTRACT This paper discusses electric rate slternatives to cogeneration for the industrisl... PERSPECTIVE Gulf States Utilities was incorporated in 1925 and is primarily in the business of generating. transmitting and distributing electricity to 555.000 customers in southeast Texas and south Louisiana. The service area extends 350 miles westward...

Sandberg, K. R. Jr.

299

Evaluation of Reaction Rate Theory and Monte Carlo Methods for Application to Radiation-Induced Microstructural Characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The multiscale modeling scheme encompasses models from the atomistic to the continuum scale. Phenomena at the mesoscale are typically simulated using reaction rate theory, Monte Carlo, or phase field models. These mesoscale models are appropriate for application to problems that involve intermediate length scales, and timescales from those characteristic of diffusion to long-term microstructural evolution (~?s to years). Although the rate theory and Monte Carlo models can be used simulate the same phenomena, some of the details are handled quite differently in the two approaches. Models employing the rate theory have been extensively used to describe radiation-induced phenomena such as void swelling and irradiation creep. The primary approximations in such models are time- and spatial averaging of the radiation damage source term, and spatial averaging of the microstructure into an effective medium. Kinetic Monte Carlo models can account for these spatial and temporal correlations; their primary limitation is the computational burden which is related to the size of the simulation cell. A direct comparison of RT and object kinetic MC simulations has been made in the domain of point defect cluster dynamics modeling, which is relevant to the evolution (both nucleation and growth) of radiation-induced defect structures. The primary limitations of the OKMC model are related to computational issues. Even with modern computers, the maximum simulation cell size and the maximum dose (typically much less than 1 dpa) that can be simulated are limited. In contrast, even very detailed RT models can simulate microstructural evolution for doses up 100 dpa or greater in clock times that are relatively short. Within the context of the effective medium, essentially any defect density can be simulated. Overall, the agreement between the two methods is best for irradiation conditions which produce a high density of defects (lower temperature and higher displacement rate), and for materials that have a relatively high density of fixed sinks such as dislocations.

Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Golubov, Stanislav I [ORNL; Becquart, C. S. [Universite de Lille; Domain, C. [EDF R& D, Clamart, France

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Abstract. Tailored porous media is a proposed method of achieving higher heat transfer coefficients while seeking to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract. Tailored porous media is a proposed method of achieving higher heat transfer coefficients general porous flow model (MERLOT [1]). The Model of Energy- transfer Rate for fLow in Open transfer performance. The low heat capacities and low heat transfer coefficients, h, of gas coolants

Raffray, A. René

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher growth rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Do Solar system tests permit higher dimensional general relativity?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We perform a survey whether higher dimensional Schwarzschild space-time is compatible with some of the solar system phenomena. As a test we examine five well known solar system effects, viz., (1) Perihelion shift, (2) Bending of light, (3) Gravitational redshift, (4) Gravitational time delay and (5) Motion of test particle in the framework of general relativity with higher dimensions. It is shown that the results related to all these physical phenomena are mostly incompatible with the higher dimensional version of general relativity except that of Motion of test particle. We compare all these results with the available data in the literature.

F. Rahaman; Saibal Ray; M. Kalam; M. Sarker

2007-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

302

October 2001 - September 2006 Wholesale Power Rates (rates/previous)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002 Wholesale Power Rate Schedules (base rates) for the FY

303

October 2002 - March 2003 Power Rates (rates/previous)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002 Wholesale Power Rate Schedules (base rates) for the FY6 A2

304

October 2003 - March 2004 Power Rates (rates/previous)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002 Wholesale Power Rate Schedules (base rates) for the FY6

305

October 2004 - March 2005 Power Rates (rates/previous)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002 Wholesale Power Rate Schedules (base rates) for the FY64 -

306

October 2005 - March 2006 Power Rates (rates/previous)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002 Wholesale Power Rate Schedules (base rates) for the FY64

307

Crystalline Ice Growth on Pt(111) and Pd(111): Nonwetting Growth...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Crystalline Ice Growth on Pt(111) and Pd(111): Nonwetting Growth on a Hydrophobic Water Monolayer. Crystalline Ice Growth on Pt(111) and Pd(111): Nonwetting Growth on a Hydrophobic...

308

Evolution of Massive Protostars with High Accretion Rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Formation of massive stars by accretion requires a high accretion rate of > 10^-4 M_sun/yr to overcome the radiation pressure barrier of the forming stars. Here, we study evolution of protostars accreting at such high rates, by solving the structure of the central star and the inner accreting envelope simultaneously. The protostellar evolution is followed starting from small initial cores until their arrival at the stage of the Zero-Age Main Sequence (ZAMS) stars. An emphasis is put on evolutionary features different from those with a low accretion rate of 10^-5 M_sun/yr, which is presumed in the standard scenario for low-mass star formation. With the high accretion rate of 10^-3 M_sun/yr, the protostellar radius becomes very large and exceeds 100 R_sun. It is not until the stellar mass reaches 40 M_sun that hydrogen burning begins and the protostar reaches the ZAMS phase, and this ZAMS arrival mass increases with the accretion rate. At a very high accretion rate of > 3 x 10^-3 M_sun/yr, the total luminosity of the protostar becomes so high that the resultant radiation pressure inhibits the growth of the protostars under steady accretion before reaching the ZAMS stage. Therefore, the evolution under the critical accretion rate 3 x 10^-3 M_sun/yr gives the upper mass limit of possible pre-main-sequence stars at 60 M_sun. The upper mass limit of MS stars is also set by the radiation pressure onto the dusty envelope under the same accretion rate at 250 M_sun. We also propose that the central source enshrouded in the Orion KL/BN nebula has effective temperature and luminosity consistent with our model, and is a possible candidate for such protostars growing under the high accretion rate. (abridged)

Takashi Hosokawa; Kazuyuki Omukai

2008-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

309

Growth machine theory: a qualitative analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of land inherent in growth machine theory, does not necessarily result in a dialectic, win-lose situation. Furthermore, it is argued that the growth coalition may not always ado t a unidimensional roach to development where further growth...

Smith, Gavin Paul

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Top seeded growth and joining of bulk YBCO.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report (i) systematic studies of the growth rate for melt textured YBCO, (ii) top seeding growth techniques to determine the minimum seed size, and (iii) joining techniques for melt textured YBCO, enabling the fabrication of large single domain structures of arbitrary shape. Seeded growth of YBCO occurs in a narrow temperature window about 20 C below the peritectic decomposition temperature. Successful top seeding depends on the size of the NdBCO seed crystal. Small seeds are eventually dissolved in the melt before nucleation occurs, while large seeds regularly produce single domain monoliths. Joining techniques based on seeding of low melting point Tm123/Y211 filler material by neighboring YBCO are described. Magneto-optical images of the YBCO/TmBCO/YBCO assembly show no detectable penetration of magnetic field at the joints.

Zheng, H.; Veal, B. W.; Paulikas, A.; Nikolova, R.; Welp, U.; Claus, H.; Crabtree, G. W.

1999-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

311

Economic Impact of West Virginia Higher Education Institutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Higher Education Policy Commission and the governing board of West Virginia University. #12;i Executive (consumer sales and use, personal income, corporate net income, and business franchise) resulting from

Mohaghegh, Shahab

312

Application of Mass Lumped Higher Order Finite Elements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are many interesting phenomena in extended-MHD such as anisotropic transport, mhd, 2-fluid effects stellarator and hot particles. Any one of them challenges numerical analysts, and researchers are seeking for higher order methods, such as higher order finite difference, higher order finite elements and hp/spectral elements. It is true that these methods give more accurate solution than their linear counterparts. However, numerically they are prohibitively expensive. Here we give a successful solution of this conflict by applying mass lumped higher order finite elements. This type of elements not only keep second/third order accuracy but also scale closely to linear elements by doing mass lumping. This is especially true for second order lump elements. Full M3D and anisotropic transport models are studied.

Chen, J.; Strauss, H. R.; Jardin, S. C.; Park, W.; Sugiyama, L. E.; Fu., G.; Breslau, J.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Spherically Symmetric Considerations for a Higher Order Theory of Gravitation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A higher order theory of gravitation is considered which is obtained by modifying Einstein field equations. The Lagrange used to modify this in the form a polynomial in (scalar curvature) R. In this equation we have studied spherical symmetric metric.

S. N. Pandey; B. K. Sinha

2009-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

314

Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Review ES-127 Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy Density Erin O'Driscoll (PI) Han Wu (Presenter) Dow Kokam May 13,...

315

Field dependent emission rates in radiation damaged GaAs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have measured the temperature and field dependence of emission rates from five traps in electron damaged GaAs. Four of the traps have previously been identified as radiation defects. One of the traps, seen in higher doped diodes, has not been previously identified. We have fit the data to a multiphonon emission theory that allows recombination in GaAs to be characterized over a broad range of temperature and electric field. These results demonstrate an efficient method to calculate field-dependent emission rates in GaAs.

Fleming, R. M.; Myers, S. M.; Wampler, W. R.; Lang, D. V.; Seager, C. H.; Campbell, J. M. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1415 (United States)

2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

316

LEED for Homes Rating System affordablemarket rate multi-family  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Future Comfort Load Reduction 50% 60%20% 30% 40% Energy Savings Cost System Intensive Building Envelo pe;Rating System www.usgbc.org/leed/homes #12;LEED for Homes Project Checklist or Scorecard #12;LEED for Homes Project Checklist or Scorecard #12;How the Credit Structure Works Credit #2: Landscaping Intent

Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

317

Higher-Rank Numerical Ranges of Unitary and Normal Matrices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We verify a conjecture on the structure of higher-rank numerical ranges for a wide class of unitary and normal matrices. Using analytic and geometric techniques, we show precisely how the higher-rank numerical ranges for a generic unitary matrix are given by complex polygons determined by the spectral structure of the matrix. We discuss applications of the results to quantum error correction, specifically to the problem of identification and construction of codes for binary unitary noise models.

Man-Duen Choi; John A. Holbrook; David W. Kribs; Karol Zyczkowski

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

318

Violation of no signaling in higher order quantum measure theories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

More general probability sum-rules for describing interference than found in quantum mechanics (QM) were formulated by Sorkin in a hierarchy of such rules. The additivity of classical measure theory corresponds to the second sum-rule. QM violates this rule, but satisfies the third and higher sum-rules. This evokes the question of whether there are physical principles that forbid their violation. We show that under certain assumptions, violation of higher sum-rules allows for superluminal signaling.

Karthik S. Joshi; R. Srikanth; Urbasi Sinha

2013-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

319

Fermion localization and flavour hierarchy in higher curvature spacetime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fermion localization in a braneworld model in presence of dilaton coupled higher curvature Gauss-Bonnet bulk gravity is discussed. It is shown that the left handed fermionic modes can be localized on the visible brane due to the dilaton coupled higher curvature term without the necessity of any external localizing bulk field. This offers a natural resolution of the flavour hierarchy problem in Standard Model.

Choudhury, Sayantan; SenGupta, Soumitra

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Enrollment Logics and Discourse: Toward Professionalizing Higher Education Enrollment Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stated, enrollment management deals with how students choose a college, how they make the transition to higher education, what leads them to stay or drop out, and what influences how well they do while enrolled (Hossler, 1984, p. 2). Hence, chief... ENROLLMENT LOGICS AND DISCOURSE: TOWARD PROFESSIONALIZING HIGHER EDUCATION ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT A Dissertation by MONIQUE LAVETTE SNOWDEN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial...

Snowden, Monique Lavette

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher growth rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Vermont Employment Growth Incentive (Vermont)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of the Employment Growth Incentive (VEGI) is to encourage job creation in Vermont by a Vermont company, a Vermont division of a company that plans to grow and expand in Vermont, a...

322

Bacterial Growth H. L. Smith  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bacterial Growth H. L. Smith 1 Simple Models Bacteria are the dominant form of life on the planet the concentration of the nutrient in the media (grams/liter) and N(t) de

Smith, Hal

323

Lid for improved dendritic web growth  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A lid for a susceptor in which a crystalline material is melted by induction heating to form a pool or melt of molten material from which a dendritic web of essentially a single crystal of the material is pulled through an elongated slot in the lid and the lid has a pair of generally round openings adjacent the ends of the slot and a groove extends between each opening and the end of the slot. The grooves extend from the outboard surface of the lid to adjacent the inboard surface providing a strip contiguous with the inboard surface of the lid to produce generally uniform radiational heat loss across the width of the dendritic web adjacent the inboard surface of the lid to reduce thermal stresses in the web and facilitate the growth of wider webs at a greater withdrawal rate.

Duncan, Charles S. (Penn Hills, PA); Kochka, Edgar L. (Greentree, PA); Piotrowski, Paul A. (Monroeville, PA); Seidensticker, Raymond G. (Forest Hills, PA)

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

324

On the origin of radiation growth of hcp crystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of the present work is to study theoretically the radiation growth (RG) of hcp-type materials with a particular focus on the effect of one-dimensionally (1-D) migrating clusters of self-interstitial atoms (SIAs), which are steadily produced in displacement cascades under neutron or heavy-ion irradiation. A reaction-diffusion model is developed for the description of RG in single hcp-type metallic crystals. The model reproduces all RG stages observed in neutron-irradiated annealed samples of pure Zr and Zr alloys, such as high strain rate at low, strain saturation at intermediate and breakaway growth at relatively high irradiation doses. In addition, it accounts for the striking observations of negative strains in prismatic directions and coexistence of vacancy- and SIA-type prismatic loops. The role of cold work in RG behavior and alignment of the vacancy-type loops along basal planes are revealed and the maximum strain rate is estimated.

Golubov, Stanislav I [ORNL; Barashev, Aleksandr [University of Liverpool; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Direct estimation of decoherence rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The decoherence rate is a nonlinear channel parameter that describes quantitatively the decay of the off-diagonal elements of a density operator in the decoherence basis. We address the question of how to experimentally access such a nonlinear parameter directly without the need of complete process tomography. In particular, we design a simple experiment working with two copies of the channel, in which the registered mean value of a two-valued measurement directly determines the value of the average decoherence rate. No prior knowledge of the decoherence basis is required.

Vladimr Buek; Peter Rapcan; Jochen Rau; Mario Ziman

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

326

A Statistical Physics Perspective on Web Growth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Approaches from statistical physics are applied to investigate the structure of network models whose growth rules mimic aspects of the evolution of the world-wide web. We first determine the degree distribution of a growing network in which nodes are introduced one at a time and attach to an earlier node of degree k with rate A_ksim k^gamma. Very different behaviors arise for gamma1. We also analyze the degree distribution of a heterogeneous network, the joint age-degree distribution, the correlation between degrees of neighboring nodes, as well as global network properties. An extension to directed networks is then presented. By tuning model parameters to reasonable values, we obtain distinct power-law forms for the in-degree and out-degree distributions with exponents that are in good agreement with current data for the web. Finally, a general growth process with independent introduction of nodes and links is investigated. This leads to independently growing sub-networks that may coalesce with other sub-networks. General results for both the size distribution of sub-networks and the degree distribution are obtained.

P. L. Krapivsky; S. Redner

2002-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

327

Public Capital, Growth and Welfare  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(t) + I(t) (0,1): depreciation rate. K(t+1) = (1 - )K(t) + I(t) (0,1): efficiency/governance services Private capital Rate of time preference Consumption saving decisions Investment in physical and sanitation--increase in enrolment rates (especially for girls, rural areas). 2. Electricity

328

Cosmic Growth History and Expansion History  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the expansion history dark energy equation of state,and growth history constraints on the dark energy equationand growth history constraints on the dark energy equation

Linder, Eric V.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Higher U.S. oil production in 2013 and 2014 means lower oil imports  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuidedCH2MLLC High-Rate, High-CapacityandHigher U.S. oil

330

Pregnancy rate in beef heifers after synchrony to random or programmed estrous cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). Pregnancy rate among proestrus (PRO; 44%; n=l 8) heifers was not different than heifers in MET or DI. Mean plasma P4 concentration was affected by treatment and day. Pregnancy rate was higher (P I ng/ml plasma (52%; n=120) than...

