National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for high-energy short wavelength

  1. Electricity and short wavelength radiation generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    George, E.V.

    1985-08-26

    Methods and associated apparati for use of collisions of high energy atoms and ions of He, Ne, or Ar with themselves or with high energy neutrons to produce short wavelength radiation (lambda approx. = 840-1300 A) that may be utilized to produce cathode-anode currents or photovoltaic currents.

  2. Modulation compression for short wavelength harmonic generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiang, J.

    2010-01-01

    Wavelength Harmonic Generation Ji Qiang Lawrence Berkeleyform a basis for fourth generation light source. Currently,e?ciency was proposed for generation of short wavelength

  3. On Storage Rings for Short Wavelength FELs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    2010-01-01

    for a hypothetical 144 m long storage ring optimized for FELin the Proceedings On Storage Rings for Short WavelengthLBL-28483 ESG Note-92 ON STORAGE RINGS FOR SHORT WAVELENGTH

  4. Short wavelength ion temperature gradient turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chowdhury, J.; Ganesh, R. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar (India); Brunner, S.; Lapillonne, X.; Villard, L. [CRPP, Association EURATOM-Confederation Suisse, EPFL, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Jenko, F. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    The ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode in the high wavenumber regime (k{sub y}{rho}{sub s}>1), referred to as short wavelength ion temperature gradient mode (SWITG) is studied using the nonlinear gyrokinetic electromagnetic code GENE. It is shown that, although the SWITG mode may be linearly more unstable than the standard long wavelength (k{sub y}{rho}{sub s}<1) ITG mode, nonlinearly its contribution to the total thermal ion heat transport is found to be low. We interpret this as resulting from an increased zonal flow shearing effect on the SWITG mode suppression.

  5. Short wavelength topography on the inner-core boundary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, A.; Masson, Y.; Romanowicz, B.

    2006-01-01

    Short wavelength topography on the inner-core boundary Aimin94720 Constraining the topography of the inner-core boundaryindicates the presence of topography at the inner- core

  6. 2nd conference on Intense field- Short Wavelength Atomic and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nd conference on Intense field- Short Wavelength Atomic and Molecular Processes - ISWAMP2 http:iswamp2.jlu.edu.cn July 20-22, 2013; Xi'an, China...

  7. OMEGA: a short-wavelength laser for fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soures, J.M.; Hutchison, R.J.; Jacobs, S.D.; Lund, L.D.; McCrory, R.L.; Richardson, M.C.

    1983-01-01

    The OMEGA, Nd:glass laser facility was constructed for the purpose of investigating the feasibility of direct-drive laser fusion. With 24 beams producing a total energy of 4 kJ or a peak power of 12 TW, OMEGA is capable of nearly uniform illumination of spherical targets. Six of the OMEGA beams have recently been converted to short-wavelength operation (351 nm). In this paper, we discuss details of the system design and performance, with particular emphasis on the frequency-conversion system and multi-wavelength diagnostic system.

  8. Method for fabricating photovoltaic device having improved short wavelength photoresponse

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Catalano, Anthony W. (P.O. Box 557, Rushland, PA 18956)

    1989-07-04

    Amorphous p-i-n silicon photovoltaic cells with improved short wavelength photoresponse are fabricated with reduced p-dopant contamination at the p/i interface. Residual p-dopants are removed by flushing the deposition chamber with a gaseous mixture capable of reacting with excess doping contaminants prior to the deposition of the i-layer and subsequent to the deposition of the p-layer.

  9. Future directions for probing two and three nucleon short-range correlations at high energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonid Frankfurt; Misak Sargsian; Mark Strikman

    2009-01-15

    We summarize recent progress in the studies of the short-rang correlations (SRC) in nuclei in high energy electron and hadron nucleus scattering and suggest directions for the future high energy studies aimed at establishing detailed structure of two-nucleon SRCs, revealing structure of three nucleon SRC correlations and discovering non-nucleonic degrees of freedom in nuclei.

  10. Short wavelength limits of current shot noise suppression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nause, Ariel; Dyunin, Egor; Gover, Avraham

    2014-08-15

    Shot noise in electron beam was assumed to be one of the features beyond control of accelerator physics. Current results attained in experiments at Accelerator Test Facility in Brookhaven and Linac Coherent Light Source in Stanford suggest that the control of the shot noise in electron beam (and therefore of spontaneous radiation and Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission of Free Electron Lasers) is feasible at least in the visible range of the spectrum. Here, we present a general linear formulation for collective micro-dynamics of e-beam noise and its control. Specifically, we compare two schemes for current noise suppression: a quarter plasma wavelength drift section and a combined drift/dispersive (transverse magnetic field) section. We examine and compare their limits of applicability at short wavelengths via considerations of electron phase-spread and the related Landau damping effect.

  11. MILAGRO CONSTRAINTS ON VERY HIGH ENERGY EMISSION FROM SHORT-DURATION GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    MILAGRO CONSTRAINTS ON VERY HIGH ENERGY EMISSION FROM SHORT-DURATION GAMMA-RAY BURSTS A. A. Abdo,1 localizations of short, hard gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) by the Swift and HETE satellites have led: bursts -- gamma rays: observations Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have long been classified by their durations

  12. Stability of short wavelength tearing and twisting modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waelbroeck, F.L.

    1998-09-22

    The stability and mutual interaction of tearing and twisting modes in a torus is governed by matrices that generalize the well-known {Delta}{prime} stability index. The diagonal elements of these matrices determine the intrinsic stability of modes that reconnect the magnetic field at a single resonant surface. The off-diagonal elements indicate the strength of the coupling between the different modes. The author shows how the elements of these matrices can be evaluated, in the limit of short wavelength, from the free energy driving radially extended ballooning modes. The author applies the results by calculating the tearing and twisting {Delta}{prime} for a model high-beta equilibrium with circular flux surfaces.

  13. Title of Dissertation: A Search for Short Duration Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    of GRBs. #12;A Search for Short Duration Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts by David NoyesABSTRACT Title of Dissertation: A Search for Short Duration Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray by gamma rays with primary energies of approximately 100 GeV and higher. The wide field of view ( 2 sr

  14. Observation of finite-wavelength screening in high-energy-density matter

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chapman, D. A.; Vorberger, J.; Fletcher, L. B.; Baggott, R. A.; Divol, L.; Döppner, T.; Falcone, R. W.; Glenzer, S. H.; Gregori, G.; Guymer, T. M.; et al

    2015-04-23

    A key component for the description of charged particle systems is the screening of the Coulomb interaction between charge carriers. First investigated in the 1920s by Debye and Hückel for electrolytes, charge screening is important for determining the structural and transport properties of matter as diverse as astrophysical and laboratory plasmas, nuclear matter such as quark-gluon plasmas, electrons in solids, planetary cores and charged macromolecules. For systems with negligible dynamics, screening is still mostly described using a Debye–Hückel-type approach. Here, we report the novel observation of a significant departure from the Debye–Hückel-type model in high-energy-density matter by probing laser-driven, shock-compressedmore »plastic with high-energy X-rays. We use spectrally resolved X-ray scattering in a geometry that enables direct investigation of the screening cloud, and demonstrate that the observed elastic scattering amplitude is only well described within a more general approach.« less

  15. Relation between millimeter wavelengths emission and high-energy emission for active galactic nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. H. Huang; D. R. Jiang; Xinwu Cao

    1998-09-21

    After comparing the flux densities of a sample of active galactic nuclei detected by energetic gamma-ray experiment telescope at 90 and 230 GHz with the $\\gamma$-ray emissions detected by Compton Gamma Ray Observatory and x-ray emission, a strong correlation between the emissions at the millimeter wavelength and the $\\gamma$-ray emission is found. The average flux density of x-ray is almost proportional to the average flux density at the millimeter wavelength for quasars detected by energetic gamma-ray experiment telescope, which strongly supports the previous idea that the x-ray emissions of this kind sources are mainly produced by Synchrotron Self-Compton process.

  16. Use of Dynamical Undulator Mechanism to Produce Short Wavelength Radiation in Volume FEL (VFEL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. G. Baryshevsky; K. G. Batrakov

    2002-09-06

    VFEL lasing in system with dynamical undulator is described. In this system radiation of long wavelength creates the undulator for lasing on shorter wavelength. Two diffraction gratings with different spatial periods form VFEL resonator. The grating with longer period pumps the resonator with long wavelength radiation to provide necessary amplitude of undulator field. The grating with shorter period makes mode selection for short wavelength radiation. Lasing of such a system in terahertz frequency range is discussed.

  17. Excellent optical thermometry based on short-wavelength upconversion emissions in Er3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Wenwu

    Excellent optical thermometry based on short-wavelength upconversion emissions in Er3 Yb3 codoped (Doc. ID 175753); published November 22, 2012 Excited by a 980 nm laser, upconversion emissions coupled levels, which can emit the shortest wavelength emissions for optical thermometry known so far

  18. Milagro Constraints on Very High Energy Emission from Short Duration Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdo, A A; Berley, D; Blaufuss, E; Casanova, S; Dingus, B L; Ellsworth, R W; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Hays, E; Hoffman, C M; Kolterman, B E; Lansdell, C P; Linnemann, J T; McEnery, J E; Mincer, A I; Némethy, P; Noyes, D; Ryan, J M; Samuelson, F W; Parkinson, P M Saz; Shoup, A; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Vasileiou, V; Walker, G P; Williams, D A; Xu, X W; Yodh, G B

    2007-01-01

    Recent rapid localizations of short, hard gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) by the Swift and HETE satellites have led to the observation of the first afterglows and the measurement of the first redshifts from this type of burst. Detection of >100 GeV counterparts would place powerful constraints on GRB mechanisms. Seventeen short duration (100 GeV counterparts to these GRBs and find no significant emission correlated with these bursts. Due to the absorption of high-energy gamma rays by the extragalactic background light (EBL), detections are only expected for redshifts less than ~0.5. While most long duration GRBs occur at redshifts higher than 0.5, the opposite is thought to be true of short GRBs. Lack of a detected VHE signal thus allows setting meaningful fluence limits. One GRB in the sample (050509b) has a likely association with a galaxy at a redshift of 0.225, while another (051103) has been tentatively linked to the nearby galaxy M81. Fluence limits are corrected for EBL absorption, either using the known measu...

  19. Milagro Constraints on Very High Energy Emission from Short Duration Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Abdo; B. T. Allen; D. Berley; E. Blaufuss; S. Casanova; B. L. Dingus; R. W. Ellsworth; M. M. Gonzalez; J. A. Goodman; E. Hays; C. M. Hoffman; B. E. Kolterman; C. P. Lansdell; J. T. Linnemann; J. E. McEnery; A. I. Mincer; P. Nemethy; D. Noyes; J. M. Ryan; F. W. Samuelson; P. M. Saz Parkinson; A. Shoup; G. Sinnis; A. J. Smith; G. W. Sullivan; V. Vasileiou; G. P. Walker; D. A. Williams; X. W. Xu; G. B. Yodh

    2007-05-10

    Recent rapid localizations of short, hard gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) by the Swift and HETE satellites have led to the observation of the first afterglows and the measurement of the first redshifts from this type of burst. Detection of >100 GeV counterparts would place powerful constraints on GRB mechanisms. Seventeen short duration (100 GeV counterparts to these GRBs and find no significant emission correlated with these bursts. Due to the absorption of high-energy gamma rays by the extragalactic background light (EBL), detections are only expected for redshifts less than ~0.5. While most long duration GRBs occur at redshifts higher than 0.5, the opposite is thought to be true of short GRBs. Lack of a detected VHE signal thus allows setting meaningful fluence limits. One GRB in the sample (050509b) has a likely association with a galaxy at a redshift of 0.225, while another (051103) has been tentatively linked to the nearby galaxy M81. Fluence limits are corrected for EBL absorption, either using the known measured redshift, or computing the corresponding absorption for a redshift of 0.1 and 0.5, as well as for the case of z=0.

  20. Multi-wavelength analysis of high energy electrons in solar flares: a case study of August 20, 2002 flare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Kasparova; M. Karlicky; E. P. Kontar; R. A. Schwartz; B. R. Dennis

    2005-08-30

    A multi-wavelength spatial and temporal analysis of solar high energy electrons is conducted using the August 20, 2002 flare of an unusually flat (gamma=1.8) hard X-ray spectrum. The flare is studied using RHESSI, Halpha, radio, TRACE, and MDI observations with advanced methods and techniques never previously applied in the solar flare context. A new method to account for X-ray Compton backscattering in the photosphere (photospheric albedo) has been used to deduce the primary X-ray flare spectra. The mean electron flux distribution has been analysed using both forward fitting and model independent inversion methods of spectral analysis. We show that the contribution of the photospheric albedo to the photon spectrum modifies the calculated mean electron flux distribution, mainly at energies below 100 keV. The positions of the Halpha emission and hard X-ray sources with respect to the current-free extrapolation of the MDI photospheric magnetic field and the characteristics of the radio emission provide evidence of the closed geometry of the magnetic field structure and the flare process in low altitude magnetic loops. In agreement with the predictions of some solar flare models, the hard X-ray sources are located on the external edges of the Halpha emission and show chromospheric plasma heated by the non-thermal electrons. The fast changes of Halpha intensities are located not only inside the hard X-ray sources, as expected if they are the signatures of the chromospheric response to the electron bombardment, but also away from them.

  1. Short-wavelength upconversion emissions in codoped glass ceramic and the optical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Wenwu

    Short-wavelength upconversion emissions in Ho3+ /Yb3+ codoped glass ceramic and the optical+ /Yb3+ codoped glass ceramic was prepared by melt- quenching and subsequent thermal treatment. Under ceramic. An explanation for this phenomenon is given based on the fluorescence decay curve measurements

  2. Low work function surface layers produced by laser ablation using short-wavelength photons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balooch, Mehdi (Berkeley, CA); Dinh, Long N. (Concord, CA); Siekhaus, Wigbert J. (Berkeley, CA)

    2000-01-01

    Short-wavelength photons are used to ablate material from a low work function target onto a suitable substrate. The short-wavelength photons are at or below visible wavelength. The elemental composition of the deposit is controlled by the composition of the target and the gaseous environment in which the ablation process is performed. The process is carried out in a deposition chamber to which a short-wavelength laser is mounted and which includes a substrate holder which can be rotated, tilted, heated, or cooled. The target material is mounted onto a holder that spins the target during laser ablation. In addition, the deposition chamber is provided with a vacuum pump, an external gas supply with atomizer and radical generator, a gas generator for producing a flow of molecules on the substrate, and a substrate cleaning device, such as an ion gun. The substrate can be rotated and tilted, for example, whereby only the tip of an emitter can be coated with a low work function material.

  3. In-situ short-circuit protection system and method for high-energy electrochemical cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gauthier, Michel (La Prairie, CA); Domroese, Michael K. (South St. Paul, MN); Hoffman, Joseph A. (Minneapolis, MN); Lindeman, David D. (Hudson, WI); Noel, Joseph-Robert-Gaetan (St-Hubert, CA); Radewald, Vern E. (Austin, TX); Rouillard, Jean (Saint-Luc, CA); Rouillard, Roger (Beloeil, CA); Shiota, Toshimi (St. Bruno, CA); Trice, Jennifer L. (Eagan, MN)

    2003-04-15

    An in-situ thermal management system for an energy storage device. The energy storage device includes a plurality of energy storage cells each being coupled in parallel to common positive and negative connections. Each of the energy storage cells, in accordance with the cell's technology, dimensions, and thermal/electrical properties, is configured to have a ratio of energy content-to-contact surface area such that thermal energy produced by a short-circuit in a particular cell is conducted to a cell adjacent the particular cell so as to prevent the temperature of the particular cell from exceeding a breakdown temperature. In one embodiment, a fuse is coupled in series with each of a number of energy storage cells. The fuses are activated by a current spike capacitively produced by a cell upon occurrence of a short-circuit in the cell, thereby electrically isolating the short-circuited cell from the common positive and negative connections.

  4. In-situ short circuit protection system and method for high-energy electrochemical cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gauthier, Michel (La Prairie, CA); Domroese, Michael K. (South St. Paul, MN); Hoffman, Joseph A. (Minneapolis, MN); Lindeman, David D. (Hudson, WI); Noel, Joseph-Robert-Gaetan (St-Hubert, CA); Radewald, Vern E. (Austin, TX); Rouillard, Jean (Saint-Luc, CA); Rouillard, Roger (Beloeil, CA); Shiota, Toshimi (St. Bruno, CA); Trice, Jennifer L. (Eagan, MN)

    2000-01-01

    An in-situ thermal management system for an energy storage device. The energy storage device includes a plurality of energy storage cells each being coupled in parallel to common positive and negative connections. Each of the energy storage cells, in accordance with the cell's technology, dimensions, and thermal/electrical properties, is configured to have a ratio of energy content-to-contact surface area such that thermal energy produced by a short-circuit in a particular cell is conducted to a cell adjacent the particular cell so as to prevent the temperature of the particular cell from exceeding a breakdown temperature. In one embodiment, a fuse is coupled in series with each of a number of energy storage cells. The fuses are activated by a current spike capacitively produced by a cell upon occurrence of a short-circuit in the cell, thereby electrically isolating the short-circuited cell from the common positive and negative connections.

  5. Space-resolved extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy free of high-energy neutral particle noise in wavelength range of 10–130 Å on the large helical device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Xianli; Morita, Shigeru; Oishi, Tetsutarou; Goto, Motoshi; National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 Gifu ; Dong, Chunfeng

    2014-04-15

    A flat-field space-resolved extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrometer system working in wavelength range of 10–130 Å has been constructed in the Large Helical Device (LHD) for profile measurements of bremsstrahlung continuum and line emissions of heavy impurities in the central column of plasmas, which are aimed at studies on Z{sub eff} and impurity transport, respectively. Until now, a large amount of spike noise caused by neutral particles with high energies (?180 keV) originating in neutral beam injection has been observed in EUV spectroscopy on LHD. The new system has been developed with an aim to delete such a spike noise from the signal by installing a thin filter which can block the high-energy neutral particles entering the EUV spectrometer. Three filters of 11 ?m thick beryllium (Be), 3.3 ?m thick polypropylene (PP), and 0.5 ?m thick polyethylene terephthalate (PET: polyester) have been examined to eliminate the spike noise. Although the 11 ?m Be and 3.3 ?m PP filters can fully delete the spike noise in wavelength range of ? ? 20 Å, the signal intensity is also reduced. The 0.5 ?m PET filter, on the other hand, can maintain sufficient signal intensity for the measurement and the spike noise remained in the signal is acceptable. As a result, the bremsstrahlung profile is successfully measured without noise at 20 Å even in low-density discharges, e.g., 2.9 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup ?3}, when the 0.5 ?m PET filter is used. The iron n = 3–2 L? transition array consisting of FeXVII to FeXXIV is also excellently observed with their radial profiles in wavelength range of 10–18 Å. Each transition in the L? array can be accurately identified with its radial profile. As a typical example of the method a spectral line at 17.62 Å is identified as FeXVIII transition. Results on absolute intensity calibration of the spectrometer system, pulse height and noise count analyses of the spike noise between holographic and ruled gratings and wavelength response of the used filters are also presented with performance of the present spectrometer system.

  6. High detectivity short-wavelength II-VI quantum cascade detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ravikumar, Arvind P. Gmachl, Claire F.; Garcia, Thor A.; Tamargo, Maria C.; Jesus, Joel De

    2014-08-11

    We report on the experimental demonstration of a ZnCdSe/ZnCdMgSe-based short-wavelength photovoltaic Quantum Cascade Detector (QCD). The QCD operates in two spectral bands centered around 2.6??m and 3.6??m. Calibrated blackbody measurements yield a peak responsivity of 0.1?mA/W or 2400?V/W at 80?K, and a corresponding 300?K background radiation limited infrared performance detectivity (BLIP) of ?2.5?×?10{sup 10?}cm ?Hz/W. Comparison of background illuminated and dark current-voltage measurements demonstrates a BLIP temperature of 200?K. The device differential resistance-area product, decreases from about 10{sup 6} ? cm{sup 2} at 80?K to about 8000 ? cm{sup 2} at 300?K, indicative of the ultra-low Johnson noise in the detectors.

  7. Feasibility of producing a short, high energy s-band linear accelerator using a klystron power source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baillie, Devin [Department of Oncology, Medical Physics Division, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Aubin, J. St. [Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Fallone, B. G. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, 11322-89 Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G7 (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Department of Oncology, Medical Physics Division, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Steciw, S. [Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Department of Oncology, Medical Physics Division, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada)

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: To use a finite-element method (FEM) model to study the feasibility of producing a short s-band (2.9985 GHz) waveguide capable of producing x-rays energies up to 10 MV, for applications in a linac-MR, as well as conventional radiotherapy. Methods: An existing waveguide FEM model developed by the authors' group is used to simulate replacing the magnetron power source with a klystron. Peak fields within the waveguide are compared with a published experimental threshold for electric breakdown. The RF fields in the first accelerating cavity are scaled, approximating the effect of modifications to the first coupling cavity. Electron trajectories are calculated within the RF fields, and the energy spectrum, beam current, and focal spot of the electron beam are analyzed. One electron spectrum is selected for Monte Carlo simulations and the resulting PDD compared to measurement. Results: When the first cavity fields are scaled by a factor of 0.475, the peak magnitude of the electric fields within the waveguide are calculated to be 223.1 MV/m, 29% lower than the published threshold for breakdown at this operating frequency. Maximum electron energy increased from 6.2 to 10.4 MeV, and beam current increased from 134 to 170 mA. The focal spot FWHM is decreased slightly from 0.07 to 0.05 mm, and the width of the energy spectrum increased slightly from 0.44 to 0.70 MeV. Monte Carlo results show d{sub max} is at 2.15 cm for a 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 cm{sup 2} field, compared with 2.3 cm for a Varian 10 MV linac, while the penumbral widths are 4.8 and 5.6 mm, respectively. Conclusions: The authors' simulation results show that a short, high-energy, s-band accelerator is feasible and electric breakdown is not expected to interfere with operation at these field strengths. With minor modifications to the first coupling cavity, all electron beam parameters are improved.

  8. Relativistic Single-Cycled Short-Wavelength Laser Pulse Compressed from a Chirped Pulse Induced by Laser-Foil Interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji, L. L.; Shen, B. F.; Li, D. X.; Wang, D.; Leng, Y. X.; Zhang, X. M.; Wen, M.; Wang, W. P.; Xu, J. C.; Yu, Y. H. [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 800-211, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2010-07-09

    By particle-in-cell simulation and analysis, we propose a plasma approach to generate a relativistic chirped pulse based on a laser-foil interaction. When two counterpropagating circularly polarized pulses interact with an overdense foil, the driving pulse (with a larger laser field amplitude) will accelerate the whole foil to form a double-layer structure, and the scattered pulse (with a smaller laser field amplitude) is reflected by this flying layer. Because of the Doppler effect and the varying velocity of the layer, the reflected pulse is up-shifted for frequency and chirped; thus, it could be compressed to a nearly single-cycled relativistic laser pulse with a short wavelength. Simulations show that a nearly single-cycled subfemtosecond relativistic pulse can be generated with a wavelength of 0.2 {mu}m after dispersion compensation.

  9. The Shoelace Antenna : a device to induce short-wavelength fluctuations in the edge plasma of the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golfinopoulos, Theodore

    2014-01-01

    The "Shoelace" antenna is a unique device built to induce short-wavelength fluctuations in the edge plasma of the Alcator C-Mod tokamak, at a wave number and in the frequency range associated with the Quasi-Coherent Mode ...

  10. External excitation of a short-wavelength fluctuation in the Alcator C-Mod edge plasma and its relationship to the quasi-coherent mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, R. R.

    A novel “Shoelace” antenna has been used to inductively excite a short-wavelength edge fluctuation in a tokamak boundary layer for the first time. The principal design parameters, k[subscript ?] = 1.5 ± 0.1 cm[superscript ...

  11. Spin rotation and depolarization of high-energy particles in crystals at Hadron Collider (LHC) and Future Circular Collider (FCC) energies and the possibility to measure the anomalous magnetic moments of short-lived particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baryshevsky, V G

    2015-01-01

    We study the phenomena of spin rotation and depolarization of high-energy particles in crystals in the range of high energies that will be available at Hadron Collider (LHC) and Future Circular Collider (FCC). It is shown that these phenomena can be used to measure the anomalous magnetic moments of short-lived particles in this range of energies. We also demonstrate that the phenomenon of particle spin depolarization in crystals provides a unique possibility of measuring the anomalous magnetic moment of negatively-charged particles (e.g., beauty baryons), for which the channeling effect is hampered due to far more rapid dechanneling as compared to that for positively-charged particles. Channeling of particles in either straight or bent crystals with polarized nuclei could be used for polarization and the analysis thereof of high-energy particles.

  12. Spin rotation and depolarization of high-energy particles in crystals at Hadron Collider (LHC) and Future Circular Collider (FCC) energies and the possibility to measure the anomalous magnetic moments of short-lived particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. G. Baryshevsky

    2015-04-25

    We study the phenomena of spin rotation and depolarization of high-energy particles in crystals in the range of high energies that will be available at Hadron Collider (LHC) and Future Circular Collider (FCC). It is shown that these phenomena can be used to measure the anomalous magnetic moments of short-lived particles in this range of energies. We also demonstrate that the phenomenon of particle spin depolarization in crystals provides a unique possibility of measuring the anomalous magnetic moment of negatively-charged particles (e.g., beauty baryons), for which the channeling effect is hampered due to far more rapid dechanneling as compared to that for positively-charged particles. Channeling of particles in either straight or bent crystals with polarized nuclei could be used for polarization and the analysis thereof of high-energy particles.

  13. JOURNAL OF LIGHTWAVE TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 18, NO. 12, DECEMBER 2000 2167 10 Gb/s Multiple Wavelength, Coherent Short Pulse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jalali. Bahram

    accommodate 600 wavelength channels with 50 GHz channel spacing and 6 Tb/s aggregate data rate. We also. INTRODUCTION DUE TO fast growth in Internet technology, demand for bandwidth is estimated to exceed 1 Tb/s by year 2002 with a further doubling every two years. Utilizing the entire 40 THz low loss transmission

  14. Investigation of the effect of bilayer membrane structures and fluctuation amplitudes on SANS/SAXS profile for short membrane wavelength

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Victor; Hawa, Takumi [School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, The University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States)] [School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, The University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States)

    2013-09-28

    The effect of bilayer membrane structures and fluctuation amplitudes on small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) profile is investigated based on harmonic motions of the surfactant bilayers with bending as well as thickness fluctuation motions. In this study we consider the case in which the wavelength of the bilayer membrane is shorter than the thickness of the membrane. We find that the thickness of the surfactant bilayer membrane, d{sub m}, affects both q{sub dip} and q{sub peak} of I(q,0) profile, and that the fluctuation amplitude, a, of the membrane changes the peak of I(q,0). A simple formula is derived to estimate the thickness of the bilayer based on the q{sub dip} of the profile obtained from the simulation. The resulting estimates of the thickness of the bilayer with harmonic motion showed accuracy within 1%. Moreover, the bilayer thicknesses estimated from the proposed formula show an excellent agreement with the SANS and SAXS experimental results available in the literatures. We also propose a curve fit model, which describes the relationship between the fluctuation amplitude and the normalized q{sub peak} ratio. The present results show the feasibility of the simple formula to estimate the fluctuation amplitude based on the SANS and SAXS profiles.

  15. A New Charge Transporting Host Material for Short Wavelength Organic Electrophosphorescence: 2,7–Bis(diphenylphosphine oxide)–9,9–dimethylfluorene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Padmaperuma, Asanga B.; Sapochak, Linda S.; Burrows, Paul E.

    2006-05-01

    We report the synthesis, crystal structure, photophysical and electroluminescent properties of a new charge transporting host material for short wavelength phosphor-doped organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) based on 2,7-bis(diphenylphosphine oxide)-9,9-dimethylfluorene (PO6). The P=O moiety is used as a point of saturation between the fluorene bridge and outer phenyl groups so that the triplet exciton energy of PO6 is 2.72 eV, similar to that of a dibromo substituted fluorene, but it is more amenable to vacuum sublimation and has good film forming properties. Computational analysis (B3LYP/6-31G*) predicts the HOMO and LUMO energies of PO6 to be lower by 1.5 eV and 0.59 eV, respectively, compared to a similar diphenylamino substituted derivative. In a simple bilayer OLED device, PO6 exhibits structured UV electroluminescence (EL) at a peak wavelength of 335 nm and structured lower energy emission with peaks at 380 nm and 397 nm, similar to the solid film and crystalline solid photoluminescence spectra. The longer wavelength peaks are attributed to aggregate formation via strong intermolecular interactions (P-O---H-C and edge-to-face C-H---??contacts?) and longer range electrostatic interactions between P=O moieties leading to ordered regions in the film. Devices incorporating PO6 as the host material doped with iridium(III)bis(4,6-(di-fluorophenyl)-pyridinato-N,C2.)picolinate (FIrpic) exhibited sky blue emission with peak external quantum efficiency (?ext,max) of 8.1 % and luminous power efficiency (?p,max) of 25.3 lm/W. At a brightness of 800 cd/m2, generally considered to be sufficient for lighting applications, the ?ext and ?p are 6.7 % and 11.8 lm/W and the operating voltage is 5.6 V, which is significantly lower than has been demonstrated previously using this dopant.

  16. High Energy Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Large Scale Production Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics: Target 2017 HEPlogo.jpg The NERSC Program Requirements Review "Large Scale Computing and Storage...

  17. High Energy Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientific Computing Research Basic Energy Sciences Biological and Environmental Research Fusion Energy Sciences High Energy Physics Nuclear Physics Advanced Scientific Computing...

  18. High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas General Plasma Science Developing founda/ons and advancing fundamental understanding #12;The High Energy Density developing innovative techniques to study the properties of instabilities in magnetized-high-energy-density

  19. High-energy detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E. (South Setauket, NY); Camarda, Giuseppe (Farmingville, NY); Cui, Yonggang (Upton, NY); James, Ralph B. (Ridge, NY)

    2011-11-22

    The preferred embodiments are directed to a high-energy detector that is electrically shielded using an anode, a cathode, and a conducting shield to substantially reduce or eliminate electrically unshielded area. The anode and the cathode are disposed at opposite ends of the detector and the conducting shield substantially surrounds at least a portion of the longitudinal surface of the detector. The conducting shield extends longitudinally to the anode end of the detector and substantially surrounds at least a portion of the detector. Signals read from one or more of the anode, cathode, and conducting shield can be used to determine the number of electrons that are liberated as a result of high-energy particles impinge on the detector. A correction technique can be implemented to correct for liberated electron that become trapped to improve the energy resolution of the high-energy detectors disclosed herein.

  20. High Energy Photoproduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. M. Butterworth; M. Wing

    2005-09-15

    The experimental and phenomenological status of high energy photoproduction is reviewed. Topics covered include the structure of the photon, production of jets, heavy flavours and prompt photons, rapidity gaps, energy flow and underlying events. The results are placed in the context of the current understanding of QCD, with particular application to present and future hadron and lepton colliders.

  1. Particle Diffraction at High Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimir A. Petrov

    1998-04-27

    A brief ideological and historical review of problems of high energy diffractive scattering is given.

  2. Dual-wavelength InP quantum dot lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shutts, S.; Smowton, P. M.; Krysa, A. B.

    2014-06-16

    We have demonstrated a two-section dual-wavelength diode laser incorporating distributed Bragg reflectors, with a peak-wavelength separation of 62.5?nm at 300?K. Each lasing wavelength has a different temperature dependence, providing a difference-tuning of 0.11?nm/K. We discuss the mechanisms governing the light output of the two competing modes and explain how the short wavelength can be relatively insensitive to output changes at the longer wavelength. Starting from an initial condition when the output at both wavelengths are equal, a 500% increase in the long wavelength output causes the short wavelength output to fall by only 6%.

  3. Ultra High Energy Fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burra G. Sidharth

    2015-04-07

    The LHC in Geneva is already operating at a total energy of $7 TeV$ and hopefully after a pause in 2012, it will attain its full capacity of $14 TeV$ in 2013. These are the highest energies achieved todate in any accelerator. It is against this backdrop that it is worthwhile to revisit very high energy collisions of Fermions (Cf. also \\cite{bgspp}). We will in fact examine their behaviour at such energies.

  4. Theoretical High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christ, Norman H.; Weinberg, Erick J.

    2014-07-14

    we provide reports from each of the six faculty supported by the Department of Energy High Energy Physics Theory grant at Columbia University. Each is followed by a bibliography of the references cited. A complete list of all of the publications in the 12/1/2010-04/30/2014 period resulting from research supported by this grant is provided in the following section. The final section lists the Ph.D. dissertations based on research supported by the grant that were submitted during this period.

  5. FSU High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prosper, Harrison B.; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Berg, Bernd; Blessing, Susan K.; Okui, Takemichi; Owens, Joseph F.; Reina, Laura; Wahl, Horst D.

    2014-12-01

    The High Energy Physics group at Florida State University (FSU), which was established in 1958, is engaged in the study of the fundamental constituents of matter and the laws by which they interact. The group comprises theoretical and experimental physicists, who sometimes collaborate on projects of mutual interest. The report highlights the main recent achievements of the group. Significant, recent, achievements of the group’s theoretical physicists include progress in making precise predictions in the theory of the Higgs boson and its associated processes, and in the theoretical understanding of mathematical quantities called parton distribution functions that are related to the structure of composite particles such as the proton. These functions are needed to compare data from particle collisions, such as the proton-proton collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), with theoretical predictions. The report also describes the progress in providing analogous functions for heavy nuclei, which find application in neutrino physics. The report highlights progress in understanding quantum field theory on a lattice of points in space and time (an area of study called lattice field theory), the progress in constructing several theories of potential new physics that can be tested at the LHC, and interesting new ideas in the theory of the inflationary expansion of the very early universe. The focus of the experimental physicists is the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at CERN. The report, however, also includes results from the D0 experiment at Fermilab to which the group made numerous contributions over a period of many years. The experimental group is particularly interested in looking for new physics at the LHC that may provide the necessary insight to extend the standard model (SM) of particle physics. Indeed, the search for new physics is the primary task of contemporary particle physics, one motivated by the need to explain certain facts, such as the non-zero neutrino masses or the overwhelming astrophysical evidence for an invisible form of matter, called dark matter, that has had a marked effect on the evolution of structure in the universe. The report highlights the main, recent, experimental achievements of the experimental group, which include the investigation of properties of the W and Z bosons; the search for new heavy stable charged particles and the search for a proposed property of nature called supersymmetry in proton-proton collisions that yield high energy photons. In addition, we report a few results from a more general search for supersymmetry at the LHC, initiated by the group. The report also highlights the group's significant contributions, both theoretical and experimental, to the 2012 discovery of the Higgs boson and the measurement of its properties.

  6. High Energy Density Microwaves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, R.M. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford, CA 94309 (United States)

    1999-04-01

    These proceedings represent papers presented at the RF98 Workshop entitled `High Energy Density Microwaves` held in California in October, 1998. The topics discussed were predominantly accelerator{minus}related. The Workshop dealt, for the most part, with the generation and control of electron beams, the amplification of RF signals, the design of mode converters, and the effect of very high RF field gradients. This Workshop was designed to address the concerns of the microwave tube industry worldwide, the plasma physicists who deal with very high beam currents and gigawatts of RF power, and researchers in accelerator centers around the world. Papers were presented on multibeam klystrons, gyrotron development, plasmas in microwave tubes, RF breakdown, and alternatives to conventional linear coliders at 1 TeV and above. The Workshop was partially sponsored by the US Department of Energy. There were 46 papers presented at the conference,out of which 19 have been abstracted for the Energy,Science and Technology database.(AIP)

  7. High energy physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.; Ma, E.

    1997-07-01

    This proposal is for the continuation of the High Energy Physics program at the University of California at Riverside. In hadron collider physics the authors will complete their transition from experiment UA1 at CERN to the DZERO experiment at Fermilab. On experiment UA1 their effort will concentrate on data analysis at Riverside. At Fermilab they will coordinate the high voltage system for all detector elements. They will also carry out hardware/software development for the D0 muon detector. The TPC/Two-Gamma experiment has completed its present phase of data-taking after accumulating 160 pb{sup {minus}}1 of luminosity. The UC Riverside group will continue data and physics analysis and make minor hardware improvement for the high luminosity run. The UC Riverside group is participating in design and implementation of the data acquisition system for the OPAL experiment at LEP. Mechanical and electronics construction of the OPAL hadron calorimeter strip readout system is proceeding on schedule. Data analysis and Monte Carlo detector simulation efforts are proceeding in preparation for the first physics run when IEP operation comenses in fall 1989.

  8. Excitation of multiple wakefields by short laser pulses in dense plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shukla, P K; Marklund, M; Stenflo, L

    2009-01-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of the excitation of multiple electrostatic wakefields by the ponderomotive force of a short electromagnetic pulse propagating through a dense plasma. It is found that the inclusion of the quantum statistical pressure and quantum electron tunneling effects can qualitatively change the classical behavior of the wakefield. In addition to the well known plasma oscillation wakefield, with a wavelength of the order of the electron skin depth, which in a dense plasma is of the order of several nanometers, wakefields in dense plasmas with a shorter wavelength are also excited. The wakefields can trap electrons and accelerate them to extremely high energies over nanoscales.

  9. Astronomy 117 High Energy Astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Astronomy 117 High Energy Astrophysics Instructor: David A. Williams (office NS2 319, phone 459-3032, e-mail: daw@scipp.ucsc.edu) Place: Earth & Marine Sciences, B210 Time: Mondays, Wednesdays is · High Energy Astrophysics, second edition, volumes 1 and 2, by Malcolm S. Longair Course materials

  10. Investigation of photoluminescence of Si?O?C(?H) ceramics at an early stage of decarbonization by using high energy excitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narisawa, Masaki; Iwase, Akihiro; Kawai, Taketoshi; Watase, Seiji; Matsukawa, Kimihiro

    2014-01-15

    Si?O?C(?H) ceramics with reduced carbon contents were prepared by pyrolyzing polysiloxane particles in hydrogen at temperatures of 750, 800 and 850?°C. Under HeCd laser irradiation (325 nm), the obtained ceramics show broad spectra peaking at 400–415 nm. On the other hand, the excitation on the higher energy region by an ArF excimer laser (193 nm) induces new PL bands located at short wavelength region of 300 and 355 nm. Such high energy PL bands appear prominently in the ceramics synthesized at 750?°C, and are minor in ceramics synthesized at 800 and 850?°C.

  11. Channeling and dechanneling at high energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrigan, R.A. Jr.

    1987-09-30

    The possibility of using channeling as a tool for high energy particle physics has now been extensively investigated. Bent crystals have been used as an accelerator extraction element and for particle deflection. Applications as accelerating devices have been discussed but appear remote. The major advantage in using a bent crystal rather than a magnet is the large deflection that can be achieved in a short length. The major disadvantage is the low transmission. A good understanding of dechanneling is important for applications. 43 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  12. PRACTICAL NEUTRON DOSIMETRY AT HIGH ENERGIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCaslin, J.B.

    2010-01-01

    of High-Energy Accelerators, New York, April, 1957. USAECShielding of High-Energy Accelerators, New York, April 1957.Shielding of High-Energy Accelerators, New York, April 1957.

  13. Proposal for a High Energy Nuclear Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, David A.; Vogt, Ramona

    2005-01-01

    Proposal for a High Energy Nuclear Database David A. Brown 1it requires the high-energy nuclear physics com- munity’s ?compilations of high-energy nuclear data for applications

  14. Proposal for a High Energy Nuclear Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, David A.; Vogt, Ramona

    2005-01-01

    Proposal for a High Energy Nuclear Database XML documentsProposal for a High Energy Nuclear Database David A. Brown 1it requires the high-energy nuclear physics com- munity’s ?

  15. Sandia Energy - Wavelength Conversion Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wavelength Conversion Materials Home Energy Research EFRCs Solid-State Lighting Science EFRC Overview Wavelength Conversion Materials Wavelength Conversion MaterialsAlyssa...

  16. A high energy physics perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marciano, W.J.

    1997-01-13

    The status of the Standard model and role of symmetry in its development are reviewed. Some outstanding problems are surveyed and possible solutions in the form of additional {open_quotes}Hidden Symmetries {close_quotes} are discussed. Experimental approaches to uncover {open_quotes}New Physics{close_quotes} associated with those symmetries are described with emphasis on high energy colliders. An outlook for the future is given.

  17. High-energy Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas K. Gaisser; Todor Stanev

    2005-10-11

    After a brief review of galactic cosmic rays in the GeV to TeV energy range, we describe some current problems of interest for particles of very high energy. Particularly interesting are two features of the spectrum, the `knee' above $10^{15}$ eV and the `ankle' above $10^{18}$ eV. An important question is whether the highest energy particles are of extra-galactic origin and, if so, at what energy the transition occurs. A theme common to all energy ranges is use of nuclear abundances as a tool for understanding the origin of the cosmic radiation.

