Sample records for high-altitude absorbing aerosols

  1. Radiative and climate impacts of absorbing aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Aihua

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    P.M. Forster (2004), The semi-direct aerosol effect: Impactof absorbing aerosols on marine stratocumulus. Q. J .2005), Global anthropogenic aerosol direct forcing derived

  2. Detection of UV-absorbing aerosols using GOME and SCIAMACHY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Martin de

    Detection of UV-absorbing aerosols using GOME and SCIAMACHY Martin de Graaf KNMI #12; Outline · The Absorbing Aerosol Index: some theory · Detection of biomass burning aerosols and desert dust. -no clouds -no scattering aerosols Absorbing Aerosol Index AAI Algorithm LUT #12;GOME & SCIAMACHY

  3. Absorbing Aerosol Index (AAI) The residue method for the detection of aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Martin de

    Absorbing Aerosol Index (AAI) The residue method for the detection of aerosols from space reflection and absorption Surface Rayleigh atmosphere #12;TOA Multiple scattering Multiple scattering Aerosol layer satellite Surface reflection and absorption Surface Rayleigh atmosphere Rayleigh atmophere Aerosol

  4. Global observations of UV-absorbing aerosols from ERS-2/GOME Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Martin de

    Global observations of UV-absorbing aerosols from ERS-2/GOME Data Martin de Graaf Piet Stammes Absorbing Aerosol Index ­ Theory GOME AAI results Conclusions & Outlook #12; Absorbing Aerosol Index; Rayleigh (multiple) scattering clouds aerosols surface Top Of Atmosphere incoming radiation outgoing

  5. SCIAMACHY'S ABSORBING AEROSOL INDEX AND THE CONSEQUENCES OF INSTRUMENT DEGRADATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tilstra, Gijsbert

    SCIAMACHY'S ABSORBING AEROSOL INDEX AND THE CONSEQUENCES OF INSTRUMENT DEGRADATION L. G. Tilstra1 a strong increase in the AAI with time, which is found to be caused completely by degradation of the optics. This we conclude from straightforward calculation of the effect of instrument degradation based

  6. Satellite observations of the seasonal cycles of absorbing aerosols in Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Martin de

    Satellite observations of the seasonal cycles of absorbing aerosols in Africa related to monsoon system and aerosol loading is studied using multi-year satellite observations of UV-absorbing aerosols and rain gauge measurements. The seasonal variation of the aerosol distribution is clearly linked

  7. Studying trends in biomass burning aerosol using the Absorbing Aerosol Index derived from GOME, SCIAMACHY, and GOME-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tilstra, Gijsbert

    Studying trends in biomass burning aerosol using the Absorbing Aerosol Index derived from GOME the resulting time series, we use tropospheric NO2 data as a reference in the regions dominated by biomass sensitive to desert dust aerosols (DDA) and biomass burning aerosols (BBA). See Figure 1. The AAI

  8. Polarity and oxidation level of visible absorbers in model organic aerosol F. Rifkha Kameel a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Shan-Hu

    dis- crete, low-molecular weight a-keto carboxylic acids [11], such as the widespread pyruvic of typical aerosol matter. The photolysis of pyruvic acid solutions is known to produce small polyfunctional and mesoxalic acids byproducts of the oxi- dation of aromatics [8,13,14]. These acids absorb (kmax $320 nm

  9. In-flight degradation correction of SCIAMACHY UV reflectances and Absorbing Aerosol Index

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    In-flight degradation correction of SCIAMACHY UV reflectances and Absorbing Aerosol Index L. G) derived from the observed Earth reflectance. Instrument degradation of the Scanning Imaging Absorption mean should be more or less constant when instrument degradation is absent. The analysis reveals

  10. Utilization of Wind Energy at High Altitude

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground based, wind energy extraction systems have reached their maximum capability. The limitations of current designs are: wind instability, high cost of installations, and small power output of a single unit. The wind energy industry needs of revolutionary ideas to increase the capabilities of wind installations. This article suggests a revolutionary innovation which produces a dramatic increase in power per unit and is independent of prevailing weather and at a lower cost per unit of energy extracted. The main innovation consists of large free-flying air rotors positioned at high altitude for power and air stream stability, and an energy cable transmission system between the air rotor and a ground based electric generator. The air rotor system flies at high altitude up to 14 km. A stability and control is provided and systems enable the changing of altitude. This article includes six examples having a high unit power output (up to 100 MW). The proposed examples provide the following main advantages: 1. Large power production capacity per unit - up to 5,000-10,000 times more than conventional ground-based rotor designs; 2. The rotor operates at high altitude of 1-14 km, where the wind flow is strong and steady; 3. Installation cost per unit energy is low. 4. The installation is environmentally friendly (no propeller noise). -- * Presented in International Energy Conversion Engineering Conference at Providence., RI, Aug. 16-19. 2004. AIAA-2004-5705. USA. Keyword: wind energy, cable energy transmission, utilization of wind energy at high altitude, air rotor, windmills, Bolonkin.

  11. Nonlinear Effects of Coexisting Surface and Atmospheric Forcing of Anthropogenic Absorbing Aerosols: Impact on the South Asian Monsoon Onset

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Shao-Yi

    The direct radiative effect of absorbing aerosols consists of absorption-induced atmospheric heating together with scattering- and absorption-induced surface cooling. It is thus important to understand whether some of the ...

  12. The Genetic Architecture of Adaptations to High Altitude in Ethiopia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean, Matthew D.

    The Genetic Architecture of Adaptations to High Altitude in Ethiopia Gorka Alkorta-Aranburu1, Ethiopia, 4 Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Chevy Chase, Maryland, United States of America Abstract JK, et al. (2012) The Genetic Architecture of Adaptations to High Altitude in Ethiopia. PLoS Genet 8

  13. The aerosol direct radiative effect (DRE) over clouds is quantified using measured reflectance spectra of UV-absorbing aerosol polluted cloud scenes and modeled reflectance spectra of unpolluted cloud scenes. The cloud reflectance spectra are read from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Martin de

    distribution of clouds and aerosols along the white CALIPSO track in Fig.1b is shown in Fig. 2. The distanceThe aerosol direct radiative effect (DRE) over clouds is quantified using measured reflectance spectra of UV-absorbing aerosol polluted cloud scenes and modeled reflectance spectra of unpolluted cloud

  14. Simultaneous Retrieval of Effective Refractive Index and Density from Size Distribution and Light Scattering Data: Weakly-Absorbing Aerosol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Berg, Larry K.; Shilling, John E.; Flynn, Connor J.; Mei, Fan; Jefferson, Anne

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose here a novel approach for retrieving in parallel the effective density and real refractive index of weakly absorbing aerosol from optical and size distribution measurements. Here we define “weakly absorbing” as aerosol single-scattering albedos that exceed 0.95 at 0.5 um.The required optical measurements are the scattering coefficient and the hemispheric backscatter fraction, obtained in this work from an integrating nephelometer. The required size spectra come from a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer and an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer. The performance of this approach is first evaluated using a sensitivity study with synthetically generated but measurement-related inputs. The sensitivity study reveals that the proposed approach is robust to random noise; additionally the uncertainties of the retrieval are almost linearly proportional to the measurement errors, and these uncertainties are smaller for the real refractive index than for the effective density. Next, actual measurements are used to evaluate our approach. These measurements include the optical, microphysical, and chemical properties of weakly absorbing aerosol which are representative of a variety of coastal summertime conditions observed during the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP; http://campaign.arm.gov/tcap/). The evaluation includes calculating the root mean square error (RMSE) between the aerosol characteristics retrieved by our approach, and the same quantities calculated using the conventional volume mixing rule for chemical constituents. For dry conditions (defined in this work as relative humidity less than 55%) and sub-micron particles, a very good (RMSE~3%) and reasonable (RMSE~28%) agreement is obtained for the retrieved real refractive index (1.49±0.02) and effective density (1.68±0.21), respectively. Our approach permits discrimination between the retrieved aerosol characteristics of sub-micron and sub-10micron particles. The evaluation results also reveal that the retrieved density and refractive index tend to decrease with an increase of the relative humidity.

  15. A High-Altitude, Station-Keeping Astronomical Platform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert A. Fesen

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Several commercial telecommunication ventures together with a well funded US military program make it a likely possibility that an autonomous, high-altitude, light-than-air (LTA) vehicle which could maneuver and station-keep for weeks to many months will be a reality in a few years. Here I outline how this technology could be used to develop a high-altitude astronomical observing platform which could return high-resolution optical data rivaling those from space-based platforms but at a fraction of the cost.

  16. A High-Altitude, Station-Keeping Astronomical Platform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fesen, R A

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several commercial telecommunication ventures together with a well funded US military program make it a likely possibility that an autonomous, high-altitude, light-than-air (LTA) vehicle which could maneuver and station-keep for weeks to many months will be a reality in a few years. Here I outline how this technology could be used to develop a high-altitude astronomical observing platform which could return high-resolution optical data rivaling those from space-based platforms but at a fraction of the cost.

  17. FAST PHOTOMETRIC IMAGING OF HIGH ALTITUDE OPTICAL FLASHES ABOVE THUNDERSTORMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the lower ionospheric (80 to 95 km altitude) flash due to heating by an impinging electromagnetic pulseFAST PHOTOMETRIC IMAGING OF HIGH ALTITUDE OPTICAL FLASHES ABOVE THUNDERSTORMS a dissertation." A novel photometric array with a high-speed triggered data acquisition system, bore-sighted image

  18. Parametric study of high altitude nuclear EMP fields. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lavigne, R.J.

    1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A program is developed to model the electromagnetic pulse from a high altitude nuclear detonation. A Runge-Kutta numerical technique is used to solve for the electric fields. A continuous Fourier Transform of the EMP is used to determine the frequency profile of the EMP. Parametric studies are performed to determine cause and effect relationships between burst parameters and the EMP frequency profile from 100 KHz to 100 MHz. Burst parameters studied are: gamma pulse time history, gamma ray energies from 1 MeV to 10 MeV, gamma ray yield, height of burst from 75 Km to 200 Km and intersection angle of the slant range with the geomagnetic field from 90 degrees to 30 degrees.

  19. From Hydrogen Fuel Cells to High-Altitude-Pilot Protection Suits...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    From Hydrogen Fuel Cells to High-Altitude-Pilot Protection Suits- Mound Science and Energy Museum Programs Cover a Wide Range of Topics From Hydrogen Fuel Cells to...

  20. HCN ice in Titan's high-altitude southern polar cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Kok, Remco J; Maltagliati, Luca; Irwin, Patrick G J; Vinatier, Sandrine

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Titan's middle atmosphere is currently experiencing a rapid change of season after northern spring arrived in 2009. A large cloud was observed for the first time above Titan's southern pole in May 2012, at an altitude of 300 km. This altitude previously showed a temperature maximum and condensation was not expected for any of Titan's atmospheric gases. Here we show that this cloud is composed of micron-sized hydrogen cyanide (HCN) ice particles. The presence of HCN particles at this altitude, together with new temperature determinations from mid-infrared observations, indicate a very dramatic cooling of Titan's atmosphere inside the winter polar vortex in early 2012. Such a cooling is completely contrary to previously measured high-altitude warming in the polar vortex, and temperatures are a hundred degrees colder than predicted by circulation models. Besides elucidating the nature of Titan's mysterious polar cloud, these results thus show that post-equinox cooling at the winter pole is much more efficient th...

  1. Global observations of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Martin de

    Global observations of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols Martin de Graaf KNMI #12; Outline · Absorbing Aerosol Index - Theory · Absorbing Aerosol Index - Reality · Biomass burning and desert dust observations from GOME and SCIAMACHY · Conclusions and Outlook #12; · Absorbing Aerosol

  2. Iron supplementation at high altitudes induces inflammation and oxidative injury to lung tissues in rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salama, Samir A., E-mail: salama.3@buckeyemail.osu.edu [High Altitude Research Center, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Al-Azhar University, Cairo 11751 (Egypt); Department of Pharmacology and GTMR Unit, College of Clinical Pharmacy, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); Omar, Hany A. [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Beni-Suef University, Beni-Suef 62514 (Egypt); Maghrabi, Ibrahim A. [Department of Clinical Pharmacy, College of Clinical Pharmacy, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); AlSaeed, Mohammed S. [Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); EL-Tarras, Adel E. [High Altitude Research Center, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exposure to high altitudes is associated with hypoxia and increased vulnerability to oxidative stress. Polycythemia (increased number of circulating erythrocytes) develops to compensate the high altitude associated hypoxia. Iron supplementation is, thus, recommended to meet the demand for the physiological polycythemia. Iron is a major player in redox reactions and may exacerbate the high altitudes-associated oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to explore the potential iron-induced oxidative lung tissue injury in rats at high altitudes (6000 ft above the sea level). Iron supplementation (2 mg elemental iron/kg, once daily for 15 days) induced histopathological changes to lung tissues that include severe congestion, dilatation of the blood vessels, emphysema in the air alveoli, and peribronchial inflammatory cell infiltration. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1?, IL-6, and TNF-?), lipid peroxidation product and protein carbonyl content in lung tissues were significantly elevated. Moreover, the levels of reduced glutathione and total antioxidant capacity were significantly reduced. Co-administration of trolox, a water soluble vitamin E analog (25 mg/kg, once daily for the last 7 days of iron supplementation), alleviated the lung histological impairments, significantly decreased the pro-inflammatory cytokines, and restored the oxidative stress markers. Together, our findings indicate that iron supplementation at high altitudes induces lung tissue injury in rats. This injury could be mediated through excessive production of reactive oxygen species and induction of inflammatory responses. The study highlights the tissue injury induced by iron supplementation at high altitudes and suggests the co-administration of antioxidants such as trolox as protective measures. - Highlights: • Iron supplementation at high altitudes induced lung histological changes in rats. • Iron induced oxidative stress in lung tissues of rats at high altitudes. • Iron increased the levels of IL-1?, IL-6 and TNF-? in lung tissues at high altitudes. • Trolox alleviated the iron-induced histological and biochemical changes to the lungs.

  3. Phenotypic Plasticity of the Lung Surfactant System at High Altitude in Deer Mice, Peromyscus maniculatus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diaz, Sonia

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surfactant System. In The Lung: Development, Aging and theJr. and Martin, T. R. (1988). The lung at high altitude:Alveolar dimensions in the lungs of animals raised at high

  4. Magnetospheric application of high-altitude long-duration balloon technology: Daylight auroral observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lummerzheim, Dirk

    Magnetospheric application of high-altitude long-duration balloon technology: Daylight auroral; accepted 12 February 2007 Abstract Daylight auroral imaging is a proposed application of the NASA high

  5. A study of the performance parameters of the High Altitude Gamma Ray (HAGAR) telescope system at Ladakh in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamasundar, R.K.

    results of Monte Carlo simulations for the High Altitude Gamma Ray (HAGAR) telescope array which detects High Altitude GAmma Ray (HAGAR) telescope system is designed to detect very high energy gamma rays fromA study of the performance parameters of the High Altitude Gamma Ray (HAGAR) telescope system

  6. Wintertime high-altitude surface energy balance of a Bolivian glacier, Illimani, 6340 m above sea level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berthier, Etienne

    Wintertime high-altitude surface energy balance of a Bolivian glacier, Illimani, 6340 m above sea] The objective of this study is to evaluate the surface energy balance (SEB) of a cold, high-altitude tropical, high altitude, sublimation, turbulent fluxes, net all-wave radiation, energy balance Citation: Wagnon

  7. Effects of high-altitude electromagnetic pulse (HEMP) on telecommunications assets. Final Technical Information Bulletin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) Mitigation Program is the removal of EMP as a significant impediment to timely reestablishment of regional and national telecommunications following an attack against the United States that includes high-altitude nuclear detonations. The program approach involves estimating the effects of High-altitude EMP (HEMP) on telecommunication connectivity and traffic-handling capability, assessing the impact of available HEMP mitigation alternatives, and developing a comprehensive plan for implementating mitigation alternatives. This report summarizes available test results as they apply to the EMP Mitigation Program, and supercedes all previous versions of this report.

  8. Ikarus: Large-Scale Participatory Sensing at High Altitudes Michael von Kaenel, Philipp Sommer, and Roger Wattenhofer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ikarus: Large-Scale Participatory Sensing at High Altitudes Michael von Kaenel, Philipp Sommer, and Roger Wattenhofer Computer Engineering and Networks Laboratory ETH Zurich, Switzerland {vkaenemi,sommer

  9. Feasibility of observing dayside aurora using NIR camera onboard high-altitude balloons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lummerzheim, Dirk

    Feasibility of observing dayside aurora using NIR camera onboard high-altitude balloons X.-Y. Zhou-duration balloons. This effort is motivated by science interest in the dayside aurora. Model predictions indicate decreases with increasing altitude. To address the question whether aurora can indeed be detected

  10. High Altitude Wind Power Systems: A Survey on Flexible Power Kites Mariam Ahmed*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Electrical Engineering Laboratory (G2ELab) 38402 Saint-Martin d'Heres, France Ahmad Hably** GIPSA-lab -ENSE3 BP 46 38402 Saint-Martin d'Heres, France Seddik Bacha*** Grenoble Electrical Engineering Laboratory (G2ELab) 38402 Saint-Martin d'Heres, France Abstract-- High altitude wind energy (HAWE) is a new

  11. System for beaming power from earth to a high altitude platform

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Friedman, Herbert W. (Oakland, CA); Porter, Terry J. (Ridgecrest, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Power is transmitted to a high altitude platform by an array of diode pumped solid state lasers each operated at a single range of laser wavelengths outside of infrared and without using adaptive optics. Each laser produces a beam with a desired arrival spot size. An aircraft avoidance system uses a radar system for automatic control of the shutters of the lasers.

  12. On the HEMP (high-altitude electromagnetic pulse) response of protective relays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, D.E.; Wiggins, C.M.; Barnes, P.R. (BDM International, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (USA); Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An assessment of the susceptibility of protective relays to the transients produced by high-altitude electromagnetic pulse (HEMP) events is presented in this paper. Several mechanisms responsible for coupling of HEMP to relay terminals are examined. The predicted relay responses to HEMP events are compared to measured data on a solid state based relay's impulse. 11 refs., 16 figs.

  13. On the HEMP environment for protective relays. [High-altitude electromagnetic pulse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, D.E.; Wiggins, C.M.; Salas, T.M. (BDM International, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Barnes, P.R. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An assessment of the transient environment for protective relays produced by high-altitude electromagnetic pulse (HEMP) events is presented in this paper. Several mechanisms for coupling of HEMP to relay terminals are used to develop estimates of possible HEMP threats to relays. These predicted relay responses to HEMP events are compared to measured data on a solid state based relay's impulse strength.

  14. Interpreting discrepancies between discharge and precipitation in high-altitude area of Chile's Norte Chico region (2632S)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rabatel, Antoine

    's Norte Chico region (26­32°S) Vincent Favier,1,2 Mark Falvey,3 Antoine Rabatel,1 Estelle Praderio,1 February 2009. [1] The water resources of high-altitude areas of Chile's semiarid Norte Chico region (26 discrepancies between discharge and precipitation in high-altitude area of Chile's Norte Chico region (26­32°S

  15. Effects of high-altitude electromagnetic pulse (HEMP) on telecommunications assets. Volume 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to Executive Order (E.O.) 12472 and National Security Decision Directive 97 (NSDD-97), the Office of the Manager, National Communications System (OMNCS) has begun an ElectroMagnetic Pulse (EMP) mitigation program. The objective of this program is the removal of EMP as a significant impediment to timely reestablishment of regional and national telecommunications following an attack against the United States that includes high-altitude nuclear detonations. The methodology for developing an EMP mitigation program plan was described in the National Communications System (NCS) report Electromagnetic Pulse Mitigation Program Approach of July 1982. The program approach involves estimating the effects of High-altitude EMP (HEMP) on telecommunications capabilities, assessing the impact of available HEMP mitigation alternatives, and developing a comprehensive plan for implementing mitigation alternatives. The purpose of this report is to summarize available test results as they apply to the EMP mitigation program.

  16. Operating Water Cherenkov Detectors in high altitude sites for the Large Aperture GRB Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allard, D; Asorey, H; Barros, H; Bertou, X; Castillo, M; Chirinos, J M; De Castro, A; Flores, S; González, J; Berisso, M Gomez; Grajales, J; Guada, C; Day, W R Guevara; Ishitsuka, J; López, J A; Martínez, O; Melfo, A; Meza, E; Loza, P Miranda; Barbosa, E Moreno; Murrugarra, C; Núñez, L A; Ormachea, L J Otiniano; Pérez, G; Perez, Y; Ponce, E; Quispe, J; Quintero, C; Rivera, H; Rosales, M; Rovero, A C; Saavedra, O; Salazar, H; Tello, J C; Peralda, R Ticona; Varela, E; Velarde, A; Villaseñor, L; Wahl, D; Zamalloa, M A

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water Cherenkov Detectors (WCD) are efficient detectors for detecting GRBs in the 10 GeV - 1 TeV energy range using the single particle technique, given their sensitivity to low energy secondary photons produced by high energy photons when cascading in the atmosphere. The Large Aperture GRB Observatory (LAGO) operates arrays of WCD in high altitude sites (above 4500 m a.s.l.) in Bolivia, Mexico and Venezuela, with planned extension to Peru. Details on the operation and stability of these WCD in remote sites with high background rates of particles will be detailed, and compared to simulations. Specific issues due to operation at high altitude, atmospheric effects and solar activity, as well as possible hardware enhancements will also be presented.

  17. On the HEMP (high-altitude electromagnetic pulse) environment for protective relays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, D.E.; Wiggins, C.M.; Salas, T.M. (BDM International, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Barnes, P.R. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An assessment of the transient environment for protective relays produced by high-altitude electromagnetic pulse (HEMP) events is presented in this paper. Several mechanisms for coupling of HEMP to relay terminals are used to develop estimates of possible HEMP threats to relays. These predicted relay responses to HEMP events are compared to measured data on a solid state based relay's impulse strength. 12 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Experimental investigations into high-altitude relight of a gas turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Read, Robert William

    2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental Investigations into High-Altitude Relight of a Gas Turbine Robert William Read Homerton College University of Cambridge This dissertation is submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy 2008 To my mother and father Declaration I... of many ignition events has revealed several distinct modes of ignition failure. Keywords: altitude relight, planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF), gas turbine, lean direct injection, spark ignition. Acknowledgements I would like to thank my supervisor...

  19. Radiative Reactions and Coherence Modeling in the High Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles N. Vittitoe; Mario Rabinowitz

    2003-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A high altitude nuclear electromagnetic pulse (EMP) with a peak field intensity of 5 x 10^4 V/m carries momentum that results in a retarding force on the average Compton electron (radiating coherently to produce the waveform) with magnitude near that of the geomagnetic force responsible for the coherent radiation. The retarding force results from a self field effect. The Compton electron interaction with the self generated magnetic field due to the other electrons accounts for the momentum density in the propagating wave; interaction with the self generated electric field accounts for the energy flux density in the propagating wave. Coherent addition of radiation is also quantitatively modeled.

  20. Estimate of air carrier and air taxi crash frequencies from high altitude en route flight operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanzo, D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Kimura, C.Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Prassinos, P.G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Washington, DC (United States)

    1996-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In estimating the frequency of an aircraft crashing into a facility, it has been found convenient to break the problem down into two broad categories. One category estimates the aircraft crash frequency due to air traffic from nearby airports, the so-called near-airport environment. The other category estimates the aircraft crash frequency onto facilities due to air traffic from airways, jet routes, and other traffic flying outside the near-airport environment The total aircraft crash frequency is the summation of the crash frequencies from each airport near the facility under evaluation and from all airways, jet routes, and other traffic near the facility of interest. This paper will examine the problems associated with the determining the aircraft crash frequencies onto facilities outside the near-airport environment. This paper will further concentrate on the estimating the risk of aircraft crashes to ground facilities due to high altitude air carrier and air taxi traffic. High altitude air carrier and air taxi traffic will be defined as all air carrier and air taxi flights above 18,000 feet Mean Sea Level (MSL).

  1. Development of a new high altitude electromagnetic pulse (HEMP) environment and resulting over head line responses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tesche, F.M.; Barnes, P.R.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Being able to accurately determine the response of an electrical system which is excited by a high altitude nuclear electromagnetic pulse (EMP) requires a knowledge of the time history of the incident EMP field strength, as well as its angle of incidence and polarization. A commonly used, unclassified, description of this environment is provided by the ''Bell Laboratory waveform.'' Recent studies have shown, however, that this EMP waveform tends to overestimate the response of an above-ground transmission line by more than an order of magnitude. As a result, other unclassified high altitude EMP environments have been developed. This presentation discusses the development of two alternate unclassified EMP environment descriptions: one arising from a simple radiating dipole moment model, and the other resulting from curve-fitting the calculated fields from a computer code named CHAP. For both of these EMP models, the electric field at two earth observation points are compared. These fields are then coupled to an above-ground line and the resulting open-circuit voltage responses are compared. Using the CHAP EMP environment, a limited parametric study of the peak positive and negative open-circuit voltage is then performed and surface plots of these peak voltages are presented. 8 refs., 21 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Radiative reactions and coherence modeling in the high-altitude electromagnetic pulse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vittitoe, C.N.; Rabinowitz, M.

    1988-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-altitude nuclear electromagnetic pulse (EMP) with a peak field intensity of 5 x 10/sup 4/ V/m carries momentum that results in a retarding force on the average Compton electron (radiating coherently to produce the waveform) with magnitude near that of the geomagnetic force responsible for the coherent radiation. The retarding force results from a self-field effect. The Compton electron interaction with the self-generated magnetic field due to the other electrons accounts for the momentum density in the propagating wave; interaction with the self-generated electric field accounts for the energy-flux density in the propagating wave. Coherent addition of radiation is also quantitatively modeled.

  3. Study to assess the effects of high-altitude electromagnetic pulse on electric power systems. Phase I, final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Legro, J.R.; Abi-Samra, N.C.; Crouse, J.C.; Hileman, A.R.; Kruse, V.J.; Taylor, E.R. Jr.; Tesche, F.M.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high-altitude burst of a nuclear device over the continental United States can expose civilian electric utility systems to transient electromagnetic pulses (EMP). The electromagnetic fields experienced within one second after the burst have been collectively defined by the term high-altitude EMP (HEMP). The phenomena has been subdivided, for this report, into an early-time HEMP field followed by an intermediate-time HEMP field. This volume documents a preliminary research effort to: investigate the nature and coupling of the HEMP environments to electric power systems, define the construction of approximate system response models, and document the development of a methodology to assess equipment and system vulnerability.

  4. aerosol particles emitted: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aerosols scatter and absorb solar, estimates of the impact of aerosols on visibility, the solar radiation balance, and crop production is presented. 1. INTRODUCTION The attenuation...

  5. Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) - Part 1-3: General - The effects of high-altitude EMP (HEMP) on civil equipment and systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) - Part 1-3: General - The effects of high-altitude EMP (HEMP) on civil equipment and systems

  6. EVALUATION OF AIRBORNE AND SATELLITE ELECTRO-OPTICAL SENSORS PERFORMANCES BY USE OF HIGH-ALTITUDE CLOUDS OCCURRENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EVALUATION OF AIRBORNE AND SATELLITE ELECTRO-OPTICAL SENSORS PERFORMANCES BY USE OF HIGH The impact of high-altitude clouds along an electro- optical sensor line of sight has been studied, F-91761 Palaiseau, France, email : karine.caillault@onera.fr KEYWORDS: sensor performance

  7. A methodology to assess the effects of high altitude electromagnetic pulse (HEMP) on electric power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, E.R. Jr.; Eichler, C.H.; Barnes, P.R.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear electromagnetic pulse (EMP) from high altitude nuclear detonations (HEMP) has the potential to seriously disrupt electric power systems. A methodology has been developed to assess the vulnerability of electric power systems to this phenomena for any specified nuclear burst scenario. The methodology is based on a structured approach whereby the power system is broken down into subsystems, functional groups, and circuits and devices. Vulnerability (likelihood of failure) is assessed for individual equipment (circuits and devices) for each nuclear burst scenario. These effects are then evaluated for their performance impact on successively higher system levels. This forms the input for classical load flow, short circuit and transient stability studies to evaluate system stability and survivability. Applicability of the assessment methodology is not dependent on the quality of component/equipment vulnerability data. Susceptibility of power equipment to HEMP damage may be determined by established technical analysis, by intepretation of equipment design and testing standards, and by laboratory testing. This paper has been written not only for the electric utility engineer, but also for experts in EMP who may not be knowledgeable in electric utility systems. 12 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Remote sensing of terrestrial tropospheric aerosols from aircraft and satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Remote sensing of terrestrial tropospheric aerosols from aircraft and satellites M I Mishchenko1 instruments suitable for aerosol remote sensing and give examples of aerosol retrievals obtained forcing directly by absorbing and reflecting sunlight, thereby cooling or heating the atmosphere

  9. Characterization of ambient aerosol composition and formation mechanisms and development of quantification methodologies utilizing ATOFMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Xueying

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cloud coverage as a consequence of aerosol heating effect after absorbing solar radiation.effects of aerosols can cause cooling since clouds reflect the incoming solar radiation

  10. Methodology A simple linear model for radiative forcing of absorbing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Karsten

    Absorbing aerosol in cloudy scenes: effects on atmospheric radia7on Aerosol Cloud Cloud prevents aerosol-radiation interaction; small negative forcing, i.e. COOLING Indirect rather than direct effect through modification of cloud properties Cloud enhances "surface albedo"; potentially large

  11. Physical and computer modeling of military earth grounding practices in a HEMP (high-altitude electromagnetic pulse) environment. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuneo, A.A. Jr.; Loftus, J.J.; Perala, R.A.