Mathis, Clay Patrick

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Exploration of the multiparameter space of nanosecond-laser damage growth in fused silica optics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Historically, the rate at which laser-induced damage sites grow on the exit surface of SiO{sub 2} optics under subsequent illumination with nanosecond-laser pulses of any wavelength was believed to depend solely on laser fluence. We demonstrate here that much of the scatter in previous growth observations was due to additional parameters that were not previously known to affect growth rate, namely the temporal pulse shape and the size of a site. Furthermore, the remaining variability observed in the rate at which sites grow is well described in terms of Weibull statistics. The effects of site size and laser fluence may both be expressed orthogonally in terms of Weibull coefficients. In addition, we employ a clustering algorithm to explore the multiparameter growth space and expose average growth trends. Conversely, this analysis approach also identifies sites likely to exhibit growth rates outside the norm. The ability to identify which sites are likely to grow abnormally fast in advance of the manifestation of such behavior will significantly enhance the accuracy of predictive models over those based on average growth behaviors.

Negres, Raluca A.; Liao, Zhi M.; Abdulla, Ghaleb M.; Cross, David A.; Norton, Mary A.; Carr, Christopher W.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Fast repetition rate (FRR) flasher  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fast repetition rate (FRR) flasher is described suitable for high flash photolysis including kinetic chemical and biological analysis. The flasher includes a power supply, a discharge capacitor operably connected to be charged by the power supply, and a flash lamp for producing a series of flashes in response to discharge of the discharge capacitor. A triggering circuit operably connected to the flash lamp initially ionizes the flash lamp. A current switch is operably connected between the flash lamp and the discharge capacitor. The current switch has at least one insulated gate bipolar transistor for switching current that is operable to initiate a controllable discharge of the discharge capacitor through the flash lamp. Control means connected to the current switch for controlling the rate of discharge of the discharge capacitor thereby to effectively keep the flash lamp in an ionized state between successive discharges of the discharge capacitor. Advantageously, the control means is operable to discharge the discharge capacitor at a rate greater than 10,000 Hz and even up to a rate greater than about 250,000 Hz. 14 figs.

Kolber, Z.; Falkowski, P.

1997-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

333

Instability statistics and mixing rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We claim that looking at probability distributions of \\emph{finite time} largest Lyapunov exponents, and more precisely studying their large deviation properties, yields an extremely powerful technique to get quantitative estimates of polynomial decay rates of time correlations and Poincar\\'e recurrences in the -quite delicate- case of dynamical systems with weak chaotic properties.

Roberto Artuso; Cesar Manchein

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

334

Undergraduate Kentucky Metropolitan Rate Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Undergraduate Kentucky Metropolitan Rate Application REGISTRAR'S OFFICE University of Cincinnati PO@ucmail.uc.edu Undergraduate residents of specified counties in Kentucky, who are matriculated in degree or certificate requirement to establish Kentucky residency, these students are not eligible for the undergraduate

Franco, John

335

High swelling rates observed in neutron-irradiated V-Cr and V-Si binary alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Additions of 5 to 14 wt% chromium to vanadium lead to very large swelling rates during neutron irradiation of the binary alloys, with swelling increasing strongly at higher irradiation temperatures. Addition of 2 wt% silicon to vanadium also leads to very large swelling rates but swelling decreases with increasing irradiation temperature. Addition of 1 wt% zirconium does not yield high swelling rates, however.

Garner, F.A.; Gelles, D.S. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Takahashi, H.; Ohnuki, S.; Kinoshita, H. (Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan)); Loomis, B.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Human Disturbance Influences Reproductive Success and Growth Rate in California Sea Lions (Zalophus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Zalophus californianus) in the Gulf of California, Mexico. Increased human presence was associated that explicitly consider the potential impact of human activities such as ecotourism on vertebrate populations

Gerber, Leah R.

337

Scales, growth rates and spectral fluxes of baroclinic instability in the ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) and debated (Large et al. 1991; Stammer and Wunsch 1999) that stochastic wind forcing can generate the mid by an interaction between interior quasi- geostrophic potential vorticity (QGPV) gradients, with a zero crossing), grow more slowly (e-folding scale of a few weeks), and owe their existence to the interaction

Smith, K. Shafer

338

A determination of in vivo growth rates for Perkinsus marinus, a parasite of Crassostrea virginica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-0. 103 0. 130-0. 120 21 450 X X 350 c 300 C 0 u 250 200 0 150 X X X X 50 0. 02 0. 04 0. 06 0. 08 0. 1 0. 12 0. 14 Fluorescence intensity Figure 1. The relationship between calf thymus DNA concentration (ng/ml) and fluorescence intensity... 8 79E-05 1. 19E-05 2. 31E-03 4. 55E-03 2. 97E-05 4 87E-05 2 06E-04 1. 79E-04 1. 54E-04 1 02E-03 5 70E-04 1. 96E-05 2. 73E-04 5. 40E-04 3. 32E-04 3. 60E-03 Population size is the number of hypnospores (cells) in each oyster. DPM of DNA...

Saunders, Georgianna L

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Growth Rate of Marine Microalgal Species using Sodium Bicarbonate for Biofuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With additional research on species characteristics and continued work towards cost effective production methods, algae are viewed as a possible alternative biofuel crop to current feedstocks such as corn. Current open pond production methods...

Gore, Matthew

2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

340

Hydrogen isotope fractionation in freshwater and marine algae: II. Temperature and nitrogen limited growth rate effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen isotope fractionation in freshwater and marine algae: II. Temperature and nitrogen limited isotope fractionation in freshwater algae: I. Variations among lipids and spe- cies. Organic Geochemistry. Two species of freshwater green algae, Eudorina unicocca and Volvox aureus, were grown in batch

Sachs, Julian P.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher growth rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Effect of vitamin E and thiamin supplementation on growth rate of the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Webb, S. C. Manolis and P. 3. Whitehead (eds), Surrey Beatty and Sons Pty Limited. Chipping Norton, NSW, Australia. 552pp. Joanen, T. & McNease, L. (1987a) Alligator farming and research in Louisiana, USA. pp. 329-340 in Wildlife Managemen...L' Crocodiles and Alligators. G J. W. Webb, S. C. Manolis, and P. 3. Whitehead (eds), Surrey Beatty and Sons Pty Limited, Chipping Norton, NSW, Australia. 552pp. Joanen, T. & McNease, L. (1987b) Alligator farming research in Louisiana. Proceedings of a...

Swart, Jonathan Edward

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

342

Growth rates, stable oxygen isotopes (d18 O), and strontium (Sr/Ca)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mg calcite, 21 mol% Mg) from Palau, four A. wellsi (highMg calcite, 21 mol% Mg) from Saipan, and three specimen from Palau spanning 1945­2001.5. In Saipan, speciesspecific and mineralogical effects appear. On multidecadal timescales, A. wellsi sclerosponge d18 O in Palau tracked the Southern Oscillation Index

Adkins, Jess F.

343

Maximal Sum of Metabolic Exchange Fluxes Outperforms Biomass Yield as a Predictor of Growth Rate of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and Eugene Rosenberg for helpful comments. We especially thank Rami Pugatch for conceptual contributions

Ruppin, Eytan

344

Size-dependent standard deviation for growth rates: Empirical results and theoretical modeling Boris Podobnik*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Croatia; Zagreb School of Economics and Management, Zagreb, Croatia; and Center for Polymer Studies of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia Fabio Pammolli Faculty of Economics

Podobnik, Boris

345

Fertility and rate of growth in a beef cattle herd in the 0rient of Venezuela  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to express his utmost gratitude to Venezuela for giving him the opportunity to work toward the Master of Science degree through a scholarship of the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientzficas (CONICIT) and the Universidad de Oriente. Special...

Gonzalez Crespo, Justo Nicolas

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

E-Print Network 3.0 - assemblage growth rate Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

J. - Department of Zoology, University of Oklahoma Collection: Biology and Medicine ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 6 Crustal architecture of SW Yukon, northern...

347

The rate of germination and growth of certain range grasses under experimental conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

29 1. 45 Root allot Ratio 5+32 4. 15 1, 26 2, 78 2. 96 No, of Qeed Heads 4 80 1AO 60 8 8 ~8c-C9~ SQSSRRSQSS WNW44 WWWC Ol&WWM K4 45~o88 )gRggi~gqg ~ e P4 PI 8QQSS QQagg@Q8QQ WA -tt CIO&C CV g b0 5 eI 4 0 gPee gg ~ g QP5? OOOO...

Oxnam, Herbert Richard

1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Effects of pre-feedlot growth rate on carcass composition and meat tenderness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 6 Simple correlation coefficients among sarcomere length (SARC), calpastatin activity (CA), total collagen (TC), soluble collagen (SC), Warner-Bratzler Shear force (WBS), marbling, pasture ADG (PAST), feedlot ADG (FDLT), juiciness (JUIC...

Brigman, Ivan Todd

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Dynamic estimation of specific growth rates and concentrations of bacteria for the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at- tractive method for the treatment and recycling of organic wastes. Successful combination. Keywords: Waste treatment, Biotechnology, Observer, Estimation theory, Algebraic systems theory 1 out in continuously stirred tank bioreactors, the organic matter is depolluted by mi- croorganisms

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

350

Higher derivative effects for 4d AdS gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motivated by holography, we explore higher derivative corrections to four-dimensional Anti-de Sitter (AdS) gravity. We point out that in such a theory the variational problem is generically not well-posed given only a boundary condition for the metric. However, when one evaluates the higher derivative terms perturbatively on a leading order Einstein solution, the equations of motion are always second order and therefore the variational problem indeed requires only a boundary condition for the metric. The equations of motion required to compute the spectrum around the corrected background are still generically higher order, with the additional boundary conditions being associated with new operators in the dual conformal field theory. We discuss which higher derivative curvature invariants are expected to arise in the four-dimensional action from a top-down perspective and compute the corrections to planar AdS black holes and to the spectrum around AdS in various cases. Requiring that the dual theory is unitary strongly constrains the higher derivative terms in the action, as the operators associated with the extra boundary conditions generically have complex conformal dimensions and non-positive norms.

Jelena Smolic; Marika Taylor

2013-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

351

Construction of conformally invariant higher spin operators using transvector algebras  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper deals with a systematic construction of higher spin operators, defined as conformally invariant differential operators acting on functions on flat space R{sup m} with values in an arbitrary half-integer irreducible representation for the spin group. To be more precise, the higher spin version of the Dirac operator and associated twistor operators will be constructed as generators of a transvector algebra, hereby generalising the well-known fact that the classical Dirac operator on R{sup m} and its symbol generate the orthosymplectic Lie superalgebra osp(1,2). To do so, we will use the extremal projection operator and its relation to transvector algebras. In the second part of the article, the conformal invariance of the constructed higher spin operators will be proven explicitly.

Eelbode, D., E-mail: David.Eelbode@ua.ac.be [Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Antwerp, Campus Middelheim, G-Building, Middelheimlaan 1, 2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); Raeymaekers, T., E-mail: Tim.Raeymaekers@UGent.be [Clifford Research Group, Department of Mathematical Analysis, Ghent University, Galglaan 2, 9000 Ghent (Belgium)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

352

STUDY OF FROST GROWTH ON HEAT EXCHANGERS USED AS OUTDOOR COILS IN AIR SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STUDY OF FROST GROWTH ON HEAT EXCHANGERS USED AS OUTDOOR COILS IN AIR SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS OF FROST GROWTH ON HEAT EXCHANGERS USED AS OUTDOOR COILS IN AIR SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS Dissertation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 3.5.3 Air Side Heat Transfer Rates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 3.5.4 Fluid Side Heat

353

Independent Signs of Lower Mass-Loss Rates for O-Type Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I discuss observational evidence -- independent of the direct spectral diagnostics of stellar winds themselves -- suggesting that mass-loss rates for O stars need to be revised downward by roughly a factor of three or more, in line with recent observed mass-loss rates for clumped winds. These independent constraints include the large observed mass-loss rates in LBV eruptions, the large masses of evolved massive stars like LBVs and WNH stars, WR stars in lower metallicity environments, observed rotation rates of massive stars at different metallicity, supernovae that seem to defy expectations of high mass-loss rates in stellar evolution, and other clues. I pay particular attention to the role of feedback that would result from higher mass-loss rates, driving the star to the Eddington limit too particular attention to the role of feedback that would result from higher mass-loss rates, driving the star to the Eddington limit too soon, and therefore making higher rates appear highly implausible. Some of these arguments by themselves may have more than one interpretation, but together they paint a consistent picture that steady line-driven winds of O-type stars have lower mass-loss rates and are significantly clumped.

Nathan Smith

2007-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

354

Economic Growth and Development Economics 777  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economic Growth and Development Economics 777 July 18, 2008 Fall Semester 2008 Professor J. H. Mc of economic growth and development. We will analyze several different growth models and look at some recent empirical research. Text The text for this course is: Economic Growth (2nd Edition) by Robert J. Barro

Almor, Amit

355

Parameter Estimation of Gravitational Waves from Precessing BH-NS Inspirals with higher harmonics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Precessing black hole-neutron star (BH-NS) binaries produce a rich gravitational wave signal, encoding the binary's nature and inspiral kinematics. Using the lalinference\\_mcmc Markov-chain Monte Carlo parameter estimation code, we use two fiducial examples to illustrate how the geometry and kinematics are encoded into the modulated gravitational wave signal, using coordinates well-adapted to precession. Even for precessing binaries, we show the performance of detailed parameter estimation can be estimated by "effective" estimates: comparisons of a prototype signal with its nearest neighbors, adopting a fixed sky location and idealized two-detector network. We use detailed and effective approaches to show higher harmonics provide nonzero but small local improvement when estimating the parameters of precessing BH-NS binaries. That said, we show higher harmonics can improve parameter estimation accuracy for precessing binaries ruling out approximately-degenerate source orientations. Our work illustrates quantities gravitational wave measurements can provide, such as reliable component masses and the precise orientation of a precessing short gamma ray burst progenitor relative to the line of sight. "Effective" estimates may provide a simple way to estimate trends in the performance of parameter estimation for generic precessing BH-NS binaries in next-generation detectors. For example, our results suggest that the orbital chirp rate, precession rate, and precession geometry are roughly-independent observables, defining natural variables to organize correlations in the high-dimensional BH-NS binary parameter space.

R. O'Shaughnessy; B. Farr; E. Ochsner; H. S. Cho; V. Raymond; C. Kim; C. H. Lee

2014-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

356

Light and CO sub 2 effects on photosynthesis and growth in Kudzu  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kudzu (Pueraria lobata Willd.) was grown for 28 days under four permutations of light (1,500 or 450 {mu}mol quanta m{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}) and CO{sub 2} (700 or 350 {mu}L L{sup {minus}1} CO{sub 2}). Total biomass and leaf area were up to 55% and 52% respectively greater in the high CO{sub 2} treatments. When measured at the growth CO{sub 2} concentration, photosynthetic rates showed little reduction over the 28 day period, and remained up to 29% higher in the high CO{sub 2} treatments. Under high light, soluble protein was 27% greater in the plants grown at high CO{sub 2}. Neither light nor CO{sub 2} had a significant effect on the initial or total rubisco activities. However, phosphoribulokinase activity was decreased under the high CO{sub 2} treatments. These data indicate that photosynthesis in kudzu shows little acclimation when grown at elevated CO{sub 2}.