  18. H.E.S.S. discovery of very-high-energy gamma-ray emission of PKS 1440-389

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prokoph, H; Böttcher, M; Boisson, C; Lenain, J -P

    2015-01-01

    Blazars are the most abundant class of known extragalactic very-high-energy (VHE, E>100 GeV) gamma-ray sources. However, one of the biggest difficulties in investigating their VHE emission resides in their limited number, since less than 60 of them are known by now. In this contribution we report on H.E.S.S. observations of the BL Lac object PKS 1440-389. This source has been selected as target for H.E.S.S. based on its high-energy gamma-ray properties measured by Fermi-LAT. The extrapolation of this bright, hard-spectrum gamma-ray blazar into the VHE regime made a detection on a relatively short time scale very likely, despite its uncertain redshift. H.E.S.S. observations were carried out with the 4-telescope array from February to May 2012 and resulted in a clear detection of the source. Contemporaneous multi-wavelength data are used to construct the spectral energy distribution of PKS 1440-389 which can be described by a simple one-zone synchrotron-self Compton model.

  19. Oxides having high energy densities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ceder, Gerbrand; Kang, Kisuk

    2013-09-10

    Certain disclosed embodiments generally relate to oxide materials having relatively high energy and/or power densities. Various aspects of the embodiments are directed to oxide materials having a structure B.sub.i(M.sub.jY.sub.k)O.sub.2, for example, a structure Li.sub.j(Ni.sub.jY.sub.k)O.sub.2 such as Li(Ni.sub.0.5Mn.sub.0.5)O.sub.2. In this structure, Y represents one or more atoms, each independently selected from the group consisting of alkaline earth metals, transition metals, Group 14 elements, Group 15, or Group 16 elements. In some embodiments, such an oxide material may have an O3 crystal structure, and/or a layered structure such that the oxide comprises a plurality of first, repeating atomic planes comprising Li, and a plurality of second, repeating atomic planes comprising Ni and/or Y.

  20. High Energy Density Utracapacitors: Low-Cost, High Energy and Power Density, Nanotube-Enhanced Ultracapacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-04-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: FastCAP is improving the performance of an ultracapacitor—a battery-like electronic device that can complement, and possibly even replace, an HEV or EV battery pack. Ultracapacitors have many advantages over conventional batteries, including long lifespans (over 1 million cycles, as compared to 10,000 for conventional batteries) and better durability. Ultracapacitors also charge more quickly than conventional batteries, and they release energy more quickly. However, ultracapacitors have fallen short of batteries in one key metric: energy density—high energy density means more energy storage. FastCAP is redesigning the ultracapacitor’s internal structure to increase its energy density. Ultracapacitors traditionally use electrodes made of irregularly shaped, porous carbon. FastCAP’s ultracapacitors are made of tiny, aligned carbon nanotubes. The nanotubes provide a regular path for ions moving in and out of the ultracapacitor’s electrode, increasing the overall efficiency and energy density of the device.

  1. High Energy Astrophysics: Overview 1/47 High Energy Astrophysics in Context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bicknell, Geoff

    High Energy Astrophysics: Overview 1/47 High Energy Astrophysics in Context 1 Some references The following set of volumes is an outstanding summary of the field of High Energy Astrophysics and its relation to the rest of Astrophysics High Energy Astrophysics, Vols. 1,2 and 3. M.S. Longair, Cam- bridge University

  2. High Energy Physics and Nuclear Physics Network Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dart, Eli

    2014-01-01

    High Energy Physics and Nuclear Physics Network RequirementsCalifornia. High Energy Physics and Nuclear Physics Networkof High Energy Physics and Nuclear Physics, DOE Office of

  3. Engineered High Energy Crop (EHEC) Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Engineered High Energy Crop Programs Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement DOEEIS-0481 JULY 2015 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK...

  4. High Energy Dirac Solutions: Issues and Ramifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burra G. Sidharth

    2013-09-10

    In this paper we consider solutions of the Dirac equation at ultra high energies. The study provides new insights including features overlooked thus far and also new ramifications.

  5. Making glue in high energy nuclear collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alex Krasnitz; Raju Venugopalan

    1999-05-12

    We discuss a real time, non-perturbative computation of the transverse dynamics of gluon fields at central rapidities in very high energy nuclear collisions.

  6. Accelerators for high energy physics research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chao, A.

    1995-12-01

    A brief survey of particle accelerators as research tools for high energy physics is given. The survey includes existing accelerators, as well as those envisioned for the future.

  7. MURI High Energy Microwave Sources F496209510253

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    MURI ­ High Energy Microwave Sources F49620­95­1­0253 1 August 1999 to 14 March 2000 PROGRESS University Research Initiative (MURI) High Energy Microwave (HEM) research program. The PTSG, reports, and conference papers. The PTSG is primarily involved in the modeling of microwave­beam, plasma

  8. High-Energy Astrophysics and Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Ellis

    2002-10-26

    Interfaces between high-energy physics, astrophysics and cosmology are reviewed, with particular emphasis on the important roles played by high-energy cosmic-ray physics. These include the understanding of atmospheric neutrinos, the search for massive cold dark matter particles and possible tests of models of quantum gravity. In return, experiments at the LHC may be useful for refining models of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, and thereby contributing indirectly to understanding their origin. Only future experiments will be able to tell whether these are due to some bottom-up astrophysical mechanism or some top-down cosmological mechanism.

  9. High energy physics in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Month, M.

    1985-10-16

    The US program in high energy physics from 1985 to 1995 is reviewed. The program depends primarily upon work at the national accelerator centers, but includes a modest but diversified nonaccelerator program. Involvement of universities is described. International cooperation in high energy physics is discussed, including the European, Japanese, USSR, and the People's Republic of China's programs. Finally, new facilities needed by the US high energy physics program are discussed, with particular emphasis given to a Superconducting Super Collider for achieving ever higher energies in the 20 TeV range. (LEW)

  10. Physics at high energy photon photon colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1994-06-01

    I review the physic prospects for high energy photon photon colliders, emphasizing results presented at the LBL Gamma Gamma Collider Workshop. Advantages and difficulties are reported for studies of QCD, the electroweak gauge sector, supersymmetry, and electroweak symmetry breaking.

  11. Terrestrial Effects of High Energy Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atri, Dimitra

    2011-04-26

    On geological timescales, the Earth is likely to be exposed to higher than the usual flux of high energy cosmic rays (HECRs) from astrophysical sources such as nearby supernovae, gamma ray bursts or by galactic shocks. ...

  12. Research in High Energy Physics. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conway, John S.

    2013-08-09

    This final report details the work done from January 2010 until April 2013 in the area of experimental and theoretical high energy particle physics and cosmology at the University of California, Davis.

  13. Engineering of High Energy Cathode Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Kang Xu ( ARL) * Jun Liu (PNNL) * Toda * BASF * ECPRO Partners 2 Enable the Argonne high energy composite layered cathode xLi 2 MnO 3 *(1-x)LiNiO 2 (LMR- NMC) for 40 miles PHEV...

  14. Nuclear diffractive structure functions at high energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Marquet; H. Kowalski; T. Lappi; R. Venugopalan

    2008-05-30

    A future high-energy electron-ion collider would explore the non-linear weakly-coupled regime of QCD, and test the Color Glass Condensate (CGC) approach to high-energy scattering. Hard diffraction in deep inelastic scattering off nuclei will provide many fundamental measurements. In this work, the nuclear diffractive structure function F_{2,A}^D is predicted in the CGC framework, and the features of nuclear enhancement and suppression are discussed.

  15. High Energy Cost Grants | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool Fits the Bill Financing ToolSustainableSecurityHigh Energy Cost Grants High Energy

  16. Future Accelerator Challenges in Support of High-Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zisman, M.S.

    2008-01-01

    IN SUPPORT OF HIGH- ENERGY PHYSICS* M. S. Zisman ‡ , LBNL,progress in high-energy physics has largely been determinedprogress in high-energy physics has traditionally depended

  17. Ultra-short wavelength x-ray system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Umstadter, Donald (Ann Arbor, MI); He, Fei (Ann Arbor, MI); Lau, Yue-Ying (Potomac, MD)

    2008-01-22

    A method and apparatus to generate a beam of coherent light including x-rays or XUV by colliding a high-intensity laser pulse with an electron beam that is accelerated by a synchronized laser pulse. Applications include x-ray and EUV lithography, protein structural analysis, plasma diagnostics, x-ray diffraction, crack analysis, non-destructive testing, surface science and ultrafast science.

  18. Scientific applications for high-energy lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, R.W. [comp.

    1994-03-01

    The convergence of numerous factors makes the time ripe for the development of a community of researchers to use the high-energy laser for scientific investigations. This document attempts to outline the steps necessary to access high-energy laser systems and create a realistic plan to implement usage. Since an academic/scientific user community does not exist in the USA to any viable extent, we include information on present capabilities at the Nova laser. This will briefly cover laser performance and diagnostics and a sampling of some current experimental projects. Further, to make the future possibilities clearer, we will describe the proposed next- generation high-energy laser, named for its inertial fusion confinement (ICF) goal, the multi-megaJoule, 500-teraWatt National Facility, or NIF.

  19. High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program...

  20. Designing Silicon Nanostructures for High Energy Lithium Ion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Designing Silicon Nanostructures for High Energy Lithium Ion Battery Anodes Designing Silicon Nanostructures for High Energy Lithium Ion Battery Anodes 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...

  1. Highly Energy Efficient Directed Green Liquor Utilization (D...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Highly Energy Efficient Directed Green Liquor Utilization (D-GLU) Pulping Highly Energy Efficient Directed Green Liquor Utilization (D-GLU) Pulping This factsheet describes a...

  2. Final Report: High Energy Physics Program (HEP), Physics Department...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Final Report: High Energy Physics Program (HEP), Physics Department, Princeton University Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Final Report: High Energy Physics Program...

  3. DIAGNOSTICS FOR ION BEAM DRIVEN HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bieniosek, F.M.

    2010-01-01

    for high energy density physics and fusion applications,IFSA 2007, Journal of Physics, Conference Series 112 (2008)high energy density physics experiments F. M. Bieniosek, E.

  4. Gwitchyaa Zhee Gwich'in Tribal Government Counteracts High Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Tribal Government Counteracts High Energy Costs, Climate Challenges with Building Energy Retrofits Gwitchyaa Zhee Gwich'in Tribal Government Counteracts High Energy Costs,...

  5. Additives and Cathode Materials for High-Energy Lithium Sulfur...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Additives and Cathode Materials for High-Energy Lithium Sulfur Batteries Additives and Cathode Materials for High-Energy Lithium Sulfur Batteries 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Energy Lithium...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    High Energy Lithium Batteries for PHEV Applications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Energy Lithium Batteries for PHEV Applications Presentation given by...

  7. Modular Low Cost High Energy Exhaust Heat Thermoelectric Generator...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low Cost High Energy Exhaust Heat Thermoelectric Generator with Closed-Loop Exhaust By-Pass System Modular Low Cost High Energy Exhaust Heat Thermoelectric Generator with...

  8. Energy Storage Testing and Analysis High Power and High Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Testing and Analysis High Power and High Energy Development Energy Storage Testing and Analysis High Power and High Energy Development 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle...

  9. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High Energy Lithium...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Energy Lithium-Sulfur Cathodes Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High Energy Lithium-Sulfur Cathodes Presentation given by Stanford University at 2015 DOE...

  10. Mitigating Breakdown in High Energy Density Perovskite Polymer...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mitigating Breakdown in High Energy Density Perovskite Polymer Nanocomposite Capacitors Mitigating Breakdown in High Energy Density Perovskite Polymer Nanocomposite Capacitors 2012...

  11. High-energy cosmic ray interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engel, Ralph; Orellana, Mariana; Reynoso, Matias M.; Vila, Gabriela S.

    2009-04-30

    Research into hadronic interactions and high-energy cosmic rays are closely related. On one hand--due to the indirect observation of cosmic rays through air showers--the understanding of hadronic multiparticle production is needed for deriving the flux and composition of cosmic rays at high energy. On the other hand the highest energy particles from the universe allow us to study the characteristics of hadronic interactions at energies far beyond the reach of terrestrial accelerators. This is the summary of three introductory lectures on our current understanding of hadronic interactions of cosmic rays.

  12. Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray Accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angela V. Olinto

    1999-11-09

    The surprising lack of a high energy cutoff in the cosmic ray spectrum at the highest energies together with an apparently isotropic distribution of arrival directions have strongly challenged most models proposed for the acceleration of ultra high energy cosmic rays. Young neutron star winds may be able to explain the mystery. We discuss this recent proposal after summarizing the observational challenge and plausible acceleration sites. Young neutrons star winds differ from alternative models in the predictions for composition, spectrum, and angular distribution which will be tested in future experiments.

  13. High Energy Physics Research at Louisiana Tech

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sawyer, Lee; Greenwood, Zeno; Wobisch, Marcus

    2013-06-28

    The goal of this project was to create, maintain, and strengthen a world-class, nationally and internationally recognized experimental high energy physics group at Louisiana Tech University, focusing on research at the energy frontier of collider-based particle physics, first on the D? experiment and then with the ATLAS experiment, and providing leadership within the US high energy physics community in the areas of jet physics, top quark and charged Higgs decays involving tau leptons, as well as developing leadership in high performance computing.

  14. High Energy Neutrino Generator for Neutrino Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marek Kowalski; Askhat Gazizov

    2003-12-08

    We present the high energy neutrino Monte Carlo event generator ANIS (All Neutrino Interaction Simulation). The aim of the program is to provide a detailed and flexible neutrino event simulation for high energy neutrino detectors, such as AMANDA and ICECUBE. It generates neutrinos of any flavor according to a specific flux, propagates them through the Earth and in a final step simulates neutrino interactions within a specified volume. All relevant standard model processes are implemented. We discuss strength and limitations of the program, and provide as an example event rates for atmospheric and E^-2 neutrino spectra.

  15. Precision Crystal Calorimeters in High Energy Physics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ren-Yuan Zhu

    2010-01-08

    Precision crystal calorimeters traditionally play an important role in high energy physics experiments. In the last two decades, it faces a challenge to maintain its precision in a hostile radiation environment. This paper reviews the performance of crystal calorimeters constructed for high energy physics experiments and the progress achieved in understanding crystal?s radiation damage as well as in developing high quality scintillating crystals for particle physics. Potential applications of new generation scintillating crystals of high density and high light yield, such as LSO and LYSO, in particle physics experiments is also discussed.

  16. On the Future High Energy Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shiltsev, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    High energy particle colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics for more than three decades. At present the near term US, European and international strategies of the particle physics community are centered on full exploitation of the physics potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) through its high-luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC). A number of the next generation collider facilities have been proposed and are currently under consideration for the medium and far-future of accelerator-based high energy physics. In this paper we offer a uniform approach to evaluation of various accelerators based on the feasibility of their energy reach, performance potential and cost range.

  17. On the Future High Energy Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimir Shiltsev

    2015-09-28

    High energy particle colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics for more than three decades. At present the near term US, European and international strategies of the particle physics community are centered on full exploitation of the physics potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) through its high-luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC). A number of the next generation collider facilities have been proposed and are currently under consideration for the medium and far-future of accelerator-based high energy physics. In this paper we offer a uniform approach to evaluation of various accelerators based on the feasibility of their energy reach, performance potential and cost range.

  18. COMPILATION OF CURRENT HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wohl, C.G.; Kelly, R.L.; Armstrong, F.E.; Horne, C.P.; Hutchinson, M.S.; Rittenberg, A.; Trippe, T.G.; Yost, G.P.; Addis, L.; Ward, C.E.W.; Baggett, N.; Goldschmidt-Clermong, Y.; Joos, P.; Gelfand, N.; Oyanagi, Y.; Grudtsin, S.N.; Ryabov, Yu.G.

    1981-05-01

    This is the fourth edition of our compilation of current high energy physics experiments. It is a collaborative effort of the Berkeley Particle Data Group, the SLAC library, and nine participating laboratories: Argonne (ANL), Brookhaven (BNL), CERN, DESY, Fermilab (FNAL), the Institute for Nuclear Study, Tokyo (INS), KEK, Serpukhov (SERP), and SLAC. The compilation includes summaries of all high energy physics experiments at the above laboratories that (1) were approved (and not subsequently withdrawn) before about April 1981, and (2) had not completed taking of data by 1 January 1977. We emphasize that only approved experiments are included.

  19. High energy neutron Computed Tomography developed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (JournalvivoHigh energy neutron Computed Tomography developed High energy

  20. Equilibrium Statistical-Thermal Models in High-Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdel Nasser Tawfik

    2014-10-25

    We review some recent highlights from the applications of statistical-thermal models to different experimental measurements and lattice QCD thermodynamics, that have been made during the last decade. We start with a short review of the historical milestones on the path of constructing statistical-thermal models for heavy-ion physics. We discovered that Heinz Koppe formulated in 1948 an almost complete recipe for the statistical-thermal models. In 1950, Enrico Fermi generalized this statistical approach, in which he started with a general cross-section formula and inserted into it simplifying assumptions about the matrix element of the interaction process that likely reflects many features of the high-energy reactions dominated by density in the phase space of final states. In 1964, Hagedorn systematically analysed the high-energy phenomena using all tools of statistical physics and introduced the concept of limiting temperature based on the statistical bootstrap model. It turns to be quite often that many-particle systems can be studied with the help of statistical-thermal methods. The analysis of yield multiplicities in high-energy collisions gives an overwhelming evidence for the chemical equilibrium in the final state. The strange particles might be an exception, as they are suppressed at lower beam energies. However, their relative yields fulfill statistical equilibrium, as well. We review the equilibrium statistical-thermal models for particle production, fluctuations and collective flow in heavy-ion experiments. We also review their reproduction of the lattice QCD thermodynamics at vanishing and finite chemical potential. During the last decade, five conditions have been suggested to describe the universal behavior of the chemical freeze out parameters.

  1. HIGH ENERGY HADRONINDUCED DILEPTON PRODUCTION FROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HIGH ENERGY HADRON­INDUCED DILEPTON PRODUCTION FROM NUCLEONS AND NUCLEI P.L. McGaughey, J.M. Moss Drell­Yan and W \\Sigma Production 3.3 Charge Symmetry Violation of Parton Distributions 3.4 Parton Scattering and Energy Loss 4. QUARKONIUM PRODUCTION 4.1 Quarkonium Production in Hadronic Collisions 4

  2. Anomalous loss in blue-green wavelength discrimination with very

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foster, David H.

    Anomalous loss in blue-green wavelength discrimination with very brief monochromatic stimuli to yield non-uniform increases in discrimination thresholds in the blue-green region of the spectrum that the effect was not attributable to the reduced energy of the short flash. One of the most significant

  3. High Energy Lithium-Sulfur Cathodes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    * Start: August 1, 2013 * End: July 31, 2016 * Percent complete: 60% Barriers of batteries - High cost (A) - Low energy density (C) - Short battery life (E) Targets:...

  4. High Energy Studies of Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick Slane

    2008-11-12

    The extended nebulae formed as pulsar winds expand into their surroundings provide information about the composition of the winds, the injection history from the host pulsar, and the material into which the nebulae are expanding. Observations from across the electromagnetic spectrum provide constraints on the evolution of the nebulae, the density and composition of the surrounding ejecta, the geometry of the systems, the formation of jets, and the maximum energy of the particles in the nebulae. Here I provide a broad overview of the structure of pulsar wind nebulae, with specific examples that demonstrate our ability to constrain the above parameters. The association of pulsar wind nebulae with extended sources of very high energy gamma-ray emission are investigated, along with constraints on the nature of such high energy emission.

  5. ACCELERATING POLARIZED PROTONS TO HIGH ENERGY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BAI, M.; AHRENS, L.; ALEKSEEV, I.G.; ALESSI, J.; BEEBE-WANG, J.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; BRAVAR, A.; BRENNAN, J.M.; BRUNO, D.; BUNCE, G.; ET AL.

    2006-10-02

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is designed to provide collisions of high energy polarized protons for the quest of understanding the proton spin structure. Polarized proton collisions at a beam energy of 100 GeV have been achieved in RHIC since 2001. Recently, polarized proton beam was accelerated to 250 GeV in RHIC for the first time. Unlike accelerating unpolarized protons, the challenge for achieving high energy polarized protons is to fight the various mechanisms in an accelerator that can lead to partial or total polarization loss due to the interaction of the spin vector with the magnetic fields. We report on the progress of the RHIC polarized proton program. We also present the strategies of how to preserve the polarization through the entire acceleration chain, i.e. a 200 MeV linear accelerator, the Booster, the AGS and RHIC.

  6. Accelerating Polarized Protons to High Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, M.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I. G.; Alessi, J.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Bravar, A.; Brennan, J. M.; Bruno, D.; Bunce, G.; Butler, J.; Cameron, P.; Connolly, R.; Delong, J.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.

    2007-06-13

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is designed to provide collisions of high energy polarized protons for the quest of understanding the proton spin structure. Polarized proton collisions at a beam energy of 100 GeV have been achieved in RHIC since 2001. Recently, polarized proton beam was accelerated to 250 GeV in RHIC for the first time. Unlike accelerating unpolarized protons, the challenge for achieving high energy polarized protons is to fight the various mechanisms in an accelerator that can lead to partial or total polarization loss due to the interaction of the spin vector with the magnetic fields. We report on the progress of the RHIC polarized proton program. We also present the strategies of how to preserve the polarization through the entire acceleration chain, i.e. a 200 MeV linear accelerator, the Booster, the AGS and RHIC.

  7. High Energy Particles in the Solar Corona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Widom; Y. N. Srivastava; L. Larsen

    2008-04-16

    Collective Ampere law interactions producing magnetic flux tubes piercing through sunspots into and then out of the solar corona allow for low energy nuclear reactions in a steady state and high energy particle reactions if a magnetic flux tube explodes in a violent event such as a solar flare. Filamentous flux tubes themselves are vortices of Ampere currents circulating around in a tornado fashion in a roughly cylindrical geometry. The magnetic field lines are parallel to and largely confined within the core of the vortex. The vortices may thereby be viewed as long current carrying coils surrounding magnetic flux and subject to inductive Faraday and Ampere laws. These laws set the energy scales of (i) low energy solar nuclear reactions which may regularly occur and (ii) high energy electro-weak interactions which occur when magnetic flux coils explode into violent episodic events such as solar flares or coronal mass ejections.

  8. New Prospects in High Energy Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blandford, Roger; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2011-11-15

    Recent discoveries using TeV, X-ray and radio telescopes as well as Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray arrays are leading to new insights into longstanding puzzles in high energy astrophysics. Many of these insights come from combining observations throughout the electromagnetic and other spectra as well as evidence assembled from different types of source to propose general principles. Issues discussed in this general overview include methods of accelerating relativistic particles, and amplifying magnetic field, the dynamics of relativistic outflows and the nature of the prime movers that power them. Observational approaches to distinguishing hadronic, leptonic and electromagnetic outflows and emission mechanisms are discussed along with probes of the velocity field and the confinement mechanisms. Observations with GLAST promise to be very prescriptive for addressing these problems.

  9. Prospects of High Energy Laboratory Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, J.S.T.; Chen, P.; /SLAC

    2006-09-21

    Ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) have been observed but their sources and production mechanisms are yet to be understood. We envision a laboratory astrophysics program that will contribute to the understanding of cosmic accelerators with efforts to: (1) test and calibrate UHECR observational techniques, and (2) elucidate the underlying physics of cosmic acceleration through laboratory experiments and computer simulations. Innovative experiments belonging to the first category have already been done at the SLAC FFTB. Results on air fluorescence yields from the FLASH experiment are reviewed. Proposed future accelerator facilities can provided unprecedented high-energy-densities in a regime relevant to cosmic acceleration studies and accessible in a terrestrial environment for the first time. We review recent simulation studies of nonlinear plasma dynamics that could give rise to cosmic acceleration, and discuss prospects for experimental investigation of the underlying mechanisms.

  10. High energy physics at UC Riverside

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-07-01

    This report discusses progress made for the following two tasks: experimental high energy physics, Task A, and theoretical high energy physics, Task B. Task A1 covers hadron collider physics. Information for Task A1 includes: personnel/talks/publications; D0: proton-antiproton interactions at 2 TeV; SDC: proton-proton interactions at 40 TeV; computing facilities; equipment needs; and budget notes. The physics program of Task A2 has been the systematic study of leptons and hadrons. Information covered for Task A2 includes: personnel/talks/publications; OPAL at LEP; OPAL at LEP200; CMS at LHC; the RD5 experiment; LSND at LAMPF; and budget notes. The research activities of the Theory Group are briefly discussed and a list of completed or published papers for this period is given.

  11. Why is High Energy Physics Lorentz Invariant?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afshordi, Niayesh

    2015-01-01

    Despite the tremendous empirical success of equivalence principle, there are several theoretical motivations for existence of a preferred reference frame (or aether) in a consistent theory of quantum gravity. However, if quantum gravity had a preferred reference frame, why would high energy processes enjoy such a high degree of Lorentz symmetry? While this is often considered as an argument against aether, here I provide three independent arguments for why perturbative unitarity (or weak coupling) of the Lorentz-violating effective field theories put stringent constraints on possible observable violations of Lorentz symmetry at high energies. In particular, the interaction with the scalar graviton in a consistent low-energy theory of gravity and a (radiatively and dynamically) stable cosmological framework, leads to these constraints. The violation (quantified by the relative difference in maximum speed of propagation) is limited to $\\lesssim 10^{-10} E({\\rm eV})^{-4}$ (superseding all current empirical bound...

  12. Strongly Interacting Matter at High Energy Density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larry McLerran

    2008-12-08

    This lecture concerns the properties of strongly interacting matter (which is described by Quantum Chromodynamics) at very high energy density. I review the properties of matter at high temperature, discussing the deconfinement phase transition . At high baryon density and low temperature, large $N_c$ arguments are developed which suggest that high baryonic density matter is a third form of matter, Quarkyonic Matter, that is distinct from confined hadronic matter and deconfined matter. I finally discuss the Color Glass Condensate which controls the high energy limit of QCD, and forms the low x part of a hadron wavefunction. The Glasma is introduced as matter formed by the Color Glass Condensate which eventually thermalizes into a Quark Gluon Plasma.

  13. Viscosity of High Energy Nuclear Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Parihar; A. Widom; D. Drosdoff; Y. N. Srivastava

    2007-03-15

    Relativistic high energy heavy ion collision cross sections have been interpreted in terms of almost ideal liquid droplets of nuclear matter. The experimental low viscosity of these nuclear fluids have been of considerable recent quantum chromodynamic interest. The viscosity is here discussed in terms of the string fragmentation models wherein the temperature dependence of the nuclear fluid viscosity obeys the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann law.

  14. Special Colloquium : Looking at High Energy Physics from a gender studies perspective

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Human actors, workplace cultures and knowledge production: Gender studies analyse the social constructions and cultural representations of gender. Using methods and tools from the humanities and social science, we look at all areas, including the natural sciences and technology, science education and research labs. After a short introduction to gender studies, the main focus of my talk will be the presentation of selected research findings on gender and high energy physics. You will hear about an ongoing research project on women in neutrino physics and learn about a study on the world of high energy physicists characterised by "rites of passage" and "male tales" told during a life in physics. I will also present a study on how the HEP community communicates, and research findings on the naming culture in HEP. Getting to know findings from another field on your own might contribute to create a high energy physics culture that is fair and welcoming to all genders.

  15. The Case for a Kilometer-Scale High-Energy Neutrino Detector: 1996

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Halzen

    1996-05-02

    The objective of neutrino astronomy, born with the identification of thermonuclear fusion in the sun and the particle processes controlling the fate of a nearby supernova, is to build instruments which reach throughout and far beyond our Galaxy and make measurements relevant to cosmology, astrophysics, cosmic-ray and particle physics. These telescopes will push astronomy to wavelengths smaller than $10^{-14}$~cm by mapping the sky in high-energy neutrinos instead of high-energy photons to which the Universe is partially opaque. While a variety of collaborations are pioneering complementary methods by building neutrino detectors with effective area in excess of 0.01~km$^2$, we show here that the science dictates 1~km$^2$, or a 1~km$^3$ instrumented volume, as the natural scale of a high-energy neutrino telescope. The construction of a high-energy neutrino telescope therefore requires a huge volume of very transparent, deeply buried material such as ocean water or ice, which acts as the medium for detecting the particles. We will speculate on its architecture. The field is immersed in technology in the domain of particle physics to which many of its research goals are intellectually connected. With several thousand optical modules the scope of constructing a kilometer-scale instrument is similar to that of experiments presently being commissioned such as the SNO neutrino observatory in Canada and the Superkamiokande experiment in Japan.

  16. Devloping High Energy Radiography for HED Experiments on NIF and Omega-EP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maddox, B; Tommasini, R; Remington, B; Key, M; Town, R

    2008-02-14

    High energy radiography capabilities are essential for many future DNT/HED experiments on NIF. We have been developing bright, high-energy (15-100 keV), high resolution (< 20 {micro}m), 1-D and 2-D radiography solutions for DNT experiments on NIF. In this LDRD, we have made significant progress utilizing high-energy, high-intensity, short-pulse lasers to generate hard K-{alpha} photons. High energy K-{alpha} sources are created by hot electrons interacting in the target fluor material after irradiation by lasers with intensity I{sub L} > 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}. High resolution point projection 1-D and 2-D radiography have been achieved using {mu}-foil and {mu}-wire targets attached to low-Z substrate materials. The {mu}-wire size was 10 x 10 x 300 {micro}m on a 300 x 300 x 5 {micro}m CH substrate creating the point source size equivalent to these micro targets. This unique technique will utilize the NIF short pulse laser (ARC) as a backlighter suitable for the full range of DNT science experiments on NIF.

  17. Diffuse emission of high-energy neutrinos from gamma-ray burst fireballs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tamborra, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been suggested as possible sources of the high-energy neutrino flux recently detected by the IceCube telescope. We revisit the fireball emission model and elaborate an analytical prescription to estimate the high-energy neutrino prompt emission from pion and kaon decays, assuming that the leading mechanism for the neutrino production is lepto-hadronic. To this purpose, we include hadronic, radiative and adiabatic cooling effects and discuss their relevance for long- (including high- and low-luminosity) and short-duration GRBs. The expected diffuse neutrino background is derived, by requiring that the GRB high-energy neutrino counterparts follow up-to-date gamma-ray luminosity functions and redshift evolutions of the long and short GRBs. Although dedicated stacking searches have been unsuccessful up to now, we find that the GRBs could contribute up to a few percents to the observed IceCube high-energy neutrino flux for sub-PeV energies, assuming that the latter has a diffuse origin...

  18. Why is High Energy Physics Lorentz Invariant?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niayesh Afshordi

    2015-11-24

    Despite the tremendous empirical success of equivalence principle, there are several theoretical motivations for existence of a preferred reference frame (or aether) in a consistent theory of quantum gravity. However, if quantum gravity had a preferred reference frame, why would high energy processes enjoy such a high degree of Lorentz symmetry? While this is often considered as an argument against aether, here I provide three independent arguments for why perturbative unitarity (or weak coupling) of the Lorentz-violating effective field theories put stringent constraints on possible observable violations of Lorentz symmetry at high energies. In particular, the interaction with the scalar graviton in a consistent low-energy theory of gravity and a (radiatively and dynamically) stable cosmological framework, leads to these constraints. The violation (quantified by the relative difference in maximum speed of propagation) is limited to $\\lesssim 10^{-10} E({\\rm eV})^{-4}$ (superseding all current empirical bounds), or the theory will be strongly coupled beyond meV scale. The latter happens in extended Horava-Lifshitz gravities, as a result of a previously ignored quantum anomaly. Finally, given that all cosmologically viable theories with significant Lorentz violation appear to be strongly coupled beyond meV scale, we conjecture that, similar to color confinement in QCD, or Vainshetin screening for massive gravity, high energy theories (that interact with gravity) are shielded from Lorentz violation (at least, up to the scale where gravity is UV-completed). In contrast, microwave or radio photons, cosmic background neutrinos, or gravitational waves may provide more promising candidates for discovery of violations of Lorentz symmetry.

  19. HIGH ENERGY POLARIZATION OF BLAZARS: DETECTION PROSPECTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakraborty, N.; Pavlidou, V.; Fields, B. D.

    2015-01-01

    Emission from blazar jets in the ultraviolet, optical, and infrared is polarized. If these low-energy photons were inverse-Compton scattered, the upscattered high-energy photons retain a fraction of the polarization. Current and future X-ray and gamma-ray polarimeters such as INTEGRAL-SPI, PoGOLITE, X-Calibur, Gamma-Ray Burst Polarimeter, GEMS-like missions, ASTRO-H, and POLARIX have the potential to discover polarized X-rays and gamma-rays from blazar jets for the first time. Detection of such polarization will open a qualitatively new window into high-energy blazar emission; actual measurements of polarization degree and angle will quantitatively test theories of jet emission mechanisms. We examine the detection prospects of blazars by these polarimetry missions using examples of 3C 279, PKS 1510-089, and 3C 454.3, bright sources with relatively high degrees of low-energy polarization. We conclude that while balloon polarimeters will be challenged to detect blazars within reasonable observational times (with X-Calibur offering the most promising prospects), space-based missions should detect the brightest blazars for polarization fractions down to a few percent. Typical flaring activity of blazars could boost the overall number of polarimetric detections by nearly a factor of five to six purely accounting for flux increase of the brightest of the comprehensive, all-sky, Fermi-LAT blazar distribution. The instantaneous increase in the number of detections is approximately a factor of two, assuming a duty cycle of 20% for every source. The detectability of particular blazars may be reduced if variations in the flux and polarization fraction are anticorrelated. Simultaneous use of variability and polarization trends could guide the selection of blazars for high-energy polarimetric observations.

  20. High Energy Instrumentation Efforts in Turkey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalemci, Emrah

    2011-09-21

    This work summarizes the efforts in Turkey to build a laboratory capable of building and testing high energy astrophysics detectors that work in space. The EC FP6 ASTRONS project contributed strongly to these efforts, and as a result a fully operational laboratory at Sabanci University have been developed. In this laboratory we test and develop Si and CdZnTe based room temperature semiconductor strip detectors and develop detector and electronics system to be used as a payload on potential small Turkish satellites.

  1. High Energy Output Marx Generator Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monty Lehmann

    2011-07-01

    High Energy Output Marx Generator Design a design of a six stage Marx generator that has a unipolar pulse waveform of 200 kA in a 50×500 microsecond waveform is presented. The difficulties encountered in designing the components to withstand the temperatures and pressures generated during the output pulse are discussed. The unique methods and materials used to successfully overcome these problems are given. The steps necessary to increase the current output of this Marx generator design to the meg-ampere region or higher are specified.

  2. High Energy Scattering in Higher Dimensional Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maharana, Jnanadeva

    2015-01-01

    The high energy behavior of scattering amplitudes in spacetime dimensions, $D>4$, is investigated. The bound on total cross sections, $\\sigma_t \\le Constant~(los s)^{D-2}$, $D\\ge 4$ has been obtained in the past under usual assumptions. I derive new bound on scattering amplitudes in the region $|t|

  3. High-energy cosmic-ray acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bustamante, M; de Paula, W; Duarte Chavez, J A; Gago, A M; Hakobyan, H; Jez, P; Monroy Montañez, J A; Ortiz Velasquez, A; Padilla Cabal, F; Pino Rozas, M; Rodriguez Patarroyo, D J; Romeo, G L; Saldaña-Salazar , U J; Velasquez, M; von Steinkirch, M

    2010-01-01

    We briefly review the basics of ultrahigh-energy cosmic-ray acceleration. The Hillas criterion is introduced as a geometrical criterion that must be fulfilled by potential acceleration sites, and energy losses are taken into account in order to obtain a more realistic scenario. The different available acceleration mechanisms are presented, with special emphasis on Fermi shock acceleration and its prediction of a power-law cosmic-ray energy spectrum. We conclude that first-order Fermi acceleration, though not entirely satisfactory, is the most promising mechanism for explaining the ultra-high-energy cosmic-ray flux.

  4. Emerging Computing Technologies in High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amir Farbin

    2009-10-19

    While in the early 90s High Energy Physics (HEP) lead the computing industry by establishing the HTTP protocol and the first web-servers, the long time-scale for planning and building modern HEP experiments has resulted in a generally slow adoption of emerging computing technologies which rapidly become commonplace in business and other scientific fields. I will overview some of the fundamental computing problems in HEP computing and then present the current state and future potential of employing new computing technologies in addressing these problems.

  5. High energy neutron Computed Tomography developed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy, Ph.D. Title: Professor -|High energy neutron Computed

  6. Search for Acoustic Signals from Ultra-High Energy Neutrinos...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Search for Acoustic Signals from Ultra-High Energy Neutrinos in 1500 Km3 of Sea Water Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Search for Acoustic Signals from Ultra-High Energy...

  7. High Energy Resummation in Quantum Chromo–Dynamics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marzani, Simone

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis I discuss different aspects of high energy resummation in Quantum Chromo-Dynamics and its relevance for precision physics at hadron colliders. The high energy factorisation theorem is presented and discussed ...

  8. High energy. Progress report, March 1, 1992--February 28, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonner, B.E.; Roberts, J.B. Jr.

    1996-09-01

    The Bonner Lab High Energy Group at Rice University has major hardware and software design and construction responsibilities in three of the flagship experiments of US High Energy Physics: D0, CMS, and KTeV. These commitments were undertaken after managing boards of the collaborations had evaluated the unique capabilities that Bonner Lab has to offer. Although fiscal constraints prohibited their participation in the final year of the SMC experiment (1996) on the spin dependent structure functions of nucleons, they played a major role there since it was proposed in 1988. The new results from the SMC data taken in previous years continue to generate a buzz of theoretical activity--and to increase understanding of the nucleon structure functions and their behavior as a function of Q{sup 2} and x. They have also spawned large new experimental spin physics programs at HERA and at RHIC that ultimately will provide answers to these fundamental questions. This is a direct result of the unprecedented precision and kinematic range of the SMC results. Such precision would not have been possible without the improvement in the knowledge of the muon beam polarization using the Rice-designed beam polarimeter. In D0 Bonner Lab has been active in data taking, data analysis, upgrade design, and upgrade construction projects. In CMS they are responsible for the design and construction of the trigger electronics for one of the crucial subsystems: the end cap muon detectors. Other responsibilities are fully expected as the US commitment to LHC projects becomes clearer. The technical capabilities are well matched to the enormous challenges posed by the physics measurements being contemplated for the CMS detector. KTeV will be taking data shortly. Rice made major contributions to the construction and commissioning of this experiment. The long list of publications and presentations during the past five years attests to the fact that the group has been working hard and productively.

  9. Data mining in high energy physics Bertrand Brelier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prodiæ, Aleksandar

    Data mining in high energy physics Bertrand Brelier SOSCIP July 3, 2014 Bertrand Brelier (SOSCIP) Data mining in high energy physics July 3, 2014 1 / 8 #12;The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Bertrand Brelier (SOSCIP) Data mining in high energy physics July 3, 2014 2 / 8 #12;The ATLAS detector Bertrand

  10. Japanese Future Space Programs for High Energy Astrophysics KAZUHISA MITSUDA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitsuda, Kazuhisa

    Japanese Future Space Programs for High Energy Astrophysics KAZUHISA MITSUDA Institute of space and astronautical science, Sagamihara 229-8510, Japan ABSTRACT. Japanese future space programs for high energy the Japanese future space high energy astrophysics missions in 2000's and early 2010's. The approved

  11. DIFFRACTION SCATTERING AT HIGH ENERGIES (outlook from 1980s) 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Titov, Anatoly

    DIFFRACTION SCATTERING AT HIGH ENERGIES (outlook from 1980s) 1 A.A.Vorobyov 1. Introduction In 1960 of the most exciting tasks in the high energy physics. Several theorems have been formulated based on general cross sections in the asymptotic region at high energies. Among the general theorems of the axiomatic

  12. 2D Optical Streaking for Ultra-Short Electron Beam Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Y.T.; Huang, Z.; Wang, L.; /SLAC

    2011-12-14

    We propose a novel approach to measure short electron bunch profiles at micrometer level. Low energy electrons generated during beam-gas ionization are simultaneously modulated by the transverse electric field of a circularly-polarized laser, and then they are collected at a downstream screen where the angular modulation is converted to a circular shape. The longitudinal bunch profile is simply represented by the angular distribution of the electrons on the screen. We only need to know the laser wavelength for calibration and there is no phase synchronization problem. Meanwhile the required laser power is also relatively low in this setup. Some simulations examples and experimental consideration of this method are discussed. At Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), an S-band RF transverse deflector (TCAV) is used to measure the bunch length with a resolution 10 femtosecond (fs) rms. An X-band deflector (wavelength 2.6cm) is proposed recently to improve the resolution. However, at the low charge operation mode (20pC), the pulse length can be as short as fs. It is very challenging to measure femtosecond and sub-femtosecond level bunch length. One of the methods is switching from RF to {mu}m level wavelength laser to deflect the bunch. A powerful laser ({approx}10s GW) is required to deflect such a high energy beam (GeV) in a wiggler. Synchronization is another difficulty: the jitter between the bunch and the laser can be larger than the laser wavelength, which makes single-shot measurement impossible. To reduce the laser power, we propose to use ionized electrons from high energy electron beam and gas interaction for high energy electron bunch diagnostics. Similarly, the femtosecond X-ray streak camera uses X-ray ionization electrons to measure the X-ray pulse. The electrons generated by beam-gas ionization have low energy (eVs). Therefore, a lower laser power is possible to deflect such low energy electrons. Note that there is no field ionization in our case. To avoid field ionization, which occurs in plasma case, gases species with high field ionization threshold should be considered. For a linear polarized laser, the kick to the ionized electrons depends on the phase of the laser when the electrons are born and the unknown timing jitter between the electron beam and laser beam makes the data analysis very difficult. Here we propose to use a circular polarized laser to do a 2-dimensional (2D) streaking (both x and y) and measure the bunch length from the angular distribution on the screen, where the phase jitter causes only a rotation of the image on the screen without changing of the relative angular distribution. Also we only need to know the laser wavelength for calibration. A similar circular RF deflecting mode was used to measure long bunches. We developed a numerical particle-in-Cell (PIC) code to study the dynamics of ionization electrons with the high energy beam and the laser beam.

