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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Heat wave contributes to higher summer electricity demand in...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

contributes to higher summer electricity demand in the Northeast In its new energy forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration expects summer retail electricity prices...

2

Heat wave contributes to higher summer electricity demand in...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

more than a decade, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration EIA's new forecast shows household electricity use is expected to drop 1.1 percent this year and then...

3

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

4

Electrical Demand Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Demand Management Plan set forth in this paper has proven to be a viable action to reduce a 3 million per year electric bill at the Columbus Works location of Western Electric. Measures are outlined which have reduced the peak demand 5% below the previous year's level and yielded $150,000 annual savings. These measures include rescheduling of selected operations and demand limiting techniques such as fuel switching to alternate power sources during periods of high peak demand. For example, by rescheduling the startup of five heat treat annealing ovens to second shift, 950 kW of load was shifted off peak. Also, retired, non-productive steam turbine chillers and a diesel air compressor have been effectively operated to displaced 1330 kW during peak periods each day. Installed metering devices have enabled the recognition of critical demand periods. The paper concludes with a brief look at future plans and long range objectives of the Demand Management Plan.

Fetters, J. L.; Teets, S. J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

ELECTRICITY DEMAND FORECAST COMPARISON REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ELECTRICITY DEMAND FORECAST COMPARISON REPORT STAFFREPORT June 2005 ..............................................................................3 Residential Forecast Comparison ..............................................................................................5 Nonresidential Forecast Comparisons

6

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acknowledgments SUMMARY Electricity Demand ElectricityAdverse Impacts ELECTRICITY DEMAND . . . .Demand forElectricity Sales Electricity Demand by Major Utility

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

electricity demand | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

demand demand Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity consumption and demand datasets, specifically: annual observed electricity consumption by sector (1974 to 2009); observed percentage of consumers by sector (2002 - 2009); and regional electricity demand, as a percentage of total demand (2009). Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 03rd, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords Electricity Consumption electricity demand energy use by sector New Zealand Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Electricity Consumption by Sector (1974 - 2009) (xls, 46.1 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon Percentage of Consumers by Sector (2002 - 2009) (xls, 43.5 KiB)

8

EIA - AEO2010 - Electricity Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Demand Electricity Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Electricity Demand Figure 69. U.S. electricity demand growth 1950-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 60. Average annual U.S. retail electricity prices in three cases, 1970-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 61. Electricity generation by fuel in three cases, 2008 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 62. Electricity generation capacity additions by fuel type, 2008-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 63. Levelized electricity costs for new power plants, 2020 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 64. Electricity generating capacity at U.S. nuclear power plants in three cases, 2008, 2020, and 2035

9

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

55. Sample distribution of vehicle electricity demand forand distribution facilities that supply electricity demand.55. Sample distribution of vehicle electricity demand for

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Statewide California Electricity Demand. [accessed June 22,fuel efficiency and electricity demand assumptions used into added vehicle electricity demand in the BAU (no IGCC)

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Electrical Demand Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Almost every building owner or manager is interested in controlling electrical costs. Since the HVAC system is a large user of electricity, this article will discuss what can be done in the HVAC system to influence parts of the utility bill.

Eppelheimer, D. M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table 1. Economic demand response and real time pricing (Implications of Demand Response Programs in CompetitiveAdvanced Metering, and Demand Response in Electricity

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Electricity Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data Rate of Electricity Demand Growth Slows, Following the Historical Trend Electricity demand fluctuates in the short term in response to business cycles, weather conditions,...

14

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DEMAND . . . .Demand for Electricity and Power PeakDemand . . . . ELECTRICITY REQUIREMENTS FOR AGRICULTUREResults . . Coriclusions ELECTRICITY SUPPLY Hydroelectric

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1997  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1997 Executive Summary Background Demand-side management (DSM) programs consist of the planning, implementing, and monitoring ...

16

Price-elastic demand in deregulated electricity markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the amount of electricity demand that is settled forward.unresponsive demand side, electricity demand has to be metxed percentage of overall electricity demand. The ISO, thus,

Siddiqui, Afzal S.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Residential Electricity Demand in China -- Can Efficiency Reverse the Growth?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with Residential Electricity Demand in India's Future - How2008). The Boom of Electricity Demand in the residential2005). Forecasting Electricity Demand in Developing

Letschert, Virginie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Climate, extreme heat, and electricity demand in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

warming and electricity demand: A study of California.Extreme Heat, and Electricity Demand in California Norman L.high temperature and electricity demand for air-conditioned

Miller, N.L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Electric Utility Demand-Side Management  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Demand side management (DSM) activities in the electric power industry. The report presents a general discussion of DSM, its history, current issues, and a ...

20

Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1997  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA-0589(97) Distribution Category UC-950 U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1997 December 1998 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Electricity Demand and Energy Consumption Management System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This project describes the electricity demand and energy consumption management system and its application to the Smelter Plant of Southern Peru. It is composted of an hourly demand-forecasting module and of a simulation component for a plant electrical system. The first module was done using dynamic neural networks, with backpropagation training algorithm; it is used to predict the electric power demanded every hour, with an error percentage below of 1%. This information allows management the peak demand before this happen, distributing the raise of electric load to other hours or improving those equipments that increase the demand. The simulation module is based in advanced estimation techniques, such as: parametric estimation, neural network modeling, statistic regression and previously developed models, which simulates the electric behavior of the smelter plant. These modules allow the proper planning because it allows knowing the behavior of the hourly demand and the consumption patterns of the plant, in...

Sarmiento, Juan Ojeda

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Electricity Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Demand Electricity Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Electricity Demand Figure 60. Annual electricity sales by sector, 1980-2030 (billion kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 61. Electricity generation by fuel, 2006 and 2030 (billion kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Residential and Commercial Sectors Dominate Electricity Demand Growth Total electricity sales increase by 29 percent in the AEO2008 reference case, from 3,659 billion kilowatthours in 2006 to 4,705 billion in 2030, at an average rate of 1.1 percent per year. The relatively slow growth follows the historical trend, with the growth rate slowing in each succeeding

23

Forecasting Electricity Demand by Time Series Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electricity demand is one of the most important variables required for estimating the amount of additional capacity required to ensure a sufficient supply of energy. Demand and technological losses forecasts can be used to control the generation and distribution of electricity more efficiently. The aim of this paper is to utilize time series model

E. Stoimenova; K. Prodanova; R. Prodanova

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Designing Markets for Electricity, Wiley-IEEE Press. CEC (in Major Drivers in U.S. Electricity Markets, NREL/CP-620-and fuel efficiency and electricity demand assumptions used

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Climate, extreme heat, and electricity demand in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

projected extreme heat and peak demand for electricity areadequately kept up with peak demand, and electricity supplytrend in aggregate peak demand in California is expected to

Miller, N.L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

availability, operational limits, ramp rates, and start-up costs Reliability requirements Transmission andavailability, electricity demand, and dispatches power plants based on operating costs and transmission

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Essays on exchange rates and electricity demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines two important issues in economic development: exchange rates and electricity demand and addresses methodological issues of using time series and panel data analysis to investigate important policy ...

Li, Xiangming, 1966-

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Rapid increases in electricity demand challenge both ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... on April 1 was the steepest so far this year in SPP. The rate of increase in electricity demand peaked at 12.4% between 6 a.m. and 7 a.m. ...

29

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reliability Corporation. Demand response data task force:Energy. Benefits of demand response in electricity marketsAssessment of demand response & advanced metering, staff

Cappers, Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Dynamic Pricing, Advanced Metering, and Demand Response in Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the New England ISO Demand Response Collaborative, a NYSERDACEC Staff. Selected Demand Response Pilots in California:New Principles for Demand Response Planning, Electric Power

Borenstein, Severin; Jaske, Michael; Rosenfeld, Arthur

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Electricity and Power Peak Demand . . . . ELECTRICITYby Major Utility Service Area Projected Peak Demand for1977 Historical Peak Demand by Utility Service Area Weather-

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Rapid increases in electricity demand challenge both generating ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Because supply and demand for electricity must balance in real-time, rapid changes in demand create operational challenges for the electric system and generating unit ...

33

Hawaiian Electric Company Demand Response Roadmap Project Final...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hawaiian Electric Company Demand Response Roadmap Project Final Report Title Hawaiian Electric Company Demand Response Roadmap Project Final Report Publication Type Report LBNL...

34

Electricity demand as frequency controlled reserves, ENS (Smart...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity demand as frequency controlled reserves, ENS (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Electricity demand as frequency controlled reserves, ENS...

35

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations Windows and Daylighting Electricity Grid Demand Response Distributed Energy Electricity Reliability Energy Analysis...

36

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 3: Electricity Demand Forecast  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 3: Electricity Demand Forecast Summary............................................................................................................ 2 Sixth Power Plan Demand Forecast................................................................................................ 4 Demand Forecast Range

37

Price-elastic demand in deregulated electricity markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is unable to reduce electricity prices. The unstorability ofhourly variability in electricity prices while maintainingboth forward and spot electricity prices a ect demand. Our

Siddiqui, Afzal S.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Demand for Electric Vehicles in Hybrid Households: An Exploratory Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stated they wouldlikely add an electric and vehicle to theirhouseholdsand the demand electric vehicles", Transportation1983) "A Critical Reviewof Electric Vehicle MarketStudies",

Kurani, Kenneth S.; Turrentine, Tom; Sperling, Daniel

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1999  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1999 Executive Summary Background Demand-side management (DSM) programs consist of the planning, implementing, and monitoring ...

40

Variability in electricity demand highlights potential roles for ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Demand-response programs and technologies that tend to reduce the variability of hourly electric demand and the resulting supply requirement would reduce the need ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

2012 Portland General Electric. All rights reserved. Planning for Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2/13/2013 1 © 2012 Portland General Electric. All rights reserved. Planning for Demand Response their usage. Demand Response ­ PGE Current Status 10 Automated Demand R

42

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Preface. The U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management report is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Elec-

43

Poster: Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peak-demand Mitigation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Poster: Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peak-demand Mitigation: A Solution in Developing and Developed World Alike Title Poster: Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity...

44

Does EIA publish electric utility rate, tariff, and demand charge ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Does EIA publish electric utility rate, tariff, and demand charge data? No, EIA does not collect or publish data on electricity rates, or tariffs, for the sale or ...

45

Demand response can lower electric power load when needed - Today ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

February 15, 2011 Demand response can lower electric power load when needed . Consumers can play a major role in ensuring reliable electricity supply by reducing ...

46

Revised Draft Forecast of Electricity Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Forecasts of higher electricity and natural gas prices will fundamentally challenge energy intensive. These include the reduced growth in natural gas supplies in spite of significant drilling activity and #12;DRAFT the medium-high case, while paper and allied products has been below the medium-low. Future natural gas

47

Climate, extreme heat, and electricity demand in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

State-wide, electricity demand per capita has remained essentially flat partially due to energy efficiency incentives.

Miller, N.L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Climate, extreme heat, and electricity demand in California  

SciTech Connect

Climate projections from three atmosphere-ocean climate models with a range of low to mid-high temperature sensitivity forced by the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change SRES higher, middle, and lower emission scenarios indicate that, over the 21st century, extreme heat events for major cities in heavily air-conditioned California will increase rapidly. These increases in temperature extremes are projected to exceed the rate of increase in mean temperature, along with increased variance. Extreme heat is defined here as the 90 percent exceedance probability (T90) of the local warmest summer days under the current climate. The number of extreme heat days in Los Angeles, where T90 is currently 95 F (32 C), may increase from 12 days to as many as 96 days per year by 2100, implying current-day heat wave conditions may last for the entire summer, with earlier onset. Overall, projected increases in extreme heat under the higher A1fi emission scenario by 2070-2099 tend to be 20-30 percent higher than those projected under the lower B1 emission scenario, ranging from approximately double the historical number of days for inland California cities (e.g. Sacramento and Fresno), up to four times for previously temperate coastal cities (e.g. Los Angeles, San Diego). These findings, combined with observed relationships between high temperature and electricity demand for air-conditioned regions, suggest potential shortfalls in transmission and supply during T90 peak electricity demand periods. When the projected extreme heat and peak demand for electricity are mapped onto current availability, maintaining technology and population constant only for demand side calculations, we find the potential for electricity deficits as high as 17 percent. Similar increases in extreme heat days are suggested for other locations across the U.S. southwest, as well as for developing nations with rapidly increasing electricity demands. Electricity response to recent extreme heat events, such as the July 2006 heat wave in California, suggests that peak electricity demand will challenge current supply, as well as future planned supply capacities when population and income growth are taken into account.

Miller, N.L.; Hayhoe, K.; Jin, J.; Auffhammer, M.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Electricity demand changes in predictable patterns - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... winter months tend to be higher than demand levels during the fall and spring "shoulder" seasons when system demand for space conditioning (heating or cooling) ...

50

Demand-side management of China`s electric power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article presents an analysis of China`s strategies for electricity demand-side management (DSM) by the year 2000. It discusses electricity shortages, potential for electricity conservation, and measures to cope with the problems. It concludes that the country should speed up the reform of electricity pricing, make executable laws, and invest capital in demand-side management.

Yang, M. [Asian Inst. of Tech., Bangkok (Thailand). School of Environment, Resources and Development

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

California's Summer 2004 Electricity Supply and Demand Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transmission or system-wide electricity failures will occur; and, · No significant gaming (manipulationCALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION California's Summer 2004 Electricity Supply and Demand Outlook Ashuckian, Manager Electricity Analysis Office Terrence O'Brien, Deputy Director Systems Assessment

52

Climate, extreme heat, and electricity demand in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1992. Global warming and electricity demand: A study ofValuing the Time-Varying Electricity Production of SolarCEC). 2002. 2002-2012 Electricity Outlook Report, P700- 01-

Miller, N.L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oakland CA, December. PJM Demand Side Response WorkingPrice Response Program a PJM Economic Load Response ProgramLoad Response Statistics PJM Demand Response Working Group

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Customers Respond to Electricity Price Variability: A Studyand lower average electricity prices paid by consumers. Inperiods with high electricity prices; (2) load displacement,

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

feature of competitive wholesale electricity markets. Ineffectively in wholesale electricity markets, we will needEfficiency in the US Electricity Futures Market, Australian

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using OpenADR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

months when buildings' electricity demand is also high dueoptimize buildings' electricity demand according to hourlymonths when buildings' electricity demand is also high due

Kim, Joyce Jihyun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

The role of building technologies in reducing and controlling peak electricity demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND CONTROLLING PEAK ELECTRICITY DEMAND Jonathan Koomey* andData to Improve Electricity Demand ForecastsFinal Report.further research. Electricity demand varies constantly. At

Koomey, Jonathan; Brown, Richard E.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. MethodologyImpacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. MethodologyFigure 3: Commercial electricity demand with and without the

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations for Achieving Them. A report to the United States Congress Pursuant to Section 1252 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (February 2006) Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations for Achieving Them. A report to the United States Congress Pursuant to Section 1252 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (February 2006) Most electricity customers see electricity rates that are based on average electricity costs and bear little relation to the true production costs of electricity as they vary over time. Demand response is a tariff or program established to motivate changes in electric use by end-use customers in response to changes in the price of electricity over time, or to give

60

Does EIA publish electric utility rate, tariff, and demand charge ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration - EIA ... tariff, and demand charge data? No, EIA does not collect or publish data on electricity rates, or tariffs, ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final issue of this report. - Presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand side management (DSM) activities in the United States at the national, regional, and utility levels.

Information Center

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

forward price curves in electricity markets, Energyenergy markets tends to increase electricity system reliability, reduce pricemarkets deregulate and energy tariffs increasingly expose customers to commodity price

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

rates that are based on average electricity costs and bear little relation to the true production costs of electricity as they vary over time. Demand response is a tariff or...

64

Demand Response is Focus of New Effort by Electricity Industry...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

is Focus of New Effort by Electricity Industry Leaders Demand Response is Focus of New Effort by Electricity Industry Leaders U.S. Utilities, Grid Operators, Others Come Together...

65

Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using OpenADR Title Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using OpenADR Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5557E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Kim, Joyce Jihyun, and Sila Kiliccote Date Published 06/2012 Publisher LBNL/NYSERDA Keywords commercial, demand response, dynamic pricing, mandatory hourly pricing, open automated demand response, openadr, pilot studies & implementation, price responsive demand Abstract In New York State, the default electricity pricing for large customers is Mandatory Hourly Pricing (MHP), which is charged based on zonal day-ahead market price for energy. With MHP, retail customers can adjust their building load to an economically optimal level according to hourly electricity prices. Yet, many customers seek alternative pricing options such as fixed rates through retail access for their electricity supply. Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) is an XML (eXtensible Markup Language) based information exchange model that communicates price and reliability information. It allows customers to evaluate hourly prices and provide demand response in an automated fashion to minimize electricity costs. This document shows how OpenADR can support MHP and facilitate price responsive demand for large commercial customers in New York City.

66

Elasticities of Electricity Demand in Urban Indian Households  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy demand, and in particular electricity demand in India has been growing at a very rapid rate over the last decade. Given, current trends in population growth, industrialisation, urbanisation, modernisation and income growth, electricity consumption is expected to increase substantially in the coming decades as well. Tariff reforms could play a potentially important role as a demand side management tool in India. However, the effects of any price revisions on consumption will depend on the price elasticity of demand for electricity. In the past, electricity demand studies for India published in international journals have been based on aggregate macro data at the country or sub-national / state level. In this paper, price and income elasticities of electricity demand in the residential sector of all urban areas of India are estimated for the first time using disaggregate level survey data for over thirty thousand households. Three electricity demand functions have been estimated using monthly data for the following seasons: winter, monsoon and summer. The results show electricity demand is income and price inelastic in all three seasons, and that household, demographic and geographical variables are important in determining electricity demand, something that is not possible to determine using aggregate macro models alone. Key Words Residential electricity demand, price elasticity, income elasticity Short Title Electricity demand in Indian households Acknowledgements: The authors would like to gratefully acknowledge the National Sample Survey Organisation, Department of Statistics of the Government of India, for making available to us the unit level, household survey data. We would also like to thank Prof. Daniel Spreng for his support of our research. 2 1.

Shonali Pachauri

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Electric demand growth: An uncertain future for uranium  

SciTech Connect

Broadly conceived, the demand for electricity depends upon three sets of variables: (i) the growths of the many individual demands for energy services; (ii) the competitiveness of electrically driven technologies in meeting these demands; and (iii) the energy-conversion efficiencies of installed electrical technologies. The first set of variables establishes the size of the potential market; the second, the market penetration of electrical equipment; and the third, the quantity of electricity required to operate the equipment. All forecasts of electricity consumption ultimately depend upon inferred or assumed relationships to describe the future behavior of these variables. In this paper, the authors review recent forecasts of electricity demand growth. They also examine, in a qualitative way, some of the causes for the systematic, downward revisions of these forecasts over recent years. Graphical presentations of data are extensively used in the discussions. In an important sense, forecasting, whatever the number of variables, remains a matter of ''curve fitting.''

Asbury, J.G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-vehicle demand load factor Natural gas price Carbon tax89). They increase with demand (and gross natural gas-firedelectricity demand and by changing natural gas price and CO

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

serves to partially fill off-peak demand troughs. If passivehigher before or after the peak demand hour when hydro powerare highest during off-peak demand hours, and are low at

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Commercial & Industrial Demand Response Within Hawaiian Electric Company Service Territory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By reducing power usage during peak demand periods, demand response (DR) programs can help utilities manage power loads and complement energy efficiency activities while providing ratepayers an opportunity to substantially reduce their electric bills. This project assessed the costs and benefits of potential DR programs for Hawaiian Electric Company's (HECO's) commercial and industrial (CI) customers.

2007-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

71

Future demand for electricity in the Nassau--Suffolk region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory established a new technology for load forecasting for the Long Island Lighting Company and prepared an independent forecast of the demand for electricity in the LILCO area. The method includes: demand for electricity placed in a total energy perspective so that substitutions between electricity and other fuels can be examined; assessment of the impact of conservation, new technology, gas curtailment, and other factors upon demand for electricity; and construction of the probability distribution of the demand for electricity. A detailed analysis of changing levels of demand for electricity, and other fuels, associated with these new developments is founded upon a disaggregated end-use characterization of energy utilization, including space heat, lighting, process energy, etc., coupled to basic driving forces for future demand, namely: population, housing mix, and economic growth in the region. The range of future events covers conservation, heat pumps, solar systems, storage resistance heaters, electric vehicles, extension of electrified rail, total energy systems, and gas curtailment. Based upon cost and other elements of the competition between technologies, BNL assessed the likelihood of these future developments. An optimistic view toward conservation leads to ''low'' demand for electricity, whereas rapid development of new technologies suggests ''high'' demand. (MCW)

Carroll, T.W.; Palmedo, P.F.; Stern, R.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy markets. References Aniti, L. , 2002, Energy InformationEnergy Information Administration Energy Management Control Systems Electricity Market

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Duke Power d FirstEnergy Georgia Power Niagara Mohawk Pacific Gas & Electric Pennsylvania Power & Light Progress Energy

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Electric Demand Cost Versus Labor Cost: A Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric Utility companies charge industrial clients for two things: demand and usage. Depending on type of business and hours operation, demand cost could be very high. Most of the operations scheduling in a plant is achieved considering labor cost. For small plants, it is quite possible that a decrease in labor could result in an increase in electric demand and cost or vice versa. In this paper two cases are presented which highlight the dependence of one on other.

Agrawal, S.; Jensen, R.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence The work described in this paper was funded by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Permitting, Siting and Analysis of the U.S. Department of Energy under contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. The authors are solely responsible for any omissions or errors contained herein. Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence More Documents & Publications Demand Response National Trends: Implications for the West? Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations for Achieving Them. A report to the United States Congress Pursuant to Section 1252 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (February 2006)

76

Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using OpenADR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advanced Metering, and Demand Response in Electricity2006. Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and2010. Open Automated Demand Response Technologies for

Kim, Joyce Jihyun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 3: End-Use Electricity Demand  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

Hostick, D.; Belzer, D.B.; Hadley, S.W.; Markel, T.; Marnay, C.; Kintner-Meyer, M.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CEC (2009) Statewide Electricity Rates by Utility, Class andrates if the marginal electricity rate from the LCFS isestimated marginal electricity emissions rate in California

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Variability in electricity demand highlights potential roles ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

These technologies convert electricity into another form of energy for storage: the potential energy in water pumped uphill to a reservoir and in compressed air, ...

80

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity customers are being exposed to real-time prices (RTP) in their default service tariff rates offered by utilities, particularly in states

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix C: Demand Forecast  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix C: Demand Forecast Energy Demand................................................................................................................................. 1 Demand Forecast Methodology.................................................................................................. 3 New Demand Forecasting Model for the Sixth Plan

82

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Electricity Market Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the planning, operations, and pricing of electricity in the United States. It is composed of four primary submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. In addition, nonutility generation and supply and electricity transmission and trade are represented in the planning and dispatching submodules. Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the planning, operations, and pricing of electricity in the United States. It is composed of four primary submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. In addition, nonutility generation and supply and electricity transmission and trade are represented in the planning and dispatching submodules. Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are assumptions about the operations of the electricity sector and the costs of various options in each of the EMM submodules. The major assumptions are summarized below.

83

Swarm intelligence approaches to estimate electricity energy demand in Turkey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes two new models based on artificial bee colony (ABC) and particle swarm optimization (PSO) techniques to estimate electricity energy demand in Turkey. ABC and PSO electricity energy estimation models (ABCEE and PSOEE) are developed ... Keywords: Ant colony optimization, Artificial bee colony, Electricity energy estimation, Particle swarm optimization, Swarm intelligence

Mustafa Servet K?Ran; Eren Zceylan; Mesut GNdZ; Turan Paksoy

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Electricity demand patterns matter for valuing electricity supply ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

PJM's hourly real-time energy prices corresponding to the week of hourly demand values are shown below. Prices also vary by hour and are much more volatile than demand.

85

The Economics of Energy (and Electricity) Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% electrical efficiency might be able to deliver electrical heat using half the gas of gas fired boiler with 90% efficiency (p.152-153). An electric car uses around 15 kWh per 100 km, around 5 times less than the average fossil fuel car. This implies... that there is always a wide-range of observed efficiencies in the economy, with the average efficiency of the provision of an energy service being significantly less than the efficiency of the most efficient. Current new fossil fuel cars and gas boilers are 50...

Platchkov, Laura M.; Pollitt, Michael G.

86

Analysis of recent projections of electric power demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews the changes and potential changes in the outlook for electric power demand since the publication of Review and Analysis of Electricity Supply Market Projections (B. Swezey, SERI/MR-360-3322, National Renewable Energy Laboratory). Forecasts of the following organizations were reviewed: DOE/Energy Information Administration, DOE/Policy Office, DRI/McGraw-Hill, North American Electric Reliability Council, and Gas Research Institute. Supply uncertainty was briefly reviewed to place the uncertainties of the demand outlook in perspective. Also discussed were opportunities for modular technologies, such as renewable energy technologies, to fill a potential gap in energy demand and supply.

Hudson, D.V. Jr.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Response to Electricity Real Time Prices: Short Run and LongOver-the-counter Real-time Prices Thermal Energy Storage viiare being exposed to real-time prices (RTP) in their default

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

U.S. electric utility demand-side management 1995  

SciTech Connect

The US Electric Utility Demand-Side Management report is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternative Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. The report presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand-side management (DSM) activities in the US at the national, regional, and utility levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decision makers, government policy makers, analysts, and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding DSM as it relates to the US electric power industry. The first chapter, ``Profile: US Electric Utility Demand-Side Management``, presents a general discussion of DSM, its history, current issues, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent chapters present discussions and more detailed data on energy savings, peak load reductions and costs attributable to DSM. 9 figs., 24 tabs.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impacts of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles on RegionalAnalysis of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles, ANL/ESD/09-2,of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles, Volume 2: United States

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Regional PowerTransmission Area, in Electric Vehicle Symposium, Anaheim,of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles, ANL/ESD/09-2, Argonne

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

U.S. electric utility demand-side management 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand-side management activities in the United States at the national, regional, and utility levels. Data is included for energy savings, peakload reductions, and costs.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Forecasting electricity demand by hybrid machine learning model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a hybrid machine learning model for electricity demand forecasting, based on Bayesian Clustering by Dynamics (BCD) and Support Vector Machine (SVM). In the proposed model, a BCD classifier is firstly applied to cluster the input data ...

