Sample records for high-energy short wavelength

  1. Short wavelength laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hagelstein, P.L.

    1984-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A short wavelength laser is provided that is driven by conventional-laser pulses. A multiplicity of panels, mounted on substrates, are supported in two separated and alternately staggered facing and parallel arrays disposed along an approximately linear path. When the panels are illuminated by the conventional-laser pulses, single pass EUV or soft x-ray laser pulses are produced.

  2. Electricity and short wavelength radiation generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    George, E.V.

    1985-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and associated apparati for use of collisions of high energy atoms and ions of He, Ne, or Ar with themselves or with high energy neutrons to produce short wavelength radiation (lambda approx. = 840-1300 A) that may be utilized to produce cathode-anode currents or photovoltaic currents.

  3. Short wavelength laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hagelstein, Peter L. (Livermore, CA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A short wavelength laser (28) is provided that is driven by conventional-laser pulses (30, 31). A multiplicity of panels (32), mounted on substrates (34), are supported in two separated and alternately staggered facing and parallel arrays disposed along an approximately linear path (42). When the panels (32) are illuminated by the conventional-laser pulses (30, 31), single pass EUV or soft x-ray laser pulses (44, 46) are produced.

  4. Source of coherent short wavelength radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Villa, Francesco (Alameda, CA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for producing coherent radiation ranging from X-rays to the far ultraviolet (i.e., 1 Kev to 10 eV) utilizing the Compton scattering effect. A photon beam from a laser is scattered on a high energy electron bunch from a pulse power linac. The short wavelength radiation produced by such scattering has sufficient intensity and spatial coherence for use in high resolution applications such as microscopy.

  5. Modulation compression for short wavelength harmonic generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiang, J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wavelength Harmonic Generation Ji Qiang Lawrence Berkeleyform a basis for fourth generation light source. Currently,e?ciency was proposed for generation of short wavelength

  6. On Storage Rings for Short Wavelength FELs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for a hypothetical 144 m long storage ring optimized for FELin the Proceedings On Storage Rings for Short WavelengthLBL-28483 ESG Note-92 ON STORAGE RINGS FOR SHORT WAVELENGTH

  7. Dual wavelength laser damage testing for high energy lasers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atherton, Briggs W.; Rambo, Patrick K.; Schwarz, Jens; Kimmel, Mark W.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As high energy laser systems evolve towards higher energies, fundamental material properties such as the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) of the optics limit the overall system performance. The Z-Backlighter Laser Facility at Sandia National Laboratories uses a pair of such kiljoule-class Nd:Phosphate Glass lasers for x-ray radiography of high energy density physics events on the Z-Accelerator. These two systems, the Z-Beamlet system operating at 527nm/ 1ns and the Z-Petawatt system operating at 1054nm/ 0.5ps, can be combined for some experimental applications. In these scenarios, dichroic beam combining optics and subsequent dual wavelength high reflectors will see a high fluence from combined simultaneous laser exposure and may even see lingering effects when used for pump-probe configurations. Only recently have researchers begun to explore such concerns, looking at individual and simultaneous exposures of optics to 1064 and third harmonic 355nm light from Nd:YAG [1]. However, to our knowledge, measurements of simultaneous and delayed dual wavelength damage thresholds on such optics have not been performed for exposure to 1054nm and its second harmonic light, especially when the pulses are of disparate pulse duration. The Z-Backlighter Facility has an instrumented damage tester setup to examine the issues of laser-induced damage thresholds in a variety of such situations [2] . Using this damage tester, we have measured the LIDT of dual wavelength high reflectors at 1054nm/0.5ps and 532nm/7ns, separately and spatially combined, both co-temporal and delayed, with single and multiple exposures. We found that the LIDT of the sample at 1054nm/0.5ps can be significantly lowered, from 1.32J/cm{sup 2} damage fluence with 1054/0.5ps only to 1.05 J/cm{sup 2} with the simultaneous presence of 532nm/7ns laser light at a fluence of 8.1 J/cm{sup 2}. This reduction of LIDT of the sample at 1054nm/0.5ps continues as the fluence of 532nm/7ns laser light simultaneously present increases. The reduction of LIDT does not occur when the 2 pulses are temporally separated. This paper will also present dual wavelength LIDT results of commercial dichroic beam-combining optics simultaneously exposed with laser light at 1054nm/2.5ns and 532nm/7ns.

  8. Multi-wavelength identification of high-energy sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mignani, R P

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature of most of the ~300 high-energy gamma-ray sources discovered by the EGRET instrument aboard the Gamma-ray Observatory (GRO) between 1991 and 1999 is one of the greatest enigmas in high-energy astrophysics. While about half of the extragalactic sources have been optically identified with Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), only a meagre 10% of the galactic sources have a reliable identification. This low success rate has mainly to be ascribed to the local crowding of potential optical counterparts and to the large gamma-ray error boxes (of the order of one degree in radius) which prevented a straightforward optical identification. Indeed, a multi-wavelength identification strategy, based on a systematic coverage of the gamma-ray error boxes, has been the only do-able approach. The situation is now greatly improving thanks to the observations performed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope which, thanks to the LAT instrument, provides a factor of 50 improvement in sensitivity and a factor of 10 improvemen...

  9. High Average Power, High Energy Short Pulse Fiber Laser System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Messerly, M J

    2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently continuous wave fiber laser systems with output powers in excess of 500W with good beam quality have been demonstrated [1]. High energy, ultrafast, chirped pulsed fiber laser systems have achieved record output energies of 1mJ [2]. However, these high-energy systems have not been scaled beyond a few watts of average output power. Fiber laser systems are attractive for many applications because they offer the promise of high efficiency, compact, robust systems that are turn key. Applications such as cutting, drilling and materials processing, front end systems for high energy pulsed lasers (such as petawatts) and laser based sources of high spatial coherence, high flux x-rays all require high energy short pulses and two of the three of these applications also require high average power. The challenge in creating a high energy chirped pulse fiber laser system is to find a way to scale the output energy while avoiding nonlinear effects and maintaining good beam quality in the amplifier fiber. To this end, our 3-year LDRD program sought to demonstrate a high energy, high average power fiber laser system. This work included exploring designs of large mode area optical fiber amplifiers for high energy systems as well as understanding the issues associated chirped pulse amplification in optical fiber amplifier systems.

  10. Short wavelength ion temperature gradient turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chowdhury, J.; Ganesh, R. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar (India); Brunner, S.; Lapillonne, X.; Villard, L. [CRPP, Association EURATOM-Confederation Suisse, EPFL, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Jenko, F. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode in the high wavenumber regime (k{sub y}{rho}{sub s}>1), referred to as short wavelength ion temperature gradient mode (SWITG) is studied using the nonlinear gyrokinetic electromagnetic code GENE. It is shown that, although the SWITG mode may be linearly more unstable than the standard long wavelength (k{sub y}{rho}{sub s}<1) ITG mode, nonlinearly its contribution to the total thermal ion heat transport is found to be low. We interpret this as resulting from an increased zonal flow shearing effect on the SWITG mode suppression.

  11. Fluid dynamic issues in continuous wave short wavelength chemical lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mikatarian, R.R.; Jumper, E.J.; Woolhiser, C.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper addresses fluid dynamic issues of concern in the design and development of Continuous Wave (CW) Short Wavelength Chemical Lasers (SWCLs). Short Wavelength Chemical Laser technology is in its research stage and SWCL concepts are in their evolving mode. Researchers are presently addressing candidate chemical systems and activation concepts. Since these lasers will be flowing systems, it is necessary to discuss both the probable fluid dynamics issues, because of the inherent complexities fluid dynamicist can support this activity. In addition to addressing the SWCL fluid dynamic issues, this paper will review past fluid dynamic activities in high energy lasers and discuss additional research still required. This paper will also address the various levels of fluid dynamic modeling and how these models can be applied in studying the fluid dynamics of Short Wavelength Chemical Lasers. Where it is felt that specific fluid methodologies are not available, but are required in order to conduct specific analyses, they will be defined. 34 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Short Wavelength Seeding through Compression for Fee Electron Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiang, Ji

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tunable short wavelength free electron lasers (FELs) providereduces the laser power needed for the generation of shortbetween the laser ?eld and the electron beam inside a short

  13. MILAGRO CONSTRAINTS ON VERY HIGH ENERGY EMISSION FROM SHORT-DURATION GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    MILAGRO CONSTRAINTS ON VERY HIGH ENERGY EMISSION FROM SHORT-DURATION GAMMA-RAY BURSTS A. A. Abdo,1 localizations of short, hard gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) by the Swift and HETE satellites have led: bursts -- gamma rays: observations Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have long been classified by their durations

  14. First observations of short wavelength coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) at BC3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    First observations of short wavelength coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) at BC3 Christopher-FLA) short wavelength CSR at BC3 11th December 2007 1 / 26 #12;Outline 1 Motivation CSR at BC3 End Christopher Behrens (DESY-FLA) short wavelength CSR at BC3 11th December 2007 2 / 26 #12

  15. Nonlinear pair production in scattering of photons on ultra-short laser pulses at high energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tuchin, Kirill

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider scattering of a photon on a short intense laser pulse at high energy. We argue that for ultra-short laser pulses the interaction is coherent over the entire length of the pulse. At low pulse intensity $I$ the total cross section for electron-positron pair production is proportional to $I$. However, at pulse intensities higher than the characteristic value $I_s$, the total cross section saturates -- it becomes proportional to the logarithm of intensity. This nonlinear effect is due to multi-photon interactions. We derive the total cross section for pair production at high energies by resuming the multi-photon amplitudes to all orders in intensity. We calculate the saturation intensity $I_s$ and show that it is significantly lower than the Schwinger's critical value. We discuss possible experimental tests.

  16. Nonlinear pair production in scattering of photons on ultra-short laser pulses at high energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirill Tuchin

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider scattering of a photon on a short intense laser pulse at high energy. We argue that for ultra-short laser pulses the interaction is coherent over the entire length of the pulse. At low pulse intensity $I$ the total cross section for electron-positron pair production is proportional to $I$. However, at pulse intensities higher than the characteristic value $I_s$, the total cross section saturates -- it becomes proportional to the logarithm of intensity. This nonlinear effect is due to multi-photon interactions. We derive the total cross section for pair production at high energies by resuming the multi-photon amplitudes to all orders in intensity. We calculate the saturation intensity $I_s$ and show that it is significantly lower than the Schwinger's critical value. We discuss possible experimental tests.

  17. Title of Dissertation: A Search for Short Duration Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    of GRBs. #12;A Search for Short Duration Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts by David NoyesABSTRACT Title of Dissertation: A Search for Short Duration Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray by gamma rays with primary energies of approximately 100 GeV and higher. The wide field of view ( 2 sr

  18. Observation of finite-wavelength screening in high-energy-density matter

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chapman, D. A.; Vorberger, J.; Fletcher, L. B.; Baggott, R. A.; Divol, L.; Döppner, T.; Falcone, R. W.; Glenzer, S. H.; Gregori, G.; Guymer, T. M.; et al

    2015-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A key component for the description of charged particle systems is the screening of the Coulomb interaction between charge carriers. First investigated in the 1920s by Debye and Hückel for electrolytes, charge screening is important for determining the structural and transport properties of matter as diverse as astrophysical and laboratory plasmas, nuclear matter such as quark-gluon plasmas, electrons in solids, planetary cores and charged macromolecules. For systems with negligible dynamics, screening is still mostly described using a Debye–Hückel-type approach. Here, we report the novel observation of a significant departure from the Debye–Hückel-type model in high-energy-density matter by probing laser-driven, shock-compressedmore »plastic with high-energy X-rays. We use spectrally resolved X-ray scattering in a geometry that enables direct investigation of the screening cloud, and demonstrate that the observed elastic scattering amplitude is only well described within a more general approach.« less

  19. Milagro Constraints on Very High Energy Emission from Short Duration Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdo, A A; Berley, D; Blaufuss, E; Casanova, S; Dingus, B L; Ellsworth, R W; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Hays, E; Hoffman, C M; Kolterman, B E; Lansdell, C P; Linnemann, J T; McEnery, J E; Mincer, A I; Némethy, P; Noyes, D; Ryan, J M; Samuelson, F W; Parkinson, P M Saz; Shoup, A; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Vasileiou, V; Walker, G P; Williams, D A; Xu, X W; Yodh, G B

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent rapid localizations of short, hard gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) by the Swift and HETE satellites have led to the observation of the first afterglows and the measurement of the first redshifts from this type of burst. Detection of >100 GeV counterparts would place powerful constraints on GRB mechanisms. Seventeen short duration (100 GeV counterparts to these GRBs and find no significant emission correlated with these bursts. Due to the absorption of high-energy gamma rays by the extragalactic background light (EBL), detections are only expected for redshifts less than ~0.5. While most long duration GRBs occur at redshifts higher than 0.5, the opposite is thought to be true of short GRBs. Lack of a detected VHE signal thus allows setting meaningful fluence limits. One GRB in the sample (050509b) has a likely association with a galaxy at a redshift of 0.225, while another (051103) has been tentatively linked to the nearby galaxy M81. Fluence limits are corrected for EBL absorption, either using the known measu...

  20. Milagro Constraints on Very High Energy Emission from Short Duration Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Abdo; B. T. Allen; D. Berley; E. Blaufuss; S. Casanova; B. L. Dingus; R. W. Ellsworth; M. M. Gonzalez; J. A. Goodman; E. Hays; C. M. Hoffman; B. E. Kolterman; C. P. Lansdell; J. T. Linnemann; J. E. McEnery; A. I. Mincer; P. Nemethy; D. Noyes; J. M. Ryan; F. W. Samuelson; P. M. Saz Parkinson; A. Shoup; G. Sinnis; A. J. Smith; G. W. Sullivan; V. Vasileiou; G. P. Walker; D. A. Williams; X. W. Xu; G. B. Yodh

    2007-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent rapid localizations of short, hard gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) by the Swift and HETE satellites have led to the observation of the first afterglows and the measurement of the first redshifts from this type of burst. Detection of >100 GeV counterparts would place powerful constraints on GRB mechanisms. Seventeen short duration (100 GeV counterparts to these GRBs and find no significant emission correlated with these bursts. Due to the absorption of high-energy gamma rays by the extragalactic background light (EBL), detections are only expected for redshifts less than ~0.5. While most long duration GRBs occur at redshifts higher than 0.5, the opposite is thought to be true of short GRBs. Lack of a detected VHE signal thus allows setting meaningful fluence limits. One GRB in the sample (050509b) has a likely association with a galaxy at a redshift of 0.225, while another (051103) has been tentatively linked to the nearby galaxy M81. Fluence limits are corrected for EBL absorption, either using the known measured redshift, or computing the corresponding absorption for a redshift of 0.1 and 0.5, as well as for the case of z=0.

  1. Attenuated short wavelength buckling and force propagation in a biopolymer-reinforced rod

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shan, Wanliang

    rigidity k and the elastic energy in the medium due to lateral deections of the rod results in a bucklingAttenuated short wavelength buckling and force propagation in a biopolymer-reinforced rod W. L investigate short wavelength buckling of a thin elastic rod embedded in an elastic gelatin biopolymer network

  2. Use of Dynamical Undulator Mechanism to Produce Short Wavelength Radiation in Volume FEL (VFEL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. G. Baryshevsky; K. G. Batrakov

    2002-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    VFEL lasing in system with dynamical undulator is described. In this system radiation of long wavelength creates the undulator for lasing on shorter wavelength. Two diffraction gratings with different spatial periods form VFEL resonator. The grating with longer period pumps the resonator with long wavelength radiation to provide necessary amplitude of undulator field. The grating with shorter period makes mode selection for short wavelength radiation. Lasing of such a system in terahertz frequency range is discussed.

  3. Development of a resonant laser ionization gas cell for high-energy, short-lived nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Sonoda; M. Wada; H. Tomita; C. Sakamoto; T. Takatsuka; T. Furukawa; H. Iimura; Y. Ito; T. Kubo; Y. Matsuo; H. Mita; S. Naimi; S. Nakamura; T. Noto; P. Schury; T. Shinozuka; T. Wakui; H. Miyatake; S. Jeong; H. Ishiyama; Y. X. Watanabe; Y. Hirayama; K. Okada; A. Takamine

    2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A new laser ion source configuration based on resonant photoionization in a gas cell has been developed at RIBF RIKEN. This system is intended for the future PArasitic RI-beam production by Laser Ion-Source (PALIS) project which will be installed at RIKEN's fragment separator, BigRIPS. A novel implementation of differential pumping, in combination with a sextupole ion beam guide (SPIG), has been developed. A few small scroll pumps create a pressure difference from 1000 hPa - 10^-3 Pa within a geometry drastically miniaturized compared to conventional systems. This system can utilize a large exit hole for fast evacuation times, minimizing the decay loss for short-lived nuclei during extraction from a buffer gas cell, while sufficient gas cell pressure is maintained for stopping high energy RI-beams. In spite of the motion in a dense pressure gradient, the photo-ionized ions inside the gas cell are ejected with an assisting force gas jet and successfully transported to a high-vacuum region via SPIG followed by a quadrupole mass separator. Observed behaviors agree with the results of gas flow and Monte Carlo simulations.

  4. Multi-wavelength analysis of high energy electrons in solar flares: a case study of August 20, 2002 flare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Kasparova; M. Karlicky; E. P. Kontar; R. A. Schwartz; B. R. Dennis

    2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-wavelength spatial and temporal analysis of solar high energy electrons is conducted using the August 20, 2002 flare of an unusually flat (gamma=1.8) hard X-ray spectrum. The flare is studied using RHESSI, Halpha, radio, TRACE, and MDI observations with advanced methods and techniques never previously applied in the solar flare context. A new method to account for X-ray Compton backscattering in the photosphere (photospheric albedo) has been used to deduce the primary X-ray flare spectra. The mean electron flux distribution has been analysed using both forward fitting and model independent inversion methods of spectral analysis. We show that the contribution of the photospheric albedo to the photon spectrum modifies the calculated mean electron flux distribution, mainly at energies below 100 keV. The positions of the Halpha emission and hard X-ray sources with respect to the current-free extrapolation of the MDI photospheric magnetic field and the characteristics of the radio emission provide evidence of the closed geometry of the magnetic field structure and the flare process in low altitude magnetic loops. In agreement with the predictions of some solar flare models, the hard X-ray sources are located on the external edges of the Halpha emission and show chromospheric plasma heated by the non-thermal electrons. The fast changes of Halpha intensities are located not only inside the hard X-ray sources, as expected if they are the signatures of the chromospheric response to the electron bombardment, but also away from them.

  5. Ion heating and short wavelength fluctuations in a helicon plasma source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scime, E. E.; Carr, J. Jr.; Galante, M.; Magee, R. M. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Hardin, R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    For typical helicon source parameters, the driving antenna can couple to two plasma modes; the weakly damped 'helicon' wave, and the strongly damped, short wavelength, slow wave. Here, we present direct measurements, obtained with two different techniques, of few hundred kHz, short wavelength fluctuations that are parametrically driven by the primary antenna and localized to the edge of the plasma. The short wavelength fluctuations appear for plasma source parameters such that the driving frequency is approximately equal to the lower hybrid frequency. Measurements of the steady-state ion temperature and fluctuation amplitude radial profiles suggest that the anomalously high ion temperatures observed at the edge of helicon sources result from damping of the short wavelength fluctuations. Additional measurements of the time evolution of the ion temperature and fluctuation profiles in pulsed helicon source plasmas support the same conclusion.

  6. Asymptotic description of radially localized short wavelength eigenmodes in a tokamak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asymptotic description of radially localized short wavelength eigenmodes in a tokamak G. V-driven instabilities in a tokamak. It is shown that eigenmodes of the ballooning type are generated by toroidally

  7. SHORT-WAVELENGTH, SINGLE-PASS FREE-ELECTRON LASERS J. Rossbach, DESY, 22603 Hamburg, Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SHORT-WAVELENGTH, SINGLE-PASS FREE-ELECTRON LASERS J. Rossbach, DESY, 22603 Hamburg, Germany in demonstration of high power gain at single- pass free-electron lasers operating in the wavelength range from in the undulator. Eq. (1) exhibits two main advantages of the free-electron laser: the free tunability

  8. Excellent optical thermometry based on short-wavelength upconversion emissions in Er3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Wenwu

    Excellent optical thermometry based on short-wavelength upconversion emissions in Er3 Yb3 codoped (Doc. ID 175753); published November 22, 2012 Excited by a 980 nm laser, upconversion emissions coupled levels, which can emit the shortest wavelength emissions for optical thermometry known so far

  9. In-situ short-circuit protection system and method for high-energy electrochemical cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gauthier, Michel (La Prairie, CA); Domroese, Michael K. (South St. Paul, MN); Hoffman, Joseph A. (Minneapolis, MN); Lindeman, David D. (Hudson, WI); Noel, Joseph-Robert-Gaetan (St-Hubert, CA); Radewald, Vern E. (Austin, TX); Rouillard, Jean (Saint-Luc, CA); Rouillard, Roger (Beloeil, CA); Shiota, Toshimi (St. Bruno, CA); Trice, Jennifer L. (Eagan, MN)

    2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An in-situ thermal management system for an energy storage device. The energy storage device includes a plurality of energy storage cells each being coupled in parallel to common positive and negative connections. Each of the energy storage cells, in accordance with the cell's technology, dimensions, and thermal/electrical properties, is configured to have a ratio of energy content-to-contact surface area such that thermal energy produced by a short-circuit in a particular cell is conducted to a cell adjacent the particular cell so as to prevent the temperature of the particular cell from exceeding a breakdown temperature. In one embodiment, a fuse is coupled in series with each of a number of energy storage cells. The fuses are activated by a current spike capacitively produced by a cell upon occurrence of a short-circuit in the cell, thereby electrically isolating the short-circuited cell from the common positive and negative connections.

  10. In-situ short circuit protection system and method for high-energy electrochemical cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gauthier, Michel (La Prairie, CA); Domroese, Michael K. (South St. Paul, MN); Hoffman, Joseph A. (Minneapolis, MN); Lindeman, David D. (Hudson, WI); Noel, Joseph-Robert-Gaetan (St-Hubert, CA); Radewald, Vern E. (Austin, TX); Rouillard, Jean (Saint-Luc, CA); Rouillard, Roger (Beloeil, CA); Shiota, Toshimi (St. Bruno, CA); Trice, Jennifer L. (Eagan, MN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An in-situ thermal management system for an energy storage device. The energy storage device includes a plurality of energy storage cells each being coupled in parallel to common positive and negative connections. Each of the energy storage cells, in accordance with the cell's technology, dimensions, and thermal/electrical properties, is configured to have a ratio of energy content-to-contact surface area such that thermal energy produced by a short-circuit in a particular cell is conducted to a cell adjacent the particular cell so as to prevent the temperature of the particular cell from exceeding a breakdown temperature. In one embodiment, a fuse is coupled in series with each of a number of energy storage cells. The fuses are activated by a current spike capacitively produced by a cell upon occurrence of a short-circuit in the cell, thereby electrically isolating the short-circuited cell from the common positive and negative connections.

  11. Low work function surface layers produced by laser ablation using short-wavelength photons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balooch, Mehdi (Berkeley, CA); Dinh, Long N. (Concord, CA); Siekhaus, Wigbert J. (Berkeley, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Short-wavelength photons are used to ablate material from a low work function target onto a suitable substrate. The short-wavelength photons are at or below visible wavelength. The elemental composition of the deposit is controlled by the composition of the target and the gaseous environment in which the ablation process is performed. The process is carried out in a deposition chamber to which a short-wavelength laser is mounted and which includes a substrate holder which can be rotated, tilted, heated, or cooled. The target material is mounted onto a holder that spins the target during laser ablation. In addition, the deposition chamber is provided with a vacuum pump, an external gas supply with atomizer and radical generator, a gas generator for producing a flow of molecules on the substrate, and a substrate cleaning device, such as an ion gun. The substrate can be rotated and tilted, for example, whereby only the tip of an emitter can be coated with a low work function material.

  12. Whispering-gallery mirrors for short-wavelength laser cavities: Shapes and tolerances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braud, J.P.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The whispering-gallery mirrors desired for use in short-wavelength laser cavities are seen to be highly aspheric and very different from the shapes encountered in conventional optics. Fabrication tolerance are established by examining the effects of various surface imperfections. The mirrors are found to be relatively insensitive to figures errors. The requirements on surface finish are shown to be fairly strict, though less severe than with normal-incidence optics.

  13. Whispering-gallery mirrors for short-wavelength laser cavities: Shapes and tolerances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braud, J.P.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The whispering-gallery mirrors desired for use in short-wavelength laser cavities are seen to be highly aspheric and very different from the shapes encountered in conventional optics. Fabrication tolerance are established by examining the effects of various surface imperfections. The mirrors are found to be relatively insensitive to figures errors. The requirements on surface finish are shown to be fairly strict, though less severe than with normal-incidence optics.

  14. Space-resolved extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy free of high-energy neutral particle noise in wavelength range of 10–130 Å on the large helical device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Xianli, E-mail: huang.xianli@nifs.ac.jp [Department of Fusion Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292 Gifu (Japan)] [Department of Fusion Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292 Gifu (Japan); Morita, Shigeru; Oishi, Tetsutarou; Goto, Motoshi [Department of Fusion Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292 Gifu (Japan) [Department of Fusion Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292 Gifu (Japan); National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 Gifu (Japan); Dong, Chunfeng [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China)] [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A flat-field space-resolved extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrometer system working in wavelength range of 10–130 Å has been constructed in the Large Helical Device (LHD) for profile measurements of bremsstrahlung continuum and line emissions of heavy impurities in the central column of plasmas, which are aimed at studies on Z{sub eff} and impurity transport, respectively. Until now, a large amount of spike noise caused by neutral particles with high energies (?180 keV) originating in neutral beam injection has been observed in EUV spectroscopy on LHD. The new system has been developed with an aim to delete such a spike noise from the signal by installing a thin filter which can block the high-energy neutral particles entering the EUV spectrometer. Three filters of 11 ?m thick beryllium (Be), 3.3 ?m thick polypropylene (PP), and 0.5 ?m thick polyethylene terephthalate (PET: polyester) have been examined to eliminate the spike noise. Although the 11 ?m Be and 3.3 ?m PP filters can fully delete the spike noise in wavelength range of ? ? 20 Å, the signal intensity is also reduced. The 0.5 ?m PET filter, on the other hand, can maintain sufficient signal intensity for the measurement and the spike noise remained in the signal is acceptable. As a result, the bremsstrahlung profile is successfully measured without noise at 20 Å even in low-density discharges, e.g., 2.9 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup ?3}, when the 0.5 ?m PET filter is used. The iron n = 3–2 L? transition array consisting of FeXVII to FeXXIV is also excellently observed with their radial profiles in wavelength range of 10–18 Å. Each transition in the L? array can be accurately identified with its radial profile. As a typical example of the method a spectral line at 17.62 Å is identified as FeXVIII transition. Results on absolute intensity calibration of the spectrometer system, pulse height and noise count analyses of the spike noise between holographic and ruled gratings and wavelength response of the used filters are also presented with performance of the present spectrometer system.

  15. PHYSICAL REVIEW A 83, 013405 (2011) Precision calculation of above-threshold multiphoton ionization in intense short-wavelength laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Shih-I

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in intense short-wavelength laser fields: The momentum-space approach and time-dependent generalized to the advance of the intense and short pulse laser technology, the study of ATI phenomenon continues to attract) dynamics of atomic systems driven by intense laser fields. In this approach, the electron wave function

  16. High detectivity short-wavelength II-VI quantum cascade detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ravikumar, Arvind P., E-mail: aravikum@princeton.edu; Gmachl, Claire F. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Garcia, Thor A.; Tamargo, Maria C. [Department of Chemistry, The Graduate Center and The City College of New York, CUNY, New York, New York 10031 (United States); Jesus, Joel De [Department of Physics, The Graduate Center and The City College of New York, CUNY, New York, New York 10031 (United States)

    2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the experimental demonstration of a ZnCdSe/ZnCdMgSe-based short-wavelength photovoltaic Quantum Cascade Detector (QCD). The QCD operates in two spectral bands centered around 2.6??m and 3.6??m. Calibrated blackbody measurements yield a peak responsivity of 0.1?mA/W or 2400?V/W at 80?K, and a corresponding 300?K background radiation limited infrared performance detectivity (BLIP) of ?2.5?×?10{sup 10?}cm ?Hz/W. Comparison of background illuminated and dark current-voltage measurements demonstrates a BLIP temperature of 200?K. The device differential resistance-area product, decreases from about 10{sup 6} ? cm{sup 2} at 80?K to about 8000 ? cm{sup 2} at 300?K, indicative of the ultra-low Johnson noise in the detectors.

  17. Near-infrared wavelength intersubband transitions in GaN/AlN short period superlattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeCuir, E. A. Jr.; Fred, Emil; Passmore, B. S.; Muddasani, A.; Manasreh, M. O.; Xie Jinqiao; Morkoc, Hadis; Ware, M. E.; Salamo, G. J. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Arkansas, 3217 Bell Engineering Center, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Commonwealth University, 601 W. Main St., Richmond, Virginia 23284-3072 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 (United States)

    2006-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Intersubband transitions in GaN/AlN short period superlattices prepared by molecular beam epitaxy were investigated using the optical absorption technique. The peak position wavelengths of these transitions are found to span the spectral range of 1.35-2.90 {mu}m for samples cut into 45 deg. waveguides with GaN quantum well thicknesses ranging between 1.70 and 2.41 nm. The Fermi energy levels are estimated from the carrier concentrations, which were measured using an electrochemical capacitance-voltage profiler. The well widths were inferred from comparing the measured peak position energy of the intersubband transitions and the bound state energy levels calculated using the transfer matrix method.

  18. PHYSICAL REVIEW A 84, 043423 (2011) Dynamic of rescattering-electron wave packets in strong and short-wavelength laser fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and short-wavelength laser fields: Roles of Coulomb potential and excited states Yanjun Chen* Beijing and molecules exposed in strong and short- wavelength (shorter than 800 nm) laser fields. Our simulations show the potential, to explain the electronic response in intense and relatively high-frequency laser fields. DOI: 10

  19. Relativistic Single-Cycled Short-Wavelength Laser Pulse Compressed from a Chirped Pulse Induced by Laser-Foil Interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji, L. L.; Shen, B. F.; Li, D. X.; Wang, D.; Leng, Y. X.; Zhang, X. M.; Wen, M.; Wang, W. P.; Xu, J. C.; Yu, Y. H. [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 800-211, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    By particle-in-cell simulation and analysis, we propose a plasma approach to generate a relativistic chirped pulse based on a laser-foil interaction. When two counterpropagating circularly polarized pulses interact with an overdense foil, the driving pulse (with a larger laser field amplitude) will accelerate the whole foil to form a double-layer structure, and the scattered pulse (with a smaller laser field amplitude) is reflected by this flying layer. Because of the Doppler effect and the varying velocity of the layer, the reflected pulse is up-shifted for frequency and chirped; thus, it could be compressed to a nearly single-cycled relativistic laser pulse with a short wavelength. Simulations show that a nearly single-cycled subfemtosecond relativistic pulse can be generated with a wavelength of 0.2 {mu}m after dispersion compensation.

  20. A Short Wavelength GigaHertz Clocked Fiber-Optic Quantum Key Distribution System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karen J. Gordon; Veronica Fernandez; Paul D. Townsend; Gerald S. Buller

    2006-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A quantum key distribution system has been developed, using standard telecommunications optical fiber, which is capable of operating at clock rates of greater than 1 GHz. The quantum key distribution system implements a polarization encoded version of the B92 protocol. The system employs vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with emission wavelengths of 850 nm as weak coherent light sources, and silicon single photon avalanche diodes as the single photon detectors. A distributed feedback laser of emission wavelength 1.3 micro-metres, and a linear gain germanium avalanche photodiode was used to optically synchronize individual photons over the standard telecommunications fiber. The quantum key distribution system exhibited a quantum bit error rate of 1.4%, and an estimated net bit rate greater than 100,000 bits-per-second for a 4.2 km transmission range. For a 10 km fiber range a quantum bit error rate of 2.1%, and estimated net bit rate of greater than 7,000 bits-per-second was achieved.

  1. Analysis, modeling, and design of short-wavelength laser-plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mead, W.C.; Coggeshall, S.V.; Goldman, S.R.; Stover, E.K.; Goldstone, P.D.; Hauer, A.; Kindel, J.M.; Montierth, L.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present analysis and LASNEX modeling of two experiments designed to explore the mechanisms and scaling of laser-plasma coupling in high-Z plasmas. The first used layered Au-on-CH spheres irradiated symmetrically using the Omega (Laboratory for Laser Energetics) 0.35 ..mu..m laser to observe the x-ray emission and energy penetration in gold plasmas. Measurements of the subkilovolt and kilovolt emission from targets with varying Au-coating thicknesses were made using diagnostics of varying spectral, temporal, and spatial resolution. The results indicate that the x-ray conversion efficiency is a function of target size, with larger targets yielding x-ray emission in excellent agreement with calculations. The x-ray emission fall-off with decreasing gold thickness agrees well with predictions. The second experiment used the Novette (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) laser to irradiate solid gold disk targets, examining wavelength scaling to 0.26 ..mu..m. The measured subkilovolt x-ray emission is in good agreement with calculations using mildly inhibited thermal electron transport, indicating enhanced target coupling, compared with previous experiments using smaller spot sizes. The experiment also indicates very low suprathermal electron populations, on the order of 0.1% at about 30 keV effective temperature. Finally, we present preliminary plans and designs for experiments which will use the Aurora 5 kJ, 5 ns, 0.25 ..mu..m KrF laser now being constructed at Los Alamos.

  2. The Shoelace Antenna : a device to induce short-wavelength fluctuations in the edge plasma of the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golfinopoulos, Theodore

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The "Shoelace" antenna is a unique device built to induce short-wavelength fluctuations in the edge plasma of the Alcator C-Mod tokamak, at a wave number and in the frequency range associated with the Quasi-Coherent Mode ...

  3. Spin rotation and depolarization of high-energy particles in crystals at Hadron Collider (LHC) and Future Circular Collider (FCC) energies and the possibility to measure the anomalous magnetic moments of short-lived particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baryshevsky, V G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the phenomena of spin rotation and depolarization of high-energy particles in crystals in the range of high energies that will be available at Hadron Collider (LHC) and Future Circular Collider (FCC). It is shown that these phenomena can be used to measure the anomalous magnetic moments of short-lived particles in this range of energies. We also demonstrate that the phenomenon of particle spin depolarization in crystals provides a unique possibility of measuring the anomalous magnetic moment of negatively-charged particles (e.g., beauty baryons), for which the channeling effect is hampered due to far more rapid dechanneling as compared to that for positively-charged particles. Channeling of particles in either straight or bent crystals with polarized nuclei could be used for polarization and the analysis thereof of high-energy particles.

  4. Self-focusing, channel formation, and high-energy ion generation in interaction of an intense short laser pulse with a He jet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Umstadter, Donald

    A number of proposed applications of ultrahigh intensity short laser pulses require laser guiding-focusing related to plasma motion during the laser pulse. Although the self-focusing of a short laser pulse motion induced by a short relativistic laser pulse was studied in hydrodynamic simula

  5. Mode-Locked Fibre Lasers with High-Energy Pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turitsyn, Sergei K.

    , including generation of ultra-short and high-energy pulses. Since the invention of the laser researchers, technological, medical, and other applications. High energies and ultra-short pulse durations are both resonators. In addition, the path to high-energy ultra-short pulses is, typically, further complicated

  6. Thermonuclear yield of targets under the action of high-power short-wavelength (lambda< or =1. mu. ) lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basov, N.G.; Gus'kov, S.Y.; Danilova, G.V.; Demchenko, N.N.; Zmitrenko, N.V.; Karpov, V.Y.; Mishchenko, T.V.; Rozanov, V.B.; Samarskii, A.A.

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A unified optimization scheme is used in a numerical calculation of the dependences of the thermonuclear yield of two-layer shell targets on the absorbed laser energy in the range 0.3--10 mJ for lasers emitting radiation of wavelengths shorter than 1 ..mu...

  7. Ultra High Energy Neutrino Astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Berezinsky

    2005-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The short review of theoretical aspects of ultra high energy (UHE) neutrinos and superGZK neutrinos. The sources and diffuse fluxes of UHE neutrinos are discussed. Much attention is given to comparison of the cascade and cosmic ray upper bounds for diffuse neutrino fluxes. Cosmogenic neutrinos and neutrinos from the mirror mater are considered as superGZK neutrinos.

  8. Investigation of the effect of bilayer membrane structures and fluctuation amplitudes on SANS/SAXS profile for short membrane wavelength

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Victor; Hawa, Takumi [School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, The University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States)] [School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, The University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States)

    2013-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of bilayer membrane structures and fluctuation amplitudes on small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) profile is investigated based on harmonic motions of the surfactant bilayers with bending as well as thickness fluctuation motions. In this study we consider the case in which the wavelength of the bilayer membrane is shorter than the thickness of the membrane. We find that the thickness of the surfactant bilayer membrane, d{sub m}, affects both q{sub dip} and q{sub peak} of I(q,0) profile, and that the fluctuation amplitude, a, of the membrane changes the peak of I(q,0). A simple formula is derived to estimate the thickness of the bilayer based on the q{sub dip} of the profile obtained from the simulation. The resulting estimates of the thickness of the bilayer with harmonic motion showed accuracy within 1%. Moreover, the bilayer thicknesses estimated from the proposed formula show an excellent agreement with the SANS and SAXS experimental results available in the literatures. We also propose a curve fit model, which describes the relationship between the fluctuation amplitude and the normalized q{sub peak} ratio. The present results show the feasibility of the simple formula to estimate the fluctuation amplitude based on the SANS and SAXS profiles.

  9. Short wavelength turbulence generated by shear in the quiescent H-mode edge on DIII–D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rost, J. C.; Porkolab, M.; Dorris, J. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Burrell, K. H. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A region of turbulence with large radial wavenumber (k{sub r}?{sub s}>1) is found in the high-shear portion of the plasma edge in Quiescent H-mode (QH-mode) on DIII–D using the Phase Contrast Imaging (PCI) diagnostic. At its peak outside the minimum of the E{sub r} well, the turbulence exhibits large amplitude n{sup ~}/n?40%, with large radial wavenumber |k{sup ¯}{sub r}/k{sup ¯}{sub ?}|?11 and short radial correlation length L{sub r}/?{sub i}?0.2. The turbulence inside the E{sub r} well minimum is characterized by the opposite sign in radial wavenumber from that of turbulence outside the minimum, consistent with the expected effects of velocity shear. The PCI diagnostic provides a line-integrated measurement of density fluctuations, so data are taken during a scan of plasma position at constant parameters to allow the PCI to sample a range in k{sub r}/k{sub ?}. Analysis of the Doppler shift and plasma geometry allows the turbulence to be localized to a narrow region 3?mm inside the last closed flux surface, outside the minimum of the E{sub r} well. The turbulence amplitude and radial wavenumber and correlation length are determined by fitting the PCI results with a simple non-isotropic turbulence model with two regions of turbulence. These PCI observations, made in QH-mode, are qualitatively similar to those made in standard edge localized modes (ELM)-free H-mode and between ELMs, suggesting a similar role for large k{sub r} turbulence there.

  10. High Energy Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientific Computing Research Basic Energy Sciences Biological and Environmental Research Fusion Energy Sciences High Energy Physics Nuclear Physics Advanced Scientific Computing...

  11. High energy astrophysical processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todor Stanev

    2005-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We briefly review the high energy astrophysical processes that are related to the production of high energy $\\gamma$-ray and neutrino signals and are likely to be important for the energy loss of high and ultrahigh energy cosmic rays. We also give examples for neutrino fluxes generated by different astrophysical objects and describe the cosmological link provided by cosmogenic neutrinos.

  12. High-energy detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E. (South Setauket, NY); Camarda, Giuseppe (Farmingville, NY); Cui, Yonggang (Upton, NY); James, Ralph B. (Ridge, NY)

    2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The preferred embodiments are directed to a high-energy detector that is electrically shielded using an anode, a cathode, and a conducting shield to substantially reduce or eliminate electrically unshielded area. The anode and the cathode are disposed at opposite ends of the detector and the conducting shield substantially surrounds at least a portion of the longitudinal surface of the detector. The conducting shield extends longitudinally to the anode end of the detector and substantially surrounds at least a portion of the detector. Signals read from one or more of the anode, cathode, and conducting shield can be used to determine the number of electrons that are liberated as a result of high-energy particles impinge on the detector. A correction technique can be implemented to correct for liberated electron that become trapped to improve the energy resolution of the high-energy detectors disclosed herein.

  13. High Energy Neutrino Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. D. Hoffman

    2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a review of the history, motivation and current status of high energy neutrino telescopes. Many years after these detectors were first conceived, the operation of kilometer-cubed scale detectors is finally on the horizon at both the South Pole and in the Mediterranean Sea. These new detectors will perhaps provide us the first view of high energy astrophysical objects with a new messenger particle and provide us with our first real glimpse of the distant universe at energies above those accessible by gamma-ray instruments. Some of the topics that can be addressed by these new instruments include the origin of cosmic rays, the nature of dark matter, and the mechanisms at work in high energy astrophysical objects such as gamma-ray bursts, active galactic nuclei, pulsar wind nebula and supernova remnants.

  14. High Energy Photoproduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. M. Butterworth; M. Wing

    2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The experimental and phenomenological status of high energy photoproduction is reviewed. Topics covered include the structure of the photon, production of jets, heavy flavours and prompt photons, rapidity gaps, energy flow and underlying events. The results are placed in the context of the current understanding of QCD, with particular application to present and future hadron and lepton colliders.

  15. Ultra High Energy Behaviour

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burra G. Sidharth

    2011-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We reexamine the behaviour of particles at Ultra Highe energies in the context of the fact that the LHC has already touched an energy of $7 TeV$ and is likely to attain $14 TeV$ by 2013/2014.Consequences like a possible new shortlived interaction within the Compton scale are discussed.

  16. Particle Diffraction at High Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimir A. Petrov

    1998-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief ideological and historical review of problems of high energy diffractive scattering is given.

  17. Ultra High Energy Fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burra G. Sidharth

    2015-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The LHC in Geneva is already operating at a total energy of $7 TeV$ and hopefully after a pause in 2012, it will attain its full capacity of $14 TeV$ in 2013. These are the highest energies achieved todate in any accelerator. It is against this backdrop that it is worthwhile to revisit very high energy collisions of Fermions (Cf. also \\cite{bgspp}). We will in fact examine their behaviour at such energies.

  18. Theoretical High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christ, Norman H.; Weinberg, Erick J.

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    we provide reports from each of the six faculty supported by the Department of Energy High Energy Physics Theory grant at Columbia University. Each is followed by a bibliography of the references cited. A complete list of all of the publications in the 12/1/2010-04/30/2014 period resulting from research supported by this grant is provided in the following section. The final section lists the Ph.D. dissertations based on research supported by the grant that were submitted during this period.