Schweder, M.; Bowes, G. (Univ. of Florida, Gainesville (USA)); Cure, J. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Interviewer's ratings of personality: can these ratings predict job performance?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Goldberg, 1993a; Guastello, 1993; McCrae k Costa, 1985; McCrae & John, 1992) has been about the validity of the five-factor model as a measure of personality; in other words, does the model truly capture all traits of personality? The five-factor model...; Goldberg, 1981; McCrae & Costa, 1987; McCrae & John, 1992; Peabody & Goldberg, 1989). Tupes and Christal (1958, 1992) were the first to look at peer ratings of personality in a variety of samples. Although these samples varied in length and kind...

Archuleta, Kathryn Diane

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

358

WP-07 Rate Case Workshops (rates/meetings)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudhaSurface.Laboratory30,WP-07 power rates On July

359

Dynamic and rate-dependent yielding in model cohesive suspensions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An experimental system has been found recently, a coagulated CaCO3 suspension, that shows very different yield behaviour depending upon how it is tested and at what rate it is strained. At P\\'eclet number Pe > 1 it behaves as a simple Herschel Bulkley liquid, whereas at Pe it shows hysteresis and shear-banding and in the usual type of sweep used to measure flow curves in controlled stress mode routinely, it shows very erratic and irreproducible behaviour. All of these features can be attributed to a dependence of yield stress on rate of strain. Stress growth curves obtained from step strain-rate testing showed that the rate-dependence of the yield stress was a consequence of rate-dependent strain-softening. At very low Pe yield was cooperative and the yield strain was order-one, whereas as the Pe approached unity, the yield strain reduced to that needed to break interparticle bonds and the yield stress decayed to a minimal value. For example, at 40%v/v it dropped from ca. 200 Pa to It is suspected that the rich behaviour seen for the CaCO3 system could well be the rule rather than the exception for cohesive suspensions, the importance or otherwise of the rate dependence being a matter of scale or degree. If so, then the Herschel-Bulkley equation could usefully be generalised to read (in simple shear). The proposition that rate-dependent yield might be general, for cohesive suspensions at least, is amenable to further rigorous experimental testing by a range of means and along lines suggested.

Richard Buscall; Peter J Scales; Anthony D Stickland; Hui-En Teo; Tiara E Kusuma; Daniel R Lester

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Opportunities and Challenges for Higher Renewable Penetration in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to unsustainable levels for solar PV #12;11 Capacity Value Declines Significantly at High Penetration Peak net loadOpportunities and Challenges for Higher Renewable Penetration in California Beyond 33%: UC Davis Policy Forum Series Sacramento, California October 17, 2014 Arne Olson, Partner, E3 #12;2 California

California at Davis, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher growth rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Concrete Company Aims Higher for More Wind Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Today, most steel towers that support utility-scale turbines stand about 80 meters tall, but the Tindall Corporation wants to go higher using precast concrete to raise turbines over 100 meters in height to capture stronger, steadier winds - and more energy.

362

ON THE HOMOLOGY OF GL n AND HIGHER PREBLOCH GROUPS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ON THE HOMOLOGY OF GL n AND HIGHER PRE­BLOCH GROUPS SERGE YAGUNOV Introduction The purpose of the present work is to extend an approach used for in­ vestigation of the homology of GL n by Suslin, Sah, and others. Studying of groups H # (GL n ) seems rather important, in particular, because of their close

363

An Experience Report on Using Gamification in Technical Higher Education  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Experience Report on Using Gamification in Technical Higher Education Alexandru Iosup Parallel with gamification, which we loosely define as a teaching technique that uses social gaming elements to deliver long-running attempts to show that gamification can be used to teach technically challenging courses

Iosup, Alexandru

364

CCT: Center for Computation & Technology Clouds Provide Grids with Higher-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CCT: Center for Computation & Technology Clouds Provide Grids with Higher- Levels of Abstraction and Explicit Support for Usage Modes S Jha*, A Merzky, G Fox #12;In a Nutshell First attempt to characterise: Centrality of Usage Mode: Principal pattern of usage, access Affinity: System's internal design principle

365

Constraints to Stop HigherOrder Deforestation FB IV Informatik  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Constraints to Stop Higher­Order Deforestation H. Seidl FB IV ­ Informatik Universit¨at Trier, D of Copenhagen Universitetsparken 1, DK­2100 Copenhagen ?, Denmark rambo@diku.dk Abstract Wadler's deforestation in a compiler, it must terminate on all programs. Several techniques to ensure termi­ nation of deforestation

Seidl, Helmut

366

The blowup formula for higher rank Donaldson invariants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, I study the relationship between the higher rank Donaldson invariants of a smooth 4-manifold X and the invariants of its blowup X#CP2 . This relationship can be expressed in terms of a formal power series ...

Culler, Lucas Howard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Chemistry in Higher What's available and where is the info?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry in Higher Education What's available and where is the info? What does studying chemistry? Where does it lead and what might a chemistry career look like? Dr. David Read, Director of Outreach 2013 #12;310 (294) HE courses with chemistry offered as a single subject hosted at 53 universities 699

Anderson, Jim

368

ON HIGHER ORDER BOURGAIN ALGEBRAS OF A NEST ALGEBRA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ON HIGHER ORDER BOURGAIN ALGEBRAS OF A NEST ALGEBRA TIMOTHY G. FEEMAN Abstract. Following earlier algebras, as well as the second order Bourgain algebras, associated with a nest algebra, we herein demonstrate that a given nest algebra has (essentially) at most six different third order Bourgain algebras

Feeman, Timothy

369

Looking into Higher Dimensions: Research with Joseph McMoneagle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by nuclear reactors can travel as far as 25 light- years in solid lead before being deflected. Another at nuclear distances, and see into higher dimensions. To "calibrate" McMoneagle, I asked him three things (in, if not the best: Joseph McMoneagle. [Joe has published four interesting and informative books on remote viewing

Bryan, Ronald

370

Nonlinear structural crack growth monitoring  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus are provided for the detection, through nonlinear manipulation of data, of an indicator of imminent failure due to crack growth in structural elements. The method is a process of determining energy consumption due to crack growth and correlating the energy consumption with physical phenomena indicative of a failure event. The apparatus includes sensors for sensing physical data factors, processors or the like for computing a relationship between the physical data factors and phenomena indicative of the failure event, and apparatus for providing notification of the characteristics and extent of such phenomena.

Welch, Donald E. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hively, Lee M. (Philadelphia, TN); Holdaway, Ray F. (Clinton, TN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Digital electronic bone growth stimulator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device is described for stimulating bone tissue by applying a low level alternating current signal directly to the patient`s skin. A crystal oscillator, a binary divider chain and digital logic gates are used to generate the desired waveforms that reproduce the natural electrical characteristics found in bone tissue needed for stimulating bone growth and treating osteoporosis. The device, powered by a battery, contains a switch allowing selection of the correct waveform for bone growth stimulation or osteoporosis treatment so that, when attached to the skin of the patient using standard skin contact electrodes, the correct signal is communicated to the underlying bone structures. 5 figs.

Kronberg, J.W.

1995-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

372

Digital electronic bone growth stimulator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device for stimulating bone tissue by applying a low level alternating current signal directly to the patient's skin. A crystal oscillator, a binary divider chain and digital logic gates are used to generate the desired waveforms that reproduce the natural electrical characteristics found in bone tissue needed for stimulating bone growth and treating osteoporosis. The device, powered by a battery, contains a switch allowing selection of the correct waveform for bone growth stimulation or osteoporosis treatment so that, when attached to the skin of the patient using standard skin contact electrodes, the correct signal is communicated to the underlying bone structures.

Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Synthesis of higher alcohols from carbon monoxide and hydrogen in a slurry reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Higher, i.e. C{sub 2{sup +}}, alcohols are desired as gasoline additives, feedstocks for producing ethers and as alternative fuels for automobiles. In all cases, the backbone branching of an alcohol improves octane rating, which is essential for good engine performance. These types of branched, higher alcohols are the desired products for a process converting synthesis gas, a CO and H{sub 2} mixture, often generated from coal gasification. Based on this premise, promoted ZnCr oxide catalysts appear to be as one of the best avenues for further investigation. Once this investigation is complete, a natural extension is to replace the Cr in the ZnCr oxide catalyst with Mo and W, both in the same elemental triad with Cr. Mo has already been shown as an active HAS catalyst, both on a SiO{sub 2} support and in the MoS{sub 2} form. The three catalyst combinations, ZnMo, ZnW, and MnCr oxides will be tested in the stirred autoclave system. However, if none of the three indicate any comparable activity and/or selectivity toward higher alcohols as compared with other HAS catalysts, then an investigation of the effects of Cs promotion on the ZnCr oxide methanol catalysts will be executed.

McCutchen, M.S.

1992-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

374

Towards Unifying Structures in Higher Spin Gauge Symmetry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This article is expository in nature, outlining some of the many still incompletely understood features of higher spin field theory. We are mainly considering higher spin gauge fields in their own right as free-standing theoretical constructs and not circumstances where they occur as part of another system. Considering the problem of introducing interactions among higher spin gauge fields, there has historically been two broad avenues of approach. One approach entails gauging a non-Abelian global symmetry algebra, in the process making it local. The other approach entails deforming an already local but Abelian gauge algebra, in the process making it non-Abelian. In cases where both avenues have been explored, such as for spin 1 and 2 gauge fields, the results agree (barring conceptual and technical issues) with Yang-Mills theory and Einstein gravity. In the case of an infinite tower of higher spin gauge fields, the first approach has been thoroughly developed and explored by M. Vasiliev, whereas the second approach, after having lain dormant for a long time, has received new attention by several authors lately. In the present paper we briefly review some aspects of the history of higher spin gauge fields as a backdrop to an attempt at comparing the gauging vs. deforming approaches. A common unifying structure of strongly homotopy Lie algebras underlying both approaches will be discussed. The modern deformation approach, using BRST-BV methods, will be described as far as it is developed at the present time. The first steps of a formulation in the categorical language of operads will be outlined. A few aspects of the subject that seems not to have been thoroughly investigated are pointed out.

Anders K. H. Bengtsson

2008-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

375

Growth and characterization of liquid phase epitaxial GaP layers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and supercooling amount. The results are compared with a diffusion-controlled model predictions for various cooling methods and very good agreements observed. The resistivity and mobility of grown GaP layers at room temperature are studied and the obtained... for further growth. As a result, LPE has the capability of producing multi-layers of controllable composition. The reproducibility of such layers is governed by parameters like: solution concentration, temperature, cooling rate, growth time, and substrate...

Kao, Yung-Chung

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

376

Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandRateStructure/Tier3Rate | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County,ContAddr2NumberOfPrograms Jump to:URIInformation Rate

377

Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/EnergyRateStructure/Tier5Rate | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscotInformation Max Jump to: navigation, search This is aInformation Rate

378

Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/EnergyRateStructure/Tier6Rate | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscotInformation Max Jump to: navigation, search This isInformation Rate Jump

379

Structural Change, the Real Exchange Rate, and the Balance of Payments in Mexico, 1960-2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structural Change, the Real Exchange Rate, and the Balance of Payments in Mexico, 1960-2012 Carlos structural changes in the composition of Mexico's trade and the parameters that affect it across five-of-payments constraint may account for the post-liberalization slowdown in Mexico's growth only during certain subperiods

Lansky, Joshua

380

Original article Increase of plasma eCG binding rate after  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Original article Increase of plasma eCG binding rate after administration of repeated high dose of eCG to cows Pierre V. DRIONa*, Rudy DE ROOVERb, Jean-Yves HOUTAINc, Edmond M. MCNAMARAd, Benoît chorionic gonadotrophin (eCG) is still used to promote follicular growth in cat- tle and, more recently

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher growth rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Structural Change, the Real Exchange Rate, and the Balance of Payments in Mexico, 1960-2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structural Change, the Real Exchange Rate, and the Balance of Payments in Mexico, 1960-2012 Carlos in Mexico's growth only during certain subperiods of the post-liberalization era, and that the impact the recent crisis), Mexico stands out for having fully embraced trade liberalization and undergoing deep

Carlini, David

382

Upper Great Plains Rates information  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption by sectorlongUpdates by Diane Johnson Email Alerts SubscribeRates

383

Previous Announcements (rates/fc)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedles for4-16 FOR IMMEDIATEPreviewing the 2011 RenewableRates >

384

Characterization of elevated temperature crack growth in Hastelloy-X using integral parameters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Linear elastic fracture mechanics approaches are not suitable for prediction of fatigue crack growth in the nonlinear regime at elevated temperatures. The objective of this paper is to investigate the ability of the integral parameters by Blackburn (J*), by Kishimoto et al. ({cflx J}), and by Atluri et al. ({Delta}Tp*, {Delta}Tp) to correlate crack growth data of Hastelloy-X at elevated temperatures under nominally elastic and nominally plastic loading. Crack growth is analyzed using a finite element method, and the integral parameters are computed from the results of analysis. The experimental crack growth rates are correlated with these parameters. It is found that J*, {cflx J}, and {Delta}Tp* can correlate crack growth data within an acceptable accuracy.

Kim, K.S. [Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Van Stone, R.H. [General Electric Aircraft Engines, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Geodesic deviation at higher orders via covariant bitensors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review a simple but instructive application of the formalism of covariant bitensors, to use a deviation vector field along a fiducial geodesic to describe a neighboring worldline, in an exact and manifestly covariant manner, via the exponential map. Requiring the neighboring worldline to be a geodesic leads to the usual linear geodesic deviation equation for the deviation vector, plus corrections at higher order in the deviation and relative velocity. We show how these corrections can be efficiently computed to arbitrary orders via covariant bitensor expansions, deriving a form of the geodesic deviation equation valid to all orders, and producing its explicit expanded form through fourth order. We also discuss the generalized Jacobi equation, action principles for the higher-order geodesic deviation equations, results useful for describing accelerated neighboring worldlines, and the formal general solution to the geodesic deviation equation through second order.

Justin Vines

2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

386

Palladium chloride to palladium metal two-dimensional nucleation and growth phenomena  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reduction of a monolayer of surface-bound Pd(II) to Pd(0) on a palladium substrate reveals two-dimensional nucleation and growth phenomena. Using well-known 2D nucleation-growth theories, this reduction is shown to proceed by an instantaneous nucleation and growth mechanism. However, when a submonolayer of Pd(II) is present, this mechanism fails to account for the experimentally observed high cathodic currents seen at zero time. A model incorporating preexisting Pd(0) cylindrical sites on the partially oxidized Pd(0) surface has been successfully applied to account for the discrepancy between the experimental results and current 2D theories. Using this modified 2D model, values for the mathematical product of cylindrical growth rate and the square root of the nucleation site densities have been determined, and the overpotential dependence of the growth rate has been confirmed and quantified. These 2D nucleation-growth phenomena have practical consequences on the performance of the Pd(II)/Pd(0) system as a faradaic supercapacitor, and probably on the performance of other 2D faradaic supercapacitor systems. In addition, because many electrodes undergo monolayer surface oxidation-reduction reactions in other solvent systems, especially aqueous electrolytes, these 2D nucleation-growth phenomena may play a role in these important surface-modifying redox systems as well.

