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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high-altitude absorbing aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Radiative and climate impacts of absorbing aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

P.M. Forster (2004), The semi-direct aerosol effect: Impactof absorbing aerosols on marine stratocumulus. Q. J .2005), Global anthropogenic aerosol direct forcing derived

Zhu, Aihua

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Radiative and climate impacts of absorbing aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

over the southwest summer monsoon region, Meteorol. Atmos.Absorbing aerosols and summer monsoon evolution over SouthK. M. Kim (2006), Asian summer monsoon anomalies induced by

Zhu, Aihua

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Another Look at the Influence of Absorbing Aerosols in Drops on Cloud Absorption: Large Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since as early as 1969, solar absorbing aerosols inside of cloud drops have been suggested to influence cloud radiative properties. The absorbing aerosols were invoked to help explain two “anomalies”: 1) the maximum visible albedo of thick ...

Carynelisa Erlick; Dana Schlesinger

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Tropical Tropospheric-Only Responses to Absorbing Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Absorbing aerosols affect the earth’s climate through direct radiative heating of the troposphere. This study analyzes the tropical tropospheric-only response to a globally uniform increase in black carbon, simulated with an atmospheric general ...

Geeta G. Persad; Yi Ming; V. Ramaswamy

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Radiative and climate impacts of absorbing aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

during SHADE: 1. Solar spectrum, J. Geophys. Res . , 108(sensed data in the solar spectrum, J. Geophys. Res , 106 (a scattering aerosol in the solar spectrum with a SSA=1 and

Zhu, Aihua

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Studying trends in biomass burning aerosol using the Absorbing Aerosol Index derived from GOME, SCIAMACHY, and GOME-2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studying trends in biomass burning aerosol using the Absorbing Aerosol Index derived from GOME burning events. It is found that the regional AAI data follow the regional tropospheric NO2 data well sensitive to desert dust aerosols (DDA) and biomass burning aerosols (BBA). See Figure 1. The AAI

Tilstra, Gijsbert

7

Source Attribution of Light Absorbing Aerosol in Arctic Snow  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Source Attribution of Light Absorbing Source Attribution of Light Absorbing Aerosol in Arctic Snow (Preliminary analysis of 2008-2009 data) Outline * Receptor modeling overview * Results from 2007 data set * New goals arising from analysis of 2007 data * New data for 2008 * New data for 2009 * Tentative conclusions * Future analysis i Factor profiles from 2007 analysis Source attribution of Black Carbon from 2007 analysis Goals/Issues suggested by the analysis of the 2007 data set * Are there seasonal differences in the source strengths? * Are there other LAA chemical components besides black carbon. What are their sources? * Can the various data sets available (e.g., 2007, 2008, 2009) be combined in a single large PMF analysis 2008 Data Set For Receptor Analysis * 42 samples from Eastern Siberia including 4 depth profiles

8

Influence of Absorbing Aerosols on the Inference of Solar Surface Radiation Budget and Cloud Absorption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study addresses the impact of absorbing aerosols on the retrieval of the solar surface radiation budget (SSRB) and on the inference of cloud absorption using multiple global datasets. The data pertain to the radiation budgets at the top of ...

Zhanqing Li

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Absorbing Aerosols and Summer Monsoon Evolution over South Asia: An Observational Portrayal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The South Asian haze builds up from December to May, is mostly of anthropogenic origin, and absorbs part of the solar radiation. The influence of interannual variations of absorbing aerosols over the Indo-Gangetic Plain in May on the Indian ...

Massimo Bollasina; Sumant Nigam; K-M. Lau

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Utilization of Wind Energy at High Altitude  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ground based, wind energy extraction systems have reached their maximum capability. The limitations of current designs are: wind instability, high cost of installations, and small power output of a single unit. The wind energy industry needs of revolutionary ideas to increase the capabilities of wind installations. This article suggests a revolutionary innovation which produces a dramatic increase in power per unit and is independent of prevailing weather and at a lower cost per unit of energy extracted. The main innovation consists of large free-flying air rotors positioned at high altitude for power and air stream stability, and an energy cable transmission system between the air rotor and a ground based electric generator. The air rotor system flies at high altitude up to 14 km. A stability and control is provided and systems enable the changing of altitude. This article includes six examples having a high unit power output (up to 100 MW). The proposed examples provide the following main advantages: 1. Large power production capacity per unit - up to 5,000-10,000 times more than conventional ground-based rotor designs; 2. The rotor operates at high altitude of 1-14 km, where the wind flow is strong and steady; 3. Installation cost per unit energy is low. 4. The installation is environmentally friendly (no propeller noise). -- * Presented in International Energy Conversion Engineering Conference at Providence., RI, Aug. 16-19. 2004. AIAA-2004-5705. USA. Keyword: wind energy, cable energy transmission, utilization of wind energy at high altitude, air rotor, windmills, Bolonkin.

Alexander Bolonkin

2007-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

11

Nonlinear Effects of Coexisting Surface and Atmospheric Forcing of Anthropogenic Absorbing Aerosols: Impact on the South Asian Monsoon Onset  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The direct radiative effect of absorbing aerosols consists of absorption-induced atmospheric heating together with scattering- and absorption-induced surface cooling. It is thus important to understand whether some of the reported climate impacts ...

Shao-Yi Lee; Ho-Jeong Shin; Chien Wang

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Satellite observations of the seasonal cycles of absorbing aerosols in Africa related to the monsoon rainfall, 1995e2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the monsoon rainfall, 1995e2008 M. de Graaf a,*, L.G. Tilstra a , I. Aben b , P. Stammes a a Royal Netherlands: Absorbing aerosols Remote sensing African monsoon Precipitation a b s t r a c t The link between the African Monsoon systems and aerosol loading in Africa is studied using multi-year satellite observations of UV

Tilstra, Gijsbert

13

The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is a large field of view, continuously operated, TeV gamma-ray experiment under construction at 4,100 m a.s.l. in Mexico. The HAWC observatory will have an order of magnitude better sensitivity, angular resolution, and background rejection than its predecessor, the Milagro experiment. The improved performance will allow us to detect both transient and steady emissions, to study the Galactic diffuse emission at TeV energies, and to measure or constrain the TeV spectra of GeV gamma-ray sources. In addition, HAWC will be the only ground-based instrument capable of detecting prompt emission from gamma-ray bursts above 50 GeV. The HAWC observatory will consist of an array of 300 water Cherenkov detectors (WCDs), each with four photomultiplier tubes. This array is currently under construction on the flanks of the Sierra Negra volcano near the city of Puebla, Mexico. The first thirty WCDs (forming an array approximately the size of Milagro) were deployed in Summer...

,

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Methods for delivering liquid payloads from high altitudes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As part of a military design project, further research was requested into an optimum method for delivering water from high altitude to a civilian population on the ground. This thesis explores current airdrop technology ...

Lipoma, Thomas (Thomas S.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Optical Observations of Lightning from a High-Altitude Airplane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lightning has been observed from above cloud top by using satellites, balloons, rockets, and high-altitude airplanes, each of which provides a unique perspective and holds the potential for gaining new understanding of lightning phenomena. During ...

H. J. Christian; S. J. Goodman

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Octane number requirements of vehicles at high altitude  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Past tests of vehicles show that their octane number requirements decrease with altitude. As a result, gasoline marketers sell lower-octane-number(ON) gasoline in the mountain states and other high-altitude areas. The current ASTM specifications, which allow reduction of gasoline octane of 1.0 to 1.5 ON per thousand feet, are based on CRC test programs run on 1967 to 1972 model vehicles. However, many new vehicles are now equipped with sophisticated electronic engine systems for control of emissions and improvement of performance and fuel economy at all altitudes. Because these new systems could minimize the altitude effect on octane requirement, Amoco Oil tested twelve 1984-1986 model cars and light trucks. The authors found their ON requirements were reduced on average about 0.2 ON per thousand feet on an (R+M)/2 basis (RMON/1,000 feet). The authors expect octane demand on gasoline suppliers in high-altitude areas to increase as these new cars make up a larger part of the vehicle population, and this could raise the cost of gasoline.

Callison, J.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

LETTER PROGRESS REPORT FOR APRIL 1962 ON HIGH ALTITUDE SAMPLING  

SciTech Connect

Progress is reported in the design and testing of equipment for high- altitude air sampling. The operational characteristics of an air ejector were tested over a complete range of back pressures and primary pressures. Data are tabulated. Modifications were made in an altitude sensor for use on balloons at high altitudes. A balloon flight was made to 110,000 ft with two direct-flow units and an electrostatic precipitator. A sketch is included of the flight train and components used. Total payload on the balloon was 506 lbs. A second balloon flight was made to obtain a vertical profile of radioactive debris with directflow units at 70,000 and 80,000 ft. This was accomplished by using a gondola equipped with two direct-flow units and ballast to float the system at the lower of the two altitudes. After sampling was completed at the lower step, the ballast was dropped, and the system ascended. Total payload on the balloon was 865.5 lb. (C.H.)

1962-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

18

Reactor thrust during boost in a high altitude trajectory  

SciTech Connect

Reactor startup of a submarine based missile must be accomplished during boost., so that at burnout the reactor maximum wall temperature is at or near the design value. Because cooling air must be supplied during this period, there exists the possibility of obtaining some thrust to augment the booster. To find how much reactor thrust might be available, a representative high altitude boost trajectory was selected. This is shown together with an estimated pressure recovery curve for the inlet. It has been assumed that by some appropriate means the flow rate passed by the inlet exactly matches that demanded by the reactor and nozzle. Hot day conditions are assumed. The missile power plant was the Tory II-C reactor with its design point-optimized nozzle throat area of 750 square inches. Nozzle expansion is complete. The reactor maximum wall temperature was assumed to be constant at design (2500 degrees F) from time zero. Thus the thrust computed at any time is the maximum possible within the reactor design temperature limitation, and provides a guide to a desirable startup time. Available thrust and reactor exit conditions were obtained with the digital codes Dash N and Nomac.

Moyer, J.H.

1962-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

19

High Altitude Aerial Natural Gas Leak Detection System  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this program was to develop and demonstrate a cost-effective and power-efficient advanced standoff sensing technology able to detect and quantify, from a high-altitude (> 10,000 ft) aircraft, natural gas leaking from a high-pressure pipeline. The advanced technology is based on an enhanced version of the Remote Methane Leak Detector (RMLD) platform developed previously by Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI). The RMLD combines a telecommunications-style diode laser, fiber-optic components, and low-cost DSP electronics with the well-understood principles of Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy (WMS), to indicate the presence of natural gas located between the operator and a topographic target. The transceiver transmits a laser beam onto a topographic target and receives some of the laser light reflected by the target. The controller processes the received light signal to deduce the amount of methane in the laser's path. For use in the airborne platform, we modified three aspects of the RMLD, by: (1) inserting an Erbium-doped optical fiber laser amplifier to increase the transmitted laser power from 10 mW to 5W; (2) increasing the optical receiver diameter from 10 cm to 25 cm; and (3) altering the laser wavelength from 1653 nm to 1618 nm. The modified RMLD system provides a path-integrated methane concentration sensitivity {approx}5000 ppm-m, sufficient to detect the presence of a leak from a high capacity transmission line while discriminating against attenuation by ambient methane. In ground-based simulations of the aerial leak detection scenario, we demonstrated the ability to measure methane leaks within the laser beam path when it illuminates a topographic target 2000 m away. We also demonstrated simulated leak detection from ranges of 200 m using the 25 cm optical receiver without the fiber amplifier.

Richard T. Wainner; Mickey B. Frish; B. David Green; Matthew C. Laderer; Mark G. Allen; Joseph R. Morency

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

20

High Altitude Platform Station (HAPS): A Review of New Infrastructure Development for Future Wireless Communications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper looks into the relatively new field of high altitude platform stations. HAPS is seen as a `middle ground' between the terrestrial and satellite cases, and aims to exploit of the advantages of both types of system. Since HAPS is such a new ... Keywords: Broadband Wireless Access, High Altitude Platform Station, Mobile communications, Wireless Communications

Anggoro K. Widiawan; Rahim Tafazolli

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high-altitude absorbing aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Evaluation of SSMIS Upper Atmosphere Sounding Channels for High-Altitude Data Assimilation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Upper atmosphere sounding (UAS) channels of the Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) were assimilated using a high-altitude version of the Navy Global Environmental Model (NAVGEM) in order to investigate their potential for operational ...

Karl W. Hoppel; Stephen D. Eckermann; Lawrence Coy; Gerald E. Nedoluha; Douglas R. Allen; Steven D. Swadley; Nancy L. Baker

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Assessment of Roughness Length Schemes Implemented within the Noah Land Surface Model for High Altitude Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current land surface models still have difficulties with producing reliable surface heat fluxes and skin temperature (Tsfc) estimates for high altitude regions, which may be addressed via adequate parameterization of the roughness lengths for ...

Donghai Zheng; Rogier Van Der Velde; Zhongbo Su; Martijn J. Booij; Arjen Y. Hoekstra

23

Structure of Florida Thunderstorms Using High-Altitude Aircraft Radiometer and Radar Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an analysis of a unique radar and radiometer dataset from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) ER-2 high-altitude aircraft overlying Florida thunderstorms on 5 October 1993 during the Convection and ...

G. M. Heymsfield; J. M. Shepherd; S. W. Bidwell; W. C. Boncyk; I. J. Caylor; S. Ameen; W. S. Olson

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Negative mood endures after completion of high-altitude military training  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of High-Altitude Military Training Wayne A. Bardwell, Ph.D.mood effects strenuous training would have on Marines, whatdays after completion of training, and how mood scores would

Bardwell, Wayne A; Ensign, Wayne Y; Mills, Paul J

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

A multi-sensor approach for assessing the impacts of ultraviolet-absorbing aerosols on top of atmosphere radiative fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One year (June 2006-May 2007) of the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) top of atmosphere (TOA) shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) fluxes are used with Ozone Monitoring Instrument-Aerosol Index (OMI-AI) data to assess the direct radiative ...

Thomas A. Jones; Sundar A. Christopher

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

System for beaming power from earth to a high altitude platform  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Power is transmitted to a high altitude platform by an array of diode pumped solid state lasers each operated at a single range of laser wavelengths outside of infrared and without using adaptive optics. Each laser produces a beam with a desired arrival spot size. An aircraft avoidance system uses a radar system for automatic control of the shutters of the lasers.

Friedman, Herbert W. (Oakland, CA); Porter, Terry J. (Ridgecrest, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

A 94-GHz Cloud Radar System on a NASA High-Altitude ER-2 Aircraft  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 94-GHz (W band) Cloud Radar System (CRS) has been developed and flown on a NASA ER-2 high-altitude (20 km) aircraft. The CRS is a fully coherent, polarimetric Doppler radar that is capable of detecting clouds and precipitation from the ...

Lihua Li; Gerald M. Heymsfield; Paul E. Racette; Lin Tian; Ed Zenker

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

The EDOP Radar System on the High-Altitude NASA ER-2 Aircraft  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NASA ER-2 high-altitude (20 km) aircraft that emulates a satellite view of precipitation systems carries a variety of passive and active (lidar) remote sensing instruments. A new Doppler weather radar system at X band (9.6 GHz) called the ER-...

Gerald M. Heymsfield; Steven W. Bidwell; I. Jeff Caylor; Syed Ameen; Shaun Nicholson; Wayne Boncyk; Lee Miller; Doug Vandemark; Paul E. Racette; Louis R. Dod

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

High Altitude Wind Power Systems: A Survey on Flexible Power Kites Mariam Ahmed*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(G2ELab) 38402 Saint-Martin d'Heres, France Abstract-- High altitude wind energy (HAWE) is a new interest in sustainable development, renewable energy systems, such as solar photo-voltaic, wind and tidal systems, are heavily explored. One ideal source of renewable energy is the wind. Tradi- tionally, wind

30

Observations of a Drainage Flow Event on a High-Altitude Simple Slope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of a drainage flow event on a high-altitude simple slope were made for a few hours during a five-day field study that was otherwise characterized by high and gusty winds blowing across the face of the slope believed due to the ...

William E. Clements; Carmen J. Nappo

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Operating Water Cherenkov Detectors in high altitude sites for the Large Aperture GRB Observatory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Cherenkov Detectors (WCD) are efficient detectors for detecting GRBs in the 10 GeV - 1 TeV energy range using the single particle technique, given their sensitivity to low energy secondary photons produced by high energy photons when cascading in the atmosphere. The Large Aperture GRB Observatory (LAGO) operates arrays of WCD in high altitude sites (above 4500 m a.s.l.) in Bolivia, Mexico and Venezuela, with planned extension to Peru. Details on the operation and stability of these WCD in remote sites with high background rates of particles will be detailed, and compared to simulations. Specific issues due to operation at high altitude, atmospheric effects and solar activity, as well as possible hardware enhancements will also be presented.

Allard, D; Asorey, H; Barros, H; Bertou, X; Castillo, M; Chirinos, J M; De Castro, A; Flores, S; González, J; Berisso, M Gomez; Grajales, J; Guada, C; Day, W R Guevara; Ishitsuka, J; López, J A; Martínez, O; Melfo, A; Meza, E; Loza, P Miranda; Barbosa, E Moreno; Murrugarra, C; Núñez, L A; Ormachea, L J Otiniano; Pérez, G; Perez, Y; Ponce, E; Quispe, J; Quintero, C; Rivera, H; Rosales, M; Rovero, A C; Saavedra, O; Salazar, H; Tello, J C; Peralda, R Ticona; Varela, E; Velarde, A; Villaseñor, L; Wahl, D; Zamalloa, M A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Radiative Reactions and Coherence Modeling in the High Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A high altitude nuclear electromagnetic pulse (EMP) with a peak field intensity of 5 x 10^4 V/m carries momentum that results in a retarding force on the average Compton electron (radiating coherently to produce the waveform) with magnitude near that of the geomagnetic force responsible for the coherent radiation. The retarding force results from a self field effect. The Compton electron interaction with the self generated magnetic field due to the other electrons accounts for the momentum density in the propagating wave; interaction with the self generated electric field accounts for the energy flux density in the propagating wave. Coherent addition of radiation is also quantitatively modeled.

Charles N. Vittitoe; Mario Rabinowitz

2003-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

33

LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Aug. 21, 2013-The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

gamma-ray observatory begins gamma-ray observatory begins operations at Sierra Negra volcano in the state of Puebla, Mexico August 21, 2013 New site to observe supernovas and supermassive black holes LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Aug. 21, 2013-The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Gamma Ray Observatory has begun formal operations at its site in Mexico. HAWC is designed to study the origin of very high-energy cosmic rays and observe the most energetic objects in the known universe. This extraordinary observatory, using a unique detection technique that differs from the classical astronomical design of mirrors, - 2 - lenses, and antennae, is a significant boost to international scientific and technical knowledge. "The HAWC observatory will search for signals from dark matter and to study some

34

Global observations of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global observations of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols Martin de Graaf KNMI #12; Outline · Absorbing Aerosol Index - Theory · Absorbing Aerosol Index - Reality · Biomass burning.6 Biomass burning over Angola, 09 Sep. 2004 Absorbing Aerosol Index PMD image #12;biomass burning ocean

Graaf, Martin de

35

High altitude atmospheric discharges according to the runaway air breakdown mechanism  

SciTech Connect

High altitude optical transients - red sprites, blue jets, and elves - are modeled in the context of the relativistic electron runaway air breakdown mechanism. These emissions are usually associated with large mesoscale convective systems (hereafter MCS). In thunderstorms cloud electrification proceeds over a time scale long enough to permit the conducting atmosphere above the cloud to polarize and short out the thunderstorm electric field. When a lightning strike rapidly neutralizes a cloud charge layer runaway driving fields can develop in the stratosphere and mesosphere. According to present simulations of the full runaway process the variety of observed optical emissions are due to the nature of the normal lightning event in the MCS that kick starts the runaway avalanche. In this paper the authors describe some details of the model, present the results of the evolution of the primary electron population, and summarize the initial conditions necessary for different types of discharges. Two companion papers present (a) the predicted optical, gamma ray, and radio emissions caused by these electrical discharges, and (b) the time evolution of the secondary electron population and its implications in terms of observables.

Symbalisty, E.; Roussel-Dupre, R.; Yukhimuk, V.; Taranenko, Y.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

An Analysis of Daily Humidity Patterns at a Mountainous and Urban Site in a Tropical High-Altitude Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mixing ratio data of water vapor at different hours of the day in a high-altitude tropical plateau in Mexico are shown. The objective is to measure water vapor quantity in a mountainous zone, where no previous studies of this kind exist, and in ...

H. G. Padilla; A. C. Leyva; P. A. Mosiño

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Regenerative fuel cells for High Altitude Long Endurance Solar Powered Aircraft  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High Altitude Long Endurance (HALE) unmanned missions appear to be feasible using a lightweight, high efficiency, span-loaded, Solar Powered Aircraft (SPA) which includes a Regenerative Fuel Cell (RFC) system and novel tankage for energy storage. An existing flightworthy electric powered flying wing design was modified to incorporate present and near-term technologies in energy storage, power electronics, aerodynamics, and guidance and control in order to design philosophy was to work with vendors to identify affordable near-term technological opportunities that could be applied to existing designs in order to reduce weight, increase reliability, and maintain adequate efficiency of components for delivery within 18 months. The energy storage subsystem for a HALE SPA is a key driver for the entire vehicle because it can represent up to half of the vehicle weight and most missions of interest require the specific energy to be considerably higher than 200 W-hr/kg for many cycles. This stringent specific energy requirement precludes the use of rechargeable batteries or flywheels and suggests examination of various RFC designs. An RFC system using lightweight tankage, a single fuel cell (FC) stack, and a single electrolyzer (EC) stack separated by the length of a spar segment (up to 39 ft), has specific energy of {approximately}300 W-hr/kg with 45% efficiency, which is adequate for HALE SPA requirements. However, this design has complexity and weight penalties associated with thermal management, electrical wiring, plumbing, and structural weight. A more elegant solution is to use unitized RFC stacks (reversible stacks that act as both FCs and ECs) because these systems have superior specific energy, scale to smaller systems more favorably, and have intrinsically simpler thermal management.

Mitlitsky, F.; Colella, N.J.; Myers, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Anderson, C.J. [Aero Vironment, Inc., Monrovia, CA (United States)

1993-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

38

Cone structure and focusing of VLF and LF electromagnetic waves at high altitudes in the ionosphere  

SciTech Connect

The frequency and angle dependencies of the electric field radiated by an electric dipole E = E[sub 0] cos [omega]t are studied through numerical calculations of [vert bar]E[vert bar] in the VLF and LF frequency bands 0.02f[sub b] [le] F [le] 0.5f[sub b] in a model ionosphere over an altitude region of 800-6000 km where the wave frequency and electron gyrofrequency varies between F [approximately]4 - 500 kHz and f[sub b] [approx equal] (1.1 to 0.2) MHz respectively. It is found that the amplitudes of the electric field have large maxima in four regions: close to the direction of the Earth magnetic field line B[sub 0] (it is called the axis field E[sub 0]), in the Storey E[sub St], reversed Storey E[sub RevSt], and resonance E[sub Res] cones. The maximal values of E[sub 0], E[sub Res], and E[sub RevSt] are the most pronounced close to the lower hybrid frequency, F [approximately] F[sub L]. The flux of the electric field is concentrated in very narrow regions, with the apex angles of the cones [delta][beta] [approx equal] (0.1-1) deg. The enhancement and focusing of the electric field increases with altitude starting at Z>800 km. At Z [ge] 1000 up to 6000 km, the relative value of [vert bar]E[vert bar], in comparison with its value at Z = 800 km is about (10[sup 2] to 10[sup 4]) times larger. Thus, the flux of VLF and LF electromagnetic waves generated at high altitudes in the Earth's ionosphere are trapped into very narrow conical beams similar to laser beams. 7 refs., 14 figs., 5 tabs.

Alpert, Ya.L. (Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States)); Green, J.L. (NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States))

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Relating Secondary Organic Aerosol Characteristics with Cloud Condensation Nuclei Activity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and absorb solar and terrestrial radiation, influence cloudand absorb solar and terrestrial radiation, influence cloudand absorption of solar and thermal radiation by aerosol

Tang, Xiaochen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Atmospheric Aerosols  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tom Kirchstetter with aerosol measurement instrument Atmospheric Aerosols Atmospheric aerosol research at LBNL seeks to understand the air quality and climate impacts of particles...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high-altitude absorbing aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Sensitivity of the High Altitude Water Cherenkov Detector to Sources of Multi-TeV Gamma Rays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is an array of large water Cherenkov detectors sensitive to gamma rays and hadronic cosmic rays in the energy band between 100 GeV and 100 TeV. The observatory will be used to measure high-energy protons and cosmic rays via detection of the energetic secondary particles reaching the ground when one of these particles interacts in the atmosphere above the detector. HAWC is under construction at a site 4100 meters above sea level on the northern slope of the volcano Sierra Negra, which is located in central Mexico at 19 degrees N latitude. It is scheduled for completion in 2014. In this paper we estimate the sensitivity of the HAWC instrument to point-like and extended sources of gamma rays. The source fluxes are modeled using both unbroken power laws and power laws with exponential cutoffs. HAWC, in one year, is sensitive to point sources with integral power-law spectra as low as 5x10^-13 cm^-2 sec^-1 above 2 TeV (approximately 50 mCrab) over 5 sr of the sky...

Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; Álvarez, J D; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Belmont, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Lopez, R A; Carramiñana, A; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De León, C; DeYoung, T; Hernandez, R Diaz; Diaz-Velez, J C; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fernandez, A; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; Garcia-Luna, J L; Garcia-Torales, G; Garfias, F; González, L X; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Grabski, V; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Hui, C M; Hüntemeyer, P; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H León; Linares, E C; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-Garc\\'\\ia, R; Marinelli, A; Martinez, O; Mart\\'\\inez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostafá, M; Nava, J; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Pérez-Pérez, E G; Pretz, J; Rivière, C; Rosa-González, D; Salazar, H; Salesa, F; Sandoval, A; Santos, E; Schneider, M; Silich, S; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sparks, K; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseñor, L; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

SAGE I and SAM II Measurements of 1 ?m Aerosol Extinction in the Free Troposphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The SAGE-I and SAM-II satellite sensors were designed to measure, with global coverage, the 1 ?m extinction produced by the stratospheric aerosol. In the absence of high altitude clouds, similar measurements may be made for the free tropospheric ...

G. S. Kent; U. O. Farrukh; P. H. Wang; A. Deepak

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Scanning the Earth's Limb from a High-Altitude Balloon: The Development and Flight of a New Balloon-Based Pointing System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development and first flight of a new balloon-borne pointing system is discussed. The system is capable of pointing a platform of optical instruments at an inertial target from a pendulating platform suspended below a high-altitude balloon. ...

Brendan M. Quine; Kimberly Strong; Aldona Wiacek; Debra Wunch; James A. Anstey; James R. Drummond

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Spectrum Correlated Criteria and Their Impacts on High Altitude Platform Station (HAPS) and Fixed Satellite Service (FSS) Coexistence in Frequency Range 5,850---7,075 MHz  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High altitude platform station (HAPS) is an innovative technology which delivers some unique features, contrary to conventional communications networks, such as fixed satellite service (FSS). The absence of confirmed spectrum emission mask (SEM) of HAPS ... Keywords: Adjacent channel interference ratio (ACIR), Clutter loss, Interference to noise ratio (I/N), Mask discrimination (MD), Net filter discrimination (NFD), Spectrum emission mask (SEM)

M. Mohebbi Nia; T. Abdul Rahman

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Radiative and climate impacts of absorbing aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enhancement of Atmospheric Solar Heating from Forest FiresScale dependence of solar heating rates in convective cloudScale Dependence of Solar Heating Rates in Convective Cloud

Zhu, Aihua

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Radiative and climate impacts of absorbing aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resolved Radiative Transfer Model: MODTRAN……….131 APMEXModerate Imaging Spectroradiometer MODTRAN MODerate spectralprovide by MODTRAN…………………………………………………………………………133 Table 4.2

Zhu, Aihua

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Radiative and climate impacts of absorbing aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

strong northwesterly offshore wind [Pease et al. , 1998],dusty air moves offshore blown by the easterly winds, it is

Zhu, Aihua

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Radiative and climate impacts of absorbing aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuel, biofuel and biomass combustion, organic carbon hasefficient combustion processes such as biomass burning haveincomplete combustion of fossil fuel and biomass burning. BC

Zhu, Aihua

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Radiative and climate impacts of absorbing aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wind carries warm marine air mass from the Southern Hemisphere northward and brings moisture and precipitation over India

Zhu, Aihua

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Atmospheric Aerosols  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

measuring equipment Atmospheric Aerosols Atmospheric aerosol research at Berkeley Lab seeks to understand the air quality and climate impacts of particles in the atmosphere. On...

51

Performance of a Focused Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer for Measurements in the Stratosphere of Particle Size in the 0.06–2.0-µm-Diameter Range  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A focused cavity aerosol spectrometer aboard a NASA ER-2 high-altitude aircraft provided high-resolution measurements of the size of the stratospheric particles in the 0.06–2.0-µm-diameter range in flights following the eruption of Mount Pinatubo ...

H.H. Jonsson; J.C. Wilson; C.A. Brock; R.G. Knollenberg; T.R. Newton; J.E. Dye; D. Baumgardner; S. Borrmann; G.V. Ferry; R. Pueschel; Dave C. Woods; Mike C. Pitts

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Energy Absorbing Material  

To overcome limitations with cellular silicone foams, LLNL innovators have developed a new 3D energy absorbing material with tailored/engineered bulk-scale properties. The energy absorbing material has 3D patterned architectures specially designed for ...

53

Understanding Brown Carbon Aerosols and Their Role in Climate Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brown Carbon Aerosols Brown Carbon Aerosols Tiny aerosol particles in the atmosphere are a possible cause of climate change. Among the many contributors to climate change are aerosols in the atmosphere. These tiny particles suspended in the air come from many sources, some natural and some man-made. Some aerosols are organic (containing carbon), while others are inorganic (such as sea salt and sulfates). Most aerosols reflect sunlight, and some also absorb it. Many of these nanoparticles have severe health effects in addition to climate effects. Human activities that produce aerosols include transportation, industry, and agriculture. Black carbon particles (a component of soot) originating from combustion processes have been known for some time to absorb sunlight and warm the

54

Composition for absorbing hydrogen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrogen absorbing composition. The composition comprises a porous glass matrix, made by a sol-gel process, having a hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed throughout the matrix. A sol, made from tetraethyl orthosilicate, is mixed with a hydrogen-absorbing material and solidified to form a porous glass matrix with the hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed uniformly throughout the matrix. The glass matrix has pores large enough to allow gases having hydrogen to pass through the matrix, yet small enough to hold the particles dispersed within the matrix so that the hydrogen-absorbing particles are not released during repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles.

Heung, Leung K. (Aiken, SC); Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC); Enz, Glenn L. (N. Augusta, SC)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Composition for absorbing hydrogen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrogen absorbing composition is described. The composition comprises a porous glass matrix, made by a sol-gel process, having a hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed throughout the matrix. A sol, made from tetraethyl orthosilicate, is mixed with a hydrogen-absorbing material and solidified to form a porous glass matrix with the hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed uniformly throughout the matrix. The glass matrix has pores large enough to allow gases having hydrogen to pass through the matrix, yet small enough to hold the particles dispersed within the matrix so that the hydrogen-absorbing particles are not released during repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles.

Heung, L.K.; Wicks, G.G.; Enz, G.L.

1995-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

56

Liquid Cryogen Absorber for MICE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the absorber body, its heat exchanger, the hydrogen system,the absorber. The heat exchanger pipes (used for absorberextended surface. The heat exchanger built into the absorber

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Liquid Hydrogen Absorber for MICE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REFERENCES Figure 5: Liquid hydrogen absorber and test6: Cooling time of liquid hydrogen absorber. Eight CernoxLIQUID HYDROGEN ABSORBER FOR MICE S. Ishimoto, S. Suzuki, M.

Ishimoto, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Externally tuned vibration absorber  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vibration absorber unit or units are mounted on the exterior housing of a hydraulic drive system of the type that is powered from a pressure wave generated, e.g., by a Stirling engine. The hydraulic drive system employs a piston which is hydraulically driven to oscillate in a direction perpendicular to the axis of the hydraulic drive system. The vibration absorbers each include a spring or other resilient member having one side affixed to the housing and another side to which an absorber mass is affixed. In a preferred embodiment, a pair of vibration absorbers is employed, each absorber being formed of a pair of leaf spring assemblies, between which the absorber mass is suspended.

Vincent, Ronald J. (Latham, NY)

1987-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

59

Methods for absorbing neutrons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A conduction cooled neutron absorber may include a metal matrix composite that comprises a metal having a thermal neutron cross-section of at least about 50 barns and a metal having a thermal conductivity of at least about 1 W/cmK. Apparatus for providing a neutron flux having a high fast-to-thermal neutron ratio may include a source of neutrons that produces fast neutrons and thermal neutrons. A neutron absorber positioned adjacent the neutron source absorbs at least some of the thermal neutrons so that a region adjacent the neutron absorber has a fast-to-thermal neutron ratio of at least about 15. A coolant in thermal contact with the neutron absorber removes heat from the neutron absorber.

Guillen, Donna P. (Idaho Falls, ID); Longhurst, Glen R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Porter, Douglas L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Parry, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

60

Linearity of Climate Response to Increases in Black Carbon Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impacts of absorbing aerosols on global climate are not completely understood. This paper presents the results of idealized experiments conducted with the Community Atmosphere Model, version 4 (CAM4), coupled to a slab ocean model (CAM4–SOM) ...

Salil Mahajan; Katherine J. Evans; James J. Hack; John E. Truesdale

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high-altitude absorbing aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Direct and Indirect Shortwave Radiative Effects of Sea Salt Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sea salt aerosols play a dual role in affecting the atmospheric radiative balance. Directly, sea salt particles scatter the incoming solar radiation and absorb the outgoing terrestrial radiation. By acting as cloud condensation nuclei, sea salt ...

Tarek Ayash; Sunling Gong; Charles Q. Jia

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Evaporation–Condensation Effects on Resonant Photoacoustics of Volatile Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In determining the optical properties of the atmosphere, the measurement of light absorption by aerosols is particularly challenging, and yet it is important because of the influence of strongly absorbing black carbon on climate and atmospheric ...

Richard Raspet; William V. Slaton; W. Patrick Arnott; Hans Moosmüller

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Observed Impact of Atmospheric Aerosols on the Surface Energy Budget  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric aerosols scatter and potentially absorb incoming solar radiation, thereby reducing the total amount of radiation reaching the surface and increasing the fraction that is diffuse. The partitioning of incoming energy at the surface into ...

Allison L. Steiner; Dori Mermelstein; Susan J. Cheng; Tracy E. Twine; Andrew Oliphant

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Observed impact of atmospheric aerosols on the surface energy budget  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric aerosols scatter and potentially absorb incoming solar radiation, thereby reducing the total amount of radiation reaching the surface and increasing the fraction that is diffuse. The partitioning of incoming energy at the surface into ...

Allison L. Steiner; Dori Mermelstein; Susan J. Cheng; Tracy E. Twine; Andrew Oliphant

65

Liquid Cryogen Absorber for MICE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

through a gravity feed heat pipe that insures that thethe absorber. The heat exchanger pipes (used for absorber

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Energy Absorbing Material  

To overcome limitations with cellular silicone foams, LLNL innovators have developed a new 3D energy absorbing material with tailored/engineered ...

67

Advanced neutron absorber materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron absorbing material and method utilizing rare earth elements such as gadolinium, europium and samarium to form metallic glasses and/or noble base nano/microcrystalline materials, the neutron absorbing material having a combination of superior neutron capture cross sections coupled with enhanced resistance to corrosion, oxidation and leaching.

Branagan, Daniel J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smolik, Galen R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol scattering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectrometer RL : Raman Lidar Field Campaign Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System DRI-GND : Desert Research Institute Ground-Based Aerosol Instruments AEROSOL-TOWER-EML :...

69

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol extinction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CSPHOT : Cimel Sunphotometer CLDAEROSMICRO : Cloud and Aerosol Microphysical Properties DRI-GND : Desert Research Institute Ground-Based Aerosol Instruments IAP : In-situ Aerosol...

70

Internal absorber solar collector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Thin solar collecting panels are described made from arrays of small rod collectors consisting of a refracting dielectric rod lens with an absorber imbedded within it and a reflecting mirror coated on the back side of the dielectric rod. Non-tracking collector panels on vertical walls or roof tops receive approximately 90% of solar radiation within an acceptance zone 60.degree. in elevation angle by 120.degree. or more in the azimuth sectors with a collector concentration ratio of approximately 3.0. Miniaturized construction of the circular dielectric rods with internal absorbers reduces the weight per area of glass, plastic and metal used in the collector panels. No external parts or insulation are needed as heat losses are low due to partial vacuum or low conductivity gas surrounding heated portions of the collector. The miniature internal absorbers are generally made of solid copper with black selective surface and the collected solar heat is extracted at the collector ends by thermal conductivity along the absorber rods. Heat is removed from end fittings by use of liquid circulants. Several alternate constructions are provided for simplifying collector panel fabrication and for preventing the thermal expansion and contraction of the heated absorber or circulant tubes from damaging vacuum seals. In a modified version of the internal absorber collector, oil with temperature dependent viscosity is pumped through a segmented absorber which is now composed of closely spaced insulated metal tubes. In this way the circulant is automatically diverted through heated portions of the absorber giving higher collector concentration ratios than theoretically possible for an unsegmented absorber.