  19. Key words: GPS, attitude, inertial GPS was used with ultra-short baselines (2-3 carrier wavelengths) in a triple antenna configuration to obtain aircraft atti-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Abstract Key words: GPS, attitude, inertial GPS was used with ultra-short baselines (2-3 carrier and yaw respectively. The accuracy and robustness of the system was enhanced by combining the ultra short is currently obtained by spinning rotor or ring laser gyros. In General Aviation (GA) applications a vertical

  20. FSU High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prosper, Harrison B. [Florida State University; Adams, Todd [Florida State University; Askew, Andrew [Florida State University; Berg, Bernd [Florida State University; Blessing, Susan K. [Florida State University; Okui, Takemichi [Florida State University; Owens, Joseph F. [Florida State University; Reina, Laura [Florida State University; Wahl, Horst D. [Florida State University

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Energy Physics group at Florida State University (FSU), which was established in 1958, is engaged in the study of the fundamental constituents of matter and the laws by which they interact. The group comprises theoretical and experimental physicists, who sometimes collaborate on projects of mutual interest. The report highlights the main recent achievements of the group. Significant, recent, achievements of the group’s theoretical physicists include progress in making precise predictions in the theory of the Higgs boson and its associated processes, and in the theoretical understanding of mathematical quantities called parton distribution functions that are related to the structure of composite particles such as the proton. These functions are needed to compare data from particle collisions, such as the proton-proton collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), with theoretical predictions. The report also describes the progress in providing analogous functions for heavy nuclei, which find application in neutrino physics. The report highlights progress in understanding quantum field theory on a lattice of points in space and time (an area of study called lattice field theory), the progress in constructing several theories of potential new physics that can be tested at the LHC, and interesting new ideas in the theory of the inflationary expansion of the very early universe. The focus of the experimental physicists is the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at CERN. The report, however, also includes results from the D0 experiment at Fermilab to which the group made numerous contributions over a period of many years. The experimental group is particularly interested in looking for new physics at the LHC that may provide the necessary insight to extend the standard model (SM) of particle physics. Indeed, the search for new physics is the primary task of contemporary particle physics, one motivated by the need to explain certain facts, such as the non-zero neutrino masses or the overwhelming astrophysical evidence for an invisible form of matter, called dark matter, that has had a marked effect on the evolution of structure in the universe. The report highlights the main, recent, experimental achievements of the experimental group, which include the investigation of properties of the W and Z bosons; the search for new heavy stable charged particles and the search for a proposed property of nature called supersymmetry in proton-proton collisions that yield high energy photons. In addition, we report a few results from a more general search for supersymmetry at the LHC, initiated by the group. The report also highlights the group's significant contributions, both theoretical and experimental, to the 2012 discovery of the Higgs boson and the measurement of its properties.

  1. Gamma Ray Bursts as Possible High Energy Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles D. Dermer

    2005-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray bursts are known to be sources of high-energy gamma rays, and are likely to be sources of high-energy cosmic rays and neutrinos. Following a short review of observations of GRBs at multi-MeV energies and above, the physics of leptonic and hadronic models of GRBs is summarized. Evidence for two components in BATSE and EGRET/TASC data suggest that GRBs are sources of high-energy cosmic rays. GLAST observations will reveal the high-energy gamma-ray power and energy releases from GRBs, and will provide detailed knowledge of anomalous high-energy emission components, but confirmation of cosmic ray acceleration must await 100 TeV -- PeV neutrino detection from GRBs.

  2. Study of Very High Energy Gamma-ray Emission from the Pulsar Wind Nebula in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enomoto, Ryoji

    telescopes have achieved remarkably high sensitivity in the very high energy gamma-ray band. This is well-wavelength spectra were per- formed, based on both leptonic and hadronic models. In the leptonic model, gamma raysStudy of Very High Energy Gamma-ray Emission from the Pulsar Wind Nebula in MSH 15-52 with CANGAROO

  3. PRACTICAL NEUTRON DOSIMETRY AT HIGH ENERGIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCaslin, J.B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of High-Energy Accelerators, New York, April, 1957. USAECShielding of High-Energy Accelerators, New York, April 1957.Shielding of High-Energy Accelerators, New York, April 1957.

  4. High Energy Neutrino Astronomy: Towards Kilometer-Scale Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Halzen

    2001-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Of all high-energy particles, only neutrinos can directly convey astronomical information from the edge of the universe---and from deep inside the most cataclysmic high-energy processes. Copiously produced in high-energy collisions, travelling at the velocity of light, and not deflected by magnetic fields, neutrinos meet the basic requirements for astronomy. Their unique advantage arises from a fundamental property: they are affected only by the weakest of nature's forces (but for gravity) and are therefore essentially unabsorbed as they travel cosmological distances between their origin and us. Many of the outstanding mysteries of astrophysics may be hidden from our sight at all wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum because of absorption by matter and radiation between us and the source. For example, the hot dense regions that form the central engines of stars and galaxies are opaque to photons. In other cases, such as supernova remnants, gamma ray bursters, and active galaxies, all of which may involve compact objects or black holes at their cores, the precise origin of the high-energy photons emerging from their surface regions is uncertain. Therefore, data obtained through a variety of observational windows---and especially through direct observations with neutrinos---may be of cardinal importance. In this talk, the scientific goals of high energy neutrino astronomy and the technical aspects of water and ice Cherenkov detectors are examined, and future experimental possibilities, including a kilometer-square deep ice neutrino telescope, are explored.

  5. High energy neutrino cross sections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. H. Reno

    2004-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The theoretical status of the neutrino-nucleon cross section is reviewed for incident neutrino energies up to E_nu=10^12 GeV, including different approaches to high energy extrapolations. Nonstandard model physics may play a role at ultrahigh energies. The cases of mini-black hole production and electroweak instanton contributions are discussed as examples in the context of ultrahigh energy neutrino scattering.

  6. High-energy Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas K. Gaisser; Todor Stanev

    2005-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    After a brief review of galactic cosmic rays in the GeV to TeV energy range, we describe some current problems of interest for particles of very high energy. Particularly interesting are two features of the spectrum, the `knee' above $10^{15}$ eV and the `ankle' above $10^{18}$ eV. An important question is whether the highest energy particles are of extra-galactic origin and, if so, at what energy the transition occurs. A theme common to all energy ranges is use of nuclear abundances as a tool for understanding the origin of the cosmic radiation.

  7. Ultra-low repetition rate mode-locked fiber laser with high-energy pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kobtsev, Sergei M.

    to ultra-short record high-energy pulses out of laser oscillators," Phys. Lett. A 372, 3124­3128 (2008). 5Ultra-low repetition rate mode-locked fiber laser with high-energy pulses Sergey Kobtsev* , Sergey Kukarin, Yurii Fedotov Laser Systems Laboratory, Novosibirsk State University,Pirigova 2, Novosibirsk

  8. Hadron dynamics in high-energy pion-nucleus scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, M.B.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    It is argued that pion-nucleus scattering at high energy (above 300 MeV) is likely to be easier to interpret than it has been at lower energies where the {Delta}{sub 33} resonance dominates. We establish this by examining the relative importance of various dynamic ingredients of scattering theory for high-energy pions and comparing different versions of the theory: a ``model-exact`` microscopic optical model and an eikonal approximation. For nuclei as heavy as Ca, the eikonal theory is an excellent approximation to the full theory for the angular distribution out to the position of the second minimum in the cross section. The prospects for using high-energy pions to examine modifications of nucleons and baryon resonances in nuclei, nuclear structure, exchange currents, short-range correlations, and to characterize pion propagation are discussed.

  9. Hadron dynamics in high-energy pion-nucleus scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, M.B.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is argued that pion-nucleus scattering at high energy (above 300 MeV) is likely to be easier to interpret than it has been at lower energies where the [Delta][sub 33] resonance dominates. We establish this by examining the relative importance of various dynamic ingredients of scattering theory for high-energy pions and comparing different versions of the theory: a model-exact'' microscopic optical model and an eikonal approximation. For nuclei as heavy as Ca, the eikonal theory is an excellent approximation to the full theory for the angular distribution out to the position of the second minimum in the cross section. The prospects for using high-energy pions to examine modifications of nucleons and baryon resonances in nuclei, nuclear structure, exchange currents, short-range correlations, and to characterize pion propagation are discussed.

  10. Imaging the High Energy Cosmic Ray Sky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haviland, David

    Imaging the High Energy Cosmic Ray Sky PETTER HOFVERBERG Licentiate Thesis Stockholm, Sweden 2006 #12;#12;Licentiate Thesis Imaging the High Energy Cosmic Ray Sky Petter Hofverberg Particle

  11. Oxides having high energy densities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ceder, Gerbrand; Kang, Kisuk

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Certain disclosed embodiments generally relate to oxide materials having relatively high energy and/or power densities. Various aspects of the embodiments are directed to oxide materials having a structure B.sub.i(M.sub.jY.sub.k)O.sub.2, for example, a structure Li.sub.j(Ni.sub.jY.sub.k)O.sub.2 such as Li(Ni.sub.0.5Mn.sub.0.5)O.sub.2. In this structure, Y represents one or more atoms, each independently selected from the group consisting of alkaline earth metals, transition metals, Group 14 elements, Group 15, or Group 16 elements. In some embodiments, such an oxide material may have an O3 crystal structure, and/or a layered structure such that the oxide comprises a plurality of first, repeating atomic planes comprising Li, and a plurality of second, repeating atomic planes comprising Ni and/or Y.

  12. Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todor Stanev

    2004-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss theoretical issues and experimental data that brought the ultra high energy cosmic rays in the list of Nature's greatest puzzles. After many years of research we still do not know how astrophysical acceleration processes can reach energies exceeding 10$^{11}$ GeV. The main alternative {\\em top-down} mechanism postulates the existence of super massive $X$-particles that create a particle spectrum extending down to the observed energy through their decay channels. The propagation of nuclei and photons from their sources to us adds to the puzzle as all particles of these energies interact with the ambient photons, mostly of the microwave background. We also describe briefly the main observational results and give some information on the new experiments that are being built and designed now.

  13. High Energy Gas Fracturing Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schulte, R.

    2001-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) has recently completed two tests of a high-energy gas fracturing system being developed by Western Technologies of Crossville, Tennessee. The tests involved the use of two active wells located at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3), thirty-five miles north of Casper, Wyoming (See Figure 1). During the testing process the delivery and operational system was enhanced by RMOTC, Western Technologies, and commercial wireline subcontractors. RMOTC has assisted an industrial client in developing their technology for high energy gas fracturing to a commercial level. The modifications and improvements implemented during the technology testing process are instrumental in all field testing efforts at RMOTC. The importance of well selection can also be critical in demonstrating the success of the technology. To date, significant increases in well productivity have been clearly proven in well 63-TPX-10. Gross fluid production was initially raised by a factor of three. Final production rates increased by a factor of six with the use of a larger submersible pump. Well productivity (bbls of fluid per foot of drawdown) increased by a factor of 15 to 20. The above results assume that no mechanical damage has occurred to the casing or cast iron bridge plug which could allow well production from the Tensleep ''B'' sand. In the case of well 61-A-3, a six-fold increase in total fluid production was seen. Unfortunately, the increase is clouded by the water injection into the well that was necessary to have a positive fluid head on the propellant tool. No significant increase in oil production was seen. The tools which were retrieved from both 63-TPX-10 and 61-A-3 indicated a large amount of energy, similar to high gram perforating, had been expended downhole upon the formation face.

  14. High Energy Astrophysics: Overview 1/47 High Energy Astrophysics in Context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bicknell, Geoff

    High Energy Astrophysics: Overview 1/47 High Energy Astrophysics in Context 1 Some references The following set of volumes is an outstanding summary of the field of High Energy Astrophysics and its relation to the rest of Astrophysics High Energy Astrophysics, Vols. 1,2 and 3. M.S. Longair, Cam- bridge University

  15. High energy heavy ion jets emerging from laser plasma generated by long pulse laser beams from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in inter- action processes of short and ultra-short laser pulses with matter. Ion generation from laserHigh energy heavy ion jets emerging from laser plasma generated by long pulse laser beams from the NHELIX laser system at GSI G. SCHAUMANN,1 M.S. SCHOLLMEIER,1 G. RODRIGUEZ-PRIETO,2 A. BLAZEVIC,2 E

  16. Participation in high energy physics, Task D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lederman, L.M.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following topics: Communication and Advancement of High Energy Physics; B-Quarks; Secondary Vertex Trigger; and Science Education.

  17. Development of High Energy Cathode Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    other high- energy cathodes. Improved the performance of Li-rich, Mn-rich layered composite cathode suitable for PHEV and EV applications. Developed electrolyte additives...

  18. Developing high energy mode-locked fiber laser at 2 micron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, C; Shang, W; Tang, Y; Xu, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While dissipative soliton operation has successfully improved the pulse energy of 1 {\\mu}m and 1.5 {\\mu}m fiber lasers to tens of nanojoules, it is still hard to scale the pulse energy of dissipative solitons at 2 {\\mu}m due to the anomalous dispersion of the gain fiber. Based on theoretical simulation, we analyze intracavity dynamics of dissipative solitons (DSs) and propose that gain fiber should be condensed to short length in order to scale the pulse energy of 2 {\\mu}m DSs. The simulation predicts pulse energy of over 10 nJ for 2 {\\mu}m dissipative solitons, comparable to that achieved in the 1 {\\mu}m and 1.5 {\\mu}m regimes. Experimental operation generates stable 2 {\\mu}m DSs from a linear cavity with pulse energy of 4.9 nJ and dechirped pulse duration of 579 fs. These results advance our understanding of mode-locked fiber laser at different wavelengths and lay an important step in achieving high energy ultrafast laser pulses from anomalous dispersion gain media at 2 {\\mu}m.

  19. Langston University - High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    snow, joel

    2012-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report is presented by Langston University (LU) for the project entitled "Langston University High Energy Physics" (LUHEP) under the direction of principal investigator (PI) and project director Professor Joel Snow. The project encompassed high energy physics research performed at hadron colliders. The PI is a collaborator on the DZero experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, IL, USA and the ATLAS experiment at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland and was during the entire project period from April 1, 1999 until May 14, 2012. Both experiments seek to understand the fundamental constituents of the physical universe and the forces that govern their interactions. In 1999 as member of the Online Systems group for Run 2 the PI developed a cross-platform Python-based, Graphical User Interface (GUI) application for monitoring and control of EPICS based devices for control room use. This served as a model for other developers to enhance and build on for further monitoring and control tasks written in Python. Subsequently the PI created and developed a cross-platform C++ GUI utilizing a networked client-server paradigm and based on ROOT, the object oriented analysis framework from CERN. The GUI served as a user interface to the Examine tasks running in the D\\O\\ control room which monitored the status and integrity of data taking for Run 2. The PI developed the histogram server/control interface to the GUI client for the EXAMINE processes. The histogram server was built from the ROOT framework and was integrated into the D\\O\\ framework used for online monitoring programs and offline analysis. The PI developed the first implementation of displaying histograms dynamically generated by ROOT in a Web Browser. The PI's work resulted in several talks and papers at international conferences and workshops. The PI established computing software infrastructure at LU and U. Oklahoma (OU) to do analysis of DZero production data and produce simulation data for the experiment. Eventually this included the FNAL SAM data grid system, the SAMGrid (SG) infrastructure, and the Open Science Grid software stacks for computing and storage elements. At the end of 2003 the PI took on the role of global Monte Carlo production coordinator for the DZero experiment. In January of 2004 the PI started working with the SAMGrid development team to help debug, deploy, and integrate SAMGrid with DZero Monte Carlo production. The PI installed and configured SG execution and client sites at LUHEP and OUHEP, and a SG scheduler site at LUHEP. The PI developed a python based GUI (DAJ) that acts as a front end for job submission to SAMGrid. The GUI interfaces to the DZero Mone Carlo (MC) request system that uses SAM to manage MC requests by the physics analysis groups. DAJ significantly simplified SG job submission and was deployed in DZero in an effort to increase the user base of SG. The following year was the advent of SAMGrid job submission to the Open Science Grid (OSG) and LHC Computing Grid (LCG) through a forwarding mechanism. The PI oversaw the integration of these grids into the existing production infrastructure. The PI developed an automatic MC (Automc) request processing system capable of operating without user intervention (other than getting grid credentials), and able to submit to any number of sites on various grids. The system manages production at all but 2 sites. The system was deployed at Fermilab and remains operating there today. The PI's work in distributed computing resulted in several talks at international conferences. UTA, OU, and LU were chosen as the collaborating institutions that form the Southwest Tier 2 Center (SWT2) for ATLAS. During the project period the PI contributed to the online and offline software infrastructure through his work with the Run 2 online group, and played a major role in Monte Carlo production for DZero. During the part of the project period in which the PI served as MC production coordinator MC production increased very significantly. In the first year of the PI's tenure as production coor

  20. Physics of intense, high energy radiation effects.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Hartman, E. Frederick; Magyar, Rudolph J.; Crozier, Paul Stewart

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the work done in our three-year LDRD project titled 'Physics of Intense, High Energy Radiation Effects.' This LDRD is focused on electrical effects of ionizing radiation at high dose-rates. One major thrust throughout the project has been the radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) produced by the ionizing radiation. Another important consideration has been the electrical effect of dose-enhanced radiation. This transient effect can produce an electromagnetic pulse (EMP). The unifying theme of the project has been the dielectric function. This quantity contains much of the physics covered in this project. For example, the work on transient electrical effects in radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) has been a key focus for the work on the EMP effects. This physics in contained in the dielectric function, which can also be expressed as a conductivity. The transient defects created during a radiation event are also contained, in principle. The energy loss lead the hot electrons and holes is given by the stopping power of ionizing radiation. This information is given by the inverse dielectric function. Finally, the short time atomistic phenomena caused by ionizing radiation can also be considered to be contained within the dielectric function. During the LDRD, meetings about the work were held every week. These discussions involved theorists, experimentalists and engineers. These discussions branched out into the work done in other projects. For example, the work on EMP effects had influence on another project focused on such phenomena in gases. Furthermore, the physics of radiation detectors and radiation dosimeters was often discussed, and these discussions had impact on related projects. Some LDRD-related documents are now stored on a sharepoint site (https://sharepoint.sandia.gov/sites/LDRD-REMS/default.aspx). In the remainder of this document the work is described in catergories but there is much overlap between the atomistic calculations, the continuum calculations and the experiments.

  1. High Energy Evolution with Pomeron Loops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Lublinsky

    2006-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The high energy/density QCD has been widely used for DIS phenomenology with a projectile particle considered as perturbative and dilute. We review some recent attempts to derive a high energy evolution kernel which treats targets and projectiles in a symmetric manner. From theoretical point of view the problem is tightly related to inclusion of Pomeron loops in the evolution. The ultimate goal is to consider high energy scatterings with both projectile and target being dense, the situation faced at RHIC and the LHC.

  2. High-Energy Astrophysics and Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Ellis

    2002-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Interfaces between high-energy physics, astrophysics and cosmology are reviewed, with particular emphasis on the important roles played by high-energy cosmic-ray physics. These include the understanding of atmospheric neutrinos, the search for massive cold dark matter particles and possible tests of models of quantum gravity. In return, experiments at the LHC may be useful for refining models of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, and thereby contributing indirectly to understanding their origin. Only future experiments will be able to tell whether these are due to some bottom-up astrophysical mechanism or some top-down cosmological mechanism.

  3. High Energy Laser for Space Debris Removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barty, C; Caird, J; Erlandson, A; Beach, R; Rubenchik, A

    2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) and Photon Science Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has substantial relevant experience in the construction of high energy lasers, and more recently in the development of advanced high average power solid state lasers. We are currently developing new concepts for advanced solid state laser drivers for the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) application, and other high average power laser applications that could become central technologies for use in space debris removal. The debris population most readily addressed by our laser technology is that of 0.1-10 cm sized debris in low earth orbit (LEO). In this application, a ground based laser system would engage an orbiting target and slow it down by ablating material from its surface which leads to reentry into the atmosphere, as proposed by NASA's ORION Project. The ORION concept of operations (CONOPS) is also described in general terms by Phipps. Key aspects of this approach include the need for high irradiance on target, 10{sup 8} to 10{sup 9} W/cm{sup 2}, which favors short (i.e., picoseconds to nanoseconds) laser pulse durations and high energy per pulse ({approx} > 10 kJ). Due to the target's orbital velocity, the potential duration of engagement is only of order 100 seconds, so a high pulse repetition rate is also essential. The laser technology needed for this application did not exist when ORION was first proposed, but today, a unique combination of emerging technologies could create a path to enable deployment in the near future. Our concepts for the laser system architecture are an extension of what was developed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), combined with high repetition rate laser technology developed for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE), and heat capacity laser technology developed for military applications. The 'front-end' seed pulse generator would be fiber-optics based, and would generate a temporally, and spectrally tailored pulse designed for high transmission through the atmosphere, as well as efficient ablative coupling to the target. The main amplifier would use either diode-pumped or flashlamp-pumped solid state gain media, depending on budget constraints of the project. A continuously operating system would use the gas-cooled amplifier technology developed for Mercury, while a burst-mode option would use the heat capacity laser technology. The ground-based system that we propose is capable of rapid engagement of targets whose orbits cross over the site, with potential for kill on a single pass. Very little target mass is ablated per pulse so the potential to create additional hazardous orbiting debris is minimal. Our cost estimates range from $2500 to $5000 per J depending on choices for laser gain medium, amplifier pump source, and thermal management method. A flashlamp-pumped, Nd:glass heat-capacity laser operating in the burst mode would have costs at the lower end of this spectrum and would suffice to demonstrate the efficacy of this approach as a prototype system. A diode-pumped, gas-cooled laser would have higher costs but could be operated continuously, and might be desirable for more demanding mission needs. Maneuverability can be incorporated in the system design if the additional cost is deemed acceptable. The laser system would need to be coupled with a target pointing and tracking telescope with guide-star-like wavefront correction capability.

  4. Physics at high energy photon photon colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I review the physic prospects for high energy photon photon colliders, emphasizing results presented at the LBL Gamma Gamma Collider Workshop. Advantages and difficulties are reported for studies of QCD, the electroweak gauge sector, supersymmetry, and electroweak symmetry breaking.

  5. Terrestrial Effects of High Energy Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atri, Dimitra

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    On geological timescales, the Earth is likely to be exposed to higher than the usual flux of high energy cosmic rays (HECRs) from astrophysical sources such as nearby supernovae, gamma ray bursts or by galactic shocks. ...

  6. Research in High Energy Physics. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conway, John S.

    2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report details the work done from January 2010 until April 2013 in the area of experimental and theoretical high energy particle physics and cosmology at the University of California, Davis.

  7. Nuclear diffractive structure functions at high energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Marquet; H. Kowalski; T. Lappi; R. Venugopalan

    2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A future high-energy electron-ion collider would explore the non-linear weakly-coupled regime of QCD, and test the Color Glass Condensate (CGC) approach to high-energy scattering. Hard diffraction in deep inelastic scattering off nuclei will provide many fundamental measurements. In this work, the nuclear diffractive structure function F_{2,A}^D is predicted in the CGC framework, and the features of nuclear enhancement and suppression are discussed.

  8. High Energy Scattering Amplitudes of Superstring Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuan-Tsung Chan; Jen-Chi Lee; Yi Yang

    2005-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We use three different methods to calculate the proportionality constants among high-energy scattering amplitudes of different string states with polarizations on the scattering plane. These are the decoupling of high-energy zero-norm states (HZNS), the Virasoro constraints and the saddle-point calculation. These calculations are performed at arbitrary but fixed mass level for the NS sector of 10D open superstring. All three methods give the consistent results, which generalize the previous works on the high-energy 26D open bosonic string theory. In addition, we discover new leading order high-energy scattering amplitudes, which are still proportional to the previous ones, with polarizations orthogonal to the scattering plane. These scattering amplitudes are of subleading order in energy for the case of 26D open bosonic string theory. The existence of these new high-energy scattering amplitudes is due to the worldsheet fermion exchange in the correlation functions and is, presumably, related to the high-energy massive spacetime fermionic scattering amplitudes in the R-sector of the theory.

  9. High Energy Processes in Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Bednarek

    2006-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Young pulsars produce relativistic winds which interact with matter ejected during the supernova explosion and the surrounding interstellar gas. Particles are accelerated to very high energies somewhere in the pulsar winds or at the shocks produced in collisions of the winds with the surrounding medium. As a result of interactions of relativistic leptons with the magnetic field and low energy radiation (of synchrotron origin, thermal, or microwave background), the non-thermal radiation is produced with the lowest possible energies up to $\\sim$100 TeV. The high energy (TeV) gamma-ray emission has been originally observed from the Crab Nebula and recently from several other objects. Recent observations by the HESS Cherenkov telescopes allow to study for the first time morphology of the sources of high energy emission, showing unexpected spectral features. They might be also interpreted as due to acceleration of hadrons. However, theory of particle acceleration in the PWNe and models for production of radiation are still at their early stage of development since it becomes clear that realistic modeling of these objects should include their time evolution and three-dimensional geometry. In this paper we concentrate on the attempts to create a model for the high energy processes inside the PWNe which includes existence not only relativistic leptons but also hadrons inside the nebula. Such model should also take into account evolution of the nebula in time. Possible high energy expectations based on such a model are discussed in the context of new observations.

  10. Cosmic absorption of ultra high energy particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruffini, R; Xue, S -S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes the limits on propagation of ultra high energy particles in the Universe, set up by their interactions with cosmic background of photons and neutrinos. By taking into account cosmic evolution of these backgrounds and considering appropriate interactions we derive the mean free path for ultra high energy photons, protons and neutrinos. For photons the relevant processes are the Breit-Wheeler process as well as the double pair production process. For protons the relevant reactions are the photopion production and the Bethe-Heitler process. We discuss the interplay between the energy loss length and mean free path for the Bethe-Heitler process. Neutrino opacity is determined by its scattering off the cosmic background neutrino. We compute for the first time the high energy neutrino horizon as a function of its energy.

  11. Diffuse emission of high-energy neutrinos from gamma-ray burst fireballs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irene Tamborra; Shin'ichiro Ando

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been suggested as possible sources of the high-energy neutrino flux recently detected by the IceCube telescope. We revisit the fireball emission model and elaborate an analytical prescription to estimate the high-energy neutrino prompt emission from pion and kaon decays, assuming that the leading mechanism for the neutrino production is lepto-hadronic. To this purpose, we include hadronic, radiative and adiabatic cooling effects and discuss their relevance for long- (including high- and low-luminosity) and short-duration GRBs. The expected diffuse neutrino background is derived, by requiring that the GRB high-energy neutrino counterparts follow up-to-date gamma-ray luminosity functions and redshift evolutions of the long and short GRBs. Although dedicated stacking searches have been unsuccessful up to now, we find that the GRBs could contribute up to a few percents to the observed IceCube high-energy neutrino flux for sub-PeV energies, assuming that the latter has a diffuse origin. The high-luminosity component gives the dominant contribution to the diffuse neutrino emission, while the fluxes from both the low-luminosity and the short-duration GRBs are significantly smaller. Our findings confirm the most-recent IceCube results on the GRB searches and suggest that larger exposure is mandatory to detect high-energy neutrinos from GRBs in the near future.

  12. Calibration in High-Energy Astrophysics Statistical Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dyk, David

    Calibration in High-Energy Astrophysics Statistical Methods Statistical Computation Empirical Illustrations Accounting for Calibration Uncertainty: High Energy Astrophysics and the PCG Sampler David A. van Dyk Accounting for Calibration Uncertainty #12;Calibration in High-Energy Astrophysics Statistical

  13. Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray Accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angela V. Olinto

    1999-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The surprising lack of a high energy cutoff in the cosmic ray spectrum at the highest energies together with an apparently isotropic distribution of arrival directions have strongly challenged most models proposed for the acceleration of ultra high energy cosmic rays. Young neutron star winds may be able to explain the mystery. We discuss this recent proposal after summarizing the observational challenge and plausible acceleration sites. Young neutrons star winds differ from alternative models in the predictions for composition, spectrum, and angular distribution which will be tested in future experiments.

  14. Precision Crystal Calorimeters in High Energy Physics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ren-Yuan Zhu

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Precision crystal calorimeters traditionally play an important role in high energy physics experiments. In the last two decades, it faces a challenge to maintain its precision in a hostile radiation environment. This paper reviews the performance of crystal calorimeters constructed for high energy physics experiments and the progress achieved in understanding crystal?s radiation damage as well as in developing high quality scintillating crystals for particle physics. Potential applications of new generation scintillating crystals of high density and high light yield, such as LSO and LYSO, in particle physics experiments is also discussed.

  15. High Energy Physics Research at Louisiana Tech

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sawyer, Lee; Greenwood, Zeno; Wobisch, Marcus

    2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project was to create, maintain, and strengthen a world-class, nationally and internationally recognized experimental high energy physics group at Louisiana Tech University, focusing on research at the energy frontier of collider-based particle physics, first on the D? experiment and then with the ATLAS experiment, and providing leadership within the US high energy physics community in the areas of jet physics, top quark and charged Higgs decays involving tau leptons, as well as developing leadership in high performance computing.

  16. Energy Storage Testing and Analysis High Power and High Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Testing and Analysis High Power and High Energy Development Energy Storage Testing and Analysis High Power and High Energy Development 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle...

  17. Highly Energy Efficient Directed Green Liquor Utilization (D...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Highly Energy Efficient Directed Green Liquor Utilization (D-GLU) Pulping Highly Energy Efficient Directed Green Liquor Utilization (D-GLU) Pulping This factsheet describes a...

  18. Developing new high energy gradient concentration cathode material...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    new high energy gradient concentration cathode material Developing new high energy gradient concentration cathode material 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies...

  19. Modular Low Cost High Energy Exhaust Heat Thermoelectric Generator...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low Cost High Energy Exhaust Heat Thermoelectric Generator with Closed-Loop Exhaust By-Pass System Modular Low Cost High Energy Exhaust Heat Thermoelectric Generator with...

  20. TEMPO-based Catholyte for High Energy Density Nonaqueous Redox...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TEMPO-based Catholyte for High Energy Density Nonaqueous Redox Flow Batteries. TEMPO-based Catholyte for High Energy Density Nonaqueous Redox Flow Batteries. Abstract: We will...

  1. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High Energy High...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    High Energy High Power Battery Exceeding PHEV-40 Requirements Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High Energy High Power Battery Exceeding PHEV-40 Requirements...

  2. High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program...

  3. Interface Modifications by Anion Acceptors for High Energy Lithium...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modifications by Anion Acceptors for High Energy Lithium Ion Batteries. Interface Modifications by Anion Acceptors for High Energy Lithium Ion Batteries. Abstract: Li-rich, Mn-rich...

  4. Designing Silicon Nanostructures for High Energy Lithium Ion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Designing Silicon Nanostructures for High Energy Lithium Ion Battery Anodes Designing Silicon Nanostructures for High Energy Lithium Ion Battery Anodes 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...

  5. Mitigating Breakdown in High Energy Density Perovskite Polymer...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigating Breakdown in High Energy Density Perovskite Polymer Nanocomposite Capacitors Mitigating Breakdown in High Energy Density Perovskite Polymer Nanocomposite Capacitors 2012...

  6. Geometry of attosecond laser pulses and photon-photon scattering at high energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tuchin, Kirill

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the total cross section for scattering of a photon on an ultra-short laser pulse at high energies. We take into account all multi-photon interactions. We argue that the nonlinear effects due to these interactions become important at very high intensities of the laser pulse. We demonstrate however, that these intensities are significantly lower than the Schwinger critical value.

  7. Equilibrium Statistical-Thermal Models in High-Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdel Nasser Tawfik

    2014-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We review some recent highlights from the applications of statistical-thermal models to different experimental measurements and lattice QCD thermodynamics, that have been made during the last decade. We start with a short review of the historical milestones on the path of constructing statistical-thermal models for heavy-ion physics. We discovered that Heinz Koppe formulated in 1948 an almost complete recipe for the statistical-thermal models. In 1950, Enrico Fermi generalized this statistical approach, in which he started with a general cross-section formula and inserted into it simplifying assumptions about the matrix element of the interaction process that likely reflects many features of the high-energy reactions dominated by density in the phase space of final states. In 1964, Hagedorn systematically analysed the high-energy phenomena using all tools of statistical physics and introduced the concept of limiting temperature based on the statistical bootstrap model. It turns to be quite often that many-particle systems can be studied with the help of statistical-thermal methods. The analysis of yield multiplicities in high-energy collisions gives an overwhelming evidence for the chemical equilibrium in the final state. The strange particles might be an exception, as they are suppressed at lower beam energies. However, their relative yields fulfill statistical equilibrium, as well. We review the equilibrium statistical-thermal models for particle production, fluctuations and collective flow in heavy-ion experiments. We also review their reproduction of the lattice QCD thermodynamics at vanishing and finite chemical potential. During the last decade, five conditions have been suggested to describe the universal behavior of the chemical freeze out parameters.

  8. Streaking at high energies with electrons and positrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ipp, Andreas; Evers, Joerg; Keitel, Christoph H.; Hatsagortsyan, Karen Z. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Technische Universitaet Wien, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    State-of-the-art attosecond metrology deals with the detection and characterization of photon pulses with typical energies up to the hundreds of eV and time resolution of several tens of attoseconds. Such short pulses are used for example to control the motion of electrons on the atomic scale or to measure inner-shell atomic dynamics. The next challenge of time-resolving the inner-nuclear dynamics, transient meson states and resonances requires photon pulses below attosecond duration and with energies exceeding the MeV scale. Here we discuss a detection scheme for time-resolving high-energy gamma ray pulses down to the zeptosecond timescale. The scheme is based on the concept of attosecond streak imaging, but instead of conversion of photons into electrons in a nonlinear medium, the high-energy process of electron-positron pair creation is utilized. These pairs are produced in vacuum through the collision of a test pulse to be characterized with an intense laser pulse, and they acquire additional energy and momentum depending on their phase in the streaking pulse at the moment of production. A coincidence measurement of the electron and positron momenta after the interaction provides information on the pair production phase within the streaking pulse. We examine the limitations imposed by quantum radiation reaction in multiphoton Compton scattering on this detection scheme, and discuss other necessary conditions to render the scheme feasible in the upcoming Extreme Light Infrastructure (ELI) laser facility.

  9. High Energy Particles in the Solar Corona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Widom; Y. N. Srivastava; L. Larsen

    2008-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Collective Ampere law interactions producing magnetic flux tubes piercing through sunspots into and then out of the solar corona allow for low energy nuclear reactions in a steady state and high energy particle reactions if a magnetic flux tube explodes in a violent event such as a solar flare. Filamentous flux tubes themselves are vortices of Ampere currents circulating around in a tornado fashion in a roughly cylindrical geometry. The magnetic field lines are parallel to and largely confined within the core of the vortex. The vortices may thereby be viewed as long current carrying coils surrounding magnetic flux and subject to inductive Faraday and Ampere laws. These laws set the energy scales of (i) low energy solar nuclear reactions which may regularly occur and (ii) high energy electro-weak interactions which occur when magnetic flux coils explode into violent episodic events such as solar flares or coronal mass ejections.

  10. High Energy Studies of Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick Slane

    2008-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The extended nebulae formed as pulsar winds expand into their surroundings provide information about the composition of the winds, the injection history from the host pulsar, and the material into which the nebulae are expanding. Observations from across the electromagnetic spectrum provide constraints on the evolution of the nebulae, the density and composition of the surrounding ejecta, the geometry of the systems, the formation of jets, and the maximum energy of the particles in the nebulae. Here I provide a broad overview of the structure of pulsar wind nebulae, with specific examples that demonstrate our ability to constrain the above parameters. The association of pulsar wind nebulae with extended sources of very high energy gamma-ray emission are investigated, along with constraints on the nature of such high energy emission.

  11. High Energy Neutrino Astronomy: WIN 99

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Halzen

    1999-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Although high energy neutrino astronomy is a multidisciplinary science, gamma ray bursts have become the theoretical focus since recent astronomical observations revealed their potential as cosmic particle accelerators. This spotlight is shared with investigations of the potential of high energy telescopes to observe oscillating atmospheric neutrinos. The Superkamiokande results have boosted atmospheric neutrinos from a calibration tool and a background for doing astronomy, to an opportunity to confirm the evidence for neutrino mass. Nevertheless, the highlights are mostly on the experimental front with the completion of the first-generation Baikal and AMANDA detectors. Neutrino signals from the Lake Baikal detector bode well for the flurry of activities in the Mediterranean. The completed AMANDA telescope announced first light, neutrinos actually, at this meeting.

  12. New Prospects in High Energy Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blandford, Roger; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent discoveries using TeV, X-ray and radio telescopes as well as Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray arrays are leading to new insights into longstanding puzzles in high energy astrophysics. Many of these insights come from combining observations throughout the electromagnetic and other spectra as well as evidence assembled from different types of source to propose general principles. Issues discussed in this general overview include methods of accelerating relativistic particles, and amplifying magnetic field, the dynamics of relativistic outflows and the nature of the prime movers that power them. Observational approaches to distinguishing hadronic, leptonic and electromagnetic outflows and emission mechanisms are discussed along with probes of the velocity field and the confinement mechanisms. Observations with GLAST promise to be very prescriptive for addressing these problems.

  13. Prospects of High Energy Laboratory Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, J.S.T.; Chen, P.; /SLAC

    2006-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) have been observed but their sources and production mechanisms are yet to be understood. We envision a laboratory astrophysics program that will contribute to the understanding of cosmic accelerators with efforts to: (1) test and calibrate UHECR observational techniques, and (2) elucidate the underlying physics of cosmic acceleration through laboratory experiments and computer simulations. Innovative experiments belonging to the first category have already been done at the SLAC FFTB. Results on air fluorescence yields from the FLASH experiment are reviewed. Proposed future accelerator facilities can provided unprecedented high-energy-densities in a regime relevant to cosmic acceleration studies and accessible in a terrestrial environment for the first time. We review recent simulation studies of nonlinear plasma dynamics that could give rise to cosmic acceleration, and discuss prospects for experimental investigation of the underlying mechanisms.

  14. New rest wavelength determinations for 7 mid-infrared fine structure lines by ISO-SWS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Feuchtgruber; D. Lutz; D. A. Beintema

    2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of the planetary nebulae NGC6302, NGC6543 and NGC7027 by the Short Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS) on board the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) have been used to determine rest wavelengths of spectral lines. We report on improved accuracies for wavelengths of 7 mid-infrared ionic fine structure lines.

  15. Viscosity of High Energy Nuclear Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Parihar; A. Widom; D. Drosdoff; Y. N. Srivastava

    2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Relativistic high energy heavy ion collision cross sections have been interpreted in terms of almost ideal liquid droplets of nuclear matter. The experimental low viscosity of these nuclear fluids have been of considerable recent quantum chromodynamic interest. The viscosity is here discussed in terms of the string fragmentation models wherein the temperature dependence of the nuclear fluid viscosity obeys the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann law.

  16. UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutherfoord, John P. [University of Arizona] [University of Arizona; Johns, Kenneth A. [University of Arizona] [University of Arizona; Shupe, Michael A. [University of Arizona] [University of Arizona; Cheu, Elliott C. [University of Arizona] [University of Arizona; Varnes, Erich W. [University of Arizona] [University of Arizona; Dienes, Keith [University of Arizona] [University of Arizona; Su, Shufang [University of Arizona] [University of Arizona; Toussaint, William Doug [University of Arizona] [University of Arizona; Sarcevic, Ina [University of Arizona] [University of Arizona

    2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Energy Physics Group at the University of Arizona has conducted forefront research in elementary particle physics. Our theorists have developed new ideas in lattice QCD, SUSY phenomenology, string theory phenomenology, extra spatial dimensions, dark matter, and neutrino astrophysics. The experimentalists produced significant physics results on the ATLAS experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider and on the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron. In addition, the experimentalists were leaders in detector development and construction, and on service roles in these experiments.

  17. High energy photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, S.J. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Zerwas, P.M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The collisions of high energy photons produced at a electron-positron collider provide a comprehensive laboratory for testing QCD, electroweak interactions and extensions of the standard model. The luminosity and energy of the colliding photons produced by back-scattering laser beams is expected to be comparable to that of the primary e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions. In this overview, we shall focus on tests of electroweak theory in photon-photon annihilation, particularly {gamma}{gamma} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup {minus}}, {gamma}{gamma} {yields} Higgs bosons, and higher-order loop processes, such as {gamma}{gamma} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}, Z{gamma} and ZZ. Since each photon can be resolved into a W{sup +}W{sup minus} pair, high energy photon-photon collisions can also provide a remarkably background-free laboratory for studying WW collisions and annihilation. We also review high energy {gamma}{gamma} tests of quantum chromodynamics, such as the scaling of the photon structure function, t{bar t} production, mini-jet processes, and diffractive reactions.

  18. High-energy electron beam technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danko, J.C.; Lundin, C.D. (Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)); Nolting, E.E. (Naval Surface Warfare Center, White Oak, MD (United States))

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-energy electron beam (HEEB) technology was developed under the US Department of Defense (DOD) charged-particle-beam (CPB) directed-energy program. The program's objective was advanced military weapon systems. For the past two decades, charged-particle-beam research focused on producing intense beams and the vehicles to deliver large amounts of electrical energy. The charged-particle beams of interest for weapon systems had particle energies up to 100 MeV, beam currents of tens of kiloamperes, and propagation distances in excess of 100 m. However, such high energy levels are not required for industrial uses of the technology. It is anticipated that these less-aggressive beams will provide an electrical heat source suitable for a variety of materials processing applications, including surface treatment, joining, shock hardening, phase-transformation hardening, peening, shock-wave compaction, and melting. Much more R and D is needed to transfer to industry the high-energy electron beam technology developed in the CPB program. For example, its power as a materials processing tool must be convincingly demonstrated. Also required are compact, reliable accelerators that are relatively simple to use and reasonably priced.

  19. A High Energy Nuclear Database Proposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David A. Brown; Ramona Vogt

    2005-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose to develop a high-energy heavy-ion experimental database and make it accessible to the scientific community through an on-line interace. This database will be searchable and cross-indexed with relevant publications, including published detector descriptions. Since this database will be a community resource, it requires the high-energy nuclear physics community's financial and manpower support. This database should eventually contain all published data from the Bevalac, AGS and SPS to RHIC and LHC energies, proton-proton to nucleus-nucleus collisions as well as other relevant systems and all measured observables. Such a database would have tremendous scientific payoff as it makes systematic studies easier and allows simpler benchmarking of theoretical models to a broad range of old and new experiments. Furthermore, there is a growing need for compilations of high-energy nuclear data for applications including stockpile stewardship, technology development for intertial confinement fusion and target and source development for upcoming facilities such as the Next Linear Collider. To enhance the utility of this database, we propose periodically performing evaluations of the data and summarizing the results in topical reviews.