Long, H.C. de; Carlin, R.T. [Air Force Academy, CO (United States). Frank J. Seiler Research Lab.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

The Cutaneous Epidermal Growth Factor Network: Can it be Translated Clinically to Stimulate Hair Growth?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of epidermal growth factor on hair growth in the mouse. Jstem cell character in hair follicles. Science. 2006;312:Notch signalling pathway in hair growth. Mech Dev. 1998;78:

Alexandrescu, Doru T; Kauffman, C Lisa; Dasanu, Constantin A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Higher Order Mode Heating Analysis for the ILC Superconducting Linacs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The superconducting cavities and interconnects in the 11 km long linacs of the International Linear Collider (ILC) are designed to operate at 2K, where cooling costs are very expensive. It is thus important to minimize cryogenic heat loads. In addition to an unavoidable static load and the dynamic load of the fundamental 1.3 GHz accelerating rf, a further heat source is presented by the higher order mode (HOM) power deposited by the beam. Such modes will be damped by specially designed HOM couplers attached to the cavities (for trapped modes), and by ceramic dampers at 70K that are located between the eight or nine cavity cryomodules (for propagating modes). Brute force calculation of the higher frequency modes excited in a string of cryomodules is limited by computing capacity (see, e.g. [1]). M. Liepe has calculated {approx} 400 longitudinal TM modes in 3 superconducting cavities plus absorbers, up to 8 GHz [2]. Joestingmeier, et al., have used a ray tracing calculation to find the effect at higher frequencies, specifically in the range of tens of GHz and above [3]. In this report we present a scattering matrix approach, which we apply to an rf unit comprising 26 cavities and 3 absorbers. We perform calculations at sample frequencies (up to 20 GHz) to predict the effectiveness of the ceramic dampers in limiting HOM heat deposition at 2K.

Bane, K.L.F.; Nantista, C.; Adolphsen, C.; /SLAC; ,

2010-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

389

Condensed phase conversion and growth of nanorods and other materials instead of from vapor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Compositions, systems and methods are described for condensed phase conversion and growth of nanorods and other materials. A method includes providing a condensed phase matrix material; and activating the condensed phase matrix material to produce a plurality of nanorods by condensed phase conversion and growth from the condensed phase matrix material instead of from vapor. The compositions are very strong. The compositions and methods provide advantages because they allow (1) formation rates of nanostructures necessary for reasonable production rates, and (2) the near net shaped production of component structures.

Geohegan, David B. (Knoxville, TN); Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Puretzky, Alex A. (Knoxville, TN); Fan, Xudong (Oak Ridge, TN)

2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

390

Condensed phase conversion and growth of nanorods instead of from vapor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Compositions, systems and methods are described for condensed phase conversion and growth of nanorods and other materials. A method includes providing a condensed phase matrix material; and activating the condensed phase matrix material to produce a plurality of nanorods by condensed phase conversion and growth from the condensed chase matrix material instead of from vacor. The compositions are very strong. The compositions and methods provide advantages because they allow (1) formation rates of nanostructures necessary for reasonable production rates, and (2) the near net shaped production of component structures.

Geohegan, David B.; Seals, Roland D.; Puretzky, Alex A.; Fan, Xudong

2005-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

391

Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandRateStructure/Tier1Rate | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County,ContAddr2NumberOfPrograms Jump to:URI JumpEnergyInformation Rate

392

Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandRateStructure/Tier2Rate | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County,ContAddr2NumberOfPrograms Jump to:URIInformation Rate Jump to:

393

Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandRateStructure/Tier4Rate | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County,ContAddr2NumberOfPrograms Jump to:URIInformationInformation Rate

394

Spin Exchange Rates in Electron-Hydrogen Collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The spin temperature of neutral hydrogen, which determines the 21 cm optical depth and brightness temperature, is set by the competition between radiative and collisional processes. In the high-redshift intergalactic medium, the dominant collisions are typically those between hydrogen atoms. However, collisions with electrons couple much more efficiently to the spin state of hydrogen than do collisions with other hydrogen atoms and thus become important once the ionized fraction exceeds ~1%. Here we compute the rate at which electron-hydrogen collisions change the hydrogen spin. Previous calculations included only S-wave scattering and ignored resonances near the n=2 threshold. We provide accurate results, including all partial wave terms through the F-wave, for the de-excitation rate at temperatures T_K =2 hydrogen levels becomes significant. Accurate electron-hydrogen collision rates at higher temperatures are not necessary, because collisional excitation in this regime inevitably produces Lyman-alpha photons, which in turn dominate spin exchange when T_K > 6200 K even in the absence of radiative sources. Our rates differ from previous calculations by several percent over the temperature range of interest. We also consider some simple astrophysical examples where our spin de-excitation rates are useful.

Steven Furlanetto; Michael Furlanetto

2006-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

395

7, 29612989, 2007 Predicting arene rate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

software or computing power. Measured gas-phase rate coefficients for the reaction of aromatic hydrocarbons

Boyer, Edmond

396

Combined Retrieval, Microphysical Retrievals and Heating Rates  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Microphysical retrievals and heating rates from the AMIE/Gan deployment using the PNNL Combined Retrieval.

Feng, Zhe

397

Composite Fringe Benefit Rates Nancy R. Lewis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

January 1, 2015 Retirement Eligible FY 2014-15 Rate FY 2015-16 Rate FY 2016-17 Rate B Healthcomp Faculty of Research #12;New Rates · Provided by the Budget Office for use when planning proposal budgets for contract and grants · Effective for use in proposals submitted to sponsors January 1, 2015 and thereafter · Title

Wood, Marcelo A.

398

Combined Retrieval, Microphysical Retrievals and Heating Rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microphysical retrievals and heating rates from the AMIE/Gan deployment using the PNNL Combined Retrieval.

Feng, Zhe

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

399

G.M. Wright, VLT Highlight, March 28, 2012 Growth of tungsten nano-tendrils in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 G.M. Wright, VLT Highlight, March 28, 2012 Growth of tungsten nano-tendrils in the Alcator C morphology of a tungsten divertor modify into fuzz under Helium bombardment in ITER and reactors?! Linear fragile nano-tendrils! Increased unipolar arcing! Likely higher net erosion and W dust production

400

The Gamma Ray Burst Rate at High Photon Energies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Some gamma-ray burst (GRB) spectra exhibit high energy tails with the highest photon energy detected at 18 GeV. The spectral slope of the high-energy tails is sufficiently flat in nu F_nu to consider the possibility of their detection at still higher energies. We calculate how many bursts can reasonably be expected above a given energy threshold for a cosmological distribution of bursts satisfying the observed apparent brightness distribution. The crucial point is that the gamma-ray absorption by pair production in the intergalactic diffuse radiation field eliminates bursts from beyond the gamma-ray horizon tau ~ 1, thus drastically reducing the number of bursts at high energies. Our results are consistent with the non-detection of bursts by current experiments in the 100 GeV to 100 TeV energy range. For the earth-bound detector array MILAGRO, we predict a maximal GRB rate of ~ 10 events per year. The Whipple Observatory can detect, under favorable conditions, ~1 event per year. The event rate for the HEGRA array is ~ 0.01 per year. Detection of significantly higher rates of bursts would severely challenge cosmological burst scenarios.

Karl Mannheim; Dieter Hartmann; Burkhardt Funk

1996-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher growth rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Energetic condensation growth of Nb thin films  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

This paper describes energetic condensation growth of Nb films using a cathodic arc plasma, whose 60120 eV ions penetrate a few monolayers into the substrate and enable sufficient surface mobility to ensure that the lowest energy state (crystalline structure with minimal defects) is accessible to the film. Heteroepitaxial films of Nb were grown on ?-plane sapphire and MgO crystals with good superconducting properties and crystal size (10??mm 20??mm ) limited only by substrate size. The substrates were heated to temperatures of up to 700C and coated at 125C, 300C, 500C, and 700C . Film thickness was varied from ?0.25???m to >3???m . Residual resistivity ratio (RRR) values (up to a record (RRR)=587 on MgO and (RRR)=328 on ?-sapphire) depend strongly on substrate annealing and deposition temperatures. X-ray diffraction spectra and pole figures reveal that RRR increases as the crystal structure of the Nb film becomes more ordered, consistent with fewer defects and, hence, longer electron mean-free path. A transition from Nb(110) to Nb(100) orientation on the MgO(100) lattice occurs at higher temperatures. This transition is discussed in light of substrate heating and energetic condensation physics. Electron backscattered diffraction and scanning electron microscope images complement the XRD data.

Krishnan, M.; Valderrama, E.; James, C.; Zhao, X.; Spradlin, J.; Feliciano, A-M Valente; Phillips, L.; Reece, C. E.; Seo, K.; Sung, Z. H.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Emission from the D1D5 CFT: Higher Twists  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study a certain class of nonextremal D1D5 geometries and their ergoregion emission. Using a detailed CFT computation and the formalism developed in arXiv:0906.2015 [hep-th], we compute the full spectrum and rate of emission from the geometries and find exact agreement with the gravity answer. Previously, only part of the spectrum had been reproduced using a CFT description. We close with a discussion of the context and significance of the calculation.

Steven G. Avery; Borun D. Chowdhury

2009-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

403

Stress corrosion crack growth in porous sandstones.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stress corrosion crack growth occurs when the chemical weakening of strained crack tip bonds facilitates crack propagation. I have examined the effect of chemical processes on the growth of a creack population by carrying out triaxial compression...

Ojala, Ira O

404

Higher derivatives and power spectrum in effective single field inflation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study next-to-leading corrections to the effective action of the curvature perturbation obtained by integrating out the coupled heavy isocurvature perturbation. These corrections result from including higher order derivative operators, weighted by the mass scale of the heavy physics, in the effective theory expansion. We find that the correction terms are suppressed by the ratio of the Hubble parameter to the heavy mass scale. The corresponding corrections to the power spectrum of the curvature perturbation are presented for a simple illustrative example.

Jinn-Ouk Gong; Min-Seok Seo; Spyros Sypsas

2015-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

405

DOE Solid-State Lighting in Higher Ed Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of the workshop was on higher education facilities because college and university campuses are an important market for lighting products and they use almost every kind of luminaire on the market. This workshop was seen as a chance for SSL manufacturers large and small to get the inside scoop from a group of people that specify, pay for, install, use, maintain, and dispose of lighting systems for nearly every type of application. Workshop attendees explored the barriers to SSL adoption, the applications where SSL products could work better than existing technologies, and where SSL luminaires are currently falling short. This report summarizes the Workshop activities and presentation highlights.

Miller, Naomi J.; Curry, Ku'Uipo J.

2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

406

Mathematical problems in higher order gravity and cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the issue of motivating the analysis of higher order gravity theories and their cosmologies and introduce a rule which states that these theories may be considered as a vehicle for testing whether certain properties may be of relevance to quantum theory. We discuss the physicality issue arising as a consequence of the conformal transformation theorem, the question of formulating a consistent first order formalism of such theories and also the isotropization problem for a class of generalized cosmologies. We point out that this field may have an important role to play in clarifying issues arising also in general relativity.

S. Cotsakis

1997-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

407

Method for crystal growth control  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The growth of a crystalline body of a selected material is controlled so that the body has a selected cross-sectional shape. The apparatus is of the type which includes the structure normally employed in known capillary die devices as well as means for observing at least the portion of the surfaces of the growing crystalline body and the meniscus (of melt material from which the body is being pulled) including the solid/liquid/vapor junction in a direction substantially perpendicular to the meniscus surface formed at the junction when the growth of the crystalline body is under steady state conditions. The cross-sectional size of the growing crystalline body can be controlled by determining which points exhibit a sharp change in the amount of reflected radiation of a preselected wavelength and controlling the speed at which the body is being pulled or the temperature of the growth pool of melt so as to maintain those points exhibiting a sharp change at a preselected spatial position relative to a predetermined reference position. The improvement comprises reference object means positioned near the solid/liquid/vapor junction and capable of being observed by the means for observing so as to define said reference position so that the problems associated with convection current jitter are overcome.

Yates, Douglas A. (Burlington, MA); Hatch, Arthur E. (Waltham, MA); Goldsmith, Jeff M. (Medford, MA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Reaction Rate and Composition Dependence of the Stability of Thermonuclear Burning on Accreting Neutron Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The stability of thermonuclear burning of hydrogen and helium accreted onto neutron stars is strongly dependent on the mass accretion rate. The burning behavior is observed to change from Type I X-ray bursts to stable burning, with oscillatory burning occurring at the transition. Simulations predict the transition at a ten times higher mass accretion rate than observed. Using numerical models we investigate how the transition depends on the hydrogen, helium, and CNO mass fractions of the accreted material, as well as on the nuclear reaction rates of triple alpha and the hot-CNO breakout reactions 15O(a,g)19Ne and 18Ne(a,p)21Na. For a lower hydrogen content the transition is at higher accretion rates. Furthermore, most experimentally allowed reaction rate variations change the transition accretion rate by at most 10%. A factor ten decrease of the 15O(a,g)19Ne rate, however, produces an increase of the transition accretion rate of 35%. None of our models reproduce the transition at the observed rate, and depend...

Keek, L; Heger, A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Efficiency of energy funneling in the photosystem II supercomplex of higher plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The investigation of energy transfer properties in photosynthetic multi-protein networks gives insight into their underlying design principles.Here, we discuss excitonic energy transfer mechanisms of the photosystem II (PS-II) C$_2$S$_2$M$_2$ supercomplex, which is the largest isolated functional unit of the photosynthetic apparatus of higher plants.Despite the lack of a decisive energy gradient in C$_2$S$_2$M$_2$, we show that the energy transfer is directed by relaxation to low energy states. C$_2$S$_2$M$_2$ is not organized to form pathways with strict energetic downhill transfer, which has direct consequences on the transfer efficiency, transfer pathways and transfer limiting steps. The exciton dynamics is sensitive to small structural changes, which, for instance, are induced by the reorganization of vibrational coordinates. In order to incorporate the reorganization process in our numerical simulations, we go beyond rate equations and use the hierarchically coupled equation of motion approach (HEOM). Wh...

Kreisbeck, Christoph

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Reduced models of algae growth Heikki Haario,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reduced models of algae growth Heikki Haario, Leonid Kalachev Marko Laine, Lappeenranta University of the phenomena studied. Here, in the case of algae growth modelling, we show how a systematic model reduction may: Algae growth modelling, asymptotic methods, model reduction, MCMC, Adaptive Markov chain Monte Carlo. 1

Bardsley, John

411

Original article Growth stresses in tension wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Original article Growth stresses in tension wood: role of microfibrils and lignification T Okuyama the growth stress generation in the region of normal and tension woods. growth stress/ tension wood in normal and ten- sion wood. The compressive stress from the deposition of lignin controls the level

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

412

Real-time operating systems at higher control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although virtually all development of real-time operating systems focuses on the lowest of the three traditional control levels, sheet economics demands higher level real-time OSs. Meeting this demand requires a major change in the mindset of the people who have been focusing on the lowest level of control. {open_quotes}These people are trying to deal with an elephant`s tail, but they don`t realize that there is an elephant attached to it.{close_quotes} For more than three decades, the historical real-time mindset, concepts and techniques have been driven by a particular pair of contexts. First is the application context, which can be characterized as {open_quotes}small, simple, centralized, static subsystems for low-level, sampled data, monitoring and first-order control.{close_quotes} Second is the hardware context, characterized by a scarcity of hardware resources due to size, weight, power and cost considerations. Both of these contexts are changing dramatically in ways that {open_quotes}have a significant impact on the concepts and techniques of real-time computing.{close_quotes} Hardware now offers much higher performance and the real-time domain is expanding upward in the application control hierarchy.