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Military grounding practices compatible with hardening electronic systems to high-altitude electromagnetic pulse (HEMP) illumination are considered. This study concerns the grounding practices outlined in MIL-STD-188-124, Common Long-Haul/Tactical Communications Systems. Three standard grounding schemes and one new scheme were chosen for study at a 10:1 scale, illuminated by a 59-V/m peak simulated HEMP. There were several significant results: (a) The theoretical technique in general agrees to within a factor of three with the experimental results, (b) The type end of earth ground system does not appear to be important, and (c) Intrasite transients tend to be dominated by electromagnetic coupling to completed conductive loops. When the loop is broken, the transient is characterized by the half-wavelength resonance of the conductor. Grounding paths which do not form part of the loop do not contribute significantly to the transient in the loop.

  12. 4, 75617614, 2004 Indirect aerosol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . While the cloud albedo enhance- ment (Twomey effect) of warm clouds received most attention so far, they can15 scatter, absorb and emit thermal radiation. Thirdly aerosol particles act as cloud con properties influenced by20 aerosols (e.g. semi-direct effect, suppression of convection). Clouds themselves

  13. Effects of High-Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse (HEMP) on the Northern Telecom Inc. DMS-100 (trademark) switch. Volume 2. Test program. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is part of a three volume set that presents the results of simulated High-Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse (HEMP) testing of a DMS-100 Switching System. This volume is a detailed description of the test procedures, test results, and the mitigation alternatives evaluated. This volume also presents a discussion of the conclusion and recommendations of the program.

  14. Effects of High-Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse (HEMP) on the Northern Telecom Inc. DMS-100 (trademark) switch. Volume 3. Data analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is part of a three volume set that presents the results of simulated High-Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse (HEMP) testing of a DMS-100 Switching System. This volume describes the post test analysis of the measured electromagnetic fields and induced transients. This volume also includes a comparison of the characteristic attributes of the various simulator environments.

  15. Sensitivity of the High Altitude Water Cherenkov Detector to Sources of Multi-TeV Gamma Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; Álvarez, J D; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Belmont, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Lopez, R A; Carramiñana, A; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De León, C; DeYoung, T; Hernandez, R Diaz; Diaz-Velez, J C; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fernandez, A; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; Garcia-Luna, J L; Garcia-Torales, G; Garfias, F; González, L X; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Grabski, V; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Hui, C M; Hüntemeyer, P; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H León; Linares, E C; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-Garc\\'\\ia, R; Marinelli, A; Martinez, O; Mart\\'\\inez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostafá, M; Nava, J; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Pérez-Pérez, E G; Pretz, J; Rivière, C; Rosa-González, D; Salazar, H; Salesa, F; Sandoval, A; Santos, E; Schneider, M; Silich, S; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sparks, K; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseñor, L; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is an array of large water Cherenkov detectors sensitive to gamma rays and hadronic cosmic rays in the energy band between 100 GeV and 100 TeV. The observatory will be used to measure high-energy protons and cosmic rays via detection of the energetic secondary particles reaching the ground when one of these particles interacts in the atmosphere above the detector. HAWC is under construction at a site 4100 meters above sea level on the northern slope of the volcano Sierra Negra, which is located in central Mexico at 19 degrees N latitude. It is scheduled for completion in 2014. In this paper we estimate the sensitivity of the HAWC instrument to point-like and extended sources of gamma rays. The source fluxes are modeled using both unbroken power laws and power laws with exponential cutoffs. HAWC, in one year, is sensitive to point sources with integral power-law spectra as low as 5x10^-13 cm^-2 sec^-1 above 2 TeV (approximately 50 mCrab) over 5 sr of the sky...

  16. Radiative and climate impacts of absorbing aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Aihua

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and less surface solar radiation in China from 1955 to 2000,2001 in China, and meanwhile, both surface solar radiationsolar heating greatly decreases RH in the lower troposphere for both China and

  17. Radiative and climate impacts of absorbing aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Aihua

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    V. Ramanathan (2008), Solar radiation budget and radiativeV. Ramanathan (2008), Solar radiation budget and radiativeapproximation for solar radiation in the NCAR Community

  18. Aerosol-cloud radiative effects from passive satellite instruments Mar%n de Graaf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Martin de

    Graaf Global annual mean Earth's energy budget for March 2000 ­ May 2004 (Wm2) [Trenberth et al. 2009 Satellite measurements of absorbing aerosols Reflectance Difference Method Cloud modelling Results Outlook] Global energy budget #12;Absorbing Aerosol Workshop, 15 October2013, Leipzig Aerosol effects over clouds

  19. Global observations and spectral characteristics of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Martin de

    Global observations and spectral characteristics of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols M. de (UV) absorbing aerosols, mainly desert dust and biomass burning aerosols. The AAI is not an aerosol quantity, but a radiation difference in the UV. Its main advantages are its insensitivity to scattering

  20. Large Aerosols Play Unexpected Role in Ganges Valley | U.S. DOE...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    amount of light than expected. The Science Aerosol particles in the atmosphere may absorb solar radiation, resulting in additional heating in the atmospheric column, which affects...

  1. Aerosol remote sensing in polar regions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tomasi, C.; Wagener, R.; Kokhanovsky, A. A.; Lupi, A.; Ritter, C.; Smirnov, A.; O Neill, N. T.; Stone, R. S.; Holben, B. N.; Nyeki, S.; Wehrli, C.; Stohl, A.; Mazzola, M.; Lanconelli, C.; Vitale, V.; Stebel, K.; Aaltonen, V.; de Leeuw, G.; Rodriguez, E.; Herber, A. B.; Radionov, V. F.; Zielinski, T.; Petelski, T.; Sakerin, S. M.; Kabanov, D. M.; Xue, Y.; Mei, L.; Istomina, L.; Wagener, R.; McArthur, B.; Sobolewski, P. S.; Kivi, R.; Courcoux, Y.; Larouche, P.; Broccardo, S.; Piketh, S. J.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-year sets of ground-based sun-photometer measurements conducted at 12 Arctic sites and 9 Antarctic sites were examined to determine daily mean values of aerosol optical thickness ?(?) at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, from which best-fit values of Ångström's exponent ? were calculated. Analysing these data, the monthly mean values of ?(0.50 ?m) and ? and the relative frequency histograms of the daily mean values of both parameters were determined for winter–spring and summer–autumn in the Arctic and for austral summer in Antarctica. The Arctic and Antarctic covariance plots of the seasonal median values of ? versus ?(0.50 ?m) showed: (i) a considerable increase in ?(0.50 ?m) for the Arctic aerosol from summer to winter–spring, without marked changes in ?; and (ii) a marked increase in ?(0.50 ?m) passing from the Antarctic Plateau to coastal sites, whereas ? decreased considerably due to the larger fraction of sea-salt aerosol. Good agreement was found when comparing ground-based sun-photometer measurements of ?(?) and ? at Arctic and Antarctic coastal sites with Microtops measurements conducted during numerous AERONET/MAN cruises from 2006 to 2013 in three Arctic Ocean sectors and in coastal and off-shore regions of the Southern Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans, and the Antarctic Peninsula. Lidar measurements were also examined to characterise vertical profiles of the aerosol backscattering coefficient measured throughout the year at Ny-Ålesund. Satellite-based MODIS, MISR, and AATSR retrievals of ?(?) over large parts of the oceanic polar regions during spring and summer were in close agreement with ship-borne and coastal ground-based sun-photometer measurements. An overview of the chemical composition of mode particles is also presented, based on in-situ measurements at Arctic and Antarctic sites. Fourteen log-normal aerosol number size-distributions were defined to represent the average features of nuclei, accumulation and coarse mode particles for Arctic haze, summer background aerosol, Asian dust and boreal forest fire smoke, and for various background austral summer aerosol types at coastal and high-altitude Antarctic sites. The main columnar aerosol optical characteristics were determined for all 14 particle modes, based on in-situ measurements of the scattering and absorption coefficients. Diurnally averaged direct aerosol-induced radiative forcing and efficiency were calculated for a set of multimodal aerosol extinction models, using various Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function models over vegetation-covered, oceanic and snow-covered surfaces. These gave a reliable measure of the pronounced effects of aerosols on the radiation balance of the surface–atmosphere system over polar regions.

  2. Aerosol remote sensing in polar regions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tomasi, C.; Wagener, R.; Kokhanovsky, A. A.; Lupi, A.; Ritter, C.; Smirnov, A.; O Neill, N. T.; Stone, R. S.; Holben, B. N.; Nyeki, S.; et al

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-year sets of ground-based sun-photometer measurements conducted at 12 Arctic sites and 9 Antarctic sites were examined to determine daily mean values of aerosol optical thickness ?(?) at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, from which best-fit values of Ångström's exponent ? were calculated. Analysing these data, the monthly mean values of ?(0.50 ?m) and ? and the relative frequency histograms of the daily mean values of both parameters were determined for winter–spring and summer–autumn in the Arctic and for austral summer in Antarctica. The Arctic and Antarctic covariance plots of the seasonal median values of ? versus ?(0.50 ?m) showed: (i)more »a considerable increase in ?(0.50 ?m) for the Arctic aerosol from summer to winter–spring, without marked changes in ?; and (ii) a marked increase in ?(0.50 ?m) passing from the Antarctic Plateau to coastal sites, whereas ? decreased considerably due to the larger fraction of sea-salt aerosol. Good agreement was found when comparing ground-based sun-photometer measurements of ?(?) and ? at Arctic and Antarctic coastal sites with Microtops measurements conducted during numerous AERONET/MAN cruises from 2006 to 2013 in three Arctic Ocean sectors and in coastal and off-shore regions of the Southern Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans, and the Antarctic Peninsula. Lidar measurements were also examined to characterise vertical profiles of the aerosol backscattering coefficient measured throughout the year at Ny-Ålesund. Satellite-based MODIS, MISR, and AATSR retrievals of ?(?) over large parts of the oceanic polar regions during spring and summer were in close agreement with ship-borne and coastal ground-based sun-photometer measurements. An overview of the chemical composition of mode particles is also presented, based on in-situ measurements at Arctic and Antarctic sites. Fourteen log-normal aerosol number size-distributions were defined to represent the average features of nuclei, accumulation and coarse mode particles for Arctic haze, summer background aerosol, Asian dust and boreal forest fire smoke, and for various background austral summer aerosol types at coastal and high-altitude Antarctic sites. The main columnar aerosol optical characteristics were determined for all 14 particle modes, based on in-situ measurements of the scattering and absorption coefficients. Diurnally averaged direct aerosol-induced radiative forcing and efficiency were calculated for a set of multimodal aerosol extinction models, using various Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function models over vegetation-covered, oceanic and snow-covered surfaces. These gave a reliable measure of the pronounced effects of aerosols on the radiation balance of the surface–atmosphere system over polar regions.« less

  3. Effects of High-Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse (HEMP) on the Northern Telecom Inc. DMS-100 (trademark) switch. Volume 1. Executive summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is part of a three volume set that presents the results of simulated High Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse (HEMP) testing of a DMS-100 switching system. This volume presents a brief discussion of the test events and the test results, and summarizes the conclusions and recommendations of the test program. Volume II is a detailed description of the test procedures, the test results, and the mitigation alternatives evaluated. Volume II also presents a discussion of the conclusions and recommendations of the program. Volume III describes the post-test analysis of the measured electromagnetic fields and induced transients. Volume III also includes a comparison of the characteristic attributes of the various simulator environments.

  4. High-altitude-nuclear electromagnetic pulse (HEMP) environment simulation public health and safety considerations. Technical report, 1 Oct 89-31 May 91

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, K.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The existence of electromagnetic fields external to the working volumes of high-altitude nuclear electromagnetic pulse (HEMP) environment simulators has raised both environmental and public-health concerns regarding the safety of HEMP environment simulator operations. This report contains a review of what HEMP is, what its effects on defense systems are, and why and how HEMP environment simulation testing is conducted. The state of present knowledge concerning the external simulator fields and their possible effects on biological and electronic systems is summarized. Research initiatives are identified to aid in answering the most important questions regarding the continued environmental safety of HEMP simulator operations. These initiatives are intended to support (1) development of options for modification and/or relocation of HEMP environment simulator facilities and (2) determination of safe exposure levels for biological and electronic systems. Recommendations for specific DoD actions are given.

  5. Liquid Hydrogen Absorber for MICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishimoto, S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REFERENCES Figure 5: Liquid hydrogen absorber and test6: Cooling time of liquid hydrogen absorber. Eight CernoxLIQUID HYDROGEN ABSORBER FOR MICE S. Ishimoto, S. Suzuki, M.

  6. BNL -65518-AB UNCERTAINTIES IN CLIMATE FORCING BY ANTHROPOGENIC AEROSOLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the earth radiation budget and climate by scattering and absorbing shortwave radiation (direct effect), by modifying cloud shortwave and longwave optical properties (indirect effect), and by modifying cloud of these aerosols, as well as determination of the radiative influence of a specified well characterized aerosol

  7. Atmospheric Aerosols Workshop | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atmospheric Aerosols Workshop Atmospheric Aerosols Workshop EMSL Science Theme Advisory Panel Workshop - Atmospheric Aerosol Chemistry, Climate Change, and Air Quality. Baer DR, BJ...

  8. Externally tuned vibration absorber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vincent, Ronald J. (Latham, NY)

    1987-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A vibration absorber unit or units are mounted on the exterior housing of a hydraulic drive system of the type that is powered from a pressure wave generated, e.g., by a Stirling engine. The hydraulic drive system employs a piston which is hydraulically driven to oscillate in a direction perpendicular to the axis of the hydraulic drive system. The vibration absorbers each include a spring or other resilient member having one side affixed to the housing and another side to which an absorber mass is affixed. In a preferred embodiment, a pair of vibration absorbers is employed, each absorber being formed of a pair of leaf spring assemblies, between which the absorber mass is suspended.

  9. Methods for absorbing neutrons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guillen, Donna P. (Idaho Falls, ID); Longhurst, Glen R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Porter, Douglas L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Parry, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A conduction cooled neutron absorber may include a metal matrix composite that comprises a metal having a thermal neutron cross-section of at least about 50 barns and a metal having a thermal conductivity of at least about 1 W/cmK. Apparatus for providing a neutron flux having a high fast-to-thermal neutron ratio may include a source of neutrons that produces fast neutrons and thermal neutrons. A neutron absorber positioned adjacent the neutron source absorbs at least some of the thermal neutrons so that a region adjacent the neutron absorber has a fast-to-thermal neutron ratio of at least about 15. A coolant in thermal contact with the neutron absorber removes heat from the neutron absorber.

  10. AEROSOL, CLOUDS, AND CLIMATE CHANGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SCHWARTZ, S.E.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Earth's climate is thought to be quite sensitive to changes in radiative fluxes that are quite small in absolute magnitude, a few watts per square meter, and in relation to these fluxes in the natural climate. Atmospheric aerosol particles exert influence on climate directly, by scattering and absorbing radiation, and indirectly by modifying the microphysical properties of clouds and in turn their radiative effects and hydrology. The forcing of climate change by these indirect effects is thought to be quite substantial relative to forcing by incremental concentrations of greenhouse gases, but highly uncertain. Quantification of aerosol indirect forcing by satellite- or ground-based remote sensing has proved quite difficult in view of inherent large variation in the pertinent observables such as cloud optical depth, which is controlled mainly by liquid water path and only secondarily by aerosols. Limited work has shown instances of large magnitude of aerosol indirect forcing, with local instantaneous forcing upwards of 50 W m{sup 66}-2. Ultimately it will be necessary to represent aerosol indirect effects in climate models to accurately identify the anthropogenic forcing at present and over secular time and to assess the influence of this forcing in the context of other forcings of climate change. While the elements of aerosol processes that must be represented in models describing the evolution and properties of aerosol particles that serve as cloud condensation particles are known, many important components of these processes remain to be understood and to be represented in models, and the models evaluated against observation, before such model-based representations can confidently be used to represent aerosol indirect effects in climate models.

  11. Advanced neutron absorber materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Branagan, Daniel J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smolik, Galen R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron absorbing material and method utilizing rare earth elements such as gadolinium, europium and samarium to form metallic glasses and/or noble base nano/microcrystalline materials, the neutron absorbing material having a combination of superior neutron capture cross sections coupled with enhanced resistance to corrosion, oxidation and leaching.

  12. Atmospheric Aerosol Systems | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Themes Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Overview Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Biosystem Dynamics & Design Energy Materials & Processes Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems...

  13. Dust and Biological Aerosols from the Sahara and Asia Influence Precipitation in the Western US

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Creamean, Jessie; Suski, Kaitlyn; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Cazorla, Alberto; DeMott, Paul J.; Sullivan, Ryan C.; White, Allen B.; Ralph, F. M.; Minnis, Patrick; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Prather, Kimberly

    2013-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Winter storms in California’s Sierra Nevada increase seasonal snowpack and provide critical water resources for the state. Thus, the mechanisms influencing precipitation in this region have been the subject of research for decades. Previous studies suggest Asian dust enhances cloud ice and precipitation (1), while few studies consider biological aerosols as an important global source of ice nuclei (IN). Here, we show that dust and biological aerosols transported from as far as the Sahara were present in glaciated high-altitude clouds coincident with elevated IN concentrations and ice-induced precipitation. This study presents the first direct cloud and precipitation measurements showing that Saharan and Asian dust and biological aerosols likely serve as IN and play an important role in orographic precipitation processes over the western United States.

  14. Internal absorber solar collector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sletten, Carlyle J. (106 Nagog Hill Rd., Acton, MA 01720); Herskovitz, Sheldon B. (88 Hammond St., Acton, MA 01720); Holt, F. S. (46 Emerson Rd., Winchester, MA 01890); Sletten, E. J. (Chestnut Hill Rd. R.F.D. Rte. #4, Amherst, NH 03031)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thin solar collecting panels are described made from arrays of small rod collectors consisting of a refracting dielectric rod lens with an absorber imbedded within it and a reflecting mirror coated on the back side of the dielectric rod. Non-tracking collector panels on vertical walls or roof tops receive approximately 90% of solar radiation within an acceptance zone 60.degree. in elevation angle by 120.degree. or more in the azimuth sectors with a collector concentration ratio of approximately 3.0. Miniaturized construction of the circular dielectric rods with internal absorbers reduces the weight per area of glass, plastic and metal used in the collector panels. No external parts or insulation are needed as heat losses are low due to partial vacuum or low conductivity gas surrounding heated portions of the collector. The miniature internal absorbers are generally made of solid copper with black selective surface and the collected solar heat is extracted at the collector ends by thermal conductivity along the absorber rods. Heat is removed from end fittings by use of liquid circulants. Several alternate constructions are provided for simplifying collector panel fabrication and for preventing the thermal expansion and contraction of the heated absorber or circulant tubes from damaging vacuum seals. In a modified version of the internal absorber collector, oil with temperature dependent viscosity is pumped through a segmented absorber which is now composed of closely spaced insulated metal tubes. In this way the circulant is automatically diverted through heated portions of the absorber giving higher collector concentration ratios than theoretically possible for an unsegmented absorber.

  15. Federal Aviation Administration: High Altitude Pollution Program, third biennial report prepared in accordance with the Stratospheric Ozone Protection Provision, section 153(g), of the Clean Air Act amendments of 1977. Report for Jan 80-Dec 81

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of high altitude aviation on stratospheric ozone is now believed to be a decrease in total columnar ozone for flights above 15 km (about 49,000 feet). The model calculations also show that the current subsonic fleet (and the fleet foreseeable to 1990) will result in a net ozone increase of about 1 percent, considering normal flight altitudes. Whatever the net change in total column ozone, increases or depletions will occur at different altitudes. These are expected to have subtle influences on atmospheric circulation, the effects of which are only beginning to be understood. As a formal program, the High Altitude Pollution Program will be terminated in 1982 with the issuance of a final report. The FAA will continue to maintain and update, as appropriate, its capability to make quantitative assessments of the environmental effects of cruise-altitude emissions, and will monitor and assist, as possible, other research programs, both here and abroad.

  16. Absorbance modulation optical lithography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Hsin-Yu Sidney

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, the concept of absorbance-modulation optical lithography (AMOL) is described, and the feasibility experimentally verified. AMOL is an implementation of nodal lithography, which is not bounded by the diffraction ...

  17. Iron Chalcogenide Photovoltaic Absorbers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Liping [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lany, Stephan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kykyneshi, Robert [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Jieratum, Vorranutch [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Ravichandran, Ram [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Pelatt, Brian [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Altschul, Emmeline [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Platt, Heather A. S. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Wager, John F. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Keszler, Douglas A. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Zunger, Alex [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated computational and experimental study of FeS? pyrite reveals that phase coexistence is an important factor limiting performance as a thin-film solar absorber. This phase coexistence is suppressed with the ternary materials Fe?SiS? and Fe?GeS?, which also exhibit higher band gaps than FeS?. Thus, the ternaries provide a new entry point for development of thin-film absorbers and high-efficiency photovoltaics.

  18. PUBLISHED ONLINE: 22 FEBRUARY 2009 DOI: 10.1038/NGEO437 Satellite-derived direct radiative effect of aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Robert

    effect of aerosols dependent on cloud cover D. Chand1 *, R. Wood1 , T. L. Anderson1 , S. K. Satheesh2 by reflecting and absorbing solar radiation1 . Whether aerosols exert a net cooling or a net warming effect-based approach to quantify the direct, top-of-atmosphere radiative effect of aerosol layers advected over

  19. Aerosol Cans? -Aerosol cans use a pressurized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    WHAT TO DO WITH... Aerosol Cans? -Aerosol cans use a pressurized propellant to distribute the product. Propellants are often flammable and/or toxic. Therefore, never store aerosol cans near ignition aerosol cans must be disposed of as hazardous waste. PROPER SAFETY EQUIPMENT Safety Glasses - Proper eye

  20. Neutron Absorbing Alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mizia, Ronald E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Shaber, Eric L. (Idaho Falls, ID); DuPont, John N. (Whitehall, PA); Robino, Charles V. (Albuquerque, NM); Williams, David B. (Bethlehem, PA)

    2004-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is drawn to new classes of advanced neutron absorbing structural materials for use in spent nuclear fuel applications requiring structural strength, weldability, and long term corrosion resistance. Particularly, an austenitic stainless steel alloy containing gadolinium and less than 5% of a ferrite content is disclosed. Additionally, a nickel-based alloy containing gadolinium and greater than 50% nickel is also disclosed.

  1. EMSL - Atmospheric Aerosol Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    scienceatmospheric The Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Science Theme focuses on understanding the chemistry, physics and molecular-scale dynamics of aerosols for model...

  2. Light Absorption by Secondary Organic Aerosol from ?-Pinene: Effects of Oxidants, Seed Aerosol Acidity, and Relative Humidity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Chen; Gyawali, Madhu S.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Shilling, John E.; Arnott, W. Patrick

    2013-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well known that light absorption from dust and black carbon aerosols has a warming effect on climate while light scattering from sulfate, nitrate, and sea salt aerosols has a cooling effect. However, there are large uncertainties associated with light absorption and scattering by different types of organic aerosols, especially in the near-UV and UV spectral regions. In this paper, we present the results from a systematic laboratory study focused on measuring light absorption by secondary organic aerosols (SOA) generated from ozonolysis or NO3 oxidation of ?-pinene in the presence of neutral and acidic sulfate seed aerosols. Light absorption was monitored using photoacoustic spectrometers at four different wavelengths: 355, 405, 532 and 870 nm. Light absorption at 355 and 405 nm was observed by SOA generated from oxidation of ?-pinene in the presence of acidic sulfate seed aerosols, under dry conditions. No absorption was observed when the relative humidity was elevated to greater than 27%, or in the presence of neutral sulfate seed aerosols. The light-absorbing compounds are speculated to be aldol condensation oligomers with organosulfate and organic nitrate groups. The results of this study also indicate that organic nitrates from ?-pinene SOA formed in the presence of neutral sulfate seed aerosols do not appear to absorb near-UV and UV radiation.

  3. Effect of Hydrophobic Primary Organic Aerosols on Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation from Ozonolysis of ?-Pinene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Chen; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Alexander, M. Lizabeth; Thornton, Joel A.; Madronich, Sasha; Ortega, John V.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Laskin, Alexander; Maughan, A. D.

    2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Semi-empirical secondary organic aerosol (SOA) models typically assume a well-mixed organic aerosol phase even in the presence of hydrophobic primary organic aerosols (POA). This assumption significantly enhances the modeled SOA yields as additional organic mass is made available to absorb greater amounts of oxidized secondary organic gases than otherwise. We investigate the applicability of this critical assumption by measuring SOA yields from ozonolysis of ?-pinene (a major biogenic SOA precursor) in a smog chamber in the absence and in the presence of dioctyl phthalate (DOP) and lubricating oil seed aerosol. These particles serve as surrogates for urban hydrophobic POA. The results show that these POA did not enhance the SOA yields. If these results are found to apply to other biogenic SOA precursors, then the semi-empirical models used in many global models would predict significantly less biogenic SOA mass and display reduced sensitivity to anthropogenic POA emissions than previously thought.

  4. Impact of anthropogenic absorbing aerosols on clouds and precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the climate system. On the other hand, the atmospheric heating and surface cooling introduced progresses* Chien Wang *Reprinted from Atmospheric Research, 122: 237­249 Copyright © 2013 with kind. Being data-driven, the Program uses extensive Earth system and economic data and models to produce

  5. Point and column aerosol radiative closure during ACE 1: Effects of particle shape and size

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    impact the earth's climate and photo- chemistry by directly scattering and absorbing solar radia- tion these impacts [e.g., Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 2001]. Because of the short temporal and spatial scales of aerosol heterogeneity, numerical models of aerosol optical behavior are required to make

  6. Optical Properties of Mixed Black Carbon, Inorganic and Secondary Organic Aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paulson, S E

    2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Summarizes the achievements of the project, which are divided into four areas: 1) Optical properties of secondary organic aerosols; 2) Development and of a polar nephelometer to measure aerosol optical properties and theoretical approaches to several optical analysis problems, 3) Studies on the accuracy of measurements of absorbing carbon by several methods, and 4) Environmental impacts of biodiesel.

  7. Droplet activation properties of organic aerosols observed at an urban site during CalNex-LA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    directly influence the global energy budget, by scattering and absorbing incoming solar radiation [Jacobson. This effect is known as the first indirect aerosol effect or Twomey effect [Twomey, 1977]. The smaller cloud to an increase in cloud lifetime and coverage (the second indirect aerosol effect) [Albrecht, 1989]. Although

  8. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Farmer, Joseph C; Lee, Chuck K; Walker, Jeffrey; Russell, Paige; Kirkwood, Jon; Yang, Nancy; Champagne, Victor

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  9. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Choi, Jor-Shan (El Cerrito, CA); Farmer, Joseph C. (Tracy, CA); Lee, Chuck K. (Hayward, CA); Walker, Jeffrey (Gaithersburg, MD); Russell, Paige (Las Vegas, NV); Kirkwood, Jon (Saint Leonard, MD); Yang, Nancy (Lafayette, CA); Champagne, Victor (Oxford, PA)

    2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  10. Development and Characterization of a Thermodenuder for Aerosol Volatility Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Timothy Onasch

    2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This SBIR Phase I project addressed the critical need for improved characterization of carbonaceous aerosol species in the atmosphere. The proposed work focused on the development of a thermodenuder (TD) system capable of systematically measuring volatility profiles of primary and secondary organic aerosol species and providing insight into the effects of absorbing and nonabsorbing organic coatings on particle absorption properties. This work provided the fundamental framework for the generation of essential information needed for improved predictions of ambient aerosol loadings and radiative properties by atmospheric chemistry models. As part of this work, Aerodyne Research, Inc. (ARI) continued to develop and test, with the final objective of commercialization, an improved thermodenuder system that can be used in series with any aerosol instrument or suite of instruments (e.g., aerosol mass spectrometers-AMS, scanning mobility particle sizers-SMPS, photoacoustic absorption spectrometers-PAS, etc.) to obtain aerosol chemical, physical, and optical properties as a function of particle volatility. In particular, we provided the proof of concept for the direct coupling of our improved TD design with a full microphysical model to obtain volatility profiles for different organic aerosol components and to allow for meaningful comparisons between different TD-derived aerosol measurements. In a TD, particles are passed through a heated zone and a denuding (activated charcoal) zone to remove semi-volatile material. Changes in particle size, number concentration, optical absorption, and chemical composition are subsequently detected with aerosol instrumentation. The aerosol volatility profiles provided by the TD will strengthen organic aerosol emission inventories, provide further insight into secondary aerosol formation mechanisms, and provide an important measure of particle absorption (including brown carbon contributions and identification, and absorption enhancements due to coatings on soot particles). The successfully completed Phase I project included construction of a prototype design for the TD with detailed physical modeling, testing with laboratory and ambient aerosol particles, and the initiation of a detailed microphysical model of the aerosol particles passing through the TD to extract vapor pressure distributions. The objective of the microphysical model is to derive vapor pressure distributions (i.e. vapor pressure ranges, including single chemical compounds, mixtures of known compounds, and complex ‘real-world’ aerosols, such as SOA, and soot particles with absorbing and nonabsorbing coatings) from TD measurements of changes in particle size, mass, and chemical composition for known TD temperatures and flow rates (i.e. residence times). The proposed Phase II project was designed to optimize several TD systems for different instrument applications and to combine the hardware and modeling into a robust package for commercial sales.