Shu Fan; Chengxiong Mao; Jiadong Zhang; Luonan Chen

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Automated electricity demand response - Tech Close-Up  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Automated electricity demand response - Tech Close-Up Click here to view this video Date: August 27, 2013 Presenter(s): Many, including EETD's Mary Ann Piette. A Tech Close-Up news...

94

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final issue of this report. - 1996 - Presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand side management (DSM) activities in the United States at the national, regional, and utility levels.

Information Center

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Electrical ship demand modeling for future generation warships  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The design of future warships will require increased reliance on accurate prediction of electrical demand as the shipboard consumption continues to rise. Current US Navy policy, codified in design standards, dictates methods ...

Sievenpiper, Bartholomew J. (Bartholomew Jay)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Demand-side participation in the Australian National Electricity...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand-side participation in the Australian National Electricity Market Speaker(s): Hugh Outhred Date: March 4, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar HostPoint of Contact:...

97

The residential demand for electricity in New England,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The residential demand for electricity, studied on the national level for many years, is here investigated on the regional level. A survey of the literature is first presented outlining past econometric work in the field ...

Levy, Paul F.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s Colorado service area, system electricity requirementsColorado from the Southwest. ) The definitions of the three regions used by the Western Electricity

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

DRAFT DRAFT DRAFT Forecasting Electricity Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

prices. With the medium natural gas price assumptions, the Council currently is seeing draft spot market for Northwest smelters. Since electricity prices are related to natural gas prices in the long-term, and high natural gas prices are associated with the high economic growth case, it may now make more sense to assume

100

Turkey opens electricity markets as demand grows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Turkey's growing power market has attracted investors and project developers for over a decade, yet their plans have been dashed by unexpected political or financial crises or, worse, obstructed by a lengthy bureaucratic approval process. Now, with a more transparent retail electricity market, government regulators and investors are bullish on Turkey. Is Turkey ready to turn the power on? This report closely examine Turkey's plans to create a power infrastructure capable of providing the reliable electricity supplies necessary for sustained economic growth. It was compiled with on-the-ground research and extensive interview with key industrial and political figures. Today, hard coal and lignite account for 21% of Turkey's electricity generation and gas-fired plants account for 50%. The Alfin Elbistan-B lignite-fired plant has attracted criticism for its lack of desulfurization units and ash dam facilities that have tarnished the industry's image. A 1,100 MW hard-coal fired plant using supercritical technology is under construction. 9 figs., 1 tab.

McKeigue, J.; Da Cunha, A.; Severino, D. [Global Business Reports (United States)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Control Mechanisms for Residential Electricity Demand in SmartGrids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Control Mechanisms for Residential Electricity Demand in SmartGrids Shalinee Kishore Department of the emerging SmartGrid, use both prices and user preferences to control power usage across the home. We first, accounts for the potential for electricity capacity constraints. I. INTRODUCTION The emerging SmartGrid

Snyder, Larry

102

Density Forecasting for Long-Term Peak Electricity Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Long-term electricity demand forecasting plays an important role in planning for future generation facilities and transmission augmentation. In a long-term context, planners must adopt a probabilistic view of potential peak demand levels. Therefore density forecasts (providing estimates of the full probability distributions of the possible future values of the demand) are more helpful than point forecasts, and are necessary for utilities to evaluate and hedge the financial risk accrued by demand variability and forecasting uncertainty. This paper proposes a new methodology to forecast the density of long-term peak electricity demand. Peak electricity demand in a given season is subject to a range of uncertainties, including underlying population growth, changing technology, economic conditions, prevailing weather conditions (and the timing of those conditions), as well as the general randomness inherent in individual usage. It is also subject to some known calendar effects due to the time of day, day of week, time of year, and public holidays. A comprehensive forecasting solution is described in this paper. First, semi-parametric additive models are used to estimate the relationships between demand and the driver variables, including temperatures, calendar effects and some demographic and economic variables. Then the demand distributions are forecasted by using a mixture of temperature simulation, assumed future economic scenarios, and residual bootstrapping. The temperature simulation is implemented through a new seasonal bootstrapping method with variable blocks. The proposed methodology has been used to forecast the probability distribution of annual and weekly peak electricity demand for South Australia since 2007. The performance of the methodology is evaluated by comparing the forecast results with the actual demand of the summer 20072008.

Rob J. Hyndman; Shu Fan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Price-elastic demand in deregulated electricity markets  

SciTech Connect

The degree to which any deregulated market functions efficiently often depends on the ability of market agents to respond quickly to fluctuating conditions. Many restructured electricity markets, however, experience high prices caused by supply shortages and little demand-side response. We examine the implications for market operations when a risk-averse retailer's end-use consumers are allowed to perceive real-time variations in the electricity spot price. Using a market-equilibrium model, we find that price elasticity both increases the retailers revenue risk exposure and decreases the spot price. Since the latter induces the retailer to reduce forward electricity purchases, while the former has the opposite effect, the overall impact of price responsive demand on the relative magnitudes of its risk exposure and end-user price elasticity. Nevertheless, price elasticity decreases cumulative electricity consumption. By extending the analysis to allow for early settlement of demand, we find that forward stage end-user price responsiveness decreases the electricity forward price relative to the case with price-elastic demand only in real time. Moreover, we find that only if forward stage end-user demand is price elastic will the equilibrium electricity forward price be reduced.

Siddiqui, Afzal S.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Price-elastic demand in deregulated electricity markets  

SciTech Connect

The degree to which any deregulated market functions efficiently often depends on the ability of market agents to respond quickly to fluctuating conditions. Many restructured electricity markets, however, experience high prices caused by supply shortages and little demand-side response. We examine the implications for market operations when a risk-averse retailer's end-use consumers are allowed to perceive real-time variations in the electricity spot price. Using a market-equilibrium model, we find that price elasticity both increases the retailers revenue risk exposure and decreases the spot price. Since the latter induces the retailer to reduce forward electricity purchases, while the former has the opposite effect, the overall impact of price responsive demand on the relative magnitudes of its risk exposure and end-user price elasticity. Nevertheless, price elasticity decreases cumulative electricity consumption. By extending the analysis to allow for early settlement of demand, we find that forward stage end-user price responsiveness decreases the electricity forward price relative to the case with price-elastic demand only in real time. Moreover, we find that only if forward stage end-user demand is price elastic will the equilibrium electricity forward price be reduced.

Siddiqui, Afzal S.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

US electric utility demand-side management, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The report presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand-side management (DSM) activities in US at the national, regional, and utility levels. Objective is provide industry decision makers, government policy makers, analysts, and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding DSM as it relates to the US electric power industry. The first chapter, ``Profile: US Electric Utility Demand-Side Management,`` presents a general discussion of DSM, its history, current issues, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent chapters present discussions and more detailed data on energy savings, peak load reductions, and costs attributable to DSM.

NONE

1995-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

106

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hourly distribution of hydro energy does change with demand,drawn down, non-baseload hydro energy is assumed to be load-the spread of annual hydro energy has varied by more than a

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

U.S. electric utility demand-side management 1996  

SciTech Connect

The US Electric Utility Demand-Side Management report presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand-side management (DSM) activities in the US at the national, regional, and utility levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decision makers, government policy makers, analysts, and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding DSM as it related to the US electric power industry. The first chapter, ``Profile: U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management,`` presents a general discussion of DSM, its history, current issues, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent chapters present discussions and more detailed data on energy savings, peak load reductions and costs attributable to DSM. 9 figs., 24 tabs.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Social Welfare implications of demand response programs in competitiv e electricity markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2. Customer Electricity Demand Under Fixed Tariffs vs.to re-emphasize that these electricity demands are the onesdamage from fire. of electricity demand, it is system-wide

Boisvert, Richard N.; Neenan, Bernard F.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Automated Demand Response: The Missing Link in the Electricity Value Chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

promise in reducing the electricity demand of the industrialchanges the time of electricity demand to off-peak hours.Load shedding curtails electricity demand during a DR event.

McKane, Aimee

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

determine marginal generation sources. Although electricity16. Validation of generation by energy source in EDGE-CA (Validation of generation by energy source in EDGE-CA (TWh).

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices are described. In one aspect, an electrical power distribution control method includes providing electrical energy from an electrical power distribution system, applying the electrical energy to a load, providing a plurality of different values for a threshold at a plurality of moments in time and corresponding to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy, and adjusting an amount of the electrical energy applied to the load responsive to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy triggering one of the values of the threshold at the respective moment in time.

Chassin, David P. (Pasco, WA); Donnelly, Matthew K. (Kennewick, WA); Dagle, Jeffery E. (Richland, WA)

2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

112

Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices are described. In one aspect, an electrical power distribution control method includes providing electrical energy from an electrical power distribution system, applying the electrical energy to a load, providing a plurality of different values for a threshold at a plurality of moments in time and corresponding to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy, and adjusting an amount of the electrical energy applied to the load responsive to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy triggering one of the values of the threshold at the respective moment in time.

Chassin, David P. (Pasco, WA); Donnelly, Matthew K. (Kennewick, WA); Dagle, Jeffery E. (Richland, WA)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

113

Electricity demand as frequency controlled reserves, ENS (Smart Grid  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity demand as frequency controlled reserves, ENS (Smart Grid Electricity demand as frequency controlled reserves, ENS (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Electricity demand as frequency controlled reserves, ENS Country Denmark Coordinates 56.26392°, 9.501785° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":56.26392,"lon":9.501785,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

114

Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Standards and Labeling for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India Title Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Standards and Labeling for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India Publication Type Conference Paper Refereed Designation Unknown LBNL Report Number LBNL-2322E Year of Publication 2009 Authors McNeil, Michael A., and Maithili Iyer Date Published 06/2009 Keywords Air Conditioners, Appliance Efficiency, appliance energy efficiency, energy efficiency, greenhouse gas emissions, india, Labels, MEPS, refrigerators, Standards and labeling URL https://isswprod.lbl.gov/library/view-docs/public/output/rpt77250.PDF Refereed Designation Unknown Attachment Size

115

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas Emissions from Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles: Implications forGas Emissions from Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles: Implications forassessment of plug-in hybrid vehicles on electric utilities

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

The Boom of Electricity Demand in the Residential Sector in the Developing World and the Potential for Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with Residential Electricity Demand in India's Future - HowThe Boom of Electricity Demand in the Residential Sector instraightforward. Electricity demand per end use and region

Letschert, Virginie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Smart Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment Demand Response Pilot  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses a unique pilot project to evaluate electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) capable of demand response (DR) and its integration into the utility smart metering infrastructure.BackgroundThere is an immediate need to research grid interface compatibility of public charging apparatus and to develop requirements and reference design blueprints for the entire plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) charging infrastructurefrom the vehicle ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

118

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

provided by natural gas power plants. In fact, based ondispatchable natural gas power plants, which can be rampedefficiency among natural gas power plants and higher average

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

provided by natural gas power plants. In fact, based onof dispatchable natural gas power plants, which can beefficiency among natural gas power plants and higher average

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Greater fuel diversity needed to meet growing US electricity demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electricity demand is growing in the USA. One way to manage the uncertainty is to diversity fuel sources. Fuel sources include coal, natural gas, nuclear and renewable energy sources. Tables show actual and planned generation projects by fuel types. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Burt, B.; Mullins, S. [Industrial Info Resources (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Electricity Markets Meet the Home through Demand Response Lazaros Gkatzikis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with increasing trends [9]. Dynamic pricing motivates home users to modify their electricity consumption behavior price timeslots leading to the same total energy consumption, but a significantly different demand in practice though, since home users require to know the price per unit of consumed energy in advance. Instead

Massoulié, Laurent

122

Demand Response: An UntappedDemand Response: An Untapped Resource for Western ElectricityResource for Western Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information Administration, Form EIA-861 Database. #12;Energy Analysis Department Significant cost@lbl.gov FERC Western Energy Infrastructure Conference Denver, Colorado July 30, 2003 #12;Energy Analysis value of demand-side for electricity markets - Short-term Load Management - Dynamic Pricing - Energy

123

Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using OpenADR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

charges to avoid high electricity bills. Demand Responseaffect customers' electricity bills negatively. Therefore,charges to avoid high electricity bills Under ConEd's SC-9

Kim, Joyce Jihyun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Testing Electric Vehicle Demand in `Hybrid Households' Using a Reflexive Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1994) Demand for Electric Vehicles in Hybrid Households: A nand the Household Electric Vehicle Market: A Constraintsthe mar- ket for electric vehicles in California. Presented

Kurani, Kenneth; Turrentine, Thomas; Sperling, Daniel

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Testing Electric Vehicle Demand in "Hybrid Households" Using a Reflexive Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the demand electric vehicles, TransportationResearchA,1994) ~tive NewsCalifornia Electric Vehicle ConsumerStudy.1995) Forecasting Electric Vehicle Ownership Use in the

Kurani, Kenneth S.; Turrentine, Thomas; Sperling, Daniel

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Table 11.2 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010; 2 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Electricity Components; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Sales and Net Demand Economic Total Onsite Transfers for Characteristic(a) Purchases Transfers In(b) Generation(c) Offsite Electricity(d) Total United States Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 91,909 Q 1,406 194 93,319 20-49 86,795 81 2,466 282 89,060 50-99 90,115 215 2,593 1,115 91,808 100-249 124,827 347 11,375 5,225 131,324 250-499 116,631 2,402 24,079 5,595 137,516 500 and Over 225,242 6,485 91,741 20,770 302,699 Total 735,520 9,728 133,661 33,181 845,727 Employment Size Under 50

127

Table 11.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010; 1.1 Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Total Sales and Net Demand NAICS Transfers Onsite Transfers for Code(a) Subsector and Industry Purchases In(b) Generation(c) Offsite Electricity(d) Total United States 311 Food 75,652 21 5,666 347 80,993 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 16,620 0 3,494 142 19,972 311221 Wet Corn Milling 7,481 0 3,213 14 10,680 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 1,264 0 1,382 109 2,537 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 9,258 0 336 66 9,528 3115 Dairy Products 9,585 2 38 22 9,602 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 20,121 15 19 0 20,155 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products

128

Forecasting Electricity Demand on Short, Medium and Long Time Scales Using Neural Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the application of artificial neural networks (ANNs) to the modelling and forecasting of electricity demand experienced by an electricity supplier. The data used in the application examples relates to the national electricity demand ... Keywords: BoxJenkins model, artificial neural networks, electrical load, electricity demand, load forecasting

J. V. Ringwood; D. Bofelli; F. T. Murray

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Innovative and Progressive Electric Utility Demand-Side Management Strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conservation of electric energy has been a concern of energy users in the residential, commercial and industrial sectors for several decades, and has increased in significance since the 1973 energy shortages. During this time, it has also become increasing difficult for electric utilities to install new generating capacity due to public concerns about nuclear energy and environmental issues. In many areas of the country, utilities now find themselves capacity short during their peak periods, and have concerns about providing a reliable supply of electricity. These utilities have initiated programs which encourage their customers to conserve electric energy, and shift or lower use during the utility's peak periods. In other areas of the country there are utilities which have more than adequate electric supplies. These utilities have developed programs which ensure that costs of electricity are such that existing customers are maintained. Programs which address demand issues of an energy utility are referred to as Demand-Side Management (DSM) and are extremely rigorous in scope. Electric utilities have pursued many different DSM policies and strategies during the past decade. These programs have addressed various technologies and have included rebates for efficient lighting, electric motors and packaged air conditioning systems. More recently, however, many utilities have implemented very innovative programs, which indicates an increased commitment towards demand planning, and requires a substantial financial investment in new equipment and engineering services. Some programs have addressed such areas as thermal storage and industrial processes, and others have included comprehensive facility energy studies where greater than fifty percent of the cost of energy retrofits may be covered by the utility. Progressive pricing strategies have included real-time pricing and aggressive curtailable rates for commercial and industrial buildings. Further, new standards are being established by electric utilities which promote energy efficient new construct ion. All of these programs can have considerable impacts on both the customer's and utility's energy use patterns and load shapes. This paper will discuss a number of more significant and innovative DSM programs, and will explain the potential load and energy impacts.

Epstein, G. J.; Fuller, W. H.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Analyzing strategic behaviors in electricity markets via transmission-constrained residual demand.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation studies how to characterize strategic behaviors in electricity markets from a transmission-constrained residual demand perspective. This dissertation generalizes the residual demand concept, widely (more)

Xu, Lin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Electric Water Heater Modeling and Control Strategies for Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Demand response (DR) has a great potential to provide balancing services at normal operating conditions and emergency support when a power system is subject to disturbances. Effective control strategies can significantly relieve the balancing burden of conventional generators and reduce investment on generation and transmission expansion. This paper is aimed at modeling electric water heaters (EWH) in households and tests their response to control strategies to implement DR. The open-loop response of EWH to a centralized signal is studied by adjusting temperature settings to provide regulation services; and two types of decentralized controllers are tested to provide frequency support following generator trips. EWH models are included in a simulation platform in DIgSILENT to perform electromechanical simulation, which contains 147 households in a distribution feeder. Simulation results show the dependence of EWH response on water heater usage . These results provide insight suggestions on the need of control strategies to achieve better performance for demand response implementation. Index Terms Centralized control, decentralized control, demand response, electrical water heater, smart grid

Diao, Ruisheng; Lu, Shuai; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Zhang, Yu; Samaan, Nader A.

2012-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

132

Residential Electricity Demand in China -- Can Efficiency Reverse the Growth?  

SciTech Connect

The time when energy-related carbon emissions come overwhelmingly from developed countries is coming to a close. China has already overtaken the United States as the world's leading emitter of greenhouse gas emissions. The economic growth that China has experienced is not expected to slow down significantly in the long term, which implies continued massive growth in energy demand. This paper draws on the extensive expertise from the China Energy Group at LBNL on forecasting energy consumption in China, but adds to it by exploring the dynamics of demand growth for electricity in the residential sector -- and the realistic potential for coping with it through efficiency. This paper forecasts ownership growth of each product using econometric modeling, in combination with historical trends in China. The products considered (refrigerators, air conditioners, fans, washing machines, lighting, standby power, space heaters, and water heating) account for 90percent of household electricity consumption in China. Using this method, we determine the trend and dynamics of demandgrowth and its dependence on macroeconomic drivers at a level of detail not accessible by models of a more aggregate nature. In addition, we present scenarios for reducing residential consumption through efficiency measures defined at the product level. The research takes advantage of an analytical framework developed by LBNL (BUENAS) which integrates end use technology parameters into demand forecasting and stock accounting to produce detailed efficiency scenarios, thus allowing for a technologically realistic assessment of efficiency opportunities specifically in the Chinese context.

Letschert, Virginie; McNeil, Michael A.; Zhou, Nan

2009-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

133

Solutions for Summer Electric Power Shortages: Demand Response and its Applications in Air Conditioning and Refrigerating Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air Conditioning, & Electric Power Machinery 29(1): 1-4 Solutions for Summer Electric Power Shortages: DemandUSA Solutions for summer electric power shortages: Demand

Han, Junqiao; Piette, Mary Ann

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Demand responsive programs - an emerging resource for competitive electricity markets?  

SciTech Connect

The restructuring of regional electricity markets in the U.S. has been accompanied by numerous problems, including generation capacity shortages, transmission congestion, wholesale price volatility, and reduced system reliability. These problems have created significant new opportunities for technologies and business approaches that allow load serving entities and other aggregators, to control and manage the load patterns of their wholesale or retail end-users. These technologies and business approaches for manipulating end-user load shapes are known as Load Management or, more recently, Demand Responsive programs. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is conducting case studies on innovative demand responsive programs and presents preliminary results for five case studies in this paper. These case studies illustrate the diversity of market participants and range of technologies and business approaches and focus on key program elements such as target markets, market segmentation and participation results; pricing scheme; dispatch and coordination; measurement, verification, and settlement; and operational results where available.

Heffner, Grayson C. Dr.; Goldman, Charles A.

2001-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

135

Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demand changes impact the electric power sector. Figure 2:for electricity on the electric power sector as a whole. Thedemand changes impact the electric power sector. We refer to

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

A distributed renewable energy system meeting 100% of electricity demand in Humboldt County: a feasibility study.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A model of electricity supply and demand in Humboldt County, California over the course of one year is presented. Wind, oceanwave, solar, and biomass electricity (more)

Ross, Darrell Adam

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

The dynamics of electricity demand and supply in the low voltage distribution grid: a model study:.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this thesis a simulation study is executed that analyses how new developments of household electricity demand and decentralised electricity generation affect the low voltage (more)

Van Zoest, P.L.A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Testing Electric Vehicle Demand in "Hybrid Households" Using a Reflexive Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In contrast to a hybrid vehicle whichcombines multiple1994) "Demand Electric Vehicles in Hybrid for Households:or 180 mile hybrid electric vehicle. Natural gas vehicles (

Kurani, Kenneth S.; Turrentine, Thomas; Sperling, Daniel

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LBNL-2124E LBNL-2124E Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence Principal Authors Peter Cappers a , Charles Goldman a , and David Kathan b a Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 b Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, 888 First Street, NE, Washington, DC 20426, Energy Analysis Department Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 90R4000 Berkeley CA 94720-8136 Environmental Energy Technologies Division June 2009 http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/EMS_pubs.html Pre-print version of the article to be published in Energy, forthcoming 2009. The work described in this paper was funded by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Permitting, Siting and Analysis of the U.S.

140

TRENDS IN ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION, PEAK DEMAND, AND GENERATING CAPACITY IN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

relative to increases in its consumption at a higher rate than all but two states (in part because California is the lowest user of electricity per capita and per dollar of gross state product in the west). Annual WSCC consumption increased 64% from 1977 to 1998, but California's consumption grew by only 44

California at Berkeley. University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

New Zealand Energy Data: Electricity Demand and Consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Demand and Consumption Electricity Demand and Consumption Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity consumption and demand datasets, specifically: annual observed electricity consumption by sector (1974 to 2009); observed percentage of consumers by sector (2002 - 2009); and regional electricity demand, as a percentage of total demand (2009). The sectors included are: agriculture, forestry and fishing; industrial (mining, food processing, wood and paper, chemicals, basic metals, other minor sectors); commercial; and residential. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 03rd, 2009 (5 years ago)

142

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

concerns during system peak demand conditions, and failurerelative to national peak demand, was about 5.0% in 2006 [2]to a regions summer peak demand (see Fig. 2). Demand

Cappers, Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrical Energy Consumption in California: Data Collection and Analysis,"analysis of electricity requirements for irrigated agri- electrical energy

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Forecasting electricity load demand: analysis of the 2001 rationing period  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CEPEL e UENF. Abstract. This paper studies the electricity load demand behavior during the 2001 rationing period, which was implemented because of the Brazilian energetic crisis. The hourly data refers to a utility situated in the southeast of the country. We use the model proposed by Soares and Souza (2003), making use of generalized long memory to model the seasonal behavior of the load. The rationing period is shown to have imposed a structural break in the series, decreasing the load at about 20%. Even so, the forecast accuracy is decreased only marginally, and the forecasts rapidly readapt to the new situation. The forecast errors from this model also permit verifying the public response to pieces of information released regarding the crisis.

Leonardo Rocha Souza; Lacir Jorge Soares; Leonardo Rocha Souza; Epge Fundao; Getlio Vargas; Lacir Jorge Soares

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

SciTech Connect

Empirical evidence concerning demand response (DR) resources is needed in order to establish baseline conditions, develop standardized methods to assess DR availability and performance, and to build confidence among policymakers, utilities, system operators, and stakeholders that DR resources do offer a viable, cost-effective alternative to supply-side investments. This paper summarizes the existing contribution of DR resources in U.S. electric power markets. In 2008, customers enrolled in existing wholesale and retail DR programs were capable of providing ~;;38,000 MW of potential peak load reductions in the United States. Participants in organized wholesale market DR programs, though, have historically overestimated their likely performance during declared curtailments events, but appear to be getting better as they and their agents gain experience. In places with less developed organized wholesale market DR programs, utilities are learning how to create more flexible DR resources by adapting legacy load management programs to fit into existing wholesale market constructs. Overall, the development of open and organized wholesale markets coupled with direct policy support by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has facilitated new entry by curtailment service providers, which has likely expanded the demand response industry and led to product and service innovation.

Cappers, Peter; Goldman, Charles; Kathan, David

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using OpenADR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Demand Response in Electricity Markets." University ofRates and Tariffs /Schedule for Electricity Service, P.S.C.no. 10- Electricity/Rules 24 (Riders)/Leaf No. 177-327."

Kim, Joyce Jihyun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Testing Electric Vehicle Demand in `Hybrid Households' Using a Reflexive Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or 180 mile hybrid electric vehicle. Natural gas vehicles (1994) Demand for Electric Vehicles in Hybrid Households: A nof Electric, Hybrid and Other Alternative Vehicles. A r t h

Kurani, Kenneth; Turrentine, Thomas; Sperling, Daniel

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Electric grid planners: demand response and energy efficiency to ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Source: Form EIA-411, Coordinated Bulk Power Demand and Supply Report Note: All data are reported for time of summer peak, rather than overall demand.