Jensen, E.D.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Horizon entropy and higher curvature equations of state  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Clausius relation between entropy change and heat flux has previously been used to derive Einstein's field equations as an equation of state. In that derivation the entropy is proportional to the area of a local causal horizon, and the heat is the energy flux across the horizon, defined relative to an approximate boost Killing vector. We examine here whether a similar derivation can be given for extensions beyond Einstein gravity to include higher derivative and higher curvature terms. We review previous proposals which, in our opinion, are problematic or incomplete. Refining one of these, we assume that the horizon entropy depends on an approximate local Killing vector in a way that mimics the diffeomorphism Noether charge that yields the entropy of a stationary black hole. We show how this can be made to work if various restrictions are imposed on the nature of the horizon slices and the approximate Killing vector. Also, an integrability condition on the assumed horizon entropy density must hold. This can yield field equations of a Lagrangian constructed algebraically from the metric and Riemann tensor, but appears unlikely to allow for derivatives of curvature in the Lagrangian.

Raf Guedens; Ted Jacobson; Sudipta Sarkar

2012-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

414

Increase of Black Hole Entropy in Higher Curvature Gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine the Zeroth Law and the Second Law of black hole thermodynamics within the context of effective gravitational actions including higher curvature interactions. We show that entropy can never decrease for quasi-stationary processes in which a black hole accretes positive energy matter, independent of the details of the gravitational action. Within a class of higher curvature theories where the Lagrangian consists of a polynomial in the Ricci scalar, we use a conformally equivalent theory to establish that stationary black hole solutions with a Killing horizon satisfy the Zeroth Law, and that the Second Law holds in general for any dynamical process. We also introduce a new method for establishing the Second Law based on a generalization of the area theorem, which may prove useful for a wider class of Lagrangians. Finally, we show how one can infer the form of the black hole entropy, at least for the Ricci polynomial theories, by integrating the changes of mass and angular momentum in a quasistationary accretion process.

Ted Jacobson; Gungwon Kang; Robert C. Myers

1995-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

415

C-field cosmological model in higher dimensions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hoyle and Narlikar's $C$-field cosmology is extended in the framework of higher dimensional spacetime and a class of exact solutions is obtained. Adjusting the arbitrary constants of integration one can show that our model is amenable to the desirable property of dimensional reduction so that the universe ends up in an effective 4D one.Further with matter creation from the $C$-field the mass density steadies with time and the usual bigbang singularity is avoided. An alternative mechanism is also suggested which seems to provide matter creation in the 4D spacetime although total matter in the 5D world remains conserved. Quintessence phenomenon and energy conditions are also discussed and it is found that in line with the physical requirements our model admits a solution with a decelerating phase in the early era followed by an accelerated expansion later. Moreover, as the contribution from the $C$-field is made negligible a class of our solutions reduces to the previously known higher dimensional models in the framework of Einstein's theory.

S. Chatterjee; A. Banerjee

2003-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

416

Monopoles for gravitation and for higher spin fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We consider massless higher spin gauge theories with both electric and magnetic sources, with a special emphasis on the spin two case. We write the equations of motion at the linear level (with conserved external sources) and introduce Dirac strings so as to derive the equations from a variational principle. We then derive a quantization condition that generalizes the familiar Dirac quantization condition, and which involves the conserved charges associated with the asymptotic symmetries for higher spins. Next we discuss briefly how the result extends to the nonlinear theory. This is done in the context of gravitation, where the Taub-NUT solution provides the exact solution of the field equations with both types of sources. We rederive, in analogy with electromagnetism, the quantization condition from the quantization of the angular momentum. We also observe that the Taub-NUT metric is asymptotically flat at spatial infinity in the sense of Regge and Teitelboim (including their parity conditions). It follows, in particular, that one can consistently consider in the variational principle configurations with different electric and magnetic masses.

Bunster, Claudio; Portugues, Ruben [Centro de Estudios Cientificos (CECS), Valdivia (Chile); Cnockaert, Sandrine [Physique Theorique et Mathematique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles and International Solvay Institutes, ULB Campus Plaine C.P. 231, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Henneaux, Marc [Centro de Estudios Cientificos (CECS), Valdivia (Chile); Physique Theorique et Mathematique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles and International Solvay Institutes, ULB Campus Plaine C.P. 231, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

417

Development of nuclear models for higher energy calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two nuclear models for higher energy calculations have been developed in the regions of high and low energy transfer, respectively. In the former, a relativistic hybrid-type preequilibrium model is compared with data ranging from 60 to 800 MeV. Also, the GNASH exciton preequilibrium-model code with higher energy improvements is compared with data at 200 and 318 MeV. In the region of low energy transfer, nucleon-nucleus scattering is predominately a direct reaction involving quasi-elastic collisions with one or more target nucleons. We discuss various aspects of quasi-elastic scattering which are important in understanding features of cross sections and spin observables. These include (1) contributions from multi-step processes; (2) damping of the continuum response from 2p-2h excitations; (3) the ''optimal'' choice of frame in which to evaluate the nucleon-nucleon amplitudes; and (4) the effect of optical and spin-orbit distortions, which are included in a model based on the RPA the DWIA and the eikonal approximation. 33 refs., 15 figs.

Bozoian, M.; Siciliano, E.R.; Smith, R.D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Higher order harmonic detection for exploring nonlinear interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nonlinear dynamics underpin a vast array of physical phenomena ranging from interfacial motion to jamming transitions. In many cases, decoupling the contributions of competing or co-existing mechanisms to the system response can be achieved through investigation of higher order harmonics. Here, a method using band excitation scanning probe microscopy to investigate higher order harmonics of the electromechanical response, with nanometer scale spatial resolution is presented. The utility of the technique is demonstrated by probing the first three harmonics of strain for a well-known system, a model Pb(Zr1-xTix)O3 ferroelectric capacitor. It is shown that the second order harmonic response is correlated with the first harmonic response, whereas the third harmonic is not. Additionally, nanoscale measurements of the second harmonic response with field reveal significant deviations from Rayleigh-type models in the form of a much more complicated field dependence than is observed in the spatially averaged data. These results illustrate the versatility of combining proximal probe techniques with nth harmonic detection methods in exploring and decoupling nonlinear dynamics in a wide variety of nanoscale materials.

Vasudevan, Rama K [ORNL; Okatan, M. B. [University of New South Wales; Rajapaksa, Indrajit [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Kim, Yunseok [ORNL; Marincel, Dan [Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan [Pennsylvania State University; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Nagarajan, Valanoor [University of New South Wales; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Korea's Green Growth Strategy: Mitigating Climate Change and...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Korea's Green Growth Strategy: Mitigating Climate Change and Developing New Growth Engines Jump to: navigation, search Name Korea's Green Growth Strategy: Mitigating Climate Change...

420

Temporal variations of solar rotation rate at high latitudes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Frequency splitting coefficients from Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) and Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) observations covering the period 1995--2001 are used to study temporal variations in the solar rotation rate at high latitudes. The torsional oscillation pattern in the Sun is known to penetrate to a depth of about $0.1R_\\odot$ with alternate bands of faster and slower rotating plasma. At lower latitudes the bands move towards equator with time. At higher latitudes, however, the bands appear to move towards the poles. This is similar to the observed pole-ward movement of large scale magnetic fields at high latitudes. This also supports theoretical results of pole-ward moving bands at high latitudes in some mean field dynamo models. The polar rotation rate is found to decrease between 1995 and 1999 after which it has started increasing.

H. M. Antia; Sarbani Basu

2001-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher growth rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Higher coronary heart disease and heart attack morbidity in Appalachian coal mining regions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study analyzes the U.S. 2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey data (N = 235,783) to test whether self-reported cardiovascular disease rates are higher in Appalachian coal mining counties compared to other counties after control for other risks. Dependent variables include self-reported measures of ever (1) being diagnosed with cardiovascular disease (CVD) or with a specific form of CVD including (2) stroke, (3) heart attack, or (4) angina or coronary heart disease (CHD). Independent variables included coal mining, smoking, BMI, drinking, physician supply, diabetes co-morbidity, age, race/ethnicity, education, income, and others. SUDAAN Multilog models were estimated, and odds ratios tested for coal mining effects. After control for covariates, people in Appalachian coal mining areas reported significantly higher risk of CVD (OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.14-1.30), angina or CHO (OR = 1.29, 95% C1 = 1.19-1.39) and heart attack (OR = 1.19, 95% C1 = 1.10-1.30). Effects were present for both men and women. Cardiovascular diseases have been linked to both air and water contamination in ways consistent with toxicants found in coal and coal processing. Future research is indicated to assess air and water quality in coal mining communities in Appalachia, with corresponding environmental programs and standards established as indicated.

Hendryx, M.; Zullig, K.J. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States). Dept. of Community Medicine

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

422

From "Stages" of Business Growth to a Dynamic States Model of Entrepreneurial Growth and Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From "Stages" of Business Growth to a Dynamic States Model of Entrepreneurial Growth and Change and Gumpert, 1985), and virtually all economic models of business creation follow firm birth with firm growth models of new business growth assume a limited number of distinct stages through #12;3 which businesses

Mottram, Nigel

423

Growth promotants in feeding pigs and poultry. I. Growth and feed efficiency responses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review Growth promotants in feeding pigs and poultry. I. Growth and feed efficiency responses growth promoters of antibiotic type authorised in the Euro- pean Union as additives for pig and poultry) growth promoter / antibiotic / pig / poultry Résumé - Les promoteurs de croissance dans l

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

424

Growth and elemental composition of sorghum sudangrass grown on flyash/organic waste-amended soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A greenhouse study was conducted to evaluate the potential benefitsof using fly ash/organic waste mixtures amended to soils for growth andcomposition of mineral elements by `sorgrass` (Sorghum vulgaris var.sudanense Hitchc.) a shorghum-sudangrass hybrid plant. This experimentwas conducted using a 1:1 ratio of fly ash to either sewage sludge,poultry manure, or dairy manure at six application rates. Our threeorganic wastes when mixed with fly ash at varied rates of applicationresulted in elevated concentrations of NO{sub 3}, P, K, Ca, Mg, Mn, Fe, B,Cu and Zn in both soil and plants. The data of this study indicated thatthe availability of elements to plants varied according to the organicsource mixed with fly ash and the rate of application. The elements Band Zn were observed to be significantly greater in plant tissuesexposed to fly ash/poultry manure or fly ash/dairy manure mixtures.Soils amended with fly ash/sewage sludge or poultry manure generallyimproved plant growth and enhanced yield when applied at rates of 25tons/acre, and decreased thereafter. However, soils amended with flyash/dairy manure improved plant growth and enhanced yield when appliedat rates upto 50 tons/acre and decreased thereafter. The decreases inyield beyond these application rates were probably due to theaccumulation of high levels of B and Zn which are phytotoxic and/orelevated levels of inorganic dissolved salts. 22 refs., 4 tabs.

Sajwan, K.S. [Savannah State College, GA (United States); Ornes, W.H.; Youngblood, T.V. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Visualizing Higher Order Finite Elements: FY05 Yearly Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains an algorithm for decomposing higher-order finite elementsinto regions appropriate for isosurfacing and proves the conditions under which thealgorithm will terminate. Finite elements are used to create piecewise polynomialapproximants to the solution of partial differential equations for which no analyticalsolution exists. These polynomials represent fields such as pressure, stress, and mo-mentim. In the past, these polynomials have been linear in each parametric coordinate.Each polynomial coefficient must be uniquely determined by a simulation, and thesecoefficients are called degrees of freedom. When there are not enough degrees of free-dom, simulations will typically fail to produce a valid approximation to the solution.Recent work has shown that increasing the number of degrees of freedom by increas-ing the order of the polynomial approximation (instead of increasing the number offinite elements, each of which has its own set of coefficients) can allow some typesof simulations to produce a valid approximation with many fewer degrees of freedomthan increasing the number of finite elements alone. However, once the simulation hasdetermined the values of all the coefficients in a higher-order approximant, tools donot exist for visual inspection of the solution.This report focuses on a technique for the visual inspection of higher-order finiteelement simulation results based on decomposing each finite element into simplicialregions where existing visualization algorithms such as isosurfacing will work. Therequirements of the isosurfacing algorithm are enumerated and related to the placeswhere the partial derivatives of the polynomial become zero. The original isosurfacingalgorithm is then applied to each of these regions in turn.3 AcknowledgementThe authors would like to thank David Day and Louis Romero for their insight into poly-nomial system solvers and the LDRD Senior Council for the opportunity to pursue thisresearch. The authors were supported by the United States Department of Energy, Officeof Defense Programs by the Labratory Directed Research and Development Senior Coun-cil, project 90499. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation,a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contractDE-AC04-94-AL85000.4

Thompson, David; Pebay, Philippe Pierre

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Note: Operation of gamma-ray microcalorimeters at elevated count rates using filters with constraints  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microcalorimeter sensors operated near 0.1 K can measure the energy of individual x- and gamma-ray photons with significantly more precision than conventional semiconductor technologies. Both microcalorimeter arrays and higher per pixel count rates are desirable to increase the total throughput of spectrometers based on these devices. The millisecond recovery time of gamma-ray microcalorimeters and the resulting pulse pileup are significant obstacles to high per pixel count rates. Here, we demonstrate operation of a microcalorimeter detector at elevated count rates by use of convolution filters designed to be orthogonal to the exponential tail of a preceding pulse. These filters allow operation at 50% higher count rates than conventional filters while largely preserving sensor energy resolution.

Alpert, B. K.; Horansky, R. D.; Bennett, D. A.; Doriese, W. B.; Fowler, J. W.; Ullom, J. N. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States); Hoover, A. S.; Rabin, M. W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

427

Gas-bubble growth mechanisms in the analysis of metal fuel swelling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During steady-state irradiation, swelling rates associated with growth of fission-gas bubbles in metallic fast reactor fuels may be expected to remain small. As a consequence, bubble-growth mechanisms are not a major consideration in modeling the steady-state fuel behavior, and it is usually adequate to consider the gas pressure to be in equilibrium with the external pressure and surface tension restraint. On transient time scales, however, various bubble-growth mechanisms become important components of the swelling rate. These mechanisms include growth by diffusion, for bubbles within grains and on grain boundaries; dislocation nucleation at the bubble surface, or ''punchout''; and bubble growth by creep. Analyses of these mechanisms are presented and applied to provide information on the conditions and the relative time scales for which the various processes should dominate fuel swelling. The results are compared to a series of experiments in which the swelling of irradiated metal fuel was determined after annealing at various temperatures and pressures. The diffusive growth of bubbles on grain boundaries is concluded to be dominant in these experiments.

Gruber, E.E.; Kramer, J.M.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Home Energy Ratings and Building Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

climate as they affect the rating score of a proposed or completed structure. The rating is used to determine the most cost effective mechanical systems, building envelope design including window and door types, effect of various roofing materials...

Gardner, J.C.

429

Smokeless Control of Flare Steam Flow Rate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

measurement of mass flow rate of flare gas, in spite of the hostile environment. Its use for initiating control of flare steam flow rate and the addition of molecular weight compensation, using specific gravity (relative density) measurement to achieve...

Agar, J.; Balls, B. W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

2012 Wholesale Power and Transmission Rate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the meaning given such term in section 3.3.5. "COU Parties' PF Rate" means any BPA wholesale power rate for service to COUs' "general requirements" (as defined in section...

431

Kiwifruitsize influences softening rate during storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fruit size and the rate of softening under air and CA conditions will help cold storage managerssafelyparts per billion induce rapid kiwifruit softening during cold storage, we investigated the rate

Crisosto, Carlos H.