  11. Aerosol collection characteristics of ambient aerosol samplers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ortiz, Carlos A

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are contained in Appendix C. Dichotomous Sam ler The basic principle of operation of the dichotomous, Figure 9, is that aerosol particles are passed through an acceleration nozzle where the particle velocity is increased to a speed V. at the nozzle exit... AEROSOL COLLECTION CHARACTERISTICS OF AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLERS A Thesis by CARLOS A. ORTIZ Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978...

  12. Synthesis of information on aerosol optical properties Hongqing Liu,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chin, Mian

    revealed a significant decrease in sur- face solar heating due to the presence of absorbing aerosols, which spectral dependence derived from AERONET retrievals. The asymmetry parameter over the solar spectrum radiation balance [Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 2001]. Their potential to increase reflected

  13. Aerosol mobility size spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Jian (Port Jefferson, NY); Kulkarni, Pramod (Port Jefferson Station, NY)

    2007-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for measuring aerosol size distribution within a sample containing aerosol particles. The device generally includes a spectrometer housing defining an interior chamber and a camera for recording aerosol size streams exiting the chamber. The housing includes an inlet for introducing a flow medium into the chamber in a flow direction, an aerosol injection port adjacent the inlet for introducing a charged aerosol sample into the chamber, a separation section for applying an electric field to the aerosol sample across the flow direction and an outlet opposite the inlet. In the separation section, the aerosol sample becomes entrained in the flow medium and the aerosol particles within the aerosol sample are separated by size into a plurality of aerosol flow streams under the influence of the electric field. The camera is disposed adjacent the housing outlet for optically detecting a relative position of at least one aerosol flow stream exiting the outlet and for optically detecting the number of aerosol particles within the at least one aerosol flow stream.

  14. Broadband patterned magnetic microwave absorber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Wei; Wu, Tianlong; Wang, Wei; Guan, Jianguo, E-mail: guanjg@whut.edu.cn [State Key Lab of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Zhai, Pengcheng [School of Science, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    It is a tough task to greatly improve the working bandwidth for the traditional flat microwave absorbers because of the restriction of available material parameters. In this work, a simple patterning method is proposed to drastically broaden the absorption bandwidth of a conventional magnetic absorber. As a demonstration, an ultra-broadband microwave absorber with more than 90% absorption in the frequency range of 4–40 GHz is designed and experimentally realized, which has a thin thickness of 3.7?mm and a light weight equivalent to a 2-mm-thick flat absorber. In such a patterned absorber, the broadband strong absorption is mainly originated from the simultaneous incorporation of multiple ?/4 resonances and edge diffraction effects. This work provides a facile route to greatly extend the microwave absorption bandwidth for the currently available absorbing materials.

  15. An optimal fitting approach to improve the GISS ModelE aerosol optical property parameterization using AERONET data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and absorbing solar radiation and the indirect effect by interacting with water vapor to affect cloud formation and lifetime. Absorbing aerosols also have the semidirect effect by heating the atmosphere layer, reducing; Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 2001]. [3] Globalscale models, which simulate the emission, transport

  16. Aerosol Retrievals from ARM SGP MFRSR Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Alexandrov, Mikhail

    The Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) makes precise simultaneous measurements of the solar direct normal and diffuse horizontal irradiances at six wavelengths (nominally 415, 500, 615, 673, 870, and 940 nm) at short intervals (20 sec for ARM instruments) throughout the day. Time series of spectral optical depth are derived from these measurements. Besides water vapor at 940 nm, the other gaseous absorbers within the MFRSR channels are NO2 (at 415, 500, and 615 nm) and ozone (at 500, 615, and 670 nm). Aerosols and Rayleigh scattering contribute atmospheric extinction in all MFRSR channels. Our recently updated MFRSR data analysis algorithm allows us to partition the spectral aerosol optical depth into fine and coarse modes and to retrieve the fine mode effective radius. In this approach we rely on climatological amounts of NO2 from SCIAMACHY satellite retrievals and use daily ozone columns from TOMS.

  17. Liquid Hydrogen Absorber for MICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishimoto, S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hydrogen leakage and heat inputs to the absorber. In MICE,vacuum region. To minimize heat input from the magnet bore,To minimize radiative heat input from surrounding material,

  18. Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilkinson, William H. (Columbus, OH)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber devices are provided for use in absorption cycle refrigeration systems and thermal boosting systems. The devices have increased residence time and surface area resulting in improved heat and mass transfer characteristics. The apparatuses may be incorporated into open cycle thermal boosting systems in which steam serves both as the refrigerant vapor which is supplied to the absorber section and as the supply of heat to drive the desorber section of the system.

  19. Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilkinson, W.H.

    1984-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber devices are provided for use in absorption cycle refrigeration systems and thermal boosting systems. The devices have increased residence time and surface area resulting in improved heat and mass transfer characteristics. The apparatuses may be incorporated into open cycle thermal boosting systems in which steam serves both as the refrigerant vapor which is supplied to the absorber section and as the supply of heat to drive the desorber section of the system. 9 figs.

  20. Modeling Atmospheric Aerosols V. Rao Kotamarthi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling Atmospheric Aerosols V. Rao Kotamarthi and Yan Feng Climate Research Section Environmental Science Division Argonne National Laboratory #12;Outline Atmospheric Aerosols and gas phase heterogeneous reactions Regional Scales and Atmospheric Aerosols Regional Scale Aerosols: Ganges Valley Aerosol

  1. Direct and semidirect aerosol effects of Southern African biomass burning aerosol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakaeda, Naoko; Wood, Robert; Rasch, Philip J.

    2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct and semi-direct radiative effects of biomass burning aerosols from Southern African fires during July-October are investigated using 20 year runs of the Community Atmospheric Model (CAM) coupled to a slab ocean model. The aerosol optical depth is constrained using observations in clear skies from MODIS and for aerosol layers above clouds from CALIPSO. Over the ocean, where the absorbing biomass burning aerosol layers are primarily located above cloud, negative top of atmosphere (TOA) semi-direct radiative effects associated with increased low cloud cover dominate over a weaker positive all-sky direct radiative effect (DRE). In contrast, over the land where the aerosols are often below or within cloud layers, reductions in cloud liquid water path (LWP) lead to a positive semi-direct radiative effect that dominates over a near-zero DRE. Over the ocean, the cloud response can be understood as a response to increased lower tropospheric stability (LTS) which is caused both by aerosol absorptive warming in overlying layers and surface cooling in response to direct aerosol forcing. The ocean cloud changes are robust to changes in the cloud parameterization (removal of the hard-wired dependence of clouds on LTS), suggesting that they are physically realistic. Over land where cloud cover changes are minimal, decreased LWP is consistent with weaker convection driven by increased static stability. Over the entire region the overall TOA radiative effect from the biomass burning aerosols is almost zero due to opposing effects over the land and ocean. However, the surface forcing is strongly negative requiring a reduction in precipitation. This is primarily realized through reductions in convective precipitation on both the southern and northern flanks of the convective precipitation region spanning the equatorial rainforest and the ITCZ in the southern Sahel. The changes are consistent with the low-level aerosol forced cooling pattern. The results highlight the importance of semi-direct radiative effects and precipitation responses for determining the climatic effects of aerosols in the African region.

  2. Method of dispersing particulate aerosol tracer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Holleran, Thomas P. (Belleville, MI)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A particulate aerosol tracer which comprises a particulate carrier of sheet silicate composition having a particle size up to one micron, and a cationic dopant chemically absorbed in solid solution in the carrier. The carrier is preferably selected from the group consisting of natural mineral clays such as bentonite, and the dopant is selected from the group consisting of rare earth elements and transition elements. The tracers are dispersed by forming an aqueous salt solution with the dopant present as cations, dispersing the carriers in the solution, and then atomizing the solution under heat sufficient to superheat the solution droplets at a level sufficient to prevent reagglomeration of the carrier particles.

  3. Crossing the Transition Region High Altitude Observatory,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : enhanced emission at TR temperatures Much lower density in umbra and plume: (log(Ne/cm 3)=10 Lyman line profiles not reversed in umbra and plume TR above sunspots is higher and probably more extended than in the surrounding plage region ------plage -.-.-.penumbra ......umbra ____plume #12;Outline Recent observations

  4. Ganges valley aerosol experiment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotamarthi, V.R.; Satheesh, S.K. (Environmental Science Division); (Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, India)

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In June 2011, the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX) began in the Ganges Valley region of India. The objective of this field campaign is to obtain measurements of clouds, precipitation, and complex aerosols to study their impact on cloud formation and monsoon activity in the region.

  5. Direct Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mccomiskey, Allison

    Understanding sources of uncertainty in aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF), the difference in a given radiative flux component with and without aerosol, is essential to quantifying changes in Earth's radiation budget. We examine the uncertainty in DRF due to measurement uncertainty in the quantities on which it depends: aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, solar geometry, and surface albedo. Direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface as well as sensitivities, the changes in DRF in response to unit changes in individual aerosol or surface properties, are calculated at three locations representing distinct aerosol types and radiative environments. The uncertainty in DRF associated with a given property is computed as the product of the sensitivity and typical measurement uncertainty in the respective aerosol or surface property. Sensitivity and uncertainty values permit estimation of total uncertainty in calculated DRF and identification of properties that most limit accuracy in estimating forcing. Total uncertainties in modeled local diurnally averaged forcing range from 0.2 to 1.3 W m-2 (42 to 20%) depending on location (from tropical to polar sites), solar zenith angle, surface reflectance, aerosol type, and aerosol optical depth. The largest contributor to total uncertainty in DRF is usually single scattering albedo; however decreasing measurement uncertainties for any property would increase accuracy in DRF. Comparison of two radiative transfer models suggests the contribution of modeling error is small compared to the total uncertainty although comparable to uncertainty arising from some individual properties.

  6. Damage tolerant light absorbing material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hamby, Jr., Clyde (Harriman, TN); Akerman, M. Alfred (Knoxville, TN); Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A light absorbing article comprised of a composite of carbon-bonded carbon fibers, prepared by: blending carbon fibers with a carbonizable organic powder to form a mixture; dispersing the mixture into an aqueous slurry; vacuum molding the aqueous slurry to form a green article; drying and curing the green article to form a cured article; and, carbonizing the cured article at a temperature of at least about 1000.degree. C. to form a carbon-bonded carbon fiber light absorbing composite article having a bulk density less than 1 g/cm.sup.3.

  7. Damage tolerant light absorbing material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, R.J.; Hamby, C. Jr.; Akerman, M.A.; Seals, R.D.

    1993-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A light absorbing article comprised of a composite of carbon-bonded carbon fibers, is prepared by: blending carbon fibers with a carbonizable organic powder to form a mixture; dispersing the mixture into an aqueous slurry; vacuum molding the aqueous slurry to form a green article; drying and curing the green article to form a cured article; and, carbonizing the cured article at a temperature of at least about 1000 C to form a carbon-bonded carbon fiber light absorbing composite article having a bulk density less than 1 g/cm[sup 3]. 9 figures.

  8. Counterflow absorber for an absorption refrigeration system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reimann, Robert C. (Lafayette, NY)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An air-cooled, vertical tube absorber for an absorption refrigeration system is disclosed. Strong absorbent solution is supplied to the top of the absorber and refrigerant vapor is supplied to the bottom of the absorber to create a direct counterflow of refrigerant vapor and absorbent solution in the absorber. The refrigeration system is designed so that the volume flow rate of refrigerant vapor in the tubes of the absorber is sufficient to create a substantially direct counterflow along the entire length of each tube in the absorber. This provides several advantages for the absorber such as higher efficiency and improved heat transfer characteristics, and allows improved purging of non-condensibles from the absorber.

  9. 7, 55535593, 2007 Nitrate aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 7, 5553­5593, 2007 Nitrate aerosols today and in 2030 S. E. Bauer et al. Title Page Abstract Discussions Nitrate aerosols today and in 2030: importance relative to other aerosol species and tropospheric, 5553­5593, 2007 Nitrate aerosols today and in 2030 S. E. Bauer et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction

  10. ARM: 1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

    1-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

  11. ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Newsom, Rob; Goldsmith, John

    10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

  12. Global environmental effects of impact-generated aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Covey, C.; Ghan, S.J.; Walton, J.J.; Weissman, P.R. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA); Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, CA (USA))

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interception of sunlight by the high altitude worldwide dust cloud generated by impact of a large asteroid or comet would lead to substantial land surface cooling, according to our three-dimensional atmospheric general circulation model (GCM). This result is qualitatively similar to conclusions drawn from an earlier study that employed a one-dimensional atmospheric model, but in the GCM simulation the heat capacity of the oceans, not included in the one-dimensional model, substantially mitigates land surface cooling. On the other hand, the low heat capacity of the GCM's land surface allows temperatures to drop more rapidly in the initial stages of cooling than in the one-dimensional model study. GCM-simulated climatic changes in the scenario of asteroid/comet winter'' are more severe than in nuclear winter'' because the assumed aerosol amount is large enough to intercept all sunlight falling on Earth. Impacts of smaller objects could also lead to dramatic, though of course less severe, climatic changes, according to our GCM. An asteroid or comet impact would not lead to anything approaching complete global freezing, but quite reasonable to assume that impacts would dramatically alter the climate in at least a patchy'' sense.

  13. Toxicity of atmospheric aerosols on marine phytoplankton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    metals added from these aerosols to the bioassay incubationsreleased to seawater from the aerosol filters after Author4605 CHEMISTRY Atmospheric aerosol deposition CHEMISTRY

  14. The Effects of Black Carbon and Sulfate Aerosols in ChinaRegions on East Asia Monsoons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Bai [ORNL; Liu, Yu [Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences, Beijing, China; Sun, Jiaren [South China Institute of Environmental Sciences, Guangzhou, China

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we examine the direct effects of sulfate and black carbon aerosols in China on East Asia monsoons and its precipitation processes by using the CAM3.0 model. It is demonstrated that sulfate and black carbon aerosols in China both have the effects to weaken East Asia monsoons in both summer and winter seasons. However, they certainly differ from each other in affecting vertical structures of temperature and atmospheric circulations. Their differences are expected because of their distinct optical properties, i.e., scattering vs. absorbing. Even for a single type of aerosol, its effects on temperature structures and atmospheric circulations are largely season-dependent. Applications of T-test on our results indicate that forcing from black carbon aerosols over China is relatively weak and limited. It is also evident from our results that the effects of synthetic aerosols (sulfate and black carbon together) on monsoons are not simply a linear summation between these two types of aerosols. Instead, they are determined by their integrated optical properties. Synthetic aerosols to a large degree resemble effects of sulfate aerosols. This implies a likely scattering property for the integration of black carbon and sulfate aerosols in China.

  15. Nanomaterials from Aerosols Aerosols are suspensions of liquid or solid particles in a gas. Aerosol particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beaucage, Gregory

    1 Nanomaterials from Aerosols Aerosols are suspensions of liquid or solid particles in a gas. Aerosol particles can range in size from molecular-scale to hundreds of microns with a typical example be synthesized by aerosol routes where precursor species are dispersed either in a vapor or in micron

  16. Modal aerosol dynamics modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitby, E.R.; McMurry, P.H.; Shankar, U.; Binkowski, F.S.

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report presents the governing equations for representing aerosol dynamics, based on several different representations of the aerosol size distribution. Analytical and numerical solution techniques for these governing equations are also reviewed. Described in detail is a computationally efficient numerical technique for simulating aerosol behavior in systems undergoing simultaneous heat transfer, fluid flow, and mass transfer in and between the gas and condensed phases. The technique belongs to a general class of models known as modal aerosol dynamics (MAD) models. These models solve for the temporal and spatial evolution of the particle size distribution function. Computational efficiency is achieved by representing the complete aerosol population as a sum of additive overlapping populations (modes), and solving for the time rate of change of integral moments of each mode. Applications of MAD models for simulating aerosol dynamics in continuous stirred tank aerosol reactors and flow aerosol reactors are provided. For the application to flow aerosol reactors, the discussion is developed in terms of considerations for merging a MAD model with the SIMPLER routine described by Patankar (1980). Considerations for incorporating a MAD model into the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Regional Particulate Model are also described. Numerical and analytical techniques for evaluating the size-space integrals of the modal dynamics equations (MDEs) are described. For multimodal logonormal distributions, an analytical expression for the coagulation integrals of the MDEs, applicable for all size regimes, is derived, and is within 20% of accurate numerical evaluation of the same moment coagulation integrals. A computationally efficient integration technique, based on Gauss-Hermite numerical integration, is also derived.

  17. Aerosol Sampler Operations Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Emily V.

    -1123 Laboratory FAX (916) 752-4107 Standard Operating Procedures Technical Information Document TI 201A #12;TI 201.................................................................................................................................................. 3 1.0 Weekly Maintenance ProceduresIMPROVE Aerosol Sampler Operations Manual February 10, 1997 Air Quality Group Crocker Nuclear

  18. AEROSOL-CLOUD INTERACTIONS CONTROL OF EARTH RADIATION AND LATENT HEAT RELEASE BUDGETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    role in energizing the climate system: they reflect much of the solar radiation back to space and so and aerosols reflect back to space 22.5% of the solar radiation (Figure 1). An additional 8.8% is reflected.1% are absorbed by the surface. Surface evaporation consumes 22.8% of the solar energy that subsequently heats

  19. Aerosol Optical Depth Prediction from Satellite Observations by Multiple Instance Regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vucetic, Slobodan

    airborne particles that both reflect and absorb incoming solar radiation and whose effect on the Earth's radiation budget is one of the biggest challenges of current climate research. To help address profiles, cloud/aerosol properties, or vegetation cover. Achieving accurate estimations is a critical

  20. Evolution of organic aerosol mass spectra upon heating: implications for OA phase and partitioning behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    UC Davis; Cappa, Christopher D.; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2010-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization mass spectrometry has been used to measure the evolution of chemical composition for two distinct organic aerosol types as they are passed through a thermodenuder at different temperatures. The two organic aerosol types considered are primary lubricating oil (LO) aerosol and secondary aerosol from the alpha-pinene + O3 reaction (alphaP). The evolution of the VUV mass spectra for the two aerosol types with temperature are observed to differ dramatically. For LO particles, the spectra exhibit distinct changes with temperature in which the lower m/z peaks, corresponding to compounds with higher vapor pressures, disappear more rapidly than the high m/z peaks. In contrast, the alphaP aerosol spectrum is essentially unchanged by temperature even though the particles experience significant mass loss due to evaporation. The variations in the LO spectra are found to be quantitatively in agreement with expectations from absorptive partitioning theory whereas the alphaP spectra suggest that the evaporation of alphaP derived aerosol appears to not be governed by partitioning theory. We postulate that this difference arises from the alphaP particles existing as in a glassy state instead of having the expected liquid-like behavior. To reconcile these observations with decades of aerosol growth measurements, which indicate that OA formation is described by equilibrium partitioning, we present a conceptual model wherein the secondary OA is formed and then rapidly converted from an absorbing form to a non-absorbing form. The results suggest that although OA growth may be describable by equilibrium partitioning theory, the properties of organic aerosol once formed may differ significantly from the properties determined in the equilibrium framework.

  1. Porcelain enamel neutron absorbing material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Iverson, D.C.

    1987-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A porcelain enamel composition as a neutron absorbing material can be prepared of a major proportion by weight of a cadmium compound and a minor proportion of compound of boron, lithium and silicon. These compounds in the form of a porcelain enamel coating or layer on several alloys has been found to be particularly effective in enhancing the nuclear safety of equipment for use in the processing and storage of fissile material. The composition of the porcelain enamel coating can be tailored to match the coefficient of thermal expansion of the equipment to be coated and excellent coating adhesion can be achieved. 2 figs.

  2. Porcelain enamel neutron absorbing material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Iverson, Daniel C. (Aiken, SC)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A porcelain enamel composition as a neutron absorbing material can be prepared of a major proportion by weight of a cadmium compound and a minor proportion of compounds of boron, lithium and silicon. These compounds in the form of a porcelain enamel coating or layer on several alloys has been found to be particularly effective in enhancing the nuclear safety of equipment for use in the processing and storage of fissile material. The composition of the porcelain enamel coating can be tailored to match the coefficient of thermal expansion of the equipment to be coated and excellent coating adhesion can be achieved.

  3. Role of ammonia chemistry and coarse mode aerosols in global climatological inorganic aerosol distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Chao; Zender, Charles S; Bian, Huisheng; Metzger, Swen

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    times of tropospheric aerosols inferred from a global three-sional simulation of 210Pb aerosols. Journal of Geophysicalof sulfate and nitrate aerosol. Atmospheric Environ- ment

  4. Climate implications of carbonaceous aerosols: An aerosol microphysical study using the GISS/MATRIX climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Susanne E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and R. Ruedy, Matrix (multiconfiguration aerosol tracker ofmixing state): An aerosol microphysical module for globalAn investigative review, Aerosol Sci. Technol. , Vol. 40,

  5. Vadose Zone Soil Moisture Wicking Using Super Absorbent Polymers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vadose Zone Soil Moisture Wicking Using Super Absorbent Polymers. Vadose Zone Soil Moisture Wicking Using Super Absorbent Polymers. Abstract: Super-absorbent polymers (SAPs) have...

  6. A New Aerosol Flow System for Photochemical and Thermal Studies...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aerosol Flow System for Photochemical and Thermal Studies of Tropospheric Aerosols. A New Aerosol Flow System for Photochemical and Thermal Studies of Tropospheric Aerosols....

  7. 6, 11791198, 2006 Aerosols closing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ACPD 6, 1179­1198, 2006 Aerosols closing open Benard cells D. Rosenfeld et al. Title Page Abstract of precipitation by aerosols D. Rosenfeld1 , Y. J. Kaufman2 , and I. Koren3 1 Institute of Earth Sciences­1198, 2006 Aerosols closing open Benard cells D. Rosenfeld et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction

  8. 8, 14571503, 2008 The aerosol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 8, 1457­1503, 2008 The aerosol distribution in Europe V. Matthias Title Page Abstract Discussions The aerosol distribution in Europe derived with the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model.matthias@gkss.de) 1457 #12;ACPD 8, 1457­1503, 2008 The aerosol distribution in Europe V. Matthias Title Page Abstract

  9. 5, 79658026, 2005 Simulating aerosol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    composition, number concentration, and size distribution of the global submicrometer aerosol. The present, coagulation, condensation, nucleation of sulfuric acid vapor, aerosol chemistry, cloud processing, and sizeACPD 5, 7965­8026, 2005 Simulating aerosol microphysics with ECHAM/MADE A. Lauer et al. Title Page

  10. VARIATION OF AEROSOL OPTICAL PROPERTIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    radiative forcing due to the aerosol, W m-2 FT is the solar constant, W m-2 Ac is the fractional cloud cover;APPROACH TO MODELING AEROSOL RADIATIVE EFFECTS Transport Chemistry Microphysics Removal ModelEmissions Size-distributed Composition Optical Properties Radiative Effects Optics Model Radiation Transfer Model #12;CLASSES OF AEROSOL

  11. Aerosol engineering: design and stability of aerosol reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratsinis, S.E.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A theoretical study of the performance of aerosol reactors is presented. The goals of this study are (1) to identify the appropriate reactor types (batch, CSTR, and tubular) for production of aerosol with specific properties (for example, uniform size particles, high aerosol surface area, etc.) and (2) to investigate the effect of various process parameters on product aerosol characteristics and on the stability of operation of aerosol reactors. In all the reactors considered, the aerosol dynamics were detemined by chemical reaction, nucleation, and aerosol growth in the free molecule regime in the absence of coagulation at isothermal conditions. Formulation of the aerosol dynamics in terms of moments of the aerosol size distribution facilitated the numerical solution of the resulting systems of ordinary or partial differential equations. The stability characteristics of a continuous stirred tank aerosol reactor (CSTAR) were investigated since experimental data in the literature indicate that under certain conditions this reactor exhibits oscillatory behavior with respect to product aerosol concentration and size distribution.

  12. Highly stable aerosol generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeFord, H.S.; Clark, M.L.

    1981-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved compressed air nebulizer has been developed such that a uniform aerosol particle size and concentration may be produced over long time periods. This result is achieved by applying a vacuum pressure to the makeup assembly and by use of a vent tube between the atmosphere and the makeup solution. By applying appropriate vacuum pressures to the makeup solution container and by proper positioning of the vent tube, a constant level of aspirating solution may be maintained within the aspirating assembly with aspirating solution continuously replaced from the makeup solution supply. This device may also be adapted to have a plurality of aerosol generators and only one central makeup assembly. 2 figs.

  13. Aerosol collection characteristics of ambient aerosol samplers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ortiz, Carlos A

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . These samplers have an effic1ency approach1ng 100 percent for particles for which the gravitational and 1nertial forces are small (less than approximately 5 um); however, for larger-sized part1cles the efficiency is quite variable and depends not only upon.... According to Agarwal, representative samples can be collected by an aerosol instrument without meeting the Davies criter1a. Raynor ( 7), with the aid of a wind tunnel, observed the effects of environmental and physical parameters on the entrance effic1...

  14. Geometrical Optics of Dense Aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hay, Michael J.; Valeo, Ernest J.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Assembling a free-standing, sharp-edged slab of homogeneous material that is much denser than gas, but much more rare ed than a solid, is an outstanding technological challenge. The solution may lie in focusing a dense aerosol to assume this geometry. However, whereas the geometrical optics of dilute aerosols is a well-developed fi eld, the dense aerosol limit is mostly unexplored. Yet controlling the geometrical optics of dense aerosols is necessary in preparing such a material slab. Focusing dense aerosols is shown here to be possible, but the nite particle density reduces the eff ective Stokes number of the flow, a critical result for controlled focusing. __________________________________________________

  15. Chapter 3: Evaluating the impacts of carbonaceous aerosols on clouds and climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menon, Surabi; Del Genio, Anthony D.