Sletten, Carlyle J. (106 Nagog Hill Rd., Acton, MA 01720); Herskovitz, Sheldon B. (88 Hammond St., Acton, MA 01720); Holt, F. S. (46 Emerson Rd., Winchester, MA 01890); Sletten, E. J. (Chestnut Hill Rd. R.F.D. Rte. #4, Amherst, NH 03031)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Impact of anthropogenic aerosols on Indian summer monsoon  

SciTech Connect

Using an interactive aerosol-climate model we find that absorbing anthropogenic aerosols, whether coexisting with scattering aerosols or not, can significantly affect the Indian summer monsoon system. We also show that the influence is reflected in a perturbation to the moist static energy in the sub-cloud layer, initiated as a heating by absorbing aerosols to the planetary boundary layer. The perturbation appears mostly over land, extending from just north of the Arabian Sea to northern India along the southern slope of the Tibetan Plateau. As a result, during the summer monsoon season, modeled convective precipitation experiences a clear northward shift, coincidently in agreement with observed monsoon precipitation changes in recent decades particularly during the onset season. We demonstrate that the sub-cloud layer moist static energy is a useful quantity for determining the impact of aerosols on the northward extent and to a certain degree the strength of monsoon convection.

Wang, Chien; Kim, Dongchul; Ekman, Annica; Barth, Mary; Rasch, Philip J.

2009-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

72

Neutron Absorbing Alloys  

SciTech Connect

The present invention is drawn to new classes of advanced neutron absorbing structural materials for use in spent nuclear fuel applications requiring structural strength, weldability, and long term corrosion resistance. Particularly, an austenitic stainless steel alloy containing gadolinium and less than 5% of a ferrite content is disclosed. Additionally, a nickel-based alloy containing gadolinium and greater than 50% nickel is also disclosed.

Mizia, Ronald E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Shaber, Eric L. (Idaho Falls, ID); DuPont, John N. (Whitehall, PA); Robino, Charles V. (Albuquerque, NM); Williams, David B. (Bethlehem, PA)

2004-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

73

Shock absorbing battery housing  

SciTech Connect

A portable battery device is provided which dampens shock incident upon the battery device such that an electrical energizable apparatus connected to the battery device is subject to reduced shock whenever the battery device receives an impact. The battery device includes a battery housing of resilient shock absorbing material injection molded around an interconnecting structure which mechanically and electrically interconnects the battery housing to an electrically energizable apparatus.

McCartney, W.J.; Jacobs, J.D.; Keil, M.J.

1984-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

74

Aerosol Can Failure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Aerosol Can Failure ... Abstract Scope, A three-piece, welded seam aerosol can of liquid undercoating material failed catastrophically, ...

75

BNL | Aerosol Lifecycle Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

identified strategic process-science foci: aerosol nucleation and growth and aerosol aging and mixing state. BNL is the lead laboratory responsible for the design and...

76

Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings  

SciTech Connect

A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

Choi, Jor-Shan (El Cerrito, CA); Farmer, Joseph C. (Tracy, CA); Lee, Chuck K. (Hayward, CA); Walker, Jeffrey (Gaithersburg, MD); Russell, Paige (Las Vegas, NV); Kirkwood, Jon (Saint Leonard, MD); Yang, Nancy (Lafayette, CA); Champagne, Victor (Oxford, PA)

2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

77

Solar radiation absorbing material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Solar energy absorbing means in solar collectors are provided by a solar selective carbon surface. A solar selective carbon surface is a microporous carbon surface having pores within the range of 0.2 to 2 micrometers. Such a surface is provided in a microporous carbon article by controlling the pore size. A thermally conductive substrate is provided with a solar selective surface by adhering an array of carbon particles in a suitable binder to the substrate, a majority of said particles having diameters within the range of about 0.2-10 microns.

Googin, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Schmitt, Charles R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Schreyer, James M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Whitehead, Harlan D. (Clinton, TN)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Liquid Cryogen Absorber for MICE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will test ionization cooling of muons. In order to have effective ionization cooling, one must use an absorber that is made from a low-z material. The most effective low z materials for ionization cooling are hydrogen, helium, lithium hydride, lithium and beryllium, in that order. In order to measure the effect of material on cooling, several absorber materials must be used. This report describes a liquid-hydrogen absorber that is within a pair of superconducting focusing solenoids. The absorber must also be suitable for use with liquid helium. The following absorber components are discussed in this report; the absorber body, its heat exchanger, the hydrogen system, and the hydrogen safety. Absorber cooling and the thin windows are not discussed here.

Baynham, D.E.; Bish, P.; Bradshaw, T.W.; Cummings, M.A.; Green,M.A.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivaniouchenkov, I.; Lau, W.; Yang, S.Q.; Zisman, M.S.

2005-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

79

Optical Properties of Mixed Black Carbon, Inorganic and Secondary Organic Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Summarizes the achievements of the project, which are divided into four areas: 1) Optical properties of secondary organic aerosols; 2) Development and of a polar nephelometer to measure aerosol optical properties and theoretical approaches to several optical analysis problems, 3) Studies on the accuracy of measurements of absorbing carbon by several methods, and 4) Environmental impacts of biodiesel.

Paulson, S E

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

80

Development and Characterization of a Thermodenuder for Aerosol Volatility Measurements  

SciTech Connect

This SBIR Phase I project addressed the critical need for improved characterization of carbonaceous aerosol species in the atmosphere. The proposed work focused on the development of a thermodenuder (TD) system capable of systematically measuring volatility profiles of primary and secondary organic aerosol species and providing insight into the effects of absorbing and nonabsorbing organic coatings on particle absorption properties. This work provided the fundamental framework for the generation of essential information needed for improved predictions of ambient aerosol loadings and radiative properties by atmospheric chemistry models. As part of this work, Aerodyne Research, Inc. (ARI) continued to develop and test, with the final objective of commercialization, an improved thermodenuder system that can be used in series with any aerosol instrument or suite of instruments (e.g., aerosol mass spectrometers-AMS, scanning mobility particle sizers-SMPS, photoacoustic absorption spectrometers-PAS, etc.) to obtain aerosol chemical, physical, and optical properties as a function of particle volatility. In particular, we provided the proof of concept for the direct coupling of our improved TD design with a full microphysical model to obtain volatility profiles for different organic aerosol components and to allow for meaningful comparisons between different TD-derived aerosol measurements. In a TD, particles are passed through a heated zone and a denuding (activated charcoal) zone to remove semi-volatile material. Changes in particle size, number concentration, optical absorption, and chemical composition are subsequently detected with aerosol instrumentation. The aerosol volatility profiles provided by the TD will strengthen organic aerosol emission inventories, provide further insight into secondary aerosol formation mechanisms, and provide an important measure of particle absorption (including brown carbon contributions and identification, and absorption enhancements due to coatings on soot particles). The successfully completed Phase I project included construction of a prototype design for the TD with detailed physical modeling, testing with laboratory and ambient aerosol particles, and the initiation of a detailed microphysical model of the aerosol particles passing through the TD to extract vapor pressure distributions. The objective of the microphysical model is to derive vapor pressure distributions (i.e. vapor pressure ranges, including single chemical compounds, mixtures of known compounds, and complex ‘real-world’ aerosols, such as SOA, and soot particles with absorbing and nonabsorbing coatings) from TD measurements of changes in particle size, mass, and chemical composition for known TD temperatures and flow rates (i.e. residence times). The proposed Phase II project was designed to optimize several TD systems for different instrument applications and to combine the hardware and modeling into a robust package for commercial sales.

Dr. Timothy Onasch

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high-altitude absorbing aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Examining the Effects of Dust Aerosols on Satellite Sea Surface Temperatures in the Mediterranean Sea Using the Medspiration Matchup Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dust aerosol plumes from the Sahara cover the Mediterranean Sea regularly during the summer months (June–August) and occasionally during other seasons. Dust can absorb infrared longwave radiation, thus causing a drop in sea surface temperature (...

Ana B. Ruescas; Manuel Arbelo; Jose A. Sobrino; Cristian Mattar

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Solid aerosol generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates.

Prescott, Donald S. (Shelley, ID); Schober, Robert K. (Midwest City, OK); Beller, John (Idaho Falls, ID)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Anthropogenic Aerosol Radiative Forcing in Asia Derived From Regional Models With Atmospheric and Aerosol Data Assimilation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A high-resolution estimate of monthly 3D aerosol solar heating rates and surface solar fluxes in Asia from 2001 to 2004 is described here. This product stems from an Asian aerosol assimilation project, in which a) the PNNL regional model bounded by the NCEP reanalyses was used to provide meteorology, b) MODIS and AERONET data were integrated for aerosol observations, c) the Iowa aerosol/chemistry model STEM-2K1 used the PNNL meteorology and assimilated aerosol observations, and d) 3D (X-Y-Z) aerosol simulations from the STEM-2K1 were used in the Scripps Monte-Carlo Aerosol Cloud Radiation (MACR) model to produce total and anthropogenic aerosol direct solar forcing for average cloudy skies. The MACR model and STEM both used the PNNL model resolution of 0.45º×0.4º in the horizontal and of 23 layers in the troposphere. The 2001–2004 averaged anthropogenic all-sky aerosol forcing is ?1.3 Wm-2 (TOA), +7.3 Wm-2 (atmosphere) and ?8.6 Wm-2 (surface) averaged in Asia (60?138°E & Eq. ?45°N). In the absence of AERONET SSA assimilation, absorbing aerosol concentration (especially BC aerosol) is much smaller, giving ?2.3 Wm-2 (TOA), +4.5 Wm-2 (atmosphere) and ?6.8 Wm-2 (surface), averaged in Asia. In the vertical, monthly forcing is mainly concentrated below 600hPa with maxima around 800hPa. Seasonally, low-level forcing is far larger in dry season than in wet season in South Asia, whereas the wet season forcing exceeds the dry season forcing in East Asia. The anthropogenic forcing in the present study is similar to that in Chung et al.’s [2005] in overall magnitude but the former offers fine-scale features and simulated vertical profiles. The interannual variability of the computed anthropogenic forcing is significant and extremely large over major emission outflow areas. In view of this, the present study’s estimate is within the implicated range of the 1999 INDOEX result. However, NCAR/CCSM3’s anthropogenic aerosol forcing is much smaller than the present study’s estimate at the surface, and is outside of what the INDOEX findings can support.

Chung, Chul Eddy; Ramanathan, V.; Carmichael, Gregory; Kulkarni, S.; Tang, Youhua; Adhikary, Bhupesh; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Qian, Yun

2010-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

84

Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber devices are provided for use in absorption cycle refrigeration systems and thermal boosting systems. The devices have increased residence time and surface area resulting in improved heat and mass transfer characteristics. The apparatuses may be incorporated into open cycle thermal boosting systems in which steam serves both as the refrigerant vapor which is supplied to the absorber section and as the supply of heat to drive the desorber section of the system. 9 figs.

Wilkinson, W.H.

1984-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

85

Mobile Climate Observatory for Atmospheric Aerosols in India  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Aerosols in India Atmospheric Aerosols in India Nainital, India, was the site chosen for deployment of a portable climate research laboratory to study how aerosols impact clouds and energy transfer in the atmosphere. The well-being of hundreds of millions of residents in northeastern India depends on the fertile land around the Ganges River, which is fed by monsoon rains and runoff from the nearby Himalayan Mountains. Any disturbance to the monsoon rains could threaten the population. In the same region, increased industrial activities due to economic growth are releasing small aerosol particles, such as soot and dust, that absorb and scatter sunlight and thus can change cloud formation processes and the heat distribution in the atmosphere. Such changes could greatly increase or

86

Direct radiative forcing of anthropogenic organic aerosol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[1] This study simulates the direct radiative forcing of organic aerosol using the GFDL AM2 GCM. The aerosol climatology is provided by the MOZART chemical transport model (CTM). The approach to calculating aerosol optical properties explicitly considers relative humidity–dependent hygroscopic growth by employing a functional group– based thermodynamic model, and makes use of the size distribution derived from AERONET measurements. The preindustrial (PI) and present-day (PD) global burdens of organic carbon are 0.17 and 1.36 Tg OC, respectively. The annual global mean total-sky and clear-sky top-of-the atmosphere (TOA) forcings (PI to PD) are estimated as 0.34 and 0.71 W m 2, respectively. Geographically the radiative cooling largely lies over the source regions, namely part of South America, Central Africa, Europe and South and East Asia. The annual global mean total-sky and clear-sky surface forcings are 0.63 and 0.98 W m 2, respectively. A series of sensitivity analyses shows that the treatments of hygroscopic growth and optical properties of organic aerosol are intertwined in the determination of the global organic aerosol forcing. For example, complete deprivation of water uptake by hydrophilic organic particles reduces the standard (total-sky) and clearsky TOA forcing estimates by 18 % and 20%, respectively, while the uptake by a highly soluble organic compound (malonic acid) enhances them by 18 % and 32%, respectively. Treating particles as non-absorbing enhances aerosol reflection and increases the total-sky and clear-sky TOA forcing by 47 % and 18%, respectively, while neglecting the scattering brought about by the water associated with particles reduces them by 24% and 7%, respectively.

Yi Ming; V. Ramaswamy; Paul A. Ginoux; Larry H. Horowitz

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Overview of the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosols influence climate directly by scattering and absorbing radiation and indirectly through their influence on cloud microphysical and dynamical properties. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) concluded that the global radiative forcing due to aerosols is large and in general cools the planet. But the uncertainties in these estimates are also large due to our poor understanding of many of the important processes related to aerosols and clouds. To address this uncertainty an integrated strategy for addressing issues related to aerosols and aerosol processes was proposed. Using this conceptual framework, the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS) is a stage 1 activity, that is, a detailed process study. The specific focus of CHAPS was to provide concurrent observations of the chemical composition of the activated [particles that are currently serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN)] and nonactivated aerosols, the scattering and extinction profiles, and detailed aerosol and droplet size spectra in the vicinity of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, during June 2007. Numerous campaigns have examined aerosol properties downwind from large pollution sources, including the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) campaign and the two of the three Aerosol Characterization Experiments, ACE-2 and ACE-Asia. Other studies conducted near cities have examined changes in both aerosols and clouds downwind of urban areas. For example wintertime stratiform clouds associated with the urban plumes of Denver, Colorado, and Kansas City, Missouri, have a larger number concentration and smaller median volume diameter of droplets than clouds that had not been affected by the urban plume. Likewise, a decrease in precipitation in polluted regions along the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains was discovered. In a modeling study, it was found that precipitation downwind of urban areas may be influenced by changes in aerosols as well as the convergence pattern caused by the city. Recently, the New England Air Quality Study (NEAQS), and the 2004 International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation, which were conducted during the summer of 2004, examined the transport of pollutants and aerosols eastward from New England over the Atlantic Ocean. The Texas Air Quality Study/Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (TexAQS/GoMACCS) also looked at relationships between clouds and aerosols in polluted conditions around Houston, Texas. In contrast to these recent studies near large or very dirty cities, CHAPS was conducted near a moderately sized city that is representative of a large number of cities around the United States. CHAPS was also one of the first times that a Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer was used in conjunction with a counterflow virtual impactor (CVI) inlet on an aircraft. The AMS provides information on the nonrefractory (i.e., materials that are chemically and physically unstable at high temperatures) composition of aerosols, while the CVI uses a counterflow relative to the main incoming airstream to exclude small droplets and nonactivated particles from the inlet, allowing only larger cloud droplets to enter the inlet. The combination of the CVI and AMS allow the examination of the chemical composition of the dried aerosol kernel from the cloud droplets. A key objective of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE)'s Atmospheric Sciences Program (ASP) is to improve the understanding of aerosol radiative effects on climate. This objective encompasses not only clear sky observations but also studies relating the effects of both aerosols on clouds and clouds on aerosols - in particular, how clouds affect the chemical and optical properties of aerosols. The latter was the science driver in the design of CHAPS. The measurement strategy for CHAPS was intended to provide measurements relevant to four questions associated with the aerosol radiative forcing issues of interest to the ASP: (1) How do the below-cloud and above-cloud aerosol optical and clou

Berg, L. K.; Berkowitz, C. M.; Ogren, J. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Ferrare, R. A.; Dubey, M.; Andrews, E.; Coulter, R. L.; Hair, J. W.; Hubbe, J. M.Lee, Y. N.; Mazzoleni, C; Olfert, J; Springston, SR; Environmental Science Division; PNNL; NOAA Earth System Research Lab.; NASA Langley Research Center; LANL; BNL; Univ.of Alberta; Univ. of Colorado

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Aerosol concentration and size distribution measured below, in, and above cloud from the DOE G-1 during VOCALS-REx  

SciTech Connect

During the VOCALS Regional Experiment, the DOE G-1 aircraft was used to sample a varying aerosol environment pertinent to properties of stratocumulus clouds over a longitude band extending 800 km west from the Chilean coast at Arica. Trace gas and aerosol measurements are presented as a function of longitude, altitude, and dew point in this study. Spatial distributions are consistent with an upper atmospheric source for O{sub 3} and South American coastal sources for marine boundary layer (MBL) CO and aerosol, most of which is acidic sulfate. Pollutant layers in the free troposphere (FT) can be a result of emissions to the north in Peru or long range transport from the west. At a given altitude in the FT (up to 3 km), dew point varies by 40 C with dry air descending from the upper atmospheric and moist air having a boundary layer (BL) contribution. Ascent of BL air to a cold high altitude results in the condensation and precipitation removal of all but a few percent of BL water along with aerosol that served as CCN. Thus, aerosol volume decreases with dew point in the FT. Aerosol size spectra have a bimodal structure in the MBL and an intermediate diameter unimodal distribution in the FT. Comparing cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) and pre-cloud aerosol (D{sub p} > 100 nm) gives a linear relation up to a number concentration of {approx}150 cm{sup -3}, followed by a less than proportional increase in CDNC at higher aerosol number concentration. A number balance between below cloud aerosol and cloud droplets indicates that {approx}25 % of aerosol with D{sub p} > 100 nm are interstitial (not activated). A direct comparison of pre-cloud and in-cloud aerosol yields a higher estimate. Artifacts in the measurement of interstitial aerosol due to droplet shatter and evaporation are discussed. Within each of 102 constant altitude cloud transects, CDNC and interstitial aerosol were anti-correlated. An examination of one cloud as a case study shows that the interstitial aerosol appears to have a background, upon which is superimposed a high frequency signal that contains the anti-correlation. The anti-correlation is a possible source of information on particle activation or evaporation.

Kleinman L. I.; Daum, P. H.; Lee, Y.-N.; Lewis, E. R.; Sedlacek III, A. J.; Senum, G. I.; Springston, S. R.; Wang, J.; Hubbe, J.; Jayne, J.; Min, Q.; Yum, S. S.; Allen, G.

2012-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

89

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol absorption  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

absorption absorption ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Aerosol absorption The process in which radiation energy is retained by aerosols. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System CSPHOT : Cimel Sunphotometer IAP : In-situ Aerosol Profiles (Cessna Aerosol Flights) PSAP : Particle Soot Absorption Photometer PASS : Photoacoustic Soot Spectrometer External Instruments OMI : Ozone Monitoring Instrument

90

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol concentration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

concentration concentration ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Aerosol concentration A measure of the amount of aerosol particles (e.g. number, mass, volume) per unit volume of air. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System CSPHOT : Cimel Sunphotometer CPC : Condensation Particle Counter IAP : In-situ Aerosol Profiles (Cessna Aerosol Flights) TDMA : Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer

91

Aerosols and solar energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief description is presented of the involvement of the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) in atmospheric research, including aerosol characterization and modeling. The use of both rigorous and simple models for radiation transport is described. Modeled broadband solar irradiance data are shown to illustrate the important influence that aerosols have on the energy available to solar systems and the economics of solar systems design. Standard aerosol measurement methods for solar applications are discussed along with the need for improved instrumentation and methods.

Bird, R. E.; Hulstrom, R. L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Direct and semidirect aerosol effects of Southern African biomass burning aerosol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The direct and semi-direct radiative effects of biomass burning aerosols from Southern African fires during July-October are investigated using 20 year runs of the Community Atmospheric Model (CAM) coupled to a slab ocean model. The aerosol optical depth is constrained using observations in clear skies from MODIS and for aerosol layers above clouds from CALIPSO. Over the ocean, where the absorbing biomass burning aerosol layers are primarily located above cloud, negative top of atmosphere (TOA) semi-direct radiative effects associated with increased low cloud cover dominate over a weaker positive all-sky direct radiative effect (DRE). In contrast, over the land where the aerosols are often below or within cloud layers, reductions in cloud liquid water path (LWP) lead to a positive semi-direct radiative effect that dominates over a near-zero DRE. Over the ocean, the cloud response can be understood as a response to increased lower tropospheric stability (LTS) which is caused both by aerosol absorptive warming in overlying layers and surface cooling in response to direct aerosol forcing. The ocean cloud changes are robust to changes in the cloud parameterization (removal of the hard-wired dependence of clouds on LTS), suggesting that they are physically realistic. Over land where cloud cover changes are minimal, decreased LWP is consistent with weaker convection driven by increased static stability. Over the entire region the overall TOA radiative effect from the biomass burning aerosols is almost zero due to opposing effects over the land and ocean. However, the surface forcing is strongly negative requiring a reduction in precipitation. This is primarily realized through reductions in convective precipitation on both the southern and northern flanks of the convective precipitation region spanning the equatorial rainforest and the ITCZ in the southern Sahel. The changes are consistent with the low-level aerosol forced cooling pattern. The results highlight the importance of semi-direct radiative effects and precipitation responses for determining the climatic effects of aerosols in the African region.

Sakaeda, Naoko; Wood, Robert; Rasch, Philip J.

2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

93

Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study Science Objective This field campaign is designed to increase scientific knowledge about the evolution of black carbon, primary organic...

94

Damage tolerant light absorbing material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A light absorbing article comprised of a composite of carbon-bonded carbon fibers, is prepared by: blending carbon fibers with a carbonizable organic powder to form a mixture; dispersing the mixture into an aqueous slurry; vacuum molding the aqueous slurry to form a green article; drying and curing the green article to form a cured article; and, carbonizing the cured article at a temperature of at least about 1000 C to form a carbon-bonded carbon fiber light absorbing composite article having a bulk density less than 1 g/cm[sup 3]. 9 figures.

Lauf, R.J.; Hamby, C. Jr.; Akerman, M.A.; Seals, R.D.

1993-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

95

Damage tolerant light absorbing material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A light absorbing article comprised of a composite of carbon-bonded carbon fibers, prepared by: blending carbon fibers with a carbonizable organic powder to form a mixture; dispersing the mixture into an aqueous slurry; vacuum molding the aqueous slurry to form a green article; drying and curing the green article to form a cured article; and, carbonizing the cured article at a temperature of at least about 1000.degree. C. to form a carbon-bonded carbon fiber light absorbing composite article having a bulk density less than 1 g/cm.sup.3.

Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hamby, Jr., Clyde (Harriman, TN); Akerman, M. Alfred (Knoxville, TN); Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Computational simulation of aerosol behaviour.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this thesis, computational methods have been developed for the simulation of aerosol dynamics and transport. Two different coupled aerosol-computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models are… (more)

Pyykönen, Jouni

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Aerosol concentration and size distribution measured below, in, and above cloud from the DOE G-1 during VOCALS-REx  

SciTech Connect

During the VOCALS Regional Experiment, the DOE G-1 aircraft was used to sample a varying aerosol environment pertinent to properties of stratocumulus clouds over a longitude band extending 800 km west from the Chilean coast at Arica. Trace gas and aerosol measurements are presented as a function of longitude, altitude, and dew point in this study. Spatial distributions are consistent with an upper atmospheric source for O{sub 3} and South American coastal sources for marine boundary layer (MBL) CO and aerosol, most of which is acidic sulfate in agreement with the dominant pollution source being SO{sub 2} from Cu smelters and power plants. Pollutant layers in the free troposphere (FT) can be a result of emissions to the north in Peru or long range transport from the west. At a given altitude in the FT (up to 3 km), dew point varies by 40 C with dry air descending from the upper atmospheric and moist air having a BL contribution. Ascent of BL air to a cold high altitude results in the condensation and precipitation removal of all but a few percent of BL water along with aerosol that served as CCN. Thus, aerosol volume decreases with dew point in the FT. Aerosol size spectra have a bimodal structure in the MBL and an intermediate diameter unimodal distribution in the FT. Comparing cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) and pre-cloud aerosol (Dp > 100 nm) gives a linear relation up to a number concentration of {approx}150 cm{sup -3}, followed by a less than proportional increase in CDNC at higher aerosol number concentration. A number balance between below cloud aerosol and cloud droplets indicates that {approx}25% of aerosol in the PCASP size range are interstitial (not activated). One hundred and two constant altitude cloud transects were identified and used to determine properties of interstitial aerosol. One transect is examined in detail as a case study. Approximately 25 to 50% of aerosol with D{sub p} > 110 nm were not activated, the difference between the two approaches possibly representing shattered cloud droplets or unknown artifact. CDNC and interstitial aerosol were anti-correlated in all cloud transects, consistent with the occurrence of dry in-cloud areas due to entrainment or circulation mixing.

Kleinman, L.I.; Daum, P. H.; Lee, Y.-N.; Lewis, E. R.; Sedlacek III, A. J.; Senum, G. I.; Springston, S. R.; Wang, J.; Hubbe, J.; Jayne, J.; Min, Q.; Yum, S. S.; Allen, G.

2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

98

Ganges valley aerosol experiment.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In June 2011, the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX) began in the Ganges Valley region of India. The objective of this field campaign is to obtain measurements of clouds, precipitation, and complex aerosols to study their impact on cloud formation and monsoon activity in the region.

Kotamarthi, V.R.; Satheesh, S.K. (Environmental Science Division); (Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, India)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

BNL | Aerosol Lifecycle IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Program Aerosol Life Cycle IOP The primary objectives that make up the Aerosol Life Cycle IOP can be broken down into three categories: Scientific; Logistical; and GVAX preparation. Scientific Objectives The science goals are to conduct intensive aerosol observations in a region exposed to anthropogenic, biogenic, and marine emissions with atmospheric processing times depending on air mass trajectories and time of day. Take advantage of new instruments in the MAOS (e.g., SP2, HR-PTRMS, ACSM, Trace Gas Suite, PASS-3, Aethelometer, UHSAS). Within this broad umbrella are embedded three main foci: Aerosol light absorption: How does the aerosol mass absorption coefficient (absorption per unit mass of BC) vary with atmospheric processing? Do observations agree with a shell-core model?

100

Novel CO2 - Philic Absorbents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Novel Co Novel Co 2 - PhiliC AbsorbeNts Summary The ability to separate a high pressure mixture of CO 2 and H 2 such that a high pressure stream of CO 2 for sequestration and a high pressure stream of H 2 for energy are produced remains an elusive goal. This research has identified a class of compounds that melt in the presence of high pressure CO 2 , forming a liquid phase composed of roughly 50wt% CO 2 and 50wt% of the compound. Unlike conventional solvents that require substantial depressurization during regeneration to release a low pressure CO 2 stream, these novel compounds completely release the CO 2 at many hundreds of psia as the compound solidifies. This work will reveal whether one of more of these compounds can selectively remove CO 2 from a mixture

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101

Evidence that the spectral dependence of light absorption by aerosols is  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evidence that the spectral dependence of light absorption by aerosols is Evidence that the spectral dependence of light absorption by aerosols is affected by organic carbon Title Evidence that the spectral dependence of light absorption by aerosols is affected by organic carbon Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-55056 Year of Publication 2004 Authors Kirchstetter, Thomas W., Tihomir Novakov, and Peter V. Hobbs Journal Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres Volume 109 Issue D21 Keywords aerosol light absorption, biomass burning, organic carbon Abstract The wavelength dependence of light absorption by aerosols collected on filters is investigated throughout the near-ultraviolet to near-infrared spectral region. Measurements were made using an optical transmission method. Aerosols produced by biomass combustion, including wood and savanna burning, and by motor vehicles, including diesel trucks, are included in the analysis. These aerosol types were distinguished by different wavelength (λ) dependences in light absorption. Light absorption by the motor vehicle aerosols exhibited relatively weak wavelength dependence; absorption varied approximately as λ-1, indicating that black carbon (BC) was the dominant absorbing aerosol component. By contrast, the biomass smoke aerosols had much stronger wavelength dependence, approximately λ-2. The stronger spectral dependence was the result of enhanced light absorption at wavelengths shorter than 600 nm and was largely reduced when much of the sample organic carbon (OC) was extracted by dissolution in acetone. This indicates that OC in addition to BC in the biomass smoke aerosols contributed significantly to measured light absorption in the ultraviolet and visible spectral regions and that OC in biomass burning aerosols may appreciably absorb solar radiation. Estimated absorption efficiencies and imaginary refractive indices are presented for the OC extracted from biomass burning samples and the BC in motor vehicle-dominated aerosol samples. The uncertainty of these constants is discussed. Overall, results of this investigation show that low-temperature, incomplete combustion processes, including biomass burning, can produce light-absorbing aerosols that exhibit much stronger spectral dependence than high-temperature combustion processes, such as diesel combustion.

102

ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

Rob Newsom; John Goldsmith

103

ARM: 1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

104

ARM: 1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm  

SciTech Connect

1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

105

Carbonaceous Aerosol Study Using Advanced Particle Instrumentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and atmospheric organic aerosol formation. Envir. Sci.of secondary organic aerosol mass fraction, Atmos. Chem.composition of ambient aerosol particles. Environ. Sci.

Qi, Li

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

ARM - PI Product - Aerosol Retrievals from ARM SGP MFRSR Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsAerosol Retrievals from ARM SGP MFRSR Data ProductsAerosol Retrievals from ARM SGP MFRSR Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Aerosol Retrievals from ARM SGP MFRSR Data 2000.01.01 - 2000.12.31 Site(s) SGP General Description The Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) makes precise simultaneous measurements of the solar direct normal and diffuse horizontal irradiances at six wavelengths (nominally 415, 500, 615, 673, 870, and 940 nm) at short intervals (20 sec for ARM instruments) throughout the day. Time series of spectral optical depth are derived from these measurements. Besides water vapor at 940 nm, the other gaseous absorbers within the MFRSR channels are NO2 (at 415, 500, and 615 nm) and ozone (at 500, 615, and 670

107

The Effects of Black Carbon and Sulfate Aerosols in ChinaRegions on East Asia Monsoons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we examine the direct effects of sulfate and black carbon aerosols in China on East Asia monsoons and its precipitation processes by using the CAM3.0 model. It is demonstrated that sulfate and black carbon aerosols in China both have the effects to weaken East Asia monsoons in both summer and winter seasons. However, they certainly differ from each other in affecting vertical structures of temperature and atmospheric circulations. Their differences are expected because of their distinct optical properties, i.e., scattering vs. absorbing. Even for a single type of aerosol, its effects on temperature structures and atmospheric circulations are largely season-dependent. Applications of T-test on our results indicate that forcing from black carbon aerosols over China is relatively weak and limited. It is also evident from our results that the effects of synthetic aerosols (sulfate and black carbon together) on monsoons are not simply a linear summation between these two types of aerosols. Instead, they are determined by their integrated optical properties. Synthetic aerosols to a large degree resemble effects of sulfate aerosols. This implies a likely scattering property for the integration of black carbon and sulfate aerosols in China.

Yang, Bai [ORNL; Liu, Yu [Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences, Beijing, China; Sun, Jiaren [South China Institute of Environmental Sciences, Guangzhou, China

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Monodisperse aerosol generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An aerosol generator is described which is capable of producing a monodisperse aerosol within narrow limits utilizing an aqueous solution capable of providing a high population of seed nuclei and an organic solution having a low vapor pressure. The two solutions are cold nebulized, mixed, vaporized, and cooled. During cooling, particles of the organic vapor condense onto the excess seed nuclei, and grow to a uniform particle size.

Ortiz, L.W.; Soderholm, S.C.

1988-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

109

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol particle size  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

particle size particle size ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Aerosol particle size Linear size (e.g. radius or diameter) of an aerosol particle. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. Field Campaign Instruments AEROSMASSSPEC : Aerosol Mass Spectrometer CPI : Cloud Particle Imager DRI-GND : Desert Research Institute Ground-Based Aerosol Instruments DRUM-AEROSOL : Drum Aerosol Sampler AEROSOL-TOWER-EML : EML Tower based Aerosol Measurements

110

Porcelain enamel neutron absorbing material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A porcelain enamel composition as a neutron absorbing material can be prepared of a major proportion by weight of a cadmium compound and a minor proportion of compound of boron, lithium and silicon. These compounds in the form of a porcelain enamel coating or layer on several alloys has been found to be particularly effective in enhancing the nuclear safety of equipment for use in the processing and storage of fissile material. The composition of the porcelain enamel coating can be tailored to match the coefficient of thermal expansion of the equipment to be coated and excellent coating adhesion can be achieved. 2 figs.

Iverson, D.C.

1987-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

111

RACORO aerosol data processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The RACORO aerosol data (cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), condensation nuclei (CN) and aerosol size distributions) need further processing to be useful for model evaluation (e.g., GCM droplet nucleation parameterizations) and other investigations. These tasks include: (1) Identification and flagging of 'splash' contaminated Twin Otter aerosol data. (2) Calculation of actual supersaturation (SS) values in the two CCN columns flown on the Twin Otter. (3) Interpolation of CCN spectra from SGP and Twin Otter to 0.2% SS. (4) Process data for spatial variability studies. (5) Provide calculated light scattering from measured aerosol size distributions. Below we first briefly describe the measurements and then describe the results of several data processing tasks that which have been completed, paving the way for the scientific analyses for which the campaign was designed. The end result of this research will be several aerosol data sets which can be used to achieve some of the goals of the RACORO mission including the enhanced understanding of cloud-aerosol interactions and improved cloud simulations in climate models.

Elisabeth Andrews

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

112

Wavelength Dependence of Aerosol Extinction Coefficient for Stratospheric Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple empirical formula for the wavelength dependence of the aerosol extinction coefficient is proposed. The relationship between the constants in the formula and the variable parameter in the aerosol size distribution is explicitly expressed. ...

Glenn K. Yue

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Aerosols in a Changing Atmosphere: From Detailed Aerosol Microphysics...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerosols in a Changing Atmosphere: From Detailed Aerosol Microphysics to Policy Applications Speaker(s): Susanne Bauer Date: December 6, 2011 - 4:00pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar...

114

Evolution of organic aerosol mass spectra upon heating: implications for OA phase and partitioning behavior  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization mass spectrometry has been used to measure the evolution of chemical composition for two distinct organic aerosol types as they are passed through a thermodenuder at different temperatures. The two organic aerosol types considered are primary lubricating oil (LO) aerosol and secondary aerosol from the alpha-pinene + O3 reaction (alphaP). The evolution of the VUV mass spectra for the two aerosol types with temperature are observed to differ dramatically. For LO particles, the spectra exhibit distinct changes with temperature in which the lower m/z peaks, corresponding to compounds with higher vapor pressures, disappear more rapidly than the high m/z peaks. In contrast, the alphaP aerosol spectrum is essentially unchanged by temperature even though the particles experience significant mass loss due to evaporation. The variations in the LO spectra are found to be quantitatively in agreement with expectations from absorptive partitioning theory whereas the alphaP spectra suggest that the evaporation of alphaP derived aerosol appears to not be governed by partitioning theory. We postulate that this difference arises from the alphaP particles existing as in a glassy state instead of having the expected liquid-like behavior. To reconcile these observations with decades of aerosol growth measurements, which indicate that OA formation is described by equilibrium partitioning, we present a conceptual model wherein the secondary OA is formed and then rapidly converted from an absorbing form to a non-absorbing form. The results suggest that although OA growth may be describable by equilibrium partitioning theory, the properties of organic aerosol once formed may differ significantly from the properties determined in the equilibrium framework.

UC Davis; Cappa, Christopher D.; Wilson, Kevin R.

2010-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

115

Aerosol–CCN Closure at a Semi-rural Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

aerosol size distributions and size-resolved aerosol compositions measured by ... Keywords Cloud condensation nuclei, closure study, organic aerosols, Köhler.

116

Formation mechanisms and quantification of organic nitrates in atmospheric aerosol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric submicron aerosol . . . . . . . 2.3 Partitioningon SOA organic aerosol formation alkyl nitrate and secondaryPeroxy radical fate . . . . . . Aerosol . . . . . . . .

Rollins, Andrew Waite

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Climate implications of carbonaceous aerosols: An aerosol microphysical study using the GISS/MATRIX climate model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and R. Ruedy, Matrix (multiconfiguration aerosol tracker ofmixing state): An aerosol microphysical module for globalAn investigative review, Aerosol Sci. Technol. , Vol. 40,

Bauer, Susanne E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

The impact of biogenic carbon emissions on aerosol absorption inMexico City  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to determine the wavelength dependence of atmospheric aerosol absorption in the Mexico City area, the absorption angstrom exponents (AAEs) were calculated from aerosol absorption measurements at seven wavelengths obtained with a seven-channel aethalometer during two field campaigns, the Mexico City Metropolitan Area study in April 2003 (MCMA 2003) and the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations in March 2006 (MILAGRO). The AAEs varied from 0.76 to 1.56 in 2003 and from 0.54 to 1.52 in 2006. The AAE values determined in the afternoon were consistently higher than the corresponding morning values, suggesting the photochemical formation of absorbing secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the afternoon. The AAE values were compared to stable and radiocarbon isotopic measurements of aerosol samples collected at the same time to determine the sources of the aerosol carbon. The fraction of modern carbon (fM) in the aerosol samples, as determined from {sup 14}C analysis, showed that 70% of the carbonaceous aerosols in Mexico City were from modern sources, indicating a significant impact from biomass burning during both field campaigns. The {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratios of the aerosol samples illustrate the significant impact of Yucatan forest fires (C-3 plants) in 2003 and local grass fires (C-4 plants) at site T1 in 2006. A direct comparison of the fM values, stable carbon isotope ratios, and calculated aerosol AAEs suggested that the wavelength dependence of the aerosol absorption was controlled by the biogenically derived aerosol components.