  20. Data Preservation in High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roman Kogler; David M. South; Michael Steder

    2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Data from high-energy physics experiments are collected with significant financial and human effort and are mostly unique. However, until recently no coherent strategy existed for data preservation and re-use, and many important and complex data sets have simply been lost. While the current focus is on the LHC at CERN, in the current period several important and unique experimental programs at other facilities are coming to an end, including those at HERA, b-factories and the Tevatron. To address this issue, an inter-experimental study group on HEP data preservation and long-term analysis (DPHEP) was convened at the end of 2008. The group now aims to publish a full and detailed review of the present status of data preservation in high energy physics. This contribution summarises the results of the DPHEP study group, describing the challenges of data preservation in high energy physics and the group's first conclusions and recommendations. The physics motivation for data preservation, generic computing and preservation models, technological expectations and governance aspects at local and international levels are examined.

  1. Future high energy colliders. Formal report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parsa, Z. [ed.] [ed.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Report includes copies of transparencies and notes from the presentations made at the Symposium on Future High Energy Colliders, October 21-25, 1996 at the Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara California, that was made available by the authors. Editing, reduction and changes to the authors contributions were made only to fulfill the printing and publication requirements. We would like to take this opportunity and thank the speakers for their informative presentations and for providing copies of their transparencies and notes for inclusion in this Report.

  2. Astronomy with ultra high-energy particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joerg R. Hoerandel

    2008-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent measurements of the properties of cosmic rays above 10^17 eV are summarized and implications on our contemporary understanding of their origin are discussed. Cosmic rays with energies exceeding 10^20 eV have been measured, they are the highest-energy particles in the Universe. Particles at highest energies are expected to be only marginally deflected by magnetic fields and they should point towards their sources on the sky. Recent results of the Pierre Auger Observatory have opened a new window to the Universe - astronomy with ultra high-energy particles.

  3. High energy neutron Computed Tomography developed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet WhenHiggs BosonAccurate knowledgeHigh energy

  4. High Energy Cost Grants | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department of Energy CompletingPresented By:DanielHigh Energy Cost

  5. Engineering of High Energy Cathode Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisoryStandard |inHVACEnforcementEngaging Students in20High Energy

  6. Special Colloquium : Looking at High Energy Physics from a gender studies perspective

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Human actors, workplace cultures and knowledge production: Gender studies analyse the social constructions and cultural representations of gender. Using methods and tools from the humanities and social science, we look at all areas, including the natural sciences and technology, science education and research labs. After a short introduction to gender studies, the main focus of my talk will be the presentation of selected research findings on gender and high energy physics. You will hear about an ongoing research project on women in neutrino physics and learn about a study on the world of high energy physicists characterised by "rites of passage" and "male tales" told during a life in physics. I will also present a study on how the HEP community communicates, and research findings on the naming culture in HEP. Getting to know findings from another field on your own might contribute to create a high energy physics culture that is fair and welcoming to all genders.

  7. Special Colloquium : Looking at High Energy Physics from a gender studies perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Human actors, workplace cultures and knowledge production: Gender studies analyse the social constructions and cultural representations of gender. Using methods and tools from the humanities and social science, we look at all areas, including the natural sciences and technology, science education and research labs. After a short introduction to gender studies, the main focus of my talk will be the presentation of selected research findings on gender and high energy physics. You will hear about an ongoing research project on women in neutrino physics and learn about a study on the world of high energy physicists characterised by "rites of passage" and "male tales" told during a life in physics. I will also present a study on how the HEP community communicates, and research findings on the naming culture in HEP. Getting to know findings from another field on your own might contribute to create a high energy physics culture that is fair and welcoming to all genders.

  8. High Energy Density Science at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, R W

    2007-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    High energy density science (HEDS), as a discipline that has developed in the United States from National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA)-sponsored laboratory research programs, is, and will remain, a major component of the NNSA science and technology strategy. Its scientific borders are not restricted to NNSA. 'Frontiers in High Energy Density Physics: The X-Games of Contemporary Science' identified numerous exciting scientific opportunities in this field, while pointing to the need for a overarching interagency plan for its evolution. Meanwhile, construction of the first x-ray free-electron laser, the Office-of-Science-funded Linear Coherent Light Source-LCLS: the world's first free electron x-ray laser, with 100-fsec time resolution, tunable x-ray energies, a high rep rate, and a 10 order-of-magnitude increase in brightness over any other x-ray source--led to the realization that the scientific needs of NNSA and the broader scientific community could be well served by an LCLS HEDS endstation employing both short-pulse and high-energy optical lasers. Development of this concept has been well received in the community. NNSA requested a workshop on the applicability of LCLS to its needs. 'High Energy Density Science at the LCLS: NNSA Defense Programs Mission Need' was held in December 2006. The workshop provided strong support for the relevance of the endstation to NNSA strategic requirements. The range of science that was addressed covered a wide swath of the vast HEDS phase space. The unique possibilities provided by the LCLS in areas of intense interest to NNSA Defense Programs were discussed. The areas of focus included warm dense matter and equations of state, hot dense matter, and behavior of high-pressure materials under conditions of high strain-rate and extreme dynamic loading. Development of new and advanced diagnostic techniques was also addressed. This report lays out the relevant science, as brief summaries (Ch. II), expanded descriptions (Ch. V), and a more detailed plans for experiments (Ch. VI), highlighting the uniqueness the HEDS endstation will play in providing mission-relevant HED data and in the development of the field. One of the more exciting aspects of NNSA-relevant experiments on LCLS is that, given the extraordinary investment and consequent advances in accurate atomic-scale simulations of matter (to a large extent via the Accelerated Scientific Computing program sponsored by NNSA), the facility will provide a platform that, for the first time, will permit experiments in the regimes of interest at the time and spatial scales of the simulations. In Chapter III, the report places the potential of LCLS with an HED science endstation in the context of science required by NNSA, as well as explicating the relationship of NNSA and HED science in general. Chapter IV discusses 4th-generation light sources, like LCLS, in the context of other laboratory technologies presently utilized by NNSA. The report concludes, noting that an HED endstation on LCLS can provide access to data in regimes that are relevant to NNSA needs but no mechanism exists for providing such data. The endstation will also serve to build a broad-based community in the 'X-Games' of physics. The science generated by the facility will be a collaboration of NNSA-based laboratory scientists and university-based researchers. The LCLS endstation fulfills the need for an intermediate-scale facility capable of delivering fundamental advances and mission-relevant research in high energy density science.

  9. High Energy Resummation in Quantum Chromo–Dynamics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marzani, Simone

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis I discuss different aspects of high energy resummation in Quantum Chromo-Dynamics and its relevance for precision physics at hadron colliders. The high energy factorisation theorem is presented and discussed ...

  10. High energy. Progress report, March 1, 1992--February 28, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonner, B.E.; Roberts, J.B. Jr.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonner Lab High Energy Group at Rice University has major hardware and software design and construction responsibilities in three of the flagship experiments of US High Energy Physics: D0, CMS, and KTeV. These commitments were undertaken after managing boards of the collaborations had evaluated the unique capabilities that Bonner Lab has to offer. Although fiscal constraints prohibited their participation in the final year of the SMC experiment (1996) on the spin dependent structure functions of nucleons, they played a major role there since it was proposed in 1988. The new results from the SMC data taken in previous years continue to generate a buzz of theoretical activity--and to increase understanding of the nucleon structure functions and their behavior as a function of Q{sup 2} and x. They have also spawned large new experimental spin physics programs at HERA and at RHIC that ultimately will provide answers to these fundamental questions. This is a direct result of the unprecedented precision and kinematic range of the SMC results. Such precision would not have been possible without the improvement in the knowledge of the muon beam polarization using the Rice-designed beam polarimeter. In D0 Bonner Lab has been active in data taking, data analysis, upgrade design, and upgrade construction projects. In CMS they are responsible for the design and construction of the trigger electronics for one of the crucial subsystems: the end cap muon detectors. Other responsibilities are fully expected as the US commitment to LHC projects becomes clearer. The technical capabilities are well matched to the enormous challenges posed by the physics measurements being contemplated for the CMS detector. KTeV will be taking data shortly. Rice made major contributions to the construction and commissioning of this experiment. The long list of publications and presentations during the past five years attests to the fact that the group has been working hard and productively.

  11. Diffuse emission of high-energy neutrinos from gamma-ray burst fireballs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tamborra, Irene

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been suggested as possible sources of the high-energy neutrino flux recently detected by the IceCube telescope. We revisit the fireball emission model and elaborate an analytical prescription to estimate the high-energy neutrino prompt emission from pion and kaon decays, assuming that the leading mechanism for the neutrino production is lepto-hadronic. To this purpose, we include hadronic, radiative and adiabatic cooling effects and discuss their relevance for long- (including high- and low-luminosity) and short-duration GRBs. The expected diffuse neutrino background is derived, by requiring that the GRB high-energy neutrino counterparts follow up-to-date gamma-ray luminosity functions and redshift evolutions of the long and short GRBs. Although dedicated stacking searches have been unsuccessful up to now, we find that the GRBs could contribute up to a few percents to the observed IceCube high-energy neutrino flux for sub-PeV energies, assuming that the latter has a diffuse origin...

  12. ISTC SAC Seminar "New Perspectives of High Energy Physics"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    13th ISTC SAC Seminar "New Perspectives of High Energy Physics" 15 September, 2010, Budker) is organizing the 13th SAC Seminar "New Perspectives of High Energy Physics", from 01 till 05 September 2010 of this Seminar is to report on the newest achievements and challenges in High Energy Physics and to identify

  13. Data mining in high energy physics Bertrand Brelier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prodiæ, Aleksandar

    Data mining in high energy physics Bertrand Brelier SOSCIP July 3, 2014 Bertrand Brelier (SOSCIP) Data mining in high energy physics July 3, 2014 1 / 8 #12;The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Bertrand Brelier (SOSCIP) Data mining in high energy physics July 3, 2014 2 / 8 #12;The ATLAS detector Bertrand

  14. Calibration in High-Energy Astrophysics Statistical Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dyk, David

    Calibration in High-Energy Astrophysics Statistical Methods Empirical Illustrations Accounting for Calibration Uncertainty in High Energy Astrophysics David A. van Dyk1 Vinay Kashyap2 Taeyoung Park3 Jin Xu4 David A. van Dyk Accounting for Calibration Uncertainty #12;Calibration in High-Energy Astrophysics

  15. Structures in high-energy fusion data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Esbensen

    2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Structures observed in heavy-ion fusion cross sections at energies above the Coulomb barrier are interpreted as caused by the penetration of centrifugal barriers that are well-separated in energy. The structures are most pronounced in the fusion of lighter, symmetric systems, where the separation in energy between successive angular momentum barriers is relatively large. It is shown that the structures or peaks can be revealed by plotting the first derivative of the energy weighted cross section. It is also shown how an orbital angular momentum can be assign to the observed peaks by comparing to coupled-channels calculations. This is illustrated by analyzing high-energy fusion data for $^{12}$C+$^{16}$O and $^{16}$O+$^{16}$O, and the possibility of observing similar structures in the fusion of heavier systems is discussed.

  16. Photoresist integrity during high energy implant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parrill, T.M. [Texas Instruments Productization, Dallas, TX (United States); Jones, M. [Eaton Corporation, Beverly, MA (United States); Jain, A. [Texas Indstruments Semiconductor Process and Development Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Photoresist integrity was evaluated on a commercial high-energy ion implanter operated up to the specified energy (1.7 MeV B or 3.0 MeV P) and power (1.0 MeV B at 1000 p{mu}A or 2.0 MeV P at 500 p{mu}A) limits. SEM Cross-sectional analysis of several photoresists showed that the proper cooling was maintained to avoid significant photoresist degradation. Photoresist shrinkage was observed, resulting in thickness reductions up to 22% and significant changes in sidewall slope. Little asymmetry was observed when photoresist was implanted at a 7{degrees} tilt. At the specified power limits, photoresist outgassing prevented smooth implant operation unless pressure compensation was implemented.

  17. A high energy photon polarimeter for astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eingorn, Maxim; Vlahovic, Branislav; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Urciuoli, Guido Maria; De Persio, Fulvio; Meddi, Franco

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-energy photon polarimeter for astrophysics studies in the energy range from 20 MeV to 1000 MeV is considered. The proposed concept uses a stack of silicon micro-strip detectors where they play the roles of both a converter and a tracker. The purpose of this paper is to outline the parameters of such a polarimeter and to estimate the productivity of measurements. Our study supported by a Monte Carlo simulation shows that with a one-year observation period the polarimeter will provide 5.5 % accuracy of the polarization degree for a photon energy of 100 MeV, which would be a significant advance relative to the currently explored energy range of a few MeV. The proposed polarimeter design could easily be adjusted to the specific photon energy range to maximize efficiency if needed.

  18. Microfluidic Scintillation Detectors for High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maoddi, Pietro; Mapelli, Alessandro

    This thesis deals with the development and study of microfluidic scintillation detectors, a technology of recent introduction for the detection of high energy particles. Most of the interest for such devices comes from the use of a liquid scintillator, which entails the possibility of changing the active material in the detector, leading to increased radiation resistance. A first part of the thesis focuses on the work performed in terms of design and modelling studies of novel prototype devices, hinting to new possibilities and applications. In this framework, the simulations performed to validate selected designs and the main technological choices made in view of their fabrication are addressed. The second part of this thesis deals with the microfabrication of several prototype devices. Two different materials were studied for the manufacturing of microfluidic scintillation detectors, namely the SU-8 photosensitive epoxy and monocrystalline silicon. For what concerns the former, an original fabrication appro...

  19. High energy density redox flow device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Carter, W. Craig; Ho, Bryan Y; Duduta, Mihai; Limthongkul, Pimpa

    2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Redox flow devices are described in which at least one of the positive electrode or negative electrode-active materials is a semi-solid or is a condensed ion-storing electroactive material, and in which at least one of the electrode-active materials is transported to and from an assembly at which the electrochemical reaction occurs, producing electrical energy. The electronic conductivity of the semi-solid is increased by the addition of conductive particles to suspensions and/or via the surface modification of the solid in semi-solids (e.g., by coating the solid with a more electron conductive coating material to increase the power of the device). High energy density and high power redox flow devices are disclosed. The redox flow devices described herein can also include one or more inventive design features. In addition, inventive chemistries for use in redox flow devices are also described.

  20. New High-Energy Nanofiber Anode Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xiangwu; Fedkiw, Peter; Khan, Saad; Huang, Alex; Fan, Jiang

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of the proposed work was to use electrospinning technology to integrate dissimilar materials (lithium alloy and carbon) into novel composite nanofiber anodes, which simultaneously had high energy density, reduced cost, and improved abuse tolerance. The nanofiber structure allowed the anodes to withstand repeated cycles of expansion and contraction. These composite nanofibers were electrospun into nonwoven fabrics with thickness of 50 ?m or more, and then directly used as anodes in a lithium-ion battery. This eliminated the presence of non-active materials (e.g., conducting carbon black and polymer binder) and resulted in high energy and power densities. The nonwoven anode structure also provided a large electrode-electrolyte interface and, hence, high rate capacity and good lowtemperature performance capability. Following are detailed objectives for three proposed project periods. • During the first six months: Obtain anodes capable of initial specific capacities of 650 mAh/g and achieve ~50 full charge/discharge cycles in small laboratory scale cells (50 to 100 mAh) at the 1C rate with less than 20 percent capacity fade; • In the middle of project period: Assemble, cycle, and evaluate 18650 cells using proposed anode materials, and demonstrate practical and useful cycle life (750 cycles of ~70% state of charge swing with less than 20% capacity fade) in 18650 cells with at least twice improvement in the specific capacity than that of conventional graphite electrodes; • At the end of project period: Deliver 18650 cells containing proposed anode materials, and achieve specific capacities greater than 1200 mAh/g and cycle life longer than 5000 cycles of ~70% state of charge swing with less than 20% capacity fade.

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: Wavelength Conversion Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TechnologiesWavelength Conversion Materials Wavelength Conversion Materials Overview of SSL Wavelength Conversion Materials Rare-Earth Phosphors Inorganic phosphors doped with...

  2. Ultra-short wavelength x-ray system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Umstadter, Donald (Ann Arbor, MI); He, Fei (Ann Arbor, MI); Lau, Yue-Ying (Potomac, MD)

    2008-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus to generate a beam of coherent light including x-rays or XUV by colliding a high-intensity laser pulse with an electron beam that is accelerated by a synchronized laser pulse. Applications include x-ray and EUV lithography, protein structural analysis, plasma diagnostics, x-ray diffraction, crack analysis, non-destructive testing, surface science and ultrafast science.

  3. Non-linear modulation of short wavelength compressional Alfven eigenmodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fredrickson, E. D.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Podesta, M.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; LeBlanc, B. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Bortolon, A. [University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Crocker, N. A. [University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Levinton, F. M.; Yuh, H. [Nova Photonics, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Most Alfvenic activity in the frequency range between toroidal Alfven eigenmodes and roughly one half of the ion cyclotron frequency on National Spherical Torus eXperiment [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)], that is, approximately 0.3 MHz up to Almost-Equal-To 1.2 MHz, are modes propagating counter to the neutral beam ions. These have been modeled as Compressional and Global Alfven Eigenmodes (CAE and GAE) and are excited through a Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance with the beam ions. There is also a class of co-propagating modes at higher frequency than the counter-propagating CAE and GAE. These modes have been identified as CAE, and are seen mostly in the company of a low frequency, n = 1 kink-like mode. In this paper, we present measurements of the spectrum of these high frequency CAE (hfCAE) and their mode structure. We compare those measurements to a simple model of CAE and present a predator-prey type model of the curious non-linear coupling of the hfCAE and the low frequency kink-like mode.

  4. FACT - Monitoring Blazars at Very High Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorner, D; Bergmann, M; Biland, A; Balbo, M; Bretz, T; Buss, J; Einecke, S; Freiwald, J; Hempfling, C; Hildebrand, D; Hughes, G; Lustermann, W; Mannheim, K; Meier, K; Mueller, S; Neise, D; Neronov, A; Overkemping, A -K; Paravac, A; Pauss, F; Rhode, W; Steinbring, T; Temme, F; Thaele, J; Toscano, S; Vogler, P; Walter, R; Wilbert, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The First G-APD Cherenkov Telescope (FACT) was built on the Canary Island of La Palma in October 2011 as a proof of principle for silicon based photosensors in Cherenkov Astronomy. The scientific goal of the project is to study the variability of active galatic nuclei (AGN) at TeV energies. Observing a small sample of TeV blazars whenever possible, an unbiased data sample is collected. This allows to study the variability of the selected objects on timescales from hours to years. Results from the first three years of monitoring will be presented. To provide quick flare alerts to the community and trigger multi-wavelength observations, a quick look analysis has been installed on-site providing results publicly online within the same night. In summer 2014, several flare alerts were issued. Results of the quick look analysis are summarized.

  5. Rapid thermal processing of steel using high energy electron beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elmer, J.W.; Newton, A.; Smith, C. Jr.

    1993-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    High energy electron beams (HEEBs) with megavolt energies represent a new generation of charged particle beams that rapidly deposit up to several hundred joules/pulse over areas on the order of a few square millimeters to 100s of square centimeters. These pulsed beams have energies in the 1 to 10 MeV range, which enables the electrons to deposit large amounts of energy deeply into the material being processed, and these beams have short pulse durations (50 ns) that can heat materials at rates as high as 10{sup 10} {degrees}C/s for a 1000 {degree}C temperature rise in the material. Lower heating rates, on the order of 10{sup 4} {degrees}C/s, can be produced by reducing the energy per pulse and distributing the total required energy over a series of sub-ms pulses, at pulse repetition frequencies (PRFs) up to several kHz. This paper presents results from materials processing experiments performed on steel with a 6 MeV electron beam, analyzes these results using a Monte Carlo transport code, and presents a first-order predictive method for estimating the peak energy deposition, temperature, and heating rate for HEEB processed steel.

  6. High-Energy Neutrinos from Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Halzen

    2002-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce neutrino astronomy from the observational fact that Nature accelerates protons and photons to energies in excess of 10^{20} and 10^{13} eV, respectively. Although the discovery of cosmic rays dates back close to a century, we do not know how and where they are accelerated. We review the facts as well as the speculations about the sources. Among these gamma ray bursts and active galaxies represent well-motivated speculations because these are also the sources of the highest energy gamma rays, with emission observed up to 20 TeV, possibly higher. We discuss why cosmic accelerators are also expected to be cosmic beam dumps producing high-energy neutrino beams associated with the highest energy cosmic rays. Cosmic ray sources may produce neutrinos from MeV to EeV energy by a variety of mechanisms. The important conclusion is that, independently of the specific blueprint of the source, it takes a kilometer-scale neutrino observatory to detect the neutrino beam associated with the highest energy cosmic rays and gamma rays. The technology for commissioning such instruments exists.

  7. Nuclear and High-Energy Astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridolin Weber

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There has never been a more exciting time in the overlapping areas of nuclear physics, particle physics and relativistic astrophysics than today. Orbiting observatories such as the Hubble Space Telescope, Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), Chandra X-ray satellite, and the X-ray Multi Mirror Mission (XMM) have extended our vision tremendously, allowing us to see vistas with an unprecedented clarity and angular resolution that previously were only imagined, enabling astrophysicists for the first time ever to perform detailed studies of large samples of galactic and extragalactic objects. On the Earth, radio telescopes (e.g., Arecibo, Green Bank, Parkes, VLA) and instruments using adaptive optics and other revolutionary techniques have exceeded previous expectations of what can be accomplished from the ground. The gravitational wave detectors LIGO, LISA VIRGO, and Geo-600 are opening up a window for the detection of gravitational waves emitted from compact stellar objects such as neutron stars and black holes. Together with new experimental forefront facilities like ISAC, ORLaND and RIA, these detectors provide direct, quantitative physical insight into nucleosynthesis, supernova dynamics, accreting compact objects, cosmic-ray acceleration, and pair-production in high energy sources which reinforce the urgent need for a strong and continuous feedback from nuclear and particle theory and theoretical astrophysics. In my lectures, I shall concentrate on three selected topics, which range from the behavior of superdense stellar matter, to general relativistic stellar models, to strange quark stars and possible signals of quark matter in neutron stars.

  8. Spin structure in high energy processes: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DePorcel, L.; Dunwoodie, C. [eds.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains papers as the following topics: Spin, Mass, and Symmetry; physics with polarized Z{sup 0}s; spin and precision electroweak physics; polarized electron sources; polarization phenomena in quantum chromodynamics; polarized lepton-nucleon scattering; polarized targets in high energy physics; spin dynamics in storage rings and linear accelerators; spin formalism and applications to new physics searches; precision electroweak physics at LEP; recent results on heavy flavor physics from LEP experiments using 1990--1992 data; precise measurement of the left-right cross section asymmetry in Z boson production by electron-positron collisions; preliminary results on heavy flavor physics at SLD; QCD tests with SLD and polarized beams; recent results from TRISTAN at KEK; recent B physics results from CLEO; searching for the H dibaryon at Brookhaven; recent results from the compton observatory; the spin structure of the deuteron; spin structure of the neutron ({sup 3}HE) and the Bjoerken sum rule; a consumer`s guide to lattice QCD results; top ten models constrained by b {yields} sy; a review of the Fermilab fixed target program; results from the D0 experiment; results from CDF at FNAL; quantum-mechanical suppression of bremsstrahlung; report from the ZEUS collaboration at HERA; physics from the first year of H1 at HERA, and hard diffraction. These papers have been cataloged separately elsewhere.

  9. Phosphate glass useful in high energy lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hayden, Yuiko T. (Clarks Summit, PA); Guesto-Barnak, Donna (Dupont, PA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A low-or no-silica, low- or no-alkali phosphate glass useful as a laser amplifier in a multiple pass, high energy laser system having a high thermal conductivity, K.sub.90.degree. C. >0.85 W/mK, a low coefficient of thermal expansion, .alpha..sub.20.degree.-300.degree. C. <80.times.10.sup.-7 /.degree.C., low emission cross section, .sigma.<2.5.times.10.sup.-20 cm.sup.2, and a high fluorescence lifetime, .tau.>325 .mu.secs at 3 wt. % Nd doping, consisting essentially of (on an oxide composition basis): wherein Ln.sub.2 O.sub.3 is the sum of lanthanide oxides; .SIGMA.R.sub.2 O is <5, R being Li, Na, K, Cs, and Rb; the sum of Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 and MgO is <24 unless .SIGMA.R.sub.2 O is 0, then the sum of Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 and MgO is <42; and the ratio of MgO to B.sub.2 O.sub.3 is 0.48-4.20.

  10. Axionic shortcuts for high energy photons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicolaidis, A., E-mail: nicolaid@auth.gr [Theoretical Physics Department, University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the photon axion mixing in the presence of large extra dimensions. The eigenvalues and eigenstates of the mixing matrix are analyzed and we establish the resonance condition for the total conversion of a high energy photon into a Kaluza-Klein (KK) axion state. This resonant transition, a photon transformed into a KK axion traveling freely through the bulk and converting back into a photon, may provide a plausible explanation for the transparency of the universe to energetic photons. If the brane we live in is curved, then there are shortcuts through the bulk, which the axion can take. Within our model, the photons having the appropriate resonance energy are using the axionic shortcut and arrive earlier compared to the photons which follow the geodesic on the brane. We suggest that such axionic shortcuts are at the root of the dispersion of time arrival of photons observed by the MAGIC telescope. We indicate also the cosmological significance of the existence of axionic shortcuts for the photon.

  11. High energy activation data library (HEAD-2009)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mashnik, Stepan G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Korovin, Yury A [NON LANL; Natalenko, Anatoly A [NON LANL; Konobeyev, Alexander Yu [NON LANL; Stankovskiy, A Yu [NON LANL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A proton activation data library for 682 nuclides from 1 H to 210Po in the energy range from 150 MeV up to 1 GeV was developed. To calculate proton activation data, the MCNPX 2.6.0 and CASCADE/INPE codes were chosen. Different intranuclear cascade, preequilibrium, and equilibrium nuclear reaction models and their combinations were used. The optimum calculation models have been chosen on the basis of statistical correlations for calculated and experimental proton data taken from the EXFOR library of experimental nuclear data. All the data are written in ENDF-6 format. The library is called HEPAD-2008 (High-Energy Proton Activation Data). A revision of IEAF-2005 neutron activation data library has been performed. A set of nuclides for which the cross-section data can be (and were) updated using more modern and improved models is specified, and the corresponding calculations have been made in the present work. The new version of the library is called IEAF-2009. The HEPAD-2008 and IEAF-2009 are merged to the final HEAD-2009 library.

  12. High energy hadron-hadron collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, T.T.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of a study on high energy collision with the geometrical model are summarized in three parts: (1) the elastic hadron-hadron collision, (2) the inelastic hadron-hadron collision, and (3) the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation. More recent studies are highlighted below. For elastic scattering, a modified form for the hadronic matter form factor of the proton was proposed which remains to be dipole in form but contains an energy-dependent range parameter. This new expression of the opacity function fits the elastic {bar p}p scattering very well from the ISR to S{bar p}pS energies. Extrapolation of this theory also yielded results in good agreement with the {bar p}p differential cross section measured at the Tevatron. For inelastic hadron-hadron collisions, we have made a systematic investigation of the single-particle momentum spectra in the entire S{bar p}pS energy region. Results are useful for the extrapolation of angular distribution to the higher SSC energies. In e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation, a detailed analysis of all available experimental multiplicity data from PETRA to LEP energies has been performed. We discovered that the cluster size of emitted hadrons increases steadily with energy and is close to 2 as we predicted.

  13. Oklahoma Center for High Energy Physics (OCHEP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Nandi; M.J. Strauss; J. Snow; F. Rizatdinova; B. Abbott; K. Babu; P. Gutierrez; C. Kao; A. Khanov; K.A. Milton; H. Neaman; H. Severini, P. Skubic

    2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE EPSCoR implementation grant, with the support from the State of Oklahoma and from the three universities, Oklahoma State University, University of Oklahoma and Langston University, resulted in establishing of the Oklahoma Center for High Energy Physics (OCHEP) in 2004. Currently, OCHEP continues to flourish as a vibrant hub for research in experimental and theoretical particle physics and an educational center in the State of Oklahoma. All goals of the original proposal were successfully accomplished. These include foun- dation of a new experimental particle physics group at OSU, the establishment of a Tier 2 computing facility for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and Tevatron data analysis at OU and organization of a vital particle physics research center in Oklahoma based on resources of the three universities. OSU has hired two tenure-track faculty members with initial support from the grant funds. Now both positions are supported through OSU budget. This new HEP Experimental Group at OSU has established itself as a full member of the Fermilab D0 Collaboration and LHC ATLAS Experiment and has secured external funds from the DOE and the NSF. These funds currently support 2 graduate students, 1 postdoctoral fellow, and 1 part-time engineer. The grant initiated creation of a Tier 2 computing facility at OU as part of the Southwest Tier 2 facility, and a permanent Research Scientist was hired at OU to maintain and run the facility. Permanent support for this position has now been provided through the OU university budget. OCHEP represents a successful model of cooperation of several universities, providing the establishment of critical mass of manpower, computing and hardware resources. This led to increasing Oklahoma�¢����s impact in all areas of HEP, theory, experiment, and computation. The Center personnel are involved in cutting edge research in experimental, theoretical, and computational aspects of High Energy Physics with the research areas ranging from the search for new phenomena at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider to theoretical modeling, computer simulation, detector development and testing, and physics analysis. OCHEP faculty members participating on the D0 collaboration at the Fermilab Tevatron and on the ATLAS collaboration at the CERN LHC have made major impact on the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson search, top quark studies, B physics studies, and measurements of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) phenomena. The OCHEP Grid computing facility consists of a large computer cluster which is playing a major role in data analysis and Monte Carlo productions for both the D0 and ATLAS experiments. Theoretical efforts are devoted to new ideas in Higgs bosons physics, extra dimensions, neutrino masses and oscillations, Grand Unified Theories, supersymmetric models, dark matter, and nonperturbative quantum field theory. Theory members are making major contributions to the understanding of phenomena being explored at the Tevatron and the LHC. They have proposed new models for Higgs bosons, and have suggested new signals for extra dimensions, and for the search of supersymmetric particles. During the seven year period when OCHEP was partially funded through the DOE EPSCoR implementation grant, OCHEP members published over 500 refereed journal articles and made over 200 invited presentations at major conferences. The Center is also involved in education and outreach activities by offering summer research programs for high school teachers and college students, and organizing summer workshops for high school teachers, sometimes coordinating with the Quarknet programs at OSU and OU. The details of the Center can be found in http://ochep.phy.okstate.edu.

  14. Phosphate glass useful in high energy lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hayden, Y.T.; Payne, S.A.; Hayden, J.S.; Campbell, J.H.; Aston, M.K.; Elder, M.L.

    1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In a high energy laser system utilizing phosphate laser glass components to amplify the laser beam, the laser system requires a generated laser beam having an emission bandwidth of less than 26 nm and the laser glass components consist essentially of (on an oxide composition basis) in mole percent: P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, 50--75; Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, {gt}0--10; K{sub 2}O, {gt}0--30; MgO, 0--30; CaO, 0--30; Li{sub 2}O, 0--20; Na{sub 2}O, 0--20; Rb{sub 2}O, 0--20; Cs{sub 2}O, 0--20; BeO, 0--20; SrO, 0--20; BaO, 0--20; ZnO, 0--20; PbO, 0--20; B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--10; Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--10; La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--8; Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0.01--8; wherein the sum of MgO and CaO is >0--30; the sum of Li{sub 2}O, Na{sub 2}O, Rb{sub 2}O, and Cs{sub 2}O is 0--20; the sum of BeO, SrO, BaO, ZnO, and PbO is 0--20; the sum of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} is 0--10; and Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3} represents the sum of the oxides of active lasing lanthanides of atomic number 58--71. 21 figs.

  15. Phosphate glass useful in high energy lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hayden, Yuiko T. (Clarks Summit, PA); Payne, Stephen A. (Castro Valley, CA); Hayden, Joseph S. (Clarks Summit, PA); Campbell, John H. (Livermore, CA); Aston, Mary Kay (Moscow, PA); Elder, Melanie L. (Dublin, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a high energy laser system utilizing phosphate laser glass components to amplify the laser beam, the laser system requires a generated laser beam having an emission bandwidth of less than 26 nm and the laser glass components consist essentially of (on an oxide composition basis) in mole percent: P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, 50--75; Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, {gt}0--10; K{sub 2}O, {gt}0--30; MgO, 0--30; CaO, 0--30; Li{sub 2}O, 0--20; Na{sub 2}O, 0--20; Rb{sub 2}O, 0--20; Cs{sub 2}O, 0--20; BeO, 0--20; SrO, 0--20; BaO, 0--20; ZnO, 0--20; PbO, 0--20; B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--10; Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--10; La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--8; Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0.01--8; wherein the sum of MgO and CaO is >0--30; the sum of Li{sub 2}O, Na{sub 2}O, Rb{sub 2}O, and Cs{sub 2}O is 0--20; the sum of BeO, SrO, BaO, ZnO, and PbO is 0--20; the sum of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} is 0--10; and Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3} represents the sum of the oxides of active lasing lanthanides of atomic number 58--71. 21 figs.

  16. Data Preservation in High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mount, Richard; Brooks, Travis; /SLAC; Le Diberder, Francois; /Orsay, LAL; Dubois-Felsmann, Gregory; Neal, Homer; /SLAC; Bellis, Matt; /Stanford U.; Boehnlein, Amber; Votava, Margaret; White, Vicky; Wolbers, Stephen; /Fermilab; Konigsberg, Jacobo; /Florida U.; Roser, Robert; Snider, Rick; /Fermilab; Lucchesi, Donatella; /INFN, Padua; Denisov, Dmitri; /Fermilab; Soldner-Rembold, Stefan; /Manchester U.; Li, Qizhong; /Fermilab; Varnes, Erich; /Arizona U.; Jonckheere, Alan; /Fermilab; Gasthuber, Martin; Gulzow, Volker; /DESY /Marseille, CPPM /Dortmund U. /DESY /Gent U. /DESY, Zeuthen /KEK, Tsukuba /CC, Villeurbanne /CERN /INFN, Bari /Gjovik Coll. Engineering /Karlsruhe, Forschungszentrum /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Carleton U. /Cornell U. /Rutherford

    2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Data from high-energy physics (HEP) experiments are collected with significant financial and human effort and are mostly unique. At the same time, HEP has no coherent strategy for data preservation and re-use. An inter-experimental Study Group on HEP data preservation and long-term analysis was convened at the end of 2008 and held two workshops, at DESY (January 2009) and SLAC (May 2009). This document is an intermediate report to the International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA) of the reflections of this Study Group. Large data sets accumulated during many years of detector operation at particle accelerators are the heritage of experimental HEP. These data sets offer unique opportunities for future scientific studies, sometimes long after the shut-down of the actual experiments: new theoretical input; new experimental results and analysis techniques; the quest for high-sensitivity combined analyses; the necessity of cross checks. In many cases, HEP data sets are unique; they cannot and most likely will not be superseded by data from newer generations of experiments. Once lost, or in an unusable state, HEP data samples cannot be reasonably recovered. The cost of conserving this heritage through a collaborative, target-oriented long-term data preservation program would be small, compared to the costs of past experimental projects or to the efforts to re-do experiments. However, this cost is not negligible, especially for collaborations close or past their end-date. The preservation of HEP data would provide today's collaborations with a secure way to complete their data analysis and enable them to seize new scientific opportunities in the coming years. The HEP community will benefit from preserved data samples through reanalysis, combination, education and outreach. Funding agencies would receive more scientific return, and a positive image, from their initial investment leading to the production and the first analysis of preserved data.

  17. Phase conjugation of high energy lasers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bliss, David Emery; Valley, Michael T.; Atherton, Briggs W.; Bigman, Verle; Boye, Lydia Ann; Broyles, Robin Scott; Kimmel, Mark W.; Law, Ryan J.; Yoder, James R.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report we explore claims that phase conjugation of high energy lasers by stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) can compensate optical aberrations associated with severely distorted laser amplifier media and aberrations induced by the atmosphere. The SBS media tested was a gas cell pressurized up to 300 psi with SF6 or Xe or both. The laser was a 10 Hz, 3J, Q-switched Nd:YAG with 25 ns wide pulses. Atmospheric aberrations were created with space heaters, helium jets and phase plates designed with a Kolmogorov turbulence spectrum characterized by a Fried parameter, ro , ranging from 0.6 - 6.0 mm. Phase conjugate tests in the laboratory were conducted without amplification. For the strongest aberrations, D/ro ~ 20, created by combining the space heaters with the phase plate, the Strehl ratio was degraded by a factor of ~50. Phase conjugation in SF6 restored the peak focusable intensity to about 30% of the original laser. Phase conjugate tests at the outdoor laser range were conducted with laser amplifiers providing gain in combination with the SBS cell. A large 600,000 BTU kerosene space heater was used to create turbulence along the beam path. An atmospheric structure factor of Cn2 = 5x10-13 m2/3 caused the illumination beam to expand to a diameter 250mm and overfill the receiver. The phase conjugate amplified return could successfully be targeted back onto glints 5mm in diameter. Use of a lenslet arrays to lower the peak focusable intensity in the SBS cell failed to produce a useful phase conjugate beam; The Strehl ratio was degraded with multiple random lobes instead of a single focus. I will review literature results which show how multiple beams can be coherently combined by SBS when a confocal reflecting geometry is used to focus the laser in the SBS cell.

  18. High energy, low frequency, ultrasonic transducer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Albert E. (Hayward, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wide bandwidth, ultrasonic transducer to generate nondispersive, extensional, pulsed acoustic pressure waves into concrete reinforced rods and tendons. The wave propagation distance is limited to double the length of the rod. The transducer acoustic impedance is matched to the rod impedance for maximum transfer of acoustic energy. The efficiency of the transducer is approximately 60 percent, depending upon the type of active elements used in the transducer. The transducer input energy is, for example, approximately 1 mJ. Ultrasonic reflections will occur at points along the rod where there are changes of one percent of a wavelength in the rod diameter. A reduction in the rod diameter will reflect a phase reversed echo, as compared with the reflection from an incremental increase in diameter. Echo signal processing of the stored waveform permits a reconstruction of those echoes into an image of the rod. The ultrasonic transducer has use in the acoustic inspection of long (40+foot) architectural reinforcements and structural supporting members, such as in bridges and dams.

  19. Varying speed of light cosmology from a stringy short distance cutoff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. C. Niemeyer

    2001-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that varying speed of light cosmology follows from a string-inspired minimal length uncertainty relation. Due to the reduction of the available phase space volume per quantum mode at short wavelengths, the equation of state of ultrarelativistic particles stiffens at very high densities. This causes a stronger than usual deceleration of the scale factor which competes with a higher than usual propagation speed of the particles. Various measures for the effective propagation speed are analyzed: the group and phase velocity in the high energy tail, the thermal average of the group and phase velocity, and the speed of sound. Of these three groups, only the first provides a possible solution to the cosmological horizon problem.

  20. Varying speed of light cosmology from a stringy short distance cutoff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niemeyer, J C

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that varying speed of light cosmology follows from a string-inspired minimal length uncertainty relation. Due to the reduction of the available phase space volume per quantum mode at short wavelengths, the equation of state of ultrarelativistic particles stiffens at very high densities. This causes a stronger than usual deceleration of the scale factor which competes with a higher than usual propagation speed of the particles. Various measures for the effective propagation speed are analyzed: the group and phase velocity in the high energy tail, the thermal average of the group and phase velocity, and the speed of sound. Of these three groups, only the first provides a possible solution to the cosmological horizon problem.

  1. Color Glass Condensate in QCD at High Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazunori Itakura

    2004-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    I give a brief review about the color glass condensate, which is the universal form of hadrons and nuclei at high energies.

  2. Polymer Electrolytes for High Energy Density Lithium Batteries

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electrolytes for High Energy Density Lithium Batteries Ashoutosh Panday Scott Mullin Nitash Balsara Proposed Battery anode (Li metal) Li Li + + e - e - Li salt in a hard solid...

  3. Development of High Energy Lithium Batteries for Electric Vehicles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lithium Batteries for Electric Vehicles Development of High Energy Lithium Batteries for Electric Vehicles 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program...

  4. High-energy radiation damage in zirconia: modeling results ....

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    zirconia in intense radiation environments. Citation: Zarkadoula E, R Devanathan, WJ Weber, M Seaton, I Todorov, K Nordlund, MT Dove, and K Trachenko.2014."High-energy radiation...

  5. High energy eigenfunctions of one-dimensional Schrödinger ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High energy eigenfunctions of one-dimensional. Schrödinger operators with polynomial. potentials. A. Eremenko?, A. Gabrielov and B. Shapiro. October 5, 2007.

  6. QCD and High Energy Interactions: Moriond 2014 Theory Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Gehrmann

    2014-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This article summarizes new theoretical developments, ideas and results that were presented at the 2014 Moriond "QCD and High Energy Interactions".

  7. Development of High Energy Lithium Batteries for Electric Vehicles...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Kasei * Focused on High Capacity Manganese Rich (HCMR TM ) cathodes & Silicon-Carbon composite anodes for Lithium ion batteries * Envia's high energy Li-ion battery materials...

  8. Development of Novel Electrolytes for Use in High Energy Lithium...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Development of Novel Electrolytes for Use in High Energy Lithium-Ion Batteries with Wide Operating Temperature Range Development of Novel Electrolytes...

  9. The Effective Action for QCD at High Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lech Szymanowski

    1994-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    I discuss the construction of the effective action for QCD suitable for the description of high-energy and small momentum transfer diffractive processes.

  10. Development of High Energy Cathode for Li-ion Batteries

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    3 3 Objectives Develop cost-effective, high energy cathode based on lithium metal phosphate materials suitable for PHEV and EV applications. Investigate the...

  11. Why Onion-Like Carbons Make High-Energy Supercapacitors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High-Energy Supercapacitors Simulations explain experimental results for electrical storage devices June 1, 2012 JiangCummingsCoverLarge.gif Capacitance and geometry effects...

  12. Phosphate glass useful in high energy lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hayden, Y.T.; Guesto-Barnak, D.