  13. UPR/Mayaguez High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendez, Hector

    2014-10-31

    This year the University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez (UPRM) High Energy Physics (HEP) group continued with the ongoing research program outlined in the grant proposal. The program is centered on the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the proton-proton (pp) collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. The main research focus is on data analysis and on the preparation for the High Luminosity (HL) LHC or experiment detector upgrade. The physics data analysis included Higgs Doublet Search and measurement of the (1)#3; ?0b branching fraction, (2) B meson mass, and (3) hyperon ?-b lifetime. The detector upgrade included work on the preparations for the Forward Pixel (FPIX) detector Silicon Sensor Testing in a production run at Fermilab. In addition, the group has taken responsibilities on the Software Release through our former research associate Dr. Eric Brownson who acted until last December as a Level Two Offline Manager for the CMS Upgrade. In support of the CMS data analysis activities carried out locally, the UPRM group has built and maintains an excellent Tier3 analysis center in Mayaguez. This allowed us to analyze large data samples and to continue the development of algorithms for the upgrade tracking robustness we started several years ago, and we plan to resume in the near future. This project involves computer simulation of the radiation damage to be suffered at the higher luminosities of the upgraded LHC. This year we continued to serve as a source of outstanding students for the field of high energy physics. Three of our graduate students finished their MS work in May, 2014, Their theses research were on data analysis of heavy quark b-physics. All of them are currently enrolled at Ph.D. physics program across the nation. One of them (Hector Moreno) at New Mexico University (Hector Moreno), one at University of New Hampshire (Sandra Santiesteban) and one at University of Puerto Rico-Rio Piedras (Carlos Malca). The students H. Moreno and C. Malca has been directly supervised by Dr. Mendez and S. Santiesteban supervised by Dr. Ramirez. During the last 13 years, our group have graduated 23 MS students on experimental High Energy Physics data analysis and applied hardware techniques. Most of the students have been supported by DOE grants, included this grant. Since 2001, Dr. Mendez have directly supervised eleven students, Dr. Ramirez three students and the former PI (Dr. Lopez) nine students. These theses work are fully documented in the group web page (http://charma.uprm.edu). The High Energy Physics group at Mayaguez is small and presently consists of three Physics faculty members, the Senior Investigators Dr. Hector Mendez (Professor) and Dr. Juan Eduardo Ramirez (Professor), and Dr. Sudhir Malik who was just hired in July 2014. Dr. Ramirez is in charge of the UPRM Tier-3 computing and will be building the network bandwidth infrastructure for the campus, while Dr. Mendez will continues his effort in finishing the heavy quark physics data analysis and moving to work on SUSY analysis for the 2015 data. Our last grant application in 2012 was awarded only for 2013-2014. As a result our postdoc position was lost last month of March. Since then, we have hired Dr. Malik as a new faculty in order to reinforce the group and to continue our efforts with the CMS experiment. Our plan is to hire another junior faculty in the next two years to strengthen the HEP group even further. Dr. Mendez continues with QuarkNet activities involving an ever larger group of high school physics teachers from all around Puerto Rico.

  14. Structures in high-energy fusion data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Esbensen

    2012-06-05

    Structures observed in heavy-ion fusion cross sections at energies above the Coulomb barrier are interpreted as caused by the penetration of centrifugal barriers that are well-separated in energy. The structures are most pronounced in the fusion of lighter, symmetric systems, where the separation in energy between successive angular momentum barriers is relatively large. It is shown that the structures or peaks can be revealed by plotting the first derivative of the energy weighted cross section. It is also shown how an orbital angular momentum can be assign to the observed peaks by comparing to coupled-channels calculations. This is illustrated by analyzing high-energy fusion data for $^{12}$C+$^{16}$O and $^{16}$O+$^{16}$O, and the possibility of observing similar structures in the fusion of heavier systems is discussed.

  15. Angular correlations and high energy evolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kovner, Alex; Lublinsky, Michael

    2011-11-01

    We address the question of to what extent JIMWLK evolution is capable of taking into account angular correlations in a high energy hadronic wave function. Our conclusion is that angular (and indeed other) correlations in the wave function cannot be reliably calculated without taking into account Pomeron loops in the evolution. As an example we study numerically the energy evolution of angular correlations between dipole scattering amplitudes in the framework of the large N{sub c} approximation to JIMWLK evolution (the 'projectile dipole model'). Target correlations are introduced via averaging over an (isotropic) ensemble of anisotropic initial conditions. We find that correlations disappear very quickly with rapidity even inside the saturation radius. This is in accordance with our physical picture of JIMWLK evolution. The actual correlations inside the saturation radius in the target QCD wave function, on the other hand, should remain sizable at any rapidity.

  16. Microfluidic Scintillation Detectors for High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maoddi, Pietro; Mapelli, Alessandro

    This thesis deals with the development and study of microfluidic scintillation detectors, a technology of recent introduction for the detection of high energy particles. Most of the interest for such devices comes from the use of a liquid scintillator, which entails the possibility of changing the active material in the detector, leading to increased radiation resistance. A first part of the thesis focuses on the work performed in terms of design and modelling studies of novel prototype devices, hinting to new possibilities and applications. In this framework, the simulations performed to validate selected designs and the main technological choices made in view of their fabrication are addressed. The second part of this thesis deals with the microfabrication of several prototype devices. Two different materials were studied for the manufacturing of microfluidic scintillation detectors, namely the SU-8 photosensitive epoxy and monocrystalline silicon. For what concerns the former, an original fabrication appro...

  17. High energy density redox flow device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Carter, W. Craig; Ho, Bryan Y; Duduta, Mihai; Limthongkul, Pimpa

    2014-05-13

    Redox flow devices are described in which at least one of the positive electrode or negative electrode-active materials is a semi-solid or is a condensed ion-storing electroactive material, and in which at least one of the electrode-active materials is transported to and from an assembly at which the electrochemical reaction occurs, producing electrical energy. The electronic conductivity of the semi-solid is increased by the addition of conductive particles to suspensions and/or via the surface modification of the solid in semi-solids (e.g., by coating the solid with a more electron conductive coating material to increase the power of the device). High energy density and high power redox flow devices are disclosed. The redox flow devices described herein can also include one or more inventive design features. In addition, inventive chemistries for use in redox flow devices are also described.

  18. New High-Energy Nanofiber Anode Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xiangwu; Fedkiw, Peter; Khan, Saad; Huang, Alex; Fan, Jiang

    2013-11-15

    The overall goal of the proposed work was to use electrospinning technology to integrate dissimilar materials (lithium alloy and carbon) into novel composite nanofiber anodes, which simultaneously had high energy density, reduced cost, and improved abuse tolerance. The nanofiber structure allowed the anodes to withstand repeated cycles of expansion and contraction. These composite nanofibers were electrospun into nonwoven fabrics with thickness of 50 ?m or more, and then directly used as anodes in a lithium-ion battery. This eliminated the presence of non-active materials (e.g., conducting carbon black and polymer binder) and resulted in high energy and power densities. The nonwoven anode structure also provided a large electrode-electrolyte interface and, hence, high rate capacity and good lowtemperature performance capability. Following are detailed objectives for three proposed project periods. • During the first six months: Obtain anodes capable of initial specific capacities of 650 mAh/g and achieve ~50 full charge/discharge cycles in small laboratory scale cells (50 to 100 mAh) at the 1C rate with less than 20 percent capacity fade; • In the middle of project period: Assemble, cycle, and evaluate 18650 cells using proposed anode materials, and demonstrate practical and useful cycle life (750 cycles of ~70% state of charge swing with less than 20% capacity fade) in 18650 cells with at least twice improvement in the specific capacity than that of conventional graphite electrodes; • At the end of project period: Deliver 18650 cells containing proposed anode materials, and achieve specific capacities greater than 1200 mAh/g and cycle life longer than 5000 cycles of ~70% state of charge swing with less than 20% capacity fade.

  19. On the Origin of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, T K; Colgate, S; Li, H; Bulmer, R H; Pino, J

    2011-03-08

    We show that accretion disks around Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) could account for the enormous power in observed ultra high energy cosmic rays {approx}10{sup 20} eV (UHEs). In our model, cosmic rays are produced by quasi-steady acceleration of ions in magnetic structures previously proposed to explain jets around Active Galactic Nuclei with supermassive black holes. Steady acceleration requires that an AGN accretion disk act as a dynamo, which we show to follow from a modified Standard Model in which the magnetic torque of the dynamo replaces viscosity as the dominant mechanism accounting for angular momentum conservation during accretion. A black hole of mass M{sub BH} produces a steady dynamo voltage V {proportional_to} {radical}M{sub BH} giving V {approx} 10{sup 20} volts for M{sub BH} {approx} 10{sup 8} solar masses. The voltage V reappears as an inductive electric field at the advancing nose of a dynamo-driven jet, where plasma instability inherent in collisionless runaway acceleration allows ions to be steadily accelerated to energies {approx} V, finally ejected as cosmic rays. Transient events can produce much higher energies. The predicted disk radiation is similar to the Standard Model. Unique predictions concern the remarkable collimation of jets and emissions from the jet/radiolobe structure. Given MBH and the accretion rate, the model makes 7 predictions roughly consistent with data: (1) the jet length; (2) the jet radius; (3) the steady-state cosmic ray energy spectrum; (4) the maximum energy in this spectrum; (5) the UHE cosmic ray intensity on Earth; (6) electron synchrotron wavelengths; and (7) the power in synchrotron radiation. These qualitative successes motivate new computer simulations, experiments and data analysis to provide a quantitative verification of the model.

  20. High Energy Vision: Processing X-rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DePasquale, Joseph; Edmonds, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Astronomy is by nature a visual science. The high quality imagery produced by the world's observatories can be a key to effectively engaging with the public and helping to inspire the next generation of scientists. Creating compelling astronomical imagery can, however, be particularly challenging in the non-optical wavelength regimes. In the case of X-ray astronomy, where the amount of light available to create an image is severely limited, it is necessary to employ sophisticated image processing algorithms to translate light beyond human vision into imagery that is aesthetically pleasing while still being scientifically accurate. This paper provides a brief overview of the history of X-ray astronomy leading to the deployment of NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, followed by an examination of the specific challenges posed by processing X-ray imagery. The authors then explore image processing techniques used to mitigate such processing challenges in order to create effective public imagery for X-ray astronomy. ...

  1. FACT - Monitoring Blazars at Very High Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorner, D; Bergmann, M; Biland, A; Balbo, M; Bretz, T; Buss, J; Einecke, S; Freiwald, J; Hempfling, C; Hildebrand, D; Hughes, G; Lustermann, W; Mannheim, K; Meier, K; Mueller, S; Neise, D; Neronov, A; Overkemping, A -K; Paravac, A; Pauss, F; Rhode, W; Steinbring, T; Temme, F; Thaele, J; Toscano, S; Vogler, P; Walter, R; Wilbert, A

    2015-01-01

    The First G-APD Cherenkov Telescope (FACT) was built on the Canary Island of La Palma in October 2011 as a proof of principle for silicon based photosensors in Cherenkov Astronomy. The scientific goal of the project is to study the variability of active galatic nuclei (AGN) at TeV energies. Observing a small sample of TeV blazars whenever possible, an unbiased data sample is collected. This allows to study the variability of the selected objects on timescales from hours to years. Results from the first three years of monitoring will be presented. To provide quick flare alerts to the community and trigger multi-wavelength observations, a quick look analysis has been installed on-site providing results publicly online within the same night. In summer 2014, several flare alerts were issued. Results of the quick look analysis are summarized.

  2. Cosmological Surveys at Submillimetre Wavelengths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David H. Hughes

    2000-03-28

    One of the major goals of observational cosmology is to acquire empirical data that has the diagnostic power to develop the theoretical modelling of the high-redshift universe, ultimately leading to an accurate understanding of the processes by which galaxies and clusters form and subsequently evolve. New bolometer arrays operating on the world's largest submillimetre telescopes now offer a unique view of the high-redshift universe through unbiassed surveys with unprecedented sensitivity. For brevity, except when there is a need to be more specific, the FIR to millimetre wavelength regime (100um 1, and determine their contribution to the submm extragalactic background. The field of observational cosmology will be revolutionized during the course of the next 10 years due to the variety of powerful new ground-based, airborne and satellite facilities, particularly those operating at FIR to millimetre wavelengths. This review summarises the results from the recent blank-field submm surveys, and describes the future observations that will provide accurate source-counts over wider ranges of wavelength and flux-density, constrain the spectral energy distributions of the submm-selected galaxies and accurately constrain the redshift distribution and submm luminosity function by removing the current ambiguities in the optical, IR and radio counterparts.

  3. Focusing monochromators for high energy synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suortti, P. )

    1992-01-01

    Bent crystals are introduced as monochromators for high energy synchrotron radiation. The reflectivity of the crystal can be calculated reliably from a model where the bent crystal is approximated by a stack of lamellas, which have a gradually changing angle of reflection. The reflectivity curves of a 4 mm thick, asymmetrically cut ({chi}=9.5{degree}) Si(220) crystal are measured using 150 keV radiation and varying the bending radius from 25 to 140 m. The width of the reflectivity curve is up to 50 times the Darwin width of the reflection, and the maximum reflectivity exceeds 80%. The crystal is used as a monochromator in Compton scattering measurements. The source is on the focusing circle, so that the resolution is limited essentially by the detector/analyzer. A wide bandpass, sharply focused beam is attained when the source is outside the focusing circle in the transmission geometry. In a test experiment. 10{sup 12} photons on an area of 2 mm{sup 2} was observed. The energy band was about 4 keV centered at 40 keV. A powder diffraction pattern of a few reflections of interest was recorded by an intrinsic Ge detector, and this demonstrated that a structural transition can be followed at intervals of a few milliseconds.

  4. Galactic discrete sources of high energy neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Bednarek; G. F. Burgio; T. Montaruli

    2004-04-27

    We review recently developed models of galactic discrete sources of high energy neutrinos. Some of them are based on a simple rescaling of the TeV $\\gamma$-ray fluxes from recently detected galactic sources, such as, shell-type supernova remnants or pulsar wind nebulae. Others present detailed and originally performed modeling of processes occurring close to compact objects, i.e. neutron stars and low mass black holes, which are supposed to accelerate hadrons close to dense matter and radiation fields. Most of the models considered in this review optimistically assume that the energy content in relativistic hadrons is equal to a significant part of the maximum observable power output in specific sources, i.e. typically $\\sim 10%$. This may give a large overestimation of the neutrino fluxes. This is the case of models which postulate neutrino production in hadron-photon collisions already at the acceleration place, due to the likely $e^\\pm$ pair plasma domination. Models postulating neutrino production in hadron-hadron collisions avoid such problems and therefore seem to be more promising. The neutrino telescopes currently taking data have not detected any excess from discrete sources yet, although some models could already be constrained by the limits they are providing.

  5. High energy hadron-hadron collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, T.T.

    1991-12-01

    Results of a study on high energy collision with the geometrical model are summarized in three parts: (1) the elastic hadron-hadron collision, (2) the inelastic hadron-hadron collision, and (3) the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation. More recent studies are highlighted below. For elastic scattering, a modified form for the hadronic matter form factor of the proton was proposed which remains to be dipole in form but contains an energy-dependent range parameter. This new expression of the opacity function fits the elastic {bar p}p scattering very well from the ISR to S{bar p}pS energies. Extrapolation of this theory also yielded results in good agreement with the {bar p}p differential cross section measured at the Tevatron. For inelastic hadron-hadron collisions, we have made a systematic investigation of the single-particle momentum spectra in the entire S{bar p}pS energy region. Results are useful for the extrapolation of angular distribution to the higher SSC energies. In e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation, a detailed analysis of all available experimental multiplicity data from PETRA to LEP energies has been performed. We discovered that the cluster size of emitted hadrons increases steadily with energy and is close to 2 as we predicted.

  6. QCD and High Energy Interactions: Moriond 2014 Theory Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Gehrmann

    2014-06-20

    This article summarizes new theoretical developments, ideas and results that were presented at the 2014 Moriond "QCD and High Energy Interactions".

  7. Azimuthal anisotropy distributions in high-energy collisions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Search Title: Azimuthal anisotropy distributions in high-energy collisions Elliptic flow in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions results from the hydrodynamic response to the...

  8. High energy eigenfunctions of one-dimensional Schrödinger ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-11-25

    High energy eigenfunctions of one-dimensional. Schrödinger operators with polynomial. potentials. A. Eremenko?, A. Gabrielov and B. Shapiro. October 5, 2007.

  9. Experiences with the High Energy Resolution Optics (HERO) update...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Experiences with the High Energy Resolution Optics (HERO) update on a physical electronics 690 auger system. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Experiences with the High...

  10. The Effective Action for QCD at High Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lech Szymanowski

    1994-11-16

    I discuss the construction of the effective action for QCD suitable for the description of high-energy and small momentum transfer diffractive processes.

  11. HEPTech funding opportunites HEPTech -High Energy Physics Technology Transfer Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roma "La Sapienza", Università di

    HEPTech funding opportunites 1 HEPTech - High Energy Physics Technology Transfer Network May 2015 Prepared by: Jozef Stefan Institute, CTT - Center for Technology Transfer and Innovation, Slovenia dr

  12. High Energy Materials for PHEVs: Cathodes (New Project) | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Materials for PHEVs: Cathodes (New Project) High Energy Materials for PHEVs: Cathodes (New Project) Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit...

  13. Why Onion-Like Carbons Make High-Energy Supercapacitors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Make High-Energy Supercapacitors Simulations explain experimental results for electrical storage devices June 1, 2012 JiangCummingsCoverLarge.gif Capacitance and geometry...

  14. Gwitchyaa Zhee Gwich'in Tribal Government Counteracts High Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Gwitchyaa Zhee Gwich'in Tribal Government Counteracts High Energy Costs, Climate Challenges with Building Energy Retrofits Gwitchyaa Zhee Gwich'in Tribal Government Counteracts...

  15. Development of High Energy Lithium Batteries for Electric Vehicles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lithium Batteries for Electric Vehicles Development of High Energy Lithium Batteries for Electric Vehicles 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program...

  16. Oklahoma Center for High Energy Physics (OCHEP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Nandi; M.J. Strauss; J. Snow; F. Rizatdinova; B. Abbott; K. Babu; P. Gutierrez; C. Kao; A. Khanov; K.A. Milton; H. Neaman; H. Severini, P. Skubic

    2012-02-29

    The DOE EPSCoR implementation grant, with the support from the State of Oklahoma and from the three universities, Oklahoma State University, University of Oklahoma and Langston University, resulted in establishing of the Oklahoma Center for High Energy Physics (OCHEP) in 2004. Currently, OCHEP continues to flourish as a vibrant hub for research in experimental and theoretical particle physics and an educational center in the State of Oklahoma. All goals of the original proposal were successfully accomplished. These include foun- dation of a new experimental particle physics group at OSU, the establishment of a Tier 2 computing facility for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and Tevatron data analysis at OU and organization of a vital particle physics research center in Oklahoma based on resources of the three universities. OSU has hired two tenure-track faculty members with initial support from the grant funds. Now both positions are supported through OSU budget. This new HEP Experimental Group at OSU has established itself as a full member of the Fermilab D0 Collaboration and LHC ATLAS Experiment and has secured external funds from the DOE and the NSF. These funds currently support 2 graduate students, 1 postdoctoral fellow, and 1 part-time engineer. The grant initiated creation of a Tier 2 computing facility at OU as part of the Southwest Tier 2 facility, and a permanent Research Scientist was hired at OU to maintain and run the facility. Permanent support for this position has now been provided through the OU university budget. OCHEP represents a successful model of cooperation of several universities, providing the establishment of critical mass of manpower, computing and hardware resources. This led to increasing Oklahoma�¢����s impact in all areas of HEP, theory, experiment, and computation. The Center personnel are involved in cutting edge research in experimental, theoretical, and computational aspects of High Energy Physics with the research areas ranging from the search for new phenomena at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider to theoretical modeling, computer simulation, detector development and testing, and physics analysis. OCHEP faculty members participating on the D0 collaboration at the Fermilab Tevatron and on the ATLAS collaboration at the CERN LHC have made major impact on the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson search, top quark studies, B physics studies, and measurements of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) phenomena. The OCHEP Grid computing facility consists of a large computer cluster which is playing a major role in data analysis and Monte Carlo productions for both the D0 and ATLAS experiments. Theoretical efforts are devoted to new ideas in Higgs bosons physics, extra dimensions, neutrino masses and oscillations, Grand Unified Theories, supersymmetric models, dark matter, and nonperturbative quantum field theory. Theory members are making major contributions to the understanding of phenomena being explored at the Tevatron and the LHC. They have proposed new models for Higgs bosons, and have suggested new signals for extra dimensions, and for the search of supersymmetric particles. During the seven year period when OCHEP was partially funded through the DOE EPSCoR implementation grant, OCHEP members published over 500 refereed journal articles and made over 200 invited presentations at major conferences. The Center is also involved in education and outreach activities by offering summer research programs for high school teachers and college students, and organizing summer workshops for high school teachers, sometimes coordinating with the Quarknet programs at OSU and OU. The details of the Center can be found in http://ochep.phy.okstate.edu.

  17. High energy physics advisory panel`s subpanel on vision for the future of high-energy physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This report was requested by the Secretary of Energy to (1) define a long-term program for pursuing the most important high-energy physics goals since the termination of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) project, (2) assess the current US high-energy physics program, and (3) make recommendations regarding the future of the field. Subjects on which recommendations were sought and which the report addresses were: high-energy physics funding priorities; facilitating international collaboration for future construction of large high-energy physics facilities; optimizing uses of the investment made in the SSC; how to encourage displaced scientists and engineers to remain in high-energy physics and to attract young scientists to enter the field in the future. The report includes a description of the state of high-energy physics research in the context of history, a summary of the SSC project, and documentation of the report`s own origins and development.

  18. Phosphate glass useful in high energy lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hayden, Y.T.; Payne, S.A.; Hayden, J.S.; Campbell, J.H.; Aston, M.K.; Elder, M.L.

    1996-06-11

    In a high energy laser system utilizing phosphate laser glass components to amplify the laser beam, the laser system requires a generated laser beam having an emission bandwidth of less than 26 nm and the laser glass components consist essentially of (on an oxide composition basis) in mole percent: P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, 50--75; Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, {gt}0--10; K{sub 2}O, {gt}0--30; MgO, 0--30; CaO, 0--30; Li{sub 2}O, 0--20; Na{sub 2}O, 0--20; Rb{sub 2}O, 0--20; Cs{sub 2}O, 0--20; BeO, 0--20; SrO, 0--20; BaO, 0--20; ZnO, 0--20; PbO, 0--20; B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--10; Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--10; La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--8; Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0.01--8; wherein the sum of MgO and CaO is >0--30; the sum of Li{sub 2}O, Na{sub 2}O, Rb{sub 2}O, and Cs{sub 2}O is 0--20; the sum of BeO, SrO, BaO, ZnO, and PbO is 0--20; the sum of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} is 0--10; and Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3} represents the sum of the oxides of active lasing lanthanides of atomic number 58--71. 21 figs.

  19. Phosphate glass useful in high energy lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hayden, Yuiko T. (Clarks Summit, PA); Payne, Stephen A. (Castro Valley, CA); Hayden, Joseph S. (Clarks Summit, PA); Campbell, John H. (Livermore, CA); Aston, Mary Kay (Moscow, PA); Elder, Melanie L. (Dublin, CA)

    1996-01-01

    In a high energy laser system utilizing phosphate laser glass components to amplify the laser beam, the laser system requires a generated laser beam having an emission bandwidth of less than 26 nm and the laser glass components consist essentially of (on an oxide composition basis) in mole percent: P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, 50--75; Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, {gt}0--10; K{sub 2}O, {gt}0--30; MgO, 0--30; CaO, 0--30; Li{sub 2}O, 0--20; Na{sub 2}O, 0--20; Rb{sub 2}O, 0--20; Cs{sub 2}O, 0--20; BeO, 0--20; SrO, 0--20; BaO, 0--20; ZnO, 0--20; PbO, 0--20; B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--10; Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--10; La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--8; Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0.01--8; wherein the sum of MgO and CaO is >0--30; the sum of Li{sub 2}O, Na{sub 2}O, Rb{sub 2}O, and Cs{sub 2}O is 0--20; the sum of BeO, SrO, BaO, ZnO, and PbO is 0--20; the sum of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} is 0--10; and Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3} represents the sum of the oxides of active lasing lanthanides of atomic number 58--71. 21 figs.

  20. Light Transmission through Sub-Wavelength Apertures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visser, Taco D.

    Light Transmission through Sub-Wavelength Apertures #12;#12;VRIJE UNIVERSITEIT Light Transmission Transmission through a Single Sub-wavelength Slit 59 3.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 3.2 The configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 3.3 Transmission

  1. High energy, low frequency, ultrasonic transducer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Albert E. (Hayward, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A wide bandwidth, ultrasonic transducer to generate nondispersive, extensional, pulsed acoustic pressure waves into concrete reinforced rods and tendons. The wave propagation distance is limited to double the length of the rod. The transducer acoustic impedance is matched to the rod impedance for maximum transfer of acoustic energy. The efficiency of the transducer is approximately 60 percent, depending upon the type of active elements used in the transducer. The transducer input energy is, for example, approximately 1 mJ. Ultrasonic reflections will occur at points along the rod where there are changes of one percent of a wavelength in the rod diameter. A reduction in the rod diameter will reflect a phase reversed echo, as compared with the reflection from an incremental increase in diameter. Echo signal processing of the stored waveform permits a reconstruction of those echoes into an image of the rod. The ultrasonic transducer has use in the acoustic inspection of long (40+foot) architectural reinforcements and structural supporting members, such as in bridges and dams.

  2. Sandia Energy - Wavelength Conversion Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid youOxygenLaboratory FellowsStationarytdheinrWaterWavelength

  3. High energy heavy ions: techniques and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alonso, J.R.

    1985-04-01

    Pioneering work at the Bevalac has given significant insight into the field of relativistic heavy ions, both in the development of techniques for acceleration and delivery of these beams as well as in many novel areas of applications. This paper will outline our experiences at the Bevalac; ion sources, low velocity acceleration, matching to the synchrotron booster, and beam delivery. Applications discussed will include the observation of new effects in central nuclear collisions, production of beams of exotic short-lived (down to 1 ..mu..sec) isotopes through peripheral nuclear collisions, atomic physics with hydrogen-like uranium ions, effects of heavy ''cosmic rays'' on satellite equipment, and an ongoing cancer radiotherapy program with heavy ions. 39 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  4. University of Oklahoma - High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skubic, Patrick L.

    2013-07-31

    The High Energy Physics program at the University of Oklahoma, Pat Skubic, Principal Investigator, is attempting to understand nature at the deepest level using the most advanced experimental and theoretical tools. The four experimental faculty, Brad Abbott, Phil Gutierrez, Pat Skubic, and Mike Strauss, together with post-doctoral associates and graduate students, are finishing their work as part of the D0 collaboration at Fermilab, and increasingly focusing their investigations at the Large Hadron Collidor (LHC) as part of the ATLAS Collaboration. Work at the LHC has become even more exciting with the recent discovery by ATLAS and the other collaboration, CMS, of the long-sought Higgs boson, which plays a key role in generating masses for the elementary constituents of matter. Work of the OUHEP group has been in the three areas of hardware, software, and analysis. Now that the Higgs boson has been discovered, completing the Standard Model of fundamental physics, new efforts will focus on finding hints of physics beyond the standard model, such as supersymmetry. The OUHEP theory group (Kim Milton, PI) also consists of four faculty members, Howie Baer, Chung Kao, Kim Milton, and Yun Wang, and associated students and postdocs. They are involved in understanding fundamental issues in formulating theories of the microworld, and in proposing models that carry us past the Standard Model, which is an incomplete description of nature. They therefore work in close concert with their experimental colleagues. One also can study fundamental physics by looking at the large scale structure of the universe; in particular the ``dark energy'' that seems to be causing the universe to expand at an accelerating rate, effectively makes up about 3/4 of the energy in the universe, and yet is totally unidentified. Dark energy and dark matter, which together account for nearly all of the energy in the universe, are an important probe of fundamental physics at the very shortest distances, or at the very highest energies. The outcomes of the group's combined experimental and theoretical research will be an improved understanding of nature, at the highest energies reachable, from which applications to technological innovation will surely result, as they always have from such studies in the past.

  5. Phosphate glass useful in high energy lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hayden, Y.T.; Guesto-Barnak, D.

    1992-12-22

    Disclosed is a low-or no-silica, low- or no-alkali phosphate glass useful as a laser amplifier in a multiple pass, high energy laser system having a high thermal conductivity, K[sub 90 C] >0.85 W/mK, a low coefficient of thermal expansion, [alpha][sub 20-300 C] <80[times]10[sup [minus]7]/C, low emission cross section, [sigma]<2.5[times]10[sup [minus]20] cm[sup 2], and a high fluorescence lifetime, [tau]>325 [mu]secs at 3 wt. % Nd doping, consisting essentially of (on an oxide composition basis): (Mole %) P[sub 2]O[sub 5], (52-72); Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], (0-<20); B[sub 2]O[sub 3], (>0-25); ZnO, (0-31); Li[sub 2]O, (0-5); K[sub 2]O, (0-5); Na[sub 2]O, (0-5); Cs[sub 2]O, (0-5); Rb[sub 2]O, (0-5); MgO, (>0-<30); CaO, (0-20); BaO, (0-20); SrO, (0-<20); Sb[sub 2]O[sub 3], (0-<1); As[sub 2]O[sub 3], (0-<1); Nb[sub 2]O[sub 5], (0-<1); Ln[sub 2]O[sub 3], (up to 6.5); PbO, (0-<5); and SiO[sub 2], (0-3); wherein Ln[sub 2]O[sub 3] is the sum of lanthanide oxides; [Sigma]R[sub 2]O is <5, R being Li, Na, K, Cs, and Rb; the sum of Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] and MgO is <24 unless [Sigma]R[sub 2]O is 0, then the sum of Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] and MgO is <42; and the ratio of MgO to B[sub 2]O[sub 3] is 0.48-4.20. 7 figs.

  6. DOE/NSF HIGH-ENERGY PHYSICS ADVISORY PANEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    will emerge, or to separate basic science from technology - advances in one are dependent on advancesDOE/NSF HIGH-ENERGY PHYSICS ADVISORY PANEL SUBPANEL ON LONG RANGE PLANNING FOR U.S. HIGH-ENERGY PHYSICS January 2002 Department of Energy National Science Foundation #12;COVER LETTER Through the spring

  7. LIQUID METAL JET TARGETS FOR INTENSE HIGH ENERGY BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    LIQUID METAL JET TARGETS FOR INTENSE HIGH ENERGY BEAMS G. I. Silvestrov, Budker Institute for Nuclear Physics Novosibirsk, August 1998. #12;1 LIQUID METAL JET TARGETS FOR INTENSE HIGH ENERGY BEAMS target of liquid metal. The technical solution is producing the target in the form of flat jet flowing

  8. HIGH-ENERGY PHYSICS LABORATORIES AND AGENCIES Particle Data Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HIGH-ENERGY PHYSICS LABORATORIES AND AGENCIES Particle Data Group Lawrence Berkeley National, write to: List of Addresses of High-Energy Physics Institutes Scientific Information Service CERN Greenwich (Universal) time. Cities with negative numbers lie to the east of Greenwich, England; cities

  9. The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) Mission R. P. fla B. Dennis, G mission is to investigate the physics of particle acceleration and energy release in solar flares, through-ray/gamma-ray spectroscopy 1. INTRODUCTION The primary scientific objective of the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar

  10. Participation in High Energy Physics at the University of Chicago

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinec, Emil J. [University of Chicago

    2013-06-27

    This report covers research at the University of Chicago in theoretical high energy physics and its connections to cosmology, over the period Nov. 1, 2009 to April 30, 2013. This research is divided broadly into two tasks: Task A, which covers a broad array of topics in high energy physics; and task C, primarily concerned with cosmology.

  11. Thermalization of color gauge fields in high energy heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iwazaki, Aiichi [International Politics Economics, Nishogakusha University, Ohi Kashiwa Chiba 277-8585 (Japan)

    2008-03-15

    We discuss the quantum mechanical decay of the color magnetic field generated initially during high-energy heavy-ion collisions. The decay is caused by Nielsen-Olesen unstable modes and is accomplished possibly in a period <1 fm/c. We show that the decay products (i.e., incoherent gluons) may be thermalized in a sufficiently short period (<1 fm/c). The precise determination of the period is made by calculating the two-point function of the color magnetic field in a color glass condensate model.

  12. High Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts - Before GLAST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, Yi-Zhong; Piran, Tsvi

    2011-11-29

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are short and intense emission of soft {gamma}-rays, which have fascinated astronomers and astrophysicists since their unexpected discovery in 1960s. The X-ray/optical/radio afterglow observations confirm the cosmological origin of GRBs, support the fireball model, and imply a long-activity of the central engine. The high-energy {gamma}-ray emission (> 20 MeV) from GRBs is particularly important because they shed some lights on the radiation mechanisms and can help us to constrain the physical processes giving rise to the early afterglows. In this work, we review observational and theoretical studies of the high-energy emission from GRBs. Special attention is given to the expected high-energy emission signatures accompanying the canonical early-time X-ray afterglow that was observed by the Swift X-ray Telescope. We also discuss the detection prospect of the upcoming GLAST satellite and the current ground-based Cerenkov detectors.

  13. Electromagnetic cascade in high energy electron, positron, and photon interactions with intense laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. S. Bulanov; C. B. Schroeder; E. Esarey; W. P. Leemans

    2013-06-05

    The interaction of high energy electrons, positrons, and photons with intense laser pulses is studied in head-on collision geometry. It is shown that electrons and/or positrons undergo a cascade-type process involving multiple emissions of photons. These photons can consequently convert into electron-positron pairs. As a result charged particles quickly lose their energy developing an exponentially decaying energy distribution, which suppresses the emission of high energy photons, thus reducing the number of electron-positron pairs being generated. Therefore, this type of interaction suppresses the development of the electromagnetic avalanche-type discharge, i.e., the exponential growth of the number of electrons, positrons, and photons does not occur in the course of interaction. The suppression will occur when 3D effects can be neglected in the transverse particle orbits, i.e., for sufficiently broad laser pulses with intensities that are not too extreme. The final distributions of electrons, positrons, and photons are calculated for the case of a high energy e-beam interacting with a counter-streaming, short intense laser pulse. The energy loss of the e-beam, which requires a self-consistent quantum description, plays an important role in this process, as well as provides a clear experimental observable for the transition from the classical to quantum regime of interaction.

  14. Application of Plasma Waveguides to High Energy Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milchberg, Howard M

    2013-03-30

    The eventual success of laser-plasma based acceleration schemes for high-energy particle physics will require the focusing and stable guiding of short intense laser pulses in reproducible plasma channels. For this goal to be realized, many scientific issues need to be addressed. These issues include an understanding of the basic physics of, and an exploration of various schemes for, plasma channel formation. In addition, the coupling of intense laser pulses to these channels and the stable propagation of pulses in the channels require study. Finally, new theoretical and computational tools need to be developed to aid in the design and analysis of experiments and future accelerators. Here we propose a 3-year renewal of our combined theoretical and experimental program on the applications of plasma waveguides to high-energy accelerators. During the past grant period we have made a number of significant advances in the science of laser-plasma based acceleration. We pioneered the development of clustered gases as a new highly efficient medium for plasma channel formation. Our contributions here include theoretical and experimental studies of the physics of cluster ionization, heating, explosion, and channel formation. We have demonstrated for the first time the generation of and guiding in a corrugated plasma waveguide. The fine structure demonstrated in these guides is only possible with cluster jet heating by lasers. The corrugated guide is a slow wave structure operable at arbitrarily high laser intensities, allowing direct laser acceleration, a process we have explored in detail with simulations. The development of these guides opens the possibility of direct laser acceleration, a true miniature analogue of the SLAC RF-based accelerator. Our theoretical studies during this period have also contributed to the further development of the simulation codes, Wake and QuickPIC, which can be used for both laser driven and beam driven plasma based acceleration schemes. We will continue our development of advanced simulation tools by modifying the QuickPIC algorithm to allow for the simulation of plasma particle pick-up by the wake fields. We have also performed extensive simulations of plasma slow wave structures for efficient THz generation by guided laser beams or accelerated electron beams. We will pursue experimental studies of direct laser acceleration, and THz generation by two methods, ponderomotive-induced THz polarization, and THz radiation by laser accelerated electron beams. We also plan to study both conventional and corrugated plasma channels using our new 30 TW in our new lab facilities. We will investigate production of very long hydrogen plasma waveguides (5 cm). We will study guiding at increasing power levels through the onset of laser-induced cavitation (bubble regime) to assess the role played by the preformed channel. Experiments in direct acceleration will be performed, using laser plasma wakefields as the electron injector. Finally, we will use 2-colour ionization of gases as a high frequency THz source (<60 THz) in order for femtosecond measurements of low plasma densities in waveguides and beams.

  15. Wavelength-doubling optical parametric oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Armstrong, Darrell J. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, Arlee V. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-07-24

    A wavelength-doubling optical parametric oscillator (OPO) comprising a type II nonlinear optical medium for generating a pair of degenerate waves at twice a pump wavelength and a plurality of mirrors for rotating the polarization of one wave by 90 degrees to produce a wavelength-doubled beam with an increased output energy by coupling both of the degenerate waves out of the OPO cavity through the same output coupler following polarization rotation of one of the degenerate waves.

  16. High-energy sub-cycle optical waveform synthesizer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Shu-Wei, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade, the control of atomic-scale electronic motion by optical fields strong enough to mitigate the atomic Coulomb potential, has broken tremendous new ground with the advent of phase controlled high-energy ...

  17. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    Journal of Computational Physics, Large Scale Computing andRequirements for High Energy Physics [3] A. S. Almgren, J.Journal of Computational Physics, 87:171–200, 1990. [7] G.

  18. On the use of Satellite Television in High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucas Taylor; David O. Williams

    1998-10-24

    This paper assesses the feasibility of exploiting commercial satellite television technologies to broadcast video signals and data from major High Energy Physics facilities to collaborating institutes throughout the world.

  19. Basic Research Needs for High Energy Density Laboratory Physics

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    in ICF target physics is the demonstration of high-energy gain. For a viable fusion energy power plant, the product of the driver efficiency and the target gain 8 should exceed...

  20. Probing high-energy spin fluctuations in iron pnictide superconductors...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Probing high-energy spin fluctuations in iron pnictide superconductors and the metal-insulator transition in rare-earth nickelates by soft X-ray RIXS Wednesday, November 18, 2015 -...

  1. Search for anomalous production of events with a high energy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ThesisDissertation: Search for anomalous production of events with a high energy lepton and photon at the Tevatron Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Search for anomalous...

  2. High-energy asymptotic expansion of the Green function for one-dimensional Fokker-Planck and Schrödinger equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toru Miyazawa

    2011-12-26

    A new formalism is presented for high-energy analysis of the Green function for Fokker-Planck and Schr\\"odinger equations in one dimension. Formulas for the asymptotic expansion in powers of the inverse wave number are derived, and conditions for the validity of the expansion are studied through the analysis of the remainder term. The short-time expansion of the Green function is also discussed.