432

ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CONVERGENCE RATES OF ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Q-rates in terms of the di erential properties of v and in terms of the ... schemes of this kind is to assure that they converge at a provably fast rate to a point.

433

Energy Efficiency Interest Rate Reduction Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Alaska Housing Finance Corporation (AHFC) offers interest rate reductions to home buyers purchasing new and existing homes with 5 Star and 5 Star Plus energy ratings. All homes constructed on...

434

Variable-Rate State Gasoline Taxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J Bradshaw, "SLate F~es Gasoline Tax So ~t Wdl Rise," TheVarlable-Rate State Gasoline Taxers Jeffrey Ang-Olson MartinVariable-Rate State Gasoline Taxes Jeffrey Ang-Olson

Ang-Olson, Jeffrey; Wachs, Martin; Taylor, Brian D.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

An atomistic methodology of energy release rate for graphene at nanoscale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphene is a single layer of carbon atoms packed into a honeycomb architecture, serving as a fundamental building block for electric devices. Understanding the fracture mechanism of graphene under various conditions is crucial for tailoring the electrical and mechanical properties of graphene-based devices at atomic scale. Although most of the fracture mechanics concepts, such as stress intensity factors, are not applicable in molecular dynamics simulation, energy release rate still remains to be a feasible and crucial physical quantity to characterize the fracture mechanical property of materials at nanoscale. This work introduces an atomistic simulation methodology, based on the energy release rate, as a tool to unveil the fracture mechanism of graphene at nanoscale. This methodology can be easily extended to any atomistic material system. We have investigated both opening mode and mixed mode at different temperatures. Simulation results show that the critical energy release rate of graphene is independent of initial crack length at low temperature. Graphene with inclined pre-crack possesses higher fracture strength and fracture deformation but smaller critical energy release rate compared with the graphene with vertical pre-crack. Owing to its anisotropy, graphene with armchair chirality always has greater critical energy release rate than graphene with zigzag chirality. The increase of temperature leads to the reduction of fracture strength, fracture deformation, and the critical energy release rate of graphene. Also, higher temperature brings higher randomness of energy release rate of graphene under a variety of predefined crack lengths. The energy release rate is independent of the strain rate as long as the strain rate is small enough.

Zhang, Zhen; Lee, James D., E-mail: jdlee@gwu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, the George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Wang, Xianqiao [College of Engineering, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States)

2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

436

Need for guidance and controls on royalty rate reductions for federal coal leases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Secretary of the Interior has used his authority to reduce royalty rates on eight Federal coal leases - amounting to $12 million in reduced Federal revenues. Requests for royalty rate reductions were precipitated by recent legislative enactments and a 2-year departmental experiment that raised royalty rates on coal leases to significantly higher levels. Because the Secretary is authorized to readjust the royalty rates on 438 leases by 1990 more requests for royalty reductions are likely in the future. The Interior Department has not clearly defined its policy and procedures on royalty rate reductions. The approval process is inconsistent, and accounting and auditing expertise needed to evaluate reduction requests have not been used adequately. GAO recommends that Interior develop a more clearly defined policy and accompanying regulations on royalty rate reductions, determine when audits of applicants' financial statements are needed, and better use existing financial expertise in its evaluations of reduction requests.

Not Available

1982-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

437

Holography as a Gauge Phenomenon in Higher Spin Duality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Employing the world line spinning particle picture we discuss the appearance of several different `gauges' which we use to gain a deeper explanation of the Collective/Gravity identification. We discuss transformations and algebraic equivalences between them. For a bulk identification we develop a `gauge independent' representation where all gauge constraints are eliminated. This `gauge reduction' of Higher Spin Gravity demonstrates that the physical content of 4D AdS HS theory is represented by the dynamics of an unconstrained scalar field in 6d. It is in this gauge reduced form that HS Theory can be seen to be equivalent to a 3+3 dimensional bi-local collective representation of CFT3.

Robert de Mello Koch; Antal Jevicki; Joao P. Rodrigues; Junggi Yoon

2014-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

438

Higher-Dimensional Communication and S.E.T.I  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In cosmologies with more than four dimensions, of the type required for unification, it is possible for signals to have velocities in excess of that of light. Using a five-dimensional model which otherwise agrees with observations, two subjects are reviewed: (a) An exact solution of the field equations which describes a 4D spacetime with a large cosmological constant and waves travelling in ordinary 3D space with velocities exceeding lightspeed. (b) An example where the 4D interval or proper time is modulated by the systematic variation of the scalar field associated with the fifth dimension, providing a simple signalling method. These and related consequences of higher-dimensional cosmology have significant implications for astrophysics, and especially the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence.

Paul S. Wesson

2014-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

439

The geodesic rule for higher codimensional global defects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We generalize the geodesic rule to the case of formation of higher codimensional global defects. Relying on energetic arguments, we argue that, for such defects, the geometric structures of interest are the totally geodesic submanifolds. On the other hand, stochastic arguments lead to a diffusion equation approach, from which the geodesic rule is deduced. It turns out that the most appropriate geometric structure that one should consider is the convex hull of the values of the order parameter on the causal volumes whose collision gives rise to the defect. We explain why these two approaches lead to similar results when calculating the density of global defects by using a theorem of Cheeger and Gromoll. We present a computation of the probability of formation of strings/vortices in the case of a system, such as nematic liquid crystals, whose vacuum is $\\mathbb{R}P^2$.

Anthony J. Creaco; Nikos Kalogeropoulos

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

440

On higher derivative gravity, c-theorems and cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider higher derivative gravity lagrangians in 3 and 4 dimensions, which admit simple c-theorems, including upto six derivative curvature invariants. Following a suggestion by Myers, these lagrangians are restricted such that the fluctuations around (anti) de Sitter spaces have second order linearized equations of motion. We study c-theorems both in the context of AdS/CFT and cosmology. In the context of cosmology, the monotonic function is the entropy defined on the apparent horizon through Wald's formula. Exact black hole solutions which are asymptotically (anti) de Sitter are presented. An interesting lower bound for entropy is found in de Sitter space. Some aspects of cosmology in both D=3 and D=4 are discussed.

Aninda Sinha

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher growth rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Higher signal harmonics, LISA's angular resolution, and dark energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is generally believed that the angular resolution of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) for binary supermassive black holes (SMBH) will not be good enough to identify the host galaxy or galaxy cluster. This conclusion, based on using only the dominant harmonic of the binary SMBH signal, changes substantially when higher signal harmonics are included in assessing the parameter estimation problem. We show that in a subset of the source parameter space the angular resolution increases by more than a factor of 10, thereby making it possible for LISA to identify the host galaxy/galaxy cluster. Thus, LISA's observation of certain binary SMBH coalescence events could constrain the dark energy equation of state to within a few percent, comparable to the level expected from other dark energy missions.

K. G. Arun; Bala R. Iyer; B. S. Sathyaprakash; Siddhartha Sinha; Chris Van Den Broeck

2007-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

442

Pulse transmission transmitter including a higher order time derivate filter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Systems and methods for pulse-transmission low-power communication modes are disclosed. A pulse transmission transmitter includes: a clock; a pseudorandom polynomial generator coupled to the clock, the pseudorandom polynomial generator having a polynomial load input; an exclusive-OR gate coupled to the pseudorandom polynomial generator, the exclusive-OR gate having a serial data input; a programmable delay circuit coupled to both the clock and the exclusive-OR gate; a pulse generator coupled to the programmable delay circuit; and a higher order time derivative filter coupled to the pulse generator. The systems and methods significantly reduce lower-frequency emissions from pulse transmission spread-spectrum communication modes, which reduces potentially harmful interference to existing radio frequency services and users and also simultaneously permit transmission of multiple data bits by utilizing specific pulse shapes.

Dress Jr., William B.; Smith, Stephen F.

2003-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

443

Americium separation from nuclear fuel dissolution using higher oxidation states.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Much of the complexity in current AFCI proposals is driven by the need to separate the minor actinides from the lanthanides. Partitioning and recycling Am, but not Cm, would allow for significant simplification because Am has redox chemistry that may be exploited while Cm does not. Here, we have explored methods based on higher oxidation states of Am (AmV and AmVI) to partition Am from the lanthanides. In a separate but related approach we have also initiated an investigation of the utility of TRUEX Am extraction from thiocyanate solution. The stripping of loaded TRUEX by Am oxidation or SCN- has not yet proved successful; however, the partitioning of inextractable AmV by TRUEX shows promise.

Bruce J. Mincher

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Catalysts for conversion of methane to higher hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Catalysts for converting methane to higher hydrocarbons such as ethane and ethylene in the presence of oxygen at temperatures in the range of about 700.degree. to 900.degree. C. are described. These catalysts comprise calcium oxide or gadolinium oxide respectively promoted with about 0.025-0.4 mole and about 0.1-0.7 mole sodium pyrophosphate. A preferred reaction temperature in a range of about 800.degree. to 850.degree. C. with a preferred oxygen-to-methane ratio of about 2:1 provides an essentially constant C.sub.2 hydrocarbon yield in the range of about 12 to 19 percent over a period of time greater than about 20 hours.

Siriwardane, Ranjani V. (Morgantown, WV)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

The effect of copper deficiency on fetal growth and liver anti-oxidant capacity in the Cohen diabetic rat model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High sucrose low copper diet induces fetal growth restriction in the three strains of the Cohen diabetic rats: an inbred copper deficient resistant (CDr), an inbred copper deficient sensitive (CDs that become diabetic on high sucrose low copper diet -HSD) and an outbred Wistar derived Sabra rats. Although those growth restricted fetuses also exhibit increased oxidative stress, antioxidants do not restore normal growth. In the present study, we evaluated the role of copper deficiency in the HSD induced fetal growth restriction by adding to the drinking water of the rats 1 ppm or 2 ppm of copper throughout their pregnancy. Fetal and placental growth in correlation with fetal liver copper content and anti-oxidant capacity was evaluated on day 21 of pregnancy. HSD compared to regular chow induced fetal growth restriction, which was most significant in the Cohen diabetic sensitive animals. The addition of 1 ppm and 2 ppm copper to the drinking water normalized fetal growth in a dose dependent manner and reduced the degree of hyperglycemia in the diabetes sensitive rats. The CDs fetuses responded to the HSD with lower catalase like activity, and less reduced superoxide dismutase levels compared to the Sabra strain, and had high malondialdehyde levels even when fed regular chow. Immunostaining was higher for nitrotyrosine among the CDr and higher for hypoxia factor 1 ? among the CDs. We conclude that in our model of dietary-induced fetal growth restriction, copper deficiency plays a major etiologic role in the decrease of fetal growth and anti-oxidant capacity. -- Highlights: ? High sucrose low copper diet restricted fetal growth in the Cohen diabetic rat model ? Maternal copper blood levels directly correlated with fetal liver copper content ? Copper supplementation decreased embryonic resorption in the inbred strains ? Copper supplementation reduced hyperglycemia in the sucrose sensitive inbred strain ? Copper supplementation alleviated growth restriction and oxidative stress of liver.

Ergaz, Zivanit, E-mail: zivanit@hadassah.org.il [Hebrew University Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem (Israel)] [Hebrew University Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem (Israel); Shoshani-Dror, Dana [Hebrew University Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem (Israel)] [Hebrew University Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem (Israel); Guillemin, Claire [Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, McGill University, Montreal (Canada)] [Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Neeman-azulay, Meytal; Fudim, Liza [Hebrew University Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem (Israel)] [Hebrew University Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem (Israel); Weksler-Zangen, Sarah [Diabetes Research Unit, Hebrew University Hadassah Medical School and Hospital, Jerusalem (Israel)] [Diabetes Research Unit, Hebrew University Hadassah Medical School and Hospital, Jerusalem (Israel); Stodgell, Christopher J.; Miller, Richard K. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Rochester, Rochester, MN (United States)] [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Rochester, Rochester, MN (United States); Ornoy, Asher [Hebrew University Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem (Israel)] [Hebrew University Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem (Israel)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Effects of metallurgical variables on swelling of modified 316 and higher Ni austenitic stainless steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of solute elements and cold-work on swelling in modified 316 and higher Ni advanced austenitic stainless steels developed for FBR core material were investigated together with the posted model alloys. The Si, P, B, Ti, Nb modified and cold-worked steels exhibited an improved swelling resistance. In the temperature range between 400 and 500 C, the swelling was suppressed significantly by an addition of 0.8 wt% Si. The beneficial effect of Si appears to be reduced in the steels without Ti and Nb tending to form {gamma}{prime} precipitates. In the temperature range between 500 and 600 C, a needle-like phosphide precipitates played an important role in suppressing void growth. Additions of Ti and/or Nb were found to stabilize the phosphide phase and extended the swelling incubation period. In the improved austenitic steels, the synergistic effect of cold-working and P, B, Ti, Nb additions act beneficially to stabilize the dislocation structure and to form finely dispersed precipitates during irradiation.

Shibahara, Itaru; Akasaka, Naoaki; Onose, Shoji [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

447

Spontaneous Emission Rate Enhancement Using Optical Antennas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Spontaneous Emission in a Semiconductor nanoLED, emission rate enhancement using the Fluorescent Emission by Lattice Resonances in

Kumar, Nikhil

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Optimization Online - Faster convergence rates of relaxed ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jul 19, 2014 ... Faster convergence rates of relaxed Peaceman-Rachford and ADMM under regularity assumptions. Damek Davis (damek ***at***...

Damek Davis

2014-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

449

Commercial Buildings Partnerships - Overview of Higher Education Projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Commercial Building Partnership (CBP), a public/private, cost-shared program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), paired selected commercial building owners and operators with representatives of DOE, its national laboratories, and private-sector technical experts. These teams explored energy-saving measures across building systems including some considered too costly or technologically challenging and used advanced energy modeling to achieve peak whole-building performance. Modeling results were then included in new construction or retrofit designs to achieve significant energy reductions. CBP design goals aimed to achieve 50 percent energy savings compared to ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2004 for new construction, while retrofits are designed to consume at least 30 percent less energy than either Standard 90.1-2004 or current consumption. After construction and commissioning of the project, laboratory staff continued to work with partners to collect and analyze data for verification of the actual energy reduction. CBP projects represent diverse building types in commercial real estate, including lodging, grocery, retail, higher education, office, and warehouse/storage facilities. Partners also commit to replicating low-energy technologies and strategies from their CBP projects throughout their building portfolios. As a result of CBP projects, five sector overviews (Lodging, Food Sales, General Merchandise, Higher Education, Offices) were created to capture successful strategies and recommended energy efficiency measures that could broadly be applied across these sectors. These overviews are supplemented with individual case studies providing specific details on the decision criteria, modeling results, and lessons learned on specific projects. Sector overviews and CBP case studies will also be updated to reflect verified data and replication strategies as they become available.

