Sample records for high-energy physics nuclear

  1. Physics of Nuclear Collisions at High Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwa, Rudolph C.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wide range of problems has been investigated in the research program during the period of this grant. Although the major effort has been in the subject of heavy-ion collisions, we have also studied problems in biological and other physical systems. The method of analysis used in reducing complex data in multiparticle production to simple descriptions can also be applied to the study of complex systems of very different nature. Phase transition is an important phenomenon in many areas of physics, and for heavy-ion collisions we study the fluctuations of multiplicities at the critical point. Human brain activities as revealed in EEG also involve fluctuations in time series, and we have found that our experience enables us to find the appropriate quantification of the fluctuations in ways that can differentiate stroke and normal subjects. The main topic that characterizes the research at Oregon in heavy-ion collisions is the recombination model for the treatment of the hadronization process. We have avoided the hydrodynamical model partly because there is already a large community engaged in it, but more significantly we have found the assumption of rapid thermalization unconvincing. Recent results in studying LHC physics lead us to provide more evidence that shower partons are very important even at low p_T, but are ignored by hydro. It is not easy to work in an environment where the conventional wisdom regards our approach as being incorrect because it does not adhere to the standard paradigm. But that is just what a vibrant research community needs: unconventional approach may find evidences that can challenge the orthodoxy. An example is the usual belief that elliptic flow in fluid dynamics gives rise to azimuthal anisotropy. We claim that it is only sufficient but not necessary. With more data from LHC and more independent thinkers working on the subject what is sufficient as a theory may turn out to be incorrect in reality. Another area of investigation that has long been associated with this PI is the study of quark-hadron phase transition in heavy-ion collisions. Finally, at LHC enough particles are produced to make feasible the investigation of intermittency and erraticity indices that we have proposed as signatures of that phase transition.

  2. High Energy Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientific Computing Research Basic Energy Sciences Biological and Environmental Research Fusion Energy Sciences High Energy Physics Nuclear Physics Advanced Scientific Computing...

  3. High Energy Physics and Nuclear Physics Network Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dart, Eli; Bauerdick, Lothar; Bell, Greg; Ciuffo, Leandro; Dasu, Sridhara; Dattoria, Vince; De, Kaushik; Ernst, Michael; Finkelson, Dale; Gottleib, Steven; Gutsche, Oliver; Habib, Salman; Hoeche, Stefan; Hughes-Jones, Richard; Ibarra, Julio; Johnston, William; Kisner, Theodore; Kowalski, Andy; Lauret, Jerome; Luitz, Steffen; Mackenzie, Paul; Maguire, Chales; Metzger, Joe; Monga, Inder; Ng, Cho-Kuen; Nielsen, Jason; Price, Larry; Porter, Jeff; Purschke, Martin; Rai, Gulshan; Roser, Rob; Schram, Malachi; Tull, Craig; Watson, Chip; Zurawski, Jason

    2014-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of SC programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements needed by instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 25 years. In August 2013, ESnet and the DOE SC Offices of High Energy Physics (HEP) and Nuclear Physics (NP) organized a review to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by the HEP and NP program offices. Several key findings resulted from the review. Among them: 1. The Large Hadron Collider?s ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC Apparatus) and CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) experiments are adopting remote input/output (I/O) as a core component of their data analysis infrastructure. This will significantly increase their demands on the network from both a reliability perspective and a performance perspective. 2. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments (particularly ATLAS and CMS) are working to integrate network awareness into the workflow systems that manage the large number of daily analysis jobs (1 million analysis jobs per day for ATLAS), which are an integral part of the experiments. Collaboration with networking organizations such as ESnet, and the consumption of performance data (e.g., from perfSONAR [PERformance Service Oriented Network monitoring Architecture]) are critical to the success of these efforts. 3. The international aspects of HEP and NP collaborations continue to expand. This includes the LHC experiments, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) experiments, the Belle II Collaboration, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), and others. The international nature of these collaborations makes them heavily reliant on transoceanic connectivity, which is subject to longer term service disruptions than terrestrial connectivity. The network engineering aspects of undersea connectivity will continue to be a significant part of the planning, deployment, and operation of the data analysis infrastructure for HEP and NP experiments for the foreseeable future. Given their critical dependency on networking services, the experiments have expressed the need for tight integration (both technically and operationally) of the domestic and the transoceanic parts of the network infrastructure that supports the experiments. 4. The datasets associated with simulations continue to increase in size, and the need to move these datasets between analysis centers is placing ever-increasing demands on networks and on data management systems at the supercomputing centers. In addition, there is a need to harmonize cybersecurity practice with the data transfer performance requirements of the science. This report expands on these points, and addresses others as well. The report contains a findings section in addition to the text of the case studies discussed during the review.

  4. The Future of High Energy Nuclear Physics in Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Schukraft

    2006-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In less than two years from now, the LHC at CERN will start operating with protons and later with heavy ions in the multi TeV energy range. With its unique physics potential and a strong, state-of-the complement of detectors, the LHC will provide the European, and in fact worldwide Nuclear Physics community, with a forefront facility to study nuclear matter under extreme conditions well into the next decade.

  5. NETWORKING FOR HIGH ENERGY AND NUCLEAR PHYSICS AS GLOBAL E-SCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    an overview of the status and outlook for the world's research networks, technology advances, and the problemNETWORKING FOR HIGH ENERGY AND NUCLEAR PHYSICS AS GLOBAL E-SCIENCE Harvey B Newman, California are vital for every phase of high energy physicists' work. Our bandwidth usage, and the typical capacity

  6. Large-x connections of nuclear and high-energy physics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Accardi, Alberto [Hampton U., JLAB

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I discuss how global QCD fits of parton distribution functions can make the somewhat separated fields of high-energy particle physics and lower energy hadronic and nuclear physics interact to the benefit of both. I review specific examples of this interplay from recent works of the CTEQ-Jefferson Lab collaboration, including hadron structure at large parton momentum and gauge boson production at colliders. I devote particular attention to quantifying theoretical uncertainties arising in the treatment of large partonic momentum contributions to deep inelastic scattering observables, and to discussing the experimental progress needed to reduce these.

  7. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 565 (2006) 650656 Semiconductor high-energy radiation scintillation detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luryi, Serge

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 565 (2006) 650­656 Semiconductor high-energy radiation scintillation detector A. Kastalskya , S. Luryia,Ă, B. Spivakb a University at Stony Brook, ECE scintillation-type detector in which high-energy radiation generates electron­hole pairs in a direct

  8. Theoretical High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christ, Norman H.; Weinberg, Erick J.

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    we provide reports from each of the six faculty supported by the Department of Energy High Energy Physics Theory grant at Columbia University. Each is followed by a bibliography of the references cited. A complete list of all of the publications in the 12/1/2010-04/30/2014 period resulting from research supported by this grant is provided in the following section. The final section lists the Ph.D. dissertations based on research supported by the grant that were submitted during this period.

  9. FSU High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prosper, Harrison B. [Florida State University; Adams, Todd [Florida State University; Askew, Andrew [Florida State University; Berg, Bernd [Florida State University; Blessing, Susan K. [Florida State University; Okui, Takemichi [Florida State University; Owens, Joseph F. [Florida State University; Reina, Laura [Florida State University; Wahl, Horst D. [Florida State University

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Energy Physics group at Florida State University (FSU), which was established in 1958, is engaged in the study of the fundamental constituents of matter and the laws by which they interact. The group comprises theoretical and experimental physicists, who sometimes collaborate on projects of mutual interest. The report highlights the main recent achievements of the group. Significant, recent, achievements of the group’s theoretical physicists include progress in making precise predictions in the theory of the Higgs boson and its associated processes, and in the theoretical understanding of mathematical quantities called parton distribution functions that are related to the structure of composite particles such as the proton. These functions are needed to compare data from particle collisions, such as the proton-proton collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), with theoretical predictions. The report also describes the progress in providing analogous functions for heavy nuclei, which find application in neutrino physics. The report highlights progress in understanding quantum field theory on a lattice of points in space and time (an area of study called lattice field theory), the progress in constructing several theories of potential new physics that can be tested at the LHC, and interesting new ideas in the theory of the inflationary expansion of the very early universe. The focus of the experimental physicists is the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at CERN. The report, however, also includes results from the D0 experiment at Fermilab to which the group made numerous contributions over a period of many years. The experimental group is particularly interested in looking for new physics at the LHC that may provide the necessary insight to extend the standard model (SM) of particle physics. Indeed, the search for new physics is the primary task of contemporary particle physics, one motivated by the need to explain certain facts, such as the non-zero neutrino masses or the overwhelming astrophysical evidence for an invisible form of matter, called dark matter, that has had a marked effect on the evolution of structure in the universe. The report highlights the main, recent, experimental achievements of the experimental group, which include the investigation of properties of the W and Z bosons; the search for new heavy stable charged particles and the search for a proposed property of nature called supersymmetry in proton-proton collisions that yield high energy photons. In addition, we report a few results from a more general search for supersymmetry at the LHC, initiated by the group. The report also highlights the group's significant contributions, both theoretical and experimental, to the 2012 discovery of the Higgs boson and the measurement of its properties.

  10. Proceedings of the Fourth International Workshop on Software Engineering and Artificial Intelligence for High Energy and Nuclear Physics, eds. B. Denby and D. PerretGallix, International Journal of Modern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Carsten

    Intelligence for High Energy and Nuclear Physics, eds. B. Denby and D. Perret­Gallix, International Journal on Software Engineering and Artificial Intelligence for High Energy and Nuclear Physics, Pisa, Italy, April 3

  11. LANL | Physics | High Energy Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Exploring the intensity frontier On the trail of one of the greatest mysteries in physics, researchers on the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) seek to discover why...

  12. HARD PARTON PHYSICS IN HIGH ENERGY NUCLEAR COLLISIONS. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, VOLUME 17

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CARROLL,J.

    1999-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The RIKEN-BNL center workshop on ''Hard parton physics in high energy nuclear collisions'' was held at BNL from March 1st-5th! 1999. The focus of the workshop was on hard probes of nucleus-nucleus collisions that will be measured at RHIC with the PHENIX and STAR detectors. There were about 45 speakers and over 70 registered participants at the workshop, with roughly a quarter of the speakers from overseas. About 60% of the talks were theory talks. A nice overview of theory for RHIC was provided by George Sterman. The theoretical talks were on a wide range of topics in QCD which can be classified under the following: (a) energy loss and the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal effect; (b) minijet production and equilibration; (c) small x physics and initial conditions; (d) nuclear parton distributions and shadowing; (e) spin physics; (f) photon, di-lepton, and charm production; and (g) hadronization, and simulations of high pt physics in event generators. Several of the experimental talks discussed the capabilities of the PHENIX and STAR detectors at RHIC in measuring high pt particles in heavy ion collisions. In general, these talks were included in the relevant theory sessions. A session was set aside to discuss the spin program at RHIC with polarized proton beams. In addition, there were speakers from 08, HERA, the fixed target experiments at Fermilab, and the CERN fixed target Pb+Pb program, who provided additional perspective on a range of issues of relevance to RHIC; from jets at the Tevatron, to saturation of parton distributions at HERA, and recent puzzling data on direct photon production in fixed target experiments, among others.

  13. A High Energy Nuclear Database Proposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David A. Brown; Ramona Vogt

    2005-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose to develop a high-energy heavy-ion experimental database and make it accessible to the scientific community through an on-line interace. This database will be searchable and cross-indexed with relevant publications, including published detector descriptions. Since this database will be a community resource, it requires the high-energy nuclear physics community's financial and manpower support. This database should eventually contain all published data from the Bevalac, AGS and SPS to RHIC and LHC energies, proton-proton to nucleus-nucleus collisions as well as other relevant systems and all measured observables. Such a database would have tremendous scientific payoff as it makes systematic studies easier and allows simpler benchmarking of theoretical models to a broad range of old and new experiments. Furthermore, there is a growing need for compilations of high-energy nuclear data for applications including stockpile stewardship, technology development for intertial confinement fusion and target and source development for upcoming facilities such as the Next Linear Collider. To enhance the utility of this database, we propose periodically performing evaluations of the data and summarizing the results in topical reviews.

  14. Participation in high energy physics, Task D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lederman, L.M.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following topics: Communication and Advancement of High Energy Physics; B-Quarks; Secondary Vertex Trigger; and Science Education.

  15. Frontiers for Discovery in High Energy Density Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, R. C.; Katsouleas, T.; Arons, J.; Baring, M.; Deeney, C.; Di Mauro, L.; Ditmire, T.; Falcone, R.; Hammer, D.; Hill, W.; Jacak, B.; Joshi, C.; Lamb, F.; Lee, R.; Logan, B. G.; Melissinos, A.; Meyerhofer, D.; Mori, W.; Murnane, M.; Remington, B.; Rosner, R.; Schneider, D.; Silvera, I.; Stone, J.; Wilde, B.; Zajc. W.

    2004-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The report is intended to identify the compelling research opportunities of high intellectual value in high energy density physics. The opportunities for discovery include the broad scope of this highly interdisciplinary field that spans a wide range of physics areas including plasma physics, laser and particle beam physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics, atomic and molecular physics, materials science and condensed matter physics, intense radiation-matter interaction physics, fluid dynamics, and magnetohydrodynamics

  16. Langston University - High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    snow, joel

    2012-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report is presented by Langston University (LU) for the project entitled "Langston University High Energy Physics" (LUHEP) under the direction of principal investigator (PI) and project director Professor Joel Snow. The project encompassed high energy physics research performed at hadron colliders. The PI is a collaborator on the DZero experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, IL, USA and the ATLAS experiment at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland and was during the entire project period from April 1, 1999 until May 14, 2012. Both experiments seek to understand the fundamental constituents of the physical universe and the forces that govern their interactions. In 1999 as member of the Online Systems group for Run 2 the PI developed a cross-platform Python-based, Graphical User Interface (GUI) application for monitoring and control of EPICS based devices for control room use. This served as a model for other developers to enhance and build on for further monitoring and control tasks written in Python. Subsequently the PI created and developed a cross-platform C++ GUI utilizing a networked client-server paradigm and based on ROOT, the object oriented analysis framework from CERN. The GUI served as a user interface to the Examine tasks running in the D\\O\\ control room which monitored the status and integrity of data taking for Run 2. The PI developed the histogram server/control interface to the GUI client for the EXAMINE processes. The histogram server was built from the ROOT framework and was integrated into the D\\O\\ framework used for online monitoring programs and offline analysis. The PI developed the first implementation of displaying histograms dynamically generated by ROOT in a Web Browser. The PI's work resulted in several talks and papers at international conferences and workshops. The PI established computing software infrastructure at LU and U. Oklahoma (OU) to do analysis of DZero production data and produce simulation data for the experiment. Eventually this included the FNAL SAM data grid system, the SAMGrid (SG) infrastructure, and the Open Science Grid software stacks for computing and storage elements. At the end of 2003 the PI took on the role of global Monte Carlo production coordinator for the DZero experiment. In January of 2004 the PI started working with the SAMGrid development team to help debug, deploy, and integrate SAMGrid with DZero Monte Carlo production. The PI installed and configured SG execution and client sites at LUHEP and OUHEP, and a SG scheduler site at LUHEP. The PI developed a python based GUI (DAJ) that acts as a front end for job submission to SAMGrid. The GUI interfaces to the DZero Mone Carlo (MC) request system that uses SAM to manage MC requests by the physics analysis groups. DAJ significantly simplified SG job submission and was deployed in DZero in an effort to increase the user base of SG. The following year was the advent of SAMGrid job submission to the Open Science Grid (OSG) and LHC Computing Grid (LCG) through a forwarding mechanism. The PI oversaw the integration of these grids into the existing production infrastructure. The PI developed an automatic MC (Automc) request processing system capable of operating without user intervention (other than getting grid credentials), and able to submit to any number of sites on various grids. The system manages production at all but 2 sites. The system was deployed at Fermilab and remains operating there today. The PI's work in distributed computing resulted in several talks at international conferences. UTA, OU, and LU were chosen as the collaborating institutions that form the Southwest Tier 2 Center (SWT2) for ATLAS. During the project period the PI contributed to the online and offline software infrastructure through his work with the Run 2 online group, and played a major role in Monte Carlo production for DZero. During the part of the project period in which the PI served as MC production coordinator MC production increased very significantly. In the first year of the PI's tenure as production coor

  17. Nuclear diffractive structure functions at high energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Marquet; H. Kowalski; T. Lappi; R. Venugopalan

    2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A future high-energy electron-ion collider would explore the non-linear weakly-coupled regime of QCD, and test the Color Glass Condensate (CGC) approach to high-energy scattering. Hard diffraction in deep inelastic scattering off nuclei will provide many fundamental measurements. In this work, the nuclear diffractive structure function F_{2,A}^D is predicted in the CGC framework, and the features of nuclear enhancement and suppression are discussed.

  18. Nuclear and High-Energy Astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridolin Weber

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There has never been a more exciting time in the overlapping areas of nuclear physics, particle physics and relativistic astrophysics than today. Orbiting observatories such as the Hubble Space Telescope, Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), Chandra X-ray satellite, and the X-ray Multi Mirror Mission (XMM) have extended our vision tremendously, allowing us to see vistas with an unprecedented clarity and angular resolution that previously were only imagined, enabling astrophysicists for the first time ever to perform detailed studies of large samples of galactic and extragalactic objects. On the Earth, radio telescopes (e.g., Arecibo, Green Bank, Parkes, VLA) and instruments using adaptive optics and other revolutionary techniques have exceeded previous expectations of what can be accomplished from the ground. The gravitational wave detectors LIGO, LISA VIRGO, and Geo-600 are opening up a window for the detection of gravitational waves emitted from compact stellar objects such as neutron stars and black holes. Together with new experimental forefront facilities like ISAC, ORLaND and RIA, these detectors provide direct, quantitative physical insight into nucleosynthesis, supernova dynamics, accreting compact objects, cosmic-ray acceleration, and pair-production in high energy sources which reinforce the urgent need for a strong and continuous feedback from nuclear and particle theory and theoretical astrophysics. In my lectures, I shall concentrate on three selected topics, which range from the behavior of superdense stellar matter, to general relativistic stellar models, to strange quark stars and possible signals of quark matter in neutron stars.

  19. Co-operation agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and the Government of Albania concerning Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High-Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Co-operation agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and the Government of Albania concerning Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High-Energy Physics

  20. Co-operation agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and the Government of People's Republic of Bangladesh concerning Education, Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High-Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Co-operation agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and the Government of People's Republic of Bangladesh concerning Education, Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High-Energy Physics

  1. Co-operation agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and the Government of Mongolia concerning Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High-Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Co-operation agreement between the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and the Government of Mongolia concerning Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High-Energy Physics

  2. Physics at high energy photon photon colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I review the physic prospects for high energy photon photon colliders, emphasizing results presented at the LBL Gamma Gamma Collider Workshop. Advantages and difficulties are reported for studies of QCD, the electroweak gauge sector, supersymmetry, and electroweak symmetry breaking.

  3. Research in High Energy Physics. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conway, John S.

    2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report details the work done from January 2010 until April 2013 in the area of experimental and theoretical high energy particle physics and cosmology at the University of California, Davis.

  4. Viscosity of High Energy Nuclear Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Parihar; A. Widom; D. Drosdoff; Y. N. Srivastava

    2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Relativistic high energy heavy ion collision cross sections have been interpreted in terms of almost ideal liquid droplets of nuclear matter. The experimental low viscosity of these nuclear fluids have been of considerable recent quantum chromodynamic interest. The viscosity is here discussed in terms of the string fragmentation models wherein the temperature dependence of the nuclear fluid viscosity obeys the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann law.

  5. Precision Crystal Calorimeters in High Energy Physics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ren-Yuan Zhu

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Precision crystal calorimeters traditionally play an important role in high energy physics experiments. In the last two decades, it faces a challenge to maintain its precision in a hostile radiation environment. This paper reviews the performance of crystal calorimeters constructed for high energy physics experiments and the progress achieved in understanding crystal?s radiation damage as well as in developing high quality scintillating crystals for particle physics. Potential applications of new generation scintillating crystals of high density and high light yield, such as LSO and LYSO, in particle physics experiments is also discussed.

  6. High Energy Physics Research at Louisiana Tech

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sawyer, Lee; Greenwood, Zeno; Wobisch, Marcus

    2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project was to create, maintain, and strengthen a world-class, nationally and internationally recognized experimental high energy physics group at Louisiana Tech University, focusing on research at the energy frontier of collider-based particle physics, first on the D? experiment and then with the ATLAS experiment, and providing leadership within the US high energy physics community in the areas of jet physics, top quark and charged Higgs decays involving tau leptons, as well as developing leadership in high performance computing.

  7. PARTICIPATION IN HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Christopher

    2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This grant funded experimental and theoretical activities in elementary particles physics at the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT). The experiments in which IIT faculty collaborated included the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment, the MINOS experiment, the Double Chooz experiment, and FNAL E871 - HyperCP experiment. Funds were used to support summer salary for faculty, salary for postdocs, and general support for graduate and undergraduate students. Funds were also used for travel expenses related to these projects and general supplies.

  8. UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutherfoord, John P. [University of Arizona] [University of Arizona; Johns, Kenneth A. [University of Arizona] [University of Arizona; Shupe, Michael A. [University of Arizona] [University of Arizona; Cheu, Elliott C. [University of Arizona] [University of Arizona; Varnes, Erich W. [University of Arizona] [University of Arizona; Dienes, Keith [University of Arizona] [University of Arizona; Su, Shufang [University of Arizona] [University of Arizona; Toussaint, William Doug [University of Arizona] [University of Arizona; Sarcevic, Ina [University of Arizona] [University of Arizona

    2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Energy Physics Group at the University of Arizona has conducted forefront research in elementary particle physics. Our theorists have developed new ideas in lattice QCD, SUSY phenomenology, string theory phenomenology, extra spatial dimensions, dark matter, and neutrino astrophysics. The experimentalists produced significant physics results on the ATLAS experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider and on the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron. In addition, the experimentalists were leaders in detector development and construction, and on service roles in these experiments.

  9. Exploration of Plasma Jets Approach to High Energy Density Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Chiping [Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    High-energy-density laboratory plasma (HEDLP) physics is an emerging, important area of research in plasma physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics, and particle acceleration. While the HEDLP regime occurs at extreme conditions which are often found naturally in space but not on the earth, it may be accessible by colliding high intensity plasmas such as high-energy-density plasma jets, plasmoids or compact toroids from plasma guns. The physics of plasma jets is investigated in the context of high energy density laboratory plasma research. This report summarizes results of theoretical and computational investigation of a plasma jet undergoing adiabatic compression and adiabatic expansion. A root-mean-squared (rms) envelope theory of plasma jets is developed. Comparison between theory and experiment is made. Good agreement between theory and experiment is found.

  10. Data Preservation in High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roman Kogler; David M. South; Michael Steder

    2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Data from high-energy physics experiments are collected with significant financial and human effort and are mostly unique. However, until recently no coherent strategy existed for data preservation and re-use, and many important and complex data sets have simply been lost. While the current focus is on the LHC at CERN, in the current period several important and unique experimental programs at other facilities are coming to an end, including those at HERA, b-factories and the Tevatron. To address this issue, an inter-experimental study group on HEP data preservation and long-term analysis (DPHEP) was convened at the end of 2008. The group now aims to publish a full and detailed review of the present status of data preservation in high energy physics. This contribution summarises the results of the DPHEP study group, describing the challenges of data preservation in high energy physics and the group's first conclusions and recommendations. The physics motivation for data preservation, generic computing and preservation models, technological expectations and governance aspects at local and international levels are examined.

  11. ISTC SAC Seminar "New Perspectives of High Energy Physics"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    13th ISTC SAC Seminar "New Perspectives of High Energy Physics" 15 September, 2010, Budker) is organizing the 13th SAC Seminar "New Perspectives of High Energy Physics", from 01 till 05 September 2010 of this Seminar is to report on the newest achievements and challenges in High Energy Physics and to identify

  12. Data mining in high energy physics Bertrand Brelier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prodić, Aleksandar

    Data mining in high energy physics Bertrand Brelier SOSCIP July 3, 2014 Bertrand Brelier (SOSCIP) Data mining in high energy physics July 3, 2014 1 / 8 #12;The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Bertrand Brelier (SOSCIP) Data mining in high energy physics July 3, 2014 2 / 8 #12;The ATLAS detector Bertrand

  13. NUCLEAR FLUID DYNAMICS VERSUS INTRANUCLEAR CASCADE--POSSIBLE EVIDENCE FOR COLLECTIVE FLOW IN CENTRAL HIGH ENERGY NUCLEAR COLLISIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stocker, H.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flow in Central High Energy Nuclear Collisions H. Stockera,theoretical models of high energy nuclear collisions andunder Contract High energy nuclear collisions offer a unique

  14. Oklahoma Center for High Energy Physics (OCHEP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Nandi; M.J. Strauss; J. Snow; F. Rizatdinova; B. Abbott; K. Babu; P. Gutierrez; C. Kao; A. Khanov; K.A. Milton; H. Neaman; H. Severini, P. Skubic

    2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE EPSCoR implementation grant, with the support from the State of Oklahoma and from the three universities, Oklahoma State University, University of Oklahoma and Langston University, resulted in establishing of the Oklahoma Center for High Energy Physics (OCHEP) in 2004. Currently, OCHEP continues to flourish as a vibrant hub for research in experimental and theoretical particle physics and an educational center in the State of Oklahoma. All goals of the original proposal were successfully accomplished. These include foun- dation of a new experimental particle physics group at OSU, the establishment of a Tier 2 computing facility for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and Tevatron data analysis at OU and organization of a vital particle physics research center in Oklahoma based on resources of the three universities. OSU has hired two tenure-track faculty members with initial support from the grant funds. Now both positions are supported through OSU budget. This new HEP Experimental Group at OSU has established itself as a full member of the Fermilab D0 Collaboration and LHC ATLAS Experiment and has secured external funds from the DOE and the NSF. These funds currently support 2 graduate students, 1 postdoctoral fellow, and 1 part-time engineer. The grant initiated creation of a Tier 2 computing facility at OU as part of the Southwest Tier 2 facility, and a permanent Research Scientist was hired at OU to maintain and run the facility. Permanent support for this position has now been provided through the OU university budget. OCHEP represents a successful model of cooperation of several universities, providing the establishment of critical mass of manpower, computing and hardware resources. This led to increasing Oklahoma�¢����s impact in all areas of HEP, theory, experiment, and computation. The Center personnel are involved in cutting edge research in experimental, theoretical, and computational aspects of High Energy Physics with the research areas ranging from the search for new phenomena at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider to theoretical modeling, computer simulation, detector development and testing, and physics analysis. OCHEP faculty members participating on the D0 collaboration at the Fermilab Tevatron and on the ATLAS collaboration at the CERN LHC have made major impact on the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson search, top quark studies, B physics studies, and measurements of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) phenomena. The OCHEP Grid computing facility consists of a large computer cluster which is playing a major role in data analysis and Monte Carlo productions for both the D0 and ATLAS experiments. Theoretical efforts are devoted to new ideas in Higgs bosons physics, extra dimensions, neutrino masses and oscillations, Grand Unified Theories, supersymmetric models, dark matter, and nonperturbative quantum field theory. Theory members are making major contributions to the understanding of phenomena being explored at the Tevatron and the LHC. They have proposed new models for Higgs bosons, and have suggested new signals for extra dimensions, and for the search of supersymmetric particles. During the seven year period when OCHEP was partially funded through the DOE EPSCoR implementation grant, OCHEP members published over 500 refereed journal articles and made over 200 invited presentations at major conferences. The Center is also involved in education and outreach activities by offering summer research programs for high school teachers and college students, and organizing summer workshops for high school teachers, sometimes coordinating with the Quarknet programs at OSU and OU. The details of the Center can be found in http://ochep.phy.okstate.edu.

  15. Physics of intense, high energy radiation effects.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Hartman, E. Frederick; Magyar, Rudolph J.; Crozier, Paul Stewart

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the work done in our three-year LDRD project titled 'Physics of Intense, High Energy Radiation Effects.' This LDRD is focused on electrical effects of ionizing radiation at high dose-rates. One major thrust throughout the project has been the radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) produced by the ionizing radiation. Another important consideration has been the electrical effect of dose-enhanced radiation. This transient effect can produce an electromagnetic pulse (EMP). The unifying theme of the project has been the dielectric function. This quantity contains much of the physics covered in this project. For example, the work on transient electrical effects in radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) has been a key focus for the work on the EMP effects. This physics in contained in the dielectric function, which can also be expressed as a conductivity. The transient defects created during a radiation event are also contained, in principle. The energy loss lead the hot electrons and holes is given by the stopping power of ionizing radiation. This information is given by the inverse dielectric function. Finally, the short time atomistic phenomena caused by ionizing radiation can also be considered to be contained within the dielectric function. During the LDRD, meetings about the work were held every week. These discussions involved theorists, experimentalists and engineers. These discussions branched out into the work done in other projects. For example, the work on EMP effects had influence on another project focused on such phenomena in gases. Furthermore, the physics of radiation detectors and radiation dosimeters was often discussed, and these discussions had impact on related projects. Some LDRD-related documents are now stored on a sharepoint site (https://sharepoint.sandia.gov/sites/LDRD-REMS/default.aspx). In the remainder of this document the work is described in catergories but there is much overlap between the atomistic calculations, the continuum calculations and the experiments.

  16. University of Oklahoma - High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skubic, Patrick L. [University of Oklahoma] [University of Oklahoma

    2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Energy Physics program at the University of Oklahoma, Pat Skubic, Principal Investigator, is attempting to understand nature at the deepest level using the most advanced experimental and theoretical tools. The four experimental faculty, Brad Abbott, Phil Gutierrez, Pat Skubic, and Mike Strauss, together with post-doctoral associates and graduate students, are finishing their work as part of the D0 collaboration at Fermilab, and increasingly focusing their investigations at the Large Hadron Collidor (LHC) as part of the ATLAS Collaboration. Work at the LHC has become even more exciting with the recent discovery by ATLAS and the other collaboration, CMS, of the long-sought Higgs boson, which plays a key role in generating masses for the elementary constituents of matter. Work of the OUHEP group has been in the three areas of hardware, software, and analysis. Now that the Higgs boson has been discovered, completing the Standard Model of fundamental physics, new efforts will focus on finding hints of physics beyond the standard model, such as supersymmetry. The OUHEP theory group (Kim Milton, PI) also consists of four faculty members, Howie Baer, Chung Kao, Kim Milton, and Yun Wang, and associated students and postdocs. They are involved in understanding fundamental issues in formulating theories of the microworld, and in proposing models that carry us past the Standard Model, which is an incomplete description of nature. They therefore work in close concert with their experimental colleagues. One also can study fundamental physics by looking at the large scale structure of the universe; in particular the ``dark energy'' that seems to be causing the universe to expand at an accelerating rate, effectively makes up about 3/4 of the energy in the universe, and yet is totally unidentified. Dark energy and dark matter, which together account for nearly all of the energy in the universe, are an important probe of fundamental physics at the very shortest distances, or at the very highest energies. The outcomes of the group's combined experimental and theoretical research will be an improved understanding of nature, at the highest energies reachable, from which applications to technological innovation will surely result, as they always have from such studies in the past.

  17. Data Preservation in High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mount, Richard; Brooks, Travis; /SLAC; Le Diberder, Francois; /Orsay, LAL; Dubois-Felsmann, Gregory; Neal, Homer; /SLAC; Bellis, Matt; /Stanford U.; Boehnlein, Amber; Votava, Margaret; White, Vicky; Wolbers, Stephen; /Fermilab; Konigsberg, Jacobo; /Florida U.; Roser, Robert; Snider, Rick; /Fermilab; Lucchesi, Donatella; /INFN, Padua; Denisov, Dmitri; /Fermilab; Soldner-Rembold, Stefan; /Manchester U.; Li, Qizhong; /Fermilab; Varnes, Erich; /Arizona U.; Jonckheere, Alan; /Fermilab; Gasthuber, Martin; Gulzow, Volker; /DESY /Marseille, CPPM /Dortmund U. /DESY /Gent U. /DESY, Zeuthen /KEK, Tsukuba /CC, Villeurbanne /CERN /INFN, Bari /Gjovik Coll. Engineering /Karlsruhe, Forschungszentrum /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Carleton U. /Cornell U. /Rutherford

    2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Data from high-energy physics (HEP) experiments are collected with significant financial and human effort and are mostly unique. At the same time, HEP has no coherent strategy for data preservation and re-use. An inter-experimental Study Group on HEP data preservation and long-term analysis was convened at the end of 2008 and held two workshops, at DESY (January 2009) and SLAC (May 2009). This document is an intermediate report to the International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA) of the reflections of this Study Group. Large data sets accumulated during many years of detector operation at particle accelerators are the heritage of experimental HEP. These data sets offer unique opportunities for future scientific studies, sometimes long after the shut-down of the actual experiments: new theoretical input; new experimental results and analysis techniques; the quest for high-sensitivity combined analyses; the necessity of cross checks. In many cases, HEP data sets are unique; they cannot and most likely will not be superseded by data from newer generations of experiments. Once lost, or in an unusable state, HEP data samples cannot be reasonably recovered. The cost of conserving this heritage through a collaborative, target-oriented long-term data preservation program would be small, compared to the costs of past experimental projects or to the efforts to re-do experiments. However, this cost is not negligible, especially for collaborations close or past their end-date. The preservation of HEP data would provide today's collaborations with a secure way to complete their data analysis and enable them to seize new scientific opportunities in the coming years. The HEP community will benefit from preserved data samples through reanalysis, combination, education and outreach. Funding agencies would receive more scientific return, and a positive image, from their initial investment leading to the production and the first analysis of preserved data.

  18. High energy physics advisory panel`s subpanel on vision for the future of high-energy physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was requested by the Secretary of Energy to (1) define a long-term program for pursuing the most important high-energy physics goals since the termination of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) project, (2) assess the current US high-energy physics program, and (3) make recommendations regarding the future of the field. Subjects on which recommendations were sought and which the report addresses were: high-energy physics funding priorities; facilitating international collaboration for future construction of large high-energy physics facilities; optimizing uses of the investment made in the SSC; how to encourage displaced scientists and engineers to remain in high-energy physics and to attract young scientists to enter the field in the future. The report includes a description of the state of high-energy physics research in the context of history, a summary of the SSC project, and documentation of the report`s own origins and development.

  19. Basic Research Needs for High Energy Density Laboratory Physics

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    physical science areas-atomic physics, computational physics and nuclear physics. The health and vibrancy of these areas, while essential to HEDLP, are not solely determined by...

  20. Analyzing High Energy Physics Data Using Databases: A Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossman, Robert

    Analyzing High Energy Physics Data Using Databases: A Case Study R. Grossman, X. &in, D. Valsamis. Nixdorf, B. Scipioni, T. Song Superconducting Supercollider Laboratory Abstract We describe the initial experimental data from high energy physics. At this time, we have designed two proto- types to analyze high

  1. Participation in High Energy Physics at the University of Chicago

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinec, Emil J. [University of Chicago

    2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers research at the University of Chicago in theoretical high energy physics and its connections to cosmology, over the period Nov. 1, 2009 to April 30, 2013. This research is divided broadly into two tasks: Task A, which covers a broad array of topics in high energy physics; and task C, primarily concerned with cosmology.

  2. Investigation of Rare Particle Production in High Energy Nuclear Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1999-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Our program is an investigation of the hadronization process through measurement of rare particle production in high energy nuclear interactions. Such collisions of heavy nuclei provide an environment similar in energy density to the conditions in the Big Bang. We are currently involved in two major experiments to study this environment, E896 at the AGS and STAR at RHIC. We have completed our physics running of E896, a search for the H dibaryon and measurement of hyperon production in AuAu collisions, and are in the process of analyzing the data. We have produced the electronics and software for the STAR trigger and will begin to use these tools to search for anti-nuclei and strange hadrons when RHIC turns on later this year.

  3. Partonic EoS in High-Energy Nuclear Collisions at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Nu

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Partonic EoS in High-Energy Nuclear Collisions at RHIC Nu Xuproperties. In high-energy nuclear collisions, the term ?owthe early stage of high-energy nuclear collision, both the

  4. Outreach and Education on High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Michael Barnett

    1994-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We review ongoing efforts and discuss possible future directions in informing the public and educating students about Particle Physics.

  5. Microfluidic Scintillation Detectors for High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maoddi, Pietro; Mapelli, Alessandro

    This thesis deals with the development and study of microfluidic scintillation detectors, a technology of recent introduction for the detection of high energy particles. Most of the interest for such devices comes from the use of a liquid scintillator, which entails the possibility of changing the active material in the detector, leading to increased radiation resistance. A first part of the thesis focuses on the work performed in terms of design and modelling studies of novel prototype devices, hinting to new possibilities and applications. In this framework, the simulations performed to validate selected designs and the main technological choices made in view of their fabrication are addressed. The second part of this thesis deals with the microfabrication of several prototype devices. Two different materials were studied for the manufacturing of microfluidic scintillation detectors, namely the SU-8 photosensitive epoxy and monocrystalline silicon. For what concerns the former, an original fabrication appro...

  6. POSTDOCTORAL POSITIONS in THEORETICAL HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Advanced Studies (SISSA), the Department of Theoretical Physics of Trieste University, the Trieste section of the INFN, and the Trieste Observatory. The Section is also a member of the European network "Quest Centre for Theoretical Physics Strada Costiera n. 11 - 34151 Trieste, Italy E-mail: rosanna@ictp.it #12;

  7. Muon Collider Physics at Very High Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. S. Berger

    2000-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Muon colliders might greatly extend the energy frontier of collider physics. One can contemplate circular colliders with center-of-mass energies in excess of 10 TeV. Some physics issues that might be relevant at such a machine are discussed.

  8. High Energy Physics from High Performance Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Blum

    2009-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss Quantum Chromodynamics calculations using the lattice regulator. The theory of the strong force is a cornerstone of the Standard Model of particle physics. We present USQCD collaboration results obtained on Argonne National Lab's Intrepid supercomputer that deepen our understanding of these fundamental theories of Nature and provide critical support to frontier particle physics experiments and phenomenology.

  9. On the use of Satellite Television in High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucas Taylor; David O. Williams

    1998-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper assesses the feasibility of exploiting commercial satellite television technologies to broadcast video signals and data from major High Energy Physics facilities to collaborating institutes throughout the world.

  10. Improving the Performance of High-Energy Physics Analysis through Bitmap Indices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoschek, Wolfgang

    Improving the Performance of High-Energy Physics Analysis through Bitmap Indices Kurt Stockinger1 for Nuclear Research CH-1211 Geneva, Switzerland {Kurt.Stockinger, Dirk.Duellmann, Wolfgang.Hoschek}@cern.ch 2 indices are popular multi-dimensional data struc- tures for accessing read-mostly data such as data

  11. Revised 3/30/09 High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    Revised 3/30/09 1 High Energy Physics INTERNAL CONTROLS Procedures for FY 2009 Organizational Chart with the Prime Contract, DOE, and other controlling mandates including sound business practices. Funds cannot that no research and development costs (other than LDRD work) are charged to indirect expense. 4. HEP Division

  12. Beam Dynamics Challenges in High Energy Physics Accelerators!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beam Dynamics Challenges in High Energy Physics Accelerators! Alexander Valishev! University/1/2014!A. Valishev | Beam Dynamics Challenges in HEP Accelerators!2! #12;The Olympic Motto for Accelerators! 12/1/2014!A. Valishev | Beam Dynamics Challenges in HEP Accelerators!3! ENERGY INTENSITY BRIGHTNESS

  13. Integrity of Data Samples and Results in High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

    plots from the Particle Data Group; each point is cum avg. #12;But there is also good in us... http articles so far; now about 1/week. · Data also contain many well understood processes that can be usedIntegrity of Data Samples and Results in High Energy Physics Jeffrey D. RichmanJeffrey D. Richman

  14. Experimental And Theoretical High Energy Physics Research At UCLA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cousins, Robert D. [University of California Los Angeles] [University of California Los Angeles

    2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of the UCLA High Energy Physics DOE Grant No. DE-FG02- 91ER40662. This report covers the last grant project period, namely the three years beginning January 15, 2010, plus extensions through April 30, 2013. The report describes the broad range of our experimental research spanning direct dark matter detection searches using both liquid xenon (XENON) and liquid argon (DARKSIDE); present (ICARUS) and R&D for future (LBNE) neutrino physics; ultra-high-energy neutrino and cosmic ray detection (ANITA); and the highest-energy accelerator-based physics with the CMS experiment and CERN’s Large Hadron Collider. For our theory group, the report describes frontier activities including particle astrophysics and cosmology; neutrino physics; LHC interaction cross section calculations now feasible due to breakthroughs in theoretical techniques; and advances in the formal theory of supergravity.

  15. CERN and high energy physics, the grand picture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The lecture will touch on several topics, to illustrate the role of CERN in the present and future of high-energy physics: how does CERN work? What is the role of the scientific community, of bodies like Council and SPC, and of international cooperation, in the definition of CERN's scientific programme? What are the plans for the future of the LHC and of the non-LHC physics programme? What is the role of R&D; and technology transfer at CERN?

  16. Experimental and theoretical high energy physics research. [UCLA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress in the various components of the UCLA High-Energy Physics Research program is summarized, including some representative figures and lists of resulting presentations and published papers. Principal efforts were directed at the following: (I) UCLA hadronization model, PEP4/9 e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} analysis, {bar P} decay; (II) ICARUS and astroparticle physics (physics goals, technical progress on electronics, data acquisition, and detector performance, long baseline neutrino beam from CERN to the Gran Sasso and ICARUS, future ICARUS program, and WIMP experiment with xenon), B physics with hadron beams and colliders, high-energy collider physics, and the {phi} factory project; (III) theoretical high-energy physics; (IV) H dibaryon search, search for K{sub L}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{gamma}{gamma} and {pi}{sup 0}{nu}{bar {nu}}, and detector design and construction for the FNAL-KTeV project; (V) UCLA participation in the experiment CDF at Fermilab; and (VI) VLPC/scintillating fiber R D.