Marley, N; Gaffney, J; Tackett, M J; Sturchio, N; Hearty, L; Martinez, N; Hardy, K D; Machany-Rivera, A; Guilderson, T P; MacMillan, A; Steelman, K

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

119

Absorbents for Mineral Oil Spill Cleanup  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residual mineral oil on the ground surface following electrical equipment spills is often removed using a surface application of an absorbent material. Traditional absorbent products include clays, sawdust-like products, silica-based products, and various organic industry byproduct materials. After the material has had time to absorb the mineral oil on the ground surface, it is removed and normally sent to a landfill with a liner and leachate collection system designed to Subtitle D standards for municip...

2011-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

120

Highly stable aerosol generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved compressed air nebulizer has been developed such that a uniform aerosol particle size and concentration may be produced over long time periods. This result is achieved by applying a vacuum pressure to the makeup assembly and by use of a vent tube between the atmosphere and the makeup solution. By applying appropriate vacuum pressures to the makeup solution container and by proper positioning of the vent tube, a constant level of aspirating solution may be maintained within the aspirating assembly with aspirating solution continuously replaced from the makeup solution supply. This device may also be adapted to have a plurality of aerosol generators and only one central makeup assembly.

DeFord, Henry S. (Kennewick, WA); Clark, Mark L. (Kennewick, WA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high-altitude absorbing aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Highly stable aerosol generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved compressed air nebulizer has been developed such that a uniform aerosol particle size and concentration may be produced over long time periods. This result is achieved by applying a vacuum pressure to the makeup assembly and by use of a vent tube between the atmosphere and the makeup solution. By applying appropriate vacuum pressures to the makeup solution container and by proper positioning of the vent tube, a constant level of aspirating solution may be maintained within the aspirating assembly with aspirating solution continuously replaced from the makeup solution supply. This device may also be adapted to have a plurality of aerosol generators and only one central makeup assembly. 2 figs.

DeFord, H.S.; Clark, M.L.

1981-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

122

Efficient Energy Absorbing Element for Crashworthiness ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tubes of high strength steel and composites can be utilized to absorb the impact energy. In this work, circular tubes of annealed, dual phase (DP) steel and ...

123

SELECTIVE ABSORBER COATED FOILS FOR SOLAR COLLECTORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the University of California, nor any of their employees,of the University of California. The views and opinions ofof the University of California. SELECTIVE ABSORBER COATED

Lampert, Carl M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

BNL | Aerosol, Cloud, Precipitation Interactions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Atmospheric aerosols exert important "indirect effects" on clouds and climate by serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei that affect cloud radiative and microphysical properties. For example, an increase in CCN increases the number concentration of droplets enhances cloud albedo, and suppresses precipitation that alters cloud coverage and lifetime. However, in the case of moist and strong convective clouds, increasing aerosols may increase precipitation and enhance storm development. Although aerosol-induced indirect effects on climate are believed to have a significant impact on global climate change, estimating their impact continues to be one of the most uncertain climate forcings.

125

Jankovic Aerosol Characterization.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization, Characterization, Aerosol Characterization, Interpretation, and Interpretation, and Application of Data Application of Data NSRC Symposium NSRC Symposium July 8, 2008 John Jankovic, CIH CIH Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences Aerosol Characterization, Interpretation, and Aerosol Characterization, Interpretation, and Application of Data Application of Data Department of Energy (DOE) Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRC) developing Approach to Nanomaterial ES&H - The CNMS Approach * Establish Exposure Control Guideline (ECG) - Characterize Aerosol * Collect and interpret data * Assign Process to a Control Band Aerosol Particle Characterization * Size distribution (geometric mean and geometric standard deviation related to either mass, surface, or number)

126

Geometrical Optics of Dense Aerosols  

SciTech Connect

Assembling a free-standing, sharp-edged slab of homogeneous material that is much denser than gas, but much more rare ed than a solid, is an outstanding technological challenge. The solution may lie in focusing a dense aerosol to assume this geometry. However, whereas the geometrical optics of dilute aerosols is a well-developed fi eld, the dense aerosol limit is mostly unexplored. Yet controlling the geometrical optics of dense aerosols is necessary in preparing such a material slab. Focusing dense aerosols is shown here to be possible, but the nite particle density reduces the eff ective Stokes number of the flow, a critical result for controlled focusing. __________________________________________________

Hay, Michael J.; Valeo, Ernest J.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

127

Device for absorbing mechanical shock  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is a comparatively inexpensive but efficient shock-absorbing device having special application to the protection of shipping and storage cylinders. In a typical application, two of the devices are strapped to a cylinder to serve as saddle-type supports for the cylinder during storage and to protect the cylinder in the event it is dropped during lifting or lowering operations. In its preferred form, the invention includes a hardwood plank whose grain runs in the longitudinal direction. The basal portion of the plank is of solid cross-section, whereas the upper face of the plank is cut away to form a concave surface fittable against the sidewall of a storage cylinder. The concave surface is divided into a series of segments by transversely extending, throughgoing relief slots. A layer of elastomeric material is positioned on the concave face, the elastomer being extrudable into slots when pressed against the segments by a preselected pressure characteristic of a high-energy impact. The compressive, tensile, and shear properties of the hardwood and the elastomer are utilized in combination to provide a surprisingly high energy-absorption capability.

Newlon, Charles E. (Knoxville, TN)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Device for absorbing mechanical shock  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is a comparatively inexpensive but efficient shock-absorbing device having special application to the protection of shipping and storage cylinders. In a typical application, two of the devices are strapped to a cylinder to serve as saddle-type supports for the cylinder during storage and to protect the cylinder in the event it is dropped during lifting or lowering operations. In its preferred form, the invention includes a hardwood plank whose grain runs in the longitudinal direction. The basal portion of the plank is of solid cross-section, whereas the upper face of the plank is cut away to form a concave surface fittable against the sidewall of a storage cylinder. The concave surface is divided into a series of segments by transversely extending, throughgoing relief slots. A layer of elastomeric material is positioned on the concave face, the elastomer being extrudable into slots when pressed against the segments by a preselected pressure characteristic of a high-energy impact. The compressive, tensile, and shear properties of the hardwood and the elastomer are utilized in combination to provide a surprisingly high energy-absorption capability.

Newlon, C.E.

1979-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

129

Impact of biomass burning aerosol on the monsoon circulation transition over Amazonia  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ensemble simulations of a regional climate model (RegCM3) forced by aerosol radiative forcing suggest that biomass burning aerosols can work against the seasonal monsoon circulation transition, thus re-enforce the dry season rainfall pattern for Southern Amazonia. Strongly absorbing smoke aerosols warm and stabilize the lower troposphere within the smoke center in southern Amazonia (where aerosol optical depth > 0.3). These changes increase the surface pressure in the smoke center, weaken the southward surface pressure gradient between northern and southern Amazonia, and consequently induce an anomalous moisture divergence in the smoke center and an anomalous convergence occurs in northwestern Amazonia (5°S-5°N, 60°W-40 70°W). The increased atmospheric thermodynamic stability, surface pressure, and divergent flow in Southern Amazonia may inhibit synoptic cyclonic activities propagated from extratropical South America, and re-enforce winter-like synoptic cyclonic activities and rainfall in southeastern Brazil, Paraguay and northeastern Argentina.

Zhang, Y.; Fu, Rong; Yu, Hongbin; Qian, Yun; Dickinson, Robert; Silva Dias, Maria Assuncao F.; da Silva Dias, Pedro L.; Fernandes, Katia

2009-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

130

Definition: Point Absorber | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Point Absorber Point Absorber Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Point Absorber Wave energy capture device, with principal dimension relatively small compared to the wavelength, and is able to capture energy from a wave front greater than the physical dimension of the device. There are floating and submerged models.[1] Related Terms Wave power; PowerBouy References ↑ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wave_power Poi LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ntabsorber.jpg Example of a Point Absorber A submerged pressure differential wave energy capturing device, which can be considered a fully submerged point absorber. A pressure differential is induced within the device as the wave passes, driving a fluid pump to create mechanical energy. Retrieved from

131

Airborne measurements of carbonaceous aerosols in southern Africa during  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Airborne measurements of carbonaceous aerosols in southern Africa during Airborne measurements of carbonaceous aerosols in southern Africa during the dry, biomass burning season Title Airborne measurements of carbonaceous aerosols in southern Africa during the dry, biomass burning season Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-50880 Year of Publication 2003 Authors Kirchstetter, Thomas W., Tihomir Novakov, and Peter V. Hobbs Journal Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres Keywords black carbon, evolved gas analysis, light absorption, organic carbon, positive sampling artifact, SAFARI Abstract Particulate matter collected aboard the University of Washington's Convair-580 research aircraft over southern Africa during the dry, biomass burning season was analyzed for total carbon, organic carbon, and black carbon contents using thermal and optical methods. Samples were collected in smoke plumes of burning savanna and in regional haze. A known artifact, produced by the adsorption of organic gases on the quartz filter substrates used to collect the particulate matter samples, comprised a significant portion of the total carbon collected. Consequently, conclusions derived from the data are greatly dependent on whether or not organic carbon concentrations are corrected for this artifact. For example, the estimated aerosol co-albedo (1 - single scattering albedo), which is a measure of aerosol absorption, of the biomass smoke samples is 60% larger using corrected organic carbon concentrations. Thus, the corrected data imply that the biomass smoke is 60% more absorbing than do the uncorrected data. The black carbon to (corrected) organic carbon mass ratio (BC/OC) of smoke plume samples (0.18±0.06) is lower than that of samples collected in the regional haze (0.25±0.08). The difference may be due to mixing of biomass smoke with background air characterized by a higher BC/OC ratio. A simple source apportionment indicates that biomass smoke contributes about three-quarters of the aerosol burden in the regional haze, while other sources (e.g., fossil fuel burning) contribute the remainder.

132

Climate Impacts of Atmospheric Sulfate and Black Carbon Aerosols  

SciTech Connect

Although the global average surface temperature has increased by about 0.6°C during the last century (IPCC, 2001), some regions such as East Asia, Eastern North America, and Western Europe have cooled rather than warmed during the past decades (Jones, 1988; Qian and Giorgi, 2000). Coherent changes at the regional scale may reflect responses to different climate forcings that need to be understood in order to predict the future net climate response at the global and regional scales under different emission scenarios. Atmospheric aerosols play an important role in global climate change (IPCC 2001). They perturb the earth’s radiative budget directly by scattering and absorbing solar and long wave radiation, and indirectly by changing cloud reflectivity, lifetime, and precipitation efficiency via their role as cloud condensation nuclei. Because aerosols have much shorter lifetime (days to weeks) compared to most greenhouse gases, they tend to concentrate near their emission sources and distribute very unevenly both in time and space. This non-uniform distribution of aerosols, in conjunction with the greenhouse effect, may lead to differential net heating in some areas and net cooling in others (Penner et al. 1994). Sulfate aerosols come mainly from the oxidation of sulfur dioxide (SO2) emitted from fossil fuel burning. Black carbon aerosols are directly emitted during incomplete combustion of biomass, coal, and diesel derived sources. Due to the different optical properties, sulfate and black carbon affect climate in different ways. Because of the massive emissions of sulfur and black carbon that accompany the rapid economic expansions in East Asia, understanding the effects of aerosols on climate is particularly important scientifically and politically in order to develop adaptation and mitigation strategies.

Qian, Yun; Song, Qingyuan; Menon, Surabi; Yu, Shaocai; Liu, Shaw C.; Shi, Guangyu; Leung, Lai R.; Luo, Yunfeng

2008-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

133

Vertical distribution and radiative effects of mineral dust and biomass burning aerosol over West Africa during DABEX  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents measurements of the vertical distribution of aerosol extinction coefficient over West Africa, during the Dust and Biomass burning aerosol Experiment (DABEX) / African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis dry season Special Observing period zero (AMMA-SOP0). In situ aircraft measurements from the UK FAAM aircraft are compared with two ground based lidars (POLIS and ARM MPL) and an airborne lidar on an ultra-light aircraft. In general mineral dust was observed at low altitudes (up to 2km) and a mixture of biomass burning aerosol and dust was observed at altitudes of 2-5km. The study exposes difficulties associated with spatial and temporal variability when inter-comparing aircraft and ground measurements. Averaging over many profiles provided a better means of assessing consistent errors and biases associated with in situ sampling instruments and retrievals of lidar ratios. Shortwave radiative transfer calculations and a 3-year simulation with the HadGEM2-A climate model show that the radiative effect of biomass burning aerosol is somewhat sensitive to the vertical distribution of aerosol. Results show a 15% increase in absorption of solar radiation by elevated biomass burning aerosol when the observed low-level dust layer is included as part of the background atmospheric state in the model. This illustrates that the radiative forcing of anthropogenic absorbing aerosol is sensitive to the treatment of other aerosol species and that care is needed in simulating natural aerosols assumed to exist in the pre-industrial, or natural state of the atmosphere.

Johnson, Ben; Heese, B.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Chazette, P.; Jones, A.; Bellouin, N.

2008-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

134

Aerosols in a Changing Atmosphere: From Detailed Aerosol Microphysics to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerosols in a Changing Atmosphere: From Detailed Aerosol Microphysics to Aerosols in a Changing Atmosphere: From Detailed Aerosol Microphysics to Policy Applications Speaker(s): Susanne Bauer Date: December 6, 2011 - 4:00pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Surabi Menon The anthropogenic increase in aerosol concentrations since preindustrial times and its net cooling effect on the atmosphere is thought to mask some of the greenhouse gas induced warming. Although the overall effect of aerosols on solar radiation and clouds is most certainly negative, some individual forcing agents and feedbacks have positive forcing effects. Recent studies have tried to identify some of those positive forcing agents and their individual emission sectors, However, understanding the net effect of multi-source emitting sectors and the involved cloud feedbacks is

135

Chemical Bonding and Structural Information of Black Carbon Reference Materials and Individual Carbonaceous Atmospheric Aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HULIS) in biomass-burning aerosols, Atmospheric Chemistrymicroscopical and aerosol dynamical characterizationof soot aerosols, Journal of Aerosol Science , 34 , 1347-

Hopkins, Rebecca J.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Marten, Bryan D.; Gilles, Mary K.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Thin film absorber for a solar collector  

SciTech Connect

This invention pertains to energy absorbers for solar collectors, and more particularly to high performance thin film absorbers. The solar collectors comprising the absorber of this invention overcome several problems seen in current systems, such as excessive hardware, high cost and unreliability. In the preferred form, the apparatus features a substantially rigid planar frame with a thin film window bonded to one planar side of the frame. An absorber in accordance with the present invention is comprised of two thin film layers that are sealed perimetrically. In a preferred embodiment, thin film layers are formed from a metal/plastic laminate. The layers define a fluid-tight planar envelope of large surface area to volume through which a heat transfer fluid flows. The absorber is bonded to the other planar side of the frame. The thin film construction of the absorber assures substantially full envelope wetting and thus good efficiency. The window and absorber films stress the frame adding to the overall strength of the collector.

Wilhelm, William G. (Cutchogue, NY)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

ARM - Mobile Aerosol Observing System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FacilitiesMobile Aerosol Observing System FacilitiesMobile Aerosol Observing System AMF Information Science Architecture Baseline Instruments AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 Data Operations AMF Fact Sheet Images Contacts AMF Deployments Hyytiälä, Finland, 2014 Manacapuru, Brazil, 2014 Oliktok Point, Alaska, 2013 Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, 2012 Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2012 Gan Island, Maldives, 2011 Ganges Valley, India, 2011 Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 2010 Graciosa Island, Azores, 2009-2010 Shouxian, China, 2008 Black Forest, Germany, 2007 Niamey, Niger, 2006 Point Reyes, California, 2005 Mobile Aerosol Observing System Intensive aerosol observations conducted on the campus of Brookhaven National Laboratory on Long Island, New York, using the ARM Mobile Aerosol Observing System. Intensive aerosol observations conducted on the campus of Brookhaven

138

Aerosol Observing System (AOS) Handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Aerosol Observing System (AOS) is a suite of in situ surface measurements of aerosol optical and cloud-forming properties. The instruments measure aerosol properties that influence the earth’s radiative balance. The primary optical measurements are those of the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients as a function of particle size and radiation wavelength and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements as a function of percent supersaturation. Additional measurements include those of the particle number concentration and scattering hygroscopic growth. Aerosol optical measurements are useful for calculating parameters used in radiative forcing calculations such as the aerosol single-scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, mass scattering efficiency, and hygroscopic growth. CCN measurements are important in cloud microphysical models to predict droplet formation.

Jefferson, A

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

139

THE ROLE OF SOOT IN AEROSOL CHEMISTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

characterization of aerosols." in Nature. Aim. and MethodsLAWRENCE THE ROLE OF SOOT IN AEROSOL CHEMISTRY T. NovakovTHE ROLE OF SOOT IN AEROSOL CHEMISTRY* T. Novakov Lawrence

Novakov, T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Characterizing the formation of secondary organic aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Flagan, R.C. (1990) Aerosol Sci. and Technol. 13 , 230.and Seinfeld, J.H. (2002) Aerosol Science and Technology ,light absorption by atmospheric aerosol, in preparation for

Lunden, Melissa; Black, Douglas; Brown, Nancy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high-altitude absorbing aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Optical Properties of Secondary Organic Aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Paulson, S. E. ; Chung, A. Aerosol Sci. Technol. 2007 , 41,Y. G. ; Daum, P. H. J. Aerosol Sci 2008 , 39, 974-986. (32)Accurate Monitoring of Terrestrial Aerosols and Total Solar

Kim, Hwajin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

ARM: 10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

143

ARM: 10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm  

SciTech Connect

10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

144

EMSL: Science: Atmospheric Aerosol Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Atmospheric Aerosol Systems atmospheric logo Nighttime enhancement of nitrogen-containing organic compounds, or NOC Observed nighttime enhancement of nitrogen-containing organic compounds, or NOC, showed evidence of being formed by reactions that transform carbonyls into imines. The Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Science Theme focuses on understanding the chemistry, physics and molecular-scale dynamics of aerosols for model parameterization to improve the accuracy of climate model simulations and develop a predictive understanding of climate. By elucidating the role of natural and anthropogenic regional and global climate forcing mechanisms, EMSL can provide DOE and others with the ability to develop cost-effective strategies to monitor, control and mitigate them.

145

Aerosol Metrology for Climate Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the interaction of aerosols with solar radiation ... that will accelerate the development of new ... together experts from government, industry and academia ...

2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

146

Durability of Polymeric Glazing and Absorber Materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Heating and Lighting Program has set the goal of reducing the cost of solar water heating systems by at least 50%. An attractive approach to such large cost reduction is to replace glass and metal parts with less-expensive, lighter-weight, more-integrated polymeric components. The key challenge with polymers is to maintain performance and assure requisite durability for extended lifetimes. The objective of this task is to quantify lifetimes through measurement of the optical and mechanical stability of candidate polymeric glazing and absorber materials. Polycarbonate sheet glazings, as proposed by two industry partners, have been tested for resistance to UV radiation with three complementary methods. Incorporation of a specific 2-mil thick UV-absorbing screening layer results in glazing lifetimes of at least 15 years; improved screens promise even longer lifetimes. Proposed absorber materials were tested for creep and embrittlement under high temperature, and appear adequate for planned ICS absorbers.

Jorgensen, G.; Terwilliger, K.; Bingham, C.; Milbourne, M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

NETL: Carbon Absorber Retrofit Equipment (CARE)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions Control Carbon Absorber Retrofit Equipment (CARE) Project No.: DE-FE0007528 Spray Jet Array for Neustream-C Nozzle Technology Spray Jet Array for Neustream-C Nozzle...

148

Neutron absorbing coating for nuclear criticality control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron absorbing coating for use on a substrate, and which provides nuclear criticality control is described and which includes a nickel, chromium, molybdenum, and gadolinium alloy having less than about 5% boron, by weight.

Mizia, Ronald E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Richard N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Swank, William D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lister, Tedd E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Pinhero, Patrick J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

149

Researchers Model Impact of Aerosols Over California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Researchers Model Impact of Aerosols Over California Researchers Model Impact of Aerosols Over California Research may clarify the effectiveness of regional pollution controls May...

150

Porous absorber for solar air heaters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A general discussion of the factors affecting solar collector performance is presented. Bench scale tests done to try to determine the heat transfer characteristics of various screen materials are explained. The design, performance, and evaluation of a crude collector with a simple screen stack absorber is treated. The more sophisticated absorber concept, and its first experimental approximation is examined. A short summary of future plans for the collector concept is included. (MHR)

Finch, J.A.

1980-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

151

The Cooling of a Liquid Absorber using a Small Cooler  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

liquid absorber with its condenser and surge volume and theMICE liquid absorber, the condenser, and the absorber 4 Ka liquid surge tank (with condenser). The heat leak estimate

Baynham, D.E.; Bradshaw, T.W.; Green, M.A.; Ishimoto, S.; Liggins, N.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Organic Aerosol Partition Module Documentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the promulgation of new National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for fine particulate matter (PM-2.5), data and analytical tools are needed to support their implementation. This report documents an EPRI modeling component for efficiently simulating aspects of organic aerosol formation. Without this component, simulations would tend to overestimate the contribution of power plant emissions to atmospheric aerosol mass.

1999-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

153

Photoacoustic optical properties at UV, VIS, and near IR wavelengths for laboratory generated and winter time ambient urban aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the laboratory and ambient photoacoustic (PA) measurement of aerosol light absorption coefficients at ultraviolet wavelength (i.e., 355 nm) and compare with measurements at 405, 532, 870, and 1047 nm. Simultaneous measurements of aerosol light scattering coefficients were achieved by the integrating reciprocal nephelometer within the PA's acoustic resonator. Absorption and scattering measurements were carried out for various laboratory generated aerosols, including salt, incense, and kerosene soot to evaluate the instrument calibration and gain insight on the spectral dependence of aerosol light absorption and scattering. Ambient measurements were obtained in Reno, Nevada, between 18 December 2009 and 18 January 2010. The measurement period included days with and without strong ground level temperature inversions, corresponding to highly polluted (freshly emitted aerosols) and relatively clean (aged aerosols) conditions. Particulate matter (PM) concentrations were measured and analyzed with other tracers of traffic emissions. The temperature inversion episodes caused very high concentration of PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 10} (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 {mu}m and 10 {mu}m, respectively) and gaseous pollutants: carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), and nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}). The diurnal change of absorption and scattering coefficients during the polluted (inversion) days increased approximately by a factor of two for all wavelengths compared to the clean days. The spectral variation in aerosol absorption coefficients indicated a significant amount of absorbing aerosol from traffic emissions and residential wood burning. The analysis of single scattering albedo (SSA), Angstrom exponent of absorption (AEA), and Angstrom exponent of scattering (AES) for clean and polluted days provides evidences that the aerosol aging and coating process is suppressed by strong temperature inversion under cloudy conditions. In general, measured UV absorption coefficients were found to be much larger for biomass burning aerosol than for typical ambient aerosols.

Gyawali, Madhu S.; Arnott, W. Patrick; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Song, Chen; Moosmuller, H.; Liu, Li; Mishchenko, M.; Chen, L-W A.; Green, M.; Watson, J. G.; Chow, J. C.

2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

154

Nanomaterials from Aerosols Aerosols are suspensions of liquid or solid particles in a gas. Aerosol particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

arid regions in China and Africa. Such aerosol streams have been shown to travel around the globe with silica aerosols from China impacting air quality in the continental US and #12;2 alumina and titania delivery mechanisms for a variety of drugs as an alternative to injections. As delivery devices

Beaucage, Gregory

155

Aerosol Laboratory - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities > Engineering Capabilities > Engineering Experimentation > Aerosol Laboratory Capabilities Engineering Experimentation Reactor Safety Experimentation Aerosol Experiments System Components Laser Applications Robots Applications Other Facilities Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Aerosol Laboratory The Aerosol Laboratory (AL) houses equipment to measure and record the physical parameters necessary to characterize the formation and transport of aerosols. Bookmark and Share The Aerosol Laboratory (AL) has extensive analytic and experimental capabilities to characterize the formation and transport of aerosols formed from the condensation of vapors. Computer codes have been developed to

156

Ferrite HOM Absorber for the RHIC ERL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A superconducting Energy Recovery Linac is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory to serve as test bed for RHIC upgrades. The damping of higher-order modes in the superconducting five-cell cavity for the Energy-Recovery linac at RHIC is performed exclusively by two ferrite absorbers. The ferrite properties have been measured in ferrite-loaded pill box cavities resulting in the permeability values given by a first-order Debye model for the tiled absorber structure and an equivalent permeability value for computer simulations with solid ring dampers. Measured and simulated results for the higher-order modes in the prototype copper cavity are discussed. First room-temperature measurements of the finished niobium cavity are presented which confirm the effective damping of higher-order modes in the ERL. by the ferrite absorbers.

Hahn,H.; Choi, E.M.; Hammons, L.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Absorber Materials at Room and Cryogenic Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We recently reported on investigations of RF absorber materials at cryogenic temperatures conducted at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The work was initiated to find a replacement material for the 2 Kelvin low power waveguide Higher Order Mode (HOM) absorbers employed within the original cavity cryomodules of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). This effort eventually led to suitable candidates as reported in this paper. Furthermore, though constrained by small funds for labor and resources, we have analyzed a variety of lossy ceramic materials, several of which could be usable as HOM absorbers for both normal conducting and superconducting RF structures, e.g. as loads in cavity waveguides and beam tubes either at room or cryogenic temperatures and, depending on cooling measures, low to high operational power levels.

F. Marhauser, T.S. Elliott, A.T. Wu, E.P. Chojnacki, E. Savrun

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

SELECTIVE ABSORBER COATED FOILS FOR SOLAR COLLECTORS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar absorber metal foils are discussed in terms of materials and basic processing science. Also included is the use of finished heavy sheet stock for direct fabrication of solar collector panels. Both the adhesives and bonding methods for foils and sheet are surveyed. Developmental and representative commercial foils are used as illustrative examples. As a result it was found that foils can compete economically with batch plating but are limited by adhesive temperature stability. Also absorber foils are very versatile and direct collector fabrication from heavy foils appears very promising.

Lampert, Carl M.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Durability of Polymeric Glazing and Absorber Materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Heating and Lighting Program has set the goal of reducing the cost of solar water heating systems by at least 50%. An attractive approach to such large cost reduction is to replace glass and metal parts with less-expensive, lighter-weight, more-integrated polymeric components. The key challenge with polymers is to maintain performance and assure requisite durability for extended lifetimes. We have begun evaluation of several new UV-screened polycarbonate sheet glazing constructions. This has involved interactions with several major polymer industry companies to obtain improved candidate samples. Proposed absorber materials were tested for UV resistance, and appear adequate for unglazed ICS absorbers.

Jorgensen, G.; Terwilliger, K.; Bingham, C.; Lindquist, C.; Milbourne, M.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Investigations of the Absorption Properties of Near-Ground Aerosol by the Methods of Optical-Acoustic Spectrometry and Diff...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigations of the Absorption Properties of Investigations of the Absorption Properties of Near-Ground Aerosol by the Methods of Optical-Acoustic Spectrometry and Diffuse Extinction V. S. Kozlov, M. V. Panchenko, A. B. Tikhomirov, and B. A. Tikhomirov Institute of Atmospheric Optics Tomsk, Russia Introduction Aerosol absorption is an important factor in the formation of non-selective radiation extinction in the visible wavelength range, and plays a great role in solving many radiative and climatic problems. The principal absorbing substance in atmospheric aerosol is soot (crystal carbon), which strongly affects the atmospheric transparency, albedo of clouds, and snow cover. The non-selective absorption by finely dispersed soot aerosol is considered to be one of the most plausible reasons for the appearance of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high-altitude absorbing aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Relating Secondary Organic Aerosol Characteristics with Cloud Condensation Nuclei Activity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and microphysical characterization of ambient aerosols withthe aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer, Mass Spectrom Rev,of secondary organic aerosol under near atmospheric

Tang, Xiaochen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Soft ionization of thermally evaporated hypergolic ionic liquid aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

+ ][Dca ? ]. Figure 2. Aerosol particle size distribution ofhypergolic ionic liquid aerosols Christine J. Koh † , Chen-ionization of evaporated IL aerosols Isolated ion pairs of a

Koh, Christine J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH ANNUAL REPORT 1975-76  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this room ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH -RECEIVED •I.AWSSKCEDIVISION ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH ANNUAL REPORTMass and Composition of Aerosol as a Function of Time,

Novakov, T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Response of California temperature to regional anthropogenic aerosol changes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to regional anthropogenic aerosol changes T. Novakov, T.W.indicator of anthropogenic aerosols – with observed surfacetemperature increase. Seasonal aerosol concentration trends

Novakov, T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Aerosol measurements with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

anthropogenic sulfate aerosols. Tellus, Ser. A, vol. 43, p.Twomey, Atmospheric Aerosols. New York : Elsevier ScientificCo. , 45. B.A. Albrecht, Aerosols, cloud microphysics, and

Lithgow, Gregg Arthur

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH, ANNUAL REPORT 1976-77  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DIVISION ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH ANNUAL REPORTLow-Z Elements in Atmospheric Aerosol Particles by Nuclearof sulfur dioxide by aerosols of manganese sulfate," Ind.

Novakov, T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Black carbon aerosols and the third polar ice cap  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

estimations in global aerosol models, Atmos. Chem. Phys. ,Cloud mi- crophysics and aerosol indirect efefcts in theuncertainties in assessing aerosol effects on climate, Ann.

Menon, Surabi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Total aerosol effect: forcing or radiative flux perturbation?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the ?rst indirect aerosol effect, Atmos. Chem. Phys. , 5,Cloud susceptibility and the ?rst aerosol indirect forcing:to black carbon and aerosol concentrations, J. Geophys.

Lohmann, Ulrike

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

GCM Aerosol Radiative Effects Using Geographically Varying Aerosol Sizes Deduced from AERONET Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosol optical properties, and hence the direct radiative effects, are largely determined by the assumed aerosol size distribution. In order to relax the fixed aerosol size constraint commonly used in general circulation models (GCMs), ...

Glen Lesins; Ulrike Lohmann

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Spectro-microscopic Measurements of Carbonaceous Aerosol Aging in Central California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectro-microscopic Measurements of Carbonaceous Spectro-microscopic Measurements of Carbonaceous Aerosol Aging in Central California For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http://www.arm.gov/science/highlights/ Research Highlight Atmospheric aerosols affect climate by scattering and absorbing sunlight and by modifying the properties of clouds. However, there are gaps in our understanding of chemical processes involving these airborne particulates, and these gaps contribute significantly to uncertainties in predicting future climate change. Developing more- accurate global climate models requires a more complete understanding of the aerosol lifecycle, from initial particle formation to loss through incorporation into precipitating clouds or dry deposition. In research published in the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, a team of

171

AERONET: The Aerosol Robotic Network  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

AERONET collaboration provides globally distributed observations of spectral aerosol optical Depth (AOD), inversion products, and precipitable water in diverse aerosol regimes. Aerosol optical depth data are computed for three data quality levels: Level 1.0 (unscreened), Level 1.5 (cloud-screened), and Level 2.0 (cloud screened and quality-assured). Inversions, precipitable water, and other AOD-dependent products are derived from these levels and may implement additional quality checks.[Copied from http://aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov/new_web/system_descriptions.html

172

Hydrolysis of organonitrate functional groups in aerosol particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Organonitrate (ON) groups are important substituents in secondary organic aerosols. Model simulations and laboratory studies indicate a large fraction of ON groups in aerosol particles, but much lower quantities are observed in the atmosphere. Hydrolysis of ON groups in aerosol particles has been proposed recently. To test this hypothesis, we simulated formation of ON molecules in a reaction chamber under a wide range of relative humidity (0% to 90%). The mass fraction of ON groups (5% to 20% for high-NOx experiments) consistently decreased with increasing relative humidity, which was best explained by hydrolysis of ON groups at a rate of 4 day-1 (lifetime of 6 hours) for reactions under relative humidity greater than 20%. In addition, we found that secondary nitrogen-containing molecules absorb light, with greater absorption under dry and high-NOx conditions. This work provides the first evidence for particle-phase hydrolysis of ON groups, a process that could substantially reduce ON group concentration in the atmosphere.

Liu, Shang; Shilling, John E.; Song, Chen; Hiranuma, Naruki; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Russell, Lynn M.

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

173

Large historical changes of fossil-fuel black carbon aerosols  

SciTech Connect

Anthropogenic emissions of fine black carbon (BC) particles, the principal light-absorbing atmospheric aerosol, have varied during the past century in response to changes of fossil-fuel utilization, technology developments, and emission controls. We estimate historical trends of fossil-fuel BC emissions in six regions that represent about two-thirds of present day emissions and extrapolate these to global emissions from 1875 onward. Qualitative features in these trends show rapid increase in the latter part of the 1800s, the leveling off in the first half of the 1900s, and the re-acceleration in the past 50 years as China and India developed. We find that historical changes of fuel utilization have caused large temporal change in aerosol absorption, and thus substantial change of aerosol single scatter albedo in some regions, which suggests that BC may have contributed to global temperature changes in the past century. This implies that the BC history needs to be represented realistically in climate change assessments.

Novakov, T.; Ramanathan, V.; Hansen, J.E.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Sato, M.; Sinton, J.E.; Sathaye, J.A.

2002-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

174

Analyzing signatures of aerosol-cloud interactions from satellite retrievals and the GISS GCM to constrain the aerosol indirect effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dust, and pollution aerosol on shallow cloud developmentclouds on indirect aerosol climate forcing, Nature, 432,1014– Albrecht, B. A. , Aerosols, cloud microphysics, and

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Moving core beam energy absorber and converter  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus for the prevention of overheating of laser or particle beam impact zones through the use of a moving-in-the-coolant-flow arrangement for the energy absorbing core of the device. Moving of the core spreads the energy deposition in it in 1, 2, or 3 dimensions, thus increasing the effective cooling area of the device.

Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

176

Composition for absorbing hydrogen from gas mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrogen storage composition is provided which defines a physical sol-gel matrix having an average pore size of less than 3.5 angstroms which effectively excludes gaseous metal hydride poisons while permitting hydrogen gas to enter. The composition is useful for separating hydrogen gas from diverse gas streams which may have contaminants that would otherwise render the hydrogen absorbing material inactive.

Heung, Leung K. (Aiken, SC); Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC); Lee, Myung W. (Aiken, SC)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

ARM - Surface Aerosol Observing System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FacilitiesSurface Aerosol Observing System FacilitiesSurface Aerosol Observing System AMF Information Science Architecture Baseline Instruments AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 Data Operations AMF Fact Sheet Images Contacts AMF Deployments Hyytiälä, Finland, 2014 Manacapuru, Brazil, 2014 Oliktok Point, Alaska, 2013 Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, 2012 Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2012 Gan Island, Maldives, 2011 Ganges Valley, India, 2011 Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 2010 Graciosa Island, Azores, 2009-2010 Shouxian, China, 2008 Black Forest, Germany, 2007 Niamey, Niger, 2006 Point Reyes, California, 2005 Surface Aerosol Observing System The ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is equipped to quantify the interaction between clouds and aerosol particles. A counter-flow virtual impactor (CVI) is used to selectively sample cloud drops. The CVI takes advantage of the

178

Two-Column Aerosol Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Research Facility is conducting the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) at Cape Cod National Seashore. From July 2012 to June 2013, the ARM Mobile Facility-a portable...

179

Mesoscale Variations of Tropospheric Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tropospheric aerosols are calculated to cause global-scale changes in the earth's heat balance, but these forcings are space/time integrals over highly variable quantities. Accurate quantification of these forcings will require an unprecedented ...

Theodore L. Anderson; Robert J. Charlson; David M. Winker; John A. Ogren; Kim Holmén

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Method for producing monodisperse aerosols  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An aerosol generator is described which is capable of producing a monodisperse aerosol within narrow limits utilizing an aqueous solution capable of providing a high population of seed nuclei and an organic solution having a low vapor pressure. The two solutions are cold nebulized, mixed, vaporized, and cooled. During cooling, particles of the organic vapor condense onto the excess seed nuclei, and grow to a uniform particle size.

Ortiz, Lawrence W. (Los Alamos, NM); Soderholm, Sidney C. (Pittsford, NY)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high-altitude absorbing aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Background Stratospheric Aerosol Variations Deduced from Satellite Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) aerosol products from 1998 to 2004 have been analyzed for the tendency of changes in background stratospheric aerosol properties. The aerosol extinction coefficient E has apparently ...