    2007-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Any attempt to reconcile observed surface temperature changes within the last 150 years to changes simulated by climate models that include various atmospheric forcings is sensitive to the changes attributed to aerosols and aerosol-cloud-climate interactions, which are the main contributors that may well balance the positive forcings associated with greenhouse gases, absorbing aerosols, ozone related changes, etc. These aerosol effects on climate, from various modeling studies discussed in Menon (2004), range from +0.8 to -2.4 W m{sup -2}, with an implied value of -1.0 W m{sup -2} (range from -0.5 to -4.5 W m{sup -2}) for the aerosol indirect effects. Quantifying the contribution of aerosols and aerosol-cloud interactions remain complicated for several reasons some of which are related to aerosol distributions and some to the processes used to represent their effects on clouds. Aerosol effects on low lying marine stratocumulus clouds that cover much of the Earth's surface (about 70%) have been the focus of most of prior aerosol-cloud interaction effect simulations. Since cumulus clouds (shallow and deep convective) are short lived and cover about 15 to 20% of the Earth's surface, they are not usually considered as radiatively important. However, the large amount of latent heat released from convective towers, and corresponding changes in precipitation, especially in biomass regions due to convective heating effects (Graf et al. 2004), suggest that these cloud systems and aerosol effects on them, must be examined more closely. The radiative heating effects for mature deep convective systems can account for 10-30% of maximum latent heating effects and thus cannot be ignored (Jensen and Del Genio 2003). The first study that isolated the sensitivity of cumulus clouds to aerosols was from Nober et al. (2003) who found a reduction in precipitation in biomass burning regions and shifts in circulation patterns. Aerosol effects on convection have been included in other models as well (cf. Jacobson, 2002) but the relative impacts on convective and stratiform processes were not separated. Other changes to atmospheric stability and thermodynamical quantities due to aerosol absorption are also known to be important in modifying cloud macro/micro properties. Linkages between convection and boreal biomass burning can also impact the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, radiation and cloud microphysical properties via transport of tropospheric aerosols to the lower stratosphere during extreme convection (Fromm and Servranckx 2003). Relevant questions regarding the impact of biomass aerosols on convective cloud properties include the effects of vertical transport of aerosols, spatial and temporal distribution of rainfall, vertical shift in latent heat release, phase shift of precipitation, circulation and their impacts on radiation. Over land surfaces, a decrease in surface shortwave radiation ({approx} 3-6 W m{sup -2} per decade) has been observed between 1960 to 1990, whereas, increases of 0.4 K in land temperature during the same period that occurred have resulted in speculations that evaporation and precipitation should also have decreased (Wild et al. 2004). However, precipitation records for the same period over land do not indicate any significant trend (Beck et al. 2005). The changes in precipitation are thought to be related to increased moisture advection from the oceans (Wild et al. 2004), which may well have some contributions from aerosol-radiation-convection coupling that could modify circulation patterns and hence moisture advection in specific regions. Other important aspects of aerosol effects, besides the direct, semi-direct, microphysical and thermodynamical impacts include alteration of surface albedos, especially snow and ice covered surfaces, due to absorbing aerosols. These effects are uncertain (Jacobson, 2004) but may produce as much as 0.3 W m{sup -2} forcing in the Northern hemisphere that could contribute to melting of ice and permafrost and change in the length of the season (e.g. early arrival of Spring

  16. Numerical simulations of quasar absorbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Theuns

    2005-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The physical state of the intergalactic medium can be probed in great detail with the intervening absorption systems seen in quasar spectra. The properties of the Hydrogen absorbers depend on many cosmological parameters, such as the matter-power spectrum, reionisation history, ionising background and the nature of the dark matter. The spectra also contain metal lines, which can be used to constrain the star formation history and the feedback processes acting in large and small galaxies. Simulations have been instrumental in investigating to what extent these parameters can be unambiguously constrained with current and future data. This paper is meant as an introduction to this subject, and reviews techniques and methods for simulating the intergalactic medium.

  17. Laboratory and field studies of combustion aerosol from the viewpoint of the nuclear winter scenario. Annual summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hallett, J.

    1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear winter scenario postulates that aerosol produced by widespread fires following a nuclear exchange is lofted to mid and upper tropospheric levels where it absorbs solar radiation (0.3 to 4 ..mu..m), but permits loss of thermal radiation (4 to 20 ..mu..m). This paper discusses possible removal and modification of the aerosol by cloud and precipitation processes which might take place during this period. Aerosol was produced from a selection of likely materials, its physical characteristics - (particle size, particle shape, coagulation rate) examined and its ability to form cloud droplets or ice crystals tested under conditions typical of a cloud system, both natural and perturbed by large scale fires. A numerical model of condensation growth has been used to illustrate the role of competition in growth of cloud droplets. During the first year we have looked at low aerosol concentration; during the coming year we will look at high aerosol concentrations and its influence on optical properties.

  18. Electrostatics and radioactive aerosol behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clement, C.F.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactive aerosols differ from their nonradioactive counterparts by their ability to charge themselves by emitting charged particles during the radioactive decay process. Evidence that electrostatics, including this charging process, can affect the transport of the aerosols was summarized previously. Charge distributions and the mean charge for a monodisperse radioactive aerosol have been considered in detail. The principal results of theory to calculate charge distributions on a aerosol with a size distribution, changes to Brownian coagulation rates for an aerosol in a reactor containment, and possible changes to aerosol deposition resulting from the charging will be presented. The main purpose of the work has been to improve calculations of aerosol behavior in reactor containments, but behavior in less ionizing environments will be affected more strongly, and some problems remain to be solved in performing reliable calculations.

  19. Climate Impacts of Atmospheric Sulfate and Black Carbon Aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qian, Yun; Song, Qingyuan; Menon, Surabi; Yu, Shaocai; Liu, Shaw C.; Shi, Guangyu; Leung, Lai R.; Luo, Yunfeng

    2008-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Although the global average surface temperature has increased by about 0.6°C during the last century (IPCC, 2001), some regions such as East Asia, Eastern North America, and Western Europe have cooled rather than warmed during the past decades (Jones, 1988; Qian and Giorgi, 2000). Coherent changes at the regional scale may reflect responses to different climate forcings that need to be understood in order to predict the future net climate response at the global and regional scales under different emission scenarios. Atmospheric aerosols play an important role in global climate change (IPCC 2001). They perturb the earth’s radiative budget directly by scattering and absorbing solar and long wave radiation, and indirectly by changing cloud reflectivity, lifetime, and precipitation efficiency via their role as cloud condensation nuclei. Because aerosols have much shorter lifetime (days to weeks) compared to most greenhouse gases, they tend to concentrate near their emission sources and distribute very unevenly both in time and space. This non-uniform distribution of aerosols, in conjunction with the greenhouse effect, may lead to differential net heating in some areas and net cooling in others (Penner et al. 1994). Sulfate aerosols come mainly from the oxidation of sulfur dioxide (SO2) emitted from fossil fuel burning. Black carbon aerosols are directly emitted during incomplete combustion of biomass, coal, and diesel derived sources. Due to the different optical properties, sulfate and black carbon affect climate in different ways. Because of the massive emissions of sulfur and black carbon that accompany the rapid economic expansions in East Asia, understanding the effects of aerosols on climate is particularly important scientifically and politically in order to develop adaptation and mitigation strategies.

  20. aerosols and climate : uncertainties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    contributes to creating a level playing field. (BC emissions tradeble like CO2 emissions?) OUTLINE #12;size. policy measures, is even more uncertain (emissions & their chemical fingerprint are uncertain (not just aerosol emissions, not just climate impacts) OUTLINE #12;- Standardization doesn't reduce

  1. Estimating the Radiative Forcing of Carbonaceous Aerosols over California based on Satellite and Ground Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Yangyang; Bahadur, R.; Zhao, Chun; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbonaceous aerosols have the potential to impact climate both through directly absorbing incoming solar radiation, and by indirectly affecting the cloud layer. To quantify this impact recent modeling studies have made great efforts to simulate both the spatial and temporal distribution of carbonaceous aerosols and their associated radiative forcing. This study makes the first observationally constrained assessment of the direct radiative forcing of carbonaceous aerosols at a regional scale over California. By exploiting multiple observations (including ground sites and satellites), we constructed the distribution of aerosol optical depths and aerosol absorption optical depths over California for a ten-year period (2000-2010). The total solar absorption was then partitioned into contributions from elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC) and dust aerosols using a newly developed scheme. Aerosol absorption optical depth due to carbonaceous aerosols (EC and OC) at 440 nm is 50%-200% larger than natural dust, with EC contributing the bulk (70%-90%). Observationally constrained EC absorption agrees reasonably well with estimates from regional transport models, but the model underestimates the OC AAOD by at least 50%. We estimate that the TOA warming from carbonaceous aerosols is 0.7 W/m2 and the TOA forcing due to OC is close to zero. The atmospheric heating of carbonaceous aerosols is 2.2-2.9 W/m2, of which EC contributed about 80-90%. The atmospheric heating due to OC is estimated to be 0.1 to 0.4 W/m2, larger than model simulations. The surface brightening due to EC reduction over the last two decades is estimated to be 1.5-3.5 W/m2.

  2. REPRESENTING AEROSOL DYNAMICS AND PROPERTIES IN CHEMICAL TRANSPORT MODELS BY THE METHOD OF MOMENTS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SCHWARTZ,S.E.; MCGRAW,R.; BENKOVITZ,C.M.; WRIGHT,D.L.

    2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric aerosols, suspensions of solid or liquid particles, are an important multi-phase system. Aerosols scatter and absorb shortwave (solar) radiation, affecting climate (Charlson et al., 1992; Schwartz, 1996) and visibility; nucleate cloud droplet formation, modifying the reflectivity of clouds (Twomey et al., 1984; Schwartz and Slingo, 1996) as well as contributing to composition of cloudwater and to wet deposition (Seinfeld and Pandis, 1998); and affect human health through inhalation (NRC, 1998). Existing and prospective air quality regulations impose standards on concentrations of atmospheric aerosols to protect human health and welfare (EPA, 1998). Chemical transport and transformation models representing the loading and geographical distribution of aerosols and precursor gases are needed to permit development of effective and efficient strategies for meeting air quality standards, and for examining aerosol effects on climate retrospectively and prospectively for different emissions scenarios. Important aerosol properties and processes depend on their size distribution: light scattering, cloud nucleating properties, dry deposition, and penetration into airways of lungs. The evolution of the mass loading itself depends on particle size because of the size dependence of growth and removal processes. For these reasons it is increasingly recognized that chemical transport and transformation models must represent not just the mass loading of atmospheric particulate matter but also the aerosol microphysical properties and the evolution of these properties if aerosols are to be accurately represented in these models. If the size distribution of the aerosol is known, a given property can be evaluated as the integral of the appropriate kernel function over the size distribution. This has motivated the approach of determining aerosol size distribution, and of explicitly representing this distribution and its evolution in chemical transport models.

  3. absorbance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Absorbing Boundary Condition, Domain Decomposition and Hydrodynamic Wave Model O. Wilk Introduction. appli. (wave equation) Num. appli. (hydro. wave model)...

  4. absorbents: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Absorbing Boundary Condition, Domain Decomposition and Hydrodynamic Wave Model O. Wilk Introduction. appli. (wave equation) Num. appli. (hydro. wave model)...

  5. Advanced Reflector and Absorber Materials (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fact sheet describing NREL CSP Program capabilities in the area of advanced reflector and absorber materials: evaluating performance, determining degradation rates and lifetime, and developing new coatings.

  6. Residence times of fine tropospheric aerosols as determined by {sup 210}Pb progeny.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marley, N. A.; Gaffney, J. S.; Drayton, P. J.; Cunningham, M. M.; Mielcarek, C.; Ravelo, R.; Wagner, C.

    1999-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Fine tropospheric aerosols can play important roles in the radiative balance of the atmosphere. The fine aerosols can act directly to cool the atmosphere by scattering incoming solar radiation, as well as indirectly by serving as cloud condensation nuclei. Fine aerosols, particularly carbonaceous soots, can also warm the atmosphere by absorbing incoming solar radiation. In addition, aerosols smaller than 2.5 {micro}m have recently been implicated in the health effects of air pollution. Aerosol-active radioisotopes are ideal tracers for the study of atmospheric transport processes. The source terms of these radioisotopes are relatively well known, and they are removed from the atmosphere only by radioactive decay or by wet or dry deposition of the host aerosol. The progeny of the primordial radionuclide {sup 238}U are of particular importance to atmospheric studies. Uranium-238 is common throughout Earth's crust and decays to the inert gas {sup 222}Rn, which escapes into the atmosphere. Radon-222 decays by the series of alpha and beta emissions shown in Figure 1 to the long-lived {sup 210}Pb. Once formed, {sup 210}Pb becomes attached to aerosol particles with average attachment times of 40 s to 3 min.

  7. 6, 43414373, 2006 Cloud-borne aerosol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Discussions Impact of cloud-borne aerosol representation on aerosol direct and indirect effects S. J. Ghan of aerosols employ a variety of rep- resentations of such cloud-borne particles. Here we use a global aerosol- ulated aerosol, cloud and radiation fields to various approximations to the representa- tion of cloud

  8. Multiple reflection solar energy absorber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooley, W.L.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of converting solar energy into heat energy thereby generating power is described comprising the steps: (a) focusing said solar energy by means of a primary concentrator, (b) concentrating said solar energy from said primary concentrator by means of a secondary concentrator located at the focal point of said primary concentrator, (c) slowing the flux of said solar energy from said secondary concentrator by means of a multiple reflection chamber attached to the rear aperture of the secondary concentrator, (d) circulating a working fluid by means of a working fluid delivery tube into said secondary concentrator and said multiple reflection chamber, (e) absorbing said solar energy into said working fluid by means of an ultra high concentration of said solar energy in said multiple reflection chamber, (f) insulating said working fluid by means of a surrounding thermal barrier, (g) exhausting the heat working fluid by means as of a nozzle joined to said multiple reflection chamber, (h) replacing said working fluid by means of a working fluid delivery tube, thereby completing a cycle for generating power.

  9. ARM: 10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sivaraman, Chitra; Flynn, Connor

    10-minute TEMPORARY Raman Lidar: aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness, from first Ferrare algorithm

  10. Proton Absorber Feasibility Study Chris Rogers,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Proton Absorber ­ Feasibility Study Chris Rogers, ASTeC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory 14 Sept 2010 #12;Overview We have a problem with secondary protons in the front end Deposit significant Need remote handling (ouch) One way to fix this is using a proton absorber Change in beam power

  11. Aerosol Retrieval Using Remote-sensed Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yueqing

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.2 Aerosols Impacts on HumanBayesian Approach for Aerosol Retrieval Using MISR Data 2.1for Including a Richer Variety of Aerosol Compositions . 2.5

  12. Optical Properties of Secondary Organic Aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Hwajin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paulson, S. E. ; Chung, A. Aerosol Sci. Technol. 2007 , 41,Y. G. ; Daum, P. H. J. Aerosol Sci 2008 , 39, 974-986. (32)Accurate Monitoring of Terrestrial Aerosols and Total Solar

  13. Optical trapping and rotation of airborne absorbing particles with a single focused laser beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Jinda; Li, Yong-qing, E-mail: liy@ecu.edu [Department of Physics, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina 27858-4353 (United States)] [Department of Physics, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina 27858-4353 (United States)

    2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We measure the periodic circular motion of single absorbing aerosol particles that are optically trapped with a single focused Gaussian beam and rotate around the laser propagation direction. The scattered light from the trapped particle is observed to be directional and change periodically at 0.4–20?kHz. The instantaneous positions of the moving particle within a rotation period are measured by a high-speed imaging technique using a charge coupled device camera and a repetitively pulsed light-emitting diode illumination. The centripetal acceleration of the trapped particle as high as ?20 times the gravitational acceleration is observed and is attributed to the photophoretic forces.

  14. Aerosol Observing System (AOS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jefferson, A

    2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Aerosol Observing System (AOS) is a suite of in situ surface measurements of aerosol optical and cloud-forming properties. The instruments measure aerosol properties that influence the earth’s radiative balance. The primary optical measurements are those of the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients as a function of particle size and radiation wavelength and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements as a function of percent supersaturation. Additional measurements include those of the particle number concentration and scattering hygroscopic growth. Aerosol optical measurements are useful for calculating parameters used in radiative forcing calculations such as the aerosol single-scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, mass scattering efficiency, and hygroscopic growth. CCN measurements are important in cloud microphysical models to predict droplet formation.

  15. Nonequilibrium Atmospheric Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aerosol Formation and Growth. Abstract: Airborne particles play a critical role in air quality, human health effects, visibility and climate. Secondary organic aerosols (SOA)...

  16. Sunlight Changes Aerosols in Clouds | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sunlight Changes Aerosols in Clouds Sunlight Changes Aerosols in Clouds Released: October 20, 2011 Scientists show how sunlight alters optical, chemical properties of atmospheric...

  17. Molecular Characterization of Biomass Burning Aerosols Using...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biomass Burning Aerosols Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry. Molecular Characterization of Biomass Burning Aerosols Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry. Abstract: Chemical...

  18. Thin film absorber for a solar collector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilhelm, William G. (Cutchogue, NY)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention pertains to energy absorbers for solar collectors, and more particularly to high performance thin film absorbers. The solar collectors comprising the absorber of this invention overcome several problems seen in current systems, such as excessive hardware, high cost and unreliability. In the preferred form, the apparatus features a substantially rigid planar frame with a thin film window bonded to one planar side of the frame. An absorber in accordance with the present invention is comprised of two thin film layers that are sealed perimetrically. In a preferred embodiment, thin film layers are formed from a metal/plastic laminate. The layers define a fluid-tight planar envelope of large surface area to volume through which a heat transfer fluid flows. The absorber is bonded to the other planar side of the frame. The thin film construction of the absorber assures substantially full envelope wetting and thus good efficiency. The window and absorber films stress the frame adding to the overall strength of the collector.

  19. Photoacoustic optical properties at UV, VIS, and near IR wavelengths for laboratory generated and winter time ambient urban aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gyawali, Madhu S.; Arnott, W. Patrick; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Song, Chen; Moosmuller, H.; Liu, Li; Mishchenko, M.; Chen, L-W A.; Green, M.; Watson, J. G.; Chow, J. C.

    2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the laboratory and ambient photoacoustic (PA) measurement of aerosol light absorption coefficients at ultraviolet wavelength (i.e., 355 nm) and compare with measurements at 405, 532, 870, and 1047 nm. Simultaneous measurements of aerosol light scattering coefficients were achieved by the integrating reciprocal nephelometer within the PA's acoustic resonator. Absorption and scattering measurements were carried out for various laboratory generated aerosols, including salt, incense, and kerosene soot to evaluate the instrument calibration and gain insight on the spectral dependence of aerosol light absorption and scattering. Ambient measurements were obtained in Reno, Nevada, between 18 December 2009 and 18 January 2010. The measurement period included days with and without strong ground level temperature inversions, corresponding to highly polluted (freshly emitted aerosols) and relatively clean (aged aerosols) conditions. Particulate matter (PM) concentrations were measured and analyzed with other tracers of traffic emissions. The temperature inversion episodes caused very high concentration of PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 10} (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 {mu}m and 10 {mu}m, respectively) and gaseous pollutants: carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), and nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}). The diurnal change of absorption and scattering coefficients during the polluted (inversion) days increased approximately by a factor of two for all wavelengths compared to the clean days. The spectral variation in aerosol absorption coefficients indicated a significant amount of absorbing aerosol from traffic emissions and residential wood burning. The analysis of single scattering albedo (SSA), Angstrom exponent of absorption (AEA), and Angstrom exponent of scattering (AES) for clean and polluted days provides evidences that the aerosol aging and coating process is suppressed by strong temperature inversion under cloudy conditions. In general, measured UV absorption coefficients were found to be much larger for biomass burning aerosol than for typical ambient aerosols.

  20. Black nickel selective absorber, optimization of parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akinoglu, B.; Cercioglu, V.; Ecevit, A.

    1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electroplated black nickel selective absorber is one of the most commercially used element of solar energy systems. Electrodeposition parameters such as time of deposition, pH, current density, electrolyte temperature should be optimized to produce the most efficient selective absorber. The topology of the substrate material is very effective on selectivity and it should also be optimized. In this study, by controlling the conditions of electrodeposition black nickel selective absorbers are produced and their reflectivities are measured. The effects of the electrodeposition parameters together with the topology of the substrate, on the selective properties are investigated.

  1. 6, 75197562, 2006 Simulating aerosol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , particle number concentration and aerosol size-distribution. The model takes into account sulfate (SO4. This model system enables explicit simulations of the particle number concentration and size-distribution of aerosol dynamical processes (nucleation, condensation, coagulation) is evaluated by comparison

  2. 7, 37193761, 2007 Aerosol indirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    effects and is defined as the difference in the top-of-the-atmosphere net radiation be- tween present when either a statistical cloud cover scheme or a different aerosol emission inventory are employed. 1ACPD 7, 3719­3761, 2007 Aerosol indirect effects in ECHAM5-HAM U. Lohmann et al. Title Page

  3. 7, 1268712714, 2007 Aerosols' influence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    in the polluted cloud is due to a more efficient collection process. 1 Introduction10 The effect of aerosol). Numerous studies have addressed the effect of aerosol on marine stratocumulus clouds, due to their key role in the global radiative energy. Marine stratocumuli, bounded by strong marine boundary layer inversion, have

  4. Attenuation of external Bremsstrahlung in metallic absorbers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dhaliwal, A.S.; Powar, M.S.; Singh, M. (Punjabi Univ., Physics Dept., Patiala 147002 (IN))

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper attenuation of bremsstrahlung from {sup 147}Pm and {sup 170}Tm beta emitters has been studied in aluminum, copper, tin, and lead metallic absorbers. Bremsstrahlung spectra and mass attenuation coefficients for monoenergetic gamma rays are used to calculate theoretical attenuation curves. Magnetic deflection and beta stopping techniques are used to measure the integral bremsstrahlung intensities above 30 keV in different target thicknesses. Comparison of measured and calculated attenuation curves shows a good agreement for various absorbers, thus providing a test of this technique, which may be useful in understanding bremsstrahlung intensity buildup and in the design of optimum shielding for bremsstrahlung sources. It is found that the absorption of bremsstrahlung in metallic absorbers does not obey an exponential law and that absorbers act as energy filters.

  5. Neutron absorbing coating for nuclear criticality control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mizia, Ronald E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Richard N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Swank, William D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lister, Tedd E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Pinhero, Patrick J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron absorbing coating for use on a substrate, and which provides nuclear criticality control is described and which includes a nickel, chromium, molybdenum, and gadolinium alloy having less than about 5% boron, by weight.

  6. Durability of Polymeric Glazing and Absorber Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorgensen, G.; Terwilliger, K.; Bingham, C.; Milbourne, M.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Solar Heating and Lighting Program has set the goal of reducing the cost of solar water heating systems by at least 50%. An attractive approach to such large cost reduction is to replace glass and metal parts with less-expensive, lighter-weight, more-integrated polymeric components. The key challenge with polymers is to maintain performance and assure requisite durability for extended lifetimes. The objective of this task is to quantify lifetimes through measurement of the optical and mechanical stability of candidate polymeric glazing and absorber materials. Polycarbonate sheet glazings, as proposed by two industry partners, have been tested for resistance to UV radiation with three complementary methods. Incorporation of a specific 2-mil thick UV-absorbing screening layer results in glazing lifetimes of at least 15 years; improved screens promise even longer lifetimes. Proposed absorber materials were tested for creep and embrittlement under high temperature, and appear adequate for planned ICS absorbers.

  7. Aerosol Science and Technology, 42:115, 2008 Copyright c American Association for Aerosol Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aerosol Science and Technology, 42:1­15, 2008 Copyright c American Association for Aerosol Research of a Fast-Response Aerosol Size Spectrometer Jason S. Olfert and Jian Wang Atmospheric Science Department by the mixing of the aerosol in the inlet of the instrument, which `smears' the detected aerosol over a range

  8. The Nearby Supernova Factory Ozone + Aerosol + Rayleigh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rayleigh + Aerosol Extinction monitor filter Auxiliary Camera CCD Spectrograph picko ff mirror Umbra

  9. absorber rod measurements: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Domain: Absorbing Boundary Condition, Domain Decomposition and Hydrodynamic Wave Model M2NIMathCnam 12;Absorbing Mancini, Simona 30 Dynamic Loading of Polycrystalline...

  10. Method of absorbance correction in a spectroscopic heating value sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Saveliev, Alexei; Jangale, Vilas Vyankatrao; Zelepouga, Sergeui; Pratapas, John

    2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for absorbance correction in a spectroscopic heating value sensor in which a reference light intensity measurement is made on a non-absorbing reference fluid, a light intensity measurement is made on a sample fluid, and a measured light absorbance of the sample fluid is determined. A corrective light intensity measurement at a non-absorbing wavelength of the sample fluid is made on the sample fluid from which an absorbance correction factor is determined. The absorbance correction factor is then applied to the measured light absorbance of the sample fluid to arrive at a true or accurate absorbance for the sample fluid.

  11. absorbed gamma dose: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Index 1 Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and dose conversion coefficient of radon progeny Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and...

  12. absorbed dose profiles: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Index 1 Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and dose conversion coefficient of radon progeny Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and...

  13. astronaut absorbed dose: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Index 1 Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and dose conversion coefficient of radon progeny Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and...

  14. absorbed dose kerma: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Index 1 Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and dose conversion coefficient of radon progeny Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and...

  15. absorbed dose estimates: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NTS tests 3 Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and dose conversion coefficient of radon progeny Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and...

  16. absorbed doses: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Index 1 Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and dose conversion coefficient of radon progeny Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and...

  17. absorbed doses received: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Index 1 Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and dose conversion coefficient of radon progeny Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and...

  18. absorbed energy avaliacao: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    45 Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and dose conversion coefficient of radon progeny Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and...

  19. absorbed radiation dose: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10 Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and dose conversion coefficient of radon progeny Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and...

  20. average absorbed doses: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Index 1 Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and dose conversion coefficient of radon progeny Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and...

  1. absorbed dose optimization: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Index 1 Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and dose conversion coefficient of radon progeny Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and...

  2. absorbed dose estimation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NTS tests 3 Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and dose conversion coefficient of radon progeny Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and...

  3. absorbed glandular dose: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Index 1 Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and dose conversion coefficient of radon progeny Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and...

  4. absorbed dose metrology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Index 1 Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and dose conversion coefficient of radon progeny Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and...

  5. absorbed dose onboard: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Index 1 Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and dose conversion coefficient of radon progeny Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and...

  6. absorbed doses profiles: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Index 1 Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and dose conversion coefficient of radon progeny Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and...

  7. absorbed dose appears: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Index 1 Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and dose conversion coefficient of radon progeny Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and...

  8. absorbed dose computations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Index 1 Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and dose conversion coefficient of radon progeny Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and...

  9. absorbed dose 3d: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Index 1 Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and dose conversion coefficient of radon progeny Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and...

  10. absorbed doses onboard: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Index 1 Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and dose conversion coefficient of radon progeny Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and...

  11. absorbed dose evaluation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Index 1 Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and dose conversion coefficient of radon progeny Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and...

  12. Soft ionization of thermally evaporated hypergolic ionic liquid aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koh, Christine J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    + ][Dca ? ]. Figure 2. Aerosol particle size distribution ofhypergolic ionic liquid aerosols Christine J. Koh † , Chen-ionization of evaporated IL aerosols Isolated ion pairs of a

  13. Amine-Amine Exchange in Aminium-Methanesulfonate Aerosols. |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Amine-Amine Exchange in Aminium-Methanesulfonate Aerosols. Amine-Amine Exchange in Aminium-Methanesulfonate Aerosols. Abstract: Aerosol particles are ubiquitous in the atmosphere...

  14. Effect of Hydrophobic Primary Organic Aerosols on Secondary Organic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrophobic Primary Organic Aerosols on Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation from Ozonolysis of ?-Pinene. Effect of Hydrophobic Primary Organic Aerosols on Secondary Organic...

  15. Mexico City Aerosol Analysis during MILAGRO using High Resolution...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2: Mexico City Aerosol Analysis during MILAGRO using High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometry at the Urban Supersite (T0). Part 2: Abstract: Submicron aerosol was analyzed during...

  16. Mexico City Aerosol Analysis during MILAGRO using High Resolution...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1: Mexico City Aerosol Analysis during MILAGRO using High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometry at the Urban Supersite (T0). Part 1: Abstract: Submicron aerosol was analyzed during...

  17. aerosol particles collected: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Saller 2002-05-07 6 Nanomaterials from Aerosols Aerosols are suspensions of liquid or solid particles in a gas. Aerosol particles Materials Science Websites Summary: being clouds...

  18. Role of ammonia chemistry and coarse mode aerosols in global climatological inorganic aerosol distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zender, Charles

    1 Role of ammonia chemistry and coarse mode aerosols in global climatological inorganic aerosol distributions Chao Luo1 , Charles S. Zender1 , Huisheng Bian2 , Swen Metzger3 Abstract We use an inorganic aerosol thermodynamic equilibrium model

  19. AERONET: The Aerosol Robotic Network

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    AERONET collaboration provides globally distributed observations of spectral aerosol optical Depth (AOD), inversion products, and precipitable water in diverse aerosol regimes. Aerosol optical depth data are computed for three data quality levels: Level 1.0 (unscreened), Level 1.5 (cloud-screened), and Level 2.0 (cloud screened and quality-assured). Inversions, precipitable water, and other AOD-dependent products are derived from these levels and may implement additional quality checks.[Copied from http://aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov/new_web/system_descriptions.html

  20. Measurement Needs and Challenges for Absorbing Aerosol Black Carbon, Brown Carbon, Dust and Coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Carmichael 2008) 1. BC mixing state. 2. BC vertical distributions. 3. Inventories. 4. Indirect effect mixing state. 2. BC vertical distributions. 3. Inventories. 4. Indirect effect. · Most information comes

  1. AAI Absorbing Aerosol Index ADAGUC Atmospheric Data Access for the Geospatial User Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    Change IPT Integrated Profiling Technique IR Infrared IsA International standard Atmosphere (recommended by WMO) IsCCP International satellite Cloud Climatology Project IsO International Organization in Europe (EU project) IPC International Pyrheliometer Comparison IPCC Intergovernmental Panel on Climate

  2. Absorber Materials at Room and Cryogenic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F. Marhauser, T.S. Elliott, A.T. Wu, E.P. Chojnacki, E. Savrun

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We recently reported on investigations of RF absorber materials at cryogenic temperatures conducted at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The work was initiated to find a replacement material for the 2 Kelvin low power waveguide Higher Order Mode (HOM) absorbers employed within the original cavity cryomodules of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). This effort eventually led to suitable candidates as reported in this paper. Furthermore, though constrained by small funds for labor and resources, we have analyzed a variety of lossy ceramic materials, several of which could be usable as HOM absorbers for both normal conducting and superconducting RF structures, e.g. as loads in cavity waveguides and beam tubes either at room or cryogenic temperatures and, depending on cooling measures, low to high operational power levels.