  3. AGNs and microquasars as high energy gamma-ray sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Josep M. Paredes

    2004-12-02

    The extragalactic analogs of the microquasars, the quasars, are strong gamma-ray emitters at GeV energies. It is expected that microquasars are also gamma-ray sources, because of the analogy with quasars and because theoretical models predict the high-energy emission. There are two microquasars that appear as the possible counterparts for two unidentified high-energy gamma-ray sources.

  4. ANIS: High Energy Neutrino Generator for Neutrino Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Askhat Gazizov; Marek P. Kowalski

    2004-06-19

    We present the high-energy neutrino Monte Carlo event generator ANIS (All Neutrino Interaction Simulation). The program provides a detailed and flexible neutrino event simulation for high-energy neutrino detectors, such as AMANDA, ANTARES or ICECUBE. It generates neutrinos of any flavor according to a specified flux and propagates them through the Earth. In a final step neutrino interactions are simulated within a specified volume. All relevant standard model processes are implemented. We discuss strengths and limitations of the program.

  5. High energy photon production in strong colliding laser beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Kuchiev; Julian Ingham

    2015-07-21

    The collision of two intense, low-frequency laser beams is considered. The $e^-e^+$ pairs created in this field are shown to exhibit recollisions, which take place at high energy accumulated due to the wiggling of fermions. The resulting $e^-e^+$ annihilation produces high energy photons, or heavy particles. The coherent nature of the laser field provides strong enhancement of the probability of these events. Analytical and numerical results are outlined.

  6. ON THE REDSHIFT OF THE VERY HIGH ENERGY BLAZAR 3C 66A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furniss, A.; Williams, D. A. [Santa Cruz Institute of Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)] [Santa Cruz Institute of Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Fumagalli, M. [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)] [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Danforth, C. [CASA, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, 389-UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)] [CASA, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, 389-UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Prochaska, J. X. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2013-03-20

    As a bright gamma-ray source, 3C 66A is of great interest to the high-energy astrophysics community, having a potential for placing cosmological constraints on models for the extragalactic background light (EBL) and the processes which contribute to this photon field. No firm spectroscopic redshift measurement has been possible for this blazar due to a lack of intrinsic emission and absorption features in optical spectra. We present new far-ultraviolet spectra from the Hubble Space Telescope/Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (HST/COS) of the BL Lac object 3C 66A covering the wavelength range 1132-1800 A. The data show a smooth continuum with intergalactic medium absorption features which can be used to place a firm lower limit on the blazar redshift of z {>=} 0.3347. An upper limit is set by statistically treating the non-detection of additional absorbers beyond z = 0.3347, indicating a redshift of less than 0.41 at 99% confidence and ruling out z {>=} 0.444 at 99.9% confidence. We conclude by showing how the redshift limits derived from the COS spectra remove the potential for this gamma-ray emitting blazar to place an upper limit on the flux of the EBL using high energy data from a flare in 2009 October.

  7. The Case for a Kilometer-Scale High Energy Neutrino Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Halzen

    1994-10-26

    Doing astronomy with photons of energies in excess of a GeV has turned out to be extremely challenging. Efforts are underway to develop instruments that may push astronomy to wavelengths smaller than $10^{-14}$~cm by mapping the sky in high energy neutrinos instead. Neutrino astronomy, born with the identification of thermonuclear fusion in the sun and the particle processes controlling the fate of a nearby supernova, will reach outside the galaxy and make measurements relevant to cosmology. The field is immersed in technology in the domains of particle physics to which many of its research goals are intellectually connected. To mind come the search for neutrino mass, cold dark matter (supersymmetric particles?) and the monopoles of the Standard Model. While a variety of collaborations are pioneering complementary methods by building telescopes with effective area in excess of 0.01~km$^2$, we show here that the natural scale of a high energy neutrino telescope is 1~km$^2$. With several thousand optical modules and a price tag unlikely to exceed 100 million dollars, the scope of a kilometer-scale instrument is similar to that of experiments presently being commissioned such as the SNO neutrino observatory in Canada and the Superkamiokande experiment in Japan.

  8. SS 433: Results of a Recent Multi-wavelength Campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandip K. Chakrabarti; B. G. Anandarao; S. Pal; Soumen Mondal; A. Nandi; A. Bhattacharyya; Samir Mandal; Ram Sagar; J. C. Pandey; A. Pati; S. K. Saha

    2005-01-14

    We conducted a multi-wavelength campaign in September-October, 2002, to observe SS 433. We used 45 meter sized 30 dishes of Giant Meter Radio Telescope (GMRT) for radio observation, 1.2 meter Physical Research Laboratory Infra-red telescope at Mt Abu for IR, 1 meter Telescope at the State Observatory, Nainital for Optical photometry, 2.3 meter optical telescope at the Vainu Bappu observatory for spectrum and Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) Target of Opportunity (TOO) observation for X-ray observations. We find sharp variations in intensity in time-scales of a few minutes in X-rays, IR and radio wavelengths. Differential photometry at the IR observation clearly indicated significant intrinsic variations in short time scales of minutes throughout the campaign. Combining results of these wavelengths, we find a signature of delay of about two days between IR and Radio. The X-ray spectrum yielded double Fe line profiles which corresponded to red and blue components of the relativistic jet. We also present the broadband spectrum averaged over the campaign duration.

  9. Semiconductor laser with multiple lasing wavelengths

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fischer, Arthur J.; Choquette, Kent D.; Chow, Weng W.

    2003-07-29

    A new class of multi-terminal vertical-cavity semiconductor laser components has been developed. These multi-terminal laser components can be switched, either electrically or optically, between distinct lasing wavelengths, or can be made to lase simultaneously at multiple wavelengths.

  10. BER Performance in Wavelength Packet Switched WDM systems during Nano-second Wavelength Switching Events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, John

    . This effect may ultimately influence the design of WDM wavelength packet- switched networks employing transmitter, as the overall design of the wavelength packet-switched WDM networks will be heavily dependent-mode suppression ratio (SMSR), the output power, and the speed at which the device can switch from one wavelength

  11. Partonic EoS in High-Energy Nuclear Collisions at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Nu

    2006-01-01

    Partonic EoS in High-Energy Nuclear Collisions at RHIC Nu Xuproperties. In high-energy nuclear collisions, the term ?owthe early stage of high-energy nuclear collision, both the

  12. Search for high-energy neutrinos from dust obscured Blazars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maggi, G; Correa, P; Vries, K D; Gentile, G; Scholten, O; van Eijndhoven, N

    2015-01-01

    The recent discovery of high-energy cosmic neutrinos by the IceCube neutrino observatory opens up a new field in physics, the field of neutrino astronomy. Using the IceCube neutrino detector we plan to search for high-energy neutrinos emitted from Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), since AGN are believed to be one of the most promising sources of the most energetic cosmic rays and hence of high-energy neutrinos. We discuss a specific type of AGN which we plan to investigate in more detail with data obtained by the IceCube observatory. The main properties of the AGN category in which we are interested are given by a high-energy jet which is pointing in our line of sight defining a class of AGN, called Blazars, and in particular the ones that are obscured by surrounding dust. The jet-matter interaction is expected to give an increased high-energy neutrino production. The properties of this specific type of AGN are expected to give very distinct features in the electromagnetic spectrum, which are discussed in detail.

  13. Long pulse production from short pulses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Toeppen, J.S.

    1994-08-02

    A method of producing a long output pulse from a short pump pulse is disclosed, using an elongated amplified fiber having a doped core that provides an amplifying medium for light of one color when driven into an excited state by light of a shorter wavelength and a surrounding cladding. A seed beam of the longer wavelength is injected into the core at one end of the fiber and a pump pulse of the shorter wavelength is injected into the cladding at the other end of the fiber. The counter-propagating seed beam and pump pulse will produce an amplified output pulse having a time duration equal to twice the transit time of the pump pulse through the fiber plus the length of the pump pulse. 3 figs.

  14. The DPHEP Study Group: Data Preservation in High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David M. South

    2013-02-14

    An inter-experimental study group, DPHEP, was formed in 2009 to systematically investigate the technical and organisational aspects of data preservation and long-term analysis in high-energy physics, a subject which had hitherto lacked clarity in the field. The study group includes representation from all major high-energy physics collider-based experiments and laboratories, as well as computing centres and funding agencies. A major report was released in May 2012, greatly expanding on the ideas contained in a preliminary publication three years earlier, and providing a more solid set of recommendations, not only concerning data preservation and its implementation in high-energy physics, but also the future direction and organisational model of the study group. A brief description of the DPHEP Study Group and some of the key messages from the major report are presented.

  15. Modulated Standing Waves in a Short Reaction-Diffusion System Milos Dolnik, Anatol M. Zhabotinsky,* and Irving R. Epstein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Epstein, Irving R.

    Modulated Standing Waves in a Short Reaction-Diffusion System Milos Dolnik, Anatol M. Zhabotinsky. As the system length is varied, modulated standing waves, characterized by short-lived alternating nodes, are found between the domains of the half-wavelength and the one-wavelength standing waves. The space- time

  16. High-Energy Laser Diagnostics (HELD) for the Measurement of Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Energy Laser Diagnostics (HELD) for the Measurement of Diesel Particulate Matter High-Energy Laser Diagnostics (HELD) for the Measurement of Diesel Particulate Matter 2004...

  17. High Energy Physics Advisory Panel October 1-2, 2015 | U.S. DOE...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    High Energy Physics Advisory Panel October 1-2, 2015 High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) HEPAP Home Meetings Previous Meetings 2015 HEPAP Membership ChargesReports Charter...

  18. The Office of High Energy Physics Announces the Launch of Its...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    News & Resources News Archives 2013 The Office of High Energy Physics Announces the Launch of Its New Accelerator R&D Stewardship Webpages High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP...

  19. Graduate Fellows in High Energy Theory | U.S. DOE Office of Science...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Graduate Fellows in High Energy Theory High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Closed Funding...

  20. Optical amplification at the 1. 31 wavelength

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cockroft, N.J.

    1994-02-15

    An optical amplifier operating at the 1.31 [mu]m wavelength for use in such applications as telecommunications, cable television, and computer systems is described. An optical fiber or other waveguide device is doped with both Tm[sup 3+] and Pr[sup 3+] ions. When pumped by a diode laser operating at a wavelength of 785 nm, energy is transferred from the Tm[sup 3+] ions to the Pr[sup 3+] ions, causing the Pr[sup 3+] ions to amplify at a wavelength of 1.31. 1 figure.

  1. Recoil proton distribution in high energy photoproduction processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Bartos; E. A. Kuraev; Yu. P. Peresunko; E. A. Vinokurov

    2006-11-22

    For high energy linearly polarized photon--proton scattering we have calculated the azimuthal and polar angle distributions in inclusive on recoil proton experimental setup. We have taken into account the production of lepton and pseudoscalar meson charged pairs. The typical values of cross sections are of order of hundreds of picobarn. The size of polarization effects are of order of several percents. The results are generalized for the case of electroproduction processes on the proton at rest and for high energy proton production process on resting proton.

  2. High energy cosmic rays, gamma rays and neutrinos from AGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yukio Tomozawa

    2008-02-03

    The author reviews a model for the emission of high energy cosmic rays, gamma-rays and neutrinos from AGN (Active Galactic Nuclei) that he has proposed since 1985. Further discussion of the knee energy phenomenon of the cosmic ray energy spectrum requires the existence of a heavy particle with mass in the knee energy range. A possible method of detecting such a particle in the Pierre Auger Project is suggested. Also presented is a relation between the spectra of neutrinos and gamma-rays emitted from AGN. This relation can be tested by high energy neutrino detectors such as ICECUBE, the Mediterranean Sea Detector and possibly by the Pierre Auger Project.

  3. Compilation of current high-energy physics experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wohl, C.G.; Kelly, R.L.; Armstrong, F.E.

    1981-05-01

    This is the fourth edition of the compilation of current high energy physics experiments. It is a collaborative effort of the Berkeley Particle Data Group, the SLAC library, and nine participating laboratories: Argonne (ANL), Brookhaven (BNL), CERN, DESY, Fermilab (FNAL), the Institute for Nuclear Study, Tokyo (INS), KEK, Serpukhov (SERP), and SLAC. The compilation includes summaries of all high energy physics experiments at the above laboratories that (1) were approved (and not subsequently withdrawn) before about April 1981, and (2) had not completed taking of data by 1 January 1977. Only approved experiments are included.

  4. NUCLEAR FLUID DYNAMICS VERSUS INTRANUCLEAR CASCADE--POSSIBLE EVIDENCE FOR COLLECTIVE FLOW IN CENTRAL HIGH ENERGY NUCLEAR COLLISIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stocker, H.

    2012-01-01

    Flow in Central High Energy Nuclear Collisions H. Stockera,under Contract High energy nuclear collisions offer a uniquesidewards flow·in high-energy nuclear collisions. The

  5. Testing the millisecond pulsar scenario of the Galactic center gamma-ray excess with very high energy gamma-rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiang Yuan; Kunihito Ioka

    2015-02-09

    The recent analyses of the Fermi Large Area Telescope data show an extended GeV $\\gamma$-ray excess on top of the expected diffuse background in the Galactic center region, which can be explained with annihilating dark matter or a population of millisecond pulsars (MSPs). We propose to observe the very high energy $\\gamma$-rays for distinguishing the MSP scenario from the dark matter scenario. The GeV $\\gamma$-ray MSPs should release most energy to the relativistic $e^{\\pm}$ wind, which will diffuse in the Galaxy and radiate TeV $\\gamma$-rays through inverse Compton scattering and bremsstrahlung processes. By calculating the spectrum and spatial distribution, we show that such emission is detectable with the next generation very high energy $\\gamma$-ray observatory, the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), under reasonable model parameters. It is essential to search for the multi-wavelength counterparts to the GeV $\\gamma$-ray excess for solving this mystery in the high energy universe.

  6. Photon and dilepton production in high energy heavy ion collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sakaguchi, Takao

    2015-05-07

    The recent results on direct photons and dileptons in high energy heavy ion collisions, obtained particularly at RHIC and LHC are reviewed. The results are new not only in terms of the probes, but also in terms of the precision. We shall discuss the physics learned from the results.

  7. Type IIn supernovae as sources of high energy neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zirakashvili, V N

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that high-energy astrophysical neutrinos observed in the IceCube experiment can be produced by protons accelerated in extragalactic Type IIn supernova remnants by shocks propagating in the dense circumstellar medium. The nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration model is used for description of particle acceleration.

  8. High energy density lithium-oxygen secondary battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sammells, A.F.

    1989-02-07

    A high energy density lithium-oxygen secondary cell is described comprising a lithium-containing negative electrode; a lithium ion conducting molten salt electrolyte contacting the negative electrode; an oxygen ion conducting solid electrolyte contacting and containing the molten salt electrolyte; and an oxygen redox positive electrode contacting the oxygen ion conducting solid electrolyte.

  9. Sgoldstinos: Primaries of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. S. Gorbunov

    2002-05-30

    I describe supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model with light sgoldstinos and discuss the explanation of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays above GZK cutoff in these models. Also I briefly discuss the possibility to solve other cosmological and astrophysical puzzles, such as gamma-ray bursts and dimming of high-redshift supernovae, within the models with light sgoldstinos.

  10. Use of Oriented Crystals at High-Energy Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotov, V.I.; Afonin, A.G.; Baranov, V.T.; Biryukov, V.M.; Ivanov, Yu.M.; Kardash, A.A.; Maisheev, V.A.; Terekhov, V.I.; Troyanov, E.F.; Fedotov, Yu.S.; Chepegin, V.N.; Chesnokov, Yu.A.

    2005-06-01

    The application of bent crystals for extracting accelerated beams from high-energy accelerators is reviewed. The results of realizing highly efficient extraction of protons from the IHEP accelerator are presented. Proposals on using oriented crystals for designing efficient positron sources at linear colliders and on developing new undulators are discussed.

  11. Multiplicity Distributions in QCD at Very High Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. M. Dremin

    1994-08-18

    Recent results in QCD on multiplicity distributions are briefly reviewed. QCD is able to predict very tiny features of multiplicity distributions which demonstrate that the negative binomial distribution (and, more generally, any infinitely divisible distribution) is inappropriate for precise description of experimental data. New fits of high energy multiplicity distributions can be derived.

  12. HIGHLY COMPRESSED ION BEAMS FOR HIGH ENERGY DENSITY SCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    HIGHLY COMPRESSED ION BEAMS FOR HIGH ENERGY DENSITY SCIENCE A. Friedman1,2 , J.J.Barnard1,2 , R Energy Density regimes required for Inertial Fu- sion Energy and other applications. An interim goal we are pursuing, low to medium mass ions with energies just above the Bragg peak are directed onto

  13. Hindawi Publishing Corporation Advances in High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mcdonough, William F.

    Hindawi Publishing Corporation Advances in High Energy Physics Volume 2012, Article ID 235686, 34 under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution . The initial hot state 4.5 billion years ago was a result of gravitational energy of accretion and global

  14. Wave Function Properties in a High Energy Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arjun Berera

    1994-11-14

    A model example is given of how properties of the hadronic light-cone wave function are revealed in a particular high energy process. The meson wave function is derived in scalar quark QCD. We apply it to compute the form of the cross section for lossless diffractive jet-production, an upcoming possiblity at HERA.

  15. Overview of surface studies on high energy materials at Mound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moddeman, W.E.; Collins, L.W.; Wang, P.S.; Haws, L.D.; Wittberg, T.N.

    1980-01-01

    Since 1975 Mound has been examining the surface structure of high energy materials and the interaction of these materials with various metal containers. The high energy materials that have been studied include: the pyrotechnic TiH/sub x//KClO/sub 4/, the Al/Cu/sub 2/O machinable thermite, the PETN, HMX and RDX explosives, and two plastic bonded explosives (PBX). Aluminum and alloys of Fe, Ni and Cr have been used as the containment materials. Two aims in this research are: (1) the elucidation of the mechanism of pyrotechnic ignition and (2) the compatibility of high energy materials with their surroundings. New information has been generated by coupling Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) with thermal data. In particular, AES and XPS studies on the pyrotechnic materials and on thermites have shown the mechanism of ignition to be nearly independent of the type of oxidizer present but directly related to surface chemistry of the fuels. In studies on the two PBX's, PBX-9407 and LX-16, it was concluded that the Exon coating on 9407 was complete and greater than or equal to 100A; whereas in LX-16, the coating was < 100A or even incomplete. AES and scanning Auger have been used to characterize the surface composition and oxide thickness for an iron-nickel alloy and showed the thicker oxides to have the least propensity for atmospheric hydrocarbon adsorption. Data are presented and illustrations made which highlight this new approach to studying ignition and compatibility of high energy materials. Finally, the salient features of the X-SAM-800 purchased by Mound are discussed in light of future studies on high energy materials.

  16. The slingshot effect: A possible new laser-driven high energy acceleration mechanism for electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiore, Gaetano; Fedele, Renato; Angelis, Umberto de

    2014-11-15

    We show that under appropriate conditions the impact of a very short and intense laser pulse onto a plasma causes the expulsion of surface electrons with high energy in the direction opposite to the one of the propagations of the pulse. This is due to the combined effects of the ponderomotive force and the huge longitudinal field arising from charge separation (“slingshot effect”). The effect should also be present with other states of matter, provided the pulse is sufficiently intense to locally cause complete ionization. An experimental test seems to be feasible and, if confirmed, would provide a new extraction and acceleration mechanism for electrons, alternative to traditional radio-frequency-based or laser-wake-field ones.

  17. The slingshot effect: a possible new laser-driven high energy acceleration mechanism for electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaetano Fiore; Renato Fedele; Umberto de Angelis

    2014-11-14

    We show that under appropriate conditions the impact of a very short and intense laser pulse onto a plasma causes the expulsion of surface electrons with high energy in the direction opposite to the one of propagation of the pulse. This is due to the combined effects of the ponderomotive force and the huge longitudinal field arising from charge separation ("slingshot effect"). The effect should also be present with other states of matter, provided the pulse is sufficiently intense to locally cause complete ionization. An experimental test seems to be feasible and, if confirmed, would provide a new extraction and acceleration mechanism for electrons, alternative to traditional radio-frequency-based or Laser-Wake-Field ones.

  18. Extra-galactic high-energy transients: event rate densities and luminosity functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Hui; Li, Zhuo

    2015-01-01

    Several types of extra-galactic high-energy transients have been discovered, which include high-luminosity and low-luminosity long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), short-duration GRBs, supernova shock breakouts (SBOs), and tidal disruption events (TDEs) without or with an associated relativistic jet. In this paper, we apply a unified method to systematically study the redshift-dependent event rate densities and the global luminosity functions (ignoring redshift evolution) of these transients. We introduce some empirical formulae for the redshift-dependent event rate densities for different types of transients, and derive the local specific event rate density, which also represents its global luminosity function. Long GRBs have a large enough sample to reveal features in the global luminosity function, which is best characterized as a triple power law. All the other transients are consistent with having a single power law luminosity function. The total event rate density depends on the minimum luminosity, and...

  19. A novel zirconium K{alpha} imager for high energy density physics research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akli, K. U.; Jiang, S.; Storm, M. S.; Krygier, A.; Freeman, R. R.; Sanchez del Rio, M.; Stephens, R. B.; Pereira, N. R.; Baronova, E. O.; Theobald, W.; Ping, Y.; McLean, H. S.; Patel, P. K.; Key, M. H.

    2011-12-15

    We report on the development and characterization of a zirconium K{alpha} imager for high energy density physics research. The imager consists of a spherically bent quartz crystal operating at 15.7 keV photon energy. We compare the performance of the imager in terms of integrated reflectivity (R{sub int}) and temperature dependent collection efficiency ({eta}{sub Te}) to that of the widely used Cu K{alpha} imager. Our collisional-radiative simulations show that the new imager can be reliably used up to 250 eV plasma temperature. Monte Carlo simulations show that for a 25 {mu}m thick tracer layer of zirconium, the contribution to K{alpha} production from photo-pumping is only 2%. We present, for the first time, 2D spatially resolved images of zirconium plasmas generated by a high intensity short pulse laser interacting with Zr solid targets.

  20. Correlation and Finite Interaction-Range Effects in High-Energy Electron Inclusive Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akihisa Kohama; Koichi Yazaki; Ryoichi Seki

    2000-01-19

    We calculate cross sections of high energy electron inclusive scattering off nuclear matter in a new and consistent formulation based on the Green's function method with the Glauber approximation, which is an extension of our previous work on the nuclear transparency in (e, e'p) reaction. The comparison with other approaches is discussed. In this framework, we study the finite-range effect of the nucleon-nucleon interaction in the final-state interactions, and the effect of the nuclear short-range correlation. We propose a zero-range approximation, which works well when correlation and finite interaction-range effects are included. It greatly reduces the numerical work, while maintaining a reasonable accuracy.

  1. WEB Portal for Monte Carlo Simulations in High Energy Physics - HEPWEB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. I. Alexandrov; V. M. Kotov; V. V. Uzhinsky; P. V. Zrelov

    2012-08-31

    A WEB-portal HepWeb allows users to perform the most popular calculations in high energy physics - calculations of hadron-hadron, hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus interaction cross sections as well as calculations of secondary particles characteristics in the interactions using Monte Carlo event generators. The List of the generators includes Dubna version of the intra-nuclear cascade model (CASCADE), FRITIOF model, ultra-relativistic quantum molecular dynamic model (UrQMD), HIJING model, and AMPT model. Setting up the colliding particles/nucleus properties (collision energy, mass numbers and charges of nuclei, impact parameters of interactions, and number of generated events) is realized by a WEB interface. A query is processed by a server, and results are presented to the user as a WEB-page. Short descriptions of the installed generators, the WEB interface implementation and the server operation are given.

  2. Inverse scattering at high energies for the multidimensional Newton equation in a long range potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandre Jollivet

    2013-06-16

    We define scattering data for the Newton equation in a potential $V\\in C^2(\\R^n,\\R)$, $n\\ge2$, that decays at infinity like $r^{-\\alpha}$ for some $\\alpha\\in (0,1]$. We provide estimates on the scattering solutions and scattering data and we prove, in particular, that the scattering data at high energies uniquely determine the short range part of the potential up to the knowledge of the long range tail of the potential. The Born approximation at fixed energy of the scattering data is also considered. We then change the definition of the scattering data to study inverse scattering in other asymptotic regimes. These results were obtained by developing the inverse scattering approach of [Novikov, 1999].

  3. Extinction Monitor by Using a Dissociation of Hydrogen Molecule to Atoms with High Energy Proton Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itahashi, I; Arimoto, Y; Kuno, Y; Sato, A; Yoshida, M Y

    2008-01-01

    Extinction Monitor by Using a Dissociation of Hydrogen Molecule to Atoms with High Energy Proton Beam

  4. Influence of Multiple Scattering on High-energy Deuteron Quasi-optical Birefringence Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. G. Baryshevsky; A. R. Shyrvel

    2011-01-12

    Influence of multiple scattering on high-energy deuteron quasi-optical birefringence effect is discussed.

  5. Modelling Neutral Particle Analyzer Measurements of High Energy Fusion Alpha-Particle Distributions in JET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modelling Neutral Particle Analyzer Measurements of High Energy Fusion Alpha-Particle Distributions in JET

  6. Performance test of wavelength-shifting acrylic plastic Cherenkov detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Beckford; A. de la Puente; Y. Fuji; K. Futatsukawa; O. Hashimoto; M. Kaneta; H. Kanda; K. Maeda; A. Matsumura; S. N. Nakamura; J. Reinhold; L. Tang; K. Tsukada

    2013-05-22

    The collection efficiency for Cherenkov light incident on a wavelength shifting plate (WLS) has been determined during a beam test at the Proton Synchrotron facility located in the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics (KEK), Tsukuba, Japan. The experiment was conducted in order to determine the detector's response to photoelectrons converted from photons produced by a fused silica radiator; this allows for an approximation of the detector's quality. The yield of the photoelectrons produced through internally generated Cherenkov light as well as light incident from the radiator was measured as a function of the momentum of the incident hadron beam. The yield is proportional to sin$^2$$\\theta_c$, where $\\theta_{c}$ is the opening angle of the Cherenkov light created. Based on estimations and results from similarly conducted tests, where the collection efficiency was roughly 39%, the experimental result was expected to be around 40% for internally produced light from the WLS. The results of the experiment determined the photon collection response efficiency of the WLS to be roughly 62% for photons created in a fused silica radiator and 41% for light created in the WLS.

  7. Radio Wavelength Observatories within the Exploration Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Lazio; R. J. Macdowall; J. Burns; L. Demaio; D. L. Jones; K. W. Weiler

    2007-01-26

    Observations at radio wavelengths address key problems in astrophysics, astrobiology, and lunar structure including the first light in the Universe (the Epoch of Reionization), the presence of magnetic fields around extrasolar planets, particle acceleration mechanisms, and the structure of the lunar ionosphere. Moreover, achieving the performance needed to address these scientific questions demands observations at wavelengths longer than those that penetrate the Earth's ionosphere, observations in extremely "radio quiet" locations such as the Moon's far side, or both. We describe a series of lunar-based radio wavelength interferometers of increasing capability. The Radio Observatory for Lunar Sortie Science (ROLSS) is an array designed to be deployed during the first lunar sorties (or even before via robotic rovers) and addressing particle acceleration and the lunar ionosphere. Future arrays would be larger, more capable, and deployed as experience is gained in working on the lunar surface.

  8. Device for wavelength-selective imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frangioni, John V. (Wayland, MA)

    2010-09-14

    An imaging device captures both a visible light image and a diagnostic image, the diagnostic image corresponding to emissions from an imaging medium within the object. The visible light image (which may be color or grayscale) and the diagnostic image may be superimposed to display regions of diagnostic significance within a visible light image. A number of imaging media may be used according to an intended application for the imaging device, and an imaging medium may have wavelengths above, below, or within the visible light spectrum. The devices described herein may be advantageously packaged within a single integrated device or other solid state device, and/or employed in an integrated, single-camera medical imaging system, as well as many non-medical imaging systems that would benefit from simultaneous capture of visible-light wavelength images along with images at other wavelengths.

  9. Reinventing the Accelerator for the High Energy Frontier

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Rosenzweig, James [UCLA, Los Angeles, California, United States

    2009-09-01

    The history of discovery in high-energy physics has been intimately connected with progress in methods of accelerating particles for the past 75 years. This remains true today, as the post-LHC era in particle physics will require significant innovation and investment in a superconducting linear collider. The choice of the linear collider as the next-generation discovery machine, and the selection of superconducting technology has rather suddenly thrown promising competing techniques -- such as very large hadron colliders, muon colliders, and high-field, high frequency linear colliders -- into the background. We discuss the state of such conventional options, and the likelihood of their eventual success. We then follow with a much longer view: a survey of a new, burgeoning frontier in high energy accelerators, where intense lasers, charged particle beams, and plasmas are all combined in a cross-disciplinary effort to reinvent the accelerator from its fundamental principles on up.

  10. Experimental And Theoretical High Energy Physics Research At UCLA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cousins, Robert D.

    2013-07-22

    This is the final report of the UCLA High Energy Physics DOE Grant No. DE-FG02- 91ER40662. This report covers the last grant project period, namely the three years beginning January 15, 2010, plus extensions through April 30, 2013. The report describes the broad range of our experimental research spanning direct dark matter detection searches using both liquid xenon (XENON) and liquid argon (DARKSIDE); present (ICARUS) and R&D for future (LBNE) neutrino physics; ultra-high-energy neutrino and cosmic ray detection (ANITA); and the highest-energy accelerator-based physics with the CMS experiment and CERN’s Large Hadron Collider. For our theory group, the report describes frontier activities including particle astrophysics and cosmology; neutrino physics; LHC interaction cross section calculations now feasible due to breakthroughs in theoretical techniques; and advances in the formal theory of supergravity.

  11. Solvated electron lithium electrode for high energy density battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sammells, A.F.

    1987-05-26

    A rechargeable high energy density lithium-based cell is described comprising: a solvated electron lithium negative electrode comprising a solution of lithium dissolved in liquid ammonia; a lithium ion conducting solid electrolyte contacting the negative electrode; a liquid non-aqueous lithium ion conducting electrolyte comprising a lithium ion conducting supporting electrolyte dissolved in a non-aqueous solvent. The liquid electrolyte contacting the lithium ion conducting solid electrolyte; and a solid lithium intercalation positive electrode contacting the liquid electrolyte.

  12. High Energy Neutrino Astronomy - the cosmic-ray connection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas K. Gaisser

    2000-11-28

    Several of the models for origin of the highest energy cosmic rays also predict significant neutrino fluxes. A common factor of the models is that they must provide sufficient power to supply the observed energy in the extragalactic component of the cosmic radiation. The assumption that a comparable amount of energy goes into high-energy neutrinos allows a model-independent estimate of the neutrino signal that may be expected.

  13. High-Energy Scattering vs Static QCD Strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. A. Petrov; R. A. Ryutin

    2014-09-30

    We discuss the shape of the interaction region of the elastically scattered protons stipulated by the high-energy Pomeron exchange which turns out to be very similar with the shape of the static string representing the confining QCD flux tube. This similarity disappears when we enter the LHC energy region, which corresponds to many-Pomeron exchanges. Reversing the argument we conjecture a modified relationship between the width and the length of the confining string at very large lengths.

  14. High Energy Cosmic Rays from Local GRBs Armen Atoyan1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Energy Cosmic Rays from Local GRBs Armen Atoyan1 and Charles D. Dermer2 1 CRM, Universit´e de Montr´eal, Montr´eal, Canada H3C 3J7; atoyan@crm.umontreal.ca 2 NRL, Code 7653, Washington, DC 20375 with energies E between 0.1 - 1 PeV and the energy of the second knee at E2 3 � 1017 eV as originating from

  15. Science with the new generation high energy gamma- ray experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, M; Agnetta, G; Alberdi, A; Antonelli, A; Argan, A; Assis, P; Baltz, E A; Bambi, C; Barbiellini, G; Bartko, H; Basset, M; Bastieri, D; Belli, P; Benford, G; Bergström, L; Bernabei, R; Bertone, G; Biland, A; Biondo, B; Bocchino, F; Branchini, E; Brigida, M; Bringmann, T; Brogueira, P; Bulgarelli, A; Caballero, J A; Caliandro, G A; Camarri, P; Cappella, F; Caraveo, P; Carbone, R; Carvajal, M; Casanova, S; Castro-Tirado, A J; Catalano, O; Catena, R; Celi, F; Celotti, A; Cerulli, R; Chen, A; Clay, R; Cocco, V; Conrad, J; Costa, E; Cuoco, A; Cusumano, G; Dai, C J; Dawson, B; De Lotto, B; De Paris, G; Postigo, A de Ugarte; Del Monte, E; Delgado, C; Di Ciaccio, A; Di Cocco, G; Di Falco, S; Di Persio, G; Dingus, B L; Dominguez, A; Donato, F; Donnarumma, I; Doro, M; Edsjö, J; Navas, J M Espino; Santo, M C Espirito; Evangelista, Y; Evoli, C; Fargion, D; Favuzzi, C; Feroci, M; Fiorini, M; Foggetta, L; Fornengo, N; Froysland, T; Frutti, M; Fuschino, F; Gómez, J L; Gómez, M; Gaggero, D; Galante, N; Gallardo, M I; Galli, M; García, J E; Garczarczyk, M; Gargano, F; Gaug, M; Gianotti, F; Giarrusso, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Giuliani, A; Glicenstein, J; Gonçalves, P; Grasso, D; Guerriero, M; He, H L; Incicchitti, A; Kirk, J; Kuang, H H; La Barbera, A; La Rosa, G; Labanti, C; Lamanna, G; Lapshov, I; Lazzarotto, F; Liberati, S; Liello, F; Lipari, P; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lozano, M; De Sanctis, P G Lucentini; Ma, J M; Maccarone, M C; Maccione, L; Malvezzi, V; Mangano, A; Mariotti, M; Marisaldi, M; Martel, I; Masiero, A; Massaro, E; Mastropietro, M; Mattaini, E; Mauri, F; Mazziotta, M N; Mereghetti, S; Mineo, T; Mizobuchi, S; Moiseev, A; Moles, M; Monte, C; Montecchia, F; Morelli, E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I; Nozzoli, F; Ormes, J F; Peres-Torres, M A; Pacciani, L; Pellizzoni, A; Pérez-Bernal, F; Perotti, F; Picozza, P; Pieri, L; Pietroni, M; Pimenta, M; Pina, A; Pittori, C; Pontoni, C; Porrovecchio, G; Prada, F; Prest, M; Prosperi, D; Protheroe, R; Pucella, G; Quesada, J M; Quintana, J M; Quintero, J R; Rainó, S; Rapisarda, M; Rissi, M; Rodríguez, J; Rossi, E; Rowell, G; Rubini, A; Russo, F; Sanchez-Conde, M; Sacco, B; Scapin, V; Schelke, M; Segreto, A; Sellerholm, A; Sheng, X D; Smith, A; Soffitta, P; Sparvoli, R; Spinelli, P; Stamatescu, V; Stark, L S; Tavani, M; Thornton, G; Titarchuk, L G; Tomé, B; Traci, A; Trifoglio, M; Trois, A; Vallania, P; Vallazza, E; Vercellone, S; Vernetto, S; Vitale, V; Wild, N; Ye, Z P; Zambra, A; Zandanel, F; Zanello, D

    2007-01-01

    This Conference is the fifth of a series of Workshops on High Energy Gamma- ray Experiments, following the Conferences held in Perugia 2003, Bari 2004, Cividale del Friuli 2005, Elba Island 2006. This year the focus was on the use of gamma-ray to study the Dark Matter component of the Universe, the origin and propagation of Cosmic Rays, Extra Large Spatial Dimensions and Tests of Lorentz Invariance.

  16. CERN and high energy physics, the grand picture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    The lecture will touch on several topics, to illustrate the role of CERN in the present and future of high-energy physics: how does CERN work? What is the role of the scientific community, of bodies like Council and SPC, and of international cooperation, in the definition of CERN's scientific programme? What are the plans for the future of the LHC and of the non-LHC physics programme? What is the role of R&D; and technology transfer at CERN?

  17. High Energy Scattering in the AdS/CFT Correspondence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joao Penedones

    2008-02-06

    This work explores the celebrated AdS/CFT correspondence in the regime of high energy scattering in Anti--de Sitter (AdS) spacetime. In particular, we develop the eikonal approximation to high energy scattering in AdS and explore its consequences for the dual Conformal Field Theory (CFT). Using position space Feynman rules, we rederive the eikonal approximation for high energy scattering in flat space. Following this intuitive position space perspective, we then generalize the eikonal approximation for high energy scattering in AdS and other spacetimes. Remarkably, we are able to resum, in terms of a generalized phase shift, ladder and cross ladder Witten diagrams associated to the exchange of an AdS spin j field, to all orders in the coupling constant. By the AdS/CFT correspondence, the eikonal amplitude in AdS is related to the four point function of CFT primary operators in the regime of large 't Hooft coupling, including all terms of the 1/N expansion. We then show that the eikonal amplitude determines the behavior of the CFT four point function for small values of the cross ratios in a Lorentzian regime and that this controls its high spin and dimension conformal partial wave decomposition. These results allow us to determine the anomalous dimension of high spin and dimension double trace primary operators, by relating it to the AdS eikonal phase shift. Finally we find that, at large energies and large impact parameters in AdS, the gravitational interaction dominates all other interactions, as in flat space. Therefore, the anomalous dimension of double trace operators, associated to graviton exchange in AdS, yields a universal prediction for CFT's with AdS gravitational duals.

  18. Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays: present status and future prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Watson

    2001-12-20

    Reasons for the current interest in cosmic rays above 10^19 eV are described. The latest results on the energy spectrum, arrival direction distribution and mass composition of cosmic rays are reviewed, including data that were reported after the meeting in Blois in June 2001. The enigma set by the existence of ultra high-energy cosmic rays remains. Ideas proposed to explain it are discussed and progress with the construction of the Pierre Auger Observatory is outlined.

  19. Frontiers for Discovery in High Energy Density Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, R. C.; Katsouleas, T.; Arons, J.; Baring, M.; Deeney, C.; Di Mauro, L.; Ditmire, T.; Falcone, R.; Hammer, D.; Hill, W.; Jacak, B.; Joshi, C.; Lamb, F.; Lee, R.; Logan, B. G.; Melissinos, A.; Meyerhofer, D.; Mori, W.; Murnane, M.; Remington, B.; Rosner, R.; Schneider, D.; Silvera, I.; Stone, J.; Wilde, B.; Zajc. W.

    2004-07-20

    The report is intended to identify the compelling research opportunities of high intellectual value in high energy density physics. The opportunities for discovery include the broad scope of this highly interdisciplinary field that spans a wide range of physics areas including plasma physics, laser and particle beam physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics, atomic and molecular physics, materials science and condensed matter physics, intense radiation-matter interaction physics, fluid dynamics, and magnetohydrodynamics

  20. Automatic anomaly detection in high energy collider data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon de Visscher; Michel Herquet

    2011-04-13

    We address the problem of automatic anomaly detection in high energy collider data. Our approach is based on the random generation of analytic expressions for kinematical variables, which can then be evolved following a genetic programming procedure to enhance their discriminating power. We apply this approach to three concrete scenarios to demonstrate its possible usefulness, both as a detailed check of reference Monte-Carlo simulations and as a model independent tool for the detection of New Physics signatures.

  1. Tunneling through high energy barriers in simulated quantum annealing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elizabeth Crosson; Mingkai Deng

    2014-10-30

    We analyze the performance of simulated quantum annealing (SQA) on an optimization problem for which simulated classical annealing (SA) is provably inefficient because of a high energy barrier. We present evidence that SQA can pass through this barrier to find the global minimum efficiently. This demonstrates the potential for SQA to inherit some of the advantages of quantum annealing (QA), since this problem has been previously shown to be efficiently solvable by quantum adiabatic optimization.

  2. Neutrino-Nucleon Cross section in Ultra High Energy Regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bora, Kalpana

    2015-01-01

    Neutrino Physics is now entering precision era and neutrino-nucleon cross sections are an im- portant ingredient in all neutrino oscillation experiments. Specially, precise knowledge of neutrino- nucleon cross sections in Ultra High Energy (UHE) regime (TeV-PeV) is becoming more important now, as several experiments worldwide are going to observe processes involving such UHE neutrinos. In this work, we present new results on neutrino-nucleon cross-sections in this UHE regime, using QCD.

  3. High energy KrCl electric discharge laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sze, Robert C. (Santa Fe, NM); Scott, Peter B. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01

    A high energy KrCl laser for producing coherent radiation at 222 nm. Output energies on the order of 100 mJ per pulse are produced utilizing a discharge excitation source to minimize formation of molecular ions, thereby minimizing absorption of laser radiation by the active medium. Additionally, HCl is used as a halogen donor which undergoes a harpooning reaction with metastable Kr.sub.M * to form KrCl.