Yu Liu; Xuepeng Zhao; Weiliang Li; Xiuji Zhou

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Thermodynamic Characterization of Mexico City Aerosol during MILAGRO 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermodynamic Characterization of Mexico City Aerosol duringA computationally efficient thermodynamic equilibrium modelurban aerosols determined by thermodynamic equilibrium? An

Fountoukis, C.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Shock wave absorber having apertured plate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The shock or energy absorber disclosed herein utilizes an apertured plate maintained under the normal level of liquid flowing in a piping system and disposed between the normal liquid flow path and a cavity pressurized with a compressible gas. The degree of openness (or porosity) of the plate is between 0.01 and 0.60. The energy level of a shock wave travelling down the piping system thus is dissipated by some of the liquid being jetted through the apertured plate toward the cavity. The cavity is large compared to the quantity of liquid jetted through the apertured plate, so there is little change in its volume. The porosity of the apertured plate influences the percentage of energy absorbed.

Shin, Yong W. (Western Springs, IL); Wiedermann, Arne H. (Chicago Heights, IL); Ockert, Carl E. (Vienna, VA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Shock wave absorber having apertured plate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The shock or energy absorber disclosed herein utilizes an apertured plate maintained under the normal level of liquid flowing in a piping system and disposed between the normal liquid flow path and a cavity pressurized with a compressible gas. The degree of openness (or porosity) of the plate is between 0.01 and 0.60. The energy level of a shock wave travelling down the piping system thus is dissipated by some of the liquid being jetted through the apertured plate toward the cavity. The cavity is large compared to the quantity of liquid jetted through the apertured plate, so there is little change in its volume. The porosity of the apertured plate influences the percentage of energy absorbed.

Shin, Y.W.; Wiedermann, A.H.; Ockert, C.E.

1983-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

185

Subarctic atmospheric aerosol composition: 1. Ambient aerosol characterization  

SciTech Connect

Sub-Arctic aerosol was sampled during July 2007 at the Abisko Research Station Stordalen field site operated by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. Located in northern Sweden at 68º latitude and 385 meters above sea level (msl), this site is classified as a semi-continuous permafrost mire. Number density, size distribution, cloud condensation nucleus properties, and chemical composition of the ambient aerosol were determined. Backtrajectories showed that three distinct airmasses were present over Stordalen during the sampling period. Aerosol properties changed and correlated with airmass origin to the south, northeast, or west. We observe that Arctic aerosol is not compositionally unlike that found in the free troposphere at mid-latitudes. Internal mixtures of sulfates and organics, many on insoluble biomass burning and/or elemental carbon cores, dominate the number density of particles from ~200 to 2000 nm aerodynamic diameter. Mineral dust which had taken up gas phase species was observed in all airmasses. Sea salt, and the extent to which it had lost volatile components, was the aerosol type that most varied with airmass.

Friedman, Beth; Herich, Hanna; Kammermann, Lukas; Gross, Deborah S.; Ameth, Almut; Holst, Thomas; Lohmann, U.; Cziczo, Daniel J.

2009-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

186

Shock wave absorber having a deformable liner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention discloses a shock wave absorber for a piping system carrying liquid. The absorber has a plastically deformable liner defining the normal flow boundary for an axial segment of the piping system, and a nondeformable housing is spaced outwardly from the liner so as to define a gas-tight space therebetween. The flow capacity of the liner generally corresponds to the flow capacity of the piping system line, but the liner has a noncircular cross section and extends axially of the piping system line a distance between one and twenty times the diameter thereof. Gas pressurizes the gas-tight space equal to the normal liquid pressure in the piping system. The liner has sufficient structural capacity to withstand between one and one-half and two times this normal liquid pressures; but at greater pressures it begins to plastically deform initially with respect to shape to a more circular cross section, and then with respect to material extension by circumferentially stretching the wall of the liner. A high energy shock wave passing through the liner thus plastically deforms the liner radially into the gas space and progressively also as needed in the axial direction of the shock wave to minimize transmission of the shock wave beyond the absorber.

Youngdahl, C.K.; Wiedermann, A.H.; Shin, Y.W.; Kot, C.A.; Ockert, C.E.

1983-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

187

Direct and semi-direct aerosol effects of Southern African1 biomass burning aerosol2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Direct and semi-direct aerosol effects of Southern African1 biomass burning aerosol2 Naoko effects of biomass burning aerosols from Southern African fires9 during July-October are investigated region the overall TOA radiative effect from the23 biomass burning aerosols is almost zero due

Wood, Robert

188

ARM - Field Campaign - Fall 1997 Aerosol IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerosol IOP Aerosol IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Fall 1997 Aerosol IOP 1997.09.15 - 1997.10.05 Lead Scientist : Stephen Schwartz For data sets, see below. Summary The Aerosol IOP was highlighted by the Gulfstream-1 aircraft flying clear-sky aerosol missions over the Central Facility to study the effect of aerosol loading on clear sky radiation fields, with weather particularly favorable for these flights during the first and third weeks of the IOP. A secondary but important goal of this IOP was to fly cloudy-sky missions over the Central Facility to study the effect of aerosol loading on cloud microphysics, and the effect of the microphysics on cloud optical properties. The Gulfstream obtained aerosol data in support of some of the

189

Volcanoes and Climate Effects of Aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONTENTS 8.1 Importance of volcanoes, natural aerosols, and anthropogenic aerosols 341 8.2 Major scientific questions and hypotheses 342 8.2.1 Stratospheric volcanic aerosols and climate 342 8.2.1.1 Source gases for stratospheric aerosols 342 8.2.1.2 Explosiveness and plume history during individual eruptions 343 8.2.1.3 Frequency of eruptions, tectonic setting, rock/ash vs. SO 2 343 8.2.1.4 Gas-to-particle conversion and removal mechanisms 343 8.2.1.5 Radiative properties and climatic effects of stratospheric aerosols 345 8.2.1.6 Needed satellite and in situ measurements 347 8.2.1.6.1 Global observations of stratospheric aerosol optical properties 347 8.2.1.6.2 Lidar measurements of aerosols 347 8.2.2 Volcanic aerosols and stratospheric ozone depletion 349 8.2.3 Climatic effects of t

Hartmann And Mouginis-Mark; Volcanoes; D. L. Hartmann; P. Mouginis-mark; G. J. Bluth; J. A. Coakley; J. Crisp; R. E. Dickinson; P. W. Francis; J. E. Hansen; P. V. Hobbs; B. L. Isacks; Y. J. Kaufman; M. D. King; W. I. Rose; S. Self; L. D. Travis

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Climate Response to Soil Dust Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of radiative forcing by soil dust aerosols upon climate is calculated. Two atmospheric GCM (AGCM) simulations are compared, one containing a prescribed seasonally varying concentration of dust aerosols, and the other omitting dust. ...

R. L. Miller; I. Tegen

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Indirect and Semi-direct Aerosol Campaign  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive dataset of microphysical and radiative properties of aerosols and clouds in the boundary layer in the vicinity of Barrow, Alaska, was collected in April 2008 during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC). ISDAC's ...

Greg M. McFarquhar; Steven Ghan; Johannes Verlinde; Alexei Korolev; J. Walter Strapp; Beat Schmid; Jason M. Tomlinson; Mengistu Wolde; Sarah D. Brooks; Dan Cziczo; Manvendra K. Dubey; Jiwen Fan; Connor Flynn; Ismail Gultepe; John Hubbe; Mary K. Gilles; Alexander Laskin; Paul Lawson; W. Richard Leaitch; Peter Liu; Xiaohong Liu; Dan Lubin; Claudio Mazzoleni; Ann-Marie Macdonald; Ryan C. Moffet; Hugh Morrison; Mikhail Ovchinnikov; Matthew D. Shupe; David D. Turner; Shaocheng Xie; Alla Zelenyuk; Kenny Bae; Matt Freer; Andrew Glen

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

ARM - Evaluation Product - Organic Aerosol Component VAP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsOrganic Aerosol Component VAP ProductsOrganic Aerosol Component VAP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Organic Aerosol Component VAP 2011.01.08 - 2012.03.24 Site(s) SGP General Description Organic aerosol (OA, i.e., the organic fraction of particles) accounts for 10-90% of the fine aerosol mass globally and is a key determinant of aerosol radiative forcing. But atmospheric OA is poorly characterized and its life cycle insufficiently represented in models. As a result, current models are unable to simulate OA concentrations and properties. This deficiency represents a large source of uncertainty in the quantification of aerosol direct and indirect effects and the prediction of future climate change. The Organic Aerosol Component (OACOMP) value-added product (VAP) uses

193

Condition and Potential for Improvement of High Altitude Rangelands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to produce forage for grazing animals without degradation of related values and environmental quality (USDA, 1978). Prime rangeland must have slopes less than 50%, produce annual DM yields of at least 750 kg per ha, have adequate water supply... , past and present management of grazing, fire and nutrients; iii) The condition of rangeland deterioration varies considerably from very poor to good based on ground cover and biomass production; and iv) The causes of rangeland deterioration...

Gyamtsho, Pema

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

The current situation of high-altitude wind power.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The importance of the use of renewable energy sources is obviously. But what the problem confused us, is that renewable energy unlike the fossil… (more)

Tang, Yunmo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Single particle characterization, source apportionment, and aging effects of ambient aerosols in Southern California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

detection efficiencies of aerosol time of flight masscomposition of ambient aerosol particles. Environmentalsize dependent response of aerosol counters, Atmospheric

Shields, Laura Grace

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

ATI TDA 5A aerosol generator evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Oil based aerosol ``Smoke`` commonly used for testing the efficiency and penetration of High Efficiency Particulate Air filters (HEPA) and HEPA systems can produce flammability hazards that may not have been previously considered. A combustion incident involving an aerosol generator has caused an investigation into the hazards of the aerosol used to test HEPA systems at Hanford.

Gilles, D.A.

1998-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

197

Absorbents for Mineral Oil Spill Cleanup, Phase 3: Field Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residual mineral oil on the ground surface following electrical equipment spills is often removed using a surface application of an absorbent material. Traditional absorbent products include clays, sawdust-like products, silica-based products, and various organic industry byproduct materials. This project was performed in three phases. Phase 1 included testing to measure overall mineral oil absorption efficiency of 24 absorbents. In Phase 2, absorbents studied in Phase 1 were further ...

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

198

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol optical depth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

depth depth ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Aerosol optical depth A measure of how much light aerosols prevent from passing through a column of atmosphere. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments HSRL : High Spectral Resolution Lidar MPL : Micropulse Lidar MFRSR : Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer NIMFR : Normal Incidence Multifilter Radiometer Field Campaign Instruments AOS-PMFOV : Acoustical Optical Spectrometer-Photometer with Multiple

199

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol optical properties  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

properties properties ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Aerosol optical properties The optical properties of aerosols, including asymmetry factor, phase-function, single-scattering albedo, refractive index, and backscatter fraction. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CSPHOT : Cimel Sunphotometer NEPHELOMETER : Nephelometer Field Campaign Instruments AOS-PMFOV : Acoustical Optical Spectrometer-Photometer with Multiple

200

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol backscattered radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

backscattered radiation backscattered radiation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Aerosol backscattered radiation The scattering of radiant energy into the hemisphere of space bounded by a plane normal to the direction of the incident radiation and lying on the same side as the incident ray. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System MPL : Micropulse Lidar NEPHELOMETER : Nephelometer

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high-altitude absorbing aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Secondary organic aerosol from ozone-initiated reactions with terpene-rich household products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis of competition between aerosol particle removal andof secondary organic aerosol. Part I: ?-pinene/ozone system.data when measuring ambient aerosol. Aerosol Science and

Coleman, Beverly K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy: Applications in Atmospheric Aerosol Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in secondary organic aerosol. Environ. Sci. Technol. 41 ,particles from an urban aerosol. Environ. Sci. Technol. 26 ,carbonaceous atmospheric aerosols. Journal of Aerosol

Moffet, Ryan C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Real time infrared aerosol analyzer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for analyzing aerosols in essentially real time includes a virtual impactor which separates coarse particles from fine and ultrafine particles in an aerosol sample. The coarse and ultrafine particles are captured in PTFE filters, and the fine particles impact onto an internal light reflection element. The composition and quantity of the particles on the PTFE filter and on the internal reflection element are measured by alternately passing infrared light through the filter and the internal light reflection element, and analyzing the light through infrared spectrophotometry to identify the particles in the sample.

Johnson, Stanley A. (Countryside, IL); Reedy, Gerald T. (Bourbonnais, IL); Kumar, Romesh (Naperville, IL)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Absorber Alignment Measurement Tool for Solar Parabolic Trough Collectors: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As we pursue efforts to lower the capital and installation costs of parabolic trough solar collectors, it is essential to maintain high optical performance. While there are many optical tools available to measure the reflector slope errors of parabolic trough solar collectors, there are few tools to measure the absorber alignment. A new method is presented here to measure the absorber alignment in two dimensions to within 0.5 cm. The absorber alignment is measured using a digital camera and four photogrammetric targets. Physical contact with the receiver absorber or glass is not necessary. The alignment of the absorber is measured along its full length so that sagging of the absorber can be quantified with this technique. The resulting absorber alignment measurement provides critical information required to accurately determine the intercept factor of a collector.

Stynes, J. K.; Ihas, B.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Container and method for absorbing and reducing hydrogen concentration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for absorbing hydrogen from an enclosed environment comprising providing a vessel; providing a hydrogen storage composition in communication with a vessel, the hydrogen storage composition further comprising a matrix defining a pore size which permits the passage of hydrogen gas while blocking the passage of gaseous poisons; placing a material within the vessel, the material evolving hydrogen gas; sealing the vessel; and absorbing the hydrogen gas released into the vessel by the hydrogen storage composition. A container for absorbing evolved hydrogen gas comprising: a vessel having an interior and adapted for receiving materials which release hydrogen gas; a hydrogen absorbing composition in communication with the interior, the composition defining a matrix surrounding a hydrogen absorber, the matrix permitting the passage of hydrogen gas while excluding gaseous poisons; wherein, when the vessel is sealed, hydrogen gas, which is released into the vessel interior, is absorbed by the hydrogen absorbing composition.

Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC); Lee, Myung W. (North Augusta, SC); Heung, Leung K. (Aiken, SC)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Evaluation of Empirical Aerosol Correlations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examined the adequacy of novel scaling and correlation methods used to analyze aerosol behavior in versions 2.0 and 3.0 of the MAAP computer code. The results show that the MAAP 2.0 method suffers from inaccurate scaling. The method used in MAAP 3.0 is theoretically superior and more consistent with experimental data.

1986-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

207

Method of absorbing UF.sub.6 from gaseous mixtures in alkamine absorbents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of recovering uranium hexafluoride from gaseous mixtures employing as an absorbent a liquid composition at least one of the components of which is chosen from the group consisting of ethanolamine, diethanolamine, and 3-methyl-3-amino-propane-diol-1,2.

Lafferty, Robert H. (Oak Ridge, TN); Smiley, Seymour H. (Oak Ridge, TN); Radimer, Kenneth J. (Little Falls, NJ)

1976-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

208

Safeguards Verification Measurements using Laser Ablation, Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry in Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser Ablation Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry (LAARS) is a new verification measurement technology under development at the US Department of Energy’s (DOE) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). LAARS uses three lasers to ablate and then measure the relative isotopic abundance of uranium compounds. An ablation laser is tightly focused on uranium-bearing solids producing a small plume containing uranium atoms. Two collinear wavelength-tuned spectrometry lasers transit through the plume and the absorbance of U-235 and U-238 isotopes are measured to determine U-235 enrichment. The measurement has high relative precision and detection limits approaching the femtogram range for uranium. It is independent of chemical form and degree of dilution with nuisance dust and other materials. High speed sample scanning and pinpoint characterization allow measurements on millions of particles/hour to detect and analyze the enrichment of trace uranium in samples. The spectrometer is assembled using commercially available components at comparatively low cost, and features a compact and low power design. Future designs can be engineered for reliable, autonomous deployment within an industrial plant environment. Two specific applications of the spectrometer are under development: 1) automated unattended aerosol sampling and analysis and 2) on-site small sample destructive assay measurement. The two applications propose game-changing technological advances in gaseous centrifuge enrichment plant (GCEP) safeguards verification. The aerosol measurement instrument, LAARS-environmental sampling (ES), collects aerosol particles from the plant environment in a purpose-built rotating drum impactor and then uses LAARS-ES to quickly scan the surface of the impactor to measure the enrichments of the captured particles. The current approach to plant misuse detection involves swipe sampling and offsite analysis. Though this approach is very robust it generally requires several months to obtain results from a given sample collection. The destructive assay instrument, LAARS-destructive assay (DA), uses a simple purpose-built fixture with a sampling planchet to collect adsorbed UF6 gas from a cylinder valve or from a process line tap or pigtail. A portable LAARS-DA instrument scans the microgram quantity of uranium collected on the planchet and the assay of the uranium is measured to ~0.15% relative precision. Currently, destructive assay samples for bias defect measurements are collected in small sample cylinders for offsite mass spectrometry measurement.

Anheier, Norman C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Qiao, Hong (Amy); Phillips, Jon R.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Electromagnetic radiation absorbers and modulators comprising polyaniline  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition for absorbing electromagnetic radiation, wherein said electromagnetic radiation possesses a wavelength generally in the range of from about 1000 Angstroms to about 50 meters, wherein said composition comprises a polyaniline composition of the formula ##STR1## where y can be equal to or greater than zero, and R.sup.1 and R.sup.2 are independently selected from the group containing of H, --OCH.sub.3, --CH.sub.3, --F, --Cl, --Br, --I, NR.sup.3 .sub.2, --NHCOR.sup.3, --OH, --O.sup.-, SR.sup.3, --OCOR.sup.3, --NO.sub.2, --COOH, --COOR.sup.3, --COR.sup.3, --CHO, and --CN, where R.sup.3 is a C.sub.1 to C.sub.8 alkyl, aryl or aralkyl group.

Epstein, Arthur J. (Bexley, OH); Ginder, John M. (Columbus, OH); Roe, Mitchell G. (Columbus, OH); Hajiseyedjavadi, Hamid (Columbus, OH)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Simulating Aerosols Using a Chemical Transport Model with Assimilation of Satellite Aerosol Retrievals: Methodology for INDOEX  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A system for simulating aerosols has been developed using a chemical transport model together with an assimilation of satellite aerosol retrievals. The methodology and model components are described in this paper, and the modeled distribution of aerosols for the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) is presented by Rasch et al. [this issue]. The system generated aerosol forecasts to guide deployment of ships and aircraft during INDOEX. The system consists of the Model of Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry (MATCH) combined with an assimilation package developed for applications in atmospheric chemistry. MATCH predicts the evolution of sulfate, carbonaceous, and mineral dust aerosols, and it diagnoses the distribution of sea salt aerosols. The model includes a detailed treatment of the sources, chemical transformation, transport, and deposition of the aerosol species. The aerosol forecasts involve a two-stage process. During the assimilation phase the total column aerosol optical depth (AOD) is estimated from the model aerosol fields. The model state is then adjusted to improve the agreement between the simulated AOD and satellite retrievals of AOD. During the subsequent integration phase the aerosol fields are evolved using meteorological fields from an external model. Comparison of the modeled AOD against estimates of the AOD from INDOEX Sun photometer data show that the differences in daily means are #0.03 # 0.06. Although the initial application is limited to the Indian Ocean, the methodology could be extended to derive global aerosol analyses combining in situ and remotely sensed aerosol observations.

William D. Collins; Phillip J. Rasch; Brian E. Eaton; Boris V. Khattatov; Jean-francois Lamarque; C. Zender

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Method and apparatus for aerosol particle absorption spectroscopy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for determining the absorption spectra, and other properties, of aerosol particles. A heating beam source provides a beam of electromagnetic energy which is scanned through the region of the spectrum which is of interest. Particles exposed to the heating beam which have absorption bands within the band width of the heating beam absorb energy from the beam. The particles are also illuminated by light of a wave length such that the light is scattered by the particles. The absorption spectra of the particles can thus be determined from an analysis of the scattered light since the absorption of energy by the particles will affect the way the light is scattered. Preferably the heating beam is modulated to simplify the analysis of the scattered light. In one embodiment the heating beam is intensity modulated so that the scattered light will also be intensity modulated when the particles absorb energy. In another embodiment the heating beam passes through an interferometer and the scattered light reflects the Fourier Transform of the absorption spectra.

Campillo, Anthony J. (Nesconset, NY); Lin, Horn-Bond (Manorville, NY)

1983-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

212

Design and Sampling Characteristics of a New Airborne Aerosol Inlet for Aerosol Measurements in Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design of a new submicron aerosol inlet (SMAI) for airborne sampling of aerosol particles is introduced and its performance characteristics under a range of sampling conditions are presented. Analysis of inlet performance in clear-air and cloud ...

Lucas Craig; Allen Schanot; Arash Moharreri; David C. Rogers; Suresh Dhaniyala

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

The Aerosol Modeling Testbed: A Community Tool to Objectively Evaluate Aerosol Process Modules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current paradigm of developing and testing new aerosol process modules is haphazard and slow. Aerosol modules are often tested for short simulation periods using limited data so that their overall performance over a wide range of ...

Jerome D. Fast; William I. Gustafson Jr.; Elaine G. Chapman; Richard C. Easter; Jeremy P. Rishel; Rahul A. Zaveri; Georg A. Grell; Mary C. Barth

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Assessment of Aerosol Modes Used in the MODIS Ocean Aerosol Retrieval  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coastal and island Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites are used to determine characteristic aerosol modes over marine environments. They are compared with the assumed modes used in the operational Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (...

Jiacheng Wang; Qiang Zhao; Shengcheng Cui; Chengjie Zhu

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Intercomparison of Radiation Transfer Models Representing Direct Shortwave Forcing by Sulfate Aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study has been conducted, involving 15 models by 12 groups, to compare modeled forcing (change in shortwave radiation budget) due to sulfate aerosol for a wide range of values of particle radius, optical depth, surface albedo, and solar zenith angle (SZA). The models included high- and low-spectral resolution models, incorporating a variety of radiative transfer approximations, as well as a line-by-line model. The normalized forcings (forcing per sulfate column burden) obtained with the radiative transfer models were examined and the differences characterized. All models simulate forcings of comparable amplitude and exhibit a similar dependence on input parameters. As expected for a non-light-absorbing aerosol, forcings were negative (cooling influence), except at high surface albedo combined with low SZA. The relative standard deviation of the zenith-angle-average normalized broadband forcing for 15 models was 8% for particle radius near the maximum in magnitude of this forcing (ca....

Sulfate Aerosols; Stephen E Schwartz

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

ARM - PI Product - Direct Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsDirect Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty ProductsDirect Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Direct Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty Site(s) NSA SGP TWP General Description Understanding sources of uncertainty in aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF), the difference in a given radiative flux component with and without aerosol, is essential to quantifying changes in Earth's radiation budget. We examine the uncertainty in DRF due to measurement uncertainty in the quantities on which it depends: aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, solar geometry, and surface albedo. Direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface as well as sensitivities, the changes in DRF in response to unit changes in

217

Progress on the MICE Liquid Absorber Cooling and Cryogenic Distribution System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cold head with a gravity heat pipe. MICE ABSORBER OPERATIONthe heat leak into the absorber must be pipes into

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

ARM - Field Campaign - Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsTwo-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) govCampaignsTwo-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) Campaign Links TCAP website Related Campaigns Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Field Evaluation of Real-time Cloud OD Sensor TWST 2013.04.15, Scott, AMF Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Winter Aerosol Effects on Cloud Formation 2013.02.04, Cziczo, AMF Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): CU GMAX-DOAS Deployment 2012.07.15, Volkamer, AMF Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Aerosol Light Extinction Measurements 2012.07.15, Dubey, AMF Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Aerial Campaign 2012.07.07, Berg, AAF Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Aerodynamic Particle Sizer 2012.07.01, Berg, AMF Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): KASPRR Engineering Tests 2012.07.01, Mead, AMF Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Airborne HSRL and RSP Measurements

219

Using MODIS and AERONET to Determine GCM Aerosol Size  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosol size is still a poorly constrained quantity in general circulation models (GCMs). By using the modal radii of the coarse and fine mode retrieved from 103 stations in the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and the fine mode aerosol optical ...

Glen Lesins; Ulrike Lohmann

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Aerosol Remote Sensing over Clouds Using A-Train Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The detection of aerosol above clouds is critical for the estimate of both the aerosol and cloud radiative impacts. In this study, the authors present a new method to retrieve the aerosol properties over clouds that uses the multiangle ...

F. Waquet; J. Riedi; L. C. Labonnote; P. Goloub; B. Cairns; J-L. Deuzé; D. Tanré

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high-altitude absorbing aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

AEROSOL ANALYSIS FOR THE REGIONAL AIR POLLUTION STUDY - FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Beta-Gauge Methods Applied to Aerosol Samples." Submitted toHusar and B.Y.H. Liu. "The Aerosol Size Distribution of LosAngeles Smog." In: Aerosols and Atmospheric Chemistry, G.M.

Jaklevic, J.M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Distinguishing Aerosol Impacts on Climate Over the Past Century  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table 1. Aerosol Characteristics Species Emissions Burdenc and h), IE (d, i) and BAE (e, f). List of Tables AerosolEmission of trace gases and aerosols from biomass burning,

Koch, Dorothy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

OH-initiated heterogeneous aging of highly oxidized organic aerosol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

P. ; Jimenez, J. L. Aerosol Science and Technology 2004, 38,A. G. Highly dispersed aerosols; Halsted Press, New York,highly oxidized organic aerosol Sean H. Kessler 1 , Theodora

Kessler, Sean H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

SPURIOUS SULFATE FORMATION ON COLLECTED AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FORMATION ON COLLECTED AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLES B. W. Loo, R.FORMATION ON COLLECTED AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLES Billy W. Lao,ON COLLECTED AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLES* _B_il_l~y ___ W_. _L~o

Loo, B.W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

The CALIPSO Automated Aerosol Classification and Lidar Ratio Selection Algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Descriptions are provided of the aerosol classification algorithms and the extinction-to-backscatter ratio (lidar ratio) selection schemes for the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) aerosol products. One ...

Ali H. Omar; David M. Winker; Mark A. Vaughan; Yongxiang Hu; Charles R. Trepte; Richard A. Ferrare; Kam-Pui Lee; Chris A. Hostetler; Chieko Kittaka; Raymond R. Rogers; Ralph E. Kuehn; Zhaoyan Liu

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Understanding How Semiconductors Absorb Light | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Understanding How Semiconductors Absorb Light Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy...

227

Energy-absorbent material and method of making - Energy Innovation ...  

This invention relates to materials which absorb and dissipate energy and/or selectively allow energy to be transmitted, methods of making same, and articles ...

228

Photon Absorbed-Dose-to-Water Primary Standards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Photon Absorbed-Dose-to-Water Primary Standards. ... and scattering/perturbation for the water calorimeter in both Co-60 and high-energy x-ray ...

2013-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

229

Direct and semidirect aerosol effects of southern African biomass burning aerosol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Direct and semidirect aerosol effects of southern African biomass burning aerosol Naoko Sakaeda,1 2011; published 21 June 2011. [1] Direct and semidirect radiative effects of biomass burning aerosols static stability. Over the entire region the overall TOA radiative effect from the biomass burning

Wood, Robert

230

Micro Aerosol-based Decontamination System - Available ...  

Search PNNL. PNNL Home; About; Research; Publications; Jobs; News; Contacts; Micro Aerosol-based Decontamination System. Battelle Number(s): 15847. ...

231

Aerosol Retrieval Using Remote-sensed Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electromagnetic solar radiation. The amount of atmosphericas the amount of solar radiation that aerosols scatter andbased on reflected solar radiation field measurements

Wang, Yueqing

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

change. Tiny Specks with Large Effects Most people equate aerosols with hairspray and household cleaning products, but a large portion of these microscopic particles floating...

233

Carbonaceous Aerosol Study Using Advanced Particle Instrumentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

range transport of biomass combustion aerosols. Environ.6 6.1 Introduction Biomass combustion emissions contributeparticles from the combustion of biomass fuels. Environ.

Qi, Li

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Coupled aerosol-chemistry-climate twentieth century transient...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coupled aerosol-chemistry-climate twentieth century transient model investigation: Trends in short-lived species and climate responses Title Coupled aerosol-chemistry-climate...

235

THERMOPHORESIS AND ITS THERMAL PARAMETERS FOR AEROSOL COLLECTION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

THERMOPHORESIS AND ITS THERMAL PARAMETERS FOR AEROSOL COLLECTION Title THERMOPHORESIS AND ITS THERMAL PARAMETERS FOR AEROSOL COLLECTION Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report...

236

Aerosol organic carbon to black carbon ratios: Analysis of published...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerosol organic carbon to black carbon ratios: Analysis of published data and implications for climate forcing Title Aerosol organic carbon to black carbon ratios: Analysis of...

237

OLIGOMERIZATION OF LEVOGLUCOSAN IN PROXIES OF BIOMASS BURNING AEROSOLS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biomass burning aerosols play an important role in the chemistry and physics of the atmosphere and therefore, affect global climate. Biomass burning aerosols are generally… (more)

Holmes, Bryan J.

238

Evaluating the Direct and Indirect Aerosol Effect on Climate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

one of the largest uncertainties in climate forcing studies is the effect of aerosols on the earth-atmosphere system. Aerosols affect the radiation budget under both clear...

239

Aerosol Jet® Material Deposition for High Resolution Printed ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Aerosol Jet printing, is finding wide use in a number of ... The Aerosol Jet systems deposit a wide variety of functional materials onto a wide ...

240

Characterizing the Formation of Secondary Organic Aerosols-Interim...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterizing the Formation of Secondary Organic Aerosols-Interim Report. Title Characterizing the Formation of Secondary Organic Aerosols-Interim Report. Publication Type Report...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high-altitude absorbing aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Modeling Corrosion of a Metal under an Aerosol Droplet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deposition of aerosol droplets produced either by marine or industrial activity on the ... The atmospheric corrosion caused by aerosols is a result of a complex ...

242

Raman Lidar Measurements of Aerosols and Water Vapor During the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Raman Lidar Measurements of Aerosols and Water Vapor During the May 2003 Aerosol IOP R. A. Ferrare National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton,...

243

Factors affecting the indoor concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Factors affecting the indoor concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols of outdoor origin Title Factors affecting the indoor concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols of outdoor origin...

244

The Transformation of Outdoor Ammonium Nitrate Aerosols in the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Transformation of Outdoor Ammonium Nitrate Aerosols in the Indoor Environment Title The Transformation of Outdoor Ammonium Nitrate Aerosols in the Indoor Environment...

245

Retrieval of Aerosol Mass Concentration from Elastic Lidar Data.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Agricultural aerosol sources can contribute significantly to air pollution in many regions of the country. Characterization of the aerosol emissions of agricultural operations is required… (more)

Marchant, Christian C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Studies of urban atmospheric aerosols using lidar and sky radiometer.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

???This thesis discusses the remote sensing of atmospheric aerosols, the corresponding instrumental technology and inversion algorithm. The urban aerosol optical properties in Hong Kong have… (more)

Yang, Xun (??)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

The mixing state of carbonaceous aerosol particles in northern and southern California measured during CARES and CalNex 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbonaceous aerosols impact climate directly by scattering and absorbing radiation, and hence play a major, although highly uncertain, role in global radiative forcing. Commonly, ambient carbonaceous aerosols are internally mixed with secondary species such as nitrate, sulfate, and ammonium, which influence their climate impacts through optical properties, hygroscopicity, and atmospheric lifetime. Aircraft-aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (A-ATOFMS), which measures single-particle mixing state, was used to determine the fraction of organic and soot aerosols that were internally mixed and the variability of their mixing state in California during the Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) and the Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) field campaigns in the late spring and early summer of 2010. Nearly 88% of all A-ATOFMS measured particles (100-1000 nm in diameter) were internally mixed with secondary species, with 96% and 75% of particles internally mixed with nitrate and/or sulfate in southern and northern California, respectively. Even though atmospheric particle composition in both regions was primarily influenced by urban sources, the mixing state was found to vary greatly, with nitrate and soot being the dominant species in southern California, and sulfate and organic carbon in northern California. Furthermore, mixing state varied temporally in northern California, with soot becoming the prevalent particle type towards the end of the study as regional pollution levels increased. The results from these studies demonstrate that the majority of ambient carbonaceous particles are internally mixed and are heavily influenced by secondary species that are most predominant in each region. Based on these findings, considerations of regionally dominant sources and secondary species, as well as temporal variations of aerosol physical and optical properties, will be required to obtain more accurate predictions of the climate impacts of aerosol in California.

Cahill, John F.; Suski, Kaitlyn; Seinfeld, John H.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Prather, Kimberly A.

2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

248

The Cooling of a Liquid Absorber using a Small Cooler  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

helium gas at 14 K to a heat exchanger on the absorber tank.S Fill Neck 304 S S H2 Heat Exchanger T5 H T4 H2 Fill ValveTube Seal Cool Down Heat Exchanger Absorber Heater H T2

Baynham, D.E.; Bradshaw, T.W.; Green, M.A.; Ishimoto, S.; Liggins, N.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Validation of high performance pneumo-hydraulic shock absorbers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper discusses a theoretical and experimental approach to the validation of high performance shock absorbers, based on a flexible and innovative procedure. This type of components needs specific and unconventional tests, in order to detect the actual ... Keywords: oil-hydraulics, shock absorbers, validation, virtual instrumentation

Enrico Ravina

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Distribution of small dispersive coal dust particles and absorbed radioactive chemical elements in conditions of forced acoustic resonance in iodine air filter at nuclear power plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The physical features of distribution of the small dispersive coal dust particles and the adsorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes in the absorber with the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal granules were researched in the case of the intensive air dust aerosol stream flow through the iodine air filter (IAF). It was shown that, at the certain aerodynamic conditions in the IAF, the generation of the acoustic oscillations is possible. It was found that the acoustic oscillations generation results in an appearance of the standing acoustic waves of the air pressure (density) in the IAF. In the case of the intensive blow of the air dust aerosol, it was demonstrated that the standing acoustic waves have some strong influences on both: 1) the dynamics of small dispersive coal dust particles movement and their accumulation in the IAF; 2) the oversaturation of the cylindrical coal granules by the adsorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes in the regions, where the antin...

Ledenyov, Oleg P

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

ABSORBING WIPP BRINES: A TRU WASTE DISPOSAL STRATEGY  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has completed experiments involving 15 each, 250- liter experimental test containers of transuranic (TRU) heterogeneous waste immersed in two types of brine similar to those found in the underground portion of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). To dispose of the waste without removing the brine from the test containers, LANL added commercially available cross-linked polyacrylate granules to absorb the 190 liters of brine in each container, making the waste compliant for shipping to the WIPP in a Standard Waste Box (SWB). Prior to performing the absorption, LANL and the manufacturer of the absorbent conducted laboratory and field tests to determine the ratio of absorbent to brine that would fully absorb the liquid. Bench scale tests indicated a ratio of 10 parts Castile brine to one part absorbent and 6.25 parts Brine A to one part absorbent. The minimum ratio of absorbent to brine was sought because headspace in the containers was limited. However, full scale testing revealed that the ratio should be adjusted to be about 15% richer in absorbent. Additional testing showed that the absorbent would not apply more than 13.8 kPa pressure on the walls of the vessel and that the absorbent would still function normally at that pressure and would not degrade in the approximately 5e-4 Sv/hr radioactive field produced by the waste. Heat generation from the absorption was minimal. The in situ absorption created a single waste stream of 8 SWBs whereas the least complicated alternate method of disposal would have yielded at least an additional 2600 liters of mixed low level liquid waste plus about two cubic meters of mixed low level solid waste, and would have resulted in higher risk of radiation exposure to workers. The in situ absorption saved $311k in a combination of waste treatment, disposal, material and personnel costs compared to the least expensive alternative and $984k compared to the original plan.

Yeamans, D. R.; Wrights, R. S.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

252

Absorbing WIPP brines : a TRU waste disposal strategy.  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has completed experiments involving 15 each, 250-liter experimental test containers of transuranic (TRU) heterogeneous waste immersed in two types of brine similar to those found in the underground portion of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). To dispose of the waste without removing the brine from the test containers, LANL added commercially available cross-linked polyacrylate granules to absorb the 190 liters of brine in each container, making the waste compliant for shipping to the WlPP in a Standard Waste Box (SWB). Prior to performing the absorption, LANL and the manufacturer of the absorbent conducted laboratory and field tests to determine the ratio of absorbent to brine that would fully absorb the liquid. Bench scale tests indicated a ratio of 10 parts Castile brine to one part absorbent and 6.25 parts Brine A to one part absorbent. The minimum ratio of absorbent to brine was sought because headspace in the containers was limited. However, full scale testing revealed that the ratio should be adjusted to be about 15% richer in absorbent. Additional testing showed that the absorbent would not apply more than 13.8 kPa pressure on the walls of the vessel and that the absorbent would still function normally at that pressure and would not degrade in the approximately 5e-4 Sv/hr radioactive field produced by the waste. Heat generation from the absorption was minimal. The in situ absorption created a single waste stream of 8 SWBs whereas the least complicated alternate method of disposal would have yielded at least an additional 2600 liters of mixed low level liquid waste plus about two cubic meters of mixed low level solid waste, and would have resulted in higher risk of radiation exposure to workers. The in situ absorption saved $3 1 lk in a combination of waste treatment, disposal, material and personnel costs compared to the least expensive alternative and $984k compared to the original plan.