149

Dynamic Pricing, Advanced Metering, and Demand Response in Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as Large Comm. Interval metering system with monthly dataDynamic Pricing, Advanced Metering and Demand Response inE Dynamic Pricing, Advanced Metering, and Demand Response in

Borenstein, Severin; Jaske, Michael; Rosenfeld, Arthur

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Table E13.1. Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 1998;" 1. Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Electricity Components;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." " ",," "," ",," " ,,,,"Sales and","Net Demand","RSE" "Economic",,,"Total Onsite","Transfers","for","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Purchases","Transfers In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)","Factors" ,"Total United States"

151

An analysis of the potential for shifting electric power demand within daily load requirement  

SciTech Connect

This report analyzes the potential for shifting the electric power demand within the daily load requirements for large industrial and commercial customers of the Philadelphia Electric Company. This shifting of electric power demand would tend to flatten the daily load curve of electricity demand, benefitting both the power industry and the consumer. Data on estimated summer load curves of large commercial and industrial customers are analyzed for load flattening potential. Cost savings to the customers are determined. (GRA)

Lamb, P.G.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

The Demand Component of Electric Service: Linkages to Service Reliability and Need for Transparency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This white paper distinguishes the demand component of electric service (measured in kilowatts)distinct from the energy component (measured in kilowatthours)and emphasizes the need for power demand cost transparency. Customers' experience with electric service reliability is described in terms of continuity of electric service, availability of service, and restoration time after service interruption. The paper discusses the connection between power demand and electric service reliability, as experienced ...

2012-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

153

A Dynamic Supply-Demand Model for Electricity Prices Manuela Buzoianu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

played a role during the crisis period. 1 Introduction The energy industry provides electrical powerA Dynamic Supply-Demand Model for Electricity Prices Manuela Buzoianu , Anthony E. Brockwell of supply and demand equilibrium. The model includes latent supply and demand curves, which may vary over

154

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

10. U.S. Electric Utility Energy Savings by North American Electric Reliability Council Region and ... design, advanced electric motors and drive systems,

155

The behavioral response to voluntary provision of an environmental public good: Evidence from residential electricity demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

residential electricity demand Grant D. Jacobsen a,n , Matthew J. Kotchen b,c , Michael P. Vandenbergh d online 25 February 2012 JEL classification: H41 Q42 G54 Keywords: Green electricity Voluntary environmental protection Carbon offset Renewable energy Moral licensing Residential electricity demand a b s t r

Kotchen, Matthew J.

156

Demand Dispatch Based on Smart Charging of Plug-in Electric Vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uncontrolled charging of Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEVs) has a negative impact on the peak load and brings potential challenges to electric utility. In this paper, we apply a statistical load model of PEVs charging demand to simulate the driving habits ... Keywords: Plug-in Electric Vehicles, Demand dispatch, Smart charging, Driving habits, Load model

Ting Wu, Gang Wu, Zhejing Bao, Wenjun Yan, Yiyan Zhang

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

A demand responsive bidding mechanism with price elasticity matrix in wholesale electricity pools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the past several decades, many demand-side participation features have been applied in the electricity power systems. These features, such as distributed generation, on-site storage and demand response, add uncertainties ...

Wang, Jiankang, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand (RT- Demand), Real-Time Price (RT-Price) and Day-to reduce load in real-time when a specific price point iscloser to real-time when energy market prices rose above a

Cappers, Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

"Table A16. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Industry"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Industry" 6. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Industry" " Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," ","Sales and/or"," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Transfers","Total Onsite","Transfers","Net Demand for","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Purchases","In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)","Factors"

160

The Impact of Residential Air Conditioner Charging and Sizing on Peak Electrical Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric utilities have had a number of air conditioner rebate and maintenance programs for many years. The purpose of these programs was to improve the efficiency of the stock of air conditioning equipment and provide better demand-side management. This paper examines the effect of refrigerant charging (proper servicing of the equipment), system sizing, and efficiency on the steady-state, coincident peak utility demand of a residential central air conditioning system. The study is based on the results of laboratory tests of a three-ton, capillary tube expansion, split-system air conditioner, system capacity and efficiency data available from manufacturer's literature, and assumptions about relative sizing of the equipment to cooling load on a residence. A qualitative discussion is provided concerning the possible impacts of transient operation and total energy use on utility program decisions. The analysis indicates that proper sizing of the unit is the largest factor affecting energy demand of the three factors (sizing, charging, and efficiency) studied in this paper. For typical oversizing of units to cooling loads in houses, both overcharging and undercharging showed significant negative impact on peak demand. The impacts of SEER changes in utility peak demand were found to be virtually independent of oversizing. For properly sized units, there was a small peak benefit to higher efficiency air conditioners.

Neal, L.; O'Neal, D. L.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

A Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building simulation, Energy use, Peak electricity demand, Typical meteorological year, Weather data Abstract Buildings consume more than one third of the world's total primary...

162

The Outlook for Electricity Supply and Demand to 2035: Key Drivers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov The Outlook for Electricity Supply and Demand to 2035: Key Drivers

163

Electricity demand analysis in different sectors: a case study of Iran.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this thesis is to estimate the main determinants of electricity demand in Iran for various subsectors (residential, industrial, agricultural and public) using (more)

Pourazarm, Elham

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

An Evaluation of Demand Response in New York State's Wholesale Electricity Markets .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis identifies the conditions under which and quantifies how much society gains from integrating demand response directly into wholesale electricity markets and the level (more)

Cappers, Peter Andrew

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Electricity pricing as a demand-side management strategy: Western lessons for developing countries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utilities in the Western world have increasingly realized that load commitments can be met not only by constructing new generating plants but also by influencing electricity demand. This demand-side management (DSM) process requires that electric utilities promote measures on the customer's side of the meter to directly or indirectly influence electricity consumption to meet desired load objectives. An important demand-side option to achieve these load objectives is innovative electricity pricing, both by itself and as a financial incentive for other demand-site measures. This study explores electricity pricing as a DSM strategy, addressing four questions in the process: What is the Western experience with DSM in general and electricity pricing in particular Do innovative pricing strategies alter the amount and pattern of electricity consumption Do the benefits of these pricing strategies outweigh the costs of implementation What are future directions in electricity pricing Although DSM can be used to promote increases in electricity consumption for electric utilities with excess capacity as well as to slow demand growth for capacity-short utilities, emphasis here is placed on the latter. The discussion should be especially useful for electric utilities in developing countries that are exploring alternatives to capacity expansion to meet current and future electric power demand.

Hill, L.J.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Consensus forecast of U. S. electricity supply and demand to the year 2000  

SciTech Connect

Recent forecasts of total electricity generating capacity and energy demand as well as for electricity produced from nuclear energy and hydroelectric power are presented in tables and graphs to the year 2000. A forecast of the distribution of type of fuel and energy source that will supply the future electricity demand is presented. Use of electricity by each major consuming sector is presented for 1975. Projected demands for electricity in the years 1985 and 2000, as allocated to consuming sectors, are derived and presented.

Lane, J.A.

1976-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Electricity demand as frequency controlled reserves, ForskEL...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

References EU Smart Grid Projects Map1 Overview The project developed technology for demand frequency controlled reserve (DFR) implementation, a system that automatically...

168

Demand responsive programs - an emerging resource for competitive electricity markets?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

difference between Strike Price & forecast wholesale priceon day-ahead forecast of demand & price Wholesale utilitiesday-of forecast, or actual hourly spot price. A quick

Heffner, Dr. Grayson C.; Goldman, Charles A.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

A Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and Energy Use of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and Energy Use of Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and Energy Use of Buildings Using 30-Year ActualWeather Data Title A Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and Energy Use of Buildings Using 30-Year ActualWeather Data Publication Type Journal Year of Publication 2013 Authors Hong, Tianzhen, Wen-Kuei Chang, and Hung-Wen Lin Keywords Actual meteorological year, Building simulation, Energy use, Peak electricity demand, Typical meteorological year, Weather data Abstract Buildings consume more than one third of the world's total primary energy. Weather plays a unique and significant role as it directly affects the thermal loads and thus energy performance of buildings. The traditional simulated energy performance using Typical Meteorological Year (TMY) weather data represents the building performance for a typical year, but not necessarily the average or typical long-term performance as buildings with different energy systems and designs respond differently to weather changes. Furthermore, the single-year TMY simulations do not provide a range of results that capture yearly variations due to changing weather, which is important for building energy management, and for performing risk assessments of energy efficiency investments. This paper employs large-scale building simulation (a total of 3162 runs) to study the weather impact on peak electricity demand and energy use with the 30-year (1980 to 2009) Actual Meteorological Year (AMY) weather data for three types of office buildings at two design efficiency levels, across all 17 ASHRAE climate zones. The simulated results using the AMY data are compared to those from the TMY3 data to determine and analyze the differences. Besides further demonstration, as done by other studies, that actual weather has a significant impact on both the peak electricity demand and energy use of buildings, the main findings from the current study include: 1) annual weather variation has a greater impact on the peak electricity demand than it does on energy use in buildings; 2) the simulated energy use using the TMY3 weather data is not necessarily representative of the average energy use over a long period, and the TMY3 results can be significantly higher or lower than those from the AMY data; 3) the weather impact is greater for buildings in colder climates than warmer climates; 4) the weather impact on the medium-sized office building was the greatest, followed by the large office and then the small office; and 5) simulated energy savings and peak demand reduction by energy conservation measures using the TMY3 weather data can be significantly underestimated or overestimated. It is crucial to run multi-decade simulations with AMY weather data to fully assess the impact of weather on the long-term performance of buildings, and to evaluate the energy savings potential of energy conservation measures for new and existing buildings from a life cycle perspective.

170

The Influence of Residential Solar Water Heating on Electric Utility Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Similar sets of residences in Austin, Texas with electric water heaters and solar water heaters with electric back-up were monitored during 1982 to determine their instantaneous electric demands, the purpose being to determine the influence of residential solar water heating on electric utility demand. The electric demand of solar water hears was found to be approximately 0.39 kW lass than conventional electric water heaters during the late late afternoon, early evening period in the summer months when the Austin utility experiences its peak demand. The annual load factor would be only very slightly reduced if there were a major penetration of solar water heaters in the all electric housing sector. Thus solar water heating represents beneficial load management for utilities experiencing summer peaks.

Vliet, G. C.; Askey, J. L.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

THE CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES TO MEET THE WORKFORCE DEMAND IN THE ELECTRIC POWER AND ENERGY PROFESSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 THE CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES TO MEET THE WORKFORCE DEMAND IN THE ELECTRIC POWER AND ENERGY PROFESSION Wanda Reder, S & C Electric Company, 6601 North Ridge Blvd., Chicago, IL 60626- 3997, USA Vahid, Iowa State University ABSTRACT There is a tremendous imbalance between engineering workforce demand

172

Table A19. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region and" Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region and" " Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," ","Sales/"," ","RSE" " "," ","Transfers","Onsite","Transfers"," ","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Purchases","In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Net Demand(d)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:",0.5,1.4,1.3,1.9,0.5 "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)"

173

Table A26. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Di  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, and" Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, and" " Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," ","Sales/"," ","RSE" " "," ","Transfers","Onsite","Transfers"," ","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Purchases","In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Net Demand(d)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:",0.5,2.1,1.2,2,0.4 "Value of Shipments and Receipts"

174

Trends in electricity demand and supply in the developing countries, 1980--1990  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an overview of trends concerning electricity demand and supply in the developing countries in the 1980--1990 period, with special focus on 13 major countries for which we have assembled consistent data series. We describe the linkage between electricity demand and economic growth, the changing sectoral composition of electricity consumption, and changes in the mix of energy sources for electricity generation. We also cover trends in the efficiency of utility electricity supply with respect to power plant efficiency and own-use and delivery losses, and consider the trends in carbon dioxide emissions from electricity supply.

Meyers, S.; Campbell, C.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

The relationship between electricity demand and the business cycle, 1969--1985  

SciTech Connect

This analysis examines the relationship between changes in electricity demand and changes in economic growth and concludes that there is no strong, consistent lead or lag pattern between these two variables. Weak evidence exists that changes in electricity use, in some cases, may have occurred prior to changes in economic activity, although this result was not discovered in all business cycles examined. Other factors including inventory behavior and capacity utilization may have little observable effect in delaying or accelerating electricity use. Based on a lack of compelling evidence, therefore, changes in electricity demand most likely are concurrent with changes in economic activity. Total electricity demand was noticeably affected only during the most recent business cycle. The drop in electricity use during that cycle (September 1981 through December 1985) was attributed largely to a decline in industrial electricity demand, the consequence of a severe drop in output from major electricity-intensive industries. Industrial electricity sales continue to be depressed because these cyclical industries have not yet experienced the recovery seen in other areas of the economy. Whether or not these industries do recover could affect the future electricity/GNP ratio and the nature of changes in electricity demand during business cycles. 11 figs., 10 tabs.

1986-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

176

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

by end use customers from their normal consumption patterns in response to changes in the price of electricity over time, or to incentive payments designed to induce lower...

177

Effects of the drought on California electricity supply and demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ELECTRICITY SUPPLY Hydroelectric Energy Supply Thermal-question. Data on PG&E's hydroelectric resources and Pacific27 Table 28 Table 29 Hydroelectric Supply in California Fuel

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Electric generator dispatch depends on system demand and the ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This Week in Petroleum Weekly Petroleum Status Report ... for electricity changes over the course of the ... for a future article? Send your feedback ...

179

Economy and Electricity Demand Growth Linked but ƒƒƒ.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Economy and Electricity Demand Economy and Electricity Demand Growth Linked but ... for International Utility Conference, Demand Trends Panel March 12, 2013 | London, UK by Adam Sieminski, Administrator U. S. electricity use and economic growth, 1950-2040 Adam Sieminski, EEI Demand Trends, March 12, 2013 2 -2% 0% 2% 4% 6% 8% 10% 12% 14% 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 2040 Percent growth, 3-year rolling average Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release History Projections 2011 Electricity Use GDP 2.4% 0.9% 2011 - 2040 average Annual energy use of a new refrigerator, 1950-2008 Adam Sieminski, EEI Demand Trends, March 12, 2013 3 Kilowatthours per year Source: DOE / EERE - Building Technologies Office 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800

180

Residential Electricity Demand in China -- Can Efficiency Reverse the Growth?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be implemented in 2010, 2020 and 2030. In this scenario, allEER by 2020, and 6 EER by 2030 [14]. We use the UEC providedspace to be conditioned). By 2030, we assume that electric

Letschert, Virginie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

THE RESIDENTIAL DEMAND FOR ELECTRICITY BY TIME-OF-DAY .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The use of time-of-day (TOD) pricing as a load management tool for electric utilities has recently gained wide interest. Although utilities have successfully used TOD (more)

Ott, Deborah Ann

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Electricity Distribution Networks: Investment and Regulation, and Uncertain Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. At the same time, the utilities investment decisions are dependent on the regulatory framework within which they operate. Following the liberalisation of the electricity sectors around the world, the introduction of incentive regulation regimes based...

Jamasb, Tooraj; Marantes, Cristiano

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

183

AN ECONOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF ZAMBIAN INDUSTRIAL ELECTRICITY DEMAND.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this thesis is twofold: to examine the electricity use in Zambias mining industry by focusing on own-price, cross price and index of (more)

Chama, Yoram Chama

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Residential Electricity Demand in China -- Can Efficiency Reverse the Growth?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity consumption of 12kWh assuming 2.5 kg per load and 250 cycles per yearelectricity consumption annual growth rates for the three scenarios for every decade, since standards levels are applied every 10 years.

Letschert, Virginie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 2000  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Savings for the 516 large electric utilities increased to 53.7 billion kilowatthours (kWh), 3.1 billion kWh more than in 1999. These energy savings

186

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Managment 1996  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Savings as a Percentage of Retail Sales by U.S. Electric Utilities with DSM Energy Savings Programs and Sales to Ultimate Consumers by Class of Ownership, 1996

187

Quantifying Changes in Building Electricity Use, with Application to Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present methods for analyzing commercial and industrial facility 15-minute-interval electric load data. These methods allow building managers to better understand their facility's electricity consumption over time and to compare it to other buildings, helping them to ask the right questions to discover opportunities for demand response, energy efficiency, electricity waste elimination, and peak load management. We primarily focus on demand response. Methods discussed include graphical representations of electric load data, a regression-based electricity load model that uses a time-of-week indicator variable and a piecewise linear and continuous outdoor air temperature dependence, and the definition of various parameters that characterize facility electricity loads and demand response behavior. In the future, these methods could be translated into easy-to-use tools for building managers.

Mathieu, Johanna L.; Price, Phillip N.; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

188

Solutions for Summer Electric Power Shortages: Demand Response and its Applications in Air Conditioning and Refrigerating Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Berkeley, CA94720, USA Summary Demand response (DR) is anVirginia, USA in 1961, female Research Director, PIER DemandUSA Solutions for summer electric power shortages: Demand

Han, Junqiao; Piette, Mary Ann

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Own-price and income elasticities for household electricity demand : a survey of literature using meta-regression analysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Maria Wist Langmoen Own-price and income elasticities for household electricity demand -A Literature survey using meta-regression analysis Economists have been modelling the electricity demand for (more)

Langmoen, Maria Wist

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Figure 75. U.S. electricity demand growth, 1950-2040 (percent, 3 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 75. U.S. electricity demand growth, 1950-2040 (percent, 3-year moving average) Year 3-year moving average Trendline 1950.00

191

Beyond kWh and kW demand: Understanding the new real-time electric...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beyond kWh and kW demand: Understanding the new real-time electric power measurement system in LBNL Building 90 Speaker(s): Alex McEachern Date: January 14, 2010 - 12:00pm...

192

Smart Metering and Electricity Demand: Technology, Economics and International Experience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for overall levels of advanced metering in both the electricity and gas sectors (FERC, 2006). Comparing countries and regions is a difficult task, however, because there is no single definition of what it means for a meter or a metering system...

Brophy Haney, A; Jamasb, Tooraj; Pollitt, Michael G.

193

Energy packet networks: smart electricity storage to meet surges in demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When renewable energy is used either as a primary source, or as a back-up source to meet excess demand, energy storage becomes very useful. Simple examples of energy storage units include electric car batteries and uninterruptible power supplies. More ... Keywords: energy packet networks, network control of energy flow, on-demand energy dispatching, smart grid, store and forward energy, storing renewable energy

Erol Gelenbe

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Peak load diagram Demand Response Demand Response (DR) is a set of time-dependent activities that reduce or shift electricity use to improve electric grid reliability, manage...

195

Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Peak load diagram Demand Response Demand response (DR) is a set of time-dependent activities that reduce or shift electricity use to improve electric grid reliability, manage...

196

Electric shovels meet the demands for mining operations  

SciTech Connect

Rugged, intelligent shovels offer better productivity and help mine operators avoid costly downtime in a very tight market. In 2007 P & H Mining Equipment began to produce a new breed of electric mining shovels designed to help reduce operating cost in coal and other mining operations. These were designated the P & H C-Series. All have an advanced communication, command and control system called the Centurion system. Coal mining applications for this series include 4100XPCs in Australia, China and Wyoming, USA. The Centurion system provides information on shovel performance and systems health which is communicated via graphic user interface terminals to the operators cab. Bucyrus International is developing a hydraulic crowd mechanism for its electric shovels and is now field testing one for its 495 series shovel. The company has also added greater capability in the primary software in the drive system for troubleshooting and fault identification to quickly diagnose problems onboard or remotely. 4 photos.

Fiscor, S.

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

197

Managing Water Resource Requirements for Growing Electric Generation Demands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a general guide to analytical techniques used to address water resource management as related to long-term sustainability planning, and short-term regulatory requirements, including total maximum daily loads, endangered species, and relicensing of hydropower facilities. The example applications presented in the report highlight the capability of the techniques, and help electric power company and government regulatory staffs identify the best approach for a specific need.

2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

198

Price Elasticity of Demand for Electricity: A Primer and Synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of recent real-time pricing (RTP) and critical peak pricing (CPP) pilots demonstrate resoundingly that consumers can and will adjust electricity usage in response to price changes. Nonetheless, dynamic pricing plans are still novelties, in part because policy makers and pricing plan designers are equally skeptical of the impact of large-scale implementation. There is no consensus on the degree to which consumers will respond to price changes and as a result no concurrence on which pricing pla...

2008-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

199

Residential electricity demand: a suggested appliance stock equation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The author develops a simple appliance stock equation for estimating seasonal patterns of power demand elasticity. The equation relates an index of appliances (estimates of typical use) to marginal price per kWh, to income, to average price of alternative fuels, to climate (cooling degree days and heating degree days), to age of the household head, to family size, and to race. Price elasticity is -0.785 for the winter and 0.493 for the summer, with all estimates significant to 0.001. The appliance stock coefficient is 0.801 for the winter and 0.971 for the summer. The equation may be useful in studies that do not require elaborate disaggregation of appliance stock. 7 references, 2 tables.

Garbacz, C.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

National micro-data based model of residential electricity demand: new evidence on seasonal variation  

SciTech Connect

Building on earlier estimates of electricity demand, the author estimates elasticities by month to determine differences between heating and cooling seasons. He develops a three equation model of residential electricity demand that includes all the main components of economic theory. The model generates seasonal elasticity estimates that generally support economic theory. Based on the model using a national current household data set (monthly division), the evidence indicates there is a seasonal pattern for price elasticity of demand. While less pronounced, there also appears to be seasonal patterns for cross-price elasticity of alternative fuels, for the elasticity of appliance stock index, and for an intensity of use variable.

Garbacz, C.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Solutions for Summer Electric Power Shortages: Demand Response andits Applications in Air Conditioning and Refrigerating Systems  

SciTech Connect

Demand response (DR) is an effective tool which resolves inconsistencies between electric power supply and demand. It further provides a reliable and credible resource that ensures stable and economical operation of the power grid. This paper introduces systematic definitions for DR and demand side management, along with operational differences between these two methods. A classification is provided for DR programs, and various DR strategies are provided for application in air conditioning and refrigerating systems. The reliability of DR is demonstrated through discussion of successful overseas examples. Finally, suggestions as to the implementation of demand response in China are provided.

Han, Junqiao; Piette, Mary Ann

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

202

Draft Forecast of Electricity Demand for the 5th  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

products has been below the medium-low. Future natural gas prices are expected to be higher in this power's draft natural gas price forecasts. The medium natural gas price forecast for this plan in 2015 is about Council Document 2001-23, sited above. #12;DRAFT DRAFT DRAFT 11 Table 1 Natural Gas Price Forecasts

203

A statistical analysis of structural differences in minority household electricity demand  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, the structures for electricity demand in non-Latino Black and White households are compared. Electricity demand will be analyzed within the context of a complete demand system, and statistical tests for structural differences will be systematically conducted in the hope of pinpointing the location of differences within the context of this model. Structural differences in demand are defined as statistically significant differences in a parameter or group of parameters that identify the quantitative relationship between explanatory variables and electricity consumption. Along with population taste differences, which might emanate from historical and cultural population differences, structural differences might also occur because of differences in housing and geographic patterns and as a result of differences in access to markets and information. As a consequence, energy consumption decisions will differ, and the level and composition of energy consumption are likely to vary. In practice, it is nearly impossible to untangle the causes contributing to structural differences, but it is reasonably easy to test for statistical differences. The superficial evidence indicates there is a strong likelihood that structural differences do exist in electricity demand between White and Black households. The null hypothesis, which states that there exist no differences in the structures for electricity demand for Black and White households, is tested.

Poyer, D.A.; Earl, E.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

DSM strikes again. [Demand-side management of gas and electric utilities  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses and explains demand-side management (DSM) of the gas and electric utility companies. It contrasts the advantages that electric utilities offering economic incentives (with any cost passed on to rate payers) to increase demand while such offerings are rarely available from the gas utilities. It then discusses the cause and cost of pollution from conventional electrical facilities compared to gas-operated equipment and facilities. The paper goes on to discuss fuel switching and other incentives to get individuals and facilities to switch to natural gas.

Katz, M.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Estimating the Customer-Level Demand for Electricity Under Real-Time Market Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents estimates of the customer-level demand for electricity by industrial and commercial customers purchasing electricity according to the half-hourly energy prices from the England and Wales (E&W) electricity market. These customers also face the possibility of a demand charge on its electricity consumption during the three half-hour periods that are coincident with E&W system peaks. Although energy charges are largely known by 4 PM the day prior to consumption, a fraction of the energy charge and the identity of the half-hour periods when demand charges occur are only known with certainty ex post of consumption. Four years of data from a Regional Electricity Company (REC) in the United Kingdom is used to quantify the half-hourly customer-level demands under this real-time pricing program. The econometric model developed and estimated here quantifies the extent of intertemporal substitution in electricity consumption across pricing periods within the day due to changes ...

Robert H. Patrick; Frank A. Wolak

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Assessment of factors affecting industrial electricity demand. Final report (revision version)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Chapter 2, we identify those factors affecting the industrial product mix - taste, relative output prices, and relative input prices - and isolate several determinants which have not been adequately accounted for to date in industrial electricity demand forecasts. We discuss how the lower energy prices of foreign producers affect domestic producers and how the growth in the number of substitutes for intermediate products such as steel and aluminum with plastics and composites affects the composition of production and, hence, the demand for electricity. We also investigate how the changing age structure of the population brought on by the baby boom could change the mix of outputs produced by the industrial sector. In Chapter 3, we review the history of the 1970s with regard to changes in output mix and the manufacturing demand for electricity, and with regard to changes in the use of electricity vis-a-vis the other inputs in the production process. In Chapter 4, we generate forecasts using two models which control for efficiency changes, but in different ways. In this chapter we present the sensitivity of these projections using three sets of assumptions about product mix. The last chapter summarizes our results and draw from those results implications regarding public policy and industrial electricity demand. Two appendices present ISTUM2 results from selected electricity intensive industries, describes the ISTUM and ORIM models.

None

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Preliminary Examination of the Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable Electricity  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, the demand for renewable electricity has accelerated as a consequence of state and federal policies and the growth of voluntary green power purchase markets, along with the generally improving economics of renewable energy development. This paper reports on a preliminary examination of the supply and demand balance for renewable electricity in the United States, with a focus on renewable energy projects that meet the generally accepted definition of "new" for voluntary market purposes, i.e., projects installed on or after January 1, 1997. After estimating current supply and demand, this paper presents projections of the supply and demand balance out to 2010 and describe a number of key market uncertainties.