  3. Ferrite HOM Absorber for the RHIC ERL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hahn,H.; Choi, E.M.; Hammons, L.

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconducting Energy Recovery Linac is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory to serve as test bed for RHIC upgrades. The damping of higher-order modes in the superconducting five-cell cavity for the Energy-Recovery linac at RHIC is performed exclusively by two ferrite absorbers. The ferrite properties have been measured in ferrite-loaded pill box cavities resulting in the permeability values given by a first-order Debye model for the tiled absorber structure and an equivalent permeability value for computer simulations with solid ring dampers. Measured and simulated results for the higher-order modes in the prototype copper cavity are discussed. First room-temperature measurements of the finished niobium cavity are presented which confirm the effective damping of higher-order modes in the ERL. by the ferrite absorbers.

  4. 8, 68456901, 2008 Aerosol optical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of solar radiation by atmospheric aerosols is a key el- ement of the Earth's radiative energy balance, Germany 2 Helmholtz Center Munich, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute

  5. Aerosol penetration through transport lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dileep, V.R.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to predict aerosol penetration thrush shrouded probes and transition fitting('s. Experimnents were carried Out to validate the code. The experiments were carried out for different flow rates for a particle size of IO lam aerodynamic diameter (AD...

  6. 6, 55435583, 2006 Aerosol nucleation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    and cloud cover via the second indirect aerosol effect that would explain observed variations in global cloud cover. We esti- mate that the variation in radiative forcing resulting from a response of clouds

  7. EAS/CEE 6795 Atmospheric Aerosols Fall 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Rodney

    EAS/CEE 6795 Atmospheric Aerosols Fall 2011 Mon Wed Fri ­ 11 concepts of aerosol physics with applications to atmospheric aerosols. Text Book: Hinds, Aerosol Technology: Properties, behavior and measurement of airborne particles

  8. Method for manufacture of neutron absorbing articles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owens, D.

    1980-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A one-step curing method for the manufacture of a neutron absorbing article which comprises irreversibly curing, in desired article form, a form-retaining mixture of boron carbide particles, curable phenolic resin in solid state and in particula te form and a minor proportion of a liquid medium, which boils at a temperature below 200*c., at an elevated temperature so as to obtain bonding of the irreversibly cured phenolic polymer resulting to the boron carbide particles and production of the neutron absorbing article in desired form.

  9. Durability of Polymeric Glazing and Absorber Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorgensen, G.; Terwilliger, K.; Bingham, C.; Lindquist, C.; Milbourne, M.

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Solar Heating and Lighting Program has set the goal of reducing the cost of solar water heating systems by at least 50%. An attractive approach to such large cost reduction is to replace glass and metal parts with less-expensive, lighter-weight, more-integrated polymeric components. The key challenge with polymers is to maintain performance and assure requisite durability for extended lifetimes. We have begun evaluation of several new UV-screened polycarbonate sheet glazing constructions. This has involved interactions with several major polymer industry companies to obtain improved candidate samples. Proposed absorber materials were tested for UV resistance, and appear adequate for unglazed ICS absorbers.

  10. SELECTIVE ABSORBER COATED FOILS FOR SOLAR COLLECTORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lampert, Carl M.

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar absorber metal foils are discussed in terms of materials and basic processing science. Also included is the use of finished heavy sheet stock for direct fabrication of solar collector panels. Both the adhesives and bonding methods for foils and sheet are surveyed. Developmental and representative commercial foils are used as illustrative examples. As a result it was found that foils can compete economically with batch plating but are limited by adhesive temperature stability. Also absorber foils are very versatile and direct collector fabrication from heavy foils appears very promising.

  11. Method for producing monodisperse aerosols

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ortiz, Lawrence W. (Los Alamos, NM); Soderholm, Sidney C. (Pittsford, NY)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An aerosol generator is described which is capable of producing a monodisperse aerosol within narrow limits utilizing an aqueous solution capable of providing a high population of seed nuclei and an organic solution having a low vapor pressure. The two solutions are cold nebulized, mixed, vaporized, and cooled. During cooling, particles of the organic vapor condense onto the excess seed nuclei, and grow to a uniform particle size.

  12. Optical Properties of Moderately-Absorbing Organic and Mixed Organic/Inorganic Particles at Very High Humidities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond, Tami C; Rood, Mark J; Brem, Benjamin T; Mena-Gonzalez, Francisco C; Chen, Yanju

    2012-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Relative humidity (RH) affects the water content of an aerosol, altering its ability to scatter and absorb light, which is important for aerosol effects on climate and visibility. This project involves in situ measurement and modeling of aerosol optical properties including absorption, scattering and extinction at three visible wavelengths (467, 530, 660 nm), for organic carbon (OC) generated by pyrolysis of biomass, ammonium sulfate and sodium chloride, and their mixtures at controlled RH conditions. Novel components of this project include investigation of: (1) Changes in all three of these optical properties at scanned RH conditions; (2) Optical properties at RH values up to 95%, which are usually extrapolated instead of measured; and (3) Examination of aerosols generated by the pyrolysis of wood, which is representative of primary atmospheric organic carbon, and its mixture with inorganic aerosol. Scattering and extinction values were used to determine light absorption by difference and single scattering albedo values. Extensive instrumentation development and benchmarking with independently measured and modeled values were used to obtain and evaluate these new results. The single scattering albedo value for a dry absorbing polystyrene microsphere benchmark agreed within 0.02 (absolute value) with independently published results at 530 nm. Light absorption by a nigrosin (sample light-absorbing) benchmark increased by a factor of 1.24 +/-0.06 at all wavelengths as RH increased from 38 to 95%. Closure modeling with Mie theory was able to reproduce this increase with the linear volume average (LVA) refractive index mixing rule for this water soluble compound. Absorption by biomass OC aerosol increased by a factor of 2.1 +/- 0.7 and 2.3 +/- 1.2 between 32 and 95% RH at 467 nm and 530 nm, but there was no detectable absorption at 660 nm. Additionally, the spectral dependence of absorption by OC that was observed with filter measurements was confirmed qualitatively in situ at 467 and 530 nm. Closure modeling with the dynamic effective medium approximation (DEMA) refractive index model was able to capture the increasing absorption trend with RH indicating that the droplets were heterogeneously mixed while containing dispersed insoluble absorbing material within those droplets. Seven other refractive index mixing models including LVA did not adequately describe the measurements for OC. Mixing the biomass OC aerosol with select mass fractions of ammonium sulfate ranging from 25 to 36% and sodium chloride ranging from 21 to 30% resulted in an increase in light scattering and extinction with RH and inorganic mass fraction. However, no detectable difference in light absorption behavior in comparison to pure biomass OC was observed. The main finding of this research is a measured increase in absorption with increasing RH, which is currently not represented in radiative transfer models even though biomass burning produces most of the primary OC aerosol in the atmosphere.

  13. Composition for absorbing hydrogen from gas mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heung, Leung K. (Aiken, SC); Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC); Lee, Myung W. (Aiken, SC)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hydrogen storage composition is provided which defines a physical sol-gel matrix having an average pore size of less than 3.5 angstroms which effectively excludes gaseous metal hydride poisons while permitting hydrogen gas to enter. The composition is useful for separating hydrogen gas from diverse gas streams which may have contaminants that would otherwise render the hydrogen absorbing material inactive.

  14. Development of a crash energy absorber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bullard, Delbert Lance

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new energy absorbing cartridge, named the "Z-tube" was developed for use in a new conceptualized highway safety appurtenance. The Z-tube was developed to provide a low cost method of dissipating the kinetic energy of errant motor vehicles. The Z...

  15. Moving core beam energy absorber and converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for the prevention of overheating of laser or particle beam impact zones through the use of a moving-in-the-coolant-flow arrangement for the energy absorbing core of the device. Moving of the core spreads the energy deposition in it in 1, 2, or 3 dimensions, thus increasing the effective cooling area of the device.

  16. Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation From the Heterogeneous Chemistry of Isoprene-Derived Epoxides: Implications for Air Quality, Climate and Public Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Qiao

    through aerosol-cloud interactions, and is associated with adverse effects on human health. Globally Sciences and Engineering, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel.5 µm) impacts Earth's climate directly through scattering/absorbing solar radiation and indirectly

  17. Neutron absorbers and methods of forming at least a portion of a neutron absorber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guillen, Donna P; Porter, Douglas L; Swank, W David; Erickson, Arnold W

    2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of forming at least a portion of a neutron absorber include combining a first material and a second material to form a compound, reducing the compound into a plurality of particles, mixing the plurality of particles with a third material, and pressing the mixture of the plurality of particles and the third material. One or more components of neutron absorbers may be formed by such methods. Neutron absorbers may include a composite material including an intermetallic compound comprising hafnium aluminide and a matrix material comprising pure aluminum.

  18. Effect of aerosols and NO2 concentration on ultraviolet actinic flux near Mexico City during MILAGRO: Measurements and model calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palancar, Gustavo G.; Lefer, Barry; Hall, Samual R.; Shaw, William J.; Corr, Chelsea A.; Herndon, Scott C.; Slusser, J. R.; Madronich, Sasha

    2013-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultraviolet (UV) actinic ?uxes (AF) measured with three Scanning Actinic Flux Spectroradiometers (SAFS) are compared with the Tropospheric Ultraviolet-Visible (TUV) model v.5 in order to assess the effects of aerosols and NO2 concentrations on the radiation. Measurements were made during the MILAGRO campaign near Mexico City in March 2006, at a ground-based station near Mexico City (the T1 supersite) and from the NSF/NCAR C-130 aircraft. At the surface, measurements are typically smaller by up to 25 % in the morning, 10% at noon, and 40% in the afternoon, than actinic flux modeled for clean, cloud-free conditions. When measurements of PBL height, NO2 concentration and aerosols optical properties are included in the model, the agreement improves to within ±10% in the morning and afternoon, and ±3% at noon. Based on daily averages, aerosols account for 68%, NO2 for 25%, and residual uncertainties for 7% of these AF reductions observed at the surface. Several overpasses from the C-130 aircraft provided the opportunity to examine the actinic flux perturbations aloft, and also show better agreement with the model when aerosol and NO2 effects are included above and below the flight altitude. TUV model simulations show that the vertical structure of the actinic flux is sensitive to the choice of the aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA) at UV wavelengths. Typically, aerosols caused enhanced AF above the PBL and reduced AF near the surface. However, for highly scattering aerosols (SSA > 0.95), enhancements can penetrate well into the PBL, while for strongly absorbing aerosols (SSA<0.7) reductions in AF are computed in the free troposphere as well as in the PBL. Additional measurements of the SSA at these wavelengths are needed to better constrain the effect of aerosols on the vertical structure of the actinic flux.

  19. Aerosol Science and Technology, 43:641652, 2009 Copyright American Association for Aerosol Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aerosol Science and Technology, 43:641­652, 2009 Copyright © American Association for Aerosol is the irreversibility of the hygroscopic growth fac- tor of aerosol particles. The instrument uses the hysteresis for ideal instrument performance in application to a test aerosol of fully deliquesce- able particles

  20. Aerosol Science and Technology, 43:799807, 2009 Copyright American Association for Aerosol Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aerosol Science and Technology, 43:799­807, 2009 Copyright © American Association for Aerosol and Efflorescence of Potassium Salts Relevant to Biomass-Burning Aerosol Particles Evelyn J. Freney,1 Scot T. Martin mate- rial into the atmosphere. Such aerosol particles affect the climate in part because

  1. Aerosol Science and Technology, 47:9398, 2013 Copyright C American Association for Aerosol Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jiaxing

    Aerosol Science and Technology, 47:93­98, 2013 Copyright C American Association for Aerosol of Pt-Nanoparticles-Laden Graphene Crumples by Aerosol Spray Pyrolysis and Evaluation of aqueous chloroplatinic acid (H2PtCl6) and graphene oxide (GO) sheets via aerosol spray pyrol- ysis (ASP

  2. Simulating aerosols using a chemical transport model with assimilation of satellite aerosol retrievals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zender, Charles

    Simulating aerosols using a chemical transport model with assimilation of satellite aerosol for simulating aerosols has been developed using a chemical transport model together with an assimilation of satellite aerosol retrievals. The methodology and model components are described in this paper

  3. Aerosol Science and Technology, 46:12391245, 2012 Copyright C American Association for Aerosol Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    Aerosol Science and Technology, 46:1239­1245, 2012 Copyright C American Association for Aerosol of Surfactants in Nanoparticles Produced by an Electrospray Aerosol Generator Amanda C. MacMillan,1 John B, USA Electrospray aerosol generators (EAGs) disperse conducting solutions into air, promptly neutralize

  4. Aerosol Science and Technology, 41:10891101, 2007 Copyright c American Association for Aerosol Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aerosol Science and Technology, 41:1089­1101, 2007 Copyright c American Association for Aerosol Interferometric Aerosol Absorption Spectrometry Arthur Sedlacek and Jeonghoon Lee Brookhaven National Laboratory, Atmospheric Sciences, Upton, New York, USA Aerosol light absorption still remains a difficult quantity to mea

  5. Aerosol Science and Technology, 40:97106, 2006 Copyright c American Association for Aerosol Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aerosol Science and Technology, 40:97­106, 2006 Copyright c American Association for Aerosol the aerosol particles, namely by vaporizing and condensing granular sodium chloride and by electrospraying materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of Aerosol Science and Tech

  6. Aerosol Science and Technology, 46:937949, 2012 Copyright C American Association for Aerosol Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aerosol Science and Technology, 46:937­949, 2012 Copyright C American Association for Aerosol Distributions following Condensational Growth in Continuous Flow Aerosol Reactors as Derived from Residence Time Distributions: Theoretical Development and Application to Secondary Organic Aerosol Mikinori Kuwata and Scot T

  7. Aerosol Science and Technology, 44:11401145, 2010 Copyright American Association for Aerosol Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jiaxing

    Aerosol Science and Technology, 44:1140­1145, 2010 Copyright © American Association for Aerosol-Assembly of Nanoparticles in Evaporating Aerosol Droplets: Preparation of Nanoporous Pt/TiO2 Composite Particles Hee Dong, USA Nanoporous Pt/TiO2 micro-particles were synthesized via an aerosol assisted co-assembly (AACA

  8. Single particle characterization, source apportionment, and aging effects of ambient aerosols in Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shields, Laura Grace

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    detection efficiencies of aerosol time of flight masscomposition of ambient aerosol particles. Environmentalsize dependent response of aerosol counters, Atmospheric

  9. Optimization of aerosol penetration through transport lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong Luque, Fermin Samuel

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    function of Reynolds number for the aerosol transport system of Strom. Tube diameter = 15. 9 mm. 69 Figure Page 16. Comparison of model, experiments and Strom's data for aerosol penetration through the transport system of Strom. Tube diameter = 15. 9... mm, AED = 8 nm. 70 17. Comparison of model and experiments for aerosol penetration through the transport system of Strom. Tube diameter = 15. 9 mm, AED = 10 pm. . 71 18. Comparison of model, experiments and Strom's data for aerosol penetration...

  10. Wide band cryogenic ultra-high vacuum microwave absorber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campisi, Isidoro E. (Newport News, VA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An absorber wave guide assembly for absorbing higher order modes of microwave energy under cryogenic ultra-high vacuum conditions, that absorbs wide-band multi-mode energy. The absorber is of a special triangular shape, made from flat tiles of silicon carbide and aluminum nitride. The leading sharp end of the absorber is located in a corner of the wave guide and tapers to a larger cross-sectional area whose center is located approximately in the center of the wave guide. The absorber is relatively short, being of less height than the maximum width of the wave guide.

  11. Wide band cryogenic ultra-high vacuum microwave absorber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campisi, I.E.

    1992-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An absorber waveguide assembly for absorbing higher order modes of microwave energy under cryogenic ultra-high vacuum conditions, that absorbs wide-band multi-mode energy. The absorber is of a special triangular shape, made from flat tiles of silicon carbide and aluminum nitride. The leading sharp end of the absorber is located in a corner of the waveguide and tapers to a larger cross-sectional area whose center is located approximately in the center of the wave guide. The absorber is relatively short, being of less height than the maximum width of the waveguide. 11 figs.

  12. 6, 42134249, 2006 Organic aerosols in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 6, 4213­4249, 2006 Organic aerosols in the Northeastern Pacific K. K. Crahan et al. Title Page Chemistry and Physics Discussions Organics in the Northeastern Pacific and their impacts on aerosol Organic aerosols in the Northeastern Pacific K. K. Crahan et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction

  13. 8, 7194, 2008 Sea salt aerosol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 8, 71­94, 2008 Sea salt aerosol refractive indices R. Irshad et al. Title Page Abstract Discussions Laboratory measurements of the optical properties of sea salt aerosol R. Irshad 1 , R. G. Grainger salt aerosol refractive indices R. Irshad et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions

  14. 4, 20552088, 2004 Aerosol-ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ACPD 4, 2055­2088, 2004 Aerosol-ozone correlations during dust transport episodes P. Bonasoni et al and Physics Discussions Aerosol-ozone correlations during dust transport episodes P. Bonasoni1 , P.bonasoni@isac.cnr.it) 2055 #12;ACPD 4, 2055­2088, 2004 Aerosol-ozone correlations during dust transport episodes P. Bonasoni

  15. ATI TDA 5A aerosol generator evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilles, D.A.

    1998-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil based aerosol ``Smoke`` commonly used for testing the efficiency and penetration of High Efficiency Particulate Air filters (HEPA) and HEPA systems can produce flammability hazards that may not have been previously considered. A combustion incident involving an aerosol generator has caused an investigation into the hazards of the aerosol used to test HEPA systems at Hanford.

  16. 6, 93519388, 2006 Aerosol-cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 6, 9351­9388, 2006 Aerosol-cloud interaction inferred from MODIS and models G. Myhre et al Chemistry and Physics Discussions Aerosol-cloud interaction inferred from MODIS satellite data and global 6, 9351­9388, 2006 Aerosol-cloud interaction inferred from MODIS and models G. Myhre et al. Title

  17. 5, 50075038, 2005 Aerosol effect on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and Physics Discussions Aerosol effect on the distribution of solar radiation over the clear-sky global oceansACPD 5, 5007­5038, 2005 Aerosol effect on solar radiation from MODIS L. A. Remer and Y. J. Kaufman the reflected sunlight by the aerosol over global oceans in cloud free conditions. The MODIS high spatial

  18. Dielectric studies of water absorbed in epoxies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pham, Ha Quoc

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . They are used in many applications such as surface coatings, adhesives, elqctronic encapsulation and structural composites. Water absorption in epoxy resins is known to be detrimental to resin performances. One example is the unusually large lowering... ent) Nay 1987 ABSTRACT Dielectric Studies of Mater Absorbed in Epoxies. (May 1987) Ha I)uoc Pham, B. S. , Tokyo University of Agriculture Chairman of Advisory Committee: C. A. J. Hoeve Epoxy resins are industrially important polymers...

  19. Design and Manufacture of Energy Absorbing Materials

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Duoss, Eric

    2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Learn about an ordered cellular material that has been designed and manufactured using direct ink writing (DIW), a 3-D printing technology being developed at LLNL. The new material is a patterned cellular material that can absorb mechanical energy-a cushion-while also providing protection against sheering. This material is expected to find utility in application spaces that currently use unordered foams, such as sporting and consumer goods as well as defense and aerospace.

  20. Design and Manufacture of Energy Absorbing Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duoss, Eric

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Learn about an ordered cellular material that has been designed and manufactured using direct ink writing (DIW), a 3-D printing technology being developed at LLNL. The new material is a patterned cellular material that can absorb mechanical energy-a cushion-while also providing protection against sheering. This material is expected to find utility in application spaces that currently use unordered foams, such as sporting and consumer goods as well as defense and aerospace.

  1. Tech Transfer Webinar: Energy Absorbing Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duoss, Eric

    2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A new material has been designed and manufactured at LLNL that can absorb mechanical energy--a cushion--while also providing protection against sheering. This ordered cellular material is 3D printed using direct ink writing techniques under development at LLNL. It is expected to find utility in application spaces that currently use unordered foams, such as sporting and consumer goods as well as defense and aerospace.

  2. Tech Transfer Webinar: Energy Absorbing Materials

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Duoss, Eric

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new material has been designed and manufactured at LLNL that can absorb mechanical energy--a cushion--while also providing protection against sheering. This ordered cellular material is 3D printed using direct ink writing techniques under development at LLNL. It is expected to find utility in application spaces that currently use unordered foams, such as sporting and consumer goods as well as defense and aerospace.

  3. Real time infrared aerosol analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Stanley A. (Countryside, IL); Reedy, Gerald T. (Bourbonnais, IL); Kumar, Romesh (Naperville, IL)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for analyzing aerosols in essentially real time includes a virtual impactor which separates coarse particles from fine and ultrafine particles in an aerosol sample. The coarse and ultrafine particles are captured in PTFE filters, and the fine particles impact onto an internal light reflection element. The composition and quantity of the particles on the PTFE filter and on the internal reflection element are measured by alternately passing infrared light through the filter and the internal light reflection element, and analyzing the light through infrared spectrophotometry to identify the particles in the sample.

  4. absorbed dose calculation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2010-01-01 4 Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and dose conversion coefficient of radon progeny Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and...

  5. absorbed dose measurements: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2013-01-01 3 Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and dose conversion coefficient of radon progeny Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and...

  6. air dose absorbed: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2009-01-01 3 Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and dose conversion coefficient of radon progeny Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and...

  7. absorbed dose distribution: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2010-01-01 3 Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and dose conversion coefficient of radon progeny Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and...

  8. absorbed dose measurement: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2013-01-01 3 Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and dose conversion coefficient of radon progeny Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and...

  9. absorbed dose determination: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2012-06-07 5 Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and dose conversion coefficient of radon progeny Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and...

  10. absorbed dose effective: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2010-01-01 2 Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and dose conversion coefficient of radon progeny Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and...

  11. absorbed dose standard: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2010-01-01 4 Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and dose conversion coefficient of radon progeny Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and...

  12. absorbed doses distribution: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2010-01-01 3 Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and dose conversion coefficient of radon progeny Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and...

  13. absorbed dose distributions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2010-01-01 3 Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and dose conversion coefficient of radon progeny Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and...

  14. absorbed dose rate: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2010-01-01 3 Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and dose conversion coefficient of radon progeny Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and...

  15. absorbed dose determinations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2012-06-07 5 Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and dose conversion coefficient of radon progeny Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and...

  16. absorbed dose calculations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2010-01-01 4 Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and dose conversion coefficient of radon progeny Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Absorbed dose in target cell nuclei and...

  17. High Altitude Unmanned Air System for Atmospheric Science Missions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    designed to enable the construction of an emulator (surrogate model) of an atmospheric quantity across-launched dropsonde will record temperature, dewpoint, ambient pressure and GPS-derived wind speed. b) Pollution industry is that a safe level of ash density is around 2 Ã? 10-3 g/m3 (corresponding to an engine core

  18. absorbing structural material: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    terahertz frequencies Engineering Websites Summary: Flexible metamaterial absorbers for stealth applications at terahertz frequencies Krzysztof: We have wrapped metallic...

  19. X-RAYING THE INTERGALACTIC O VI ABSORBERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Y.

    The observed intergalactic O vi absorbers at z > 0 have been regarded as a significant reservoir of the “missing

  20. Review of models applicable to accident aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, J.A.

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimations of potential airborne-particle releases are essential in safety assessments of nuclear-fuel facilities. This report is a review of aerosol behavior models that have potential applications for predicting aerosol characteristics in compartments containing accident-generated aerosol sources. Such characterization of the accident-generated aerosols is a necessary step toward estimating their eventual release in any accident scenario. Existing aerosol models can predict the size distribution, concentration, and composition of aerosols as they are acted on by ventilation, diffusion, gravity, coagulation, and other phenomena. Models developed in the fields of fluid mechanics, indoor air pollution, and nuclear-reactor accidents are reviewed with this nuclear fuel facility application in mind. The various capabilities of modeling aerosol behavior are tabulated and discussed, and recommendations are made for applying the models to problems of differing complexity.

  1. 7, 71717233, 2007 Aerosol absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    black carbon refractive indices, new cloud radiative properties considering the effect of aerosol absorption and radiative forcing. The effect of the usage of more accurate effective medium approximations radiative properties re- sults in a small global annual-mean all-sky absorption of 0.05 W m-2 and a positive

  2. DO AEROSOLS CHANGE CLOUD COVER AND AFFECT CLIMATE?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    BALANCE Global and annual average energy fluxes in watts per square meter Schwartz, 1996, modified from;AEROSOL INFLUENCES ON CLIMATE AND CLIMATE CHANGE #12;DMS #12;AEROSOL IN MEXICO CITY BASIN #12;AEROSOL IN MEXICO CITY BASIN Light scattering by aerosols decreases absorption of solar radiation. #12;AEROSOLS

  3. Dielectric studies of water absorbed in epoxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pham, Ha Quoc

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Comparison Solution Reported relative humidity X Water in films 1 Mater Na2S03/H2 NaN02/H2 CaC12/H20 100X 95X 9 293oK 66$ 8 293'K 33K Cd 293'K 14 1 Data from CRC's Handbook of ~Cba ist and ~ob sits and Nerck's Index. 25 100 80 50 40 0 20...DIELECTRIC STUDIES OF WATER ABSORBED IN EPOXIES A Thesis by HA QUOC PHAM Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1987 Major Subject...

  4. Safeguards Verification Measurements using Laser Ablation, Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry in Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anheier, Norman C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Munley, John T.; Nelson, Danny A.; Qiao, Hong (Amy) [Amy; Phillips, Jon R.

    2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser Ablation Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry (LAARS) is a new verification measurement technology under development at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). LAARS uses three lasers to ablate and then measure the relative isotopic abundance of uranium compounds. An ablation laser is tightly focused on uranium-bearing solids, producing a small atomic uranium vapor plume. Two collinear wavelength-tuned spectrometry lasers transit through the plume and the absorbance of U-235 and U-238 isotopes are measured to determine U-235 enrichment. The measurement is independent of chemical form and degree of dilution with nuisance dust and other materials. LAARS has high relative precision and detection limits approaching the femtogram range for U-235. The sample is scanned and assayed point-by-point at rates reaching 1 million measurements/hour, enabling LAARS to detect and analyze uranium in trace samples. The spectrometer is assembled using primarily commercially available components and features a compact design and automated analysis.Two specific gaseous centrifuge enrichment plant (GCEP) applications of the spectrometer are currently under development: 1) LAARS-Environmental Sampling (ES), which collects and analyzes aerosol particles for GCEP misuse detection and 2) LAARS-Destructive Assay (DA), which enables onsite enrichment DA sample collection and analysis for protracted diversion detection. The two applications propose game-changing technological advances in GCEP safeguards verification.

  5. Safeguards Verification Measurements using Laser Ablation, Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry in Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anheier, Norman C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Qiao, Hong (Amy) [Amy; Phillips, Jon R.

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser Ablation Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry (LAARS) is a new verification measurement technology under development at the US Department of Energy’s (DOE) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). LAARS uses three lasers to ablate and then measure the relative isotopic abundance of uranium compounds. An ablation laser is tightly focused on uranium-bearing solids producing a small plume containing uranium atoms. Two collinear wavelength-tuned spectrometry lasers transit through the plume and the absorbance of U-235 and U-238 isotopes are measured to determine U-235 enrichment. The measurement has high relative precision and detection limits approaching the femtogram range for uranium. It is independent of chemical form and degree of dilution with nuisance dust and other materials. High speed sample scanning and pinpoint characterization allow measurements on millions of particles/hour to detect and analyze the enrichment of trace uranium in samples. The spectrometer is assembled using commercially available components at comparatively low cost, and features a compact and low power design. Future designs can be engineered for reliable, autonomous deployment within an industrial plant environment. Two specific applications of the spectrometer are under development: 1) automated unattended aerosol sampling and analysis and 2) on-site small sample destructive assay measurement. The two applications propose game-changing technological advances in gaseous centrifuge enrichment plant (GCEP) safeguards verification. The aerosol measurement instrument, LAARS-environmental sampling (ES), collects aerosol particles from the plant environment in a purpose-built rotating drum impactor and then uses LAARS-ES to quickly scan the surface of the impactor to measure the enrichments of the captured particles. The current approach to plant misuse detection involves swipe sampling and offsite analysis. Though this approach is very robust it generally requires several months to obtain results from a given sample collection. The destructive assay instrument, LAARS-destructive assay (DA), uses a simple purpose-built fixture with a sampling planchet to collect adsorbed UF6 gas from a cylinder valve or from a process line tap or pigtail. A portable LAARS-DA instrument scans the microgram quantity of uranium collected on the planchet and the assay of the uranium is measured to ~0.15% relative precision. Currently, destructive assay samples for bias defect measurements are collected in small sample cylinders for offsite mass spectrometry measurement.