Yeamans, D. R. (David R.); Wright, R. (Robert)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Longwave radiative forcing by aqueous aerosols  

SciTech Connect

Recently, a great deal of interest has been focused on the role of aerosols in climatic change because of their potential cooling impacts due to light scattering. Recent advances in infrared spectroscopy using cylindrical internal reflectance have allowed the longwave absorption of dissolved aerosol species and the associated liquid water to be accurately determined and evaluated. Experimental measurements using these techniques have shown that dissolved sulfate, nitrate, and numerous other aerosol species will act to cause greenhouse effects. Preliminary calculations indicate that the longwave climate forcing (i.e., heating) for sulfate aerosol will be comparable in magnitude to the cooling effect produced by light scattering. However, more detailed modeling will clearly be needed to address the impact of the longwave forcing due to aerosols as a function of atmospheric height and composition. Their work has shown that aerosol composition will be important in determining longwave forcing, while shortwave forcing will be more related to the physical size of the aerosol droplets. On the basis of these studies, it is increasingly apparent that aerosols, fogs, and clouds play a key role in determining the radiative balance of the atmosphere and in controlling regional and global climates.

Gaffney, J.S.; Marley, N.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Research Div.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

BNL | Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) The Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) is a platform and instrument suite for Intensive Operation Periods (IOPs) to conduct in situ measurements of aerosols and their precursors. MAOS is part of the ARM Climate Research Facility. Physically MAOS is contained in two 20' SeaTainers custom adapted to provide a sheltered laboratory environment for operators and instruments even under harsh conditions. The two structures are designated MAOS-A and MAOS-C for Aerosol and Chemistry respectively. Although independent, with separate data systems, inlets and power distribution, the two structures are normally a single operating unit. The two enclosures comprising MAOS are designed for rapid deployment. All components (except for the Radar Wind Profiler) are transported internally

255

The Opposed Migration Aerosol Classifier (OMAC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Opposed Migration Aerosol Classifier (OMAC) The Opposed Migration Aerosol Classifier (OMAC) Speaker(s): Harmony Gates Date: February 22, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Melissa Lunden A new differential mobility classifier will be described. The instrument classifies aerosol particles in a channel flow between porous (or screen) electrodes. The aerosol enters the channel parallel to the porous electrodes, while a larger, particle-free cross-flow enters through one of the porous electrode. A potential difference between electrodes causes the charged aerosol particles to migrate upstream against the cross-flow. Only particles whose upward migration velocity balances the cross flow will be transmitted along the path of the classifier. Simulations of the OMAC show that it should give the same resolution at the traditional

256

AEROSOL PARTICLE COLLECTOR DESIGN STUDY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A computational evaluation of a particle collector design was performed to evaluate the behavior of aerosol particles in a fast flowing gas stream. The objective of the work was to improve the collection efficiency of the device while maintaining a minimum specified air throughput, nominal collector size, and minimal power requirements. The impact of a range of parameters was considered subject to constraints on gas flow rate, overall collector dimensions, and power limitations. Potential improvements were identified, some of which have already been implemented. Other more complex changes were identified and are described here for further consideration. In addition, fruitful areas for further study are proposed.

Lee, S; Richard Dimenna, R

2007-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

257

Thin-film absorber for a solar collector  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This invention pertains to energy absorbers for solar collectors, and more particularly to high performance thin film absorbers. The solar collectors comprising the absorber of this invention overcome several problems seen in current systems, such as excessive hardware, high cost and unreliability. In the preferred form, the apparatus features a substantially rigid planar frame with a thin film window bonded to one planar side of the frame. An absorber in accordance with the present invention is comprised of two thin film layers that are sealed perimetrically. In a preferred embodiment, thin film layers are formed from a metal/plastic laminate. The layers define a fluid-tight planar envelope of large surface area to volume through which a heat transfer fluid flows. The absorber is bonded to the other planar side of the frame. The thin film construction of the absorber assures substantially full envelope wetting and thus good efficiency. The window and absorber films stress the frame adding to the overall strength of the collector.

Wilhelm, W.G.

1982-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

258

Study of segmented absorbers of thermal solar compound parabolic collectors  

SciTech Connect

One of the most promising means of improving the performance of solar thermal collectors is by reducing the energy lost by the host absorber. One way to do this, not currently part of the technology, is by recognizing that the absorber is usually not irradiated uniformly. Therefore, it is possible to construct an absorber of thermally isolated segments, circulate the fluid in sequence from low to high irradiance segments, and reduce loss by improving effective concentration. This procedure works even for ideal concentrators, without violating Winston's theorem.

Keita, M.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Linearity of Climate Response to Increases in Black Carbon Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of absorbing aerosols on global climate are not completely understood. Here, we present results of idealized experiments conducted with the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM4) coupled to a slab ocean model (CAM4-SOM) to simulate the climate response to increases in tropospheric black carbon aerosols (BC) by direct and semi-direct effects. CAM4-SOM was forced with 0, 1x, 2x, 5x and 10x an estimate of the present day concentration of BC while maintaining their estimated present day global spatial and vertical distribution. The top of the atmosphere (TOA) radiative forcing of BC in these experiments is positive (warming) and increases linearly as the BC burden increases. The total semi-direct effect for the 1x experiment is positive but becomes increasingly negative for higher BC concentrations. The global average surface temperature response is found to be a linear function of the TOA radiative forcing. The climate sensitivity to BC from these experiments is estimated to be 0.42 K $\\textnormal W^{-1} m^{2}$ when the semi-direct effects are accounted for and 0.22 K $\\textnormal W^{-1} m^{2}$ with only the direct effects considered. Global average precipitation decreases linearly as BC increases, with a precipitation sensitivity to atmospheric absorption of 0.4 $\\%$ $\\textnormal W^{-1} \\textnormal m^{2}$ . The hemispheric asymmetry of BC also causes an increase in southward cross-equatorial heat transport and a resulting northward shift of the inter-tropical convergence zone in the simulations at a rate of 4$^{\\circ}$N $\\textnormal PW^{-1}$. Global average mid- and high-level clouds decrease, whereas the low-level clouds increase linearly with BC. The increase in marine stratocumulus cloud fraction over the south tropical Atlantic is caused by increased BC-induced diabatic heating of the free troposphere.

Evans, Katherine J [ORNL; Hack, James J [ORNL; Truesdale, John [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Evolution of organic aerosol mass spectra upon heating: implications for OA phase and partitioning behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Seinfeld, J. H. : Organic aerosol formation from theJ. : A large organic aerosol source in the free troposphereand Worsnop, D. R. : Organic aerosol components observed in

Cappa, Christopher D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high-altitude absorbing aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Aerosol effects on red blue ratio of clear sky images, and impact on solar forecasting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

urban, and desert dust aerosols ." JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICALand K. V. S. Badarinath. "Aerosol climatology: dependence ofUsing a Sky Imager for aerosol characterization."

Ghonima, Mohamed Sherif

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Emissions of trace gases and aerosols during the open combustion of biomass in the laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in press), Organic aerosols in the earth's atmosphere,loss, and trace gas and aerosol emissions during laboratoryproperties of biomass burn aerosols, Geophysical Research

McMeeking, Gavin R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Aerosol indirect effects -- general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. : A parameterization of aerosol activation - 3. Sectionalclouds on indirect aerosol climate forcing, Nature, 432,2004. Albrecht, B. A. : Aerosols, cloud microphysics, and

Quaas, Johannes

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation from Primary Aliphatic Amines with Nitrate Radical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

back- ground atmospheric aerosol in the UK determined inof secondary organic aerosols, Atmos. Environ. , 31, 3921–et al. : Secondary organic aerosol formation from amines

Malloy, Q G J; Qi, L; Warren, B; Cocker III, D R; Erupe, M E; Silva, P J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Impacts of aerosol-cloud interactions on past and future changes in tropospheric composition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of gas-phase chemistry-aerosol interactions on directforcing by anthropogenic aerosols and ozone, J. Geophys.GCM to constrain the aerosol indirect effect, J. Geophys.

Menon, S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Correlations between Optical, Chemical and Physical Properties of Biomass Burn Aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

instruments and photoelectric aerosol sensors in source-sampling of black carbon aerosol and particle-bound PAHsAirborne minerals and related aerosol particles: Effects on

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Composition, sources, and formation of secondary organic aerosols from urban emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

organonitrate functional groups in aerosol particles200 5.1v aerosol Chapter 3 Meteorological conditions during theSecondary organic aerosol formation from fossil fuel sources

Liu, Shang; Liu, Shang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

X-RAY METHODS FOR THE CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Goulding Fine Particles: Aerosol Generation, Sampling andCHARACTERIZATION OF ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS J.M. Jaklevic andCHARACTERIZATION OF ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS J.M. Jaklevic and

Jaklevic, J.M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Chapter 3: Evaluating the impacts of carbonaceous aerosols on clouds and climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud susceptibility and the first aerosol indirect forcing:Sensitivity to BC and aerosol concentrations. J. Geophys.of cloud droplet and aerosols number concentrations:

Menon, Surabi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Characterization of the Molecular Composition of Secondary Organic Aerosols using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in secondary organic aerosol formation from isoprene, Proc.biogenic secondary organic aerosol, J. Phys. Chem. A, 112(in secondary organic aerosol, Environ. Sci. Technol. , 41(

Sellon, Rachel Elizabeth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Measurements of the chemical, physical, and optical properties of single aerosol particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

composition of ambient aerosol particles, EnvironmentalParticle Measurement of Ambient Aerosol Particles Containingfor quantifying direct aerosol forcing of climate, Bull. Am.

Moffet, Ryan Christopher

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

DETERMINATION OF CARBON IN ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS BY DEUTERON-INDUCED NUCLEAR REACTIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

deuteron irradiation of an atmospheric aerosol sample.CARBON IN ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS BY DEUTERON-INDUCED NUCLEARCARBON IN ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS BY DEUTERON-INDUCED NUCLEAR

Clemenson, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

On the Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding Organic Aerosol Particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carbon fractions in atmospheric aerosols, J. Geophys. Res. -particulate diesel exhaust, Aerosol Sci. Technol. 25: 221-climate forcing of carbonaceous aerosols, J. Geophys. Res. -

Pang, Y.; Turpin, B.J.; Gundel, L.A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Aerosol indirect effects ? general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oscillation influence aerosol variability? , J. Geophys.clouds on indirect aerosol climate forcing, Nature, 432,2004. Albrecht, B. A. : Aerosols, cloud microphysics, and

Quaas, Johannes

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Real time in situ detection of organic nitrates in atmospheric aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biogenic Secondary Organic Aerosol. J. Phys. Chem. A 2008,H. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from reactionsec- ondary organic aerosol yields. Atmospheric Chemistry

Rollins, Andrew W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation From Radical-Initiated Reactions of Alkenes: Development of Mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Secondary Organic Aerosols in Southern California duringSources of Organic Carbon Aerosols in the Free Troposphere21 co-authors), 2005. Organic Aerosol and Global Climate

Matsunaga, Aiko

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Aerosol organic carbon to black carbon ratios: Analysis of published data and implications for climate forcing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ryu (2004), Carbonaceous aerosol characteristics ofPM 2.5Allen (1990), Transported acid aerosols measured in southernconference international aerosol carbon round robin test

Novakov, T.; Menon, S.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Koch, D.; Hansen, J.E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH FY-1979, CHAPTER IN THE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT ANNUAL REPORT, 1979  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California atmospheric aerosols," Environ. Sci. Technol. ll•suspensions," in Atmospheric Aerosol Research Annual Report,formation," in Atmospheric Aerosol Research Annual Report,

Authors, Various

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

MHK Technologies/Trondheim Point Absorber | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trondheim Point Absorber Trondheim Point Absorber < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Trondheim Point Absorber.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Norwegian University of Science and Technology CONWEC AS Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Floating Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The floating buoy can oscillate along a strut that at its lower end is connected to a universal joint on an anchor on the sea bed The water depth which depends on the tide is in the range of 4 to 7 m On the top of the hull the latching mechanism and one of the guiding roller units are visible As the bottom of the hull is open sea water is flowing into and out from an inner chamber where the water surface acts as the piston of an air pump

280

MHK Technologies/Floating absorber | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

absorber absorber < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Floating absorber.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Euro Wave Energy Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Floating Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The main module consists of Two drive wheels on each side of the vertical running rod which always move in the opposite direction A unique connection of two camclutches which operate such that at all time the correct rotating direction in one of the drive wheels run the generator Generator and buoyancy elements Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 27:29.6

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high-altitude absorbing aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Scientists Identify New Family of Iron-Based Absorber Materials...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use of Earth-abundant materials in solar absorber films is critical for expanding the reach of photovoltaic (PV) technologies. The use of Earth-abundant and inexpensive Fe in PV...

282

An Upper Gravity-Wave Absorbing Layer for NWP Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although the use of a damping layer near the top of a computational model domain has proven effective in absorbing upward-propagating gravity-wave energy in idealized simulations, this technique has been less successful in real atmospheric ...

J. B. Klemp; J. Dudhia; A. D. Hassiotis

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Energy-absorbent Material and Method of Making  

This invention relates to materials that absorb and dissipate energy and/or selectively allow energy to be transmitted – in particular, polymeric materials that include polyol(s) such as polyethers, polyesters, polyether/esters, acrylics, plus other ...

284

Overcoming the far-field diffraction limit via absorbance modulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diffraction limits the resolution of far-field lithography and imaging to about half of the wavelength, which greatly limits the capability of optical techniques. The proposed technique with absorbance modulation aims to ...

Tsai, Hsin-Yu Sidney

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

The Cooling of a Liquid Absorber using a Small Cooler  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

absorber is to use a gravity heat pipe. Liquid hydrogen (orcirculates the liquid. A heat pipe can have a very low DT (heat pipe. A copper strap shown is

Baynham, D.E.; Bradshaw, T.W.; Green, M.A.; Ishimoto, S.; Liggins, N.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Handbook on Neutron Absorber Materials for Spent Nuclear Fuel Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This handbook is intended to become a single source of information regarding technical characteristics of neutron absorber materials that have been used for storage and transportation of spent nuclear fuel as well as to provide a summary of users' experience.

2005-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

287

Liquid absorbent solutions for separating nitrogen from natural gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nitrogen-absorbing and -desorbing compositions, novel ligands and transition metal complexes, and methods of using the same, which are useful for the selective separation of nitrogen from other gases, especially natural gas.

Friesen, Dwayne T. (Bend, OR); Babcock, Walter C. (Bend, OR); Edlund, David J. (Redmond, OR); Lyon, David K. (Bend, OR); Miller, Warren K. (Bend, OR)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Polarimetric Remote Sensing of Aerosols over Land  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sensitivity of accurate polarized reflectance measurements over a broad spectral (410 -2250 nm) and angular (±60° from nadir) range to the presence of aerosols over land is analyzed and the consequent ability to retrieve the aerosol burden and microphysical model is assessed. Here we present a new approach to the correction of polarization observations for the effects of the surface that uses longer wavelength observations to provide a direct estimate of the surface polarized reflectance. This approach to surface modeling is incorporated into an optimal estimation framework for retrieving the particle number density and a detailed aerosol microphysical model: effective radius, effective variance and complex refractive index of aerosols. A sensitivity analysis shows that the uncertainties in aerosol optical thickness (AOT) increase with AOT while the uncertainties in the microphysical model decrease. Of particular note is that the uncertainty in the single scattering albedo is less than 0.05 by the time the AOT is greater than 0.2. We also find that calibration is the major source of uncertainty and that perfect angular and spectral correlation of calibration errors reduces the uncertainties in retrieved quantities compared with the case of uncorrelated errors. Finally, in terms of required spectral range, we observe that shorter wavelength (aerosols from polarized reflectance observations. The optimal estimation scheme is then tested on observations made by the Research Scanning Polarimeter during the Aerosol Lidar Validation experiment and over Southern California wild fires. These two sets of observations test the retrieval scheme under pristine and polluted conditions respectively. In both cases we find that the retrievals are within the combined uncertainties of the retrieval and the Aerosol Robotic Network Cimel products and Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer Aerosol Index that we are comparing to. This confirms the validity of the sensitivity analysis of the polarized reflectance observations to the aerosol number density and microphysical model and demonstrates the unique capability to accurately retrieve aerosol optical depths under pristine conditions and also the single scattering albedo of aerosols at higher optical depths.

Waquet, F.; Cairns, Brian; Knobelspiesse, Kirk D.; Chowdhary, J.; Travis, Larry D.; Schmid, Beat; Mishchenko, M.

2009-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

289

Airborne measurements of carbonaceous aerosols in southern Africa during the dry, biomass burning season  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Particulate matter collected aboard the University of Washington's Convair-580 research aircraft over southern Africa during the dry, biomass burning season was analyzed for total carbon, organic carbon, and black carbon contents using thermal and optical methods. Samples were collected in smoke plumes of burning savanna and in regional haze. A known artifact, produced by the adsorption of organic gases on the quartz filter substrates used to collect the particulate matter samples, comprised a significant portion of the total carbon collected. Consequently, conclusions derived from the data are greatly dependent on whether or not organic carbon concentrations are corrected for this artifact. For example, the estimated aerosol co-albedo (1 - single scattering albedo), which is a measure of aerosol absorption, of the biomass smoke samples is 60 percent larger using corrected organic carbon concentrations. Thus, the corrected data imply that the biomass smoke is 60 percent more absorbing than do the uncorrected data. The black carbon to (corrected) organic carbon mass ratio (BC/OC) of smoke plume samples (0.18/2610.06) is lower than that of samples collected in the regional haze (0.25/2610.08). The difference may be due to mixing of biomass smoke with background air characterized by a higher BC/OC ratio. A simple source apportionment indicates that biomass smoke contributes about three-quarters of the aerosol burden in the regional haze, while other sources (e.g., fossil fuel burning) contribute the remainder.

Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Novakov, T.; Hobbs, Peter V.; Magi, Brian

2002-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

290

Aerosol, Cloud, and Climate: From Observation to Model (457th Brookhaven Lecture)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the last 100 years, the Earth has warmed by about 1ºF, glaciers and sea ice have been melting more quickly than previously, especially during the past decade, and the level of the sea has risen about 6-8 inches worldwide. Scientists have long been investigating this phenomenon of “global warming,” which is believed to be at least partly due to the increased carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration in the air from burning fossil fuels. Funded by DOE, teams of researchers from BNL and other national labs have been gathering data in the U.S. and internationally to build computer models of climate and weather to help in understanding general patterns, causes, and perhaps, solutions. Among many findings, researchers observed that atmospheric aerosols, minute particles in the atmosphere, can significantly affect global energy balance and climate. Directly, aerosols scatter and absorb sunlight. Indirectly, increased aerosol concentration can lead to smaller cloud droplets, changing clouds in ways that tend to cool global climate and potentially mask overall warming from man-made CO2.

Wang, Jian (Ph.D., Environmental Sciences Department)

2010-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

291

National program plan for absorber surfaces R and D  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The optical properties - solar absorptance (..cap alpha../sub s/) and thermal emittance (epsilon/sub t/) - of the receiver surface are important in a wide range of solar energy conversion devices from passive solar buildings to sophisticated two axis tracking concentrators. This report describes a National Plan for Absorber Surfaces R and D and includes the background information (available absorber materials and characteristics, applications, and probable benefits) used to derive the plan.

Call, P. J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Project goals: (1) Use the routine surface and airborne measurements at the ARM SGP site, and the routine surface measurements at the NSA site, to continue our evaluations of model aerosol simulations; (2) Determine the degree to which the Raman lidar measurements of water vapor and aerosol scattering and extinction can be used to remotely characterize the aerosol humidification factor; (3) Use the high temporal resolution CARL data to examine how aerosol properties vary near clouds; and (4) Use the high temporal resolution CARL and Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) data to quantify entrainment in optically thin continental cumulus clouds.

Richard A. Ferrare; David D. Turner

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Instrumentation for the absorbers in the low Beta* Insertions of the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ll~ A ccr cu ~:~ 'if' Instrumentation for the Absorbers inLBNL-42180 CBP Note-251 Instrumentation for the Absorbers inPaper CBP Note 251 Instrumentation for the Absorbers in the

Turner, W.C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Composition and Reactions of Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Wednesday, 29 June 2005 00:00 Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion emissions released from around the world. How long these tiny particles remain in the atmosphere can have a huge impact on the global climate. Measurements based on high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the ALS have revealed chemical reactions on and in atmospheric aerosol particles that caused particle growth while changing organic composition by 13 to 24% per day, an oxidation rate significantly slower than is currently used in atmospheric models. Since oxidation has a strong effect on particle lifetime in the atmosphere, these results will help climate scientists refine the computer models used to predict climate change.

295

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol particle size distribution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

particle size distribution particle size distribution ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Aerosol particle size distribution The number of aerosol particles present in any given volume of air within a specificied size range Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments SMPS : Scanning mobility particle sizer TDMA : Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer UHSAS : Ultra-High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer Field Campaign Instruments

296

BNL | Two-Column Aerosol Program (TCAP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) There remain many key knowledge gaps despite advances in the scientific understanding of how aerosols and clouds evolve and affect climate. Many climatically important processes depend on particles that undergo continuous changes within a size range spanning a few nanometers to a few microns, and with compositions that consist of a variety of carbonaceous materials, soluble inorganic salts and acids and insoluble mineral dust. Primary particles, which are externally-mixed when emitted, are subject to coagulation and chemical changes associated with the condensation of semi-volatile gases to their surface resulting in a spectrum of compositions or mixing-states with a range of climate-affecting optical and hygroscopic properties. The numerical treatments of aerosol transformation

297

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion emissions released from around the world. How long these tiny particles remain in the atmosphere can have a huge impact on the global climate. Measurements based on high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the ALS have revealed chemical reactions on and in atmospheric aerosol particles that caused particle growth while changing organic composition by 13 to 24% per day, an oxidation rate significantly slower than is currently used in atmospheric models. Since oxidation has a strong effect on particle lifetime in the atmosphere, these results will help climate scientists refine the computer models used to predict climate change.

298

Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosol–cloud–radiation interactions are widely held to be the largest single source of uncertainty in climate model projections of future radiative forcing due to increasing anthropogenic emissions. The underlying causes of this uncertainty among modeled ...

Lynn M. Russell; Armin Sorooshian; John H. Seinfeld; Bruce A. Albrecht; Athanasios Nenes; Lars Ahlm; Yi-Chun Chen; Matthew Coggon; Jill S. Craven; Richard C. Flagan; Amanda A. Frossard; Haflidi Jonsson; Eunsil Jung; Jack J. Lin; Andrew R. Metcalf; Robin Modini; Johannes Mülmenstädt; Greg Roberts; Taylor Shingler; Siwon Song; Zhen Wang; Anna Wonaschütz

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

ARM - Campaign Instrument - aerosol-tower-eml  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govInstrumentsaerosol-tower-eml Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : EML Tower based Aerosol...

300

Remote Sensing of Aerosol Properties during CARES  

SciTech Connect

One month of MFRSR data collected at two sites in the central California (USA) region during the CARES campaign are processed and the MFRSR-derived AODs at 500 nm wavelength are compared with available AODs provided by AERONET measurements. We find that the MFRSR and AERONET AODs are small ({approx}0.05) and comparable. A reasonable quantitative agreement between column aerosol size distributions (up to 2 um) from the MFRSR and AERONET retrievals is illustrated as well. Analysis of the retrieved (MFRSR and AERONET) and in situ measured aerosol size distributions suggests that the contribution of the coarse mode to aerosol optical properties is substantial for several days. The results of a radiative closure experiment performed for the two sites and one-month period show a favorable agreement between the calculated and measured broadband downwelling irradiances (bias does not exceed about 3 Wm-2), and thus imply that the MFRSR-derived aerosol optical properties are reasonable.

Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Flynn, Connor J.; Ferrare, R.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Hair, John; Jobson, Bertram Thomas

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high-altitude absorbing aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

The Life Cycle of Stratospheric Aerosol Particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the life cycle of the background (nonvolcanic) stratospheric sulfate aerosol. The authors assume the particles are formed by homogeneous nucleation near the tropical tropopause and are carried aloft into the stratosphere. The ...

Patrick Hamill; Eric J. Jensen; P. B. Russell; Jill J. Bauman

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Exploring Atmospheric Aerosols by Twilight Photometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The instrument twilight photometer was designed, developed, and installed at the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (IITM), Pune, India (18°43?N, 73°51?E), to monitor the vertical distribution of atmospheric aerosols. The instrument, based ...

B. Padma Kumari; S. H. Kulkarni; D. B. Jadhav; A. L. Londhe; H. K. Trimbake

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

On the Background Stratospheric Aerosol Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Balloonborne aerosol particle counter measurements are used in studying the stratospheric sulfate layer at Laramie, Wyoming, during 1978 and 1979, a 2-year volcanically quiescent period in which the layer appears to have been in a near ...

D. J. Hofmann; J. M. Rosen

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Study of Aerosol Indirect Effects in China  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerosol Indirect Effects in China In 2008, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is providing the ARM Mobile...

305

A New Method for Measuring Aerosol Absorption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new technique has recently been developed to measure aerosol absorption by means of a microdensitometer. Black particulate material is collected into six spots on membrane filters by a laboratory-tested impaction/concentration technique. Follow-...

B. B. Murphey; S. I. Reynolds

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Aerosol Transport in the Southern Sierra Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosol transport and meteorology were investigated during 10 days in August 1985, at three elevations in the southern Sierra. Ground weather station and pilot balloon data revealed the diurnal variation of the topographic winds to be remarkably ...

D. M. Ewell; R. G. Flocchini; L. O. Myrup; T. A. Cahill

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Urban Aerosol Impacts on Downwind Convective Storms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impacts of urban-enhanced aerosol concentrations on convective storm development and precipitation over and downwind of St. Louis, Missouri, are investigated. This is achieved through the use of a cloud-resolving mesoscale model, in which ...

Susan C. van den Heever; William R. Cotton

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Aerosol Best Estimate Value-Added Product  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the Aerosol Best Estimate (AEROSOLBE) value-added product (VAP) is to provide vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, single scatter albedo, asymmetry parameter, and Angstroem exponents for the atmospheric column above the Central Facility at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. We expect that AEROSOLBE will provide nearly continuous estimates of aerosol optical properties under a range of conditions (clear, broken clouds, overcast clouds, etc.). The primary requirement of this VAP was to provide an aerosol data set as continuous as possible in both time and height for the Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) VAP in order to provide a structure for the comprehensive assessment of our ability to model atmospheric radiative transfer for all conditions. Even though BBHRP has been completed, AEROSOLBE results are very valuable for environmental, atmospheric, and climate research.

Flynn, C; Turner, D; Koontz, A; Chand, D; Sivaraman, C

2012-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

309

Emerging Technology for Measuring Atmospheric Aerosol Properties...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brookhaven Laboratory and with funding from the DOE STTR program. DMT is developing a new technique for measuring aerosol size distributions in the sub-0.1 um size range. The...

310

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Composition and Reactions of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles Print Microscopic aerosol particles in the atmosphere contain carbonaceous components from mineral dust and combustion emissions released from around the world. How long these tiny particles remain in the atmosphere can have a huge impact on the global climate. Measurements based on high-resolution scanning transmission x-ray images obtained at the ALS have revealed chemical reactions on and in atmospheric aerosol particles that caused particle growth while changing organic composition by 13 to 24% per day, an oxidation rate significantly slower than is currently used in atmospheric models. Since oxidation has a strong effect on particle lifetime in the atmosphere, these results will help climate scientists refine the computer models used to predict climate change.

311

ARM - Field Campaign - Aerosol Lidar Validation Experiment -...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsAerosol Lidar Validation Experiment - ALIVE Campaign Links ALIVE Website Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA....

312

DETERMINATION OF RADIAL MOMENTS OF AN AEROSOL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DETERMINATION OF RADIAL MOMENTS OF AN AEROSOL DETERMINATION OF RADIAL MOMENTS OF AN AEROSOL SIZE DISTRIBUTION FROM MEASUREMENTS OF LIGHT TRANSMITTANCE AND SCATTERING Ernie R. Lewis and Stephen E. Schwartz Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11933 ses@bnl.gov elewis@bnl.gov MOMENTS FROM MEASUREMENTS As each of the measured quantities is linear in the size distribution dn/dr, it is possible to construct linear combinations of measurements that yield

313

Apparatus for sampling and characterizing aerosols  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for sampling and characterizing aerosols having a wide particle size range at relatively low velocities may comprise a chamber having an inlet and an outlet, the chamber including: a plurality of vertically stacked, successive particle collection stages; each collection stage includes a separator plate and a channel guide mounted transverse to the separator plate, defining a labyrinthine flow path across the collection stage. An opening in each separator plate provides a path for the aerosols from one collection stage t

Dunn, P.F.; Herceg, J.E.; Klocksieben, R.H.

1984-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

314

ARM - Field Campaign - Aerosol Life Cycle IOP at BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsAerosol Life Cycle IOP at BNL govCampaignsAerosol Life Cycle IOP at BNL Campaign Links Images Wiki 2011 ASR STM Presentation: Sedlacek 2011 ASR STM Presentation: Springston 2010 ASR Fall Meeting: Sedlacek News, June 14, 2011: Next-generation Aerosol-sampling Stations to Head for India Related Campaigns Aerosol Life Cycle: Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer - CIMS 2011.07.10, Lee, OSC Aerosol Life Cycle: HR-ToF-AMS 2011.06.15, Zhang, OSC Aerosol Life Cycle: ARM Mobile Facility 2 Aerosol Observing System 2011.06.15, Sedlacek, OSC Aerosol Life Cycle: UV-APS and Nano-SMPS 2011.06.10, Hallar, OSC Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Aerosol Life Cycle IOP at BNL 2011.06.01 - 2011.08.31 Lead Scientist : Arthur Sedlacek For data sets, see below.

315

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: A decade long aerosol  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A decade long aerosol and cloud statistics and aerosol indirect effect at A decade long aerosol and cloud statistics and aerosol indirect effect at the ARM SGP site Min, Qilong State University of New York at Albany Duan, Minzheng State University of New York at Albany Harrison, Lee State University of New York Joseph, Everette Howard University Twelve-year data of MFRSR and MWR have been used to derive aerosol and cloud optical properties at the ARM SGP. Diurnal, monthly, seasonal and interannual variability of aerosol (optical depth and Angstrom coefficient) and cloud (optical depth and effective radius) have been analyzed. We specially focused on aerosol-cloud interactions. We found a signature of indirect aerosol effect for summer data: increased aerosol index has a statistically-significant anti-correlation with mean effective radius. No

316

Examination of the Effects of Sea Salt Aerosols on Southeast Texas Ozone and Secondary Organic Aerosol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Despite decades of study, we still do not fully understand aerosols and their interactions among gases or other aerosols in the atmosphere. Among their impacts, they influence radiative transfer in the atmosphere and contribute to cloud formation. There are many different types of aerosols, including dust particles, soot particles, and microscopic particles containing inorganic compounds such as sulfates. Most of these particles have natural origins, but many are anthropogenic. The eventual purpose of this research is to examine sea salt aerosols and their impact on polluted environments. Sea salt aerosols act as Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) as well as providing a surface for heterogeneous reactions. Such reactions have implications for trace gases such as ozone, reactive nitrogen, mercury, and sulfur containing compounds. Urban areas are most impacted by these trace gases, which is a concern because ozone especially affects the health of citizens. Experiments have three basic parts. First we generate mono-disperse 3 aerosols. That aerosol is then injected into the aerosol chambers with sea salt aerosols and prescribed concentrations of trace gases to characterize relevant interactions. However, those chambers are still under construction and not used during my study. The processed aerosols are then analyzed with a tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) and other equipment. Different concentrations of sea salt aerosols, Cl, NOx, and other gases were planned to be introduced during the experiments. Concentrations of other gases and intensity of solar radiation would mimic those outside. Because these reactions have proved to increase localized concentrations of ozone in other work, this could have important implications. Future work will be designed to find study these interactions. This is important because the EPA has considered tightening the standards for both ozone and particulate matter. Industries would then need to reduce emissions or move farther from current sources of Cl or NOx pollution.

Benoit, Mark David

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Heat and Mass transfer in an absorption process with mixed absorbent solution.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Falling film absorption process is studied for the simulation of the absorber of the absorption solar cooling system. In this study, we use different absorbents… (more)

Chi, Ten-yen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Assessment of the global impact of aerosols on tropospheric oxidants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[1] We present here a fully coupled global aerosol and chemistry model for the troposphere. The model is used to assess the interactions between aerosols and chemical oxidants in the troposphere, including (1) the conversion from gas-phase oxidants into the condensed phase during the formation of aerosols, (2) the heterogeneous reactions occurring on the surface of aerosols, and (3) the effect of aerosols on ultraviolet radiation and photolysis rates. The present study uses the global three-dimensional chemical/ transport model, Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers, version 2 (MOZART-2), in which aerosols are coupled with the model. The model accounts for the presence of

Xuexi Tie; Sasha Madronich; Stacy Walters; David P. Edwards; Paul Ginoux; Natalie Mahowald; Renyi Zhang; Chao Lou; Guy Brasseur

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Aerosol Characterization Data from the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Project (ACE-Asia)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Aerosol Characterization Experiments (ACE) were designed to increase understanding of how atmospheric aerosol particles affect the Earth's climate system. These experiments integrated in-situ measurements, satellite observations, and models to reduce the uncertainty in calculations of the climate forcing due to aerosol particles and improve the ability of models to predict the influences of aerosols on the Earth's radiation balance. ACE-Asia was the fourth in a series of experiments organized by the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry (IGAC) Program (A Core Project of the International Geosphere Biosphere Program). The Intensive Field Phase for ACE-Asia took place during the spring of 2001 (mid-March through early May) off the coast of China, Japan and Korea. ACE-Asia pursued three specific objectives: 1) Determine the physical, chemical, and radiative properties of the major aerosol types in the Eastern Asia and Northwest Pacific region and investigate the relationships among these properties. 2) Quantify the physical and chemical processes controlling the evolution of the major aerosol types and in particular their physical, chemical, and radiative properties. 3) Develop procedures to extrapolate aerosol properties and processes from local to regional and global scales, and assess the regional direct and indirect radiative forcing by aerosols in the Eastern Asia and Northwest Pacific region [Edited and shortened version of summary at http://data.eol.ucar.edu/codiac/projs?ACE-ASIA]. The Ace-Asia collection contains 174 datasets.

320

Aerosols in Central California: Unexpectedly Large Contribution of Coarse Mode to Aerosol Radiative Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The majority of previous studies dealing with effect of coarse-mode aerosols on the radiation budget have focused primary on polluted regions with substantial aerosol loadings. We reexamine this effect for a relatively "pristine" area using a unique 1-month dataset collected during recent Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES). We demonstrate that the coarse-mode (supermicron) particles can contribute substantially (more than 50%) and frequently (up to 85% of time) to the total volume. In contrast to the conventional expectations that the radiative impact of coarse-mode aerosols should be small for "pristine" regions, we find that the neglecting of the large particles may lead to significant overestimation (up to 45%) of direct aerosol radiative forcing at the top-of atmosphere despite of very small aerosol optical depth (about 0.05 at 0.5 ). Our findings highlight the potential for widespread impacts of the coarse-mode aerosols on the pristine radiative properties over land and the need for more explicit inclusion of the coarse-mode aerosols in climate-related observational and model studies.

Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Barnard, James C.

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high-altitude absorbing aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 'Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds' project focused extensively on the analysis and utilization of water vapor and aerosol profiles derived from the ARM Raman lidar at the Southern Great Plains ARM site. A wide range of different tasks were performed during this project, all of which improved quality of the data products derived from the lidar or advanced the understanding of atmospheric processes over the site. These activities included: upgrading the Raman lidar to improve its sensitivity; participating in field experiments to validate the lidar aerosol and water vapor retrievals; using the lidar aerosol profiles to evaluate the accuracy of the vertical distribution of aerosols in global aerosol model simulations; examining the correlation between relative humidity and aerosol extinction, and how these change, due to horizontal distance away from cumulus clouds; inferring boundary layer turbulence structure in convective boundary layers from the high-time-resolution lidar water vapor measurements; retrieving cumulus entrainment rates in boundary layer cumulus clouds; and participating in a field experiment that provided data to help validate both the entrainment rate retrievals and the turbulent profiles derived from lidar observations.

Turner, David, D.; Ferrare, Richard, A.

2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

322

Sensitivity of shortwave radiative flux density, forcing, and heating rates to the aerosol vertical profile  

SciTech Connect

The effect of the aerosol vertical distribution on the solar radiation profiles, for idealized and measured profiles of optical properties (extinction and single-scattering albedo (SSA)) during the May 2003 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerosol Intensive Observation Period (AIOP), has been investigated using the Rapid Radiative Transfer Model Shortwave (RRTM_SW) code. Calculated profiles of down-welling and up-welling solar fluxes during the AIOP have been compared with the data measured by up- and down-looking solar broadband radiometers aboard a profiling research aircraft. The measured profiles of aerosol extinction, SSA, and water vapor obtained from the same aircraft that carried the radiometers served as the inputs for the model calculations. It is noteworthy that for this study, the uplooking radiometers were mounted on a stabilized platform that kept the radiometers parallel with respect to the earth’s horizontal plane. The results indicate that the shape of the aerosol extinction profiles has very little impact on direct radiative forcings at the top of atmosphere and surface in a cloud-free sky. However, as long as the aerosol is not purely scattering, the shape of the extinction profiles is important for forcing profiles. Identical extinction profiles with different absorption profiles drastically influence the forcing and heating rate profiles. Using aircraft data from 19 AIOP profiles over the Southern Great Plains (SGP), we are able to achieve broadband down-welling solar flux closure within 0.8% (bias difference) or 1.8% (rms difference), well within the expected measurement uncertainty of 1 to 3%. The poorer agreement in up-welling flux (bias -3.7%, rms 10%) is attributed to the use of inaccurate surface albedo data. The sensitivity tests reveal the important role accurate, vertically resolved aerosol extinction data plays in tightening flux closure. This study also suggests that in the presence of a strongly absorbing substance, aircraft flux measurements from a stabilized platform have the potential to determine heating rate profiles. These measurement-based heating rate profiles provide useful data for heating rate closure studies and indirect estimates of single scattering albedo assumed in radiative transfer calculations.