  4. High energy XeBr electric discharge laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sze, Robert C. (Santa Fe, NM); Scott, Peter B. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01

    A high energy XeBr laser for producing coherent radiation at 282 nm. The XeBr laser utilizes an electric discharge as the excitation source to minimize formation of molecular ions thereby minimizing absorption of laser radiation by the active medium. Additionally, HBr is used as the halogen donor which undergoes harpooning reactions with Xe.sub.M * to form XeBr*.

  5. Double Pair Production by Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray Photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. V. Demidov; O. E. Kalashev

    2008-12-22

    With use of CompHEP package we've made the detailed estimate of the influence of double e+e- pair production by photons (DPP) on the propagation of ultra high energy electromagnetic cascade. We show that in the models in which cosmic ray photons energy reaches few thousand EeV refined DPP analysis may lead to substantial difference in predicted photon spectrum compared to previous rough estimates.

  6. High-Energy QCD Asymptotics of Photon--Photon Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2002-07-26

    The high-energy behavior of the total cross section for highly virtual photons, as predicted by the BFKL equation at next-to-leading order (NLO) in QCD, is discussed. The NLO BFKL predictions, improved by the BLM optimal scale setting, are in good agreement with recent OPAL and L3 data at CERN LEP2. NLO BFKL predictions for future linear colliders are presented.

  7. Search for High Energy Density Cathode Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 -RobSSL INDepartmentHigh Energy Density Cathode Materials

  8. Laboratory for Nuclear Science. High Energy Physics Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milner, Richard

    2014-07-30

    High energy and nuclear physics research at MIT is conducted within the Laboratory for Nuclear Science (LNS). Almost half of the faculty in the MIT Physics Department carry out research in LNS at the theoretical and experimental frontiers of subatomic physics. Since 2004, the U.S. Department of Energy has funded the high energy physics research program through grant DE-FG02-05ER41360 (other grants and cooperative agreements provided decades of support prior to 2004). The Director of LNS serves as PI. The grant supports the research of four groups within LNS as “tasks” within the umbrella grant. Brief descriptions of each group are given here. A more detailed report from each task follows in later sections. Although grant DE-FG02-05ER41360 has ended, DOE continues to fund LNS high energy physics research through five separate grants (a research grant for each of the four groups, as well as a grant for AMS Operations). We are pleased to continue this longstanding partnership.

  9. An Experimental and Theoretical High Energy Physics Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shipsey, Ian

    2012-07-31

    The Purdue High Energy Physics Group conducts research in experimental and theoretical elementary particle physics and experimental high energy astrophysics. Our goals, which we share with high energy physics colleagues around the world, are to understand at the most fundamental level the nature of matter, energy, space and time, and in order to explain the birth, evolution and fate of the Universe. The experiments in which we are currently involved are: CDF, CLEO-c, CMS, LSST, and VERITAS. We have been instrumental in establishing two major in-house facilities: The Purdue Particle Physics Microstructure Detector Facility (P3MD) in 1995 and the CMS Tier-2 center in 2005. The research efforts of the theory group span phenomenological and theoretical aspects of the Standard Model as well as many of its possible extensions. Recent work includes phenomenological consequences of supersymmetric models, string theory and applications of gauge/gravity duality, the cosmological implications of massive gravitons, and the physics of extra dimensions.

  10. Double photo-electron momentum spectra of Helium at infrared wavelength

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zielinski, Alejandro; Scrinzi, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Double photo-electron momentum spectra of the Helium atom are calculated \\textit{ab initio} at extreme ultra-violet and near infrared wavelengths. At short wavelengths two-photon double ionization yields, two-electron energy spectra, and triply differential cross sections agree with results from recent literature. At the near infrared wavelength of $780\\,nm$ the experimental single-to-double ionization ratio is reproduced up to intensities of $4\\times 10^{14}W/cm^2$, and two-electron energy spectra and joint angular distributions are presented. The time-dependent surface flux (tSurff) approach is extended to full 3+3 spatial dimensions and systematic error control is demonstrated. We analyze our differential spectra in terms of an experimentally accessible quantitative measure of correlation.

  11. Study of high-energy particle acceleration in Tycho with gamma-ray observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Nahee

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray emission from supernova remnants (SNRs) can provide a unique window to observe the cosmic-ray acceleration believed to take place in these objects. Tycho is an especially good target for investigating hadronic cosmic-ray acceleration and interactions because it is a young type Ia SNR that is well studied in other wavelengths, and it is located in a relatively clean environment. Several different theoretical models have been advanced to explain the broadband spectral energy emission of Tycho from radio to the gamma-ray emission detected by the Fermi-LAT in the GeV and by VERITAS in the TeV. We will present an update on the high-energy gamma-ray studies of Tycho with $\\sim150$ hours of VERITAS and $\\sim77$ months of the Fermi-LAT observations, which represents about a factor of two increase in exposure over previously published data. VERITAS data also include exposure with an upgraded camera, which made it possible to extend the TeV measurements toward lower energy, thanks to its improved low energy s...

  12. Two-wavelength spatial-heterodyne holography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hanson, Gregory R. (Clinton, TN); Bingham, Philip R. (Knoxville, TN); Simpson, John T. (Knoxville, TN); Karnowski, Thomas P. (Knoxville, TN); Voelkl, Edgar (Austin, TX)

    2007-12-25

    Systems and methods are described for obtaining two-wavelength differential-phase holograms. A method includes determining a difference between a filtered analyzed recorded first spatially heterodyne hologram phase and a filtered analyzed recorded second spatially-heterodyned hologram phase.

  13. High resolution 17 keV to 75 keV backlighters for High Energy Density experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, H; Maddox, B R; Giraldez, E; Hatchett, S P; Hudson, L; Izumi, N; Key, M H; Pape, S L; MacKinnon, A J; MacPhee, A G; Patel, P K; Phillips, T W; Remington, B A; Seely, J F; Tommasini, R; Town, R; Workman, J

    2008-02-25

    We have developed 17 keV to 75 keV 1-dimensional and 2-dimensional high-resolution (< 10 {micro}m) radiography using high-intensity short pulse lasers. High energy K-{alpha} sources are created by fluorescence from hot electrons interacting in the target material after irradiation by lasers with intensity I{sub L} > 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}. We have achieved high resolution point projection 1-dimensional and 2-dimensional radiography using micro-foil and micro-wire targets attached to low-Z substrate materials. The micro-wire size was 10 {micro}m x 10 {micro}m x 300 {micro}m on a 300 {micro}m x 300 {micro}m x 5 {micro}m CH substrate. The radiography performance was demonstrated using the Titan laser at LLNL. We observed that the resolution is dominated by the micro-wire target size and there is very little degradation from the plasma plume, implying that the high energy x-ray photons are generated mostly within the micro-wire volume. We also observe that there are enough K{alpha} photons created with a 300 J, 1-{omega}, 40 ps pulse laser from these small volume targets, and that the signal-to-noise ratio is sufficiently high, for single shot radiography experiments. This unique technique will be used on future high energy density (HED) experiments at the new Omega-EP, ZR and NIF facilities.

  14. Charmonium Transverse Momentum Distribution in High Energy Nuclear Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zebo Tang; Nu Xu; Kai Zhou; Pengfei Zhuang

    2014-09-19

    The Charmonium transverse momentum distribution is more sensitive to the nature of the hot QCD matter created in high energy nuclear collisions, in comparison with the yield. Taking a detailed transport approach for charmonium motion together with a hydrodynamic description for the medium evolution, the cancelation between the two hot nuclear matter effects, the dissociation and the regeneration, controls the charmonium transverse momentum distribution. Especially, the second moment of the distribution can be used to differentiate between the hot mediums produced at SPS, RHIC and LHC energies.

  15. DDbar Correlations probing Thermalization in High-Energy Nuclear Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Schweda; X. Zhu; M. Bleicher; S. L. Huang; H. Stoecker; N. Xu; P. Zhuang

    2006-10-30

    We propose to measure azimuthal correlations of heavy-flavor hadrons to address the status of thermalization at the partonic stage of light quarks and gluons in high-energy nuclear collisions. In particular, we show that hadronic interactions at the late stage cannot significantly disturb the initial back-to-back azimuthal correlations of DDbar pairs. Thus, a decrease or the complete absence of these initial correlations does indicate frequent interactions of heavy-flavor quarks and also light partons in the partonic stage, which are essential for the early thermalization of light partons.

  16. Operational Radiation Protection in High-Energy Physics Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rokni, S.H.; Fasso, A.; Liu, J.C.; /SLAC

    2012-04-03

    An overview of operational radiation protection (RP) policies and practices at high-energy electron and proton accelerators used for physics research is presented. The different radiation fields and hazards typical of these facilities are described, as well as access control and radiation control systems. The implementation of an operational RP programme is illustrated, covering area and personnel classification and monitoring, radiation surveys, radiological environmental protection, management of induced radioactivity, radiological work planning and control, management of radioactive materials and wastes, facility dismantling and decommissioning, instrumentation and training.

  17. Heavy Quark and Quarkonium Transport in High Energy Nuclear Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Kai; Xu, Nu; Zhuang, Pengfei

    2016-01-01

    The strong interaction between heavy quarks and the quark gluon plasma makes the open and hidden charm hadrons be sensitive probes of the deconfinement phase transition in high energy nuclear collisions. Both the cold and hot nuclear matter effects change with the colliding energy and significantly influence the heavy quark and charmonium yield and their transverse momentum distributions. The ratio of averaged quarkonium transverse momentum square and the elliptic flow reveal the nature of the QCD medium created in heavy ion collisions at SPS, RHIC and LHC energies.

  18. High Energy Colliders as Tools to Understand the Early Universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tait, Tim (ANL) [ANL

    2008-08-16

    Cosmological observations have reached a new era of precision, and reveal many interesting and puzzling features of the Universe. I will briefly review two of the most exciting mysteries: the nature of the dark components of the Universe, and the origin of the asymmetry between matter and anti-matter. I will argue that our best hope of unraveling these questions will need to combine information from the heavens with measurements in the lab at high energy particle accelerators. The end of run II of the Tevatron, the up-coming Large Hadron Collider and proposed International Linear Collider all have great potential to help us answer these questions in the near future.

  19. Evolution equation for soft physics at high energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Brogueira; J. Dias de Deus

    2010-05-20

    Based on the non-linear logistic equation we study, in a qualitative and semi-quantitative way, the evolution with energy and saturation of the elastic differential cross-section in $pp(\\bar{p}p)$ collisions at high energy. Geometrical scaling occurs at the black disk limit, and scaling develops first for small values of the scaling variable $|t|\\sigma_{tot.}$. Our prediction for $d \\sigma / \\ d t$ at LHC, with two zeros and a minimum at large $|t|$ differs, as far as we know, from all existing ones.

  20. High Energy Absorption Top Nozzle For A Nuclaer Fuel Assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sparrow, James A. (Irmo, SC); Aleshin, Yuriy (Columbia, SC); Slyeptsov, Aleksey (Columbia, SC)

    2004-05-18

    A high energy absorption top nozzle for a nuclear fuel assembly that employs an elongated upper tubular housing and an elongated lower tubular housing slidable within the upper tubular housing. The upper and lower housings are biased away from each other by a plurality of longitudinally extending springs that are restrained by a longitudinally moveable piston whose upward travel is limited within the upper housing. The energy imparted to the nozzle by a control rod scram is mostly absorbed by the springs and the hydraulic affect of the piston within the nozzle.

  1. Spin rotation of polarized beams in high energy storage ring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. G. Baryshevsky

    2006-03-23

    The equations for spin evolution of a particle in a storage ring are obtained considering contributions from the tensor electric and magnetic polarizabilities of the particle along with the contributions from spin rotation and birefringence effect in polarized matter of an internal target. % Study of the spin rotation and birefringence effects for a particle in a high energy storage ring provides for measurement both the spin-dependent real part of the coherent elastic zero-angle scattering amplitude and tensor electric (magnetic) polarizabilities.

  2. A Study of Soft Interactions at Ultra High Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Gotsman; E. Levin; U. Maor

    2008-05-04

    We present and discuss our recent study of an eikonal two channel model, in which we reproduce the soft total, integrated elastic and diffractive cross sections, and the corresponding forward differential slopes in the ISR-Tevatron energy range. Our study is extended to provide predictions at the LHC and Cosmic Rays ene$ These are utilized to assess the role of unitarity at ultra high energies, as well as predict the implied survival probability of exclusive diffractiv$ central production of a light Higgs. Our approach is critically examined so as to estimate the margins of error of the calculated survival probability for diffractive Higgs production

  3. Meson production in high-energy electron-nucleus scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Göran Fäldt

    2010-06-09

    Experimental studies of meson production through two-photon fusion in inelastic electron-nucleus scattering is now under way. A high-energy photon radiated by the incident electron is fused with a soft photon radiated by the nucleus. The process takes place in the small-angle-Coulomb region of nuclear scattering. We expound the theory for this production process as well as its interference with coherent-radiative-meson production. In particular, we investigate the distortion of the electron wave function due to multiple-Coulomb scattering.

  4. High-Energy, Pulsed-Laser Diagnostics for Real-Time Measurements...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Energy, Pulsed-Laser Diagnostics for Real-Time Measurements of Reciprocating Engine PM Emissions High-Energy, Pulsed-Laser Diagnostics for Real-Time Measurements of...

  5. Plug-In Electric Vehicle R&D on High Energy Materials | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    R&D on High Energy Materials Plug-In Electric Vehicle R&D on High Energy Materials Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on...

  6. High-Energy, Low-Frequency Risk to the North American Bulk Power...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Energy, Low-Frequency Risk to the North American Bulk Power System (June 2010) High-Energy, Low-Frequency Risk to the North American Bulk Power System (June 2010) A...

  7. High-Efficiency Deflection of High-Energy Protons through Axial...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    High-Efficiency Deflection of High-Energy Protons through Axial Channeling in a Bent Crystal Citation Details In-Document Search Title: High-Efficiency Deflection of High-Energy...

  8. Prospects for Future Very High-Energy Gamma-Ray Sky Survey: Impact...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Prospects for Future Very High-Energy Gamma-Ray Sky Survey: Impact of Secondary Gamma Rays Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Prospects for Future Very High-Energy...

  9. Design of Safer High-Energy Density Materials for Lithium-Ion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Safer High-Energy Density Materials for Lithium-Ion Cells Design of Safer High-Energy Density Materials for Lithium-Ion Cells 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and...

  10. THE NUCLEAR SPECTROSCOPIC TELESCOPE ARRAY (NuSTAR) HIGH-ENERGY...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    NUCLEAR SPECTROSCOPIC TELESCOPE ARRAY (NuSTAR) HIGH-ENERGY X-RAY MISSION Citation Details In-Document Search Title: THE NUCLEAR SPECTROSCOPIC TELESCOPE ARRAY (NuSTAR) HIGH-ENERGY...

  11. Novel X-ray imaging diagnostics of high energy nanosecond pulse accelerators.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Graham W.; Gallegos, Roque Rosauro; Hohlfelder, Robert James; Beutler, David Eric; Dudley, John; Seymour, Calvin L. G.; Bell, John D.

    2004-08-01

    Pioneering x-ray imaging has been undertaken on a number of AWE's and Sandia National Laboratories radiation effects x-ray simulators. These simulators typically yield a single very short (<50ns) pulse of high-energy (MeV endpoint energy bremsstrahlung) x-ray radiation with doses in the kilorad (krad(Si)) region. X-ray source targets vary in size from 2 to 25cm diameter, dependent upon the particular simulator. Electronic imaging of the source x-ray emission under dynamic conditions yields valuable information upon how the simulator is performing. The resultant images are of interest to the simulator designer who may configure new x-ray source converter targets and diode designs. The images can provide quantitative information about machine performance during radiation effects testing of components under active conditions. The effects testing program is a valuable interface for validation of high performance computer codes and models for the radiation effects community. A novel high-energy x-ray imaging spectrometer is described whereby the spectral energy (0.1 to 2.5MeV) profile may be discerned from the digitally recorded and viewable images via a pinhole/scintillator/CCD imaging system and knowledge of the filtration parameters. Unique images, analysis and a preliminary evaluation of the capability of the spectrometer are presented. Further, a novel time resolved imaging system is described that captures a sequence of high spatial resolution temporal images, with zero interframe time, in the nanosecond timeframe, of our source x-rays.

  12. Develop high energy high power Li-ion battery cathode materials : a first principles computational study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Bo; Xu, Bo

    2012-01-01

    Designing new electrode materials for energy devices byTo1) - a New Cathode Material for Batteries of High- Energy

  13. What Can We Learn from the Study of Single Diffractive Dissociation at High Energies?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Arkhipov

    1999-09-28

    The fundamental relations in the dynamics of single diffraction dissociation and elastic scattering at high energies are discussed.

  14. Theoretical Research in Cosmology, High-Energy Physics and String Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, Y Jack; Dolan, Louise; Mersini-Houghton, Laura; Frampton, Paul

    2013-07-29

    The research was in the area of Theoretical Physics: Cosmology, High-Energy Physics and String Theory

  15. Do high energy astrophysical neutrinos trace star formation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emig, Kimberly; Windhorst, Rogier

    2015-01-01

    The IceCube Neutrino Observatory has provided the first map of the high energy (~ 0.01 -- 1 PeV) sky in neutrinos. Since neutrinos propagate undeflected, their arrival direction is an important identifier for sources of high energy particle acceleration. Reconstructed arrival directions are consistent with an extragalactic origin, with possibly a galactic component, of the neutrino flux. We present a statistical analysis of positional coincidences of the IceCube neutrinos with known astrophysical objects from several catalogs. For the brightest gamma-ray emitting blazars and for Seyfert galaxies, the number of coincidences is consistent with the random, or "null", distribution. Instead, when considering starburst galaxies with the highest flux in gamma-rays and infrared radiation, up to n = 8 coincidences are found, representing an excess over the ~4 predicted for the null distribution. The probability that this excess is realized in the null case, the p-value, is p = 0.042. This value falls to p = 0.003 for ...

  16. Ultra High Energy Neutrino Signature in Top-Down Scenario

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberto Aloisio

    2006-12-22

    Neutrinos are the best candidates to test the extreme Universe and ideas beyond the Standard Model of particle Physics. Once produced, neutrinos do not suffer any kind of attenuation by intervening radiation fields like the Cosmic Microwave Background and are not affected by magnetic fields. In this sense neutrinos are useful messengers from the far and young Universe. In the present paper we will discuss a particular class of sources of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays introduced to explain the possible excess of events with energy larger than the Graisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin cut-off. These sources, collectively called top-down, share a common feature: UHE particles are produced in the decay or annihilation of superheavy, exotic, particles. As we will review in the present paper, the largest fraction of Ultra High Energy particles produced in the top-down scenario are neutrinos. The study of these radiation offers us a unique opportunity to test the exotic mechanisms of the top-down scenario.

  17. Progress in ultra high energy neutrino experiments using radio techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Jiali [Physics department, Kunming University, Kunming, 650214 (China); Tiedt, Douglas [Physics department, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD, 57701-3995 (United States)

    2013-05-23

    Studying the source of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray (UHECR) can provide important clues on the understanding of UHE particle physics, astrophysics, and other extremely energetic phenomena in the universe. However, charged CR particles are deflected by magnetic fields and can not point back to the source. Furthermore, UHECR charged particles above the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin (GZK) cutoff (about 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} eV) suffer severe energy loss due to the interaction with the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMBR). Consequently almost all the information carried by CR particles about their origin is lost. Neutrinos, which are neutral particles and have extremely weak interactions with other materials can arrive at the earth without deflection and absorption. Therefore UHE neutrinos can be traced back to the place where they are produced. Due to their weak interaction and ultra high energies (thus extremely low flux) the detection of UHE neutrinos requires a large collecting area and massive amounts of material. Cherenkov detection at radio frequency, which has long attenuation lengths and can travel freely in natural dense medium (ice, rock and salt et al), can fulfill the detection requirement. Many UHE neutrino experiments are being performed by radio techniques using natural ice, lunar, and salt as detection mediums. These experiments have obtained much data about radio production, propagation and detection, and the upper limit of UHE neutrino flux.

  18. Sharpening of field emitter tips using high-energy ions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Musket, Ronald G. (Danville, CA)

    1999-11-30

    A process for sharpening arrays of field emitter tips of field emission cathodes, such as found in field-emission, flat-panel video displays. The process uses sputtering by high-energy (more than 30 keV) ions incident along or near the longitudinal axis of the field emitter to sharpen the emitter with a taper from the tip or top of the emitter down to the shank of the emitter. The process is particularly applicable to sharpening tips of emitters having cylindrical or similar (e.g., pyramidal) symmetry. The process will sharpen tips down to radii of less than 12 nm with an included angle of about 20 degrees. Because the ions are incident along or near the longitudinal axis of each emitter, the tips of gated arrays can be sharpened by high-energy ion beams rastered over the arrays using standard ion implantation equipment. While the process is particularly applicable for sharpening of arrays of field emitters in field-emission flat-panel displays, it can be effectively utilized in the fabrication of other vacuum microelectronic devices that rely on field emission of electrons.

  19. GZK Photons as Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graciela B. Gelmini; Oleg E. Kalashev; Dmitry V. Semikoz

    2007-11-01

    We calculate the flux of "GZK-photons", namely the flux of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR) consisting of photons produced by extragalactic nucleons through the resonant photoproduction of pions, the so called GZK effect. We We calculate the flux of "GZK-photons", namely the flux of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR) consisting of photons produced by extragalactic nucleons through the resonant photoproduction of pions, the so called GZK effect. We show that, for primary nucleons, the GZK photon fraction of the total UHECR flux is between $10^{-4}$ and $10^{-2}$ above $10^{19}$ eV and up to the order of 0.1 above $10^{20}$ eV. The GZK photon flux depends on the assumed UHECR spectrum, slope of the nucleon flux at the source, distribution of sources and intervening backgrounds. Detection of this photon flux would open the way for UHECR gamma-ray astronomy. Detection of a larger photon flux would imply the emission of photons at the source or new physics. We compare the photon fractions expected for GZK photons and the minimal predicted by Top-Down models. We find that the photon fraction above $10^{19}$ eV is a crucial test for Top-Down models.

  20. Crystal Ball: On the Future High Energy Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shiltsev, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    High energy particle colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics for more than three decades. At present the near term US, European and international strategies of the particle physics community are centered on full exploitation of the physics potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) through its high-luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC). A number of next generation collider facilities have been proposed and are currently under consideration for the medium- and far-future of the accelerator-based high energy physics. In this paper we offer a uniform approach to evaluation of various accelerators based on the feasibility of their energy reach, performance reach and cost range. We briefly review such post-LHC options as linear e+e- colliders in Japan (ILC) or at CERN (CLIC), muon collider, and circular lepton or hadron colliders in China (CepC/SppC) and Europe (FCC). We conclude with a look into ultimate energy reach accelerators based on plasmas and crystals, and some perspectives for the far future of ...

  1. High energy hadron-hadron collisions. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, T.T.

    1992-12-31

    Results of a study on high energy collisions with the geometrical model are summarized in three parts: (1) the elastic hadron-hadron collision, (2) the inelastic hadron-hadron collision, and (3) e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation. For elastic scattering, a modified form for the hadronic matter form factor of the proton was proposed which is still dipole in form but contains an energy--dependent range parameter. This new expression of the opacity function fits the elastic {bar p}p scattering very well from the ISR to S{bar p}pS energies. Extrapolation of this theory also yielded results {bar p}p in good agreement with the {bar p}p differential cross section measured at the Tevatron. For inelastic hadron-hadron collisions, we have made a systematic investigation of the single-particle momentum spectra in the entire S{bar p}pS energy region. Results are useful for the extrapolation of angular distribution to the higher SSC energies. In e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation, a detailed analysis of all available experimental multiplicity data from PETRA to LEP energies has been performed. The cluster size of emitted hadrons increases gradually with energy. Aside from high-energy collisions, the giant fullerene molecules were studied and precise algebraic eigenvalue expressions of the Hueckel problem for carbon-240 were obtained.

  2. Multiple wavelength X-ray monochromators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinmeyer, P.A.

    1992-11-17

    An improved apparatus and method is provided for separating input x-ray radiation containing first and second x-ray wavelengths into spatially separate first and second output radiation which contain the first and second x-ray wavelengths, respectively. The apparatus includes a crystalline diffractor which includes a first set of parallel crystal planes, where each of the planes is spaced a predetermined first distance from one another. The crystalline diffractor also includes a second set of parallel crystal planes inclined at an angle with respect to the first set of crystal planes where each of the planes of the second set of parallel crystal planes is spaced a predetermined second distance from one another. In one embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a single crystal. In a second embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a stack of two crystals. In a third embodiment, the crystalline diffractor includes a single crystal that is bent for focusing the separate first and second output x-ray radiation wavelengths into separate focal points. 3 figs.

  3. Multiple wavelength X-ray monochromators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinmeyer, Peter A. (Arvada, CO)

    1992-11-17

    An improved apparatus and method is provided for separating input x-ray radiation containing first and second x-ray wavelengths into spatially separate first and second output radiation which contain the first and second x-ray wavelengths, respectively. The apparatus includes a crystalline diffractor which includes a first set of parallel crystal planes, where each of the planes is spaced a predetermined first distance from one another. The crystalline diffractor also includes a second set of parallel crystal planes inclined at an angle with respect to the first set of crystal planes where each of the planes of the second set of parallel crystal planes is spaced a predetermined second distance from one another. In one embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a single crystal. In a second embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a stack of two crystals. In a third embodiment, the crystalline diffractor includes a single crystal that is bent for focussing the separate first and second output x-ray radiation wavelengths into separate focal points.

  4. Magic wavelengths in the alkaline earth ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaur, Jasmeet; Arora, Bindiya; Sahoo, B K

    2015-01-01

    We present magic wavelengths for the $nS$ - $nP_{1/2,3/2}$ and $nS$ - $mD_{3/2,5/2}$ transitions, with the respective ground and first excited $D$ states principal quantum numbers $n$ and $m$, in the Mg$^+$, Ca$^+$, Sr$^+$ and Ba$^+$ alkaline earth ions for linearly polarized lights by plotting dynamic polarizatbilities of the $nS$, $nP_{1/2,3/2}$ and $mD_{3/2,5/2}$ states of the ions. These dynamic polarizabilities are evaluated by employing a relativistic all-order perturbative method and their accuracies are ratified by comparing their static values with the available high precision experimental or other theoretical results. Moreover, some of the magic wavelengths identified by us in Ca$^+$ concurs with the recent measurements reported in [{\\bf Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 223001 (2015)}]. Knowledge of these magic wavelengths are propitious to carry out many proposed high precision measurements trapping the above ions in the electric fields with the corresponding frequencies.

  5. HEPAP White Paper on planning for U.S. high-energy physics [High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2000-10-01

    High-energy physicists seek to understand what the universe is made of, how it works, and where it has come from. They investigate the most basic particles and the forces between them. Experiments and theoretical insights over the past several decades have made it possible to see the deep connection between apparently unrelated phenomena, and to piece together more of the story of how a rich and complex cosmos could evolve from just a few kinds of elementary particles. The 1998 Subpanel of the High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) laid out a strategy for U.S. high-energy physics for the next decade. That strategy balanced exciting near-term opportunities with preparations for the most important discovery possibilities in the longer-term. Difficult choices were made to end several highly productive programs and to reduce others. This year HEPAP was charged to take the plan given in the Subpanel's report, understand it in the context of worldwide progress, and update it. In response to that charge, this White Paper provides an assessment of where we stand, states the next steps to take in the intermediate term, and serves as input for a longer range planning process involving a new HEPAP subpanel and high-energy physics community evaluation in 2001. Since the 1998 Subpanel, there have been important developments and a number of the Subpanel's recommendations have been implemented. Notably, construction of the B-factory at SLAC, the Main Injector at Fermilab, and the upgrade of CESR at Cornell have all been finished on schedule and on budget. We have gained great confidence in the performance of these accelerators and the associated detectors. The B-factory at SLAC is already operating above design luminosity and plans are in place to reach three times the design in the next few years. In addition, there have been major physics developments that lead us to believe that these completed projects are guaranteed to produce frontier physics results and have an enhanced potential for a truly major breakthrough. However, taking advantage of these facilities requires greater funding for operations than the significantly reduced level of the last several years.

  6. Alternative Techniques for High Energy Neutrino Astronomy John G. Learned a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Learned, John

    1 Alternative Techniques for High Energy Neutrino Astronomy John G. Learned a a Department interest in high energy astrophysical neutrinos and particularly neutrinos near the upper end of the cosmic were known to have a high energy threshold (radio and acous­ tic thresholds expected to be above the 10

  7. High energy neutrinos from astrophysical sources: An upper bound Eli Waxman* and John Bahcall +

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahcall, John

    luminous AGN accelerator of high­energy protons. The hypothesized black­hole accelerators are ``neutrinoHigh energy neutrinos from astrophysical sources: An upper bound Eli Waxman* and John BahcallV/cm 2 s sr to the intensity of high­energy neutrinos produced by photo­meson ~or p­p! interactions

  8. High energy neutrinos from astrophysical sources: An upper bound Eli Waxman* and John Bahcall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahcall, John

    neutrinos for, or against, the hypothesized luminous AGN accelerator of high-energy protonsHigh energy neutrinos from astrophysical sources: An upper bound Eli Waxman* and John Bahcall to the intensity of high-energy neutrinos produced by photo-meson or p-p interactions in sources of size not much

  9. IMPACT OF MAGNETIC ENVIRONMENT ON THE GENERATION OF HIGH-ENERGY NEUTRONS AT THE SUN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usoskin, Ilya G.

    IMPACT OF MAGNETIC ENVIRONMENT ON THE GENERATION OF HIGH-ENERGY NEUTRONS AT THE SUN L. G. KOCHAROV emissions to deduce spectra of high-energy ions interacting at the Sun (for a review see Mandzhavidze at the flare site is proved to be the most important parameter limiting anisotropy of high-energy secondary

  10. Determination of ultra high-energy cosmic ray composition using surface detector parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Suijlekom, Walter

    know that sources of low-energy cosmic rays are stars like our sun. For high energy cosmic raysDetermination of ultra high-energy cosmic ray composition using surface detector parameters Marie This bachelor thesis is the result of my Bachelor project at the department of Experimental High Energy Physics

  11. Present and future perspectives for high energy density physics with intense heavy ion and laser beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Germany! accelerator facilities, together with two high energy laser systems: petawatt high energy laserPresent and future perspectives for high energy density physics with intense heavy ion and laser!, Plasmaphysik, Darmstadt, Germany 2 Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Darmstadt

  12. MIT Research using High-Energy Density Plasmas at OMEGA and the NIF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MIT Research using High-Energy Density Plasmas at OMEGA and the NIF Hans Rinderknecht Wednesday He D-D T 2.3 m SiO2 D3He gas 860 m #12;The High Energy Density Physics Division at MIT of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) implosions VII. Proton Radiography #12;High Energy Density Physics

  13. National Research Council Study on Frontiers in High-Energy-Density Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Research Council Study on Frontiers in High-Energy-Density Physics David D. Meyerhofer of Fusion Fusion Power Associates Washington, DC 19­21 November 2003 #12;E12541 High-energy-density physics (HEDP) is a rapidly growing research area · Pressures in excess of 1 Mbar constitute high-energy-density

  14. Theory of short-wavelength lasing from channeled projectiles: Nondegenerate dipole transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurizki, G.; Strauss, M.; Oreg, J.; Rostoker, N.

    1987-01-01

    length, e.g. , by using bent crystals, as damage to crystalsphoton dif- fraction in bent crystals may increase the x-ray

  15. Measurements of short wavelength VLF bursts in the auroral ionosphere: A case for electromagnetic mode conversion?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    electric field measurements from dipole antennas and an onboard burst memory system. The observation the local lower hybrid frequency (flh) up to the electron plasma or cyclotron frequencies heating in the auroral ionosphere. Vago et al. [1992] and Labelle et al. [1986] have measured Trans

  16. 2nd conference on Intense field- Short Wavelength Atomic and Molecular

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.TheoryTuesday, August 10, 20102016 News Below are newsBelle-IIProcesses - ISWAMP2

  17. 2nd conference on Intense field- Short Wavelength Atomic and Molecular

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.TheoryTuesday, August 10, 20102016 News Below are newsBelle-IIProcesses -

  18. Wavelength meter having single mode fiber optics multiplexed inputs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, Richard P. (Livermore, CA); Paris, Robert D. (San Ramon, CA); Feldman, Mark (Pleasanton, CA)

    1993-01-01

    A wavelength meter having a single mode fiber optics input is disclosed. The single mode fiber enables a plurality of laser beams to be multiplexed to form a multiplexed input to the wavelength meter. The wavelength meter can provide a determination of the wavelength of any one or all of the plurality of laser beams by suitable processing. Another aspect of the present invention is that one of the laser beams could be a known reference laser having a predetermined wavelength. Hence, the improved wavelength meter can provide an on-line calibration capability with the reference laser input as one of the plurality of laser beams.

  19. Wavelength meter having single mode fiber optics multiplexed inputs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, R.P.; Paris, R.D.; Feldman, M.

    1993-02-23

    A wavelength meter having a single mode fiber optics input is disclosed. The single mode fiber enables a plurality of laser beams to be multiplexed to form a multiplexed input to the wavelength meter. The wavelength meter can provide a determination of the wavelength of any one or all of the plurality of laser beams by suitable processing. Another aspect of the present invention is that one of the laser beams could be a known reference laser having a predetermined wavelength. Hence, the improved wavelength meter can provide an on-line calibration capability with the reference laser input as one of the plurality of laser beams.

  20. Entropy Production at High Energy and mu_B

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Steinberg

    2007-02-08

    The systematics of bulk entropy production in experimental data on A+A, p+p and e+e- interactions at high energies and large mu_B is discussed. It is proposed that scenarios with very early thermalization, such as Landau's hydrodynamical model, capture several essential features of the experimental results. It is also pointed out that the dynamics of systems which reach the hydrodynamic regime give similar multiplicities and angular distributions as those calculated in weak-coupling approximations (e.g. pQCD) over a wide range of beam energies. Finally, it is shown that the dynamics of baryon stopping are relevant to the physics of total entropy production, explaining why A+A and e+e- multiplicities are different at low beam energies.

  1. Final project report: High energy rotor development, test and evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-09-01

    Under the auspices of the {open_quotes}Government/Industry Wind Technology Applications Project{close_quotes} [{open_quotes}Letter of Interest{close_quotes} (LOI) Number RC-1-11101], Flo Wind Corp. has successfully developed, tested, and delivered a high-energy rotor upgrade candidate for their 19-meter Vertical Axis Wind Turbine. The project included the demonstration of the innovative extended height-to-diameter ratio concept, the development of a continuous span single-piece composite blade, the demonstration of a continuous blade manufacturing technique, the utilization of the Sandia National Laboratories developed SNLA 2150 natural laminar flow airfoil and the reuse of existing wind turbine and wind power plant infrastructure.

  2. A Phenomenological Cost Model for High Energy Particle Accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimir Shiltsev

    2014-04-15

    Accelerator-based high-energy physics have been in the forefront of scientific discoveries for more than half a century. The accelerator technology of the colliders has progressed immensely, while the beam energy, luminosity, facility size, and cost have grown by several orders of magnitude. The method of colliding beams has not fully exhausted its potential but has slowed down considerably in its progress. In this paper we derive a simple scaling model for the cost of large accelerators and colliding beam facilities based on costs of 17 big facilities which have been either built or carefully estimated. Although this approach cannot replace an actual cost estimate based on an engineering design, this parameterization is to indicate a somewhat realistic cost range for consideration of what future frontier accelerator facilities might be fiscally realizable.

  3. Composition of Primary Cosmic-Ray Nuclei at High Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Ave; P. J. Boyle; F. Gahbauer; C. Hoppner; J. R. Horandel; M. Ichimura; D. Muller; A. Romero-Wolf

    2008-01-03

    The TRACER instrument (``Transition Radiation Array for Cosmic Energetic Radiation'') has been developed for direct measurements of the heavier primary cosmic-ray nuclei at high energies. The instrument had a successful long-duration balloon flight in Antarctica in 2003. The detector system and measurement process are described, details of the data analysis are discussed, and the individual energy spectra of the elements O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ar, Ca, and Fe (nuclear charge Z=8 to 26) are presented. The large geometric factor of TRACER and the use of a transition radiation detector make it possible to determine the spectra up to energies in excess of 10$^{14}$ eV per particle. A power-law fit to the individual energy spectra above 20 GeV per amu exhibits nearly the same spectral index ($\\sim$ 2.65 $\\pm$ 0.05) for all elements, without noticeable dependence on the elemental charge Z.

  4. High-energy accelerator for beams of heavy ions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Ronald L. (La Grange, IL); Arnold, Richard C. (Chicago, IL)

    1978-01-01

    An apparatus for accelerating heavy ions to high energies and directing the accelerated ions at a target comprises a source of singly ionized heavy ions of an element or compound of greater than 100 atomic mass units, means for accelerating the heavy ions, a storage ring for accumulating the accelerated heavy ions and switching means for switching the heavy ions from the storage ring to strike a target substantially simultaneously from a plurality of directions. In a particular embodiment the heavy ion that is accelerated is singly ionized hydrogen iodide. After acceleration, if the beam is of molecular ions, the ions are dissociated to leave an accelerated singly ionized atomic ion in a beam. Extraction of the beam may be accomplished by stripping all the electrons from the atomic ion to switch the beam from the storage ring by bending it in magnetic field of the storage ring.

  5. DIAGNOSTICS FOR ION BEAM DRIVEN HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Lidia, S.; Ni, P.A.

    2010-01-04

    Intense beams of heavy ions are capable of heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density. Experiments are performed on the resulting warm dense matter (WDM) at the NDCX-I ion beam accelerator. The 0.3 MeV, 30-mA K{sup +} beam from NDCX-I heats foil targets by combined longitudinal and transverse neutralized drift compression of the ion beam. Both the compressed and uncompressed parts of the NDCX-I beam heat targets. The exotic state of matter (WDM) in these experiments requires specialized diagnostic techniques. We have developed a target chamber and fielded target diagnostics including a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, laser Doppler-shift interferometer (VISAR), beam transmission diagnostics, and high-speed gated cameras. We also present plans and opportunities for diagnostic development and a new target chamber for NDCX-II.

  6. CENTER FOR PULSED POWER DRIVEN HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PLASMA STUDIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Professor Bruce R. Kusse; Professor David A. Hammer

    2007-04-18

    This annual report summarizes the activities of the Cornell Center for Pulsed-Power-Driven High-Energy-Density Plasma Studies, for the 12-month period October 1, 2005-September 30, 2006. This period corresponds to the first year of the two-year extension (awarded in October, 2005) to the original 3-year NNSA/DOE Cooperative Agreement with Cornell, DE-FC03-02NA00057. As such, the period covered in this report also corresponds to the fourth year of the (now) 5-year term of the Cooperative Agreement. The participants, in addition to Cornell University, include Imperial College, London (IC), the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), the University of Rochester (UR), the Weizmann Institute of Science (WSI), and the P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI), Moscow. A listing of all faculty, technical staff and students, both graduate and undergraduate, who participated in Center research activities during the year in question is given in Appendix A.

  7. Ultra high energy cosmic rays: the highest energy frontier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neto, João R T de Mello

    2015-01-01

    Ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) are the highest energy messengers of the present universe, with energies up to $10^{20}$ eV. Studies of astrophysical particles (nuclei, electrons, neutrinos and photons) at their highest observed energies have implications for fundamental physics as well as astrophysics. The primary particles interact in the atmosphere and generate extensive air showers. Analysis of those showers enables one not only to estimate the energy, direction and most probable mass of the primary cosmic particles, but also to obtain information about the properties of their hadronic interactions at an energy more than one order of magnitude above that accessible with the current highest energy human-made accelerator. In this contribution we will review the state-of-the-art in UHECRs detection. We will present the leading experiments Pierre Auger Observatory and Telescope Array and discuss the cosmic ray energy spectrum, searches for directional anisotropy, studies of mass composition, the determ...

  8. High Energy Physics at the University of Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liss, Tony M.; Thaler, Jon J.