Swezey, B.; Aabakken, J.; Bird, L.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Influence of Air Conditioner Operation on Electricity Use and Peak Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity demand due to occupant controlled room air conditioners in a large mater-metered apartment building is analyzed. Hourly data on the electric demand of the building and of individual air conditioners are used in analyses of annual and time-of-day peaks. Effects of occupant schedules and behavior are examined. We conclude that room air conditioners cause a sharp annual peak demand because occupants have strongly varying thresholds with respect to toleration of high indoor temperatures. However, time-or-day peaking is smoothed by air conditioning in this building due to significant off-peak operation of air conditioners by some occupants. If occupants were billed directly for electricity, off-peak use would probably diminish making the peaks more pronounced and exacerbating the utility company's load management problems. Future studies of this type in individually metered apartment buildings are recommended.

McGarity, A. E.; Feuermann, D.; Kempton, W.; Norford, L. K.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Long range forecast of power demands on the Baltimore Gas and Electric Company system. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The report presents the results of an econometric forecast of peak and electric power demands for the Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (BGandE) through the year 2003. The report describes the methodology, the results of the econometric estimations and associated summary statistics, the forecast assumptions, and the calculated forecasts of energy usage and peak demand. Separate models were estimated for summer and winter residential electricity usage in both Baltimore city and the non-city portion of the BGandE service area. Equations were also estimated for commercial energy usage, industrial usage, streetlighting, and for losses plus Company use. Non-econometric techniques were used to estimate future energy use by Bethlehem Steel Corporation's Sparrows Point plant in Baltimore County, Conrail, and the Baltimore Mass Transit Administration underground rail system. Models of peak demand for summer and winter were also estimated.

Estomin, S.L.; Kahal, M.I.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Demand-side management programs change along with the electric utility industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

They heyday of demand-side management may be over as far as utilities are concerned. The future path of utility demand-side management programs is obscured in a haze of important questions, especially questions regarding potential legislation and retail wheeling. Until recently, utility after utility was announcing new DSM programs, seemingly almost daily. But, as pointed out in our November issue by Robert Smock, Electric Light & Power`s editorial director, {open_quotes}Survivors of ruthless competition will not be doing much to reduce electricity sales. They`ll be doing their best to sell more of their product.

Stein, H. [ed.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Automated Demand Response: The Missing Link in the Electricity Value Chain  

SciTech Connect

In 2006, the Public Interest Energy Research Program (PIER) Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory initiated research into Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) applications in California industry. The goal is to improve electric grid reliability and lower electricity use during periods of peak demand. The purpose of this research is to begin to define the relationship among a portfolio of actions that industrial facilities can undertake relative to their electricity use. This 'electricity value chain' defines energy management and demand response (DR) at six levels of service, distinguished by the magnitude, type, and rapidity of response. One element in the electricity supply chain is OpenADR, an open-standards based communications system to send signals to customers to allow them to manage their electric demand in response to supply conditions, such as prices or reliability, through a set of standard, open communications. Initial DRRC research suggests that industrial facilities that have undertaken energy efficiency measures are probably more, not less, likely to initiate other actions within this value chain such as daily load management and demand response. Moreover, OpenADR appears to afford some facilities the opportunity to develop the supporting control structure and to 'demo' potential reductions in energy use that can later be applied to either more effective load management or a permanent reduction in use via energy efficiency. Under the right conditions, some types of industrial facilities can shift or shed loads, without any, or minimal disruption to operations, to protect their energy supply reliability and to take advantage of financial incentives. In 2007 and 2008, 35 industrial facilities agreed to implement OpenADR, representing a total capacity of nearly 40 MW. This paper describes how integrated or centralized demand management and system-level network controls are linked to OpenADR systems. Case studies of refrigerated warehouses and wastewater treatment facilities are used to illustrate OpenADR load reduction potential. Typical shed and shift strategies include: turning off or operating compressors, aerator blowers and pumps at reduced capacity, increasing temperature set-points or pre-cooling cold storage areas and over-oxygenating stored wastewater prior to a DR event. This study concludes that understanding industrial end-use processes and control capabilities is a key to support reduced service during DR events and these capabilities, if DR enabled, hold significant promise in reducing the electricity demand of the industrial sector during utility peak periods.

McKane, Aimee; Rhyne, Ivin; Piette, Mary Ann; Thompson, Lisa; Lekov, Alex

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Automated Demand Response: The Missing Link in the Electricity Value Chain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2006, the Public Interest Energy Research Program (PIER) Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory initiated research into Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) applications in California industry. The goal is to improve electric grid reliability and lower electricity use during periods of peak demand. The purpose of this research is to begin to define the relationship among a portfolio of actions that industrial facilities can undertake relative to their electricity use. This ?electricity value chain? defines energy management and demand response (DR) at six levels of service, distinguished by the magnitude, type, and rapidity of response. One element in the electricity supply chain is OpenADR, an open-standards based communications system to send signals to customers to allow them to manage their electric demand in response to supply conditions, such as prices or reliability, through a set of standard, open communications. Initial DRRC research suggests that industrial facilities that have undertaken energy efficiency measures are probably more, not less, likely to initiate other actions within this value chain such as daily load management and demand response. Moreover, OpenADR appears to afford some facilities the opportunity to develop the supporting control structure and to"demo" potential reductions in energy use that can later be applied to either more effective load management or a permanent reduction in use via energy efficiency. Under the right conditions, some types of industrial facilities can shift or shed loads, without any, or minimal disruption to operations, to protect their energy supply reliability and to take advantage of financial incentives.1 In 2007 and 2008, 35 industrial facilities agreed to implement OpenADR, representing a total capacity of nearly 40 MW. This paper describes how integrated or centralized demand management and system-level network controls are linked to OpenADR systems. Case studies of refrigerated warehouses and wastewater treatment facilities are used to illustrate OpenADR load reduction potential. Typical shed and shift strategies include: turning off or operating compressors, aerator blowers and pumps at reduced capacity, increasing temperature set-points or pre-cooling cold storage areas and over-oxygenating stored wastewater prior to a DR event. This study concludes that understanding industrial end-use processes and control capabilities is a key to support reduced service during DR events and these capabilities, if DR enabled, hold significant promise in reducing the electricity demand of the industrial sector during utility peak periods.

McKane, Aimee; Rhyne, Ivin; Lekov, Alex; Thompson, Lisa; Piette, MaryAnn

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Automated Demand Response: The Missing Link in the Electricity Value Chain  

SciTech Connect

In 2006, the Public Interest Energy Research Program (PIER) Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory initiated research into Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) applications in California industry. The goal is to improve electric grid reliability and lower electricity use during periods of peak demand. The purpose of this research is to begin to define the relationship among a portfolio of actions that industrial facilities can undertake relative to their electricity use. This 'electricity value chain' defines energy management and demand response (DR) at six levels of service, distinguished by the magnitude, type, and rapidity of response. One element in the electricity supply chain is OpenADR, an open-standards based communications system to send signals to customers to allow them to manage their electric demand in response to supply conditions, such as prices or reliability, through a set of standard, open communications. Initial DRRC research suggests that industrial facilities that have undertaken energy efficiency measures are probably more, not less, likely to initiate other actions within this value chain such as daily load management and demand response. Moreover, OpenADR appears to afford some facilities the opportunity to develop the supporting control structure and to 'demo' potential reductions in energy use that can later be applied to either more effective load management or a permanent reduction in use via energy efficiency. Under the right conditions, some types of industrial facilities can shift or shed loads, without any, or minimal disruption to operations, to protect their energy supply reliability and to take advantage of financial incentives. In 2007 and 2008, 35 industrial facilities agreed to implement OpenADR, representing a total capacity of nearly 40 MW. This paper describes how integrated or centralized demand management and system-level network controls are linked to OpenADR systems. Case studies of refrigerated warehouses and wastewater treatment facilities are used to illustrate OpenADR load reduction potential. Typical shed and shift strategies include: turning off or operating compressors, aerator blowers and pumps at reduced capacity, increasing temperature set-points or pre-cooling cold storage areas and over-oxygenating stored wastewater prior to a DR event. This study concludes that understanding industrial end-use processes and control capabilities is a key to support reduced service during DR events and these capabilities, if DR enabled, hold significant promise in reducing the electricity demand of the industrial sector during utility peak periods.

McKane, Aimee; Rhyne, Ivin; Piette, Mary Ann; Thompson, Lisa; Lekov, Alex

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Program on Technology Innovation: Tracking the Demand for Electricity from Grid Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To help address the many challenges facing the electric power industry in the next 20years, an effective process of technology research and development (R&D) planning is needed. Based on input from a broad range of stakeholders and using a proven scenario planning process, this report represents an attempt to monitor one of three key drivers, namely, the demand for electricity from grid services, which may impact the industry in the future. Collectively, these drivers form the basis of a ...

2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

215

"Table A25. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, Industry"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, Industry" Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, Industry" " Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," ","Sales and/or"," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Transfers","Total Onsite","Transfers","Net Demand for","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Purchases","In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)","Factors"

216

Solar Two is a concentrating solar power plant that can supply electric power "on demand"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Two is a concentrating solar power plant that can supply electric power "on demand time ever, a utility-scale solar power plant can supply elec- tricity when the utility needs it most achievement. The design is based on lessons learned at Solar One, this country's first power tower. Solar One

Laughlin, Robert B.

217

Structural changes between models of fossil-fuel demand by steam-electric power plants  

SciTech Connect

A consumption function for multi-fuel steam-electric power plants is used to investigate fossil-fuel demand behavior. The input consumption equations for a plant's primary and alternate fossil fuels are derived by Shepard's lemma from a generalized Cobb-Douglas cost function reflecting average variable cost minimization constrained by technology and the demand for electricity. These equations are estimated by primary and alternate fuel subsets with ordinary least squares and seemingly unrelated regression techniques for 1974, 1977, and 1980. The results of the regression analysis show the importance of consumer demand in the fossil fuel consumption decision; it has the only significant parameter in all of the estimated equations. The estimated own- and cross-price elasticities are small, when they are statistically significant. The results for the primary fuel equations are better than those for the alternate fuel equations in all of the fuel pair subsets.

Gerring, L.F.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Statewide Emissions Reduction, Electricity and Demand Savings from the Implementation of Building-Energy-Codes in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper focuses on the estimate of electricity reduction and electric demand savings from the adoption energy codes for single-family residences in Texas, 2002-2009, corresponding increase in cnstruction costs and estimates of the statewide emissions reduction.

Yazdani, B.; Haberl, J.; Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Zilbershtein, G.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Design for implementation : fully integrated charging & docking infrastructure used in Mobility-on-Demand electric vehicle fleets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the technology used in electric vehicles continues to advance, there is an increased demand for urban-appropriate electric charging stations emphasizing a modern user interface, robust design, and reliable functionality. ...

Martin, Jean Mario Nations

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Statewide Electricity and Demand Capacity Savings from the Implementation of IECC Code in Texas: Analysis for Single-Family Residences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents estimates of the statewide electricity and electric demand savings achieved from the adoption of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for single-family residences in Texas and includes the corresponding increase in construction costs over the eight-year period from 2002 through 2009. Using the Energy Systems Laboratory's International Code Compliance Calculator (IC3) simulation tool, the annual statewide electricity savings in 2009 are estimated to be $161 million. The statewide peak electric demand reductions in 2009 are estimated to be 694 MW for the summer and 766 MW for the winter periods. Since 2002, the cumulative statewide electricity and electric demand savings over the eight year period from 2002 to 2009 are $1,803 million ($776 million from electricity savings and $1,027 million from electric demand savings) while the total increased costs are estimated to be $670 million.

Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Haberl, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The Impact of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Programs on the U.S. Electricity Market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study analyzes the impact of the energy efficiency (EE) and demand response (DR) programs on the grid and the consequent level of production. Changes in demand caused by EE and DR programs affect not only the dispatch of existing plants and new generation technologies, the retirements of old plants, and the finances of the market. To find the new equilibrium in the market, we use the Oak Ridge Competitive Electricity Dispatch Model (ORCED) developed to simulate the operations and costs of regional power markets depending on various factors including fuel prices, initial mix of generation capacity, and customer response to electricity prices. In ORCED, over 19,000 plant units in the nation are aggregated into up to 200 plant groups per region. Then, ORCED dispatches the power plant groups in each region to meet the electricity demands for a given year up to 2035. In our analysis, we show various demand, supply, and dispatch patterns affected by EE and DR programs across regions.

Baek, Young Sun [ORNL; Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Demand-side carbon reduction strategies in an era of electric industry competition  

SciTech Connect

With the national debate on the need for intensified research and development, supply-side mandates, and carbon taxes likely to continue for some time, the authors propose a five-point, integrated demand-side plan that is compatible with marketplace forces and can be implemented now. This paper presents a five-point, integrated demand-side plan designed to be compatible with marketplace forces in the competitive electricity era, while the nation continues to debate the need for intensified research and development, supply-side mandates, and carbon taxes.

Meyers, E.M.; Hu, G.M. [District of Columbia Public Service Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Electrical Energy Conservation and Peak Demand Reduction Potential for Buildings in Texas: Preliminary Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents preliminary results of a study of electrical energy conservation and peak demand reduction potential for the building sector in Texas. Starting from 1980 building stocks and energy use characteristics, technical conservation potentials were calculated relative to frozen energy efficiency stock growth over the 1980-2000 period. The application of conservation supply methodology to Texas utilities is outlined, and then the energy use and peak demand savings, and their associated costs, are calculated using a prototypical building technique. Representative results are presented, for residential and commercial building types, as conservation supply curves for several end use categories; complete results of the study are presented in Ref. 1.

Hunn, B. D.; Baughman, M. L.; Silver, S. C.; Rosenfeld, A. H.; Akbari, H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Economic Modeling of Mid-Term Gas Demand and Electric Generation Capacity Trends  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. power sector natural gas use over the next 10 to 20 years is a topic of significant uncertainty and debate. The industry expects the power sector to be the principal source of growth in national gas demand in the short run; and the manner in which it drives demand and affects the market over the "mid term," to 2020-2030, is an important consideration for planners in both the electric and gas industries. With abundant, relatively low-priced supplies, gas-fired generation can be a strong competito...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

225

Duct Leakage Impacts on Airtightness, Infiltration, and Peak Electrical Demand in Florida Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Testing for duct leakage was done in 155 homes. Tracer gas tests found that infiltration rates were three times greater when the air handler was operating than when it was off. Infiltration averaged 0.85 air changes per hour (ach) with the air handler (AH) operating continuously and 0.29 ach with the AH off. Return leaks were found to average 10.3% of AH total flow. House airtightness, in 90 of these homes, determined by blower door testing, averaged 12.58 air changes per hour at 50 Pascals (ACHSO). When the duct registers were sealed, ACHSO decreased to 11.04, indicating that 12.2% of the house leaks were in the duct system. Duct leaks have a dramatic impact upon peak electrical demand. Based on theoretical analysis, a fifteen percent return leak from the attic can increase cooling electrical demand by 100%. Duct repairs in a typical. electrically heated Florida home reduce winter peak demand by about 1.6 kW per house at about one-sixth the cost of building new electrical generation capacity.

Cummings, J. B.; Tooley, J. J.; Moyer, N.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Specification, estimation, and forecasts of industrial demand and price of electricity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the specification of electricity-demand and price equations for manufacturing industries and presents empirical results based on the data for 16 Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) three-digit industries from 1959 to 1976. Performances of estimated equations are evaluated by sample-period simulation tests. The estimated coefficients are then used to forecast electricity demand by industry. Results show that most of the estimated coefficients have expected signs and are statistically significant. The estimated equations perform well in terms of sample-period simulation tests, registering small mean absolute percentage errors and mean square percentage errors for most of the industries studied. Forecasted results indicate that total electricity demand by manufacturing industries would grow at an average annual rate of 3.53% according to the baseline forecast, 2.39% in the high-price scenario, and 4.76% in the low-price scenario. The forecasted growth rates vary substantially among industries. The results also indicate that the price of electricity would continue to grow at a faster rate than the general price level in the forecasted period 1977 to 1990. 19 references, 6 tables.

Chang, H.S. (Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville); Chern, W.S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 5.8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 3,335 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 84 133 23 2,119 8 547 Conventional Boiler Use 84 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,639 62 52 2,788 39 412 Process Heating 379 59 19 2,487 32 345 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

228

A Preliminary Examination of the Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable Electricity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Preliminary Examination A Preliminary Examination of the Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable Electricity Blair Swezey, Jørn Aabakken, and Lori Bird Technical Report NREL/TP-670-42266 October 2007 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 A Preliminary Examination of the Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable Electricity Blair Swezey, Jørn Aabakken, and Lori Bird Prepared under Task No. WF6N.1015 Technical Report NREL/TP-670-42266 October 2007 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle

229

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21 46 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 24,584 21 4 2,059 2 25 Conventional Boiler Use 24,584 11 3 1,245 2 6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 10 1 814 * 19 Direct Uses-Total Process 773,574 10 9 2,709 10 19 Process Heating

230

An integrated assessment of global and regional water demands for electricity generation to 2095  

SciTech Connect

Electric power plants currently account for approximately one-half of the global industrial water withdrawal. While continued expansion of the electric sector seems likely into the future, the consequent water demands are quite uncertain, and will depend on highly variable water intensities by electricity technologies, at present and in the future. Using GCAM, an integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, and climate change, we first establish lower-bound, median, and upper-bound estimates for present-day electric sector water withdrawals and consumption by individual electric generation technologies in each of 14 geopolitical regions, and compare them with available estimates of regional industrial or electric sector water use. We then explore the evolution of global and regional electric sector water use over the next century, focusing on uncertainties related to withdrawal and consumption intensities for a variety of electric generation technologies, rates of change of power plant cooling system types, and rates of adoption of a suite of water-saving technologies. Results reveal that the water withdrawal intensity of electricity generation is likely to decrease in the near term with capital stock turnover, as wet towers replace once-through flow cooling systems and advanced electricity generation technologies replace conventional ones. An increase in consumptive use accompanies the decrease in water withdrawal rates; however, a suite of water conservation technologies currently under development could compensate for this increase in consumption. Finally, at a regional scale, water use characteristics vary significantly based on characteristics of the existing capital stock and the selection of electricity generation technologies into the future.

Davies, Evan; Kyle, G. Page; Edmonds, James A.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

The Boom of Electricity Demand in the Residential Sector in the Developing World and the Potential for Energy Efficiency  

SciTech Connect

With the emergence of China as the world's largest energy consumer, the awareness of developing country energy consumption has risen. According to common economic scenarios, the rest of the developing world will probably see an economic expansion as well. With this growth will surely come continued rapid growth in energy demand. This paper explores the dynamics of that demand growth for electricity in the residential sector and the realistic potential for coping with it through efficiency. In 2000, only 66% of developing world households had access to electricity. Appliance ownership rates remain low, but with better access to electricity and a higher income one can expect that households will see their electricity consumption rise significantly. This paper forecasts developing country appliance growth using econometric modeling. Products considered explicitly - refrigerators, air conditioners, lighting, washing machines, fans, televisions, stand-by power, water heating and space heating - represent the bulk of household electricity consumption in developing countries. The resulting diffusion model determines the trend and dynamics of demand growth at a level of detail not accessible by models of a more aggregate nature. In addition, the paper presents scenarios for reducing residential consumption through cost-effective and/or best practice efficiency measures defined at the product level. The research takes advantage of an analytical framework developed by LBNL (BUENAS) which integrates end use technology parameters into demand forecasting and stock accounting to produce detailed efficiency scenarios, which allows for a realistic assessment of efficiency opportunities at the national or regional level. The past decades have seen some of the developing world moving towards a standard of living previously reserved for industrialized countries. Rapid economic development, combined with large populations has led to first China and now India to emerging as 'energy giants', a phenomenon that is expected to continue, accelerate and spread to other countries. This paper explores the potential for slowing energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in the residential sector in developing countries and evaluates the potential of energy savings and emissions mitigation through market transformation programs such as, but not limited to Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling (EES&L). The bottom-up methodology used allows one to identify which end uses and regions have the greatest potential for savings.

Letschert, Virginie; McNeil, Michael A.

2008-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

232

The Boom of Electricity Demand in the Residential Sector in the Developing World and the Potential for Energy Efficiency  

SciTech Connect

With the emergence of China as the world's largest energy consumer, the awareness of developing country energy consumption has risen. According to common economic scenarios, the rest of the developing world will probably see an economic expansion as well. With this growth will surely come continued rapid growth in energy demand. This paper explores the dynamics of that demand growth for electricity in the residential sector and the realistic potential for coping with it through efficiency. In 2000, only 66% of developing world households had access to electricity. Appliance ownership rates remain low, but with better access to electricity and a higher income one can expect that households will see their electricity consumption rise significantly. This paper forecasts developing country appliance growth using econometric modeling. Products considered explicitly - refrigerators, air conditioners, lighting, washing machines, fans, televisions, stand-by power, water heating and space heating - represent the bulk of household electricity consumption in developing countries. The resulting diffusion model determines the trend and dynamics of demand growth at a level of detail not accessible by models of a more aggregate nature. In addition, the paper presents scenarios for reducing residential consumption through cost-effective and/or best practice efficiency measures defined at the product level. The research takes advantage of an analytical framework developed by LBNL (BUENAS) which integrates end use technology parameters into demand forecasting and stock accounting to produce detailed efficiency scenarios, which allows for a realistic assessment of efficiency opportunities at the national or regional level. The past decades have seen some of the developing world moving towards a standard of living previously reserved for industrialized countries. Rapid economic development, combined with large populations has led to first China and now India to emerging as 'energy giants', a phenomenon that is expected to continue, accelerate and spread to other countries. This paper explores the potential for slowing energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in the residential sector in developing countries and evaluates the potential of energy savings and emissions mitigation through market transformation programs such as, but not limited to Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling (EES&L). The bottom-up methodology used allows one to identify which end uses and regions have the greatest potential for savings.

Letschert, Virginie; McNeil, Michael A.

2008-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

233

Electric and magnetic Weyl tensors in higher dimensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent results on purely electric (PE) or magnetic (PM) spacetimes in n dimensions are summarized. These include: Weyl types; diagonalizability; conditions under which direct (or warped) products are PE/PM.

Sigbjrn Hervik; Marcello Ortaggio; Lode Wylleman

2013-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

234

Energy Demand: Limits on the Response to Higher Energy Prices in the End-Use Sectors (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Energy consumption in the end-use demand sectorsresidential, commercial, industrial, and transportationgenerally shows only limited change when energy prices increase. Several factors that limit the sensitivity of end-use energy demand to price signals are common across the end-use sectors. For example, because energy generally is consumed in long-lived capital equipment, short-run consumer responses to changes in energy prices are limited to reductions in the use of energy services or, in a few cases, fuel switching; and because energy services affect such critical lifestyle areas as personal comfort, medical services, and travel, end-use consumers often are willing to absorb price increases rather than cut back on energy use, especially when they are uncertain whether price increases will be long-lasting. Manufacturers, on the other hand, often are able to pass along higher energy costs, especially in cases where energy inputs are a relatively minor component of production costs. In economic terms, short-run energy demand typically is inelastic, and long-run energy demand is less inelastic or moderately elastic at best.

Information Center

2007-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

235

Measured electric hot water standby and demand loads from Pacific Northwest homes  

SciTech Connect

The Bonneville Power Administration began the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP) in 1983 to obtain metered hourly end-use consumption data for a large sample of new and existing residential and commercial buildings in the Pacific Northwest. Loads and load shapes from the first 3 years of data fro each of several ELCAP residential studies representing various segments of the housing population have been summarized by Pratt et al. The analysis reported here uses the ELCAP data to investigate in much greater detail the relationship of key occupant and tank characteristics to the consumption of electricity for water heating. The hourly data collected provides opportunities to understand electricity consumption for heating water and to examine assumptions about water heating that are critical to load forecasting and conservation resource assessments. Specific objectives of this analysis are to: (A) determine the current baseline for standby heat losses by determining the standby heat loss of each hot water tank in the sample, (B) examine key assumptions affecting standby heat losses such as hot water temperatures and tank sizes and locations, (C) estimate, where possible, impacts on standby heat losses by conservation measures such as insulating tank wraps, pipe wraps, anticonvection valves or traps, and insulating bottom boards, (D) estimate the EF-factors used by the federal efficiency standards and the nominal R-values of the tanks in the sample, (E) develop estimates of demand for hot water for each home in the sample by subtracting the standby load from the total hot water load, (F) examine the relationship between the ages and number of occupants and the hot water demand, (G) place the standby and demand components of water heating electricity consumption in perspective with the total hot water load and load shape.

Pratt, R.G.; Ross, B.A.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

LBNL-6280E A Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

280E 280E A Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and Energy Use of Buildings Using 30- Year Actual Weather Data Tianzhen Hong 1 , Wen-kuei Chang 2 , Hung-Wen Lin 2 1 Environmental Energy Technologies Division 2 Green Energy and Environment Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Taiwan, ROC May 2013 This work was supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, the U.S.-China Clean Energy Research Center for Building Energy Efficiency, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-

237

Automated Demand Response: The Missing Link in the Electricity Value Chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory. Berkeley. Demand Response Research Center,and Automated Demand Response in Wastewater TreatmentLaboratory. Berkeley. Demand Response Research Center,

McKane, Aimee

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Automated Demand Response: The Missing Link in the Electricity Value Chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Open Automated Demand Response. In Grid Interop Forum.Berkeley National Laboratory. Demand Response ResearchCenter, Demand Response Research Center PIER Team Briefing,

McKane, Aimee

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

xxxv Option Value of Electricity Demand Response, Osmanelasticity in aggregate electricity demand. With these newii) reduction in electricity demand during peak periods (

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Integrating demand into the U.S. electric power system : technical, economic, and regulatory frameworks for responsive load  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electric power system in the US developed with the assumption of exogenous, inelastic demand. The resulting evolution of the power system reinforced this assumption as nearly all controls, monitors, and feedbacks were ...