Guan, Hong; Schmid, Beat; Bucholtz, Anthony; Bergstrom, Robert

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

323

MHK Technologies/WEGA wave energy gravitational absorber | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

WEGA wave energy gravitational absorber WEGA wave energy gravitational absorber < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage WEGA wave energy gravitational absorber.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Sea for Life Technology Type Click here Oscillating Wave Surge Converter Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description The WEGA device is an articulated suspended body semi submerged attached to a mount structure that oscillates in an elliptical orbit with the passage of the waves The movement of the body drives an hydraulic cylinder which pushes high pressure fluid through an accumulator and an hydraulic motor driving the generator that produces energy The articulated body attaches to the mount structure through a rotary head which allows it to adapt to the direction wave propagation Multiple devices can be placed on a single mount structure according to the size and place of the structure

324

Experimental investigation and model verification for a GAX absorber  

SciTech Connect

In the ammonia-water generator-absorber heat exchange (GAX) absorption heat pump, the heat and mass transfer processes which occur between the generator and absorber are the most crucial in assuring that the heat pump will achieve COPs competitive with those of current technologies. In this study, a model is developed for the heat and mass transfer processes that occur in a counter-current vertical fluted tube absorber (VFTA) with inserts. Correlations for heat and mass transfer in annuli are used to model the processes in the VTA. Experimental data is used to validate the model for three different insert geometries. Comparison of model results with experimental data provides insight into model corrections necessary to bring the model into agreement with the physical phenomena observed in the laboratory.

Palmer, S.C. [Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD (United States). Mechanical Engineering Dept.; Christensen, R.N. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Mechanical Engineering Dept.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

325

Sealed absorbed electrolyte battery with bulge compensating end cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A sealed absorbed electrolyte battery is described comprising, in combination: a sealed container divided into working cells by internal partition walls; each working cell containing an electrode stack comprising positive and negative plates and substantially porous separators intimately contacting and separating the positive and negative plates; an electrolyte substantially completely absorbed in the plates and separators; the working cells being dimensioned to hold the plates and separators within the working cell in contact with each other; and bulge compensating auxiliary cells for accommodating gas pressure changes within the battery without substantially deforming the working cells.

Oswald, T.L.

1988-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

326

Energy absorber for sodium-heated heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger is described in which water-carrying tubes are heated by liquid sodium and in which the results of accidental contact between the water and the sodium caused by failure of one or more of the water tubes is minimized. An energy absorbing chamber contains a compressible gas and is connected to the body of flowing sodium by a channel so that, in the event of a sodium-water reaction, products of the reaction will partially fill the energy absorbing chamber to attenuate the rise in pressure within the heat exchanger.

Essebaggers, J.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Integrity of neutron-absorbing components of LWR fuel systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study of the integrity and behavior of neutron-absorbing components of light-water (LWR) fuel systems was performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The components studies include control blades (cruciforms) for boiling-water reactors (BWRs) and rod cluster control assemblies for pressurized-water reactors (PWRs). The results of this study can be useful for understanding the degradation of neutron-absorbing components and for waste management planning and repository design. The report includes examples of the types of degradation, damage, or failures that have been encountered. Conclusions and recommendations are listed. 84 refs.

Bailey, W.J.; Berting, F.M.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

ARM Aerosol Working Group Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and MFRSR Measurements ARM STM 2008 Norfolk, VA Connor Flynn 1 , Annette Koontz 1 , Anne Jefferson 2 , Jim Barnard 1 , Sally McFarlane 1 1 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 2 CIRES, University of Colorado, Boulder Progress towards ARM DOE 2008 Performance Metric 3 & 4 * Produce and make available new continuous time series of aerosol total column depth, based on results from the AMF deployment in Niger, Africa. * Produce and make available new continuous time series of retrieved dust properties, based on results from the AMF deployment in Niger, Africa. 0 100 200 300 400 0 20 40 60 80 100 ITF movement and surface RH % RH day of year (2006) 0 100 200 300 400 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 day of year wind direction (N = 0, E = 90) 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 Wind speed m/s 0 100 200 300 1.4 1.6 1.8 2 MFRSR Vo for filter2, Niamey

329

Distribution of small dispersive coal dust particles and absorbed radioactive chemical elements in conditions of forced acoustic resonance in iodine air filter at nuclear power plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The physical features of distribution of the small dispersive coal dust particles and the adsorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes in the absorber with the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal granules were researched in the case of the intensive air dust aerosol stream flow through the iodine air filter (IAF). It was shown that, at the certain aerodynamic conditions in the IAF, the generation of the acoustic oscillations is possible. It was found that the acoustic oscillations generation results in an appearance of the standing acoustic waves of the air pressure (density) in the IAF. In the case of the intensive blow of the air dust aerosol, it was demonstrated that the standing acoustic waves have some strong influences on both: 1) the dynamics of small dispersive coal dust particles movement and their accumulation in the IAF; 2) the oversaturation of the cylindrical coal granules by the adsorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes in the regions, where the antinodes of the acoustic waves are positioned. Finally, we completed the comparative analysis of the theoretical calculations with the experimental results, obtained for the cases of: 1) the experimental aerodynamic modeling of physical processes of the absorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes distribution in the IAF; and 2) the gamma-activation spectroscopy analysis of the absorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes distribution in the IAF. We made the innovative propositions on the necessary technical modifications with the purpose to improve the IAF technical characteristics and increase its operational time at the nuclear power plant (NPP), going from the completed precise characterization of the IAF parameters at the long term operation.

Oleg P. Ledenyov; Ivan M. Neklyudov

2013-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

330

ARM - Field Campaign - Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsCarbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) govCampaignsCarbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) Campaign Links CARES Website Related Campaigns Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiation Effects Study (CARES) - Surface Meteorological Sounding 2010.05.26, Zaveri, OSC Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiation Effects Study (CARES) Photo-Acoustic Aerosol Light Absorption and Scattering 2010.05.26, Arnott, OSC Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES): SMPS & CCN counter deployment during CARES/Cal-NEx 2010.05.04, Wang, OSC Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) Ground Based Instruments 2010.04.01, Cziczo, OSC Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES)

331

Aerosol Data Sources and Their Roles within PARAGON  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We briefly but systematically review major sources of aerosol data, emphasizing suites of measurements that seem most likely to contribute to assessments of global aerosol climate forcing. The strengths and limitations of existing satellite, ...

Ralph A. Kahn; John A. Ogren; Thomas P. Ackerman; Jens Bösenberg; Robert J. Charlson; David J. Diner; Brent N. Holben; Robert T. Menzies; Mark A. Miller; John H. Seinfeld

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Aerosol beam-focus laser-induced plasma spectrometer device  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus for detecting elements in an aerosol includes an aerosol beam focuser for concentrating aerosol into an aerosol beam; a laser for directing a laser beam into the aerosol beam to form a plasma; a detection device that detects a wavelength of a light emission caused by the formation of the plasma. The detection device can be a spectrometer having at least one grating and a gated intensified charge-coupled device. The apparatus may also include a processor that correlates the wavelength of the light emission caused by the formation of the plasma with an identity of an element that corresponds to the wavelength. Furthermore, the apparatus can also include an aerosol generator for forming an aerosol beam from bulk materials. A method for detecting elements in an aerosol is also disclosed.

Cheng, Meng-Dawn (Oak Ridge, TN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Optical Properties of Atmospheric Aerosol in Maritime Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Systematic characterization of aerosol over the oceans is needed to understand the aerosol effect on climate and on transport of pollutants between continents. Reported are the results of a comprehensive optical and physical characterization of ...

Alexander Smirnov; Brent N. Holben; Yoram J. Kaufman; Oleg Dubovik; Thomas F. Eck; Ilya Slutsker; Christophe Pietras; Rangasayi N. Halthore

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

ARM - Field Campaign - Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Aerial...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility (AMF) and the Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) will be deployed on Cape Cod (MA) for a 12-month period starting in the summer of 2012 in order to quantify aerosol...

335

Light Extinction by Aerosols during Summer Air Pollution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to utilize satellite measurements of optical thickness over land for estimating aerosol properties during air pollution episodes the optical thickness was measured from the surface and investigated. Aerosol optical thicknesses have been ...

Yoram J. Kaufman; Robert S. Fraser

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Optical Properties of Aerosol Particles over the Northeast Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In July 2002, atmospheric aerosol measurements were conducted over the northeast Pacific Ocean as part of the Subarctic Ecosystem Response to Iron Enhancement Study (SERIES). The following aerosol quantities were measured: particle number size ...

Julia Marshall; Ulrike Lohmann; W. Richard Leaitch; Nicole Shantz; Lisa Phinney; Desiree Toom-Sauntry; Sangeeta Sharma

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Experimental investigation of aerosol deposition on slot-and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experimental investigation of aerosol deposition on slot-and joint-type leaks Title Experimental investigation of aerosol deposition on slot-and joint-type leaks Publication Type...

338

Quantifying and Minimizing Uncertainty of Climate Forcing by Anthropogenic Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anthropogenic aerosols are composed of a variety of aerosol types and components including water-soluble inorganic species (e.g., sulfate, nitrate, ammonium), condensed organic species, elemental or black carbon, and mineral dust. Previous ...

J. E. Penner; R. J. Charlson; S. E. Schwartz; J. M. Hales; N. S. Laulainen; L. Travis; R. Leifer; T. Novakov; J. Ogren; L. F. Radke

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Overview of the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary goal of the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS) was to characterize and contrast freshly emitted aerosols below, within, and above fields of cumuli, and to study changes to the cloud microphysical structure within these ...

Larry K. Berg; Carl M. Berkowitz; John M. Hubbe; John A. Ogren; Chris A. Hostetler; Richard A. Ferrare; Johnathan W. Hair; Manvendra K. Dubey; Claudio Mazzoleni; Elisabeth Andrews; Richard L. Coulter; Yin-Nan Lee; Jasono Olfert; Stephen R. Springston

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Distinguishing Aerosol Impacts on Climate over the Past Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosol direct (DE), indirect (IE), and black carbon–snow albedo (BAE) effects on climate between 1890 and 1995 are compared using equilibrium aerosol–climate simulations in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies General Circulation Model ...

Dorothy Koch; Surabi Menon; Anthony Del Genio; Reto Ruedy; Igor Alienov; Gavin A. Schmidt

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high-altitude absorbing aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Aerosol Impacts on the Microphysical Growth Processes of Orographic Snowfall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Regional Atmospheric Modeling System was used to simulate four winter snowfall events over the Park Range of Colorado. For each event, three hygroscopic aerosol sensitivity simulations were performed with initial aerosol profiles representing ...

Stephen M. Saleeby; William R. Cotton; Douglas Lowenthal; Joe Messina

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Aerosol Impacts on the Diurnal Cycle of Marine Stratocumulus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent large-eddy simulation (LES) studies of the impact of aerosol on the dynamics of nocturnal marine stratocumulus revealed that, depending on the large-scale forcings, an aerosol-induced increase of the droplet concentration can lead to ...

Irina Sandu; Jean-Louis Brenguier; Olivier Geoffroy; Odile Thouron; Valery Masson

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

A Critical Examination of the Observed First Aerosol Indirect Effect  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relative change in cloud droplet number concentration with respect to the relative change in aerosol number concentration, ?, is an indicator of the strength of the aerosol indirect effect and is commonly used in models to parameterize this ...

Hongfei Shao; Guosheng Liu

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Dynamical Effects of Aerosol Perturbations on Simulated Idealized Squall Lines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamical effects of increased aerosol loading on the strength and structure of numerically simulated squall lines are explored. Results are explained in the context of RKW theory. Changes in aerosol loading lead to changes in rain drop size ...

Zachary J. Lebo; Hugh Morrison

345

Generation of concentration density maxima of small dispersive coal dust particles in horizontal iodine air filter at air-dust aerosol blow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The spatial distributions of the small dispersive coal dust particles with the nano and micro sizes in the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal granules in the absorber in the horizontal iodine air filter during its long term operation at the nuclear power plant are researched. It is shown that the concentration density maxima of the small dispersive coal dust particles appear in the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal absorbent granules in the horizontal iodine air filter at an action by the air dust aerosol blow. The comparison of the measured aerodynamic resistances of the horizontal and vertical iodine air filters is conducted. The main conclusion is that the magnitude of the aerodynamic resistance of the horizontal iodine air filters is much smaller in comparison with the magnitude of the aerodynamic resistance of the vertical iodine air filters at the same loads of the air dust aerosol volumes. It is explained that the direction of the air dust aerosol blow and the direction of the gravitation force in the horizontal iodine air filter are orthogonal, hence the effective accumulation of the small dispersive coal dust particles takes place at the bottom of absorber in the horizontal iodine air filter. It is found that the air dust aerosol stream flow in the horizontal iodine air filter is not limited by the appearing structures, made of the precipitated small dispersive coal dust particles, in distinction from the vertical iodine air filter, in the process of long term operation of the iodine air filters at the nuclear power plant.

I. M. Neklyudov; O. P. Ledenyov; L. I. Fedorova; P. Ya. Poltinin

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

346

Sensitivity of aerosol radiative forcing calculations to spectral resolution  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Potential impacts of aerosol radiative forcing on climate have generated considerable recent interest. An important consideration in estimating the forcing from various aerosol components is the spectral resolution used for the solar radiative transfer calculations. This paper examines the spectral resolution required from the viewpoint of overlapping spectrally varying aerosol properties with other cross sections. A diagnostic is developed for comparing different band choices, and the impact of these choices on the radiative forcing calculated for typical sulfate and biomass aerosols was investigated.

Grant, K.E.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Evaluation of the carbon content of aerosols from the burn- ing of biomass in the Brazilian Amazon using thermal, op- tical and thermal-optical analysis methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Crutzen, P. : Atmospheric Aerosols: Biogeochemical sourcesof optically active aerosol particles over the Amazonproperties of Amazonian aerosol particles: Rev. Geophys. ,

Soto-Garcia, Lydia L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Methods for applying microchannels to separate methane using liquid absorbents, especially ionic liquid absorbents from a mixture comprising methane and nitrogen  

SciTech Connect

Methods of using microchannel separation systems including absorbents to improve thermal efficiency and reduce parasitic power loss. Energy is typically added to desorb methane and then energy or heat is removed to absorb methane using a working solution. The working solution or absorbent may comprise an ionic liquid, or other fluids that demonstrate a difference in affinity between methane and nitrogen in a solution.

Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y. (Dublin, OH); Litt, Robert D. (Westerville, OH); Dongming, Qiu (Dublin, OH); Silva, Laura J. (Plain City, OH); Lamont, Micheal Jay (Plain City, OH); Fanelli, Maddalena (Plain City, OH); Simmons, Wayne W. (Plain city, OH); Perry, Steven (Galloway, OH)

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

349

Observations of Saharan Aerosols: Results of ECLATS Field Experiment. Part I: Optical Thicknesses and Aerosol Size Distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of ground-based and airborne observations of desert aerosols, the ECLATS experiment was carried out in December 1980 in the vicinity of Niamey (Niger). This paper deals with aerosol optical thicknesses and size distributions derived from ...

Y. Fouquart; B. Bonnel; M. Chaoui Roquai; R. Santer; A. Cerf

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Toward a Minimal Representation of Aerosols in Climate Models: Comparative Decomposition of Aerosol Direct, Semidirect, and Indirect Radiative Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have decomposed the anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing into direct contributions from each aerosol species to the planetary energy balance through absorption and scattering of solar radiation, indirect effects of anthropogenic ...

S. J. Ghan; X. Liu; R. C. Easter; R. Zaveri; P. J. Rasch; J.-H. Yoon; B. Eaton

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Emission-Induced Nonlinearities in the Global Aerosol System: Results from the ECHAM5-HAM Aerosol-Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a series of simulations with the global ECHAM5-HAM aerosol-climate model, the response to changes in anthropogenic emissions is analyzed. Traditionally, additivity is assumed in the assessment of the aerosol climate impact, as the underlying ...

Philip Stier; Johann Feichter; Silvia Kloster; Elisabetta Vignati; Julian Wilson

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Gas compressor with side branch absorber for pulsation control  

SciTech Connect

A method and system for reducing pulsation in lateral piping associated with a gas compressor system. A tunable side branch absorber (TSBA) is installed on the lateral piping. A pulsation sensor is placed in the lateral piping, to measure pulsation within the piping. The sensor output signals are delivered to a controller, which controls actuators that change the acoustic dimensions of the SBA.

Harris, Ralph E. (San Antonio, TX); Scrivner, Christine M. (San Antonio, TX); Broerman, III, Eugene L. (San Antonio, TX)

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

353

Flue Gas Desulfurization Scrubber Maintenance Guide: Absorber Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Flue Gas Desulfurization Scrubber Maintenance Guide: Absorber Area provides fossil plant maintenance personnel with current maintenance information on this system and will help to improve the reliability of and reduce the maintenance costs for this area of their scrubber system.

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

354

On experiments taken by the active shock absorber test stand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Suspension system influences both the comfort and safety of the passengers. In the paper, energy recuperation and management in automotive suspension systems with linear electric motors that are controlled by a designed H8 controller to generate a variable ... Keywords: active vehicle shock absorber, energy control, energy recuperation, linear electric motor, robust control

Katerina Hyniova; Ladislava Smitkova-Janku; Jaroslav Honcu; Antonin Stribrsky

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Controlling Nanoparticle Aggregation in Colloidal Microwave Absorbers via Interface Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

paints, and particle laden polymeric layers, are passive in nature. There is some work with active demonstrated where the number of single-stranded DNA per particle determines the ultimate size bias across the absorbing layer is an effective tuning mechanism for modulation of the reflected

Stowell, Michael

356

Progress in Absorber R&D 2: Windows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A program is underway to develop liquid-hydrogen energy absorbers for ionization cooling of muon-beam transverse emittance. Minimization of multiple-scattering-induced beam heating requires thin windows. The first window prototype has been destructively tested, validating the finite-element-analysis model and the design approach.

D. M. Kaplan; E. L. Black; K. W. Cassel; S. Geer; M. Popovic; S. Ishimoto; K. Yoshimura; L. Bandura; M. A. Cummings; A. Dyshkant; D. Kubik; D. Hedin; C. Darve; Y. Kuno; D. Errede; M. Haney; S. Majewski; M. Reep; D. Summers

2001-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

357

Progress in Absorber R&D for Muon Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A stored-muon-beam neutrino factory may require transverse ionization cooling of the muon beam. We describe recent progress in research and development on energy absorbers for muon-beam cooling carried out by a collaboration of university and laboratory groups.

D. M. Kaplan; E. L. Black; M. Boghosian; K. W. Cassel; R. P. Johnson; S. Geer; C. J. Johnstone; M. Popovic; S. Ishimoto; K. Yoshimura; L. Bandura; M. A. Cummings; A. Dyshkant; D. Hedin; D. Kubik; C. Darve; Y. Kuno; D. Errede; M. Haney; S. Majewski; M. Reep; D. Summers

2001-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

358

Measurement of Absorption in Rooms with Sound Absorbing Ceilings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Serious difficulties have been encountered in attempts to measure the absorption coefficients of sound absorbing ceilings in large offices. An analysis of the sound field is made and it is concluded (1) that the reverberation time formula is usually invalid if the absorption is concentrated on one surface of the room

J. R. Power

1938-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Discrete-element modeling of particulate aerosol flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multiple-time step computational approach is presented for efficient discrete-element modeling of aerosol flows containing adhesive solid particles. Adhesive aerosol particulates are found in numerous dust and smoke contamination problems, including ... Keywords: Aerosols, Aggregation, Particle adhesion, Particulate flow

J. S. Marshall

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Possible Aerosol Effects on Ice Clouds via Contact Nucleation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The indirect effect of aerosols on water clouds, whereby aerosol particles change cloud optical properties, is caused by aerosol-induced changes of the size and number of cloud droplets. This affects the lifetime of the water clouds as well as ...

Ulrike Lohmann

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high-altitude absorbing aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Campaign Campaign For the month of April, researchers are descending on and above Barrow, Alaska, to obtain data from the atmosphere that will help them understand the impacts that aerosols have on Arctic clouds and climate. Scientists sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility are using a heavily instrumented aircraft to collect data from the sky, while instruments based at surface sites in Barrow and Atqasuk, Alaska, are obtaining measurements from the ground. Information obtained during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign, or ISDAC, will help scientists analyze the role of aerosols in climate, and represents a key contribution to Arctic climate research during International Polar Year.

362

Researchers Model Impact of Aerosols Over California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Researchers Model Researchers Model Impact of Aerosols Over California Researchers Model Impact of Aerosols Over California Research may clarify the effectiveness of regional pollution controls May 28, 2013 | Tags: Climate Research, Hopper Contact: Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, (510) 495-2404 LosAngelesSmogv1.jpg Smog over downtown Los Angeles. Aerosols are microscopic particles-like dust, pollen and soot-that ubiquitously float around in our atmosphere. Despite their tiny stature, these particles can have a huge impact on human health, climate and the environment. So scientists from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Colorado State University and the California Air Resources Board have set out to characterize the roles of various particles as atmospheric change agents on a regional scale.

363

Evolution of Organic Aerosols in the Atmosphere.  

SciTech Connect

Organic aerosol (OA) particles affect climate forcing and human health, but their sources and evolution remain poorly characterized. We present a unifying model framework that describes the atmospheric evolution of OA and is constrained and motivated by new, high time resolution, experimental characterizations of their composition, volatility, and oxidation state. OA and OA-precursor gases evolve by becoming increasingly oxidized, less volatile, and more hygroscopic, leading to the formation of large amounts of oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) mass that has comparable concentrations to sulfate aerosol over the Northern Hemisphere. Our new model framework captures the dynamic aging behavior observed in the atmosphere and the laboratory and can serve as a basis for improving parameterizations in regional and global models.

Jimenez, J. L.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Donahue, N. M.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Zhang, Qi; Kroll, Jesse H.; DeCarlo, Peter F.; Allan, James D.; Coe, H.; Ng, N. L.; Aiken, Allison; Docherty, Kenneth S.; Ulbrich, Ingrid M.; Grieshop, A. P.; Robinson, A. L.; Duplissy, J.; Smith, J. D.; Wilson, K. R.; Lanz, V. A.; Hueglin, C.; Sun, Y. L.; Tian, J.; Laaksonen, A.; Raatikainen, T.; Rautiainen, J.; Vaattovaara, P.; Ehn, M.; Kulmala, M.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Collins, Donald R.; Cubison, Michael J.; Dunlea, E. J.; Huffman, John A.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Alfarra, M. R.; Williams, Paul I.; Bower, K.; Kondo, Yutaka; Schneider, J.; Drewnick, F.; Borrmann, S.; Weimer, S.; Demerjian, K.; Salcedo, D.; Cottrell, L.; Griffin, Robert; Takami, A.; Miyoshi, T.; Hatakeyama, S.; Shimono, A.; Sun, J. Y.; Zhang, Y. M.; Dzepina, K.; Kimmel, Joel; Sueper, D.; Jayne, J. T.; Herndon, Scott C.; Trimborn, Achim; Williams, L. R.; Wood, Ezra C.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Kolb, C. E.; Baltensperger, Urs; Worsnop, Douglas R.

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

364

Can aerosols be trapped in open flows?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fate of aerosols in open flows is relevant in a variety of physical contexts. Previous results are consistent with the assumption that such finite-size particles always escape in open chaotic advection. Here we show that a different behavior is possible. We analyze the dynamics of aerosols both in the absence and presence of gravitational effects, and both when the dynamics of the fluid particles is hyperbolic and nonhyperbolic. Permanent trapping of aerosols much heavier than the advecting fluid is shown to occur in all these cases. This phenomenon is determined by the occurrence of multiple vortices in the flow and is predicted to happen for realistic particle-fluid density ratios.

Rafael D. Vilela; Adilson E. Motter

2007-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

365

Morphology effects on polydispersed aerosol deposition rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the analysis of severe nuclear accidents, accurate prediction of aerosol deposition is important since, among other things, this influences the distribution of radioactive decay heat within the primary system and containment compartments. The fact that the aerosol cloud is not comprised of dense isolated spherical particles of only one size inevitably complicates such calculations but must be taken into account. Some particle deposition mechanisms are more sensitive to particle size and morphology than others so that simplifying assumptions valid for one mechanism [such as particle thermophoresis (notoriously size and morphology insensitive)] may be seriously in error for others (e.g., convective Brownian diffusion or eddy impaction). This paper deals with aggregate aerosol deposition.

Rosner, D.E.; Tandon, P. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Khalil, Y.F. [Northeast Utilities Service Co., Berlin, CT (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

between Photolytic Aerosols and Solar Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the early 70’s chemistry and transport models (ChTMs) have been proposed and improved. Tropospheric ChTMs for trace species are detailed numerical formulations intended to represent the atmospheric system as a whole, accounting for all the individual processes and phenomena that influence climate changes. The development of computer resources and the retrieval of emission inventories and observational data of the species of interest have enhanced the model evolution towards three-dimensional global models that account for more complicated chemical mechanisms, wet and dry deposition phenomena, and interactions and feedback mechanisms between meteorology and atmospheric chemistry. The purpose of this study is to ascertain the sensitivity of the solar radiative field in the atmosphere to absorption and scattering by aerosols. This effort is preliminary to the study of feedback mechanisms between photolytic processes that create and destroy aerosols and the radiation field itself. In this study, a cloud of water-soluble aerosols, randomly distributed in space within hypothetical 1-cm cubes of atmosphere, is generated. A random radius is assigned to each aerosol according to a lognormal size distribution function. The radiative field characterization is analyzed using a Mie scattering code to determine the scattering phase function and the absorption and scattering coefficients of sulfate aerosols, and a Monte Carlo ray-trace code is used to evaluate the radiative exchange. The ultimate goal of the effort is to create a tool to analyze the vertical distribution of absorption by aerosols in order to determine whether or not feedback between photolytic processes and the radiation field needs to be included in a Third Generation Chemistry and Transport model. ii

María Santa; María Iruzubieta; María Santa; María Iruzubieta

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Apparatus for sampling and characterizing aerosols  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for sampling and characterizing aerosols having a wide particle size range at relatively low velocities may comprise a chamber having an inlet and an outlet, the chamber including: a plurality of vertically stacked, successive particle collection stages; each collection stage includes a separator plate and a channel guide mounted transverse to the separator plate, defining a labyrinthine flow path across the collection stage. An opening in each separator plate provides a path for the aerosols from one collection stage to the next. Mounted within each collection stage are one or more particle collection frames.

Dunn, Patrick F. (Downers Grove, IL); Herceg, Joseph E. (Naperville, IL); Klocksieben, Robert H. (Park Forest, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Spatial and temporal variations of aerosols around Beijing in summer 2006: 2. Local and column aerosol optical properties  

SciTech Connect

Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF)-chem model calculations were conducted to study aerosol optical properties around Beijing, China, during the Campaign of Air Quality Research in Beijing and Surrounding Region 2006 (CAREBeijing-2006) period. In this paper, we interpret aerosol optical properties in terms of aerosol mass concentrations and their chemical compositions by linking model calculations with measurements. In general, model calculations reproduced observed features of spatial and temporal variations of various surface and column aerosol optical parameters in and around Beijing. Spatial and temporal variations of aerosol absorption, scattering, and extinction coefficient corresponded well to those of elemental carbon (primary aerosol), sulfate (secondary aerosol), and the total aerosol mass concentration, respectively. These results show that spatial and temporal variations of the absorption coefficient are controlled by local emissions (within 100 km around Beijing during the preceding 24 h), while those of the scattering coefficient are controlled by regional-scale emissions (within 500 km around Beijing during the preceding 3 days) under synoptic-scale meteorological conditions, as discussed in our previous study of aerosol mass concentration. Vertical profiles of aerosol extinction revealed that the contribution of secondary aerosols and their water uptake increased with altitude within the planetary boundary layer, leading to a considerable increase in column aerosol optical depth (AOD) around Beijing. These effects are the main factors causing differences in regional and temporal variations between particulate matter (PM) mass concentration at the surface and column AOD over a wide region in the northern part of the Great North China Plain.

Matsui, Hitoshi; Koike, Makoto; Kondo, Yutaka; Takegawa, Nobuyuki; Fast, Jerome D.; Poschl, U.; Garland, R. M.; Andreae, M. O.; Wiedensohler, A.; Sugimoto, N.; Zhu, T.

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

369

Near-Real-Time Measurement of Sea-Salt Aerosol during the SEAS Campaign: Comparison of Emission-Based Sodium Detection with an Aerosol Volatility Technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first deployment of an emission-based aerosol sodium detector (ASD), designed to chemically characterize marine aerosols on a near-real-time basis, is reported. Deployment occurred as part of the Shoreline Environment Aerosol Study (SEAS) ...

P. Campuzano-Jost; C. D. Clark; H. Maring; D. S. Covert; S. Howell; V. Kapustin; K. A. Clarke; E. S. Saltzman; A. J. Hynes

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Near real time vapor detection and enhancement using aerosol adsorption  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vapor sample detection method where the vapor sample contains vapor and ambient air and surrounding natural background particles. The vapor sample detection method includes the steps of generating a supply of aerosol that have a particular effective median particle size, mixing the aerosol with the vapor sample forming aerosol and adsorbed vapor suspended in an air stream, impacting the suspended aerosol and adsorbed vapor upon a reflecting element, alternatively directing infrared light to the impacted aerosol and adsorbed vapor, detecting and analyzing the alternatively directed infrared light in essentially real time using a spectrometer and a microcomputer and identifying the vapor sample.

Novick, Vincent J.; Johnson, Stanley A.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Radially Classified Aerosol Detector for Aircraft-Based Submicron Aerosol Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A radially classified aerosol detector (RCAD) for fast characterization of fine particle size distributions aboard aircraft has been designed and implemented. The measurement system includes a radial differential mobility analyzer and a high-flow,...

Lynn M. Russell; Shou-Hua Zhang; Richard C. Flagan; John H. Seinfeld; Mark R. Stolzenburg; Robert Caldow

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Organic aerosol components observed in Northern Hemispheric datasets from Aerosol Mass Spectrometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this study we compile and present results from the factor analysis of 43 Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) datasets (27 of the datasets are reanalyzed in this work). The components from all sites, when taken together, ...

Kroll, Jesse

373

Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign: The Impact of Arctic Aerosols on Clouds  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive dataset of microphysical and radiative properties of aerosols and clouds in the arctic boundary layer in the vicinity of Barrow, Alaska was collected in April 2008 during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) sponsored by the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) and Atmospheric Science Programs. The primary aim of ISDAC was to examine indirect effects of aerosols on clouds that contain both liquid and ice water. The experiment utilized the ARM permanent observational facilities at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) in Barrow. These include a cloud radar, a polarized micropulse lidar, and an atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer as well as instruments specially deployed for ISDAC measuring aerosol, ice fog, precipitation and spectral shortwave radiation. The National Research Council of Canada Convair-580 flew 27 sorties during ISDAC, collecting data using an unprecedented 42 cloud and aerosol instruments for more than 100 hours on 12 different days. Data were obtained above, below and within single-layer stratus on 8 April and 26 April 2008. These data enable a process-oriented understanding of how aerosols affect the microphysical and radiative properties of arctic clouds influenced by different surface conditions. Observations acquired on a heavily polluted day, 19 April 2008, are enhancing this understanding. Data acquired in cirrus on transit flights between Fairbanks and Barrow are improving our understanding of the performance of cloud probes in ice. Ultimately the ISDAC data will be used to improve the representation of cloud and aerosol processes in models covering a variety of spatial and temporal scales, and to determine the extent to which long-term surface-based measurements can provide retrievals of aerosols, clouds, precipitation and radiative heating in the Arctic.

McFarquhar, Greg; Ghan, Steven J.; Verlinde, J.; Korolev, Alexei; Strapp, J. Walter; Schmid, Beat; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Wolde, Mengistu; Brooks, Sarah D.; Cziczo, Daniel J.; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Fan, Jiwen; Flynn, Connor J.; Gultepe, Ismail; Hubbe, John M.; Gilles, Mary K.; Laskin, Alexander; Lawson, Paul; Leaitch, W. R.; Liu, Peter S.; Liu, Xiaohong; Lubin, Dan; Mazzoleni, Claudio; Macdonald, A. M.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Morrison, H.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shupe, Matthew D.; Turner, David D.; Xie, Shaocheng; Zelenyuk, Alla; Bae, Kenny; Freer, Matthew; Glen, Andrew

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Response of California temperature to regional anthropogenic aerosol  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Response of California temperature to regional anthropogenic aerosol Response of California temperature to regional anthropogenic aerosol changes Title Response of California temperature to regional anthropogenic aerosol changes Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2008 Authors Novakov, Tihomir, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, Surabi Menon, and Jeffery Aguiar Journal Geophysical Research Letters Volume 35 Issue 19 Abstract In this paper, we compare constructed records of concentrations of black carbon (BC) - an indicator of anthropogenic aerosols - with observed surface temperature trends in California. Annual average BC concentrations in major air basins in California significantly decreased after about 1990, coincident with an observed statewide surface temperature increase. Seasonal aerosol concentration trends are consistent with observed seasonal temperature trends. These data suggest that the reduction in anthropogenic aerosol concentrations contributed to the observed surface temperature increase. Conversely, high aerosol concentrations may lower surface temperature and partially offset the temperature increase of greenhouse gases.

375

Generation of concentration density maxima of small dispersive coal dust particles in horizontal iodine air filter at air-dust aerosol blow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The spatial distributions of the small dispersive coal dust particles with the nano and micro sizes in the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal granules in the absorber in the horizontal iodine air filter during its long term operation at the nuclear power plant are researched. It is shown that the concentration density maxima of the small dispersive coal dust particles appear in the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal absorbent granules in the horizontal iodine air filter at an action by the air dust aerosol blow. The comparison of the measured aerodynamic resistances of the horizontal and vertical iodine air filters is conducted. The main conclusion is that the magnitude of the aerodynamic resistance of the horizontal iodine air filters is much smaller in comparison with the magnitude of the aerodynamic resistance of the vertical iodine air filters at the same loads of the air dust aerosol volumes. It is explained that the direction of the air dust aerosol blow and the directi...

Neklyudov, I M; Fedorova, L I; Poltinin, P Ya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

The Aerosol Modeling Testbed: A community tool to objectively evaluate aerosol process modules  

SciTech Connect

This study describes a new modeling paradigm that significantly advances how the third activity is conducted while also fully exploiting data and findings from the first two activities. The Aerosol Modeling Testbed (AMT) is a computational framework for the atmospheric sciences community that streamlines the process of testing and evaluating aerosol process modules over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. The AMT consists of a fully-coupled meteorology-chemistry-aerosol model, and a suite of tools to evaluate the performance of aerosol process modules via comparison with a wide range of field measurements. The philosophy of the AMT is to systematically and objectively evaluate aerosol process modules over local to regional spatial scales that are compatible with most field campaigns measurement strategies. The performance of new treatments can then be quantified and compared to existing treatments before they are incorporated into regional and global climate models. Since the AMT is a community tool, it also provides a means of enhancing collaboration and coordination among aerosol modelers.

Fast, Jerome D.; Gustafson, William I.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Easter, Richard C.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Grell, Georg; Barth, Mary

2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

377

RADIATIVE FORCING OF CLIMATE CHANGE BY AEROSOLS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nonbelievers. #12;Level of Scientific Understanding 2 1 0 1 2 3 Radiativeforcing(Wattspersquaremetre) Cooling scattering -- Cooling influence Light absorption -- Warming influence, depending on surface Indirect Effects is highly sensitive to modest aerosol loadings. Global-average AOT 0.1 corresponds to global-average forcing

Schwartz, Stephen E.

378

Scavenging of Aerosol Particles by Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Airborne measurements have been made of aerosol particle size distributions (>0.01 ?m) in aged air masses, in the plumes from several coal power plants and a large Kraft paper mill, and in the emissions from a volcano, before and after rain or ...

Lawrence F. Radke; Peter V. Hobbs; Mark W. Eltgroth

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Scanning 6-Wavelength 11-Channel Aerosol Lidar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A transportable multiple-wavelength lidar is presented, which is used for the profiling of optical and physical aerosol properties. Two Nd:YAG and two dye lasers in combination with frequency-doubling crystals emit simultaneously at 355, 400, 532,...