    2013-07-26

    This is the final report for DOE award DE-FG02-91ER40677 (“High Energy Physics at the University of Illinois”), covering the award period November 1, 2009 through April 30, 2013. During this period, our research involved particle physics at Fermilab and CERN, particle physics related cosmology at Fermilab and SLAC, and theoretical particle physics. Here is a list of the activities described in the final report: * The CDF Collaboration at the Fermilab Tevatron * Search For Lepton Flavor Violation in the Mu2e Experiment At Fermilab * The ATLAS Collaboration at the CERN Large Hadron Collider * the Study of Dark Matter and Dark Energy: DES and LSST * Lattice QCD * String Theory and Field Theory * Collider Phenomenology

  9. Secondary Photons from High-energy Protons Accelerated in Hypernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Asano; P. Mészáros

    2008-03-15

    Recent observations show that hypernovae may deposit some fraction of their kinetic energy in mildly relativistic ejecta. In the dissipation process of such ejecta in a stellar wind, cosmic ray protons can be accelerated up to $\\sim 10^{19}$ eV. We discuss the TeV to MeV gamma-ray and the X-ray photon signatures of cosmic rays accelerated in hypernovae. Secondary X-ray photons, emitted by electron-positron pairs produced via cascade processes due to high-energy protons, are the most promising targets for X-ray telescopes. Synchrotron photons emitted by protons can appear in the GeV band, requiring nearby ($photons emitted by electron-positron pairs generated by CMB attenuation of $\\pi^0$ decay photons.

  10. Cosmic ray transport and anisotropies to high energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biermann, P L; Meli, A; Nath, B N; Seo, E -S; de Souza, V; Tjus, J Becker

    2015-01-01

    A model is introduced, in which the irregularity spectrum of the Galactic magnetic field beyond the dissipation length scale is first a Kolmogorov spectrum $k^{-5/3}$ at small scales $\\lambda \\, = \\, 2 \\pi/k$ with $k$ the wave-number, then a saturation spectrum $k^{-1}$, and finally a shock-dominated spectrum $k^{-2}$ mostly in the halo/wind outside the Cosmic Ray disk. In an isotropic approximation such a model is consistent with the Interstellar Medium (ISM) data. With this model we discuss the Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) spectrum, as well as the extragalactic Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECRs), their chemical abundances and anisotropies. UHECRs may include a proton component from many radio galaxies integrated over vast distances, visible already below 3 EeV.

  11. Proceedings of the 8th high energy heavy ion study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, J.W.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1988-01-01

    This was the eighth in a series of conferences jointly sponsored by the Nuclear Science Division of LBL and the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung in West Germany. Sixty papers on current research at both relativistic and intermediate energies are included in this report. Topics covered consisted of: Equation of State of Nuclear Matter, Pion and High Energy Gamma Emission, Theory of Multifragmentation, Intermediate Energies, Fragmentation, Atomic Physics, Nuclear Structure, Electromagnetic Processes, and New Facilities planned for SIS-ESR. The latest design parameters of the Bevalac Upgrade Proposal were reviewed for the user community. Also, the design of a new electronic 4..pi.. detector, a time projection chamber which would be placed at the HISS facility, was presented.

  12. PAMELA's Measurements of Magnetospheric Effects on High Energy Solar Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adriani, O; Bazilevskaya, G A; Bellotti, R; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bongi, M; Bonvicini, V; Bottai, S; Bravar, U; Bruno, A; Cafagna, F; Campana, D; Carbone, R; Carlson, P; Casolino, M; Castellini, G; Christian, E C; De Donato, C; de Nolfo, G A; De Santis, C; De Simone, N; Di Felice, V; Formato, V; Galper, A M; Karelin, A V; Koldashov, S V; Koldobskiy, S; Krutkov, S Y; Kvashnin, A N; Lee, M; Leonov, A; Malakhov, V; Marcelli, L; Martucci, M; Mayorov, A G; Menn, W; Mergé, M; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Monaco, A; Mori, N; Munini, R; Osteria, G; Palma, F; Panico, B; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Ricci, M; Ricciarini, S B; Ryan, J M; Sarkar, R; Scotti, V; Simon, M; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Stochaj, S; Stozhkov, Y I; Thakur, N; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G I; Voronov, S A; Yurkin, Y T; Zampa, G; Zampa, N

    2015-01-01

    The nature of particle acceleration at the Sun, whether through flare reconnection processes or through shocks driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), is still under scrutiny despite decades of research. The measured properties of solar energetic particles (SEPs) have long been modeled in different particle-acceleration scenarios. The challenge has been to disentangle to the effects of transport from those of acceleration. The Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA) instrument, enables unique observations of SEPs including composition and the angular distribution of the particles about the magnetic field, i.e. pitch angle distribution, over a broad energy range (>80 MeV) -- bridging a critical gap between space-based measurements and ground-based. We present high-energy SEP data from PAMELA acquired during the 2012 May 17 SEP event. These data exhibit differential anisotropies and thus transport features over the instrument rigidity range. SEP protons exhibit two dist...

  13. High energy hadron-hadron collisions. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, T.T.

    1995-08-01

    This project of studying high energy collision phenomena with the geometrical model has been undertaken and developed by this investigator and collaborators since 1967. Instead of basing conjectures on mathematical extrapolations from some ad hoc theories, this approach was to scrutinize first the general features of the phenomena before going into specific details. This particular method has proved successful in correlating experimental data, suggesting experiments, predicting new phenomena and guiding future experimental studies. In the following, important results of the geometrical model obtained with the support of the DOE grant are summarized in three parts: the elastic hadron-hadron scattering, the inelastic hadron-hadron collision, and the hadronic production in e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation. The fourth part of this report outlines the results of other topics of investigation. To avoid repetition, only the main physical ideas and essential experimental evidences are presented, leaving out detailed discussions which can be found in the literature and previous reports.

  14. Automatic Metadata Extraction - The High Energy Physics Use Case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd, Joseph; Rajman, Martin

    Automatic metadata extraction (AME) of scientific papers has been described as one of the hardest problems in document engineering. Heterogeneous content, varying style, and unpredictable placement of article components render the problem inherently indeterministic. Conditional random fields (CRF), a machine learning technique, can be used to classify document metadata amidst this uncertainty, annotating document contents with semantic labels. High energy physics (HEP) papers, such as those written at CERN, have unique content and structural characteristics, with scientific collaborations of thousands of authors altering article layouts dramatically. The distinctive qualities of these papers necessitate the creation of specialised datasets and model features. In this work we build an unprecedented training set of HEP papers and propose and evaluate a set of innovative features for CRF models. We build upon state-of-the-art AME software, GROBID, a tool coordinating a hierarchy of CRF models in a full document ...

  15. Methods for point source analysis in high energy neutrino telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jim Braun; Jon Dumm; Francesco De Palma; Chad Finley; Albrecht Karle; Teresa Montaruli

    2008-01-10

    Neutrino telescopes are moving steadily toward the goal of detecting astrophysical neutrinos from the most powerful galactic and extragalactic sources. Here we describe analysis methods to search for high energy point-like neutrino sources using detectors deep in the ice or sea. We simulate an ideal cubic kilometer detector based on real world performance of existing detectors such as AMANDA, IceCube, and ANTARES. An unbinned likelihood ratio method is applied, making use of the point spread function and energy distribution of simulated neutrino signal events to separate them from the background of atmospheric neutrinos produced by cosmic ray showers. The unbinned point source analyses are shown to perform better than binned searches and, depending on the source spectral index, the use of energy information is shown to improve discovery potential by almost a factor of two.

  16. Compton Scattered Transition Radiation from Very High Energy Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. L. Cherry; G. L. Case

    2002-06-04

    X-ray transition radiation can be used to measure the Lorentz factor of relativistic particles. At energies approaching gamma = E/mc^2 = 10^5, transition radiation detectors (TRDs) can be optimized by using thick (sim 5 - 10 mil) foils with large (5-10 mm) spacings. This implies X-ray energies >100 keV and the use of scintillators as the X-ray detectors. Compton scattering of the X-rays out of the particle beam then becomes an important effect. We discuss the design of very high energy detectors, the use of metal radiator foils rather than the standard plastic foils, inorganic scintillators for detecting Compton scattered transition radiation, and the application to the ACCESS cosmic ray experiment.

  17. On the Origin of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, T; Colgate, S; Li, H

    2009-07-01

    Turbulence-driven plasma accelerators produced by magnetized accretion disks around black holes are proposed as the mechanism mainly responsible for observed cosmic ray protons with ultra high energies 10{sup 19}-10{sup 21} eV. The magnetized disk produces a voltage comparable to these cosmic ray energies. Here we present a Poynting model in which this voltage provides all of the energy to create the jet-like structures observed to be ejected from accretion disks, and this voltage also accelerates ions to high energies at the top of the expanding structure. Since the inductive electric field E = -v x B driving expansion has no component parallel to the magnetic field B, ion acceleration requires plasma wave generation - either a coherent wave accelerator as recently proposed, or instability-driven turbulence. We find that turbulence can tap the full inductive voltage as a quasi-steady accelerator, and even higher energies are produced by transient events on this structure. We find that both MHD modes due to the current and ion diffusion due to kinetic instability caused by the non-Maxwellian ion distribution contribute to acceleration. We apply our results to extragalactic giant radiolobes, whose synchrotron emissions serve to calibrate the model, and we discuss extrapolating to other astrophysical structures. Approximate calculations of the cosmic ray intensity and energy spectrum are in rough agreement with data and serve to motivate more extensive MHD and kinetic simulations of turbulence that could provide more accurate cosmic ray and synchrotron spectra to be compared with observations. A distinctive difference from previous models is that the cosmic ray and synchrotron emissions arise from different parts of the magnetic structure, thus providing a signature for the model.

  18. Two wavelength division multiplexing WAN trials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lennon, W.J.; Thombley, R.L.

    1995-01-20

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, as a super-user, supercomputer, and super-application site, is anticipating the future bandwidth and protocol requirements necessary to connect to other such sites as well as to connect to remote-sited control centers and experiments. In this paper the authors discuss their vision of the future of Wide Area Networking, describe the plans for a wavelength division multiplexed link connecting Livermore with the University of California at Berkeley and describe plans for a transparent, {approx} 10 Gb/s ring around San Francisco Bay.

  19. Multilevel interference lithography--fabricating sub-wavelength periodic nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Chih-Hao, 1980-

    2008-01-01

    Periodic nanostructures have many exciting applications, including high-energy spectroscopy, patterned magnetic media, photonic crystals, and templates for self-assembly. Interference lithography (IL) is an attractive ...

  20. Constraints on the flux of Ultra-High Energy neutrinos from WSRT observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scholten, O.; Bacelar, J.; Braun, R.; de Bruyn, A.G.; Falcke, H.; Singh, K.; Stappers, B.; Strom, R.G.; al Yahyaoui, R.

    2010-04-02

    Context. Ultra-high energy (UHE) neutrinos and cosmic rays initiate particle cascades underneath theMoon?s surface. These cascades have a negative charge excess and radiate Cherenkov radio emission in a process known as the Askaryan effect. The optimal frequencywindow for observation of these pulses with radio telescopes on the Earth is around 150 MHz. Aims. By observing the Moon with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope array we are able to set a new limit on the UHEneutrino flux. Methods. The PuMa II backend is used to monitor the Moon in 4 frequency bands between 113 and 175 MHz with a samplingfrequency of 40 MHz. The narrowband radio interference is digitally filtered out and the dispersive effect of the Earth?s ionosphere is compensated for. A trigger system is implemented to search for short pulses. By inserting simulated pulses in the raw data, thedetection efficiency for pulses of various strength is calculated. Results. With 47.6 hours of observation time, we are able to set a limit onthe UHE neutrino flux. This new limit is an order of magnitude lower than existing limits. In the near future, the digital radio array LOFAR will be used to achieve an even lower limit.

  1. Design of the Second-Generation ARIANNA Ultra-High-Energy Neutrino Detector Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,

    2015-01-01

    We report on the development of the seven station ARIANNA Hexagonal Radio Array neutrino detector systems in Antarctica. The primary goal of the ARIANNA project is to observe ultra-high energy (>100 PeV) cosmogenic neutrino signatures using a large array of autonomous stations each dispersed 1 km apart on the surface of the Ross Ice Shelf. Sensing radio emissions of 100 MHz to 1 GHz, each station in the array contains RF antennas, amplifiers, a 2 G-sample/s signal acquisition and trigger circuit I.C. (the "SST"), an embedded CPU, 32 GB of solid-state data storage, a 20 Ah LiFePO4 battery with associated battery management unit, Iridium short-burst messaging satellite and long-distance WiFi communications. The new SST chip is completely synchronous, contains 4 channels of 256 samples per channel, obtains 6 orders of magnitude sample rate range up to 2 GHz acquisition speeds. It achieves 1.5 GHz bandwidth, 12 bits RMS of dynamic range, ~1 mV RMS trigger sensitivity at >600 MHz trigger bandwidth and ps-level tim...

  2. Three Dimensional Imaging of the Nucleon and Semi-Inclusive High Energy Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kai-bao Chen; Shu-yi Wei; Zuo-tang Liang

    2015-06-24

    We present a short overview on the studies of transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions of the nucleon. The aim of such studies is to provide a three dimensional imagining of the nucleon and a comprehensive description of semi-inclusive high energy reactions. By comparing with the theoretical framework that we have for the inclusive deep inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering and the one-dimensional imaging of the nucleon, we summarize what we need to do in order to construct such a comprehensive theoretical framework for semi-inclusive processes in terms of three dimensional gauge invariant parton distributions. After that, we present an overview of what we have already achieved with emphasize on the theoretical framework for semi-inclusive reactions in leading order perturbative QCD but with leading and higher twist contributions. We summarize in particular the results for the differential cross section and the azimuthal spin asymmetries in terms of the gauge invariant transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions. We also briefly summarize the available experimental results on semi-inclusive reactions and parameterizations of transverse momentum dependent parton distributions extracted from them and make an outlook for the future studies.

  3. Strong gravitational lensing as a tool to investigate the structure of jets at high energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnacka, Anna; Geller, Margaret J.; Benbow, Wystan; Dell'antonio, Ian P.

    2014-06-20

    The components of blazar jets that emit radiation span a factor of 10{sup 10} in scale. The spatial structure of these emitting regions depends on the observed energy. Photons emitted at different sites cross the lens plane at different distances from the mass-weighted center of the lens. Thus there are differences in magnification ratios and time delays between the images of lensed blazars observed at different energies. When the lens structure and redshift are known from optical observations, these constraints can elucidate the structure of the source at high energies. At these energies, current technology is inadequate to resolve these sources, and the observed light curve is thus the sum of the images. Durations of ?-ray flares are short compared with typical time delays; thus both the magnification ratio and the time delay can be measured for the delayed counterparts. These measurements are a basis for localizing the emitting region along the jet. To demonstrate the power of strong gravitational lensing, we build a toy model based on the best studied and the nearest relativistic jet M87.

  4. Research in High Energy Physics at Duke University

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotwal, Ashutosh V.; Goshaw, Al; Kruse, Mark; Oh, Seog; Scholberg, Kate; Walter, Chris

    2013-07-29

    This is the Closeout Report for the research grant in experimental elementary particle physics, carried out by the Duke University High Energy Physics (HEP) group. We re- port on physics results and detector development carried out under this grant, focussing on the recent three-year grant period (2010 to 2013). The Duke HEP group consisted of seven faculty members, two senior scientists, #12;ve postdocs and eight graduate students. There were three thrusts of the research program. Measurements at the energy frontier at CDF and ATLAS were used to test aspects of elementary particle theory described by the Stan- dard Model (SM) and to search for new forces and particles beyond those contained within the SM. The neutrino sector was explored using data obtained from a large neutrino detector located in Japan, and R & D was conducted on new experiments to be built in the US. The measurements provided information about neutrino masses and the manner in which neutri- nos change species in particle beams. Two years ago we have started a new research program in rare processes based on the Mu2E experiment at Fermilab. This research is motivated by the search for the #22; ! e transition with unprecedented sensitivity, a transition forbidden in the standard model but allowed in supersymmetric and other models of new physics. The high energy research program used proton and antiproton colliding beams. The experiments were done at the Fermilab Tevatron (proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV) and at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (proton-proton collisions at 7-8 TeV). The neutrino program used data obtained from the Super-Kamiokande detec- tor. This water-#12;lled Cherenkov counter was used to detect and measure the properties of neutrinos produced in cosmic ray showers, and from neutrino beams produced from acceler- ators in Japan. The Mu2E experiment will use a special stopped muon beam to be built at Fermilab.

  5. Research in High Energy Physics at Duke University

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goshaw, Alfred; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kruse, Mark; Oh, Seog; Scholberg, Kate; Walter, Chris

    2013-07-29

    This is the Closeout Report for the research grant in experimental elementary particle physics, carried out by the Duke University High Energy Physics (HEP) group. We re- port on physics results and detector development carried out under this grant, focussing on the recent three-year grant period (2010 to 2013). The Duke HEP group consisted of seven faculty members, two senior scientists, five postdocs and eight graduate students. There were three thrusts of the research program. Measurements at the energy frontier at CDF and ATLAS were used to test aspects of elementary particle theory described by the Stan- dard Model (SM) and to search for new forces and particles beyond those contained within the SM. The neutrino sector was explored using data obtained from a large neutrino detector located in Japan, and R & D was conducted on new experiments to be built in the US. The measurements provided information about neutrino masses and the manner in which neutri- nos change species in particle beams. Two years ago we have started a new research program in rare processes based on the Mu2E experiment at Fermilab. This research is motivated by the search for the #22;{mu} {yields} e transition with unprecedented sensitivity, a transition forbidden in the standard model but allowed in supersymmetric and other models of new physics. The high energy research program used proton and antiproton colliding beams. The experiments were done at the Fermilab Tevatron (proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV) and at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (proton-proton collisions at 7-8 TeV). The neutrino program used data obtained from the Super-Kamiokande detector. This water-filled Cherenkov counter was used to detect and measure the properties of neutrinos produced in cosmic ray showers, and from neutrino beams produced from acceler- ators in Japan. The Mu2E experiment will use a special stopped muon beam to be built at Fermilab.

  6. High energy density Z-pinch plasmas using flow stabilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shumlak, U. Golingo, R. P. Nelson, B. A. Bowers, C. A. Doty, S. A. Forbes, E. G. Hughes, M. C. Kim, B. Knecht, S. D. Lambert, K. K. Lowrie, W. Ross, M. P. Weed, J. R.

    2014-12-15

    The ZaP Flow Z-Pinch research project[1] at the University of Washington investigates the effect of sheared flows on MHD instabilities. Axially flowing Z-pinch plasmas are produced that are 100 cm long with a 1 cm radius. The plasma remains quiescent for many radial Alfvén times and axial flow times. The quiescent periods are characterized by low magnetic mode activity measured at several locations along the plasma column and by stationary visible plasma emission. Plasma evolution is modeled with high-resolution simulation codes – Mach2, WARPX, NIMROD, and HiFi. Plasma flow profiles are experimentally measured with a multi-chord ion Doppler spectrometer. A sheared flow profile is observed to be coincident with the quiescent period, and is consistent with classical plasma viscosity. Equilibrium is determined by diagnostic measurements: interferometry for density; spectroscopy for ion temperature, plasma flow, and density[2]; Thomson scattering for electron temperature; Zeeman splitting for internal magnetic field measurements[3]; and fast framing photography for global structure. Wall stabilization has been investigated computationally and experimentally by removing 70% of the surrounding conducting wall to demonstrate no change in stability behavior.[4] Experimental evidence suggests that the plasma lifetime is only limited by plasma supply and current waveform. The flow Z-pinch concept provides an approach to achieve high energy density plasmas,[5] which are large, easy to diagnose, and persist for extended durations. A new experiment, ZaP-HD, has been built to investigate this approach by separating the flow Z-pinch formation from the radial compression using a triaxial-electrode configuration. This innovation allows more detailed investigations of the sheared flow stabilizing effect, and it allows compression to much higher densities than previously achieved on ZaP by reducing the linear density and increasing the pinch current. Experimental results and scaling analyses will be presented. In addition to studying fundamental plasma science and high energy density physics, the ZaP and ZaP-HD experiments can be applied to laboratory astrophysics.

  7. Extensive Air Showers and the Physics of High Energy Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. D. Erlykin

    2007-03-20

    Extensive Air Showers are still the only source of information on primary cosmic rays and their interactions at energies above PeV. However, this information is hidden inside the multiplicative character of the cascading process. Inspite of the great experimental and theoretical efforts the results of different studies are often ambiguous and even conflicting. These controversies can partly be referred to imperfections of our models of high energy interactions. The first part of the paper is concerned with this problem. The author thinks that the present models should be corrected to give slightly deeper penetration of the cascade into the atmosphere. In this respect the modification suggested by the QGSJET-II model seems to be the step in the right direction. The Sibyll 2.1 model provides a similar penetrating properties. However, this modification is not enough and a small additional transfer of the energy from EAS hadrons to the electromagnetic component is needed too. As a possible candidate for such a process the inelastic charge exchange of pions is discussed. In the second part of the paper the author discusses the need to account for the interaction of EAS with the stuff of detectors, their environment and the ground in the light of the 'neutron thunder' phenomenon, discovered recently.

  8. GALAXIES CORRELATING WITH ULTRA-HIGH ENERGY COSMIC RAYS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaw, Ingyin; Farrar, Glennys R. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics and Department of Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Greene, Jenny E. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08854 (United States)

    2009-05-10

    The Pierre Auger Observatory reported that 20 of the 27 highest energy cosmic rays have arrival directions within 3.{sup 0}2 of a nearby galaxy in the Veron-Cetty and Veron (VCV) Catalog of Quasars and Active Galactic Nuclei (12th ed.), with a 1% probability that this would be due to chance if the cosmic ray directions were isotropic. In this paper, we examine the correlated galaxies to gain insight into the possible ultra-high energy cosmic ray (UHECR) sources. We find that 14 of the 21 correlated VCV galaxies are active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and we determine their bolometric luminosities. The remaining seven are primarily star-forming galaxies. The bolometric luminosities of the correlated AGNs are all greater than 5 x 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}. This may explain the absence of UHECRs from the Virgo region in spite of the large number of VCV galaxies in Virgo, since most of the VCV galaxies in the Virgo region are low-luminosity AGNs. Interestingly, the bolometric luminosities of most of the AGNs are significantly lower than that required to satisfy the minimum condition for UHECR acceleration in a continuous jet. If a UHECR-AGN correlation is substantiated with further statistics, our results lend support to the recently proposed 'giant AGN flare' mechanism for UHECR acceleration.

  9. Modular multi-element high energy particle detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coon, D.D.; Elliott, J.P.

    1990-01-02

    Multi-element high energy particle detector modules comprise a planar heavy metal carrier of tungsten alloy with planar detector units uniformly distributed over one planar surface. The detector units are secured to the heavy metal carrier by electrically conductive adhesive so that the carrier serves as a common ground. The other surface of each planar detector unit is electrically connected to a feedthrough electrical terminal extending through the carrier for front or rear readout. The feedthrough electrical terminals comprise sockets at one face of the carrier and mating pins projecting from the other face, so that any number of modules may be plugged together to create a stack of modules of any desired number of radiation lengths. The detector units each comprise four, preferably rectangular, p-i-n diode chips arranged around the associated feedthrough terminal to form a square detector unit providing at least 90% detector element coverage of the carrier. Integral spacers projecting from the carriers extend at least partially along the boundaries between detector units to space the p-i-n diode chips from adjacent carriers in a stack. The spacers along the perimeters of the modules are one-half the width of the interior spacers so that when stacks of modules are arranged side by side to form a large array of any size or shape, distribution of the detector units is uniform over the entire array. 5 figs.

  10. Metrology Challenges for High Energy Density Science Target Manufacture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seugling, R M; Bono, M J; Davis, P

    2009-02-19

    Currently, High Energy Density Science (HEDS) experiments are used to support and qualify predictive physics models. These models assume ideal conditions such as energy (input) and device (target) geometry. The experiments rely on precision targets constructed from components with dimensions in the millimeter range, while having micrometer-scale, functional features, including planar steps, sine waves, and step-joint geometry on hemispherical targets. Future target designs will likely have features and forms that rival or surpass current manufacturing and characterization capability. The dimensional metrology of these features is important for a number of reasons, including qualification of sub-components prior to assembly, quantification of critical features on the as-built assemblies and as a feedback mechanism for fabrication process development. Variations in geometry from part to part can lead to functional limitations, such as unpredictable instabilities during an experiment and the inability to assemble a target from poorly matched sub-components. Adding to the complexity are the large number and variety of materials, components, and shapes that render any single metrology technique difficult to use with low uncertainty. Common materials include metal and glass foams, doped transparent and opaque plastics and a variety of deposited and wrought metals. A suite of metrology tools and techniques developed to address the many critical issues relevant to the manufacture of HEDS targets including interferometry, x-ray radiography and contact metrology are presented including two sided interferometry for absolute thickness metrology and low force probe technology for micrometer feature coordinate metrology.

  11. High-energy solar particle events in cycle 24

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gopalswamy, Nat; Yashiro, Seiji; Xie, Hong; Akiyama, Sachiko; Thakur, Neeharika

    2015-01-01

    The Sun is already in the declining phase of cycle 24, but the paucity of high-energy solar energetic particle (SEP) events continues with only two ground level enhancement (GLE) events as of March 31, 2015. In an attempt to understand this, we considered all the large SEP events of cycle 24 that occurred until the end of 2014. We compared the properties of the associated CMEs with those in cycle 23. We found that the CME speeds in the sky plane were similar, but almost all those cycle-24 CMEs were halos. A significant fraction of (16%) of the frontside SEP events were associated with eruptive prominence events. CMEs associated with filament eruption events accelerate slowly and attain peak speeds beyond the typical GLE release heights. When we considered only western hemispheric events that had good connectivity to the CME nose, there were only 8 events that could be considered as GLE candidates. One turned out to be the first GLE event of cycle 24 (2012 May 17). In two events, the CMEs were very fast (>2000...

  12. High energy hadron-hadron collisions. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, T.T.

    1991-12-01

    Results of a study on high energy collision with the geometrical model are summarized in three parts: (1) the elastic hadron-hadron collision, (2) the inelastic hadron-hadron collision, and (3) the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation. More recent studies are highlighted below. For elastic scattering, a modified form for the hadronic matter form factor of the proton was proposed which remains to be dipole in form but contains an energy-dependent range parameter. This new expression of the opacity function fits the elastic {bar p}p scattering very well from the ISR to S{bar p}pS energies. Extrapolation of this theory also yielded results in good agreement with the {bar p}p differential cross section measured at the Tevatron. For inelastic hadron-hadron collisions, we have made a systematic investigation of the single-particle momentum spectra in the entire S{bar p}pS energy region. Results are useful for the extrapolation of angular distribution to the higher SSC energies. In e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation, a detailed analysis of all available experimental multiplicity data from PETRA to LEP energies has been performed. We discovered that the cluster size of emitted hadrons increases steadily with energy and is close to 2 as we predicted.

  13. Modular multi-element high energy particle detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coon, Darryl D. (Pittsburgh, PA); Elliott, John P. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1990-01-02

    Multi-element high energy particle detector modules comprise a planar heavy metal carrier of tungsten alloy with planar detector units uniformly distributed over one planar surface. The detector units are secured to the heavy metal carrier by electrically conductive adhesive so that the carrier serves as a common ground. The other surface of each planar detector unit is electrically connected to a feedthrough electrical terminal extending through the carrier for front or rear readout. The feedthrough electrical terminals comprise sockets at one face of the carrier and mating pins porjecting from the other face, so that any number of modules may be plugged together to create a stack of modules of any desired number of radiation lengths. The detector units each comprise four, preferably rectangular, p-i-n diode chips arranged around the associated feedthrough terminal to form a square detector unit providing at least 90% detector element coverage of the carrier. Integral spacers projecting from the carriers extend at least partially along the boundaries between detector units to space the p-i-n diode chips from adjacent carriers in a stack. The spacers along the perimeters of the modules are one-half the width of the interior spacers so that when stacks of modules are arranged side by side to form a large array of any size or shape, distribution of the detector units is uniform over the entire array.

  14. Upgrading of biorenewables to high energy density fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, John C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batista, Enrique R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chen, Weizhong [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Currier, Robert P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dirmyer, Matthew R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; John, Kevin D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kim, Jin K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Keith, Jason [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martin, Richard L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pierpont, Aaron W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Silks Ill, L. A. "" Pete [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smythe, Mathan C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sutton, Andrew D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Taw, Felicia L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Trovitch, Ryan J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vasudevan, Kalyan V [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Waidmann, Christopher R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wu, Ruilian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Baker, R. Thomas [UNIV OF OTTAWWA; Schlaf, Marcel [UNIV OF GUELPH

    2010-12-07

    According to a recent report, lignocellulose is the most abundant renewable biological resource on earth, with an annual production of {approx} 200 x 10{sup 9} tons. Conversion of lignocellulosics derived from wood, agricultural wastes, and woody grasses into liquid fuels and value-added chemical feedstocks is an active area of research that has seen an explosion of effort due to the need to replace petroleum based sources. The carbohydrates D-glucose (C{sub 6}), L-arabinose (C{sub 5}), and D-xylose (C{sub 5}) are readily obtained from the hydrolysis of lignocellulose and constitute the most abundant renewable organic carbon source on the planet. Because they are naturally produced on such a large scale, these sugars have the greatest potential to displace petrochemical derived transportation fuel. Recent efforts in our laboratories aimed towards the production of high energy density transportation fuels from carbohydrates have been structured around the parameters of selective carbohydrate carbon chain extension chemistries, low reaction temperatures, and the desired use of water or neat substrate as the solvent. Some of our efforts in this regard will be presented.

  15. Ion Sources for High Energy Ion Implantation at BNL | U.S. DOE...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Ion Sources for High Energy Ion Implantation at BNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science...

  16. Super stable garnet ceramics may be ideal for high-energy lithium...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (865) 574-7308 Super stable garnet ceramics may be ideal for high-energy lithium batteries ORNL researchers used scanning transmission electron microscopy to take an...

  17. New solar cell technology captures high-energy photons more efficientl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (click to enlarge) Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials (click to enlarge) New solar cell technology captures high-energy photons more efficiently By Jared Sagoff *...

  18. Hadron-hadron and hadron-nuclei collisions at high energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Giacomelli; R. Giacomelli

    2000-11-15

    A brief review is made of the present situation of hadron-hadron and hadron-nuclei total elastic and inelastic cross sections at high energies

  19. PROMPT HIGH-ENERGY EMISSION FROM PROTON-DOMINATED GAMMA-RAY BURSTS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    'proton-dominated' GRBs in the internal shock scenario through Monte Carlo simulations, accounting for various processes related to high-energy electrons and protons. Besides...

  20. Electrolytes for Use in High Energy Lithium-Ion Batteries with...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    with Wide Operating Temperature Range Electrolytes for Use in High Energy Lithium-Ion Batteries with Wide Operating Temperature Range 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program...

  1. Interaction of the high energy deuterons with the graphite target in the plasma focus devices based on Lee model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akel, M. Alsheikh Salo, S.; Ismael, Sh.; Saw, S. H.; Lee, S.

    2014-07-15

    Numerical experiments are systematically carried out using the Lee model code extended to compute the ion beams on various plasma focus devices operated with Deuterium gas. The deuteron beam properties of the plasma focus are studied for low and high energy plasma focus device. The energy spectral distribution for deuteron ions ejected from the pinch plasma is calculated and the ion numbers with energy around 1?MeV is then determined. The deuteron–graphite target interaction is studied for different conditions. The yield of the reaction {sup 12}C(d,n){sup 13}N and the induced radioactivity for one and multi shots plasma focus devices in the graphite solid target is investigated. Our results present the optimized high energy repetitive plasma focus devices as an alternative to accelerators for the production of {sup 13}N short lived radioisotopes. However, technical challenges await solutions on two fronts: (a) operation of plasma focus machines at high rep rates for a sufficient period of time (b) design of durable targets that can take the thermal load.

  2. INTEGRAL/RossiXTE high-energy observation of a state transition of GX 339-4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Belloni; I. Parolin; M. Del Santo; J. Homan; P. Casella; R. P. Fender; W. H. G. Lewin; M. Mendez; J. M. Miller; M. van der Klis

    2006-01-02

    On 2004 August 15, we observed a fast (shorter than 10 hours) state transition in the bright black-hole transient GX 339-4 simultaneously with RossiXTE and INTEGRAL. This transition was evident both in timing and spectral properties. Combining the data from PCA, HEXTE and IBIS, we obtained good quality broad-band (3-200 keV) energy spectra before and after the transition. These spectra indicate that the hard component steepened. Also, the high-energy cutoff that was present at ~70 keV before the transition was not detected after the transition. This is the first time that an accurate determination of the broad-band spectrum across such a transition has been measured on a short time scale. It shows that, although some spectral parameters do not change abruptly through the transition, the high-energy cutoff increases/disappears rather fast. These results constitute a benchmark on which to test theoretical models for the production of the hard component in these systems.

  3. Simultaneous multi-wavelength campaign on PKS 2005-489 in a high state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abramowski, A; Aharonian, F; Akhperjanian, A G; Anton, G; Barnacka, A; de Almeida, U Barres; Bazer-Bachi, A R; Becherini, Y; Becker, J; Behera, B; Bernlöhr, K; Bochow, A; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Borrel, V; Brucker, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bulik, T; Büsching, I; Casanova, S; Cerruti, M; Chadwick, P M; Charbonnier, A; Chaves, R C G; Cheesebrough, A; Chounet, L -M; Clapson, A C; Coignet, G; Conrad, J; Dalton, M; Daniel, M K; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Drury, L O'C; Dubois, F; Dubus, G; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Espigat, P; Fallon, L; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fernandes, M V; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Füßling, M; Gabici, S; Gallant, Y A; Gast, H; Gérard, L; Gerbig, D; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Glück, B; Goret, P; Göring, D; Hague, J D; Hampf, D; Hauser, M; Heinz, S; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hoffmann, A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; de Jager, O C; Jahn, C; Jamrozy, M; Jung, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzy?ski, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Keogh, D; Kerschhaggl, M; Khangulyan, D; Khélifi, B; Klochkov, D; Klu?niak, W; Kneiske, T; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Kossakowski, R; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lenain, J -P; Lennarz, D; Lohse, T; Lopatin, A; Lu, C -C; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Masbou, J; Maurin, D; Maxted, N; McComb, T J L; Medina, M C; Méhault, J; Nguyen, N; Moderski, R; Moulin, E; Naumann-Godo, M; de Naurois, M; Nedbal, D; Nekrassov, D; Nicholas, B; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Ohm, S; Olive, J-F; Wilhelmi, E de Oña; Opitz, B; Ostrowski, M; Panter, M; Arribas, M Paz; Pedaletti, G; Pelletier, G; Petrucci, P -O; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raue, M; Rayner, S M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Ruppel, J; Ryde, F; Sahakian, V; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schöck, F M; Schönwald, A; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Shalchi, A; Sikora, M; Skilton, J L; Sol, H; Spengler, G; Stawarz, ?; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Sushch, I; Szostek, A; Tam, P H; Tavernet, J -P; Terrier, R; Tibolla, O; Tluczykont, M; Valerius, K; van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Vialle, J P; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Vivier, M; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Vorobiov, S; Vorster, M; Wagner, S J; Ward, M; Wierzcholska, A; Zajczyk, A; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zechlin, H -S; Abdo, A A; Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Cannon, A; Caraveo, P A; Carrigan, S; Casandjian, J M; Cavazzuti, E; Cecchi, C; Çelik, Ö; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Cutini, S; Dermer, C D; de Palma, F; Silva, E do Couto e; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Escande, L; Favuzzi, C; Ferrara, E C; Focke, W B; Fortin, P; Frailis, M; Fukazawa, Y; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giglietto, N; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grove, J E; Guiriec, S; Hadasch, D; Hays, E; Horan, D; Hughes, R E; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, W N; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Knödlseder, J; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Latronico, L; Lee, S -H; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Makeev, A; Mazziotta, M N; McConville, W; McEnery, J E; Michelson, P F; Mizuno, T; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nakamori, T; Nishino, S; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Ozaki, M; Paneque, D; Panetta, J H; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Sadrozinski, H F -W; Sanchez, D; Sander, A; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Troja, E; Uehara, T; Usher, T L; Vandenbroucke, J; Vianello, G; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Wang, P; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Yang, Z; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M

    2011-01-01

    The high-frequency peaked BL Lac object PKS 2005-489 was the target of a multi-wavelength campaign with simultaneous observations in the TeV gamma-ray (H.E.S.S.), GeV gamma-ray (Fermi/LAT), X-ray (RXTE, Swift), UV (Swift) and optical (ATOM, Swift) bands. This campaign was carried out during a high flux state in the synchrotron regime. The flux in the optical and X-ray bands reached the level of the historical maxima. The hard GeV spectrum observed with Fermi/LAT connects well to the very high energy (VHE, E>100GeV) spectrum measured with H.E.S.S. with a peak energy between ~5 and 500 GeV. Compared to observations with contemporaneous coverage in the VHE and X-ray bands in 2004, the X-ray flux was ~50 times higher during the 2009 campaign while the TeV gamma-ray flux shows marginal variation over the years. The spectral energy distribution during this multi-wavelength campaign was fit by a one zone synchrotron self-Compton model with a well determined cutoff in X-rays. The parameters of a one zone SSC model ar...

  4. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2010-03-16

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  5. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2008-08-01

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  6. Visible-wavelength semiconductor lasers and arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schneider, Jr., Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM); Crawford, Mary H. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1996-01-01

    A visible semiconductor laser. The visible semiconductor laser includes an InAlGaP active region surrounded by one or more AlGaAs layers on each side, with carbon as the sole p-type dopant. Embodiments of the invention are provided as vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) and as edge-emitting lasers (EELs). One or more transition layers comprised of a substantially indium-free semiconductor alloy such as AlAsP, AlGaAsP, or the like may be provided between the InAlGaP active region and the AlGaAS DBR mirrors or confinement layers to improve carrier injection and device efficiency by reducing any band offsets. Visible VCSEL devices fabricated according to the invention with a one-wavelength-thick (1.lambda.) optical cavity operate continuous-wave (cw) with lasing output powers up to 8 mW, and a peak power conversion efficiency of up to 11%.

  7. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, Richard A.; Wasserman, Harvey

    2010-11-24

    The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the leading scientific computing facility for the Department of Energy's Office of Science, providing high-performance computing (HPC) resources to more than 3,000 researchers working on about 400 projects. NERSC provides large-scale computing resources and, crucially, the support and expertise needed for scientists to make effective use of them. In November 2009, NERSC, DOE's Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), and DOE's Office of High Energy Physics (HEP) held a workshop to characterize the HPC resources needed at NERSC to support HEP research through the next three to five years. The effort is part of NERSC's legacy of anticipating users needs and deploying resources to meet those demands. The workshop revealed several key points, in addition to achieving its goal of collecting and characterizing computing requirements. The chief findings: (1) Science teams need access to a significant increase in computational resources to meet their research goals; (2) Research teams need to be able to read, write, transfer, store online, archive, analyze, and share huge volumes of data; (3) Science teams need guidance and support to implement their codes on future architectures; and (4) Projects need predictable, rapid turnaround of their computational jobs to meet mission-critical time constraints. This report expands upon these key points and includes others. It also presents a number of case studies as representative of the research conducted within HEP. Workshop participants were asked to codify their requirements in this case study format, summarizing their science goals, methods of solution, current and three-to-five year computing requirements, and software and support needs. Participants were also asked to describe their strategy for computing in the highly parallel, multi-core environment that is expected to dominate HPC architectures over the next few years. The report includes a section that describes efforts already underway or planned at NERSC that address requirements collected at the workshop. NERSC has many initiatives in progress that address key workshop findings and are aligned with NERSC's strategic plans.

  8. Illuminating Dark Photons with High-Energy Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Curtin; Rouven Essig; Stefania Gori; Jessie Shelton

    2015-02-27

    High-energy colliders offer a unique sensitivity to dark photons, the mediators of a broken dark U(1) gauge theory that kinetically mixes with the Standard Model (SM) hypercharge. Dark photons can be detected in the exotic decay of the 125 GeV Higgs boson, h -> Z Z_D -> 4l, and in Drell-Yan events, pp -> Z_D -> ll. If the dark U(1) is broken by a hidden-sector Higgs mechanism, then mixing between the dark and SM Higgs bosons also allows the exotic decay h -> Z_D Z_D -> 4l. We show that the 14 TeV LHC and a 100 TeV proton-proton collider provide powerful probes of both exotic Higgs decay channels. In the case of kinetic mixing alone, direct Drell-Yan production offers the best sensitivity to Z_D, and can probe epsilon >~ 9 x 10^(-4) (4 x 10^(-4)) at the HL-LHC (100 TeV pp collider). The exotic Higgs decay h -> Z Z_D offers slightly weaker sensitivity, but both measurements are necessary to distinguish the kinetically mixed dark photon from other scenarios. If Higgs mixing is also present, then the decay h -> Z_D Z_D can allow sensitivity to the Z_D for epsilon >~ 10^(-9) - 10^(-6) (10^(-10) - 10^(-7)) for the mass range 2 m_mu < m_(Z_D) < m_h/2 by searching for displaced dark photon decays. We also compare the Z_D sensitivity at pp colliders to the indirect, but model-independent, sensitivity of global fits to electroweak precision observables. We perform a global electroweak fit of the dark photon model, substantially updating previous work in the literature. Electroweak precision measurements at LEP, Tevatron, and the LHC exclude epsilon as low as 3 x 10^(-2). Sensitivity can be improved by up to a factor of ~2 with HL-LHC data, and an additional factor of ~4 with ILC/GigaZ data.