    1992-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a low-or no-silica, low- or no-alkali phosphate glass useful as a laser amplifier in a multiple pass, high energy laser system having a high thermal conductivity, K[sub 90 C] >0.85 W/mK, a low coefficient of thermal expansion, [alpha][sub 20-300 C] <80[times]10[sup [minus]7]/C, low emission cross section, [sigma]<2.5[times]10[sup [minus]20] cm[sup 2], and a high fluorescence lifetime, [tau]>325 [mu]secs at 3 wt. % Nd doping, consisting essentially of (on an oxide composition basis): (Mole %) P[sub 2]O[sub 5], (52-72); Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], (0-<20); B[sub 2]O[sub 3], (>0-25); ZnO, (0-31); Li[sub 2]O, (0-5); K[sub 2]O, (0-5); Na[sub 2]O, (0-5); Cs[sub 2]O, (0-5); Rb[sub 2]O, (0-5); MgO, (>0-<30); CaO, (0-20); BaO, (0-20); SrO, (0-<20); Sb[sub 2]O[sub 3], (0-<1); As[sub 2]O[sub 3], (0-<1); Nb[sub 2]O[sub 5], (0-<1); Ln[sub 2]O[sub 3], (up to 6.5); PbO, (0-<5); and SiO[sub 2], (0-3); wherein Ln[sub 2]O[sub 3] is the sum of lanthanide oxides; [Sigma]R[sub 2]O is <5, R being Li, Na, K, Cs, and Rb; the sum of Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] and MgO is <24 unless [Sigma]R[sub 2]O is 0, then the sum of Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] and MgO is <42; and the ratio of MgO to B[sub 2]O[sub 3] is 0.48-4.20. 7 figs.

  13. University of Oklahoma - High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skubic, Patrick L. [University of Oklahoma] [University of Oklahoma

    2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Energy Physics program at the University of Oklahoma, Pat Skubic, Principal Investigator, is attempting to understand nature at the deepest level using the most advanced experimental and theoretical tools. The four experimental faculty, Brad Abbott, Phil Gutierrez, Pat Skubic, and Mike Strauss, together with post-doctoral associates and graduate students, are finishing their work as part of the D0 collaboration at Fermilab, and increasingly focusing their investigations at the Large Hadron Collidor (LHC) as part of the ATLAS Collaboration. Work at the LHC has become even more exciting with the recent discovery by ATLAS and the other collaboration, CMS, of the long-sought Higgs boson, which plays a key role in generating masses for the elementary constituents of matter. Work of the OUHEP group has been in the three areas of hardware, software, and analysis. Now that the Higgs boson has been discovered, completing the Standard Model of fundamental physics, new efforts will focus on finding hints of physics beyond the standard model, such as supersymmetry. The OUHEP theory group (Kim Milton, PI) also consists of four faculty members, Howie Baer, Chung Kao, Kim Milton, and Yun Wang, and associated students and postdocs. They are involved in understanding fundamental issues in formulating theories of the microworld, and in proposing models that carry us past the Standard Model, which is an incomplete description of nature. They therefore work in close concert with their experimental colleagues. One also can study fundamental physics by looking at the large scale structure of the universe; in particular the ``dark energy'' that seems to be causing the universe to expand at an accelerating rate, effectively makes up about 3/4 of the energy in the universe, and yet is totally unidentified. Dark energy and dark matter, which together account for nearly all of the energy in the universe, are an important probe of fundamental physics at the very shortest distances, or at the very highest energies. The outcomes of the group's combined experimental and theoretical research will be an improved understanding of nature, at the highest energies reachable, from which applications to technological innovation will surely result, as they always have from such studies in the past.

  14. High energy physics advisory panel`s subpanel on vision for the future of high-energy physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was requested by the Secretary of Energy to (1) define a long-term program for pursuing the most important high-energy physics goals since the termination of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) project, (2) assess the current US high-energy physics program, and (3) make recommendations regarding the future of the field. Subjects on which recommendations were sought and which the report addresses were: high-energy physics funding priorities; facilitating international collaboration for future construction of large high-energy physics facilities; optimizing uses of the investment made in the SSC; how to encourage displaced scientists and engineers to remain in high-energy physics and to attract young scientists to enter the field in the future. The report includes a description of the state of high-energy physics research in the context of history, a summary of the SSC project, and documentation of the report`s own origins and development.

  15. The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) Mission R. P. fla B. Dennis, G mission is to investigate the physics of particle acceleration and energy release in solar flares, through-ray/gamma-ray spectroscopy 1. INTRODUCTION The primary scientific objective of the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar

  16. Analyzing High Energy Physics Data Using Databases: A Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossman, Robert

    Analyzing High Energy Physics Data Using Databases: A Case Study R. Grossman, X. &in, D. Valsamis. Nixdorf, B. Scipioni, T. Song Superconducting Supercollider Laboratory Abstract We describe the initial experimental data from high energy physics. At this time, we have designed two proto- types to analyze high

  17. Participation in High Energy Physics at the University of Chicago

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinec, Emil J. [University of Chicago

    2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers research at the University of Chicago in theoretical high energy physics and its connections to cosmology, over the period Nov. 1, 2009 to April 30, 2013. This research is divided broadly into two tasks: Task A, which covers a broad array of topics in high energy physics; and task C, primarily concerned with cosmology.

  18. Sandia Energy - Wavelength Conversion Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to a wider range of wavelengths in this region. Phosphors based on divalent europium (Eu+2) are available in the green and even into the blue emission region. Photon...

  19. TenureTrack Position in High Energy Theory or High Energy Nuclear Theory at CUNY, Baruch College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of - Department of Physics, Electroweak Interaction Research Group

    University of New York (CUNY) beginning September 1, 2008. The initial appointment will be a cooperative Baruch College, City University of New York 17 Lexington Avenue Box A0506 New York, NY 10010 In additionTenureTrack Position in High Energy Theory or High Energy Nuclear Theory at CUNY, Baruch College

  20. Analysis of a spinning polygon wavelength swept laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Bart; Kuznetsov, Mark; Goldberg, Brian D; Whitney, Peter; Flanders, Dale C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been known for quite some time that spinning polygon, and similar, swept lasers used in OCT favor the short to long wavelength sweep direction because of four wave mixing in the gain medium. Here we have reformulated the problem in the time domain and show experimentally and through numerical simulation that these lasers are pulsed. The emitted pulses modulate the gain medium refractive index to red shift the light. Instead of new wavelengths being built up slowly from spontaneous emission, each pulse hops to a longer wavelength by nonlinear means, tracking the tunable filter. This allows high speed, low noise tuning in the blue to red direction. Based on this model, we make the first coherence length calculations for a swept source.

  1. Application of Plasma Waveguides to High Energy Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milchberg, Howard M

    2013-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The eventual success of laser-plasma based acceleration schemes for high-energy particle physics will require the focusing and stable guiding of short intense laser pulses in reproducible plasma channels. For this goal to be realized, many scientific issues need to be addressed. These issues include an understanding of the basic physics of, and an exploration of various schemes for, plasma channel formation. In addition, the coupling of intense laser pulses to these channels and the stable propagation of pulses in the channels require study. Finally, new theoretical and computational tools need to be developed to aid in the design and analysis of experiments and future accelerators. Here we propose a 3-year renewal of our combined theoretical and experimental program on the applications of plasma waveguides to high-energy accelerators. During the past grant period we have made a number of significant advances in the science of laser-plasma based acceleration. We pioneered the development of clustered gases as a new highly efficient medium for plasma channel formation. Our contributions here include theoretical and experimental studies of the physics of cluster ionization, heating, explosion, and channel formation. We have demonstrated for the first time the generation of and guiding in a corrugated plasma waveguide. The fine structure demonstrated in these guides is only possible with cluster jet heating by lasers. The corrugated guide is a slow wave structure operable at arbitrarily high laser intensities, allowing direct laser acceleration, a process we have explored in detail with simulations. The development of these guides opens the possibility of direct laser acceleration, a true miniature analogue of the SLAC RF-based accelerator. Our theoretical studies during this period have also contributed to the further development of the simulation codes, Wake and QuickPIC, which can be used for both laser driven and beam driven plasma based acceleration schemes. We will continue our development of advanced simulation tools by modifying the QuickPIC algorithm to allow for the simulation of plasma particle pick-up by the wake fields. We have also performed extensive simulations of plasma slow wave structures for efficient THz generation by guided laser beams or accelerated electron beams. We will pursue experimental studies of direct laser acceleration, and THz generation by two methods, ponderomotive-induced THz polarization, and THz radiation by laser accelerated electron beams. We also plan to study both conventional and corrugated plasma channels using our new 30 TW in our new lab facilities. We will investigate production of very long hydrogen plasma waveguides (5 cm). We will study guiding at increasing power levels through the onset of laser-induced cavitation (bubble regime) to assess the role played by the preformed channel. Experiments in direct acceleration will be performed, using laser plasma wakefields as the electron injector. Finally, we will use 2-colour ionization of gases as a high frequency THz source (<60 THz) in order for femtosecond measurements of low plasma densities in waveguides and beams.

  2. On the use of Satellite Television in High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucas Taylor; David O. Williams

    1998-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper assesses the feasibility of exploiting commercial satellite television technologies to broadcast video signals and data from major High Energy Physics facilities to collaborating institutes throughout the world.

  3. Reflection High-Energy Electron Diffraction Beam-Induced Structural...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beam-Induced Structural and Property Changes on WO3 Thin Films. Reflection High-Energy Electron Diffraction Beam-Induced Structural and Property Changes on WO3 Thin...

  4. AGN: The High-Energy Status before INTEGRAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Collmar

    2001-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Much progress in the knowledge of the high-energy emission (>50 keV) from Active Galactic Nuclei has been made during the last decade, predominately by the experiments aboard the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory. After the end of the CGRO mission and prior to the upcoming INTEGRAL mission the current status of high-energy emission properties and scenarios is summarized for different AGN classes. In addition, prospects for INTEGRAL observations of AGN are given.

  5. Stirling number Identities and High energy String Scatterings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jen-Chi Lee; Yi Yang; Sheng-Lan Ko

    2009-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We use Stirling number identities developed recently in number theory to show that ratios among high energy string scattering amplitudes in the fixed angle regime can be extracted from the Kummer function of the second kind. This result not only brings an interesting bridge between string theory and combinatoric number theory but also sheds light on the understanding of algebraic structure of high energy stringy symmetry.

  6. High Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts - Before GLAST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, Yi-Zhong; Piran, Tsvi

    2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are short and intense emission of soft {gamma}-rays, which have fascinated astronomers and astrophysicists since their unexpected discovery in 1960s. The X-ray/optical/radio afterglow observations confirm the cosmological origin of GRBs, support the fireball model, and imply a long-activity of the central engine. The high-energy {gamma}-ray emission (> 20 MeV) from GRBs is particularly important because they shed some lights on the radiation mechanisms and can help us to constrain the physical processes giving rise to the early afterglows. In this work, we review observational and theoretical studies of the high-energy emission from GRBs. Special attention is given to the expected high-energy emission signatures accompanying the canonical early-time X-ray afterglow that was observed by the Swift X-ray Telescope. We also discuss the detection prospect of the upcoming GLAST satellite and the current ground-based Cerenkov detectors.

  7. Electromagnetic cascade in high energy electron, positron, and photon interactions with intense laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. S. Bulanov; C. B. Schroeder; E. Esarey; W. P. Leemans

    2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction of high energy electrons, positrons, and photons with intense laser pulses is studied in head-on collision geometry. It is shown that electrons and/or positrons undergo a cascade-type process involving multiple emissions of photons. These photons can consequently convert into electron-positron pairs. As a result charged particles quickly lose their energy developing an exponentially decaying energy distribution, which suppresses the emission of high energy photons, thus reducing the number of electron-positron pairs being generated. Therefore, this type of interaction suppresses the development of the electromagnetic avalanche-type discharge, i.e., the exponential growth of the number of electrons, positrons, and photons does not occur in the course of interaction. The suppression will occur when 3D effects can be neglected in the transverse particle orbits, i.e., for sufficiently broad laser pulses with intensities that are not too extreme. The final distributions of electrons, positrons, and photons are calculated for the case of a high energy e-beam interacting with a counter-streaming, short intense laser pulse. The energy loss of the e-beam, which requires a self-consistent quantum description, plays an important role in this process, as well as provides a clear experimental observable for the transition from the classical to quantum regime of interaction.

  8. High-energy asymptotic expansion of the Green function for one-dimensional Fokker-Planck and Schrödinger equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toru Miyazawa

    2011-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A new formalism is presented for high-energy analysis of the Green function for Fokker-Planck and Schr\\"odinger equations in one dimension. Formulas for the asymptotic expansion in powers of the inverse wave number are derived, and conditions for the validity of the expansion are studied through the analysis of the remainder term. The short-time expansion of the Green function is also discussed.

  9. HIGH-ENERGY EMISSION INDUCED BY ULTRA-HIGH-ENERGY PHOTONS AS A PROBE OF ULTRA-HIGH-ENERGY COSMIC-RAY ACCELERATORS EMBEDDED IN THE COSMIC WEB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murase, Kohta [Department of Physics, Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The photomeson production in ultra-high-energy cosmic-ray (UHECR) accelerators such as {gamma}-ray bursts and active galaxies may lead to ultra-high-energy (UHE) {gamma}-ray emission. We show that the generation of UHE pairs in magnetized structured regions where the sources are embedded is inevitable, and accompanying {approx}> 0.1 TeV synchrotron emission provides an important probe of UHECR acceleration. It would especially be relevant for powerful transient sources, and synchrotron pair echoes may be detected by future CTA via coordinated search for transients of duration {approx}0.1-1 yr for the structured regions of {approx}Mpc. Detections will be useful for knowing structured extragalactic magnetic fields as well as properties of the sources.

  10. Exploration of Plasma Jets Approach to High Energy Density Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Chiping [Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    High-energy-density laboratory plasma (HEDLP) physics is an emerging, important area of research in plasma physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics, and particle acceleration. While the HEDLP regime occurs at extreme conditions which are often found naturally in space but not on the earth, it may be accessible by colliding high intensity plasmas such as high-energy-density plasma jets, plasmoids or compact toroids from plasma guns. The physics of plasma jets is investigated in the context of high energy density laboratory plasma research. This report summarizes results of theoretical and computational investigation of a plasma jet undergoing adiabatic compression and adiabatic expansion. A root-mean-squared (rms) envelope theory of plasma jets is developed. Comparison between theory and experiment is made. Good agreement between theory and experiment is found.

  11. Partonic EoS in High-Energy Nuclear Collisions at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Nu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Partonic EoS in High-Energy Nuclear Collisions at RHIC Nu Xuproperties. In high-energy nuclear collisions, the term ?owthe early stage of high-energy nuclear collision, both the

  12. Recoil proton distribution in high energy photoproduction processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Bartos; E. A. Kuraev; Yu. P. Peresunko; E. A. Vinokurov

    2006-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    For high energy linearly polarized photon--proton scattering we have calculated the azimuthal and polar angle distributions in inclusive on recoil proton experimental setup. We have taken into account the production of lepton and pseudoscalar meson charged pairs. The typical values of cross sections are of order of hundreds of picobarn. The size of polarization effects are of order of several percents. The results are generalized for the case of electroproduction processes on the proton at rest and for high energy proton production process on resting proton.

  13. UV curing and photoresist outgassing in high energy implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, M.A.; Erokhin, Y.; Horsky, T. [Eaton Corporation, Beverly, MA (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Thick photoresists, typically 3 microns or more in thickness, necessary for high energy implantation present some unique problems. The outgassing of thick photoresist In high energy applications varies from that of thinner resist and lower energies. It requires appropriate processing to cure without reticulation of field regions deformity of features, or blistering during subsequent processing. This paper examines different resist treatments and their effects on implanter pressure during processing. Data on outgassing of thick photoresist, outgassing effects on absolute dose and dose uniformity as measured by sheet resistance contour maps, and the variation in gas composition are presented.

  14. A Water Tank Cerenkov Detector for Very High Energy Astroparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Bauleo; A. Etchegoyen; J. O. Fernandez Niello; A. M. J. Ferrero; A. Filevich; C. K. Guerard; F. Hasenbalg; M. A. Mostafa; D. Ravignani; J. Rodriguez Martino

    1997-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Extensive airshower detection is an important issue in current astrophysics endeavours. Surface arrays detectors are a common practice since they are easy to handle and have a 100% duty cycle. In this work we present an experimental study of the parameters relevant to the design of a water Cerenkov detector for high energy airshowers. This detector is conceived as part of the surface array of the Pierre Auger Project, which is expected to be sensitive to ultra high energy cosmic rays. In this paper we focus our attention in the geometry of the tank and its inner liner material, discussing pulse shapes and charge collections.

  15. Graduate Fellows in High Energy Theory | U.S. DOE Office of Science...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Graduate Fellows in High Energy Theory High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Closed Funding...

  16. Carbon/Sulfur Nanocomposites and Additives for High-Energy Lithium...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Publications Additives and Cathode Materials for High-Energy Lithium Sulfur Batteries CarbonSulfur Nanocomposites and Additives for High-Energy Lithium Sulfur Batteries Vehicle...

  17. High-Energy Laser Diagnostics (HELD) for the Measurement of Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Energy Laser Diagnostics (HELD) for the Measurement of Diesel Particulate Matter High-Energy Laser Diagnostics (HELD) for the Measurement of Diesel Particulate Matter 2004...

  18. High-energy neutrinos in the context of multimessenger physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julia K. Becker

    2008-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The field of astroparticle physics is currently developing rapidly, since new experiments challenge our understanding of the investigated processes. Three messengers can be used to extract information on the properties of astrophysical sources: photons, charged Cosmic Rays and neutrinos. This review focuses on high-energy neutrinos (E>100 GeV) with the main topics as follows. The production mechanism of high-energy neutrinos in astrophysical shocks. The connection between the observed photon spectra and charged Cosmic Rays is described and the source properties as they are known from photon observations and from charged Cosmic Rays are presented. High-energy neutrino detection. Current detection methods are described and the status of the next generation neutrino telescopes are reviewed. In particular, water and ice Cherenkov detectors as well as radio measurements in ice and with balloon experiments are presented. In addition, future perspectives for optical, radio and acoustic detection of neutrinos are reviewed. Sources of neutrino emission. The main source classes are reviewed, i.e. galactic sources, Active Galactic Nuclei, starburst galaxies and Gamma Ray Bursts. The interaction of high energy protons with the cosmic microwave background implies the production of neutrinos, referred to as GZK neutrinos. Implications of neutrino flux limits. Recent limits given by the AMANDA experiment and their implications regarding the physics of the sources are presented.

  19. Ultra high energy neutrinos: absorption, thermal effects and signatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lunardini, Cecilia; Sabancilar, Eray; Yang, Lili, E-mail: Cecilia.Lunardini@asu.edu, E-mail: Eray.Sabancilar@asu.edu, E-mail: lyang54@asu.edu [Physics Department, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study absorption of ultra high energy neutrinos by the cosmic neutrino background, with full inclusion of the effect of the thermal distribution of the background on the resonant annihilation channel. For a hierarchical neutrino mass spectrum (with at least one neutrino with mass below ? 10{sup ?2} eV), thermal effects are important for ultra high energy neutrino sources at z?>16. The neutrino transmission probability shows no more than two separate suppression dips since the two lightest mass eigenstates contribute as a single species when thermal effects are included. Results are applied to a number of models of ultra high energy neutrino emission. Suppression effects are strong for sources that extend beyond z ? 10, which can be realized for certain top down scenarios, such as superheavy dark matter decays, cosmic strings and cosmic necklaces. For these, a broad suppression valley should affect the neutrino spectrum at least in the energy interval 10{sup 12}?10{sup 13} GeV — which therefore is disfavored for ultra high energy neutrino searches — with only a mild dependence on the neutrino mass spectrum and hierarchy. The observation of absorption effects would indicate a population of sources beyond z ? 10, and favor top-down mechanisms; it would also be an interesting probe of the physics of the relic neutrino background in the unexplored redshift interval z ? 10–100.

  20. GLAST and Very High Energy astrophysics Berrie Giebels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Polytechnique - CNRS/IN2P3 F-91128 Palaiseau Cedex, France The pioneering age of high energy gamma-ray assembled and is scheduled for launch in 2007. At that point, gamma-ray astrophysics will enter again the status of the major Cerenkov telescopes has been pre- sented. By the time the Gamma ray Large Area

  1. Calibration in High-Energy Astrophysics Statistical Computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dyk, David

    : Effective area records sensitivity as a function of energy Energy redistribution matrix can vary with energy/location Point Spread Functions can vary with energy and location Exposure Map shows how effective area variesCalibration in High-Energy Astrophysics Statistical Computation Back to Calibration Uncertainty

  2. Revised 3/30/09 High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    Revised 3/30/09 1 High Energy Physics INTERNAL CONTROLS Procedures for FY 2009 Organizational Chart with the Prime Contract, DOE, and other controlling mandates including sound business practices. Funds cannot that no research and development costs (other than LDRD work) are charged to indirect expense. 4. HEP Division

  3. Beam Dynamics Challenges in High Energy Physics Accelerators!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beam Dynamics Challenges in High Energy Physics Accelerators! Alexander Valishev! University/1/2014!A. Valishev | Beam Dynamics Challenges in HEP Accelerators!2! #12;The Olympic Motto for Accelerators! 12/1/2014!A. Valishev | Beam Dynamics Challenges in HEP Accelerators!3! ENERGY INTENSITY BRIGHTNESS

  4. airborne high energy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    airborne high energy First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Department of Geomatics...

  5. Wave Function Properties in a High Energy Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arjun Berera

    1994-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A model example is given of how properties of the hadronic light-cone wave function are revealed in a particular high energy process. The meson wave function is derived in scalar quark QCD. We apply it to compute the form of the cross section for lossless diffractive jet-production, an upcoming possiblity at HERA.

  6. VERY HIGH ENERGY GAMMA RAYS FROM THE VELA PULSAR DIRECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enomoto, Ryoji

    VERY HIGH ENERGY GAMMA RAYS FROM THE VELA PULSAR DIRECTION T. Yoshikoshi1;2, T. Kifune2, S and Mathematical Physics, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia 5005, Australia 4Institute of SpaceDepartment of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Kyoto 606, Japan 8Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory

  7. The Composition of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays Through Hybrid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    nuclei originating outside the Solar System "Ultra High Energy" E > 1017eV First discovered by interact high in the Earth's atmosphere EASs result in billions of secondary particles Fluorescence) Image produced by 16x16 PMT "Cluster Box" 3.3 m diameter mirrors collect light and focus

  8. High energy density lithium-oxygen secondary battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sammells, A.F.

    1989-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A high energy density lithium-oxygen secondary cell is described comprising a lithium-containing negative electrode; a lithium ion conducting molten salt electrolyte contacting the negative electrode; an oxygen ion conducting solid electrolyte contacting and containing the molten salt electrolyte; and an oxygen redox positive electrode contacting the oxygen ion conducting solid electrolyte.

  9. Multiplicity Distributions in QCD at Very High Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. M. Dremin

    1994-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent results in QCD on multiplicity distributions are briefly reviewed. QCD is able to predict very tiny features of multiplicity distributions which demonstrate that the negative binomial distribution (and, more generally, any infinitely divisible distribution) is inappropriate for precise description of experimental data. New fits of high energy multiplicity distributions can be derived.

  10. Direct-Write Piezoelectric Polymeric Nanogenerator with High Energy Conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Liwei

    Direct-Write Piezoelectric Polymeric Nanogenerator with High Energy Conversion Efficiency Chieh conversion efficiency. Here, we report direct-write, piezoelectric polymeric nanogenerators based on organic to direct-write poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) nanofibers with in situ mechanical stretch and electrical

  11. Neutron-Proton High-Energy Charge Exchange Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Yan; R. Tegen; T. Gutsche; V. E. Lyubovitskij; Amand Faessler

    2002-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The high energy proton-neutron charge exchange scattering reaction is studied in an effective hadron model for the energy range of s from 45.9 to 414.61 GeV*GeV. The main features of the observed differential cross section, the forward peak and the scaling behavior over a large energy region, are well reproduced.

  12. Type IIn supernovae as sources of high energy neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zirakashvili, V N

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that high-energy astrophysical neutrinos observed in the IceCube experiment can be produced by protons accelerated in extragalactic Type IIn supernova remnants by shocks propagating in the dense circumstellar medium. The nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration model is used for description of particle acceleration.

  13. High-energy scattering in noncommutative field theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Jason; Rajaraman, Arvind [Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48105 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California-Irvine, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)

    2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze high-energy scattering for noncommutative field theories using the dual gravity description. We find that the Froissart-Martin bound still holds, but that cross sections stretch in the noncommutative directions in a way dependent on the infrared cutoff. This puzzling behavior suggests new aspects of UV/IR mixing.

  14. Integrity of Data Samples and Results in High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

    plots from the Particle Data Group; each point is cum avg. #12;But there is also good in us... http articles so far; now about 1/week. · Data also contain many well understood processes that can be usedIntegrity of Data Samples and Results in High Energy Physics Jeffrey D. RichmanJeffrey D. Richman

  15. Azimuthal asymmetry in lepton-proton scattering at high energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chay, J.; Ellis, S.D.; Stirling, W.J. (Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the azimuthal angular dependence of the distribution of final-state hadrons in high-energy lepton-proton scattering. The distribution displays an azimuthal asymmetry due to both perturbative and nonperturbative effects. At the large momentum transfers attainable, for example, at the DESY {ital ep} collider HERA we expect the perturbative effects to dominate and constitute a clear test of QCD.

  16. NUCLEAR FLUID DYNAMICS VERSUS INTRANUCLEAR CASCADE--POSSIBLE EVIDENCE FOR COLLECTIVE FLOW IN CENTRAL HIGH ENERGY NUCLEAR COLLISIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stocker, H.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flow in Central High Energy Nuclear Collisions H. Stockera,theoretical models of high energy nuclear collisions andunder Contract High energy nuclear collisions offer a unique

  17. Testing the millisecond pulsar scenario of the Galactic center gamma-ray excess with very high energy gamma-rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiang Yuan; Kunihito Ioka

    2015-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent analyses of the Fermi Large Area Telescope data show an extended GeV $\\gamma$-ray excess on top of the expected diffuse background in the Galactic center region, which can be explained with annihilating dark matter or a population of millisecond pulsars (MSPs). We propose to observe the very high energy $\\gamma$-rays for distinguishing the MSP scenario from the dark matter scenario. The GeV $\\gamma$-ray MSPs should release most energy to the relativistic $e^{\\pm}$ wind, which will diffuse in the Galaxy and radiate TeV $\\gamma$-rays through inverse Compton scattering and bremsstrahlung processes. By calculating the spectrum and spatial distribution, we show that such emission is detectable with the next generation very high energy $\\gamma$-ray observatory, the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), under reasonable model parameters. It is essential to search for the multi-wavelength counterparts to the GeV $\\gamma$-ray excess for solving this mystery in the high energy universe.

  18. The slingshot effect: a possible new laser-driven high energy acceleration mechanism for electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaetano Fiore; Renato Fedele; Umberto de Angelis

    2014-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that under appropriate conditions the impact of a very short and intense laser pulse onto a plasma causes the expulsion of surface electrons with high energy in the direction opposite to the one of propagation of the pulse. This is due to the combined effects of the ponderomotive force and the huge longitudinal field arising from charge separation ("slingshot effect"). The effect should also be present with other states of matter, provided the pulse is sufficiently intense to locally cause complete ionization. An experimental test seems to be feasible and, if confirmed, would provide a new extraction and acceleration mechanism for electrons, alternative to traditional radio-frequency-based or Laser-Wake-Field ones.

  19. Inverse scattering at high energies for the multidimensional Newton equation in a long range potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandre Jollivet

    2013-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We define scattering data for the Newton equation in a potential $V\\in C^2(\\R^n,\\R)$, $n\\ge2$, that decays at infinity like $r^{-\\alpha}$ for some $\\alpha\\in (0,1]$. We provide estimates on the scattering solutions and scattering data and we prove, in particular, that the scattering data at high energies uniquely determine the short range part of the potential up to the knowledge of the long range tail of the potential. The Born approximation at fixed energy of the scattering data is also considered. We then change the definition of the scattering data to study inverse scattering in other asymptotic regimes. These results were obtained by developing the inverse scattering approach of [Novikov, 1999].

  20. Compact Muon Production and Collection Scheme for High-Energy Physics Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stratakis, Diktys

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The relative immunity of muons to synchrotron radiation suggests that they might be used in place of electrons as probes in fundamental high-energy physics experiments. Muons are commonly produced indirectly through pion decay by interaction of a charged particle beam with a target. However, the large angle and energy dispersion of the initial beams as well as the short muon lifetime limits many potential applications. Here, we describe a fast method for manipulating the longitudinal and transverse phase-space of a divergent pion-muon beam to enable efficient capture and downstream transport with minimum losses. We also discuss the design of a handling system for the removal of unwanted secondary particles from the target region and thus reduce activation of the machine. The compact muon source we describe can be used for fundamental physics research in neutrino experiments.

  1. Towards hadronic shower timing with CALICE Analog Hadron Calorimeter, Calorimetry for High Energy Frontier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramilli, M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Towards hadronic shower timing with CALICE Analog Hadron Calorimeter, Calorimetry for High Energy Frontier

  2. Experimental And Theoretical High Energy Physics Research At UCLA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cousins, Robert D. [University of California Los Angeles] [University of California Los Angeles

    2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of the UCLA High Energy Physics DOE Grant No. DE-FG02- 91ER40662. This report covers the last grant project period, namely the three years beginning January 15, 2010, plus extensions through April 30, 2013. The report describes the broad range of our experimental research spanning direct dark matter detection searches using both liquid xenon (XENON) and liquid argon (DARKSIDE); present (ICARUS) and R&D for future (LBNE) neutrino physics; ultra-high-energy neutrino and cosmic ray detection (ANITA); and the highest-energy accelerator-based physics with the CMS experiment and CERN’s Large Hadron Collider. For our theory group, the report describes frontier activities including particle astrophysics and cosmology; neutrino physics; LHC interaction cross section calculations now feasible due to breakthroughs in theoretical techniques; and advances in the formal theory of supergravity.

  3. Off-shell helicity amplitudes in high-energy factorization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piotr Kotko

    2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Catani-Ciafaloni-Hautmann high-energy factorization approach a cross section is expressed as a convolution of unintegrated gluon densities and a gauge-invariant hard process, in which two incoming gluons are off-shell with momenta satisfying certain high-energy kinematics. We present two methods of evaluating the tree-level hard process with multiple final states. The first one assumes that only one of the gluons is off-shell and relies on the Slavnov-Taylor identities. Such asymmetric configuration of incoming gluons is phenomenologically important in small x probing by forward processes. The second method deals also with two off-shell gluons and is based on the analytic continuation of the off-shell gluons momenta to the complex space. The methods were implemented into Monte Carlo computer programs and used in phenomenological applications. The results of both methods are straightforwardly related to Lipatov's effective vertices in quasi-multi-regge kinematics.

  4. Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays from Decaying Superheavy Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Berezinsky

    1998-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Decaying superheavy particles can be produced by Topological Defects or, in case they are quasi-stable, as relics from the early Universe. The decays of these particles can be the sources of observed Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays ($E \\sim 10^{10} - 10^{12} GeV$). The Topological Defects as the UHE CR sources are critically reviewed and cosmic necklaces and monopole-antiminopole pairs are identified as most plausible sources. The relic superheavy particles are shown to be clustering in the halo and their decays produce UHE CR without GZK cutoff. The Lightest Supersymmetric Particles with Ultra High Energies are naturally produced in the cascades accompanying the decays of superheavy particles. These particles are discussed as UHE carriers in the Universe.

  5. Searches For New Physics with High Energy Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Sauvan

    2009-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent experimental results of searches for new phenomena performed at high energy colliders are reviewed. The results reported are based on data samples of up to 1 fb^-1 and 4 fb^-1 collected at HERA and at the Tevatron, respectively. No significant evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model has been found and limits at the 95% confidence level have been set on the mass and couplings of several possible new particles.

  6. High energy laser optics manufacturing: a preliminary study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baird, E.D.

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents concepts and methods, major conclusions, and major recommendations concerning the fabrication of high energy laser optics (HELO) that are to be machined by the Large Optics Diamond Turning Machine (LODTM) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Detailed discussions of concepts and methods proposed for metrological operations, polishing of reflective surfaces, mounting of optical components, construction of mirror substrates, and applications of coatings are included.

  7. Amplitudes for High Energy Factorization via BCFW recursion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Serino, Mirko

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, an extension of the BCFW on-shell recursion relation suitable to compute gauge invariant scattering amplitudes with off-shell particles has been presented for Yang-Mills theories with fermions. In particular, 4- and 5-point amplitudes have been completely worked out. The results are needed for the study of multi-parton scattering at hadron colliders in the framework of High Energy Factorization (HEF).

  8. High-energy Astrophysics and the Virtual Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Padovani

    2005-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Virtual Observatory (VO) will revolutionise the way we do Astronomy by allowing easy access to all astronomical data and by making the handling and analysis of datasets at various locations across the globe much simpler and faster. I report here on the need for the VO and its status in Europe, concentrating on the recently started EURO-VO project, and then give two specific applications of VO tools to high-energy astrophysics.

  9. CERN and high energy physics, the grand picture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The lecture will touch on several topics, to illustrate the role of CERN in the present and future of high-energy physics: how does CERN work? What is the role of the scientific community, of bodies like Council and SPC, and of international cooperation, in the definition of CERN's scientific programme? What are the plans for the future of the LHC and of the non-LHC physics programme? What is the role of R&D; and technology transfer at CERN?

  10. Solvated electron lithium electrode for high energy density battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sammells, A.F.

    1987-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A rechargeable high energy density lithium-based cell is described comprising: a solvated electron lithium negative electrode comprising a solution of lithium dissolved in liquid ammonia; a lithium ion conducting solid electrolyte contacting the negative electrode; a liquid non-aqueous lithium ion conducting electrolyte comprising a lithium ion conducting supporting electrolyte dissolved in a non-aqueous solvent. The liquid electrolyte contacting the lithium ion conducting solid electrolyte; and a solid lithium intercalation positive electrode contacting the liquid electrolyte.

  11. High Energy Neutrino Astronomy - the cosmic-ray connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas K. Gaisser

    2000-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Several of the models for origin of the highest energy cosmic rays also predict significant neutrino fluxes. A common factor of the models is that they must provide sufficient power to supply the observed energy in the extragalactic component of the cosmic radiation. The assumption that a comparable amount of energy goes into high-energy neutrinos allows a model-independent estimate of the neutrino signal that may be expected.

  12. Science with the new generation high energy gamma- ray experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Alvarez; D. D'Armiento; G. Agnetta; A. Alberdi; A. Antonelli; A. Argan; P. Assis; E. A. Baltz; C. Bambi; G. Barbiellini; H. Bartko; M. Basset; D. Bastieri; P. Belli; G. Benford; L. Bergstrom; R. Bernabei; G. Bertone; A. Biland; B. Biondo; F. Bocchino; E. Branchini; M. Brigida; T. Bringmann; P. Brogueira; A. Bulgarelli; J. A. Caballero; G. A. Caliandro; P. Camarri; F. Cappella; P. Caraveo; R. Carbone; M. Carvajal; S. Casanova; A. J. Castro-Tirado; O. Catalano; R. Catena; F. Celi; A. Celotti; R. Cerulli; A. Chen; R. Clay; V. Cocco; J. Conrad; E. Costa; A. Cuoco; G. Cusumano; C. J. Dai; B. Dawson; B. De Lotto; G. De Paris; A. de Ugarte Postigo; E. Del Monte; C. Delgado; A. Di Ciaccio; G. Di Cocco; S. Di Falco; G. Di Persio; B. L. Dingus; A. Dominguez; F. Donato; I. Donnarumma; M. Doro; J. Edsjo; J. M. Espino Navas; M. C. Espirito Santo; Y. Evangelista; C. Evoli; D. Fargion; C. Favuzzi; M. Feroci; M. Fiorini; L. Foggetta; N. Fornengo; T. Froysland; M. Frutti; F. Fuschino; J. L. Gomez; M. Gomez; D. Gaggero; N. Galante; M. I. Gallardo; M. Galli; J. E. Garcia; M. Garczarczyk; F. Gargano; M. Gaug; F. Gianotti; S. Giarrusso; B. Giebels; N. Giglietto; P. Giommi; F. Giordano; A. Giuliani; J. Glicenstein; P. Goncalves; D. Grasso; M. Guerriero; H. L. He; A. Incicchitti; J. Kirk; H. H. Kuang; A. La Barbera; G. La Rosa; C. Labanti; G. Lamanna; I. Lapshov; F. Lazzarotto; S. Liberati; F. Liello; P. Lipari; F. Longo; F. Loparco; M. Lozano; P. G. Lucentini De Sanctis; J. M. Ma; M. C. Maccarone; L. Maccione; V. Malvezzi; A. Mangano; M. Mariotti; M. Marisaldi; I. Martel; A. Masiero; E. Massaro; M. Mastropietro; E. Mattaini; F. Mauri; M. N. Mazziotta; S. Mereghetti; T. Mineo; S. Mizobuchi; A. Moiseev; M. Moles; C. Monte; F. Montecchia; E. Morelli; A. Morselli; I. Moskalenko; F. Nozzoli; J. F. Ormes; M. A. Peres-Torres; L. Pacciani; A. Pellizzoni; F. Perez-Bernal; F. Perotti; P. Picozza; L. Pieri; M. Pietroni; M. Pimenta; A. Pina; C. Pittori; C. Pontoni; G. Porrovecchio; F. Prada; M. Prest; D. Prosperi; R. Protheroe; G. Pucella; J. M. Quesada; J. M. Quintana; J. R. Quintero; S. Raino; M. Rapisarda; M. Rissi; J. Rodriguez; E. Rossi; G. Rowell; A. Rubini; F. Russo; M. Sanchez-Conde; B. Sacco; V. Scapin; M. Schelke; A. Segreto; A. Sellerholm; X. D. Sheng; A. Smith; P. Soffitta; R. Sparvoli; P. Spinelli; V. Stamatescu; L. S. Stark; M. Tavani; G. Thornton; L. G. Titarchuk; B. Tome; A. Traci; M. Trifoglio; A. Trois; P. Vallania; E. Vallazza; S. Vercellone; S. Vernetto; V. Vitale; N. Wild; Z. P. Ye; A. Zambra; F. Zandanel; D. Zanello

    2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This Conference is the fifth of a series of Workshops on High Energy Gamma- ray Experiments, following the Conferences held in Perugia 2003, Bari 2004, Cividale del Friuli 2005, Elba Island 2006. This year the focus was on the use of gamma-ray to study the Dark Matter component of the Universe, the origin and propagation of Cosmic Rays, Extra Large Spatial Dimensions and Tests of Lorentz Invariance.

  13. Science with the new generation high energy gamma- ray experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, M; Agnetta, G; Alberdi, A; Antonelli, A; Argan, A; Assis, P; Baltz, E A; Bambi, C; Barbiellini, G; Bartko, H; Basset, M; Bastieri, D; Belli, P; Benford, G; Bergström, L; Bernabei, R; Bertone, G; Biland, A; Biondo, B; Bocchino, F; Branchini, E; Brigida, M; Bringmann, T; Brogueira, P; Bulgarelli, A; Caballero, J A; Caliandro, G A; Camarri, P; Cappella, F; Caraveo, P; Carbone, R; Carvajal, M; Casanova, S; Castro-Tirado, A J; Catalano, O; Catena, R; Celi, F; Celotti, A; Cerulli, R; Chen, A; Clay, R; Cocco, V; Conrad, J; Costa, E; Cuoco, A; Cusumano, G; Dai, C J; Dawson, B; De Lotto, B; De Paris, G; Postigo, A de Ugarte; Del Monte, E; Delgado, C; Di Ciaccio, A; Di Cocco, G; Di Falco, S; Di Persio, G; Dingus, B L; Dominguez, A; Donato, F; Donnarumma, I; Doro, M; Edsjö, J; Navas, J M Espino; Santo, M C Espirito; Evangelista, Y; Evoli, C; Fargion, D; Favuzzi, C; Feroci, M; Fiorini, M; Foggetta, L; Fornengo, N; Froysland, T; Frutti, M; Fuschino, F; Gómez, J L; Gómez, M; Gaggero, D; Galante, N; Gallardo, M I; Galli, M; García, J E; Garczarczyk, M; Gargano, F; Gaug, M; Gianotti, F; Giarrusso, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Giuliani, A; Glicenstein, J; Gonçalves, P; Grasso, D; Guerriero, M; He, H L; Incicchitti, A; Kirk, J; Kuang, H H; La Barbera, A; La Rosa, G; Labanti, C; Lamanna, G; Lapshov, I; Lazzarotto, F; Liberati, S; Liello, F; Lipari, P; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lozano, M; De Sanctis, P G Lucentini; Ma, J M; Maccarone, M C; Maccione, L; Malvezzi, V; Mangano, A; Mariotti, M; Marisaldi, M; Martel, I; Masiero, A; Massaro, E; Mastropietro, M; Mattaini, E; Mauri, F; Mazziotta, M N; Mereghetti, S; Mineo, T; Mizobuchi, S; Moiseev, A; Moles, M; Monte, C; Montecchia, F; Morelli, E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I; Nozzoli, F; Ormes, J F; Peres-Torres, M A; Pacciani, L; Pellizzoni, A; Pérez-Bernal, F; Perotti, F; Picozza, P; Pieri, L; Pietroni, M; Pimenta, M; Pina, A; Pittori, C; Pontoni, C; Porrovecchio, G; Prada, F; Prest, M; Prosperi, D; Protheroe, R; Pucella, G; Quesada, J M; Quintana, J M; Quintero, J R; Rainó, S; Rapisarda, M; Rissi, M; Rodríguez, J; Rossi, E; Rowell, G; Rubini, A; Russo, F; Sanchez-Conde, M; Sacco, B; Scapin, V; Schelke, M; Segreto, A; Sellerholm, A; Sheng, X D; Smith, A; Soffitta, P; Sparvoli, R; Spinelli, P; Stamatescu, V; Stark, L S; Tavani, M; Thornton, G; Titarchuk, L G; Tomé, B; Traci, A; Trifoglio, M; Trois, A; Vallania, P; Vallazza, E; Vercellone, S; Vernetto, S; Vitale, V; Wild, N; Ye, Z P; Zambra, A; Zandanel, F; Zanello, D

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Conference is the fifth of a series of Workshops on High Energy Gamma- ray Experiments, following the Conferences held in Perugia 2003, Bari 2004, Cividale del Friuli 2005, Elba Island 2006. This year the focus was on the use of gamma-ray to study the Dark Matter component of the Universe, the origin and propagation of Cosmic Rays, Extra Large Spatial Dimensions and Tests of Lorentz Invariance.

  14. Tunneling through high energy barriers in simulated quantum annealing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elizabeth Crosson; Mingkai Deng

    2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the performance of simulated quantum annealing (SQA) on an optimization problem for which simulated classical annealing (SA) is provably inefficient because of a high energy barrier. We present evidence that SQA can pass through this barrier to find the global minimum efficiently. This demonstrates the potential for SQA to inherit some of the advantages of quantum annealing (QA), since this problem has been previously shown to be efficiently solvable by quantum adiabatic optimization.

  15. High energy physics - The large and the small

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santoro, Alberto [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2012-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In this Sixth International School on Field Theory and Gravitation, I was invited to give this talk to the students and researchers of Field Theory mainly about LHC - The Large Hadron Collider and results. I will try to summarize the main daily life of the high energy physics and give an idea about the experiments and the expectations for the near future. I will comment the present results and the prospects to LHC/CMS.