Parrish, Kristen; Robinson, Alastair; Regnier, Cindy

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

2007 Wholesale Power Rate Case Initial Proposal : 2007 Wholesale Power Rate Schedule and General Rate Schedule Provisions.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This schedule is available for the contract purchase of Firm Power to be used within the Pacific Northwest (PNW). Priority Firm (PF) Power may be purchased by public bodies, cooperatives, and Federal agencies for resale to ultimate consumers, for direct consumption, and for Construction, Test and Start-Up, and Station Service. Rates in this schedule are in effect beginning October 1, 2006, and apply to purchases under requirements Firm Power sales contracts for a three-year period. The Slice Product is only available for public bodies and cooperatives who have signed Slice contracts for the FY 2002-2011 period. Utilities participating in the Residential Exchange Program (REP) under Section 5(c) of the Northwest Power Act may purchase Priority Firm Power pursuant to the Residential Exchange Program. Rates under contracts that contain charges that escalate based on BPA's Priority Firm Power rates shall be based on the three-year rates listed in this rate schedule in addition to applicable transmission charges. This rate schedule supersedes the PF-02 rate schedule, which went into effect October 1, 2001. Sales under the PF-07 rate schedule are subject to BPA's 2007 General Rate Schedule Provisions (2007 GRSPs). Products available under this rate schedule are defined in the 2007 GRSPs. For sales under this rate schedule, bills shall be rendered and payments due pursuant to BPA's 2007 GRSPs and billing process.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

WAGES, FLEXIBLE EXCHANGE RATES, AND MACROECONOMIC POLICY*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WAGES, FLEXIBLE EXCHANGE RATES, AND MACROECONOMIC POLICY* JEFFREY SACHS In an open economy with a floaLing exchange rate, the efficacy of fiscal and monetary policy depends fundamentally on the wage rate depreciation, while fiscal expansion has no output effect. These results hold only when real wages

452

AUXILIARY RATE CALCULATION The Budget Office  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AUXILIARY RATE CALCULATION The Budget Office #12;AGENDA Guiding Principles Rate Proposal Building Office supplies for budget manager reconciliationOffice supplies for budget manager reconciliation: Equipment Compensated Leave #12;CALCULATING A RATE Budgeted Expenses Budgeted Usage BaseBudgeted Usage Base

Weston, Ken

453

Spallation in ductile void growth  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mathematical model of ductile void growth under the application of a mean tensile stress is applied to the problem of spallation in solids. Calculation of plate-impact spallation in copper (peak compressive stress approx. 29 kbar) shows good agreement with the dynamically measured spall signal. A second calculation, using identical material parameters, of explosively produced spallation in copper (peak compressive stress approx. 250 kbar) does very well in reproducing experimentally observed multiple spall thicknesses as observed by dynamic x-radiographic techniques. This theoretical model thus appears applicable to a wide range of dynamic uniaxial-strain loading conditions, bridging a gap that has been thought to exist for some time.

Johnson, J.N.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

The effects of Bio-Mos on lamb growth and immune function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of inclusion of Bio-Mos in the growing ration for weaned lambs on growth rate, feed efficiency, and clinical measures of health of the lambs. Mannan oligosaccharides (MOS), when included as a...

Thayne, Jeffrey Thomas

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

455

Extending the utility of machine based height sensors to spatially monitor cotton growth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COTMAN using two sites selected from height data in place of six sites selected per COTMAN recommendations. The HMAP system was extended to monitor rate of growth in real time in addition to plant height by comparing historical plant height data recorded...

Geiger, David William

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

456

Analysis of calorimetric measurements of grain growth L. C. Chena) and F. Spaepen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solidification4 or vapor deposition,' or in some of the materials prepared by gas condensation and compaction,6Analysis of calorimetric measurements of grain growth L. C. Chena) and F. Spaepen Division. The Kissinger' analysis of the shift of the transformation peaks as a function of heating rate is perhaps

Spaepen, Frans A.

457

The differential effects of Ligula intestinalis (L.) plerocercoids on host growth in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

populations of roach, Rutilus rutilus (L.) Un resumen en espan? ol se incluye detra? s del texto principal de natural populations of roach, Rutilus rutilus (L.). Ecology of Freshwater Fish 2002: 11: 168 cestode, Ligula intestinalis, on the growth rates of three fish populations of the roach, Rutilus rutilus

Roche, Benjamin

458

Growth and virulence response of Salmonella typhimurium to soluble Maillard reaction products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: ________________________ ________________________ Steven C. Ricke Luc Berghman (Chair of Committee) (Member) ________________________ ________________________ J. Allen Byrd Randle Moore.... Ricke In order to determine the effects that Maillard Reaction Products (MRP) have on Salmonella Typhimurium, growth rates and virulence expression, in the presence of Maillard reaction products, were observed, using the ?? galactosidase Miller Assay...

Kundinger, Megan Mary

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

459

Routine and Active Metabolic Rates of Migrating Adult Wild Sockeye Salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka Walbaum) in Seawater and Freshwater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in freshwater at all swimming speeds except those approaching critical swimming speed. Dur- ing a 45-min- water. When fish performed a second swim test, active meta- bolic rates again remained 28%­81% higher for fish in seawater except at the critical swimming speed. Despite their differences in metabolic rates

Farrell, Anthony P.

460

West Virginia University -Main Campus Student Retention and Graduation Rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

West Virginia University - Main Campus Student Retention and Graduation Rates First-Time, Full ---------------------------------------------------------------------Continuation Rates and Cumulative Graduation Rates

Mohaghegh, Shahab

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher growth rates" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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461

Grain growth in a conventional titanium alloy during rapid, continuous heat treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the present work was to analyze the kinetics of beta grain growth during rapid, continuous heating of a conventional alpha-beta titanium alloy. The analysis was based on approximate, closed-form theoretical expressions derived by Bourell and Kaysser and Soper and Semiatin as well as a fully numerical, computer-based approach. The problem and approach discussed here differs from previous investigations of grain growth during continuous heating and cooling, most of which have been for austenite grain growth in the heat-affected zone during welding of steels. In this regard, the main features of the present work are the very high heating rates involved, the avoidance of the application of complex numerical integration schemes, and the avoidance of using isothermal grain growth kinetic data to fit continuous heating results.

Semiatin, S.L. (Wright Lab., Wright-Patterson AFB, OH (United States)); Soper, J.C. (Wright State Univ., Dayton, OH (United States)); Sukonnik, I.M. (Texas Instruments, Inc., Attleboro, MA (United States))

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Apparatus for monitoring crystal growth  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and method are disclosed for monitoring the growth of a crystalline body from a liquid meniscus in a furnace. The system provides an improved human/machine interface so as to reduce operator stress, strain and fatigue while improving the conditions for observation and control of the growing process. The system comprises suitable optics for forming an image of the meniscus and body wherein the image is anamorphic so that the entire meniscus can be viewed with good resolution in both the width and height dimensions. The system also comprises a video display for displaying the anamorphic image. The video display includes means for enhancing the contrast between any two contrasting points in the image. The video display also comprises a signal averager for averaging the intensity of at least one preselected portions of the image. The value of the average intensity, can in turn be utilized to control the growth of the body. The system and method are also capable of observing and monitoring multiple processes.

Sachs, Emanual M. (Watertown, MA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Method of monitoring crystal growth  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and method are disclosed for monitoring the growth of a crystalline body from a liquid meniscus in a furnace. The system provides an improved human/machine interface so as to reduce operator stress, strain and fatigue while improving the conditions for observation and control of the growing process. The system comprises suitable optics for forming an image of the meniscus and body wherein the image is anamorphic so that the entire meniscus can be viewed with good resolution in both the width and height dimensions. The system also comprises a video display for displaying the anamorphic image. The video display includes means for enhancing the contrast between any two contrasting points in the image. The video display also comprises a signal averager for averaging the intensity of at least one preselected portions of the image. The value of the average intensity, can in turn be utilized to control the growth of the body. The system and method are also capable of observing and monitoring multiple processes.

Sachs, Emanual M. (Watertown, MA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

honeys were classified higher and were pre-ferred. Honeys with an ethanol content  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

honeys were classified higher and were pre- ferred. Honeys with an ethanol content higher than 100 with an ethanol con- tent higher than 1000 mg·kg-1 were classi- fied as 'extremely fermented'. Ethanol

Boyer, Edmond

465

FITCH RATES ENERGY NORTHWEST (WA) ELECTRIC REV REF BONDS 'AA...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FITCH RATES ENERGY NORTHWEST (WA) ELECTRIC REV REF BONDS 'AA'; OUTLOOK STABLE Fitch Ratings-Austin-08 April 2015: Fitch Ratings assigns 'AA' ratings to the following Energy...

466

Hydrodynamic instability growth and mix experiments at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrodynamic instability growth and its effects on implosion performance were studied at the National Ignition Facility [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 443, 2841 (2004)]. Implosion performance and mix have been measured at peak compression using plastic shells filled with tritium gas and containing embedded localized carbon-deuterium diagnostic layers in various locations in the ablator. Neutron yield and ion temperature of the deuterium-tritium fusion reactions were used as a measure of shell-gas mix, while neutron yield of the tritium-tritium fusion reaction was used as a measure of implosion performance. The results have indicated that the low-mode hydrodynamic instabilities due to surface roughness were the primary culprits for yield degradation, with atomic ablator-gas mix playing a secondary role. In addition, spherical shells with pre-imposed 2D modulations were used to measure instability growth in the acceleration phase of the implosions. The capsules were imploded using ignition-relevant laser pulses, and ablation-front modulation growth was measured using x-ray radiography for a shell convergence ratio of ?2. The measured growth was in good agreement with that predicted, thus validating simulations for the fastest growing modulations with mode numbers up to 90 in the acceleration phase. Future experiments will be focused on measurements at higher convergence, higher-mode number modulations, and growth occurring during the deceleration phase.

Smalyuk, V. A.; Barrios, M.; Caggiano, J. A.; Casey, D. T.; Cerjan, C. J.; Clark, D. S.; Edwards, M. J.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A.; Hsing, W. W.; Hurricane, O.; Kroll, J.; Landen, O. L.; Lindl, J. D.; Ma, T.; McNaney, J. M.; Mintz, M.; Parham, T.; Peterson, J. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, NIF Directorate, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, NIF Directorate, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

467

Regional growth and energy supply: Is there an energy security issue?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study examines how the growth of the developing world might affect energy markets in the future. Based on recent growth trends, world energy demand could reasonably be expected to grow from about 350 Exajoules (EJ: 1.0E18=0.95 Quad) to nearly 1025 EJ by the year 2020, nearly 3x current consumption estimates. Introduction of more energy-efficient technologies could reduce this growth by about 17% to 830 EJ. But one cannot rely exclusively on current trends to forecast future energy demand. The growth of the developing world will interact with supply to affect prices, which in turn will mitigate the growth of demand, and growth rates of energy use will be much more modes. Under the Business as Usual scenario, energy demand will grow to 835 EJ by 2020, and this could be reduced a further 15% to 714 EJ through the adoption of more energy efficient technologies. Fuel prices based on model results are analyzed. Energy security implications of rapid growth in the developing world are considered and found to be of likely little significance.

Roop, J.M.; Freund, K.A.; Godoy-Kain, P.; Gu, A.Y.; Johnson, A.K.; Paananen, O.H.; Woodruff, M.G.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Space-charged-induced emittance growth in the transport of high-brightness electron beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The emittance induced by space charge in a drifting beam of finite length has been investigated, and a scaling law has been obtained from simple considerations of the different rates of expansion of different portions of the beam. The scaling law predicts the initial rate of emittance growth, before the beam shape has distorted significantly, and thus represents an upper bound on the rate of emittance increase. This scaling law has been substantiated by particle-in-cell simulation and the dependence on geometric factors evaluated for specific choices of the beam profile. For long, axially nonuniform beams, the geometric factors have been evaluated explicitly for Gaussian profiles, and other shapes.

Jones, M.E.; Carlsten, B.E.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Thermodynamics of higher spin black holes in 3D  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine the thermodynamic properties of recently constructed black hole solutions in SL(3,R) x SL(3,R) Chern-Simons theory in the presence of a chemical potential for spin-3 charge, which acts as an irrelevant deformation of the dual CFT with W_3 x W_3 symmetry. The smoothness or holonomy conditions admit four branches of solutions describing a flow between two AdS_3 backgrounds corresponding to two different CFTs. The dominant branch at low temperatures, connected to the BTZ black hole, merges smoothly with a thermodynamically unstable branch and disappears at higher temperatures. We confirm that the UV region of the flow satisfies the Ward identities of a CFT with W_3^(2) x W_3^(2) symmetry deformed by a spin-3/2 current. This allows to identify the precise map between UV and IR thermodynamic variables. We find that the high temperature regime is dominated by a black hole branch whose thermodynamics can only be consistently inferred with reference to this W_3^(2) x W_3^(2) CFT.

Justin R. David; Michael Ferlaino; S. Prem Kumar

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

PROMOTED ZINC CHROMITE CATALYSTS FOR HIGHER ALCOHOL SYNTHESIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During this reporting period, a ''zinc chromite'' catalyst promoted with 6 wt.% cesium (Cs) was evaluated at the following conditions: Temperature--375 C; Total Pressure--6.8 MPa (1000 psig); Gas Hourly Space Velocity (GHSV) - 5000 standard liters/kg(cat)-hr, and; H{sub 2}/CO feed ratio--1.0 mole/mole. Decahydronaphthalene (DHN) was used as the slurry liquid. The experiment lasted for eight days of continuous operation. Although the experimental data once again did not exhibit the desired degree of consistency, the data did show that methanol was the primary reaction product. The slurry liquid did not decompose or alkylate to a measurable extent during the continuous 8-day experiment. There was a relatively significant loss of catalyst surface area during the experiment. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis of various fractions of ''spent'' THQ was carried out. The fractions were prepared by silica gel liquid chromatography (LC). Chemical formuli and probable structures for each major compound were obtained. However, a higher degree of purification will be necessary to allow nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis to be used for definitive compound identification. A new Maxpro gas booster (DLE 15-75) was purchased because the existing Haskel gas booster once again developed a severe leak of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, and was judged to be unworthy of repair.

Ms. Xiaolei Sun; Professor George W. Roberts

2000-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

471

Higher-order web link analysis using multilinear algebra.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Linear algebra is a powerful and proven tool in web search. Techniques, such as the PageRank algorithm of Brin and Page and the HITS algorithm of Kleinberg, score web pages based on the principal eigenvector (or singular vector) of a particular non-negative matrix that captures the hyperlink structure of the web graph. We propose and test a new methodology that uses multilinear algebra to elicit more information from a higher-order representation of the hyperlink graph. We start by labeling the edges in our graph with the anchor text of the hyperlinks so that the associated linear algebra representation is a sparse, three-way tensor. The first two dimensions of the tensor represent the web pages while the third dimension adds the anchor text. We then use the rank-1 factors of a multilinear PARAFAC tensor decomposition, which are akin to singular vectors of the SVD, to automatically identify topics in the collection along with the associated authoritative web pages.

Kenny, Joseph P.; Bader, Brett William (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Kolda, Tamara Gibson

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Business Association Joint Task Force Position on Higher Education December 2010 Business Association Joint Task Force Position on Higher Education December 2010 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Business Association Joint Task Force Position on Higher Education ­ December 2010 Business Association Joint Task Force Position on Higher Education ­ December 2010 1 Joint Business Association Task Force on Higher Education Summary The four business associations, Associated Oregon Industries, Oregon

Escher, Christine

473

Physics of Substorm Growth Phase, Onset, and Dipolarization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new scenario of substorm growth phase, onset, and depolarization during expansion phase and the corresponding physical processes are presented. During the growth phase, as a result of enhanced plasma convection, the plasma pressure and its gradient are continued to be enhanced over the quiet-time values in the plasma sheet. Toward the late growth phase, a strong cross-tail current sheet is formed in the near-Earth plasma sheet region, where a local magnetic well is formed, the plasma beta can reach a local maximum with value larger than 50 and the cross-tail current density can be enhanced to over 10nA/m{sup 2} as obtained from 3D quasi-static magnetospheric equilibrium solutions for the growth phase. The most unstable kinetic ballooning instabilities (KBI) are expected to be located in the tailward side of the strong cross-tail current sheet region. The field lines in the most unstable KBI region map to the transition region between the region-1 and region-2 currents in the ionosphere, which is consistent with the observed initial brightening location of the breakup arc in the intense proton precipitation region. The KBI explains the AMPTE/CCE observations that a low-frequency instability with a wave period of 50-75 seconds is excited about 2-3 minutes prior to substorm onset and grows exponentially to a large amplitude at the onset of current disruption (or current reduction). At the current disruption onset higher frequency instabilities are excited so that the plasma and electromagnetic field fluctuations form a strong turbulent state. Plasma transport takes place due to the strong turbulence to relax the ambient plasma pressure profile so that the plasma pressure and current density are reduced and the ambient magnetic field intensity increases by more than a factor of 2 in the high-beta(sub)eq region and the field line geometry recovers from tail-like to dipole-like dipolarization.