Black, Jason W. (Jason Wayne)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Electricity demand-side management for an energy efficient future in China : technology options and policy priorities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main objective of this research is to identify robust technology and policy options which achieve substantial reductions in electricity demand in China's Shandong Province. This research utilizes a scenario-based ...

Cheng, Chia-Chin

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Intelligent energy management: impact of demand response and plug-in electric vehicles in a smart grid environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modernization of the power grid to meet the growing demand requires significant amount of operational, technological, and infrastructural overhaul. The Department of Energy's "Grid 2030" strategic vision outlines the action plan to alleviate the concerns ... Keywords: controlled charging, demand response, plug in hybrid electric vehicles, smart grid

Seshadri Srinivasa Raghavan; Alireza Khaligh

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Framing Scenarios of Electricity Generation and Gas Use: EPRI Report Series on Gas Demands for Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a systematic appraisal of trends in electric generation and demands for gas for power generation. Gas-fired generation is the leading driver of forecasted growth in demand for natural gas in the United States, and natural gas is a leading fuel for planned new generating capacity. The report goes behind the numbers and forecasts to quantify key drivers and uncertainties.

1996-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

244

Using Compressed Air Efficiency Projects to Reduce Peak Industrial Electric Demands: Lessons Learned  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"To help customers respond to the wildly fluctuating energy markets in California, Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E) initiated an emergency electric demand reduction program in October 2000 to cut electric use during peak periods. One component of that wide-ranging program focused on industrial compressed air systems as the target for such electric use reductions. What stands out about the compressed air effort is that customer acceptance of the program was very high (8 out of 10 customer sites implemented at least some of the efficiency projects recommended in the program's air system audits) and overall savings levels were more than 3X the original program goal (550 kW vs. 1730 kW). XENERGY, Inc. designed and carried out the program on behalf of PG&E. Key features of the program included working with compressed air system distributors to identify and qualify good customer leads and post-audit technical assistance to help customer implement recommended projects. This paper reviews the project and outlines some of the lessons learned in completing the project."

Skelton, J.

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

SmartCap: Flattening Peak Electricity Demand in Smart Homes Sean Barker, Aditya Mishra, David Irwin, Prashant Shenoy, and Jeannie Albrecht  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SmartCap: Flattening Peak Electricity Demand in Smart Homes Sean Barker, Aditya Mishra, David Irwin--Flattening household electricity demand reduces generation costs, since costs are disproportionately affected by peak demands. While the vast majority of household electrical loads are interactive and have little scheduling

Shenoy, Prashant

246

Controlling Market Power and Price Spikes in Electricity Networks: Demand-side Bidding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simona Lup, Jia Jing Liu and Stephen Sosnicki for help with running the experiments and testing the software. This paper has benefited from comments from Kevin McCabe, Mark Olson, Dave Porter, and Stan Reynolds, but all errors are our own. The data are available upon request from the authors. Controlling Market Power and Price Spikes in Electricity Networks: Demand-Side Bidding In this paper we report experiments that examine how two structural features of electricity networks contribute to the exercise of market power in deregulated markets. The first feature is the distribution of ownership of a given set of generating assets. In the market power treatment, two large firms are allocated baseload and intermediate cost generators such that either firm might unilaterally withhold the capacity of its intermediate cost generators from the market to benefit from the supracompetitive prices that would result from only selling its baseload units. In the converse treatment, ownership of some of the intermediate cost generators is transferred from each of these firms to two other firms, so that no one firm could unilaterally restrict output to spawn supra-competitive prices. The second feature explores how the presence of line constraints in a radial network may segment the market and promote supra-competitive pricing in the isolated market segments. We also consider the interaction effect when both of these structural features are present. Having established a wellcontrolled data set with price spikes paralleling those observed in the naturally occurring economy, we also extend the design to include demand-side bidding. We find that demand-side bidding completely neutralizes the exercise of market power and eliminates price spikes.

Stephen J. Rassenti; Vernon L. Smith; Bart J. Wilson

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098. Price-Elastic Demand in Deregulated Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The degree to which anyderegulated market functions e ciently often depends on the ability ofmarket agents to respond quickly to uctuating conditions. Many restructured electricity markets, however, experience high prices caused by supply shortages and little demand-side response. We examine the implications for market operations when a risk-averse retailer's end-use consumers are allowed to perceive real-time variations in the electricity spot price. Using a market-equilibrium model, we nd that price elasticity bothincreases the retailer's revenue risk exposure and decreases the spot price. Since the latter induces the retailer to reduce forward electricity purchases, while the former has the opposite e ect, the overall impact of price responsive demand on the electricity forward price is ambiguous. Indeed, each retailer's response depends on the relative magnitudes of its risk exposure and end-user price elasticity. Nevertheless, price elasticity decreases cumulative electricity consumption. By extending the analysis to allow for early settlement of demand, we nd that forward stage end-user price responsiveness decreases the electricity forward price relative to the case with price-elastic demand only in real time. Moreover, we nd that only if forward stage end-user demand is price elastic will the equilibrium electricity forward price be reduced.

Afzal S. Siddiqui; Afzal S. Siddiqui

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Electricity demand as frequency controlled reserves, ForskEL (Smart Grid  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ForskEL (Smart Grid ForskEL (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Electricity demand as frequency controlled reserves, ForskEL Country Denmark Coordinates 56.26392°, 9.501785° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":56.26392,"lon":9.501785,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

249

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

internal conditions. Maximum Demand Saving Intensity [W/ft2]automated electric demand sheds. The maximum electric shed

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Table 8.13 Electric Utility Demand-Side Management Programs ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Savings: Electric Utility Costs 4: ... motor drive) with less electricity. Examples include high-efficiency appliances, ... advanced electric motor drives, and

251

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of integrating demand response and energy efficiencyand D. Kathan (2009), Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityFRAMEWORKS THAT PROMOTE DEMAND RESPONSE 3.1. Demand Response

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Beyond kWh and kW demand: Understanding the new real-time electric power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beyond kWh and kW demand: Understanding the new real-time electric power Beyond kWh and kW demand: Understanding the new real-time electric power measurement system in LBNL Building 90 Speaker(s): Alex McEachern Date: January 14, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 In the Summer of 2009, LBNL researchers installed end-use sub-metering equipment and associated Energy Information System (EIS) tools to characterize energy use and comfort in Building 90. Seven of 40 key electric loads were measured using advanced meters that make sophisticated real-time measurements of dozens of power flow parameters, power disturbances, and harmonics. The talk will review some electrical engineering fundamentals, how use and interpret data measured in building 90 in real-time. The real-time data available includes power, volt-amps, VAR's, unbalance voltage and current, voltage and current distortion,

253

Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using OpenADR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Edison/Rates and Tariffs /Schedule for Electricity Service,Edison/Rates and Tariffs /Schedule for Electricity Service,

Kim, Joyce Jihyun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Perception of price when price information is costly: evidence from electricity demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Economic theory predicts that a well-informed consumer facing multiple prices responds to marginal price rather than to average price because he equates benefits with costs at the margin. The marginal price postulate, however, may not be true if information regarding marginal price is costly. Residential consumption of electricity is an example of a good for which it is costly to determine marginal price since the price changes with quantity purchased according to a declining-block schedule. If the cost of determining marginal price exceeds its expected benefits, the consumer will base his consumption on simpler information rather than on marginal price. The most obvious candidate is the monthly bill. Since electricity expenditures are greater than they would be if priced at marginal price, perceived price is anticipated to be higher than marginal price. The model includes a price perception variable that depends on the complexity of the rate structure as measured by the ratio of average to marginal price. Pooled annual data from 1960 to 1980 on the seven Ohio electric utilities are used for estimation. The evidence supports the hypothesis that the residential consumer responds to average price. Further, the expected increase in consumer's surplus, if marginal price were correctly perceived, is calculated at the sample mean and found to be negligible compared to any possible cost of determining marginal price.

Shin, J.S.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

The Program on Technology Innovation: Tracking the Demand for Electricity From Grid-Related Services Preliminary Delphi Panel Resu lts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to develop a robust research and development portfolio under a variety of future scenarios, EPRI's research has identified three critical drivers which can substantially influence the technologies needed to provide society with clean, reliable and affordable electricity in the decades ahead. These drivers include the price of natural gas, the demand for electricity from grid services, and the potential for change in environmental and energy policy.In its scenario planning ...

2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

256

Air-conditioning electricity savings and demand reductions from exterior masonry wall insulation applied to Arizona residences  

SciTech Connect

A field test involving eight single-family houses was performed during the summer of 1991 in Scottsdale, Arizona to evaluate the potential of reducing air-conditioning electricity consumption and demand by insulating their exterior masonry walls. Total per house costs to perform the installations ranged from $3610 to $4550. The average annual savings was estimated to be 491 kWh, or 9% of pre-retrofit consumption. Peak demands without and with insulation on the hottest day of an average weather year for Phoenix were estimated to be 4.26 and 3.61 kill, for a demand reduction of 0.65 kill (15%). We conclude that exterior masonry wall insulation reduces air-conditioning electricity consumption and peak demand in hot, dry climates similar to that of Phoenix. Peak demand reductions are a primary benefit, making the retrofit worthy of consideration in electric utility conservation programs. Economics can be attractive from a consumer viewpoint if considered within a renovation or home improvement program.

Ternes, M.P.; Wilkes, K.E.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Variable-response model of electricity demand by time of day: Results of a Wisconsin pricing experiment: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observationally alike households may differ in demand parameters and thus in economic quantities that are functions of those parameters. We have proposed a methodology for dealing with this variation. Estimation of both translog and CES versions of the model with data from the Wisconsin Electricity Pricing Experiment revealed considerable variation among households in time-of-day electricity consumption demand parameters for both summer and winter seasons and for several different definitions of the peak period. Observed household characteristics explained only a small share of total household differences, but permanent household differences dominated month-to-month variation in either expenditure shares or log consumption ratios in most cases. Permanent differences among households are important relative to total variation, including transitory month-to-month variation. We calculated various economic variables from the demand parameters, including the partial elasticity of substitution, compensated and uncompensated elasticities, and a measure of electricity expenditure under peak load pricing required to maintain the utility level under flat rate pricing relative to the flat rate expenditure. Because these are nonlinear functions of the household demand parameters, the mean parameter value over households with different demand parameters may be substantially different from the value of the function at mean values, under the representative household paradigm. For time-of-day electricity demand, variation among households is significant but small relative to mean parameter values. Therefore, controlling for the effect of household variation makes little difference in these mean calculations, but it does imply substantial variation among households in the welfare implications (and elasticities of response) of the introduction of time-of-day pricing. 25 refs., 12 tabs.

Lillard, L.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Automated Demand Response: The Missing Link in the Electricity Value Chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Missing Link in the Electricity Value Chain Aimee McKane,Missing Link in the Electricity Value Chain Aimee McKane,grid reliability and lower electricity use during periods of

McKane, Aimee

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Automated Demand Response: The Missing Link in the Electricity Value Chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Missing Link in the Electricity Value Chain Aimee McKane*,Missing Link in the Electricity Value Chain Aimee McKane,grid reliability and lower electricity use during periods of

McKane, Aimee

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Today in Energy - U.S. economy and electricity demand growth ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

A country's economy and its energy use, particularly electricity use, are linked. Short-term changes in electricity use are often positively correlated with changes ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Impact of Plug-in Electrical Cars on Energy Demand, on Power System and on Environment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The use of an electric vehicle (EV) over a gasoline vehicle (GV) is often portrayed as environment friendly or green movement ignoring how the electricity (more)

Tiwari, Sital

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

U.S. economy and electricity demand growth are linked, but ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Absent a very rapid introduction of some new electricity-using deviceperhaps electric vehiclesa sharp rebound in ... less energy intensive industry. ...

263

Thermal energy storage for space cooling. Technology for reducing on-peak electricity demand and cost  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cool storage technology can be used to significantly reduce energy costs by allowing energy intensive, electrically driven cooling equipment to be predominantly operated during off-peak hours when electricity rates are lower. In addition, some system configurations may result in lower first costs and/or lower operating costs. Cool storage systems of one type or another could potentially be cost-effectively applied in most buildings with a space cooling system. A survey of approximately 25 manufacturers providing cool storage systems or components identified several thousand current installations, but less than 1% of these were at Federal facilities. With the Federal sector representing nearly 4% of commercial building floor space and 5% of commercial building energy use, Federal utilization would appear to be lagging. Although current applications are relatively few, the estimated potential annual savings from using cool storage in the Federal sector is $50 million. There are many different types of cool storage systems representing different combinations of storage media, charging mechanisms, and discharging mechanisms. The basic media options are water, ice, and eutectic salts. Ice systems can be further broken down into ice harvesting, ice-on-coil, ice slurry, and encapsulated ice options. Ice-on-coil systems may be internal melt or external melt and may be charged and discharged with refrigerant or a single-phase coolant (typically a water/glycol mixture). Independent of the technology choice, cool storage systems can be designed to provide full storage or partial storage, with load-leveling and demand-limiting options for partial storage. Finally, storage systems can be operated on a chiller-priority or storage priority basis whenever the cooling load is less than the design conditions. The first section describes the basic types of cool storage technologies and cooling system integration options. The next three sections define the savings potential in the Federal sector, present application advice, and describe the performance experience of specific Federal users. A step-by-step methodology illustrating how to evaluate cool storage options is presented next, followed by a case study of a GSA building using cool storage. Latter sections list manufacturers, selected Federal users, and reference materials. Finally, the appendixes give Federal life-cycle costing procedures and results for a case study.

None

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Impact of Reflective Roofing on Cooling Electrical Use and Peak Demand in a Florida Retail Mall  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Architects in hot climates have long recognized that reflective roof colors can reduce building cooling load. Experimentation spanning nearly three decades has shown that white roofing surfaces can significantly reduce surface temperatures and cooling loads (Givoni and Hoffmann, 1968; Reagan and Acklam, 1979; Griggs and Shipp, 1988; Anderson, 1989; Anderson et al., 1991 and Bansal et al., 1992). More importantly, measured cooling energy savings of white surfaces have been significant in California's climate (Akbari et al., 1991, 1992, 1997). In Florida, field research by the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) since 1993 has quantified the impact of reflective roof coatings on sub-metered air conditioning (AC) consumption in tests in a dozen occupied homes (Parker et al., 1993; 1994; 1995; 1997). The coatings were applied to the roofs of each home in mid-summer after a month-long period of monitoring during which meteorological conditions, building temperatures and AC energy use were recorded. Using weather periods with similar temperatures and solar insolation, air conditioning energy use was reduced by 10% - 43% in the homes. The average drop in space cooling energy use was about 7.4 kWh/day or 19% of the pre-application air conditioning consumption. Unfortunately, until this project there has been little objective testing of the impact of roof whitening on the AC load of commercial buildings in Florida. Two demonstration sites have been monitored. The first was an elementary school in Cocoa Beach, Florida, which was monitored for a year before and after a white roof coating was applied. A final report on this project was published in the CADDET Newsletter (Parker et al., 1996a, b). The project demonstrated a 10% annual savings in chiller energy with a 30% reduction in peak cooling electrical demand. This paper summarizes the findings from the second demonstration at a commercial strip mall.

Parker, D. S.; Sonne, J. K.; Sherwin, J. R.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Is Real-Time Pricing Green?: The Environmental Impacts of Electricity Demand Variance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production costs of hydroelectricity are typically low) bute?ects likely driven by hydroelectricity availability. Thus,demand for peak-shaving hydroelectricity. Finally, the four

Holland, Stephen P.; Mansur, Erin T.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Analysis of PG&E`s residential end-use metered data to improve electricity demand forecasts -- final report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes findings from a unique project to improve the end-use electricity load shape and peak demand forecasts made by the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) and the California Energy Commission (CEC). First, the direct incorporation of end-use metered data into electricity demand forecasting models is a new approach that has only been made possible by recent end-use metering projects. Second, and perhaps more importantly, the joint-sponsorship of this analysis has led to the development of consistent sets of forecasting model inputs. That is, the ability to use a common data base and similar data treatment conventions for some of the forecasting inputs frees forecasters to concentrate on those differences (between their competing forecasts) that stem from real differences of opinion, rather than differences that can be readily resolved with better data. The focus of the analysis is residential space cooling, which represents a large and growing demand in the PG&E service territory. Using five years of end-use metered, central air conditioner data collected by PG&E from over 300 residences, we developed consistent sets of new inputs for both PG&E`s and CEC`s end-use load shape forecasting models. We compared the performance of the new inputs both to the inputs previously used by PG&E and CEC, and to a second set of new inputs developed to take advantage of a recently added modeling option to the forecasting model. The testing criteria included ability to forecast total daily energy use, daily peak demand, and demand at 4 P.M. (the most frequent hour of PG&E`s system peak demand). We also tested the new inputs with the weather data used by PG&E and CEC in preparing their forecasts.

Eto, J.H.; Moezzi, M.M.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Electrical energy and demand savings from a geothermal heat pump energy savings performance contract at Ft. Polk, LA  

SciTech Connect

At Fort Polk, LA the space conditioning systems of an entire city (4,003 military family housing units) have been converted to geothermal heat pumps (GHP) under an energy savings performance contract. At the same time, other efficiency measures such as compact fluorescent lights (CFLs), low-flow hot water outlets, and attic insulation were installed. Pre- and post-retrofit data were taken at 15-minute intervals on energy flows through the electrical distribution feeders that serve the family housing areas of the post. 15-minute interval data was also taken on energy use from a sample of the residences. This paper summarizes the electrical energy and demand savings observed in this data. Analysis of feeder-level data shows that for a typical year, the project will result in a 25.6 million kWh savings in electrical energy use, or 32.4% of the pre-retrofit electrical consumption in family housing. Results from analysis of building-level data compare well with this figure. Analysis of feeder-level data also shows that the project has resulted in a reduction of peak electrical demand of 6,541 kW, which is 39.6% of the pre-retrofit peak electrical demand. In addition to these electrical savings, the facility is also saving an estimated 260,000 therms per year of natural gas. It should be noted that the energy savings presented in this document are the apparent energy savings observed in the monitored data, and are not to be confused with the contracted energy savings used as the basis for payments. To determine the contracted energy savings, the apparent energy savings may require adjustments for such things as changes in indoor temperature performance criteria, additions of ceiling fans, and other factors.

Shonder, J.A.; Hughes, P.J.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Testing Electric Vehicle Demand in `Hybrid Households' Using a Reflexive Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

travel by electric and hybrid vehicles. SAE Technical PapersIn contrast to a hybrid vehicle which combines multipleElectric, Hybrid and Other Alternative Vehicles. A r t h u r

Kurani, Kenneth; Turrentine, Thomas; Sperling, Daniel

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 3,335 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 84 133 23 2,119 8 547 Conventional Boiler Use 84 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,639 62 52 2,788 39 412 Process Heating 379 59 19 2,487 32 345 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

270

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 5.3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Code(a) End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21 46 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 24,584 21 4 2,059 2 25 Conventional Boiler Use 24,584 11 3

271

Industrial-Load-Shaping: The Practice of and Prospects for Utility/Industry Cooperation to Manage Peak Electricity Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Load-management programs designed to reduce demand for electricity during peak periods are becoming increasingly important to electric utilities. For a growing number of utilities, however, such peak-reduction programs don't go far enough in the face of new problems and challenges, and hence are proving ineffective or counterproductive. For example, many of a utility's largest customers--especially industrial customers who may be "locked into" seemingly inflexible process activities--have limited ability to respond to load-management programs that employ price signals as a central peak-reduction tool. Moreover, utilities in general are finding that vigorous efforts to reduce electric load can result in underutilization of base-load generating facilities. In these and other instances, "load-shaping," which emphasizes a shift of electric load or demand from peak to off-peak periods and provides for greater customer flexibility, may be a more effective strategy. This paper explains the need for and presents the components of a load-shaping program, and describes Pacific Gas and Electric Company's (PGandE) recent experience in designing and pursuing an industrial-load-shaping program. The paper also outlines important obstacles and opportunities likely to confront other utilities and industrial customers interested in working together to develop such programs.

Bules, D. J.; Rubin, D. E.; Maniates, M. F.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Prospects of Renewable Energy for Meeting Growing Electricity Demand in Pakistan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pakistan is an energy deficit country. About half of the country's population has access to electricity and per capita supply is only 520 kWh. Majority of the country's population resides in rural areas and most of them are yet without electricity. Conventional electricity generation includes 66.8% thermal

Mohammad Aslam Uqaili; Khanji Harijan; Mujeebuddin Memon

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Is Real-Time Pricing Green?: The Environmental Impacts of Electricity Demand Variance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L) of demand. Oil Marginal Cost ($/MWh) Hydroelectricsince oil and gas have high marginal costs, their shares ofcost, fuel sources are gen- erally ordered hydroelectric, nuclear, coal, natural gas, and oil.

Holland, Stephen P.; Mansur, Erin T.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Liquid Fuel From Renewable Electricity and Bacteria: Electro-Autotrophic Synthesis of Higher Alcohols  

SciTech Connect

Electrofuels Project: UCLA is utilizing renewable electricity to power direct liquid fuel production in genetically engineered Ralstonia eutropha bacteria. UCLA is using renewable electricity to convert carbon dioxide into formic acid, a liquid soluble compound that delivers both carbon and energy to the bacteria. The bacteriaare genetically engineered to convert the formic acid into liquid fuelin this case alcohols such as butanol. The electricity required for the process can be generated from sunlight, wind, or other renewable energy sources. In fact, UCLAs electricity-to-fuel system could be a more efficient way to utilize these renewable energy sources considering the energy density of liquid fuel is much higher than the energy density of other renewable energy storage options, such as batteries.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

The Outlook for Electricity Supply and Demand to 2035: Key Drivers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 History . Projections2010. 18% . 16% . Electricity mix gradually shifts to lower -carbon options in the

276

The Growth in Electricity Demand in U - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

responsible almost for 70 percent of household emissions. ... Weather is a major cause of the variation in household electricity use for space cooling and

277

Responsiveness of residential electricity demand to changes in price, information, and policy .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study analyzes consumers' behavioral responsiveness to changes in price and policy regarding residential electricity consumption, using a hybrid method of econometric analyses and energy (more)

Baek, Youngsun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Testing Electric Vehicle Demand in `Hybrid Households' Using a Reflexive Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

new features of compressed natural gas, battery poweredgasoline, compressed natural gas, hybrid electric, two typesNatural gas vehicles (NGVs) were available with one or two compressed

Kurani, Kenneth; Turrentine, Thomas; Sperling, Daniel

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the average and maximum peak demand savings. The electricity1: Average and Maximum Peak Electric Demand Savings during

Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Estimated effect of eliminating TVA electricity demand charges on the price of enriched uranium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An estimate of the price of enrichment services from fiscal years 1984 through 1995 are forecast assuming demand charges were eliminated and TVA power rates were set. Uranium enrichment program officials estimated the TVA power rate and TVA officials confirmed the reasonableness of that estimate.

Not Available

1983-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

U.S. Propane Demand  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Demand is higher in 1999 due to higher petrochemical demand and a strong economy. We are also seeing strong demand in the first quarter of 2000; however, ...

282

Electric Demand Reduction for the U.S. Navy Public Works Center San Diego, California  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory investigated the profitability of operating a Navy ship's generators (in San Diego) during high electricity price periods rather than the ships hooking up to the Base electrical system for power. Profitability is predicated on the trade-off between the operating and maintenance cost incurred by the Navy for operating the ship generators and the net profit associated with the sale of the electric power on the spot market. In addition, PNNL assessed the use of the ship's generators as a means to achieve predicted load curtailments, which can then be marketed to the California Independent System Operator.

Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

2000-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

283

Floating offshore wind farms : demand planning & logistical challenges of electricity generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Floating offshore wind farms are likely to become the next paradigm in electricity generation from wind energy mainly because of the near constant high wind speeds in an offshore environment as opposed to the erratic wind ...

Nnadili, Christopher Dozie, 1978-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Dynamic pricing and stabilization of supply and demand in modern electric power grids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper proposes a mechanism for real-time pricing of electricity in smart power grids, with price stability as the primary concern. In previous publications the authors argued that relaying the real-time wholesale market ...

Roozbehani, Mardavij

285

Is Real-Time Pricing Green?: The Environmental Impacts of Electricity Demand Variance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atlantic region, where the PJM wholesale electricity marketoperates. Firms in PJM use a mix of fuel sources andof the fossil fuel sources in PJM. The fossil-?red units are

Holland, Stephen P.; Mansur, Erin T.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity consumption for the end-use in the current yearelectricity consumption for this end-use in the current yearelectricity consumption for this end-use in the current year

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

202-328-5000 www.rff.orgA New Look at Residential Electricity Demand Using Household Expenditure Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We estimate residential electricity demand for different regions of the country, assuming that consumers respond to average electricity prices. We circumvent the need for individual billing information by developing a novel generalized method of moments approach that allows us to estimate demand based on household electricity expenditure data from the Consumer Expenditure Survey, which does not have quantity and price information. We find that price elasticity estimates vary across the four census regionsthe South at 1.02 is the most price-elastic region and the Northeast at 0.82 is the leastand are essentially equivalent across income quartiles. In general, these price elasticity estimates are considerably larger in magnitude than those found in other studies using household-level data that assume that consumers respond to marginal prices. We also apply our elasticity estimates in a U.S. climate policy simulation to determine how these elasticity estimates alter consumption and price outcomes compared to the more conservative elasticity estimates commonly used in policy analysis.