  6. Absorber Alignment Measurement Tool for Solar Parabolic Trough Collectors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stynes, J. K.; Ihas, B.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As we pursue efforts to lower the capital and installation costs of parabolic trough solar collectors, it is essential to maintain high optical performance. While there are many optical tools available to measure the reflector slope errors of parabolic trough solar collectors, there are few tools to measure the absorber alignment. A new method is presented here to measure the absorber alignment in two dimensions to within 0.5 cm. The absorber alignment is measured using a digital camera and four photogrammetric targets. Physical contact with the receiver absorber or glass is not necessary. The alignment of the absorber is measured along its full length so that sagging of the absorber can be quantified with this technique. The resulting absorber alignment measurement provides critical information required to accurately determine the intercept factor of a collector.

  7. Composite neutron absorbing coatings for nuclear criticality control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, Richard N.; Swank, W. David; Mizia, Ronald E.

    2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal neutron absorbing composite coating materials and methods of applying such coating materials to spent nuclear fuel storage systems are provided. A composite neutron absorbing coating applied to a substrate surface includes a neutron absorbing layer overlying at least a portion of the substrate surface, and a corrosion resistant top coat layer overlying at least a portion of the neutron absorbing layer. An optional bond coat layer can be formed on the substrate surface prior to forming the neutron absorbing layer. The neutron absorbing layer can include a neutron absorbing material, such as gadolinium oxide or gadolinium phosphate, dispersed in a metal alloy matrix. The coating layers may be formed by a plasma spray process or a high velocity oxygen fuel process.

  8. Global environmental effects of impact-generated aerosols: Results from a general circulation model: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Covey, C.; Ghan, S.J.; Walton, J.J.; Weissman, P.R.

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interception of sunlight by the high altitude worldwide dust cloud generated by impact of a large asteroid or comet would lead to substantial land surface cooling, according to our three-dimensional atmospheric general circulation model (GCM). This result is qualitatively similar to conclusions drawn from an earlier study that employed a one-dimensional atmospheric model, but in the GCM simulation the heat capacity of the oceans substantially mitigates land surface cooling, an effect that one-dimensional models cannot quantify. On the other hand, the low heat capacity of the GCM's land surface allows temperatures to drop more rapidly in the initial stage of cooling than in the one-dimensional model study. These two differences between three-dimensional and one-dimensional model simulations were noted previously in studies of ''nuclear winter; '' GCM-simulated climatic changes in the Alvarez-inspired scenario of ''asteroid/comet winter,'' however, are more severe than in ''nuclear winter'' because the assumed aerosol amount is large enough to intercept all sunlight falling on earth. Impacts of smaller objects -- which would occur much more frequently than the Cretaceous/Tertiary event deduced by Alvarez and coworkers -- could also lead to dramatic, though less severe, climatic changes, according to our GCM. Our conclusion is that it is difficult to imagine an asteroid or comet impact leading to anything approaching complete global freezing, but quite reasonable to assume that impacts at the Alvarez level, or even smaller, dramatically alter the climate in at least a ''patchy'' sense. 30 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Method and apparatus for aerosol particle absorption spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campillo, Anthony J. (Nesconset, NY); Lin, Horn-Bond (Manorville, NY)

    1983-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for determining the absorption spectra, and other properties, of aerosol particles. A heating beam source provides a beam of electromagnetic energy which is scanned through the region of the spectrum which is of interest. Particles exposed to the heating beam which have absorption bands within the band width of the heating beam absorb energy from the beam. The particles are also illuminated by light of a wave length such that the light is scattered by the particles. The absorption spectra of the particles can thus be determined from an analysis of the scattered light since the absorption of energy by the particles will affect the way the light is scattered. Preferably the heating beam is modulated to simplify the analysis of the scattered light. In one embodiment the heating beam is intensity modulated so that the scattered light will also be intensity modulated when the particles absorb energy. In another embodiment the heating beam passes through an interferometer and the scattered light reflects the Fourier Transform of the absorption spectra.

  10. Erbium concentration dependent absorbance in tellurite glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sazali, E. S., E-mail: mdsupar@utm; Rohani, M. S., E-mail: mdsupar@utm; Sahar, M. R., E-mail: mdsupar@utm; Arifin, R., E-mail: mdsupar@utm; Ghoshal, S. K., E-mail: mdsupar@utm; Hamzah, K., E-mail: mdsupar@utm [Advanced Optical Material Research Group, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310, Skudai, Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Enhancing the optical absorption cross-section in topically important rare earth doped tellurite glasses is challenging for photonic devices. Controlled synthesis and detailed characterizations of the optical properties of these glasses are important for the optimization. The influence of varying concentration of Er{sup 3+} ions on the absorbance characteristics of lead tellurite glasses synthesized via melt-quenching technique are investigated. The UV-Vis absorption spectra exhibits six prominent peaks centered at 490, 526, 652, 800, 982 and 1520 nm ascribed to the transitions in erbium ion from the ground state to the excited states {sup 4}F{sub 7/2}, {sup 2}H{sub 11/2}, {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}, {sup 4}I{sub 9/2}, {sup 2}H{sub 11/2} and {sup 4}I{sub 13/2}, respectively. The results are analyzed by means of optical band gap E{sub g} and Urbach energy E{sub u}. The values of the energy band gap are found decreased from 2.82 to 2.51 eV and the Urbach energy increased from 0.15 to 0.24 eV with the increase of the Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration from 0 to 1.5 mol%. The excellent absorbance of the prepared tellurite glasses makes them suitable for fabricating solid state lasers.

  11. Mass spectrometric approaches for chemical characterisation of atmospheric aerosols: critical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    Mass spectrometric approaches for chemical characterisation of atmospheric aerosols: critical. Atmospheric aerosols have profound effects on the environment through several physicochemical processes on the respiratory and cardiovascular systems. Understanding aerosol atmospheric chemistry and its environmental

  12. Intercomparison of 14C Analysis of Carbonaceous Aerosols: Exercise 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    analysis of carbonaceous aerosols: recent developments.Source apportionment of aerosols by 14 C measurements inAnalysis of Carbonaceous Aerosols Table 2a 14 C(TC) results

  13. Enhanced photolysis in aerosols: evidence for important surface effects.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nissenson, Paul; Knox, Christopher J H; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J; Phillips, Leon F; Dabdub, Donald

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    irradiated for 30 s in the aerosol phase, (b) Mo(CO) 6 in 1-irradiation for both aerosols and the bulk-liquid solution.Enhanced photolysis in aerosols: evidence for important

  14. Molecular Characterization of Organic Aerosols Using Nanospray...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in OA, which is important for understanding chemical aging phenomena. Citation: Roach PJ, J Laskin, and A Laskin.2010."Molecular Characterization of Organic Aerosols Using...

  15. Researchers Model Impact of Aerosols Over California

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Impact of Aerosols Over California Research may clarify the effectiveness of regional pollution controls May 28, 2013 | Tags: Climate Research, Hopper Contact: Linda Vu,...

  16. Photolytic processing of secondary organic aerosols dissolved...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    processing of secondary organic aerosols dissolved in cloud droplets. Abstract: The effect of UV irradiation on the molecular composition of aqueous extracts of secondary...

  17. Quantifying aerosol direct radiative effect with Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer observations: Top-of-atmosphere albedo change by aerosols based on land surface types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yang; Li, Qinbin; Kahn, Ralph A; Randerson, James T; Diner, David J

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    coincident MISR and MODIS aerosol optical depths over land2003), Estimates of the spectral aerosol single scatteringalbedo and aerosol radiative effects during SAFARI 2000, J.

  18. Synergy between Secondary Organic Aerosols and Long Range Transport...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    between Secondary Organic Aerosols and Long Range Transport of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons. Synergy between Secondary Organic Aerosols and Long Range Transport of Polycyclic...

  19. acid aerosol exposure: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nenes, Athanasios 8 Neutralization of soil aerosol and its impact on the distribution of acid rain over east Asia Geosciences Websites Summary: Neutralization of soil aerosol and...

  20. Spectro-Microscopic Measurements of Carbonaceous Aerosol Aging...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Carbonaceous Aerosol Aging in Central California. Abstract: Carbonaceous aerosols are responsible for large uncertainties in climate models, degraded visibility, and...

  1. Measurements of submicron aerosols in Houston, Texas during the...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of submicron aerosols in Houston, Texas during the 2009 SHARP field campaign. Measurements of submicron aerosols in Houston, Texas during the 2009 SHARP field campaign. Abstract:...

  2. Building America Webinar: Sealing of Home Enclosures with Aerosol...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Sealing of Home Enclosures with Aerosol Particles Building America Webinar: Sealing of Home Enclosures with Aerosol Particles This webinar was presented by research team Building...

  3. The dependence of ice microphysics on aerosol concentration in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The dependence of ice microphysics on aerosol concentration in arctic mixed-phase stratus clouds during ISDAC and M-PACE. The dependence of ice microphysics on aerosol...

  4. Reduction in biomass burning aerosol light absorption upon humidificat...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in biomass burning aerosol light absorption upon humidification: Roles of inorganically-induced hygroscopicity, Reduction in biomass burning aerosol light absorption upon...

  5. aerosols iii morphologic: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences Websites Summary: of aerosols. Keywords: metal waste recycling; aerosols; fire hazard; explosion hazard. 1. OVERVIEW ProductsRisks generated by the treatment of...

  6. Molecular Chemistry of Organic Aerosols Through the Application...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemistry of Organic Aerosols Through the Application of High Resolution Mass Spectrometry. Molecular Chemistry of Organic Aerosols Through the Application of High Resolution Mass...

  7. Comparative Analysis of Urban Atmospheric Aerosol by Particle...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis of Urban Atmospheric Aerosol by Particle-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), Proton Elastic Scattering Analysis Comparative Analysis of Urban Atmospheric Aerosol by...

  8. ambient aerosol concentrations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    soluble in water: 2. Isolation of acid, neutral, and basic fractions by modified size Weber, Rodney 4 Ambient aerosol sampling using the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer...

  9. ambient ultrafine aerosols: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    soluble in water: 2. Isolation of acid, neutral, and basic fractions by modified size Weber, Rodney 4 Ambient aerosol sampling using the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer...

  10. aerosol flow reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    APPROACH TO SPACEBORN HYPERSPECTRAL OPTICAL FLOW ESTIMATION ON DUST AEROSOLS Fabian E, Canada ABSTRACT The significant role dust aerosols play in the earth's climate sys- tem and...

  11. aerosol formation durint: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    XI, Universit de 86 8, 68456901, 2008 Aerosol optical Physics Websites Summary: of solar radiation by atmospheric aerosols is a key el- ement of the Earth's radiative energy...

  12. The Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ghan, Steve

    2014-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Research projects like the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign, or ISDAC, increase our knowledge of atmospheric aerosol particles and cloud physics.

  13. aerosol ratio program: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    contribute a major portion of atmospheric aerosol mass loading 5. The estimated global annual Liou, K. N. 2 Studying Clouds and Aerosols with Lidar Depolarization Ratio and...

  14. aerosol optical thickness: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of solar radiation by atmospheric aerosols is a key el- ement of the Earth's radiative energy balance and climate. The optical properties of aerosol particles are, however,...

  15. aerosol black carbon: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of solar radiation by atmospheric aerosols is a key el- ement of the Earth's radiative energy balance and climate. The optical properties of aerosol particles are, however,...

  16. The Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghan, Steve

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Research projects like the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign, or ISDAC, increase our knowledge of atmospheric aerosol particles and cloud physics.

  17. aerosol samples collected: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    elements analysis of aerosol samples from some CiteSeer Summary: Aerosols deposits on filters from ten Romanian towns with different kinds and levels of industrial development...

  18. aerosol size classification: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2006 Aerosol size Physics Websites Summary: ACPD 6, 10493-10522, 2006 Aerosol size distribution source identification T. W. Chan and M Esc Printer-friendly Version...

  19. aerosolized pentamidine effect: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ON CCN CONCENTRATION AND AEROSOL FIRST INDIRECT RADIATIVE composition, aerosol size distribution is the more dominant parameter on CCN activation Feingold, GRL 2003;...

  20. aerosol monitoring: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ON CCN CONCENTRATION AND AEROSOL FIRST INDIRECT RADIATIVE composition, aerosol size distribution is the more dominant parameter on CCN activation Feingold, GRL 2003;...

  1. aerosols radioactifs artificiels: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ON CCN CONCENTRATION AND AEROSOL FIRST INDIRECT RADIATIVE composition, aerosol size distribution is the more dominant parameter on CCN activation Feingold, GRL 2003;...

  2. aerosolized polymerized type: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ON CCN CONCENTRATION AND AEROSOL FIRST INDIRECT RADIATIVE composition, aerosol size distribution is the more dominant parameter on CCN activation Feingold, GRL 2003;...

  3. aerosol concentration enrichment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ON CCN CONCENTRATION AND AEROSOL FIRST INDIRECT RADIATIVE composition, aerosol size distribution is the more dominant parameter on CCN activation Feingold, GRL 2003;...

  4. aerosol direct radiative: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ON CCN CONCENTRATION AND AEROSOL FIRST INDIRECT RADIATIVE composition, aerosol size distribution is the more dominant parameter on CCN activation Feingold, GRL 2003;...

  5. aerosol biokinetics concentrations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ON CCN CONCENTRATION AND AEROSOL FIRST INDIRECT RADIATIVE composition, aerosol size distribution is the more dominant parameter on CCN activation Feingold, GRL 2003;...

  6. aerosol particle analysis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: data analysis algorithm is presented. Our earlier algorithm assumed a monomodal aerosol size distribution, while the new algorithm allows us to partition the aerosol...

  7. aerosol radiative forcing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ON CCN CONCENTRATION AND AEROSOL FIRST INDIRECT RADIATIVE composition, aerosol size distribution is the more dominant parameter on CCN activation Feingold, GRL 2003;...

  8. aerosol research study: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in atmospheric thermal structure, burning, bio-sources changes? 12;Aerosol microphysics: size distribution, mixing state, morphology, shape 9 Aerosol Science and Technology,...

  9. aerosol chemical composition: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ON CCN CONCENTRATION AND AEROSOL FIRST INDIRECT RADIATIVE composition, aerosol size distribution is the more dominant parameter on CCN activation Feingold, GRL 2003;...

  10. Ice-condenser aerosol tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ligotke, M.W.; Eschbach, E.J.; Winegardner, W.K. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of an experimental investigation of aerosol particle transport and capture using a full-scale height and reduced-scale cross section test facility based on the design of the ice compartment of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) ice-condenser containment system. Results of 38 tests included thermal-hydraulic as well as aerosol particle data. Particle retention in the test section was greatly influenced by thermal-hydraulic and aerosol test parameters. Test-average decontamination factor (DF) ranged between 1.0 and 36 (retentions between {approximately}0 and 97.2%). The measured test-average particle retentions for tests without and with ice and steam ranged between DF = 1.0 and 2.2 and DF = 2.4 and 36, respectively. In order to apparent importance, parameters that caused particle retention in the test section in the presence of ice were steam mole fraction (SMF), noncondensible gas flow rate (residence time), particle solubility, and inlet particle size. Ice-basket section noncondensible flows greater than 0.1 m{sup 3}/s resulted in stable thermal stratification whereas flows less than 0.1 m{sup 3}/s resulted in thermal behavior termed meandering with frequent temperature crossovers between flow channels. 10 refs., 66 figs., 16 tabs.

  11. Heterogeneous Chemistry: Understanding Aerosol/Oxidant Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joyce E. Penner

    2005-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Global radiative forcing of nitrate and ammonium aerosols has mostly been estimated from aerosol concentrations calculated at thermodynamic equilibrium or using approximate treatments for their uptake by aerosols. In this study, a more accurate hybrid dynamical approach (DYN) was used to simulate the uptake of nitrate and ammonium by aerosols and the interaction with tropospheric reactive nitrogen chemistry in a three-dimensional global aerosol and chemistry model, IMPACT, which also treats sulfate, sea salt and mineral dust aerosol. 43% of the global annual average nitrate aerosol burden, 0.16 TgN, and 92% of the global annual average ammonium aerosol burden, 0.29 TgN, exist in the fine mode (D<1.25 {micro}m) that scatters most efficiently. Results from an equilibrium calculation differ significantly from those of DYN since the fraction of fine-mode nitrate to total nitrate (gas plus aerosol) is 9.8%, compared to 13% in DYN. Our results suggest that the estimates of aerosol forcing from equilibrium concentrations will be underestimated. We also show that two common approaches used to treat nitrate and ammonium in aerosol in global models, including the first-order gas-to-particle approximation based on uptake coefficients (UPTAKE) and a hybrid method that combines the former with an equilibrium model (HYB), significantly overpredict the nitrate uptake by aerosols especially that by coarse particles, resulting in total nitrate aerosol burdens higher than that in DYN by +106% and +47%, respectively. Thus, nitrate aerosol in the coarse mode calculated by HYB is 0.18 Tg N, a factor of 2 more than that in DYN (0.086 Tg N). Excessive formation of the coarse-mode nitrate in HYB leads to near surface nitrate concentrations in the fine mode lower than that in DYN by up to 50% over continents. In addition, near-surface HNO{sub 3} and NO{sub x} concentrations are underpredicted by HYB by up to 90% and 5%, respectively. UPTAKE overpredicts the NO{sub x} burden by 56% and near-surface NO{sub x} concentrations by a factor of 2-5. These results suggest the importance of using the more accurate hybrid dynamical method in the estimates of both aerosol forcing and tropospheric ozone chemistry.

  12. Characterization of aerosols produced by surgical procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeh, H.C.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Lundgren, D.L.; Guilmette, R.A.; Snipes, M.B.; Jones, R.K. [Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Turner, R.S. [Lovelace Health Systems, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In many surgeries, especially orthopedic procedures, power tools such as saws and drills are used. These tools may produce aerosolized blood and other biological material from bone and soft tissues. Surgical lasers and electrocautery tools can also produce aerosols when tissues are vaporized and condensed. Studies have been reported in the literature concerning production of aerosols during surgery, and some of these aerosols may contain infectious material. Garden et al. (1988) reported the presence of papilloma virus DNA in the fumes produced from laser surgery, but the infectivity of the aerosol was not assessed. Moon and Nininger (1989) measured the size distribution and production rate of emissions from laser surgery and found that particles were generally less than 0.5 {mu}m diameter. More recently there has been concern expressed over the production of aerosolized blood during surgical procedures that require power tools. In an in vitro study, the production of an aerosol containing the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was reported when power tools were used to cut tissues with blood infected with HIV. Another study measured the size distribution of blood aerosols produced by surgical power tools and found blood-containing particles in a number of size ranges. Health care workers are anxious and concerned about whether surgically produced aerosols are inspirable and can contain viable pathogens such as HIV. Other pathogens such as hepatitis B virus (HBV) are also of concern. The Occupational Safety and Health funded a project at the National Institute for Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute to assess the extent of aerosolization of blood and other tissues during surgical procedures. This document reports details of the experimental and sampling approach, methods, analyses, and results on potential production of blood-associated aerosols from surgical procedures in the laboratory and in the hospital surgical suite.

  13. absorbing boundary condition: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Absorbing Boundary Condition, Domain Decomposition and Hydrodynamic Wave Model O. Wilk Introduction. appli. (wave equation) Num. appli. (hydro. wave model)...

  14. absorbed assessment quantificacao: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Absorbing Boundary Condition, Domain Decomposition and Hydrodynamic Wave Model O. Wilk Introduction. appli. (wave equation) Num. appli. (hydro. wave model)...

  15. absorbing boundary conditions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Absorbing Boundary Condition, Domain Decomposition and Hydrodynamic Wave Model O. Wilk Introduction. appli. (wave equation) Num. appli. (hydro. wave model)...

  16. absorbing compounds called: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Absorbing Boundary Condition, Domain Decomposition and Hydrodynamic Wave Model O. Wilk Introduction. appli. (wave equation) Num. appli. (hydro. wave model)...

  17. advanced burnable absorbers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    utilizing thorium together with gadolinium, erbium, or boron burnable absorber in BWR fuel assemblies for very long cycle is investigated. Nuclear characteristics such as...

  18. absorbers solar: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    photonic crystal absorbers and emitters Engineering Websites Summary: ) systems convert solar energy into electricity via thermally radiated photons at tailored wavelengths...

  19. absorbed fraction internal irradiation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    boundary conditions; non-reflecting boundary conditions; perfectly matched layers; wave Guddati, Murthy N. 76 The Kinematic Composition of MgII Absorbers Astrophysics...

  20. ON THE KK-THEORY OF STRONGLY SELF-ABSORBING ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    be simple and nuclear; moreover, they are either purely infinite or stably finite. The only known examples of strongly self-absorbing C?-algebras are the UHF ...

  1. Distribution of small dispersive coal dust particles and absorbed radioactive chemical elements in conditions of forced acoustic resonance in iodine air filter at nuclear power plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ledenyov, Oleg P

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The physical features of distribution of the small dispersive coal dust particles and the adsorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes in the absorber with the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal granules were researched in the case of the intensive air dust aerosol stream flow through the iodine air filter (IAF). It was shown that, at the certain aerodynamic conditions in the IAF, the generation of the acoustic oscillations is possible. It was found that the acoustic oscillations generation results in an appearance of the standing acoustic waves of the air pressure (density) in the IAF. In the case of the intensive blow of the air dust aerosol, it was demonstrated that the standing acoustic waves have some strong influences on both: 1) the dynamics of small dispersive coal dust particles movement and their accumulation in the IAF; 2) the oversaturation of the cylindrical coal granules by the adsorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes in the regions, where the antin...

  2. Aerosol Condensational Growth in Cloud Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geng, Jun

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A code for the quasi-stationary solution of the coupled heat and mass transport equations for aerosols in a finite volume was developed. Both mass and heat are conserved effectively in the volume, which results in a competitive aerosol condensation...

  3. 6, 32653319, 2006 Study aerosol with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 6, 3265­3319, 2006 Study aerosol with two emission inventories and time factors A. de Meij et in Europe to two different emission inventories and temporal distribution of emissions A. de Meij 1 , M Study aerosol with two emission inventories and time factors A. de Meij et al. Title Page Abstract

  4. 5, 75777611, 2005 A look at aerosol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ACPD 5, 7577­7611, 2005 A look at aerosol formation using data mining techniques S. Hyv and Physics Discussions A look at aerosol formation using data mining techniques S. Hyv¨onen1 , H. Junninen2 Korkeakoski, Finland 4 Department of Forest Ecology, Faculty of Agriculture and Forestry, P.O. Box 27, FIN

  5. 2, 12871315, 2002 Aerosol sources and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    in climate variability and climate change studies (IPCC, 2001). Radiative forcing of natural and their contribution to the chemical composition of aerosols in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea during summertime J aerosol sources in the Eastern Mediterranean5 Basin could be investigated at this location since the site

  6. 6, 1217912197, 2006 Aerosol formation in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    troposphere and lower stratosphere. The model implements a first order scheme for resolving the aerosol size distribution within its geometric size10 sections, which efficiently suppresses numerical diffusion. We operate removes freshly nucleated particles by coagulation. The observation of high ultrafine aerosol

  7. Numerical and experimental investigation of nonlinear properties of rubber absorber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Numerical and experimental investigation of nonlinear properties of rubber absorber in rail, Shanghai, 201804 Abstract: A dynamic nonlinear model of rubber absorber in railway fastening is proposed in this paper based on a superposition principal demonstrating that the restoring force of rubber components

  8. ARM - AOS Aerosol Properties Plots

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearchSOLICITATIONIMODI FICATION OF CONTRACTOperations AMF2ViewersAOS Aerosol

  9. Aerosol Releases from the ICPP July 2005 FINAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aerosol Releases from the ICPP July 2005 FINAL REPORT AEROSOL RELEASES FROM THE IDAHO CHEMICAL, Inc. July 2005 #12;Aerosol Releases from the ICPP July 2005 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 Introduction ......................................... 5-1 5.1 Beta-minus Iodine Aerosol Formation Mechanism

  10. Exploring matrix effects on photochemistry of organic aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    Exploring matrix effects on photochemistry of organic aerosols Hanna Lignella,b,1 , Mallory L of photochemical processes in organic aerosols will depend on both relative humidity and temperature and thus and impacts. aerosol aging | particle viscosity | organic photochemistry Aqueous droplets and aerosol

  11. Performance evaluation of CFRP-rubber shock absorbers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamanna, Giuseppe, E-mail: giuseppe.lamanna@unina2.it; Sepe, Raffaele, E-mail: giuseppe.lamanna@unina2.it [Department of Industrial and Information Engineering, Second University of Naples, via Roma, 29 - 81031 Aversa (Italy)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present work a numerical investigation on the energy absorbing capability of dedicated structural components made of a carbon fiber reinforced polymer and an emulsion polymerised styrene butadiene rubber is reported. The shock absorbers are devices designed to absorb large amounts of energy by sacrificing their own structural integrity. Their aim is to cushion the effects of an impact phenomenon with the intent to preserve other structures from global failure or local damaging. Another important role of shock absorbers is reducing the peak of the acceleration showed during an impact phenomenon. This effect is of considerable interest in the case of vehicles to preserve passengers’ safety. Static and dynamic numerical results are compared with experimental ones in terms of mean crushing forces, energy and peak crushing. The global performance of the absorbers has been evaluated by referencing to a proposed quality index.

  12. Thermally Induced Nonlinear Optical Absorption in Metamaterial Perfect Absorbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guddala, Sriram; Ramakrishna, S Anantha

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A metamaterial perfect absorber consisting of a tri-layer (Al/ZnS/Al) metal-dielectric-metal system with top aluminium nano-disks is fabricated by laser-interference lithography and lift-off processing. The metamaterial absorber had peak resonant absorbance at 1090 nm and showed nonlinear absorption for 600ps laser pulses at 1064 nm wavelength. A nonlinear saturation of reflectance was measured to be dependent on the average laser power incident and not the peak laser intensity. The nonlinear behaviour is shown to arise from the heating due to the absorbed radiation and photo-thermal changes in the dielectric properties of aluminium. The metamaterial absorber is seen to be damage resistant at large laser intensities of 25 MW/cm2.

  13. Linearity of Climate Response to Increases in Black Carbon Aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahajan, Salil [ORNL; Evans, Katherine J [ORNL; Hack, James J [ORNL; Truesdale, John [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of absorbing aerosols on global climate are not completely understood. Here, we present results of idealized experiments conducted with the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM4) coupled to a slab ocean model (CAM4-SOM) to simulate the climate response to increases in tropospheric black carbon aerosols (BC) by direct and semi-direct effects. CAM4-SOM was forced with 0, 1x, 2x, 5x and 10x an estimate of the present day concentration of BC while maintaining their estimated present day global spatial and vertical distribution. The top of the atmosphere (TOA) radiative forcing of BC in these experiments is positive (warming) and increases linearly as the BC burden increases. The total semi-direct effect for the 1x experiment is positive but becomes increasingly negative for higher BC concentrations. The global average surface temperature response is found to be a linear function of the TOA radiative forcing. The climate sensitivity to BC from these experiments is estimated to be 0.42 K $\\textnormal W^{-1} m^{2}$ when the semi-direct effects are accounted for and 0.22 K $\\textnormal W^{-1} m^{2}$ with only the direct effects considered. Global average precipitation decreases linearly as BC increases, with a precipitation sensitivity to atmospheric absorption of 0.4 $\\%$ $\\textnormal W^{-1} \\textnormal m^{2}$ . The hemispheric asymmetry of BC also causes an increase in southward cross-equatorial heat transport and a resulting northward shift of the inter-tropical convergence zone in the simulations at a rate of 4$^{\\circ}$N $\\textnormal PW^{-1}$. Global average mid- and high-level clouds decrease, whereas the low-level clouds increase linearly with BC. The increase in marine stratocumulus cloud fraction over the south tropical Atlantic is caused by increased BC-induced diabatic heating of the free troposphere.