  17. Charmonium Transverse Momentum Distribution in High Energy Nuclear Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zebo Tang; Nu Xu; Kai Zhou; Pengfei Zhuang

    2014-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Charmonium transverse momentum distribution is more sensitive to the nature of the hot QCD matter created in high energy nuclear collisions, in comparison with the yield. Taking a detailed transport approach for charmonium motion together with a hydrodynamic description for the medium evolution, the cancelation between the two hot nuclear matter effects, the dissociation and the regeneration, controls the charmonium transverse momentum distribution. Especially, the second moment of the distribution can be used to differentiate between the hot mediums produced at SPS, RHIC and LHC energies.

  18. THE STUDY OF NUCLEAR FISSION INDUCED BY HIGH-ENERGY PROTONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    243 THE STUDY OF NUCLEAR FISSION INDUCED BY HIGH-ENERGY PROTONS R. BRANDT (*), F. CARBONARA (**), E been undertaken with the aim to measure cross-sections for nuclear fission of heavy nuclei induced by high-energy protons. Nuclear fission at high energies is defined here as a nuclear break-up into two

  19. An Experimental and Theoretical High Energy Physics Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shipsey, Ian

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Purdue High Energy Physics Group conducts research in experimental and theoretical elementary particle physics and experimental high energy astrophysics. Our goals, which we share with high energy physics colleagues around the world, are to understand at the most fundamental level the nature of matter, energy, space and time, and in order to explain the birth, evolution and fate of the Universe. The experiments in which we are currently involved are: CDF, CLEO-c, CMS, LSST, and VERITAS. We have been instrumental in establishing two major in-house facilities: The Purdue Particle Physics Microstructure Detector Facility (P3MD) in 1995 and the CMS Tier-2 center in 2005. The research efforts of the theory group span phenomenological and theoretical aspects of the Standard Model as well as many of its possible extensions. Recent work includes phenomenological consequences of supersymmetric models, string theory and applications of gauge/gravity duality, the cosmological implications of massive gravitons, and the physics of extra dimensions.

  20. TenureTrack Position in High Energy Theory or High Energy Nuclear Theory at CUNY, Baruch College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of - Department of Physics, Electroweak Interaction Research Group

    University of New York (CUNY) beginning September 1, 2008. The initial appointment will be a cooperative Baruch College, City University of New York 17 Lexington Avenue Box A0506 New York, NY 10010 In additionTenureTrack Position in High Energy Theory or High Energy Nuclear Theory at CUNY, Baruch College

  1. High-energy neutrinos in the context of multimessenger physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julia K. Becker

    2008-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The field of astroparticle physics is currently developing rapidly, since new experiments challenge our understanding of the investigated processes. Three messengers can be used to extract information on the properties of astrophysical sources: photons, charged Cosmic Rays and neutrinos. This review focuses on high-energy neutrinos (E>100 GeV) with the main topics as follows. The production mechanism of high-energy neutrinos in astrophysical shocks. The connection between the observed photon spectra and charged Cosmic Rays is described and the source properties as they are known from photon observations and from charged Cosmic Rays are presented. High-energy neutrino detection. Current detection methods are described and the status of the next generation neutrino telescopes are reviewed. In particular, water and ice Cherenkov detectors as well as radio measurements in ice and with balloon experiments are presented. In addition, future perspectives for optical, radio and acoustic detection of neutrinos are reviewed. Sources of neutrino emission. The main source classes are reviewed, i.e. galactic sources, Active Galactic Nuclei, starburst galaxies and Gamma Ray Bursts. The interaction of high energy protons with the cosmic microwave background implies the production of neutrinos, referred to as GZK neutrinos. Implications of neutrino flux limits. Recent limits given by the AMANDA experiment and their implications regarding the physics of the sources are presented.

  2. Theoretical Research in Cosmology, High-Energy Physics and String Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, Y Jack; Dolan, Louise; Mersini-Houghton, Laura; Frampton, Paul

    2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The research was in the area of Theoretical Physics: Cosmology, High-Energy Physics and String Theory

  3. Searches For New Physics with High Energy Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Sauvan

    2009-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent experimental results of searches for new phenomena performed at high energy colliders are reviewed. The results reported are based on data samples of up to 1 fb^-1 and 4 fb^-1 collected at HERA and at the Tevatron, respectively. No significant evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model has been found and limits at the 95% confidence level have been set on the mass and couplings of several possible new particles.

  4. High energy physics - The large and the small

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santoro, Alberto [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2012-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In this Sixth International School on Field Theory and Gravitation, I was invited to give this talk to the students and researchers of Field Theory mainly about LHC - The Large Hadron Collider and results. I will try to summarize the main daily life of the high energy physics and give an idea about the experiments and the expectations for the near future. I will comment the present results and the prospects to LHC/CMS.

  5. Dynamics of heavy flavor quarks in high energy nuclear collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Beraudo

    2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A general overview on the role of heavy quarks as probes of the medium formed in high energy nuclear collisions is presented. Experimental data compared to model calculations at low and moderate pT are exploited to extract information on the transport coefficients of the medium, on possible modifications of heavy flavor hadronization in a hot environment and to provide quantitative answers to the issue of kinetic (and chemical, at conceivable future experimental facilities) thermalization of charm. Finally, the role of heavy flavor at high pT as a tool to study the mass and color-charge dependence the jet quenching is also analyzed.

  6. DDbar Correlations probing Thermalization in High-Energy Nuclear Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Schweda; X. Zhu; M. Bleicher; S. L. Huang; H. Stoecker; N. Xu; P. Zhuang

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose to measure azimuthal correlations of heavy-flavor hadrons to address the status of thermalization at the partonic stage of light quarks and gluons in high-energy nuclear collisions. In particular, we show that hadronic interactions at the late stage cannot significantly disturb the initial back-to-back azimuthal correlations of DDbar pairs. Thus, a decrease or the complete absence of these initial correlations does indicate frequent interactions of heavy-flavor quarks and also light partons in the partonic stage, which are essential for the early thermalization of light partons.

  7. High Energy Physics at the University of Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liss, Tony M. [University of Illinois] [University of Illinois; Thaler, Jon J. [University of Illinois] [University of Illinois

    2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report for DOE award DE-FG02-91ER40677 (“High Energy Physics at the University of Illinois”), covering the award period November 1, 2009 through April 30, 2013. During this period, our research involved particle physics at Fermilab and CERN, particle physics related cosmology at Fermilab and SLAC, and theoretical particle physics. Here is a list of the activities described in the final report: * The CDF Collaboration at the Fermilab Tevatron * Search For Lepton Flavor Violation in the Mu2e Experiment At Fermilab * The ATLAS Collaboration at the CERN Large Hadron Collider * the Study of Dark Matter and Dark Energy: DES and LSST * Lattice QCD * String Theory and Field Theory * Collider Phenomenology

  8. Nuclear Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Underground Research Facility in South Dakota, which will search for neutrinoless double-beta decay. Strong Los Alamos programs in nuclear data and nuclear theory supports...

  9. Validation of hadron shower models using data from CALICE, The 2013 European Physical Society Conference on High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dannheim, D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Validation of hadron shower models using data from CALICE, The 2013 European Physical Society Conference on High Energy Physics

  10. High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program...

  11. Operational Radiation Protection in High-Energy Physics Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rokni, S.H.; Fasso, A.; Liu, J.C.; /SLAC

    2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview of operational radiation protection (RP) policies and practices at high-energy electron and proton accelerators used for physics research is presented. The different radiation fields and hazards typical of these facilities are described, as well as access control and radiation control systems. The implementation of an operational RP programme is illustrated, covering area and personnel classification and monitoring, radiation surveys, radiological environmental protection, management of induced radioactivity, radiological work planning and control, management of radioactive materials and wastes, facility dismantling and decommissioning, instrumentation and training.

  12. HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS AT TUFTS UNIVERSITY FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldstein, Gary R; Oliver, William P; Napier, Austin; Gallagher, Hugh R

    2012-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In this Final Report, we the researchers of the high energy physics group at Tufts University summarize our works and achievements in three frontier areas of elementary particle physics: (i) Neutrino physics at the Intensity Frontier, (ii) Collider physics at the Energy Frontier, and (iii) Theory investigations of spin structure and quark-gluon dynamics of nucleons using quantum chromodynamics. With our Neutrino research we completed, or else brought to a useful state, the following: Data-taking, physics simulations, physics analysis, physics reporting, explorations of matter effects, and detector component fabrication. We conducted our work as participants in the MINOS, NOvA, and LBNE neutrino oscillation experiments and in the MINERvA neutrino scattering experiment. With our Collider research we completed or else brought to a useful state: Data-taking, development of muon system geometry and tracking codes, software validation and maintenance, physics simulations, physics analysis, searches for new particles, and study of top-quark and B-quark systems. We conducted these activities as participants in the ATLAS proton-proton collider experiment at CERN and in the CDF proton-antiproton collider experiment at Fermilab. In our Theory research we developed QCD-based models, applications of spin phenomenology to fundamental systems, fitting of models to data, presenting and reporting of new concepts and formalisms. The overarching objectives of our research work have always been: 1) to test and clarify the predictions of the Standard Model of elementary particle physics, and 2) to discover new phenomena which may point the way to a more unified theoretical framework.

  13. Equilibrium Statistical-Thermal Models in High-Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdel Nasser Tawfik

    2014-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We review some recent highlights from the applications of statistical-thermal models to different experimental measurements and lattice QCD thermodynamics, that have been made during the last decade. We start with a short review of the historical milestones on the path of constructing statistical-thermal models for heavy-ion physics. We discovered that Heinz Koppe formulated in 1948 an almost complete recipe for the statistical-thermal models. In 1950, Enrico Fermi generalized this statistical approach, in which he started with a general cross-section formula and inserted into it simplifying assumptions about the matrix element of the interaction process that likely reflects many features of the high-energy reactions dominated by density in the phase space of final states. In 1964, Hagedorn systematically analysed the high-energy phenomena using all tools of statistical physics and introduced the concept of limiting temperature based on the statistical bootstrap model. It turns to be quite often that many-particle systems can be studied with the help of statistical-thermal methods. The analysis of yield multiplicities in high-energy collisions gives an overwhelming evidence for the chemical equilibrium in the final state. The strange particles might be an exception, as they are suppressed at lower beam energies. However, their relative yields fulfill statistical equilibrium, as well. We review the equilibrium statistical-thermal models for particle production, fluctuations and collective flow in heavy-ion experiments. We also review their reproduction of the lattice QCD thermodynamics at vanishing and finite chemical potential. During the last decade, five conditions have been suggested to describe the universal behavior of the chemical freeze out parameters.

  14. High Energy Physics: Report of research accomplishments and future goals, FY 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barish, B C

    1983-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuing research in high energy physics carried out by the group from the California Institute of Technology. The program includes research in theory, phenomenology, and experimental high energy physics. The experimental program includes experiments at SLAC, FERMILAB, and DESY.

  15. High Energy Physics Program at Texas A and M University

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high energy physics program has continued its experimental activities over. In CDF, the Texas A M group has led an effort to design an upgrade for the silicon vertex detector, and is currently working with the rest of the collaboration on the next major data taking run. In MACRO, work was done on the development of the final version of the wave form digitizing system being implemented for the entire scintillator system. This work is nearing completion, and the system is expected to be up and running on the detector by summer 1993. Work was done within the SDC group to develop gas microstrip chambers for use in precision tracking at the SSC, and in the GEM group, toward the development of a suitable forward calorimeter design. The theoretical high energy physics program has continued the study of a very successful string-derived model that unifies all known interactions: flipped SU(5), which is the leading candidate for a TOE. Work has also continued on some generalizations of the symmetries of string theory, known as W algebras. These are expected to have applications in two-dimensional conformal field theory, two-dimensional extensions of gravity and topological gravity and W-string theory.

  16. Computing trends using graphic processor in high energy physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mihai Niculescu; Sorin-Ion Zgura

    2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the main challenges in Heavy Energy Physics is to make fast analysis of high amount of experimental and simulated data. At LHC-CERN one p-p event is approximate 1 Mb in size. The time taken to analyze the data and obtain fast results depends on high computational power. The main advantage of using GPU(Graphic Processor Unit) programming over traditional CPU one is that graphical cards bring a lot of computing power at a very low price. Today a huge number of application(scientific, financial etc) began to be ported or developed for GPU, including Monte Carlo tools or data analysis tools for High Energy Physics. In this paper, we'll present current status and trends in HEP using GPU.

  17. Nuclear Physics: Campaigns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Free-Electron Laser (FEL) Medical Imaging Physics Topics Campaigns The Structure of the Nuclear Building Blocks The Structure of Nuclei Symmetry Tests in Nuclear Physics Meetings...

  18. Terascale Physics Opportunities at a High Statistics, High Energy Neutrino Scattering Experiment: NuSOnG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, T.

    This article presents the physics case for a new high-energy, ultra-high statistics neutrino scattering

  19. High energy electrons and nuclear phenomena in petawatt laser-solid experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowan, T.E.; Ditmire, T.; Hatchett, S.; Pennington, D.M.; Perry, M.D.; Phillips, T.W.; Wilks, S.C.; Young, P.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California (United States)] Dong, B. [University of Alabama, Huntsville, Alabama (United States); Parnell, T.; Takahashi, Y. [Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama (United States)] Hunt, A.W. [Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States)] Johnson, J. [University Space Research Association, Huntsville, Alabama (United States)] Kuehl, T. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petawatt laser at LLNL has opened a new regime of laser-matter interactions in which the quiver motion of plasma electrons is fully relativistic with energies extending well above the threshold for nuclear processes. We have developed broad-band magnetic spectrometers to measure the spectrum of high-energy electrons produced in laser-solid target experiments at the Petawatt, and have found that in addition to the expected flux of {approximately}few MeV electrons characteristic of the ponderomotive potential, there is a high energy component extending to {approximately}100 MeV apparently from plasma acceleration in the underdense pre-formed plasma. The generation of hard bremsstrahlung, photo-nuclear reactions, and preliminary evidence for positron-electron pair production will be discussed. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. High energy physics program at Texas A and M University

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Texas A M experimental high energy physics program continued to reach significant milestones in each of its research initiatives during the course of the past year. We are participating in two major operating experiments, CDF and MACRO. In CDF, the Texas A M group has spearheaded the test beam program to recalibrate the Forward Hadron Calorimeter for the upcoming CDF data run, as well as contributing to the ongoing analysis work on jets and b-quarks. In MACRO, we have assisted in the development of the final version of the wave form digitizing system being implemented for the entire scintillator system. The construction of the first six supermodules of the detector has been completed and all six are currently taking data with streamer chambers while four have the completed scintillator counter system up and running. We have built and tested prototypes of a liquid-scintillator fiber calorimeter system, in which internally reflecting channels are imbedded in a lead matrix and filled with liquid scintillator. This approach combines the performance features of fiber calorimetry and the radiation hardness of liquid scintillator, and is being developed for forward calorimetry at the SSC. The microstrip chamber is a new technology for precision track chambers that offers the performance required for future hadron colliders. The theoretical high energy physics program has continued to develop during the past funding cycle. We have continued the study of their very successful string-derived model that unifies all known interactions; flipped SU(5), which is the leading candidate for a TOE. Work has continued on some generalizations of the symmetries of string theory, known as W algebras. These are expected to have applications in two-dimensional conformal field theory, two-dimensional extensions of gravity and topological gravity and W-string theory.

  1. High-energy behavior of the nuclear symmetry potential in asymmetric nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lie-Wen Chen; Che Ming Ko; Bao-An Li

    2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the relativistic impulse approximation with empirical NN scattering amplitude and the nuclear scalar and vector densities from the relativistic mean-field theory, we evaluate the Dirac optical potential for neutrons and protons in asymmetric nuclear matter. From the resulting Schr\\"{o}% dinger-equivalent potential, the high energy behavior of the nuclear symmetry potential is studied. We find that the symmetry potential at fixed baryon density is essentially constant once the nucleon kinetic energy is greater than about 500 MeV. Moreover, for such high energy nucleon, the symmetry potential is slightly negative below a baryon density of about $% \\rho =0.22$ fm$^{-3}$ and then increases almost linearly to positive values at high densities. Our results thus provide an important constraint on the energy and density dependence of nuclear symmetry potential in asymmetric nuclear matter.

  2. Nuclear Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparencyDOE Project TapsDOERecovery NuclearSensor NodesNuclear

  3. Research in High Energy Physics at Duke University

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotwal, Ashutosh V. [PI] [PI; Goshaw, Al [Co-PI] [Co-PI; Kruse, Mark [Co-PI] [Co-PI; Oh, Seog [Co-PI] [Co-PI; Scholberg, Kate [Co-PI] [Co-PI; Walter, Chris [Co-PI] [Co-PI

    2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the Closeout Report for the research grant in experimental elementary particle physics, carried out by the Duke University High Energy Physics (HEP) group. We re- port on physics results and detector development carried out under this grant, focussing on the recent three-year grant period (2010 to 2013). The Duke HEP group consisted of seven faculty members, two senior scientists, #12;ve postdocs and eight graduate students. There were three thrusts of the research program. Measurements at the energy frontier at CDF and ATLAS were used to test aspects of elementary particle theory described by the Stan- dard Model (SM) and to search for new forces and particles beyond those contained within the SM. The neutrino sector was explored using data obtained from a large neutrino detector located in Japan, and R & D was conducted on new experiments to be built in the US. The measurements provided information about neutrino masses and the manner in which neutri- nos change species in particle beams. Two years ago we have started a new research program in rare processes based on the Mu2E experiment at Fermilab. This research is motivated by the search for the #22; ! e transition with unprecedented sensitivity, a transition forbidden in the standard model but allowed in supersymmetric and other models of new physics. The high energy research program used proton and antiproton colliding beams. The experiments were done at the Fermilab Tevatron (proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV) and at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (proton-proton collisions at 7-8 TeV). The neutrino program used data obtained from the Super-Kamiokande detec- tor. This water-#12;lled Cherenkov counter was used to detect and measure the properties of neutrinos produced in cosmic ray showers, and from neutrino beams produced from acceler- ators in Japan. The Mu2E experiment will use a special stopped muon beam to be built at Fermilab.

  4. Research in High Energy Physics at Duke University

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goshaw, Alfred; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kruse, Mark; Oh, Seog; Scholberg, Kate; Walter, Chris

    2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the Closeout Report for the research grant in experimental elementary particle physics, carried out by the Duke University High Energy Physics (HEP) group. We re- port on physics results and detector development carried out under this grant, focussing on the recent three-year grant period (2010 to 2013). The Duke HEP group consisted of seven faculty members, two senior scientists, five postdocs and eight graduate students. There were three thrusts of the research program. Measurements at the energy frontier at CDF and ATLAS were used to test aspects of elementary particle theory described by the Stan- dard Model (SM) and to search for new forces and particles beyond those contained within the SM. The neutrino sector was explored using data obtained from a large neutrino detector located in Japan, and R & D was conducted on new experiments to be built in the US. The measurements provided information about neutrino masses and the manner in which neutri- nos change species in particle beams. Two years ago we have started a new research program in rare processes based on the Mu2E experiment at Fermilab. This research is motivated by the search for the #22;{mu} {yields} e transition with unprecedented sensitivity, a transition forbidden in the standard model but allowed in supersymmetric and other models of new physics. The high energy research program used proton and antiproton colliding beams. The experiments were done at the Fermilab Tevatron (proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV) and at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (proton-proton collisions at 7-8 TeV). The neutrino program used data obtained from the Super-Kamiokande detector. This water-filled Cherenkov counter was used to detect and measure the properties of neutrinos produced in cosmic ray showers, and from neutrino beams produced from acceler- ators in Japan. The Mu2E experiment will use a special stopped muon beam to be built at Fermilab.

  5. Panel report: nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Joseph A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hartouni, Edward P [LLNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear science is at the very heart of the NNSA program. The energy produced by nuclear processes is central to the NNSA mission, and nuclear reactions are critical in many applications, including National Ignition Facility (NIF) capsules, energy production, weapons, and in global threat reduction. Nuclear reactions are the source of energy in all these applications, and they can also be crucial in understanding and diagnosing the complex high-energy environments integral to the work of the NNSA. Nuclear processes are complex quantum many-body problems. Modeling and simulation of nuclear reactions and their role in applications, coupled tightly with experiments, have played a key role in NNSA's mission. The science input to NNSA program applications has been heavily reliant on experiment combined with extrapolations and physical models 'just good enough' to provide a starting point to extensive engineering that generated a body of empirical information. This body of information lacks the basic science underpinnings necessary to provide reliable extrapolations beyond the domain in which it was produced and for providing quantifiable error bars. Further, the ability to perform additional engineering tests is no longer possible, especially those tests that produce data in the extreme environments that uniquely characterize these applications. The end of testing has required improvements to the predictive capabilities of codes simulating the reactions and associated applications for both well known and well characterized cases as well as incompletely known cases. Developments in high performance computing, computational physics, applied mathematics and nuclear theory have combined to make spectacular advances in the theory of fission, fusion and nuclear reactions. Current research exploits these developments in a number of Office of Science and NNSA programs, and in joint programs such as the SciDAC (Science Discovery through Advanced Computing) that supports the project Building a Universal Nuclear Energy Density Fuctional whose goals are to provide the unified approach to calculating the properties of nuclei. The successful outcome of this, and similar projects is a first steps toward a predictive nuclear theory based on fundamental interactions between constituent nucleons. The application of this theory to the domain of nuclei important for national security missions will require computational resources at the extreme scale, beyond what will be available in the near term future.

  6. Integrating INIS into a high energy physics information environment thoughts from CERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeomans, Joanne; Baudic, Romain; Picchioli, Ingrid; International Conference on Nuclear Knowledge Management : Strategies, Information Management and Human Resource Development. Special Session : The Role of INIS in Knowledge Preservation

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information searchers from the high energy physics community expect an integrated information environment. The CERN Library offers its print and electronic collections through a combined Web interface and maintains the database by semi-automated processes to upload bibliographic and full-text records. Suggestions are offered by which INIS could develop its own Web interface and better match HEP users’ expectations. These include implementing full-text linking, increasing currency, expanding search and display functions and developing the richness of the data. Links with the National Nuclear Data Center and Crossref could also increase its visibility.

  7. Nuclear Physics: Experiment Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UserResearcher Information print version Research Highlights Public Interest Nuclear Physics Accelerator Free Electron Laser (FEL) Medical Imaging Physics Topics Campaigns...

  8. THE DEVELOPMENT OF LOW TEMPERATURE TECHNOLOGY AT STANFORD AND ITS RELEVANCE TO HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    % and to indicate their relevance to several applications in high energy physics. 11. TECHNOLOGICAL INNOVATIONS 1I I I I I - . THE DEVELOPMENT OF LOW TEMPERATURE TECHNOLOGY AT STANFORD AND ITS RELEVANCE TO HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS" H. Alan Schwettmant Stanford University Stanford, California Department of Physics

  9. Neutrino Interactions Importance for Nuclear Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. E. Amaro; C. Maieron; M. Valverde; J. Nieves; M. B. Barbaro; J. A. Caballero; T. W. Donnelly; J. M. Udias

    2009-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the general interplay between Nuclear Physics and neutrino-nucleus cross sections at intermediate and high energies. The effects of different reaction mechanisms over the neutrino observables are illustrated with examples in calculations using several nuclear models and ingredients.

  10. REPORT OF RESEARCH ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND FUTURE GOALS HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, Mark B. [California Institute of Technology; Kapustin, Anton N. [California Institute of Technology; Schwarz, John Henry [California Institute of Technology; Carroll, Sean [California Institute of Technology; Ooguri, Hirosi [California Institute of Technology; Gukov, Sergei [California Institute of Technology; Preskill, John [California Institute of Technology; Hitlin, David G. [California Institute of Technology; Porter, Frank C. [California Institute of Technology; Patterson, Ryan B. [California Institute of Technology; Newman, Harvey B. [California Institute of Technology; Spiropulu, Maria [California Institute of Technology; Golwala, Sunil [California Institute of Technology; Zhu, Ren-Yuan

    2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Caltech High Energy Physics (HEP) has a broad program in both experimental and theoretical physics. We are known for our creativity and leadership. The future is uncertain and we strive to be involved in all the major areas of experimental and theoretical HEP physics so no matter where the important discoveries occur we are well positioned to play an important role. An outstanding group of postdoctoral scholars, graduate students, staff scientists, and technical and administrative personnel support our efforts in experimental and theoretical physics. The PI’s on this grant are involved in the following program of experimental and theoretical activities: I) EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS Our CMS group, led by Harvey Newman and Maria Spiropulu, has played a key role in the discovery and interpretation of the Higgs boson and in searches for new physics. They have important hardware responsibilities in both ECAL and HCAL and are also involved in the upgrades needed for the High Luminosity LHC. Newman's group also develops and operates Grid-based computing, networking, and collaborative systems for CMS and the US HEP community. The charged lepton (Mu2e) and quark BaBar flavor physics group is led by David Hitlin and Frank Porter. On Mu2e they have been instrumental in the design of the calorimeter. Construction responsibilities include one third of the crystals and associated readout as well as the calibration system. They also will have responsibility for a major part of the online system software. Although data taking ceased in 2008 the Caltech BaBar group is active on several new forefront analyses. The neutrino group is led by Ryan Patterson. They are central to NOvA's core oscillation physics program, to calibration, and to detector readiness being responsible for the production and installation of 12,000 APD arrays. They have key roles in neutrino appearance and disappearance analysis in MINOS and MINOS+. Sunil Golwala leads the dark matter direct detection effort. Areas of activity include: CDMS II data analysis, contributions to SuperCDMS Soudan operations and analysis, R&D towards SuperCDMS SNOLAB, development of a novel screener for radiocontamination (the BetaCage), and development of new WIMP detector concepts. Ren-Yuan Zhu leads the HEP crystal laboratory for the advanced detector R&D effort. The crystal lab is involved in development of novel scintillating crystals and has proposed several crystal based detector concepts for future HEP experiments at the energy and intensity frontiers. Its current research effort is concentrated on development of fast crystal scintillators with good radiation hardness and low cost. II) THEORETICAL PHYSICS The main theme of Sergei Gukov's current research is the relation between the geometry of quantum group invariants and their categorification, on the one hand, and the physics of supersymmetric gauge theory and string theory, on the other. Anton Kapustin's research spans a variety of topics in non-perturbative Quantum Field Theory (QFT). His main areas of interest are supersymmetric gauge theories, non-perturbative dualities in QFT, disorder operators, Topological Quantum Field Theory, and non-relativistic QFT. He is also interested in the foundations and possible generalizations of Quantum Mechanics. Hirosi Ooguri's current research has two main components. One is to find exact results in Calabi-Yau compactification of string theory. Another is to explore applications of the AdS/CFT correspondence. He also plans to continue his project with Caltech postdoctoral fellows on BPS spectra of supersymmetric gauge theories in diverse dimensions. John Preskill works on quantum information science. This field may lead to important future technologies, and also lead to new understanding of issues in fundamental physics John Schwarz has been exploring a number of topics in superstring theory/M-theory, supersymmetric gauge theory, and their AdS/CFT relationships. Much of the motivation for these studies is the desire to gain a deeper understanding of superstring theory and M-theory. The research

  11. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, Richard A.; Wasserman, Harvey

    2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the leading scientific computing facility for the Department of Energy's Office of Science, providing high-performance computing (HPC) resources to more than 3,000 researchers working on about 400 projects. NERSC provides large-scale computing resources and, crucially, the support and expertise needed for scientists to make effective use of them. In November 2009, NERSC, DOE's Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), and DOE's Office of High Energy Physics (HEP) held a workshop to characterize the HPC resources needed at NERSC to support HEP research through the next three to five years. The effort is part of NERSC's legacy of anticipating users needs and deploying resources to meet those demands. The workshop revealed several key points, in addition to achieving its goal of collecting and characterizing computing requirements. The chief findings: (1) Science teams need access to a significant increase in computational resources to meet their research goals; (2) Research teams need to be able to read, write, transfer, store online, archive, analyze, and share huge volumes of data; (3) Science teams need guidance and support to implement their codes on future architectures; and (4) Projects need predictable, rapid turnaround of their computational jobs to meet mission-critical time constraints. This report expands upon these key points and includes others. It also presents a number of case studies as representative of the research conducted within HEP. Workshop participants were asked to codify their requirements in this case study format, summarizing their science goals, methods of solution, current and three-to-five year computing requirements, and software and support needs. Participants were also asked to describe their strategy for computing in the highly parallel, multi-core environment that is expected to dominate HPC architectures over the next few years. The report includes a section that describes efforts already underway or planned at NERSC that address requirements collected at the workshop. NERSC has many initiatives in progress that address key workshop findings and are aligned with NERSC's strategic plans.

  12. Nuclear & Particle Physics, Astrophysics, Cosmology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear & Particle Physics science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Nuclear & Particle Physics, Astrophysics, Cosmology National security depends on science and...

  13. High Energy Neutrinos as a Probe for New Physics and Astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. V. Bugaev

    2005-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of the recent achievements in high energy neutrino physics and, partly, neutrino astrophysics is presented. It is argued that experiments with high energy neutrinos of natural origin can be used for a search of new physics effects beyond the electroweak scale.

  14. High Energy Physics: Report of research accomplishments and future goals, FY 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barish, B C; Stone, E C; Ames, C A

    1987-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses high energy physics research in the following areas: Research in elementary particle physics; QCD phenomenology; lattice gauge theory; Mark III; MARK J and Mark II/SLC.

  15. High Energy Physics: Report of research accomplishments and future goals, FY 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barish, B C; Stone, E C; Johnson, F H

    1986-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses high energy physics research in the following areas: Research in elementary particle physics; QCD phenomenology; lattice gauge theory; Mark III; MARK J and Mark II/SLC.

  16. LANL | Physics | Inertial Confinement Fusion and High Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using the world's most powerful lasers, Physics Division scientists are aiming to create thermonuclear burn in the laboratory. The experimental research of the Physics Division's...

  17. Nuclear DVCS within the high energy QCD color dipole formalism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. V. T. Machado

    2009-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In this contribution, we present a study of the coherent and incoherent nuclear DVCS process in the small-$x$ regime within the color dipole formalism. Predictions for the nuclear DVCS cross section at photon level in the collider kinematics are presented.

  18. High energy physics advisory panel`s composite subpanel for the assessment of the status of accelerator physics and technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In November 1994, Dr. Martha Krebs, Director of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Research (OER), initiated a broad assessment of the current status and promise of the field of accelerator physics and technology with respect to five OER programs -- High Energy Physics, Nuclear Physics, Basic Energy Sciences, Fusion Energy, and Health and Environmental Research. Dr. Krebs asked the High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) to establish a composite subpanel with representation from the five OER advisory committees and with a balance of membership drawn broadly from both the accelerator community and from those scientific disciplines associated with the OER programs. The Subpanel was also charged to provide recommendations and guidance on appropriate future research and development needs, management issues, and funding requirements. The Subpanel finds that accelerator science and technology is a vital and intellectually exciting field. It has provided essential capabilities for the DOE/OER research programs with an enormous impact on the nation`s scientific research, and it has significantly enhanced the nation`s biomedical and industrial capabilities. Further progress in this field promises to open new possibilities for the scientific goals of the OER programs and to further benefit the nation. Sustained support of forefront accelerator research and development by the DOE`s OER programs and the DOE`s predecessor agencies has been responsible for much of this impact on research. This report documents these contributions to the DOE energy research mission and to the nation.

  19. Nuclear Physics from QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U. van Kolck

    2008-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective field theories provide a bridge between QCD and nuclear physics. I discuss light nuclei from this perspective, emphasizing the role of fine-tuning.

  20. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,sand CERNLandLargefor High Energy

  1. JETS OF NUCLEAR MATTER FROM HIGH ENERGY HEAVY ION COLLISIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stocker, H.; Csernai, L.P.; Graebner, G.; Buchwald, G.; Kruse, H.; Cusson, R.Y.; Maruhn, J.A.; Greiner, W.

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear fluid dynamical model with final thermal breakup is used to study the reactions {sup 20}Ne + {sup 238}U and {sup 40} Ar + {sup 40}Ca at E{sub LAB}=390 MeV/n. Calculated double differential cross sections d{sup 2}{sigma}/d{Omega}dE are in agreement with recent experimental data. It is shown that azimuthally dependent triple differential cross sections d{sup 3}{sigma}/dEd cos{theta}d{phi} yield considerably deeper insight into the collision process and allow for snapshots of the reactions. Strongly correlated jets of nuclear matter are predicted.

  2. DOE SC Exascale Requirements Review: High Energy Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2015 These compelling lines of inquiry show great promise for discovery: * Use the Higgs boson as a new tool for discovery * Pursue the physics associated with neutrino mass *...

  3. Nuclear physics and cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coc, Alain [Centre de Sciences Nucléaires et de Sciences de la Matičre (CSNSM), CNRS/IN2P3, Université Paris Sud 11, UMR 8609, Bâtiment 104, F-91405 Orsay Campus (France)

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    There are important aspects of Cosmology, the scientific study of the large scale properties of the universe as a whole, for which nuclear physics can provide insights. Here, we will focus on Standard Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis and we refer to the previous edition of the School [1] for the aspects concerning the variations of constants in nuclear cosmo-physics.

  4. Astroparticle Physics with High Energy Neutrinos: from AMANDA to IceCube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francis Halzen

    2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Kilometer-scale neutrino detectors such as IceCube are discovery instruments covering nuclear and particle physics, cosmology and astronomy. Examples of their multidisciplinary missions include the search for the particle nature of dark matter and for additional small dimensions of space. In the end, their conceptual design is very much anchored to the observational fact that Nature produces protons and photons with energies in excess of $10^{20}$\\,eV and $10^{13}$\\,eV, respectively. The puzzle of where and how Nature accelerates the highest energy cosmic particles is unresolved almost a century after their discovery. The cosmic ray connection sets the scale of cosmic neutrino fluxes. In this context, we discuss the first results of the completed AMANDA detector and the science reach of its extension, IceCube. Similar experiments are under construction in the Mediterranean. Neutrino astronomy is also expanding in new directions with efforts to detect air showers, acoustic and radio signals initiated by super-EeV neutrinos. The outline of this review is as follows: Introduction Why Kilometer-Scale Detectors? Cosmic Neutrinos Associated with the Highest Energy Cosmic Rays High Energy Neutrino Telescopes: Methodologies of Neutrino Detection High Energy Neutrino Telescopes: Status

  5. High Energy Physics and Nuclear Physics Network Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dart, Eli

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) atElement Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility CERN

  6. Speculative Physics: the Ontology of Theory and Experiment in High Energy Particle Physics and Science Fiction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarissa Ai Ling Lee

    2014-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The dissertation brings together approaches across the fields of physics, critical theory, literary studies, philosophy of physics, sociology of science, and history of science to synthesize a hybrid approach for instigating more rigorous and intense cross-disciplinary interrogations between the sciences and the humanities. There are two levels of conversations going on in the dissertation; at the first level, the discussion is centered on a critical historiography and philosophical implications of the discovery Higgs boson in relation to its position at the intersection of old (current) and the potential for new possibilities in quantum physics; I then position my findings on the Higgs boson in connection to the double-slit experiment that represents foundational inquiries into quantum physics, to demonstrate the bridge between fundamental physics and high energy particle physics. The conceptualization of the variants of the double-slit experiment informs the aforementioned critical comparisons. At the second level of the conversation, theories are produced from a close study of the physics objects as speculative engine for new knowledge generation that are then reconceptualized and re-articulated for extrapolation into the speculative ontology of hard science fiction, particularly the hard science fiction written with the double intent of speaking to the science while producing imaginative and socially conscious science through the literary affordances of science fiction. The works of science fiction examined here demonstrate the tension between the internal values of physics in the practice of theory and experiment and questions on ethics, culture, and morality.

  7. High energy physics experiment triggers and the trustworthiness of software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nash, T.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For all the time and frustration that high energy physicists expend interacting with computers, it is surprising that more attention is not paid to the critical role computers play in the science. With large, expensive colliding beam experiments now dependent on complex programs working at startup, questions of reliability -- the trustworthiness of software -- need to be addressed. This issue is most acute in triggers, used to select data to record -- and data to discard -- in the real time environment of an experiment. High level triggers are built on codes that now exceed 2 million source lines -- and for the first time experiments are truly dependent on them. This dependency will increase at the accelerators planned for the new millennium (SSC and LHC), where cost and other pressures will reduce tolerance for first run problems, and the high luminosities will make this on-line data selection essential. A sense of this incipient crisis motivated the unusual juxtaposition to topics in these lectures. 37 refs., 1 fig.

  8. Stochastic Optimization for Collision Selection in High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Whiteson; D. Whiteson

    2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The underlying structure of matter can be deeply probed via precision measurements of the mass of the \\emph{top quark}, the most massive observed fundamental particle. Top quarks can be produced and studied only in collisions at high energy particle accelerators. Most collisions, however, do not produce top quarks; making precise measurements requires culling these collisions into a sample that is rich in collisions producing top quarks (\\emph{signal}) and spare in collisions producing other particles (\\emph{background}). Collision selection is typically performed with heuristics or supervised learning methods. However, such approaches are suboptimal because they assume that the selector with the highest classification accuracy will yield a mass measurement with the smallest statistical uncertainty. In practice, however, the mass measurement is more sensitive to some backgrounds than others. Hence, this paper presents a new approach that uses stochastic optimization techniques to directly search for selectors that minimize statistical uncertainty in the top quark mass measurement. Empirical results confirm that stochastically optimized selectors have much smaller uncertainty. This new approach contributes substantially to our knowledge of the top quark's mass, as the new selectors are currently in use selecting real collisions.

  9. Validation of hadronic models using CALICE highly granular calorimeters, 15th International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The CALICE Collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Validation of hadronic models using CALICE highly granular calorimeters, 15th International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics

  10. A Flexible simulation and verification framework for next generation hybrid pixel readout chips in High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marconi, Sara

    A Flexible simulation and verification framework for next generation hybrid pixel readout chips in High Energy Physics

  11. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, July 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, R.; Moonier, P.; Schoessow, P.; Talaga, R.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of July 1, 1993--December 31, 1993. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included.

  12. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, July 1, 1992--December 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoessow, P.; Moonier, P.; Talaga, R.; Wagner, R. [eds.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of July 1, 1992--December 30, 1992. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included.

  13. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, January 1, 1993--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoessow, P.; Moonier, P.; Talaga, R.; Wagner, R. [eds.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of January 1, 1993--June 30, 1993. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included.

  14. HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS WITH INTENSE HEAVY ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Roy, P.K.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating ion-beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) targets. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse space-charge neutralized drift compression of the ion beam to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. As a technique for heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition dE/dx, in a relatively large sample size, and the ability to heat any solid-phase target material. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak) from the NDCX-I accelerator. Future plans include target experiments using the NDCX-II accelerator, which is designed to heat targets at the Bragg peak using a 3-6 MeV lithium ion beam. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. We have completed the fabrication of a new experimental target chamber facility for WDM experiments, and implemented initial target diagnostics to be used for the first target experiments in NDCX-1. The target chamber has been installed on the NDCX-I beamline. The target diagnostics include a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments will heat targets by compressed NDCX-I beams and will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  15. Thoughts on the DOE University Program in High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

    design and construction, as well as in project leadership and physics analysis. Experienced senior for detector construction, operations, and data analysis. This work is highly complex and requires people go on to graduate school in HEP. This is an important pipeline for our field. Dave Hale and Susanne

  16. Experimental High Energy Physics Brandeis University Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blocker, Craig A. [Brandeis University] [Brandeis University; Bensinger, James [Brandeis University] [Brandeis University; Sciolla, Gabriella [Brandeis University] [Brandeis University; Wellenstein, Hermann [Brandeis University] [Brandeis University

    2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past three years, the Brandeis experimental particle physics group was comprised of four faculty (Bensinger, Blocker, Sciolla, and Wellenstein), one research scientist, one post doc, and ten graduate students. The group focused on the ATLAS experiment at LHC. In 2011, the LHC delivered 5/fb of pp colliding beam data at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. In 2012, the center-of-mass energy was increased to 8 TeV, and 20/fb were delivered. The Brandeis group focused on two aspects of the ATLAS experiment -- the muon detection system and physics analysis. Since data taking began at the LHC in 2009, our group actively worked on ATLAS physics analysis, with an emphasis on exploiting the new energy regime of the LHC to search for indications of physics beyond the Standard Model. The topics investigated were Z' -> ll, Higgs -> ZZ* -. 4l, lepton flavor violation, muon compositeness, left-right symmetric theories, and a search for Higgs -> ee. The Brandeis group has for many years been a leader in the endcap muon system, making important contributions to every aspect of its design and production. During the past three years, the group continued to work on commissioning the muon detector and alignment system, development of alignment software, and installation of remaining chambers.

  17. Investigations in Experimental and Theoretical High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krennrich, Frank [Iowa State University

    2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the work done under DOE grant DE-FG02-01ER41155. The experimental tasks have ongoing efforts at CERN (ATLAS), the Whipple observatory (VERITAS) and R&D work on dual readout calorimetry and neutrino-less double beta decay. The theoretical task emphasizes the weak interaction and in particular CP violation and neutrino physics. The detailed descriptions of the final report on each project are given under the appropriate task section of this report.