Dietrich Althausen; Detlef Müller; Albert Ansmann; Ulla Wandinger; Helgard Hube; Ernst Clauder; Steffen Zörner

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry of Environmental Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric particles influence many aspects of climate, air quality and human health. Understanding the composition, chemistry and behavior of atmospheric aerosols is a key remaining challenge in improving climate models. Furthermore, particles may be traced back to a particular source based on composition, stable isotope ratios, or the presence of particular surface chemistries. Finally, the characterization of atmospheric particles in the workplace plays an important role in understanding the potential for exposure and environmental and human health effects to engineered and natural nanoscale particles. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is a useful tool in determining any of several aspects of the structure, composition and chemistry of these particles. Often used in conjunction with other surface analysis and electron microscopy methods, SIMS has been used to determine or confirm reactions on and in particles, the presence of particular organic species on the surface of atmospheric aerosols and several other interesting and relevant findings. Various versions of SIMS instruments – dynamic SIMS, time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry or TOF-SIMS, nanoSIMS – have been used to determine specific aspects of aerosol structure and chemistry. This article describes the strengths of each type of SIMS instrument in the characterization of aerosols, along with guidance on sample preparation, specific characterization specific to the particular information sought in the analysis. Examples and guidance are given for each type of SIMS analysis.

Gaspar, Daniel J.; Cliff, John B.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high-altitude absorbing aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Aerosol Condensational Growth in Cloud Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A code for the quasi-stationary solution of the coupled heat and mass transport equations for aerosols in a finite volume was developed. Both mass and heat are conserved effectively in the volume, which results in a competitive aerosol condensation growth computational model. A further model that couples this competitive aerosol condensation growth computational model with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software (ANSYS FLUENT) enables the simulation of the realistic atmospheric environment. One or more air parcels, where the aerosols reside, are placed in a very big volume in order to mimic the large atmospheric environment. Mass (water vapor) and heat transportat between the air parcels and the environment facilitates the growth and prevents the parcels from unrealistically overheating. The suppression of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) growth by high number densities was quantified by our model study. Model study with organic particles (Lmalic acid and maleic acid) indicates that when these organic species and ammonium sulfate are internally mixed, the particles can grow much more than if they are separately associated with distinct particles. Moreover, by using more multiple air parcels, which are randomly assigned with different initial relative humidity values according to a power law distribution, we studied the effects of atmospheric stochastic RH distribution on the growth of CCN.

Geng, Jun

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

A Compact Lightweight Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (CLASP)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Compact Lightweight Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (CLASP) is an optical particle spectrometer capable of measuring size-resolved particle concentrations in 16 user-defined size bins spanning diameters in the range 0.24 < D < 18.5 ?m at a rate of ...

Martin K. Hill; Barbara J. Brooks; Sarah J. Norris; Michael H. Smith; Ian M. Brooks; Gerrit de Leeuw

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Attachment of radon progeny to cigarette-smoke aerosols  

SciTech Connect

The daughter products of radon gas are now recognized as a significant contributor to radiation exposure to the general public. It is also suspected that a synergistic effect exists with the combination cigarette smoking and radon exposure. We have conducted an experimental investigation to determine the physical nature of radon progeny interactions with cigarette smoke aerosols. The size distributions of the aerosols are characterized and attachment rates of radon progeny to cigarette-smoke aerosols are determined. Both the mainstream and sidestream portions of the smoke aerosol are investigated. Unattached radon progeny are very mobile and, in the presence of aerosols, readily attach to the particle surfaces. In this study, an aerosol chamber is used to contain the radon gas, progeny and aerosol mixture while allowing the attachment process to occur. The rate of attachment is dependent on the size distribution, or diffusion coefficient, of the radon progeny as well as the aerosol size distribution. The size distribution of the radon daughter products is monitored using a graded-screen diffusion battery. The diffusion battery also enables separation of the unattached radon progeny from those attached to the aerosol particles. Analysis of the radon decay products is accomplished using alpha spectrometry. The aerosols of interest are size fractionated with the aid of a differential mobility analyzer and cascade impactor. The measured attachment rates of progeny to the cigarette smoke are compared to those found in similar experiments using an ambient aerosol. The lowest attachment coefficients observed, {approximately}10{sup {minus}6} cm{sup 3}/s, occurred for the ambient aerosol. The sidestream and mainstream smoke aerosols exhibited higher attachment rates in that order. The results compared favorably with theories describing the coagulation process of aerosols.

Biermann, A.H.; Sawyer, S.R.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

A conceptual design of the 2+ MW LBNE beam absorber  

SciTech Connect

The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) will utilize a neutrino beamline facility located at Fermilab. The facility will aim a beam of neutrinos, produced by 60-120 GeV protons from the Fermilab Main Injector, toward a detector placed at the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL) in South Dakota. Secondary particles that do not decay into muons and neutrinos as well as any residual proton beam must be stopped at the end of the decay region to reduce noise/damage in the downstream muon monitors and reduce activation in the surrounding rock. This goal is achieved by placing an absorber structure at the end of the decay region. The requirements and conceptual design of such an absorber, capable of operating at 2+ MW primary proton beam power, is described.

Velev, G.; Childress, S.; Hurh, P.; Hylen, J.; Makarov, A.; Mohkhov, N.; Moore, C.D.; Novitski, I.; /Fermilab

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

A new aerosol collector for quasi on-line analysis of particulate organic matter: the Aerosol Collection Module (ACM) and first applications with a GC/MS-FID  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In many environments organic matter significantly contributes to the composition of atmospheric aerosol particles influencing its properties. Detailed chemical characterization of ambient aerosols is critical in order to ...

Hohaus, T.

386

THE LIFETIME OF AEROSOL DROPLETS IN AMBIENT AIR: CONSIDERATION OF THE EFFECTS OF SURFACTANTS AND CHEMICAL REACTIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of various urban sulfate aerosol production mechanisms.radius of an evaporating aerosol droplet in which oxidationEnvironment THE LIFETIME OF AEROSOL DROPLETS IN AMBIENT AIR:

Toossi, R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

The radiative influence of aerosol effects on liquid-phase cumulus clouds based on sensitivity studies with two climate models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A global black carbon aerosol model. J Geophys Res 101:of interactions between aerosols and cloud microphysics overby anthropogenic sulfate aerosol. J Geophys Res 106: 5279-

Menon, Surabi; Rotstayn, Leon

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Comparison of heat transfer in solar collectors with heat pipe versus flow through absorbers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analysis of heat transfer in solar collectors with heat pipe absorbers is compared to that for collectors with flow through absorbers. Both pumped and thermosiphon systems that produce hot water or other heated fluids are discussed. In these applications the heat pipe absorber suffers a heat transfer penalty compared with the flow through absorber, but in many cases the penalty can be minimized by proper design at the heat pipe condenser and system manifold. When the solar collector is used to drive an absorption chiller, the heat pipe absorber has better heat transfer characteristics than the flow through absorber.

Hull, J.R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Excitation-emission spectra and fluorescence quantum yields for fresh and aged biogenic secondary organic aerosols  

SciTech Connect

Certain biogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOA) become absorbent and fluorescent when exposed to reduced nitrogen compounds such as ammonia, amines and their salts. Fluorescent SOA may potentially be mistaken for biological particles by detection methods relying on fluorescence. This work quantifies the spectral distribution and effective quantum yields of fluorescence of SOA generated from two monoterpenes, limonene and a-pinene, and two different oxidants, ozone (O3) and hydroxyl radical (OH). The SOA was generated in a smog chamber, collected on substrates, and aged by exposure to ~100 ppb ammonia vapor in air saturated with water vapor. Absorption and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of aqueous extracts of aged and control SOA samples were measured, and the effective absorption coefficients and fluorescence quantum yields (~0.005 for 349 nm excitation) were determined from the data. The strongest fluorescence for the limonene-derived SOA was observed for excitation = 420+- 50 nm and emission = 475 +- 38 nm. The window of the strongest fluorescence shifted to excitation = 320 +- 25 nm and emission = 425 +- 38 nm for the a-pinene-derived SOA. Both regions overlap with the excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of some of the fluorophores found in primary biological aerosols. Our study suggests that, despite the low quantum yield, the aged SOA particles should have sufficient fluorescence intensities to interfere with the fluorescence detection of common bioaerosols.

Lee, Hyun Ji; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

390

MHK Technologies/Oxygen Releasing and Carbon Absorbing Ocean Based  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Releasing and Carbon Absorbing Ocean Based Releasing and Carbon Absorbing Ocean Based Renewable Energy System < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Oxygen Releasing and Carbon Absorbing Ocean Based Renewable Energy System.jpg Technology Profile Technology Description The benefits of the system developed and patented by AEEA are 1 exploitation of the greater wave energy density in the more remote off shore locations 2 usage of existing industrial fuel storage and distribution infrastructure 3 provision for a gradual transition to widespread electric vehicle use 4 avoidance of environmental destruction and visual impairment with minimal impact on commercial fishing and recreation uses 5 fostering the development of a new maritime and energy industry 6 avoidance of the high capital investment in mooring and anchoring seabed electrical cable installation and seabed restoration 7 development of flexibility by deployment of fleets of these vessels to supply widely separated market locations using coastal and national waterways and 8 provision for the addition of fleets without depletion of primary feed stocks as in nuclear energy systems 2 Fig 1 In summary the system converts wave energy from the nearly unlimited world wide

391

Absorbed dose measurements during routine equine radiographic procedures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study was performed in order to determine absorbed doses from scattered radiation to personnel during routine equine radiographic procedures and to determine if the protective apparel adequately reduced exposure from scattered radiation. Absorbed doses were measured for one month at the Texas A&M University Veterinary Teaching Hospital using Li:Mg,Cu,P thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). All personnel present in the x-ray examination room during eqine radiography were monitored using TLDs placed at: (1) the finger level; (2) the waist level; (3) the eye level; and (4) the forearm level. Absorbed doses ranged from 0.693 ligy to 31.3 tigy per study. The greatest doses were associated with the individual handling the cassette holder, although the individual making the exposures received similar doses due to improper techniques. The individual holding the horse's halter consistently received the lowest dose. Although all doses observed were within acceptable limits for occupational workers, results demonstrated the need for protective apparel to effectively reduce exposures.

Salinas, Leticia Lamar

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

CO2 Capture with Liquid-to-Solid Absorbents: CO2 Capture Process Using Phase-Changing Absorbents  

SciTech Connect

IMPACCT Project: GE and the University of Pittsburgh are developing a unique CO2 capture process in which a liquid absorbent, upon contact with CO2, changes into a solid phase. Once in solid form, the material can be separated and the CO2 can be released for storage by heating. Upon heating, the absorbent returns to its liquid form, where it can be reused to capture more CO2. The approach is more efficient than other solventbased processes because it avoids the heating of extraneous solvents such as water. This ultimately leads to a lower cost of CO2 capture and will lower the additional cost to produce electricity for coal-fired power plants that retrofit their facilities to include this technology.

None

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Aerosol size distribution using Lidar data and a typical Lidar assembly  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An algorithm is developed and detailed in this paper which determines atmospheric aerosol parameters such as backscatter and extinction coefficients, aerosol optical thickness, and the aerosol size distribution. The algorithm uses the power profile data ... Keywords: LIDAR system, aerosol optical depth, aerosol size distribution, remote sensing

Hamed Parsiani; Javier Mèndez

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Recent activities in the Aerosol Generation and Transport Program  

SciTech Connect

General statements may be made on the behavior of single-component and multi-component aerosols in the Nuclear Safety Pilot Plant vessel. The removal processes for U/sub 3/O/sub 8/, Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ + Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ aerosols are enhanced in a steam-air atmosphere. Steam-air seems to have little effect on removal of concrete aerosol from the vessel atmosphere. A steam-air environment causes a change in aerosol shape from chain-agglomerate to basically spherical for U/sub 3/O/sub 8/, Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ + Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ aerosol; for concrete the change in aerosol shape is from chain-agglomerate to partially spherical. The mass ratio of the individual components of a multi-component aerosol seems to have an observable influence on the resultant behavior of these aerosols in steam. The enhanced rate of removal of the U/sub 3/O/sub 8/, the Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and the mixed U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ + Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ aerosols from the atmosphere of the NSPP vessel by steam-air is probably caused by the change in aerosol shape and the condensation of steam on the aerosol surfaces combining to increase the effect of gravitational settling. The apparent lack of an effect by steam-air on the removal rate of concrete aerosol could result from a differing physical/chemical response of the surfaces of this aerosol to condensing steam.

Adams, R.E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Climate missing links: Aqueous greenhouse species in clouds, fogs and aerosols  

SciTech Connect

Recently, there has been considerable interest regarding possible greenhouse effects due to combustion and energy-related pollution. This concern has been due to the release and secondary production of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, freons, methane, nitrous oxide, and ozone. These gases can absorb infrared radiation as it comes back from the heated ground and therefore effectively trap the infrared radiation in the troposphere, leading to climatic change. Beyond these gases, clouds, aerosols, and fogs may also play important roles in affecting, the radiation balance by scattering incoming radiation. This work describes the measurement of water soluble infrared absorbers that are known to be derived from pollution. Polluted precipitation is likely to be an important contributor to radiation balance that is currently being neglected. Pollutants characterized include sulfate, nitrate, formate, acetate, oxalate, phenol, p-nitrophenol, ammonium, carbonate, bicarbonate, formaldehyde (dihydroxy methane), methanol, and ethanol. Band positions and band strengths have been determined. These species show measurable infrared absorption bands in the atmospheric window regions (i.e., 900--1600 cm{sup {minus}1}). These data are discussed with regard to the reported discrepancies in the radiatively important water infrared absorption region commonly referred to as the ``foreign broadened continuum.``

Gaffney, J.S.; Marley, N.A.; Cunningham, M.M.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Unglazed transpired solar collector having a low thermal-conductance absorber  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An unglazed transpired solar collector using solar radiation to heat incoming air for distribution, comprises an unglazed absorber formed of low thermal-conductance material having a front surface for receiving the solar radiation and openings in the unglazed absorber for passage of the incoming air such that the incoming air is heated as it passes towards the front surface of the absorber and the heated air passes through the openings in the absorber for distribution. 3 figs.

Christensen, C.B.; Kutscher, C.F.; Gawlik, K.M.

1997-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

397

Unglazed transpired solar collector having a low thermal-conductance absorber  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An unglazed transpired solar collector using solar radiation to heat incoming air for distribution, comprising an unglazed absorber formed of low thermal-conductance material having a front surface for receiving the solar radiation and openings in the unglazed absorber for passage of the incoming air such that the incoming air is heated as it passes towards the front surface of the absorber and the heated air passes through the openings in the absorber for distribution.

Christensen, Craig B. (Boulder, CO); Kutscher, Charles F. (Golden, CO); Gawlik, Keith M. (Boulder, CO)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Progress on the MICE Liquid Absorber Cooling and CryogenicDistribution System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the progress made on the design of the cryogenic cooling system for the liquid absorber for the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE). The absorber consists of a 20.7-liter vessel that contains liquid hydrogen (1.48 kg at 20.3 K) or liquid helium (2.59 kg at 4.2 K). The liquid cryogen vessel is located within the warm bore of the focusing magnet for the MICE. The purpose of the magnet is to provide a low beam beta region within the absorber. For safety reasons, the vacuum vessel for the hydrogen absorber is separated from the vacuum vessel for the superconducting magnet and the vacuum that surrounds the RF cavities or the detector. The absorber thin windows separate the liquid in the absorber from the absorber vacuum. The absorber vacuum vessel also has thin windows that separate the absorber vacuum space from adjacent vacuum spaces. Because the muon beam in MICE is of low intensity, there is no beam heating in the absorber. The absorber can use a single 4 K cooler to cool either liquid helium or liquid hydrogen within the absorber.

Green, M.A.; Baynham, E.; Bradshaw, T.; Drumm, P.; Ivanyushenkov,Y.; Ishimoto, S.; Cummings, M.A.C.; Lau, W.W.; Yang, S.Q.

2005-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

399

ARM - Field Campaign - Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsBiogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate: govCampaignsBiogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate: FIGAERO-ToF-CIMS Instrument in Hyytiala with AMF-2 Related Campaigns Biogenic Aerosols- Effects on Clouds and Climate 2014.02.01, Petäjä, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate: FIGAERO-ToF-CIMS Instrument in Hyytiala with AMF-2 2014.04.01 - 2014.06.01 Lead Scientist : Joel Thornton Description The ultimate goal of this work is to connect field and laboratory observations of organic aerosol chemical and physical properties during the nascent growth stage to the diurnal and vertical distributions of aerosol abundance measured over the boreal forest by the ARM Mobile Facility 2

400

Aerosol Modeling at LLNL - Our capability, results, and perspective  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerosol Indirect Effects to Cloud Aerosol Indirect Effects to Cloud Parameterizations in Short-Range Weather Forecasts with CAM3 Over the Southern Great Plains during May 2003 IOP Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 Catherine Chuang, James Boyle Shaocheng Xie and James Kelly LLNL-POST-401948 March 11, 2008 Why are aerosol/cloud interactions important? The greatest uncertainty in the assessment of radiative forcing arises from the interactions of aerosols with clouds. Radiative forcing of climate between 1750 and 2005 (IPCC, 2007) Sources of uncertainty Emissions Gas to particle conversion Aerosol size distribution Linkage between aerosols

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high-altitude absorbing aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

ARM - Field Campaign - 2007 Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Process Study (CHAPS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Process Study (CHAPS) 7 Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Process Study (CHAPS) Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : 2007 Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Process Study (CHAPS) 2007.06.04 - 2007.06.25 Lead Scientist : Carl Berkowitz For data sets, see below. Description The primary goal of this campaign was to characterize and contrast freshly emitted aerosols above, within and below fields of cumulus humilis (or fair-weather cumulus, FWC) and to use these observations to address how below-cloud and above-cloud aerosol optical and cloud nucleating properties differ downwind of a mid-size city relative to similar aerosols in air less affected by emissions. The observations from this campaign can also be used to aid in the development and evaluation of parameterizations of the

402

Total aerosol effect: forcing or radiative flux perturbation?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uncertainties in aerosol forcings, especially those associated with clouds, contribute to a large extent to uncertainties in the total anthropogenic forcing. The interaction of aerosols with clouds and radiation introduces feedbacks which can affect the rate of rain formation. Traditionally these feedbacks were not included in estimates of total aerosol forcing. Here we argue that they should be included because these feedbacks act quickly compared with the time scale of global warming. We show that for different forcing agents (aerosols and greenhouse gases) the radiative forcings as traditionally defined agree rather well with estimates from a method, here referred to as radiative flux perturbations (RFP), that takes these fast feedbacks and interactions into account. Thus we propose replacing the direct and indirect aerosol forcing in the IPCC forcing chart with RFP estimates. This implies that it is better to evaluate the total anthropogenic aerosol effect as a whole.

Lohmann, Ulrike; Storelvmo, Trude; Jones, Andy; Rotstayn, Leon; Menon, Surabi; Quaas, Johannes; Ekman, Annica; Koch, Dorothy; Ruedy, Reto

2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

403

Priorities for In-situ Aerosol Measurements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Priorities for In-situ Priorities for In-situ Aerosol Measurements Parameters * Aerosol light absorption coefficient - spectral, including UV, vis, and IR - as f(RH), and at ambient RH * Phase function - or relevant integral properties (how many?) * Ice nuclei * Scattering vs. RH, for RH>90% * CCN, as f(S, D p ) * Size distribution * Chemical composition - for determining climate forcing, vs. radiative effect Calibration * Number concentration * Size and shape * Light absorption reference method Characterization * Accuracy and precision - need well-understood error bars * Algorithm comparisons * Closure studies * Facilities for method testing - aircraft time Methods * Inlets - shattering/splashing - location on airplane - passing efficiency - inletless analyzers/samplers * Packaging - modular/portable "pods" for multiple a/c

404

LOSA-M2 aerosol Raman lidar  

SciTech Connect

The scanning LOSA-M2 aerosol Raman lidar, which is aimed at probing atmosphere at wavelengths of 532 and 1064 nm, is described. The backscattered light is received simultaneously in two regimes: analogue and photon-counting. Along with the signals of elastic light scattering at the initial wavelengths, a 607-nm Raman signal from molecular nitrogen is also recorded. It is shown that the height range of atmosphere probing can be expanded from the near-Earth layer to stratosphere using two (near- and far-field) receiving telescopes, and analogue and photon-counting lidar signals can be combined into one signal. Examples of natural measurements of aerosol stratification in atmosphere along vertical and horizontal paths during the expeditions to the Gobi Desert (Mongolia) and Lake Baikal areas are presented.

Balin, Yu S; Bairashin, G S; Kokhanenko, G P; Penner, I E; Samoilova, S V [V.E. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

405

The Role of Giant and Ultragiant Aerosol Particles in Warm Rain Initiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Giant and ultragiant aerosol particles can play an important role in warm rain initiation. Recent aerosol measurements have established that particles as large as 100 ?m are a regular part of the atmospheric aerosol. When ingested in growing ...

David B. Johnson

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Aerosols in Polluted versus Nonpolluted Air Masses: Long-Range Transport and Effects on Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To assess the influence of anthropogenic aerosols on the physics and chemistry of clouds in the northeastern United State, aerosol and cloud-drop size distributions, elemental composition of aerosols as a function of size, and ionic content of ...

R. F. Pueschel; C. C. Van Valin; R. C. Castillo; J. A. Kadlecek; E. Ganor

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

An Aerosol Climatology at Kyoto: Observed Local Radiative Forcing and Columnar Optical Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to evaluate the radiative effect of the atmospheric aerosol at Kyoto, Japan, surface solar irradiance and columnar aerosol optical properties were observed in the period between September 1998 and December 2001. The aerosol optical ...

Takahiro Yabe; Robert Höller; Susumu Tohno; Mikio Kasahara

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

A Method to Estimate Aerosol Radiative Forcing from Spectral Optical Depths  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiative forcing of aerosols is much more difficult to estimate than that of well-mixed gases due to the large spatial variability of aerosols and the lack of an adequate database on their radiative properties. Estimation of aerosol radiative ...

S. K. Satheesh; J. Srinivasan

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

THE LIFETIME OF AEROSOLS IN AMBIENT AIR: CONSIDERATION OF THE EFFECTS OF SURFACTANTS AND CHEMICAL REACTIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lltion to tre sol,thll! ' aerosols and sulfur dioxidP. inof snlfur rlioxirle by aerosols of rnanganesP KinPtics ofof various urhan Sillfate aerosols prorluction r1echani sns.

Toossi, R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Characterization of ambient aerosol composition and formation mechanisms and development of quantification methodologies utilizing ATOFMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

compounds in fine atmospheric aerosol at the Jungfraujoch,on the Quantification of Aerosol Time-of-Flight MassMass Concentrations from Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass

Qin, Xueying

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Carbon oxidation state as a metric for describing the chemistry of atmospheric organic aerosol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sun, Y. et al. Size-resolved aerosol chemistry on Whistlerwith a high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer duringBasis Set: 1. Organic-Aerosol Mixing Thermodynamics. Atmos.

Kroll, Jesse H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Measurement of fragmentation and functionalization pathways in the multistep heterogeneous oxidation of organic aerosol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E. Kolb, and D. R. Worsnop, Aerosol Science and Technology,Wilson, and D. R. Worsnop, Aerosol Science and Technology,and J. L. Jiménez, Aerosol Sci. Tech. , 2004, 38, 1185–1205.

Kroll, Jesse H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Factors affecting the indoor concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols of outdoor origin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Valley of California, USA. J. Aerosol Science 32, S631-S632.particles of outdoor origin. Aerosol Science and Technology,in Central California. Aerosol Science and Technology, 40,

Lunden, Melissa M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

DETERMINATION OF LOW-Z ELEMENTS IN ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS BY CHARGED-PARTICLE-INDUCED NUCLEAR REACTIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis of Atmospheric Aerosols . . . . G. IIo I I Is IV aat levels found in aerosols was not available. These errorsreaction on aluminum in the aerosol and degrading foils. rl

Clemenson, Mark Steven

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Quantifying the Reactive Uptake of OH by Organic Aerosols in a Continuous Flow Stirred Tank Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

O. Edney and J. B. Cohen, Aerosol Science and Technology, M.Uptake of OH by Organic Aerosols in a Continuous Flowof sub- micron organic aerosol particles using a continuous

Che, Dung L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Aerosol climate effects and air quality impacts from 1980 to 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

impacts of carbonaceous aerosols on clouds and climate. InGeophys. Res. . ”In review”. Aerosol climate e?ects and airChem. Phys. 6, 4427–4459. Aerosol climate e?ects and air

Menon, Surabi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Application of Sun/star photometry to derive the aerosol optical depth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric aerosols play a crucial role in the radiative transfer and chemical processes that control the Earth's climate. Aerosol optical depth and other related aerosol characteristics are widely known during daytime through Sun photometers, and so ...

D. Perez-Ramirez; B. Ruiz; J. Aceituno; F. J. Olmo; L. Alados-Arboledas

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

X-RAY ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY FOR THE CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHARACTERIZATION OF ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS J. M. Jaklevic andOF ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS X~RAY J. M. Jaklevic and A. C.from the atmospheric aerosol. Modern air sampling technology

Jaklevic, J. M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Experimental investigations of photochemically-generated organic aerosols and applications to early Earth and Mars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Titan’s atmospheric aerosols from in situ pyrolysis andformation rates of organic aerosols through time-resolved inExperiments of Titan Aerosol Analogues in Preparation for

Chu, Emily Faye

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

CALIPSO-Derived Three-Dimensional Structure of Aerosol over the Atlantic Basin and Adjacent Continents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate modeling of the impact of aerosols on climate requires a detailed understanding of the vertical distribution of aerosols. The Cloud–Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) provides continuous high-resolution ...

Aaron M. Adams; Joseph M. Prospero; Chidong Zhang

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high-altitude absorbing aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Comparison of Aerosol Single Scattering Albedos Derived by Diverse Techniques in Two North Atlantic Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosol single scattering albedo ? (the ratio of scattering to extinction) is important in determining aerosol climatic effects, in explaining relationships between calculated and measured radiative fluxes, and in retrieving aerosol optical ...

P. B. Russell; J. Redemann; B. Schmid; R. W. Bergstrom; J. M. Livingston; D. M. McIntosh; S. A. Ramirez; S. Hartley; P. V. Hobbs; P. K. Quinn; C. M. Carrico; M. J. Rood; E. Öström; K. J. Noone; W. von Hoyningen-Huene; L. Remer

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Tropospheric Aerosol Optical Thickness from the GOCART Model and Comparisons with Satellite and Sun Photometer Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Georgia Institute of Technology–Goddard Global Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model is used to simulate the aerosol optical thickness ? for major types of tropospheric aerosols including sulfate, dust, organic carbon ...

Mian Chin; Paul Ginoux; Stefan Kinne; Omar Torres; Brent N. Holben; Bryan N. Duncan; Randall V. Martin; Jennifer A. Logan; Akiko Higurashi; Teruyuki Nakajima

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

The CALIPSO Lidar Cloud and Aerosol Discrimination: Version 2 Algorithm and Initial Assessment of Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Cloud–Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) satellite was launched in April 2006 to provide global vertically resolved measurements of clouds and aerosols. Correct discrimination between clouds and aerosols ...

Zhaoyan Liu; Mark Vaughan; David Winker; Chieko Kittaka; Brian Getzewich; Ralph Kuehn; Ali Omar; Kathleen Powell; Charles Trepte; Chris Hostetler

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Lidar Observations of the Vertical Aerosol Flux in the Planetary Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vertical aerosol transport in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) is investigated with lidars. Profiles of the vertical wind velocity are measured with a 2-?m Doppler wind lidar. Aerosol parameters are derived from observations with an aerosol ...

Ronny Engelmann; Ulla Wandinger; Albert Ansmann; Detlef Müller; Egidijus Žeromskis; Dietrich Althausen; Birgit Wehner

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Thin Film Absorbers Based on Plasmonic Phase Resonances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate an efficient double-layer light absorber by exciting plasmonic phase resonances. We show that the addition of grooves can cause mode splitting of the plasmonic waveguide cavity modes and all the new resonant modes exhibit large absorptivity greater than 90%. Some of the generated absorption peaks have wide-angle characteristics. Furthermore, we find that the proposed structure is fairly insensitive to the alignment error between different layers. The proposed plasmonic nano-structure designs may have exciting potential applications in thin film solar cells, thermal emitters, novel infrared detectors, and highly sensitive bio-sensors.

Cui, Yanxia; Xu, Jun; He, Sailing; Fang, Nicholas X

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Natural Aerosols in the Global Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 N?ar det kjem til stykket ?Ar ut og ?ar inn har du site bøygd yver bøkene, du har samla deg meir kunnskap enn du treng til ni liv. N?ar det kjem til stykket, er det so lite som skal til, og det vesle har hjarta alltid visst. I Egypt hadde guden for lærdom hovud som ei ape. Olav H. HaugeNatural aerosols in the global atmosphere

Alf Grini; Alf Grini

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

TROPOSPHERIC AEROSOL PROGRAM, PROGRAM PLAN, MARCH 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of Tropospheric Aerosol Program (TAP) will be to develop the fundamental scientific understanding required to construct tools for simulating the life cycle of tropospheric aerosols--the processes controlling their mass loading, composition, and microphysical properties, all as a function of time, location, and altitude. The TAP approach to achieving this goal will be by conducting closely linked field, modeling, laboratory, and theoretical studies focused on the processes controlling formation, growth, transport, and deposition of tropospheric aerosols. This understanding will be represented in models suitable for describing these processes on a variety of geographical scales; evaluation of these models will be a key component of TAP field activities. In carrying out these tasks TAP will work closely with other programs in DOE and in other Federal and state agencies, and with the private sector. A forum to directly work with our counterparts in industry to ensure that the results of this research are translated into products that are useful to that community will be provided by NARSTO (formerly the North American Research Strategy on Tropospheric Ozone), a public/private partnership, whose membership spans government, the utilities, industry, and university researchers in Mexico, the US, and Canada.

SCHWARTZ,S.E.; LUNN,P.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Clustering of Aerosols in Atmospheric Turbulent Flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A mechanism of formation of small-scale inhomogeneities in spatial distributions of aerosols and droplets associated with clustering instability in the atmospheric turbulent flow is discussed. The particle clustering is a consequence of a spontaneous breakdown of their homogeneous space distribution due to the clustering instability, and is caused by a combined effect of the particle inertia and a finite correlation time of the turbulent velocity field. In this paper a theoretical approach proposed in Phys. Rev. E 66, 036302 (2002) is further developed and applied to investigate the mechanisms of formation of small-scale aerosol inhomogeneities in the atmospheric turbulent flow. The theory of the particle clustering instability is extended to the case when the particle Stokes time is larger than the Kolmogorov time scale, but is much smaller than the correlation time at the integral scale of turbulence. We determined the criterion of the clustering instability for the Stokes number larger than 1. We discussed applications of the analyzed effects to the dynamics of aerosols and droplets in the atmospheric turbulent flow.

T. Elperin; N. Kleeorin; M. A. Liberman; V. L'vov; I. Rogachevskii

2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

429

On The Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding Organic Aerosol  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

On The Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding Organic Aerosol On The Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding Organic Aerosol Particles Title On The Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding Organic Aerosol Particles Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2006 Authors Pang, Yanbo, B. J. Turpin, and Lara A. Gundel Journal Journal of Aerosol Science and Technology Volume 40 Start Page Chapter Pagination 128-133 Abstract This study shows how aerosol organic oxygen data could provide new and independent information about organic aerosol mass, aqueous solubility of organic aerosols, formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and the relative contributions of anthropogenic and biogenic sources. For more than two decades atmospheric aerosol organic mass concentration has usually been estimated by multiplying the measured carbon content by an assumed organic mass (OM)-to-organic carbon (OC ) factor of 1.4. However, this factor can vary from 1.0 to 2.5 depending on location. This great uncertainty about aerosol organic mass limits our understanding of the influence of organic aerosol on climate, visibility and health.New examination of organic aerosol speciation data shows that the oxygen content is the key factor responsible for the observed range in the OM-to-OC factor. When organic oxygen content is excluded, the ratio of non-oxygen organic mass to carbon mass varies very little across different environments (1.12 to 1.14). The non-oxygen-OM-to-non-oxygen OC factor for all studied sites (urban and non-urban) is 1.13± 0.02. The uncertainty becomes an order of magnitude smaller than the uncertainty in the best current estimates of organic mass to organic carbon ratios (1.6± 0.2 for urban and 2.1± 0.2 for non-urban areas). When aerosol organic oxygen data become available, organic aerosol mass can be quite accurately estimated using just OC and organic oxygen (OO) without the need to know whether the aerosol is fresh or aged. In addition, aerosol organic oxygen data will aid prediction of water solubility since compounds with OO-to-OC higher than 0.4 have water solubilities higher than 1g per 100 g water

430

Aerosol physics and chemistry: indoor perspective, Chapter 10  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

G. Sextro Secondary Authors Ruzer, Lev S., and Naomi H. Harley Book Title Aerosol Handbook: Measurement, Dosimetry and Health Effects Chapter Chapter Pagination 189-224...

431

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Aerosol Research...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerosol Research at the Arctic Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (AFARS): In Search of Indirect Cloud Effects Sassen, Kenneth University of Alaska Fairbanks Tiruchirapalli,...

432

Deposition of biological aerosols on HVAC heat exchangers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methods to Maintain Heat Exchanger Coil Cleanliness. ASHRAEEngineering Foundation on Heat Exchanger Fouling, UnitedAerosols on HVAC Heat Exchangers Jeffrey Siegel and Iain

Siegel, Jeffrey; Walker, Iain

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Aerosol Duct Sealing : Technologies : From the Lab to the Marketplace...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the California building code changes and increasing availability of the aerosol sealing technology, more homeowners and facilities managers will seal their duct systems and save...

434

A Mixed Bag of Aerosols over Northeastern China  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mixed Bag of Aerosols over Northeastern China For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http:www.arm.govsciencehighlights Research Highlight...

435

ARM AOS Processing Status and Aerosol Intensive Properties VAP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Andrews, and P. J. Sheridan National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Boulder, Colorado Abstract The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerosol Observing System (AOS)...

436

Overview of the COPS Aerosol and Cloud Microphysics (ACM) Subgroup...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(DAP) - Evelyne Richard, Hans-Stefan Bauer * Aerosol and Cloud Microphysics (ACM) - Chairs: Susanne Crewell, Dave Turner, Stephen Mobbs ACM Scientific Questions * What...

437

Atmospheric Aerosol Chemistry, Climate Change, and Air Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

spectrometry capabilities to analyze the molecular composition of atmospheric organic aerosols, or OA, containing nitrogen- containing organic compounds (NOC) and only carbon,...

438

Urban aerosols harbor diverse and dynamic bacterial populations  

Urban aerosols harbor diverse and dynamic bacterial populations Eoin L. Brodie, Todd Z. DeSantis, Jordan P. Moberg Parker, Ingrid X. Zubietta, Yvette M. Piceno, and ...

439

Atmospheric pressure flow reactor / aerosol mass spectrometer studies of tropospheric aerosol nucleat and growth kinetics. Final report, June, 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this program was to determine the mechanisms and rates of growth and transformation and growth processes that control secondary aerosol particles in both the clear and polluted troposphere. The experimental plan coupled an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) with a chemical ionization mass spectrometer to provide simultaneous measurement of condensed and particle phases. The first task investigated the kinetics of tropospheric particle growth and transformation by measuring vapor accretion to particles (uptake coefficients, including mass accommodation coefficients and heterogeneous reaction rate coefficients). Other work initiated investigation of aerosol nucleation processes by monitoring the appearance of submicron particles with the AMS as a function of precursor gas concentrations. Three projects were investigated during the program: (1) Ozonolysis of oleic acid aerosols as model of chemical reactivity of secondary organic aerosol; (2) Activation of soot particles by measurement deliquescence in the presence of sulfuric acid and water vapor; (3) Controlled nucleation and growth of sulfuric acid aerosols.

Worsnop, Douglas R.

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Design Issues for the Superconducting Magnet that Goes Around the Liquid Hydrogen Absorber for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the absorber body and pipes and the heat conduction down theheat transfer into the absorber to about 19 kW. The absorber vent pipeheat transfer into the liquid hydrogen to about 54 kW. The vent pipes

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high-altitude absorbing aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

MATRIX (Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state): an aerosol microphysical module for global atmospheric models  

SciTech Connect

A new aerosol microphysical module MATRIX, the Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state, and its application in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) climate model (ModelE) are described. This module, which is based on the quadrature method of moments (QMOM), represents nucleation, condensation, coagulation, internal and external mixing, and cloud-drop activation and provides aerosol particle mass and number concentration and particle size information for up to 16 mixed-mode aerosol populations. Internal and external mixing among aerosol components sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, carbonaceous aerosols, dust and sea-salt particles are represented. The solubility of each aerosol population, which is explicitly calculated based on its soluble and insoluble components, enables calculation of the dependence of cloud drop activation on the microphysical characterization of multiple soluble aerosol populations. A detailed model description and results of box-model simulations of various aerosol population configurations are presented. The box model experiments demonstrate the dependence of cloud activating aerosol number concentration on the aerosol population configuration; comparisons to sectional models are quite favorable. MATRIX is incorporated into the GISS climate model and simulations are carried out primarily to assess its performance/efficiency for global-scale atmospheric model application. Simulation results were compared with aircraft and station measurements of aerosol mass and number concentration and particle size to assess the ability of the new method to yield data suitable for such comparison. The model accurately captures the observed size distributions in the Aitken and accumulation modes up to particle diameter 1 {micro}m, in which sulfate, nitrate, black and organic carbon are predominantly located; however the model underestimates coarse-mode number concentration and size, especially in the marine environment. This is more likely due to oversimplifications of the representation of sea salt emissions - sea salt emissions are only calculated for two size classes - than to inherent limitations of MATRIX.

Bauer,S.E.; Wright, D.L.; Koch, D.; Lewis, E.R.; McGraw, R.; Chang, L.-S.; Schwartz, S.E.; Ruedy, R.