C.Z. Cheng

2003-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

474

Growth of Spirals: Secular or Driven by Mergers ?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The physical phenomena contributing to the galaxy growth can be tested all the way to z= 1. Galaxy mass, extinction, star formation and gas metal abundance can be measured in a robust way, as well as the distribution of the galaxy morphologies. I discuss here the observational methods and their accuracy. Physical quantities can be evaluated with uncertainties much lower than 0.3 dex, if they are based on 2 sets of independent measurements. For example, at a given IMF, the star formation rate is well estimated by combining flux measurements of the extinction corrected Balmer line and of the mid-IR continuum. Spiral mass growth had occurred from gas accretion and from merging. Gas accretion can explain at most half of the spiral mass growth: at moderate redshift, the numerous population of compact, merger and irregular galaxies requires another origin. A spiral rebuilding scenario is able to reproduce all the evolutionary trends observed since z~1, and could be at the origin of the present-day, numerous population of early type spirals.

F. Hammer

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

475

Method and apparatus for aluminum nitride monocrystal boule growth  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A crystal growth setup within a physical vapor transport growth furnace system for producing AlN monocrystal boules at high temperatures includes a crucible effective to contain an AlN source material and a growing AlN crystal boule. This crucible has a thin wall thickness in at least that portion housing the growing AlN crystal boule. Other components include a susceptor, in case of an inductive heating, or a heater, in case of a resistive heating, a thermal insulation enclosing the susceptor or heater effective to provide a thermal gradient inside the crucible in the range of 5-100.degree. C./cm and a furnace chamber capable of being operated from a vacuum (<0.1 torr) to a gas pressure of at least 4000 torr through filling or flowing a nitrogen gas or a mixture of nitrogen gas and argon gas. The high temperatures contribute to a high boule growth rate and the thin wall thickness contributes to reduced imparted stress during boule removal.

Wang, Shaoping (Brookfield, CT)

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

476

E-Print Network 3.0 - attending higher education Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sample search results for: attending higher education Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 The political economy of mass higher education: shrinking the 'public' and elevating the 'market'...

477

Mechanical and microstructural response of Ni sub 3 Al at high strain rate and elevated temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, the effect of strain rate and temperature on the substructure evolution and mechanical response of Ni{sub 3}Al will be presented. The strain rate response of Ni{sub 3}Al was studied at strain rates from 10{sup {minus}3} s{sup {minus}1} (quasi-static) to 10{sup 4} s{sup {minus}1} using a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar. The Hopkinson Bar tests were conducted at temperatures ranging from 77K to 1273K. At high strain rates the flow strength increased significantly with increasing temperature, similar to the behavior observed at quasi-static rates. The work hardening rates increased with strain rate and varied with temperatures. The work hardening rates, appeared to be significantly higher than those found for Ni270. The substructure evolution was characterized utilizing TEM. The defect generation and rate sensitivity of Ni{sub 3}Al are also discussed as a function of strain rate and temperature. 15 refs., 4 figs.

Sizek, H.W.; Gray, G.T. III.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Phenomenological approach for describing environment dependent growths  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Different classes of phenomenological universalities of environment dependent growths have been proposed. The logistic as well as environment dependent West-type allometry based biological growth can be explained in this proposed framework of phenomenological description. It is shown that logistic and environment dependent West-type growths are phenomenologically identical in nature. However there is a difference between them in terms of coefficients involved in the phenomenological descriptions. It is also established that environment independent and enviornment dependent biological growth processes lead to the same West-type biological growth equation. Involuted Gompertz function, used to describe biological growth processes undergoing atrophy or a demographic and economic system undergoing involution or regression, can be addressed in this proposed environment dependent description. In addition, some other phenomenological descriptions have been examined in this proposed framework and graphical representations of variation of different parameters involved in the description are executed.

Dibyendu Biswas; Swarup Poria

2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

479

Controlled Nucleation and Growth Process of Li2S2/Li2S in Lithium-Sulfur Batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lithium-sulfur battery is a promising next-generation energy storage system because of its potentially three to five times higher energy density than that of traditional lithium ion batteries. However, the dissolution and precipitation of soluble polysulfides during cycling initiate a series of key-chain reactions that significantly shorten battery life. Herein, we demonstrate that through a simple but effective strategy, significantly improved cycling performance is achieved for high sulfur loading electrodes through controlling the nucleation and precipitation of polysulfieds on the electrode surface. More than 400 or 760 stable cycling are successfully displayed in the cells with locked discharge capacity of 625 mAh g-1 or 500 mAh g-1, respectively. The nucleation and growth process of dissolved polysulfides has been electrochemically altered to confine the thickness of discharge products passivated on the cathode surface, increasing the utilization rate of sulfur while avoiding severe morphology changes on the electrode. More importantly, the exposure of new lithium metal surface to the S-containing electrolyte is also greatly reduced through this strategy, largely minimizing the anode corrosion caused by polysulfides. This work interlocks the electrode morphologies and its evolution with electrochemical interference to modulate cell performances by using Li-S system as a platform, providing different but critical directions for this community.

Zheng, Jianming; Gu, Meng; Wang, Chong M.; Zuo, Pengjian; Koech, Phillip K.; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

480

Atmospheric pressure flow reactor / aerosol mass spectrometer studies of tropospheric aerosol nucleat and growth kinetics. Final report, June, 2001  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this program was to determine the mechanisms and rates of growth and transformation and growth processes that control secondary aerosol particles in both the clear and polluted troposphere. The experimental plan coupled an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) with a chemical ionization mass spectrometer to provide simultaneous measurement of condensed and particle phases. The first task investigated the kinetics of tropospheric particle growth and transformation by measuring vapor accretion to particles (uptake coefficients, including mass accommodation coefficients and heterogeneous reaction rate coefficients). Other work initiated investigation of aerosol nucleation processes by monitoring the appearance of submicron particles with the AMS as a function of precursor gas concentrations. Three projects were investigated during the program: (1) Ozonolysis of oleic acid aerosols as model of chemical reactivity of secondary organic aerosol; (2) Activation of soot particles by measurement deliquescence in the presence of sulfuric acid and water vapor; (3) Controlled nucleation and growth of sulfuric acid aerosols.

Worsnop, Douglas R.

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Evolution of (001) and (111) facets for selective epitaxial growth inside submicron trenches  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The evolution of (001) and (111) facets for the epitaxial growth inside submicron trenches is systematically studied in this report. The analysis with the method of Lagrange multiplier indicates the equilibrium crystal shape. In the case of non-equilibrium without external fluxes, we employed the weighted mean curvature method to mathematically model the inter-facet migration rate for two extreme kinetic cases: surface diffusion limited and surface attachment/detachment limited. Coupled with external supply of atoms, the self-limited behavior of facet size is theoretically predicted. Moreover, we find that the self-limited stable facet size in trenches of different widths has a specific relationship determined by the surface energy ratio, kinetic rate ratio, and isolated growth rate difference. The two limited cases could be discriminated according to the mathematical fitting of one exponent in this relationship based on the stable facet size in trenches of different widths.

Jiang, S., E-mail: jiang@imec.be; Heyns, M., E-mail: marc.heyns@imec.be [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, KULeuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44-bus 2450, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Merckling, C.; Guo, W.; Waldron, N.; Caymax, M. [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Vandervorst, W. [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Department of Physics and Astronomy, KULeuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D-bus 2418, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Seefeldt, M. [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, KULeuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44-bus 2450, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium)

2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

482

Thermomechanical cavity-growth modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of recent field tests, laboratory studies, and modeling efforts in UCG have indicated that the thermal and mechanical properties of coal may be the controlling parameters in determining initial cavity shape. In examining this possibility, laboratory efforts have been directed at determining temperature and bedding plane dependent properties of coal. A thermomechanical model which uses these properties has indicated that the cavity shapes seen at both the Hanna and Hoe Creek test sites result from the temperature dependent properties of the coal such as the coefficients of thermal expansion and the elastic moduli. The model determines stress levels and uses a simple bedding plane dependent stress failure mechanism to determine cavity growth.

Glass, R.E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain that binds a heparin-binding growth factor receptor, covalently bound to a hydrophobic linker, which is in turn covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

Pena, Louis A.; Zamora, Paul; Lin, Xinhua; Glass, John D.

2007-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

484

Modelling of silicon oxynitridation by nitrous oxide using the reaction rate approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large technological progress in oxynitridation processing leads to the introduction of silicon oxynitride as ultra-thin gate oxide. On the theoretical side, few studies have been dedicated to the process modelling of oxynitridation. Such an objective is a considerable challenge regarding the various atomistic mechanisms occurring during this fabrication step. In this article, some progress performed to adapt the reaction rate approach for the modelling of oxynitride growth by a nitrous ambient are reported. The Ellis and Buhrman's approach is used for the gas phase decomposition modelling. Taking into account the mass balance of the species at the interface between the oxynitride and silicon, a minimal kinetic model describing the oxide growth has been calibrated and implemented. The influence of nitrogen on the reaction rate has been introduced in an empirical way. The oxidation kinetics predicted with this minimal model compares well with several experiments.

Dominique Krzeminski, Christophe, E-mail: christophe.krzeminski@isen.fr [Dpartment ISEN, IEMN-UMR-8520, 41 Boulevard Vauban, 59046 Lille Cedex (France)

2013-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

485

Labeling energy cost on light bulbs lowers implicit discount rates Jihoon Min a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

levels that could be achieved if the most energy-efficient and cost-effective end-use technologiesAnalysis Labeling energy cost on light bulbs lowers implicit discount rates Jihoon Min a , Ins L of five, lowering barriers to adoption of energy efficient alternatives with higher up-front costs

Michalek, Jeremy J.

486

HEART RATE AS A MONITOR FOR METABOLIC RATE IN CAPTIVE JUVENILE STELLER SEA LIONS (EUMETOPIAS JUBATUS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HEART RATE AS A MONITOR FOR METABOLIC RATE IN CAPTIVE JUVENILE STELLER SEA LIONS (EUMETOPIAS COLUMBIA 0Jan M. Mcl'hee, 2001 #12;ABSTRACT The potential use of heart rate to monitor energy expenditure a relationship exists between heart rate @I) and oxygen consumption ( ~ 0 ~ )in captive sea lions while swimming

487

An Examination of Harvest Rates and Brood-Take Rates as  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Examination of Harvest Rates and Brood-Take Rates as Management Strategies to Assist Recovery of Resource Management Project Number: 546 Title of Project: An Examination of Harvest Rates and Brood-Take Rates as Management Strategies to Assist Recovery of Cowichan River Chinook Salmon Examining Committee

488

Optimization Online - Robust Growth-Optimal Portfolios  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

May 24, 2014 ... Abstract: The growth-optimal portfolio is designed to have maximum ... the asset return distribution, which is not directly observable but must be...

Napat Rujeerapaiboon

2014-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

489

Essays on Indias Economic Growth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

initial euphoria about liberalisation, a revisionist viewand industrial policy liberalisation. Three, growth in thebuilt up under the pre-liberalisation policy regime), their

Singh, Nirvikar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Theoretical Ecology: Continued growth and success  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EDITORIAL Theoretical Ecology: Continued growth and successof areas in theoretical ecology. Among the highlights areyear represent theoretical ecology from around the world: 20

Hastings, Alan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

"Conflict Between Economic Growth and Environmental Protection...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dr. Bryan Czech, resident, Center for the Advancement of the Steady State of the Economy Presentation: Presentation Abstract: Abstract Conflict Between Economic Growth and...

492

IN THIS ISSUE Excessive Cotton Growth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AGRONOMY NOTES July, 2004 IN THIS ISSUE COTTON Excessive Cotton Growth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Management Influence on Hardlock Cotton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Wet Conditions and Nitrogen Applications on Cotton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Watson, Craig A.

493

Photovoltaic Degradation Rates -- An Analytical Review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As photovoltaic penetration of the power grid increases, accurate predictions of return on investment require accurate prediction of decreased power output over time. Degradation rates must be known in order to predict power delivery. This article reviews degradation rates of flat-plate terrestrial modules and systems reported in published literature from field testing throughout the last 40 years. Nearly 2000 degradation rates, measured on individual modules or entire systems, have been assembled from the literature, showing a median value of 0.5%/year. The review consists of three parts: a brief historical outline, an analytical summary of degradation rates, and a detailed bibliography partitioned by technology.

Jordan, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Confronting the Graduation Rate Crisis in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Guide to Graduation Policy and Rates, Editorial Projects inthe Graduation Crisis. Bethesda, MD: Editorial Projects inthe Graduation Crisis. Bethesda, MD: Editorial Projects in

Losen, Daniel; Orfield, Gary; Balfanz, Robert

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

CM-1-H Wholesale Power Rate Schedule  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Availability:This rate schedule shall be available to the South Mississippi Electric Power Association, Municipal Energy Agency of Mississippi, and Mississippi Delta Energy Agency (hereinafter...

496

Convergence Rates with Inexact Nonexpansive Operators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Apr 18, 2014 ... Abstract: In this paper, we present a convergence rate analysis for the inexact Krasnosel'ski{\\u{\\i}}-Mann iteration built from nonexpansive...

Jingwei Liang

2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

497

Method of controlling fusion reaction rates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to a method of controlling the reaction rates in a nuclear fusion reactor; and more particularly, to the use of polarized nuclear fuel.

Kulsrud, R.M.; Furth, H.P.; Valeo, E.J.; Goldhaber, M.

1983-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

498

2006 Texas High Plains Cotton Variety Ratings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Average Incidence of Wilt Date of Wilt Rating Earth 0.0 0.0 Sept. 8 Brownfield 5.5 1.8 Aug. 28 Petersburg

Mukhtar, Saqib

499

Home energy rating systems: Program descriptions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the descriptions of home energy rating and labelling programs (HERS) that were surveyed in January 1986 as part of a national evaluation of HERS.

Vine, E.; Barnes, B.K.; Ritschard, R.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

The push for increased coal injection rates -- Blast furnace experience at AK Steel Corporation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An effort has been undertaken to increase the coal injection rate on Amanda blast furnace at AK Steel Corporation`s Ashland Works in Ashland, Kentucky to decrease fuel costs and reduce coke demand. Operating practices have been implemented to achieve a sustained coal injection rate of 140 kg/MT, increased from 100--110 kg/MT. In order to operate successfully at the 140 kg/MT injection rate; changes were implemented to the furnace charging practice, coal rate control methodology, orientation of the injection point, and the manner of distribution of coal to the multiple injection points. Additionally, changes were implemented in the coal processing facility to accommodate the higher demand of pulverized coal; grinding 29 tonnes per hour, increased from 25 tonnes per hour. Further increases in injection rate will require a supplemental supply of fuel.

Dibert, W.A.; Duncan, J.H.; Keaton, D.E.; Smith, M.D. [AK Steel Corp., Middletown, OH (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z