Harrison Fell; Shanjun Li; Anthony Paul; Harrison Fell; Shanjun Li; Anthony Paul; Monte Carlo Analysis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Examination of the Regional Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable Electricity in the United States through 2015: Projecting from 2009 through 2015 (Revised)  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the balance between the demand and supply of new renewable electricity in the United States on a regional basis through 2015. It expands on a 2007 NREL study that assessed the supply and demand balance on a national basis. As with the earlier study, this analysis relies on estimates of renewable energy supplies compared to demand for renewable energy generation needed to meet existing state renewable portfolio standard (RPS) policies in 28 states, as well as demand by consumers who voluntarily purchase renewable energy. However, it does not address demand by utilities that may procure cost-effective renewables through an integrated resource planning process or otherwise.

Bird, L.; Hurlbut, D.; Donohoo, P.; Cory, K.; Kreycik, C.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Measured electric hot water standby and demand loads from Pacific Northwest homes. End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program  

SciTech Connect

The Bonneville Power Administration began the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP) in 1983 to obtain metered hourly end-use consumption data for a large sample of new and existing residential and commercial buildings in the Pacific Northwest. Loads and load shapes from the first 3 years of data fro each of several ELCAP residential studies representing various segments of the housing population have been summarized by Pratt et al. The analysis reported here uses the ELCAP data to investigate in much greater detail the relationship of key occupant and tank characteristics to the consumption of electricity for water heating. The hourly data collected provides opportunities to understand electricity consumption for heating water and to examine assumptions about water heating that are critical to load forecasting and conservation resource assessments. Specific objectives of this analysis are to: (A) determine the current baseline for standby heat losses by determining the standby heat loss of each hot water tank in the sample, (B) examine key assumptions affecting standby heat losses such as hot water temperatures and tank sizes and locations, (C) estimate, where possible, impacts on standby heat losses by conservation measures such as insulating tank wraps, pipe wraps, anticonvection valves or traps, and insulating bottom boards, (D) estimate the EF-factors used by the federal efficiency standards and the nominal R-values of the tanks in the sample, (E) develop estimates of demand for hot water for each home in the sample by subtracting the standby load from the total hot water load, (F) examine the relationship between the ages and number of occupants and the hot water demand, (G) place the standby and demand components of water heating electricity consumption in perspective with the total hot water load and load shape.

Pratt, R.G.; Ross, B.A.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Solutions for Summer Electric Power Shortages: Demand Response and its Applications in Air Conditioning and Refrigerating Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Director, PIER Demand Response Research CenterAssessment of Demand Response & Advanced Metering, staffPower Shortages: Demand Response and its Applications in Air

Han, Junqiao; Piette, Mary Ann

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Electricity Demand of PHEVs Operated by Private Households and Commercial Fleets: Effects of Driving and Charging Behavior  

SciTech Connect

Automotive and energy researchers have made considerable efforts to predict the impact of plug-in hybrid vehicle (PHEV) charging on the electrical grid. This work has been done primarily through computer modeling and simulation. The US Department of Energys (DOE) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA), in partnership with the University of California at Daviss Institute for Transportation Stuides, have been collecting data from a diverse fleet of PHEVs. The AVTA is conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory for DOEs Vehicle Technologies Program. This work provides the opportunity to quantify the petroleum displacement potential of early PHEV models, and also observe, rather than simulate, the charging behavior of vehicle users. This paper presents actual charging behavior and the resulting electricity demand from these PHEVs operating in undirected, real-world conditions. Charging patterns are examined for both commercial-use and personal-use vehicles. Underlying reasons for charging behavior in both groups are also presented.

John Smart; Matthew Shirk; Ken Kurani; Casey Quinn; Jamie Davies

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

On Coordinating Electricity Markets: Smart Power Scheduling for Demand Side Management and Economic Dispatch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-way system of communicating real-time prices and hourly de- mand between electricity producers and households a mechanism to approximate equilibrium prices and quantities for use as a real-time pricing scheme. Our goal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 3 Market Equilibrium 36 3.1 Retail Market Energy Consumption Game

Chen, Yiling

293

U.S. Regional Demand Forecasts Using NEMS and GIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

residential and commercial electricity demand forecasts. The23 Electricity Demandand commercial electricity demand per census division from

Cohen, Jesse A.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Average wholesale electric power prices rose in 2010 - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Average wholesale electric power prices rose in 2010, due to higher national natural gas prices and increased demand for electricity, particularly in the Eastern ...

295

Coal regains some electric generation market share from natural ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... a combination of higher prices for natural gas and increased demand for electricity during the summer months led electric systems across much of the country to ...

296

Is Real-Time Pricing Green?: The Environmental Impacts of Electricity Demand Variance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for responding to real-time prices. 3 Recently someof RTP. the higher real-time price, each would use lessretail price, p . For real-time prices below the ?at price,

Holland, Stephen P.; Mansur, Erin T.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Efforts to Harmonize Gas Pipeline Operations with the Demands of the Electricity Sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A possible future course of action is for pipelines to continue their efforts to provide new services with FERC approval. Over time, pipelines could satisfy power generators by giving them the flexibility and services they desire and for which they are willing to pay. Another possibility is that FERC will enact new rules governing regional electricity markets that would function similarly to nationwide business practices. (author)

Costello, Ken

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

298

Social Welfare implications of demand response programs in competitive electricity markets  

SciTech Connect

The price volatility exhibited by wholesale electricity markets has stymied the movement to restructure the industry, and may derail it altogether. Market designers argue that prices are superior to regulation for directing long-term investments to the proper location and function, and that price volatility is a natural manifestation of a robustly competitive market. However, episodes of prices that soar to previously unimaginable heights try customers' patience and cause policy makers to reconsider if the prize is worth the consequences.

Boisvert, Richard N.; Neenan, Bernard F.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

The geothermal analog of pumped storage for electrical demand load following  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 6 day cycle Load-Following Experiment, conducted in July 1995 at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock (HDR) test site in New Mexico, has verified that an HDR geothermal reservoir has the capability for a significant, rapid increase in thermal power output upon demand. The objective was to study the behavior of the HDR reservoir in a high-production- backpressure (2200 psi) baseload operating condition when there was superimposed a demand for significantly increased power production for a 4 hour period each day. In practice, this enhanced production, an increase of 65%, was accomplished by a programmed decrease in the production well backpressure over 4 hours, from an initial 2200 psi down to 500 psi. The rapid depressurization of the wellbore during the period of enhanced production resulted in the draining of a portion of the fluid stored in the pressure dilated joints surrounding the production well. These joints were then gradually reinflated during the following 20-hour period of high backpressure baseload operation. In essence, the HDR reservoir was acting as a fluid capacitor, being discharged for 4 hours and then slowly recharged during the subsequent 20 hours of baseload operation. In this mode, there would be no increase in the reservoir size of number of wells (the {ital in situ} capital investment) for a significant amount of peaking power production for a few hours each day. Thus, one of the advantages of geothermal load following over utility options such as pumped storage or compressed air storage is that the HDR power plant would be operated during off-peak hours in a baseline mode, with an augmented return on investment compared to these other peaking systems which would normally not be operated during off-peak periods. The surface power plant and the geofluid reinjection pumps would need to be sized for the peak rate of thermal energy production, adding somewhat to the overall HDR system capital costs when compared to a simple baseload power plant design.

Brown, D.W.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Hot Thermal Storage/Selective Energy System Reduces Electric Demand for Space Cooling As Well As Heating in Commercial Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on an experimental residential retrofit incorporating thermal storage, and extensive subsequent modeling, a commercial design was developed and implemented to use hot thermal storage to significantly reduce electric demand and utility energy costs during the cooling season as well as the heating season. To achieve air conditioning savings, the system separates dehumidification from sensible cooling; dehumidifies by desiccant absorption, using heat from storage to dry the desiccant; and then cools at an elevated temperature improving overall system efficiency. Efficient heat for desiccant regeneration is provided by a selective-energy system coupled with thermal storage. The selective-energy system incorporates diesel cogeneration, solar energy and off-peak electric resistance heating. Estimated energy and first cost savings, as compared with an all-electric VAV HVAC system, are: 30 to 50% in ductwork size and cost; 30% in fan energy; 25% in air handling equipment; 20 to 40% in utility energy for refrigeration; 10 to 20% in refrigeration equipment; and space savings due to smaller ductwork and equipment.

Meckler, G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Converting 15-Minute Interval Electricity Load Data into Reduced Demand, Energy Reduction and Cash Flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Whole-building-electric (WBE) 15-minute interval data is an extremely low-cost, easy approach to reap an immediate reduction in energy consumption. With the advance of lower cost Internet based metering technology integrated with TCP/IP Internet communications, equipment costs and installation issues are not the issues as were in the past. The challenge is to be able to interpret the data and then implement actions to correct operational and equipment problems and anomalies. This paper will address the types of data acquisition equipment and systems available and the different components of a data. Lastly, actual graphs of data will be presented to demonstrate how to dissect and analyze a data set and then implement measures that will optimize operations and maintenance of which will effect a reduction in energy costs.

Herrin, D. G.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Impact of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles on power systems with demand response and wind power.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper uses a new unit commitment model which can simulate the interactions among plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), wind power, and demand response (DR). Four PHEV charging scenarios are simulated for the Illinois power system: (1) unconstrained charging, (2) 3-hour delayed constrained charging, (3) smart charging, and (4) smart charging with DR. The PHEV charging is assumed to be optimally controlled by the system operator in the latter two scenarios, along with load shifting and shaving enabled by DR programs. The simulation results show that optimally dispatching the PHEV charging load can significantly reduce the total operating cost of the system. With DR programs in place, the operating cost can be further reduced.

Wang, J.; Liu, C.; Ton, D.; Zhou, Y.; Kim, J.; Vyas, A. (Decision and Information Sciences); ( ES); (ED); (Kyungwon Univ.)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Electric power supply and demand 1979 to 1988 for the contiguous United States as projected by the Regional Electric Reliability Councils in their April 1, 1979 long-range coordinated planning reports to the Department of Energy  

SciTech Connect

Information concerning bulk electric power supply and demand is summarized and reviewed. Electric-utility power-supply systems are composed of power sources, transmission and distribution facilities, and users of electricity. In the United States there are three such systems of large geographic extent that together cover the entire country. Subjects covered are: energy forecasts, peak demand forecasts, generating-capacity forecasts, purchases and sales of capacity, and transmission. Extensive data are compiled in 17 tables. Information in two appendices includes a general description of the Regional Electric Reliability Councils and US generating capacity as of June 30, 1979. 3 figures, 17 tables.

Savage, N.; Graban, W.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

California Baseline Energy Demands to 2050 for Advanced Energy Pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 16 Annual peak electricity demand by sector. Tableincludes an hourly electricity demand (i.e. power) profileof aggregating sectoral electricity demands into a statewide

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Energy Demands and Efficiency Strategies in Data Center Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Total Annual Energy Usage Peak Electric Demand Power UsageSetpoint (C) Peak Electric Demand Power Usage Effective-Total Annual Energy Usage Peak Electric Demand Scenario

Shehabi, Arman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Peak-Coincident Demand Savings from Behavior-Based Programs: Evidence from PPL Electric's Behavior and Education Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Policy 38 PPL Electric. 2012. First Annual report toEvidence from PPL Electrics Behavior and Education Programon the effects of PPL Electrics behavior-based program on

Stewart, James

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Fuel Switching on a Dime -- Boiler Capabilities of Electric Utilities and Industrial Companies: EPRI Report Series on Gas Demands for Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utilities play an unusual and important role in the natural gas market because so much of their ongoing gas demand is price sensitive. This report, which focuses on the pattern of this demand, tracks how switching between gas and alternative fuels by major users affects the overall market. Events over the past four years and new plant-specific data have changed our understanding of this phenomenon.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Standards and Labeling for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

prevailing marginal electricity prices, in order to give anCCE with prevailing electricity prices. In order to estimateusers. Marginal Electricity Prices and Discount Rates

McNeil, Michael A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Standards and Labeling for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in use patterns and electricity rates between commercial andRates Residential electricity rates are much lower thanin India. Residential electricity rates are subsidized to a

McNeil, Michael A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Standards and Labeling for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Discount Rates Residential electricity rates are much lowerrates in India. Residential electricity rates are subsidizedand electricity rates between commercial and residential

McNeil, Michael A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Demand Forecast INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand Forecast INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY A 20-year forecast of electricity demand is a required of any forecast of electricity demand and developing ways to reduce the risk of planning errors that could arise from this and other uncertainties in the planning process. Electricity demand is forecast

312

Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

follows: EDemand t : electricity demand during day t (incost of reducing electricity demand (in $/MWh e ) HRDCost:maximum fraction of electricity demand to be met by demand

Siddiqui, Afzal

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

What China Can Learn from International Experiences in Developing a Demand Response Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2012. Addressing Electricity Demand through Demand Response:has been driving up the electricity demand while widespreadexperiences in addressing electricity demand This section is

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Standards and Labeling for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India  

SciTech Connect

The development of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling (EES&L) began in earnest in India in 2001 with the Energy Conservation Act and the establishment of the Indian Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE). The first main residential appliance to be targeted was refrigerators, soon to be followed by room air conditioners. Both of these appliances are of critical importance to India's residential electricity demand. About 15percent of Indian households own a refrigerator, and sales total about 4 million per year, but are growing. At the same time, the Indian refrigerator market has seen a strong trend towards larger and more consumptive frost-free units. Room air conditioners in India have traditionally been sold to commercial sector customers, but an increasing number are going to the residential sector. Room air conditioner sales growth in India peaked in the last few years at 20percent per year. In this paper, we perform an engineering-based analysis using data specific to Indian appliances. We evaluate costs and benefits to residential and commercial sector consumers from increased equipment costs and utility bill savings. The analysis finds that, while the BEE scheme presents net benefits to consumers, there remain opportunities for efficiency improvement that would optimize consumer benefits, according to Life Cycle Cost analysis. Due to the large and growing market for refrigerators and air conditioners in India, we forecast large impacts from the standards and labeling program as scheduled. By 2030, this program, if fully implemented would reduce Indian residential electricity consumption by 55 TWh. Overall savings through 2030 totals 385 TWh. Finally, while efficiency levels have been set for several years for refrigerators, labels and MEPS for these products remain voluntary. We therefore consider the negative impact of this delay of implementation to energy and financial savings achievable by 2030.

McNeil, Michael A.; Iyer, Maithili

2009-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

315

Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Standards and Labeling for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India  

SciTech Connect

The development of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling (EES&L) began in earnest in India in 2001 with the Energy Conservation Act and the establishment of the Indian Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE). The first main residential appliance to be targeted was refrigerators, soon to be followed by room air conditioners. Both of these appliances are of critical importance to India's residential electricity demand. About 15percent of Indian households own a refrigerator, and sales total about 4 million per year, but are growing. At the same time, the Indian refrigerator market has seen a strong trend towards larger and more consumptive frost-free units. Room air conditioners in India have traditionally been sold to commercial sector customers, but an increasing number are going to the residential sector. Room air conditioner sales growth in India peaked in the last few years at 20percent per year. In this paper, we perform an engineering-based analysis using data specific to Indian appliances. We evaluate costs and benefits to residential and commercial sector consumers from increased equipment costs and utility bill savings. The analysis finds that, while the BEE scheme presents net benefits to consumers, there remain opportunities for efficiency improvement that would optimize consumer benefits, according to Life Cycle Cost analysis. Due to the large and growing market for refrigerators and air conditioners in India, we forecast large impacts from the standards and labeling program as scheduled. By 2030, this program, if fully implemented would reduce Indian residential electricity consumption by 55 TWh. Overall savings through 2030 totals 385 TWh. Finally, while efficiency levels have been set for several years for refrigerators, labels and MEPS for these products remain voluntary. We therefore consider the negative impact of this delay of implementation to energy and financial savings achievable by 2030.

McNeil, Michael A.; Iyer, Maithili

2009-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

316

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

14 Peak Demand Baselinewinter morning electric peak demand in commercial buildings.California to reduce peak demand during summer afternoons,

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Development of a commercial-sector data base and forecasting model for electricity usage and demand. Volume I. Preliminary model specification. [Description of subprograms BEHAV, DEMAND, ECON, ENER, and INGEN  

SciTech Connect

This is the first of twelve major technical reports under the Commission's contract with Hittman Associates. The contract will lead to the development of a data base on commercial space, and the development of a model to forecast electricity usage and demand. This report presents a preliminary specification of the model to be developed. The model being developed combines econometric and engineering approaches, and consists of five subprograms and an overall executing program. The first subprogram forecasts the stock of commercial space, based on employment data and other economic inputs. It also distinguishes among various types of commercial space, and breaks the commercial space into segments according to fuels for various end uses, such as heating, cooling, etc. The second subprogram uses detailed building-survey data to specify a typical, or characteristic building for each unique type of floorspace considered in the study. The third subprogram calculates monthly electricity usage for the typical buildings specified, using standard engineering techniques, and then scales up the electricity use for each building type according to the amount of space, of that type, in the entire building stock. The fourth subprogram performs a similar function, but produces hourly electricity demands, rather than monthly electricity usage. The fifth, and final subprogram adjusts the energy usage and demand values calculated to simulate the impact of certain economic conditions or policy measures. The report presents a flow chart for each subprogram, and a table of inputs and outputs required for each. The logic, structure, flow, and information transfer of each is described.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Demand Dispatch-Intelligent  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and energy efficiency throughout the value chain resulting in the most economical price for electricity. Having adequate quantities and capacities of demand resources is a...

319

Changes in the real price of electricity: implications for higher load growth  

SciTech Connect

While real electricity prices have increased over the last decade, they have declined relative to oil and natural gas. As a result, electricity has increased its share of the total energy market. Many believe these price trends will not continue as new base-load plants come on line. They state that the real price of electricity will increase disproportionately with respect to other energy forms, resulting in reduced levels of load growth and a loss of market share. The authors of this article disagree, and instead argue that: (1) the real price of electricity will decline over the 1980s; (2) electricity prices will not lose recent competitive gains relative to oil and natural gas; and (3) electricity's market share will continue to increase, and load growth will exceed the 3% average of the 1970s. They conclude that the potential exists for a 4 to 5% load growth scenario for the balance of the 1980s. 5 references, 2 tables.

Siegel, J.R.; Sillin, J.O.

1983-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and D. Kathan (2009). Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityEnergy Financial Group. Demand Response Research Center [2008). Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering.

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

equipment. Since electricity demand, is projected to exhibitfrom 44% in 2006. In electricity demand, its usage in plugRuns, Average Value) Electricity Demand Power/Electricity

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

electricity generation capacity to meet unrestrained future demand. To address peak electricity use Demand Response (DR) systems are being proposed to motivate reductions in...

323

California Independent System Operator demand response & proxy demand resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response programs are designed to allow end use customers to contribute to energy load reduction individually or through a demand response provider. One form of demand response can occur when an end use customer reduces their electrical usage ...

John Goodin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

An Activity-Based Assessment of the Potential Impacts of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Energy and Emissions Using One-Day Travel Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

14 4 Charging Scenarios and Electricity Demand17 4.2 Electricity Demand34 Electricity Demand

Recker, W. W.; Kang, J. E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

1995 Demand-Side Managment  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1995 January 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels

326

Draft Measuring the Capacity Impacts of Demand Response to be published in the Electricity Journal pre-print version  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand response is an increasing part of the energy policy agenda in the United States. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) has undertaken major initiatives to encourage the incorporation of demand response in the wholesale markets, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (aka, the stimulus bill) has provisions

Robert Earle; Edward P. Kahn; Edo Macan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2008-2018 STAFF REVISED FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the entire forecast period, primarily because both weather-adjusted peak and electricity consumption were forecast. Keywords Electricity demand, electricity consumption, demand forecast, weather normalization, annual peak demand, natural gas demand, self-generation, conservation, California Solar Initiative. #12

328

Optimal Tariff Period Determination Cost of electricity generation is closely related to system demand. In general, the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,Pakistan,Nepal and Bangladesh) direct management is all the more Flat-rate electricity tariffs induce farmers to pump more of annual hours of pump operation,electric (flat tariff) and diesel pumpsets Water Policy Briefing 2 #12,there are strong theoretical arguments in favor of the metered electricity tariff. Farmers would learn the real

329

Abstract--Forecasting of future electricity demand is very important for decision making in power system operation and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In the 20 years prior to the Northwest Power Act, regional electrical loads were growing at 5 percent per predicted 2000 electricity loads of 23,400 average megawatts (average of medium-low and medium, and regional electricity loads in that year are estimated to have been 21,200. The third decade following

Ducatelle, Frederick

330

Electricity Grid: Impacts of Plug-In Electric Vehicle Charging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

discusses how electricity demands for vehicle charging cantiming of vehicle electricity demands. challenges associatedand timing of vehicle electricity demand. As the number of

Yang, Christopher; McCarthy, Ryan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Configuring load as a resource for competitive electricity markets--Review of demand response programs in the U.S. and around the world  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The restructuring of regional and national electricity markets in the U.S. and around the world has been accompanied by numerous problems, including generation capacity shortages, transmission congestion, wholesale price volatility, and reduced system reliability. These problems have created new opportunities for technologies and business approaches that allow load serving entities and other aggregators to control and manage the load patterns of wholesale and retail end-users they serve. Demand Response Programs, once called Load Management, have re-emerged as an important element in the fine-tuning of newly restructured electricity markets. During the summers of 1999 and 2001 they played a vital role in stabilizing wholesale markets and providing a hedge against generation shortfalls throughout the U.S.A. Demand Response Programs include ''traditional'' capacity reservation and interruptible/curtailable rates programs as well as voluntary demand bidding programs offered by either Load Serving Entities (LSEs) or regional Independent System Operators (ISOs). The Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL) has been monitoring the development of new types of Demand Response Programs both in the U.S. and around the world. This paper provides a survey and overview of the technologies and program designs that make up these emerging and important new programs.

Heffner, Grayson C.

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

residential electricity consumption, the flattening of the demand curves (except Maximum demand) reflects decreasing population growth ratesresidential electricity demand are described in Table 11. For simplicity, end use-specific UEC and saturation rates

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Univariate Modeling and Forecasting of Monthly Energy Demand Time Series  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in this report. #12;i ABSTRACT These electricity demand forms and instructions ask load-serving entities and Instructions for Electricity Demand Forecasts. California Energy Commission, Electricity Supply Analysis.................................................................................................................................7 Form 1 Historic and Forecast Electricity Demand

Abdel-Aal, Radwan E.

334

Solutions for Summer Electric Power Shortages: Demand Response and its Applications in Air Conditioning and Refrigerating Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-63806 Refrigeration, Air Conditioning, & Electric Powerand its Applications in Air Conditioning and Refrigeratingand its applications in Air Conditioning and refrigerating

Han, Junqiao; Piette, Mary Ann

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Demand Response-Enabled Model Predictive HVAC Load Control in Buildings using Real-Time Electricity Pricing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A practical cost and energy efficient model predictive control (MPC) strategy is proposed for HVAC load control under dynamic real-time electricity pricing. The MPC strategy (more)

Avci, Mesut

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Techno-economic Assessment of Wind Energy to Supply the Demand of Electricity for a Residential Community in Ethiopia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The electricity sector is a major source of carbon dioxide emission that contributes to the global climate change. Over the past decade wind energy (more)

Yebi, Adamu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Short run price elasticity of residential electricity demand within income levels and the implications for CO2 policy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis investigates the relationship between price and use of electricity in residential homes in order to understand the impact of CO2 policy. A model (more)

Green, Eric

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Maximum demand, year 2050 electricity consumption reachesefficiency, year 2050 electricity consumption is 357 TWh,capita electricity consumption increases from 7,421 kWh/year

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Fast Automated Demand Response to Enable the Integration of Renewable Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Supply Related Electricity Demand in California. CEC33 percent of our electricity demand in 2020 from renewablebuildings, heating electricity demand is not included in

Watson, David S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

On the energy sources of Mozambican households and the demand-supply curves for domestic electricity in the northern electrical grid in Mozambique.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The development of electrical infrastructure to supply rural households is considered economically unfeasible because of the high cost of capital investment required to expand the (more)

Arthur, Maria de Fatima Serra Ribeiro

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Mass Market Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Market Demand Response Mass Market Demand Response Speaker(s): Karen Herter Date: July 24, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Demand response programs are often quickly and poorly crafted in reaction to an energy crisis and disappear once the crisis subsides, ensuring that the electricity system will be unprepared when the next crisis hits. In this paper, we propose to eliminate the event-driven nature of demand response programs by considering demand responsiveness a component of the utility obligation to serve. As such, demand response can be required as a condition of service, and the offering of demand response rates becomes a requirement of utilities as an element of customer service. Using this foundation, we explore the costs and benefits of a smart thermostat-based demand response system capable of two types of programs: (1) a mandatory,

342

General Electric Uses an Integrated Framework for Product Costing, Demand Forecasting, and Capacity Planning of New Photovoltaic Technology Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

General Electric (GE) Energy's nascent solar business has revenues of over $100 million, expects those revenues to grow to over $1 billion in the next three years, and has plans to rapidly grow the business beyond this period. GE Global Research (GEGR), ... Keywords: capital budgeting, cost analysis, facilities planning, forecasting, mathematical programming, risk

Bex George Thomas; Srinivas Bollapragada

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Travel and Electricity Demand Analysis of Potential U.S. High-Speed Rail and Maglev Corridors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highway and air travel continue to increase steadily every year, with the number of air flights growing almost three times faster than automobile trips. High-speed rail trains and magnetically levitated vehicles can potentially provide viable intercity travel alternatives to airplanes and automobiles. This report assesses the possible ridership and the potential electrical loads created by these high-speed ground transportation systems.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Use of the NII to study impacts of new technologies and policies on supply and demand of electric power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a proposal to use an implementation of client-server technology on the Internet for simulating a number of aspects of electric power production, distribution, and consumption within a wholly new regulatory, financing, operating, and control environment. This approach would use a large number of people to generate strategies and decisions, in a real-time context, needed to drive the simulation. A World Wide Web server would provide background information about the simulation for those who chose to participate as actors in one of supported roles. Roles would be based on activities associated with different business areas and would include utility manager, independent power producer (entrepreneur), electric power futures trader, electric power futures investor, electric power wheeler, industrial customer, commercial customer, and residential customer. The simulation program would run on a system of high-performance computers (parallel computer system) that communicate between each other on a high speed communications bus. These computers would also be the server systems for the client programs used by the actors. People who want to be actors would be required to register before being given a client program, as a way to have some control over the simulation results. Each role will have its corresponding client program with graphical user interface. Each client program will support a common view of the simulation results and a role specific view.