  18. Yale High Energy Physics Research: Precision Studies of Reactor Antineutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeger, Karsten M [Yale University

    2014-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This reports presents experimental research at the intensity frontier of particle physics with particular focus on the study of reactor antineutrinos and the precision measurement of neutrino oscillations. The experimental neutrino physics group of Professor Heeger and Senior Scientist Band at Yale University has had leading responsibilities in the construction and operation of the Daya Bay Reactor Antineutrino Experiment and made critical contributions to the discovery of non-zero$\\theta_{13}$. Heeger and Band led the Daya Bay detector management team and are now overseeing the operations of the antineutrino detectors. Postdoctoral researchers and students in this group have made leading contributions to the Daya Bay analysis including the prediction of the reactor antineutrino flux and spectrum, the analysis of the oscillation signal, and the precision determination of the target mass yielding unprecedented precision in the relative detector uncertainty. Heeger's group is now leading an R\\&D effort towards a short-baseline oscillation experiment, called PROSPECT, at a US research reactor and the development of antineutrino detectors with advanced background discrimination.

  19. American particle and nuclear physics planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montgomery, Hugh E. [JLAB

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the United States the planning process relevant to future deep inelastic scattering involves both the high energy physics and nuclear physics funding and the two communities. In Canada there is no such split between the communities. Within the past two years there have been several planning initiatives and there may be more to come. We review the current status of both the planning and the plans.

  20. Experimental High Energy Physics Research: Direct Detection of Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witherell, Michael S.

    2014-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The grant supported research on an experimental search for evidence of dark matter interactions with normal matter. The PI carried out the research as a member of the LUX and LZ collaborations. The LUX research team collected a first data set with the LUX experiment, a large liquid xenon detector installed in the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF). The first results were published in Physical Review Letters on March 4, 2014. The journal Nature named the LUX result a scientific highlight of the year for 2013. In addition, the LZ collaboration submitted the full proposal for the Lux Zeplin experiment, which has since been approved by DOE-HEP as a second-generation dark matter experiment. Witherell is the Level 2 manager for the Outer Detector System on the LUX-Zeplin experiment.

  1. Special Colloquium : Looking at High Energy Physics from a gender studies perspective

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Human actors, workplace cultures and knowledge production: Gender studies analyse the social constructions and cultural representations of gender. Using methods and tools from the humanities and social science, we look at all areas, including the natural sciences and technology, science education and research labs. After a short introduction to gender studies, the main focus of my talk will be the presentation of selected research findings on gender and high energy physics. You will hear about an ongoing research project on women in neutrino physics and learn about a study on the world of high energy physicists characterised by "rites of passage" and "male tales" told during a life in physics. I will also present a study on how the HEP community communicates, and research findings on the naming culture in HEP. Getting to know findings from another field on your own might contribute to create a high energy physics culture that is fair and welcoming to all genders.

  2. Special Colloquium : Looking at High Energy Physics from a gender studies perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Human actors, workplace cultures and knowledge production: Gender studies analyse the social constructions and cultural representations of gender. Using methods and tools from the humanities and social science, we look at all areas, including the natural sciences and technology, science education and research labs. After a short introduction to gender studies, the main focus of my talk will be the presentation of selected research findings on gender and high energy physics. You will hear about an ongoing research project on women in neutrino physics and learn about a study on the world of high energy physicists characterised by "rites of passage" and "male tales" told during a life in physics. I will also present a study on how the HEP community communicates, and research findings on the naming culture in HEP. Getting to know findings from another field on your own might contribute to create a high energy physics culture that is fair and welcoming to all genders.

  3. High Energy Neutrino Physics with Liquid Scintillation Detectors John G. Learned #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Learned, John

    High Energy Neutrino Physics with Liquid Scintillation Detectors John G. Learned # Department of Physics and Astronomy University of Hawaii, Manoa, 96822 USA (Dated: 22 February 2009) Large liquid scintillation detectors have been generally dedicated to low energy neutrino measure­ ments, in the MeV energy

  4. High Energy Neutrino Physics with Liquid Scintillation Detectors John G. Learned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Learned, John

    High Energy Neutrino Physics with Liquid Scintillation Detectors John G. Learned Department of Physics and Astronomy University of Hawaii, Manoa, 96822 USA (Dated: 22 February 2009) Large liquid scintillation detectors have been generally dedicated to low energy neutrino measure- ments, in the MeV energy

  5. High Energy Physics: Report of research accomplishments and future goals, FY 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1991-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses high energy physics research in the following areas: Research in theoretical physics; phenomenology; experimental computer facility at Caltech; Beijing BES; MACRO; CLEO II; SLD; L3 at LEP; the B Factory R & D Program; SSC GEM Detector; and a high resolution barium fluoride calorimeter for the SSC.

  6. The Running Spectral Index as a Probe of Physics at High Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. R. Espinosa

    2006-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The WMAP results on the scalar spectral index n and its running with scale, though preliminary, open a very interesting window to physics at very high energies. We address the problem of finding simple inflaton potentials well motivated by particle physics which can accommodate WMAP data.

  7. On the role of energy conservation in high-energy nuclear scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    On the role of energy conservation in high-energy nuclear scattering H J Drescher1 , M Hladik1-relativistic energies do not treat energy conservation in a consistent fashion. Demanding theoretical consistency), but energy conservation is not taken care of in cross section calculations. This is a serious problem

  8. THE NUCLEAR SPECTROSCOPIC TELESCOPE ARRAY (NuSTAR) HIGH-ENERGY X-RAY MISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakrabarty, Deepto

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) mission, launched on 2012 June 13, is the first focusing high-energy X-ray telescope in orbit. NuSTAR operates in the band from 3 to 79 keV, extending the sensitivity of ...

  9. Energy Loss Effect in High Energy Nuclear Drell-Yan Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chun-Gui Duan; Li-Hua Song; Li-Juan Huo; Guang-Lie Li

    2004-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy loss effect in nuclear matter, which is another nuclear effect apart from the nuclear effect on the parton distribution as in deep inelastic scattering process, can be measured best by the nuclear dependence of the high energy nuclear Drell-Yan process. By means of the nuclear parton distribution studied only with lepton deep inelastic scattering experimental data, measured Drell-Yan production cross sections for 800GeV proton incident on a variety of nuclear targets are analyzed within Glauber framework which takes into account energy loss of the beam proton. It is shown that the theoretical results with considering the energy loss effect are in good agreement with the FNAL E866.

  10. Indiana University High Energy Physics, Task A. Technical progress report, 1992--1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brabson, B.; Crittenden, R.; Dzierba, A. [and others

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses research at Indians University on the following high energy physics experiments: A search for mesons with unusual quantum numbers; hadronic states produced in association with high-mass dimuons; FNAL E740 (D0); superconducting super collider; and OPAL experiment at CERN.

  11. Roadmap for Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Ray Physics and Astronomy (whitepaper for Snowmass 2013)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anchordoqui, Luis A; Krizmanic, John F; Matthews, Jim; Mitchell, John W; Olinto, Angela V; Paul, Thomas C; Sokolsky, Pierre; Thomson, Gordon B; Weiler, Thomas J

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We summarize the remarkable recent progress in ultra-high energy cosmic ray physics and astronomy enabled by the current generation of cosmic ray observatories. We discuss the primary objectives for future measurements and describe the plans for near-term enhancements of existing experiments as well as the next generation of observatories.

  12. Research supported by the department of energy Task C: Experimental high energy physics. 1995 Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brau, J.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work of the University of Oregon high-energy physics group related to the Stanford Linear Detector, LEP`s OPAL detector, the NuTeV experiment at Fermilab, the SSC`s GEM detector, and top-quark studies at the Next Linear Collider. 160 refs., 53 figs., 12 tabs.

  13. High Energy Solar Physics: Anticipating HESSI ASP Conference Series, Vol. xxx, 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Priest, Eric

    High Energy Solar Physics: Anticipating HESSI ASP Conference Series, Vol. xxx, 2000 R. Ramaty and N. Mandzhavidze, eds. Solar Flare Theory and the Status of Flare Understanding E.R. Priest Department current understanding of the mag­ netohydrodynamics of solar flares. The theory of reconnection in 2D

  14. TMC304(TEG3) User's Manual KEK, National Laboratory for High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berns, Hans-Gerd

    TMC304(TEG3) User's Manual Yasuo Arai KEK, National Laboratory for High Energy Physics 1-1 Oho RTMC 6 TMC304(TEG3) Block Diagram 1995.11.13 Y.A CIO0-7* R encoder F encoder 6 PLL Read Pointer Write

  15. High energy electrons and nuclear phenomena in petawatt laser-solid experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowan, T. E.; Ditmire, T.; Hatchett, S.; Pennington, D. M.; Perry, M. D.; Phillips, T. W.; Wilks, S. C.; Young, P. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California (United States); Dong, B.; Takahashi, Y. [University of Alabama, Huntsville, Alabama (United States); Fountain, W.; Parnell, T. [Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama (United States); Hunt, A. W. [Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Johnson, J. [University Space Research Association, Huntsville, Alabama (United States); Kuehl, T. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)

    1999-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petawatt laser at LLNL has opened a new regime of laser-matter interactions in which the quiver motion of plasma electrons is fully relativistic with energies extending well above the threshold for nuclear processes. We have developed broad-band magnetic spectrometers to measure the spectrum of high-energy electrons produced in laser-solid target experiments at the Petawatt, and have found that in addition to the expected flux of {approx}few MeV electrons characteristic of the ponderomotive potential, there is a high energy component extending to {approx}100 MeV apparently from plasma acceleration in the underdense pre-formed plasma. The generation of hard bremsstrahlung, photo-nuclear reactions, and preliminary evidence for positron-electron pair production will be discussed.

  16. Alternative ansatz to wounded nucleon and binary collision scaling in high-energy nuclear collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Scott Moreland; Jonah E. Bernhard; Steffen A. Bass

    2015-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce TRENTO, a new parametric initial condition model for high-energy nuclear collisions based on eikonal entropy deposition via a "reduced thickness" function. The model simultaneously describes experimental proton-proton, proton-nucleus, and nucleus-nucleus multiplicity distributions, and generates nucleus-nucleus eccentricity harmonics consistent with experimental flow constraints. In addition, the model is compatible with ultra-central uranium-uranium data unlike existing models that include binary collision terms.

  17. Experimental and theoretical high energy physics research. Annual progress report, September 1, 1991--September 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress in the various components of the UCLA High-Energy Physics Research program is summarized, including some representative figures and lists of resulting presentations and published papers. Principal efforts were directed at the following: (I) UCLA hadronization model, PEP4/9 e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} analysis, {bar P} decay; (II) ICARUS and astroparticle physics (physics goals, technical progress on electronics, data acquisition, and detector performance, long baseline neutrino beam from CERN to the Gran Sasso and ICARUS, future ICARUS program, and WIMP experiment with xenon), B physics with hadron beams and colliders, high-energy collider physics, and the {phi} factory project; (III) theoretical high-energy physics; (IV) H dibaryon search, search for K{sub L}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{gamma}{gamma} and {pi}{sup 0}{nu}{bar {nu}}, and detector design and construction for the FNAL-KTeV project; (V) UCLA participation in the experiment CDF at Fermilab; and (VI) VLPC/scintillating fiber R & D.

  18. High-Energy Physics Strategies and Future Large-Scale Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmermann, F

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We sketch the actual European and international strategies and possible future facilities. In the near term the High Energy Physics (HEP) community will fully exploit the physics potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) through its high-luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC). Post-LHC options include a linear e+e- collider in Japan (ILC) or at CERN (CLIC), as well as circular lepton or hadron colliders in China (CepC/SppC) and Europe (FCC). We conclude with linear and circular acceleration approaches based on crystals, and some perspectives for the far future of accelerator-based particle physics.

  19. Nuclear Physics Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker-Loud, Andre

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Anchoring low-energy nuclear physics to the fundamental theory of strong interactions remains an outstanding challenge. I review the current progress and challenges of the endeavor to use lattice QCD to bridge this connection. This is a particularly exciting time for this line of research as demonstrated by the spike in the number of different collaborative efforts focussed on this problem and presented at this conference. I first digress and discuss the 2013 Ken Wilson Award.

  20. PHENIX (Pioneering High Energy Nuclear Interaction eXperiment): Data Tables and Figures from Published Papers

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The PHENIX Experiment is the largest of the four experiments currently taking data at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. PHENIX, the Pioneering High Energy Nuclear Interaction eXperiment, is an exploratory experiment for the investigation of high energy collisions of heavy ions and protons. PHENIX is designed specifically to measure direct probes of the collisions such as electrons, muons, and photons. The primary goal of PHENIX is to discover and study a new state of matter called the Quark-Gluon Plasma. More than 60 published papers and preprints are listed here with links to the full text and separate links to the supporting PHENIX data in plain text tables and to EPS and GIF figures from the papers.

  1. The effect of partonic wind on charm quark correlations in high-energy nuclear collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. Zhu; N. Xu; P. Zhuang

    2007-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In high-energy collisions, massive heavy quarks are produced back-to-back initially and they are sensitive to early dynamical conditions. The strong collective partonic wind from the fast expanding quark-gluon plasma created in high-energy nuclear collisions modifies the correlation pattern significantly. As a result, the angular correlation function for D$\\bar{\\rm D}$ pairs is suppressed at the angle $\\Delta\\phi=\\pi$. While the hot and dense medium in collisions at RHIC ($\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV) can only smear the initial back-to-back D$\\bar {\\rm D}$ correlation, a clear and strong near side D$\\bar{\\rm D}$ correlation is expected at LHC ($\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=5500$ GeV).

  2. HEPMath: A Mathematica Package for Semi-Automatic Computations in High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Wiebusch

    2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This article introduces the Mathematica package HEPMath which provides a number of utilities and algorithms for High Energy Physics computations in Mathematica. Its functionality is similar to packages like FormCalc or FeynCalc, but it takes a more complete and extensible approach to implementing common High Energy Physics notations in the Mathematica language, in particular those related to tensors and index contractions. It also provides a more flexible method for the generation of numerical code which is based on new features for C code generation in Mathematica. In particular it can automatically generate Python extension modules which make the compiled functions callable from Python, thus eliminating the need to write any code in a low-level language like C or Fortran. It also contains seamless interfaces to LHAPDF, FeynArts, and LoopTools.

  3. Electronic Systems for Radiation Detection in Space and High Energy Physics Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valerio, Pierpaolo; Ballabriga, Rafael

    This Ph.D. thesis focuses on the analysis and development of novel solution for electronics system for radiation detector, especially suited for space and high energy physics applications. The many blocks of a readout system were studied to develop complete systems, investigating where the performances can be improved over state of the art technologies. Two different architectures, suitable for different applications, were studied: Fractional Packet Counting, for High Dynamic Range (HDR) integrating imagers and CLICpix, an example of high-accuracy hybrid photon counting detector. The main specifications of the two systems were anayzed and solutions were proposed and implemented to meet them. A CLICpix prototype has been designed, fabricated using a commercial 65 nm CMOS technology and tested (characterization is still ongoing). The technology used for the prototype has also been characterized and validated for High Energy Physics (HEP) use and radiation hard design.

  4. Compilation of high energy physics reaction data: inventory of the particle data group holdings 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, G.C.; Stevens, P.R.; Rittenberg, A.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compilation is presented of reaction data taken from experimental high energy physics journal articles, reports, preprints, theses, and other sources. Listings of all the data are given, and the data points are indexed by reaction and momentum, as well as by their source document. Much of the original compilation was done by others working in the field. The data presented also exist in the form of a computer-readable and searchable database; primitive access facilities for this database are available.

  5. US/Japan Cooperation in High Energy Physics. Review of activities, 1988--1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Implementing Arrangement was to further the energy programs of both countries by establishing a framework for cooperation in the field of high energy physics, including research, accelerator and detector instrumentation research and development, the fabrication and subsequent use of new experimental devices and facilities, and related joint efforts as may be mutually agreed. Over the years, this cooperation has been very effective and has strengthened the overall collaborative efforts and the understanding between our nations and their citizens. It has demonstrated to the world our ability to work together to attack difficult problems. High Energy Physics goes across national borders; the bond is clearly intellectual and common ground is shared for the benefit of all in a most effective manner. This review covers the activities conducted under the aegis of the US/Japan Committee for Cooperation in High Energy Physics during the past five years (1988--1993). This was the second such US review of the US/Japan cooperative activities; the first was held in 1987.

  6. Final Technical Report for "High Energy Physics at The University of Iowa"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mallik, Usha; Meurice, Yannick; Nachtman, Jane; Onel, Yasar; Reno, Mary

    2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Particle Physics explores the very fundamental building blocks of our universe: the nature of forces, of space and time. By exploring very energetic collisions of sub-nuclear particles with sophisticated detectors at the colliding beam accelerators (as well as others), experimental particle physicists have established the current theory known as the Standard Model (SM), one of the several theoretical postulates to explain our everyday world. It explains all phenomena known up to a very small fraction of a second after the Big Bang to a high precision; the Higgs boson, discovered recently, was the last of the particle predicted by the SM. However, many other phenomena, like existence of dark energy, dark matter, absence of anti-matter, the parameters in the SM, neutrino masses etc. are not explained by the SM. So, in order to find out what lies beyond the SM, i.e., what conditions at the earliest fractions of the first second of the universe gave rise to the SM, we constructed the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN after the Tevatron collider at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Each of these projects helped us push the boundary further with new insights as we explore a yet higher energy regime. The experiments are extremely complex, and as we push the boundaries of our existing knowledge, it also requires pushing the boundaries of our technical knowhow. So, not only do we pursue humankind’s most basic intellectual pursuit of knowledge, we help develop technology that benefits today’s highly technical society. Our trained Ph.D. students become experts at fast computing, manipulation of large data volumes and databases, developing cloud computing, fast electronics, advanced detector developments, and complex interfaces in several of these areas. Many of the Particle physics Ph.D.s build their careers at various technology and computing facilities, even financial institutions use some of their skills of simulation and statistical prowess. Additionally, last but not least, today’s discoveries make for tomorrow’s practical uses of an improved life style, case in point, internet technology, fiber optics, and many such things. At The University of Iowa we are involved in the LHC experiments, ATLAS and CMS, building equipment, with calibration and maintenance, supporting the infrastructure in hardware, software and analysis as well as participating in various aspects of data analyses. Our theory group works on fundamentals of field theories and on exploration of non-accelerator high energy neutrinos and possible dark matter searches.

  7. Monochromatic radiography of high energy density physics experiments on the MAGPIE generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, G. N., E-mail: gareth.hall@imperial.ac.uk; Burdiak, G. C.; Suttle, L.; Stuart, N. H.; Swadling, G. F.; Lebedev, S. V.; Smith, R. A.; Patankar, S.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Grouchy, P. de; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Bennett, M.; Bland, S. N.; Pickworth, L.; Skidmore, J. [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BW (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A monochromatic X-ray backlighter based on Bragg reflection from a spherically bent quartz crystal has been developed for the MAGPIE pulsed power generator at Imperial College (1.4 MA, 240 ns) [I. H. Mitchell et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 67, 1533 (2005)]. This instrument has been used to diagnose high energy density physics experiments with 1.865 keV radiation (Silicon He-?) from a laser plasma source driven by a ?7 J, 1 ns pulse from the Cerberus laser. The design of the diagnostic, its characterisation and performance, and initial results in which the instrument was used to radiograph a shock physics experiment on MAGPIE are discussed.

  8. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, July 1, 1990--December 31, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, E.; Moonier, P.; May, E.; Norem, J. (eds.)

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A report is presented of research and development activities conducted in the High Energy Physics Division at Argonne National Laboratory during the six month period July 1 through December 31, 1990. Analyses of data from experiments performed by members of the Division are summarized, and the status of experiments taking data and of those being prepared is reviewed. Descriptions are included of research on theoretical and phenomenological topics in particle physics. Progress reports are provided on accelerator research and development, detector research and development, and experimental facilities research. Lists are presented of publications, of colloquia and conference talks, and of significant external community activities of members of the Division.

  9. Formalism for Simulation-based Optimization of Measurement Errors in High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuehong Xie

    2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Miminizing errors of the physical parameters of interest should be the ultimate goal of any event selection optimization in high energy physics data analysis involving parameter determination. Quick and reliable error estimation is a crucial ingredient for realizing this goal. In this paper we derive a formalism for direct evaluation of measurement errors using the signal probability density function and large fully simulated signal and background samples without need for data fitting and background modelling. We illustrate the elegance of the formalism in the case of event selection optimization for CP violation measurement in B decays. The implication of this formalism on choosing event variables for data analysis is discussed.

  10. Overview of event-by-event analysis of high energy nuclear collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tapan K. Nayak

    2007-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The event-by-event analysis of high energy nuclear collisions aims at revealing the richness of the underlying event structures and provide unique measures of dynamical fluctuations associated with QGP phase transition. The major challenge in these studies is to separate the dynamical fluctuations from the many other sources which contribute to the measured values. We present the fluctuations in terms of event multiplicity, mean transverse momentum, elliptic flow, source sizes, particle ratios and net charge distributions. In addition, we discuss the effect of long range correlations, disoriented chiral condensates and presence of jets. A brief review of various probes used for fluctuation studies and available experimental results are presented.

  11. Constraints on high energy phenomena from low energy nuclear physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Hanhart

    2001-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A procedure to derive bounds on coupling strengths of exotic particles to nucleons from the neutrino signal of supernovae is outlined. The analysis is based on a model independent calculation for the emissivities for the exotic, detailed simulation for the evolution of the early proto-neutron star as well as a Likelihood analysis. As an example we derive confidence levels for the upper bound of the size of gravity only extra dimensions.

  12. Statistical Thermal Models in High-Energy Nuclear Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ludwik Turko

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An examination of thermal models leads to the important signature of the expected critical behavior of the hadronic matter. A presentation is mainly devoted to the final volume effects. Canonical suppression factor are calculated.

  13. A pedagogical introduction to quantum integrability, with a view towards theoretical high-energy physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Lamers

    2015-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    These are lecture notes of an introduction to quantum integrability given at the Tenth Modave Summer School in Mathematical Physics, 2014, aimed at PhD candidates and junior researchers in theoretical physics. We introduce spin chains and discuss the coordinate Bethe Ansatz (CBA) for a representative example: the Heisenberg XXZ model. The focus lies on the structure of the CBA and on its main results, deferring a detailed treatment of the CBA for the general $M$-particle sector of the XXZ model to an appendix. Subsequently the transfer-matrix method is discussed for the six-vertex model, uncovering a relation between that model and the XXZ spin chain. Equipped with this background the quantum inverse-scattering method (QISM) and algebraic Bethe Ansatz (ABA) are treated. We emphasize the use of graphical notation for algebraic quantities as well as computations. Finally we turn to quantum integrability in the context of theoretical high-energy physics. We discuss factorized scattering in two-dimensional QFT, and conclude with a qualitative introduction to one current research topic relating quantum integrability to theoretical high-energy physics: the Bethe/gauge correspondence.

  14. Final Report for Research in High Energy Physics (University of Hawaii)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Browder, Thomas E.

    2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we present a final report for the DOE award for the University of Hawaii High Energy Physics Group (UHHEPG) for the period from December 1, 2009 to May 31, 2013 (including a period of no-cost extension). The high energy physics (HEP) group at the University of Hawaii (UH) has been engaged in experiments at the intensity frontier studying flavor physics (Task A: Belle, Belle-II and Task B: BES) and neutrinos (Task C: SuperK, LBNE, Double Chooz, DarkSide, and neutrino R\\&D). On the energy frontier, new types of pixel detectors were developed for upgrades of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC (Task D). On the cosmic frontier, there were investigations of ultra high-energy neutrino astrophysics and the highest energy cosmic rays using special radio detection techniques (Task E: AMBER, ANITA R\\&D) and results of the analysis of ANITA data. In addition, we have developed new types of sophisticated and cutting edge instrumentation based on novel ``oscilloscope on a chip'' electronics (Task F). Theoretical physics research (Task G) is phenomenologically oriented and has studied experimental consequences of existing and proposed new theories relevant to the energy, cosmic and intensity frontiers. The senior investigators for proposal were T. E. Browder (Task A), F. A. Harris (Task B), P. Gorham (Task E), J. Kumar (Task G), J. Maricic (Task C), J. G. Learned (Task C), S. Pakvasa (Task G), S. Parker (Task D), S. Matsuno (Task C), X. Tata (Task G) and G. S. Varner (Tasks F, A, E).

  15. Ion Sources for High Energy Ion Implantation at BNL | U.S. DOE...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Ion Sources for High Energy Ion Implantation at BNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science...

  16. Non-relativistic high-energy physics: top production and dark matter annihilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beneke, Martin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-relativistic physics is often associated with atomic physics and low-energy phenomena of the strong interactions between nuclei and quarks. In this review we cover three topics in contemporary high-energy physics at or close to the TeV scale, where non-relativistic dynamics plays an important if not defining role. We first discuss in detail the third-order corrections to top-quark pair production in electron-positron collisions in the threshold region, which plays a major role at a future high-energy e+ e- collider. Threshold effects are also relevant in the production of heavy particles in hadronic collisions, where in addition to the Coulomb force soft gluon radiation contributes to enhanced quantum corrections. We review the joint resummation of non-relativistic and soft gluon effects for pair production of top quarks and supersymmetric particles to next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy. The third topic deals with pair annihilation of dark matter particles within the framework of the Minimal Sup...

  17. Silicon detectors for the next generation of high energy physics experiments: expected degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Lazanu; S. Lazanu

    2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    There exists an enormous interest for the study of very high energy domain in particle physics, both theoretically and experimentally, in the aim to construct a general theory of the fundamental constituents of matter and of their interactions. Until now, semiconductor detectors have widely been used in modern high energy physics experiments. They are elements of the high resolution vertex and tracking system, as well as of calorimeters. The main motivation of this work is to discuss how to prepare some possible detectors - only silicon option being considered, for the new era of HEP challenges because the bulk displacement damage in the detector, consequence of irradiation, produces effects at the device level that limit their long time utilisation, increasing the leakage current and the depletion voltage, eventually up to breakdown, and thus affecting the lifetime of detector systems. In this paper, physical phenomena that conduce to the degradation of the detector are discussed and effects are analysed at the device level (leakage current and effective carrier concentration) in the radiation environments expected in the next generation of hadron colliders after LHC, at the next lepton and gamma-gamma colliders, as well as in astroparticle experiments, in conditions of long time continuum irradiations, for different technological options. The predicted results permit a better decision to obtain devices with harder parameters to radiation.

  18. Cerium Doped LSO/LYSO Crystal Development for future High Energy Physics Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren-Yuan Zhu

    2012-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of their high stopping power and fast and bright scintillation, cerium doped LSO and LYSO crystals have attracted a broad interest in the physics community pursuing precision electromagnetic calorimeter for future high energy physics experiments. Their excellent radiation hardness against gamma-rays, neutrons and charged hadrons also makes them a preferred material for calorimeters to be operated in a severe radiation environment, such as the HL-LHC. An effort was made at SIPAT to grow 25 X{sub 0} (28 cm) long LYSO crystals for high energy physics applications. In this paper, the optical and scintillation properties and its radiation hardness against gamma-ray irradiations up to 1 Mrad are presented for the first 2.5 X 2.5 X 28 cm LYSO sample. An absorption band was found at the seed end of this sample and three other 20 cm long samples, which was traced back to a bad seed crystal used in the corresponding crystal growth process. Significant progresses in optical and scintillation properties were achieved for large size LYSO crystals after eliminating this absorption band.

  19. A Globally Distributed System for Job, Data, and Information Handling for High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garzoglio, Gabriele

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The computing infrastructures of the modern high energy physics experiments need to address an unprecedented set of requirements. The collaborations consist of hundreds of members from dozens of institutions around the world and the computing power necessary to analyze the data produced surpasses already the capabilities of any single computing center. A software infrastructure capable of seamlessly integrating dozens of computing centers around the world, enabling computing for a large and dynamical group of users, is of fundamental importance for the production of scientific results. Such a computing infrastructure is called a computational grid. The SAM-Grid offers a solution to these problems for CDF and DZero, two of the largest high energy physics experiments in the world, running at Fermilab. The SAM-Grid integrates standard grid middleware, such as Condor-G and the Globus Toolkit, with software developed at Fermilab, organizing the system in three major components: data handling, job handling, and information management. This dissertation presents the challenges and the solutions provided in such a computing infrastructure.

  20. Hadronic rescattering effects on multi-strange hadrons in high-energy nuclear collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takeuchi, Shiori; Hirano, Tetsufumi; Huovinen, Pasi; Nara, Yasushi

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the effects of hadronic rescattering on hadron distributions in high-energy nuclear collisions by using an integrated dynamical approach. This approach is based on a hybrid model combining (3+1)-dimensional ideal hydrodynamics for the quark gluon plasma (QGP), and a transport model for the hadron resonance gas. Since the hadron distributions are the result of the entire expansion history of the system, understanding the QGP properties requires investigating how rescattering during the hadronic stage affects the final distributions of hadrons. We include multi-strange hadrons in our study, and quantify the effects of hadronic rescattering on their mean transverse momenta and elliptic flow. We find that multi-strange hadrons scatter less during the hadronic stage than non-strange particles, and thus their distributions reflect the properties of the system in an earlier stage than the distributions of non-strange particles.

  1. Cross sections and barriers for nuclear fission induced by high-energy nucleons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grudzevich, O. T., E-mail: ogrudzevich@ippe.ru [Leipunsky Institute for Physics and Power Engineering (Russian Federation); Yavshits, S. G. [Khlopin Radium Institute (Russian Federation)] [Khlopin Radium Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The cross sections for the fission of {sup 232}Th, {sup 235,238}U, {sup 237}Np, and {sup 239}Pu target nuclei that was induced by 20- to 1000-MeV neutrons and protons were calculated. The respective calculations were based on the multiconfiguration-fission (MCFx) model, which was used to describe three basic stages of the interaction of high-energy nucleons with nuclei: direct processes (intranuclear cascade), equilibration of the emerging compound system, and the decay of the compound nucleus (statistical model). Fission barriers were calculated within the microscopic approach for isotopic chains formed by 15 to 20 nuclei of the required elements. The calculated fission cross sections were compared with available experimental data. It was shown that the input data set and the theoretical model used made it possible to predict satisfactorily cross section for nuclear fission induced by 20- to 1000-MeV nucleons.

  2. Probe the QCD phase diagram with ?-mesons in high energy nuclear collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Mohanty; N. Xu

    2009-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    High-energy nuclear collision provide a unique tool to study the strongly interacting medium. Recent results from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) on \\phi-meson production has revealed the formation of a dense partonic medium. The medium constituents are found to exhibit collective behaviour initiated due to partonic interactions in the medium. We present a brief review of the recent results on \\phi production in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC. One crucial question is where, in the phase diagram, does the transition happen for the matter changing from hadronic to partonic degrees of freedom. We discuss how \\phi-meson elliptic flow in heavy-ion collisions can be used for the search of the QCD phase boundary.

  3. Compact Muon Production and Collection Scheme for High-Energy Physics Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stratakis, Diktys

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The relative immunity of muons to synchrotron radiation suggests that they might be used in place of electrons as probes in fundamental high-energy physics experiments. Muons are commonly produced indirectly through pion decay by interaction of a charged particle beam with a target. However, the large angle and energy dispersion of the initial beams as well as the short muon lifetime limits many potential applications. Here, we describe a fast method for manipulating the longitudinal and transverse phase-space of a divergent pion-muon beam to enable efficient capture and downstream transport with minimum losses. We also discuss the design of a handling system for the removal of unwanted secondary particles from the target region and thus reduce activation of the machine. The compact muon source we describe can be used for fundamental physics research in neutrino experiments.

  4. Saturation Physics in Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays: Heavy Quark Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. P. Goncalves; M. V. T. Machado

    2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we estimate the heavy quark production in the interaction of ultra high energy cosmic rays in the atmosphere, considering that the primary cosmic ray is a proton or a photon. At these energies the saturation momentum Q_{sat}^2 stays above the hard scale \\mu_c^2=4m_c^2, implying charm production probing the saturation regime. In particular, we show that the ep HERA data presents a scaling on \\tau_c = (Q^2+\\mu_c^2)/Q_{sat}^2. We derive our results considering the dipole picture and the Color Glass Condensate formalism, which one shows to be able to describe the heavy quark production in photon-proton and proton-proton collisions. Nuclear effects are considered in computation of cross sections for scattering on air nuclei. Implications on the flux of prompt leptons at the earth are analyzed and a large suppression is predicted.

  5. Linking Automated Data Analysis and Visualization with Applications in Developmental Biology and High-Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruebel, Oliver

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowledge discovery from large and complex collections of today's scientific datasets is a challenging task. With the ability to measure and simulate more processes at increasingly finer spatial and temporal scales, the increasing number of data dimensions and data objects is presenting tremendous challenges for data analysis and effective data exploration methods and tools. Researchers are overwhelmed with data and standard tools are often insufficient to enable effective data analysis and knowledge discovery. The main objective of this thesis is to provide important new capabilities to accelerate scientific knowledge discovery form large, complex, and multivariate scientific data. The research covered in this thesis addresses these scientific challenges using a combination of scientific visualization, information visualization, automated data analysis, and other enabling technologies, such as efficient data management. The effectiveness of the proposed analysis methods is demonstrated via applications in two distinct scientific research fields, namely developmental biology and high-energy physics.Advances in microscopy, image analysis, and embryo registration enable for the first time measurement of gene expression at cellular resolution for entire organisms. Analysis of high-dimensional spatial gene expression datasets is a challenging task. By integrating data clustering and visualization, analysis of complex, time-varying, spatial gene expression patterns and their formation becomes possible. The analysis framework MATLAB and the visualization have been integrated, making advanced analysis tools accessible to biologist and enabling bioinformatic researchers to directly integrate their analysis with the visualization. Laser wakefield particle accelerators (LWFAs) promise to be a new compact source of high-energy particles and radiation, with wide applications ranging from medicine to physics. To gain insight into the complex physical processes of particle acceleration, physicists model LWFAs computationally. The datasets produced by LWFA simulations are (i) extremely large, (ii) of varying spatial and temporal resolution, (iii) heterogeneous, and (iv) high-dimensional, making analysis and knowledge discovery from complex LWFA simulation data a challenging task. To address these challenges this thesis describes the integration of the visualization system VisIt and the state-of-the-art index/query system FastBit, enabling interactive visual exploration of extremely large three-dimensional particle datasets. Researchers are especially interested in beams of high-energy particles formed during the course of a simulation. This thesis describes novel methods for automatic detection and analysis of particle beams enabling a more accurate and efficient data analysis process. By integrating these automated analysis methods with visualization, this research enables more accurate, efficient, and effective analysis of LWFA simulation data than previously possible.

  6. Nuclear Physics of Neutron Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Piekarewicz

    2009-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the equation of state (EOS) of cold nuclear matter, namely, the relation between the pressure and energy density, is a central goal of nuclear physics that cuts across a variety of disciplines. Indeed, the limits of nuclear existence, the collision of heavy ions, the structure of neutron stars, and the dynamics of core-collapse supernova, all depend critically on the equation of state of hadronic matter. In this contribution I will concentrate on the special role that nuclear physics plays in constraining the EOS of cold baryonic matter and its impact on the properties of neutron stars.

  7. Summaries of FY 1992 research in nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the research projects supported by the Division of Nuclear Physics in the Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics during FY 1992. This Division is a component of the Office of Energy Research and provides about 85% of the funding for nuclear physics research in the United States. The objectives of the Nuclear Physics Program are two-fold: (1) to understand the interactions and structures of atomic nuclei and nuclear matter and the fundamental forces of nature as manifested in nuclear matter and (2) to foster application of this knowledge to other sciences and technical disciplines. These summaries are intended to provide a convenient guide for those interested in the research supported by the Division of Nuclear Physics. We remind the readers that this compilation is just an overview of the Nuclear Physics Program. What we attempt to portray correctly is the breadth of the program and level of activity in the field of nuclear physics research as well as the new capabilities and directions that continually alter the public face of the nuclear sciences. We hope that the limitations of space, constraints of fon-nat, and rigors of editing have not extinguished the excitement of the science as it was originally portrayed.

  8. Nuclear Physics: Recent Talks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Free Electron Laser (FEL) Medical Imaging Physics Topics Campaigns Meetings Recent Talks Archived Talks Additional Information Computing at JLab Operations Logbook Physics Topics:...

  9. On the Role of Energy Conservation in High-Energy Nuclear Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. J. Drescher; M. Hladik; S. Ostapchenko; T. Pierog; K. Werner

    2000-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We argue that most commonly used models for nuclear scattering at ultra-relativistic energies do not treat energy conservation in a consistent fashion. Demanding theoretical consistency as a minimal requirement for a realistic model, we provide a solution for the above-mentioned problem, the so-called ``Parton-Based Gribov-Regge Theory''. In order to keep a clean picture, we do not consider secondary interactions. We provide a very transparent extrapolation of the physics of more elementary interactions towards nucleus-nucleus scattering, without considering any nuclear effects due to final state interactions. In this sense we consider our model a realistic and consistent approach to describe the initial stage of nuclear collisions.

  10. Targets for R&D on Nb$_3$Sn conductor for High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ballarino, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High Energy Physics has been consistently pushing the performance of technical superconductors, for the benefit of high field magnet technology. So far the workhorse for particle accelerators has been Nb-Ti, but the practical performance limit has been attained with the LHC. Calls for higher beam luminosity (e.g. HL-LHC), and higher beam energy (e.g. FCC), demand a transition from Nb-Ti to Nb3Sn, presently the only practical candidate material offering the required high field performance. This paper provides a summary of desirable properties and performance targets for Nb3Sn to satisfy the challenging magnet specifications for upgrades of existing and future HEP accelerators.

  11. Software Aspects of IEEE Floating-Point Computations for Numerical Applications in High Energy Physics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Floating-point computations are at the heart of much of the computing done in high energy physics. The correctness, speed and accuracy of these computations are of paramount importance. The lack of any of these characteristics can mean the difference between new, exciting physics and an embarrassing correction. This talk will examine practical aspects of IEEE 754-2008 floating-point arithmetic as encountered in HEP applications. After describing the basic features of IEEE floating-point arithmetic, the presentation will cover: common hardware implementations (SSE, x87) techniques for improving the accuracy of summation, multiplication and data interchange compiler options for gcc and icc affecting floating-point operations hazards to be avoided About the speaker Jeffrey M Arnold is a Senior Software Engineer in the Intel Compiler and Languages group at Intel Corporation. He has been part of the Digital->Compaq->Intel compiler organization for nearly 20 years; part of that time, he worked on both low- and high-level math libraries. Prior to that, he was in the VMS Engineering organization at Digital Equipment Corporation. In the late 1980s, Jeff spent 2˝ years at CERN as part of the CERN/Digital Joint Project. In 2008, he returned to CERN to spent 10 weeks working with CERN/openlab. Since that time, he has returned to CERN multiple times to teach at openlab workshops and consult with various LHC experiments. Jeff received his Ph.D. in physics from Case Western Reserve University.

  12. A pedagogical introduction to quantum integrability, with a view towards theoretical high-energy physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lamers, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These are lecture notes of an introduction to quantum integrability given at the Tenth Modave Summer School in Mathematical Physics, 2014, aimed at PhD candidates and junior researchers in theoretical physics. We introduce spin chains and discuss the coordinate Bethe Ansatz (CBA) for a representative example: the Heisenberg XXZ model. The focus lies on the structure of the CBA and on its main results, deferring a detailed treatment of the CBA for the general $M$-particle sector of the XXZ model to an appendix. Subsequently the transfer-matrix method is discussed for the six-vertex model, uncovering a relation between that model and the XXZ spin chain. Equipped with this background the quantum inverse-scattering method (QISM) and algebraic Bethe Ansatz (ABA) are treated. We emphasize the use of graphical notation for algebraic quantities as well as computations. Finally we turn to quantum integrability in the context of theoretical high-energy physics. We discuss factorized scattering in two-dimensional QFT, a...

  13. Searching for Traces of Planck-Scale Physics with High Energy Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floyd W. Stecker; Sean T. Scully; Stefano Liberati; David Mattingly

    2015-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    High energy cosmic neutrino observations provide a sensitive test of Lorentz invariance violation, which may be a consequence of quantum gravity theories. We consider a class of non-renormalizable, Lorentz invariance violating operators that arise in an effective field theory description of Lorentz invariance violation in the neutrino sector inspired by Planck-scale physics and quantum gravity models. We assume a conservative generic scenario for the redshift distribution of extragalactic neutrino sources and employ Monte Carlo techniques to describe superluminal neutrino propagation, treating kinematically allowed energy losses of superluminal neutrinos caused by both vacuum pair emission and neutrino splitting. We consider EFTs with both non-renormalizable CPT-odd and non-renormalizable CPT-even operator dominance. We then compare the spectra derived using our Monte Carlo calculations in both cases with the spectrum observed by IceCube in order to determine the implications of our results regarding Planck-scale physics. We find that if the drop off in the neutrino flux above ~2 PeV is caused by Planck scale physics, rather than by a limiting energy in the source emission, a potentially significant pileup effect would be produced just below the drop off energy in the case of CPT-even operator dominance. However, such a clear drop off effect would not be observed if the CPT-odd, CPT-violating term dominates.

  14. The ultimate structure of matter: The high energy physics program from the 1950s through the 1980s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This discusses the following topics in High Energy Physics: The Particle Zoo; The Strong and the Weak; The Particle Explosion; Deep Inside the Nucleon; The Search for Unity; Physics in Collision; The Standard Model; Particles and the Cosmos; and Practical Benefits.

  15. The Dependence of the Proton-Triton Nuclear Reaction Rate on the Temperature and Energy Content of the High-Energy Proton Distribution Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Dependence of the Proton-Triton Nuclear Reaction Rate on the Temperature and Energy Content of the High-Energy Proton Distribution Function

  16. Nuclear Physics with Electroweak Probes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Omar Benhar

    2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, the italian theoretical Nuclear Physics community has played a leading role in the development of a unified approach, allowing for a consistent and fully quantitative description of the nuclear response to electromagnetic and weak probes. In this paper I review the main achievements in both fields, point out some of the open problems, and outline the most promising prospects.