  14. Global impact of smoke aerosols from landscape fires on climate and the Hadley circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tosca, M. G; Randerson, J. T; Zender, C. S

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of biomass burn- ing aerosol on the monsoon circulationA. , and Rudich, Y. : Aerosol invigoration and restructuring2011. Albrecht, B. A. : Aerosols, cloud microphysics, and

  15. Characterization of the Molecular Composition of Secondary Organic Aerosols using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sellon, Rachel Elizabeth

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in secondary organic aerosol formation from isoprene, Proc.biogenic secondary organic aerosol, J. Phys. Chem. A, 112(in secondary organic aerosol, Environ. Sci. Technol. , 41(

  16. Chapter 3: Evaluating the impacts of carbonaceous aerosols on clouds and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menon, Surabi

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cloud susceptibility and the first aerosol indirect forcing:Sensitivity to BC and aerosol concentrations. J. Geophys.of cloud droplet and aerosols number concentrations:

  17. Correlations between Optical, Chemical and Physical Properties of Biomass Burn Aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    instruments and photoelectric aerosol sensors in source-sampling of black carbon aerosol and particle-bound PAHsAirborne minerals and related aerosol particles: Effects on

  18. Real time in situ detection of organic nitrates in atmospheric aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biogenic Secondary Organic Aerosol. J. Phys. Chem. A 2008,H. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from reactionsec- ondary organic aerosol yields. Atmospheric Chemistry

  19. Composition, sources, and formation of secondary organic aerosols from urban emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Shang; Liu, Shang

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    organonitrate functional groups in aerosol particles200 5.1v aerosol Chapter 3 Meteorological conditions during theSecondary organic aerosol formation from fossil fuel sources

  20. Particles, Aerosols, and Their Transport in Built Environment Particles, aerosols, or collectively called particulate matters (PM) are ubiquitous indoor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    1 Editorial Particles, Aerosols, and Their Transport in Built Environment Particles, aerosols or aerosols and their transport in built environment. The first five papers in this special issue addressed influences ozone removal and the secondary organic aerosols generation. The study from Zuraimi et al

  1. Sources and Formation of OrganicSources and Formation of Organic Aerosols in our AtmosphereAerosols in our Atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Einat, Aharonov

    Sources and Formation of OrganicSources and Formation of Organic Aerosols in our AtmosphereAerosols Department of Chemical Engineering University of Patras, Greece #12;Sources of Organic AerosolSources of Organic Aerosol Primary Secondary Anthropogenic ·Gasoline ·Diesel ·Biomass burning ·Meat Cooking Biogenic

  2. CARES: Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study Science Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaveri, RA; Shaw, WJ; Cziczo, DJ

    2010-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbonaceous aerosol components, which include black carbon (BC), urban primary organic aerosols (POA), biomass burning aerosols, and secondary organic aerosols (SOA) from both urban and biogenic precursors, have been previously shown to play a major role in the direct and indirect radiative forcing of climate. The primary objective of the CARES 2010 intensive field study is to investigate the evolution of carbonaceous aerosols of different types and their effects on optical and cloud formation properties.

  3. Aerosol, Cloud, and Climate: From Observation to Model (457th Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jian (Ph.D., Environmental Sciences Department) [Ph.D., Environmental Sciences Department

    2010-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last 100 years, the Earth has warmed by about 1ºF, glaciers and sea ice have been melting more quickly than previously, especially during the past decade, and the level of the sea has risen about 6-8 inches worldwide. Scientists have long been investigating this phenomenon of “global warming,” which is believed to be at least partly due to the increased carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration in the air from burning fossil fuels. Funded by DOE, teams of researchers from BNL and other national labs have been gathering data in the U.S. and internationally to build computer models of climate and weather to help in understanding general patterns, causes, and perhaps, solutions. Among many findings, researchers observed that atmospheric aerosols, minute particles in the atmosphere, can significantly affect global energy balance and climate. Directly, aerosols scatter and absorb sunlight. Indirectly, increased aerosol concentration can lead to smaller cloud droplets, changing clouds in ways that tend to cool global climate and potentially mask overall warming from man-made CO2.

  4. The behavior of constant rate aerosol reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedlander, S.K.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An aerosol reactor is a gaseous system in which fine particles are formed by chemical reaction in either a batch or flow process. The particle sizes of interest range from less than 10 angstrom (molecular clusters) to 10 ..mu..m. Such reactors may be operated to study the aerosol formation process, as in a smog reactor, or to generate a product such as a pigment or a catalytic aerosol. Aerosol reactors can be characterized by three temporal or spatial zones or regions of operation for batch and flow reactors, respectively. In zone I, chemical reaction results in the formation of condensable molecular products which nucleate and form very high concentrations of small particles. The number density depends on the concentration of preexisting aerosol. Zone II is a transition region in which the aerosol number concentration levels off as a result of hetergeneous condensation by the stable aerosol. In zone III coagulation becomes sufficiently rapid to reduce the particle number concentration. There may be a zone IV in which agglomerates form.

  5. Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols: Generation and Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Szrom, Fran; Guilmette, Ray; Holmes, Tom; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L.; Collins, John W.; Sanderson, T. Ellory; Fliszar, Richard W.; Gold, Kenneth; Beckman, John C.; Long, Julie

    2004-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In a study designed to provide an improved scientific basis for assessing possible health effects from inhaling depleted uranium (DU) aerosols, a series of DU penetrators was fired at an Abrams tank and a Bradley fighting vehicle. A robust sampling system was designed to collect aerosols in this difficult environment and continuously monitor the sampler flow rates. Aerosols collected were analyzed for uranium concentration and particle size distribution as a function of time. They were also analyzed for uranium oxide phases, particle morphology, and dissolution in vitro. The resulting data provide input useful in human health risk assessments.

  6. A shrouded probe aerosol sampling cyclone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Little, Stewart Craig

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AED at three different flow rates. The results would then be interpolated to give the needed flow rate value. The collection efficiency of the cyclone was characterized by the approach of generating liquid aerosols containing an analytical tracer... was neutralized by passing the aerosol flow through a chamber which contained a 10 mCi krypton 85 line source. Aerosol size produced by this apparatus depends on the concentration of the non-volatile solute, the size of the orifice, and the frequency applied...

  7. Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard A. Ferrare; David D. Turner

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Project goals: (1) Use the routine surface and airborne measurements at the ARM SGP site, and the routine surface measurements at the NSA site, to continue our evaluations of model aerosol simulations; (2) Determine the degree to which the Raman lidar measurements of water vapor and aerosol scattering and extinction can be used to remotely characterize the aerosol humidification factor; (3) Use the high temporal resolution CARL data to examine how aerosol properties vary near clouds; and (4) Use the high temporal resolution CARL and Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) data to quantify entrainment in optically thin continental cumulus clouds.

  8. Aerosol Best Estimate Value-Added Product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, C; Turner, D; Koontz, A; Chand, D; Sivaraman, C

    2012-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Aerosol Best Estimate (AEROSOLBE) value-added product (VAP) is to provide vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, single scatter albedo, asymmetry parameter, and Angstroem exponents for the atmospheric column above the Central Facility at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. We expect that AEROSOLBE will provide nearly continuous estimates of aerosol optical properties under a range of conditions (clear, broken clouds, overcast clouds, etc.). The primary requirement of this VAP was to provide an aerosol data set as continuous as possible in both time and height for the Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) VAP in order to provide a structure for the comprehensive assessment of our ability to model atmospheric radiative transfer for all conditions. Even though BBHRP has been completed, AEROSOLBE results are very valuable for environmental, atmospheric, and climate research.

  9. 5, 90399063, 2005 Arctic aerosol effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Radiation Measurement (ARM) data, we find surface cloud radiative forcing (SCRF) is -22 W/m 2 for shortwave. If aerosols are taken into account, the SCRF has been increased during winter while15 negative SCRF has been

  10. Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign: The Impact of Arctic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign: The Impact of Arctic Aerosols on Clouds . Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign: The Impact of Arctic Aerosols on Clouds . Abstract:...

  11. The variability of warm absorbers in Active Galactic Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibson, Robert R. (Robert Ross)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents three studies of warm (photoionized) absorber variability in Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) using high-resolution X-ray spectra provided by the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating (HETG). The first ...

  12. Liquid absorbent solutions for separating nitrogen from natural gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Friesen, Dwayne T. (Bend, OR); Babcock, Walter C. (Bend, OR); Edlund, David J. (Redmond, OR); Lyon, David K. (Bend, OR); Miller, Warren K. (Bend, OR)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitrogen-absorbing and -desorbing compositions, novel ligands and transition metal complexes, and methods of using the same, which are useful for the selective separation of nitrogen from other gases, especially natural gas.

  13. Overcoming the far-field diffraction limit via absorbance modulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Hsin-Yu Sidney

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Diffraction limits the resolution of far-field lithography and imaging to about half of the wavelength, which greatly limits the capability of optical techniques. The proposed technique with absorbance modulation aims to ...

  14. absorbing film assisted: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    He as the processing gas. The film surfaces were observed by scanning Rocca, Jorge J. 6 Thin-film, wide-angle, design-tunable, selective absorber from near UV to far infrared...

  15. Electrically Driven Technologies for Radioactive Aerosol Abatement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David W. DePaoli; Ofodike A. Ezekoye; Costas Tsouris; Valmor F. de Almeida

    2003-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this research project was to develop an improved understanding of how electriexecy driven processes, including electrocoalescence, acoustic agglomeration, and electric filtration, may be employed to efficiently treat problems caused by the formation of aerosols during DOE waste treatment operations. The production of aerosols during treatment and retrieval operations in radioactive waste tanks and during thermal treatment operations such as calcination presents a significant problem of cost, worker exposure, potential for release, and increased waste volume.

  16. Apparatus for sampling and characterizing aerosols

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn, P.F.; Herceg, J.E.; Klocksieben, R.H.

    1984-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for sampling and characterizing aerosols having a wide particle size range at relatively low velocities may comprise a chamber having an inlet and an outlet, the chamber including: a plurality of vertically stacked, successive particle collection stages; each collection stage includes a separator plate and a channel guide mounted transverse to the separator plate, defining a labyrinthine flow path across the collection stage. An opening in each separator plate provides a path for the aerosols from one collection stage t

  17. Aerosol fabrication methods for monodisperse nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jiang, Xingmao; Brinker, C Jeffrey

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Exemplary embodiments provide materials and methods for forming monodisperse particles. In one embodiment, the monodisperse particles can be formed by first spraying a nanoparticle-containing dispersion into aerosol droplets and then heating the aerosol droplets in the presence of a shell precursor to form core-shell particles. By removing either the shell layer or the nanoparticle core of the core-shell particles, monodisperse nanoparticles can be formed.

  18. Development of plutonium aerosol fractionation system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mekala, Malla R.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DEVELOPMENT OF A PLUTONIUM AEROSOL FRACTIONATION SYSTEM A Thesis by MALLA R. MEKALA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August... 1993 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering DEVELOPMENT OP A PLUTONIUM AEROSOL FRACTIONATION SYSTEM A Thesis by MALLA R. MEKALA Approved as to style and content by: A. R. McFarland (Chair of Committee) N. K. Anand (Mer toer) (', & C. B...

  19. Development of plutonium aerosol fractionation system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mekala, Malla R.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    microns), inhalation accidents occurring during maintenance operations can be expected to result in long term retention of 20% to 30% of the inhaled aerosol. Thind"' performed experiments over a span of one year to observe the consistency...DEVELOPMENT OF A PLUTONIUM AEROSOL FRACTIONATION SYSTEM A Thesis by MALLA R. MEKALA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August...

  20. WRF-Chem Simulations of Aerosols and Anthropogenic Aerosol Radiative Forcing in East Asia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Yi; Zhao, Chun; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Meigen; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study aims to provide a first comprehensive evaluation of WRF-Chem for modeling aerosols and anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing (RF) over East Asia. Several numerical experiments were conducted from November 2007 to December 2008. Comparison between model results and observations shows that the model can generally reproduce the observed spatial distributions of aerosol concentration, aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA) from measurements at different sites, including the relatively higher aerosol concentration and AOD over East China and the relatively lower AOD over Southeast Asia, Korean, and Japan. The model also depicts the seasonal variation and transport of pollutions over East Asia. Particulate matter of 10 um or less in the aerodynamic diameter (PM10), black carbon (BC), sulfate (SO42-), nitrate (NO3-) and ammonium (NH4+) concentrations are higher in spring than other seasons in Japan due to the pollutant transport from polluted area of East Asia. AOD is high over Southwest and Central China in winter, spring and autumn and over North China in summer while is low over South China in summer due to monsoon precipitation. SSA is lowest in winter and highest in summer. The model also captures the dust events at the Zhangye site in the semi-arid region of China. Anthropogenic aerosol RF is estimated to range from -5 to -20 W m-2 over land and -20 to -40 W m-2 over ocean at the top of atmosphere (TOA), 5 to 30 W m-2 in the atmosphere (ATM) and -15 to -40 W m-2 at the bottom (BOT). The warming effect of anthropogenic aerosol in ATM results from BC aerosol while the negative aerosol RF at TOA is caused by scattering aerosols such as SO4 2-, NO3 - and NH4+. Positive BC RF at TOA compensates 40~50% of the TOA cooling associated with anthropogenic aerosol.

  1. A study of non-homogeneous absorbing Markov chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bean, John Kevin

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A STUDY OF NON-HOMOGENEOUS ABSORBING MARKOV CHAINS A Thesis by JOHN KEVIN BEAN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement. ior the degree of MASTER OF SCIFNCE December 1975 Major... Subject: Mathematics A STUDY OF NON-HOMOGENEOUS ABSORBING MARKOV CHAINS A Thesis by JOHN KEVIN BEAN Approved as to style and content by: (C airman of Committee) (Head of Department) , '-. ! ember) em er December 1975 ABSTRACT A Study of Non...

  2. Calirimeter/absorber optimization for a RHIC dimuon experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aronson, S.H.; Murtagh, M.J.; Starks, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Liu, X.T.; Petitt, G.A.; Zhang, Z. [Georgia State Univ., Atlanta (United States); Ewell, L.A.; Hill, J.C.; Wohn, F.K. [Iowa State Univ., Ames (United States); Costales, J.B.; Namboodiri, M.N., Sangster, T.C.; Thomas, J.H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Gavron, A.; Waters, L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Kehoe, W.L.; Steadman, S.G. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States); Awes, T.C.; Obenshain, F.E.; Saini, S.; Young, G.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Chang, J.; Fung, S.Y.; Kang, J.H. [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Kreke, J.; He, Xiaochun, Sorensen, S.P. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville (United States); Cornell, E.C.; Maguire, C.F. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The RD-10 R&D effort on calorimeter/absorber optimization for a RHIC experiment had an extended run in 1991 using the A2 test beam at the AGS. Measurements were made of the leakage of particles behind various model hadron calorimeters. Behavior of the calorimeter/absorber as a muon-identifier was studied. First comparisons of results from test measurements to calculated results using the GHEISHA code were made

  3. An experimental investigation of aluminum honeycomb as an energy absorber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bland, William Joseph

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF ALUMINUM HONEYCOMB AS AN ENERGY ABSORBER A Thesis By WILLIAM JOSEPH BLAND Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1964 Ma]or Sub)act: Aerospace Engineering AN EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF ALUMINUM HONEYCOMB AS AN ENERGY ABSORBER A Thesis By WILLIAM JOSEPH BLAND hairman of Committee) (Head of Department) (Member) (Member) May 1964...

  4. aerosol properties in-canopy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aerosol, cloud condensation nuclei, water accommodation coefficient, organic of aerosol size distribution, chemical composition and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration...

  5. Neutron absorbing article and method for manufacture of such article

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hortman, M.T.; Mcmurtry, C.H.; Naum, R.G.; Owens, D.P.

    1980-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron absorbing article, preferably in long, thin, flat form , suitable for but not necessarily limited to use in storage racks for spent nuclear fuel at locations between volumes of such stored fuel, to absorb neutrons from said spent fuel and prevent uncontrolled nuclear reaction of the spent fuel material, is composed of finely divided boron carbide particles and a solid, irreversibly cured phenolic polymer, forming a continuous matrix about the boron carbide particles, in such proportions that at least 6% of b10 from the boron carbide content is present therein. The described articles withstand thermal cycling from repeated spent fuel insertions and removals, withstand radiation from said spent nuclear fuel over long periods of time without losing desirable neutron absorbing and physical properties, are sufficiently chemically inert to water so as to retain neutron absorbing properties if brought into contact with it, are not galvanically corrodible and are sufficiently flexible so as to withstand operational basis earthquake and safe shutdown earthquake seismic events, without loss of neutron absorbing capability and other desirable properties, when installed in storage racks for spent nuclear fuel. The disclosure also relates to a plurality of such neutron absorbing articles in a storage rack for spent nuclear fuel and to a method for the manufacture of the articles.

  6. Laboratory Experiments and Instrument Development for the Study of Atmospheric Aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidovits, Paul

    2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Soot particles are generated by incomplete combustion of fossil and biomass fuels. Through direct effects clear air aerosols containing black carbon (BC) such as soot aerosols, absorb incoming light heating the atmosphere, while most other aerosols scatter light and produce cooling. Even though BC represents only 1-2% of the total annual emissions of particulate mass to the atmosphere, it has been estimated that the direct radiative effect of BC is the second-most important contributor to global warming after absorption by CO2. Ongoing studies continue to underscore the climate forcing importance of black carbon. However, estimates of the radiative effects of black carbon on climate remain highly uncertain due to the complexity of particles containing black carbon. Quantitative measurement of BC is challenging because BC often occurs in highly non-spherical soot particles of complex morphology. Freshly emitted soot particles are typically fractal hydrophobic aggregates. The aggregates consist of black carbon spherules with diameters typically in the range of about 15-40 nm, and they are usually coated by adsorbed polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) produced during combustion. Diesel-generated soot particles are often emitted with an organic coating composed primarily of lubricating oil and unburned fuel, as well as well as PAH compounds. Sulfuric acid has also been detected in diesel and aircraft-emitted soot particles. In the course of aging, these particle coatings may be substantially altered by chemical reactions and/or the deposition of other materials. Such processes transform the optical and CCN properties of the soot aerosols in ways that are not yet well understood. Our work over the past seven years consisted of laboratory research, instrument development and characterization, and field studies with the central focus of improving our understanding of the black carbon aerosol climate impacts. During the sixth year as well as during this seventh year (no-cost extension period) of our grant, we extended our studies to perform experiments on the controlled production and characterization of secondary organic aerosol.

  7. Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, David, D.; Ferrare, Richard, A.

    2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The 'Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds' project focused extensively on the analysis and utilization of water vapor and aerosol profiles derived from the ARM Raman lidar at the Southern Great Plains ARM site. A wide range of different tasks were performed during this project, all of which improved quality of the data products derived from the lidar or advanced the understanding of atmospheric processes over the site. These activities included: upgrading the Raman lidar to improve its sensitivity; participating in field experiments to validate the lidar aerosol and water vapor retrievals; using the lidar aerosol profiles to evaluate the accuracy of the vertical distribution of aerosols in global aerosol model simulations; examining the correlation between relative humidity and aerosol extinction, and how these change, due to horizontal distance away from cumulus clouds; inferring boundary layer turbulence structure in convective boundary layers from the high-time-resolution lidar water vapor measurements; retrieving cumulus entrainment rates in boundary layer cumulus clouds; and participating in a field experiment that provided data to help validate both the entrainment rate retrievals and the turbulent profiles derived from lidar observations.

  8. Aerosols in Central California: Unexpectedly Large Contribution of Coarse Mode to Aerosol Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Barnard, James C.

    2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The majority of previous studies dealing with effect of coarse-mode aerosols on the radiation budget have focused primary on polluted regions with substantial aerosol loadings. We reexamine this effect for a relatively "pristine" area using a unique 1-month dataset collected during recent Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES). We demonstrate that the coarse-mode (supermicron) particles can contribute substantially (more than 50%) and frequently (up to 85% of time) to the total volume. In contrast to the conventional expectations that the radiative impact of coarse-mode aerosols should be small for "pristine" regions, we find that the neglecting of the large particles may lead to significant overestimation (up to 45%) of direct aerosol radiative forcing at the top-of atmosphere despite of very small aerosol optical depth (about 0.05 at 0.5 ). Our findings highlight the potential for widespread impacts of the coarse-mode aerosols on the pristine radiative properties over land and the need for more explicit inclusion of the coarse-mode aerosols in climate-related observational and model studies.

  9. AEROSOL CHEMICAL COMPOSITION CHARACTERIZATION AT THE ARM SOUTHERN GREAT PLAINS (SGP) SITE USING AN AEROSOL CHEMICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AEROSOL CHEMICAL COMPOSITION CHARACTERIZATION AT THE ARM SOUTHERN GREAT PLAINS (SGP) SITE USING AN AEROSOL CHEMICAL SPECIATION MONITOR Yin-Nan Lee1 , Fan Mei1 , Stephanie DeJong1 , Anne Jefferson2 1 Atmospheric Sciences Division, Brookhaven National Lab, Upton, NY 2 CIRES, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO

  10. Aerosol Characterization Data from the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Project (ACE-Asia)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Aerosol Characterization Experiments (ACE) were designed to increase understanding of how atmospheric aerosol particles affect the Earth's climate system. These experiments integrated in-situ measurements, satellite observations, and models to reduce the uncertainty in calculations of the climate forcing due to aerosol particles and improve the ability of models to predict the influences of aerosols on the Earth's radiation balance. ACE-Asia was the fourth in a series of experiments organized by the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry (IGAC) Program (A Core Project of the International Geosphere Biosphere Program). The Intensive Field Phase for ACE-Asia took place during the spring of 2001 (mid-March through early May) off the coast of China, Japan and Korea. ACE-Asia pursued three specific objectives: 1) Determine the physical, chemical, and radiative properties of the major aerosol types in the Eastern Asia and Northwest Pacific region and investigate the relationships among these properties. 2) Quantify the physical and chemical processes controlling the evolution of the major aerosol types and in particular their physical, chemical, and radiative properties. 3) Develop procedures to extrapolate aerosol properties and processes from local to regional and global scales, and assess the regional direct and indirect radiative forcing by aerosols in the Eastern Asia and Northwest Pacific region [Edited and shortened version of summary at http://data.eol.ucar.edu/codiac/projs?ACE-ASIA]. The Ace-Asia collection contains 174 datasets.

  11. Direct and semidirect aerosol effects of southern African biomass burning aerosol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Robert

    radiative effects associated with increased low cloud cover dominate over a weaker positive allsky direct 2011; published 21 June 2011. [1] Direct and semidirect radiative effects of biomass burning aerosols radiative effect (DRE). In contrast, over the land where the aerosols are often below or within cloud layers

  12. Generation of concentration density maxima of small dispersive coal dust particles in horizontal iodine air filter at air-dust aerosol blow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. M. Neklyudov; O. P. Ledenyov; L. I. Fedorova; P. Ya. Poltinin

    2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The spatial distributions of the small dispersive coal dust particles with the nano and micro sizes in the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal granules in the absorber in the horizontal iodine air filter during its long term operation at the nuclear power plant are researched. It is shown that the concentration density maxima of the small dispersive coal dust particles appear in the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal absorbent granules in the horizontal iodine air filter at an action by the air dust aerosol blow. The comparison of the measured aerodynamic resistances of the horizontal and vertical iodine air filters is conducted. The main conclusion is that the magnitude of the aerodynamic resistance of the horizontal iodine air filters is much smaller in comparison with the magnitude of the aerodynamic resistance of the vertical iodine air filters at the same loads of the air dust aerosol volumes. It is explained that the direction of the air dust aerosol blow and the direction of the gravitation force in the horizontal iodine air filter are orthogonal, hence the effective accumulation of the small dispersive coal dust particles takes place at the bottom of absorber in the horizontal iodine air filter. It is found that the air dust aerosol stream flow in the horizontal iodine air filter is not limited by the appearing structures, made of the precipitated small dispersive coal dust particles, in distinction from the vertical iodine air filter, in the process of long term operation of the iodine air filters at the nuclear power plant.

  13. Results and code predictions for ABCOVE (aerosol behavior code validation and evaluation) aerosol code validation: Test AB6 with two aerosol species. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hilliard, R K; McCormack, J C; Muhlestein, L D

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A program for aerosol behavior code validation and evaluation (ABCOVE) has been developed in accordance with the LMFBR Safety Program Plan. The ABCOVE program is a cooperative effort between the USDOE, the USNRC, and their contractor organizations currently involved in aerosol code development, testing or application. The second large-scale test in the ABCOVE program, AB6, was performed in the 850-m/sup 3/ CSTF vessel with a two-species test aerosol. The test conditions simulated the release of a fission product aerosol, NaI, in the presence of a sodium spray fire. Five organizations made pretest predictions of aerosol behavior using seven computer codes. Three of the codes (QUICKM, MAEROS and CONTAIN) were discrete, multiple species codes, while four (HAA-3, HAA-4, HAARM-3 and SOFIA) were log-normal codes which assume uniform coagglomeration of different aerosol species. Detailed test results are presented and compared with the code predictions for seven key aerosol behavior parameters.

  14. Aerosol beam-focus laser-induced plasma spectrometer device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cheng, Meng-Dawn (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for detecting elements in an aerosol includes an aerosol beam focuser for concentrating aerosol into an aerosol beam; a laser for directing a laser beam into the aerosol beam to form a plasma; a detection device that detects a wavelength of a light emission caused by the formation of the plasma. The detection device can be a spectrometer having at least one grating and a gated intensified charge-coupled device. The apparatus may also include a processor that correlates the wavelength of the light emission caused by the formation of the plasma with an identity of an element that corresponds to the wavelength. Furthermore, the apparatus can also include an aerosol generator for forming an aerosol beam from bulk materials. A method for detecting elements in an aerosol is also disclosed.

  15. iDirector with Alex Laskin: Atmospheric aerosols | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alex Laskin: Atmospheric aerosols iDirector with Alex Laskin: Atmospheric aerosols Released: September 03, 2014 iDirector with Alex Laskin iDirector interview with EMSL scientist...

  16. Application of computational fluid dynamics to aerosol sampling and concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Shishan

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An understanding of gas-liquid two-phase interactions, aerosol particle deposition, and heat transfer is needed. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is becoming a powerful tool to predict aerosol behavior for related design work. In this study...

  17. Apparatus for rapid measurement of aerosol bulk chemical composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Yin-Nan E. (East Setauket, NY); Weber, Rodney J. (Atlanta, GA)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for continuous on-line measurement of chemical composition of aerosol particles with a fast time resolution are provided. The apparatus includes a modified particle size magnifier for producing activated aerosol particles and a collection device which collects the activated aerosol particles into a liquid stream for quantitative analysis by analytical methods. The method provided for on-line measurement of chemical composition of aerosol particles includes exposing aerosol carrying sample air to hot saturated steam thereby forming activated aerosol particles; collecting the activated aerosol particles by a collection device for delivery as a jet stream onto an impaction surface; flushing off the activated aerosol particles from the impaction surface into a liquid stream for delivery of the collected liquid stream to an analytical instrument for quantitative measurement.

  18. Apparatus for rapid measurement of aerosol bulk chemical composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Yin-Nan E.; Weber, Rodney J.; Orsini, Douglas

    2006-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for continuous on-line measurement of chemical composition of aerosol particles with a fast time resolution is provided. The apparatus includes an enhanced particle size magnifier for producing activated aerosol particles and an enhanced collection device which collects the activated aerosol particles into a liquid stream for quantitative analysis by analytical means. Methods for on-line measurement of chemical composition of aerosol particles are also provided, the method including exposing aerosol carrying sample air to hot saturated steam thereby forming activated aerosol particles; collecting the activated aerosol particles by a collection device for delivery as a jet stream onto an impaction surface; and flushing off the activated aerosol particles from the impaction surface into a liquid stream for delivery of the collected liquid stream to an analytical instrument for quantitative measurement.

  19. aerosol deposition method: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and remotely sensed aerosol observations. William D. Collins; Phillip J. Rasch; Brian E. Eaton; Boris V. Khattatov; Jean-francois Lamarque; C. Zender 2001-01-01 43 Ambient aerosol...

  20. The seasonality of aerosol properties in Big Bend National Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Christopher Lee

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    ), to characterize the seasonal variability of the Big Bend regions aerosol optical properties. Mass extinction efficiencies and relative humidity scattering enhancement factors were calculated for both externally and internally mixed aerosol populations for all size...

  1. Development of the Captive Aerosol Growth and Evolution Chamber System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonietti, Carlos G

    2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Captive Aerosol Growth and Evolution (CAGE) Chamber System is an tool designed to study the evolution of aerosols under conditions identical or similar to those of the surrounding environment. Our motivation was to quantify the sensitivity...

  2. aerosol particle penetration: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the subsequent aerosol penetration performance through these tubes were conducted for a aerosol particle size range of 5 nm to 20 nm and a flow rate range of 28 Lmin to 169.9...

  3. Photodetector with absorbing region having resonant periodic absorption between reflectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryan, R.P.; Olbright, G.R.; Brennan, T.M.; Tsao, J.Y.

    1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A photodetector is disclosed that is responsive to a wavelength or wavelengths of interest which have heretofore been unrealized. The photodetector includes a resonant cavity structure bounded by first and second reflectors, the resonant cavity structure being resonant at the wavelength or wavelengths of interest for containing a plurality of standing waves therein. The photodetector further includes a radiation absorbing region disposed within the resonant cavity structure, the radiation absorbing region including a plurality of radiation absorbing layers spaced apart from one another by a distance substantially equal to a distance between antinodes of adjacent ones of the standing waves. Each of radiation absorbing layers is spatially positioned at a location of one of the antinodes of one of the standing waves such that radiation absorption is enhanced. The radiation absorbing layers may be either bulk layers or quantum wells includes a plurality of layers, each of which is comprised of a strained layer of InGaAs. Individual ones of the InGaAs layers are spaced apart from one another by a GaAs barrier layer. 11 figs.