  16. High energy XeBr electric discharge laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sze, Robert C. (Santa Fe, NM); Scott, Peter B. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high energy XeBr laser for producing coherent radiation at 282 nm. The XeBr laser utilizes an electric discharge as the excitation source to minimize formation of molecular ions thereby minimizing absorption of laser radiation by the active medium. Additionally, HBr is used as the halogen donor which undergoes harpooning reactions with Xe.sub.M * to form XeBr*.

  17. High energy KrCl electric discharge laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sze, Robert C. (Santa Fe, NM); Scott, Peter B. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high energy KrCl laser for producing coherent radiation at 222 nm. Output energies on the order of 100 mJ per pulse are produced utilizing a discharge excitation source to minimize formation of molecular ions, thereby minimizing absorption of laser radiation by the active medium. Additionally, HCl is used as a halogen donor which undergoes a harpooning reaction with metastable Kr.sub.M * to form KrCl.

  18. A High Energy Electron and Photon Detector Simulation System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srikanta Sinha

    2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed Monte-Carlo code has been developed from basic principles that simulates almost all of the basic photon and charged particle interactions. The code is used to derive the response functions of a high energy photon detector to incident beams of photons of various energies. The detector response matrices (DRMs) are calculated using this code. Deconvolution of an artificially generated spectrum is presented.

  19. Frontiers for Discovery in High Energy Density Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, R. C.; Katsouleas, T.; Arons, J.; Baring, M.; Deeney, C.; Di Mauro, L.; Ditmire, T.; Falcone, R.; Hammer, D.; Hill, W.; Jacak, B.; Joshi, C.; Lamb, F.; Lee, R.; Logan, B. G.; Melissinos, A.; Meyerhofer, D.; Mori, W.; Murnane, M.; Remington, B.; Rosner, R.; Schneider, D.; Silvera, I.; Stone, J.; Wilde, B.; Zajc. W.

    2004-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The report is intended to identify the compelling research opportunities of high intellectual value in high energy density physics. The opportunities for discovery include the broad scope of this highly interdisciplinary field that spans a wide range of physics areas including plasma physics, laser and particle beam physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics, atomic and molecular physics, materials science and condensed matter physics, intense radiation-matter interaction physics, fluid dynamics, and magnetohydrodynamics

  20. An Experimental and Theoretical High Energy Physics Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shipsey, Ian

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Purdue High Energy Physics Group conducts research in experimental and theoretical elementary particle physics and experimental high energy astrophysics. Our goals, which we share with high energy physics colleagues around the world, are to understand at the most fundamental level the nature of matter, energy, space and time, and in order to explain the birth, evolution and fate of the Universe. The experiments in which we are currently involved are: CDF, CLEO-c, CMS, LSST, and VERITAS. We have been instrumental in establishing two major in-house facilities: The Purdue Particle Physics Microstructure Detector Facility (P3MD) in 1995 and the CMS Tier-2 center in 2005. The research efforts of the theory group span phenomenological and theoretical aspects of the Standard Model as well as many of its possible extensions. Recent work includes phenomenological consequences of supersymmetric models, string theory and applications of gauge/gravity duality, the cosmological implications of massive gravitons, and the physics of extra dimensions.

  1. Experimental and theoretical high energy physics research. [UCLA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress in the various components of the UCLA High-Energy Physics Research program is summarized, including some representative figures and lists of resulting presentations and published papers. Principal efforts were directed at the following: (I) UCLA hadronization model, PEP4/9 e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} analysis, {bar P} decay; (II) ICARUS and astroparticle physics (physics goals, technical progress on electronics, data acquisition, and detector performance, long baseline neutrino beam from CERN to the Gran Sasso and ICARUS, future ICARUS program, and WIMP experiment with xenon), B physics with hadron beams and colliders, high-energy collider physics, and the {phi} factory project; (III) theoretical high-energy physics; (IV) H dibaryon search, search for K{sub L}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{gamma}{gamma} and {pi}{sup 0}{nu}{bar {nu}}, and detector design and construction for the FNAL-KTeV project; (V) UCLA participation in the experiment CDF at Fermilab; and (VI) VLPC/scintillating fiber R D.

  2. Proceedings of the 2009 CERN-Latin-American School of High-Energy Physics, Recinto Quirama, Colombia, 15 - 28 March 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Grojean; M. Spiropulu

    2010-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The CERN-Latin-American School of High-Energy Physics is intended to give young physicists an introduction to the theoretical aspects of recent advances in elementary particle physics. These proceedings contain lectures on quantum field theory, quantum chromodynamics, physics beyond the Standard Model, neutrino physics, flavour physics and CP violation, particle cosmology, high-energy astro-particle physics, and heavy-ion physics, as well as trigger and data acquisition, and commissioning and early physics analysis of the ATLAS and CMS experiments. Also included are write-ups of short review projects performed by the student discussions groups.

  3. Wavelength-doubling optical parametric oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Armstrong, Darrell J. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, Arlee V. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A wavelength-doubling optical parametric oscillator (OPO) comprising a type II nonlinear optical medium for generating a pair of degenerate waves at twice a pump wavelength and a plurality of mirrors for rotating the polarization of one wave by 90 degrees to produce a wavelength-doubled beam with an increased output energy by coupling both of the degenerate waves out of the OPO cavity through the same output coupler following polarization rotation of one of the degenerate waves.

  4. Optical sensing based on wavelength modulation spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buckley, Steven G. (Redmond, WA); Gharavi, Mohammadreza (Tehran, IR); Borchers; Marco (Berlin, DE)

    2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Techniques, apparatus and systems for using Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy measurements to optically monitor gas media such as gases in gas combustion chambers.

  5. Spin rotation of polarized beams in high energy storage ring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. G. Baryshevsky

    2006-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The equations for spin evolution of a particle in a storage ring are obtained considering contributions from the tensor electric and magnetic polarizabilities of the particle along with the contributions from spin rotation and birefringence effect in polarized matter of an internal target. % Study of the spin rotation and birefringence effects for a particle in a high energy storage ring provides for measurement both the spin-dependent real part of the coherent elastic zero-angle scattering amplitude and tensor electric (magnetic) polarizabilities.

  6. A new code for radiation processes in high energy plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Belmont; J. Malzac; A. Marcowith

    2008-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Extreme objects such as X-ray binaries, AGN, or $\\gamma$-ray bursters harbor high energy plasmas whose properties are not well understood yet. Not only are they responsible of the hard X- and $\\gamma$-ray emission we observe but also they have a strong influence on the main dynamics and energetics of these objects themselves. Here we present a new kinetic code that solves the evolution equations for particles and photons around compact objects. It produces spectra that will be compared with observations from Simbol-X to constrain the radiation and acceleration processes in these objects.

  7. Operational Radiation Protection in High-Energy Physics Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rokni, S.H.; Fasso, A.; Liu, J.C.; /SLAC

    2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview of operational radiation protection (RP) policies and practices at high-energy electron and proton accelerators used for physics research is presented. The different radiation fields and hazards typical of these facilities are described, as well as access control and radiation control systems. The implementation of an operational RP programme is illustrated, covering area and personnel classification and monitoring, radiation surveys, radiological environmental protection, management of induced radioactivity, radiological work planning and control, management of radioactive materials and wastes, facility dismantling and decommissioning, instrumentation and training.

  8. Charmonium Transverse Momentum Distribution in High Energy Nuclear Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zebo Tang; Nu Xu; Kai Zhou; Pengfei Zhuang

    2014-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Charmonium transverse momentum distribution is more sensitive to the nature of the hot QCD matter created in high energy nuclear collisions, in comparison with the yield. Taking a detailed transport approach for charmonium motion together with a hydrodynamic description for the medium evolution, the cancelation between the two hot nuclear matter effects, the dissociation and the regeneration, controls the charmonium transverse momentum distribution. Especially, the second moment of the distribution can be used to differentiate between the hot mediums produced at SPS, RHIC and LHC energies.

  9. Very high energy probes of the quark-gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludlam, T.; Paige, F.; Madansky, L.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Among the penetrating probes of nuclear matter the most frequently discussed have been those which involve the detection of photons or leptons with m/sub T/ approx. = P/sub T/ < 3 GeV. This is the expected range of emission from a hot, thermalized plasma of quarks and gluons. The suggestion has been made that in very high energy collisions of nuclei the properties of high P/sub T/ jets may also reflect the characteristics of the nuclear medium through which the parent partons have propagated just after the collision. In this note we expand on the possible uses of such a probe.

  10. Meson production in high-energy electron-nucleus scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Göran Fäldt

    2010-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental studies of meson production through two-photon fusion in inelastic electron-nucleus scattering is now under way. A high-energy photon radiated by the incident electron is fused with a soft photon radiated by the nucleus. The process takes place in the small-angle-Coulomb region of nuclear scattering. We expound the theory for this production process as well as its interference with coherent-radiative-meson production. In particular, we investigate the distortion of the electron wave function due to multiple-Coulomb scattering.

  11. High Energy Colliders as Tools to Understand the Early Universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tait, Tim (ANL) [ANL

    2008-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Cosmological observations have reached a new era of precision, and reveal many interesting and puzzling features of the Universe. I will briefly review two of the most exciting mysteries: the nature of the dark components of the Universe, and the origin of the asymmetry between matter and anti-matter. I will argue that our best hope of unraveling these questions will need to combine information from the heavens with measurements in the lab at high energy particle accelerators. The end of run II of the Tevatron, the up-coming Large Hadron Collider and proposed International Linear Collider all have great potential to help us answer these questions in the near future.

  12. Dynamics of heavy flavor quarks in high energy nuclear collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Beraudo

    2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A general overview on the role of heavy quarks as probes of the medium formed in high energy nuclear collisions is presented. Experimental data compared to model calculations at low and moderate pT are exploited to extract information on the transport coefficients of the medium, on possible modifications of heavy flavor hadronization in a hot environment and to provide quantitative answers to the issue of kinetic (and chemical, at conceivable future experimental facilities) thermalization of charm. Finally, the role of heavy flavor at high pT as a tool to study the mass and color-charge dependence the jet quenching is also analyzed.

  13. DDbar Correlations probing Thermalization in High-Energy Nuclear Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Schweda; X. Zhu; M. Bleicher; S. L. Huang; H. Stoecker; N. Xu; P. Zhuang

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose to measure azimuthal correlations of heavy-flavor hadrons to address the status of thermalization at the partonic stage of light quarks and gluons in high-energy nuclear collisions. In particular, we show that hadronic interactions at the late stage cannot significantly disturb the initial back-to-back azimuthal correlations of DDbar pairs. Thus, a decrease or the complete absence of these initial correlations does indicate frequent interactions of heavy-flavor quarks and also light partons in the partonic stage, which are essential for the early thermalization of light partons.

  14. Thermalization in collisions of large nuclei at high energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aleksi Kurkela

    2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrodynamical analysis of experimental data of ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions seems to indicate that the hot QCD matter created in the collisions thermalizes very quickly. Theoretically, we have no idea why this should be true. In this proceeding, I will describe how the thermalization takes place in the most theoretically clean limit -- that of large nuclei at asymptotically high energy per nucleon, where the system is described by weak-coupling QCD. In this limit, plasma instabilities dominate the dynamics from immediately after the collision until well after the plasma becomes nearly in equilibrium at time t \\alpha^(-5/2)Q^(-1).

  15. High Energy Absorption Top Nozzle For A Nuclaer Fuel Assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sparrow, James A. (Irmo, SC); Aleshin, Yuriy (Columbia, SC); Slyeptsov, Aleksey (Columbia, SC)

    2004-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A high energy absorption top nozzle for a nuclear fuel assembly that employs an elongated upper tubular housing and an elongated lower tubular housing slidable within the upper tubular housing. The upper and lower housings are biased away from each other by a plurality of longitudinally extending springs that are restrained by a longitudinally moveable piston whose upward travel is limited within the upper housing. The energy imparted to the nozzle by a control rod scram is mostly absorbed by the springs and the hydraulic affect of the piston within the nozzle.

  16. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,sand CERNLandLargefor High Energy

  17. Engineering of High Energy Cathode Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 FederalTexas Energyof 2005 atDepartment ofLLCEngineering of High Energy

  18. Development of High Energy Cathode Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197E T A * S H IMaterials Development of High Energy Cathode

  19. Engineering of High Energy Cathode Material | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisoryStandard |inHVACEnforcementEngaging Students in20High Energy Cathode

  20. Engineering of High Energy Cathode Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisoryStandard |inHVACEnforcementEngaging Students in20High EnergyHigh

  1. Engineering of high energy cathode material | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisoryStandard |inHVACEnforcementEngaging Students in20High EnergyHighhigh

  2. Long pulse production from short pulses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Toeppen, John S. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of producing a long output pulse (SA) from a short pump pulse (P), using an elongated amplified fiber (11) having a doped core (12) that provides an amplifying medium for light of one color when driven into an excited state by light of a shorter wavelength and a surrounding cladding 13. A seed beam (S) of the longer wavelength is injected into the core (12) at one end of the fiber (11) and a pump pulse (P) of the shorter wavelength is injected into the cladding (13) at the other end of the fiber (11). The counter-propagating seed beam (S) and pump pulse (P) will produce an amplified output pulse (SA) having a time duration equal to twice the transit time of the pump pulse (P) through the fiber (11) plus the length of the pump pulse (P).

  3. Long pulse production from short pulses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Toeppen, J.S.

    1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of producing a long output pulse from a short pump pulse is disclosed, using an elongated amplified fiber having a doped core that provides an amplifying medium for light of one color when driven into an excited state by light of a shorter wavelength and a surrounding cladding. A seed beam of the longer wavelength is injected into the core at one end of the fiber and a pump pulse of the shorter wavelength is injected into the cladding at the other end of the fiber. The counter-propagating seed beam and pump pulse will produce an amplified output pulse having a time duration equal to twice the transit time of the pump pulse through the fiber plus the length of the pump pulse. 3 figs.

  4. Wavelength Determination for Solar Features Observed by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on Hinode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown,C.; Hara, H.; Kamio, S.; Feldman, U.; Seely, J.; Doschek, G.; Mariska, J.; Korendyke, C.; Lang, J.; Dere, K.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wavelength calibration of solar lines observed by the high resolution EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on the Hinode satellite is reported. Spectral features of the quiet sun and of two mildly active areas were measured and calibrated. A listing of the stronger observed lines with identification of the leading contributor ions is presented. 41 lines are reported, with 90% identified. Wavelength precisions (2{sigma}) of {+-}0.0031 Angstroms for the EIS short band and {+-}0.0029 Angstroms for the EIS long band are obtained. These lines, typical of 1-2x10{sup 6} K plasmas, are recommended as standards for the establishment of EIS wavelength scales. The temperature of EIS varies by about 1.5 C around the orbit and also with spacecraft pointing. The correlation of these temperature changes with wavelength versus pixel number scale changes is reported.

  5. Radiation from polarized electrons in oriented crystals at high energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. N. Baier; V. M. Katkov

    2004-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation from high energy electrons in an oriented crystal can be considered in a frame of the quasiclassical operator method which appears to be a most satisfactory approach to the problem. Under some quite generic assumptions the general expression is derived for the probability of circularly polarized photon emission from the longitudinally polarized electron in oriented crystal. The particular mechanism of radiation depends on interrelation between the angle of incidence $\\vartheta_0$ (angle between the momentum of initial electron and axis (plane) of crystal) and angle $\\vartheta_v \\equiv V_0/m$ ($V_0$ is the scale of a potential of axis or a plane relative to which the angle $\\vartheta_0$ is defined). When $\\vartheta_0 \\ll \\vartheta_v$ one has magnetic bremsstrahlung type of radiation (with corrections $\\propto \\vartheta_0^2$ which are due to inhomogeneous character of field in crystal). When $\\vartheta_0 \\gg \\vartheta_v$ one obtains the theory of coherent bremsstrahlung, while for $\\vartheta_0 \\geq \\vartheta_v$ one arrives to the modified theory of coherent bremsstrahlung. At high energy radiation in oriented crystals is strongly enhanced comparing with standard bremsstrahlung.

  6. Ultra High Energy Neutrino Signature in Top-Down Scenario

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberto Aloisio

    2006-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrinos are the best candidates to test the extreme Universe and ideas beyond the Standard Model of particle Physics. Once produced, neutrinos do not suffer any kind of attenuation by intervening radiation fields like the Cosmic Microwave Background and are not affected by magnetic fields. In this sense neutrinos are useful messengers from the far and young Universe. In the present paper we will discuss a particular class of sources of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays introduced to explain the possible excess of events with energy larger than the Graisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin cut-off. These sources, collectively called top-down, share a common feature: UHE particles are produced in the decay or annihilation of superheavy, exotic, particles. As we will review in the present paper, the largest fraction of Ultra High Energy particles produced in the top-down scenario are neutrinos. The study of these radiation offers us a unique opportunity to test the exotic mechanisms of the top-down scenario.

  7. High Energy Physics Program at Texas A and M University

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high energy physics program has continued its experimental activities over. In CDF, the Texas A M group has led an effort to design an upgrade for the silicon vertex detector, and is currently working with the rest of the collaboration on the next major data taking run. In MACRO, work was done on the development of the final version of the wave form digitizing system being implemented for the entire scintillator system. This work is nearing completion, and the system is expected to be up and running on the detector by summer 1993. Work was done within the SDC group to develop gas microstrip chambers for use in precision tracking at the SSC, and in the GEM group, toward the development of a suitable forward calorimeter design. The theoretical high energy physics program has continued the study of a very successful string-derived model that unifies all known interactions: flipped SU(5), which is the leading candidate for a TOE. Work has also continued on some generalizations of the symmetries of string theory, known as W algebras. These are expected to have applications in two-dimensional conformal field theory, two-dimensional extensions of gravity and topological gravity and W-string theory.

  8. Progress in ultra high energy neutrino experiments using radio techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Jiali [Physics department, Kunming University, Kunming, 650214 (China); Tiedt, Douglas [Physics department, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD, 57701-3995 (United States)

    2013-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Studying the source of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray (UHECR) can provide important clues on the understanding of UHE particle physics, astrophysics, and other extremely energetic phenomena in the universe. However, charged CR particles are deflected by magnetic fields and can not point back to the source. Furthermore, UHECR charged particles above the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin (GZK) cutoff (about 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} eV) suffer severe energy loss due to the interaction with the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMBR). Consequently almost all the information carried by CR particles about their origin is lost. Neutrinos, which are neutral particles and have extremely weak interactions with other materials can arrive at the earth without deflection and absorption. Therefore UHE neutrinos can be traced back to the place where they are produced. Due to their weak interaction and ultra high energies (thus extremely low flux) the detection of UHE neutrinos requires a large collecting area and massive amounts of material. Cherenkov detection at radio frequency, which has long attenuation lengths and can travel freely in natural dense medium (ice, rock and salt et al), can fulfill the detection requirement. Many UHE neutrino experiments are being performed by radio techniques using natural ice, lunar, and salt as detection mediums. These experiments have obtained much data about radio production, propagation and detection, and the upper limit of UHE neutrino flux.

  9. Fifth high-energy heavy-ion study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This was the fifth of a continuing series of summer studies held at LBL to discuss high energy heavy ion collisions. Recently, a similar meeting has been held on alternate years at GSI (Darmstadt); and, in 1979, we held a meeting at LBL exclusively devoted to ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions. Two new features distinguish this study from earlier meetings in the series. First, the energy range for discussion was broadened by including collisions from about 20 MeV/nucleon to the highest available in the cosmic radiation. The lower range, particularly below 100 MeV/nucleon, will be under intense study in the near future with machines such as the upgraded Bevalac, Michigan State University Superconducting Cyclotron, GANIL in France, and the SC at CERN. Recently, the high energy collision regime has been expanded by the successful operation of the CERN ISR with alpha particles. Second, in addition to an extensive program of invited talks, we decided for the first time to actively solicit contributions. Forty-seven individual items from the conference were prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  10. Strongly Interacting Matter at Very High Energy Density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLerran, L.

    2011-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors discuss the study of matter at very high energy density. In particular: what are the scientific questions; what are the opportunities to makes significant progress in the study of such matter and what facilities are now or might be available in the future to answer the scientific questions? The theoretical and experimental study of new forms of high energy density matter is still very much a 'wild west' field. There is much freedom for developing new concepts which can have order one effects on the way we think about such matter. It is also a largely 'lawless' field, in that concepts and methods are being developed as new information is generated. There is also great possibility for new experimental discovery. Most of the exciting results from RHIC experiments were unanticipated. The methods used for studying various effects like flow, jet quenching, the ridge, two particle correlations etc. were developed as experiments evolved. I believe this will continue to be the case at LHC and as we use existing and proposed accelerators to turn theoretical conjecture into tangible reality. At some point this will no doubt evolve into a precision science, and that will make the field more respectable, but for my taste, the 'wild west' times are the most fun.

  11. Sharpening of field emitter tips using high-energy ions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Musket, Ronald G. (Danville, CA)

    1999-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for sharpening arrays of field emitter tips of field emission cathodes, such as found in field-emission, flat-panel video displays. The process uses sputtering by high-energy (more than 30 keV) ions incident along or near the longitudinal axis of the field emitter to sharpen the emitter with a taper from the tip or top of the emitter down to the shank of the emitter. The process is particularly applicable to sharpening tips of emitters having cylindrical or similar (e.g., pyramidal) symmetry. The process will sharpen tips down to radii of less than 12 nm with an included angle of about 20 degrees. Because the ions are incident along or near the longitudinal axis of each emitter, the tips of gated arrays can be sharpened by high-energy ion beams rastered over the arrays using standard ion implantation equipment. While the process is particularly applicable for sharpening of arrays of field emitters in field-emission flat-panel displays, it can be effectively utilized in the fabrication of other vacuum microelectronic devices that rely on field emission of electrons.

  12. High energy hadron-hadron collisions. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, T.T.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of a study on high energy collisions with the geometrical model are summarized in three parts: (1) the elastic hadron-hadron collision, (2) the inelastic hadron-hadron collision, and (3) e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation. For elastic scattering, a modified form for the hadronic matter form factor of the proton was proposed which is still dipole in form but contains an energy--dependent range parameter. This new expression of the opacity function fits the elastic {bar p}p scattering very well from the ISR to S{bar p}pS energies. Extrapolation of this theory also yielded results {bar p}p in good agreement with the {bar p}p differential cross section measured at the Tevatron. For inelastic hadron-hadron collisions, we have made a systematic investigation of the single-particle momentum spectra in the entire S{bar p}pS energy region. Results are useful for the extrapolation of angular distribution to the higher SSC energies. In e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation, a detailed analysis of all available experimental multiplicity data from PETRA to LEP energies has been performed. The cluster size of emitted hadrons increases gradually with energy. Aside from high-energy collisions, the giant fullerene molecules were studied and precise algebraic eigenvalue expressions of the Hueckel problem for carbon-240 were obtained.

  13. Semiconductor laser with multiple lasing wavelengths

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fischer, Arthur J.; Choquette, Kent D.; Chow, Weng W.

    2003-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A new class of multi-terminal vertical-cavity semiconductor laser components has been developed. These multi-terminal laser components can be switched, either electrically or optically, between distinct lasing wavelengths, or can be made to lase simultaneously at multiple wavelengths.

  14. A Stable Vanadium Redox-Flow Battery with High Energy Density...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stable Vanadium Redox-Flow Battery with High Energy Density for Large-scale Energy Storage. A Stable Vanadium Redox-Flow Battery with High Energy Density for Large-scale Energy...

  15. From dense-dilute duality to self duality in high energy evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alex Kovner

    2005-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    I describe recent work on inclusion of Pomeron loops in the high energy evolution. In particular I show that the complete eikonal high energy evolution kernel must be selfdual.

  16. High-Energy, Pulsed-Laser Diagnostics for Real-Time Measurements...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Energy, Pulsed-Laser Diagnostics for Real-Time Measurements of Reciprocating Engine PM Emissions High-Energy, Pulsed-Laser Diagnostics for Real-Time Measurements of...

  17. Electrolytes for Use in High Energy Lithium-Ion Batteries with...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Use in High Energy Lithium-Ion Batteries with Wide Operating Temperature Range Electrolytes for Use in High Energy Lithium-Ion Batteries with Wide Operating Temperature Range...

  18. Design of Safer High-Energy Density Materials for Lithium-Ion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Safer High-Energy Density Materials for Lithium-Ion Cells Design of Safer High-Energy Density Materials for Lithium-Ion Cells 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and...

  19. High Energy Physics: Report of research accomplishments and future goals, FY 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barish, B C

    1983-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuing research in high energy physics carried out by the group from the California Institute of Technology. The program includes research in theory, phenomenology, and experimental high energy physics. The experimental program includes experiments at SLAC, FERMILAB, and DESY.

  20. Etch-free Formation of Porous Silicon by High-energy Ion Irradiation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Etch-free Formation of Porous Silicon by High-energy Ion Irradiation. Etch-free Formation of Porous Silicon by High-energy Ion Irradiation. Abstract: In this study, porous silicon...

  1. Terascale Physics Opportunities at a High Statistics, High Energy Neutrino Scattering Experiment: NuSOnG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, T.

    This article presents the physics case for a new high-energy, ultra-high statistics neutrino scattering

  2. Satio Hayakawa and dawn of high-energy astrophysics in Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nishimura, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pioneering works and stimulation by S. Hayakawa for the development of high-energy astrophysics in Japan.

  3. Theoretical Research in Cosmology, High-Energy Physics and String Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, Y Jack; Dolan, Louise; Mersini-Houghton, Laura; Frampton, Paul

    2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The research was in the area of Theoretical Physics: Cosmology, High-Energy Physics and String Theory

  4. What Can We Learn from the Study of Single Diffractive Dissociation at High Energies?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Arkhipov

    1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The fundamental relations in the dynamics of single diffraction dissociation and elastic scattering at high energies are discussed.

  5. PLASMA FOCUSING OF HIGH ENERGY DENSITY ELECTRON AND POSITRON BEAMS \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PLASMA FOCUSING OF HIGH ENERGY DENSITY ELECTRON AND POSITRON BEAMS \\Lambda J.S.T. Ng, P. Chen, W present results from the SLAC E­150 experiment on plasma focusing of high energy density electron and of the SLAC E­150 experiment are to study plasma focusing for high energy, high density par­ ticle beams

  6. THE STUDY OF NUCLEAR FISSION INDUCED BY HIGH-ENERGY PROTONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    243 THE STUDY OF NUCLEAR FISSION INDUCED BY HIGH-ENERGY PROTONS R. BRANDT (*), F. CARBONARA (**), E been undertaken with the aim to measure cross-sections for nuclear fission of heavy nuclei induced by high-energy protons. Nuclear fission at high energies is defined here as a nuclear break-up into two

  7. Investigation of Rare Particle Production in High Energy Nuclear Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1999-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Our program is an investigation of the hadronization process through measurement of rare particle production in high energy nuclear interactions. Such collisions of heavy nuclei provide an environment similar in energy density to the conditions in the Big Bang. We are currently involved in two major experiments to study this environment, E896 at the AGS and STAR at RHIC. We have completed our physics running of E896, a search for the H dibaryon and measurement of hyperon production in AuAu collisions, and are in the process of analyzing the data. We have produced the electronics and software for the STAR trigger and will begin to use these tools to search for anti-nuclei and strange hadrons when RHIC turns on later this year.

  8. High-Energy Neutrinos in Light of Fermi-LAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahlers, Markus

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The production of high-energy astrophysical neutrinos is tightly linked to the emission of hadronic gamma-rays. I will discuss the recent observation of TeV to PeV neutrinos by the IceCube Cherenkov telescope in the context of gamma-ray astronomy. The corresponding energy range of hadronic gamma-rays is not directly accessible by extragalactic gamma-ray astronomy due to interactions with cosmic radiation backgrounds. Nevertheless, the isotropic sub-TeV gamma-ray background observed by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) contains indirect information from secondary emission produced in electromagnetic cascades and constrains hadronic emission scenarios. On the other hand, observation of PeV gamma-rays would provide a smoking-gun signal for Galactic emission. In general, the cross-correlation of neutrino emission with (extended) Galactic and extragalactic gamma-ray sources will serve as the most sensitive probe for a future identification of neutrino sources.

  9. Methods for point source analysis in high energy neutrino telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jim Braun; Jon Dumm; Francesco De Palma; Chad Finley; Albrecht Karle; Teresa Montaruli

    2008-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino telescopes are moving steadily toward the goal of detecting astrophysical neutrinos from the most powerful galactic and extragalactic sources. Here we describe analysis methods to search for high energy point-like neutrino sources using detectors deep in the ice or sea. We simulate an ideal cubic kilometer detector based on real world performance of existing detectors such as AMANDA, IceCube, and ANTARES. An unbinned likelihood ratio method is applied, making use of the point spread function and energy distribution of simulated neutrino signal events to separate them from the background of atmospheric neutrinos produced by cosmic ray showers. The unbinned point source analyses are shown to perform better than binned searches and, depending on the source spectral index, the use of energy information is shown to improve discovery potential by almost a factor of two.

  10. Neutron emission and fragment yield in high-energy fission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grudzevich, O. T., E-mail: ogrudzevich@ippe.ru; Klinov, D. A. [Institute for Physics and Power Engineering (Russian Federation)] [Institute for Physics and Power Engineering (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The KRIS special library of spectra and emission probabilities in the decays of 1500 nuclei excited up to energies between 150 and 250 MeV was developed for correctly taking into account the decay of highly excited nuclei appearing as fission fragments. The emission of neutrons, protons, and photons was taken into account. Neutron emission fromprimary fragments was found to have a substantial effect on the formation of yields of postneutron nuclei. The library was tested by comparing the calculated and measured yields of products originating from the fission of nuclei that was induced by high-energy protons. The method for calculating these yields was tested on the basis of experimental data on the thermal-neutroninduced fission of {sup 235}U nuclei.

  11. Local thermodynamic equilibrium in rapidly heated high energy density plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aslanyan, V.; Tallents, G. J. [York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Emission spectra and the dynamics of high energy density plasmas created by optical and Free Electron Lasers (FELs) depend on the populations of atomic levels. Calculations of plasma emission and ionization may be simplified by assuming Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE), where populations are given by the Saha-Boltzmann equation. LTE can be achieved at high densities when collisional processes are much more significant than radiative processes, but may not be valid if plasma conditions change rapidly. A collisional-radiative model has been used to calculate the times taken by carbon and iron plasmas to reach LTE at varying densities and heating rates. The effect of different energy deposition methods, as well as Ionization Potential Depression are explored. This work shows regimes in rapidly changing plasmas, such as those created by optical lasers and FELs, where the use of LTE is justified, because timescales for plasma changes are significantly longer than the times needed to achieve an LTE ionization balance.

  12. High energy gamma rays from old accreting neutron stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Blasi

    1996-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a magnetized neutron star with accretion from a companion star or a gas cloud around it, as a possible source of gamma rays with energy between $100$ $MeV$ and $10^{14}-10^{16}~eV$. The flow of the accreting plasma is terminated by a shock at the Alfv\\'en surface. Such a shock is the site for the acceleration of particles up to energies of $\\sim 10^{15}-10^{17}~eV$; gamma photons are produced in the inelastic $pp$ collisions between shock-accelerated particles and accreting matter. The model is applied to old neutron stars both isolated or in binary systems. The gamma ray flux above $100~MeV$ is not easily detectable, but we propose that gamma rays with very high energy could be used by Cherenkov experiments as a possible signature of isolated old neutron stars in dense clouds in our galaxy.

  13. High Energy Physics at the University of Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liss, Tony M. [University of Illinois] [University of Illinois; Thaler, Jon J. [University of Illinois] [University of Illinois

    2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report for DOE award DE-FG02-91ER40677 (“High Energy Physics at the University of Illinois”), covering the award period November 1, 2009 through April 30, 2013. During this period, our research involved particle physics at Fermilab and CERN, particle physics related cosmology at Fermilab and SLAC, and theoretical particle physics. Here is a list of the activities described in the final report: * The CDF Collaboration at the Fermilab Tevatron * Search For Lepton Flavor Violation in the Mu2e Experiment At Fermilab * The ATLAS Collaboration at the CERN Large Hadron Collider * the Study of Dark Matter and Dark Energy: DES and LSST * Lattice QCD * String Theory and Field Theory * Collider Phenomenology

  14. Ultra high energy cosmic rays from cosmological relics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Berezinsky

    1998-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR) can be a signal from very early (post-inflationary) Universe. At this cosmological epoch Topological Defects (TD) and long-lived suprheavy (SH) particles are expected to be naturally and effectively produced. Both of these relics can produce now the particles, such as protons and photons, with energies in a great excess of what is observed in UHECR, $E \\sim 10^{10} - 10^{11} GeV$. The Topological Defects as the UHECR sources are critically reviewed and cosmic necklaces and monopolonia are identified as most plausible sources. The relic superheavy particles and monopolonia are shown to be clustering in the halo of our Galaxy and their decays produce UHECR without the GZK cutoff. The observational signature of both models are discussed.

  15. Computing trends using graphic processor in high energy physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mihai Niculescu; Sorin-Ion Zgura

    2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the main challenges in Heavy Energy Physics is to make fast analysis of high amount of experimental and simulated data. At LHC-CERN one p-p event is approximate 1 Mb in size. The time taken to analyze the data and obtain fast results depends on high computational power. The main advantage of using GPU(Graphic Processor Unit) programming over traditional CPU one is that graphical cards bring a lot of computing power at a very low price. Today a huge number of application(scientific, financial etc) began to be ported or developed for GPU, including Monte Carlo tools or data analysis tools for High Energy Physics. In this paper, we'll present current status and trends in HEP using GPU.

  16. Final project report: High energy rotor development, test and evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the auspices of the {open_quotes}Government/Industry Wind Technology Applications Project{close_quotes} [{open_quotes}Letter of Interest{close_quotes} (LOI) Number RC-1-11101], Flo Wind Corp. has successfully developed, tested, and delivered a high-energy rotor upgrade candidate for their 19-meter Vertical Axis Wind Turbine. The project included the demonstration of the innovative extended height-to-diameter ratio concept, the development of a continuous span single-piece composite blade, the demonstration of a continuous blade manufacturing technique, the utilization of the Sandia National Laboratories developed SNLA 2150 natural laminar flow airfoil and the reuse of existing wind turbine and wind power plant infrastructure.

  17. Proceedings of the 8th high energy heavy ion study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, J.W. (ed.); Wozniak, G.J. (ed.)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This was the eighth in a series of conferences jointly sponsored by the Nuclear Science Division of LBL and the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung in West Germany. Sixty papers on current research at both relativistic and intermediate energies are included in this report. Topics covered consisted of: Equation of State of Nuclear Matter, Pion and High Energy Gamma Emission, Theory of Multifragmentation, Intermediate Energies, Fragmentation, Atomic Physics, Nuclear Structure, Electromagnetic Processes, and New Facilities planned for SIS-ESR. The latest design parameters of the Bevalac Upgrade Proposal were reviewed for the user community. Also, the design of a new electronic 4..pi.. detector, a time projection chamber which would be placed at the HISS facility, was presented.

  18. PAMELA's Measurements of Magnetospheric Effects on High Energy Solar Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adriani, O; Bazilevskaya, G A; Bellotti, R; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bongi, M; Bonvicini, V; Bottai, S; Bravar, U; Bruno, A; Cafagna, F; Campana, D; Carbone, R; Carlson, P; Casolino, M; Castellini, G; Christian, E C; De Donato, C; de Nolfo, G A; De Santis, C; De Simone, N; Di Felice, V; Formato, V; Galper, A M; Karelin, A V; Koldashov, S V; Koldobskiy, S; Krutkov, S Y; Kvashnin, A N; Lee, M; Leonov, A; Malakhov, V; Marcelli, L; Martucci, M; Mayorov, A G; Menn, W; Mergé, M; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Monaco, A; Mori, N; Munini, R; Osteria, G; Palma, F; Panico, B; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Ricci, M; Ricciarini, S B; Ryan, J M; Sarkar, R; Scotti, V; Simon, M; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Stochaj, S; Stozhkov, Y I; Thakur, N; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G I; Voronov, S A; Yurkin, Y T; Zampa, G; Zampa, N

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature of particle acceleration at the Sun, whether through flare reconnection processes or through shocks driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), is still under scrutiny despite decades of research. The measured properties of solar energetic particles (SEPs) have long been modeled in different particle-acceleration scenarios. The challenge has been to disentangle to the effects of transport from those of acceleration. The Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA) instrument, enables unique observations of SEPs including composition and the angular distribution of the particles about the magnetic field, i.e. pitch angle distribution, over a broad energy range (>80 MeV) -- bridging a critical gap between space-based measurements and ground-based. We present high-energy SEP data from PAMELA acquired during the 2012 May 17 SEP event. These data exhibit differential anisotropies and thus transport features over the instrument rigidity range. SEP protons exhibit two dist...

  19. A Phenomenological Cost Model for High Energy Particle Accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimir Shiltsev

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Accelerator-based high-energy physics have been in the forefront of scientific discoveries for more than half a century. The accelerator technology of the colliders has progressed immensely, while the beam energy, luminosity, facility size, and cost have grown by several orders of magnitude. The method of colliding beams has not fully exhausted its potential but has slowed down considerably in its progress. In this paper we derive a simple scaling model for the cost of large accelerators and colliding beam facilities based on costs of 17 big facilities which have been either built or carefully estimated. Although this approach cannot replace an actual cost estimate based on an engineering design, this parameterization is to indicate a somewhat realistic cost range for consideration of what future frontier accelerator facilities might be fiscally realizable.

  20. String Black Holes as Particle Accelerators to Arbitrarily High Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parthapratim Pradhan

    2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that an extremal Gibbons-Maeda-Garfinkle-Horowitz-Strominger black hole may act as a particle accelerator with arbitrarily high energy when two uncharged particles falling freely from rest to infinity on the near horizon. We show that the center of mass energy of collision independent of the extreme fine tuning of the angular momentum of the colliding particles. We further show that the center of mass energy of collisions of particles at the ISCO ($r_{ISCO}$) or at the photon orbit ($r_{ph}$) or at the marginally bound circular orbit ($r_{mb}$) i.e. at $r \\equiv r_{ISCO}=r_{ph}=r_{mb}=2M$ could be arbitrarily large for the aforementioned spacetimes, which is different from Schwarzschild and Reissner-Nordstr{\\o}m spcetimes. For non-extremal GMGHS spacetimes the CM energy is finite and depends upon the asymptotic value of the dilation field ($\\phi_{0}$).

  1. Running Coupling Corrections to High Energy Inclusive Gluon Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. A. Horowitz; Yuri V. Kovchegov

    2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate running coupling corrections for the lowest-order gluon production cross section in high energy hadronic and nuclear scattering using the BLM scale-setting prescription. In the final answer for the cross section the three powers of fixed coupling are replaced by seven factors of running coupling, five in the numerator and two in the denominator, forming a 'septumvirate' of running couplings, analogous to the 'triumvirate' of running couplings found earlier for the small-x BFKL/BK/JIMWLK evolution equations. It is interesting to note that the two running couplings in the denominator of the 'septumvirate' run with complex-valued momentum scales, which are complex conjugates of each other, such that the production cross section is indeed real. We use our lowest-order result to conjecture how running coupling corrections may enter the full fixed-coupling kT-factorization formula for gluon production which includes non-linear small-x evolution.

  2. High energy hadron-hadron collisions. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, T.T.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project of studying high energy collision phenomena with the geometrical model has been undertaken and developed by this investigator and collaborators since 1967. Instead of basing conjectures on mathematical extrapolations from some ad hoc theories, this approach was to scrutinize first the general features of the phenomena before going into specific details. This particular method has proved successful in correlating experimental data, suggesting experiments, predicting new phenomena and guiding future experimental studies. In the following, important results of the geometrical model obtained with the support of the DOE grant are summarized in three parts: the elastic hadron-hadron scattering, the inelastic hadron-hadron collision, and the hadronic production in e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation. The fourth part of this report outlines the results of other topics of investigation. To avoid repetition, only the main physical ideas and essential experimental evidences are presented, leaving out detailed discussions which can be found in the literature and previous reports.

  3. Short pulse and high repetition rate diode-pumped Yb:CaF2 regenerative amplifier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    of high energy and ultra-short laser pulses. Many research efforts have been devoted to the generation-doped crystals. Within oscillators, ultra-short pulses (down to 47 fs with Yb:CALGO [1]) or high average powers and compact laser configurations. From this point of view, due to their favorable spectroscopic and thermal

  4. High energy physics program at Texas A and M University

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Texas A M experimental high energy physics program continued to reach significant milestones in each of its research initiatives during the course of the past year. We are participating in two major operating experiments, CDF and MACRO. In CDF, the Texas A M group has spearheaded the test beam program to recalibrate the Forward Hadron Calorimeter for the upcoming CDF data run, as well as contributing to the ongoing analysis work on jets and b-quarks. In MACRO, we have assisted in the development of the final version of the wave form digitizing system being implemented for the entire scintillator system. The construction of the first six supermodules of the detector has been completed and all six are currently taking data with streamer chambers while four have the completed scintillator counter system up and running. We have built and tested prototypes of a liquid-scintillator fiber calorimeter system, in which internally reflecting channels are imbedded in a lead matrix and filled with liquid scintillator. This approach combines the performance features of fiber calorimetry and the radiation hardness of liquid scintillator, and is being developed for forward calorimetry at the SSC. The microstrip chamber is a new technology for precision track chambers that offers the performance required for future hadron colliders. The theoretical high energy physics program has continued to develop during the past funding cycle. We have continued the study of their very successful string-derived model that unifies all known interactions; flipped SU(5), which is the leading candidate for a TOE. Work has continued on some generalizations of the symmetries of string theory, known as W algebras. These are expected to have applications in two-dimensional conformal field theory, two-dimensional extensions of gravity and topological gravity and W-string theory.

  5. Laboratory testing of high energy density capacitors for electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burke, A.F.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory tests of advanced, high energy density capacitors in the Battery Test Laboratory of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory have been performed to investigate their suitability for load-leveling the battery in an electric vehicle. Two types of devices were tested -- 3 V, 70 Farad, spiral wound, carbon-based, single cell devices and 20 V, 3. 5 Farad, mixed-oxide, multi-cell bipolar devices. The energy density of the devices, based on energy stored during charge to the rated voltage, was found to be 1--2 Wh/kg, which agreed well with that claimed by the manufacturers. Constant power discharge tests were performed at power densities up to 1500 W/kg. Discharges at higher power densities could have been performed had equipment been available to maintain constant power during discharges of less than one second. It was found that the capacitance of the devices were rate dependent with the rate dependency of the carbon-based devices being higher than that of the mixed-oxide devices. The resistance of both types of devices were relatively low being 20--30 milliohms. Testing done in the study showed that the advanced high energy density capacitors can be charged and discharged over cycles (PSFUDS) which approximate the duty cycle that would be encountered if the devices are used to load-level the battery in an electric vehicle. Thermal tests of the advanced capacitors in an insulated environment using the PSFUDS cycle showed the devices do not overheat with their temperatures increasing only 4--5{degrees}C for tests that lasted 5--7 hours. 7 refs., 33 figs., 11 tabs.