  17. Physics 129 Nuclear and Particle Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    , homework solutions, handouts and announcements will be posted at my course web site: http://scipp.ucsc.edu/daw/phys129/enrolled This web site is password protected. The username and password will be announced materials will be distributed on the web site above. Nine texts on nuclear and particle physics, all

  18. THE NUCLEAR SPECTROSCOPIC TELESCOPE ARRAY (NuSTAR) HIGH-ENERGY X-RAY MISSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, Fiona A.; Cook, W. Rick; Forster, Karl; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Madsen, Kristin K.; Mao, Peter H.; Miyasaka, Hiromasa [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Craig, William W.; Pivovaroff, Michael J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Christensen, Finn E. [DTU Space, National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Hailey, Charles J.; Koglin, Jason E.; Mori, Kaya [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Zhang, William W. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Boggs, Steven E. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Stern, Daniel; Kim, Yunjin [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Giommi, Paolo; Perri, Matteo [ASI Science Data Center, c/o ESRIN, via G. Galilei, I-00044 Frascati (Italy); Kitaguchi, Takao, E-mail: fiona@srl.caltech.edu [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via di Frascati 33, I-00040 Monteporzio (Italy); and others

    2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) mission, launched on 2012 June 13, is the first focusing high-energy X-ray telescope in orbit. NuSTAR operates in the band from 3 to 79 keV, extending the sensitivity of focusing far beyond the {approx}10 keV high-energy cutoff achieved by all previous X-ray satellites. The inherently low background associated with concentrating the X-ray light enables NuSTAR to probe the hard X-ray sky with a more than 100-fold improvement in sensitivity over the collimated or coded mask instruments that have operated in this bandpass. Using its unprecedented combination of sensitivity and spatial and spectral resolution, NuSTAR will pursue five primary scientific objectives: (1) probe obscured active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity out to the peak epoch of galaxy assembly in the universe (at z {approx}< 2) by surveying selected regions of the sky; (2) study the population of hard X-ray-emitting compact objects in the Galaxy by mapping the central regions of the Milky Way; (3) study the non-thermal radiation in young supernova remnants, both the hard X-ray continuum and the emission from the radioactive element {sup 44}Ti; (4) observe blazars contemporaneously with ground-based radio, optical, and TeV telescopes, as well as with Fermi and Swift, to constrain the structure of AGN jets; and (5) observe line and continuum emission from core-collapse supernovae in the Local Group, and from nearby Type Ia events, to constrain explosion models. During its baseline two-year mission, NuSTAR will also undertake a broad program of targeted observations. The observatory consists of two co-aligned grazing-incidence X-ray telescopes pointed at celestial targets by a three-axis stabilized spacecraft. Deployed into a 600 km, near-circular, 6 Degree-Sign inclination orbit, the observatory has now completed commissioning, and is performing consistent with pre-launch expectations. NuSTAR is now executing its primary science mission, and with an expected orbit lifetime of 10 yr, we anticipate proposing a guest investigator program, to begin in late 2014.

  19. Elementary Particle Physics and High Energy Phenomena: Final Report for FY2010-13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cumalat, John P.; de Alwis, Senarath P.; DeGrand, Thomas A.; DeWolfe, Oliver; Ford, William T.; Hasenfratz, Anna; Mahanthappa, K. T.; Marino, Alysia D.; Nauenberg, Uriel; Smith, James G.; Stenson, Kevin; Wagner, Stephen R.; Zimmerman, Eric D.

    2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The work under this grant consists of experimental, theoretical, and phenomenological research on the fundamental properties of high energy subnuclear particles. The work is conducted at the University of Colorado, the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC), Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and other facilities, employing neutrino-beam experiments, test beams of various particles, and proton-proton collider experiments. It emphasizes mass generation and symmetry-breaking, neutrino oscillations, bottom particle production and decay, detector development, supergravity, supersymmetry, superstrings, quantum chromodynamics, nonequilibrium statistical mechanics, cosmology, phase transitions, lattice gauge theory, and anomaly-free theories. The goals are to improve our understanding of the basic building blocks of matter and their interactions. Data from the Large Hadron Collider at CERN have revealed new interactions responsible for particle mass, and perhaps will lead to a more unified picture of the forces among elementary material constituents. To this end our research includes searches for manifestations of theories such as supersymmetry and new gauge bosons, as well as the production and decay of heavy-flavored quarks. Our current work at J-PARC, and future work at new facilities currently under conceptual design, investigate the specifics of how the neutrinos change flavor. The research is integrated with the training of students at all university levels, benefiting both the manpower and intellectual base for future technologies.

  20. Nuclear Physics: Meetings

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Talks Archived Talks Additional Information Computing at JLab Operations Logbook Physics Topics: Meetings Talks given at the Science & Technology Review 2004 Larry Cardman:...

  1. Heavy ion fusion science research for high energy density physics and fusion applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logan, B.G.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    drive targets for inertial fusion energy. 1. Introduction Adensity matter and fusion energy. Previously, experiments inHeavy ion fusion science research for high energy density

  2. Neutrinos in Nuclear Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. D. McKeown

    2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the discovery of nuclear beta decay, nuclear physicists have studied the weak interaction and the nature of neutrinos. Many recent and current experiments have been focused on the elucidation of neutrino oscillations and neutrino mass. The quest for the absolute value of neutrino mass continues with higher precision studies of the tritium beta decay spectrum near the endpoint. Neutrino oscillations are studied through measurements of reactor neutrinos as a function of baseline and energy. And experiments searching for neutrinoless double beta decay seek to discover violation of lepton number and establish the Majorana nature of neutrino masses.

  3. Neutrinos in Nuclear Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKeown, R D

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the discovery of nuclear beta decay, nuclear physicists have studied the weak interaction and the nature of neutrinos. Many recent and current experiments have been focused on the elucidation of neutrino oscillations and neutrino mass. The quest for the absolute value of neutrino mass continues with higher precision studies of the tritium beta decay spectrum near the endpoint. Neutrino oscillations are studied through measurements of reactor neutrinos as a function of baseline and energy. And experiments searching for neutrinoless double beta decay seek to discover violation of lepton number and establish the Majorana nature of neutrino masses.

  4. Information Resources in High-Energy Physics: Surveying the Present Landscape and Charting the Future Course

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gentil-Beccot, Anne; Mele, Salvatore; Holtkamp, Annette; O'Connell, Heath B.; Brooks, Travis C.

    2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Access to previous results is of paramount importance in the scientific process. Recent progress in information management focuses on building e-infrastructures for the optimization of the research workflow, through both policy-driven and user-pulled dynamics. For decades, High-Energy Physics (HEP) has pioneered innovative solutions in the field of information management and dissemination. In light of a transforming information environment, it is important to assess the current usage of information resources by researchers and HEP provides a unique test-bed for this assessment. A survey of about 10% of practitioners in the field reveals usage trends and information needs. Community-based services, such as the pioneering arXiv and SPIRES systems, largely answer the need of the scientists, with a limited but increasing fraction of younger users relying on Google. Commercial services offered by publishers or database vendors are essentially unused in the field. The survey offers an insight into the most important features that users require to optimize their research workflow. These results inform the future evolution of information management in HEP and, as these researchers are traditionally 'early adopters' of innovation in scholarly communication, can inspire developments of disciplinary repositories serving other communities.

  5. The impact of Hall physics on magnetized high energy density plasma jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gourdain, P.-A.; Seyler, C. E.; Atoyan, L.; Greenly, J. B.; Hammer, D. A.; Kusse, B. R.; Pikuz, S. A.; Potter, W. M.; Schrafel, P. C.; Shelkovenko, T. A. [Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)] [Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Hall physics is often neglected in high energy density plasma jets due to the relatively high electron density of such jets (n{sub e}???10{sup 19}?cm{sup ?3}). However, the vacuum region surrounding the jet has much lower densities and is dominated by Hall electric field. This electric field redirects plasma flows towards or away from the axis, depending on the radial current direction. A resulting change in the jet density has been observed experimentally. Furthermore, if an axial field is applied on the jet, the Hall effect is enhanced and ignoring it leads to serious discrepancies between experimental results and numerical simulations. By combining high currents (?1 MA) and magnetic field helicity (15° angle) in a pulsed power generator such as COBRA, plasma jets can be magnetized with a 10?T axial field. The resulting field enhances the impact of the Hall effect by altering the density profile of current-free plasma jets and the stability of current-carrying plasma jets (e.g., Z-pinches)

  6. The profile likelihood ratio and the look elsewhere effect in high energy physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gioacchino Ranucci

    2012-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The experimental issue of the search for new particles of unknown mass poses the challenge of exploring a wide interval to look for the usual signatures represented by excess of events above the background. A side effect of such a broad range quest is that the significance calculations valid for signals of known location are no more applicable when such an information is missing. This circumstance is commonly termed in high energy physics applications as the look elsewhere effect. How it concretely manifests in a specific problem of signal search depends upon the particular strategy adopted to unravel the sought-after signal from the underlying background. In this respect an increasingly popular method is the profile likelihood ratio, especially because of its asymptotic behavior dictated by one of the most famous statistic result, the Wilks' theorem. This work is centered on the description of the look elsewhere effect in the framework of the profile likelihood methodology, in particular proposing a conjecture about the distribution of the likelihood ratio under the null hypothesis of absence of the signal over the searched mass interval, a condition which is known to violate the conditions of the Wilks' theorem. Several Monte Carlo tests to support the conjecture are presented, as well.

  7. FPGA based High Speed Data Acquisition System for High Energy Physics Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swagata Mandal; Suman Sau; Amlan Chakrabarti; Subhasis Chattopadhyay

    2015-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In high energy physics experiments (HEP), high speed and fault resilient data communication is needed between detectors/sensors and the host PC. Transient faults can occur in the communication hardware due to various external effects like presence of charged particles, noise in the environment or radiation effects in HEP experiments and that leads to single/multiple bit error. In order to keep the communication system functional in such a radiation environment where direct intervention of human is not possible, a high speed data acquisition (DAQ) architecture is necessary which supports error recovery. This design presents an efficient implementation of field programmable gate array (FPGA) based high speed DAQ system with optical communication link supported by multi-bit error correcting model. The design has been implemented on Xilinx Kintex-7 board and is tested for board to board communication as well as for PC communication using PCI (Peripheral Component Interconnect express). Data communication speed up to 4.8 Gbps has been achieved in board to board and board to PC communication and estimation of resource utilization and critical path delay are also measured.

  8. Physics from the Very-High Energy Cosmic-Ray Shadows of the Moon and Sun with Milagro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Physics from the Very-High Energy Cosmic-Ray Shadows of the Moon and Sun with Milagro by Grant E stringent upper limit at TeV energies. iv #12;The Milagro-measured solar shadow probes the Sun's magnetic the Milagro-measured Moon shadow to perform the first energy scale calibration of an air shower array

  9. Applications of Robust, Radiation Hard AlGaN Optoelectronic Devices in Space Exploration and High Energy Density Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, K.

    2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This slide show presents: space exploration applications; high energy density physics applications; UV LED and photodiode radiation hardness; UV LED and photodiode space qualification; UV LED AC charge management; and UV LED satellite payload instruments. A UV LED satellite will be launched 2nd half 2012.

  10. Lattice QCD and Nuclear Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konstantinos Orginos

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A steady stream of developments in Lattice QCD have made it possible today to begin to address the question of how nuclear physics emerges from the underlying theory of strong interactions. Central role in this understanding play both the effective field theory description of nuclear forces and the ability to perform accurate non-perturbative calculations in lo w energy QCD. Here I present some recent results that attempt to extract important low energy constants of the effective field theory of nuclear forces from lattice QCD.

  11. Nuclear Physics | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Astrophysics One of the great scientificResearch

  12. Realization and Tests of the Highly Granular CALICE Engineering Calorimeter Prototypes, 15th International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The CALICE Collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Realization and Tests of the Highly Granular CALICE Engineering Calorimeter Prototypes, 15th International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics

  13. High energy hadron-hadron collisions. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Georgia, Athens, Georgia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, T.T.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of a study on high energy collisions with the geometrical model are summarized in three parts: (1) the elastic hadron-hadron collision, (2) the inelastic hadron-hadron collision, and (3) e[sup +]e[sup [minus

  14. High energy physics program at Texas A&M University. Final report, April 1, 1990--March 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Texas A&M experimental high energy physics program has been supported since its inception by DOE Contract DE-AS05-81ER40039. During that period we established a viable experimental program at a university which before this time had no program in high energy physics. In 1990, the experimental program was augmented with a program in particle theory. In the accompanying final report, we outline the research work accomplished during the final year of this contract and the program being proposed for consideration by the Department of Energy for future grant support. Some of the particular areas covered are: Collider detector at Fermilab program; the TAMU MACRO program; SSC R&D program; SSC experimental program; and theoretical physics program.

  15. [Experimental nuclear physics]. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Washington on work supported in part by US Department of Energy contract DE-AC06-81ER40048. It contains chapters on giant dipole resonances in excited nuclei, nucleus-nucleus reactions, astrophysics, polarization in nuclear reactions, fundamental symmetries and interactions, accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), ultra-relativistic heavy ions, medium energy reactions, work by external users, instrumentation, accelerators and ion sources, and computer systems. An appendix lists Laboratory personnel, a Ph. D. degree granted in the 1990-1991 academic year, and publications. Refs., 41 figs., 7 tabs.

  16. Physics of Neutralization of Intense High-Energy Ion Beam Pulses by Electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaganovich, I. D.; Davidson, R. C.; Dorf, M. A.; Startsev, E. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Lee, E. P.; Friedman, A.

    2010-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutralization and focusing of intense charged particle beam pulses by electrons forms the basis for a wide range of applications to high energy accelerators and colliders, heavy ion fusion, and astrophysics. For example, for ballistic propagation of intense ion beam pulses, background plasma can be used to effectively neutralize the beam charge and current, so that the self-electric and self- magnetic fields do not affect the ballistic propagation of the beam. From the practical perspective of designing advanced plasma sources for beam neutralization, a robust theory should be able to predict the self-electric and self-magnetic fields during beam propagation through the background plasma. The major scaling relations for the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of intense ion charge bunches propagating through background plasma have been determined taking into account the effects of transients during beam entry into the plasma, the excitation of collective plasma waves, the effects of gas ionization, finite electron temperature, and applied solenoidal and dipole magnetic fields. Accounting for plasma production by gas ionization yields a larger self-magnetic field of the ion beam compared to the case without ionization, and a wake of current density and self-magnetic field perturbations is generated behind the beam pulse. A solenoidal magnetic field can be applied for controlling the beam propagation. Making use of theoretical models and advanced numerical simulations, it is shown that even a small applied magnetic field of about 100G can strongly affect the beam neutralization. It has also been demonstrated that in the presence of an applied magnetic field the ion beam pulse can excite large-amplitude whistler waves, thereby producing a complex structure of self-electric and self-magnetic fields. The presence of an applied solenoidal magnetic field may also cause a strong enhancement of the radial self-electric field of the beam pulse propagating through the background plasma. If controlled, this physical effect can be used for optimized beam transport over long distances.

  17. A new variable-resolution associative memory for high energy physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annovi, A. [INFN Frascati (Italy); Amerio, S. [INFN Padova (Italy); Beretta, M. [INFN Frascati (Italy); Bossini, E.; Crescioli, F.; Dell'Orso, M.; Giannetti, P. [INFN Pisa (Italy); Hoff, J.; Liu, T. [Fermilab (United States); Magalotti, D. [INFN Perugia (Italy); Piendibene, M.; Sacco, I. [INFN Pisa (Italy); Schoening, A.; Soltveit, H. K. [Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany); Stabile, A. [INFN Milano (Italy); Tripiccione, R. [INFN Ferrara (Italy); Liberali, V. [INFN Milano (Italy); Vitillo, R. [INFN Pisa (Italy); Volpi, G. [INFN Frascati (Italy)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe an important advancement for the Associative Memory device (AM). The AM is a VLSI processor for pattern recognition based on Content Addressable Memory (CAM) architecture. The AM is optimized for on-line track finding in high-energy physics experiments. Pattern matching is carried out by finding track candidates in coarse resolution 'roads'. A large AM bank stores all trajectories of interest, called 'patterns', for a given detector resolution. The AM extracts roads compatible with a given event during detector read-out. Two important variables characterize the quality of the AM bank: its 'coverage' and the level of fake roads. The coverage, which describes the geometric efficiency of a bank, is defined as the fraction of tracks that match at least one pattern in the bank. Given a certain road size, the coverage of the bank can be increased just adding patterns to the bank, while the number of fakes unfortunately is roughly proportional to the number of patterns in the bank. Moreover, as the luminosity increases, the fake rate increases rapidly because of the increased silicon occupancy. To counter that, we must reduce the width of our roads. If we decrease the road width using the current technology, the system will become very large and extremely expensive. We propose an elegant solution to this problem: the 'variable resolution patterns'. Each pattern and each detector layer within a pattern will be able to use the optimal width, but we will use a 'don't care' feature (inspired from ternary CAMs) to increase the width when that is more appropriate. In other words we can use patterns of variable shape. As a result we reduce the number of fake roads, while keeping the efficiency high and avoiding excessive bank size due to the reduced width. We describe the idea, the implementation in the new AM design and the implementation of the algorithm in the simulation. Finally we show the effectiveness of the 'variable resolution patterns' idea using simulated high occupancy events in the ATLAS detector. (authors)

  18. Inclusive Particle Production Data in E+E- Interactions: Data from DOE laboratory experiments as compiled in data reviews by the Durham High Energy Physics Database Group

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lafferty, G. D.; Reeves, P. I.; Whalley, M. R.

    A comprehensive compilation of experimental data on inclusive particle production in e+e- interactions is presented. Data are given in both tabular and graphical form for multiplicities and inclusive differential cross sections from experiments at all of the world`s high energy e+e- colliders. To facilitate comparison between the data sets, curves are also shown from the JETSET 7.4 Monte Carlo program. (Taken from the abstract of A Compilation of Inclusive Particle Production Data in E+E- Annihilation, G.D. Lafferty, P.I. Reeves, and M.R. Whalley, Journal of Physics G (Nuclear and Particle Physics), Volume 21, Number 12A, 1995.) The Durham High Energy Physics (HEP) Database Group makes these data, extracted from papers and data reviews, available in one place in an easy-to-access format. These data are also included in the Durham HEP Reaction Data Database which can be searched at http://hepdata.cedar.ac.uk/reaction

  19. The Austrian Academy of Sciences searches for a Director of the Institute for High Energy Physics of the Austrian Academy of Sciences.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Austrian Academy of Sciences searches for a Director of the Institute for High Energy Physics of the Austrian Academy of Sciences. The Institute of High Energy Physics (HEPHY) of the Austrian Academy of the Austrian Academy of Sciences) in order to facilitate synergies and increase the visibility of the Vienna

  20. Status Report of the DPHEP Study Group: Towards a Global Effort for Sustainable Data Preservation in High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akopov, Zaven [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Amerio, Silvia [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Padova (Italy); Asner, David [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Avetisyan, Eduard [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Barring, Olof [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Beacham, James [New York Univ., NY (United States); Bernardi, Gregorio [Lab. Nuclear Physics and High Energies (LPNHE), Paris (France); Bethke, Siegfried [Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPI), Munich (Germany); Boehnlein, Amber [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Brooks, Travis [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Browder, Thomas [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Brun, Rene [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Cartaro, Concetta [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Cattaneo, Marco [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Chen, Gang [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China). Inst. of High Energy Physics (IHEP); Corney, David [Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), Oxford (United Kingdom). Rutherford Appleton Lab. (RAL); Cranmer, Kyle [New York Univ., NY (United States); Culbertson, Ray [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Dallmeier-Tiessen, Sunje [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Denisov, Dmitri [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States). et al.

    2013-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Data from high-energy physics (HEP) experiments are collected with significant financial and human effort and are mostly unique. An inter-experimental study group on HEP data preservation and long-term analysis was convened as a panel of the International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA). The group was formed by large collider-based experiments and investigated the technical and organisational aspects of HEP data preservation. An intermediate report was released in November 2009 addressing the general issues of data preservation in HEP. This paper includes and extends the intermediate report. It provides an analysis of the research case for data preservation and a detailed description of the various projects at experiment, laboratory and international levels. In addition, the paper provides a concrete proposal for an international organisation in charge of the data management and policies in high-energy physics.

  1. Status Report of the DPHEP Study Group: Towards a Global Effort for Sustainable Data Preservation in High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. Akopov; Silvia Amerio; David Asner; Eduard Avetisyan; Olof Barring; James Beacham; Matthew Bellis; Gregorio Bernardi; Siegfried Bethke; Amber Boehnlein; Travis Brooks; Thomas Browder; Rene Brun; Concetta Cartaro; Marco Cattaneo; Gang Chen; David Corney; Kyle Cranmer; Ray Culbertson; Sunje Dallmeier-Tiessen; Dmitri Denisov; Cristinel Diaconu; Vitaliy Dodonov; Tony Doyle; Gregory Dubois-Felsmann; Michael Ernst; Martin Gasthuber; Achim Geiser; Fabiola Gianotti; Paolo Giubellino; Andrey Golutvin; John Gordon; Volker Guelzow; Takanori Hara; Hisaki Hayashii; Andreas Heiss; Frederic Hemmer; Fabio Hernandez; Graham Heyes; Andre Holzner; Peter Igo-Kemenes; Toru Iijima; Joe Incandela; Roger Jones; Yves Kemp; Kerstin Kleese van Dam; Juergen Knobloch; David Kreincik; Kati Lassila-Perini; Francois Le Diberder; Sergey Levonian; Aharon Levy; Qizhong Li; Bogdan Lobodzinski; Marcello Maggi; Janusz Malka; Salvatore Mele; Richard Mount; Homer Neal; Jan Olsson; Dmitri Ozerov; Leo Piilonen; Giovanni Punzi; Kevin Regimbal; Daniel Riley; Michael Roney; Robert Roser; Thomas Ruf; Yoshihide Sakai; Takashi Sasaki; Gunar Schnell; Matthias Schroeder; Yves Schutz; Jamie Shiers; Tim Smith; Rick Snider; David M. South; Rick St. Denis; Michael Steder; Jos Van Wezel; Erich Varnes; Margaret Votava; Yifang Wang; Dennis Weygand; Vicky White; Katarzyna Wichmann; Stephen Wolbers; Masanori Yamauchi; Itay Yavin; Hans von der Schmitt

    2012-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Data from high-energy physics (HEP) experiments are collected with significant financial and human effort and are mostly unique. An inter-experimental study group on HEP data preservation and long-term analysis was convened as a panel of the International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA). The group was formed by large collider-based experiments and investigated the technical and organisational aspects of HEP data preservation. An intermediate report was released in November 2009 addressing the general issues of data preservation in HEP. This paper includes and extends the intermediate report. It provides an analysis of the research case for data preservation and a detailed description of the various projects at experiment, laboratory and international levels. In addition, the paper provides a concrete proposal for an international organisation in charge of the data management and policies in high-energy physics.

  2. Status Report of the DPHEP Study Group: Towards a Global Effort for Sustainable Data Preservation in High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akopov, Zaven; Asner, David; Avetisyan, Eduard; Barring, Olof; Beacham, James; Bellis, Matthew; Bernardi, Gregorio; Bethke, Siegfried; Boehnlein, Amber; Brooks, Travis; Browder, Thomas; Brun, Rene; Cartaro, Concetta; Cattaneo, Marco; Chen, Gang; Corney, David; Cranmer, Kyle; Culbertson, Ray; Dallmeier-Tiessen, Sunje; Denisov, Dmitri; Diaconu, Cristinel; Dodonov, Vitaliy; Doyle, Tony; Dubois-Felsmann, Gregory; Ernst, Michael; Gasthuber, Martin; Geiser, Achim; Gianotti, Fabiola; Giubellino, Paolo; Golutvin, Andrey; Gordon, John; Guelzow, Volker; Hara, Takanori; Hayashii, Hisaki; Heiss, Andreas; Hemmer, Frederic; Hernandez, Fabio; Heyes, Graham; Holzner, Andre; Igo-Kemenes, Peter; Iijima, Toru; Incandela, Joe; Jones, Roger; Kemp, Yves; van Dam, Kerstin Kleese; Knobloch, Juergen; Kreincik, David; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Le Diberder, Francois; Levonian, Sergey; Levy, Aharon; Li, Qizhong; Lobodzinski, Bogdan; Maggi, Marcello; Malka, Janusz; Mele, Salvatore; Mount, Richard; Neal, Homer; Olsson, Jan; Ozerov, Dmitri; Piilonen, Leo; Punzi, Giovanni; Regimbal, Kevin; Riley, Daniel; Roney, Michael; Roser, Robert; Ruf, Thomas; Sakai, Yoshihide; Sasaki, Takashi; Schnell, Gunar; Schroeder, Matthias; Schutz, Yves; Shiers, Jamie; Smith, Tim; Snider, Rick; South, David M.; St. Denis, Rick; Steder, Michael; Van Wezel, Jos; Varnes, Erich; Votava, Margaret; Wang, Yifang; Weygand, Dennis; White, Vicky; Wichmann, Katarzyna; Wolbers, Stephen; Yamauchi, Masanori; Yavin, Itay; von der Schmitt, Hans

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data from high-energy physics (HEP) experiments are collected with significant financial and human effort and are mostly unique. An inter-experimental study group on HEP data preservation and long-term analysis was convened as a panel of the International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA). The group was formed by large collider-based experiments and investigated the technical and organisational aspects of HEP data preservation. An intermediate report was released in November 2009 addressing the general issues of data preservation in HEP. This paper includes and extends the intermediate report. It provides an analysis of the research case for data preservation and a detailed description of the various projects at experiment, laboratory and international levels. In addition, the paper provides a concrete proposal for an international organisation in charge of the data management and policies in high-energy physics.

  3. High energy physics research. Final report, October 1, 1969--December 31, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this research was to understand the fundamental constituents of matter and their interactions. First, a brief history of the high energy research at Princeton University is presented. Next, the extensive research covered in this 21 year period is summarized. Finally, a list of all publications issued during this period is presented.

  4. Heavy ion fusion science research for high energy density physics and fusion applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logan, B.G.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1665. [38] B G Logan, 1993 Fusion Engineering and Design 22,J Perkins, (June 2007), to be submitted to Nuclear Fusion. [36] M Tabak 1996 Nuclear Fusion 36, No 2. [37] S Atzeni, and

  5. Proceedings of the 2009 CERN-Latin-American School of High-Energy Physics, Recinto Quirama, Colombia, 15 - 28 March 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Grojean; M. Spiropulu

    2010-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The CERN-Latin-American School of High-Energy Physics is intended to give young physicists an introduction to the theoretical aspects of recent advances in elementary particle physics. These proceedings contain lectures on quantum field theory, quantum chromodynamics, physics beyond the Standard Model, neutrino physics, flavour physics and CP violation, particle cosmology, high-energy astro-particle physics, and heavy-ion physics, as well as trigger and data acquisition, and commissioning and early physics analysis of the ATLAS and CMS experiments. Also included are write-ups of short review projects performed by the student discussions groups.

  6. Color transparency and high-energy ( p ,2 p ) nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, T.H. (Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)); Miller, G.A. (Department of Physics FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States))

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Predictions relevant for exploring color transparency in ({ital p},2{ital p}) nuclear reactions are often made by using simplified treatments of nuclear dynamics. We examine the extent to which the earlier predictions are valid by carrying out calculations using an improved treatment of the proton scattering wave functions, nucleon Fermi motion, and the effects of long- and short-range nuclear correlations. The consequences of two existing models of color transparency are also presented.

  7. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 428 (1999) 593}607 Radio-controlled xenon #ashers for atmospheric monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 428 (1999) 593}607 Radio-controlled xenon of Physics, High Energy Astrophysics Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA Department

  8. Used MRI magnets get a second chance at life in high-energy physics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    spectrometer that uses the radioactive beams from FRIB at minimal cost," said Argonne nuclear physicist Birger Back. Both magnets have already been delivered to Argonne, and...

  9. Early Time Dynamics of Gluon Fields in High Energy Nuclear Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, G; Kapusta, J I; Li, Y

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclei colliding at very high energy create a strong, quasi-classical gluon field during the initial phase of their interaction. We present an analytic calculation of the initial space-time evolution of this field in the limit of very high energies using a formal recursive solution of the Yang-Mills equations. We provide analytic expressions for the initial chromo-electric and chromo-magnetic fields and for their energy-momentum tensor. In particular, we discuss event-averaged results for energy density and energy flow as well as for longitudinal and transverse pressure of this system. For example, we find that the ratio of longitudinal to transverse pressure very early in the system behaves as $p_L/p_T = -[1-\\frac{3}{2a}(Q\\tau)^2]/[1-\\frac{1}{a}(Q\\tau)^2]+\\mathcal{O}(Q\\tau)^4$ where $\\tau$ is the longitudinal proper time, $Q$ is related to the saturation scales $Q_s$ of the two nuclei, and $a = \\ln (Q^2/\\hat{m}^2)$ with $\\hat m$ a scale to be defined later. Our results are generally applicable if $\\tau \\less...

  10. Detecting special nuclear materials in containers using high-energy gamma rays emitted by fission products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Norman, Eric B. (Oakland, CA); Prussin, Stanley G. (Kensington, CA)

    2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and a system for detecting the presence of special nuclear materials in a container. The system and its method include irradiating the container with an energetic beam, so as to induce a fission in the special nuclear materials, detecting the gamma rays that are emitted from the fission products formed by the fission, to produce a detector signal, comparing the detector signal with a threshold value to form a comparison, and detecting the presence of the special nuclear materials using the comparison.

  11. Anthropic considerations in nuclear physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulf-G. Meißner

    2014-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In this short review, I discuss the sensitivity of the generation of the light and the life-relevant elements like carbon and oxygen under changes of the parameters of the Standard Model pertinent to nuclear physics. Chiral effective field theory allows for a systematic and precise description of the forces between two, three, and four nucleons. In this framework, variations under the light quark masses and the electromagnetic fine structure constant can also be consistently calculated. Combining chiral nuclear effective field theory with Monte Carlo simulations allows to further calculate the properties of nuclei, in particular of the Hoyle state in carbon, that plays a crucial role in the generation of the life-relevant elements in hot, old stars. The dependence of the triple-alpha process on the fundamental constants of Nature is calculated and some implications for our anthropic view of the Universe are discussed.

  12. Medium energy nuclear physics research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, G.A.; Dubach, J.F.; Hicks, R.S.; Miskimen, R.A.

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The UMass group has concentrated on using electromagnetic probes, particularly the electron in high-energy scattering experiments at the Stanford Liner Accelerator Center (SLAC). Plans are also being made for high energy work at the Continuous Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). The properties of this accelerator should permit a whole new class of coincidence experiments to be carried out. At SLAC UMass has made major contributions toward the plans for a cluster-jet gas target and detector system at the 16 GeV PEP storage ring. For the future CEBAF accelerator, tests were made of the feasibility of operating wire drift chambers in the vicinity of a continuous electron beam at the University Illinois microtron. At the same time a program of studies of the nuclear structure of more complex nuclei has been continued at the MIT-Bates Linear Accelerator Center and in Amsterdam at the NIKHEF-K laboratory. At the MIT-Bates Accelerator, because of an unforeseen change in beam scheduling as a result of problems with the T{sub 20} experiment, the UMass group was able to complete data acquisition on experiments involving 180{degrees} elastic magnetic scattering on {sup 117}Sn and {sup 41}Ca. A considerable effort has been given to preparations for a future experiment at Bates involving the high-resolution threshold electrodisintegration of the deuteron. The use of these chambers should permit a high degree of discrimination against background events in the measurement of the almost neutrino-like small cross sections that are expected. In Amsterdam at the NIKHEF-K facility, single arm (e,e{prime}) measurements were made in November of 1987 on {sup 10}B in order to better determine the p{sub 3/2} wave function from the transition from the J{sup pi} = 3{sup +} ground state to the O{sup +} excited state at 1.74 MeV. In 1988, (e,e{prime}p) coincidence measurements on {sup 10}B were completed. The objective was to obtain information on the p{sub 3/2} wave function by another means.

  13. HepSim: a repository with predictions for high-energy physics experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. V. Chekanov

    2015-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A file repository for calculations of cross sections and kinematic distributions using Monte Carlo generators for high-energy collisions is discussed. The repository is used to facilitate effective preservation and archiving of data from theoretical calculations, as well as for comparisons with experimental data. The HepSim data library is publicly accessible and includes a number of Monte Carlo event samples with Standard Model predictions for current and future experiments. The HepSim project includes a software package to automate the process of downloading and viewing online Monte Carlo event samples. A data streaming over a network for end-user analysis is discussed.

  14. HepSim: A Repository with Predictions for High-Energy Physics Experiments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chekanov, S. V.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A file repository for calculations of cross sections and kinematic distributions using Monte Carlo generators for high-energy collisions is discussed. The repository is used to facilitate effective preservation and archiving of data from theoretical calculations and for comparisons with experimental data. The HepSim data library is publicly accessible and includes a number of Monte Carlo event samples with Standard Model predictions for current and future experiments. The HepSim project includes a software package to automate the process of downloading and viewing online Monte Carlo event samples. Data streaming over a network for end-user analysis is discussed.

  15. Drell-Yan Cross Sections: Data from DOE laboratory experiments as compiled in data reviews by the Durham High Energy Physics Database Group

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Stirling, W. J.; Whalley, M. R.

    A compilation of data on Drell-Yan cross sections above a lepton-pair mass of 4 GeV/c2 is presented. The relevant experiments at Fermilab and CERN are included dating from approximately 1977 to the present day, covering p, p and pi +or- beams on a variety of nuclear and hydrogen targets, with centre-of-mass energies from 8.6 GeV to 630 GeV. The type of data presented include d sigma /dm, d2 sigma /dm dx and d2 sigma /dm dy distributions as well as other variations of these, and also transverse momentum distributions. The data are compared with a standard theoretical model, and a phenomenological 'K-factor' for each set is calculated. (Taken from the abstract of A Compilation of Drell-Yan Cross sections, W.J. Stirling and M.R. Whalley, Journal of Physics G (Nuclear and Particle Physics), Volume 19, Data Review, 1993.) The Durham High Energy Physics (HEP) Database Group makes these data, extracted from papers and data reviews, available in one place in an easy-to-access format. These data are also included in the Durham HEP Reaction Data Database which can be searched at http://hepdata.cedar.ac.uk/reaction

  16. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 478 (2002) 158162 Study of high-pressure hydrogen-operated wire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammel, Peter

    diameter, 1 mm wire spacing. Anode­cathode gaps: 3:5 mm The chambers were tested in a vessel filledNuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 478 (2002) 158­162 Study of high. Sorokaa , A.A. Vorobyova , N.I. Voropaeva a High Energy Physics Division (HEPD), Petersburg Nuclear

  17. Heavy flavours in high-energy nuclear collisions: quenching, flow and correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Beraudo; A. De Pace; M. Monteno; M. Nardi; F. Prino

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results for the quenching, elliptic flow and azimuthal correlations of heavy flavour particles in high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions obtained through the POWLANG transport setup, developed in the past to study the propagation of heavy quarks in the Quark-Gluon Plasma and here extended to include a modeling of their hadronization in the presence of a medium. Hadronization is described as occurring via the fragmentation of strings with endpoints given by the heavy (anti-)quark Q(Qbar) and a thermal parton $qbar(q)$ from the medium. The flow of the light quarks is shown to affect significantly the R_AA} and v_2 of the final D mesons, leading to a better agreement with the experimental data.

  18. Observable measures of critical behavior in high-energy nuclear collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudolph C. Hwa

    2000-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Critical behaviors of quark-hadron phase transition in high-energy heavy-ion collisions are investigated with the aim of identifying hadronic observables. The surface of the plasma cylinder is mapped onto a 2D lattice. The Ising model is used to simulate configurations corresponding to cross-over transitions in accordance to the findings of QCD lattice gauge theory. Hadrons are formed in clusters of all sizes. Various measures are examined to quantify the fluctuations of the cluster sizes and of the voids among the clusters. The canonical power-law behaviors near the critical temperature are found for appropriately chosen measures. Since the temperature is not directly observable, attention is given to the problem of finding observable measures. It is demonstrated that for the measures considered the dependence on the final-state randomization is weak. Thus the critical behavior of the measures proposed is likely to survive the scattering effect of the hadron gas in the final state.

  19. A sustainable business model for Open-Access journal publishing a proposed plan for High-Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vigen, Jens

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Energy Physics community over the last 15 years has achieved so-called full green Open Access through the wide dissemination of preprints via arXiv, a central subject repository managed by Cornell University. However, green Open Access does not alleviate the economic difficulties of libraries as they are still expected to offer access to versions of record of the peer-reviewed literature. For this reason the particle physics community is now addressing the issue of gold Open Access by converting a set of the existing core journals to Open Access. A Working Party has been established to bring together funding agencies, laboratories and libraries into a single consortium, called SCOAP3 (Sponsoring Consortium for Open Access Publishing in Particle Physics). This consortium will engage with publishers to build a sustainable model for Open Access publishing. In this model, subscription fees from multiple institutions are replaced by contracts with publishers of Open Access journals, where the SCOAP3 conso...

  20. Nuclear like effects in proton-proton collisions at high energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Cunqueiro; J. Dias de Deus; C. Pajares

    2009-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that several effects considered nuclear effects are not nuclear in the sense that they do not only occur in nucleus-nucleus and hadron-nucleus collisions but, as well, they are present in hadron-hadron (proton-proton) collisions. The matter creation mechanism in hh, hA and AA collisions is always the same. The pT suppression of particles produced in large multiplicity events compared to low multiplicity events, the elliptic flow and the Cronin effect are predicted to occur in pp collisions at LHC energies as a consequence of the obtained high density partonic medium.

  1. Intriguing Trends in Nuclear Physics Articles Authorship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pritychenko, B.

    2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A look at how authorship of physics publications (particularly nuclear publications) have changed throughout the decades by comparing data mined from the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) with observations.

  2. Characterization of spatially resolved high resolution x-ray spectrometers for high energy density physics and light source experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, K. W., E-mail: khill@pppl.gov; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparacio, L.; Efthimion, P.; Pablant, N. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Lu, J. [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Technology and System of Ministry of Education, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Beiersdorfer, P.; Chen, H.; Magee, E. [Physics Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A high resolution 1D imaging x-ray spectrometer concept comprising a spherically bent crystal and a 2D pixelated detector is being optimized for diagnostics of small sources such as high energy density physics (HEDP) and synchrotron radiation or x-ray free electron laser experiments. This instrument is used on tokamak experiments for Doppler measurements of ion temperature and plasma flow velocity profiles. Laboratory measurements demonstrate a resolving power, E/?E of order 10?000 and spatial resolution better than 10 ?m. Initial tests of the high resolution instrument on HEDP plasmas are being performed.

  3. Modern topics in theoretical nuclear physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. K. Jennings; A. Schwenk

    2006-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past five years there have been profound advances in nuclear physics based on effective field theory and the renormalization group. In this brief, we summarize these advances and discuss how they impact our understanding of nuclear systems and experiments that seek to unravel their unknowns. We discuss future opportunities and focus on modern topics in low-energy nuclear physics, with special attention to the strong connections to many-body atomic and condensed matter physics, as well as to astrophysics. This makes it an exciting era for nuclear physics.

  4. Nuclear Attenuation of high energy two-hadron system in the string model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akopov, N; Akopov, Z

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear attenuation of the two-hadron system is considered in the string model. The two-scale model and its improved version with two different choices of constituent formation time and sets of parameters obtained earlier for the single hadron attenuation, are used to describe available experimental data for the $z$-dependence of subleading hadron, whereas satisfactory agreement with the experimental data has been observed. A model prediction for $\

  5. Nuclear Attenuation of high energy two-hadron system in the string model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Akopov; L. Grigoryan; Z. Akopov

    2006-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear attenuation of the two-hadron system is considered in the string model. The two-scale model and its improved version with two different choices of constituent formation time and sets of parameters obtained earlier for the single hadron attenuation, are used to describe available experimental data for the $z$-dependence of subleading hadron, whereas satisfactory agreement with the experimental data has been observed. A model prediction for $\

  6. High Energy Physics Program at Texas A and M University. Annual report, November 1, 1991--October 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high energy physics program has continued its experimental activities over. In CDF, the Texas A&M group has led an effort to design an upgrade for the silicon vertex detector, and is currently working with the rest of the collaboration on the next major data taking run. In MACRO, work was done on the development of the final version of the wave form digitizing system being implemented for the entire scintillator system. This work is nearing completion, and the system is expected to be up and running on the detector by summer 1993. Work was done within the SDC group to develop gas microstrip chambers for use in precision tracking at the SSC, and in the GEM group, toward the development of a suitable forward calorimeter design. The theoretical high energy physics program has continued the study of a very successful string-derived model that unifies all known interactions: flipped SU(5), which is the leading candidate for a TOE. Work has also continued on some generalizations of the symmetries of string theory, known as W algebras. These are expected to have applications in two-dimensional conformal field theory, two-dimensional extensions of gravity and topological gravity and W-string theory.

  7. Radiative energy loss of high energy quarks in finite-size nuclear matter and quark-gluon plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. G. Zakharov

    1997-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The induced gluon radiation of a high energy quark in a finite-size QCD medium is studied. For a sufficiently energetic quark produced inside a medium we find the radiative energy loss $\\Delta E_{q}\\propto L^{2}$, where L is the distance passed by quark in the medium. It has a weak dependence on the initial quark energy $E_{q}$. The $L^{2}$ dependence turns to $L^{1}$ as the quark energy decreases. Numerical calculations are performed for a cold nuclear matter and a hot quark-gluon plasma. For a quark incident on a nucleus we predict $\\Delta E_{q}\\approx 0.1 E_{q}(L/10 fm)^{\\beta}$, with $\\beta$ close to unity.