Munro, J.K. Jr. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Instrumentation and Controls Div.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Demand Response | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Demand Response Demand Response Demand Response Demand response provides an opportunity for consumers to play a significant role in the operation of the electric grid by reducing or shifting their electricity usage during peak periods in response to time-based rates or other forms of financial incentives. Demand response programs are being used by electric system planners and operators as resource options for balancing supply and demand. Such programs can lower the cost of electricity in wholesale markets, and in turn, lead to lower retail rates. Methods of engaging customers in demand response efforts include offering time-based rates such as time-of-use pricing, critical peak pricing, variable peak pricing, real time pricing, and critical peak rebates. It also includes direct load control programs which provide the

346

Hydrogen and electricity: Parallels, interactions,and convergence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

impacts of marginal electricity demand for CA hydrogensection looks at electricity demands for a hydrogen-basedto the point-of-use. Electricity demand The typical demand

Yang, Christopher

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

The European Electricity Grid System and Winter Peak Load Stress: For how long can the european grid system survive the ever increasing demand during cold winter days?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The rich countries of Western Europe and its citizens benefited during at least the last 30 years from an extraordinary stable electricity grid. This stability was achieved by the european grid system and a large flexible and reliable spare power plant capacity. This system allowed a continuous demand growth during the past 10-20 years of up to a few % per year. However, partially due to this overcapacity, no new large power plants have been completed during the past 10-15 years. The obvious consequence is that the reliable spare capacity has been reduced and that a further yearly demand growth of 1-2% for electric energy can only be achieved if new power plants will be constructed soon. Data from various European countries, provided by the UCTE, indicate that the system stress during peak load times and especially during particular cold winter days is much larger than generally assumed. In fact, the latest UCTE data on reliable power capacity indicate that already during the Winter 2007/8 only a few very col...

Dittmar, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Impact of a solar domestic hot water demand-side management program on an electric utility and its customers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A methodology to assess the economic and environmental impacts of a large scale implementation of solar domestic hot water (SDHW) systems is developed. Energy, emission and demand reductions and their respective savings are quantified. It is shown that, on average, an SDHW system provides an energy reduction of about 3200 kWH, avoided emissions of about 2 tons and a capacity contribution of 0.7 kW to a typical Wisconsin utility that installs 5000 SDHW system. The annual savings from these reductions to utility is {dollar_sign}385,000, providing a return on an investment of over 20{percent}. It is shown that, on average, a consumer will save {dollar_sign}211 annually in hot water heating bills. 8 refs., 7 figs.

Trzeniewski, J.; Mitchell, J.W.; Klein, S.A.; Beckman, W.A.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

U.S. Propane Demand - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Demand is higher in 1999 due to higher petrochemical demand and a strong economy. We are also seeing strong demand in the first quarter of 2000; however, ...

350

Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lvi Southern California Edison filed its SmartConnectinfrastructure (e.g. , Edison Electric Institute, DemandSouthern California Edison Standard Practice Manual

Heffner, Grayson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

On the Impact of Forward Markets on Investment in Oligopolistic Markets wtih Reference to Electricity Part 1: Deterministic Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the properties of three capacity games in an oligopolistic market with Cournot players and deterministic demand. In the first game, capacity and the operation of that capacity is determined simultaneously. This is the classic open-loop Cournot game. In the second game, capacity is decided in the first stage and the operation of that capacity is determined in the second stage. The first-stage decision of each player is contingent on the solution of the second-stage game. This is a two-stage, closed-loop game. We show that when the solution exists, it is the same as the solution in the first game. However, it does not always exist. The third game has three stages with a futures position taken between the capacity stage and the operations stage and is also a closed-loop game. As with the second game, the equilibrium is the same as the open-loop game when it exists. However, the conditions for existence are more restrictive with forward markets added. When both games have an equilibrium, the solution values are identical. The results are very different from games with no capacity stage as studied by Allaz and Vila (1993), where they concluded that forward markets

Frederic Murphy; Yves Smeers

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Potential Electricity Impacts of a 1978 California Drought  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

xiv INTRODUCTION. ELECTRICITY DEMAND. Electricity Use DuringTo match both next electricity demand and supply eitherno attempt to forecast electricity demand for 1978. in three

Sathaye, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Title Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices...

354

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Title Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and...

355

Demand-Responsive and Efficient Building Systems as a Resource...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand-Responsive and Efficient Building Systems as a Resource for Electricity Reliability Title Demand-Responsive and Efficient Building Systems as a Resource for Electricity...

356

Demand Response Program Design and Implementation Case Study...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Delurey, Dan, and J. Schwartz Date Published 022013 Keywords demand response research, demand side resources: policy, electricity markets, electricity markets and policy group,...

357

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

equivalent and its electricity demand at 19 Mtoe. If wastemeet water heating and electricity demand in the residentialJournal Vol.4, No.4 electricity demand, fuel requirements

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

EIA projections of coal supply and demand  

SciTech Connect

Contents of this report include: EIA projections of coal supply and demand which covers forecasted coal supply and transportation, forecasted coal demand by consuming sector, and forecasted coal demand by the electric utility sector; and policy discussion.

Klein, D.E.

1989-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

359

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with total Statewide peak demand and on peak days isto examine the electric peak demand related to lighting inDaily) - TOU Savings - Peak Demand Charges - Grid Peak -Low

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Tankless Demand Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demand Water Heaters Tankless Demand Water Heaters August 19, 2013 - 2:57pm Addthis Illustration of an electric demand water heater. At the top of the image, the heating unit is...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20122022 FINAL FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20122022 FINAL FORECAST Volume 2: Electricity Demand.Oglesby Executive Director #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The demand forecast is the combined product to the contributing authors listed previously, Mohsen Abrishami prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad

362

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 FINAL FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 FINAL FORECAST Volume 2: Electricity Demand The demand forecast is the combined product of the hard work and expertise of numerous California Energy previously, Mohsen Abrishami prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad Soltani Nia helped prepare

363

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 REVISED FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 REVISED FORECAST Volume 2: Electricity Demand Robert P. Oglesby Executive Director #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The demand forecast is the combined prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad Soltani Nia helped prepare the industrial forecast

364

Configuring load as a resource for competitive electricity markets--Review of demand response programs in the U.S. and around the world  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MARKETS REVIEW OF DEMAND RESPONSE PROGRAMS IN THE U.S. ANDMARKETS REVIEW OF DEMAND RESPONSE PROGRAMS IN THE U.S. ANDend-users they serve. Demand Response Programs, once called

Heffner, Grayson C.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Demand Response - Policy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

over the last 11 years when interest in demand response increased. Demand response is an electricity tariff or program established to motivate changes in electric use by end-use...

366

Social Welfare Implications of Demand Response Programs in Competitive...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations Windows and Daylighting Electricity Grid Demand Response Distributed Energy Electricity Reliability Energy Analysis...

367

NREL: Energy Analysis: Electric System Flexibility and Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric System Flexibility and Storage Electric System Flexibility and Storage Options for Increasing Electric System Flexibility to Accommodate Higher Levels of Variable Renewable Electricity Increased electric system flexibility, needed to enable electricity supply-demand balance with high levels of renewable generation, can come from a portfolio of supply- and demand-side options, including flexible conventional generation, grid storage, curtailment of some renewable generation, new transmission, and more responsive loads. NREL's electric system flexibility studies investigate the role of various electric system flexibility options on large-scale deployment of renewable energy. NREL's electric system flexibility analyses show that: Key factors in improving grid flexibility include (1) increasing the

368

Demand Trading: Measurement, Verification, and Settlement (MVS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With this report, EPRI's trilogy of publications on demand trading is complete. The first report (1006015), the "Demand Trading Toolkit," documented how to conduct demand trading based on price. The second report (1001635), "Demand Trading: Building Liquidity," focused on the problem of liquidity in the energy industry and developed the Demand Response Resource Bank concept for governing electricity markets based on reliability. The present report focuses on the emerging price/risk partnerships in electr...

2004-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

369

Interim Data Changes in the Short-term Energy Outlook Data Systems Related to Electric Power Sector and Natural Gas Demand Data Revisions (Released in the STEO December 2002)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Beginning with the December 2002 issue of EIAs Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO),electricity generation and related fuel consumption totals will be presented on a basis that isconsistent with the definitions and aggregates used in the 2001 edition of EIAs Annual EnergyReview (AER). Particularly affected by these changes are the demand and balancing itemtotals for natural

Information Center

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Demand response-enabled residential thermostat controls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from the utility. The electricity rates were generated basedat the different electricity rates and the users discomfortrates. Demand response measures have the effect of adding elasticity to the electricity

Chen, Xue; Jang, Jaehwi; Auslander, David; Peffer, Therese; Arens, Edward

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Demand response-enabled residential thermostat controls.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from the utility. The electricity rates were generated basedat the different electricity rates and the users discomfortrates. Demand response measures have the effect of adding elasticity to the electricity

Chen, Xue; Jang, Jaehwi; Auslander, David M.; Peffer, Therese; Arens, Edward A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Opportunities for Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Phase II Report. San Luis Rey Wastewater Treatment Plant Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and have significant electricity demand during utility peakoperates at an average electricity demand of 1.3 MW, withalso has a high electricity demand. In many wastewater

Thompson, Lisa

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Equity Effects of Increasing-Block Electricity Pricing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evidence from Residential Electricity Demand, Review ofLester D. The Demand for Electricity: A Survey, The BellResidential Demand for Electricity under Inverted Block

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Q:\asufinal_0107_demand.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

00 00 (AEO2000) Assumptions to the January 2000 With Projections to 2020 DOE/EIA-0554(2000) Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Household Expenditures Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Commercial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution

375

STEO December 2012 - coal demand  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

coal demand seen below 1 billion tons in 2012 for fourth year in a row Coal consumption by U.S. power plants to generate electricity is expected to fall below 1 billion tons in...

376

Harnessing the power of demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response can provide a series of economic services to the market and also provide ''insurance value'' under low-likelihood, but high-impact circumstances in which grid reliablity is enhanced. Here is how ISOs and RTOs are fostering demand response within wholesale electricity markets. (author)

Sheffrin, Anjali; Yoshimura, Henry; LaPlante, David; Neenan, Bernard

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

377

Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

page intentionally left blank page intentionally left blank 69 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates transportation energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), buses, freight and passenger aircraft, freight and passenger rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous

378

Demand Response National Trends: Implications for the West? ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demand Response National Trends: Implications for the West? Demand Response National Trends: Implications for the West? Committee on Regional Electric Power Cooperation. San...

379

A Demand Forecasting System for Clean-Fuel Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

potential demand for electric cars. Journal of Econometrics,car by multi-vehicle households and the demand for electricelectric) vehicles, beginning with 2 percent of annual car

Brownstone, David; Bunch, David S.; Golob, Thomas F.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity and Natural Gas Demand in Japanese ResidentialWater Heating Natural Gas Demand Mtoe Actual Projection Mtoe

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Assessing the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California Industries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5: Periods of Elevated Electricity Demand 8am-12pm 12pm-2pmC-8: Diurnal Variations in Electricity Demand Figure C-9:Variations in Electricity Demand Figure C-10: Seasonal

Ghatikar, Girish

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

A study of industrial equipment energy use and demand control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand and duty factors were measured for selected equipment [air compressors, electric furnaces, injection-molding machines, a welder, a granulator (plastics grinder), a sheet metal press and brake, a lathe, a process chiller, and cooling tower pumps and fans] in two industrial plants. Demand factors for heavily loaded air compressors were found to be near 100 %, for lightly loaded centrifugal equipment (lathe, sheet metal shear and brake, and granulator) near 10 %, and for injection-molding machines near 50 %. The measured demand factors differ from those often estimated during energy surveys. Duty factors for some equipment were found to exceed 100 %, showing that some loads were on for longer periods than that indicated by plant personnel. Comparing a detailed summary of equipment rated loads to annual utility bills, when measurements are not available, can prevent over-estimation of the demand and duty factors for a plant. Raw unadjusted estimates of demand factors of 60 % or higher are often made, yet comparisons of rated loads to utility bills show that some equipment demand factors may be 50 % or less. This project tested a simple beacon alerting system, which used a blue strobe light to alert plant personnel when a preset demand limit had been reached. Tests of load shedding verified that the estimated demand savings of 50 kVA were realized (out of a total demand of almost 1200 kVA) when lighting and air conditioning loads were turned off.

Dooley, Edward Scott

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Electric  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Average Retail Price of Electricity to ... Period Residential Commercial Industrial ... or usage falling within specified limits by rate ...

384

Learning from Consumers: Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) Demonstration and Consumer Education, Outreach, and Market Research Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity and actual electricity demand to recharge PHEVs.the Project households, electricity demand to recharge theirAs with weekday electricity demand, most actual weekend

Kurani, Kenneth S; Axsen, Jonn; Caperello, Nicolette; Davies, Jamie; Stillwater, Tai

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

morning and summer afternoon peak electricity demand in commercial buildings the Seattle area. LBNL performed this demonstration for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA)...

386

Wireless Demand Response Controls for HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Response Controls for HVAC Systems Clifford Federspiel,tests. Figure 5: Specific HVAC electric power consumptioncontrol, demand response, HVAC, wireless Executive Summary

Federspiel, Clifford

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

peak prices) to reduce electricity bill volatility. Smallwith higher or lower electricity bills than desired, since

Ghatikar, Girish

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Demand Responsive and Energy Efficient Control Technologies and Strategies in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy. Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity MarketsEnergy Efficiency and Demand Response?7 3.1.Demand Response in Commercial

Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

California DREAMing: the design of residential demand responsive technology with people in mind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficiency and Demand Response Programs for 2005/2006. fromEngaging our Customers in Demand Response. Retrieved OctoberAdvanced Metering and Demand Response in Electricity

Peffer, Therese E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Evaluation of the supply chain of key industrial sectors and its impact on the electricity demand for a regional distribution company.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Considering the international scenario, in a recent past, the electrical industry was based on the concepts of monopolistic concessions and vertical utilities structures. In Brazil, (more)

Mariotoni, Thiago Arruda

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Configuring load as a resource for competitive electricity markets--Review of demand response programs in the U.S. and around the world  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emergencies (see Table 2). Xcels Electric Reduction Savingsinstead, operated so that Xcel could avoid exceeding MAPPElectricity Cooperative Xcel Energy Investor-Owned Utility

Heffner, Grayson C.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Design And Simulation Of A Real-time Price Demand Response Program For Electricity Subject To A Capacity Constraint For The Philadelphia Navy Yard.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis is based on data from the Philadelphia Navy Yard, which has its own transmission and distribution electric micro-grid and is home for commercial (more)

Cortes, Mercedes

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

NCEP_Demand_Response_Draft_111208.indd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Council on Electricity Policy: Electric Transmission Series for State Offi National Council on Electricity Policy: Electric Transmission Series for State Offi cials Demand Response and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the Energy Policy Act of 2005: A Summary for State Offi cials Demand Response and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the Energy Policy Act of 2005: A Summary for State Offi cials Prepared by the U.S. Demand Response Coordinating Committee for The National Council on Electricity Policy Fall 2008 i National Council on Electricity Policy: Electric Transmission Series for State Offi cials Demand Response and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the Energy Policy Act of 2005: A Summary for State Offi cials The National Council on Electricity Policy is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The views and opinions expressed herein are strictly those of the

394

Electricity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Electricity is an essential part of modern life. The Energy Department is working to create technology solutions that will reduce our energy use and save Americans money.

395

Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile … High-Performance with Solar Electric Reduced Peak Demand: Premier Homes Rancho Cordoba, CA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

95 homes in Premier Gardens are 95 homes in Premier Gardens are equipped with photovoltaic panels that take advantage of solar energy to offset peak power loads during the hottest part of the day. As the housing market continues to evolve toward zero net-energy ready homes, Building America research has provided essential guidance for integrating renewable energy systems with high-performance homes and showing how they align with utility peak-demand reduction interests. Solar photovoltaic technology is an attractive option for utilities because they can reduce reliance on fossil-fuel energy. More significantly, it reduces peak demand because systems produce the most power on sunny summer afternoons coincident with the highest demand for air conditioning. Photovoltaic systems have been a part of several research projects conducted by

396

Demand Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment for Eastern Interconnection Youngsun Baek, Stanton W. Hadley, Rocio Martinez, Gbadebo Oladosu, Alexander M. Smith, Fran Li, Paul Leiby and Russell Lee Prepared for FY12 DOE-CERTS Transmission Reliability R&D Internal Program Review September 20, 2012 2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy DOE National Laboratory Studies Funded to Support FOA 63 * DOE set aside $20 million from transmission funding for national laboratory studies. * DOE identified four areas of interest: 1. Transmission Reliability 2. Demand Side Issues 3. Water and Energy 4. Other Topics * Argonne, NREL, and ORNL support for EIPC/SSC/EISPC and the EISPC Energy Zone is funded through Area 4. * Area 2 covers LBNL and NREL work in WECC and

397

Curtailing Intermittent Generation in Electrical Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy generation from intermittent renewable sources introduces additional variability into electrical systems, resulting in a higher cost of balancing against the increased variabilities. Ways to balance demand and supply for electricity include using ... Keywords: economic curtailment, energy storage operations, flexible generation, intermittent generation, operations management practice, wind power

Owen Q. Wu, Roman Kapuscinski

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Energy Demands and Efficiency Strategies in Data Center Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DX Cooling Total Annual Energy Usage Peak Electric DemandDX Cooling Total Annual Energy Usage Scenario Supply/ ReturnDX Cooling Total Annual Energy Usage Peak Electric Demand

Shehabi, Arman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Reducing Peak Demand to Defer Power Plant Construction in Oklahoma  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reducing Peak Demand to Defer Power Plant Construction in Oklahoma Located in the heart of "Tornado Alley," Oklahoma Gas & Electric Company's (OG&E) electric grid faces significant...

400

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that growth in electricity demand in developed countriesof displacement of electricity demand by heat- activatedmeets all of its electricity demand via utility purchases

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Investment under Regulatory Uncertainty: U.S. Electricity Generation Investment Since 1996  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

signi?cant growth in electricity demand. The returns thatmore closely follows electricity demand. Furthermore, whilestate and year where electricity demand (LogLoad) is larger

Ishii, Jun; Yan, Jingming

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Customer Strategies for Responding to Day-Ahead Market Hourly Electricity Pricing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of-Use Prices and Electricity Demand: Allowing for Selectionthe theory of customer electricity demand and the specificfor in evaluating electricity demand and price response. Hot

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Developments in Electricity Demand Management – Lessons24 Table 4. Electricity Demand Projections, Energy and3. APP Base Case Electricity Demand Forecast –Residential

McNeil, MIchael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Eliminating Electricity Deficit through Energy Efficiency in India: An Evaluation of Aggregate Economic and Carbon Benefits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Business as Usual (BAU) Scenario 1 Electricity Demand andEnergy Efficiency (SEE) Scenario 2 Electricity Demand andCA 94720 Abstract Electricity demand has consistently

Sathaye, Jayant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Interactions between Electric-drive Vehicles and the Power Sector in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transportation electricity demand and power supply. Ryancompared for different electricity demand profiles. And thewith CED based on an electricity demand curve from the EPA

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Assessing Strategies for Fuel and Electricity Production in a California Hydrogen Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for hydrogen and electricity demand and supply in Californiademands from hydrogen, electricity demand is projected to0.2% annually. Electricity demands ( excluding hydrogen

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2008-2018 STAFF DRAFT FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Policy Report, over the entire forecast period, primarily because both weather-adjusted peak and commercial sectors. Keywords Electricity demand, electricity consumption, demand forecast, weather normalization, annual peak demand, natural gas demand, self-generation, California Solar Initiative. #12;ii #12

408

Distillate Demand Strong Last Winter  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Notes: Well, distillate fuel demand wasn't the reason that stocks increased in January 2001 and kept prices from going higher. As you will hear shortly, natural gas prices spiked...

409

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 FINAL FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2014­2024 FINAL FORECAST Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand in this report. #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The demand forecast is the combined product of the hard work to the contributing authors listed previously, Mohsen Abrishami prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad

410

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 REVISED FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2014­2024 REVISED FORECAST Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand in this report. #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The demand forecast is the combined product of the hard work listed previously, Mohsen Abrishami prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad Soltani Nia helped

411

REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022 Volume 2: Electricity Demand by Utility ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The staff demand forecast is the combined product of the hard work and expertise of numerous, Mohsen Abrishami prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad Soltani Nia helped prepare

412

REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022 Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand in this report. #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The staff demand forecast is the combined product of the hard work listed previously, Mohsen Abrishami prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad Soltani Nia helped

413

Ups and downs of demand limiting  

SciTech Connect

Electric power load management by limiting power demand can be used for energy conservation. Methods for affecting demand limiting, reducing peak usage in buildings, particularly usage for heating and ventilating systems, and power pricing to encourage demand limiting are discussed. (LCL)

Pannkoke, T.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 The commercial module forecasts consumption by fuel 15 at the Census division level using prices from the NEMS energy supply modules, and macroeconomic variables from the NEMS Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM), as well as external data sources (technology characterizations, for example). Energy demands are forecast for ten end-use services 16 for eleven building categories 17 in each of the nine Census divisions (see Figure 5). The model begins by developing forecasts of floorspace for the 99 building category and Census division combinations. Next, the ten end-use service demands required for the projected floorspace are developed. The electricity generation and water and space heating supplied by distributed generation and combined heat and power technologies are projected. Technologies are then

415

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Demand Response Spinning Reserve project is a pioneeringdemonstration of how existing utility load-management assets can providean important electricity system reliability resource known as spinningreserve. Using aggregated demand-side resources to provide spinningreserve will give grid operators at the California Independent SystemOperator (CAISO) and Southern California Edison (SCE) a powerful, newtool to improve system reliability, prevent rolling blackouts, and lowersystem operating costs.

Eto, Joseph H.; Nelson-Hoffman, Janine; Torres, Carlos; Hirth,Scott; Yinger, Bob; Kueck, John; Kirby, Brendan; Bernier, Clark; Wright,Roger; Barat, A.; Watson, David S.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Distillate Demand Strong in December 1999  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5% higher than in the prior year, due mainly to diesel demand growth, since warm weather kept heating oil demand from growing much. Last December, when stocks dropped below...

417

Reliability and Competitive Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Behavior in a Competitive Electricity Market, InternationalDemand Response in Electricity Markets, Hewlett FoundationGreen, R. (1999) The Electricity Contract Market in England

Joskow, Paul; Tirole, Jean

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

The Case for Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

land Press, 1995 TESTING ELECTRIC VEHICLE DEMAND IN " HYBRIDThe Case for Electric Vehicles DanieI Sperlmg Reprint UCTCor The Case for Electric Vehicles Darnel Sperling Institute

Sperling, Daniel

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Electricity Monthly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

CorrectionUpdate November 28, 2012 Map of Electric System Selected for Daily Peak Demand was replaced with the correct map showing Selected Wholesale Electricity and Natural Gas...

420

DE-AC03-76SF00098. CONFIGURING LOAD AS A RESOURCE FOR COMPETITIVE ELECTRICITY MARKETS REVIEW OF DEMAND RESPONSE PROGRAMS IN THE U.S. AND AROUND THE WORLD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The restructuring of regional and national electricity markets in the U.S. and around the world has been accompanied by numerous problems, including generation capacity shortages, transmission congestion, wholesale price volatility, and reduced system reliability. These problems have created new opportunities for technologies and business approaches that allow load serving entities and other aggregators to control and manage the load patterns of wholesale and retail end-users they serve. Demand Response Programs, once called Load Management, have re-emerged as an important element in the fine-tuning of newly restructured electricity markets. During the summers of 1999 and 2001 they played a vital role in stabilizing wholesale markets and providing a hedge

Grayson C. Heffner; Grayson C. Heffner

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

The alchemy of demand response: turning demand into supply  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Paying customers to refrain from purchasing products they want seems to run counter to the normal operation of markets. Demand response should be interpreted not as a supply-side resource but as a secondary market that attempts to correct the misallocation of electricity among electric users caused by regulated average rate tariffs. In a world with costless metering, the DR solution results in inefficiency as measured by deadweight losses. (author)

Rochlin, Cliff

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

422

Arizona Electricity Restructuring Suspended  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This inactivity strongly suggests that electricity restructuring in Arizona has ... demand side management, environmental, ... United States Departmen ...

423

ELECTRIC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT E-li, ( -,v? Cl -p4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson...

424

Feasibility of Wholesale Electricity Competition in a Developing Country: Insights from Simulating a Market in Maharashtra State, India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large Quantities of Electricity Demand for AgriculturalLarge Size of the Market Electricity demand for agriculturalconstraints, and electricity demand in MH state to simulate

Phadke, Amol

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

On Demand Paging Using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The power consumption of the network interface plays a major role in determining the total operating lifetime of wireless handheld devices. On demand paging has been proposed earlier to reduce power consumption in cellular networks. In this scheme, a low power secondary radio is used to wake up the higher power radio, allowing the latter to sleep or remain off for longer periods of time. In this paper we present use of Bluetooth radios to serve as a paging channel for the 802.11 wireless LAN. We have implemented an on-demand paging scheme on a WLAN consisting of iPAQ PDAs equipped with Bluetooth radios and Cisco Aironet wireless networking cards. Our results show power saving ranging from 19% to 46% over the present 802.11b standard operating modes with negligible impact on performance.