  6. Optical amplification at the 1. 31 wavelength

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cockroft, N.J.

    1994-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical amplifier operating at the 1.31 [mu]m wavelength for use in such applications as telecommunications, cable television, and computer systems is described. An optical fiber or other waveguide device is doped with both Tm[sup 3+] and Pr[sup 3+] ions. When pumped by a diode laser operating at a wavelength of 785 nm, energy is transferred from the Tm[sup 3+] ions to the Pr[sup 3+] ions, causing the Pr[sup 3+] ions to amplify at a wavelength of 1.31. 1 figure.

  7. Wavelength measurement of n = 3 - n' = 3 transitions in highly charged tungsten ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clementson, J; Beiersdorfer, P

    2010-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    3s{sub 1/2} - 3p{sub 3/2} and 3p{sub 1/2} - 3d{sub 3/2} transitions have been studied in potassium-like W{sup 55+} through neon-like W{sup 64}+ ions at the electron-beam ion trap facility in Livermore. The wavelengths of the lines have been measured in high resolution relative to well known reference lines from oxygen and nitrogen ions. Using the high-energy SuperEBIT electron-beam ion trap and an R = 44.3 m grazing-incidence soft x-ray spectrometer, the lines were observed with a cryogenic charge-coupled device camera. The wavelength data for the sodium-like and magnesium-like tungsten lines are compared with theoretical predictions for ions along the isoelectronic sequences.

  8. Apparatus for shifting the wavelength of light

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCulla, William H. (Oak Ridge, TN); Allen, Jr., John D. (Knoxville, TN)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A light beam is reflected back and forth between a rotating body having a retroreflection corner at opposite ends thereof and a fixed mirror to change the wavelength of the light beam by the Doppler effect.

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: Wavelength Conversion Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    because of the steep drop-off in human eye sensitivity at longer wavelength) and absorption in the near-UV or blue region has been difficult to achieve. Broader-band...

  10. Research in High Energy Physics at Duke University

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotwal, Ashutosh V. [PI] [PI; Goshaw, Al [Co-PI] [Co-PI; Kruse, Mark [Co-PI] [Co-PI; Oh, Seog [Co-PI] [Co-PI; Scholberg, Kate [Co-PI] [Co-PI; Walter, Chris [Co-PI] [Co-PI

    2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the Closeout Report for the research grant in experimental elementary particle physics, carried out by the Duke University High Energy Physics (HEP) group. We re- port on physics results and detector development carried out under this grant, focussing on the recent three-year grant period (2010 to 2013). The Duke HEP group consisted of seven faculty members, two senior scientists, #12;ve postdocs and eight graduate students. There were three thrusts of the research program. Measurements at the energy frontier at CDF and ATLAS were used to test aspects of elementary particle theory described by the Stan- dard Model (SM) and to search for new forces and particles beyond those contained within the SM. The neutrino sector was explored using data obtained from a large neutrino detector located in Japan, and R & D was conducted on new experiments to be built in the US. The measurements provided information about neutrino masses and the manner in which neutri- nos change species in particle beams. Two years ago we have started a new research program in rare processes based on the Mu2E experiment at Fermilab. This research is motivated by the search for the #22; ! e transition with unprecedented sensitivity, a transition forbidden in the standard model but allowed in supersymmetric and other models of new physics. The high energy research program used proton and antiproton colliding beams. The experiments were done at the Fermilab Tevatron (proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV) and at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (proton-proton collisions at 7-8 TeV). The neutrino program used data obtained from the Super-Kamiokande detec- tor. This water-#12;lled Cherenkov counter was used to detect and measure the properties of neutrinos produced in cosmic ray showers, and from neutrino beams produced from acceler- ators in Japan. The Mu2E experiment will use a special stopped muon beam to be built at Fermilab.

  11. Research in High Energy Physics at Duke University

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goshaw, Alfred; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kruse, Mark; Oh, Seog; Scholberg, Kate; Walter, Chris

    2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the Closeout Report for the research grant in experimental elementary particle physics, carried out by the Duke University High Energy Physics (HEP) group. We re- port on physics results and detector development carried out under this grant, focussing on the recent three-year grant period (2010 to 2013). The Duke HEP group consisted of seven faculty members, two senior scientists, five postdocs and eight graduate students. There were three thrusts of the research program. Measurements at the energy frontier at CDF and ATLAS were used to test aspects of elementary particle theory described by the Stan- dard Model (SM) and to search for new forces and particles beyond those contained within the SM. The neutrino sector was explored using data obtained from a large neutrino detector located in Japan, and R & D was conducted on new experiments to be built in the US. The measurements provided information about neutrino masses and the manner in which neutri- nos change species in particle beams. Two years ago we have started a new research program in rare processes based on the Mu2E experiment at Fermilab. This research is motivated by the search for the #22;{mu} {yields} e transition with unprecedented sensitivity, a transition forbidden in the standard model but allowed in supersymmetric and other models of new physics. The high energy research program used proton and antiproton colliding beams. The experiments were done at the Fermilab Tevatron (proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV) and at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (proton-proton collisions at 7-8 TeV). The neutrino program used data obtained from the Super-Kamiokande detector. This water-filled Cherenkov counter was used to detect and measure the properties of neutrinos produced in cosmic ray showers, and from neutrino beams produced from acceler- ators in Japan. The Mu2E experiment will use a special stopped muon beam to be built at Fermilab.

  12. A multi-crystal wavelength dispersive x-ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Montanez, Paul; Delor, James; Bergmann, Uwe [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Kern, Jan [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720-8099 (United States); Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Nordlund, Dennis [SSRL, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Tran, Rosalie; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko [Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720-8099 (United States)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-crystal wavelength dispersive hard x-ray spectrometer with high-energy resolution and large solid angle collection is described. The instrument is specifically designed for time-resolved applications of x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and x-ray Raman scattering (XRS) at X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFEL) and synchrotron radiation facilities. It also simplifies resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) studies of the whole 2d RIXS plane. The spectrometer is based on the Von Hamos geometry. This dispersive setup enables an XES or XRS spectrum to be measured in a single-shot mode, overcoming the scanning needs of the Rowland circle spectrometers. In conjunction with the XFEL temporal profile and high-flux, it is a powerful tool for studying the dynamics of time-dependent systems. Photo-induced processes and fast catalytic reaction kinetics, ranging from femtoseconds to milliseconds, will be resolvable in a wide array of systems circumventing radiation damage.

  13. Constraints on the flux of Ultra-High Energy neutrinos from WSRT observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scholten, O.; Bacelar, J.; Braun, R.; de Bruyn, A.G.; Falcke, H.; Singh, K.; Stappers, B.; Strom, R.G.; al Yahyaoui, R.

    2010-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Context. Ultra-high energy (UHE) neutrinos and cosmic rays initiate particle cascades underneath theMoon?s surface. These cascades have a negative charge excess and radiate Cherenkov radio emission in a process known as the Askaryan effect. The optimal frequencywindow for observation of these pulses with radio telescopes on the Earth is around 150 MHz. Aims. By observing the Moon with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope array we are able to set a new limit on the UHEneutrino flux. Methods. The PuMa II backend is used to monitor the Moon in 4 frequency bands between 113 and 175 MHz with a samplingfrequency of 40 MHz. The narrowband radio interference is digitally filtered out and the dispersive effect of the Earth?s ionosphere is compensated for. A trigger system is implemented to search for short pulses. By inserting simulated pulses in the raw data, thedetection efficiency for pulses of various strength is calculated. Results. With 47.6 hours of observation time, we are able to set a limit onthe UHE neutrino flux. This new limit is an order of magnitude lower than existing limits. In the near future, the digital radio array LOFAR will be used to achieve an even lower limit.

  14. Liquid scintillator for 2D dosimetry for high-energy photon beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poenisch, Falk; Archambault, Louis; Briere, Tina Marie; Sahoo, Narayan; Mohan, Radhe; Beddar, Sam; Gillin, Michael T. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard., Unit 94, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Complex radiation therapy techniques require dosimetric verification of treatment planning and delivery. The authors investigated a liquid scintillator (LS) system for application for real-time high-energy photon beam dosimetry. The system was comprised of a transparent acrylic tank filled with liquid scintillating material, an opaque outer tank, and a CCD camera. A series of images was acquired when the tank with liquid scintillator was irradiated with a 6 MV photon beam, and the light data measured with the CCD camera were filtered to correct for scattering of the optical light inside the liquid scintillator. Depth-dose and lateral profiles as well as two-dimensional (2D) dose distributions were found to agree with results from the treatment planning system. Further, the corrected light output was found to be linear with dose, dose rate independent, and is robust for single or multiple acquisitions. The short time needed for image acquisition and processing could make this system ideal for fast verification of the beam characteristics of the treatment machine. This new detector system shows a potential usefulness of the LS for 2D QA.

  15. High-energy above-threshold detachment from negative ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gazibegovic-Busuladzic, A.; Milosevic, D.B. [Faculty of Science, University of Sarajevo, Zmaja od Bosne 35, 71000 Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Becker, W. [Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Strasse 2a, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Above-threshold detachment of electrons from negative ions by an elliptically polarized laser field is analyzed within the strong-field approximation. The low-energy part of the spectrum, that is, its structure and its apparent cutoff, strongly depends on the orbital quantum number l of the initial ground state. The high-energy part is characterized by the usual extended plateau caused by rescattering, which is essentially independent of the ground state. The potential that the returning electron experiences during rescattering is modeled by the sum of a polarization potential and a static potential. This rescattering potential does not have much effect on the shape of the plateau, but it does on its height. For H{sup -} (l=0), the yield of rescattered electrons is five orders of magnitude below the direct electrons, while for I{sup -} (l=1) the yields only differ by a factor of 40. We also analyze the dependence of the angle-resolved energy spectrum on the ellipticity of the laser field and confirm general symmetry properties. An angle-integrated elliptic dichroism parameter is introduced and analyzed.

  16. Metrology Challenges for High Energy Density Science Target Manufacture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seugling, R M; Bono, M J; Davis, P

    2009-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, High Energy Density Science (HEDS) experiments are used to support and qualify predictive physics models. These models assume ideal conditions such as energy (input) and device (target) geometry. The experiments rely on precision targets constructed from components with dimensions in the millimeter range, while having micrometer-scale, functional features, including planar steps, sine waves, and step-joint geometry on hemispherical targets. Future target designs will likely have features and forms that rival or surpass current manufacturing and characterization capability. The dimensional metrology of these features is important for a number of reasons, including qualification of sub-components prior to assembly, quantification of critical features on the as-built assemblies and as a feedback mechanism for fabrication process development. Variations in geometry from part to part can lead to functional limitations, such as unpredictable instabilities during an experiment and the inability to assemble a target from poorly matched sub-components. Adding to the complexity are the large number and variety of materials, components, and shapes that render any single metrology technique difficult to use with low uncertainty. Common materials include metal and glass foams, doped transparent and opaque plastics and a variety of deposited and wrought metals. A suite of metrology tools and techniques developed to address the many critical issues relevant to the manufacture of HEDS targets including interferometry, x-ray radiography and contact metrology are presented including two sided interferometry for absolute thickness metrology and low force probe technology for micrometer feature coordinate metrology.

  17. High energy physics experiment triggers and the trustworthiness of software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nash, T.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For all the time and frustration that high energy physicists expend interacting with computers, it is surprising that more attention is not paid to the critical role computers play in the science. With large, expensive colliding beam experiments now dependent on complex programs working at startup, questions of reliability -- the trustworthiness of software -- need to be addressed. This issue is most acute in triggers, used to select data to record -- and data to discard -- in the real time environment of an experiment. High level triggers are built on codes that now exceed 2 million source lines -- and for the first time experiments are truly dependent on them. This dependency will increase at the accelerators planned for the new millennium (SSC and LHC), where cost and other pressures will reduce tolerance for first run problems, and the high luminosities will make this on-line data selection essential. A sense of this incipient crisis motivated the unusual juxtaposition to topics in these lectures. 37 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Ultra-high-energy debris from the collisional Penrose process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emanuele Berti; Richard Brito; Vitor Cardoso

    2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Soon after the discovery of the Kerr metric, Penrose realized that superradiance can be exploited to extract energy from black holes. The original idea (involving the breakup of a single particle) yields only modest energy gains. A variant of the Penrose process consists of particle collisions in the ergoregion. The collisional Penrose process has been explored recently in the context of dark matter searches, with the conclusion that the ratio $\\eta$ between the energy of post-collision particles detected at infinity and the energy of the colliding particles should be modest ($\\eta \\lesssim 1.5$). Schnittman has shown that these studies underestimated the maximum efficiency by about one order of magnitude (i.e., $\\eta \\lesssim 15$). In this work we reach an even more striking conclusion: particle collisions in the vicinity of rapidly rotating black holes can result in arbitrarily high efficiencies. The astrophysical likelihood of these events deserves further scrutiny, but our study hints at the tantalizing possibility that the collisional Penrose process may power gamma rays and ultra-high-energy cosmic rays.

  19. Neutralinos in Vector Boson Fusion at High Energy Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin, Asher; Low, Matthew; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discovering dark matter at high energy colliders continues to be a compelling and well-motivated possibility. Weakly interacting massive particles are a particularly interesting class in which the dark matter particles interact with the standard model weak gauge bosons. Neutralinos are a prototypical example that arise in supersymmetric models. In the limit where all other superpartners are decoupled, it is known that for relic density motivated masses, the rates for neutralinos are too small to be discovered at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), but that they may be large enough for a 100 TeV collider to observe. In this work we perform a careful study in the vector boson fusion channel for pure winos and pure higgsinos. We find that given a systematic uncertainty of 1% (5%), with 3000 fb$^{-1}$, the LHC is sensitive to winos of 240 GeV (125 GeV) and higgsinos of 125 GeV (55 GeV). A future 100 TeV collider would be sensitive to winos of 1.1 TeV (750 GeV) and higgsinos of 530 GeV (180 GeV) with a 1% (5%) uncert...

  20. Upgrading of biorenewables to high energy density fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, John C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batista, Enrique R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chen, Weizhong [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Currier, Robert P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dirmyer, Matthew R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; John, Kevin D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kim, Jin K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Keith, Jason [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martin, Richard L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pierpont, Aaron W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Silks Ill, L. A. "" Pete [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smythe, Mathan C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sutton, Andrew D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Taw, Felicia L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Trovitch, Ryan J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vasudevan, Kalyan V [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Waidmann, Christopher R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wu, Ruilian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Baker, R. Thomas [UNIV OF OTTAWWA; Schlaf, Marcel [UNIV OF GUELPH

    2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    According to a recent report, lignocellulose is the most abundant renewable biological resource on earth, with an annual production of {approx} 200 x 10{sup 9} tons. Conversion of lignocellulosics derived from wood, agricultural wastes, and woody grasses into liquid fuels and value-added chemical feedstocks is an active area of research that has seen an explosion of effort due to the need to replace petroleum based sources. The carbohydrates D-glucose (C{sub 6}), L-arabinose (C{sub 5}), and D-xylose (C{sub 5}) are readily obtained from the hydrolysis of lignocellulose and constitute the most abundant renewable organic carbon source on the planet. Because they are naturally produced on such a large scale, these sugars have the greatest potential to displace petrochemical derived transportation fuel. Recent efforts in our laboratories aimed towards the production of high energy density transportation fuels from carbohydrates have been structured around the parameters of selective carbohydrate carbon chain extension chemistries, low reaction temperatures, and the desired use of water or neat substrate as the solvent. Some of our efforts in this regard will be presented.

  1. Optima XE Single Wafer High Energy Ion Implanter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Satoh, Shu; Ferrara, Joseph; Bell, Edward; Patel, Shital; Sieradzki, Manny [Axcelis Technologies, Inc. 108 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, MA 01915 (United States)

    2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Optima XE is the first production worthy single wafer high energy implanter. The new system combines a state-of-art single wafer endstation capable of throughputs in excess of 400 wafers/hour with a production-proven RF linear accelerator technology. Axcelis has been evolving and refining RF Linac technology since the introduction of the NV1000 in 1986. The Optima XE provides production worthy beam currents up to energies of 1.2 MeV for P{sup +}, 2.9 MeV for P{sup ++}, and 1.5 MeV for B{sup +}. Energies as low as 10 keV and tilt angles as high as 45 degrees are also available., allowing the implanter to be used for a wide variety of traditional medium current implants to ensure high equipment utilization. The single wafer endstation provides precise implant angle control across wafer and wafer to wafer. In addition, Optima XE's unique dose control system allows compensation of photoresist outgassing effects without relying on traditional pressure-based methods. We describe the specific features, angle control and dosimetry of the Optima XE and their applications in addressing the ever-tightening demands for more precise process controls and higher productivity.

  2. Solving The High Energy Evolution Equation Including Running Coupling Corrections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Javier L. Albacete; Yuri V. Kovchegov

    2007-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the solution of the nonlinear BK evolution equation with the recently calculated running coupling corrections [hep-ph/0609105, hep-ph/0609090]. Performing a numerical solution we confirm the earlier result of [hep-ph/0408216] that the high energy evolution with the running coupling leads to a universal scaling behavior for the dipole scattering amplitude. The running coupling corrections calculated recently significantly change the shape of the scaling function as compared to the fixed coupling case leading to a considerable increase in the anomalous dimension and to a slow-down of the evolution with rapidity. The difference between the two recent calculations is due to an extra contribution to the evolution kernel, referred to as the subtraction term, which arises when running coupling corrections are included. These subtraction terms were neglected in both recent calculations. We evaluate numerically the subtraction terms for both calculations, and demonstrate that when the subtraction terms are added back to the evolution kernels obtained in the two works the resulting dipole amplitudes agree with each other! We then use the complete running coupling kernel including the subtraction term to find the numerical solution of the resulting full non-linear evolution equation with the running coupling corrections. Again the scaling regime is recovered at very large rapidity.

  3. Stochastic Optimization for Collision Selection in High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Whiteson; D. Whiteson

    2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The underlying structure of matter can be deeply probed via precision measurements of the mass of the \\emph{top quark}, the most massive observed fundamental particle. Top quarks can be produced and studied only in collisions at high energy particle accelerators. Most collisions, however, do not produce top quarks; making precise measurements requires culling these collisions into a sample that is rich in collisions producing top quarks (\\emph{signal}) and spare in collisions producing other particles (\\emph{background}). Collision selection is typically performed with heuristics or supervised learning methods. However, such approaches are suboptimal because they assume that the selector with the highest classification accuracy will yield a mass measurement with the smallest statistical uncertainty. In practice, however, the mass measurement is more sensitive to some backgrounds than others. Hence, this paper presents a new approach that uses stochastic optimization techniques to directly search for selectors that minimize statistical uncertainty in the top quark mass measurement. Empirical results confirm that stochastically optimized selectors have much smaller uncertainty. This new approach contributes substantially to our knowledge of the top quark's mass, as the new selectors are currently in use selecting real collisions.

  4. Imaging of granular sources in high energy heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhi-Tao Yang; Wei-Ning Zhang; Lei Huo; Jing-Bo Zhang

    2008-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the source imaging for a granular pion-emitting source model in high energy heavy ion collisions. The two-pion source functions of the granular sources exhibit a two-tiered structure. Using a parametrized formula of granular two-pion source function, we examine the two-tiered structure of the source functions for the imaging data of Au+Au collisions at Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) and Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). We find that the imaging technique introduced by Brown and Danielewicz is suitable for probing the granular structure of the sources. Our data-fitting results indicate that there is not visible granularity for the sources at AGS energies. However, the data for the RHIC collisions with the selections of $40 < {\\rm centrality} < 90%$ and $0.20

  5. Modular multi-element high energy particle detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coon, Darryl D. (Pittsburgh, PA); Elliott, John P. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1990-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-element high energy particle detector modules comprise a planar heavy metal carrier of tungsten alloy with planar detector units uniformly distributed over one planar surface. The detector units are secured to the heavy metal carrier by electrically conductive adhesive so that the carrier serves as a common ground. The other surface of each planar detector unit is electrically connected to a feedthrough electrical terminal extending through the carrier for front or rear readout. The feedthrough electrical terminals comprise sockets at one face of the carrier and mating pins porjecting from the other face, so that any number of modules may be plugged together to create a stack of modules of any desired number of radiation lengths. The detector units each comprise four, preferably rectangular, p-i-n diode chips arranged around the associated feedthrough terminal to form a square detector unit providing at least 90% detector element coverage of the carrier. Integral spacers projecting from the carriers extend at least partially along the boundaries between detector units to space the p-i-n diode chips from adjacent carriers in a stack. The spacers along the perimeters of the modules are one-half the width of the interior spacers so that when stacks of modules are arranged side by side to form a large array of any size or shape, distribution of the detector units is uniform over the entire array.

  6. Modular multi-element high energy particle detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coon, D.D.; Elliott, J.P.

    1990-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-element high energy particle detector modules comprise a planar heavy metal carrier of tungsten alloy with planar detector units uniformly distributed over one planar surface. The detector units are secured to the heavy metal carrier by electrically conductive adhesive so that the carrier serves as a common ground. The other surface of each planar detector unit is electrically connected to a feedthrough electrical terminal extending through the carrier for front or rear readout. The feedthrough electrical terminals comprise sockets at one face of the carrier and mating pins projecting from the other face, so that any number of modules may be plugged together to create a stack of modules of any desired number of radiation lengths. The detector units each comprise four, preferably rectangular, p-i-n diode chips arranged around the associated feedthrough terminal to form a square detector unit providing at least 90% detector element coverage of the carrier. Integral spacers projecting from the carriers extend at least partially along the boundaries between detector units to space the p-i-n diode chips from adjacent carriers in a stack. The spacers along the perimeters of the modules are one-half the width of the interior spacers so that when stacks of modules are arranged side by side to form a large array of any size or shape, distribution of the detector units is uniform over the entire array. 5 figs.

  7. Excess vacancies in high energy ion implanted SiGe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koegler, R.; Muecklich, A.; Skorupa, W.; Peeva, A.; Kuznetsov, A. Yu.; Christensen, J. S.; Svensson, B. G. [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, PF 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Institute of Solid State Physics BAS, Boulevard Tzarigradsko Chaussee 72, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Deparment of Physics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1048 Blindern, NO-0316 Oslo (Norway); Center for Materials Science and Nanotechnology, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1048 Blindern, NO-0316 Oslo (Norway)

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Excess vacancies generated by high energy implantation with 1.2 MeV Si{sup +} and 2 MeV Ge{sup +} ions in SiGe were investigated after rapid thermal annealing at 900 degree sign C. Excess vacancies were probed by decoration with Cu and measuring the Cu profile by secondary ion mass spectrometry. Cross section transmission electron microscopy of cleaved specimen enabled to visualize nanocavities resulting from agglomeration of excess vacancies. The ion-induced damage in SiGe increases with increasing Ge fraction of the alloy. The amorphization threshold decreases and the extension of a buried amorphous layer increases for given implantation and annealing conditions. In contrast to ballistic simulations of excess defect generation where perfect local self-annihilation is assumed the concentrations of excess vacancies and excess interstitials in SiGe increase with increasing Ge fraction. The main contribution to the high excess vacancy concentration in SiGe results from the inefficient recombination of vacancies and interstitials. The widely used +1 model describing the ion-induced damage in Si is not valid for SiGe.

  8. High energy hadron-hadron collisions. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, T.T.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of a study on high energy collision with the geometrical model are summarized in three parts: (1) the elastic hadron-hadron collision, (2) the inelastic hadron-hadron collision, and (3) the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation. More recent studies are highlighted below. For elastic scattering, a modified form for the hadronic matter form factor of the proton was proposed which remains to be dipole in form but contains an energy-dependent range parameter. This new expression of the opacity function fits the elastic {bar p}p scattering very well from the ISR to S{bar p}pS energies. Extrapolation of this theory also yielded results in good agreement with the {bar p}p differential cross section measured at the Tevatron. For inelastic hadron-hadron collisions, we have made a systematic investigation of the single-particle momentum spectra in the entire S{bar p}pS energy region. Results are useful for the extrapolation of angular distribution to the higher SSC energies. In e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation, a detailed analysis of all available experimental multiplicity data from PETRA to LEP energies has been performed. We discovered that the cluster size of emitted hadrons increases steadily with energy and is close to 2 as we predicted.

  9. Experimental Studies of Elementary Particle Interactions at High Energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goulianos, Konstantin [The Rockefeller University] [The Rockefeller University

    2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a program of research on ``Experimental Studies of Elementary Particle Interactions at High Energies'' of the High Energy Physics (HEP) group of The Rockefeller University. The research was carried out using the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) and the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Three faculty members, two research associates, and two postdoctoral associates participated in this project. At CDF, we studied proton-antiproton collisions at an energy of 1.96 TeV. We focused on diffractive interactions, in which the colliding antiproton loses a small fraction of its momentum, typically less than 1%, while the proton is excited into a high mass state retaining its quantum numbers. The study of such collisions provides insight into the nature of the diffractive exchange, conventionally referred to as Pomeron exchange. In studies of W and Z production, we found results that point to a QCD-based interpretation of the diffractive exchange, as predicted in a data-driven phenomenology developed within the Rockefeller HEP group. At CMS, we worked on diffraction, supersymmetry (SUSY), dark matter, large extra dimensions, and statistical applications to data analysis projects. In diffraction, we extended our CDF studies to higher energies working on two fronts: measurement of the single/double diffraction and of the rapidity gap cross sections at 7 TeV, and development of a simulation of diffractive processes along the lines of our successful model used at CDF. Working with the PYTHIA8 Monte Carlo simulation authors, we implemented our model as a PYTHIA8-MBR option in PYTHIA8 and used it in our data analysis. Preliminary results indicate good agreement. We searched for SUSY by measuring parameters in the Constrained Minimal Supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (CMSSM) and found results which, combined with other experimental constraints and theoretical considerations, indicate that the CMSSM is not a viable model. Expressing our results in terms of simple topologies, we exclude squark masses below 0.75 TeV and gluino masses below 1.1 TeV. Astrophysical measurements suggest that about 80% of the matter density of the Universe is non-luminous. One of the theories on dark matter attributes it to Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). We searched for WIMPs in 7 TeV and 8 TeV collisions at CMS and set limits on WIMP production rates, which are competitive and complementary to those of direct detection experiments. Searching for monojets (events with only one jet), which in a popular model could be produced by a jet paired by a gravitino that escapes into extra dimensions, we significantly improved the previously set limit. Our results have been used to set limits on Higgs decay to invisible particles and on production of top squarks in compressed SUSY scenarios. Statistics. We computed Bayesian reference priors for several types of measurement and used them in the analysis of CMS data; investigated the applicability of bootstrap methods to HEP measurements; studied several issues associated with simple-versus-simple hypothesis testing and applied the resulting methods to the measurement of some properties of the top quark and Higgs boson.

  10. HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS AT TUFTS UNIVERSITY FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldstein, Gary R; Oliver, William P; Napier, Austin; Gallagher, Hugh R

    2012-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In this Final Report, we the researchers of the high energy physics group at Tufts University summarize our works and achievements in three frontier areas of elementary particle physics: (i) Neutrino physics at the Intensity Frontier, (ii) Collider physics at the Energy Frontier, and (iii) Theory investigations of spin structure and quark-gluon dynamics of nucleons using quantum chromodynamics. With our Neutrino research we completed, or else brought to a useful state, the following: Data-taking, physics simulations, physics analysis, physics reporting, explorations of matter effects, and detector component fabrication. We conducted our work as participants in the MINOS, NOvA, and LBNE neutrino oscillation experiments and in the MINERvA neutrino scattering experiment. With our Collider research we completed or else brought to a useful state: Data-taking, development of muon system geometry and tracking codes, software validation and maintenance, physics simulations, physics analysis, searches for new particles, and study of top-quark and B-quark systems. We conducted these activities as participants in the ATLAS proton-proton collider experiment at CERN and in the CDF proton-antiproton collider experiment at Fermilab. In our Theory research we developed QCD-based models, applications of spin phenomenology to fundamental systems, fitting of models to data, presenting and reporting of new concepts and formalisms. The overarching objectives of our research work have always been: 1) to test and clarify the predictions of the Standard Model of elementary particle physics, and 2) to discover new phenomena which may point the way to a more unified theoretical framework.

  11. High energy density capacitors using nano-structure multilayer technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Johnson, G.W.; O`Brien, D.W.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today, many pulse power and industrial applications are limited by capacitor performance. While incremental improvements are anticipated from existing capacitor technologies, significant advances are needed in energy density to enable these applications for both the military and for American economic competitiveness. We propose a program to research and develop a novel technology for making high voltage, high energy density capacitors. Nano-structure multilayer technologies developed at LLNL may well provide a breakthrough in capacitor performance. Our controlled sputtering techniques are capable of laying down extraordinarily smooth sub-micron layers of dielectric and conductor materials. With this technology, high voltage capacitors with an order of magnitude improvement in energy density may be achievable. Well-understood dielectrics and new materials will be investigated for use with this technology. Capacitors developed by nano-structure multilayer technology are inherently solid state, exhibiting extraordinary mechanical and thermal properties. The conceptual design of a Notepad capacitor is discussed to illustrate capacitor and capacitor bank design and performance with this technology. We propose a two phase R&D program to address DNA`s capacitor needs for electro-thermal propulsion and similar pulse power programs. Phase 1 will prove the concept and further our understanding of dielectric materials and design tradeoffs with multilayers. Nano-structure multilayer capacitors will be developed and characterized. As our materials research and modeling prove successful, technology insertion in our capacitor designs will improve the possibility for dramatic performance improvements. In Phase 2, we will make Notepad capacitors, construct a capacitor bank and demonstrate its performance in a meaningful pulse power application. We will work with industrial partners to design full scale manufacturing and move this technology to industry for volume production.

  12. High energy electron beam joining of ceramic components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turman, B.N.; Glass, S.J.; Halbleib, J.A. [and others

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High strength, hermetic braze joints between ceramic components have been produced using high energy electron beams. With a penetration depth into a typical ceramic of {approximately}1 cm for a 10 MeV electron beam, this method provides the capability for rapid, transient brazing operations where temperature control of critical components is essential. The method deposits energy directly into a buried joint, allowing otherwise inaccessible interfaces to be brazed. Because of transient heating, higher thermal conductivity, lower heat capacity, and lower melting temperature of braze metals relative to the ceramic materials, a pulsed high power beam can melt a braze metal without producing excessive ceramic temperatures. We have demonstrated the feasibility of this process related to ceramic coupons as well as ceramic and glass tubes. The transient thermal response was predicted, using as input the energy absorption predicted from the coupled electron-photon transport analysis. The joining experiments were conducted with an RF Linac accelerator at 10-13 MV. The repetition rate of the pulsed beam was varied between 8 and 120 Hz, the average beam current was varied between 8 and 120 microamps, and the power was varied up to 1.5 kW. These beam parameters gave a beam power density between 0.2 to 2 kW/cm{sup 2}. The duration of the joining runs varied from 5 to 600 sec. Joining experiments have provided high strength between alumina - alumina and alumina - cermet joints in cylindrical geometry. These joints provided good hermetic seals. A series of tests was conducted to determine the minimum beam power and exposure time for producing, a hermetic seal.

  13. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  14. Illuminating Dark Photons with High-Energy Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Curtin; Rouven Essig; Stefania Gori; Jessie Shelton

    2015-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    High-energy colliders offer a unique sensitivity to dark photons, the mediators of a broken dark U(1) gauge theory that kinetically mixes with the Standard Model (SM) hypercharge. Dark photons can be detected in the exotic decay of the 125 GeV Higgs boson, h -> Z Z_D -> 4l, and in Drell-Yan events, pp -> Z_D -> ll. If the dark U(1) is broken by a hidden-sector Higgs mechanism, then mixing between the dark and SM Higgs bosons also allows the exotic decay h -> Z_D Z_D -> 4l. We show that the 14 TeV LHC and a 100 TeV proton-proton collider provide powerful probes of both exotic Higgs decay channels. In the case of kinetic mixing alone, direct Drell-Yan production offers the best sensitivity to Z_D, and can probe epsilon >~ 9 x 10^(-4) (4 x 10^(-4)) at the HL-LHC (100 TeV pp collider). The exotic Higgs decay h -> Z Z_D offers slightly weaker sensitivity, but both measurements are necessary to distinguish the kinetically mixed dark photon from other scenarios. If Higgs mixing is also present, then the decay h -> Z_D Z_D can allow sensitivity to the Z_D for epsilon >~ 10^(-9) - 10^(-6) (10^(-10) - 10^(-7)) for the mass range 2 m_mu updating previous work in the literature. Electroweak precision measurements at LEP, Tevatron, and the LHC exclude epsilon as low as 3 x 10^(-2). Sensitivity can be improved by up to a factor of ~2 with HL-LHC data, and an additional factor of ~4 with ILC/GigaZ data.

  15. Switchable wavelength-selective and diffuse metamaterial absorber/emitter with a phase transition spacer layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hao; Yang, Yue; Wang, Liping, E-mail: liping.wang@asu.edu [School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

    2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We numerically demonstrate a switchable metamaterial absorber/emitter by thermally turning on or off the excitation of magnetic resonance upon the phase transition of vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}). Perfect absorption peak exists around the wavelength of 5??m when the excitation of magnetic resonance is supported with the insulating VO{sub 2} spacer layer. The wavelength-selective absorption is switched off when the magnetic resonance is disabled with metallic VO{sub 2} that shorts the top and bottom metallic structures. The resonance wavelength can be tuned with different geometry, and the switchable metamaterial exhibits diffuse behaviors at oblique angles. The results would facilitate the design of switchable metamaterials for active control in energy and sensing applications.

  16. Radio Wavelength Observatories within the Exploration Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Lazio; R. J. Macdowall; J. Burns; L. Demaio; D. L. Jones; K. W. Weiler

    2007-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations at radio wavelengths address key problems in astrophysics, astrobiology, and lunar structure including the first light in the Universe (the Epoch of Reionization), the presence of magnetic fields around extrasolar planets, particle acceleration mechanisms, and the structure of the lunar ionosphere. Moreover, achieving the performance needed to address these scientific questions demands observations at wavelengths longer than those that penetrate the Earth's ionosphere, observations in extremely "radio quiet" locations such as the Moon's far side, or both. We describe a series of lunar-based radio wavelength interferometers of increasing capability. The Radio Observatory for Lunar Sortie Science (ROLSS) is an array designed to be deployed during the first lunar sorties (or even before via robotic rovers) and addressing particle acceleration and the lunar ionosphere. Future arrays would be larger, more capable, and deployed as experience is gained in working on the lunar surface.

  17. Device for wavelength-selective imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frangioni, John V. (Wayland, MA)

    2010-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An imaging device captures both a visible light image and a diagnostic image, the diagnostic image corresponding to emissions from an imaging medium within the object. The visible light image (which may be color or grayscale) and the diagnostic image may be superimposed to display regions of diagnostic significance within a visible light image. A number of imaging media may be used according to an intended application for the imaging device, and an imaging medium may have wavelengths above, below, or within the visible light spectrum. The devices described herein may be advantageously packaged within a single integrated device or other solid state device, and/or employed in an integrated, single-camera medical imaging system, as well as many non-medical imaging systems that would benefit from simultaneous capture of visible-light wavelength images along with images at other wavelengths.

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High Energy Lithium-Sulfur Cathodes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Stanford University at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high energy lithium...

  19. Heavy ion fusion science research for high energy density physics and fusion applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logan, B.G.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    drive targets for inertial fusion energy. 1. Introduction Adensity matter and fusion energy. Previously, experiments inHeavy ion fusion science research for high energy density

  20. New solar cell technology captures high-energy photons more efficientl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (click to enlarge) Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials (click to enlarge) New solar cell technology captures high-energy photons more efficiently By Jared Sagoff *...

  1. Ion Sources for High Energy Ion Implantation at BNL | U.S. DOE...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Ion Sources for High Energy Ion Implantation at BNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science...

  2. Super stable garnet ceramics may be ideal for high-energy lithium...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Relations (865) 574-7308 Super stable garnet ceramics may be ideal for high-energy lithium batteries ORNL researchers used scanning transmission electron microscopy to take an...

  3. Hadron-hadron and hadron-nuclei collisions at high energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Giacomelli; R. Giacomelli

    2000-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief review is made of the present situation of hadron-hadron and hadron-nuclei total elastic and inelastic cross sections at high energies

  4. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, Richard A.; Wasserman, Harvey

    2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the leading scientific computing facility for the Department of Energy's Office of Science, providing high-performance computing (HPC) resources to more than 3,000 researchers working on about 400 projects. NERSC provides large-scale computing resources and, crucially, the support and expertise needed for scientists to make effective use of them. In November 2009, NERSC, DOE's Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), and DOE's Office of High Energy Physics (HEP) held a workshop to characterize the HPC resources needed at NERSC to support HEP research through the next three to five years. The effort is part of NERSC's legacy of anticipating users needs and deploying resources to meet those demands. The workshop revealed several key points, in addition to achieving its goal of collecting and characterizing computing requirements. The chief findings: (1) Science teams need access to a significant increase in computational resources to meet their research goals; (2) Research teams need to be able to read, write, transfer, store online, archive, analyze, and share huge volumes of data; (3) Science teams need guidance and support to implement their codes on future architectures; and (4) Projects need predictable, rapid turnaround of their computational jobs to meet mission-critical time constraints. This report expands upon these key points and includes others. It also presents a number of case studies as representative of the research conducted within HEP. Workshop participants were asked to codify their requirements in this case study format, summarizing their science goals, methods of solution, current and three-to-five year computing requirements, and software and support needs. Participants were also asked to describe their strategy for computing in the highly parallel, multi-core environment that is expected to dominate HPC architectures over the next few years. The report includes a section that describes efforts already underway or planned at NERSC that address requirements collected at the workshop. NERSC has many initiatives in progress that address key workshop findings and are aligned with NERSC's strategic plans.

  5. Interaction of the high energy deuterons with the graphite target in the plasma focus devices based on Lee model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akel, M., E-mail: pscientific2@aec.org.sy; Alsheikh Salo, S.; Ismael, Sh. [Department of Physics, Atomic Energy Commission, Damascus, P. O. Box 6091 (Syrian Arab Republic); Saw, S. H. [INTI International University, 71800 Nilai (Malaysia); Institute for Plasma Focus Studies, 32 Oakpark Drive, Chadstone VIC 3148 (Australia); Lee, S. [INTI International University, 71800 Nilai (Malaysia); Institute for Plasma Focus Studies, 32 Oakpark Drive, Chadstone VIC 3148 (Australia); Physics Department, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical experiments are systematically carried out using the Lee model code extended to compute the ion beams on various plasma focus devices operated with Deuterium gas. The deuteron beam properties of the plasma focus are studied for low and high energy plasma focus device. The energy spectral distribution for deuteron ions ejected from the pinch plasma is calculated and the ion numbers with energy around 1?MeV is then determined. The deuteron–graphite target interaction is studied for different conditions. The yield of the reaction {sup 12}C(d,n){sup 13}N and the induced radioactivity for one and multi shots plasma focus devices in the graphite solid target is investigated. Our results present the optimized high energy repetitive plasma focus devices as an alternative to accelerators for the production of {sup 13}N short lived radioisotopes. However, technical challenges await solutions on two fronts: (a) operation of plasma focus machines at high rep rates for a sufficient period of time (b) design of durable targets that can take the thermal load.

  6. 5. Wavelengths and periods of field motions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finlay, Christopher

    . Using a technique based on the Radon transform [2], we determined the amount of power propagating5. Wavelengths and periods of field motions 2D frequency-wavenumber (FK) power spectra were of the large scale magnetic field at the surface of the core. Here we deconstruct such a model (gufm1

  7. Two-wavelength spatial-heterodyne holography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hanson, Gregory R. (Clinton, TN); Bingham, Philip R. (Knoxville, TN); Simpson, John T. (Knoxville, TN); Karnowski, Thomas P. (Knoxville, TN); Voelkl, Edgar (Austin, TX)

    2007-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods are described for obtaining two-wavelength differential-phase holograms. A method includes determining a difference between a filtered analyzed recorded first spatially heterodyne hologram phase and a filtered analyzed recorded second spatially-heterodyned hologram phase.

  8. The Long Wavelength Array System Technical Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    (frequency) DR Dynamic Range EMC Electromagnetic Compatibility FOV Field of View G.N.D. Galactic Noise Intermediate Array with 16 antennas (core) MCS Monitor and Control System ns nanosecond RFI Radio FrequencyThe Long Wavelength Array System Technical Requirements Version: Draft #9 2007-November-19 Compiled

  9. 12.6 keV Kr K-alpha X-ray Source For High Energy Density Physics Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kugland, N; Constantin, C G; Niemann, C; Neumayer, P; Chung, H; Doppner, T; Kemp, A; Glenzer, S H; Girard, F

    2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A high contrast 12.6 keV Kr K{alpha} source has been demonstrated on the petawatt-class Titan laser facility. The contrast ratio (K{alpha} to continuum) is 65, with a competitive ultra short pulse laser to x-ray conversion efficiency of 10{sup -5}. Filtered shadowgraphy indicates that the Kr K{alpha} and K{beta} x-rays are emitted from a roughly 1 x 2 mm emission volume, making this source suitable for area backlighting and scattering. Spectral calculations indicate a typical bulk electron temperature of 50-70 eV (i.e. mean ionization state 13-16), based on the observed ratio of K{alpha} to K{beta}. Kr gas jets provide a debris-free high energy K{alpha} source for time-resolved diagnosis of dense matter.