  9. High-energy x-ray production with pyroelectric crystals Jeffrey A. Geuthera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    High-energy x-ray production with pyroelectric crystals Jeffrey A. Geuthera and Yaron Danon, the usefulness of an x-ray source is determined by its yield and endpoint energy. In x-ray fluorescence, for example, high-energy sources enable the excitation of the K-shell x-ray peaks for high-Z materials as well

  10. Vacuum Polarization in High Energy Physics: (MZ) and at ILC scale 1. Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Röder, Beate

    Vacuum Polarization in High Energy Physics: (MZ) and at ILC scale 1. Introduction 2. (MZ. The running electric charge at high energies 179-1 #12;Physics of vacuum polarization ... 1. Introduction Non" (E) (charge screening by vacuum polarization) Of particular interest: (MZ) and aµ (g - 2)µ/2 (mµ

  11. Possible explanation for the low flux of high energy astrophysical muon neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pakvasa, Sandip

    2013-05-23

    I consider the possibility that some exotic neutrino property is responsible for reducing the muon neutrino flux at high energies from distant sources; specifically, (i) neutrino decay and (ii) neutrinos being pseudo-Dirac particles. This would provide a mechanism for the lack of high energy muon events in the Icecube detector.

  12. Energy Measurement and Strategy for a Trigger of Ultra High Energy Cosmic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erdmann, Martin

    Energy Measurement and Strategy for a Trigger of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays Measured with Radio Ray induced Air Showers 3 2.1 Physics of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2.1.1 Energy Spectrum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2.1.2 Composition

  13. A NEW HIGH ENERGY RESOLUTION NEUTRON TRANSMISSION DETECTOR SYSTEM AT THE GAERTTNER LINAC LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    Laboratory P.O. Box 1072, Schenectady, New York 12301-1072 A new high energy resolution modular neutronA NEW HIGH ENERGY RESOLUTION NEUTRON TRANSMISSION DETECTOR SYSTEM AT THE GAERTTNER LINAC LABORATORY capabilities at the Laboratory in and above the resolved resonance energy region from 1 keV to 600 ke

  14. NONTHERMAL HIGH-ENERGY EMISSION FROM COLLIDING WINDS OF MASSIVE STARS A. Reimer,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pohl, Martin Karl Wilhelm

    NONTHERMAL HIGH-ENERGY EMISSION FROM COLLIDING WINDS OF MASSIVE STARS A. Reimer,1,2 M. Pohl,3 and O of high-energy photon production in colliding winds of long-period WR+OB systems. Analytical formulae. Reimer1 Received 2005 October 24; accepted 2006 February 20 ABSTRACT Colliding winds of massive star

  15. Structure and Fine Structure in Multiparticle Production Data at High Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wit Busza

    2004-10-22

    A summary is given of data on the longitudinal rapidity and pseudorapidity distributions observed in $e^+e^-$, pp, pA and AA collisions at high energies. The remarkable simplicity and universality observed in the data and its relevance to the study of the high energy density system produced in heavy ion collisions is discussed.

  16. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for High-Energy Optical Pulse Formation Yong-Won Song

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    - 1 - Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for High-Energy Optical Pulse Formation Yong-Won Song Center-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for High-Energy Optical Pulse Formation Authors: Yong-Won Song, Shinji Yamashita, Shigeo for Energy Materials Research, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791, Korea E-mail: ysong

  17. Search for Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts using Milagro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Search for Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts using Milagro P. M. Saz Parkinson 95064 Abstract. Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) have been detected at GeV energies by EGRET and models predict for very high energy emission from a sample of 106 gamma-ray bursts (GRB) detected since the beginning

  18. Limits on Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts with the Milagro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Limits on Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts with the Milagro Observatory Miguel F of Milagro allow it to detect very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray burst emission with much higher sensitivity gamma-ray burst satellites at keV to MeV energies. Even in the absence of a positive detection, VHE

  19. High Energy Astrophysics: Emission and Absorption 1/114 Emission and Absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bicknell, Geoff

    High Energy Astrophysics: Emission and Absorption 1/114 Emission and Absorption 1 Motivation and the jet. #12;High Energy Astrophysics: Emission and Absorption 2/114 HST optical image of 3C273 Note the very strong cen- tral point source and the less luminous jet. Objects such as 3C273 radiate as much

  20. High-energy Atmospheric Muon Flux Expected at India-Based Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukanta Panda; Sergei I. Sinegovsky

    2008-02-04

    We calculate the zenith-angle dependence of conventional and prompt high-energy muon fluxes at India-Based Neutrino Observatory (INO) depth. This study demonstrates a possibility to discriminate models of the charm hadroproduction including the low-x QCD behaviour of hadronic cross-sections relevant at very high energies.

  1. High energy heavy ion jets emerging from laser plasma generated by long pulse laser beams from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High energy heavy ion jets emerging from laser plasma generated by long pulse laser beams from, Darmstadt, Germany 2 GSI, Darmstadt, Germany 3 Université de Provence et CNRS, Marseille, France 4, Albuquerque, New Mexico. ~Received 21 February 2005; Accepted 20 April 2005! Abstract High energy heavy ions

  2. The High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI) R. P. Lin and the HESSI team1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    The High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI) Mission R. P. Lin and the HESSI team1 Physics objective of the High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI) Small Explorer mission selected by NASA is to investigate the physics of particle acceleration and energy release in solar flares. The HESSI instrument

  3. PLASMA FOCUSING OF HIGH ENERGY DENSITY ELECTRON AND POSITRON BEAMS \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PLASMA FOCUSING OF HIGH ENERGY DENSITY ELECTRON AND POSITRON BEAMS \\Lambda J.S.T. Ng, P. Chen, W present results from the SLAC E­150 experiment on plasma focusing of high energy density electron and experiments to test this con­ cept were carried out with low energy density electron beams [2]. The goals

  4. Langston University - High Energy Physics (LU-HEP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snow, Dr., Joel [Langston Univ., OK (United States)

    2012-08-13

    This final report is presented by Langston University (LU) for the project entitled "Langston University High Energy Physics" (LUHEP) under the direction of principal investigator (PI) and project director Professor Joel Snow. The project encompassed high energy physics research performed at hadron colliders. The PI is a collaborator on the DZero experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, IL, USA and the ATLAS experiment at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland and was during the entire project period from April 1, 1999 until May 14, 2012. Both experiments seek to understand the fundamental constituents of the physical universe and the forces that govern their interactions. In 1999 as member of the Online Systems group for Run 2 the PI developed a cross-platform Python-based, Graphical User Interface (GUI) application for monitoring and control of EPICS based devices for control room use. This served as a model for other developers to enhance and build on for further monitoring and control tasks written in Python. Subsequently the PI created and developed a cross-platform C++ GUI utilizing a networked client-server paradigm and based on ROOT, the object oriented analysis framework from CERN. The GUI served as a user interface to the Examine tasks running in the D\\O\\ control room which monitored the status and integrity of data taking for Run 2. The PI developed the histogram server/control interface to the GUI client for the EXAMINE processes. The histogram server was built from the ROOT framework and was integrated into the D\\O\\ framework used for online monitoring programs and offline analysis. The PI developed the first implementation of displaying histograms dynamically generated by ROOT in a Web Browser. The PI's work resulted in several talks and papers at international conferences and workshops. The PI established computing software infrastructure at LU and U. Oklahoma (OU) to do analysis of DZero production data and produce simulation data for the experiment. Eventually this included the FNAL SAM data grid system, the SAMGrid (SG) infrastructure, and the Open Science Grid software stacks for computing and storage elements. At the end of 2003 Snow took on the role of global Monte Carlo production coordinator for the DØ experiment. A role which continues til this day. In January of 2004 Snow started working with the SAMGrid development team to help debug, deploy, and integrate SAMGrid with DØ Monte Carlo production. Snow installed and configured SG execution and client sites at LUHEP and OUHEP, and a SG scheduler site at LUHEP. The PI developed a python based GUI (DAJ) that acts as a front end for job submission to SAMGrid. The GUI interfaces to the DZero Mone Carlo (MC) request system that uses SAM to manage MC requests by the physics analysis groups. DAJ significantly simplified SG job submission and was deployed in DZero in an effort to increase the user base of SG. The following year was the advent of SAMGrid job submission to the Open Science Grid (OSG) and LHC Computing Grid (LCG) through a forwarding mechanism. The PI oversaw the integration of these grids into the existing production infrastructure. The PI developed an automatic MC (Automc) request processing system capable of operating without user intervention (other than getting grid credentials), and able to submit to any number of sites on various grids. The system manages production at all but 2 sites. The system was deployed at Fermilab and remains operating there today. The PI's work in distributed computing resulted in several talks at international conferences. UTA, OU, and LU were chosen as the collaborating institutions that form the Southwest Tier 2 Center (SWT2) for ATLAS. During the project period the PI contributed to the online and offline software infrastructure through his work with the Run 2 online group, and played a major role in Monte Carlo production for DZero. During the part of the project period in which the PI served as MC production coordinator MC production increased very significantly. In the first year of the PI'

  5. Wavelength modulation spectroscopy using novel mechanical light chopper blade designs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Sandip

    Wavelength modulation spectroscopy using novel mechanical light chopper blade designs Jayeeta 23 May 2005; published online 21 July 2005 We describe two mechanical light chopper blade designs wavelength for positive grating orders. Our two designs, the alternating double-slot blade and the vertical

  6. Design of Wavelength Converting Switches for Optical Burst Switching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Design of Wavelength Converting Switches for Optical Burst Switching Jeyashankher Ramamirtham, Jonathan Turner Abstract-- Optical Burst Switching (OBS) is an experi- mental network technology. In this paper, we study two designs for wavelength converting switches that are suitable for use in optical

  7. The wavelength dependence of seeing Robert W.Boyd*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd, Robert W.

    wave- length. The wavelength dependence of seeing effects has been a long-standing problem. Fried1. A systematic study of the wavelength de- pendence of this effect was conducted using the 1.5 m McMath solar device to take pictures of the solar limb at 10,umforsubsequent comparisonwith visi- ble

  8. Systematic wavelength selection for improved multivariate spectral analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thomas, Edward V. (2828 Georgia NE., Albuquerque, NM 87110); Robinson, Mark R. (1603 Solano NE., Albuquerque, NM 87110); Haaland, David M. (809 Richmond Dr. SE., Albuquerque, NM 87106)

    1995-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for determining in a biological material one or more unknown values of at least one known characteristic (e.g. the concentration of an analyte such as glucose in blood or the concentration of one or more blood gas parameters) with a model based on a set of samples with known values of the known characteristics and a multivariate algorithm using several wavelength subsets. The method includes selecting multiple wavelength subsets, from the electromagnetic spectral region appropriate for determining the known characteristic, for use by an algorithm wherein the selection of wavelength subsets improves the model's fitness of the determination for the unknown values of the known characteristic. The selection process utilizes multivariate search methods that select both predictive and synergistic wavelengths within the range of wavelengths utilized. The fitness of the wavelength subsets is determined by the fitness function F=.function.(cost, performance). The method includes the steps of: (1) using one or more applications of a genetic algorithm to produce one or more count spectra, with multiple count spectra then combined to produce a combined count spectrum; (2) smoothing the count spectrum; (3) selecting a threshold count from a count spectrum to select these wavelength subsets which optimize the fitness function; and (4) eliminating a portion of the selected wavelength subsets. The determination of the unknown values can be made: (1) noninvasively and in vivo; (2) invasively and in vivo; or (3) in vitro.

  9. Yale High Energy Physics Research: Precision Studies of Reactor Antineutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeger, Karsten M.

    2014-09-13

    This report presents experimental research at the intensity frontier of particle physics with particular focus on the study of reactor antineutrinos and the precision measurement of neutrino oscillations. The experimental neutrino physics group of Professor Heeger and Senior Scientist Band at Yale University has had leading responsibilities in the construction and operation of the Daya Bay Reactor Antineutrino Experiment and made critical contributions to the discovery of non-zero$\\theta_{13}$. Heeger and Band led the Daya Bay detector management team and are now overseeing the operations of the antineutrino detectors. Postdoctoral researchers and students in this group have made leading contributions to the Daya Bay analysis including the prediction of the reactor antineutrino flux and spectrum, the analysis of the oscillation signal, and the precision determination of the target mass yielding unprecedented precision in the relative detector uncertainty. Heeger's group is now leading an R\\&D effort towards a short-baseline oscillation experiment, called PROSPECT, at a US research reactor and the development of antineutrino detectors with advanced background discrimination.

  10. Thermal dileptons in high-energy nuclear collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanja Damjanovic

    2008-12-16

    Clear signs of excess dileptons above the known sources were found at the SPS since long. However, a real clarification of these observations was only recently achieved by NA60, measuring dimuons with unprecedented precision in 158A GeV In-In collisions. The excess mass spectrum in the region M rho -> mu+mu- annihilation. The associated rho spectral function shows a strong broadening, but essentially no shift in mass. In the region M>1 GeV, the excess is found to be prompt, not due to enhanced charm production. The inverse slope parameter Teff associated with the transverse momentum spectra rises with mass up to the rho, followed by a sudden decline above. While the initial rise, coupled to a hierarchy in hadron freeze-out, points to radial flow of a hadronic decay source, the decline above signals a transition to a low-flow source, presumably of partonic origin. The mass spectra show the steep rise towards low masses characteristic for Planck-like radiation. The polarization of the excess referred to the Collins Soper frame is found to be isotropic. All observations are consistent with a global interpretation of the excess as thermal radiation. We conclude with a short discussion of a possible link to direct photons.

  11. A Search for Prompt Very High Energy Emission from Satellite-detected Gamma-ray Bursts using Milagro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parkinson, P M Saz

    2007-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been detected up to GeV energies and are predicted by many models to emit in the very high energy (VHE, > 100 GeV) regime too. Detection of such emission would allow us to constrain GRB models. Since its launch, in late 2004, the Swift satellite has been locating GRBs at a rate of approximately 100 per year. The rapid localization and follow-up in many wavelengths has revealed new and unexpected phenomena, such as delayed emission in the form of bright X-ray flares. The Milagro gamma-ray observatory is a wide field of view (2 sr) instrument employing a water Cherenkov detector to continuously ($>$ 90% duty cycle) observe the overhead sky in the 100 GeV to 100 TeV energy range. Over 100 GRBs are known to have been in the field of view of Milagro since January 2000, including 57 since the launch of Swift (through May 2007). We discuss the results of the searches for prompt emission from these bursts, as well as for delayed emission from the X-ray flares observed in some of the Swift...

  12. A Search for Prompt Very High Energy Emission from Satellite-detected Gamma-ray Bursts using Milagro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milagro Collaboration; P. M. Saz Parkinson; B. L. Dingus

    2007-10-11

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been detected up to GeV energies and are predicted by many models to emit in the very high energy (VHE, > 100 GeV) regime too. Detection of such emission would allow us to constrain GRB models. Since its launch, in late 2004, the Swift satellite has been locating GRBs at a rate of approximately 100 per year. The rapid localization and follow-up in many wavelengths has revealed new and unexpected phenomena, such as delayed emission in the form of bright X-ray flares. The Milagro gamma-ray observatory is a wide field of view (2 sr) instrument employing a water Cherenkov detector to continuously ($>$ 90% duty cycle) observe the overhead sky in the 100 GeV to 100 TeV energy range. Over 100 GRBs are known to have been in the field of view of Milagro since January 2000, including 57 since the launch of Swift (through May 2007). We discuss the results of the searches for prompt emission from these bursts, as well as for delayed emission from the X-ray flares observed in some of the Swift bursts.

  13. Polarization-independent optical wavelength filter for channel dropping applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deri, R.J.; Patterson, F.

    1996-05-07

    The polarization dependence of optical wavelength filters is eliminated by using waveguide directional couplers. Material birefringence is used to compensate for the waveguide (electromagnetic) birefringence which is the original cause of the polarization dependence. Material birefringence is introduced in a controllable fashion by replacing bulk waveguide layers by finely layered composites, such as multiple quantum wells using III-V semiconductor materials. The filter has use in wavelength-division multiplexed fiber optic communication systems. This filter has broad application for wavelength-tunable receivers in fiber optic communication links, which may be used for telecommunications, optical computer interconnect links, or fiber optic sensor systems. Since multiple-wavelength systems are increasingly being used for all of these applications, the filter is useable whenever a rapidly tunable, wavelength-filtering receiver is required. 14 figs.

  14. Polarization-independent optical wavelength filter for channel dropping applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deri, Robert J. (Pleasanton, CA); Patterson, Frank (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01

    The polarization dependence of optical wavelength filters is eliminated by using waveguide directional couplers. Material birefringence is used to compensate for the waveguide (electromagnetic) birefringence which is the original cause of the polarization dependence. Material birefringence is introduced in a controllable fashion by replacing bulk waveguide layers by finely layered composites, such as multiple quantum wells using III-V semiconductor materials. The filter has use in wavelength-division-multiplexed fiber optic communication systems. This filter has broad application for wavelength-tunable receivers in fiber optic communication links, which may be used for telecommunications, optical computer interconnect links, or fiber optic sensor systems. Since multiple-wavelength systems are increasingly being used for all of these applications, the filter is useable whenever a rapidly tunable, wavelength-filtering receiver is required.

  15. Longitudinal Diagnostics for Short Electron Beam Bunches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loos, H.; ,

    2010-06-11

    Single-pass free electron lasers require high peak currents from ultra-short electron bunches to reach saturation and an accurate measurement of bunch length and longitudinal bunch profile is necessary to control the bunch compression process from low to high beam energy. The various state-of-the-art diagnostics methods from ps to fs time scales using coherent radiation detection, RF deflection, and other techniques are presented. The use of linear accelerators as drivers for free electron lasers (FEL) and the advent of single-pass (SASE) FELs has driven the development of a wide range of diagnostic techniques for measuring the length and longitudinal distribution of short and ultra-short electron bunches. For SASE FELs the radiation power and the length of the undulator needed to achieve saturation depend strongly on the charge density of the electron beam. In the case of X-ray FELs, this requires the accelerator to produce ultra-high brightness beams with micron size transverse normalized emittances and peak currents of several kA through several stages of magnetic bunch compression. Different longitudinal diagnostics are employed to measure the peak current and bunch profile along these stages. The measurement techniques can be distinguished into different classes. Coherent methods detect the light emitted from the beam by some coherent radiation process (spectroscopic measurement), or directly measure the Coulomb field traveling with the beam (electro-optic). Phase space manipulation techniques map the time coordinate onto a transverse dimension and then use conventional transverse beam diagnostics (transverse deflector, rf zero-phasing). Further methods measure the profile or duration of an incoherent light pulse emitted by the bunch at wavelengths much shorted than the bunch length (streak camera, fluctuation technique) or modulate the electron beam at an optical wavelength and then generate a narrow bandwidth radiation pulse with the longitudinal profile of the beam mapped onto (optical replicator). The operational needs for bunch length measurements to have fast acquisitions, to be used in feedback systems, to distinguish pulse to pulse changes and to be nondestructive or parasitically have resulted into developing many of the diagnostics into single-shot techniques and in the following the main discussion will emphasize them.

  16. Power-law Behavior of High Energy String Scatterings in Compact Spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jen-Chi Lee; Yi Yang

    2007-09-28

    We calculate high energy massive scattering amplitudes of closed bosonic string compactified on the torus. We obtain infinite linear relations among high energy scattering amplitudes. For some kinematic regimes, we discover that some linear relations break down and, simultaneously, the amplitudes enhance to power-law behavior due to the space-time T-duality symmetry in the compact direction. This result is consistent with the coexistence of the linear relations and the softer exponential fall-off behavior of high energy string scattering amplitudes as we pointed out prevously. It is also reminiscent of hard (power-law) string scatterings in warped spacetime proposed by Polchinski and Strassler.

  17. Are AGN the Best Factories for High Energy Particles and Photons?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzy Collin

    2008-11-11

    The main properties of AGN are reviewed, focussing on the accretion process and on the question of whether AGN are the best factories of ultra high energy particles and photons. I recall the large differences between the accretion/ejection flows in strong and weak accretors, and I conclude that, since low luminosity AGN and even "dormant" massive black holes in nuclei of galaxies are powering strong confined magnetized jets able to accelerate high energy particles, and are present in a large proportion of galaxies, they might be better potential sources of high energy particles and photons than luminous AGN and powerful radio galaxies.

  18. REPORT OF RESEARCH ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND FUTURE GOALS HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, Mark B.; Kapustin, Anton N.; Schwarz, John Henry; Carroll, Sean; Ooguri, Hirosi; Gukov, Sergei; Preskill, John; Hitlin, David G.; Porter, Frank C.; Patterson, Ryan B.; Newman, Harvey B.; Spiropulu, Maria; Golwala, Sunil; Zhu, Ren-Yuan

    2014-08-26

    Caltech High Energy Physics (HEP) has a broad program in both experimental and theoretical physics. We are known for our creativity and leadership. The future is uncertain and we strive to be involved in all the major areas of experimental and theoretical HEP physics so no matter where the important discoveries occur we are well positioned to play an important role. An outstanding group of postdoctoral scholars, graduate students, staff scientists, and technical and administrative personnel support our efforts in experimental and theoretical physics. The PI’s on this grant are involved in the following program of experimental and theoretical activities: I) EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS Our CMS group, led by Harvey Newman and Maria Spiropulu, has played a key role in the discovery and interpretation of the Higgs boson and in searches for new physics. They have important hardware responsibilities in both ECAL and HCAL and are also involved in the upgrades needed for the High Luminosity LHC. Newman's group also develops and operates Grid-based computing, networking, and collaborative systems for CMS and the US HEP community. The charged lepton (Mu2e) and quark BaBar flavor physics group is led by David Hitlin and Frank Porter. On Mu2e they have been instrumental in the design of the calorimeter. Construction responsibilities include one third of the crystals and associated readout as well as the calibration system. They also will have responsibility for a major part of the online system software. Although data taking ceased in 2008 the Caltech BaBar group is active on several new forefront analyses. The neutrino group is led by Ryan Patterson. They are central to NOvA's core oscillation physics program, to calibration, and to detector readiness being responsible for the production and installation of 12,000 APD arrays. They have key roles in neutrino appearance and disappearance analysis in MINOS and MINOS+. Sunil Golwala leads the dark matter direct detection effort. Areas of activity include: CDMS II data analysis, contributions to SuperCDMS Soudan operations and analysis, R&D towards SuperCDMS SNOLAB, development of a novel screener for radiocontamination (the BetaCage), and development of new WIMP detector concepts. Ren-Yuan Zhu leads the HEP crystal laboratory for the advanced detector R&D effort. The crystal lab is involved in development of novel scintillating crystals and has proposed several crystal based detector concepts for future HEP experiments at the energy and intensity frontiers. Its current research effort is concentrated on development of fast crystal scintillators with good radiation hardness and low cost. II) THEORETICAL PHYSICS The main theme of Sergei Gukov's current research is the relation between the geometry of quantum group invariants and their categorification, on the one hand, and the physics of supersymmetric gauge theory and string theory, on the other. Anton Kapustin's research spans a variety of topics in non-perturbative Quantum Field Theory (QFT). His main areas of interest are supersymmetric gauge theories, non-perturbative dualities in QFT, disorder operators, Topological Quantum Field Theory, and non-relativistic QFT. He is also interested in the foundations and possible generalizations of Quantum Mechanics. Hirosi Ooguri's current research has two main components. One is to find exact results in Calabi-Yau compactification of string theory. Another is to explore applications of the AdS/CFT correspondence. He also plans to continue his project with Caltech postdoctoral fellows on BPS spectra of supersymmetric gauge theories in diverse dimensions. John Preskill works on quantum information science. This field may lead to important future technologies, and also lead to new understanding of issues in fundamental physics John Schwarz has been exploring a number of topics in superstring theory/M-theory, supersymmetric gauge theory, and their AdS/CFT relationships. Much of the motivation for these studies is the desire to gain a deeper understanding of superstring theory and M-theory. The research

  19. Optical amplification at the 1.31 wavelength

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cockroft, Nigel J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1994-01-01

    An optical amplifier operating at the 1.31 .mu.m wavelength for use in such applications as telecommunications, cable television, and computer systems. An optical fiber or other waveguide device is doped with both Tm.sup.3+ and Pr.sup.3+ ions. When pumped by a diode laser operating at a wavelength of 785 nm, energy is transferred from the Tm.sup.3+ ions to the Pr.sup.3+ ions, causing the Pr.sup.3+ ions to amplify at a wavelength of 1.31

  20. Fermi Observations of High-Energy Gamma-Ray Emission From GRB...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    From GRB 080825C Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fermi Observations of High-Energy Gamma-Ray Emission From GRB 080825C Authors: Abdo, A.A. ; Naval Research Lab,...

  1. Fermi Observations of High-Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from GRB...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    from GRB 080916C Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fermi Observations of High-Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from GRB 080916C Authors: Abdo, Aous A. ; Naval Research...

  2. Toward high-energy-density, high-efficiency, and moderate-temperature chip-scale thermophotovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilawa-Podgurski, R. C. N.

    The challenging problem of ultra-high-energy-density, high-efficiency, and small-scale portable power generation is addressed here using a distinctive thermophotovoltaic energy conversion mechanism and chip-based system ...

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Energy Lithium Batteries for PHEV Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by [company name] at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high energy lithium batteries...

  4. Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope: High-Energy Results From the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Gamma-Ray Space Telescope: High-Energy Results From the First Year Michelson, P.F.; KIPAC, Menlo Park; Atwood, W.B.; Ritz, S.; UC, Santa Cruz UC, Santa Cruz, Phys. Dept....

  5. High energy femtosecond fiber laser at 1018 nm and high power Cherenkov radiation generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Hongyu, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01

    Two novel laser systems for ultrafast applications have been designed and built. For the seeding of a high energy cryogenically cooled Yb:YLF laser, a novel 1018 nm fiber laser system is demonstrated. It produces >35 nJ ...

  6. The Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating: Design, Fabrication, Ground Calibration and Five Years in Flight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canizares, Claude R.

    Details of the design, fabrication, and ground and flight calibration of the High Energy Transmission Grating (HETG) on the Chandra X?Ray Observatory are presented after 5 years of flight experience. Specifics include the ...

  7. High Energy Physics: Report of research accomplishments and future goals, FY 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barish, B C; Stone, E C; Ames, C A

    1987-07-10

    This report discusses high energy physics research in the following areas: Research in elementary particle physics; QCD phenomenology; lattice gauge theory; Mark III; MARK J and Mark II/SLC.

  8. High energy astrophysics with the next generation of radio astronomy facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rob Fender

    2008-10-06

    High energy astrophysics has made good use of combined high energy (X-ray, gamma-ray) and radio observations to uncover connections between outbursts, accretion, particle acceleration and kinetic feedback to the local ambient medium. In the field of microquasars the connections have been particularly important. However, radio astronomy has been relying on essentially the same facilities for the past ~25 years, whereas high-energy astrophysics, in particular space-based research, has had a series of newer and more powerful missions. In the next fifteen years this imbalance is set to be redressed, with a whole familiy of new radio facilities under development en route to the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) in the 2020s. In this brief review I will summarize these future prospects for radio astronomy, and focus on possibly the most exciting of the new facilities to be built in the next decade, the Low Frequency Array LOFAR, and its uses in high energy astrophysics.

  9. Multi-stage optimization of ultrabroadband high-energy optical parametric chirped pulse amplification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manzoni, Cristian

    We present a procedure for simultaneous optimization of efficiency-bandwidth product and superfluorescence noise suppression in ultrabroadband high-energy optical parametric chirped pulse amplification. Gain dependence of ...

  10. High Energy Physics: Report of research accomplishments and future goals, FY 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barish, B C; Stone, E C; Johnson, F H

    1986-07-30

    This report discusses high energy physics research in the following areas: Research in elementary particle physics; QCD phenomenology; lattice gauge theory; Mark III; MARK J and Mark II/SLC.

  11. Formation of Superdense Hadronic Matter in High-Energy Heavy-Ion Collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Ba0-An; Ko, Che Ming.

    1995-01-01

    We present the detail of a newly developed relativistic transport model (ART 1.0) for high energy heavy-ion collisions. Using this model, we first study the general collision dynamics between heavy ions at the AGS energies. ...

  12. A Lookup Table to Compute High Energy Cosmic Ray Effects on Terrestrial Atmospheric Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atri, Dimitra

    2009-04-27

    A variety of events such as gamma-ray bursts and supernovae may expose the Earth to an increased flux of high-energy cosmic rays, with potentially important effects on the biosphere. Existing atmospheric chemistry software does not have...

  13. High energy hadron-hadron collisions. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Georgia, Athens, Georgia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, T.T.

    1992-01-01

    Results of a study on high energy collisions with the geometrical model are summarized in three parts: (1) the elastic hadron-hadron collision, (2) the inelastic hadron-hadron collision, and (3) e[sup +]e[sup [minus

  14. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Energy Novel Cathode / Alloy Automotive Cell

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by 3M at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high energy novel cathode / alloy...

  15. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High Energy Lithium Batteries for Electric Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Envia Systems at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high energy lithium batteries...

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High Energy Anode Material Development for Li-ion Batteries

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Sinode Systems at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high energy anode material...

  17. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High Energy Density Lithium Battery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Binghamton U.-SUNY at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high energy density...

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: New High-Energy Electrochemical Couple for Automotive Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about new high-energy...

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: New High-Energy Electrochemical Couple for Automotive Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by [company name] at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about a new high-energy...

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High Energy Lithium Batteries for PHEV Applications

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given by Envia at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high energy lithium batteries for PHEV...

  1. Characterization of mono-energetic charged-particle radiography for high energy density physics experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manuel, Mario John-Errol

    2008-01-01

    Charged-particle radiography, specifically protons and alphas, has recently been used to image various High-Energy-Density Physics objects of interest, including Inertial Confinement Fusion capsules during their implosions, ...

  2. The National Ignition Facility: A New Era in High Energy Density Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moses, E

    2009-06-10

    The National Ignition Facility, the world's most energetic laser system, is now operational. This talk will describe NIF, the ignition campaign, and new opportunities in fusion energy and high energy density science enabled by NIF.

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Energy High Power Battery Exceeding PHEV-40 Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by [company name] at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high energy high power battery...

  4. Pressure-driven, resistive magnetohydrodynamic interchange instabilities in laser-produced high-energy-density plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Chikang

    Recent experiments using proton backlighting of laser-foil interactions provide unique opportunities for studying magnetized plasma instabilities in laser-produced high-energy-density plasmas. Time-gated proton radiograph ...

  5. The virtual library in action: Collaborative international control of high-energy physics pre-print

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreitz, P.A.; Addis, L.; Galic, H.; Johnson, T.

    1996-02-01

    This paper will discuss how control of the grey literature in high-energy physics pre-prints developed through a collaborative effort of librarians and physicists. It will highlight the critical steps in the development process and describe one model of a rapidly evolving virtual library for high-energy physics information. In conclusion, this paper will extend this physics model to other areas of grey literature management.

  6. Gravitational Waves from the First Order Phase Transition of the Higgs Field at High Energy Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jinno, Ryusuke; Takimoto, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    In a wide class of new physics models, there exist scalar fields which obtain vacuum expectation values of high energy scales. We study the possibility that the standard model Higgs field has experienced first-order phase transition at the high energy scale due to the couplings with these scalar fields.We estimate the amount of gravitational waves produced by the phase transition, and discuss observational consequences.

  7. Optical requirements for the magnetic lattice of the LHC high energy injectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arduini, Gianluigi

    2006-01-01

    The basic requirements for the magnetic lattice of the LHC high energy injectors will be given taken into account, wherever possible, the constraints imposed by high energy injection, fast and slow extraction, beam cleaning and dumping, acceleration. Possible solutions, based on presently available technology, will be sketched and potential limitations or difficulties indicated. The paper will focus on the case of a Super-SPS sharing the same tunnel with the present CERN SPS.

  8. Velocity distribution of high-energy particles and the solar neutrino problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jian-Miin Liu

    2001-08-18

    High energy infers high velocity and high velocity is a concept of special relativity. The Maxwellian velocity distribution is corrected to be consistent with special relativity. The corrected distribution reduces to the Maxwellian distribution for small velocities, contains a relatively depleted high-energy tail and vanishes at the velocity of light. This corrected distribution will lower solar neutrino fluxes and change solar neutrino energy spectra but keep solar sound speeds.

  9. Overview of the use of the PCI bus in present and future high energy physics data acquisition systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Praag, A; Matheys, J P; Van de Vyvre, P; Anguelov, T; Georgiev, G; Piperov, S; Vankov, I; Gillot, D; Guglielmi, A M; Orel, O; Sytin, A N

    1995-01-01

    Overview of the use of the PCI bus in present and future high energy physics data acquisition systems

  10. High-Energy Fuel Ion Diagnostics on ITER Derived from Neutron Emission Spectroscopy Measurements on JET DT Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High-Energy Fuel Ion Diagnostics on ITER Derived from Neutron Emission Spectroscopy Measurements on JET DT Plasmas

  11. Study of the Shadow of the Moon in Very High Energy Cosmic Rays with the Milagrito Water Cherenkov Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Study of the Shadow of the Moon in Very High Energy Cosmic Rays with the Milagrito Water Cherenkov of the Moon in Very High Energy Cosmic Rays with the Milagrito Water Cherenkov Detector by Morgan O of California at Riverside 2001 #12; Study of the Shadow of the Moon in Very High Energy Cosmic Rays

  12. Digital Frequency Domain Multiplexer for mm-Wavelength Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobbs, Matt

    2008-01-01

    for Large Scale Bolometer Arrays”, Monterey Far-IR, Sub-mmand mm Detector Technology Workshop proceedings, 2002, pp.Domain Multiplexer for mm-Wavelength Telescopes Matt Dobbs,

  13. Environmental effects on TPB wavelength-shifting coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiu, C. S.

    The scintillation detection systems of liquid argon time projection chambers (LArTPCs) require wavelength shifters to detect the 128 nm scintillation light produced in liquid argon. Tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) is a fluorescent ...

  14. Stability of Wavelengths and Spatiotemporal Intermittency in Coupled Map Lattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Lambert; R. Lima

    1994-08-01

    In relation to spatiotemporal intermittency, as it can be observed in coupled map lattices, we study the stability of different wavelengths in competition. Introducing a two dimensional map, we compare its dynamics with the one of the whole lattice. We conclude a good agreement between the two. The reduced model also allows to introduce an order parameter which combines the diffusion parameter and the spatial wavelength under consideration.

  15. Short-Pulse Lasers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDidDevelopment Top Scientific Impact SinceServiceShipping ToShort-Pulse

  16. Inter-network regions of the Sun at millimetre wavelengths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Wedemeyer-Boehm; H. -G. Ludwig; M. Steffen; J. Leenaarts; B. Freytag

    2007-05-18

    The continuum intensity at wavelengths around 1 mm provides an excellent way to probe the solar chromosphere. Future high-resolution millimetre arrays, such as the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), will thus produce valuable input for the ongoing controversy on the thermal structure and the dynamics of this layer. Synthetic brightness temperature maps are calculated on basis of three-dimensional radiation (magneto-)hydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. While the millimetre continuum at 0.3mm originates mainly from the upper photosphere, the longer wavelengths considered here map the low and middle chromosphere. The effective formation height increases generally with wavelength and also from disk-centre towards the solar limb. The average intensity contribution functions are usually rather broad and in some cases they are even double-peaked as there are contributions from hot shock waves and cool post-shock regions in the model chromosphere. Taking into account the deviations from ionisation equilibrium for hydrogen gives a less strong variation of the electron density and with it of the optical depth. The result is a narrower formation height range. The average brightness temperature increases with wavelength and towards the limb. The relative contrast depends on wavelength in the same way as the average intensity but decreases towards the limb. The dependence of the brightness temperature distribution on wavelength and disk-position can be explained with the differences in formation height and the variation of temperature fluctuations with height in the model atmospheres.

  17. Efficient Excitation of Gain-Saturated Sub-9-nm-Wavelength Tabletop Soft-X-Ray Lasers and Lasing Down to 7.36 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alessi, David [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Wang, Yong [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Luther, Brad [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Yin, Liang [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Martz, Dale [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Woolston, Mark [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Liu, Yanwei [University of California, Berkeley & LBNL; Berrill, Mark A [ORNL; Jorge, Rocca [Colorado State University, Fort Collins

    2011-01-01

    We have demonstrated the efficient generation of sub-9-nm-wavelength picosecond laser pulses of microjoule energy at 1-Hz repetition rate with a tabletop laser. Gain-saturated lasing was obtained at =8.85 nm in nickel-like lanthanum ions excited by collisional electron-impact excitation in a precreated plasma column heated by a picosecond optical laser pulse of 4-J energy. Furthermore, isoelectronic scaling along the lanthanide series resulted in lasing at wavelengths as short as =7.36 nm. Simulations show that the collisionally broadened atomic transitions in these dense plasmas can support the amplification of subpicosecond soft-x-ray laser pulses.

  18. Short times characterisations of stochasticity in nonintegrable galactic potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henry E. Kandrup; M. Elaine Mahon

    1994-10-20

    This paper proposes an alternative characterisation of the degree of stochasticity exhibited by orbits in a fixed galactic potential. This differs from earlier work involving Liapounov exponents by focusing on the statistical properties of ensembles of trajectories, rather than individual orbits, and by restricting attention to the properties of these ensembles over time scales shorter than the age of the Universe, t_H. For many potentials, generic ensembles of initial conditions corresponding to stochastic orbits exhibit a rapid evolution towards an invariant measure $\\Gamma$, the natural unit to consider if one is interested in self-consistent equilibria. The basic idea is to compute short time Liapounov exponents ${\\chi}(Dt)$ over time intervals $Dt$ for orbits in an ensemble that samples $\\Gamma$, and to analyse the overall distribution of these ${\\chi}$'s. One finds that time averages and ensemble averages coincide, so that the form of the distribution of short time ${\\chi}(Dt)$'s for such an ensemble is actually encoded in the calculation of ${\\chi}(t)$ for a single orbit over long times $t>>t_{H}$. The distribution of short time ${\\chi}$'s is analysed as a function of the energy E of orbits in the ensemble and the length of the short time sampling interval ${\\D}t$. For relatively high energies, the distribution is essentially Gaussian, the dispersion decreasing with time as $t^{-p}$, with an exponent 0

  19. High Energy Density Physics and Applications with a State-of-the-Art Compact X-Pinch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beg, Farhat N

    2013-08-14

    Recent advances in technology has made possible to create matter with extremely high energy density (energy densities and pressure exceeding 1011 J/m3 and 1 Mbar respectively). The field is new and complex. The basic question for high energy density physics (HEDP) is how does matter behave under extreme conditions of temperature, pressure, density and electromagnetic radiation? The conditions for studying HEDP are normally produced using high intensity short pulse laser, x-rays, particle beams and pulsed power z-pinches. Most of these installations occupy a large laboratory floor space and require a team consisting of a large number of scientists and engineers. This limits the number of experiments that can be performed to explore and understand the complex physics. A novel way of studying HEDP is with a compact x-pinch in university scale laboratory. The x-pinch is a configuration in which a pulsed current is passed through two or more wires placed between the electrodes making the shape of the letter ‘X’. Extreme conditions of magnetic field (> 200 MGauss for less than 1 ns), temperature (1 keV) and density (~ 1022 cm-3) are produced at the cross-point, where two wires make contact. Further, supersonic jets are produced on either side of the cross-point. The physics of the formation of the plasma at the cross-point is complex. It is not clear what role radiation plays in the formation of high energy density plasma (>> 1011 J/m3) at the cross-point. Nor it is understood how the supersonic jets are formed. Present numerical codes do not contain complex physics that can take into account some of these aspects. Indeed, a comprehensive experimental study could answer some of the questions, which are relevant to wide-ranging fields such as inertial confinement fusion, astrophysical plasmas, high intensity laser plasma interactions and radiation physics. The main aim of the proposal was to increase the fundamental understanding of high energy density physics and particularly address the key issues associated with x-pinches, which include radiation transport, energetic particle transport, supersonic jet formation, using state-of-the-art compact pulsed power drivers. All the primary objectives of the proposed work were met. These objectives include: • Understanding of the fundamental physics of hot and dense plasma formation, implosion to less than 1 µm size due to the radiation enhanced collapse and energetic electron heating, • Study of the jet formation mechanism, which is of interest due to the astrophysical jets and deposition of energy by energetic electrons in jets, • Characterization of an x-pinch as a point x-ray source for the phase contrast radiography of beryllium cryogenic targets for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) experiments. The work carried out included a strong educational component involving both undergraduate and graduate students. Several undergraduate students from University of California San Diego participated in this project. A post-doctoral fellow, Dr. Simon Bott and two graduate students, David Haas and Erik Shipton contributed to every aspect of this project. The success of the project can be judged from the fact that fifteen peer-reviewed papers were published in high quality journals. In addition several presentations were made to a number of scientific meetings.