Bluetooth Radios On; Yuvraj Agarwal; Rajesh K. Gupta

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Framework to Evaluate Water Demands and Availability for Electrical Power Production Within Watersheds Across the United States: Dev elopment and Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A framework to evaluate the water resources available to sustain present and projected electrical power production is under development and has been applied to four case studies around the United States. Those case studies are: the Lower Coosa River Basin (AL), the Muskingum River Basin (OH), the San Juan River Basin (CO, UT, AZ, NM), and the Platte River Basin (NE, CO, WY). The river basins were chosen for the case studies because of the difference among these basins, including climatic conditions, wate...

2005-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

427

ELECTRIC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ELECTRIC ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y$ \I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT !E-li, ( \-,v? Cl -p/4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson General ?!!mager Atomic Qxzgy Commission 1901 Constitution Avenue Kashington, D. C. Dear Sir: In the course of OUT nuclenr research we are planning to study the enc:ri;y threshold anti cross section for fission. For thib program we require a s<>piAroted sample of metallic Uranium 258 of high purity. A quantity of at lezst 5 grams would probably be sufficient for our purpose, and this was included in our 3@icntion for license to the Atonic Energy Coskqission.. This license has been approved, 2nd rre would Llp!Jreciate informztion as to how to ?r*oceed to obtain thit: m2teria.l.

428

Are they equal yet. [Demand side management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand-side management (DSM) is considered an important tool in meeting the load growth of many utilities. Northwest regional and utility resource plans forecast demand-side resources to meet from one-half to two-thirds of additional electrical energy needs over the next 10 years. Numerous sources have stated that barriers, both regulatory and financial, exist to utility acquisition of demand-side resources. Regulatory actions are being implemented in Oregon to make demand-side investments competitive with supply-side investments. In 1989, the Oregon Public Utility Commission (PUC) took two actions regarding demand-side investments. The PUC's Order 89-1700 directed utilities to capitalize demand-side investments to properly match amortization expense with the multiyear benefits provided by DSM. The PUC also began an informal investigation concerning incentives for Oregon's regulated electric utilities to acquire demand-side resources.

Irwin, K.; Phillips-Israel, K.; Busch, E.

1994-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

429

Reliability implications of price responsive demand : a study of New England's power system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With restructuring of the traditional, vertically integrated electricity industry come new opportunities for electricity demand to actively participate in electricity markets. Traditional definitions of power system ...

Whitaker, Andrew C. (Andrew Craig)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

A Dynamic household Alternative-fuel Vehicle Demand Model Using Stated and Revealed Transaction Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential Demand for Electric Cars, Journal of Economrtricsand one large car) and one mini electric car. The two modelsscenarios: (i) a subcompact electric car is introduced to

Sheng, Hongyan

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Demand-Side Management Glossary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, demand-side management (DSM) programs have grown in significance within the U.S. electric power industry. Such rapid growth has resulted in new terms, standards, and vocabulary used by DSM professionals. This report is a first attempt to provide a consistent set of definitions for the expanding DSM terminology.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Definition: Demand | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Demand Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Demand The rate at which electric energy is delivered to or by a system or part of a system, generally expressed in kilowatts or megawatts, at a given instant or averaged over any designated interval of time., The rate at which energy is being used by the customer.[1] Related Terms energy, electricity generation References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An i Like Like You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. nline Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Demand&oldid=480555"

433

California Baseline Energy Demands to 2050 for Advanced Energy Pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rate California electricity consumption (GWh) Over two-thirds of total electricity demand is concentrated in the residential andrate N/A PG&E SMUD SCE LADWP SDGE BGP Other All CA 2005 IEPR Residential electricity

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Performance-Based Seismic Demand Assessment of Concentrically Braced Steel Frame Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

were usually not the maximum demands in those stories. Whatidentifies the maximum force demand at each story underalthough higher maximum drift demands and residual drift

Chen, Chui-Hsin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Development of a data base and forecasting model for commercial-sector electricity usage and demand. Volume VII. Detailed survey, sampling methodology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the work performed toward obtaining two sets of primary data, from which econometric and engineering parameters for the model were to be derived. The first type will be collected in a mail survey of utility-company customers determined by an analysis of customer-account data. These data have been collected from Pacific Gas and Electric, Los Angeles Div. of Water and Power, San Diego Gas and Electric, and Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) and have been analyzed and the survey customers selected. The second type will consist of detailed technical data on buildings in the SMSA's of Los Angeles, San Diego, San Francisco, and Sacramento. This report presents the final methodology for the selection of building samples, by type and location, for the detailed building data collection. Eleven tables present the results of the analysis. Within service areas and/or SMSA's, significant establishment classifications are illustrated with their energy characteristics. The allocation of the detailed survey-sample members is illustrated, according to establishment classifications and the 24 different building types. This specification is further detailed as to allocations within the SMUD service area and those to be taken from other areas. The methodology presented in this final report is being used to select sample members for the detailed survey.

Not Available

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Estimating disaggregated price elasticities in industrial energy demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Econometric energy models are used to evaluate past policy experiences, assess the impact of future policies and forecast energy demand. This paper estimates an industrial energy demand model for the province of Ontario using a linear-logit specification for fuel type equations which are embedded in an aggregate energy demand equation. Short-term, long-term, own- and cross-price elasticities are estimated for electricity, natural gas, oil and coal. Own- and cross-price elasticities are disaggregated to show that overall price elasticities and the energy-constant price elasticities when aggregate energy use is held unchanged. These disaggregations suggest that a substantial part of energy conservation comes from the higher aggregate price of energy and not from interfuel substitution. 13 refs., 2 tabs.

Elkhafif, M.A.T. (Ontario Ministry of Energy, Toronto (Canada))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Evaluation of evolving residential electricity tariffs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations Windows and Daylighting Electricity Grid Demand Response Distributed Energy Electricity Reliability Energy Analysis...

438

Draft for Public Comment Appendix A. Demand Forecast  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Draft for Public Comment A-1 Appendix A. Demand Forecast INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY A 20-year forecast of electricity demand is a required component of the Council's Northwest Regional Conservation had a tradition of acknowledging the uncertainty of any forecast of electricity demand and developing

439

D:\assumptions_2001\assumptions2002\currentassump\demand.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Macroeconomic Activity Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 International Energy Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Household Expenditures Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Residential Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Commercial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Industrial Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Transportation Demand Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Electricity Market Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Oil and Gas Supply Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Petroleum Market Module. . . . . . . . . . . . .

440

Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Demand Responsive Lighting Host: Francis Rubinstein Demand Response Research Center Technical Advisory Group Meeting August 31, 2007 10:30 AM - Noon Meeting Agenda * Introductions (10 minutes) * Main Presentation (~ 1 hour) * Questions, comments from panel (15 minutes) Project History * Lighting Scoping Study (completed January 2007) - Identified potential for energy and demand savings using demand responsive lighting systems - Importance of dimming - New wireless controls technologies * Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting (commenced March 2007) Objectives * Provide up-to-date information on the reliability, predictability of dimmable lighting as a demand resource under realistic operating load conditions * Identify potential negative impacts of DR lighting on lighting quality Potential of Demand Responsive Lighting Control

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Transportation Demand This  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

69 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates...

442

Demand Response Spinning Reserve  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Title Demand Response Spinning Reserve Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2007 Authors Eto, Joseph H., Janine Nelson-Hoffman, Carlos...

443

Addressing Energy Demand  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Bo Shen, Girish Ghatikar, Chun Chun Ni, and Junqiao Dudley Environmental Energy...

444

Propane Sector Demand Shares  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... agricultural demand does not impact regional propane markets except when unusually high and late demand for propane for crop drying combines with early cold ...

445

National Action Plan on Demand Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

David Kathan, Ph.D David Kathan, Ph.D Federal Energy Regulatory Commission U.S. DOE Electricity Advisory Committee October 29, 2010 Demand Response as Power System Resources The author's views do not necessarily represent the views of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission 2 Demand Response * FERC (Order 719) defines demand response as: - A reduction in the consumption of electric energy by customers from their expected consumption in response to an increase in the price of electric energy or to in incentive payments designed to induce lower consumption of electric energy. * The National Action Plan on Demand Response released by FERC staff broadens this definition to include - Consumer actions that can change any part of the load profile of a utility or region, not just the period of peak usage

446

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Energy Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

demand for renewable fuels increasing the fastestincluding E85 and biodiesel fuels for light-duty vehicles, biomass for co-firing at coal-fired electric power plants, and...

447

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

function of real-time electricity prices (left) and windinflexible) demand and real-time prices. The case study inas a special case. The real-time price process is modeled as

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Analyzing the Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and the Northwest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

22 Figure 5. Historical Electricity Demand in California andof Month- Hours for Electricity Demand in California and theduring hours of peak electricity demand, and a smaller but

Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

The Effects of Electricity Tariff Structure on Distributed Generation Adoption in New York State  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity, volumetric natural gas, and demand rates) werevolumetric natural gas ($/kJ) rates, and demand charges. Involumetric natural gas rates, or electricity demand rates)

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20122022 FINAL FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20122022 FINAL FORECAST Volume 1: Statewide Electricity forecast is the combined product of the hard work and expertise of numerous staff members in the Demand the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad Soltani Nia helped prepare the industrial forecast. Miguel Garcia

451

Price Impact on the Demand for Water and Energy in California...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Laboratory City Berkeley Keywords block rate pricing, california, demand, electricity, natural gas, Price elasticity of demand, water Abstract This paper provides a...

452

Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Total Energy Source Demand Coal, Oil, Gas, Heat, Electricity Demography Japans population, an important factor in predicting residential energy demand as well

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Successful demand-side management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article is a brief summary of a series of case studies of five publicly-owned utilities that are noted for their success with demand-side management. These utilities are: (1) city of Austin, Texas, (2) Burlington Electric Department in Vermont, (3) Sacramento Municipal Utility District in California, (4) Seattle City Light, and (5) Waverly Light and Power in Iowa. From these case studies, the authors identified a number of traits associated with a successful demand-side management program. These traits are: (1) high rates, (2) economic factors, (3) environmental awareness, (4) state emphasis on integrated resource planning/demand side management, (5) local political support, (6) large-sized utilities, and (7) presence of a champion.

Hadley, S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States); Flanigan, T. [Results Center, Aspen, CO (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Electricity Markets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electricity Markets Electricity Markets Researchers in the electricity markets area conduct technical, economic, and policy analysis of energy topics centered on the U.S. electricity sector. Current research seeks to inform public and private decision-making on public-interest issues related to energy efficiency and demand response, renewable energy, electricity resource and transmission planning, electricity reliability and distributed generation resources. Research is conducted in the following areas: Energy efficiency research focused on portfolio planning and market assessment, design and implementation of a portfolio of energy efficiency programs that achieve various policy objectives, utility sector energy efficiency business models, options for administering energy efficiency

455

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers Title Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers...

456

Demand Trading: Building Liquidity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand trading holds substantial promise as a mechanism for efficiently integrating demand-response resources into regional power markets. However, regulatory uncertainty, the lack of proper price signals, limited progress toward standardization, problems in supply-side markets, and other factors have produced illiquidity in demand-trading markets and stalled the expansion of demand-response resources. This report shows how key obstacles to demand trading can be overcome, including how to remove the unce...

2002-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

457

Water demand management in Kuwait  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kuwait is an arid country located in the Middle East, with limited access to water resources. Yet water demand per capita is much higher than in other countries in the world, estimated to be around 450 L/capita/day. There ...

Milutinovic, Milan, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Demand Response and Risk Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For several decades, power companies have deployed various types of demand response (DR), such as interruptible contracts, and there is substantial ongoing research and development on sophisticated mechanisms for triggering DR. In this white paper, EPRI discusses the increasing use of electricity DR in the power industry and how this will affect the practice of energy risk management. This paper outlines 1) characteristics of a common approach to energy risk management, 2) the variety of types of DR impl...

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

459

How much electric supply capacity is needed to keep U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Today in Energy ... tags: capacity demand electricity generation capacity NERC (North American Electric Reliability Corporation)

460

Capitalize on Existing Assets with Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial facilities universally struggle with escalating energy costs. EnerNOC will demonstrate how commercial, industrial, and institutional end-users can capitalize on their existing assetsat no cost and no risk. Demand response, the voluntary reduction of electric demand in response to grid instability, provides financial incentives to participating facilities that agree to conserve energy. With demand response, facilities also receive advance notice of potential blackouts and can proactively protect their equipment and machinery from sudden losses of power. A detailed case study, focusing on a sample industrial customers participation in demand response, will support the presentation.

Collins, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

demand response - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA Survey Forms Facebook Twitter ... demand response June 14, 2012 California's electric power market faces challenges heading into summer. March 24, ...

462

1995 Demand-Side Managment - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

and more detailed data on energy savings, peak load reductions and costs attributable to DSM. Target Audience ... Profile: U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side

463

Letters: Energy demand prediction using GMDH networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electric power industry is in transition as it moves towards a competitive and deregulated environment. In this emerging market, traditional electric utilities as well as energy traders, power pools and independent system operators (ISOs) need the ... Keywords: Artificial neural networks, Energy demand, Forecasting, Group method of data handling (GMDH) networks, Self-organizing networks

Dipti Srinivasan

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Electricity Market Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the Electricity Market Module as it was used for the Annual Energy Outlook 2013. The Electricity Market Module (EMM) is the electricity supply component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The EMM represents the generation, transmission, and pricing of electricity. It consists of four submodules: the Electricity Capacity Planning (ECP) Submodule, the Electricity Fuel Dispatch (EFD) Submodule, the Electricity Finance and Pricing (EFP) Submodule, and the Electricity Load and Demand (ELD) Submodule.

Jeff Jones

2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

465

Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand Title Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand Publication Type Report...

466

Quantifying Changes in Building Electricity Use, with Application...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Changes in Building Electricity Use, with Application to Demand Response Title Quantifying Changes in Building Electricity Use, with Application to Demand Response Publication Type...

467

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4. Option Value of a Thermal Energy Storage System for 5counter Real-time Prices Thermal Energy Storage vii Abstractfor the day, operating thermal energy storage overnight for

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

17 3.3.1 Distributed Generation Options17 3.3.2 Distributed Generation Modeling18 3.3.3 Distributed Generation Option Results and

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

markets deregulate and energy tariffs increasingly exposereal-time energy markets either through RTP tariffs or DRtariff, the payoff is the savings for not consuming the energy

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2. Constructing a Forward View of Energy Prices and Interest5 2.1 Energy Price Forwardin response to changing energy prices. The key uncertainties

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

6 Figure 2. Natural Gas Price Forward7 Figure 4. Gas-Daily Natural Gas Price Index (New Yorkand off-peak) and natural gas prices, the volatility term

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Option Value of Electricity Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

6 Figure 2. Natural Gas Price Forward4. Gas-Daily Natural Gas Price Index (New York Transco ZoneGas Prices . 19

Sezgen, Osman; Goldman, Charles; Krishnarao, P.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Economy and Electricity Demand Growth Linked but .  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Utility Conference ... Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U ... 04 0.04 1980.00 0.03 0.02 1981.00 0.02 0.02 1982.00 ...

474

Demand Impacted by Weather  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

When you look at demand, its also interesting to note the weather. The weather has a big impact on the demand of heating fuels, if its cold, consumers will use ...

475

Higher Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Higher Education Higher Education Explore the multiple dimensions of a career at LANL: work with brilliant minds in an inclusive environment rich in intellectual vitality and...

476

Definition: Demand Side Management | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Side Management Side Management Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Demand Side Management The term for all activities or programs undertaken by Load-Serving Entity or its customers to influence the amount or timing of electricity they use.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Energy demand management, also known as demand side management (DSM), is the modification of consumer demand for energy through various methods such as financial incentives and education. Usually, the goal of demand side management is to encourage the consumer to use less energy during peak hours, or to move the time of energy use to off-peak times such as nighttime and weekends. Peak demand management does not necessarily decrease total energy consumption, but could be expected to reduce the need

477

Demand Trading Toolkit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Download report 1006017 for FREE. The global movement toward competitive markets is paving the way for a variety of market mechanisms that promise to increase market efficiency and expand customer choice options. Demand trading offers customers, energy service providers, and other participants in power markets the opportunity to buy and sell demand-response resources, just as they now buy and sell blocks of power. EPRI's Demand Trading Toolkit (DTT) describes the principles and practice of demand trading...

2001-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

478

Winter Demand Impacted by Weather  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Notes: Heating oil demand is strongly influenced by weather. The "normal" numbers are the expected values for winter 2000-2001 used in EIA's Short-Term Energy Outlook. The chart indicates the extent to which the last winter exhibited below-normal heating degree-days (and thus below-normal heating demand). Temperatures were consistently warmer than normal throughout the 1999-2000 heating season. This was particularly true in November 1999, February 2001 and March 2001. For the heating season as a whole (October through March), the 1999-2000 winter yielded total HDDs 10.7% below normal. Normal temperatures this coming winter would, then, be expected to bring about 11% higher heating demand than we saw last year. Relative to normal, the 1999-2000 heating season was the warmest in

479

Optimal Technology Investment and Operation in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings with Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity ($/kWh) demand ($/kW) natural gas 0.035 forelectricity ($/kWh) demand ($/kW) natural gas $/kWh $/thermnatural gas tariff combined with the almost constant demand

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Advanced Control Technologies and Strategies Linking Demand Response and Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and M.A. Piette, J. Braun Peak Demand Reduction from Pre-to reduce Electrical Peak Demands in Commercial BuildingsManagement (Daily) - TOU - Peak Demand Charges - Grid Peak -

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "higher electricity demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Demand Shifting with Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings in a California Hot Climate Zone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. E. Braun. 2004. Peak demand reduction from pre-coolingReducing electrical peak demand has a huge economic andmass for load shifting and peak demand reduction has been

Xu, Peng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Demand Response under Uncertainty F P t : wholesale natural gasdemand response and DER under uncertain electricity and natural gasand Demand Response under Uncertainty Energy Price Models We assume that the logarithms of the deseasonalized electricity and natural gas

Siddiqui, Afzal

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reviews the relationship between energy efficiency and demand response and discusses approaches and barriers to coordinating energy efficiency and demand response. The paper is intended to support the 10 implementation goals of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency's Vision to achieve all cost-effective energy efficiency by 2025. Improving energy efficiency in our homes, businesses, schools, governments, and industries - which consume more than 70 percent of the nation's natural gas and electricity - is one of the most constructive, cost-effective ways to address the challenges of high energy prices, energy security and independence, air pollution, and global climate change. While energy efficiency is an increasingly prominent component of efforts to supply affordable, reliable, secure, and clean electric power, demand response is becoming a valuable tool in utility and regional resource plans. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) estimated the contribution from existing U.S. demand response resources at about 41,000 megawatts (MW), about 5.8 percent of 2008 summer peak demand (FERC, 2008). Moreover, FERC recently estimated nationwide achievable demand response potential at 138,000 MW (14 percent of peak demand) by 2019 (FERC, 2009).2 A recent Electric Power Research Institute study estimates that 'the combination of demand response and energy efficiency programs has the potential to reduce non-coincident summer peak demand by 157 GW' by 2030, or 14-20 percent below projected levels (EPRI, 2009a). This paper supports the Action Plan's effort to coordinate energy efficiency and demand response programs to maximize value to customers. For information on the full suite of policy and programmatic options for removing barriers to energy efficiency, see the Vision for 2025 and the various other Action Plan papers and guides available at www.epa.gov/eeactionplan.

Goldman, Charles; Reid, Michael; Levy, Roger; Silverstein, Alison

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

484

Electric Power Annual 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.A. Summer net internal demand, capacity resources, and capacity margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region" "1999 through 2011 actual, 2012-2016 projected"...

485

Fast Automated Demand Response to Enable the Integration of Renewable Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

peak demand, and natural gas demand forecasts for eachnatural gas and other fossil fuels are the predominant heating fuels for Californias commercial buildings, heating electricity demandDemand. The California End Use Survey 2004 (CEUS 2004) provides statewide hourly electricity and natural gas

Watson, David S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Advanced Control Technologies and Strategies Linking Demand Response and Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrical Peak Demands in Commercial Buildings Center for Analysis and Dissemination of Demonstrated Energy Technologies (CADDET), IEA/OECD Analyses

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wastewater treatment is an energy intensive process which, together with water treatment, comprises about three percent of U.S. annual energy use. Yet, since wastewater treatment facilities are often peripheral to major electricity-using industries, they are frequently an overlooked area for automated demand response opportunities. Demand response is a set of actions taken to reduce electric loads when contingencies, such as emergencies or congestion, occur that threaten supply-demand balance, and/or market conditions occur that raise electric supply costs. Demand response programs are designed to improve the reliability of the electric grid and to lower the use of electricity during peak times to reduce the total system costs. Open automated demand response is a set of continuous, open communication signals and systems provided over the Internet to allow facilities to automate their demand response activities without the need for manual actions. Automated demand response strategies can be implemented as an enhanced use of upgraded equipment and facility control strategies installed as energy efficiency measures. Conversely, installation of controls to support automated demand response may result in improved energy efficiency through real-time access to operational data. This paper argues that the implementation of energy efficiency opportunities in wastewater treatment facilities creates a base for achieving successful demand reductions. This paper characterizes energy use and the state of demand response readiness in wastewater treatment facilities and outlines automated demand response opportunities.

Thompson, Lisa; Song, Katherine; Lekov, Alex; McKane, Aimee

2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

488

Volatile coal prices reflect supply, demand uncertainties  

SciTech Connect

Coal mine owners and investors say that supply and demand are now finally in balance. But coal consumers find that both spot tonnage and new contract coal come at a much higher price.

Ryan, M.

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

489

An Integrated Architecture for Demand Response Communications and Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and produced a maximum demand reduction Proceedings of the 41st Hawaii International Conference on SystemAn Integrated Architecture for Demand Response Communications and Control Michael LeMay, Rajesh,gross,cgunter}@uiuc.edu Abstract In the competitive electricity structure, demand re- sponse programs

Gross, George

490

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Title Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Publication Type Report Refereed Designation Unknown Year of Publication 2010 Authors Goldman, Charles A., Michael Reid, Roger Levy, and Alison Silverstein Pagination 74 Date Published 01/2010 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department Abstract This paper reviews the relationship between energy efficiency and demand response and discusses approaches and barriers to coordinating energy efficiency and demand response. The paper is intended to support the 10 implementation goals of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency's Vision to achieve all cost-effective energy efficiency by 2025.1 Improving energy efficiency in our homes, businesses, schools, governments, and industries-which consume more than 70 percent of the nation's natural gas and electricity-is one of the most constructive, cost-effective ways to address the challenges of high energy prices, energy security and independence, air pollution, and global climate change. While energy efficiency is an increasingly prominent component of efforts to supply affordable, reliable, secure, and clean electric power, demand response is becoming a valuable tool in utility and regional resource plans. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) estimated the contribution from existing U.S. demand response resources at about 41,000 megawatts (MW), about 5.8 percent of 2008 summer peak demand (FERC, 2008). Moreover, FERC recently estimated nationwide achievable demand response potential at 138,000 MW (14 percent of peak demand) by 2019 (FERC, 2009).2 A recent Electric Power Research Institute study estimates that "the combination of demand response and energy efficiency programs has the potential to reduce non-coincident summer peak demand by 157 GW" by 2030, or 14-20 percent below projected levels (EPRI, 2009a). This paper supports the Action Plan's effort to coordinate energy efficiency and demand response programs to maximize value to customers. For information on the full suite of policy and programmatic options for removing barriers to energy efficiency, see the Vision for 2025 and the various other Action Plan papers and guides available at www.epa.gov/eeactionplan.

491

Towards continuous policy-driven demand response in data centers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response (DR) is a technique for balancing electricity supply and demand by regulating power consumption instead of generation. DR is a key technology for emerging smart electric grids that aim to increase grid efficiency, while incorporating ... Keywords: blink, power, renewable energy, storage

David Irwin; Navin Sharma; Prashant Shenoy

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Equity Effects of Increasing-Block Electricity Pricing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increasing-Block Residential Electricity Rates in CaliforniaResidential Demand for Electricity under Inverted Block Rates:

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Customer Response to Day-ahead Wholesale Market Electricity Prices...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations Windows and Daylighting Electricity Grid Demand Response Distributed Energy Electricity Reliability Energy Analysis...

494

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations Windows and Daylighting Electricity Grid Demand Response Distributed Energy Electricity Reliability Energy Analysis...

495

Demand Response- Policy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Since its inception, the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) has been committed to modernizing the nation's electricity delivery infrastructure to assure consumers a robust,...

496

Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers Title Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers Publication Type...

497

Measuring the capacity impacts of demand response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Critical peak pricing and peak time rebate programs offer benefits by increasing system reliability, and therefore, reducing capacity needs of the electric power system. These benefits, however, decrease substantially as the size of the programs grows relative to the system size. More flexible schemes for deployment of demand response can help address the decreasing returns to scale in capacity value, but more flexible demand response has decreasing returns to scale as well. (author)

Earle, Robert; Kahn, Edward P.; Macan, Edo

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

498

Tri-State Demand Response Framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides the results of a demand response framework development project of Tri-State Generation and Transmission, a wholesale provider to a number of rural electric associations in the Rocky Mountain west. Tri-State has developed an assortment of planned demand response and energy shaping products and services designed to both shave peak and shift consumption to off-peak hours. The applications, networks, and devices that will be needed to support these needs will involve many ...

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

499

A Proposed Framework for a Demand Response Product Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response is now widely recognized as an essential feature of well-functioning wholesale and retail electricity markets. Some utilities have had dynamic pricing plans (a form of demand response) underway for many years. All major wholesale electricity markets in the United States have demand response programs today. Despite this experience, it is difficult to learn from the programs that have been implemented due to a lack of a consistent framework for comparing their major design features (includi...

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

500

Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity in California and the Northwest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

value of re- newable electricity; and customer surveys ofCalifornia or Northwestern electricity demand. This may bebetween wind speed and electricity demand," Solar Energy,

Wiser, Ryan H

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z