  10. High Energy Physics and Nuclear Physics Network Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dart, Eli; Bauerdick, Lothar; Bell, Greg; Ciuffo, Leandro; Dasu, Sridhara; Dattoria, Vince; De, Kaushik; Ernst, Michael; Finkelson, Dale; Gottleib, Steven; Gutsche, Oliver; Habib, Salman; Hoeche, Stefan; Hughes-Jones, Richard; Ibarra, Julio; Johnston, William; Kisner, Theodore; Kowalski, Andy; Lauret, Jerome; Luitz, Steffen; Mackenzie, Paul; Maguire, Chales; Metzger, Joe; Monga, Inder; Ng, Cho-Kuen; Nielsen, Jason; Price, Larry; Porter, Jeff; Purschke, Martin; Rai, Gulshan; Roser, Rob; Schram, Malachi; Tull, Craig; Watson, Chip; Zurawski, Jason

    2014-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of SC programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements needed by instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 25 years. In August 2013, ESnet and the DOE SC Offices of High Energy Physics (HEP) and Nuclear Physics (NP) organized a review to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by the HEP and NP program offices. Several key findings resulted from the review. Among them: 1. The Large Hadron Collider?s ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC Apparatus) and CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) experiments are adopting remote input/output (I/O) as a core component of their data analysis infrastructure. This will significantly increase their demands on the network from both a reliability perspective and a performance perspective. 2. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments (particularly ATLAS and CMS) are working to integrate network awareness into the workflow systems that manage the large number of daily analysis jobs (1 million analysis jobs per day for ATLAS), which are an integral part of the experiments. Collaboration with networking organizations such as ESnet, and the consumption of performance data (e.g., from perfSONAR [PERformance Service Oriented Network monitoring Architecture]) are critical to the success of these efforts. 3. The international aspects of HEP and NP collaborations continue to expand. This includes the LHC experiments, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) experiments, the Belle II Collaboration, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), and others. The international nature of these collaborations makes them heavily reliant on transoceanic connectivity, which is subject to longer term service disruptions than terrestrial connectivity. The network engineering aspects of undersea connectivity will continue to be a significant part of the planning, deployment, and operation of the data analysis infrastructure for HEP and NP experiments for the foreseeable future. Given their critical dependency on networking services, the experiments have expressed the need for tight integration (both technically and operationally) of the domestic and the transoceanic parts of the network infrastructure that supports the experiments. 4. The datasets associated with simulations continue to increase in size, and the need to move these datasets between analysis centers is placing ever-increasing demands on networks and on data management systems at the supercomputing centers. In addition, there is a need to harmonize cybersecurity practice with the data transfer performance requirements of the science. This report expands on these points, and addresses others as well. The report contains a findings section in addition to the text of the case studies discussed during the review.

  11. Sensitivity of an underwater acoustic array to ultra-high energy neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckingham, Michael

    -high energies appears in fireball models of gamma-ray bursts [6­8], active galactic nuclei [9­ 14] and of UHECR production [2, 17,18]. Weakly interacting neutrinos could, unlike UHE gamma rays and protons the possibility of searching for ultra high energy neutrinos in cosmic rays using acoustic techniques in ocean

  12. Possible explanation for the low flux of high energy astrophysical muon neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pakvasa, Sandip [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2013-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    I consider the possibility that some exotic neutrino property is responsible for reducing the muon neutrino flux at high energies from distant sources; specifically, (i) neutrino decay and (ii) neutrinos being pseudo-Dirac particles. This would provide a mechanism for the lack of high energy muon events in the Icecube detector.

  13. High Energy Neutrinos as a Probe for New Physics and Astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. V. Bugaev

    2005-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of the recent achievements in high energy neutrino physics and, partly, neutrino astrophysics is presented. It is argued that experiments with high energy neutrinos of natural origin can be used for a search of new physics effects beyond the electroweak scale.

  14. Advanced High Energy and High Power Battery Systems for Automotive Applications Khalil Amine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Anthony F. J.

    -dependent Industry 41% Oil-dependent 17% Oil-dependent 72% 22% 1% 5% U.S. Oil Consumption by End-use Sector 199.30am Advanced High Energy and High Power Battery Systems for Automotive Applications Khalil Amine Argonne National Laboratory Abstract To meet the high-energy requirem ent that can enab le the 40-miles

  15. Search for Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts using Milagro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Search for Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts using Milagro P. M. Saz Parkinson 95064 Abstract. Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) have been detected at GeV energies by EGRET and models predict for very high energy emission from a sample of 106 gamma-ray bursts (GRB) detected since the beginning

  16. List of experiments useful for understanding of high-energy e-cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    List of experiments useful for understanding of high-energy e-cooling (Dec. 11, 2003) Objective: 1. To use available electron cooler rings to study parameter range relevant for high-energy electron cooling experiments: A Measurement of Longitudinal Cooling Force as a function of relative ion velocity: +A.1

  17. THE DEVELOPMENT OF LOW TEMPERATURE TECHNOLOGY AT STANFORD AND ITS RELEVANCE TO HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    % and to indicate their relevance to several applications in high energy physics. 11. TECHNOLOGICAL INNOVATIONS 1I I I I I - . THE DEVELOPMENT OF LOW TEMPERATURE TECHNOLOGY AT STANFORD AND ITS RELEVANCE TO HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS" H. Alan Schwettmant Stanford University Stanford, California Department of Physics

  18. Energy Measurement and Strategy for a Trigger of Ultra High Energy Cosmic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erdmann, Martin

    Energy Measurement and Strategy for a Trigger of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays Measured with Radio Ray induced Air Showers 3 2.1 Physics of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2.1.1 Energy Spectrum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2.1.2 Composition

  19. NETWORKING FOR HIGH ENERGY AND NUCLEAR PHYSICS AS GLOBAL E-SCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    an overview of the status and outlook for the world's research networks, technology advances, and the problemNETWORKING FOR HIGH ENERGY AND NUCLEAR PHYSICS AS GLOBAL E-SCIENCE Harvey B Newman, California are vital for every phase of high energy physicists' work. Our bandwidth usage, and the typical capacity

  20. A NEW HIGH ENERGY RESOLUTION NEUTRON TRANSMISSION DETECTOR SYSTEM AT THE GAERTTNER LINAC LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    Laboratory P.O. Box 1072, Schenectady, New York 12301-1072 A new high energy resolution modular neutronA NEW HIGH ENERGY RESOLUTION NEUTRON TRANSMISSION DETECTOR SYSTEM AT THE GAERTTNER LINAC LABORATORY capabilities at the Laboratory in and above the resolved resonance energy region from 1 keV to 600 ke

  1. Overview of High Energy Lasers: Past, Present, and Future? D. L. Carroll1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carroll, David L.

    at high energy laser systems and their effects, respectively. Einstein published the concept of stimulated for a problem" and this needed to be addressed. Weapon-type "ray guns" were commonly envisioned (and liberally) to be a daunting challenge, especially so for handheld weapon systems. Still, several impressive high energy laser

  2. Structure and Fine Structure in Multiparticle Production Data at High Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wit Busza

    2004-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A summary is given of data on the longitudinal rapidity and pseudorapidity distributions observed in $e^+e^-$, pp, pA and AA collisions at high energies. The remarkable simplicity and universality observed in the data and its relevance to the study of the high energy density system produced in heavy ion collisions is discussed.

  3. Limits on Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts with the Milagro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Limits on Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts with the Milagro Observatory Miguel F of Milagro allow it to detect very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray burst emission with much higher sensitivity gamma-ray burst satellites at keV to MeV energies. Even in the absence of a positive detection, VHE

  4. Yale High Energy Physics Research: Precision Studies of Reactor Antineutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeger, Karsten M [Yale University

    2014-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This reports presents experimental research at the intensity frontier of particle physics with particular focus on the study of reactor antineutrinos and the precision measurement of neutrino oscillations. The experimental neutrino physics group of Professor Heeger and Senior Scientist Band at Yale University has had leading responsibilities in the construction and operation of the Daya Bay Reactor Antineutrino Experiment and made critical contributions to the discovery of non-zero$\\theta_{13}$. Heeger and Band led the Daya Bay detector management team and are now overseeing the operations of the antineutrino detectors. Postdoctoral researchers and students in this group have made leading contributions to the Daya Bay analysis including the prediction of the reactor antineutrino flux and spectrum, the analysis of the oscillation signal, and the precision determination of the target mass yielding unprecedented precision in the relative detector uncertainty. Heeger's group is now leading an R\\&D effort towards a short-baseline oscillation experiment, called PROSPECT, at a US research reactor and the development of antineutrino detectors with advanced background discrimination.

  5. Thermal dileptons in high-energy nuclear collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanja Damjanovic

    2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Clear signs of excess dileptons above the known sources were found at the SPS since long. However, a real clarification of these observations was only recently achieved by NA60, measuring dimuons with unprecedented precision in 158A GeV In-In collisions. The excess mass spectrum in the region M rho -> mu+mu- annihilation. The associated rho spectral function shows a strong broadening, but essentially no shift in mass. In the region M>1 GeV, the excess is found to be prompt, not due to enhanced charm production. The inverse slope parameter Teff associated with the transverse momentum spectra rises with mass up to the rho, followed by a sudden decline above. While the initial rise, coupled to a hierarchy in hadron freeze-out, points to radial flow of a hadronic decay source, the decline above signals a transition to a low-flow source, presumably of partonic origin. The mass spectra show the steep rise towards low masses characteristic for Planck-like radiation. The polarization of the excess referred to the Collins Soper frame is found to be isotropic. All observations are consistent with a global interpretation of the excess as thermal radiation. We conclude with a short discussion of a possible link to direct photons.

  6. Hard probes of short-range nucleon-nucleon correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Arrington; D. W. Higinbotham; G. Rosner; M. Sargsian

    2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the primary goals of nuclear physics is providing a complete description of the structure of atomic nuclei. While mean-field calculations provide detailed information on the nuclear shell structure for a wide range of nuclei, they do not capture the complete structure of nuclei, in particular the impact of small, dense structures in nuclei. The strong, short-range component of the nucleon-nucleon potential yields hard interactions between nucleons which are close together, generating a high-momentum tail to the nucleon momentum distribution, with momenta well in excess of the Fermi momentum. This high-momentum component of the nuclear wave-function is one of the most poorly understood parts of nuclear structure. Utilizing high-energy probes, we can isolate scattering from high-momentum nucleons, and use these measurements to examine the structure and impact of short-range nucleon-nucleon correlations. Over the last decade we have moved from looking for evidence of such short-range structures to mapping out their strength in nuclei and examining their isospin structure. This has been made possible by high-luminosity and high-energy accelerators, coupled with an improved understanding of the reaction mechanism issues involved in studying these structures. We review the general issues related to short-range correlations, survey recent experiments aimed at probing these short-range structures, and lay out future possibilities to further these studies.

  7. In situ characterization of GaN quantum dot growth with reflection high-energy electron diffraction and line-of-sight mass spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, J S; Koblmuller, G; Averbeck, R; Riechert, H; Speck, J S

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mass spectrometry and re?ection high-energy electronmass spectrometry ?QMS? and re?ection high-energy electron

  8. Ga adsorbate on (0001) GaN: In situ characterization with quadrupole mass spectrometry and reflection high-energy electron diffraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, J S; Koblmuller, G; Wu, F; Averbeck, R; Riechert, H; Speck, J S

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mass spectrometry and re?ection high-energy electronmass spectrometry ?QMS? and re?ection high-energy electron

  9. SHORT-WAVELENGTH TECHNOLOGY AND THE POTENTIAL FOR DISTRIBUTED NETWORKS OF SMALL RADAR SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    Bharadwajb , Yanting Wangb , Eric Lyonsa , Kurt Hondle , Yuxiang Liub , Eric Knappa , Ming Xuec , Anthony, Amherst, MA 01003 b. Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 c. University of Oklahoma, Norman, and rapid-update (tens of seconds) observations extending from the boundary layer up to the tops of storms

  10. Amplified short-wavelength light scattered by relativistic electrons in the laser-induced optical lattice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andriyash, I A; Malka, V; d'Humières, E; Balcou, Ph

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The scheme of the XUV/X-ray free electron laser based on the optical undulator created by two overlapped transverse laser beams is analyzed. A kinetic theoretical description and an ad hoc numerical model are developed to account for the finite energy spread, angular divergence and the spectral properties of the electron beam in the optical lattice. The theoretical findings are compared to the results of the one- and three-dimensional numerical modeling with the spectral free electron laser code PLARES.

  11. Short-wavelength upconversion emissions in codoped glass ceramic and the optical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Wenwu

    of electrical engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao, 066004, China 3 Laboratory of Sono- and photo. In addition, an optical temperature sensor based on the blue upconversion emissions from 5 F2,3/3 K85 I8 and 5 ceramic be a promising candidate for sensitive optical temperature sensor with high resolution and good

  12. Phase contrast imaging measurements and modeling of short wavelength turbulence in the DIII-D tokamak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorris, James Robert, III

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DIII-D phase contrast imaging (PCI) diagnostic has been upgraded and used to measure turbulence in the outer plasma region (0.7 < r/a < 1). These upgrades extended its operational range to high frequencies (10 kHz - ...

  13. Measurements of short wavelength VLF bursts in the auroral ionosphere: A case for electromagnetic mode conversion?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    electric field measurements from dipole antennas and an onboard burst memory system. The observation the local lower hybrid frequency (flh) up to the electron plasma or cyclotron frequencies heating in the auroral ionosphere. Vago et al. [1992] and Labelle et al. [1986] have measured Trans

  14. 2nd conference on Intense field- Short Wavelength Atomic and Molecular

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartment ofAugustDecember8th Meeting of the14Processes -

  15. 2nd conference on Intense field- Short Wavelength Atomic and Molecular

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartment ofAugustDecember8th Meeting of the14Processes

  16. WAVELENGTH CALIBRATION OF THE HAMILTON ECHELLE SPECTROGRAPH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pakhomov, Yu. V. [Institute of Astronomy, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zhao, G., E-mail: pakhomov@inasan.ru [Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the wavelength calibration of the Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph at Lick Observatory. The main problem with the calibration of this spectrograph arises from the fact that thorium lines are absent in the spectrum of the presumed ThAr hollow-cathode lamp now under operation; numerous unknown strong lines, which have been identified as titanium lines, are present in the spectrum. We estimate the temperature of the lamp's gas which permits us to calculate the intensities of the lines and to select a large number of relevant Ti I and Ti II lines. The resulting titanium line list for the Lick hollow-cathode lamp is presented. The wavelength calibration using this line list was made with an accuracy of about 0.006 Å.

  17. REPORT OF RESEARCH ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND FUTURE GOALS HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, Mark B. [California Institute of Technology; Kapustin, Anton N. [California Institute of Technology; Schwarz, John Henry [California Institute of Technology; Carroll, Sean [California Institute of Technology; Ooguri, Hirosi [California Institute of Technology; Gukov, Sergei [California Institute of Technology; Preskill, John [California Institute of Technology; Hitlin, David G. [California Institute of Technology; Porter, Frank C. [California Institute of Technology; Patterson, Ryan B. [California Institute of Technology; Newman, Harvey B. [California Institute of Technology; Spiropulu, Maria [California Institute of Technology; Golwala, Sunil [California Institute of Technology; Zhu, Ren-Yuan

    2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Caltech High Energy Physics (HEP) has a broad program in both experimental and theoretical physics. We are known for our creativity and leadership. The future is uncertain and we strive to be involved in all the major areas of experimental and theoretical HEP physics so no matter where the important discoveries occur we are well positioned to play an important role. An outstanding group of postdoctoral scholars, graduate students, staff scientists, and technical and administrative personnel support our efforts in experimental and theoretical physics. The PI’s on this grant are involved in the following program of experimental and theoretical activities: I) EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS Our CMS group, led by Harvey Newman and Maria Spiropulu, has played a key role in the discovery and interpretation of the Higgs boson and in searches for new physics. They have important hardware responsibilities in both ECAL and HCAL and are also involved in the upgrades needed for the High Luminosity LHC. Newman's group also develops and operates Grid-based computing, networking, and collaborative systems for CMS and the US HEP community. The charged lepton (Mu2e) and quark BaBar flavor physics group is led by David Hitlin and Frank Porter. On Mu2e they have been instrumental in the design of the calorimeter. Construction responsibilities include one third of the crystals and associated readout as well as the calibration system. They also will have responsibility for a major part of the online system software. Although data taking ceased in 2008 the Caltech BaBar group is active on several new forefront analyses. The neutrino group is led by Ryan Patterson. They are central to NOvA's core oscillation physics program, to calibration, and to detector readiness being responsible for the production and installation of 12,000 APD arrays. They have key roles in neutrino appearance and disappearance analysis in MINOS and MINOS+. Sunil Golwala leads the dark matter direct detection effort. Areas of activity include: CDMS II data analysis, contributions to SuperCDMS Soudan operations and analysis, R&D towards SuperCDMS SNOLAB, development of a novel screener for radiocontamination (the BetaCage), and development of new WIMP detector concepts. Ren-Yuan Zhu leads the HEP crystal laboratory for the advanced detector R&D effort. The crystal lab is involved in development of novel scintillating crystals and has proposed several crystal based detector concepts for future HEP experiments at the energy and intensity frontiers. Its current research effort is concentrated on development of fast crystal scintillators with good radiation hardness and low cost. II) THEORETICAL PHYSICS The main theme of Sergei Gukov's current research is the relation between the geometry of quantum group invariants and their categorification, on the one hand, and the physics of supersymmetric gauge theory and string theory, on the other. Anton Kapustin's research spans a variety of topics in non-perturbative Quantum Field Theory (QFT). His main areas of interest are supersymmetric gauge theories, non-perturbative dualities in QFT, disorder operators, Topological Quantum Field Theory, and non-relativistic QFT. He is also interested in the foundations and possible generalizations of Quantum Mechanics. Hirosi Ooguri's current research has two main components. One is to find exact results in Calabi-Yau compactification of string theory. Another is to explore applications of the AdS/CFT correspondence. He also plans to continue his project with Caltech postdoctoral fellows on BPS spectra of supersymmetric gauge theories in diverse dimensions. John Preskill works on quantum information science. This field may lead to important future technologies, and also lead to new understanding of issues in fundamental physics John Schwarz has been exploring a number of topics in superstring theory/M-theory, supersymmetric gauge theory, and their AdS/CFT relationships. Much of the motivation for these studies is the desire to gain a deeper understanding of superstring theory and M-theory. The research

  18. Wavelength meter having single mode fiber optics multiplexed inputs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, Richard P. (Livermore, CA); Paris, Robert D. (San Ramon, CA); Feldman, Mark (Pleasanton, CA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wavelength meter having a single mode fiber optics input is disclosed. The single mode fiber enables a plurality of laser beams to be multiplexed to form a multiplexed input to the wavelength meter. The wavelength meter can provide a determination of the wavelength of any one or all of the plurality of laser beams by suitable processing. Another aspect of the present invention is that one of the laser beams could be a known reference laser having a predetermined wavelength. Hence, the improved wavelength meter can provide an on-line calibration capability with the reference laser input as one of the plurality of laser beams.

  19. Wavelength meter having single mode fiber optics multiplexed inputs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, R.P.; Paris, R.D.; Feldman, M.

    1993-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A wavelength meter having a single mode fiber optics input is disclosed. The single mode fiber enables a plurality of laser beams to be multiplexed to form a multiplexed input to the wavelength meter. The wavelength meter can provide a determination of the wavelength of any one or all of the plurality of laser beams by suitable processing. Another aspect of the present invention is that one of the laser beams could be a known reference laser having a predetermined wavelength. Hence, the improved wavelength meter can provide an on-line calibration capability with the reference laser input as one of the plurality of laser beams.

  20. A Search for Prompt Very High Energy Emission from Satellite-detected Gamma-ray Bursts using Milagro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milagro Collaboration; P. M. Saz Parkinson; B. L. Dingus

    2007-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been detected up to GeV energies and are predicted by many models to emit in the very high energy (VHE, > 100 GeV) regime too. Detection of such emission would allow us to constrain GRB models. Since its launch, in late 2004, the Swift satellite has been locating GRBs at a rate of approximately 100 per year. The rapid localization and follow-up in many wavelengths has revealed new and unexpected phenomena, such as delayed emission in the form of bright X-ray flares. The Milagro gamma-ray observatory is a wide field of view (2 sr) instrument employing a water Cherenkov detector to continuously ($>$ 90% duty cycle) observe the overhead sky in the 100 GeV to 100 TeV energy range. Over 100 GRBs are known to have been in the field of view of Milagro since January 2000, including 57 since the launch of Swift (through May 2007). We discuss the results of the searches for prompt emission from these bursts, as well as for delayed emission from the X-ray flares observed in some of the Swift bursts.

  1. A Search for Prompt Very High Energy Emission from Satellite-detected Gamma-ray Bursts using Milagro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parkinson, P M Saz

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been detected up to GeV energies and are predicted by many models to emit in the very high energy (VHE, > 100 GeV) regime too. Detection of such emission would allow us to constrain GRB models. Since its launch, in late 2004, the Swift satellite has been locating GRBs at a rate of approximately 100 per year. The rapid localization and follow-up in many wavelengths has revealed new and unexpected phenomena, such as delayed emission in the form of bright X-ray flares. The Milagro gamma-ray observatory is a wide field of view (2 sr) instrument employing a water Cherenkov detector to continuously ($>$ 90% duty cycle) observe the overhead sky in the 100 GeV to 100 TeV energy range. Over 100 GRBs are known to have been in the field of view of Milagro since January 2000, including 57 since the launch of Swift (through May 2007). We discuss the results of the searches for prompt emission from these bursts, as well as for delayed emission from the X-ray flares observed in some of the Swift...

  2. Production of neutrons up to 18 MeV in high-intensity, short-pulse laser matter interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Production of neutrons up to 18 MeV in high-intensity, short-pulse laser matter interactions D. P of neutrons up to 18 MeV in high-intensity, short-pulse laser matter interactions D. P. Higginson,1,2 J. M. Mc of laser energy in a 9 ps pulse. In this technique, a short-pulse, high-energy laser accelerates deuterons

  3. CONFIRMING THE PRIMARILY SMOOTH STRUCTURE OF THE VEGA DEBRIS DISK AT MILLIMETER WAVELENGTHS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, A. Meredith; Plambeck, Richard; Chiang, Eugene [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Wilner, David J.; Andrews, Sean M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Mason, Brian [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903-2475 (United States); Carpenter, John M. [California Institute of Technology, Department of Astronomy, MC 105-24, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Chiang, Hsin-Fang [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 640 North Aohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Williams, Jonathan P. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Hales, Antonio [Joint ALMA Observatory, Av. El Golf 40, Piso 18, Santiago (Chile); Su, Kate [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Dicker, Simon; Korngut, Phil; Devlin, Mark, E-mail: mhughes@astro.berkeley.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clumpy structure in the debris disk around Vega has been previously reported at millimeter wavelengths and attributed to concentrations of dust grains trapped in resonances with an unseen planet. However, recent imaging at similar wavelengths with higher sensitivity has disputed the observed structure. We present three new millimeter-wavelength observations that help to resolve the puzzling and contradictory observations. We have observed the Vega system with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) at a wavelength of 880 {mu}m and an angular resolution of 5''; with the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) at a wavelength of 1.3 mm and an angular resolution of 5''; and with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) at a wavelength of 3.3 mm and angular resolution of 10''. Despite high sensitivity and short baselines, we do not detect the Vega debris disk in either of the interferometric data sets (SMA and CARMA), which should be sensitive at high significance to clumpy structure based on previously reported observations. We obtain a marginal (3{sigma}) detection of disk emission in the GBT data; the spatial distribution of the emission is not well constrained. We analyze the observations in the context of several different models, demonstrating that the observations are consistent with a smooth, broad, axisymmetric disk with inner radius 20-100 AU and width {approx}> 50 AU. The interferometric data require that at least half of the 860 {mu}m emission detected by previous single-dish observations with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope be distributed axisymmetrically, ruling out strong contributions from flux concentrations on spatial scales of {approx}<100 AU. These observations support recent results from the Plateau de Bure Interferometer indicating that previous detections of clumpy structure in the Vega debris disk were spurious.

  4. Influence of Adsorption Site and Wavelength on the Photodesorption...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Adsorption Site and Wavelength on the Photodesorption of NO from the (Fe,Cr)3O4(111) Mixed Oxide Surface. Influence of Adsorption Site and Wavelength on the Photodesorption of NO...

  5. Multilevel interference lithography--fabricating sub-wavelength periodic nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Chih-Hao, 1980-

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Periodic nanostructures have many exciting applications, including high-energy spectroscopy, patterned magnetic media, photonic crystals, and templates for self-assembly. Interference lithography (IL) is an attractive ...

  6. High Energy Density Li-ion Cells for EVs Based on Novel, High...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Storage Systems Vehicle Technologies Annual Merit Review 6182014 1 High Energy Density Li-ion Cells for EV's Based on Novel, High Voltage Cathode Material Systems Keith D. Kepler...

  7. Fitting Narrow Spectral Lines in High Energy Astrophysics Using Incompatible Gibbs Samplers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dyk, David

    for the data degradation processes (van Dyk et al., 2001). Efficient X-ray Spectral Fitting Hierarchical' & $ % Fitting Narrow Spectral Lines in High Energy Astrophysics Using Incompatible Gibbs Samplers Siemiginowska (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, USA, aneta

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Energy High Power Battery Exceeding PHEV-40 Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by [company name] at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high energy high power battery...

  9. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High Energy Density Lithium Battery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Binghamton U.-SUNY at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high energy density...

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High Energy Anode Material Development for Li-ion Batteries

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Sinode Systems at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high energy anode material...

  11. Characterization of Defects in N-type 4H-SiC After High-Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Characterization of Defects in N-type 4H-SiC After High-Energy N Ion Implantation by RBS-Channeling and Raman Spectroscopy. Characterization of Defects in N-type 4H-SiC After...

  12. High Energy Physics: Report of research accomplishments and future goals, FY 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barish, B C; Stone, E C; Ames, C A

    1987-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses high energy physics research in the following areas: Research in elementary particle physics; QCD phenomenology; lattice gauge theory; Mark III; MARK J and Mark II/SLC.

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Energy Novel Cathode / Alloy Automotive Cell

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by 3M at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high energy novel cathode / alloy...

  14. Experimental investigation of opacity models for stellar interior, inertial fusion, and high energy density plasmasa...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Experimental investigation of opacity models for stellar interior, inertial fusion, and high energy for calculating energy transport in plasmas. In particular, understanding stellar interiors, inertial fusion more energy and the backlight must be bright enough to overwhelm the plasma self

  15. High Energy Physics: Report of research accomplishments and future goals, FY 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barish, B C; Stone, E C; Johnson, F H

    1986-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses high energy physics research in the following areas: Research in elementary particle physics; QCD phenomenology; lattice gauge theory; Mark III; MARK J and Mark II/SLC.

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: New High-Energy Electrochemical Couple for Automotive Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by [company name] at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about a new high-energy...

  17. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Energy Lithium Batteries for PHEV Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by [company name] at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high energy lithium batteries...

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High Energy Lithium Batteries for Electric Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Envia Systems at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high energy lithium batteries...

  19. The Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating: Design, Fabrication, Ground Calibration and Five Years in Flight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canizares, Claude R.

    Details of the design, fabrication, and ground and flight calibration of the High Energy Transmission Grating (HETG) on the Chandra X?Ray Observatory are presented after 5 years of flight experience. Specifics include the ...

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: New High-Energy Electrochemical Couple for Automotive Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about new high-energy...

  1. Toward high-energy-density, high-efficiency, and moderate-temperature chip-scale thermophotovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilawa-Podgurski, R. C. N.

    The challenging problem of ultra-high-energy-density, high-efficiency, and small-scale portable power generation is addressed here using a distinctive thermophotovoltaic energy conversion mechanism and chip-based system ...

  2. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High Energy Lithium Batteries for PHEV Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Envia at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high energy lithium batteries for PHEV...

  3. Carbon/Sulfur Nanocomposites and Additives for High-Energy Lithium...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Merit Review and Peer Evaluation es105liang2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications CarbonSulfur Nanocomposites and Additives for High-Energy Lithium Sulfur Batteries Additives...

  4. High-Energy String Scattering Amplitudes and Signless Stirling Number Identity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jen-Chi Lee; Catherine H. Yan; Yi Yang

    2012-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a complete proof of a set of identities (7) proposed recently from calculation of high-energy string scattering amplitudes. These identities allow one to extract ratios among high-energy string scattering amplitudes in the fixed angle regime from high-energy amplitudes in the Regge regime. The proof is based on a signless Stirling number identity in combinatorial theory. The results are valid for arbitrary real values $L$ rather than only for $L=0,1$ proved previously. The identities for non-integer real value $L$ were recently shown to be realized in high-energy compactified string scattering amplitudes [He S., Lee J.C., Yang Y., arXiv:1012.3158]. The parameter $L$ is related to the mass level of an excited string state and can take non-integer values for Kaluza-Klein modes.

  5. High energy hadron-hadron collisions. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Georgia, Athens, Georgia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, T.T.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of a study on high energy collisions with the geometrical model are summarized in three parts: (1) the elastic hadron-hadron collision, (2) the inelastic hadron-hadron collision, and (3) e[sup +]e[sup [minus

  6. Long-duration high-energy proton events observed by GOES in October 1989

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ®cant num- bers of particles out of the ambient solar wind to high energies, but it can con®ne and reLong-duration high-energy proton events observed by GOES in October 1989 A. Anttila, L. G. Kocharov, Finland Fax: +358 2 333 5993; e-mail: aanttila@utu.® Received: 17 November 1997 / Revised: 9 February 1998

  7. Velocity distribution of high-energy particles and the solar neutrino problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jian-Miin Liu

    2001-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    High energy infers high velocity and high velocity is a concept of special relativity. The Maxwellian velocity distribution is corrected to be consistent with special relativity. The corrected distribution reduces to the Maxwellian distribution for small velocities, contains a relatively depleted high-energy tail and vanishes at the velocity of light. This corrected distribution will lower solar neutrino fluxes and change solar neutrino energy spectra but keep solar sound speeds.

  8. Wavelength tunable source of subpicosecond pulses from CW passively mode-locked two-section multiple-quantum-well laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salvatore, R.A.; Schrans, T.; Yariv, A. (California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Dept. of Applied Physics)

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wavelength tunable passively mode-locked semi-conductor laser source of subpicosecond pulses is demonstrated. The system includes a two-section multiple-quantum-well laser which is coupled to an external grating for tuning and is followed by an external grating pair for pulse compression. A tuning range of 16 nm around 846 nm is obtained, resulting in compressed pulse widths as short as 260 fs and pulse widths shorter than 600 fs for all wavelength values within this tuning range. Time bandwidth products are one to two times the transform limit.

  9. Validation of hadronic models using CALICE highly granular calorimeters, 15th International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The CALICE Collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Validation of hadronic models using CALICE highly granular calorimeters, 15th International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics

  10. Validation of hadron shower models using data from CALICE, The 2013 European Physical Society Conference on High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dannheim, D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Validation of hadron shower models using data from CALICE, The 2013 European Physical Society Conference on High Energy Physics

  11. High-Energy Fuel Ion Diagnostics on ITER Derived from Neutron Emission Spectroscopy Measurements on JET DT Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High-Energy Fuel Ion Diagnostics on ITER Derived from Neutron Emission Spectroscopy Measurements on JET DT Plasmas

  12. A Flexible simulation and verification framework for next generation hybrid pixel readout chips in High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marconi, Sara

    A Flexible simulation and verification framework for next generation hybrid pixel readout chips in High Energy Physics

  13. Excitation wavelength dependent photoluminescence in structurally non-uniform Si/SiGe-island heteroepitxial multilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Modi, N.; Tsybeskov, L. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, New Jersey 07102 (United States); Lockwood, D. J.; Wu, X.; Baribeau, J.-M. [Institute for Microstructural Sciences, National Research Council, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada)

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In nanometer-size Si/SiGe-island heteroepitxial multilayers grown on Si(001), low temperature photoluminescence spectra are observed that strongly depend on the excitation wavelength and show a strong correlation with structural properties revealed by transmission electron microscopy. These experimental results can be explained by assuming that the optically created carriers are strongly localized at Si/SiGe island heterointerfaces. We show that electron-hole pairs are generated and recombine within spatial regions mainly defined by the photoexcitation penetration depth, and that the estimated exciton diffusion length is notably short and comparable with the SiGe-island average size.

  14. X-ray conversion of ultra-short laser pulses on a solid sample: Role of electron waves excited in the pre-plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baffigi, F., E-mail: federica.baffigi@ino.it; Cristoforetti, G.; Fulgentini, L.; Giulietti, A.; Koester, P.; Labate, L.; Gizzi, L. A. [Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory, Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, CNR Campus, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124, Pisa (Italy)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Flat silicon samples were irradiated with 40 fs, 800?nm laser pulses at an intensity at the best focus of 2·10{sup 18} Wcm{sup ?2}, in the presence of a pre-plasma on the sample surface. X-ray emission in the spectral range from 2 to 30?keV was detected inside and outside the plane of incidence, while varying pre-plasma scale length, laser intensity, and polarization. The simultaneous detection of 2? and 3?/2 emission allowed the contributions to the X-ray yield to be identified as originating from laser interaction with either the near-critical density (n{sub c}) region or with the n{sub c}/4 region. In the presence of a moderate pre-plasma, our measurements reveal that, provided the pre-plasma reaches a scale-length of a few laser wavelengths, X-ray emission is dominated by the contribution from the interaction with the under dense plasma, where electron plasma waves can grow, via laser stimulated instabilities, and, in turn, accelerate free electrons to high energies. This mechanism leads also to a clear anisotropy in the angular distribution of the X-ray emission. Our findings can lead to an enhancement of the conversion efficiency of ultra short laser pulses into X-rays.

  15. Discovery of two candidate pulsar wind nebulae in very-high-energy gamma rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. E. S. S. Collaboration; :; F. Aharonian

    2007-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the discovery of two very-high-energy gamma-ray sources in an ongoing systematic search for emission above 100 GeV from pulsar wind nebulae in survey data from the H.E.S.S. telescope array. Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes are ideal tools for searching for extended emission from pulsar wind nebulae in the very-high-energy regime. H.E.S.S., with its large field of view of 5 degrees and high sensitivity, gives new prospects for the search for these objects. An ongoing systematic search for very-high-energy emission from energetic pulsars over the region of the Galactic plane between -60 degrees wind nebulae, HESS J1718-385 and HESS J1809-193. H.E.S.S. has proven to be a suitable instrument for pulsar wind nebula searches.

  16. Radiation Fields in High Energy Accelerators and their impact on Single Event Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    García Alía, Rubén; Wrobel, Frédéric; Brugger, Markus

    Including calculation models and measurements for a variety of electronic components and their concerned radiation environments, this thesis describes the complex radiation field present in the surrounding of a high-energy hadron accelerator and assesses the risks related to it in terms of Single Event Effects (SEE). It is shown that this poses not only a serious threat to the respective operation of modern accelerators but also highlights the impact on other high-energy radiation environments such as those for ground and avionics applications. Different LHC-like radiation environments are described in terms of their hadron composition and energy spectra. They are compared with other environments relevant for electronic component operation such as the ground-level, avionics or proton belt. The main characteristic of the high-energy accelerator radiation field is its mixed nature, both in terms of hadron types and energy interval. The threat to electronics ranges from neutrons of thermal energies to GeV hadron...

  17. Propagation of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays and the Production of Cosmogenic Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aloisio, R; di Matteo, A; Grillo, A F; Petrera, S; Salamida, F

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an updated version of the {\\it SimProp} Monte Carlo code to study the propagation of ultra high energy cosmic rays in astrophysical backgrounds computing the cosmogenic neutrino fluxes expected on earth. The study of secondary neutrinos provides a powerful tool to constrain the source models of these extremely energetic particles. We will show how the newly detected IceCube neutrino events at PeV energies together with the the latest experimental results of the Pierre Auger Observatory and Telescope Array experiment are almost at the level of excluding several hypothesis on the astrophysical sources of ultra high energy cosmic rays. Results presented here can be also used to evaluate the discovery capabilities of future high energy cosmic rays and neutrino detectors.

  18. Propagation of very high energy gamma-rays inside massive binaries LS 5039 and LSI +61 303

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Bednarek

    2006-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    It is expected that high energy gamma-rays, if injected relatively close to the massive stars in binary systems LS 5039 and LSI 61 3003, should be strongly absorbed, initiating inverse Compton $e^\\pm$ pair cascades in the anisotropic radiation from stellar surfaces. We investigate influence of the propagation effects on the spectral and angular features of the gamma-ray spectra emerging from these two binary systems by applying the Monte Carlo method. Two different hypothesis are considered: isotropic injection of primary gamma-rays with the power law spectrum and electrons. It is concluded that propagation effects of gamma-rays can be responsible for the spectral features observed from LS 5039. The cascade processes occurring inside these binary systems significantly reduce the gamma-ray opacity obtained in other works by simple calculations of the escape of gamma-rays from the radiation fields of the massive stars. Both systems provide very similar conditions for the TeV gamma-ray production at the periastron passage. Any TeV gamma-ray flux at the apastron passage in LSI +61 303 will be relatively stronger with respect to its GeV flux than in LS 5039. If gamma-rays are produced inside these binaries not far from the massive stars, i.e. within a few stellar radii, then clear anticorrelation between the GeV and TeV emission should be observed, provided that primary gamma-rays at GeV and TeV energies are produced in the same process by the same population of relativistic particles. These gamma-ray propagation features can be tested in the near future by the multi-wavelength campaigns engaging the AGILE and GLAST telescopes and the Cherenkov telescopes (e.g. MAGIC, HESS, VERITAS and CANGAROO).

  19. Direct photoetching of polymers using radiation of high energy density from a table-top extreme ultraviolet plasma source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barkusky, Frank; Bayer, Armin; Peth, Christian; Mann, Klaus [Laser-Laboratorium-Goettingen e.V., Hans-Adolf-Krebs-Weg 1, D-37077 Goettingen (Germany)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to perform material interaction studies with intense extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation, a Schwarzschild mirror objective coated with Mo/Si multilayers was adapted to a compact laser-driven EUV plasma source utilizing a solid Au target. By 10x demagnified imaging of the plasma a maximum pulse energy density of {approx}0.73 J/cm{sup 2} at a wavelength of 13.5 nm can be achieved in the image plane of the objective at a pulse duration of 8.8 ns. In this paper we present EUV photoetching rates measured for polymethyl methacrylate, polycarbonate, and polytetrafluoroethylene at various fluence levels. A linear dependence between etch depth and applied EUV pulse number could be observed without the necessity for any incubation pulses. By evaluating the slope of these data, etch rates were determined, revealing also a linear behavior for low fluences. A threshold energy density could not be observed. The slope of the linear etch regime as well as deviations from the linear trend at higher energy densities are discussed and compared to data known from deep UV laser ablation. Furthermore, the surface roughness of the structured polymers was measured by atomic force microscopy and compared to the nonirradiated polymer surface, indicating a rather smooth etch process (roughness increase of 20%-30%). The different shapes of the etch craters observed for the three polymers at high energy densities can be explained by the measured fluence dependence of the etch rates, having consequences for the proper use of polymer ablation for beam profiling of focused EUV radiation.

  20. Very-high-energy gamma radiation associated with the unshocked wind of the Crab pulsar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. V. Bogovalov; F. A. Aharonian

    2000-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the relativistic wind in the Crab pulsar, which is commonly thought to be invisible in the region upstream of the termination shock at R wind that is not accessible at other wavelengths.

  1. Analysis of nucleus-nucleus collisions at high energies and Random Matrix Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. G. Nazmitdinov; E. I. Shahaliev; M. K. Suleymanov; S. Tomsovic

    2009-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a novel statistical approach to the analysis of experimental data obtained in nucleus-nucleus collisions at high energies which borrows from methods developed within the context of Random Matrix Theory. It is applied to the detection of correlations in momentum distributions of emitted particles. We find good agreement between the results obtained in this way and a standard analysis based on the method of effective mass spectra and two-pair correlation function often used in high energy physics. The method introduced here is free from unwanted background contributions.

  2. Provably Good Solutions for Wavelength Assignment in Optical ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In this paper, we study the minimum converter wavelength assignment problem in .... like linear programming based branch-and-bound on the assignment ...

  3. Wavelength Assignment in Multi-Fiber WDM Networks by ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In this paper, we study wavelength assignment problems in multi-fiber WDM net- ... A comparison with linear programming lower bounds reveals that the bounds ...

  4. Visible-wavelength semiconductor lasers and arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schneider, Jr., Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM); Crawford, Mary H. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A visible semiconductor laser. The visible semiconductor laser includes an InAlGaP active region surrounded by one or more AlGaAs layers on each side, with carbon as the sole p-type dopant. Embodiments of the invention are provided as vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) and as edge-emitting lasers (EELs). One or more transition layers comprised of a substantially indium-free semiconductor alloy such as AlAsP, AlGaAsP, or the like may be provided between the InAlGaP active region and the AlGaAS DBR mirrors or confinement layers to improve carrier injection and device efficiency by reducing any band offsets. Visible VCSEL devices fabricated according to the invention with a one-wavelength-thick (1.lambda.) optical cavity operate continuous-wave (cw) with lasing output powers up to 8 mW, and a peak power conversion efficiency of up to 11%.

  5. Visible-wavelength semiconductor lasers and arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schneider, R.P. Jr.; Crawford, M.H.

    1996-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The visible semiconductor laser includes an InAlGaP active region surrounded by one or more AlGaAs layers on each side, with carbon as the sole p-type dopant. Embodiments of the invention are provided as vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) and as edge-emitting lasers (EELs). One or more transition layers comprised of a substantially indium-free semiconductor alloy such as AlAsP, AlGaAsP, or the like may be provided between the InAlGaP active region and the AlGaAS DBR mirrors or confinement layers to improve carrier injection and device efficiency by reducing any band offsets. Visible VCSEL devices fabricated according to the invention with a one-wavelength-thick (1{lambda}) optical cavity operate continuous-wave (cw) with lasing output powers up to 8 mW, and a peak power conversion efficiency of up to 11%. 5 figs.

  6. Impacts of high energy prices on long-term energy-economic scenarios for Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Impacts of high energy prices on long-term energy-economic scenarios for Germany Volker Krey1 , Dag and Technology Evaluation (IEF-STE), 52425 Jülich, Germany 2) DIW Berlin, Königin-Luise-Str. 5, 14195 Berlin, Germany 3) Öko-Institut, Novalisstr. 10, 10115 Berlin, Germany Abstract Prices of oil and other fossil

  7. High Energy Neutrino Physics with Liquid Scintillation Detectors John G. Learned #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Learned, John

    High Energy Neutrino Physics with Liquid Scintillation Detectors John G. Learned # Department of Physics and Astronomy University of Hawaii, Manoa, 96822 USA (Dated: 22 February 2009) Large liquid scintillation detectors have been generally dedicated to low energy neutrino measure­ ments, in the MeV energy

  8. High Energy Neutrino Physics with Liquid Scintillation Detectors John G. Learned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Learned, John

    High Energy Neutrino Physics with Liquid Scintillation Detectors John G. Learned Department of Physics and Astronomy University of Hawaii, Manoa, 96822 USA (Dated: 22 February 2009) Large liquid scintillation detectors have been generally dedicated to low energy neutrino measure- ments, in the MeV energy

  9. Indiana University High Energy Physics, Task A. Technical progress report, 1992--1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brabson, B.; Crittenden, R.; Dzierba, A. [and others

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses research at Indians University on the following high energy physics experiments: A search for mesons with unusual quantum numbers; hadronic states produced in association with high-mass dimuons; FNAL E740 (D0); superconducting super collider; and OPAL experiment at CERN.