  8. Enthalpic and entropic phase transitions in high energy density nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Igor Iosilevskiy

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Features of Gas-Liquid (GL) and Quark-Hadron (QH) phase transitions (PT) in dense nuclear matter are under discussion in comparison with their terrestrial counterparts, e.g. so-called "plasma" PT in shock-compressed hydrogen, nitrogen, xenon etc. Both, GLPT and QHPT, when being represented in widely accepted $T - \\mu$ diagram, are often considered as similar, i.e. amenable to one-to-one mapping by simple scaling. It is argued that this impression is illusive and that GLPT and QHPT belong to different classes: namely, GLPT is typical \\emph{enthalpic} (VdW-like) PT while QHPT ("deconfinement-driven") is typical \\emph{entropic} PT like hypothetical ionization- and dissociation-driven phase transitions in hot and dense hydrogen, nitrogen etc. of megabar pressure range. Newly introduced terms "enthalpic" and "entropic" PT, are defined and clarified in their illustrative comparison successively from $T - \\mu$ to $P - T$ and $P - V$ phase diagrams for GLPT and QHPT from one side (dense nuclear plasma) vs. GLPT and "plasma" (or "dissociative") PTs from another side (electromagnetic plasma). Fundamental difference in topology of binodal and spinodal curves for enthalpic and entropic phase transitions are discussed and illustrated. Multilayered structure of thermodynamic surfaces $T(P,V)$, $U(P,V)$, $S(P,V)$ etc. as basic origin for intrinsic anomalous properties of all entropic PTs, is stressed.

  9. High Performance Computing Modeling Advances Accelerator Science for High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amundson, James; Macridin, Alexandru; Spentzouris, Panagiotis

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The development and optimization of particle accelerators are essential for advancing our understanding of the properties of matter, energy, space and time. Particle accelerators are complex devices whose behavior involves many physical effects on multiple scales. Therefore, advanced computational tools utilizing high-performance computing (HPC) are essential for accurately modeling them. In the past decade, the DOE SciDAC program has produced such accelerator-modeling tools, which have beem employed to tackle some of the most difficult accelerator science problems. In this article we discuss the Synergia beam-dynamics framework and its applications to high-intensity particle accelerator physics. Synergia is an accelerator simulation package capable of handling the entire spectrum of beam dynamics simulations. We present the design principles, key physical and numerical models in Synergia and its performance on HPC platforms. Finally, we present the results of Synergia applications for the Fermilab proton source upgrade, known as the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP).

  10. High-Performance Computing Modeling Advances Accelerator Science for High-Energy Physics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Amundson, James [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Macridin, Alexandru [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Spentzouris, Panagiotis [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development and optimization of particle accelerators are essential for advancing our understanding of the properties of matter, energy, space and time. Particle accelerators are complex devices whose behavior involves many physical effects on multiple scales. Therefore, advanced computational tools utilizing high-performance computing (HPC) are essential for accurately modeling them. In the past decade, the DOE SciDAC program has produced such accelerator-modeling tools, which have beem employed to tackle some of the most difficult accelerator science problems. In this article we discuss the Synergia beam-dynamics framework and its applications to high-intensity particle accelerator physics. Synergia is an accelerator simulation package capable of handling the entire spectrum of beam dynamics simulations. We present the design principles, key physical and numerical models in Synergia and its performance on HPC platforms. Finally, we present the results of Synergia applications for the Fermilab proton source upgrade, known as the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP).

  11. High-Performance Computing Modeling Advances Accelerator Science for High-Energy Physics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Amundson, James; Macridin, Alexandru; Spentzouris, Panagiotis

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development and optimization of particle accelerators are essential for advancing our understanding of the properties of matter, energy, space and time. Particle accelerators are complex devices whose behavior involves many physical effects on multiple scales. Therefore, advanced computational tools utilizing high-performance computing (HPC) are essential for accurately modeling them. In the past decade, the DOE SciDAC program has produced such accelerator-modeling tools, which have beem employed to tackle some of the most difficult accelerator science problems. In this article we discuss the Synergia beam-dynamics framework and its applications to high-intensity particle accelerator physics. Synergia is an accelerator simulation packagemore »capable of handling the entire spectrum of beam dynamics simulations. We present the design principles, key physical and numerical models in Synergia and its performance on HPC platforms. Finally, we present the results of Synergia applications for the Fermilab proton source upgrade, known as the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP).« less

  12. High-energy behavior of the nuclear symmetry potential in asymmetric nuclear matter RID A-2398-2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, LW; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Ba.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the relativistic impulse approximation with empirical NN scattering amplitude and the nuclear scalar and vector densities from the relativistic mean-field theory, we evaluate the Dirac optical potential for neutrons and protons in asymmetric...

  13. DOE Closeout Report from SUNY Albany High Energy Physics to Department of Energy Office of Science.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernst, Jesse [SUNY Albany; Jain, Vivek

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A report from the SUNY Albany Particle Physics Group summarizing our activities on the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. We summarize our work: on data analysis projects, on efforts to improve detector performance, and on service work to the experiment.

  14. ICHEP98 Abstract 753 XXIX International Conference on High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sensitivity have already been placed on the scalar and on the tensor terms [8]. Since g and \\Lambda only enter window for searching for indications of physics processes beyond the Standard Model (SM). A wide class interactions (CI). Particular interest in a search for such signatures was stimulated by an excess of events

  15. The University of Virginia Experimental and Theoretical High Energy Physics Closeout Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Principal Investigator: Harry B. Thacker

    2012-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The work covered in this report includes a joint project on using gauge-gravity duality to discover qualitatively new results on jet quenching in strongly-coupled QCD-like plasmas. Other topics addressed by the theoretical work include jet stopping and energy loss in weakly-coupled plasmas, perturbative QCD amplitudes, AdS/CMT, dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking with a heavy fourth generation, electroweak-scale #23;{nu}{sub R} model, vacuum topological structure and chiral dynamics in strongly coupled gauge theory. Effort committed to the CMS experiment is reported, particularly the management, maintenance, operation and upgrade of the CMS electromagnetic detector (ECAL). Activities in various physics analyses including Supersymmetry, Higgs, Top, and QCD analyses are reported. Physics projects covering wide areas of physics at the LHC are reported. CY2010 saw the accumulation of a data sample corresponding to approximately 36 pb{sup -1}; in CY 2011 the data sample swelled to more than 5 fb{sup -1}. The UVa CMS analysis efforts are focused on this large 2011 data sample in a suite of crucial measurements and searches. KTeV physics activities are reported. Efforts are reported pertaining to several experiments, including: HyperCP, CKM, MIPP, D?, NO#23;{nu}A, and Mu2e.

  16. Fluctuations of Conserved Quantities in High Energy Nuclear Collisions at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiaofeng Luo

    2015-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluctuations of conserved quantities in heavy-ion collisions are used to probe the phase transition and the QCD critical point for the strongly interacting hot and dense nuclear matter. The STAR experiment has carried out moment analysis of net-proton (proxy for net-baryon (B)), net-kaon (proxy for net-strangeness (S)), and net-charge (Q). These measurements are important for understanding the quantum chromodynamics phase diagram. We present the analysis techniques used in the moment analysis by the STAR experiment and discuss the moments of net-proton and net-charge distributions from the first phase of the Beam Energy Scan program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider.

  17. Fluctuations of Conserved Quantities in High Energy Nuclear Collisions at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluctuations of conserved quantities in heavy-ion collisions are used to probe the phase transition and the QCD critical point for the strongly interacting hot and dense nuclear matter. The STAR experiment has carried out moment analysis of net-proton (proxy for net-baryon (B)), net-kaon (proxy for net-strangeness (S)), and net-charge (Q). These measurements are important for understanding the quantum chromodynamics phase diagram. We present the analysis techniques used in the moment analysis by the STAR experiment and discuss the moments of net-proton and net-charge distributions from the first phase of the Beam Energy Scan program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider.

  18. Evidence for radial flow of thermal dileptons in high-energy nuclear collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NA60 Collaboration; R. Arnaldi

    2007-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The NA60 experiment at the CERN SPS has studied low-mass dimuon production in 158 AGeV In-In collisions. An excess of pairs above the known meson decays has been reported before. We now present precision results on the associated transverse momentum spectra. The slope parameter Teff extracted from the spectra rises with dimuon mass up to the rho, followed by a sudden decline above. While the initial rise is consistent with the expectations for radial flow of a hadronic decay source, the decline signals a transition to an emission source with much smaller flow. This may well represent the first direct evidence for thermal radiation of partonic origin in nuclear collisions.

  19. Structure Functions in Deep Inelastic Lepton Scattering: Data from DOE laboratory experiments as compiled in data reviews by the Durham High Energy Physics Database Group

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Gehrmann, T; Roberts, R. G.; Whalley, M. R.; Durham HEP Database Group

    Gehrmann, Roberts, and Whalley in their 1999 paper, A Compilation of Structure Functions in Deep Inelastic Scattering, published in volume 25 of Journal of Physics G (Nuclear and Particle Physics) note that these data will continue to be relevant to the next generation of hadron colliders. They present data on the unpolarized structure functions F2 and xF3, R D ._L=_T /, the virtual photon asymmetries A1 and A2 and the polarized structure functions g1 and g2, from deep inelastic lepton scattering off protons, deuterium and nuclei. Data are presented in both tabular and graphical format and include predictions based on the MRST98 and CTEQ4 parton distribution functionsö as well. The data gathered from the relevant collaborations at DOE's Fermilab, SLAC, and JLAB are available, and so are data from related collaborations based at CERN and DESY. The Durham High Energy Physics (HEP) Database Group makes these data, extracted from papers and data reviews, available in one place in an easy-to-access format. These data are also include in the Durham HEP Reaction Data Database which can be searched at http://hepdata.cedar.ac.uk/reaction

  20. Single Photon Production in Hadronic Interactions: Data from DOE laboratory experiments as compiled in data reviews by the Durham High Energy Physics Database Group

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Vogelsang and Whalley in their 1997 paper, ôA Compilation of Data on Single and Double Prompt Photon Production in Hadron-Hadron Interactionsö published in volume 23 of Journal of Physics G (Nuclear and Particle Physics) present the compilation as well as ôan interpretation of these data in terms of the ćstate-of-the-art NLO theory with specific emphasis on the uncertainties involved.ö They also say, ôComparisons of this theory with the individual data sets are made in order to indicate to the reader the scope and general status of the available data. For completeness, data on two-prompt-photon production are also included in a separate small section.ö The data gathered from the relevant collaborations at DOEĆs Fermilab are available, and so are data from related collaborations based at CERN. The Durham High Energy Physics (HEP) Database Group makes these data, extracted from papers and data reviews, available in one place in an easy-to-access format. These data are also included in the Durham HEP Reaction Data Database which can be searched at http://hepdata.cedar.ac.uk/reaction

  1. Hadronic Total Cross Sections (R) in E+E- Interactions: Data from DOE laboratory experiments as compiled in data reviews by the Durham High Energy Physics Database Group

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Whalley, M. R.

    A comprehensive compilation of experimental data on total hadronic cross sections, and R ratios, in e+e- interactions is presented. Published data from the Novosibirsk, Orsay, Frascati, SLAC, CORNELL, DESY, KEK and CERN e+e- colliders on both exclusive and inclusive final particle states are included from threshold energies to the highest LEP energies. The data are presented in tabular form supplemented by compilation plots of different exclusive final particle states and of different energy regions. (Taken from abstract of paper, A Compilation of Data on Hadronic Total Cross Sections in E+E- Interactions, M.R. Whalley, Journal of Physics G (Nuclear and Particle Physics), Volume 29, Number 12A, 2003). The Durham High Energy Physics (HEP) Database Group makes these data, extracted from papers and data reviews, available in one place in an easy-to-access format. The data are also included in the Durham HEP Reaction Data Database, which can be searched at http://hepdata.cedar.ac.uk/reaction

  2. BELLE High Energy Physics Experiment at the KEK B-factory: Data and Physics Results for CPV, Rare, DKM, 5S, Charm, Tau, and New Particles

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Belle is a high-energy physics (HEP) experiment that began in 1999 at the KEK B-factory in Japan under the direction of the International Belle Collaboration. The Collaboration was formed around the common interest of clarifying a long standing physics puzzle, that of CP violation. The goal of the experiments was to make a definitive test of the Standard Models predictions for CP violations in the decays of B mesons. The original Belle experiment verified the KM theory, leading to a Nobel prize in 2008 for Kobayashi and Maskawa. Belle II Collaboration is now working on additional discoveries.

  3. Fundamental constants and their variability in theories of High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Dent

    2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Standard Model of particle physics and the theory of General Relativity (GR) currently provide a good description of almost all phenomena of particle physics and gravitation that have received controlled experimental tests. However, the Standard Model contains many a priori variable parameters whose values, and whose apparent (near-)constancy, have yet to receive a convincing theoretical explanation. At the same time, GR may now require to be extended or altered at the largest length scales, to account for the recent apparent accelerated cosmological expansion. In this introductory review I present theoretical aspects of the search for explanations of the values and possible variations of fundamental ``constants'', focusing on the possibility of unification of interactions. I also relate cosmological variations to modifications of gravity both locally and cosmologically.

  4. Entropic and enthalpic phase transitions in high energy density nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iosilevskiy, Igor

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Features of Gas-Liquid (GL) and Quark-Hadron (QH) phase transitions (PT) in dense nuclear matter are under discussion in comparison with their terrestrial counterparts, e.g. so-called "plasma" PT in shock-compressed hydrogen, nitrogen etc. Both, GLPT and QHPT, when being represented in widely accepted temperature - baryonic chemical potential plane, are often considered as similar, i.e. amenable to one-to-one mapping by simple scaling. It is argued that this impression is illusive and that GLPT and QHPT belong to different classes: GLPT is typical enthalpic PT (Van-der-Waals-like) while QHPT ("deconfinement-driven") is typical entropic PT. Subdivision of 1st-order fluid-fluid phase transitions into enthalpy- and entropy-driven subclasses was proposed previously [arXiv:1403.8053]. Properties of enthalpic and entropic PTs differ significantly. Entropic PTs are always internal parts of more general and extended thermodynamic anomalies - domains with abnormal (negative) sign for the set of (usually positive) seco...

  5. Entropic and enthalpic phase transitions in high energy density nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Igor Iosilevskiy

    2015-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Features of Gas-Liquid (GL) and Quark-Hadron (QH) phase transitions (PT) in dense nuclear matter are under discussion in comparison with their terrestrial counterparts, e.g. so-called "plasma" PT in shock-compressed hydrogen, nitrogen etc. Both, GLPT and QHPT, when being represented in widely accepted temperature - baryonic chemical potential plane, are often considered as similar, i.e. amenable to one-to-one mapping by simple scaling. It is argued that this impression is illusive and that GLPT and QHPT belong to different classes: GLPT is typical enthalpic PT (Van-der-Waals-like) while QHPT ("deconfinement-driven") is typical entropic PT. Subdivision of 1st-order fluid-fluid phase transitions into enthalpy- and entropy-driven subclasses was proposed previously [arXiv:1403.8053]. Properties of enthalpic and entropic PTs differ significantly. Entropic PTs are always internal parts of more general and extended thermodynamic anomalies - domains with abnormal (negative) sign for the set of (usually positive) second derivatives of thermodynamic potential. Three of them are of primary importance: Gruneizen and thermal expansion and thermal pressure coefficients. Negative sign of these derivatives lead to violation of standard behavior and relative order in P-V plane for many iso-lines, e.g. isotherms, isentropes, shock adiabats etc. Entropic PTs have more complicated topology of stable and metastable areas within its two-phase region in comparison with conventional enthalpic (VdW-like) PTs. In particular, new additional metastable region, bounded by new additional spinodal, appears in the case of entropic PT. All the features of entropic PTs and accompanying abnormal thermodynamics region have transparent geometrical interpretation - multi-layered structure of thermodynamic surfaces for temperature, entropy and internal energy as a pressure-volume functions, e.g. T(P,V), S(P,V) and U(P,V).

  6. High Energy Theory Workshops and Visitors at the Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics FY14

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, Aaron T. [University of Michigan

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The workshop was held from September 23-25, 2013 on the University of Michigan campus. Local organizers were Dragan Huterer, Katherine Freese, and Heidi Wu (University of Michigan). Marilena Lo Verde (University of Chicago) also served as an external organizer. This workshop sought to gather experimentalists and theorists to discuss and define directions in cosmology research after the 1st year release of Planck data. The workshop included 35 invited (non-U-M) cosmologists, most of them relatively junior. The workshop was notable for spirited discussion of various theoretical ideas and experimental developments, and particularly on how one could test theory with ongoing and future experiments. In our follow-up poll, 95% of participants reported that interactions with other participants at the workshop may lead to further collaboration. Most participants (again about 95%) reported that they are very satisfied with the quality of the program, information they received, and the logistical support. Slides are available on line at: http://www.umich.edu/~mctp/SciPrgPgs/events/2013/CAP13/program.html. The YHET visitor program invited weekly young visitors to the University of Michigan campus to present their work. This year 23 participants came under the program. Slides are available on line for talks when applicable: http://mctp.physics.lsa.umich.edu/brown-bag-seminar-history/winter 2014 and http://mctp.physics.lsa.umich.edu/brown-bag-seminar-history/fall-2013.

  7. High energy physics program at Texas A and M University. Annual report, April 1, 1991--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Texas A&M experimental high energy physics program continued to reach significant milestones in each of its research initiatives during the course of the past year. We are participating in two major operating experiments, CDF and MACRO. In CDF, the Texas A&M group has spearheaded the test beam program to recalibrate the Forward Hadron Calorimeter for the upcoming CDF data run, as well as contributing to the ongoing analysis work on jets and b-quarks. In MACRO, we have assisted in the development of the final version of the wave form digitizing system being implemented for the entire scintillator system. The construction of the first six supermodules of the detector has been completed and all six are currently taking data with streamer chambers while four have the completed scintillator counter system up and running. We have built and tested prototypes of a liquid-scintillator fiber calorimeter system, in which internally reflecting channels are imbedded in a lead matrix and filled with liquid scintillator. This approach combines the performance features of fiber calorimetry and the radiation hardness of liquid scintillator, and is being developed for forward calorimetry at the SSC. The microstrip chamber is a new technology for precision track chambers that offers the performance required for future hadron colliders. The theoretical high energy physics program has continued to develop during the past funding cycle. We have continued the study of their very successful string-derived model that unifies all known interactions; flipped SU(5), which is the leading candidate for a TOE. Work has continued on some generalizations of the symmetries of string theory, known as W algebras. These are expected to have applications in two-dimensional conformal field theory, two-dimensional extensions of gravity and topological gravity and W-string theory.

  8. REPORT OF RESEARCH ACTIVITIES FOR THE YEARS 2000 - 2003; HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS GROUP; SOUTHERN METHODIST UNIVERSITY; EXPERIMENTAL TASK A AND THEORY TASK B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Ryszard Stroynowski

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The experimental program in High Energy Physics at SMU was initiated in 1992. Its main goal is the search for new physics phenomena beyond the Standard Model (SSC, LHC) and the study of the properties of heavy quarks and leptons (CLEO, BTeV).

  9. Overview of Nuclear Physics at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKeown, Robert D. [JLAB

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) and associated experimental equipment at Jefferson Lab comprise a unique facility for experimental nuclear physics. This facility is presently being upgraded, which will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential to address important topics in nuclear, hadronic, and electroweak physics. Further in the future, it is envisioned that the Laboratory will evolve into an electron-ion colliding beam facility.

  10. Overview of Nuclear Physics at Jefferson Lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. D. McKeown

    2013-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) and associated experimental equipment at Jefferson Lab comprise a unique facility for experimental nuclear physics. This facility is presently being upgraded, which will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential to address important topics in nuclear, hadronic, and electroweak physics. Further in the future, it is envisioned that the Laboratory will evolve into an electron-ion colliding beam facility.

  11. Overview of Nuclear Physics at Jefferson Lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKeown, R D

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) and associated experimental equipment at Jefferson Lab comprise a unique facility for experimental nuclear physics. This facility is presently being upgraded, which will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential to address important topics in nuclear, hadronic, and electroweak physics. Further in the future, it is envisioned that the Laboratory will evolve into an electron-ion colliding beam facility.

  12. High Energy Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for HEP along with supporting narratives, illustrated by specific science-based case studies Findings from the review will guide NERSC procurements and service offerings;...

  13. High energy physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.; Ma, E.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hadron collider studies will focus on: (i) the search for the top quark with the newly installed D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider, (ii) the upgrade of the D0 detector to match the new main injector luminosity and (iii) R&D on silicon microstrip tracking devices for the SSC. High statistics studies of Z{sup 0} decay will continue with the OPAL detector at LEP. These studies will include a direct measurement of Z decay to neutrinos, the search for Higgs and heavy quark decays of Z. Preparations for the Large Scintillation Neutrino Detector (LSND) to measure neutrino oscillations at LAMPF will focus on data acquisition and testing of photomultiplier tubes. In the theoretical area E. Ma will concentrate on mass-generating radiative mechanisms for light quarks and leptons in renormalizable gauge field theories. J. Wudka`s program includes a detailed investigation of the magnetic-flip approach to the solar neutrino.

  14. High Energy Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet WhenHiggs Boson May BeAdministration |High

  15. High Energy Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet WhenHiggs Boson May BeAdministration |High

  16. High Energy Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet WhenHiggs Boson May BeAdministration |High

  17. High Energy Physics Jobs

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,,ofOpportunitieshighlights/ The Office ofabout/jobs/

  18. Nuclear Physics: Archived Talks - Accelerator

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Free Electron Laser (FEL) Medical Imaging Physics Topics Campaigns Meetings Recent Talks Archived Talks Accelerator Hall A Hall B Hall C 12 GeV Upgrade Experimental Techniques...

  19. High energy physics program: Task A, Experiment and theory; Task B, Numerical simulation. Progress report, July 1, 1988--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses research in High Energy Physics at Florida State University. Contained in this paper are: highlights of activities during the past few years; five year summary; fixed target experiments; collider experiments; SSC preparation, detector development and detector construction; computing, networking and VAX upgrade to ALPHA; and particle theory programs.

  20. AlGaN UV LED and Photodiodes Radiation Hardness and Space Qualifications and Their Applications in Space Science and High Energy Density Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, K. X.

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation provides an overview of robust, radiation hard AlGaN optoelectronic devices and their applications in space exploration & high energy density physics. Particularly, deep UV LED and deep UV photodiodes are discussed with regard to their applications, radiation hardness and space qualification. AC charge management of UV LED satellite payload instruments, which were to be launched in late 2012, is covered.

  1. Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Rodney

    Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs The George W. Woodruff School #12 Year Enrollment - Fall Semester Undergraduate Graduate #12; Nuclear Power Industry Radiological Engineering Industry Graduate School DOE National Labs Nuclear Navy #12; 104 Operating Nuclear Power plants

  2. Laboratory I | Nuclear Physics Division

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,sand CERN 73-11 Laboratory I | Nuclear

  3. The nuclear physics of neutron stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piekarewicz, J. [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4350 (United States)

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the unique and fascinating structure of neutron stars. Although neutron stars are of interest in many areas of Physics, our aim is to provide an intellectual bridge between Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics. We argue against the naive perception of a neutron star as a uniform assembly of neutrons packed to enormous densities. Rather, by focusing on the many exotic phases that are speculated to exist in a neutron star, we show how the reality is different and far more interesting.

  4. 22.101 Applied Nuclear Physics, Fall 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yip, Sidney

    Fundamentals of nuclear physics for engineering students. Basic properties of the nucleus and nuclear radiations. Elementary quantum mechanical calculations of bound-state energies and barrier transmission probability. ...

  5. Physics -Particle and Nuclear Physics | Theory of Nuclear Fission Springer is part of Springer Science+Business Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomorski, Krzysztof

    Physics - Particle and Nuclear Physics | Theory of Nuclear Fission © Springer is part of Springer Science+Business Media Theory of Nuclear Fission A Textbook Series: Lecture Notes in Physics, Vol. 838. Softcover, ISBN 978-3-642-23514-6 Due: October 31, 2011 69,95 About this book Theory of Nuclear Fission

  6. Nuclear physics aspects of double beta decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petr Vogel

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Comprehensive description of the phenomenology of the $\\beta\\beta$ decay is given, with emphasis on the nuclear physics aspects. After a brief review of the neutrino oscillation results and of motivation to test the lepton number conservation, the mechanism of the $0\

  7. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Llope, William J.

    Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Physics Reviewer Excerpts from the Technical, Cost, Schedule to clarify the quark-gluon plasma signature. "In summary, the STAR-TOF project is a novel system and Management Review of the STAR Time-of-Flight (TOF) Detector August 22-23, 2005 #12;EXCERPTS FROM PANEL MEMBER

  8. AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF NUCLEAR PHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Ying

    and 3rd, 1979 (1% days open). The machine was last closed on April lath and Report No .15 was circul the terminal lens. When beam was put through the machine the lens controls had no effect on it. Report NoAUSTRALIAN NATIONAL UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF NUCLEAR PHYSICS l4UDTANK OPENING REPORT NO;16 May 2nd

  9. Two-Photon Reactions Leading to Hadron Final States: Data from DOE laboratory experiments as compiled in data reviews by the Durham High Energy Physics Database Group

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Whalley, M. R.

    The data gathered from the relevant collaborations at DOEĆs SLAC are available, and so are data from related collaborations based at CERN, DESY, KEK, NOVO, ORSAY, and CORNELL University. The Durham High Energy Physics (HEP) Database Group makes these data, extracted from papers and data reviews, available in one place in an easy-to-access format. These data are also included in the Durham HEP Reaction Data Database which can be searched at http://hepdata.cedar.ac.uk/reaction

  10. [Experimental nuclear physics]. Annual report 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the May 1988 annual report of the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Washington. It contains chapters on astrophysics, giant resonances, heavy ion induced reactions, fundamental symmetries, polarization in nuclear reactions, medium energy reactions, accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), research by outside users, Van de Graaff and ion sources, the Laboratory`s booster linac project work, instrumentation, and computer systems. An appendix lists Laboratory personnel, Ph.D. degrees granted in the 1987-88 academic year, and publications. Refs., 27 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Search for a signal on intermediate baryon systems formation in hadron-nuclear and nuclear-nuclear interactions at high energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. H. Huseynaliyev; M. K. Suleymanov; E. U. Khan; A. Kravchakova; S. Vokal

    2007-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We have analyzed the behavior of different characteristics of hadron-nuclear and nuclear-nuclear interactions as a function of centrality to get a signal on the formation of intermediate baryon systems. We observed that the data demonstrate the regime change and saturation. The angular distributions of slow particles exhibit some structure in the above mentioned reactions at low energy. We believe that the structure could be connected with the formation and decay of the percolation cluster. With increasing the mass of colliding nuclei, the structure starts to become weak and almost disappears ultimately. This shows that the number of secondary internuclear interactions increases with increasing the mass of the colliding nuclei. The latter could be a reason of the disintegration of any intermediate formations as well as clusters, which decrease their influence on the angular distribution of the emitted particles.

  12. Preliminary Simulations for Geometric Optimization of a High-Energy Delayed Gamma Spectrometer for Direct Assay of Pu in Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Campbell, Luke W.; Rodriguez, Douglas C.

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    High-energy, beta-delayed gamma-ray spectroscopy is under investigation as part of the Next Generation Safeguard Initiative effort to develop non-destructive assay instruments for plutonium mass quantification in spent nuclear fuel assemblies. Results obtained to date indicate that individual isotope-specific signatures contained in the delayed gamma-ray spectra can potentially be used to quantify the total fissile content and individual weight fractions of fissile and fertile nuclides present in spent fuel. Adequate assay precision for inventory analysis can be obtained using a neutron generator of sufficient strength and currently available detection technology. In an attempt to optimize the geometric configuration and material composition for a delayed gamma measurement on spent fuel, the current study applies MCNPX, a Monte Carlo radiation transport code, in order to obtain the best signal-to-noise ratio. Results are presented for optimizing the neutron spectrum tailoring material, geometries to maximize thermal or fast fissions from a given neutron source, and detector location to allow an acceptable delayed gamma-ray signal while achieving a reasonable detector lifetime while operating in a high-energy neutron field. This work is supported in part by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security, National Nuclear Security Administration.

  13. List of Publications A. Nuclear Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamasundar, R.K.

    . Chatterjee, Subinit Roy, P. Basu, M.K. Sharan and S.K. Datta, Phys. Rev. C64, 041602 R (2001) 19. Exclusive in 72 Se, R. Palit, H.C. Jain, P.K. Joshi, J.A. Sheikh, Y. Sun, Phys. Rev. C63, 024313 (2001) 3. Chatterjee, P. Singh, A. Shrivastava, K. Mahata, S. Santra, Nuclear Physics A 679, 287 (2001) 4. Projected

  14. Nuclear Thermal Rockets: The Physics of the Fission Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ross, Shane

    Nuclear Thermal Rockets: The Physics of the Fission Reactor Shane D. Ross Control and Dynamical combustion are those powered by nuclear fission. Comparison of Chemical and Nuclear Rockets. Most existent.g., hydrogen and oxygen). In a nuclear rocket, or more precisely, a nuclear thermal rocket, the propellant

  15. Quantum Monte Carlo methods for nuclear physics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Carlson, Joseph A.; Gandolfi, Stefano; Pederiva, Francesco; Pieper, Steven C.; Schiavilla, Rocco; Schmidt, K. E,; Wiringa, Robert B.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum Monte Carlo methods have proved very valuable to study the structure and reactions of light nuclei and nucleonic matter starting from realistic nuclear interactions and currents. These ab-initio calculations reproduce many low-lying states, moments and transitions in light nuclei, and simultaneously predict many properties of light nuclei and neutron matter over a rather wide range of energy and momenta. We review the nuclear interactions and currents, and describe the continuum Quantum Monte Carlo methods used in nuclear physics. These methods are similar to those used in condensed matter and electronic structure but naturally include spin-isospin, tensor, spin-orbit, and three-bodymore »interactions. We present a variety of results including the low-lying spectra of light nuclei, nuclear form factors, and transition matrix elements. We also describe low-energy scattering techniques, studies of the electroweak response of nuclei relevant in electron and neutrino scattering, and the properties of dense nucleonic matter as found in neutron stars. A coherent picture of nuclear structure and dynamics emerges based upon rather simple but realistic interactions and currents.« less

  16. Quantum Monte Carlo methods for nuclear physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Carlson; S. Gandolfi; F. Pederiva; Steven C. Pieper; R. Schiavilla; K. E. Schmidt; R. B. Wiringa

    2015-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum Monte Carlo methods have proved very valuable to study the structure and reactions of light nuclei and nucleonic matter starting from realistic nuclear interactions and currents. These ab-initio calculations reproduce many low-lying states, moments and transitions in light nuclei, and simultaneously predict many properties of light nuclei and neutron matter over a rather wide range of energy and momenta. We review the nuclear interactions and currents, and describe the continuum Quantum Monte Carlo methods used in nuclear physics. These methods are similar to those used in condensed matter and electronic structure but naturally include spin-isospin, tensor, spin-orbit, and three-body interactions. We present a variety of results including the low-lying spectra of light nuclei, nuclear form factors, and transition matrix elements. We also describe low-energy scattering techniques, studies of the electroweak response of nuclei relevant in electron and neutrino scattering, and the properties of dense nucleonic matter as found in neutron stars. A coherent picture of nuclear structure and dynamics emerges based upon rather simple but realistic interactions and currents.

  17. Quantum Monte Carlo methods for nuclear physics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Carlson, Joseph A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gandolfi, Stefano [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pederiva, Francesco [Univ. of Trento (Italy); Pieper, Steven C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Schiavilla, Rocco [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Schmidt, K. E, [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Wiringa, Robert B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum Monte Carlo methods have proved very valuable to study the structure and reactions of light nuclei and nucleonic matter starting from realistic nuclear interactions and currents. These ab-initio calculations reproduce many low-lying states, moments and transitions in light nuclei, and simultaneously predict many properties of light nuclei and neutron matter over a rather wide range of energy and momenta. We review the nuclear interactions and currents, and describe the continuum Quantum Monte Carlo methods used in nuclear physics. These methods are similar to those used in condensed matter and electronic structure but naturally include spin-isospin, tensor, spin-orbit, and three-body interactions. We present a variety of results including the low-lying spectra of light nuclei, nuclear form factors, and transition matrix elements. We also describe low-energy scattering techniques, studies of the electroweak response of nuclei relevant in electron and neutrino scattering, and the properties of dense nucleonic matter as found in neutron stars. A coherent picture of nuclear structure and dynamics emerges based upon rather simple but realistic interactions and currents.

  18. Detecting special nuclear materials in suspect containers using high-energy gamma rays emitted by fission products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Norman, Eric B. (Oakland, CA); Prussin, Stanley G. (Kensington, CA)

    2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and a system for detecting the presence of special nuclear materials in a suspect container. The system and its method include irradiating the suspect container with a beam of neutrons, so as to induce a thermal fission in a portion of the special nuclear materials, detecting the gamma rays that are emitted from the fission products formed by the thermal fission, to produce a detector signal, comparing the detector signal with a threshold value to form a comparison, and detecting the presence of the special nuclear materials using the comparison.

  19. Detecting special nuclear materials in suspect containers using high-energy gamma rays emitted by fission products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Norman, Eric B. (Oakland, CA); Prussin, Stanley G. (Kensington, CA)

    2009-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and a system for detecting the presence of special nuclear materials in a suspect container. The system and its method include irradiating the suspect container with a beam of neutrons, so as to induce a thermal fission in a portion of the special nuclear materials, detecting the gamma rays that are emitted from the fission products formed by the thermal fission, to produce a detector signal, comparing the detector signal with a threshold value to form a comparison, and detecting the presence of the special nuclear materials using the comparison.

  20. Detecting special nuclear materials in suspect containers using high-energy gamma rays emitted by fission products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Norman, Eric B [Oakland, CA; Prussin, Stanley G [Kensington, CA

    2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and a system for detecting the presence of special nuclear materials in a suspect container. The system and its method include irradiating the suspect container with a beam of neutrons, so as to induce a thermal fission in a portion of the special nuclear materials, detecting the gamma rays that are emitted from the fission products formed by the thermal fission, to produce a detector signal, comparing the detector signal with a threshold value to form a comparison, and detecting the presence of the special nuclear materials using the comparison.

  1. Nuclear Physics A 770 (2006) 131 Relativistic nuclear energy density functional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weise, Wolfram

    Nuclear Physics A 770 (2006) 1­31 Relativistic nuclear energy density functional constrained by low-energy 10 February 2006 Available online 3 March 2006 Abstract A relativistic nuclear energy density nuclear physics: the relationship between low-energy, non- perturbative QCD and the rich structure

  2. Radioactive target needs for nuclear reactor physics and nuclear astrophysics , G. Barreau1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Radioactive target needs for nuclear reactor physics and nuclear astrophysics B.Jurado1* , G sections of short-lived nuclei are key inputs for new generation nuclear reactor simulations and for models and reactor physics where the demand of nuclear data on unstable nuclei is strong, we describe the general

  3. DOE fundamentals handbook: Nuclear physics and reactor theory. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Physics and Reactor Theory Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of nuclear physics and reactor theory. The handbook includes information on atomic and nuclear physics; neutron characteristics; reactor theory and nuclear parameters; and the theory of reactor operation. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the scientific principles that are associated with various DOE nuclear facility operations and maintenance.

  4. DOE fundamentals handbook: Nuclear physics and reactor theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Physics and Reactor Theory Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of nuclear physics and reactor theory. The handbook includes information on atomic and nuclear physics; neutron characteristics; reactor theory and nuclear parameters; and the theory of reactor operation. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the scientific principles that are associated with various DOE nuclear facility operations and maintenance.

  5. DOE fundamentals handbook: Nuclear physics and reactor theory. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Physics and Reactor Theory Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of nuclear physics and reactor theory. The handbook includes information on atomic and nuclear physics; neutron characteristics; reactor theory and nuclear parameters; and the theory of reactor operation. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the scientific principles that are associated with various DOE nuclear facility operations and maintenance.

  6. Recent U.S. advances in ion-beam-driven high energy density physics and heavy ion fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    physics and heavy ion fusion energy drivers, including bothoptions towards inertial fusion energy. Acknowledgements:fusion drivers for inertial fusion energy. 1. Introduction A

  7. Low Energy Neutrino Cross Sections: Data from DOE laboratory experiments as compiled in data reviews by the Durham High Energy Physics Database Group

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    This large collection of low-energy (less than 30 GEV) neutrino cross sections is extracted from the results of many experiments from 1973 through 2002. The experiments, facilities, and collaborations include ANL, BNL, and FNAL in the U.S., along with CERN, Gargamelle, SKAT, LSND, and others. The data are presented in both tabular and plotted formats. The Durham High Energy Physics Database Group makes these data available in one place, easy to access and compare. The data are also included in the Durham HEP Reaction Data Database, which can be searched at http://hepdata.cedar.ac.uk/reaction

  8. 12.6 keV Kr K-alpha X-ray Source For High Energy Density Physics Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kugland, N; Constantin, C G; Niemann, C; Neumayer, P; Chung, H; Doppner, T; Kemp, A; Glenzer, S H; Girard, F

    2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A high contrast 12.6 keV Kr K{alpha} source has been demonstrated on the petawatt-class Titan laser facility. The contrast ratio (K{alpha} to continuum) is 65, with a competitive ultra short pulse laser to x-ray conversion efficiency of 10{sup -5}. Filtered shadowgraphy indicates that the Kr K{alpha} and K{beta} x-rays are emitted from a roughly 1 x 2 mm emission volume, making this source suitable for area backlighting and scattering. Spectral calculations indicate a typical bulk electron temperature of 50-70 eV (i.e. mean ionization state 13-16), based on the observed ratio of K{alpha} to K{beta}. Kr gas jets provide a debris-free high energy K{alpha} source for time-resolved diagnosis of dense matter.

  9. Proposal for a Co-operation Agreement between CERN and The Government of the United Arab Emirates concerning the Further Development of Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposal for a Co-operation Agreement between CERN and The Government of the United Arab Emirates concerning the Further Development of Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High Energy Physics

  10. Co-operation agreement between CERN and the National Council for Scientific Research, Lebanon (CNRS-L) concerning Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High-Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Co-operation agreement between CERN and the National Council for Scientific Research, Lebanon (CNRS-L) concerning Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High-Energy Physics

  11. Proposal for the Award of Two Contracts for the Technical Services for Work on Components of CERN Particle Accelerators and High Energy Physics Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document concerns the award of two contracts for the technical services for work on components of CERN particle accelerators and high energy physics experiments. Following a market survey carried out among 73 firms in fourteen Member States, a call for tenders (IT-3156/SPL) was sent on 4 November 2002 to three consortia in four Member States. By the closing date, CERN had received tenders from the three consortia. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of two contracts with: 1) the consortium SERCO FACILITIES MANAGEMENT (NL) - GERARD PERRIER INDUSTRIE (FR) - INEO ALPES (FR), the lowest bidder, for approximately 55% of the technical services for work on components of CERN particle accelerators and high energy physics experiments, for an initial period of five years and for a total amount not exceeding 37 435 270 euros (54 902 500 Swiss francs), subject to revision for inflation from 1 January 2005. The contract will include options for two one-year extensions beyond the initial five-...

  12. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Nuclear Physics: Target 2014 NPFrontcover.png May 26-27, 2011 Hyatt Regency Bethesda One Bethesda Metro Center (7400 Wisconsin Ave) Bethesda, Maryland, USA 20814 Final...

  13. Proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration: a path to the future of high-energy particle physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assmann, R; Bohl, T; Bracco, C; Buttenschon, B; Butterworth, A; Caldwell, A; Chattopadhyay, S; Cipiccia, S; Feldbaumer, E; Fonseca, R A; Goddard, B; Gross, M; Grulke, O; Gschwendtner, E; Holloway, J; Huang, C; Jaroszynski, D; Jolly, S; Kempkes, P; Lopes, N; Lotov, K; Machacek, J; Mandry, S R; McKenzie, J W; Meddahi, M; Militsyn, B L; Moschuering, N; Muggli, P; Najmudin, Z; Noakes, T C Q; Norreys, P A; Oz, E; Pardons, A; Petrenko, A; Pukhov, A; Rieger, K; Reimann, O; Ruhl, H; Shaposhnikova, E; Silva, L O; Sosedkin, A; Tarkeshian, R; Trines, R M G N; Tuckmantel, T; Vieira, J; Vincke, H; Wing, M; Xia, G

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New acceleration technology is mandatory for the future elucidation of fundamental particles and their interactions. A promising approach is to exploit the properties of plasmas. Past research has focused on creating large-amplitude plasma waves by injecting an intense laser pulse or an electron bunch into the plasma. However, the maximum energy gain of electrons accelerated in a single plasma stage is limited by the energy of the driver. Proton bunches are the most promising drivers of wakefields to accelerate electrons to the TeV energy scale in a single stage. An experimental program at CERN -- the AWAKE experiment -- has been launched to study in detail the important physical processes and to demonstrate the power of proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration. Here we review the physical principles and some experimental considerations for a future proton-driven plasma wakefield accelerator.