2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

442

Self-assembly of Ni-nanoparticles in Aerosols Produced Thermally ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The self-assembly behavior in Ni-aerosols was studied on- ground ... In microgravity, convection within the thermally produced aerosols could be ...

443

Chapter 3: Evaluating the impacts of carbonaceous aerosols on clouds and climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

response of fossil fuel and biofuel soot, accounting for2005) include fossil- and biofuel sources from Bond et al. (the impacts of fossil- and biofuel BC aerosols, aerosol-

Menon, Surabi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Chemistry of atmospheric aerosol particles and their resulting warm cloud-nucleation properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of levoglucosan in biomass combustion aerosol by high-of levoglucosan in biomass combustion aerosol by high-from smoldering biomass combustion, Atmospheric Chemistry

Moore, Meagan Julia Kerry

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Evaluation of the carbon content of aerosols from the burn- ing of biomass in the Brazilian Amazon using thermal, op- tical and thermal-optical analysis methods  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Aerosol samples were collected at a pasture site in the Amazon Basin as part of the project LBA-SMOCC-2002 (Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia - Smoke Aerosols, Clouds, Rainfall and Climate: Aerosols from Biomass Burning Perturb Global and Regional Climate). Sampling was conducted during the late dry season, when the aerosol composition was dominated by biomass burning emissions, especially in the submicron fraction. A 13-stage Dekati low-pressure impactor (DLPI) was used to collect particles with nominal aerodynamic diameters (D{sub p}) ranging from 0.03 to 0.10 m. Gravimetric analyses of the DLPI substrates and filters were performed to obtain aerosol mass concentrations. The concentrations of total, apparent elemental, and organic carbon (TC, EC{sub a}, and OC) were determined using thermal and thermal-optical analysis (TOA) methods. A light transmission method (LTM) was used to determine the concentration of equivalent black carbon (BC{sub e}) or the absorbing fraction at 880 nm for the size-resolved samples. During the dry period, due to the pervasive presence of fires in the region upwind of the sampling site, concentrations of fine aerosols (D{sub p} < 2.5 {mu}m: average 59.8 {mu}g m{sup -3}) were higher than coarse aerosols (D{sub p} > 2.5 {mu}m: 4.1 {mu}g m{sup -3}). Carbonaceous matter, estimated as the sum of the particulate organic matter (i.e., OC x 1.8) plus BC{sub e}, comprised more than 90% to the total aerosol mass. Concentrations of EC{sub a} (estimated by thermal analysis with a correction for charring) and BCe (estimated by LTM) averaged 5.2 {+-} 1.3 and 3.1 {+-} 0.8 {mu}g m{sup -3}, respectively. The determination of EC was improved by extracting water-soluble organic material from the samples, which reduced the average light absorption {angstrom} exponent of particles in the size range of 0.1 to 1.0 {mu}m from > 2.0 to approximately 1.2. The size-resolved BC{sub e} measured by the LTM showed a clear maximum between 0.4 and 0.6 m in diameter. The concentrations of OC and BC{sub e} varied diurnally during the dry period, and this variation is related to diurnal changes in boundary layer thickness and in fire frequency.

Soto-Garcia, Lydia L.; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Andreae, Tracey W.; taxo, Paulo Ar-; Maenhaut, Willy; Kirchstetter, Thomas; Novakov, T.; Chow, Judith C.; Mayol-Bracero, Olga L.

2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

446

Evaluation of the carbon content of aerosols from the burn- ing of biomass in the Brazilian Amazon using thermal, op- tical and thermal-optical analysis methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosol samples were collected at a pasture site in the Amazon Basin as part of the project LBA-SMOCC-2002 (Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia - Smoke Aerosols, Clouds, Rainfall and Climate: Aerosols from Biomass Burning Perturb Global and Regional Climate). Sampling was conducted during the late dry season, when the aerosol composition was dominated by biomass burning emissions, especially in the submicron fraction. A 13-stage Dekati low-pressure impactor (DLPI) was used to collect particles with nominal aerodynamic diameters (D{sub p}) ranging from 0.03 to 0.10 m. Gravimetric analyses of the DLPI substrates and filters were performed to obtain aerosol mass concentrations. The concentrations of total, apparent elemental, and organic carbon (TC, EC{sub a}, and OC) were determined using thermal and thermal-optical analysis (TOA) methods. A light transmission method (LTM) was used to determine the concentration of equivalent black carbon (BC{sub e}) or the absorbing fraction at 880 nm for the size-resolved samples. During the dry period, due to the pervasive presence of fires in the region upwind of the sampling site, concentrations of fine aerosols (D{sub p} aerosols (D{sub p} > 2.5 {mu}m: 4.1 {mu}g m{sup -3}). Carbonaceous matter, estimated as the sum of the particulate organic matter (i.e., OC x 1.8) plus BC{sub e}, comprised more than 90% to the total aerosol mass. Concentrations of EC{sub a} (estimated by thermal analysis with a correction for charring) and BCe (estimated by LTM) averaged 5.2 {+-} 1.3 and 3.1 {+-} 0.8 {mu}g m{sup -3}, respectively. The determination of EC was improved by extracting water-soluble organic material from the samples, which reduced the average light absorption {angstrom} exponent of particles in the size range of 0.1 to 1.0 {mu}m from > 2.0 to approximately 1.2. The size-resolved BC{sub e} measured by the LTM showed a clear maximum between 0.4 and 0.6 m in diameter. The concentrations of OC and BC{sub e} varied diurnally during the dry period, and this variation is related to diurnal changes in boundary layer thickness and in fire frequency.

Soto-Garcia, Lydia L.; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Andreae, Tracey W.; taxo, Paulo Ar-; Maenhaut, Willy; Kirchstetter, Thomas; Novakov, T.; Chow, Judith C.; Mayol-Bracero, Olga L.

2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

447

Development of Aerosol Models for Radiative Flux Calculations at ARM Sites: Utility of Trajectory Clustering for Characterizing Aerosol Climatology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of Aerosol Models for Radiative Flux Development of Aerosol Models for Radiative Flux Calculations at ARM Sites: Utility of Trajectory Clustering for Characterizing Aerosol Climatology E. Andrews Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environment University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado E. Andrews, J. A. Ogren, P. J. Sheridan, and J. M. Harris Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Boulder, Colorado P. K. Quinn Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Seattle, Washington Abstract The uncertainties associated with assumptions of generic aerosol properties in radiative transfer codes are unknown, which means that these uncertainties are frequently invoked when models and

448

Design of a Transpired Air Heating Solar Collector with an Inverted Perforated Absorber and Asymmetric Compound Parabolic Concentrator.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? absorber and an asymmetric compound parabolic concentrator was applied to increase the intensity of solar radiation incident on the perforated absorber. A 2D ray… (more)

Shams, Nasif

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Role of ammonia chemistry and coarse mode aerosols in global climatological inorganic aerosol distributions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the aerosolassociated water depends on the composition of the #12;3 particles, which is determined by gas in a three dimensional chemical transport model to understand the roles of ammonia chemistry and natural precursors among modeled aerosol species selfconsistently with ambient relative humidity and natural

Zender, Charles

450

The Segregation of Aerosols by Cloud-Nucleating Activity. Part II: Observation of an Urban Aerosol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The submicron aerosol of metropolitan Seattle was segregated into CCN and non-CCN fractions by a high-flux thermal diffusion cloud chamber in series with a dichotomous separator. Each segregated fraction of the five-hour daily sample was ...

Lee Harrison

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Physicochemical Characterization of Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols I: Uranium Concentration in Aerosols as a Function of Time and Particle Size  

SciTech Connect

During the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study, aerosols containing depleted uranium were produced inside unventilated armored vehicles (i.e., Abrams tanks and Bradley Fighting Vehicles) by perforation with large-caliber DU penetrators. These aerosols were collected and characterized, and the data were subsequently used to assess human health risks to personnel exposed to DU aerosols. The DU content of each aerosol sample was first quantified by radioanalytical methods, and selected samples, primarily those from the cyclone separator grit chambers, were analyzed radiochemically. Deposition occurred inside the vehicles as particles settled on interior surfaces. Settling rates of uranium from the aerosols were evaluated using filter cassette samples that collected aerosol as total mass over eight sequential time intervals. A moving filter was used to collect aerosol samples over time particularly within the first minute after the shot. The results demonstrate that the peak uranium concentration in the aerosol occurred in the first 10 s, and the concentration decreased in the Abrams tank shots to about 50% within 1 min and to less than 2% 30 min after perforation. In the Bradley vehicle, the initial (and maximum) uranium concentration was lower than those observed in the Abrams tank and decreased more slowly. Uranium mass concentrations in the aerosols as a function of particle size were evaluated using samples collected in the cyclone samplers, which collected aerosol continuously for 2 h post perforation. The percentages of uranium mass in the cyclone separator stages from the Abrams tank tests ranged from 38% to 72% and, in most cases, varied with particle size, typically with less uranium associated with the smaller particle sizes. Results with the Bradley vehicle ranged from 18% to 29% and were not specifically correlated with particle size.

Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L.; Traub, Richard J.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Design and Evaluation of Ionic Liquids as Novel Absorbents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Design anD evaluation of ionic liquiDs Design anD evaluation of ionic liquiDs as novel absorbents Background There is growing concern among climate scientists that the buildup of greenhouse gases (GHG), particularly carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), in the atmosphere is affecting the global climate in ways that could have serious consequences. One approach to reducing GHG emissions is to scrub CO 2 from the flue gas of power plants and sequester it in geologic formations. Although it is technically feasible to remove CO 2 from flue gas, current processes are too expensive. New, less expensive processes are needed. This project is investigating the feasibility of using a novel class of compounds - ionic liquids - for the capture of CO 2 from the flue gas from coal and natural gas-fired power plants. The success of ionic liquids technology

453

THE PLUTONIUM AEROSOL MONITORING PROGRAM AT ANL-IDAHO FACILITIES  

SciTech Connect

The physical and radiation characteristics of plutonium aerosols are reviewed briefly. A number of detecting and sampling devices and techniques are discussed for application to plutonium aerosols under conditions of reactor operations. The monitoring program and the Pu-fueled reactors at ANL-Idaho are described. (D.L.C.)

Stoddart, P.G.

1963-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Deposition of Biological Aerosols on HVAC Heat Exchangers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-47669 Deposition of Biological Aerosols on HVAC Heat Exchangers Jeffrey Siegel and Iain Walker of Biological Aerosols on HVAC Heat Exchangers Jeffrey A. Siegel Iain S. Walker, Ph.D. ASHRAE Student Member that are found in commercial and residential HVAC systems of 1 - 6 m/s (200 - 1200 ft/min), particle diameters

455

Effects of Black Carbon Aerosols on the Indian Monsoon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A six-member ensemble of twentieth-century simulations with changes to only time-evolving global distributions of black carbon aerosols in a global coupled climate model is analyzed to study the effects of black carbon (BC) aerosols on the Indian ...

Gerald A. Meehl; Julie M. Arblaster; William D. Collins

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Characterization of a Modified Hexagonal Silver Iodide Ice Nucleus Aerosol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new ice nucleant aerosol was produced by combustion of a 2% AgI-0.5 mole % Bil3-NH4I-acetone-water solution. The ice nucleating effectiveness of this aerosol is an order of magnitude greater than AgI alone at ?10°C. An X-ray powder analysis ...

Paul T. Scott; William G. Finnegan; Peter C. Sinclair

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Loading capacity of various filters for lithium fire generated aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The lithium aerosol loading capacity of a prefilter, HEPA filters and a sand and gravel bed filter was determined. The test aerosol was characterized and was generated by burning lithium in an unlimited air atmosphere. Correlation to sodium aerosol loading capacities were made to relate existing data to lithium aerosol loadings under varying conditions. This work is being conducted in support of the fusion reactor safety program. The lithium aerosol was generated by burning lithium pools, up to 45 kgs, in a 340 m/sup 3/ low humidity air atmosphere to supply aerosol to recirculating filter test loops. The aerosol was sampled to determine particle size, mass concentrations and chemical species. The dew point and gas concentrations were monitored throughout the tests. Loop inlet aerosol mass concentrations ranged up to 5 gr/m/sup 3/. Chemical compounds analyzed to be present in the aerosol include Li/sub 2/O, LiOH, and Li/sub 2/CO/sub 3/. HEPA filters with and without separators and a prefilter and HEPA filter in series were loaded with 7.8 to 11.1 kg/m/sup 2/ of aerosol at a flow rate of 1.31 m/sec and 5 kPa pressure drop. The HEPA filter loading capacity was determined to be greater at a lower flow rate. The loading capacity increased from 0.4 to 2.8 kg by decreasing the flow rate from 1.31 to 0.26 m/sec for a pressure drop of 0.11 kPa due to aerosol buildup. The prefilter tested in series with a HEPA did not increase the total loading capacity significantly for the same total pressure drop. Separators in the HEPA had only minor effect on loading capacity. The sand and gravel bed filter loaded to 0.50 kg/m/sup 2/ at an aerosol flow rate of 0.069 m/sec and final pressure drop of 6.2 kPa. These loading capacities and their dependence on test variables are similar to those reported for sodium aerosols except for the lithium aerosol HEPA loading capacity dependence upon flow rate.

Jeppson, D.W.; Barreca, J.R.

1980-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

458

Effects of aerosols on deep convective cumulus clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work investigates the effects of anthropogenic aerosols on deep convective clouds and the associated radiative forcing in the Houston area. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model (GCE) coupled with a spectral-bin microphysics is employed to investigate the aerosol effects on clouds and precipitation. First, aerosol indirect effects on clouds are separately investigated under different aerosol compositions, concentrations and size distributions. Then, an updated GCE model coupled with the radiative transfer and land surface processes is employed to investigate the aerosol radiative effects on deep convective clouds. The cloud microphysical and macrophysical properties change considerably with the aerosol properties. With varying the aerosol composition from only (NH4)2SO4, (NH4)2SO4 with soluble organics, to (NH4)2SO4 with slightly soluble organics, the number of activated aerosols decreases gradually, leading to a decrease in the cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) and an increase in the droplet size. Ice processes are more sensitive to the changes of aerosol chemical properties than the warm rain processes. The most noticeable effect of increasing aerosol number concentrations is an increase of CDNC and cloud water content but a decrease in droplet size. It is indicated that the aerosol indirect effect on deep convection is more pronounced in relatively clean air than in heavily polluted air. The aerosol effects on clouds are strongly dependent on RH: the effect is very significant in humid air. Aerosol radiative effects (ARE) on clouds are very pronounced for mid-visible single-scattering albedo (SSA) of 0.85. Relative to the case without the ARE, cloud fraction and optical depth decrease by about 18% and 20%, respectively. The daytime-mean direct forcing is about 2.2 W m-2 at the TOA and -17.4 W m-2 at the surface. The semi-direct forcing is positive, about 10 and 11.2 W m-2 at the TOA and surface, respectively. Aerosol direct and semi-direct effects are very sensitive to SSA. The cloud fraction, optical depth, convective strength, and precipitation decrease with the increase of absorption, resulting from a more stable atmosphere due to enhanced surface cooling and atmospheric heating.

Fan, Jiwen

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

ARM - Field Campaign - MArine Stratus Radiation Aerosol and Drizzle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsMArine Stratus Radiation Aerosol and Drizzle (MASRAD) IOP govCampaignsMArine Stratus Radiation Aerosol and Drizzle (MASRAD) IOP Campaign Links Science Plan AMF Point Reyes Website AMF Point Reyes Data Plots Related Campaigns MASRAD: Pt. Reyes Stratus Cloud and Drizzle Study 2005.07.07, Coulter, AMF MASRAD: Cloud Condensate Nuclei Chemistry Measurements 2005.07.01, Berkowitz, AMF MASRAD - Aerosol Optical Properties 2005.06.29, Strawa, AMF MASRAD:Sub-Micron Aerosol Measurements 2005.06.20, Wang, AMF MASRAD: Cloud Study from the 2NFOV at Pt. Reyes Field Campaign 2005.06.02, Wiscombe, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : MArine Stratus Radiation Aerosol and Drizzle (MASRAD) IOP 2005.03.14 - 2005.09.14 Website : http://www.arm.gov/sites/amf/pye/ Lead Scientist : Mark Miller

460

Aerosol Retrievals under Partly Cloudy Conditions: Challenges and Perspectives  

SciTech Connect

There are lots of interesting and intriguing features of aerosols near clouds – many of which can be quite engaging, as well being useful and climate-related. Exploring aerosol with the aid of the remote sensing, in situ observations and numerical modeling has piqued our curiosity and led to improve insights into the nature of aerosol and clouds and their complex relationship. This chapter conveys the outstanding issues of cloudy-sky aerosol retrievals of important climate properties and outlines their fruitful connections to other research areas such as in situ measurements and model simulations. The chapter focuses mostly on treating the inverse problems in the context of the passive satellite remote sensing and how they can improve our understanding of the cloud-aerosol interactions. The presentation includes a basis in the inverse problem theory, reviews available approaches and discusses their applications to partly cloudy situations. Potential synergy of observations and model simulations is described as well.

Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Berg, Larry K.; Flynn, Connor J.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high-altitude absorbing aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Determination of vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, single scatter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Determination of vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, single scatter Determination of vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, single scatter albedo and asymmetry parameter at Barrow. Sivaraman, Chitra Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Flynn, Connor Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Turner, David University of Wisconsin-Madison Category: Aerosols Efforts are currently underway to run and evaluate the Broadband Heating Rate Profile project at the ARM North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Barrow site for the time period March 2004 - February 2005. The Aerosol Best-Estimate (ABE) Value-Added Procedure (VAP) is to provide continuous estimates of vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, single-scatter albedo, and asymmetry parameter above the Northern Slopes of Alaska (NSA) facility. In the interest of temporal continuity, we have developed an algorithm that

462

The Effects of Clouds on Aerosol and Chemical Species Production and Distribution. Part III: Aerosol Model Description and Sensitivity Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A modeling study of the effects of clouds on the evolution and redistribution of aerosol particles in the troposphere is presented. A two-mode, two-moment aerosol evolution model is coupled with a two-dimensional, mixed-phase, two-moment ...

Yiping Zhang; Sonia Kreidenweis; Gregory R. Taylor

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Temporal Variations of Aerosol Optical Parameters Resulting from the Aging of a Model Aerosol Number Size Distribution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosol number size distributions are subject to aging, i.e., to temporal variations. The aging of a Junge number size distribution due to a multitude of processes was modeled by Junge and Abel. The pertinent changes with time of aerosol optical ...

J. Freund

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Analysis of heat-pipe absorbers in evacuated-tube solar collectors  

SciTech Connect

Heat transfer in evacuated-tube solar collectors with heat-pipe absorbers is compared with that for similar collectors with flow-through absorbers. In systems that produce hot water or other heated fluids, the heat-pipe absorber suffers a heat transfer penalty compared with the flow-through absorber, but in many cases the penalty can be minimized by proper design at the heat-pipe condenser and system manifold. The heat transfer penalty decreases with decreasing collector heat loss coefficient, suggesting that evacuated tubes with optical concentration are more appropriate for use with heat pipes than evacuated or nonevacuated flat-plate collectors. When the solar collector is used to drive an absorption chiller, the heat-pipe absorber has better heat transfer characteristics than the flow-through absorbers.

Hull, J.R.; Schertz, W.W.; Allen, J.W.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

ARM: 2-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

2-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

466

ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

Rob Newsom; John Goldsmith

467

ARM: 1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

468

ARM: 10-second Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

10-second Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

469

ARM: 10-second Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

10-second Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

470

ARM: 1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol scattering ratio and backscattering coefficient profiles, from first Ferrare algorithm

Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

471

Report on the evaluation of the tritium producing burnable absorber rod lead test assembly. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the design and fabrication requirements for a tritium-producing burnable absorber rod lead test assembly and evaluates the safety issues associated with tritium-producing burnable absorber rod irradiation on the operation of a commercial light water reactor. The report provides an evaluation of the tritium-producing burnable absorber rod design and concludes that irradiation can be performed within U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations applicable to a commercial pressurized light water reactor.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Vapor scavenging by atmospheric aerosol particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Particle growth due to vapor scavenging was studied using both experimental and computational techniques. Vapor scavenging by particles is an important physical process in the atmosphere because it can result in changes to particle properties (e.g., size, shape, composition, and activity) and, thus, influence atmospheric phenomena in which particles play a role, such as cloud formation and long range transport. The influence of organic vapor on the evolution of a particle mass size distribution was investigated using a modified version of MAEROS (a multicomponent aerosol dynamics code). The modeling study attempted to identify the sources of organic aerosol observed by Novakov and Penner (1993) in a field study in Puerto Rico. Experimentally, vapor scavenging and particle growth were investigated using two techniques. The influence of the presence of organic vapor on the particle`s hydroscopicity was investigated using an electrodynamic balance. The charge on a particle was investigated theoretically and experimentally. A prototype apparatus--the refractive index thermal diffusion chamber (RITDC)--was developed to study multiple particles in the same environment at the same time.

Andrews, E.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Parameter exploration of optically trapped liquid aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When studying the motion of optically trapped particles on the $\\mu s$ time scale, in low viscous media such as air, inertia cannot be neglected. Resolution of unusual and interesting behaviour not seen in colloidal trapping experiments is possible. In attempt to explain the phenomena we use power spectral methods to perform a parameter study of the Brownian motion of optically trapped liquid aerosol droplets concentrated around the critically damped regime. We present evidence that the system is suitably described by a simple harmonic oscillator model which must include a description of Fax\\'{e}n's correction, but not necessarily frequency dependent hydrodynamic corrections to Stokes' law. We also provide results describing how the system behaves under several variables and discuss the difficulty in decoupling the parameters responsible for the observed behaviour. We show that due to the relatively low dynamic viscosity and high trap stiffness it is easy to transfer between over- and under-damped motion by experimentally altering either trap stiffness or damping. Our results suggest stable aerosol trapping may be achieved in under-damped conditions, but the onset of deleterious optical forces at high trapping powers prevents the probing of the upper stability limits due to Brownian motion.

D. R. Burnham; P. J. Reece; D. McGloin

2009-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

474

CuCoMnOx as a Functional Coating for Solar Absorbers Using Sol ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar thermal heaters are used widely in domestic and industrial applications for heating water or generating electrical power through the use of solar absorber ...

475

The Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) Science Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) field campaign will provide a detailed set of observations with which to (1) perform radiative and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) closure studies, (2) evaluate a new retrieval algorithm for aerosol optical depth (AOD) in the presence of clouds using passive remote sensing, (3) extend a previously developed technique to investigate aerosol indirect effects, and (4) evaluate the performance of a detailed regional-scale model and a more parameterized global-scale model in simulating particle activation and AOD associated with the aging of anthropogenic aerosols. To meet these science objectives, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility will deploy the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) and the Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, for a 12-month period starting in the summer of 2012 in order to quantify aerosol properties, radiation, and cloud characteristics at a location subject to both clear and cloudy conditions, and clean and polluted conditions. These observations will be supplemented by two aircraft intensive observation periods (IOPs), one in the summer and a second in the winter. Each IOP will deploy one, and possibly two, aircraft depending on available resources. The first aircraft will be equipped with a suite of in situ instrumentation to provide measurements of aerosol optical properties, particle composition and direct-beam irradiance. The second aircraft will fly directly over the first and use a multi-wavelength high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) and scanning polarimeter to provide continuous optical and cloud properties in the column below.

Berkowitz, CM; Berg, LK; Cziczo, DJ; Flynn, CJ; Kassianov, EI; Fast, JD; Rasch, PJ; Shilling, JE; Zaveri, RA; Zelenyuk, A; Ferrare, RA; Hostetler, CA; Cairns, B; Russell, PB; Ervens, B

2011-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

476

Aerodynamic size associations of natural radioactivity with ambient aerosols  

SciTech Connect

The aerodynamic size of /sup 214/Pb, /sup 212/Pb, /sup 210/Pb, /sup 7/Be, /sup 32/P, /sup 35/S (as SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/), and stable SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ was measured using cascade impactors. The activity distribution of /sup 212/Pb and /sup 214/Pb, measured by alpha spectroscopy, was largely associated with aerosols smaller than 0.52 ..mu..m. Based on 46 measurements, the activity median aerodynamic diameter of /sup 212/Pb averaged 0.13 ..mu..m (sigma/sub g/ = 2.97), while /sup 214/Pb averaged 0.16 ..mu..m (sigma/sub g/ = 2.86). The larger median size of /sup 214/Pb was attributed to ..cap alpha..-recoil depletion of smaller aerosols following decay of aerosol-associated /sup 218/Po. Subsequent /sup 214/Pb condensation on all aerosols effectively enriches larger aerosols. /sup 212/Pb does not undergo this recoil-driven redistribution. Low-pressure impactor measurements indicated that the mass median aerodynamic diameter of SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ was about three times larger than the activity median diameter /sup 212/Pb, reflecting differences in atmospheric residence times as well as the differences in surface area and volume distributions of the atmospheric aerosol. Cosmogenic radionuclides, especially /sup 7/Be, were associated with smaller aerosols than SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ regardless of season, while /sup 210/Pb distributions in summer measurements were similar to sulfate but smaller in winter measurements. Even considering recoil following /sup 214/Po ..cap alpha..-decay, the avervage /sup 210/Pb labeled aerosol grows by about a factor of two during its atmospheric lifetime. The presence of 5 to 10% of the /sup 7/Be on aerosols greater than 1 ..mu..m was indicative of post-condensation growth, probably either in the upper atmosphere or after mixing into the boundary layer.

Bondietti, E.A.; Papastefanou, C.; Rangarajan, C.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Ion Partitioning at the liquid/vapor interface of a multi-component alkali halide solution: A model for aqueous sea salt aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

model for aqueous sea salt aerosols Sutapa Ghosal, 1 Matthewwith sea salt ice and aerosols has been implicated in theof aqueous sea salt aerosols and particles have been

Ghosal, Sutapa

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Levelized cost of coating (LCOC) for selective absorber materials.  

SciTech Connect

A new metric has been developed to evaluate and compare selective absorber coatings for concentrating solar power applications. Previous metrics have typically considered the performance of the selective coating (i.e., solar absorptance and thermal emittance), but cost and durability were not considered. This report describes the development of the levelized cost of coating (LCOC), which is similar to the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) commonly used to evaluate alternative energy technologies. The LCOC is defined as the ratio of the annualized cost of the coating (and associated costs such as labor and number of heliostats required) to the average annual thermal energy produced by the receiver. The baseline LCOC using Pyromark 2500 paint was found to be %240.055/MWht, and the distribution of LCOC values relative to this baseline were determined in a probabilistic analysis to range from -%241.6/MWht to %247.3/MWht, accounting for the cost of additional (or fewer) heliostats required to yield the same baseline average annual thermal energy produced by the receiver. A stepwise multiple rank regression analysis showed that the initial solar absorptance was the most significant parameter impacting the LCOC, followed by thermal emittance, degradation rate, reapplication interval, and downtime during reapplication.

Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Pacheco, James Edward

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Aerosol penetration through a seismically loaded shear wall  

SciTech Connect

An experimental study was performed to measure the aerosol penetration through a reinforced concrete shear wall after simulated seismic damage. Static load-cycle testing, to stress levels sufficient to induce visible shear cracking, was used to simulate the earthquake loading. Air permeability tests were performed both before and after the simulated seismic loading damaged the structure. Aerosol penetration measurements were conducted on the cracked shear wall structure using 0.10 {mu}m monodisperse particles. The measured aerosol number penetration through the cracked shear wall was 0.5%. 7 refs.

Farrar, C.R.; Girrens, S.P.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Aerosol penetration through a seismically loaded shear wall  

SciTech Connect

An experimental study was performed to measure the aerosol penetration through a reinforced concrete shear wall after simulated seismic damage. Static load-cycle testing, to stress levels sufficient to induce visible shear cracking, was used to simulate the earthquake loading. Air permeability tests were performed both before and after the simulated seismic loading damaged the structure. Aerosol penetration measurements were conducted on the cracked shear wall structure using 0.10 {mu}m monodisperse particles. The measured aerosol number penetration through the cracked shear wall was 0.5%. 7 refs.

Farrar, C.R.; Girrens, S.P.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "high-altitude absorbing aerosols" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Atmospheric Aerosol Limb Scanning Based on the Lunar Eclipses Photometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The work is devoted to the analysis of the surface photometric observations of two total lunar eclipses in 2004. The lunar surface relative brightness distribution inside the umbra was used to retrieve the vertical distribution of aerosol extinction of the solar radiation expanding by a tangent path and its dependence on the location at the limb of the Earth. The upper altitude of troposphere aerosol layer was estimated for different latitude zones. The correlation between additional aerosol extinction in the upper troposphere and cyclones was investigated.

O. S. Ugolnikov; I. A. Maslov

2005-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

482

Design of an Unattended Environmental Aerosol Sampling and Analysis System for Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The resources of the IAEA continue to be challenged by the rapid, worldwide expansion of nuclear energy production. Gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) represent an especially formidable dilemma to the application of safeguard measures, as the size and enrichment capacity of GCEPs continue to escalate. During the early part of the 1990's, the IAEA began to lay the foundation to strengthen and make cost-effective its future safeguard regime. Measures under Part II of 'Programme 93+2' specifically sanctioned access to nuclear fuel production facilities and environmental sampling by IAEA inspectors. Today, the Additional Protocol grants inspection and environmental sample collection authority to IAEA inspectors at GCEPs during announced and low frequency unannounced (LFUA) inspections. During inspections, IAEA inspectors collect environmental swipe samples that are then shipped offsite to an analytical laboratory for enrichment assay. This approach has proven to be an effective deterrence to GCEP misuse, but this method has never achieved the timeliness of detection goals set forth by IAEA. Furthermore it is questionable whether the IAEA will have the resources to even maintain pace with the expansive production capacity of the modern GCEP, let alone improve the timeliness in reaching current safeguards conclusions. New safeguards propositions, outside of familiar mainstream safeguard measures, may therefore be required that counteract the changing landscape of nuclear energy fuel production. A new concept is proposed that offers rapid, cost effective GCEP misuse detection, without increasing LFUA inspection access or introducing intrusive access demands on GCEP operations. Our approach is based on continuous onsite aerosol collection and laser enrichment analysis. This approach mitigates many of the constraints imposed by the LFUA protocol, reduces the demand for onsite sample collection and offsite analysis, and overcomes current limitations associated with the in-facility misuse detection devices. Onsite environmental sample collection offers the ability to collect fleeting uranium hexafluoride emissions before they are lost to the ventilation system or before they disperse throughout the facility, to become deposited onto surfaces that are contaminated with background and historical production material. Onsite aerosol sample collection, combined with enrichment analysis, provides the unique ability to quickly detect stepwise enrichment level changes within the facility, leading to a significant strengthening of facility misuse deterence. We report in this paper our study of several GCEP environmental sample release scenarios and simulation results of a newly designed aerosol collection and particle capture system that is fully integrated with the Laser Ablation, Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry (LAARS) uranium particle enrichment analysis instrument that was developed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Anheier, Norman C.; Munley, John T.; Alexander, M. L.

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

483

Development of a Global Validation Package for Satellite Oceanic Aerosol Optical Thickness Retrieval Based on AERONET Observations and Its Application to NOAA/NESDIS Operational Aerosol Retrievals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a global validation package for satellite aerosol optical thickness retrieval using the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) observations as ground truth is described. To standardize the validation procedure, the optimum time–space ...

Tom X-P. Zhao; Larry L. Stowe; Alexander Smirnov; David Crosby; John Sapper; Charles R. McClain

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II CD-ROM Atlas of Global Monthly Aerosols, Ozone, NO2, Water, Vapor, and Relative Humitidy (1985–1993)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Individual profile measurements from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) instrument aboard the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite have been used to create latitude-longitude maps of monthly mean aerosols, ozone, water vapor, ...

D. Rind; X. Liao

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Mexico City Aerosol Analysis During Milagro Using High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometry at the Urban Supersite (T0) - Part 1: Fine Particle Composition and Organic Source Apportionment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Submicron aerosol was analyzed during the MILAGRO field campaign in March 2006 at the T0 urban supersite in Mexico City with a High-Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and complementary instrumentation. Positive ...

Aiken, A. C.

486

Experimental investigations into high-altitude relight of a gas turbine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the heat release rate at take-off is approximately 500 MW/m3 – 100 times more intense than that generated in the furnace of a large coal-fired power-plant (Hill and Peterson 1992). The temperature of the hot gases produced by such a flame is approximately... via the extended Zeldovich or thermal mechanism constitutes the majority of the nitrogen oxides generated in a non-premixed combustion system (Glassman 1996). The formation rate of thermal NO increases rapidly when the flame temperature exceeds...

Read, Robert William

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

487

A Relationship between Reflectivity and Snow Rate for a High-Altitude S-Band Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An important application of radar reflectivity measurements is their interpretation as precipitation intensity. Empirical relationships exist for converting microwave backscatter retrieved from precipitation particles (represented by an equivalent ...

Jonathan P. Wolfe; Jefferson R. Snider

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

SCOUT-O3/ACTIVE: High-altitude Aircraft Measurements around Deep Tropical Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During November and December 2005, two consortia of mainly European groups conducted an aircraft campaign in Darwin, Australia, to measure the composition of the tropical upper-troposphere and tropopause regions, between 12 and 20 km, in order to ...

G. Vaughan; K. Bower; C. Schiller; A. R. MacKenzie; T. Peter; H. Schlager; N. R. P. Harris; P. T. May

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Propagation and Breaking at High Altitudes of Gravity Waves Excited by Tropospheric Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An anelastic approximation is used with a time-variable coordinate transformation to formulate a two-dimensional numerical model that describes the evolution of gravity waves. The model is solved using a semi-Lagrangian method with monotone (...

Joseph M. Prusa; Piotr K. Smolarkiewicz; Rolando R. Garcia

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Glacial Chronology of a High Altitude Moraine Series, Tamarack Bench/Francis Canyon, Sierra Nevada, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

al.   (1995. ) showed that geomagnetic strength varied over are: long term?geomagnetic latitude of a  specific site, components of the  geomagnetic field, and the temporal and 

Kohut, Daryl Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

High Altitude test of RPCs for the ARGO-YBJ experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A 50 m**2 RPC carpet was operated at the YangBaJing Cosmic Ray Laboratory (Tibet) located 4300 m a.s.l. The performance of RPCs in detecting Extensive Air Showers was studied. Efficiency and time resolution measurements at the pressure and temperature conditions typical of high mountain laboratories, are reported.

The ARGO-YBJ Collaboration

1999-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

492

Classification of Tropical Oceanic Precipitation using High-Altitude Aircraft Microwave and Electric Field Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the 1998 and 2001 hurricane seasons of the western Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico, the Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR), the ER-2 Doppler (EDOP) radar, and the Lightning Instrument Package (LIP) were flown aboard the ...

Robbie E. Hood; Daniel J. Cecil; Frank J. LaFontaine; Richard J. Blakeslee; Douglas M. Mach; Gerald M. Heymsfield; Frank D. Marks Jr.; Edward J. Zipser; Michael Goodman

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Design and development of a high-altitude, in-flight-deployable micro-UAV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A micro-UAV ([mu] UAV) system was developed to provide maximum endurance for a small atmospheric sensing payload. The system, composed of a ([mu] UAV) and protective case, folds and fits into a MJU-10/B flare cartridge ...

Tao, Tony S

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Variability of Microphysical Parameters in High-Altitude Ice Clouds: Results of the Remote Sensing Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The remote sensing method for retrieving vertical profiles of microphysical parameters in ice clouds from ground-based measurements taken by the Doppler radar and IR radiometer was applied to several cloud cases observed during different field ...

Sergey Y. Matrosov

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Liquid Nitrogen-Cooled Fourier Transform Spectrometer System for Measuring Atmospheric Emission at High Altitudes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A cryogenically cooled FTS system capable of a spectral resolution of 0.06 cm?1 is described. The entire interferometer is operated at LN2 temperature with the exception of the Ge:Cu detector, which is cooled to below 10 K. In order to maintain ...

Frank H. Murcray; Frank J. Murcray; David G. Murcray; James Pritchard; George Vanasse; Hajime Sakai

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Did high-altitude EMP (electromagnetic pulse) cause the Hawaiian streetlight incident  

SciTech Connect

Studies of electromagnetic pulse (EMP) effects on civilian and military systems predict results ranging from severe destruction to no damage. Convincing analyses that support either extreme are rare. The Hawaiian streetlight incident associated with the Starfish nuclear burst is the most widely quoted observed damage. We review the streetlight characteristics and estimate the coupling between the Starfish EMP and a particular streetlight circuit identified as one of the few that failed. Evidence indicates that the damage was EMP-generated. The main contributing factors were the azimuthal angle of the circuit relative to the direction of EMP propagation, and the rapid rise of the EMP signal. The azimuthal angle provided coherent buildup of voltage as the EMP swept across the transmission line. The rapid rise allowed substantial excitation before the canceling effects of ground reflections limited the signals. Resulting voltages were at the threshold for causing the observed fuse damage and are consistent with this damage occurring in only some of the strings in the systems. 15 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

Vittitoe, C.N.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Atmospheric optical measurements during high altitude balloon flight, Part II: Sky luminances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Eglin AFB, Florida Browne, Mr. R.N. Division 5224. SandiaCorporation Sandia Base Albuquerque, New Mexico -E- Cahalan,Defense Atomic Support Agency Sandia Sase, New Mexico U.S.