  10. On the role of energy conservation in high-energy nuclear scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    On the role of energy conservation in high-energy nuclear scattering H J Drescher1 , M Hladik1-relativistic energies do not treat energy conservation in a consistent fashion. Demanding theoretical consistency), but energy conservation is not taken care of in cross section calculations. This is a serious problem

  11. arXiv:astro-ph/0305066v16May2003 High Energy Photons, Neutrinos and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Bing

    arXiv:astro-ph/0305066v16May2003 High Energy Photons, Neutrinos and Gravitational Waves from Gamma-Ray. of Physics Pennsylvania State University University Park, PA 16802, USA 1 Introduction A new era in Gamma-ray Burst (GRB) research opened in 1991 with the launch of the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO), whose

  12. DESIGN STUDY OF THE DIPOLE MAGNET FOR THE RHIC EBIS HIGH ENERGY TRANSPORT LINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DESIGN The bending section in EBIS HEBT line consists of two identical H type magnets with a slit betweenDESIGN STUDY OF THE DIPOLE MAGNET FOR THE RHIC EBIS HIGH ENERGY TRANSPORT LINE Takeshi Kanesue magnet body should be laminated. In this paper, design methods of the dipole magnet to optimize magnetic

  13. The DOE Program in High Energy Density New Initiatives in Matter in Extreme Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The DOE Program in High Energy Density Physics: New Initiatives in Matter in Extreme Conditions Siegfried H. Glenzer (SLAC) December 11, 2013 Presentation to: 2013 FUSION POWER ASSOCIATES 34th Annual to determine pressures of dense matter · Summary · High power laser workshop and outlook towards a bright

  14. Compressing magnetic fields with high-energy lasersa... J. P. Knauer,1,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Compressing magnetic fields with high-energy lasersa... J. P. Knauer,1,b O. V. Gotchev,1,2,3 P. Y, Rochester, New York 14623, USA 3 Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, 250 East-driven magnetic-field compression producing a magnetic field of tens of megaGauss is reported for the first time

  15. Milagro Search for Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts in the Swift Era

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Milagro Search for Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts in the Swift Era P. M. Saz an unprecedented number of rapid and accurate Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) localizations, facilitating a flurry of follow as the flares. INTRODUCTION Some of the most important contributions to our understanding of gamma-ray bursts

  16. Roadmap for Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Ray Physics and Astronomy (whitepaper for Snowmass 2013)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anchordoqui, Luis A; Krizmanic, John F; Matthews, Jim; Mitchell, John W; Olinto, Angela V; Paul, Thomas C; Sokolsky, Pierre; Thomson, Gordon B; Weiler, Thomas J

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We summarize the remarkable recent progress in ultra-high energy cosmic ray physics and astronomy enabled by the current generation of cosmic ray observatories. We discuss the primary objectives for future measurements and describe the plans for near-term enhancements of existing experiments as well as the next generation of observatories.

  17. The Role and Detectability of the Charm Contribution to Ultra High Energy Neutrino Fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raj Gandhi; Abhijit Samanta; Atsushi Watanabe

    2009-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    It is widely believed that charm meson production and decay may play an important role in high energy astrophysical sources of neutrinos, especially those that are baryon-rich, providing an environment conducive to pp interactions. Using slow-jet supernovae (SJS) as an example of such a source, we study the detectability of high-energy neutrinos, paying particular attention to those produced from charmed-mesons. We highlight important distinguishing features in the ultra-high energy neutrino flux which would act as markers for the role of charm in the source. In particular, charm leads to significant event rates at higher energies, after the conventional (pi, K) neutrino fluxes fall off. We calculate event rates both for a nearby single source and for diffuse SJS fluxes for an IceCube-like detector. By comparing muon event rates for the conventional and prompt fluxes in different energy bins, we demonstrate the striking energy dependence in the rates induced by the presence of charm. We also show that it leads to an energy dependant flux ratio of shower to muon events, providing an additional important diagnostic tool for the presence of prompt neutrinos. Motivated by the infusion of high energy anti-electron neutrinos into the flux by charm decay, we also study the detectability of the Glashow resonance due to these sources.

  18. Ivan De Mitri VHE Gamma Ray Astronomy 1 Very High Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Thomas

    ~ 1/day Gamma Ray Bursts The X-ray counterpart detection with better pointing accuracy instrumentsIvan De Mitri VHE Gamma Ray Astronomy 1 Very High Energy Gamma Ray Astronomy Ivan De Mitri'Aquila, 11- Jun -2002 Photo F. Arneodo #12;Ivan De Mitri VHE Gamma Ray Astronomy 2 Seminar Outline Background

  19. Title of dissertation: A SEARCH FOR BURSTS OF VERY HIGH ENERGY GAMMA RAYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    ABSTRACT Title of dissertation: A SEARCH FOR BURSTS OF VERY HIGH ENERGY GAMMA RAYS WITH MILAGRO though the search was optimized primarily for detecting the emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) or to any other kind of phenomena that produce bursts of VHE gamma rays. Measurements of the GRB spectra

  20. HETE, the High Energy Transient Explorer : unlocking the mysteries of gamma ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monnelly, Glen Pickslay, 1973-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Energy Transient Explorer (HETE), was built primarily at MIT and launched in October 2000 with the goal of studying Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) at X-ray and gamma-ray energies. A suite of instruments aboard HETE provide ...

  1. Study of Celestial Objects with Very High Energy Gamma Rays CANGAROO III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enomoto, Ryoji

    ), the doppler boosting of secondary gamma-rays is sufficient to produce TeV gamma-rays. Gamma-ray bursts: Fireballs expanding with relativistic speed explain gamma-ray bursts at cosmological distancesStudy of Celestial Objects with Very High Energy Gamma Rays CANGAROO III Project Description

  2. High Energy Physics: Report of research accomplishments and future goals, FY 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1991-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses high energy physics research in the following areas: Research in theoretical physics; phenomenology; experimental computer facility at Caltech; Beijing BES; MACRO; CLEO II; SLD; L3 at LEP; the B Factory R & D Program; SSC GEM Detector; and a high resolution barium fluoride calorimeter for the SSC.

  3. Complex workplace radiation fields at European high-energy accelerators and thermonuclear fusion facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bilski, P; D'Errico, F; Esposito, A; Fehrenbacher, G; Fernàndez, F; Fuchs, A; Golnik, N; Lacoste, V; Leuschner, A; Sandri, S; Silari, M; Spurny, F; Wiegel, B; Wright, P

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report outlines the research needs and research activities within Europe to develop new and improved methods and techniques for the characterization of complex radiation fields at workplaces around high-energy accelerators and the next generation of thermonuclear fusion facilities under the auspices of the COordinated Network for RAdiation Dosimetry (CONRAD) project funded by the European Commission.

  4. Single-crystal YAG fiber optics for the transmission of high energy laser energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Single-crystal YAG fiber optics for the transmission of high energy laser energy X.S. Zhua , James. Thus, it is reasonable to assume that YAG fibers will have high laser damage thresholds. The optical of YAG fiber grown has been about 60 cm. Keywords: Infrared fiber optics, single-crystal fibers, oxide

  5. Bose-Einstein correlations and thermal cluster formation in high-energy collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrzej Bialas; Wojciech Florkowski; Kacper Zalewski

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The blast wave model is generalized to include the production of thermal clusters, as suggested by the apparent success of the statistical model of particle production at high energies. The formulae for the HBT correlation functions and the corresponding HBT radii are derived.

  6. High-energy particle acceleration in the shell of a supernova remnant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. E. S. S. Collaboration; :; F. Aharonian

    2004-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A significant fraction of the energy density of the interstellar medium is in the form of high-energy charged particles (cosmic rays). The origin of these particles remains uncertain. Although it is generally accepted that the only sources capable of supplying the energy required to accelerate the bulk of Galactic cosmic rays are supernova explosions, and even though the mechanism of particle acceleration in expanding supernova remnant (SNR) shocks is thought to be well understood theoretically, unequivocal evidence for the production of high-energy particles in supernova shells has proven remarkably hard to find. Here we report on observations of the SNR RX J1713.7-3946 (G347.3-0.5), which was discovered by ROSAT in the X-ray spectrum and later claimed as a source of high-energy \\gamma-rays of TeV energies (1 TeV=10^{12} eV). We present a TeV \\gamma-ray image of the SNR: the spatially resolved remnant has a shell morphology similar to that seen in X-rays, which demonstrates that very-high-energy particles are accelerated there. The energy spectrum indicates efficient acceleration of charged particles to energies beyond 100 TeV, consistent with current ideas of particle acceleration in young SNR shocks.

  7. INNER SHELL EXCITATION OF ATOMS AND MOLECULES BY ELECTRON IMPACT WITH HIGH ENERGY RESOLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    INNER SHELL EXCITATION OF ATOMS AND MOLECULES BY ELECTRON IMPACT WITH HIGH ENERGY RESOLUTION F. H resolution energy loss spectra for inner shell excited states, (2) the observa- tion of inner shell excited are the subject of the present review. The inner shell states that can usefully be studied with energy resolutions

  8. alxga1-xas high-energy x-ray: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    alxga1-xas high-energy x-ray First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 ?????? ??? ??...

  9. Improving the Performance of High-Energy Physics Analysis through Bitmap Indices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoschek, Wolfgang

    Improving the Performance of High-Energy Physics Analysis through Bitmap Indices Kurt Stockinger1 for Nuclear Research CH-1211 Geneva, Switzerland {Kurt.Stockinger, Dirk.Duellmann, Wolfgang.Hoschek}@cern.ch 2 indices are popular multi-dimensional data struc- tures for accessing read-mostly data such as data

  10. Amorphization of -Thorium Phosphate Diphosphate (-TPD) irradiated with high energy krypton ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Amorphization of -Thorium Phosphate Diphosphate (-TPD) irradiated with high energy krypton ions C of nuclear wastes, the -Thorium Phosphate Diphosphate ceramic (-TPD), Th4(PO4)4P2O7, must be resistant as good candidates for nuclear waste immobilization [1-3]. Thorium Phosphate-Diphosphate (-TPD), -Th4(PO4

  11. Wurtzite GaN Surface Structures Studied by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Reflection High Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feenstra, Randall

    Wurtzite GaN Surface Structures Studied by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Reflection High Energy studies of the surface reconstructions for both the Ga-face and the N-face of wurtzite GaN films grown a surface phenomenon. Although numerous surface studies of wurtzite GaN have been performed, progress

  12. VERY HIGH ENERGY GAMMA RAYS FROM THE VELA PULSAR/NEBULA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enomoto, Ryoji

    OG 4.1.19 VERY HIGH ENERGY GAMMA RAYS FROM THE VELA PULSAR/NEBULA T. Yoshikoshi 1 , T. Kifune 1 , S Department of Physics and Mathematical Physics, University of Adelaide, South Australia 5005, Australia 3, Kobe University, Hyogo 637, Japan 8 Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606, Japan 9 Solar

  13. The Fly's Eye Extremely High Energy Cosmic Ray Spectrum D.J. Bird,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Fly's Eye Extremely High Energy Cosmic Ray Spectrum D.J. Bird,1 S.C. Corbato,3 H.Y. Dai,3 B present our latest results on the cosmic ray energy spectrum above 1017 eV observed by Fly's Eye. Tracks detected by both eyes can be well reconstructed and therefore have very good energy resolution

  14. Hydrogeological model of a high energy geothermal field (Bouillante area, Guadeloupe, French West Indies)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Hydrogeological model of a high energy geothermal field (Bouillante area, Guadeloupe, French West, France 3. BRGM, Department of Geothermal Energy 3, Av. Claude Guillemin - 45060 Orléans Cedex 2, France Abstract The Bouillante geothermal field presently provides about 8% of the annual electricity needs

  15. Wave run-up on a high-energy dissipative beach Peter Ruggiero

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wave run-up on a high-energy dissipative beach Peter Ruggiero Coastal and Marine Geology Program, U in foreshore beach morphology, wave run-up data collected along the central Oregon coast during February 1996 stand in contrast to run-up data currently available in the literature. During a single data run lasting

  16. Be7(p,gamma)B8 and the high-energy solar neutrino flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Attila Csoto

    1997-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of the Be7(p,gamma)B8 reaction in predicting the high-energy solar neutrino flux is discussed. I present a microscopic eight-body model and a potential model for the calculation of the Be7(p,gamma)B8 cross section.

  17. High energy physics research. Final report, October 1, 1969--December 31, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this research was to understand the fundamental constituents of matter and their interactions. First, a brief history of the high energy research at Princeton University is presented. Next, the extensive research covered in this 21 year period is summarized. Finally, a list of all publications issued during this period is presented.

  18. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, July 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, R.; Moonier, P.; Schoessow, P.; Talaga, R.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of July 1, 1993--December 31, 1993. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included.

  19. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, July 1, 1992--December 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoessow, P.; Moonier, P.; Talaga, R.; Wagner, R. [eds.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of July 1, 1992--December 30, 1992. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included.

  20. Formation of Superdense Hadronic Matter in High-Energy Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Ba0-An; Ko, Che Ming.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the detail of a newly developed relativistic transport model (ART 1.0) for high energy heavy-ion collisions. Using this model, we first study the general collision dynamics between heavy ions at the AGS energies. We then show...

  1. Detecting W/Z pairs and Higgs at high energy pp colliders: Main experimental issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alverson, G.; Bengtsson, H.U.; Hauptman, J.; Hedin, D.; Herrero, M.J.; Wang, E.; Linn, S.; Young, C.; Milliken, B.; Paige, F.

    1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main detection issues implied by the search for W and Z/sup 0/ pairs and Higgs in a high energy pp collider context are discussed here. It includes: precise electron identification, missing energy measurement, multilepton recognition, sophisticated jet pattern recognition, and pile-up. The study uses, as much as possible, a ''realistic simulation of life.''

  2. Research supported by the department of energy Task C: Experimental high energy physics. 1995 Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brau, J.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work of the University of Oregon high-energy physics group related to the Stanford Linear Detector, LEP`s OPAL detector, the NuTeV experiment at Fermilab, the SSC`s GEM detector, and top-quark studies at the Next Linear Collider. 160 refs., 53 figs., 12 tabs.

  3. 36Super-fast solar flares ! NASA's Ramaty High Energy Solar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    36Super-fast solar flares ! NASA's Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) satellite has been studying solar flares since 2002. The sequence of figures to the left shows a flaring region hr/3600 sec = 0.98 kilometers/sec. The solar flare blob was traveling at 207 kilometers per second

  4. High Energy Solar Physics: Anticipating HESSI ASP Conference Series, Vol. xxx, 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Priest, Eric

    High Energy Solar Physics: Anticipating HESSI ASP Conference Series, Vol. xxx, 2000 R. Ramaty and N. Mandzhavidze, eds. Solar Flare Theory and the Status of Flare Understanding E.R. Priest Department current understanding of the mag­ netohydrodynamics of solar flares. The theory of reconnection in 2D

  5. IMPACT OF MAGNETIC ENVIRONMENT ON THE GENERATION OF HIGH-ENERGY NEUTRONS AT THE SUN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usoskin, Ilya G.

    IMPACT OF MAGNETIC ENVIRONMENT ON THE GENERATION OF HIGH-ENERGY NEUTRONS AT THE SUN L. G. KOCHAROV and J. TORSTI Space Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, SF-20014 Turku University, Finland F. TANG and H. ZIRIN Big Bear Solar Observatory, Caltech, Pasadena CA 91125, U.S.A. G. A. KOVALTSOV and I

  6. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, January 1, 1993--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoessow, P.; Moonier, P.; Talaga, R.; Wagner, R. [eds.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of January 1, 1993--June 30, 1993. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included.

  7. TMC304(TEG3) User's Manual KEK, National Laboratory for High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berns, Hans-Gerd

    TMC304(TEG3) User's Manual Yasuo Arai KEK, National Laboratory for High Energy Physics 1-1 Oho RTMC 6 TMC304(TEG3) Block Diagram 1995.11.13 Y.A CIO0-7* R encoder F encoder 6 PLL Read Pointer Write

  8. Jet and Leading Hadron Production in High-energy Heavy-ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xin-Nian Wang

    2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Jet tomography has become a powerful tool for the study of properties of dense matter in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. I will discuss recent progresses in the phenomenological study of jet quenching, including momentum, colliding energy and nuclear size dependence of single hadron suppression, modification of dihadron correlations and the soft hadron distribution associated with a quenched jet.

  9. Azimuthal anisotropy in high-energy heavy-ion collisions at RHIC energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ShinIchi Esumi

    2004-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Directed and elliptic event anisotropy parameters measured in the experiments at relativistic heavy-ion collider are presented. The possible origin of the measured elliptic anisotropy parameter $v_2$ and its sensitivity to the early phase of the high-energy heavy-ion collisions are discussed.

  10. DESIGN AND VALIDATION OF A HIGH ENERGY DENSITY ELASTIC ACCUMULATOR USING POLYURETHANE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barth, Eric J.

    steels and titanium alloys have a gravimetric energy density of around 1-1.5 kJ/kg [1]. ConsequentlyDESIGN AND VALIDATION OF A HIGH ENERGY DENSITY ELASTIC ACCUMULATOR USING POLYURETHANE Alexander-35%. However, the relatively low gravimetric and volumetric energy densities of conventional HAs prohibit

  11. High-energy x-ray production with pyroelectric crystals Jeffrey A. Geuthera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    as the lower-energy L-shell peaks, allowing more positive sample identification. This report shows how a paired-ray sources for use in imaging, materials analysis, and other applications. For many applications, for example, high-energy sources enable the excitation of the K-shell x-ray peaks for high-Z materials as well

  12. ccsd00001969, Particle-in-cell simulations of high energy electron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ccsd­00001969, version 2 ­ 23 Oct 2004 Particle-in-cell simulations of high energy electron energy electrons from the underdense plasmas are investigated using two dimensional particle- in-cell simulations. When the ratio of the laser power and a critical power of relativistic self

  13. The Running Spectral Index as a Probe of Physics at High Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. R. Espinosa

    2006-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The WMAP results on the scalar spectral index n and its running with scale, though preliminary, open a very interesting window to physics at very high energies. We address the problem of finding simple inflaton potentials well motivated by particle physics which can accommodate WMAP data.

  14. THE NUCLEAR SPECTROSCOPIC TELESCOPE ARRAY (NuSTAR) HIGH-ENERGY X-RAY MISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakrabarty, Deepto

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) mission, launched on 2012 June 13, is the first focusing high-energy X-ray telescope in orbit. NuSTAR operates in the band from 3 to 79 keV, extending the sensitivity of ...

  15. In situ growth regime characterization of cubic GaN using reflection high energy electron diffraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    As, Donat Josef

    from Knudsen cells. Cubic GaN layers were deposited at 720 °C directly on 3C-SiC substrates shutters the GaN surface was exposed to different Ga fluxes for a certain time. The substrate temperatureIn situ growth regime characterization of cubic GaN using reflection high energy electron

  16. A Lookup Table to Compute High Energy Cosmic Ray Effects on Terrestrial Atmospheric Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atri, Dimitra

    2009-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    chemistry changes. We have created a table that, with the use of the NGSFC code can be used to simulate the effects of high energy cosmic rays (10 GeV to 1 PeV) ionizing the atmosphere. By interpolation, the table can be used to generate values for other...

  17. Method for generating high-energy and high repetition rate laser pulses from CW amplifiers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Shukui

    2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for obtaining high-energy, high repetition rate laser pulses simultaneously using continuous wave (CW) amplifiers is described. The method provides for generating micro-joule level energy in pico-second laser pulses at Mega-hertz repetition rates.

  18. Design of a TOF-SANS instrument for the proposed Long Wavelength Target Station at the Spallation Neutron Source.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiyagarajan, P.; Littrell, K.; Seeger, P. A.

    2000-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We have designed a versatile high-throughput SANS instrument [Broad Range Intense Multipurpose SANS (BRIMS)] for the proposed Long Wavelength Target Station at the SNS by using acceptance diagrams and the Los Alamos NISP Monte Carlo simulation package. This instrument has been fully optimized to take advantage of the 10 Hz source frequency (broad wavelength bandwidth) and the cold neutron spectrum from a tall coupled solid methane moderator (12 cm x 20 cm). BRIMS has been designed to produce data in a Q range spanning from 0.001 to 0.7 {angstrom}{sup {minus}1} in a single measurement by simultaneously using neutrons with wavelengths ranging from 1 to 14.5 {angstrom} in a time of flight mode. A supermirror guide and bender assembly is employed to separate and redirect the useful portion of the neutron spectrum with {lambda} > 1 {angstrom}, by 2.3{degree} away from the direct beam containing high energy neutrons and {gamma} rays. The effects of the supermirror coating of the guide, the location of the bender assembly with respect to the source, the bend angle, and various collimation choices on the flux, resolution and Q{sub min} have been characterized using spherical particle and delta function scatterers. The overall performance of BRIMS has been compared with that of the best existing reactor-based SANS instrument D22 at ILL.

  19. High-Energy Cosmology: gamma rays and neutrinos from beyond the galaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles D. Dermer

    2006-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Our knowledge of the high-energy universe is undergoing a period of rapid change as new astronomical detectors of high-energy radiation start to operate at their design sensitivities. Now is a boomtime for high-energy astrophysics, with new discoveries from Swift and HESS, results from MAGIC and VERITAS starting to be reported, the upcoming launches of the gamma-ray space telescopes GLAST and AGILE, and anticipated data releases from IceCube and Auger. A formalism for calculating statistical properties of cosmological gamma-ray sources is presented. Application is made to model calculations of the statistical distributions of gamma-ray and neutrino emission from (i) beamed sources, specifically, long-duration GRBs, blazars, and extagalactic microquasars, and (ii) unbeamed sources, including normal galaxies, starburst galaxies and clusters. Expressions for the integrated intensities of faint beamed and unbeamed high-energy radiation sources are also derived. A toy model for the background intensity of radiation from dark-matter annihilation taking place in the early universe is constructed. Estimates for the gamma-ray fluxes of local group galaxies, starburst, and infrared luminous galaxies are briefly reviewed. Because the brightest extragalactic gamma-ray sources are flaring sources, and these are the best targets for sources of PeV -- EeV neutrinos and ultra-high energy cosmic rays, rapidly slewing all-sky telescopes like MAGIC and an all-sky gamma-ray observatory beyond Milagro will be crucial for optimal science return in the multi-messenger age.

  20. Systematic wavelength selection for improved multivariate spectral analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thomas, Edward V. (2828 Georgia NE., Albuquerque, NM 87110); Robinson, Mark R. (1603 Solano NE., Albuquerque, NM 87110); Haaland, David M. (809 Richmond Dr. SE., Albuquerque, NM 87106)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus for determining in a biological material one or more unknown values of at least one known characteristic (e.g. the concentration of an analyte such as glucose in blood or the concentration of one or more blood gas parameters) with a model based on a set of samples with known values of the known characteristics and a multivariate algorithm using several wavelength subsets. The method includes selecting multiple wavelength subsets, from the electromagnetic spectral region appropriate for determining the known characteristic, for use by an algorithm wherein the selection of wavelength subsets improves the model's fitness of the determination for the unknown values of the known characteristic. The selection process utilizes multivariate search methods that select both predictive and synergistic wavelengths within the range of wavelengths utilized. The fitness of the wavelength subsets is determined by the fitness function F=.function.(cost, performance). The method includes the steps of: (1) using one or more applications of a genetic algorithm to produce one or more count spectra, with multiple count spectra then combined to produce a combined count spectrum; (2) smoothing the count spectrum; (3) selecting a threshold count from a count spectrum to select these wavelength subsets which optimize the fitness function; and (4) eliminating a portion of the selected wavelength subsets. The determination of the unknown values can be made: (1) noninvasively and in vivo; (2) invasively and in vivo; or (3) in vitro.

  1. Overview of LANL short-pulse ion acceleration activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flippo, Kirk A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schmitt, Mark J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Offermann, Dustin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cobble, James A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gautier, Donald [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kline, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Workman, Jonathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Archuleta, Fred [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gonzales, Raymond [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hurry, Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Randall [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Letzring, Samuel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Montgomery, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reid, Sha-Marie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shimada, Tsutomu [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gaillard, Sandrine A [UNIV OF NEVADA; Sentoku, Yasuhiko [UNIV OF NEVADA; Bussman, Michael [FORSCHUNGZENTRUM DRESDEN; Kluge, Thomas [FORSCHUNGZENTRUM DRESDEN; Cowan, Thomas E [FORSCHUNGZENTRUM DRESDEN; Rassuchine, Jenny M [FORSCHUNGZENTRUM DRESDEN; Lowenstern, Mario E [UNIV OF MICHIGAN; Mucino, J Eduardo [UNIV OF MICHIGAN; Gall, Brady [UNIV OF MISSOURI; Korgan, Grant [NANOLABZ, RENO; Malekos, Steven [NANOLABZ, RENO; Adams, Jesse [NANOLABZ, RENO; Bartal, Teresa [UCSD; Chawla, Surgreev [UCSD; Higginson, Drew [UCSD; Beg, Farhat [UCSD; Nilson, Phil [LLE, ROCHESTER; MacPhee, Andrew [LLNL; Le Pape, Sebastien [LLNL; Hey, Daniel [LLNL; MacKinnon, Andy [LLNL; Geissel, Mattias [SNL; Schollmeier, Marius [SNL; Stephens, Rich [GENERAL ATOMICS, SAN DIEGO

    2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview of Los Alamos National Laboratory's activities related to short-pulse ion acceleration is presented. LANL is involved is several projects related to Inertial Confinement Fusion (Fast Ignition) and Laser-Ion Acceleration. LANL has an active high energy X-ray backlighter program for radiographing ICF implosions and other High Energy Density Laboratory Physics experiments. Using the Trident 200TW laser we are currently developing high energy photon (>10 keV) phase contrast imaging techniques to be applied on Omega and the NIF. In addition we are engaged in multiple programs in laser ion acceleration to boost the ion energies and efficiencies for various potential applications including Fast Ignition, active material interrogation, and medical applications. Two basic avenues to increase ion performance are currently under study: one involves ultra-thin targets and the other involves changing the target geometry. We have recently had success in boosting proton energies above 65 MeV into the medical application range. Highlights covered in the presentation include: The Trident Laser System; X-ray Phase Contrast Imaging for ICF and HEDLP; Improving TNSA Ion Acceleration; Scaling Laws; Flat Targets; Thin Targets; Cone Targets; Ion Focusing;Trident; Omega EP; Scaling Comparisons; and, Conclusions.

  2. High-energy behavior of the nuclear symmetry potential in asymmetric nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lie-Wen Chen; Che Ming Ko; Bao-An Li

    2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the relativistic impulse approximation with empirical NN scattering amplitude and the nuclear scalar and vector densities from the relativistic mean-field theory, we evaluate the Dirac optical potential for neutrons and protons in asymmetric nuclear matter. From the resulting Schr\\"{o}% dinger-equivalent potential, the high energy behavior of the nuclear symmetry potential is studied. We find that the symmetry potential at fixed baryon density is essentially constant once the nucleon kinetic energy is greater than about 500 MeV. Moreover, for such high energy nucleon, the symmetry potential is slightly negative below a baryon density of about $% \\rho =0.22$ fm$^{-3}$ and then increases almost linearly to positive values at high densities. Our results thus provide an important constraint on the energy and density dependence of nuclear symmetry potential in asymmetric nuclear matter.

  3. Evaluation of high-energy-efficiency powertrain approaches: the 1996 futurecar challenge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sluder, S.; Duoba, M.; Larsen, R.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Twelve colleges and universities were selected to design, build, and develop a mid-size vehicle that could achieve high energy economy while maintaining the performance characteristics of today`s mid-size vehicle. Many of the teams were able to increase the fuel economy of their vehicles, but most of these increases came at the expense of decreased performance or worsened emissions. This paper evaluates and summarizes the high-energy-efficiency powertrain technology approaches that were utilized in the 1996 FutureCar Challenge, which was the first evaluation of these vehicles in a two-year program. Of the 11 vehicles evaluated in the competition, nine utilized hybrid electric vehicle approaches. This paper discusses the design trade- offs made by the teams to achieve high efficiency while trying to maintain stock performance.

  4. NLO corrections to ultra-high energy neutrino-nucleon scattering, shadowing and small x

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahul Basu; Debajyoti Choudhury; Swapan Majhi

    2002-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We reconsider the Standard Model interactions of ultra-high energy neutrinos with matter. The next to leading order QCD corrections are presented for charged-current and neutral-current processes. Contrary to popular expectations, these corrections are found to be quite substantial, especially for very large (anti-) neutrino energies. Hence, they need to be taken into account in any search for new physics effects in high-energy neutrino interactions. In our extrapolation of the parton densities to kinematical regions as yet unexplored directly in terrestrial accelerators, we are guided by double asymptotic scaling in the large Q^2 and small Bjorken x region and to models of saturation in the low Q^2 and low x regime. The sizes of the consequent uncertainties are commented upon. We also briefly discuss some variables which are insensitive to higher order QCD corrections and are hence suitable in any search for new physics.

  5. PHENIX (Pioneering High Energy Nuclear Interaction eXperiment): Data Tables and Figures from Published Papers

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The PHENIX Experiment is the largest of the four experiments currently taking data at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. PHENIX, the Pioneering High Energy Nuclear Interaction eXperiment, is an exploratory experiment for the investigation of high energy collisions of heavy ions and protons. PHENIX is designed specifically to measure direct probes of the collisions such as electrons, muons, and photons. The primary goal of PHENIX is to discover and study a new state of matter called the Quark-Gluon Plasma. More than 60 published papers and preprints are listed here with links to the full text and separate links to the supporting PHENIX data in plain text tables and to EPS and GIF figures from the papers.

  6. High energy electrons and nuclear phenomena in petawatt laser-solid experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowan, T. E.; Ditmire, T.; Hatchett, S.; Pennington, D. M.; Perry, M. D.; Phillips, T. W.; Wilks, S. C.; Young, P. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California (United States); Dong, B.; Takahashi, Y. [University of Alabama, Huntsville, Alabama (United States); Fountain, W.; Parnell, T. [Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama (United States); Hunt, A. W. [Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Johnson, J. [University Space Research Association, Huntsville, Alabama (United States); Kuehl, T. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)

    1999-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petawatt laser at LLNL has opened a new regime of laser-matter interactions in which the quiver motion of plasma electrons is fully relativistic with energies extending well above the threshold for nuclear processes. We have developed broad-band magnetic spectrometers to measure the spectrum of high-energy electrons produced in laser-solid target experiments at the Petawatt, and have found that in addition to the expected flux of {approx}few MeV electrons characteristic of the ponderomotive potential, there is a high energy component extending to {approx}100 MeV apparently from plasma acceleration in the underdense pre-formed plasma. The generation of hard bremsstrahlung, photo-nuclear reactions, and preliminary evidence for positron-electron pair production will be discussed.

  7. High energy electrons and nuclear phenomena in petawatt laser-solid experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowan, T.E.; Ditmire, T.; Hatchett, S.; Pennington, D.M.; Perry, M.D.; Phillips, T.W.; Wilks, S.C.; Young, P.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California (United States)] Dong, B. [University of Alabama, Huntsville, Alabama (United States); Parnell, T.; Takahashi, Y. [Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama (United States)] Hunt, A.W. [Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States)] Johnson, J. [University Space Research Association, Huntsville, Alabama (United States)] Kuehl, T. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petawatt laser at LLNL has opened a new regime of laser-matter interactions in which the quiver motion of plasma electrons is fully relativistic with energies extending well above the threshold for nuclear processes. We have developed broad-band magnetic spectrometers to measure the spectrum of high-energy electrons produced in laser-solid target experiments at the Petawatt, and have found that in addition to the expected flux of {approximately}few MeV electrons characteristic of the ponderomotive potential, there is a high energy component extending to {approximately}100 MeV apparently from plasma acceleration in the underdense pre-formed plasma. The generation of hard bremsstrahlung, photo-nuclear reactions, and preliminary evidence for positron-electron pair production will be discussed. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Method for producing through extrusion an anisotropic magnet with high energy product

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chandhok, Vijay K.

    2004-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for producing an anisotropic magnet with high energy product through extrusion and, more specifically, by placing a particle charge of a composition from the which magnet is to be produced in a noncircular container, heating the container and particle charge and extruding the container and particle charge through a noncircular extrusion die in such a manner that one of the cross-sectional axes or dimension of the container and particle charge is held substantially constant during the extrusion to compact the particle charge to substantially full density by mechanical deformation produced during the extrusion to achieve a magnet with anisotropic magnetic properties along the axes or dimension thereof and, more specifically, a high energy product along the transverse of the smallest cross-sectional dimension of the extruded magnet.

  9. The effect of partonic wind on charm quark correlations in high-energy nuclear collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. Zhu; N. Xu; P. Zhuang

    2007-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In high-energy collisions, massive heavy quarks are produced back-to-back initially and they are sensitive to early dynamical conditions. The strong collective partonic wind from the fast expanding quark-gluon plasma created in high-energy nuclear collisions modifies the correlation pattern significantly. As a result, the angular correlation function for D$\\bar{\\rm D}$ pairs is suppressed at the angle $\\Delta\\phi=\\pi$. While the hot and dense medium in collisions at RHIC ($\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV) can only smear the initial back-to-back D$\\bar {\\rm D}$ correlation, a clear and strong near side D$\\bar{\\rm D}$ correlation is expected at LHC ($\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=5500$ GeV).

  10. Lookup tables to compute high energy cosmic ray induced atmospheric ionization and changes in atmospheric chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimitra Atri; Adrian L. Melott; Brian C. Thomas

    2010-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of events such as gamma-ray bursts and supernovae may expose the Earth to an increased flux of high-energy cosmic rays, with potentially important effects on the biosphere. Existing atmospheric chemistry software does not have the capability of incorporating the effects of substantial cosmic ray flux above 10 GeV . An atmospheric code, the NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center two-dimensional (latitude, altitude) time-dependent atmospheric model (NGSFC), is used to study atmospheric chemistry changes. Using CORSIKA, we have created tables that can be used to compute high energy cosmic ray (10 GeV - 1 PeV) induced atmospheric ionization and also, with the use of the NGSFC code, can be used to simulate the resulting atmospheric chemistry changes. We discuss the tables, their uses, weaknesses, and strengths.

  11. Very-High Energy Gamma-Ray Flux Limits for Nearby Active Galactic Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Herr; W. Hofmann; for the H. E. S. S. Collaboration

    2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Combining the results of targeted observations, H.E.S.S. has accumulated a large amount of extra-galactic exposure at TeV energies. Due to its large field of view a considerable part of the sky (0.6 sr) has been observed with high sensitivity outside the targeted observation positions. Since this exposure region contains little inherent bias, it is well suited for studies of extra-galactic source populations. Given the correlation between ultra-high energy cosmic rays and nearby extra-galactic objects recently claimed by the Auger collaboration, this unbiased sky sample by H.E.S.S. is of interest since it includes (besides the targeted sources) 63 AGN within 100 Mpc, for which very-high energy gamma-ray flux limits are derived.

  12. High energy density capacitors for power electronic applications using nano-structure multilayer technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Johnson, G.W.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Power electronics applications are currently limited by capacitor size and performance. Only incremental improvements are anticipated in existing capacitor technologies, while significant performance advances are required in energy density and overall performance to meet the technical needs of the applications which are important for U.S. economic competitiveness. One application, the Power Electronic Building Block (PEBB), promises a second electronics revolution in power electronic design. High energy density capacitors with excellent electrical thermal and mechanical performance represent an enabling technology in the PEBB concept. We propose a continuing program to research and develop LLNL`s nano-structure multilayer technologies for making high voltage, high energy density capacitors. Our controlled deposition techniques are capable of synthesizing extraordinarily smooth sub-micron thick layers of dielectric and conductor materials. We have demonstrated that, with this technology, high voltage capacitors with an order of magnitude improvement in energy density are achievable.

  13. High-Energy Calibration of a BGO Detector of the GLAST Burst Monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    von Kienlin, Andreas; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE; Fishman, Gerald J.; /NASA, Marshall; Briggs, Michael S.; /Alabama U., Huntsville; Godfrey, Gary L.; /SLAC; Steinle, Helmut; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE

    2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The understanding of the instrumental response of the GLAST Burst Monitor BGO detectors at energies above the energy range which is accessible by common laboratory radiation sources (< 4.43 MeV), is important, especially for the later cross-calibration with the LAT response in the overlap region between {approx}20 MeV to 30 MeV. In November 2006 the high-energy calibration of the GBM-BGO spare detector was performed at the small Van-de-Graaff accelerator at SLAC. High-energy gamma-rays from excited {sup 8}Be* (14.6 MeV and 17.5 MeV) and {sup 16}O* (6.1 MeV) were generated through (p, {gamma})-reactions by irradiating a LiF-target. For the calibration at lower energies radioactive sources were used. The results, including spectra, the energy/channel-relation and the dependence of energy resolution are presented.

  14. Gamma-Ray Bursts: Super-Explosions in the Universe and Related High-Energy Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. A. Postnov

    2001-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent progress in studies of gamma-ray bursts, their afterglows, and host galaxies is discussed. The emphasis is given to high-energy phenomena associated with gamma-ray burst explosions: high-energy cosmic rays, neutrinos, gravitational waves. We also show how the relativistic fireball model for GRBs can be used to constrain modern theories of large and infinite extra-dimensions. In particular, in the frame of 5D gravity with the Standard Model localized on 3D brane (Dvali et al. 2000), the very existence of relativistic fireballs of $\\sim 10^{53}$ ergs puts the lower bound on the quantum gravity scale $\\sim 0.1$ eV.

  15. HEPMath: A Mathematica Package for Semi-Automatic Computations in High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Wiebusch

    2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This article introduces the Mathematica package HEPMath which provides a number of utilities and algorithms for High Energy Physics computations in Mathematica. Its functionality is similar to packages like FormCalc or FeynCalc, but it takes a more complete and extensible approach to implementing common High Energy Physics notations in the Mathematica language, in particular those related to tensors and index contractions. It also provides a more flexible method for the generation of numerical code which is based on new features for C code generation in Mathematica. In particular it can automatically generate Python extension modules which make the compiled functions callable from Python, thus eliminating the need to write any code in a low-level language like C or Fortran. It also contains seamless interfaces to LHAPDF, FeynArts, and LoopTools.

  16. Search for Very High Energy Emission from Satellite-triggered GRBs with the Milagro Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parkinson, P M S; Atkins, R; Benbow, W; Berley, D; Blaufuss, E; Coyne, D G; De Young, T R; Dingus, B L; Dorfan, D E; Ellsworth, R W; Fleysher, L; Gisler, G; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Haines, T J; Hays, E; Hoffman, C M; Kelley, L A; Lansdell, C P; Linnemann, J T; McEnery, J E; Miller, R S; Mincer, A I; Morales, M F; Némethy, P; Noyes, D; Ryan, J M; Samuelson, F W; Saz-Parkinson, P M; Shoup, A; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Williams, D A; Wilson, M E; Xu, X W; Yodh, G B

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Milagro gamma-ray observatory employs a water Cherenkov detector to observe extensive air showers produced by high energy particles interacting in the Earth's atmosphere. Milagro has a wide field of view (2 sr) and high duty cycle (> 90%) making it an ideal all-sky monitor of the northern hemisphere in the 100 GeV to 100 TeV energy range. More than 45 satellite-triggered gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have occurred in the field of view of Milagro since January 2000, with the rate of bursts increasing significantly with the launch of Swift. We discuss the most recent results of a search for very high energy (VHE) emission from these GRBs.

  17. Simulating the High Energy Gamma-ray sky seen by the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Longo; P. Azzi; D. Bastieri; G. Busetto; Y. Lei; R. Rando; O. Tibolla; L. Baldini; M. Kuss; L. Latronico; N. Omodei; M. Razzano; G. Spandre; P. Boinee; A. De Angelis; M. Frailis; M. Brigida; F. Gargano; N. Giglietto; F. Loparco; M. N. Mazziotta; C. Cecchi; P. Lubrano; F. Marcucci; M. Pepe; G. Tosti; A. Lionetto; A. Morselli; C. Pittori

    2005-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the simulation of the GLAST high energy gamma-ray telescope. The simulation package, written in C++, is based on the Geant4 toolkit, and it is integrated into a general framework used to process events. A detailed simulation of the electronic signals inside Silicon detectors has been provided and it is used for the particle tracking, which is handled by a dedicated software. A unique repository for the geometrical description of the detector has been realized using the XML language and a C++ library to access this information has been designed and implemented. A new event display based on the HepRep protocol was implemented. The full simulation was used to simulate a full week of GLAST high energy gamma-ray observations. This paper outlines the contribution developed by the Italian GLAST software group.

  18. Pomeron loop and running coupling effects in high energy QCD evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Dumitru; E. Iancu; L. Portugal; G. Soyez; D. N. Triantafyllopoulos

    2007-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the framework of a (1+1)-dimensional model which mimics evolution and scattering in QCD at high energy, we study the influence of the running of the coupling on the high-energy dynamics with Pomeron loops. We find that the particle number fluctuations are strongly suppressed by the running of the coupling, by at least one order of magnitude as compared to the case of a fixed coupling, for all the rapidities that we have investigated, up to Y=200. This reflects the slowing down of the evolution by running coupling effects, in particular, the large rapidity evolution which is required for the formation of the saturation front via diffusion. We conclude that, for all energies of interest, processes like deep inelastic scattering or forward particle production can be reliably studied within the framework of a mean-field approximation (like the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation) which includes running coupling effects.

  19. High energy cosmic rays experiments inspired by noncommutative quantum field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Josip Trampetic

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Phenomenological analysis of the covariant theta-exact noncommutative (NC) gauge field theory (GFT), inspired by high energy cosmic rays experiments, is performed in the framework of the inelastic neutrino-nucleon scatterings, plasmon and $Z$-boson decays into neutrino pair, the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) and the Reheating Phase After Inflation (RPAI), respectively. Next we have have found neutrino two-point function and shows a closed form decoupling of the hard ultraviolet (UV) divergent term from softened ultraviolet/infrared (UV/IR) mixing term and from the finite terms as well. For a certain choice of the noncommutative parameter theta which preserves unitarity, problematic UV divergent and UV/IR mixing terms vanish. Non-perturbative modifications of the neutrino dispersion relations are assymptotically independent of the scale of noncommutativity in both the low and high energy limits and may allow superluminal propagation.

  20. Electronic Systems for Radiation Detection in Space and High Energy Physics Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valerio, Pierpaolo; Ballabriga, Rafael

    This Ph.D. thesis focuses on the analysis and development of novel solution for electronics system for radiation detector, especially suited for space and high energy physics applications. The many blocks of a readout system were studied to develop complete systems, investigating where the performances can be improved over state of the art technologies. Two different architectures, suitable for different applications, were studied: Fractional Packet Counting, for High Dynamic Range (HDR) integrating imagers and CLICpix, an example of high-accuracy hybrid photon counting detector. The main specifications of the two systems were anayzed and solutions were proposed and implemented to meet them. A CLICpix prototype has been designed, fabricated using a commercial 65 nm CMOS technology and tested (characterization is still ongoing). The technology used for the prototype has also been characterized and validated for High Energy Physics (HEP) use and radiation hard design.