  14. Proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration: a path to the future of high-energy particle physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assmann, R; Bohl, T; Bracco, C; Buttenschon, B; Butterworth, A; Caldwell, A; Chattopadhyay, S; Cipiccia, S; Feldbaumer, E; Fonseca, R A; Goddard, B; Gross, M; Grulke, O; Gschwendtner, E; Holloway, J; Huang, C; Jaroszynski, D; Jolly, S; Kempkes, P; Lopes, N; Lotov, K; Machacek, J; Mandry, S R; McKenzie, J W; Meddahi, M; Militsyn, B L; Moschuering, N; Muggli, P; Najmudin, Z; Noakes, T C Q; Norreys, P A; Oz, E; Pardons, A; Petrenko, A; Pukhov, A; Rieger, K; Reimann, O; Ruhl, H; Shaposhnikova, E; Silva, L O; Sosedkin, A; Tarkeshian, R; Trines, R M G N; Tuckmantel, T; Vieira, J; Vincke, H; Wing, M; Xia G , G

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New acceleration technology is mandatory for the future elucidation of fundamental particles and their interactions. A promising approach is to exploit the properties of plasmas. Past research has focused on creating large-amplitude plasma waves by injecting an intense laser pulse or an electron bunch into the plasma. However, the maximum energy gain of electrons accelerated in a single plasma stage is limited by the energy of the driver. Proton bunches are the most promising drivers of wakefields to accelerate electrons to the TeV energy scale in a single stage. An experimental program at CERN { the AWAKE experiment { has been launched to study in detail the important physical processes and to demonstrate the power of proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration. Here we review the physical principles and some experimental considerations for a future proton-driven plasma wakefield accelerator.

  15. KRNFYSIK, FRDJUPNINGSKURS FKF021 Nuclear Physics, Advanced Course I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K�RNFYSIK, F�RDJUPNINGSKURS FKF021 Nuclear Physics, Advanced Course I Poäng: 5.0 Betygskala: TH. Kärnmodeller. Det radioaktiva sönderfallet, alfa-, beta- och gamma-emisson. Kärnreaktioner. Fission och fusion. Partikelfysik. Laborationerna är obligatoriska. Litteratur: Krane, K.S.: Introductory Nuclear Physics

  16. KRNFYSIK, FRDJUPNINGSKURS FKF 021 Nuclear Physics, Advanced Course I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K�RNFYSIK, F�RDJUPNINGSKURS FKF 021 Nuclear Physics, Advanced Course I Antal poäng: 5.0. Valfri för. Kärnmodeller. Det radioaktiva sönderfallet, alfa-, beta- och gamma-emisson. Kärnreaktioner. Fission och fusion. Partikelfysik. Laborationerna är obligatoriska. Litteratur Krane, K.S.: Introductory Nuclear Physics

  17. ANNUAL WINTER SCHOOLANNUAL WINTER SCHOOL Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Titov, Anatoly

    ANNUAL WINTER SCHOOLANNUAL WINTER SCHOOL Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute National Research February ­ 1 March, 2014 Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI) conducts the XLVIII Annual Winter Center "Kurchatov Institute" XLVIII PNPI Winter School, Roschino, 24 February ­ 1 March 2014 During 24

  18. Pulsed Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: Spin Echoes MIT Department of Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seager, Sara

    Pulsed Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: Spin Echoes MIT Department of Physics (Dated: February 5, 2014) In this experiment, the phenomenon of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is used to determine the magnetic moments-factor in atomic spectroscopy and is given by g = (µ/µN )/I, (2) and µN is the nuclear magneton, e /2mp

  19. Job advertisement Faculty 08 (Physics, Mathematics and Computer Science), Institute of Nuclear Physics, has an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Straten, Duco

    Job advertisement Faculty 08 (Physics, Mathematics and Computer Science), Institute of Nuclear; BBesG) starting from winter semester 2014/15 and limited for six years. Following the temporary and astroparticle physics, nuclear chemistry and precision physics with ultracold neutrons and ion traps. We

  20. Lifetime studies of 130nm nMOS transistors intended for long-duration, cryogenic high-energy physics experiments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoff, J.R.; /Fermilab; Arora, R.; Cressler, J.D.; /Georgia Tech; Deptuch, G.W.; /Fermilab; Gui, P.; /Southern Methodist U.; Lourenco, N.E.; /Georgia Tech; Wu, G.; /Southern Methodist U.; Yarema, R.J.; /Fermilab

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Future neutrino physics experiments intend to use unprecedented volumes of liquid argon to fill a time projection chamber in an underground facility. To increase performance, integrated readout electronics should work inside the cryostat. Due to the scale and cost associated with evacuating and filling the cryostat, the electronics will be unserviceable for the duration of the experiment. Therefore, the lifetimes of these circuits must be well in excess of 20 years. The principle mechanism for lifetime degradation of MOSFET devices and circuits operating at cryogenic temperatures is via hot carrier degradation. Choosing a process technology that is, as much as possible, immune to such degradation and developing design techniques to avoid exposure to such damage are the goals. This requires careful investigation and a basic understanding of the mechanisms that underlie hot carrier degradation and the secondary effects they cause in circuits. In this work, commercially available 130nm nMOS transistors operating at cryogenic temperatures are investigated. The results show that the difference in lifetime for room temperature operation and cryogenic operation for this process are not great and the lifetimes at both 300K and at 77K can be projected to more than 20 years at the nominal voltage (1.5V) for this technology.

  1. Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research and development activities are summarized in the following areas: Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility, nuclear physics, the UNISOR program, accelerator-based atomic physics, theoretical physics, nuclear science applications, atomic physics and plasma diagnostics for fusion program, high-energy physics, the nuclear data project, and the relativistic heavy-ion collider study. Publications and papers presented are listed. (WHK)

  2. Proceedings of the 34th International Conference in High Energy Physics (ICHEP08), Philadelphia, PA, 2008, eConf C080730, [hep-ph/0809.xxx

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lockyer, Nigel S.; Smith, AJ Stewart,; et. al.

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2004 a team from the University of Pennsylvania, Princeton University, and the Institute for Advanced Study proposed to host the 2008 International Conference on High Energy Physics (ICHEP) on the campus of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. The proposal was approved later that year by the C-11 committee of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics. The Co-Chairs were Nigel S. Lockyer (U. Penn/TRIUMF) and A.J. Stewart Smith (Princeton); Joe Kroll of U. Penn served as Deputy Chair from 2007 on. Highlights of the proposal included 1. greatly increased participation of young scientists, women scientists, and graduate students 2. new emphasis on formal theory 3. increased focus on astrophysics and cosmology 4. large informal poster session (170 posters) in prime time 5. convenient, contiguous venues for all sessions and lodging 6. landmark locations for the reception and banquet. The conference program consisted of three days of parallel sessions and three days of plenary talks.

  3. PHYSICS OF NUCLEAR REACTORS Nuclear reactions and cross sections 1-10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    PHYSICS OF NUCLEAR REACTORS Nuclear reactions and cross sections 1-10 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 Figure 5 ­ neutron capture, fission and elastic scattering in 235 U. For spaced resonances the center neutron wavelength, D is given by: cE mM Mm 2 + = h D , (1.22) 1 Bell and Glasstone, Nuclear Reactor

  4. Lattice QCD calculations for nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parreńo, A. [Dept. d'Estructura i Constituents de la Matčria. Institut de Cičncies del Cosmos (ICC), Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franqučs 1, E08028 (Spain)

    2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    I present some recent results regarding the use of numerical Lattice QCD techniques to describe light nuclear systems from the underlying theory of the strong interaction, QCD.

  5. Future directions in particle and nuclear physics at multi-GeV hadron beam facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geesaman, D.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [ed.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains papers on the following topics in particle and nuclear physics: hadron dynamics; lepton physics; spin physics; hadron and nuclear spectroscopy; hadronic weak interactions; and Eta physics. These papers have been indexed separately elsewhere.

  6. EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH European Laboratory for Particle Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH European Laboratory for Particle Physics Internal Note performance of the counter for the detection of one MIP 3 #12;(Minimum Ionizing Particle). Their hardness

  7. Accelerator mass spectrometry: from nuclear physics to dating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kutschera, W.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The discussion reviews the use of accelerators originally intended for nuclear physics to do high resolution mass spectrometry for the purpose of isotope dating and age estimation of materials. (GHT)

  8. Charged-Particle Thermonuclear Reaction Rates: III. Nuclear Physics Input

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Iliadis; Richard Longland; Art Champagne; Alain Coc

    2010-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear physics input used to compute the Monte Carlo reaction rates and probability density functions that are tabulated in the second paper of this series (Paper II) is presented. Specifically, we publish the input files to the Monte Carlo reaction rate code RatesMC, which is based on the formalism presented in the first paper of this series (Paper I). This data base contains overwhelmingly experimental nuclear physics information. The survey of literature for this review was concluded in November 2009.

  9. Reprinted from Nuclear Physics A654 (1999) 436~457~

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the reactor core is the main problem of managing nuclear reactors: it requires unconditional guarantee to handle decay heat in the reactor core and finally it makes handling and/or disposal of spent fuel almostReprinted from YSICS A Nuclear Physics A654 (1999) 436~457~ www.eIsevier.nl/locate/npe Accelerator

  10. KRNFYSIK AK FKF 011 Nuclear Physics, Basic Course

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K�RNFYSIK AK FKF 011 Nuclear Physics, Basic Course Antal poäng: 3.0. Obligatorisk för: F3. Valfri för: E4. Kursansvarig: Docent Per Kristiansson, per.kristiansson@nuclear.lu.se Förkunskapskrav. Neutroners egenskaper, framställning och registrering. Kärnreaktioner. Fission och fusion. Acceleratorer

  11. KRNFYSIK AK FKF011 Nuclear Physics, Basic Course

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K�RNFYSIK AK FKF011 Nuclear Physics, Basic Course Poäng: 3.0 Betygskala: TH Obligatorisk för: F3 Valfri för: E4 Kursansvarig: Docent Per Kristiansson, per.kristiansson@nuclear.lu.se Förkunskapskrav. Neutroners egenskaper, framställning och registrering. Kärnreaktioner. Fission och fusion. Acceleratorer

  12. Nuclear physics from strong coupling QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Fromm; Philippe de Forcrand

    2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The strong coupling limit (beta_gauge = 0) of QCD offers a number of remarkable research possibilities, of course at the price of large lattice artifacts. Here, we determine the complete phase diagram as a function of temperature T and baryon chemical potential mu_B, for one flavor of staggered fermions in the chiral limit, with emphasis on the determination of a tricritical point and on the T ~ 0 transition to nuclear matter. The latter is known to happen for mu_B substantially below the baryon mass, indicating strong nuclear interactions in QCD at infinite gauge coupling. This leads us to studying the properties of nuclear matter from first principles. We determine the nucleon-nucleon potential in the strong coupling limit, as well as masses m_A of nuclei as a function of their atomic number A. Finally, we clarify the origin of nuclear interactions at strong coupling, which turns out to be a steric effect.

  13. Nuclear Science--A Guide to the Nuclear Science Wall Chart 2003 Contemporary Physics Education Project (CPEP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nuclear Science--A Guide to the Nuclear Science Wall Chart ©2003 Contemporary Physics Education Project (CPEP) 7-1 Chapter 7 Nuclear Reactions Nuclear reactions and nuclear scattering are used, protons, alphas, or "heavy ions"), creates these reactions when they strike a target nucleus. Nuclear

  14. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF PHYSICS B: ATOMIC, MOLECULAR AND OPTICAL PHYSICS J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 37 (2004) R57R88 PII: S0953-4075(04)63251-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zajfman, Daniel

    of the high-energy storage rings used in high-energy particle physics, in particular LEAR [8], and use mainly, they are usually smaller and require neither high-energy (MeV) accelerators for injecting the beam, nor and nuclear physics, nonlinear dynamics, single component plasmas, mass spectrometry, biophysics, quantum

  15. University of Washington, Nuclear Physics Laboratory annual report, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Washington supports a broad program of experimental physics research. The current program includes in-house research using the local tandem Van de Graff and superconducting linac accelerators and non-accelerator research in double beta decay and gravitation as well as user-mode research at large accelerator and reactor facilities around the world. This book is divided into the following areas: nuclear astrophysics; neutrino physics; nucleus-nucleus reactions; fundamental symmetries and weak interactions; accelerator mass spectrometry; atomic and molecular clusters; ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions; external users; electronics, computing, and detector infrastructure; Van de Graff, superconducting booster and ion sources; nuclear physics laboratory personnel; degrees granted for 1994--1995; and list of publications from 1994--1995.

  16. Testing the Physics of Nuclear Isomers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazi, A

    2006-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    For much of the past century, physicists have searched for methods to control the release of energy stored in an atom's nucleus. Nuclear fission reactors have been one successful approach, but finding other methods to capitalize on this potential energy source have been elusive. One possible source being explored is nuclear isomers. An isomer is a long-lived excited state of an atom's nucleus--a state in which decay back to the nuclear ground state is inhibited. The nucleus of an isomer thus holds an enormous amount of energy. If scientists could develop a method to release that energy instantaneously in a gamma-ray burst, rather than slowly over time, they could use it in a nuclear battery. Research in the late 1990s indicated that scientists were closer to developing such a method--using x rays to trigger the release of energy from the nuclear isomer hafnium-178m ({sup 178m}Hf). To further investigate these claims, the Department of Energy (DOE) funded a collaborative project involving Lawrence Livermore, Los Alamos, and Argonne national laboratories that was designed to reproduce those earlier results.

  17. Proceedings of the 8th High Energy Heavy Ion Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris Ed, J.W.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    XXIV International Winter Meeting on Nuclear Physics, BormioA. C. Mueller, 25. Winter Meeting on Nuclear Physics, Bormio

  18. High energy astrophysical processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todor Stanev

    2005-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We briefly review the high energy astrophysical processes that are related to the production of high energy $\\gamma$-ray and neutrino signals and are likely to be important for the energy loss of high and ultrahigh energy cosmic rays. We also give examples for neutrino fluxes generated by different astrophysical objects and describe the cosmological link provided by cosmogenic neutrinos.

  19. High energy neutrino cross sections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. H. Reno

    2004-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The theoretical status of the neutrino-nucleon cross section is reviewed for incident neutrino energies up to E_nu=10^12 GeV, including different approaches to high energy extrapolations. Nonstandard model physics may play a role at ultrahigh energies. The cases of mini-black hole production and electroweak instanton contributions are discussed as examples in the context of ultrahigh energy neutrino scattering.

  20. 288 Int. J. Nuclear Energy Science and Technology, Vol. 7, No. 4, 2013 Multi-physics modelling of nuclear reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demazière, Christophe

    of nuclear reactors: current practices in a nutshell Christophe Demazière Department of Applied Physics of nuclear reactors are based on the use of different solvers for resolving the different physical fields and the corresponding approximations. Keywords: nuclear reactors; multi-physics; multi-scale; modelling; deterministic

  1. Accelerating Innovation: How Nuclear Physics Benefits Us All

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From fighting cancer to assuring food is safe to protecting our borders, nuclear physics impacts the lives of people around the globe every day. In learning about the nucleus of the atom and the forces that govern it, scientists develop a depth of knowledge, techniques and remarkable research tools that can be used to develop a variety of often unexpected, practical applications. These applications include devices and technologies for medical diagnostics and therapy, energy production and exploration, safety and national security, and for the analysis of materials and environmental contaminants. This brochure by the Office of Nuclear Physics of the USDOE Office of Science discusses nuclear physics and ways in which its applications fuel our economic vitality, and make the world and our lives safer and healthier.

  2. Physics Division progress report for period ending June 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress is reported in detail in the following areas: Holifield Heavy-Ion Research Facility, nuclear physics, the UNISOR program, neutron physics, theoretical physics, the Nuclear Data Project, atomic and plasma physics, and high energy physics. Publications are listed. Separate abstracts were prepared for 34 papers. (WHK)

  3. High-Energy Astrophysics and Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Ellis

    2002-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Interfaces between high-energy physics, astrophysics and cosmology are reviewed, with particular emphasis on the important roles played by high-energy cosmic-ray physics. These include the understanding of atmospheric neutrinos, the search for massive cold dark matter particles and possible tests of models of quantum gravity. In return, experiments at the LHC may be useful for refining models of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, and thereby contributing indirectly to understanding their origin. Only future experiments will be able to tell whether these are due to some bottom-up astrophysical mechanism or some top-down cosmological mechanism.

  4. High Energy Resummation in Quantum Chromo–Dynamics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marzani, Simone

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis I discuss different aspects of high energy resummation in Quantum Chromo-Dynamics and its relevance for precision physics at hadron colliders. The high energy factorisation theorem is presented and discussed ...

  5. Nuclear & Particle Physics, Astrophysics, Cosmology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The EnergyCenterDioxideDocumentationThreeNewsfuelNotesNuMatNuclear

  6. Nuclear Physics: User/Researcher Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparencyDOE Project TapsDOERecovery NuclearSensorAdvisors New User

  7. Nuclear energy | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparencyDOE Project TapsDOERecoveryNuclearLife Cycleenergy

  8. Nuclear safety | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparencyDOE Project TapsDOERecoveryNuclearLife Cycleenergysafety

  9. Nuclear Physics A 587 (1995) 787-801 (3He,t) reactions on unstable nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernández de Córdoba, Pedro

    ELSEVIER NUCLEAR PHYSICS A Nuclear Physics A 587 (1995) 787-801 (3He,t) reactions on unstable,t) reactions on unstable nuclei theoretically. Since this charge-exchange reaction takes place on the nuclear in nuclear physics since we got a new tool, "beams of unstable nuclei" [1,2]. Many experimentalists have

  10. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 356 (1995) l-4 INSTRUMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutz, Hartmut

    ELSEVIER Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 356 (1995) l-4 NUCLEAR INSTRUMENTS 8 METHODS IN PHYSICS REgtR?n Thermodynamics of dynamic nuclear polarization W.Th. Wenckebach Faculty ofApplied Physics, Delfr Unicersity of Technology, P.O.B. 5046, 2600 GA De& The Netherlands Abstract Dynamic nuclear

  11. Nuclear and particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology (NPAC) capability review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redondo, Antonio [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present document represents a summary self-assessment of the status of the Nuclear and Particle Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology (NPAC) capability across Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). For the purpose of this review, we have divided the capability into four theme areas: Nuclear Physics, Particle Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology, and Applied Physics. For each theme area we have given a general but brief description of the activities under the area, a list of the Laboratory divisions involved in the work, connections to the goals and mission of the Laboratory, a brief description of progress over the last three years, our opinion of the overall status of the theme area, and challenges and issues.

  12. High-energy Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas K. Gaisser; Todor Stanev

    2005-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    After a brief review of galactic cosmic rays in the GeV to TeV energy range, we describe some current problems of interest for particles of very high energy. Particularly interesting are two features of the spectrum, the `knee' above $10^{15}$ eV and the `ankle' above $10^{18}$ eV. An important question is whether the highest energy particles are of extra-galactic origin and, if so, at what energy the transition occurs. A theme common to all energy ranges is use of nuclear abundances as a tool for understanding the origin of the cosmic radiation.

  13. Paul Sellin, Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics Mobility and lifetime mapping in wide bandgap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sellin, Paul

    Paul Sellin, Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics Mobility and lifetime mapping in wide bandgap1. Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics Department of Physics University of Surrey www, Hungary. #12;Paul Sellin, Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics Introduction r Development of compound

  14. physical security | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, ,Development of NovelHigh( ( ( ( (physical security |

  15. Physical Security Systems | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding accessPeptoid NanosheetsStudyingFebruary PhotonsPhysical

  16. The Nuclear Physics of Solar and Supernova Neutrino Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. C. Haxton

    1999-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This talk provides a basic introduction for students interested in the responses of detectors to solar, supernova, and other low-energy neutrino sources. Some of the nuclear physics is then applied in a discussion of nucleosynthesis within a Type II supernova, including the r-process and the neutrino process.

  17. Nuclear and Particle Physics Conference 2631 May, 2003, Dubrovnik, Croatia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nuclear and Particle Physics Conference 26­31 May, 2003, Dubrovnik, Croatia Hard Exclusive all kinematic region A. Borissov, NAPP 2003, May 28, Dubrovnik, Croatia #12; The Target and Beam, Dubrovnik, Croatia #12; Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) Orbital Angular Momentum Lq Compton (DVCS

  18. EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH European Laboratory for Particle Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH European Laboratory for Particle Physics THERMAL components linking the cold mass to the vacuum vessel such as support posts and an insulation vacuum barrier aluminium thermal shield. The recent commissioning and operation of two SSS prototypes in the LHC Test

  19. applied nuclear physics: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    applied nuclear physics First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 TILLMPAD KRNFYSIK FKF 031...

  20. Self-consistent methods in nuclear structure physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobaczewski, J. [Warsaw Univ. (Poland). Inst. of Theoretical Physics][Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Joint Inst. for Heavy Ion Research]|[Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors present a very brief description of the Hartree Fock method in nuclear structure physics, discuss the numerical methods used to solve the self-consistent equations, and analyze the precision and convergence properties of solutions. As an application, they present results pertaining to quadrupole moments and single-particle quadrupole polarizations in superdeformed nuclei with A {approximately} 60.

  1. Nuclear and fundamental physics instrumentation for the ANS project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, S.J. [Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics; Raman, S.; Arterburn, J.; McManamy, T.; Peretz, F.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Faust, H. [Institut Laue-Langevin, 38 - Grenoble (France); Piotrowski, A.E. [Soltan Inst. for Nuclear Studies, Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes work carried out during the period 1991-1995 in connection with the refinement of the concepts and detailed designs for nuclear and fundamental physics research instrumentation at the proposed Advanced Neutron source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Initially, emphasis was placed on refining the existing System Design Document (SDD-43) to detail more accurately the needs and interfaces of the instruments that are identified in the document. The conceptual designs of these instruments were also refined to reflect current thinking in the field of nuclear and fundamental physics. In particular, the on-line isotope separator (ISOL) facility design was reconsidered in the light of the development of interest in radioactive ion beams within the nuclear physics community. The second stage of this work was to define those instrument parameters that would interface directly with the reactor systems so that these parameters could be considered for the ISOL facility and particularly for its associated ion source. Since two of these options involved ion sources internal to the long slant beam tube, these were studied in detail. In addition, preliminary work was done to identify the needs for the target holder and changing facility to be located in the tangential through-tube. Because many of the planned nuclear and fundamental physics instruments have similar needs in terms of detection apparatus, some progress was also made in defining the parameters for these detectors. 21 refs., 32 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Nuclear Physics Laboratory annual report, University of Washington April 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cramer, John G.; Ramirez, Maria G.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains short discusses on topics in the following areas: astrophysics; giant resonances and photonuclear reactions; nucleus-nucleus reactions; fundamental symmetries; accelerator mass spectrometry; medium energy nuclear physics; ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions; cluster fusion; instrumentation; van de graaff accelerators and ion sources; and computer data acquisition systems. (LSP)

  3. Nuclear Physics Laboratory annual report, University of Washington April 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains short discusses on topics in the following areas: astrophysics; giant resonances and photonuclear reactions; nucleus-nucleus reactions; fundamental symmetries; accelerator mass spectrometry; medium energy nuclear physics; ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions; cluster fusion; instrumentation; van de graaff accelerators and ion sources; and computer data acquisition systems. (LSP)

  4. NP2010: An Assessment and Outlook for Nuclear Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lancaster, James

    2014-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This grant provided partial support for the National Research Council’s (NRC) decadal survey of nuclear physics. This is part of NRC’s larger effort to assess and discuss the outlook for different fields in physics and astronomy, Physics 2010, which takes place approximately every ten years. A report has been prepared as a result of the study that is intended to inform those who are interested about the current status of research in this area and to help guide future developments of the field. A pdf version of the report is available for download, for free, at http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=13438. Among the principal conclusions reached in the report are that the nuclear physics program in the United States has been especially well managed, principally through a recurring long-range planning process conducted by the community, and that current opportunities developed pursuant to that planning process should be exploited. In the section entitled “Building the Foundation for the Future,” the report notes that attention needs to be paid to certain elements that are essential to the continued vitality of the field. These include ensuring that education and research at universities remain a focus for funding and that a plan be developed to ensure that forefront-computing resources, including exascale capabilities when developed, be made available to nuclear science researchers. The report also notes that nimbleness is essential for the United States to remain competitive in a rapidly expanding international nuclear physics arena and that streamlined and flexible procedures should be developed for initiating and managing smaller-scale nuclear science projects.

  5. Proceedings of the 8th high energy heavy ion study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, J.W. (ed.); Wozniak, G.J. (ed.)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This was the eighth in a series of conferences jointly sponsored by the Nuclear Science Division of LBL and the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung in West Germany. Sixty papers on current research at both relativistic and intermediate energies are included in this report. Topics covered consisted of: Equation of State of Nuclear Matter, Pion and High Energy Gamma Emission, Theory of Multifragmentation, Intermediate Energies, Fragmentation, Atomic Physics, Nuclear Structure, Electromagnetic Processes, and New Facilities planned for SIS-ESR. The latest design parameters of the Bevalac Upgrade Proposal were reviewed for the user community. Also, the design of a new electronic 4..pi.. detector, a time projection chamber which would be placed at the HISS facility, was presented.

  6. Graduate Fellows in High Energy Theory | U.S. DOE Office of Science...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Graduate Fellows in High Energy Theory High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Closed Funding...

  7. High-energy detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E. (South Setauket, NY); Camarda, Giuseppe (Farmingville, NY); Cui, Yonggang (Upton, NY); James, Ralph B. (Ridge, NY)

    2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The preferred embodiments are directed to a high-energy detector that is electrically shielded using an anode, a cathode, and a conducting shield to substantially reduce or eliminate electrically unshielded area. The anode and the cathode are disposed at opposite ends of the detector and the conducting shield substantially surrounds at least a portion of the longitudinal surface of the detector. The conducting shield extends longitudinally to the anode end of the detector and substantially surrounds at least a portion of the detector. Signals read from one or more of the anode, cathode, and conducting shield can be used to determine the number of electrons that are liberated as a result of high-energy particles impinge on the detector. A correction technique can be implemented to correct for liberated electron that become trapped to improve the energy resolution of the high-energy detectors disclosed herein.

  8. High Energy Neutrino Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. D. Hoffman

    2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a review of the history, motivation and current status of high energy neutrino telescopes. Many years after these detectors were first conceived, the operation of kilometer-cubed scale detectors is finally on the horizon at both the South Pole and in the Mediterranean Sea. These new detectors will perhaps provide us the first view of high energy astrophysical objects with a new messenger particle and provide us with our first real glimpse of the distant universe at energies above those accessible by gamma-ray instruments. Some of the topics that can be addressed by these new instruments include the origin of cosmic rays, the nature of dark matter, and the mechanisms at work in high energy astrophysical objects such as gamma-ray bursts, active galactic nuclei, pulsar wind nebula and supernova remnants.

  9. The Auxiliary Field Diffusion Monte Carlo Method for Nuclear Physics and Nuclear Astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefano Gandolfi

    2007-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I discuss the use of the Auxiliary Field Diffusion Monte Carlo method to compute the ground state of nuclear Hamiltonians, and I show several applications to interesting problems both in nuclear physics and in nuclear astrophysics. In particular, the AFDMC algorithm is applied to the study of several nuclear systems, finite, and infinite matter. Results about the ground state of nuclei ($^4$He, $^8$He, $^{16}$O and $^{40}$Ca), neutron drops (with 8 and 20 neutrons) and neutron rich-nuclei (isotopes of oxygen and calcium) are discussed, and the equation of state of nuclear and neutron matter are calculated and compared with other many-body calculations. The $^1S_0$ superfluid phase of neutron matter in the low-density regime was also studied.

  10. High Energy Photoproduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. M. Butterworth; M. Wing

    2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The experimental and phenomenological status of high energy photoproduction is reviewed. Topics covered include the structure of the photon, production of jets, heavy flavours and prompt photons, rapidity gaps, energy flow and underlying events. The results are placed in the context of the current understanding of QCD, with particular application to present and future hadron and lepton colliders.

  11. Ultra High Energy Behaviour

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burra G. Sidharth

    2011-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We reexamine the behaviour of particles at Ultra Highe energies in the context of the fact that the LHC has already touched an energy of $7 TeV$ and is likely to attain $14 TeV$ by 2013/2014.Consequences like a possible new shortlived interaction within the Compton scale are discussed.

  12. Nuclear Physics A 611 ( 1996) 484-513 Mesonic and binding contributions to the EMC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernández de Córdoba, Pedro

    NUCLEAR PHYSICS A Nuclear Physics A 611 ( 1996) 484-513 Mesonic and binding contributions November 1995; revised 30 July 1996 Abstract We revise the conventional nuclear effects of Fermi motion for an interacting Fermi sea and the local density approximation to translate results from nuclear matter to finite

  13. meeting reports 38 Nuclear Physics News, Vol. 18, No. 3, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    meeting reports 38 Nuclear Physics News, Vol. 18, No. 3, 2008 The First Workshop on the "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics" The Workshop on the "State Of The Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics theoretical and experimental, involved in the study of "Clusters in Nuclei." A Theoretical Winter School

  14. Nuclear Physics Neutrino PreTown Meeting: Summary and Recommendations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. C. Haxton; John Bahcall; A. Baha Balantekin; Stuart Freedman; Kevin Lesko; Hamish Robertson; Bob Lanou; George Fuller; Ken Lande; Tony Mezzacappa; Frank Avignone; Bill Louis; Petr Vogel; Todd Haines; John Wilkerson

    2000-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In preparation for the nuclear physics Long Range Plan exercise, a group of 104 neutrino physicists met in Seattle September 21-23 to discuss both the present state of the field and the new opportunities of the next decade. This report summarizes the conclusions of that meeting and presents its recommendations. Further information is available at the workshop's web site. This report will be further reviewed at the upcoming Oakland Town Meeting.

  15. Reprinted from Nuclear Physics A663&664 (2000) 169c-182c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .eIsevier.nl/locate/npe Transmutation of Nuclear Waste Waclaw Gudowski aRoyal Institute of Technology,Stockholm, Sweden ELSEVIER #12;Nuclear Physics A663&664 (2000) 169c-182c Transmutation of Nuclear Waste Waclaw Gudowski Royal Institute at the dawn of nuclear era in 1940 anticipated that management of radioactive materials and nuclear waste

  16. Particle Diffraction at High Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimir A. Petrov

    1998-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief ideological and historical review of problems of high energy diffractive scattering is given.

  17. Ultra High Energy Fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burra G. Sidharth

    2015-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The LHC in Geneva is already operating at a total energy of $7 TeV$ and hopefully after a pause in 2012, it will attain its full capacity of $14 TeV$ in 2013. These are the highest energies achieved todate in any accelerator. It is against this backdrop that it is worthwhile to revisit very high energy collisions of Fermions (Cf. also \\cite{bgspp}). We will in fact examine their behaviour at such energies.

  18. General Physics II Exam 5 -Chs. 30, 31 -Nuclear Physics May 11, 2010 Name Rec. Instr. Rec. Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wysin, Gary

    General Physics II Exam 5 - Chs. 30, 31 - Nuclear Physics May 11, 2010 Name Rec. Instr. Rec. Time C + p ? a. oxygen (O) b. nitrogen (N) c. boron (B) d. silicon (Si) 7. (2) A nucleus has a binding

  19. Application of AdS/CFT in Nuclear Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. R. Pahlavani; R. Morad

    2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We review some recent progress in studying the nuclear physics especially nucleon-nucleon (NN) force within the gauge-gravity duality, in context of noncritical string theory. Our main focus is on the holographic QCD model based on the $AdS_6$ background. We explain the noncritical holography model and obtain the vector-meson spectrum and pion decay constant. Also, we study the NN interaction in this frame and calculate the nucleon-meson coupling constants. A further topic covered is a toy model for calculating the light nuclei potential. In particular, we calculate the light nuclei binding energies and also excited energies of some available excited states. We compare our results with the results of other nuclear models and also with the experimental data. Moreover, we describe some other issues which are studied using the gauge-gravity duality.

  20. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 474 (2001) 273284 Optimal coded aperture patterns for improved SNR in nuclear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schettini, Raimondo

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 474 (2001) 273­284 Optimal coded aperture patterns for improved SNR in nuclear medicine imaging Roberto Accorsia , Francesca Gasparinib , Richard C. Lanzaa, * a Nuclear Engineering Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Room NW13-221, 77

  1. Nuclear Engineering & Radiation Health Physics Program Outcomes Ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Nuclear Engineering & Radiation Health Physics Program Outcomes · Ability to apply knowledge · Knowledge of contemporary issues · Ability to use techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice · Ability to apply knowledge of atomic and nuclear physics to nuclear and radiological

  2. PROCEEDINGS OF THE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON NUCLEAR PHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saxon, D.S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phys. A278 (1977) 387. NUCLEAR FISSION INDUCED BY ATOMICand J.R. Huizenga, in Nuclear Fission (Academic Press, Newvery soft nuclei, nuclear fission and heavy ion reactions.

  3. PHYSICS AND ENGINEERING OF NUCLEAR REACTORS AT THE ECOLE NATIONALE SUPRIEURE DE PHYSIQUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    PHYSICS AND ENGINEERING OF NUCLEAR REACTORS AT THE ECOLE NATIONALE SUPĂ?RIEURE DE PHYSIQUE DE. In this context, it is necessary to design and evaluate new generations of nuclear reactors as defined by the Gen. Introduction Nuclear reactors currently generate nearly one fourth of the electricity in the world, and nuclear

  4. BNL Strategic Plan for Nuclear Physics T. Kirk, Associate Laboratory Director, HENP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the Laboratory to the advance of nuclear physics. To accomplish these guiding principles, we seek to identify- Spin RHIC II eRHIC RHIC II eRHIC Neutrino Physics SNO SNOLAB s Exp. Reactor Exp. Reactor Exp. Theory of nuclear physics. In pursuing this plan, we assume that the national program will be guided by a principle

  5. Physics division progress report for period ending September 30 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livingston, A.B. (ed.)

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses research being conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in physics. The areas covered are: Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility; low/medium energy nuclear physics; high energy experimental physics; the Unisor program; experimental atomic physics; laser and electro-optics lab; theoretical physics; compilations and evaluations; and radioactive ion beam development. (LSP)

  6. The r-process nucleosynthesis: Nuclear physics challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goriely, S. [Institut d'Astronomie et d'Astrophysique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles Campus de la Plaine, CP 226, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    About half of the nuclei heavier than iron observed in nature are produced by the socalled rapid neutron capture process, or r-process, of nucleosynthesis. The identification of the astrophysics site and the specific conditions in which the r-process takes place remains, however, one of the still-unsolved mysteries of modern astrophysics. Another underlying difficulty associated with our understanding of the r-process concerns the uncertainties in the predictions of nuclear properties for the few thousands exotic neutron-rich nuclei involved and for which essentially no experimental data exist. The present contribution emphasizes some important future challenges faced by nuclear physics in this problem, particularly in the determination of the nuclear structure properties of exotic neutron-rich nuclei as well as their radiative neutron capture rates and their fission probabilities. These quantities are particularly relevant to determine the composition of the matter resulting from the r-process. Their impact on the r-abundance distribution resulting from the decompression of neutron star matter is discussed.

  7. XLV International Winter Meeting on Nuclear Physics BORMIO, Italy, January 14-21, 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    XLV International Winter Meeting on Nuclear Physics BORMIO, Italy, January 14-21, 2007 The ALICE transition of nuclear matter from a hadron gas to a new state of matter, the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP

  8. Very-High-Energy Gamma-Ray Signal from Nuclear Photodisintegration as a Probe of Extragalactic Sources of Ultrahigh-Energy Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohta Murase; John F. Beacom

    2010-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    It is crucial to identify the ultrahigh-energy cosmic-ray (UHECR) sources and probe their unknown properties. Recent results from the Pierre Auger Observatory favor a heavy nuclear composition for the UHECRs. Under the requirement that heavy nuclei survive in these sources, using gamma-ray bursts as an example, we predict a diagnostic gamma-ray signal, unique to nuclei - the emission of de-excitation gamma rays following photodisintegration. These gamma rays, boosted from MeV to TeV-PeV energies, may be detectable by gamma-ray telescopes such as VERITAS, HESS, and MAGIC, and especially the next-generation CTA and AGIS. They are a promising messenger to identify and study individual UHE nuclei accelerators.

  9. High Energy Particles in the Solar Corona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Widom; Y. N. Srivastava; L. Larsen

    2008-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Collective Ampere law interactions producing magnetic flux tubes piercing through sunspots into and then out of the solar corona allow for low energy nuclear reactions in a steady state and high energy particle reactions if a magnetic flux tube explodes in a violent event such as a solar flare. Filamentous flux tubes themselves are vortices of Ampere currents circulating around in a tornado fashion in a roughly cylindrical geometry. The magnetic field lines are parallel to and largely confined within the core of the vortex. The vortices may thereby be viewed as long current carrying coils surrounding magnetic flux and subject to inductive Faraday and Ampere laws. These laws set the energy scales of (i) low energy solar nuclear reactions which may regularly occur and (ii) high energy electro-weak interactions which occur when magnetic flux coils explode into violent episodic events such as solar flares or coronal mass ejections.

  10. Glauber model for heavy ion collisions from low energies to high energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Shukla

    2001-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Glauber model is extensively applied to heavy ion collision for describing a number of interaction processes over a wide range of energies from near the Coulomb barrier to higher energies. The model gives the nucleus-nucleus interaction in terms of interaction between the constituent nucleons with a given density distribution. The model is a semiclassical model picturing the nuclear collision in the impact parameter representation where the nuclei move along the collision direction in a straight path. In these lectures we derive this model and discuss its applications in variety of problems in nuclear and high energy physics.

  11. PHYSICAL REVIEW C 77, 024302 (2008) Analysis of fine structure in the nuclear continuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponomarev, Vladimir

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Johannesburg 2050, South Africa 3 School of Earth Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, P. O. Wits, Johannesburg 2050, South Africa 4 Department of Physics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7700, South Africa, results on the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance in 208 Pb from high-energy-resolution inelastic proton

  12. Investigating Biological Matter with Theoretical Nuclear Physics Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pietro Faccioli

    2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The internal dynamics of strongly interacting systems and that of biomolecules such as proteins display several important analogies, despite the huge difference in their characteristic energy and length scales. For example, in all such systems, collective excitations, cooperative transitions and phase transitions emerge as the result of the interplay of strong correlations with quantum or thermal fluctuations. In view of such an observation, some theoretical methods initially developed in the context of theoretical nuclear physics have been adapted to investigate the dynamics of biomolecules. In this talk, we review some of our recent studies performed along this direction. In particular, we discuss how the path integral formulation of the molecular dynamics allows to overcome some of the long-standing problems and limitations which emerge when simulating the protein folding dynamics at the atomistic level of detail.

  13. Investigating Biological Matter with Theoretical Nuclear Physics Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faccioli, Pietro

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The internal dynamics of strongly interacting systems and that of biomolecules such as proteins display several important analogies, despite the huge difference in their characteristic energy and length scales. For example, in all such systems, collective excitations, cooperative transitions and phase transitions emerge as the result of the interplay of strong correlations with quantum or thermal fluctuations. In view of such an observation, some theoretical methods initially developed in the context of theoretical nuclear physics have been adapted to investigate the dynamics of biomolecules. In this talk, we review some of our recent studies performed along this direction. In particular, we discuss how the path integral formulation of the molecular dynamics allows to overcome some of the long-standing problems and limitations which emerge when simulating the protein folding dynamics at the atomistic level of detail.

  14. Management of Scientific Images: an approach to the extraction, annotation and retrieval of figures in the field of High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Praczyk, Piotr Adam; Mele, Salvatore

    The information environment of the first decade of the XXIst century is unprecedented. The physical barriers limiting access to the knowledge are disappearing as traditional methods of accessing information are being replaced or enhanced by computer systems. Digital systems are able to manage much larger sets of documents, confronting information users with the deluge of documents related to their topic of interest. This new situation created an incentive for the rapid development of Data Mining techniques and to the creation of more efficient search engines capable of limiting the search results to a small subset of the most relevant ones. However, most of the up to date search engines operate using the text descriptions of the documents. Those descriptions can either be extracted from the content of the document or be obtained from the external sources. The retrieval based on the non-textual content of documents is a subject of ongoing research. In particular, the retrieval of images and unlocking the infor...

  15. Physics-based multiscale coupling for full core nuclear reactor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    multiscale coupling for full core nuclear reactor simulation Numerical simulation of nuclear reactors is a key technology in the quest for improvements in efficiency, safety,...

  16. The Institute for Nuclear and Particle Physics at the Department of Physics in the Faculty of Science has the following immediate openings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    experi- mental methods of nuclear physics (e.g. the neutrinoless double beta decay or the direct search

  17. FPGA-based Cherenkov Ring Recognition in Nuclear and Particle Physics Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jantsch, Axel

    FPGA-based Cherenkov Ring Recognition in Nuclear and Particle Physics Experiments Ming Liu adopted to identify particles flying through the detector systems in nuclear and particle physics to out- perform by several tens up to hundred times with acceptable resource utilizations on a Xilinx

  18. Nuclear Physics A549 (1992) 439-460 North-Holland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lagaris, Isaac

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear Physics A549 (1992) 439-460 North-Holland odel calculations of doubly closed shell nuclei . Results of calculations performed using central nucleon-nucleon potentials, without tensor components PHYSICS R In recent years much progress has been made in the development of the non- relativistic nuclear

  19. Nuclear Physics from QCD : The Anticipated Impact of Exa-Scale Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin J. Savage

    2010-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    I discuss highlights in the progress that is being made toward calculating processes of importance in nuclear physics from QCD using high performance computing. As exa-scale computing resources are expected to become available around 2017, I present current estimates of the computational resources required to accomplish central goals of nuclear physics.