  20. INTEGRAL high energy sky: The keV to MeV cosmic sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Ubertini; A. De Rosa; A. Bazzano; L. Bassani; V. Sguera

    2008-02-03

    After almost 5 years of operation, ESA's International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) Space Observatory has unveiled a new soft Gamma ray sky and produced a remarkable harvest of results, ranging from identification of new high energy sources, to the discovery of dozens of variable sources to the mapping of the Aluminum emission from the Galaxy Plane to the presence of electrons and positrons generating the annihilation line in the Galaxy central radian. INTEGRAL is continuing the deep observations of the Galactic Plane and of the whole sky in the soft Gamma ray range. The new IBIS gamma ray catalogue contains more than 420 sources detected above 20 keV. We present a view of the INTEGRAL high energy sky with particular regard to sources emitting at high energy, including Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), HESS/MAGIC counterparts and new view of the cosmic gamma ray diffuse background.

  1. Exploration of Plasma Jets Approach to High Energy Density Physics. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Chiping

    2013-08-26

    High-energy-density laboratory plasma (HEDLP) physics is an emerging, important area of research in plasma physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics, and particle acceleration. While the HEDLP regime occurs at extreme conditions which are often found naturally in space but not on the earth, it may be accessible by colliding high intensity plasmas such as high-energy-density plasma jets, plasmoids or compact toroids from plasma guns. The physics of plasma jets is investigated in the context of high energy density laboratory plasma research. This report summarizes results of theoretical and computational investigation of a plasma jet undergoing adiabatic compression and adiabatic expansion. A root-mean-squared (rms) envelope theory of plasma jets is developed. Comparison between theory and experiment is made. Good agreement between theory and experiment is found.

  2. The Cause of Photospheric and Helioseismic Responses to Solar Flares: High-Energy Electrons or Protons?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. G. Kosovichev

    2007-10-03

    Analysis of the hydrodynamic and helioseismic effects in the photosphere during the solar flare of July 23, 2002, observed by Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) on SOHO, and high-energy images from RHESSI shows that these effects are closely associated with sources of the hard X-ray emission, and that there are no such effects in the centroid region of the flare gamma-ray emission. These results demonstrate that contrary to expectations the hydrodynamic and helioseismic responses (''sunquakes") are more likely to be caused by accelerated electrons than by high-energy protons. A series of multiple impulses of high-energy electrons forms a hydrodynamic source moving in the photosphere with a supersonic speed. The moving source plays a critical role in the formation of the anisotropic wave front of sunquakes.

  3. Discovery of two candidate pulsar wind nebulae in very-high-energy gamma rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. E. S. S. Collaboration; :; F. Aharonian

    2007-05-11

    We present the discovery of two very-high-energy gamma-ray sources in an ongoing systematic search for emission above 100 GeV from pulsar wind nebulae in survey data from the H.E.S.S. telescope array. Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes are ideal tools for searching for extended emission from pulsar wind nebulae in the very-high-energy regime. H.E.S.S., with its large field of view of 5 degrees and high sensitivity, gives new prospects for the search for these objects. An ongoing systematic search for very-high-energy emission from energetic pulsars over the region of the Galactic plane between -60 degrees wind nebulae, HESS J1718-385 and HESS J1809-193. H.E.S.S. has proven to be a suitable instrument for pulsar wind nebula searches.

  4. Resummation in nonlinear equation for high energy factorizable gluon density and its extension to include coherence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krzysztof Kutak

    2012-11-16

    Motivated by forthcoming p-Pb experiments at Large Hadron Collider which require both knowledge of gluon densities accounting for saturation and for processes at a wide range of $p_t$ we study basic momentum space evolution equations of high energy QCD factorization. Solutions of those equations might be used to form a set of gluon densities to calculate observables in generalized high energy factorization. Moreover in order to provide a framework for predictions for exclusive final states in p-Pb scattering with high $p_t$ we rewrite the equation for the high energy factorizable gluon density in a resummed form, similarly to what has been done in \\cite{Kutak:2011fu} for the BK equation. The resummed equation is then extended to account for colour coherence. This introduces an external scale to the evolution of the gluon density, and therefore makes it applicable in studies of final states.

  5. Very-high-energy gamma radiation associated with the unshocked wind of the Crab pulsar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. V. Bogovalov; F. A. Aharonian

    2000-03-11

    We show that the relativistic wind in the Crab pulsar, which is commonly thought to be invisible in the region upstream of the termination shock at R wind that is not accessible at other wavelengths.

  6. Wavelength calibration of the JWST-MIRI medium resolution spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez-Galarza, J R; Hernan-Caballero, A; Azzollini, R; Glasse, A; Kendrew, S; Brandl, B; Lahuis, F

    2010-01-01

    We present the wavelength and spectral resolution characterisation of the Integral Field Unit (IFU) Medium Resolution Spectrometer for the Mid-InfraRed Instrument (MIRI), to fly onboard the James Webb Space Telescope in 2014. We use data collected using the Verification Model of the instrument and develop an empirical method to calibrate properties such as wavelength range and resolving power in a portion of the spectrometer's full spectral range (5-28 microns). We test our results against optical models to verify the system requirements and combine them with a study of the fringing pattern in the instrument's detector to provide a more accurate calibration. We show that MIRI's IFU spectrometer will be able to produce spectra with a resolving power above R=2800 in the wavelength range 6.46-7.70 microns, and that the unresolved spectral lines are well fitted by a Gaussian profile.

  7. Residual zonal flows in tokamaks and stellarators at arbitrary wavelengths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monreal, P; Sánchez, E; Parra, F I; Bustos, A; Könies, A; Kleiber, R; Görler, T

    2015-01-01

    In the linear collisionless limit, a zonal potential perturbation in a toroidal plasma relaxes, in general, to a non-zero residual value. Expressions for the residual value in tokamak and stellarator geometries, and for arbitrary wavelengths, are derived. These expressions involve averages over the lowest order particle trajectories, that typically cannot be evaluated analytically. In this work, an efficient numerical method for the evaluation of such expressions is reported. It is shown that this method is faster than direct gyrokinetic simulations. Calculations of the residual value in stellarators are provided for much shorter wavelengths than previously available in the literature. Electrons must be treated kinetically in stellarators because, unlike in tokamaks, kinetic electrons modify the residual value even at long wavelengths. This effect, that had already been predicted theoretically, is confirmed by gyrokinetic simulations.

  8. Innovation in Scholarly Communication Vision and Projects from High-Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heuer, Rolf-Dieter; Mele, Salvatore; 10.3233/ISU-2008-0570

    2008-01-01

    Having always been at the forefront of information management and open access, High-Energy Physics (HEP) proves to be an ideal test-bed for innovations in scholarly communication including new information and communication technologies. Three selected topics of scholarly communication in High-Energy Physics are presented here: A new open access business model, SCOAP3, a world-wide sponsoring consortium for peer-reviewed HEP literature; the design, development and deployment of an e-infrastructure for information management; and the emerging debate on long-term preservation, re-use and (open) access to HEP data.

  9. Research and Development towards a Detector for a High Energy Electron-Positron Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruce A. Schumm

    2001-11-01

    This exposition provides a detailed picture of ongoing and planned activities towards the development of a detector for a high-energy Linear Collider. Cases for which research and development activity does not exist, or needs to be bolstered, are identified for the various subsystems. The case is made that the full exploitation of the potential of a high-energy Linear Collider will require the augmentation of existing detector technology and simulation capability, and that this program should become a major focus of the worldwide particle physics community should the construction of a Linear Collider become likely.

  10. Unidirectional and Wavelength Selective Photonic Sphere-Array Nanoantennas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yang G; Sha, Wei E I; Chew, Weng Cho

    2015-01-01

    We design a photonic sphere-array nanoantenna (NA) exhibiting both strong directionality and wavelength selectivity. Although the geometric configuration of the photonic NA resembles a plasmonic Yagi-Uda NA, it has different working principles, and most importantly, reduces the inherent metallic loss from plasmonic elements. For any selected optical wavelength, a sharp Fano-resonance by the reflector is tunable to overlap spectrally with a wider dipole resonance by the sphere-chain director leading to the high directionality. The work provides design principles for directional and selective photonic NAs, which is particularly useful for photon detection and spontaneous emission manipulation.

  11. SHORT NARRATIVE ABOUT PROMISING PRACTICES

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ATTACHMENT 2 SHORT NARRATIVE ABOUT PROMISING PRACTICES Briefly identify a policy, practice or procedure where your agency has been successful in the implementation of actions...

  12. SHACKLING SHORT SELLERS: THE 2008 SHORTING BAN Ekkehart Boehmer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xiaodong

    degradation in market quality, as measured by spreads, price impacts, and intraday volatility. Prices,000 financial stocks. In this paper, we study changes in stock prices, the rate of short sales most short sales in nearly 1,000 financial stocks. In this paper, we study changes in stock prices

  13. he high-energy physics (HEP) com-munity engaged in the European Cen-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    T he high-energy physics (HEP) com- munity engaged in the European Cen- ter for Nuclear Research for collaboration among scientists located around the world. The massive, globally distributed data sets level by 2010. Distributing these data sets to scientists and computing centers around the world

  14. Rapidity dependence of the photon to pion production ratio in high energy collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jamal Jalilian-Marian

    2007-03-22

    We investigate rapidity dependence of the ratio of photon and pion production cross sections in high energy proton (deuteron) - nucleus collisions at RHIC and LHC. This ratio, and its rapidity dependence can be a sensitive probe of high density QCD (Color Glass Condensate) dynamics and shed further light on the role of saturation physics at RHIC and LHC.

  15. Measurement of the flux of ultra high energy cosmic rays using data from very inclined air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hebbeker, Thomas

    Measurement of the flux of ultra high energy cosmic rays using data from very inclined air showers.1.2 Cosmic rays above 100 TeV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 3.2 Extensive air-model of the hadronic cascade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 3.3 Very inclined air showers

  16. On the history of multi-particle production in high energy collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Gazdzicki

    2012-01-02

    The 60th birthday of Johann Rafelski was celebrated during the Strangeness in Quark Matter 2011 in Krakow. Johann was born in Krakow and he initiated the series of the SQM conferences. This report, which briefly presents my personal view on a history of multi-particle production in high energy collisions, is dedicated to Johann.

  17. Ultra-low repetition rate mode-locked fiber laser with high-energy pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kobtsev, Sergei M.

    of research into passively mode- locked fiber laser with a record-setting optical length of the resonant-repetition rate high- energy picosecond pulses from a single-wall carbon nanotube mode-locked fiber laser," presented at the Optical Amplifiers and their Applications Conference (OAA 2006), Whistler, British Columbia

  18. High energy physics research. Final report, October 1, 1969--December 31, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-05-01

    The goal of this research was to understand the fundamental constituents of matter and their interactions. First, a brief history of the high energy research at Princeton University is presented. Next, the extensive research covered in this 21 year period is summarized. Finally, a list of all publications issued during this period is presented.

  19. Be7(p,gamma)B8 and the high-energy solar neutrino flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Attila Csoto

    1997-04-23

    The importance of the Be7(p,gamma)B8 reaction in predicting the high-energy solar neutrino flux is discussed. I present a microscopic eight-body model and a potential model for the calculation of the Be7(p,gamma)B8 cross section.

  20. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, January 1, 1993--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoessow, P.; Moonier, P.; Talaga, R.; Wagner, R. [eds.

    1993-12-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of January 1, 1993--June 30, 1993. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included.

  1. High Energy Physics: Report of research accomplishments and future goals, FY 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1991-09-05

    This report discusses high energy physics research in the following areas: Research in theoretical physics; phenomenology; experimental computer facility at Caltech; Beijing BES; MACRO; CLEO II; SLD; L3 at LEP; the B Factory R & D Program; SSC GEM Detector; and a high resolution barium fluoride calorimeter for the SSC.

  2. 30TH INTERNATIONAL COSMIC RAY CONFERENCE Radio Detection of UltraHigh Energy Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falcke, Heino

    offers a number of interesting advantages. Since radio waves suffer no attenuation, radio measurements30TH INTERNATIONAL COSMIC RAY CONFERENCE Radio Detection of Ultra­High Energy Cosmic Rays HEINO: The radio technique for the detection of cosmic particles has seen a major revival in recent years. New

  3. Ivan De Mitri VHE Gamma Ray Astronomy 1 Very High Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Thomas

    ~ 1/day Gamma Ray Bursts The X-ray counterpart detection with better pointing accuracy instrumentsIvan De Mitri VHE Gamma Ray Astronomy 1 Very High Energy Gamma Ray Astronomy Ivan De Mitri'Aquila, 11- Jun -2002 Photo F. Arneodo #12;Ivan De Mitri VHE Gamma Ray Astronomy 2 Seminar Outline Background

  4. HETE, the High Energy Transient Explorer : unlocking the mysteries of gamma ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monnelly, Glen Pickslay, 1973-

    2002-01-01

    The High Energy Transient Explorer (HETE), was built primarily at MIT and launched in October 2000 with the goal of studying Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) at X-ray and gamma-ray energies. A suite of instruments aboard HETE provide ...

  5. Title of dissertation: A SEARCH FOR BURSTS OF VERY HIGH ENERGY GAMMA RAYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    ABSTRACT Title of dissertation: A SEARCH FOR BURSTS OF VERY HIGH ENERGY GAMMA RAYS WITH MILAGRO though the search was optimized primarily for detecting the emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) or to any other kind of phenomena that produce bursts of VHE gamma rays. Measurements of the GRB spectra

  6. arXiv:physics/0211010v225Mar2003 Citation Networks in High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    arXiv:physics/0211010v225Mar2003 Citation Networks in High Energy Physics S. Lehmann, B. Lautrup. The probability that a given paper in the SPIRES data base has k citations is well described by simple power laws are presented that both represent the data well, one which generates power laws and one which generates

  7. In situ reflection high energy electron diffraction study of dehydrogenation process of Pd coated Mg nanoblades

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Gwo-Ching

    and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180-3590, USA Received 23 March 2008; accepted,2 Hydrogen has been con- sidered as one of the promising alternative energy resources due to its abundanceIn situ reflection high energy electron diffraction study of dehydrogenation process of Pd coated

  8. Toward high-energy-density, high-efficiency, and moderate-temperature chip-scale thermophotovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ). TPVs present an extremely appealing approach for small-scale power sources due to the combination-high-energy-density, high-efficiency, and small-scale portable power generation is addressed here using a distinctive- thermophotovoltaic (TPV) generator. The approach is predicted to be capable of up to 32% efficient heat

  9. Azimuthal anisotropy in high-energy heavy-ion collisions at RHIC energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ShinIchi Esumi

    2004-05-19

    Directed and elliptic event anisotropy parameters measured in the experiments at relativistic heavy-ion collider are presented. The possible origin of the measured elliptic anisotropy parameter $v_2$ and its sensitivity to the early phase of the high-energy heavy-ion collisions are discussed.

  10. THE NUCLEAR SPECTROSCOPIC TELESCOPE ARRAY (NuSTAR) HIGH-ENERGY X-RAY MISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakrabarty, Deepto

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) mission, launched on 2012 June 13, is the first focusing high-energy X-ray telescope in orbit. NuSTAR operates in the band from 3 to 79 keV, extending the sensitivity of ...

  11. High energy amplitude in the dipole approach with Pomeron loops: asymptotic solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Levin

    2005-11-07

    In this paper an analytical solution for the high energy scattering amplitude is suggested. This solution has several unexpected features:(i) the asymptotic amplitude is a function of dipole sizes and, therefore, this amplitude shows the gray disc structure at high energy, instead of black disc behaviour which was expected; (ii) the amplitude approaches the asymptotic limit in the same way as the solution to the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation does ($\\propto \\exp(- C Y^2) $), but the coefficient $C$ in eight times smaller than for the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation; (iii) the process of merging of two dipoles into one, only influences the high energy asymptotic behaviour by changing the initial condition from $Z(Y; [u_i = 1]) = 1 $ to $Z(Y; [u_i = 1 - \\gamma_{0,i}]) =1$. The value of $\\gamma_0$ is determined by the process of merging of two dipoles into one. With this new initial condition the Balitsky-JIMWLK approach describes the high energy asymptotic behaviour of the scattering amplitude without any modifications recently suggested.

  12. Ultra High Energy Neutrinos from Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows Using the Swift-UVOT Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nir, Guy; Landsman, Hagar; Behar, Ehud

    2015-01-01

    We consider a sample of 107 Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) for which early UV emission was measured by Swift, and extrapolate the photon intensity to lower energies. Protons accelerated in the GRB jet may interact with such photons to produce charged pions and subsequently ultra high energy neutrinos $\\varepsilon_\

  13. Milagro Search for Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts in the Swift Era

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Milagro Search for Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts in the Swift Era P. M. Saz an unprecedented number of rapid and accurate Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) localizations, facilitating a flurry of follow as the flares. INTRODUCTION Some of the most important contributions to our understanding of gamma-ray bursts

  14. Mechanisms of multiparticle production in heavy ion collisions at high energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Capella

    2003-03-19

    In the framework of a microscopic string model inclusive charged particle distribution and baryon and antibaryon production are described. The emphasis is put on high energies (RHIC) where shadowing corrections play a crucial role. Some recent developments on $J/\\psi$ suppression at CERN-SPS are also discussed. Possible consequences for the crucial issue of thermal equilibration of the produced system are considered.

  15. High Energy Solar Physics: Anticipating HESSI ASP Conference Series, Vol. xxx, 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Priest, Eric

    High Energy Solar Physics: Anticipating HESSI ASP Conference Series, Vol. xxx, 2000 R. Ramaty and N. Mandzhavidze, eds. Solar Flare Theory and the Status of Flare Understanding E.R. Priest Department current understanding of the mag­ netohydrodynamics of solar flares. The theory of reconnection in 2D

  16. Roadmap for Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Ray Physics and Astronomy (whitepaper for Snowmass 2013)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luis A. Anchordoqui; Glennys R. Farrar; John F. Krizmanic; Jim Matthews; John W. Mitchell; Dave Nitz; Angela V. Olinto; Thomas C. Paul; Pierre Sokolsky; Gordon B. Thomson; Thomas J. Weiler

    2013-07-29

    We summarize the remarkable recent progress in ultra-high energy cosmic ray physics and astronomy enabled by the current generation of cosmic ray observatories. We discuss the primary objectives for future measurements and describe the plans for near-term enhancements of existing experiments as well as the next generation of observatories.

  17. Roadmap for Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Ray Physics and Astronomy (whitepaper for Snowmass 2013)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anchordoqui, Luis A; Krizmanic, John F; Matthews, Jim; Mitchell, John W; Olinto, Angela V; Paul, Thomas C; Sokolsky, Pierre; Thomson, Gordon B; Weiler, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    We summarize the remarkable recent progress in ultra-high energy cosmic ray physics and astronomy enabled by the current generation of cosmic ray observatories. We discuss the primary objectives for future measurements and describe the plans for near-term enhancements of existing experiments as well as the next generation of observatories.

  18. Fermi Observations of High-Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from GRB 080916C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moskalenko, Igor V.

    2008, Fermi observed the exceptionally luminous GRB 080916C, with the largest apparent energy releaseFermi Observations of High-Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from GRB 080916C The Fermi LAT and Fermi GBM together record GRBs over a broad energy range spanning about 7 decades of gamma- ray energy. In September

  19. Complex workplace radiation fields at European high-energy accelerators and thermonuclear fusion facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bilski, P; D'Errico, F; Esposito, A; Fehrenbacher, G; Fernàndez, F; Fuchs, A; Golnik, N; Lacoste, V; Leuschner, A; Sandri, S; Silari, M; Spurny, F; Wiegel, B; Wright, P

    2006-01-01

    This report outlines the research needs and research activities within Europe to develop new and improved methods and techniques for the characterization of complex radiation fields at workplaces around high-energy accelerators and the next generation of thermonuclear fusion facilities under the auspices of the COordinated Network for RAdiation Dosimetry (CONRAD) project funded by the European Commission.

  20. Electromagnetic Surface Wave Propagation Applicable to UltraHigh Energy Neutrino

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electromagnetic Surface Wave Propagation Applicable to UltraHigh Energy Neutrino Detection Peter ultrahigh energy cosmic rays (UHECR), which would typically interact very close to the surface. Since of electromagnetic surface waves and their propagation is presented. The charged particle shower is modelled

  1. Interplanetary coronal mass ejection influence on high energy pick-up ions at Venus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    -up ions to higher energies at lower altitudes compared to undisturbed solar wind. HoweverInterplanetary coronal mass ejection influence on high energy pick-up ions at Venus T.R. McEnulty a Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Katlenburg-Lindau, Germany a r t i c l e i n f o

  2. Angle-Time-Energy Images of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Ray Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guenter Sigl

    1997-12-10

    Substantial amount of information both on the source and on characteristics of intercepting magnetic fields is encoded in the distribution in arrival times, directions, and energies of charged ultra-high energy cosmic rays from discrete sources. We present a numerical approach that allows to extract such information from data from next generation experiments.

  3. ccsd00001969, Particle-in-cell simulations of high energy electron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ccsd­00001969, version 2 ­ 23 Oct 2004 Particle-in-cell simulations of high energy electron energy electrons from the underdense plasmas are investigated using two dimensional particle- in-cell simulations. When the ratio of the laser power and a critical power of relativistic self

  4. Review on High energy String Scattering Amplitudes and Symmetries of String Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jen-Chi

    2015-01-01

    We review high energy symmetries of string theory at both the fixed angle or Gross regime (GR) and the fixed momentum transfer or Regge regime (RR). We calculated in details high energy string scattering amplitudes at arbitrary mass levels for both regimes. We discovered infinite linear relations among fixed angle string amplitudes conjectured by Gross in 1988 from decoupling of high energy zero-norm states (ZNS), and infinite recurrence relations among Regge string amplitudes from Kummer function U and Appell function F. In the GR/RR regime, all high energy string amplitudes can be solved by these linear/recurrence relations so that all GR/RR string amplitudes can be expressed in terms of one single GR/RR string amplitude. In addition, we found an interesting link between string amplitudes of the two regimes, and discovered that at each mass level the ratios among fixed angle amplitudes can be extracted from Regge string scattering amplitudes. This result enables us to argue that the known SL(5,C) dynamical ...

  5. Hydrogeological model of a high energy geothermal field (Bouillante area, Guadeloupe, French West Indies)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    (estimated at more than 30 millions m3 using tracer tests) suggest a relatively long (>> 100 years) residence1 Hydrogeological model of a high energy geothermal field (Bouillante area, Guadeloupe, French West, France 3. BRGM, Department of Geothermal Energy 3, Av. Claude Guillemin - 45060 Orléans Cedex 2, France

  6. Wavelet Analysis of the Arrival Directions of Ultra High Energy Cosmic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hebbeker, Thomas

    and an addi- tional minimal energy cut of 10 EeV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 7 Summary and outlook 69Wavelet Analysis of the Arrival Directions of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays at the Pierre Auger Institut A RWTH Aachen #12;#12;Contents 1 Introduction 1 2 Cosmic rays 3 2.1 Energy spectrum

  7. Method for generating high-energy and high repetition rate laser pulses from CW amplifiers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Shukui

    2013-06-18

    A method for obtaining high-energy, high repetition rate laser pulses simultaneously using continuous wave (CW) amplifiers is described. The method provides for generating micro-joule level energy in pico-second laser pulses at Mega-hertz repetition rates.

  8. High energy density, thin-lm, rechargeable lithium batteries for marine eld operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoway, Donald Robert

    High energy density, thin-®lm, rechargeable lithium batteries for marine ®eld operations Biying for marines in ®eld operations. With projected practical energy densities exceeding 300 Wh/kg, low safety dimensions are projected to have energy densities exceeding 350 Wh/kg and power densities exceeding 560 W

  9. High Energy Neutrino Physics with Liquid Scintillation Detectors John G. Learned #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Learned, John

    , and these point sharply back towards the sun. But this low energy capability still has not been enough to detectHigh Energy Neutrino Physics with Liquid Scintillation Detectors John G. Learned # Department scintillation detectors have been generally dedicated to low energy neutrino measure­ ments, in the MeV energy

  10. High Energy Neutrino Physics with Liquid Scintillation Detectors John G. Learned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Learned, John

    , and these point sharply back towards the sun. But this low energy capability still has not been enough to detectHigh Energy Neutrino Physics with Liquid Scintillation Detectors John G. Learned Department scintillation detectors have been generally dedicated to low energy neutrino measure- ments, in the MeV energy

  11. 28th International Cosmic Ray Conference 2293 Search for Extremely High Energy Gamma Rays with the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hörandel, Jörg R.

    their directions of incidence points back to their points of production. The highest gamma ray energies identified28th International Cosmic Ray Conference 2293 Search for Extremely High Energy Gamma Rays, 76021 Karlsruhe, Germany (2) Institut f¨ur Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, 76021 Karlsruhe

  12. Status of networking for high energy physics in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kunz, P.F.

    1985-06-01

    Networks are used extensively for High Energy Physics in the United States. Although the networks have grown in an ad hoc manner with connections typically being made to satisfy the needs of one detector group, they now encompass to large fraction of the US HEP community in one form or another. This paper summarizes the current status and experience with networks.

  13. DESIGN STUDY OF THE DIPOLE MAGNET FOR THE RHIC EBIS HIGH ENERGY TRANSPORT LINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DESIGN The bending section in EBIS HEBT line consists of two identical H type magnets with a slit betweenDESIGN STUDY OF THE DIPOLE MAGNET FOR THE RHIC EBIS HIGH ENERGY TRANSPORT LINE Takeshi Kanesue magnet body should be laminated. In this paper, design methods of the dipole magnet to optimize magnetic

  14. DESIGN AND VALIDATION OF A HIGH ENERGY DENSITY ELASTIC ACCUMULATOR USING POLYURETHANE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barth, Eric J.

    DESIGN AND VALIDATION OF A HIGH ENERGY DENSITY ELASTIC ACCUMULATOR USING POLYURETHANE Alexander-35%. However, the relatively low gravimetric and volumetric energy densities of conventional HAs prohibit them from being used in HRB is their low gravimetric energy density. Using linear analysis, spring

  15. Inertial Confinement Fusion, High Energy Density Plasmas and an Energy Source on Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inertial Confinement Fusion, High Energy Density Plasmas and an Energy Source on Earth Max Tabak ignition robust burn Supernova core MFE ICF ignition requires large energy and power densities Log10 Achieving the necessary multiplication of power,energy and mass densities requires a well controlled

  16. LibShortText: A Library for Short-text Classification and Analysis LibShortText: A Library for Short-text Classification and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Chih-Jen

    LibShortText: A Library for Short-text Classification and Analysis LibShortText: A Library for Short-text Classification and Analysis Hsiang-Fu Yu rofuyu@cs.utexas.edu Department of Computer Science University, Taipei 106, Taiwan Editor: Editor name Abstract LibShortText is an open source library for short

  17. V&V of MCNP 6.1.1 Beta Against Intermediate and High-Energy Experimental Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mashnik, Stepan G

    2014-09-08

    This report presents a set of validation and verification (V&V) MCNP 6.1.1 beta results calculated in parallel, with MPI, obtained using its event generators at intermediate and high-energies compared against various experimental data. It also contains several examples of results using the models at energies below 150 MeV, down to 10 MeV, where data libraries are normally used. This report can be considered as the forth part of a set of MCNP6 Testing Primers, after its first, LA-UR-11-05129, and second, LA-UR-11-05627, and third, LA-UR-26944, publications, but is devoted to V&V with the latest, 1.1 beta version of MCNP6. The MCNP6 test-problems discussed here are presented in the /VALIDATION_CEM/and/VALIDATION_LAQGSM/subdirectories in the MCNP6/Testing/directory. README files that contain short descriptions of every input file, the experiment, the quantity of interest that the experiment measures and its description in the MCNP6 output files, and the publication reference of that experiment are presented for every test problem. Templates for plotting the corresponding results with xmgrace as well as pdf files with figures representing the final results of our V&V efforts are presented. Several technical “bugs” in MCNP 6.1.1 beta were discovered during our current V&V of MCNP6 while running it in parallel with MPI using its event generators. These “bugs” are to be fixed in the following version of MCNP6. Our results show that MCNP 6.1.1 beta using its CEM03.03, LAQGSM03.03, Bertini, and INCL+ABLA, event generators describes, as a rule, reasonably well different intermediate- and high-energy measured data. This primer isn’t meant to be read from cover to cover. Readers may skip some sections and go directly to any test problem in which they are interested.

  18. IEEE INFOCOM 2002 1 Design of Wavelength Converting Switches for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Jonathan S.

    IEEE INFOCOM 2002 1 Design of Wavelength Converting Switches for Optical Burst Switching Jeyashankher Ramamirtham, Jonathan Turner Abstract-- Optical Burst Switching (OBS) is an experi- mental network- tronic control. In this paper, we study two designs for wave- length converting switches

  19. Metallic transmission screen for sub-wavelength focusing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    an approach to designing a general transmission func- tion T(x), which converts an arbitrary electric fieldMetallic transmission screen for sub-wavelength focusing A.M.H. Wong, C.D. Sarris and G.V. Eleftheriades A simple metallic transmission screen is proposed that is capable of focusing an incident plane

  20. Resonator design for a visible wavelength free-electron laser (*)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhowmik, A.; Lordi, N. . Rocketdyne Div.); Ben-Zvi, I.; Gallardo, J. )

    1990-01-01

    Design requirements for a visible wavelength free-electron laser being developed at the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory are presented along with predictions of laser performance from 3-D numerical simulations. The design and construction of the optical resonator, its alignment and control systems are also described. 15 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Magic wavelength for the hydrogen 1S-2S transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawasaki, Akio

    The magic wavelength for an optical lattice for hydrogen atoms that cancels the lowest order ac Stark shift of the 1S-2S transition is calculated to be 513 nm. The magnitudes of the ac Stark shift ?E = ?119 Hz/(kW/cm[superscript ...

  2. Tunnel junction multiple wavelength light-emitting diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olson, Jerry M. (Lakewood, CO); Kurtz, Sarah R. (Golden, CO)

    1992-01-01

    A multiple wavelength LED having a monolithic cascade cell structure comprising at least two p-n junctions, wherein each of said at least two p-n junctions have substantially different band gaps, and electrical connector means by which said at least two p-n junctions may be collectively energized; and wherein said diode comprises a tunnel junction or interconnect.

  3. Stellar Surface Convection, Line Asymmetries, and Wavelength Shifts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    dark spots. Sunspots, however, occupy only a very small fraction of the surface and (being dark granules and dark intergranular lanes. Granules correlate with local blueshifts (rising motion surface, a net wavelength shift results from the statistical bias of a larger photon contribution from

  4. Tunnel junction multiple wavelength light-emitting diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olson, J.M.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1992-11-24

    A multiple wavelength LED having a monolithic cascade cell structure comprising at least two p-n junctions, wherein each of said at least two p-n junctions have substantially different band gaps, and electrical connector means by which said at least two p-n junctions may be collectively energized; and wherein said diode comprises a tunnel junction or interconnect. 5 figs.

  5. Magic Wavelength for Hydrogen 1S-2S Transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawasaki, Akio

    2015-01-01

    The magic wavelength for an optical lattice for hydrogen atoms that cancels the first order AC Stark shift of 1S-2S transition is calculated to be 513 nm. The amount of AC Stark shift $ \\Delta E = -1.19$ kHz/(10kW/cm$^2$) and the slope $d\\Delta E/d \

  6. Blocking Analysis of Multifiber Wavelength-Routed Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jue, Jason P.

    will result in lower cost compared to networks with a single fiber per link and a large number of wavelengths. One reason for their attractiveness is that multifiber networks help to lower the blocking caused], an innovative reduced load approx- imation scheme with state-dependent arrival rate is developed for blocking

  7. Wavelength tunability of ion-bombardment-induced ripples on sapphire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou Hua; Wang Yiping; Zhou Lan; Headrick, Randall L.; Oezcan, Ahmet S.; Wang Yiyi; Oezaydin, Goezde; Ludwig, Karl F. Jr.; Siddons, D. Peter [Department of Physics, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05405 (United States); Department of Physics, Boston University, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

    2007-04-15

    A study of ripple formation on sapphire surfaces by 300-2000 eV Ar{sup +} ion bombardment is presented. Surface characterization by in-situ synchrotron grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering and ex-situ atomic force microscopy is performed in order to study the wavelength of ripples formed on sapphire (0001) surfaces. We find that the wavelength can be varied over a remarkably wide range--nearly two orders of magnitude--by changing the ion incidence angle. Within the linear theory regime, the ion induced viscous flow smoothing mechanism explains the general trends of the ripple wavelength at low temperature and incidence angles larger than 30 deg. . In this model, relaxation is confined to a few nm thick damaged surface layer. The behavior at high temperature suggests relaxation by surface diffusion. However, strong smoothing is inferred from the observed ripple wavelength near normal incidence, which is not consistent with either surface diffusion or viscous flow relaxation.

  8. IMAGES OF GRADUAL MILLIMETER EMISSION AND MULTI--WAVELENGTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Stephen

    SOLAR FLARE Adriana V. R. Silva \\Lambda Solar Astronomy 264­33, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 R. P. Lin--rays and at microwave frequencies, followed by a gradual decay phase. The gradual phase was also detected at 86 GHz: a footpoint and a loop top source. Nonthermal emissions at microwave and hard X--ray wavelengths are analyzed

  9. arXiv:0709.2711v1[astro-ph]17Sep2007 Population synthesis at short wavelengths and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buzzoni, Alberto

    @inaoep.mx, mchavez@inaoep.mx, lino@inaoep.mx) 3 IAM - Instituto de Astronomia y Meteorologia, Universidad de

  10. Short Manual Software Modules for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ould Ahmedou, Mohameden

    1 Short Manual Software Modules for Format Conversion, Transformation, and Synthesis 1 Introduction This document includes a short description of calling syntax and handling of the software modules developed describes the software installation process, chapter 3 shows the calling syntax of the SIF-to-CDFG format

  11. The study of quark-gluon matter in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Andronic

    2012-10-30

    A short overview is given on the study of hot matter produced in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions, with emphasis on recent measurements at the LHC.

  12. Cavity-enhanced resonant tunneling photodetector at telecommunication wavelengths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfenning, Andreas Hartmann, Fabian; Langer, Fabian; Höfling, Sven; Kamp, Martin; Worschech, Lukas

    2014-03-10

    An AlGaAs/GaAs double barrier resonant tunneling diode (RTD) with a nearby lattice-matched GaInNAs absorption layer was integrated into an optical cavity consisting of five and seven GaAs/AlAs layers to demonstrate cavity enhanced photodetection at the telecommunication wavelength 1.3??m. The samples were grown by molecular beam epitaxy and RTD-mesas with ring-shaped contacts were fabricated. Electrical and optical properties were investigated at room temperature. The detector shows maximum photocurrent for the optical resonance at a wavelength of 1.29??m. At resonance a high sensitivity of 3.1×10{sup 4} A/W and a response up to several pA per photon at room temperature were found.

  13. Wavelength-resonant surface-emitting semiconductor laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brueck, Steven R. J. (Albuquerque, NM); Schaus, Christian F. (Albuquerque, NM); Osinski, Marek A. (Albuquerque, NM); McInerney, John G. (Cedar Crest, NM); Raja, M. Yasin A. (Albuquerque, NM); Brennan, Thomas M. (Albuquerque, NM); Hammons, Burrell E. (Tijeras, NM)

    1989-01-01

    A wavelength resonant semiconductor gain medium is disclosed. The essential feature of this medium is a multiplicity of quantum-well gain regions separated by semiconductor spacer regions of higher bandgap. Each period of this medium consisting of one quantum-well region and the adjacent spacer region is chosen such that the total width is equal to an integral multiple of 1/2 the wavelength in the medium of the radiation with which the medium is interacting. Optical, electron-beam and electrical injection pumping of the medium is disclosed. This medium may be used as a laser medium for single devices or arrays either with or without reflectors, which may be either semiconductor or external.

  14. Three dimensional imaging detector employing wavelength-shifting optical fibers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Worstell, W.A.

    1997-02-04

    A novel detector element structure and method for its use is provided. In a preferred embodiment, one or more inorganic scintillating crystals are coupled through wavelength shifting optical fibers (WLSFs) to position sensitive photomultipliers (PS-PMTs). The superior detector configuration in accordance with this invention is designed for an array of applications in high spatial resolution gamma ray sensing with particular application to SPECT, PET and PVI imaging systems. The design provides better position resolution than prior art devices at a lower total cost. By employing wavelength shifting fibers (WLSFs), the sensor configuration of this invention can operate with a significant reduction in the number of photomultipliers and electronics channels, while potentially improving the resolution of the system by allowing three dimensional reconstruction of energy deposition positions. 11 figs.

  15. Three dimensional imaging detector employing wavelength-shifting optical fibers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Worstell, William A. (Framingham, MA)

    1997-01-01

    A novel detector element structure and method for its use is provided. In a preferred embodiment, one or more inorganic scintillating crystals are coupled through wavelength shifting optical fibers (WLSFs) to position sensitive photomultipliers (PS-PMTs). The superior detector configuration in accordance with this invention is designed for an array of applications in high spatial resolution gamma ray sensing with particular application to SPECT, PET and PVI imaging systems. The design provides better position resolution than prior art devices at a lower total cost. By employing wavelength shifting fibers (WLSFs), the sensor configuration of this invention can operate with a significant reduction in the number of photomultipliers and electronics channels, while potentially improving the resolution of the system by allowing three dimensional reconstruction of energy deposition positions.

  16. Apparatus for generating coherent infrared energy of selected wavelength

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stevens, Charles G. (Danville, CA)

    1985-01-01

    A tunable source (11) of coherent infrared energy includes a heat pipe (12) having an intermediate region (24) at which cesium (22) is heated to vaporizing temperature and end regions (27, 28) at which the vapor is condensed and returned to the intermediate region (24) for reheating and recirculation. Optical pumping light (43) is directed along the axis of the heat pipe (12) through a first end window (17) to stimulate emission of coherent infrared energy which is transmitted out through an opposite end window (18). A porous walled tubulation (44) extends along the axis of the heat pipe (12) and defines a region (46) in which cesium vapor is further heated to a temperature sufficient to dissociate cesium dimers which would decrease efficiency by absorbing pump light (43). Efficient generation of any desired infrared wavelength is realized by varying the wavelength of the pump light (43).

  17. Semiconductor light source with electrically tunable emission wavelength

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Belenky, Gregory (Port Jefferson, NY); Bruno, John D. (Bowie, MD); Kisin, Mikhail V. (Centereach, NY); Luryi, Serge (Setauket, NY); Shterengas, Leon (Centereach, NY); Suchalkin, Sergey (Centereach, NY); Tober, Richard L. (Elkridge, MD)

    2011-01-25

    A semiconductor light source comprises a substrate, lower and upper claddings, a waveguide region with imbedded active area, and electrical contacts to provide voltage necessary for the wavelength tuning. The active region includes single or several heterojunction periods sandwiched between charge accumulation layers. Each of the active region periods comprises higher and lower affinity semiconductor layers with type-II band alignment. The charge carrier accumulation in the charge accumulation layers results in electric field build-up and leads to the formation of generally triangular electron and hole potential wells in the higher and lower affinity layers. Nonequillibrium carriers can be created in the active region by means of electrical injection or optical pumping. The ground state energy in the triangular wells and the radiation wavelength can be tuned by changing the voltage drop across the active region.

  18. High-energy mechanical milling of poly(methyl methacrylate), polyisoprene and poly(ethylene-alt-propylene)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High-energy mechanical milling of poly(methyl methacrylate), polyisoprene and poly November 1999; accepted 5 November 1999 Abstract High-energy mechanical milling has been performed on poly and subsequently narrows with increasing milling time. Solid-state mechanical milling promotes comparable decreases

  19. Propagation of super-high-energy cosmic rays in the Galaxy Jorg R. Horandel a,*, Nikolai N. Kalmykov b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hörandel, Jörg R.

    for the propagation in the magnetic fields. This method works best for the highest energy particles, since the timePropagation of super-high-energy cosmic rays in the Galaxy Jo¨rg R. Ho¨randel a,*, Nikolai N Available online 27 October 2006 Abstract The propagation of high-energy cosmic rays in the Galaxy

  20. Search for very high energy gamma rays from WIMP annihilations near the Sun with the Milagro detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Search for very high energy gamma rays from WIMP annihilations near the Sun with the Milagro ``dark matter''. A profusion of such neutralinos can accumulate near the Sun when they lose energy upon scattering and are gravitationally captured. Pair-annihilations of those neutralinos may produce very high-energy