  20. Pyroelectric Crystal Accelerator In The Department Of Physics And Nuclear Engineering At West Point

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    Pyroelectric Crystal Accelerator In The Department Of Physics And Nuclear Engineering At West Point , Yaron Danonc , Brian Morettia , and Jeffrey Muskb a Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering. The NSERC has created an experimental pyroelectric crystal accelerator program to enhance undergraduate

  1. The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) Mission R. P. fla B. Dennis, G mission is to investigate the physics of particle acceleration and energy release in solar flares, through-ray/gamma-ray spectroscopy 1. INTRODUCTION The primary scientific objective of the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar

  2. Oregon State University Department of Nuclear Engineering & Radiation Health Physics NeutronSpring 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    THE Oregon State University Department of Nuclear Engineering & Radiation Health Physics NeutronSpring 2011 4 Continued on page 3 2 2 Nuclear Career Horizons Expand in France NERHP Senior Alison Arnold's Study Abroad Program. Arnold will earn a B.S. in Nuclear Engineering with a minor in French when she

  3. Nuclear Physics A 781 (2007) 317341 Symmetry energies, pairing energies, and mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Donnell, Tom

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear Physics A 781 (2007) 317­341 Symmetry energies, pairing energies, and mass equations J of the respective mass equation since symmetry energies are related to the curvature of the nuclear mass surface.10.Dr; 21.10.Hw; 21.30.Fe; 21.60.-n Keywords: NUCLEAR STRUCTURE Z = 1­118; analyzed isobaric analog

  4. PHYSICAL REVIEW C 72, 025806 (2005) Nuclear fusion in dense matter: Reaction rate and carbon burning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PHYSICAL REVIEW C 72, 025806 (2005) Nuclear fusion in dense matter: Reaction rate and carbon August 2005) In this paper we analyze the nuclear fusion rates among equal nuclei for all five different nuclear burning regimes in dense matter (two thermonuclear regimes, two pycnonuclear ones

  5. PHYSICAL REVIEW C VOLUME 46, NUMBER 1 JULY 1992 Nuclear fission with diffusive dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertsch George F.

    PHYSICAL REVIEW C VOLUME 46, NUMBER 1 JULY 1992 Nuclear fission with diffusive dynamics D. Cha investigate the dynamics of nuclear fission, assuming purely diffusive motion up to the saddle point/BP=(Bp/BE' )(BE*/BP). Several authors have applied the Smoluchowski equation to nuclear fission processes

  6. Nuclear Physics A369 (1981) 47082 North-Holland Publishing Company

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lagaris, Isaac

    Nuclear Physics A369 (1981) 47082 © North-Holland Publishing Company VARIATIONAL CALCULATIONS OF ASYMMETRIC NUCLEAR MATTER I. E. LAGARIS and V. R. PANDHARIPANDE Deportment oJ'Phti'sics, Unic) Abstract: We report on variational calculations of the energy E(p, �) of asymmetric nuclear matter having p

  7. Nuclear Physics A531 (1991) 253-284 North-Holland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seevinck, Michiel

    Nuclear Physics A531 (1991) 253-284 North-Holland F E ATIO SINGLE-PARTICLE STRENGTH A E VA SHELL with what is expected from depletions calculated in infinite nuclear matter. Inclusion of higher order terms interacting Fermi systems. The interest in nuclear spectral functions has been revived by recent accurate (,e

  8. http://arXiv.org/physics/0507088 Teaching About Nature's Nuclear Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Learned, John

    http://arXiv.org/physics/0507088 Teaching About Nature's Nuclear Reactors J. Marvin Herndon reactors existed in uranium deposits on Earth long before Enrico Fermi built the first man-made nuclear reactors. The subject of planetocentric nuclear fission reactors can be a jumping off point for stimulating

  9. Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livingston, A.B. (ed.)

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses topics in the following areas: Holifield heavy ion research; Experimental Nuclear physics; The Uniser program; Experimental Atomic Physics; Theoretical Physics; Laser and electro-optics lab; High Energy Physics; compilations and evaluations; and accelerator design and development. (FI)

  10. PROCEEDINGS OF THE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON NUCLEAR PHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saxon, D.S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    address: Atomic Energy Establishment, Cairo, Egypt. 1. H.R.Energy Physics Laboratory, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt.Energy Physics Laboratory Physics Department,Faculty Of Science, Cairo University,Cairo,Egypt

  11. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, Richard A.; Wasserman, Harvey J.

    2012-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    IThe National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the primary computing center for the DOE Office of Science, serving approximately 4,000 users and hosting some 550 projects that involve nearly 700 codes for a wide variety of scientific disciplines. In addition to large-scale computing resources NERSC provides critical staff support and expertise to help scientists make the most efficient use of these resources to advance the scientific mission of the Office of Science. In May 2011, NERSC, DOE’s Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) and DOE’s Office of Nuclear Physics (NP) held a workshop to characterize HPC requirements for NP research over the next three to five years. The effort is part of NERSC’s continuing involvement in anticipating future user needs and deploying necessary resources to meet these demands. The workshop revealed several key requirements, in addition to achieving its goal of characterizing NP computing. The key requirements include: 1. Larger allocations of computational resources at NERSC; 2. Visualization and analytics support; and 3. Support at NERSC for the unique needs of experimental nuclear physicists. This report expands upon these key points and adds others. The results are based upon representative samples, called “case studies,” of the needs of science teams within NP. The case studies were prepared by NP workshop participants and contain a summary of science goals, methods of solution, current and future computing requirements, and special software and support needs. Participants were also asked to describe their strategy for computing in the highly parallel, “multi-core” environment that is expected to dominate HPC architectures over the next few years. The report also includes a section with NERSC responses to the workshop findings. NERSC has many initiatives already underway that address key workshop findings and all of the action items are aligned with NERSC strategic plans.

  12. 16 years of successful projects in16 years of successful projects in Nuclear Science & TechnologyNuclear Science & Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of operating NPP; · NPP decommissioning and waste treatment; · Novel reactor concepts and Nuclear Fuel CycleISTCISTC 16 years of successful projects in16 years of successful projects in Nuclear Science & TechnologyNuclear Science & Technology 13th CERNISTC SAC Seminar New Perspectives of High Energy Physics 01

  13. General Physics II Exam 5 -Chs. 30, 31 -Nuclear Physics Dec. 17, 2013 Name Rec. Instr. Rec. Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wysin, Gary

    General Physics II Exam 5 - Chs. 30, 31 - Nuclear Physics Dec. 17, 2013 Name Rec. Instr. Rec. Time, n+X 14 6 C + p ? a. oxygen (O) b. nitrogen (N) c. boron (B) d. silicon (Si) 6. (3) When a fission

  14. Thin-thick hydrogen target for nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gheller, J.-M.; Juster, F.-P.; Authelet, G. [CEA Saclay, Irfu/SACM, F-91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette cedex (France); Vinyar, I. [PELIN Limited Liability Company 27 A, Gzhatskaya Str, office 103 St. Petersbourg 195220 (Russian Federation); Relland, J. [CEA Saclay, Irfu/SIS, F-91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette cedex (France); Commeaux, C. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, campus Universitaire-Bat 103, 91406 Orsay cedex (France)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In spectroscopic studies of unstable nuclei, hydrogen targets are of key importance. The CHyMENE Project aims to provide to the nuclear physics community a thin and pure solid windowless hydrogen or deuterium target. CHyMENE project must respond to this request for the production of solid Hydrogen. The solid hydrogen target is produced in a continuous flow (1 cm/s) by an extrusion technique (developed with the PELIN laboratory) in a vacuum chamber. The shape of the target is determined by the design of the nozzle at the extrusion process. For the purpose, the choice is a rectangular shape with a width of 10 mm and a thickness in the range of 30-50 microns necessary for the physics objectives. The cryostat is equipped with a GM Cryocooler with sufficient power for the solidification of the hydrogen in the lower portion of the extruder. In the higher part of the cryostat, the hydrogen gas is first liquefied and partially solidified. It is then compressed at 100 bars in the cooled extruder before expulsion of the film through the nozzle at the center of the reaction vacuum chamber. After the previous step, the solid hydrogen ribbon falls by gravity into a dedicated chamber where it sublimes and the gas is pumped and evacuated in a exhaust line. This paper deals with the design of the cryostat with its equipment, with the sizing of the thermal bridge (Aluminum and copper), with the results regarding the contact resistance as well as with the vacuum computations of the reaction and recovery hydrogen gas chambers.

  15. Lecture 36 1 Physics 558 Winter 2013 Physics 558 Lecture 36

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Steve

    Lecture 36 1 Physics 558 Winter 2013 Physics 558 ­ Lecture 36 Some Final Comments on QCD of normal nuclear interactions (the spatially asymptotic states of the high energy analysis) is dominatedD L (36.3) #12;Lecture 36 2 Physics 558 Winter 2013 In this chiral limit we see that this Lagrangian

  16. FAIR Forefront Physics and Challenges: Extreme Field Physics with Lasers and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    China Finland France Germany Greece U KItaly Poland Slovakia Slovenia Spain SwedenRomania Russia Saudi Arabia #12;CrossChecking Conference August 27th #12;13th SAC Seminar "New Perspectives of High Energy Physics Physics: x600 higher target energy density 600kJ/g Nuclear Matter Physics with 35-45 GeV/u HI beams, x1000

  17. Nuclear physics: from properties of atomic nuclei to medicine / Fizyka jadrowa: od wlasnosci jadra atomowego po medycyne.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear physics: from properties of atomic nuclei to medicine / Fizyka jadrowa: od wlasnosci jadra atomowego po medycyne.

  18. JET Papers Presented at International Atomic Energy Agency 10th International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JET Papers Presented at International Atomic Energy Agency 10th International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Research

  19. COMPILATION OF CURRENT HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutchinson, M.S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4 /3xl0 4 P Usually 2xl0 12 ppp on target; 1I/K - 3 in Kspectrometer Usually 2xl0 12 ppp; 1I/K - 10 in K beam i t tC4 K /K P 8xl0 4 Usually 2xl0 12 ppp C6, C8 K /K P 6xl0 5 To

  20. September 27, 2010 HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS DIVISION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    is appropriate to National Recognized Testing Laboratory (NRTL) electrical equipment safety inspection

  1. High Energy Physics Division, ANL Lattice QCD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpgHanfordDepartmentInnovation Portal

  2. Nuclear Physics Science Network Requirements Workshop, May 2008 - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tierney, Ed., Brian L; Dart, Ed., Eli; Carlson, Rich; Dattoria, Vince; Ernest, Michael; Hitchcock, Daniel; Johnston, William; Kowalski, Andy; Lauret, Jerome; Maguire, Charles; Olson, Douglas; Purschke, Martin; Rai, Gulshan; Watson, Chip; Vale, Carla

    2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the US Department of Energy Office of Science, the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States of America. In support of the Office of Science programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years. In May 2008, ESnet and the Nuclear Physics (NP) Program Office of the DOE Office of Science organized a workshop to characterize the networking requirements of the science programs funded by the NP Program Office. Most of the key DOE sites for NP related work will require significant increases in network bandwidth in the 5 year time frame. This includes roughly 40 Gbps for BNL, and 20 Gbps for NERSC. Total transatlantic requirements are on the order of 40 Gbps, and transpacific requirements are on the order of 30 Gbps. Other key sites are Vanderbilt University and MIT, which will need on the order of 20 Gbps bandwidth to support data transfers for the CMS Heavy Ion program. In addition to bandwidth requirements, the workshop emphasized several points in regard to science process and collaboration. One key point is the heavy reliance on Grid tools and infrastructure (both PKI and tools such as GridFTP) by the NP community. The reliance on Grid software is expected to increase in the future. Therefore, continued development and support of Grid software is very important to the NP science community. Another key finding is that scientific productivity is greatly enhanced by easy researcher-local access to instrument data. This is driving the creation of distributed repositories for instrument data at collaborating institutions, along with a corresponding increase in demand for network-based data transfers and the tools to manage those transfers effectively. Network reliability is also becoming more important as there is often a narrow window between data collection and data archiving when transfer and analysis can be done. The instruments do not stop producing data, so extended network outages can result in data loss due to analysis pipeline stalls. Finally, as the scope of collaboration continues to increase, collaboration tools such as audio and video conferencing are becoming ever more critical to the productivity of scientific collaborations.

  3. High-Energy Neutrino Astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Halzen

    2004-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Kilometer-scale neutrino detectors such as IceCube are discovery instruments covering nuclear and particle physics, cosmology and astronomy. Examples of their multidisciplinary missions include the search for the particle nature of dark matter and for additional small dimensions of space. In the end, their conceptual design is very much anchored to the observational fact that Nature accelerates protons and photons to energies in excess of $10^{20}$ and $10^{13}$ eV, respectively. The cosmic ray connection sets the scale of cosmic neutrino fluxes. In this context, we discuss the first results of the completed AMANDA detector and the reach of its extension, IceCube. Similar experiments are under construction in the Mediterranean. Neutrino astronomy is also expanding in new directions with efforts to detect air showers, acoustic and radio signals initiated by super-EeV neutrinos.

  4. High-Energy Neutrino Astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Halzen

    2005-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Kilometer-scale neutrino detectors such as IceCube are discovery instruments covering nuclear and particle physics, cosmology and astronomy. Examples of their multidisciplinary missions include the search for the particle nature of dark matter and for additional small dimensions of space. In the end, their conceptual design is very much anchored to the observational fact that Nature accelerates protons and photons to energies in excess of 10^{20} and 10^{13} eV, respectively. The cosmic ray connection sets the scale of cosmic neutrino fluxes. In this context, we discuss the first results of the completed AMANDA detector and the reach of its extension, IceCube. Similar experiments are under construction in the Mediterranean. Neutrino astronomy is also expanding in new directions with efforts to detect air showers, acoustic and radio signals initiated by neutrinos with energies similar to those of the highest energy cosmic rays.

  5. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Richard A.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Physics Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, isas the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF)

  6. Prospects of High Energy Laboratory Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, J.S.T.; Chen, P.; /SLAC

    2006-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) have been observed but their sources and production mechanisms are yet to be understood. We envision a laboratory astrophysics program that will contribute to the understanding of cosmic accelerators with efforts to: (1) test and calibrate UHECR observational techniques, and (2) elucidate the underlying physics of cosmic acceleration through laboratory experiments and computer simulations. Innovative experiments belonging to the first category have already been done at the SLAC FFTB. Results on air fluorescence yields from the FLASH experiment are reviewed. Proposed future accelerator facilities can provided unprecedented high-energy-densities in a regime relevant to cosmic acceleration studies and accessible in a terrestrial environment for the first time. We review recent simulation studies of nonlinear plasma dynamics that could give rise to cosmic acceleration, and discuss prospects for experimental investigation of the underlying mechanisms.

  7. A program in Medium-Energy Nuclear Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berman, B.L.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses research on the following topics: single electron scattering; coincidence electron scattering; photonuclear reactions; pion scattering; and the GWU nuclear detector. (LSP).

  8. A program in Medium-Energy Nuclear Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berman, B.L.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses research on the following topics: single electron scattering; coincidence electron scattering; photonuclear reactions; pion scattering; and the GWU nuclear detector. (LSP).

  9. Spin structure in high energy processes: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DePorcel, L.; Dunwoodie, C. [eds.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains papers as the following topics: Spin, Mass, and Symmetry; physics with polarized Z{sup 0}s; spin and precision electroweak physics; polarized electron sources; polarization phenomena in quantum chromodynamics; polarized lepton-nucleon scattering; polarized targets in high energy physics; spin dynamics in storage rings and linear accelerators; spin formalism and applications to new physics searches; precision electroweak physics at LEP; recent results on heavy flavor physics from LEP experiments using 1990--1992 data; precise measurement of the left-right cross section asymmetry in Z boson production by electron-positron collisions; preliminary results on heavy flavor physics at SLD; QCD tests with SLD and polarized beams; recent results from TRISTAN at KEK; recent B physics results from CLEO; searching for the H dibaryon at Brookhaven; recent results from the compton observatory; the spin structure of the deuteron; spin structure of the neutron ({sup 3}HE) and the Bjoerken sum rule; a consumer`s guide to lattice QCD results; top ten models constrained by b {yields} sy; a review of the Fermilab fixed target program; results from the D0 experiment; results from CDF at FNAL; quantum-mechanical suppression of bremsstrahlung; report from the ZEUS collaboration at HERA; physics from the first year of H1 at HERA, and hard diffraction. These papers have been cataloged separately elsewhere.

  10. www.physicstoday.org November 2012 Physics Today 59 Nuclear energy can provide great

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    www.physicstoday.org November 2012 Physics Today 59 Nuclear energy can provide great The Nuclear on keeping costs and book length in check. For example, most of the graphics use gray- scale, with only a few pages in the cen- ter providing color plates. In addition, in many places additional graphics could have

  11. Physics of Nuclear Reactors, March,21 2011 What do we know ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    Dr. Danon Physics of Nuclear Reactors, March,21 2011 #12;What do we know ? All the information we have is from the media. More reliable; nuclear related information: www.nei.org www.iaea.org THE REST IS INTERPRETATION OF THIS DATA #12;BWR Reactor (Mark I containment) #12;BWR containment in more

  12. LongBaseline Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics Institute for Nuclear Theory Summer Program 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of - Department of Physics, Electroweak Interaction Research Group

    LongBaseline Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics Institute for Nuclear Theory Summer Program 2010 for Nuclear Theory Summer Program 2010 Robert J. Wilson 8/11/2010Page 2 Wednesday August 11th Session 6 PWG C520 14:00 Solar, Geo, and Reactor Neutrinos N. Tolich (Washington) 14:30 Q&A Guests/PWG Session 8

  13. Gamma Ray Bursts as Possible High Energy Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles D. Dermer

    2005-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray bursts are known to be sources of high-energy gamma rays, and are likely to be sources of high-energy cosmic rays and neutrinos. Following a short review of observations of GRBs at multi-MeV energies and above, the physics of leptonic and hadronic models of GRBs is summarized. Evidence for two components in BATSE and EGRET/TASC data suggest that GRBs are sources of high-energy cosmic rays. GLAST observations will reveal the high-energy gamma-ray power and energy releases from GRBs, and will provide detailed knowledge of anomalous high-energy emission components, but confirmation of cosmic ray acceleration must await 100 TeV -- PeV neutrino detection from GRBs.

  14. PRACTICAL NEUTRON DOSIMETRY AT HIGH ENERGIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCaslin, J.B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of High-Energy Accelerators, New York, April, 1957. USAECShielding of High-Energy Accelerators, New York, April 1957.Shielding of High-Energy Accelerators, New York, April 1957.

  15. PEBBLE-BED NUCLEAR REACTOR SYSTEM PHYSICS AND FUEL UTILIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Ryan 1989-

    2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Generation IV Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PMBR) design may be used for electricity production, co-generation applications (industrial heat, hydrogen production, desalination, etc.), and could potentially eliminate some high level nuclear wastes...

  16. A program in medium-energy nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berman, B.L.; Dhuga, K.S.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following topics: electron-scattering nuclear-structure studies; coincidence electrodisintegration studies of light nuclei; pion scattering and reactions on the three-body nuclei; and pion scattering from shell-model nuclei.

  17. Future high energy colliders. Formal report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parsa, Z. [ed.] [ed.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Report includes copies of transparencies and notes from the presentations made at the Symposium on Future High Energy Colliders, October 21-25, 1996 at the Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara California, that was made available by the authors. Editing, reduction and changes to the authors contributions were made only to fulfill the printing and publication requirements. We would like to take this opportunity and thank the speakers for their informative presentations and for providing copies of their transparencies and notes for inclusion in this Report.

  18. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 538 (2005) 159177 Muon acceleration in FFAG rings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keil, Eberhard

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 538 (2005) 159­177 Muon acceleration in FFAG August 2004 Available online 3 November 2004 Abstract Muon acceleration from 6 or 10 to 20 GeV in fixed-field alternating gradient (FFAG) rings is considered. The novel physics issues associated with non-scaling FFAG

  19. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 559 (2006) 207210 High precision numerical accuracy in physics research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villard, Gilles

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 559 (2006) 207­210 High precision numerical by physicists. However, current com- puters are able to perform billions of FP operations each second, and some in the near future. They are reviewed in Section 3, with an evaluation of their performance overhead

  20. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 476 (2002) 758764 Observation of radiation induced latchup in the readout

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramello, Luciano

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 476 (2002) 758­764 Observation of radiation.80 Keywords: Latchup; Microelectronics; Nuclear electronics; Radiation tolerant electronics; Radiation effects of Physics and Nuclear Techniques, UMM, Cracow, Poland e Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Avanzate

  1. Ultra High Energy Neutrino Astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Berezinsky

    2005-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The short review of theoretical aspects of ultra high energy (UHE) neutrinos and superGZK neutrinos. The sources and diffuse fluxes of UHE neutrinos are discussed. Much attention is given to comparison of the cascade and cosmic ray upper bounds for diffuse neutrino fluxes. Cosmogenic neutrinos and neutrinos from the mirror mater are considered as superGZK neutrinos.

  2. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Richard A.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    proceedings of High Performance Computing – 2011 (HPC-2011)is manager of High-Performance Computing group in the ITDensity Physics high-performance computing High Performance

  3. VERY HIGH ENERGY GAMMA RAYS FROM THE VELA PULSAR DIRECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enomoto, Ryoji

    VERY HIGH ENERGY GAMMA RAYS FROM THE VELA PULSAR DIRECTION T. Yoshikoshi1;2, T. Kifune2, S and Mathematical Physics, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia 5005, Australia 4Institute of SpaceDepartment of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Kyoto 606, Japan 8Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory

  4. High Energy Density Science at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, R W

    2007-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    High energy density science (HEDS), as a discipline that has developed in the United States from National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA)-sponsored laboratory research programs, is, and will remain, a major component of the NNSA science and technology strategy. Its scientific borders are not restricted to NNSA. 'Frontiers in High Energy Density Physics: The X-Games of Contemporary Science' identified numerous exciting scientific opportunities in this field, while pointing to the need for a overarching interagency plan for its evolution. Meanwhile, construction of the first x-ray free-electron laser, the Office-of-Science-funded Linear Coherent Light Source-LCLS: the world's first free electron x-ray laser, with 100-fsec time resolution, tunable x-ray energies, a high rep rate, and a 10 order-of-magnitude increase in brightness over any other x-ray source--led to the realization that the scientific needs of NNSA and the broader scientific community could be well served by an LCLS HEDS endstation employing both short-pulse and high-energy optical lasers. Development of this concept has been well received in the community. NNSA requested a workshop on the applicability of LCLS to its needs. 'High Energy Density Science at the LCLS: NNSA Defense Programs Mission Need' was held in December 2006. The workshop provided strong support for the relevance of the endstation to NNSA strategic requirements. The range of science that was addressed covered a wide swath of the vast HEDS phase space. The unique possibilities provided by the LCLS in areas of intense interest to NNSA Defense Programs were discussed. The areas of focus included warm dense matter and equations of state, hot dense matter, and behavior of high-pressure materials under conditions of high strain-rate and extreme dynamic loading. Development of new and advanced diagnostic techniques was also addressed. This report lays out the relevant science, as brief summaries (Ch. II), expanded descriptions (Ch. V), and a more detailed plans for experiments (Ch. VI), highlighting the uniqueness the HEDS endstation will play in providing mission-relevant HED data and in the development of the field. One of the more exciting aspects of NNSA-relevant experiments on LCLS is that, given the extraordinary investment and consequent advances in accurate atomic-scale simulations of matter (to a large extent via the Accelerated Scientific Computing program sponsored by NNSA), the facility will provide a platform that, for the first time, will permit experiments in the regimes of interest at the time and spatial scales of the simulations. In Chapter III, the report places the potential of LCLS with an HED science endstation in the context of science required by NNSA, as well as explicating the relationship of NNSA and HED science in general. Chapter IV discusses 4th-generation light sources, like LCLS, in the context of other laboratory technologies presently utilized by NNSA. The report concludes, noting that an HED endstation on LCLS can provide access to data in regimes that are relevant to NNSA needs but no mechanism exists for providing such data. The endstation will also serve to build a broad-based community in the 'X-Games' of physics. The science generated by the facility will be a collaboration of NNSA-based laboratory scientists and university-based researchers. The LCLS endstation fulfills the need for an intermediate-scale facility capable of delivering fundamental advances and mission-relevant research in high energy density science.

  5. Accelerating Ab Initio Nuclear Physics Calculations with GPUs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hugh Potter; Dossay Oryspayev; Pieter Maris; Masha Sosonkina; James Vary; Sven Binder; Angelo Calci; Joachim Langhammer; Robert Roth; Ümit Çatalyürek; Erik Saule

    2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes some applications of GPU acceleration in ab initio nuclear structure calculations. Specifically, we discuss GPU acceleration of the software package MFDn, a parallel nuclear structure eigensolver. We modify the matrix construction stage to run partly on the GPU. On the Titan supercomputer at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility, this produces a speedup of approximately 2.2x - 2.7x for the matrix construction stage and 1.2x - 1.4x for the entire run.

  6. ELSEVIER Nuclear Physics A682 (2001) 427~432~ Search for the wobbling mode built on triaxial super deformation*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ELSEVIER Nuclear Physics A682 (2001) 427~432~ Search for the wobbling mode built on triaxial super, Milano, Italy `Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow, Poland gDipartemento di Fisica. of Mathematical Physics, LTH, University of Lund, Lund, Sweden The nucleus 163Luis studied through the fusion

  7. TEI Piraeus students' knowledge on the beneficial applications of nuclear physics: Nuclear energy, radioactivity - consequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilakouta, Mirofora

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent nuclear accident in Japan revealed the confusion and the inadequate knowledge of the citizens about the issues of nuclear energy, nuclear applications, radioactivity and their consequences In this work we present the first results of an ongoing study which aims to evaluate the knowledge and the views of Greek undergraduate students on the above issues. A web based survey was conducted and 131 students from TEI Piraeus answered a multiple choice questionnaire with questions of general interest on nuclear energy, nuclear applications, radioactivity and their consequences. The survey showed that students, like the general population, have a series of faulty views on general interest nuclear issues. Furthermore, the first results indicate that our educational system is not so effective as source of information on these issues in comparison to the media and internet

  8. Nuclear physics information needed for accelerator driven transmutation of nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lisowski, P.W.; Bowman, C.D.; Arthur, E.D.; Young, P.G.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is renewed interest in using accelerator driven neutron sources to address the problem of high-level long-lived nuclear waste. Several laboratories have developed systems that may have a significant impact on the future use of nuclear power, adding options for dealing with long-lived actinide wastes and fission products, and for power production. This paper describes a new Los Alamos concept using thermal neutrons and examines the nuclear data requirements. 7 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 533 (2004) 612 Erratum to ``Dead time and pileup in pulsed parametric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 533 (2004) 612 Erratum Erratum to ``Dead time DanonĂ?, Bryndol Sones, Robert Block Department of Mechanical Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering

  10. Nuclear Many-Body Physics Where Structure And Reactions Meet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naureen Ahsan; Alexander Volya

    2009-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The path from understanding a simple reaction problem of scattering or tunneling to contemplating the quantum nuclear many-body system, where structure and continuum of reaction-states meet, overlap and coexist, is a complex and nontrivial one. In this presentation we discuss some of the intriguing aspects of this route.

  11. Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory1 Report to SNEAP 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory1 Report to SNEAP 2011 Chris Westerfeldt, J. Addison, B Supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, Under Grant No. DE Pulley Prototype #12;Testing of this prototype is planned for Fall/Winter 2011 using a spare drive

  12. Probing particle and nuclear physics models of neutrinoless double beta decay with different nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. L. Fogli; E. Lisi; A. M. Rotunno

    2009-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Half-life estimates for neutrinoless double beta decay depend on particle physics models for lepton flavor violation, as well as on nuclear physics models for the structure and transitions of candidate nuclei. Different models considered in the literature can be contrasted - via prospective data - with a "standard" scenario characterized by light Majorana neutrino exchange and by the quasiparticle random phase approximation, for which the theoretical covariance matrix has been recently estimated. We show that, assuming future half-life data in four promising nuclei (Ge-76, Se-82, Te-130, and Xe-136), the standard scenario can be distinguished from a few nonstandard physics models, while being compatible with alternative state-of-the-art nuclear calculations (at 95% C.L.). Future signals in different nuclei may thus help to discriminate at least some decay mechanisms, without being spoiled by current nuclear uncertainties. Prospects for possible improvements are also discussed.

  13. Probing particle and nuclear physics models of neutrinoless double beta decay with different nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fogli, G. L.; Rotunno, A. M. [Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica 'Michelangelo Merlin', Via Amendola 173, 70126 Bari (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, Via Orabona 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); Lisi, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, Via Orabona 4, 70126 Bari (Italy)

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Half-life estimates for neutrinoless double beta decay depend on particle physics models for lepton-flavor violation, as well as on nuclear physics models for the structure and transitions of candidate nuclei. Different models considered in the literature can be contrasted - via prospective data - with a 'standard' scenario characterized by light Majorana neutrino exchange and by the quasiparticle random phase approximation, for which the theoretical covariance matrix has been recently estimated. We show that, assuming future half-life data in four promising nuclei ({sup 76}Ge, {sup 82}Se, {sup 130}Te, and {sup 136}Xe), the standard scenario can be distinguished from a few nonstandard physics models, while being compatible with alternative state-of-the-art nuclear calculations (at 95% C.L.). Future signals in different nuclei may thus help to discriminate at least some decay mechanisms, without being spoiled by current nuclear uncertainties. Prospects for possible improvements are also discussed.

  14. Physics and Engineering Models | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding accessPeptoidLabPhysics Physics Our science answersPhysicsand

  15. arXiv:0802.3463v1[nucl-th]23Feb2008 Nuclear astrophysics from direct reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertulani, Carlos A. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

    , and energy production in stars. A. Nuclear reaction rates Low energy nuclear astrophysics requires the knowl Be(p, ) 8 B plays a major role for the production of high energy neutrinos from the -decay of 8 B Department of Physics, Texas A&M University, Commerce, TX 75429, USA Accurate nuclear reaction rates

  16. Mesoscopic physics: From low-energy nuclear [1] to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yannouleas, Constantine

    of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology [2] PRB 89, 035432 (2014); PRB 87, 165431 (2013) [1] Ch. 4) Concentric rings: (1,6,12) Concentric rings: (0,6) left, (1,5) right N=6e Y&L, PRB 68, 035325 (2003) Circular

  17. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A ] (

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the '80s by Fiorini and Niinikoski for searching rare events like neutrinoless double beta decay (bb-0n.60.Pq; 29.40.Vj; 95.35.ţd; 7.20.Mc Keywords: Cryogenic detectors; Neutrino mass; Neutrinoless double beta decay; Dark matter; WIMPs; Fundamental physics 1. Introduction Cryogenic detectors were proposed

  18. Dynamic adaptations in ab-initio nuclear physics calculations on multicore computer architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sosonkina, Masha

    Dynamic adaptations in ab-initio nuclear physics calculations on multicore computer architectures of an application. This is especially true in modern multi-user cluster environments where users can run many high-performance to the dynamically changing system conditions, to prevent drastic performance loss. In this paper, the parallel

  19. RHIC R&D -eCooling Annual DOE/Nuclear Physics Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    &D effort by Ilan Ben-Zvi, Collider-Accelerator Department Brookhaven National Laboratory #12;The RHIC II Booster AGS RHIC II Electron cooling IP2 Location of cooler: IP2 Objective: Cool RHIC stored ion beamsRHIC R&D - eCooling Annual DOE/Nuclear Physics Review of RHIC Science and Technology July 24

  20. Nuclear Physics A 757 (2005) 127 Quarkgluon plasma and color glass condensate at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nuclear Physics A 757 (2005) 1­27 Quark­gluon plasma and color glass condensate at RHIC hadronic and partonic matter produced in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions at RHIC. A particular focus, the so-called quark­gluon plasma (QGP). We also discuss evidence for a possible precursor state

  1. Young Physicists Program: May 2011 Lab 8: Radiation and Nuclear Physics-Do

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Onuchic, José

    Young Physicists Program: May 2011 Lab 8: Radiation and Nuclear Physics- Do Not Lick Laboratory: Types of radiation, sources of radiation, and shielding Introduction The purpose of this lab is to study the various types of radiation, their role in everyday and exceptional phenomena, and to also understand some

  2. Nuclear Physics A 635 (1998) 4701483 Boson forbidden low-energy E1-transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponomarev, Vladimir

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear Physics A 635 (1998) 4701483 Boson forbidden low-energy E1-transitions in spherical nuclei; accepted 23 March 1998 Abstract Low-energy E1-transitions in spherical nuclei forbidden in the ideal boson.V. PACS: 21.60.-n; 21.60.Jz; 23.20.-g Keywords: Low-energy E1-transitions; Fermion structure of phonons

  3. Elsevier Editorial System(tm) for Nuclear Inst. and Methods in Physics Research, A Manuscript Draft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frisch, Henry

    Elsevier Editorial System(tm) for Nuclear Inst. and Methods in Physics Research, A Manuscript DraftD; Henry J Frisch, PhD; Stephen Mrenna, PhD Abstract: We investigate the impact of theoretical on the predicted jet energies. The distributions produced at the CDF environment are intended for comparison

  4. Forging a Vision for the Future of Nuclear and Particle Physics at BNL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forging a Vision for the Future of Nuclear and Particle Physics at BNL Steve Vigdor "Get to Know bunched- beam stochastic cooling to enhance collider luminosity Productive - > 350 refereed papers, > 35K regime ELECTRON LENSES POLARIMETERS COHERENT ELECTRON COOLING DOE NP mission...to create, detect

  5. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 483 (2002) 482487 Anomalous free electron laser interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerby, Eli

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Road, Ramat Aviv 69978, Israel Abstract Free electron lasers (FELs) are considered, typically, as fast: 41.60 Cr Keywords: Free electron laser 1. Introduction Free electron lasers (FELs) and cyclotronNuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 483 (2002) 482­487 Anomalous free electron

  6. High energy activation data library (HEAD-2009)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mashnik, Stepan G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Korovin, Yury A [NON LANL; Natalenko, Anatoly A [NON LANL; Konobeyev, Alexander Yu [NON LANL; Stankovskiy, A Yu [NON LANL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A proton activation data library for 682 nuclides from 1 H to 210Po in the energy range from 150 MeV up to 1 GeV was developed. To calculate proton activation data, the MCNPX 2.6.0 and CASCADE/INPE codes were chosen. Different intranuclear cascade, preequilibrium, and equilibrium nuclear reaction models and their combinations were used. The optimum calculation models have been chosen on the basis of statistical correlations for calculated and experimental proton data taken from the EXFOR library of experimental nuclear data. All the data are written in ENDF-6 format. The library is called HEPAD-2008 (High-Energy Proton Activation Data). A revision of IEAF-2005 neutron activation data library has been performed. A set of nuclides for which the cross-section data can be (and were) updated using more modern and improved models is specified, and the corresponding calculations have been made in the present work. The new version of the library is called IEAF-2009. The HEPAD-2008 and IEAF-2009 are merged to the final HEAD-2009 library.

  7. Imaging the High Energy Cosmic Ray Sky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haviland, David

    Imaging the High Energy Cosmic Ray Sky PETTER HOFVERBERG Licentiate Thesis Stockholm, Sweden 2006 #12;#12;Licentiate Thesis Imaging the High Energy Cosmic Ray Sky Petter Hofverberg Particle

  8. US Department of Energy (DOE)/Gosatomnadzor (GAN) of Russia project at the Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baranov, I.A.; Konoplev, K.A. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Hauser, G.C. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a summary of work accomplished within the scope of the DOE-Gosatomnadzor (GAN) Agreement to reduce vulnerability to theft of direct-use nuclear materials in Russia. The DOE-GAN agreement concerns the Russian Academy of Science B.P. Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI), located 45 kilometers from St. Petersburg. The PNPI operates facilities to research basic nuclear physics. Current world conditions require particular attention to the issue of Material Protection, Control, and Accounting (MPC&A) of nuclear materials. The long-term plan to increase security at the facility is outlined, including training, physical protection upgrades, and material control and accountability. 4 figs.

  9. Hadron dynamics in high-energy pion-nucleus scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, M.B.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    It is argued that pion-nucleus scattering at high energy (above 300 MeV) is likely to be easier to interpret than it has been at lower energies where the {Delta}{sub 33} resonance dominates. We establish this by examining the relative importance of various dynamic ingredients of scattering theory for high-energy pions and comparing different versions of the theory: a ``model-exact`` microscopic optical model and an eikonal approximation. For nuclei as heavy as Ca, the eikonal theory is an excellent approximation to the full theory for the angular distribution out to the position of the second minimum in the cross section. The prospects for using high-energy pions to examine modifications of nucleons and baryon resonances in nuclei, nuclear structure, exchange currents, short-range correlations, and to characterize pion propagation are discussed.

  10. Hadron dynamics in high-energy pion-nucleus scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, M.B.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is argued that pion-nucleus scattering at high energy (above 300 MeV) is likely to be easier to interpret than it has been at lower energies where the [Delta][sub 33] resonance dominates. We establish this by examining the relative importance of various dynamic ingredients of scattering theory for high-energy pions and comparing different versions of the theory: a model-exact'' microscopic optical model and an eikonal approximation. For nuclei as heavy as Ca, the eikonal theory is an excellent approximation to the full theory for the angular distribution out to the position of the second minimum in the cross section. The prospects for using high-energy pions to examine modifications of nucleons and baryon resonances in nuclei, nuclear structure, exchange currents, short-range correlations, and to characterize pion propagation are discussed.

  11. Oxides having high energy densities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ceder, Gerbrand; Kang, Kisuk

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Certain disclosed embodiments generally relate to oxide materials having relatively high energy and/or power densities. Various aspects of the embodiments are directed to oxide materials having a structure B.sub.i(M.sub.jY.sub.k)O.sub.2, for example, a structure Li.sub.j(Ni.sub.jY.sub.k)O.sub.2 such as Li(Ni.sub.0.5Mn.sub.0.5)O.sub.2. In this structure, Y represents one or more atoms, each independently selected from the group consisting of alkaline earth metals, transition metals, Group 14 elements, Group 15, or Group 16 elements. In some embodiments, such an oxide material may have an O3 crystal structure, and/or a layered structure such that the oxide comprises a plurality of first, repeating atomic planes comprising Li, and a plurality of second, repeating atomic planes comprising Ni and/or Y.

  12. Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todor Stanev

    2004-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss theoretical issues and experimental data that brought the ultra high energy cosmic rays in the list of Nature's greatest puzzles. After many years of research we still do not know how astrophysical acceleration processes can reach energies exceeding 10$^{11}$ GeV. The main alternative {\\em top-down} mechanism postulates the existence of super massive $X$-particles that create a particle spectrum extending down to the observed energy through their decay channels. The propagation of nuclei and photons from their sources to us adds to the puzzle as all particles of these energies interact with the ambient photons, mostly of the microwave background. We also describe briefly the main observational results and give some information on the new experiments that are being built and designed now.

  13. LOW-ENERGY NUCLEAR PHYSICS NATIONAL HPC INITIATIVE: BUILDING A UNIVERSAL NUCLEAR ENERGY DENSITY FUNCTIONAL (UNEDF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bulgac, A

    2013-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a summary of the physics research carried out by the University of Washington centered group. Attached are reports for the previous years as well as the full exit report of the entire UNEDF collaboration.

  14. High Energy Gas Fracturing Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schulte, R.

    2001-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) has recently completed two tests of a high-energy gas fracturing system being developed by Western Technologies of Crossville, Tennessee. The tests involved the use of two active wells located at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3), thirty-five miles north of Casper, Wyoming (See Figure 1). During the testing process the delivery and operational system was enhanced by RMOTC, Western Technologies, and commercial wireline subcontractors. RMOTC has assisted an industrial client in developing their technology for high energy gas fracturing to a commercial level. The modifications and improvements implemented during the technology testing process are instrumental in all field testing efforts at RMOTC. The importance of well selection can also be critical in demonstrating the success of the technology. To date, significant increases in well productivity have been clearly proven in well 63-TPX-10. Gross fluid production was initially raised by a factor of three. Final production rates increased by a factor of six with the use of a larger submersible pump. Well productivity (bbls of fluid per foot of drawdown) increased by a factor of 15 to 20. The above results assume that no mechanical damage has occurred to the casing or cast iron bridge plug which could allow well production from the Tensleep ''B'' sand. In the case of well 61-A-3, a six-fold increase in total fluid production was seen. Unfortunately, the increase is clouded by the water injection into the well that was necessary to have a positive fluid head on the propellant tool. No significant increase in oil production was seen. The tools which were retrieved from both 63-TPX-10 and 61-A-3 indicated a large amount of energy, similar to high gram perforating, had been expended downhole upon the formation face.

  15. NUCLEAR SCIENCE ANNUAL REPORT 1977-1978

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, L.S.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Relation Between Nuclear Dynamics and the RenormalizationMultiplicity Distributions in Nuclear Collision M. GyulassyHigh Energy Nuclear Collisions in the Resonance Dominated

  16. Gluons and the quark sea at high energies: distributions, polarization, tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boer, D.; Venugopalan, R.; Diehl, M.; Milner, R.; Vogelsang, W.; et al.

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is based on a ten-week program on Gluons and the quark sea at high-energies, which took place at the Institute for Nuclear Theory (INT) in Seattle in Fall 2010. The principal aim of the program was to develop and sharpen the science case for an Electron-Ion Collider (EIC), a facility that will be able to collide electrons and positrons with polarized protons and with light to heavy nuclei at high energies, offering unprecedented possibilities for in-depth studies of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). This report is organized around the following four major themes: (i) the spin and flavor structure of the proton, (ii) three dimensional structure of nucleons and nuclei in momentum and configuration space, (iii) QCD matter in nuclei, and (iv) Electroweak physics and the search for physics beyond the Standard Model. Beginning with an executive summary, the report contains tables of key measurements, chapter overviews for each of the major scientific themes, and detailed individual contributions on various aspects of the scientific opportunities presented by an EIC.

  17. High Energy Astrophysics: Overview 1/47 High Energy Astrophysics in Context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bicknell, Geoff

    High Energy Astrophysics: Overview 1/47 High Energy Astrophysics in Context 1 Some references The following set of volumes is an outstanding summary of the field of High Energy Astrophysics and its relation to the rest of Astrophysics High Energy Astrophysics, Vols. 1,2 and 3. M.S. Longair, Cam- bridge University

  18. Nuclear physics research at the University of Richmond. Progress report, November 1, 1994--October 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vineyard, M.F.; Gilfoyle, G.P.; Major, R.W.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Summarized in this report is the progress achieved during the period from November 1, 1994 to October 31, 1995. The experimental work described in this report is in electromagnetic and heavy-ion nuclear physics. The effort in electromagnetic nuclear physics is in preparation for the research program at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) and is focused on the construction and use of the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). The heavy-ion experiments were performed at the Argonne National Laboratory ATLAS facility and SUNY, Stony Brook. The physics interests driving these efforts at CEBAF are in the study of the structure, interactions, and nuclear-medium modifications of mesons and baryons. This year, an extension of the experiment to measure the magnetic form factor of the neutron was approved by the CEBAF Program Advisory Committee Nine (PAC9) for beam at 6 GeV. The authors also submitted updates to PAC9 on the experiments to measure inclusive {eta} photoproduction in nuclei and electroproduction of the {Lambda}, {Lambda}*(1520), and f{sub 0}(975). In addition to these experiments, the authors collaborated on a proposal to measure rare radiative decays of the {phi} meson which was also approved by PAC9. Their contributions to the construction of the CLAS include the development of the drift-chamber gas system, drift-chamber software, and controls software. Major has been leading the effort in the construction of the gas system. In the last year, the Hall B gas shed was constructed and the installation of the gas system components built at the University of Richmond has begun. Over the last six years, the efforts in low-energy heavy-ion physics have decreased due to the change in focus to electromagnetic nuclear physics at CEBAF. Most of the heavy-ion work is completed and there are now new experiments planned. Included in this report are two papers resulting from collaborations on heavy-ion experiments.

  19. UCLA Intermediate Energy Nuclear and Particle Physics Research: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.M.K. Nefkens (Principal Investigator, ed.); J. Goetz; A. Lapik; M. Korolija; S. Prakhov; A. Starostin (ed.)

    2011-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This project covers the following research: (a) Investigations into the structure of the proton and neutron. This is done by investigating the different resonance states of nucleons with beams of tagged, polarized photons, linearly as well as circularly, incident on polarized hydrogen/deuterium targets and measuring the production of {pi}{sup #25;0}, 2{pi}{sup #25;}0, 3{pi}{sup #25;0}, {eta}#17;, {eta}', {omega}, etc. The principal detector is the Crystal Ball multiphoton spectrometer which has an acceptance of nearly 4#25;. It has been moved to the MAMI accelerator facility of the University of Mainz, Germany. We investigate the conversion of electromagnetic energy into mesonic matter and conversely. (b) We investigate the consequences of applying the "standard" symmetries of isospin, G�parity, charge conjugation, C, P, T, and chirality using rare and forbidden decays of light mesons such as the {eta}#17;,{eta}' and {omega}. We also investigate the consequences of these symmetries being slightly broken symmetries. We do this by studying selected meson decays using the Crystal Ball detector. (c) We determine the mass, or more precisely the mass difference of the three light quarks (which are inputs to Quantum Chromodynamics) by measuring the decay rate of specially selected {eta}#17; and {eta}' decay modes, again we use the Crystal Ball. (d)We have started a new program to search for the 33 missing cascade baryons using the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson Laboratory. Cascade resonances are very special: they have double strangeness and are quite narrow. This implies that they can be discovered by the missing mass technique in photoproduction reactions such as in {gamma}p{yields}{Xi}{sup #4;�}K{sup +}K{sup +}. The cascade program is of particular importance for the upgrade to 12 GeV of the CLAS detector and for design of the Hall D at JLab. (e) Finally, we are getting more involved in a new program to measure the hadronic matter form factor of complex nuclei, in particular the "neutron skin" of {sup 208}Pb, which is of great interest to astroparticle physics for determining the properties of neutron stars. Processes of study are coherent and non�coherent #25;0 photoproduction. The Crystal Ball is uniquely suited for these studies because of the large acceptance, good direction and energy resolution and it is an inclusive detector for the #25;{pi}{sup 0} final state and exclusive for background such as 2#25;{pi}{sup 0}.

  20. 46 March 2012 Physics Today www.physicstoday.org he kind of neutrinos emitted in nuclear beta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mcdonough, William F.

    46 March 2012 Physics Today www.physicstoday.org T he kind of neutrinos emitted in nuclear beta of intriguing applications beyond fun- damental particle-physics research. Like all neutrinos, they're very begun providing valuable clues about the origin and thermal history of Earth (see PHYSICS TODAY

  1. AGS fixed target program with nuclear beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, K.J.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent approval of the beam transfer line from the Tandem Van de Graaf to the AGS signals the advent of a new era of Nuclear and Particle Physics at BNL. High Energy nuclear beams are expected to be available for experiments in 1986. I will discuss the direct link between the Tandems and the AGS. Two other proposed projects, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and the Synchrotron Booster, are discussed in another presentation to this conference.

  2. Theoretical studies in hadronic and nuclear physics. Progress report, December 1, 1992--June 30 , 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, J.J.; Cohen, T.D.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research in the Maryland Nuclear Theory Group focusses on problems in four basic areas of current relevance. The section on Hadrons in Nuclei reports research into the ways in which the properties of nucleons and the mesons which play a role in the nuclear force are modified in the nuclear medium. QCD sum rules supply a new insight into the decrease of the nucleon`s mass in the nuclear medium. The quark condensate decreases in nuclear matter, and this is responsible for the decrease of the nucleon`s mass. The section on the Structure of Hadrons reports progress in understanding the structure of the nucleon. These results cover widely different approaches -- lattice gauge calculations, QCD sum rules, quark-meson models with confinement and other hedgehog models. Progress in Relativistic Nuclear Physics is reported on electromagnetic interactions in a relativistic bound state formalism, with applications to elastic electron scattering by deuterium, and on application of a two-body quasipotential equation to calculate the spectrum of mesons formed as bound states of a quark and antiquark. A Lorentz-invariant description of the nuclear force suggests a decrease of the nucleon`s mass in the nuclear medium similar to that found from QCD sum rules. Calculations of three-body bound states with simple forms of relativistic dynamics are also discussed. The section on Heavy Ion Dynamics and Related Processes describes progress on the (e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}) problem and heavy-on dynamics. In particular, the sharp electrons observed in {beta}{sup +} irradiation of heavy atoms have recently been subsumed into the ``Composite Particle Scenario,`` generalizing the ``(e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}-Puzzle`` of the pairs from heavy ion collisions to the ``Sharp Lepton Problem.``

  3. Final Report 10th Conference on the Intersections of Particle and Nuclear Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshak, Marvin L. [University of Minnesota] [University of Minnesota

    2013-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The 10th Conference on the Intersections of Particle and Nuclear Physics was held in LaJolla, California on May 26 to May 31, 2009. The Conference Proceedings are published by the American Institute of Physics in Volume 1182 of the AIP Conference Proceedings (ISBN: 978-0-7354-0723-7). The Proceedings include papers from each of the Conference Presenters and a detailed schedule of talks at the Conference. The Table of Contents of the Conference Proceedings is available at http://scitation.aip.org/content/aip/proceeding/aipcp/1182. Support by the U.S. Department of Energy and by DOE Laboratories was essential to the success of the Conference.

  4. Degeneracies of particle and nuclear physics uncertainties in neutrinoless double beta decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lisi, E; Simkovic, F

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretical estimates for the half life of neutrinoless double beta decay in candidate nuclei are affected by both particle and nuclear physics uncertainties, which may complicate the interpretation of decay signals or limits. We study such uncertainties and their degeneracies in the following context: three nuclei of great interest for large-scale experiments (76-Ge, 130-Te, 136-Xe), two representative particle physics mechanisms (light and heavy Majorana neutrino exchange), and a large set of nuclear matrix elements (NME), computed within the quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA). It turns out that the main theoretical uncertainties, associated with the effective axial coupling g_A and with the nucleon-nucleon potential, can be parametrized in terms of NME rescaling factors, up to small residuals. From this parametrization, the following QRPA features emerge: (1) the NME dependence on g_A is milder than quadratic; (2) in each of the two mechanisms, the relevant lepton flavor violating parameter is...

  5. Very high energy probes of the quark-gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludlam, T.; Paige, F.; Madansky, L.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Among the penetrating probes of nuclear matter the most frequently discussed have been those which involve the detection of photons or leptons with m/sub T/ approx. = P/sub T/ < 3 GeV. This is the expected range of emission from a hot, thermalized plasma of quarks and gluons. The suggestion has been made that in very high energy collisions of nuclei the properties of high P/sub T/ jets may also reflect the characteristics of the nuclear medium through which the parent partons have propagated just after the collision. In this note we expand on the possible uses of such a probe.

  6. Neutrino-Driven Supernovae: an Accretion Instability in a Nuclear Physics Controlled Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. -T. Janka; R. Buras; F. S. Kitaura Joyanes; A. Marek; M. Rampp; L. Scheck

    2004-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    New simulations demonstrate that low-mode, nonradial hydrodynamic instabilities of the accretion shock help starting hot-bubble convection in supernovae and thus support explosions by the neutrino-heating mechanism. The prevailing conditions depend on the high-density equation of state which governs stellar core collapse, core bounce, and neutron star formation. Tests of this sensitivity to nuclear physics variations are shown for spherically symmetric models. Implications of current explosion models for r-process nucleosynthesis are addressed.

  7. Degeneracies of particle and nuclear physics uncertainties in neutrinoless double beta decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Lisi; A. Rotunno; F. Simkovic

    2015-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretical estimates for the half life of neutrinoless double beta decay in candidate nuclei are affected by both particle and nuclear physics uncertainties, which may complicate the interpretation of decay signals or limits. We study such uncertainties and their degeneracies in the following context: three nuclei of great interest for large-scale experiments (76-Ge, 130-Te, 136-Xe), two representative particle physics mechanisms (light and heavy Majorana neutrino exchange), and a large set of nuclear matrix elements (NME), computed within the quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA). It turns out that the main theoretical uncertainties, associated with the effective axial coupling g_A and with the nucleon-nucleon potential, can be parametrized in terms of NME rescaling factors, up to small residuals. From this parametrization, the following QRPA features emerge: (1) the NME dependence on g_A is milder than quadratic; (2) in each of the two mechanisms, the relevant lepton flavor violating parameter is largely degenerate with the NME rescaling factors; and (3) the light and heavy neutrino exchange mechanisms are basically degenerate in the above three nuclei. We comment on the challenging theoretical and experimental improvements required to reduce such particle and nuclear physics uncertainties and their degeneracies.

  8. Development of High Energy Cathode Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    other high- energy cathodes. Improved the performance of Li-rich, Mn-rich layered composite cathode suitable for PHEV and EV applications. Developed electrolyte additives...

  9. Closeout for U.S. Department of Energy Final Technical Report for University of Arizona grant DOE Award Number DE-FG03-95ER40906 From 1 February 1995 to 31 January 2004 Grant title: Theory and Phenomenology of Strong and Weak High Energy Physics (Task A) and Experimental Elementary Particle Physics (Task B)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutherfoord, John; Toussaint, Doug; Sarcevic, Ina

    2005-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The following pages describe the high energy physics program at the University of Arizona which was funded by DOE grant DE-FG03-95ER40906, for the period 1 February 1995 to 31 January 2004. In this report, emphasis was placed on more recent accomplishments. This grant was divided into two tasks, a theory task (Task A) and an experimental task (Task B but called Task C early in the grant period) with separate budgets. Faculty supported by this grant, for at least part of this period, include, for the theory task, Adrian Patrascioiu (now deceased), Ina Sarcevic, and Douglas Toussaint., and, for the experimental task, Elliott Cheu, Geoffrey Forden, Kenneth Johns, John Rutherfoord, Michael Shupe, and Erich Varnes. Grant monitors from the Germantown DOE office, overseeing our grant, changed over the years. Dr. Marvin Gettner covered the first years and then he retired from the DOE. Dr. Patrick Rapp worked with us for just a few years and then left for a position at the University of Puerto Rico. Dr. Kathleen Turner took his place and continues as our grant monitor. The next section of this report covers the activities of the theory task (Task A) and the last section the activities of the experimental task (Task B).

  10. Energy Measurement and Strategy for a Trigger of Ultra High Energy Cosmic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erdmann, Martin

    Energy Measurement and Strategy for a Trigger of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays Measured with Radio Ray induced Air Showers 3 2.1 Physics of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2.1.1 Energy Spectrum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2.1.2 Composition

  11. Colloquium: Majorana Fermions in nuclear, particle and solid-state physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. R. Elliott; M. Franz

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ettore Majorana (1906-1938) disappeared while traveling by ship from Palermo to Naples in 1938. His fate has never been fully resolved and several articles have been written that explore the mystery itself. His demise intrigues us still today because of his seminal work, published the previous year, that established symmetric solutions to the Dirac equation that describe a fermionic particle that is its own anti-particle. This work has long had a significant impact in neutrino physics, where this fundamental question regarding the particle remains unanswered. But the formalism he developed has found many uses as there are now a number of candidate spin-1/2 neutral particles that may be truly neutral with no quantum number to distinguish them from their anti-particles. If such particles exist, they will influence many areas of nuclear and particle physics. Most notably the process of neutrinoless double beta decay can only exist if neutrinos are massive Majorana particles. Hence, many efforts to search for this process are underway. Majorana's influence doesn't stop with particle physics, however, even though that was his original consideration. The equations he derived also arise in solid state physics where they describe electronic states in materials with superconducting order. Of special interest here is the class of solutions of the Majorana equation in one and two spatial dimensions at exactly zero energy. These Majorana zero modes are endowed with some remarkable physical properties that may lead to advances in quantum computing and, in fact, there is evidence that they have been experimentally observed. This review first summarizes the basics of Majorana's theory and its implications. It then provides an overview of the rich experimental programs trying to find a fermion that is its own anti-particle in nuclear, particle, and solid state physics.

  12. Some physical and biological properties of the nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Heliothis zea (Boddie) and Heliothis virescens (Fabricius)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacFarlane, Johnny James

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    University Directed by: Dr. L. L. Keeley Laboratory investi ations were conducted into so ie of the physical and biological properties of the nuclear polyhedrosis virus ("!PV) of Heliothis zea (Boddie) and Peiiothi s virescens (Fabricius). information... the ranges of shapes and. sizes reported f' or other insect nuclear viruses. In contrast, the strength of alkali and dis- solving period necessary to dissolve Heliothis nuclear polyhedra are somewhat higher than those reported for other insect polyhedra...

  13. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 554 (2005) 494499 Micro-pocket fission detectors (MPFD) for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shultis, J. Kenneth

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 554 (2005) 494­499 Micro-pocket fission, A.S.M. Sabbir Ahmed, J. Kenneth Shultis S.M.A.R.T. Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Available online 18 August 2005 Abstract Micro-pocket fission detectors (MPFD) have been fabricated

  14. GKTC ACTIVITIES TO PROVIDE NUCLEAR MATERIAL PHYSICAL PROTECTION, CONTROL AND ACCOUNTING TRAINING FOR 2011-2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romanova, Olena; Gavrilyuk, Victor I.; Kirischuk, Volodymyr; Gavrilyuk-Burakova, Anna; Diakov, Oleksii; Drapey, Sergiy; Proskurin, Dmitry; Dickman, Deborah A.; Ferguson, Ken

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The GKTC was created at the Kyiv Institute of Nuclear Research as a result of collaborative efforts between the United States and Ukraine. The GKTC has been designated by the Ukrainian Government to provide the MPC&A training and methodological assistance to nuclear facilities and nuclear specialists. In 2010 the GKTC has conducted the planned assessment of training needs of Ukrainian MPC&A specialists. The objective of this work is to acquire the detailed information about the number of MPC&A specialists and guard personnel, who in the coming years should receive the further advanced training. As a result of the performed training needs evaluation the GKTC has determined that in the coming years a number of new training courses need to be developed. Some training courses are already in the process of development. Also taking into account the specific of activity on the guarding of nuclear facilities, GKTC has begun to develop the specialized training courses for the guarding unit personnel. The evaluation of needs of training of Ukrainian specialists on the physical protection shows that without the technical base of learning is not possible to satisfy the needs of Ukrainian facilities, in particular, the need for further training of specialists who maintains physical protection technical means, provides vulnerability assessment and testing of technical means. To increase the training effectiveness and create the basis for specialized training courses holding the GKTC is now working on the construction of an Interior (non-classified) Physical Protection Training Site. The objective of this site is to simulate the actual conditions of the nuclear facility PP system including the complex of engineering and technical means that will help the GKTC training course participants to consolidate the knowledge and gain the practical skills in the work with PP system engineering and technical means for more effective performance of their official duties. This paper briefly describes the practical efforts applied to the provision of physical protection specialists advanced training in Ukraine and real results on the way to implement such efforts in 2011-2012.

  15. Nuclear Simulation and Radiation Physics Investigations of the Target Station of the European Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filges, Detlef; Neef, Ralf-Dieter; Schaal, Hartwig [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)

    2000-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The European Spallation Neutron Source (ESS) delivers high-intensity pulsed particle beams with 5-MW average beam power at 1.3-GeV incident proton energy. This causes sophisticated demands on material and geometry choices and a very careful optimization of the whole target system. Therefore, complex and detailed particle transport models and computer code systems have been developed and used to study the nuclear assessment of the ESS target system. The purpose here is to describe the methods of calculation mainly based on the Monte Carlo code to show the performance of the ESS target station. The interesting results of the simulations of the mercury target system are as follows: time-dependent neutron flux densities, energy deposition and heating, radioactivity and afterheat, materials damage by radiation, and high-energy source shielding. The results are discussed in great detail. The validity of codes and models, further requirements to improve the methods of calculation, and the status of running and planned experiments are given also.

  16. Nuclear Double Beta Decay, Fundamental Particle Physics, Hot Dark Matter, And Dark Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hans V. Klapdor-Kleingrothaus; Irina V. Krivosheina

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear double beta decay, an extremely rare radioactive decay process, is - in one of its variants - one of the most exciting means of research into particle physics beyond the standard model. The large progress in sensitivity of experiments searching for neutrinoless double beta decay in the last two decades - based largely on the use of large amounts of enriched source material in "active source experiments" - has lead to the observation of the occurrence of this process in nature (on a 6.4 sigma level), with the largest half-life ever observed for a nuclear decay process (2.2 x 10^{25} y). This has fundamental consequences for particle physics - violation of lepton number, Majorana nature of the neutrino. These results are independent of any information on nuclear matrix elements (NME)*. It further leads to sharp restrictions for SUSY theories, sneutrino mass, right-handed W-boson mass, superheavy neutrino masses, compositeness, leptoquarks, violation of Lorentz invariance and equivalence principle in the neutrino sector. The masses of light-neutrinos are found to be degenerate, and to be at least 0.22 +- 0.02 eV. This fixes the contribution of neutrinos as hot dark matter to >=4.7% of the total observed dark matter. The neutrino mass determined might solve also the dark energy puzzle. *(It is briefly discussed how important NME for 0nubb decay really are.)

  17. Compound nuclear decay and the liquid to vapor phase transition: a physical picture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. G. Moretto; J. B. Elliott; L. Phair

    2005-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Analyses of multifragmentation in terms of the Fisher droplet model (FDM) and the associated construction of a nuclear phase diagram bring forth the problem of the actual existence of the nuclear vapor phase and the meaning of its associated pressure. We present here a physical picture of fragment production from excited nuclei that solves this problem and establishes the relationship between the FDM and the standard compound nucleus decay rate for rare particles emitted in first-chance decay. The compound thermal emission picture is formally equivalent to a FDM-like equilibrium description and avoids the problem of the vapor while also explaining the observation of Boltzmann-like distribution of emission times. In this picture a simple Fermi gas thermometric relation is naturally justified and verified in the fragment yields and time scales. Low energy compound nucleus fragment yields scale according to the FDM and lead to an estimate of the infinite symmetric nuclear matter critical temperature between 18 and 27 MeV depending on the choice of the surface energy coefficient of nuclear matter.

  18. BFS, a Legacy to the International Reactor Physics, Criticality Safety, and Nuclear Data Communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Blair Briggs; Anatoly Tsibulya; Yevgeniy Rozhikhin

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interest in high-quality integral benchmark data is increasing as efforts to quantify and reduce calculational uncertainties accelerate to meet the demands of next generation reactor and advanced fuel cycle concepts. Two Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) activities, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP), initiated in 1992, and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP), initiated in 2003, have been identifying existing integral experiment data, evaluating those data, and providing integral benchmark specifications for methods and data validation for nearly two decades. Thus far, 14 countries have contributed to the IRPhEP, and 20 have contributed to the ICSBEP. Data provided by these two projects will be of use to the international reactor physics, criticality safety, and nuclear data communities for future decades The Russian Federation has been a major contributor to both projects with the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE) as the major contributor from the Russian Federation. Included in the benchmark specifications from the BFS facilities are 34 critical configurations from BFS-49, 61, 62, 73, 79, 81, 97, 99, and 101; spectral characteristics measurements from BFS-31, 42, 57, 59, 61, 62, 73, 97, 99, and 101; reactivity effects measurements from BFS-62-3A; reactivity coefficients and kinetics measurements from BFS-73; and reaction rate measurements from BFS-42, 61, 62, 73, 97, 99, and 101.

  19. The Physics and Nuclear Nonproliferation Goals of WATCHMAN: A WAter CHerenkov Monitor for ANtineutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Askins, M; Bernstein, A; Dazeley, S; Dye, S T; Handler, T; Hatzikoutelis, A; Hellfeld, D; Jaffke, P; Kamyshkov, Y; Land, B J; Learned, J G; Marleau, P; Mauger, C; Gann, G D Orebi; Roecker, C; Rountree, S D; Shokair, T M; Smy, M B; Svoboda, R; Sweany, M; Vagins, M R; van Bibber, K A; Vogelaar, R B; Wetstein, M J; Yeh, M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes the physics and nonproliferation goals of WATCHMAN, the WAter Cherenkov Monitor for ANtineutrinos. The baseline WATCHMAN design is a kiloton scale gadolinium-doped (Gd) light water Cherenkov detector, placed 13 kilometers from a civil nuclear reactor in the United States. In its first deployment phase, WATCHMAN will be used to remotely detect a change in the operational status of the reactor, providing a first- ever demonstration of the potential of large Gd-doped water detectors for remote reactor monitoring for future international nuclear nonproliferation applications. During its first phase, the detector will provide a critical large-scale test of the ability to tag neutrons and thus distinguish low energy electron neutrinos and antineutrinos. This would make WATCHMAN the only detector capable of providing both direction and flavor identification of supernova neutrinos. It would also be the third largest supernova detector, and the largest underground in the western hemisphere. In a...

  20. Amorphization of -Thorium Phosphate Diphosphate (-TPD) irradiated with high energy krypton ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Amorphization of -Thorium Phosphate Diphosphate (-TPD) irradiated with high energy krypton ions C of nuclear wastes, the -Thorium Phosphate Diphosphate ceramic (-TPD), Th4(PO4)4P2O7, must be resistant as good candidates for nuclear waste immobilization [1-3]. Thorium Phosphate-Diphosphate (-TPD), -Th4(PO4

  1. Ultra high energy neutrinos: absorption, thermal effects and signatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lunardini, Cecilia; Sabancilar, Eray; Yang, Lili, E-mail: Cecilia.Lunardini@asu.edu, E-mail: Eray.Sabancilar@asu.edu, E-mail: lyang54@asu.edu [Physics Department, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study absorption of ultra high energy neutrinos by the cosmic neutrino background, with full inclusion of the effect of the thermal distribution of the background on the resonant annihilation channel. For a hierarchical neutrino mass spectrum (with at least one neutrino with mass below ? 10{sup ?2} eV), thermal effects are important for ultra high energy neutrino sources at z?>16. The neutrino transmission probability shows no more than two separate suppression dips since the two lightest mass eigenstates contribute as a single species when thermal effects are included. Results are applied to a number of models of ultra high energy neutrino emission. Suppression effects are strong for sources that extend beyond z ? 10, which can be realized for certain top down scenarios, such as superheavy dark matter decays, cosmic strings and cosmic necklaces. For these, a broad suppression valley should affect the neutrino spectrum at least in the energy interval 10{sup 12}?10{sup 13} GeV — which therefore is disfavored for ultra high energy neutrino searches — with only a mild dependence on the neutrino mass spectrum and hierarchy. The observation of absorption effects would indicate a population of sources beyond z ? 10, and favor top-down mechanisms; it would also be an interesting probe of the physics of the relic neutrino background in the unexplored redshift interval z ? 10–100.

  2. Medium energy nuclear physics research. Progress report, July 1, 1987--September 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, G.A.; Dubach, J.F.; Hicks, R.S.; Miskimen, R.A.

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The UMass group has concentrated on using electromagnetic probes, particularly the electron in high-energy scattering experiments at the Stanford Liner Accelerator Center (SLAC). Plans are also being made for high energy work at the Continuous Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). The properties of this accelerator should permit a whole new class of coincidence experiments to be carried out. At SLAC UMass has made major contributions toward the plans for a cluster-jet gas target and detector system at the 16 GeV PEP storage ring. For the future CEBAF accelerator, tests were made of the feasibility of operating wire drift chambers in the vicinity of a continuous electron beam at the University Illinois microtron. At the same time a program of studies of the nuclear structure of more complex nuclei has been continued at the MIT-Bates Linear Accelerator Center and in Amsterdam at the NIKHEF-K laboratory. At the MIT-Bates Accelerator, because of an unforeseen change in beam scheduling as a result of problems with the T{sub 20} experiment, the UMass group was able to complete data acquisition on experiments involving 180{degrees} elastic magnetic scattering on {sup 117}Sn and {sup 41}Ca. A considerable effort has been given to preparations for a future experiment at Bates involving the high-resolution threshold electrodisintegration of the deuteron. The use of these chambers should permit a high degree of discrimination against background events in the measurement of the almost neutrino-like small cross sections that are expected. In Amsterdam at the NIKHEF-K facility, single arm (e,e{prime}) measurements were made in November of 1987 on {sup 10}B in order to better determine the p{sub 3/2} wave function from the transition from the J{sup pi} = 3{sup +} ground state to the O{sup +} excited state at 1.74 MeV. In 1988, (e,e{prime}p) coincidence measurements on {sup 10}B were completed. The objective was to obtain information on the p{sub 3/2} wave function by another means.

  3. High Energy Evolution with Pomeron Loops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Lublinsky

    2006-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The high energy/density QCD has been widely used for DIS phenomenology with a projectile particle considered as perturbative and dilute. We review some recent attempts to derive a high energy evolution kernel which treats targets and projectiles in a symmetric manner. From theoretical point of view the problem is tightly related to inclusion of Pomeron loops in the evolution. The ultimate goal is to consider high energy scatterings with both projectile and target being dense, the situation faced at RHIC and the LHC.

  4. Reactor Physics and Criticality Benchmark Evaluations for Advanced Nuclear Fuel - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Anderson; James Tulenko; Bradley Rearden; Gary Harms

    2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear industry interest in advanced fuel and reactor design often drives towards fuel with uranium enrichments greater than 5 wt% 235U. Unfortunately, little data exists, in the form of reactor physics and criticality benchmarks, for uranium enrichments ranging between 5 and 10 wt% 235U. The primary purpose of this project is to provide benchmarks for fuel similar to what may be required for advanced light water reactors (LWRs). These experiments will ultimately provide additional information for application to the criticality-safety bases for commercial fuel facilities handling greater than 5 wt% 235U fuel.

  5. A program in medium energy nuclear physics. Progress report, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berman, B.L.; Dhuga, K.S.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This progress report and continuation proposal summarizes our achievements for the period from July 1, 1994 to September 30, 1995 and requests continued funding for our program in experimental medium-energy nuclear physics. The focus of our program remains the understanding of the short-range part of the strong interaction in the nuclear medium. In the past year we have focused our attention ever more sharply on experiments with real tagged photons, and we have successfully defended two new experimental proposals: Photofission of Actinide and Preactinide Nuclei at SAL and Photoproduction of the {rho} Meson from the Proton with Linearly Polarized Photons at CEBAF. (We are co-spokespersons on two previously approved Hall-B experiments at CEBAF, Photoreactions on {sup 3}He and Photoabsorption and Photofission of Nuclei.) As part of the team that is instrumenting the Photon Tagger for Hall B; we report excellent progress on the focal-plane detector array that is being built at our Nuclear Detector Laboratory, as well as progress on our plans for instrumentation of a tagged polarized-photon beam using coherent bremsstrahlung. Also, we shall soon receive a large computer system (from the SSC) which will form the basis for our new Data Analysis Center, which, like the Nuclear Detector Laboratory, will be operated under the auspices of The George Washington University Center for Nuclear Studies. Finally, during the past year we have published six more papers on the results of our measurements of pion scattering at LAMPF and of electron scattering at NIKHEF and Bates, and we can report that nearly all of the remaining papers documenting this long series of measurements are in the pipeline.

  6. VERY HIGH ENERGY GAMMA RAYS FROM THE VELA PULSAR/NEBULA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enomoto, Ryoji

    OG 4.1.19 VERY HIGH ENERGY GAMMA RAYS FROM THE VELA PULSAR/NEBULA T. Yoshikoshi 1 , T. Kifune 1 , S Department of Physics and Mathematical Physics, University of Adelaide, South Australia 5005, Australia 3, Kobe University, Hyogo 637, Japan 8 Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606, Japan 9 Solar

  7. Terrestrial Effects of High Energy Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atri, Dimitra

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    On geological timescales, the Earth is likely to be exposed to higher than the usual flux of high energy cosmic rays (HECRs) from astrophysical sources such as nearby supernovae, gamma ray bursts or by galactic shocks. ...

  8. Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livingston, A.B. (ed.)

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the research and development activities of the Physics Division for the 1985 fiscal year. The research activities were centered on experimental nuclear physics, experimental atomic physics, and theoretical nuclear and atomic physics. The experimental nuclear physics program is dominated by heavy ion research. A major part of this effort is the responsibility for operating the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility as a national user facility. A major new activity described is the preparation for participation in an ultrarelativistic heavy ion experiment to be performed at CERN in 1986. The experimental atomic physics program has two components: the accelerator-based studies of basic collisional phenomena and the studies in support of the controlled fusion program. Also associated with the fusion-related studies are a plasma diagnostics program and the operation of an atomic physics data center. Theory efforts associated with the UNISOR program are described, as well as smaller programs in applications and high-energy physics. (LEW)

  9. High Energy Scattering Amplitudes of Superstring Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuan-Tsung Chan; Jen-Chi Lee; Yi Yang

    2005-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We use three different methods to calculate the proportionality constants among high-energy scattering amplitudes of different string states with polarizations on the scattering plane. These are the decoupling of high-energy zero-norm states (HZNS), the Virasoro constraints and the saddle-point calculation. These calculations are performed at arbitrary but fixed mass level for the NS sector of 10D open superstring. All three methods give the consistent results, which generalize the previous works on the high-energy 26D open bosonic string theory. In addition, we discover new leading order high-energy scattering amplitudes, which are still proportional to the previous ones, with polarizations orthogonal to the scattering plane. These scattering amplitudes are of subleading order in energy for the case of 26D open bosonic string theory. The existence of these new high-energy scattering amplitudes is due to the worldsheet fermion exchange in the correlation functions and is, presumably, related to the high-energy massive spacetime fermionic scattering amplitudes in the R-sector of the theory.

  10. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 426 (1999) 249}253 Precise momentum determination of the external COSY proton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magiera, Andrzej

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ( nster, Germany Institute of Nuclear Physics and Nuclear Energy, Soxa, Bulgaria Institute of Physics., Cairo, Egypt. Now at Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA. 0168-9002/99/$ } see front matter 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. PII: S 0 1 6 8 - 9 0

  11. Meson production in high-energy electron-nucleus scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Göran Fäldt

    2010-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental studies of meson production through two-photon fusion in inelastic electron-nucleus scattering is now under way. A high-energy photon radiated by the incident electron is fused with a soft photon radiated by the nucleus. The process takes place in the small-angle-Coulomb region of nuclear scattering. We expound the theory for this production process as well as its interference with coherent-radiative-meson production. In particular, we investigate the distortion of the electron wave function due to multiple-Coulomb scattering.

  12. High Energy Absorption Top Nozzle For A Nuclaer Fuel Assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sparrow, James A. (Irmo, SC); Aleshin, Yuriy (Columbia, SC); Slyeptsov, Aleksey (Columbia, SC)

    2004-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A high energy absorption top nozzle for a nuclear fuel assembly that employs an elongated upper tubular housing and an elongated lower tubular housing slidable within the upper tubular housing. The upper and lower housings are biased away from each other by a plurality of longitudinally extending springs that are restrained by a longitudinally moveable piston whose upward travel is limited within the upper housing. The energy imparted to the nozzle by a control rod scram is mostly absorbed by the springs and the hydraulic affect of the piston within the nozzle.

  13. Explosive nucleosynthesis: nuclear physics impact using neutrino-driven wind simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Arcones; G. Martinez-Pinedo

    2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We present nucleosynthesis studies based on hydrodynamical simulations of core-collapse supernovae and their subsequent neutrino-driven winds. Although the conditions found in these simulations are not suitable for the rapid neutron capture (r-process) to produce elements heavier than A$\\sim$130, this can be solved by artificially increasing the wind entropy. In this way one can mimic the general behavior of an ejecta where the r-process occurs. We study the impact of the long-time dynamical evolution and of the nuclear physics input on the final abundances and show that different nuclear mass models lead to significant variations in the abundances. These differences can be linked to the behavior of nuclear masses far from stability. In addition, we have analyzed in detail the effect of neutron capture and beta-delayed neutron emission when matter decays back to stability. In all our studied cases, freeze out effects are larger than previously estimated and produce substantial changes in the post freeze out abundances.

  14. REACTOR PHYSICS MODELING OF SPENT RESEARCH REACTOR FUEL FOR TECHNICAL NUCLEAR FORENSICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, T.; Beals, D.; Sternat, M.

    2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Technical nuclear forensics (TNF) refers to the collection, analysis and evaluation of pre- and post-detonation radiological or nuclear materials, devices, and/or debris. TNF is an integral component, complementing traditional forensics and investigative work, to help enable the attribution of discovered radiological or nuclear material. Research is needed to improve the capabilities of TNF. One research area of interest is determining the isotopic signatures of research reactors. Research reactors are a potential source of both radiological and nuclear material. Research reactors are often the least safeguarded type of reactor; they vary greatly in size, fuel type, enrichment, power, and burn-up. Many research reactors are fueled with highly-enriched uranium (HEU), up to {approx}93% {sup 235}U, which could potentially be used as weapons material. All of them have significant amounts of radiological material with which a radioactive dispersal device (RDD) could be built. Therefore, the ability to attribute if material originated from or was produced in a specific research reactor is an important tool in providing for the security of the United States. Currently there are approximately 237 operating research reactors worldwide, another 12 are in temporary shutdown and 224 research reactors are reported as shut down. Little is currently known about the isotopic signatures of spent research reactor fuel. An effort is underway at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to analyze spent research reactor fuel to determine these signatures. Computer models, using reactor physics codes, are being compared to the measured analytes in the spent fuel. This allows for improving the reactor physics codes in modeling research reactors for the purpose of nuclear forensics. Currently the Oak Ridge Research reactor (ORR) is being modeled and fuel samples are being analyzed for comparison. Samples of an ORR spent fuel assembly were taken by SRNL for analytical and radiochemical analysis. The fuel assembly was modeled using MONTEBURNS(MCNP5/ ORIGEN2.2) and MCNPX/CINDER90. The results from the models have been compared to each other and to the measured data.

  15. Physical Sciences 2007 Science & Technology Highlights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazi, A U

    2008-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Physical Sciences Directorate applies frontier physics and technology to grand challenges in national security. Our highly integrated and multidisciplinary research program involves collaborations throughout Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the National Nuclear Security Administration, the Department of Energy, and with academic and industrial partners. The Directorate has a budget of approximately $150 million, and a staff of approximately 350 employees. Our scientists provide expertise in condensed matter and high-pressure physics, plasma physics, high-energy-density science, fusion energy science and technology, nuclear and particle physics, accelerator physics, radiation detection, optical science, biotechnology, and astrophysics. This document highlights the outstanding research and development activities in the Physical Sciences Directorate that made news in 2007. It also summarizes the awards and recognition received by members of the Directorate in 2007.

  16. Nuclear stopping power in warm and hot dense matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faussurier, Gerald; Blancard, Christophe [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91 297 Arpajon (France); Gauthier, Maxence [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91 297 Arpajon (France); LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, Route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a method to estimate the nuclear component of the stopping power of ions propagating in dense matter. Three kinds of effective pair potentials are proposed. Results from the warm dense matter regime and the domain of high energy density physics are presented and discussed for proton and helium. The role of ionic temperature is examined. The nuclear stopping power can play a noticeable role in hot dense matter.

  17. LANL | Physics | Nuclear Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the universe. goal 1 The 800-ton detector, called MiniBooNE (Fermilab), searches for neutrino oscillations. The detector is located 500 meters from Fermilab's second neutrino...

  18. Final Report: 06-LW-013, Nuclear Physics the Monte Carlo Way

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ormand, W E

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is document reports the progress and accomplishments achieved in 2006-2007 with LDRD funding under the proposal 06-LW-013, 'Nuclear Physics the Monte Carlo Way'. The project was a theoretical study to explore a novel approach to dealing with a persistent problem in Monte Carlo approaches to quantum many-body systems. The goal was to implement a solution to the notorious 'sign-problem', which if successful, would permit, for the first time, exact solutions to quantum many-body systems that cannot be addressed with other methods. In this document, we outline the progress and accomplishments achieved during FY2006-2007 with LDRD funding in the proposal 06-LW-013, 'Nuclear Physics the Monte Carlo Way'. This project was funded under the Lab Wide LDRD competition at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The primary objective of this project was to test the feasibility of implementing a novel approach to solving the generic quantum many-body problem, which is one of the most important problems being addressed in theoretical physics today. Instead of traditional methods based matrix diagonalization, this proposal focused a Monte Carlo method. The principal difficulty with Monte Carlo methods, is the so-called 'sign problem'. The sign problem, which will discussed in some detail later, is endemic to Monte Carlo approaches to the quantum many-body problem, and is the principal reason that they have not been completely successful in the past. Here, we outline our research in the 'shifted-contour method' applied the Auxiliary Field Monte Carlo (AFMC) method.

  19. High Energy Processes in Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Bednarek

    2006-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Young pulsars produce relativistic winds which interact with matter ejected during the supernova explosion and the surrounding interstellar gas. Particles are accelerated to very high energies somewhere in the pulsar winds or at the shocks produced in collisions of the winds with the surrounding medium. As a result of interactions of relativistic leptons with the magnetic field and low energy radiation (of synchrotron origin, thermal, or microwave background), the non-thermal radiation is produced with the lowest possible energies up to $\\sim$100 TeV. The high energy (TeV) gamma-ray emission has been originally observed from the Crab Nebula and recently from several other objects. Recent observations by the HESS Cherenkov telescopes allow to study for the first time morphology of the sources of high energy emission, showing unexpected spectral features. They might be also interpreted as due to acceleration of hadrons. However, theory of particle acceleration in the PWNe and models for production of radiation are still at their early stage of development since it becomes clear that realistic modeling of these objects should include their time evolution and three-dimensional geometry. In this paper we concentrate on the attempts to create a model for the high energy processes inside the PWNe which includes existence not only relativistic leptons but also hadrons inside the nebula. Such model should also take into account evolution of the nebula in time. Possible high energy expectations based on such a model are discussed in the context of new observations.

  20. EVALUATION METHODOLOGY FOR PROLIFERATION RESISTANCE AND PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF GENERATION IV NUCLEAR ENERGY SYSTEMS: AN OVERVIEW.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BARI, R.; ET AL.

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides an overview of the methodology approach developed by the Generation IV International Forum Expert Group on Proliferation Resistance & Physical Protection for evaluation of Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection robustness of Generation IV nuclear energy systems options. The methodology considers a set of alternative systems and evaluates their resistance or robustness to a collection of potential threats. For the challenges considered, the response of the system to these challenges is assessed and expressed in terms of outcomes. The challenges to the system are given by the threats posed by potential proliferant States and sub-national adversaries on the nuclear systems. The characteristics of the Generation IV systems, both technical and institutional, are used to evaluate their response to the threats and determine their resistance against the proliferation threats and robustness against sabotage and theft threats. System response encompasses three main elements: (1) System Element Identification. The nuclear energy system is decomposed into smaller elements (subsystems) at a level amenable to further analysis. (2) Target Identification and Categorization. A systematic process is used to identify and select representative targets for different categories of pathways, within each system element, that actors (proliferant States or adversaries) might choose to use or attack. (3) Pathway Identification and Refinement. Pathways are defined as potential sequences of events and actions followed by the proliferant State or adversary to achieve its objectives (proliferation, theft or sabotage). For each target, individual pathway segments are developed through a systematic process, analyzed at a high level, and screened where possible. Segments are connected into full pathways and analyzed in detail. The outcomes of the system response are expressed in terms of PR&PP measures. Measures are high-level characteristics of a pathway that include information important to the evaluation methodology users and to the decisions of a proliferant State or adversary. They are first evaluated for segments and then aggregated for complete pathways. Results are aggregated as appropriate to permit pathway comparisons and system assessment. The paper highlights the current achievements in the development of the Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection Evaluation Methodology. The way forward is also briefly presented together with some conclusions.