  4. Distribution of small dispersive coal dust particles and absorbed radioactive chemical elements in conditions of forced acoustic resonance in iodine air filter at nuclear power plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleg P. Ledenyov; Ivan M. Neklyudov

    2013-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The physical features of distribution of the small dispersive coal dust particles and the adsorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes in the absorber with the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal granules were researched in the case of the intensive air dust aerosol stream flow through the iodine air filter (IAF). It was shown that, at the certain aerodynamic conditions in the IAF, the generation of the acoustic oscillations is possible. It was found that the acoustic oscillations generation results in an appearance of the standing acoustic waves of the air pressure (density) in the IAF. In the case of the intensive blow of the air dust aerosol, it was demonstrated that the standing acoustic waves have some strong influences on both: 1) the dynamics of small dispersive coal dust particles movement and their accumulation in the IAF; 2) the oversaturation of the cylindrical coal granules by the adsorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes in the regions, where the antinodes of the acoustic waves are positioned. Finally, we completed the comparative analysis of the theoretical calculations with the experimental results, obtained for the cases of: 1) the experimental aerodynamic modeling of physical processes of the absorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes distribution in the IAF; and 2) the gamma-activation spectroscopy analysis of the absorbed radioactive chemical elements and their isotopes distribution in the IAF. We made the innovative propositions on the necessary technical modifications with the purpose to improve the IAF technical characteristics and increase its operational time at the nuclear power plant (NPP), going from the completed precise characterization of the IAF parameters at the long term operation.

  5. Observations of Secondary Organic Aerosol Production and Soot Aging under Atmospheric Conditions Using a Novel Environmental Aerosol Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glen, Crystal

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    of the processes leading to SOA production under ambient gaseous and particulate concentrations as well as the impact these aerosol types have on climate is poorly understood. Although the majority of atmospheric aerosols scatter radiation either directly...

  6. Sulfuric acid deposition from stratospheric geoengineering with sulfate aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    aerosols can potentially result in an increase in acid deposition. [4] Acid rain has been studiedSulfuric acid deposition from stratospheric geoengineering with sulfate aerosols Ben Kravitz,1 Alan limit of hydration of all sulfate aerosols into sulfuric acid. For annual injection of 5 Tg of SO2

  7. Volume 8 No.1 -Summer 2011 Science & Aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Ying

    Volume 8 No.1 - Summer 2011 1 Science & Aerosols How advances in spectroscopy may change climate clues to galaxy formation 04Science & Aerosols How advances in spectroscopy may change climate science. No university buildings were injured in the making of this photo! #12;Volume 8 No.1 - Summer 2011 5 &aerosols

  8. SUNLIGHT TRANSMISSION THROUGH DESERT DUST AND MARINE AEROSOLS: DIFFUSE LIGHT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SUNLIGHT TRANSMISSION THROUGH DESERT DUST AND MARINE AEROSOLS: DIFFUSE LIGHT CORRECTIONS TO SUN transmission through desert dust and marine aerosols: Diffuse light corrections to Sun photometry 2004; published 27 April 2004. [1] Desert dust and marine aerosols are receiving increased scientific

  9. The precipitation synthesis of broad-spectrum UV absorber nanoceria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nurhasanah, Iis; Sutanto, Heri; Puspaningrum, Nurul Wahyu [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Mathematics, Universitas Diponegoro Jl. Prof. Soedarto, S.H, Tembalang Semarang 50275 (Indonesia)] [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Mathematics, Universitas Diponegoro Jl. Prof. Soedarto, S.H, Tembalang Semarang 50275 (Indonesia)

    2013-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the possibility of nanoceria as broad-spectrum UV absorber was evaluated. Nanoceria were synthesized by precipitation process from cerium nitrate solution and ammonium hydroxide as precipitant agent. Isopropanol was mixed with water as solvent to prevent hard agglomeration. The structure of resulting nanoceria was characterized by x-ray diffractometer (XRD). The transparency in the visible light and efficiency of protection in UV A region were studied using ultraviolet-visible (UV - Vis) spectrophotometer. The results show that nanoceria possess good tranparency in visible light and high UV light absorption. The critical absorption wavelenght of 368 nm was obtained which is desirable for excellent broad-spectrum protection absorbers. Moreover, analysis of photodegradation nanoceria to methylene blue solution shows poor photocatalytic activity. It indicates that nanoceria suitable for used as UV absorber in personal care products.

  10. Tungsten black absorber for solar light with wide angular operation range Eden Rephaeli1,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Shanhui

    photovolatics,6,7 require absorbers that can withstand high temperatures. While there is significant amount

  11. Can aerosols be trapped in open flows?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rafael D. Vilela; Adilson E. Motter

    2008-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The fate of aerosols in open flows is relevant in a variety of physical contexts. Previous results are consistent with the assumption that such finite-size particles always escape in open chaotic advection. Here we show that a different behavior is possible. We analyze the dynamics of aerosols both in the absence and presence of gravitational effects, and both when the dynamics of the fluid particles is hyperbolic and nonhyperbolic. Permanent trapping of aerosols much heavier than the advecting fluid is shown to occur in all these cases. This phenomenon is determined by the occurrence of multiple vortices in the flow and is predicted to happen for realistic particle-fluid density ratios.

  12. Phase transformation and growth of hygroscopic aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, I.N.

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ambient aerosols play an important role in many atmospheric processes affecting air quality, visibility degradation, and climatic changes as well. Both natural and anthropogenic sources contribute to the formation of ambient aerosols, which are composed mostly of sulfates, nitrates, and chlorides in either pure or mixed forms. These inorganic salt aerosols are hygroscopic by nature and exhibit the properties of deliquescence and efflorescence in humid air. For pure inorganic salt particles with diameter larger than 0.1 micron, the phase transformation from a solid particle to a saline droplet occurs only when the relative humidity in the surrounding atmosphere reaches a certain critical level corresponding to the water activity of the saturated solution. The droplet size or mass in equilibrium with relative humidity can be calculated in a straightforward manner from thermodynamic considerations. For aqueous droplets 0.1 micron or smaller, the surface curvature effect on vapor pressure becomes important and the Kelvin equation must be used.

  13. CADS:Cantera Aerosol Dynamics Simulator.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moffat, Harry K.

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This manual describes a library for aerosol kinetics and transport, called CADS (Cantera Aerosol Dynamics Simulator), which employs a section-based approach for describing the particle size distributions. CADS is based upon Cantera, a set of C++ libraries and applications that handles gas phase species transport and reactions. The method uses a discontinuous Galerkin formulation to represent the particle distributions within each section and to solve for changes to the aerosol particle distributions due to condensation, coagulation, and nucleation processes. CADS conserves particles, elements, and total enthalpy up to numerical round-off error, in all of its formulations. Both 0-D time dependent and 1-D steady state applications (an opposing-flow flame application) have been developed with CADS, with the initial emphasis on developing fundamental mechanisms for soot formation within fires. This report also describes the 0-D application, TDcads, which models a time-dependent perfectly stirred reactor.

  14. Characterizing the formation of secondary organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lunden, Melissa; Black, Douglas; Brown, Nancy

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Organic aerosol is an important fraction of the fine particulate matter present in the atmosphere. This organic aerosol comes from a variety of sources; primary organic aerosol emitted directly from combustion process, and secondary aerosol formed in the atmosphere from condensable vapors. This secondary organic aerosol (SOA) can result from both anthropogenic and biogenic sources. In rural areas of the United States, organic aerosols can be a significant part of the aerosol load in the atmosphere. However, the extent to which gas-phase biogenic emissions contribute to this organic load is poorly understood. Such an understanding is crucial to properly apportion the effect of anthropogenic emissions in these rural areas that are sometimes dominated by biogenic sources. To help gain insight on the effect of biogenic emissions on particle concentrations in rural areas, we have been conducting a field measurement program at the University of California Blodgett Forest Research Facility. The field location includes has been used to acquire an extensive suite of measurements resulting in a rich data set, containing a combination of aerosol, organic, and nitrogenous species concentration and meteorological data with a long time record. The field location was established in 1997 by Allen Goldstein, a professor in the Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management at the University of California at Berkeley to study interactions between the biosphere and the atmosphere. The Goldstein group focuses on measurements of concentrations and whole ecosystem biosphere-atmosphere fluxes for volatile organic compounds (VOC's), oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOC's), ozone, carbon dioxide, water vapor, and energy. Another important collaborator at the Blodgett field location is Ronald Cohen, a professor in the Chemistry Department at the University of California at Berkeley. At the Blodgett field location, his group his group performs measurements of the concentrations of important gas phase nitrogen compounds. Experiments have been ongoing at the Blodgett field site since the fall of 2000, and have included portions of the summer and fall of 2001, 2002, and 2003. Analysis of both the gas and particle phase data from the year 2000 show that the particle loading at the site correlates with both biogenic precursors emitted in the forest and anthropogenic precursors advected to the site from Sacramento and the Central Valley of California. Thus the particles at the site are affected by biogenic processing of anthropogenic emissions. Size distribution measurements show that the aerosol at the site has a geometric median diameter of approximately 100 nm. On many days, in the early afternoon, growth of nuclei mode particles (<20 nm) is also observed. These growth events tend to occur on days with lower average temperatures, but are observed throughout the summer. Analysis of the size resolved data for these growth events, combined with typical measured terpene emissions, show that the particle mass measured in these nuclei mode particles could come from oxidation products of biogenic emissions, and can serve as a significant route for SOA partitioning into the particle phase. During periods of each year, the effect of emissions for forest fires can be detected at the Blodgett field location. During the summer of 2002 emissions from the Biscuit fire, a large fire located in Southwest Oregon, was detected in the aerosol data. The results show that increases in particle scattering can be directly related to increased black carbon concentration and an appearance of a larger mode in the aerosol size distribution. These results show that emissions from fires can have significant impact on visibility over large distances. The results also reinforce the view that forest fires can be a significant source of black carbon in the atmosphere, which has important climate and visibility. Continuing work with the 2002 data set, particularly the combination of the aerosol and gas phase data, will continue to provide important information o

  15. Energy deposition and radiological studies for the LBNF Hadron Absorber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rakhno, I L; Tropin, I S; Eidelman, Y I

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of detailed Monte Carlo energy deposition and radiological studies performed for the LBNF hadron absorber with the MARS15 code are described. The model of the entire facility, that includes a pion-production target, focusing horns, target chase, decay channel, hadron absorber system - all with corresponding radiation shielding - was developed using the recently implemented ROOT-based geometry option in the MARS15 code. Both normal operation and accidental conditions were studied. Results of detailed thermal calculations with the ANSYS code helped to select the most viable design options.

  16. Integrity of neutron-absorbing components of LWR fuel systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, W.J.; Berting, F.M.

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of the integrity and behavior of neutron-absorbing components of light-water (LWR) fuel systems was performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The components studies include control blades (cruciforms) for boiling-water reactors (BWRs) and rod cluster control assemblies for pressurized-water reactors (PWRs). The results of this study can be useful for understanding the degradation of neutron-absorbing components and for waste management planning and repository design. The report includes examples of the types of degradation, damage, or failures that have been encountered. Conclusions and recommendations are listed. 84 refs.

  17. A study of the direct and indirect effects of aerosols using global satellite data sets of aerosol and cloud parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    regions consistent with the global mean statistics. However, the effective cloud particle radius showedA study of the direct and indirect effects of aerosols using global satellite data sets of aerosol between aerosol and cloud parameters derived from satellite remote sensing for evaluating the radiative

  18. Exchanging Ohmic Losses in Metamaterial Absorbers with Useful Optical Absorption for Photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vora, Ankit; Pala, Nezih; Kulkarni, Anand; Pearce, Joshua M; Güney, Durdu Ö

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using metamaterial absorbers, we have shown that metallic layers in the absorbers do not necessarily constitute undesired resistive heating problem for photovoltaics. Tailoring the geometric skin depth of metals and employing the natural bulk absorbance characteristics of the semiconductors in those absorbers can enable the exchange of undesired resistive losses with the useful optical absorbance in the active semiconductors. Thus, Ohmic loss dominated metamaterial absorbers can be converted into photovoltaic near-perfect absorbers with the advantage of harvesting the full potential of light management offered by the metamaterial absorbers. Based on experimental permittivity data for indium gallium nitride, we have shown that between 75%-95% absorbance can be achieved in the semiconductor layers of the converted metamaterial absorbers. Besides other metamaterial and plasmonic devices, our results may also apply to photodectors and other metal or semiconductor based optical devices where resistive losses and p...

  19. Apparatus for sampling and characterizing aerosols

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn, Patrick F. (Downers Grove, IL); Herceg, Joseph E. (Naperville, IL); Klocksieben, Robert H. (Park Forest, IL)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for sampling and characterizing aerosols having a wide particle size range at relatively low velocities may comprise a chamber having an inlet and an outlet, the chamber including: a plurality of vertically stacked, successive particle collection stages; each collection stage includes a separator plate and a channel guide mounted transverse to the separator plate, defining a labyrinthine flow path across the collection stage. An opening in each separator plate provides a path for the aerosols from one collection stage to the next. Mounted within each collection stage are one or more particle collection frames.

  20. Aerodynamic Focusing Of High-Density Aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruiz, D. E.; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    High-density micron-sized particle aerosols might form the basis for a number of applications in which a material target with a particular shape might be quickly ionized to form a cylindrical or sheet shaped plasma. A simple experimental device was built in order to study the properties of high-density aerosol focusing for 1#22; m silica spheres. Preliminary results recover previous findings on aerodynamic focusing at low densities. At higher densities, it is demonstrated that the focusing properties change in a way which is consistent with a density dependent Stokes number.

  1. Solar thermal aerosol flow reaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weimer, Alan W.; Dahl, Jaimee K.; Pitts, J. Roland; Lewandowski, Allan A.; Bingham, Carl; Tamburini, Joseph R.

    2005-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides an environmentally beneficial process using concentrated sunlight to heat radiation absorbing particles to carry out highly endothermic gas phase chemical reactions ultimately resulting in the production of hydrogen or hydrogen synthesis gases.

  2. Methods for applying microchannels to separate methane using liquid absorbents, especially ionic liquid absorbents from a mixture comprising methane and nitrogen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y. (Dublin, OH); Litt, Robert D. (Westerville, OH); Dongming, Qiu (Dublin, OH); Silva, Laura J. (Plain City, OH); Lamont, Micheal Jay (Plain City, OH); Fanelli, Maddalena (Plain City, OH); Simmons, Wayne W. (Plain city, OH); Perry, Steven (Galloway, OH)

    2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of using microchannel separation systems including absorbents to improve thermal efficiency and reduce parasitic power loss. Energy is typically added to desorb methane and then energy or heat is removed to absorb methane using a working solution. The working solution or absorbent may comprise an ionic liquid, or other fluids that demonstrate a difference in affinity between methane and nitrogen in a solution.

  3. Near real time vapor detection and enhancement using aerosol adsorption

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Novick, V.J.; Johnson, S.A.

    1999-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A vapor sample detection method is described where the vapor sample contains vapor and ambient air and surrounding natural background particles. The vapor sample detection method includes the steps of generating a supply of aerosol that have a particular effective median particle size, mixing the aerosol with the vapor sample forming aerosol and adsorbed vapor suspended in an air stream, impacting the suspended aerosol and adsorbed vapor upon a reflecting element, alternatively directing infrared light to the impacted aerosol and adsorbed vapor, detecting and analyzing the alternatively directed infrared light in essentially real time using a spectrometer and a microcomputer and identifying the vapor sample. 13 figs.

  4. Near real time vapor detection and enhancement using aerosol adsorption

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Novick, Vincent J. (Downers Grove, IL); Johnson, Stanley A. (Countryside, IL)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A vapor sample detection method where the vapor sample contains vapor and ambient air and surrounding natural background particles. The vapor sample detection method includes the steps of generating a supply of aerosol that have a particular effective median particle size, mixing the aerosol with the vapor sample forming aerosol and adsorbed vapor suspended in an air stream, impacting the suspended aerosol and adsorbed vapor upon a reflecting element, alternatively directing infrared light to the impacted aerosol and adsorbed vapor, detecting and analyzing the alternatively directed infrared light in essentially real time using a spectrometer and a microcomputer and identifying the vapor sample.

  5. Generation of concentration density maxima of small dispersive coal dust particles in horizontal iodine air filter at air-dust aerosol blow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neklyudov, I M; Fedorova, L I; Poltinin, P Ya

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The spatial distributions of the small dispersive coal dust particles with the nano and micro sizes in the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal granules in the absorber in the horizontal iodine air filter during its long term operation at the nuclear power plant are researched. It is shown that the concentration density maxima of the small dispersive coal dust particles appear in the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal absorbent granules in the horizontal iodine air filter at an action by the air dust aerosol blow. The comparison of the measured aerodynamic resistances of the horizontal and vertical iodine air filters is conducted. The main conclusion is that the magnitude of the aerodynamic resistance of the horizontal iodine air filters is much smaller in comparison with the magnitude of the aerodynamic resistance of the vertical iodine air filters at the same loads of the air dust aerosol volumes. It is explained that the direction of the air dust aerosol blow and the directi...

  6. Organic aerosol components observed in Northern Hemispheric datasets from Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroll, Jesse

    In this study we compile and present results from the factor analysis of 43 Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) datasets (27 of the datasets are reanalyzed in this work). The components from all sites, when taken together, ...

  7. Pretest aerosol code comparisons for LWR aerosol containment tests LA1 and LA2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, A.L.; Wilson, J.H.; Arwood, P.C.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Light-Water-Reactor (LWR) Aerosol Containment Experiments (LACE) are being performed in Richland, Washington, at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) under the leadership of an international project board and the Electric Power Research Institute. These tests have two objectives: (1) to investigate, at large scale, the inherent aerosol retention behavior in LWR containments under simulated severe accident conditions, and (2) to provide an experimental data base for validating aerosol behavior and thermal-hydraulic computer codes. Aerosol computer-code comparison activities are being coordinated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. For each of the six LACE tests, ''pretest'' calculations (for code-to-code comparisons) and ''posttest'' calculations (for code-to-test data comparisons) are being performed. The overall goals of the comparison effort are (1) to provide code users with experience in applying their codes to LWR accident-sequence conditions and (2) to evaluate and improve the code models.

  8. Two Hundred Fifty Years of Aerosols and Climate: The End of the Age of Aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven J.; Bond, Tami C.

    2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbonaceous and sulfur aerosols have a substantial global and regional influence on climate in addition to their impact on health and ecosystems. The magnitude of this influence has changed substantially over the past and is expected to continue to change into the future. An integrated picture of the changing climatic influence of black carbon, organic carbon and sulfate over the period 1850 through 2100, focusing on uncertainty, is presented using updated historical inventories and a coordinated set of emission projections. While aerosols have had a substantial impact on climate over the past century, by the end of the 21st century aerosols will likely be only a minor contributor to radiative forcing due to increases in greenhouse gas forcing and a global decrease in pollutant emissions. This outcome is even more certain under a successful implementation of a policy to limit greenhouse gas emissions as low-carbon energy technologies that do not emit appreciable aerosol or SO2 are deployed.

  9. Aerosol Science and Technology, 44:329338, 2010 Copyright American Association for Aerosol Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabdub, Donald

    for Photochemical and Thermal Studies of Tropospheric Aerosols Michael J. Ezell,1 Stanley N. Johnson,1 Yong Yu,2 V of the UCI Physical Sciences Machine Shop; and J¨org Meyer of the UCI Chemistry Department Glassblow- ing

  10. Status of the ORNL Aerosol Release and Transport Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, R.E.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The behavior of aerosols assumed to be characteristic of those generated during light water reactor (LWR) accident sequences and released into containment is being studied. Recent activities in the ORNL Aerosol Release and Transport Project include studies of (1) the thermal hydraulic conditions existing during Nuclear Safety Pilot Plant (NSPP) aerosol tests in steam-air environments, (2) the thermal output and aerosol mass generation rates for plasma torch aerosol generators, and (3) the influence of humidity on the shape of agglomerated aerosols of various materials. A new Aerosol-Moisture Interaction Test (AMIT) facility was prepared at the NSPP site to accommodate the aerosol shape studies; several tests with Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ aerosol have been conducted. In addition to the above activities a special study was conducted to determine the suitability of the technique of aerosol production by plasma torch under the operating conditions of future tests of the LWR Aerosol Containment Experiments (LACE) at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory. 3 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  11. Change in atmospheric mineral aerosols in response to climate: Last glacial period, preindustrial, modern, and doubled carbon dioxide climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    parameters on mineral aerosol mobilization, transport, andand L. Kiehl (2003), Mineral aerosol and cloud interactions,for paleoclimate, in Dust Aerosols, Loess Soils and Global

  12. Direct measurements of marine aerosols to examine the influence of biological activity, anthropogenic emissions, and secondary processing on particle chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaston, Cassandra Jayne

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for fog processing of individual aerosol particles, Atmos.of marine secondary organic aerosol from biogenic amines,Pacific and their impacts on aerosol hygroscopicity in the

  13. Real-time characterization of particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ambient aerosols and from motor-vehicle exhaust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polidori, A.; Hu, S.; Biswas, S.; Delfino, R. J; Sioutas, C.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    between in-situ, real-time aerosol photoemis- sion intensityconcentration in combustion aerosols, Water, Air, Soilin-use commercial aircraft, Aerosol Sci. Tech. , 39(8), 799–

  14. Calculation of burnup of a black neutron absorber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yudkevich, M. S., E-mail: umark@adis.vver.kiae.ru [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The procedure of calculation of burnup of fuel and strong neutron absorber in a nuclear reactor is described. The method proposed here makes it possible to avoid difficulties associated with heterogeneous blocking of the absorption cross section. The effectiveness of the method is demonstrated by an example.

  15. absorber test experiment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    absorber test experiment First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Testing of the Broadband HOM...

  16. absorber materials aging: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    absorber materials aging First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Characterization of porous...

  17. absorber pellets: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    absorber pellets First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 I Investigation of Pellet Acceleration...

  18. absorber bna pellets: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    absorber bna pellets First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Reproduced with permission from...

  19. Atmospheric response to solar radiation absorbed by phytoplankton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shell, Karen M.

    Atmospheric response to solar radiation absorbed by phytoplankton K. M. Shell and R. Frouin Scripps the absorption of solar radiation, affecting upper ocean temperature and circulation. These changes, in turn: phytoplankton, atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM), absorption of solar radiation, seasonal cycle, sea

  20. Progress in Absorber R&D for Muon Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. M. Kaplan; E. L. Black; M. Boghosian; K. W. Cassel; R. P. Johnson; S. Geer; C. J. Johnstone; M. Popovic; S. Ishimoto; K. Yoshimura; L. Bandura; M. A. Cummings; A. Dyshkant; D. Hedin; D. Kubik; C. Darve; Y. Kuno; D. Errede; M. Haney; S. Majewski; M. Reep; D. Summers

    2001-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A stored-muon-beam neutrino factory may require transverse ionization cooling of the muon beam. We describe recent progress in research and development on energy absorbers for muon-beam cooling carried out by a collaboration of university and laboratory groups.

  1. Absorbed dose measurements during routine equine radiographic procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salinas, Leticia Lamar

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Absorbed doses were measured for one month at the Texas A&M University Veterinary Teaching Hospital using Li:Mg,Cu,P thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). All personnel present in the x-ray examination room during eqine radiography were monitored using TLDs...

  2. Gas compressor with side branch absorber for pulsation control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, Ralph E. (San Antonio, TX); Scrivner, Christine M. (San Antonio, TX); Broerman, III, Eugene L. (San Antonio, TX)

    2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for reducing pulsation in lateral piping associated with a gas compressor system. A tunable side branch absorber (TSBA) is installed on the lateral piping. A pulsation sensor is placed in the lateral piping, to measure pulsation within the piping. The sensor output signals are delivered to a controller, which controls actuators that change the acoustic dimensions of the SBA.

  3. Absorbing Phenomena Stephen E. Schwartz and Peter R. Buseck

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -990 Copyright © 2000 by the American Association for the Advancement of Science BNL-67462 #12;Absorbing. Schwartz is in the Atmospheric Sciences Divi sion, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton. NY 11973. USA. E of different sources and pro duction mechanisms and short atmospher ic residence times, from less than a day

  4. Effects of Burnable Absorbers on PWR Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.M. O'Leary; Dr. M.L. Pitts

    2000-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Burnup credit is an ongoing issue in designing and licensing transportation and storage casks for spent nuclear fuel (SNF). To address this issue, in July 1999, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Spent Fuel Project Office, issued Interim Staff Guidance-8 (ISG-8), Revision 1 allowing limited burnup credit for pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) to be used in transport and storage casks. However, one of the key limitations for a licensing basis analysis as stipulated in ISG-8, Revision 1 is that ''burnup credit is restricted to intact fuel assemblies that have not used burnable absorbers''. Because many PWR fuel designs have incorporated burnable-absorber rods for more than twenty years, this restriction places an unnecessary burden on the commercial nuclear power industry. This paper summarizes the effects of in-reactor irradiation on the isotopic inventory of PWR fuels containing different types of integral burnable absorbers (BAs). The work presented is illustrative and intended to represent typical magnitudes of the reactivity effects from depleting PWR fuel with different types of burnable absorbers.

  5. Examination of the Effects of Sea Salt Aerosols on Southeast Texas Ozone and Secondary Organic Aerosol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benoit, Mark David

    2013-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    condensation nuclei CPC Cloud condensation nuclei counter e-PTFE Expanded polytetrafluoroethylene HR-ToF-AMS High-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer HTDMA Humidified Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer GHG Greenhouse Gas..., but their remains a gap in research of the aging process of sea salt aerosols, their impact on a polluted environment, and their role in heterogeneous reactions of gas phase species. The evolution of sea salt aerosols in the atmosphere results from interactions...

  6. A new aerosol collector for quasi on-line analysis of particulate organic matter: the Aerosol Collection Module (ACM) and first applications with a GC/MS-FID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hohaus, T.

    In many environments organic matter significantly contributes to the composition of atmospheric aerosol particles influencing its properties. Detailed chemical characterization of ambient aerosols is critical in order to ...

  7. Attachment of radon progeny to cigarette-smoke aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biermann, A.H.; Sawyer, S.R.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The daughter products of radon gas are now recognized as a significant contributor to radiation exposure to the general public. It is also suspected that a synergistic effect exists with the combination cigarette smoking and radon exposure. We have conducted an experimental investigation to determine the physical nature of radon progeny interactions with cigarette smoke aerosols. The size distributions of the aerosols are characterized and attachment rates of radon progeny to cigarette-smoke aerosols are determined. Both the mainstream and sidestream portions of the smoke aerosol are investigated. Unattached radon progeny are very mobile and, in the presence of aerosols, readily attach to the particle surfaces. In this study, an aerosol chamber is used to contain the radon gas, progeny and aerosol mixture while allowing the attachment process to occur. The rate of attachment is dependent on the size distribution, or diffusion coefficient, of the radon progeny as well as the aerosol size distribution. The size distribution of the radon daughter products is monitored using a graded-screen diffusion battery. The diffusion battery also enables separation of the unattached radon progeny from those attached to the aerosol particles. Analysis of the radon decay products is accomplished using alpha spectrometry. The aerosols of interest are size fractionated with the aid of a differential mobility analyzer and cascade impactor. The measured attachment rates of progeny to the cigarette smoke are compared to those found in similar experiments using an ambient aerosol. The lowest attachment coefficients observed, {approximately}10{sup {minus}6} cm{sup 3}/s, occurred for the ambient aerosol. The sidestream and mainstream smoke aerosols exhibited higher attachment rates in that order. The results compared favorably with theories describing the coagulation process of aerosols.

  8. Results from simulated upper-plenum aerosol transport and aerosol resuspension experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, A.L.; Pattison, W.L.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent calculational results published as part of the Battelle-Columbus BMI-2104 source term study indicate that, for some LWR accident sequences, aerosol deposition in the reactor primary coolant system (PCS) can lead to significant reductions in the radionuclide source term. Aerosol transport and deposition in the PCS have been calculated in this study using the TRAP-MELT 2 computer code, which was developed at Battelle-Columbus; the status of validation of the TRAP-MELT 2 code has been described in an Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) report. The objective of the ORNL TRAP-MELT Validation Project, which is sponsored by the Fuel Systems Behavior Research Branch of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, is to conduct simulated reactor-vessel upper-plenum aerosol deposition and transport tests. The results from these tests will be used in the ongoing effort to validate TRAP-MELT 2. The TRAP-MELT Validation Project includes two experimental subtasks. In the Aerosol Transport Tests, aerosol transport in a vertical pipe is being studied; this geometry was chosen to simulate aerosol deposition and transport in the reactor-vessel upper-plenum. To date, four experiments have been performed; the results from these tests are presented in this paper. 7 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Calibration of the On-Line Aerosol Monitor (OLAM) with ammonium chloride and sodium chloride aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brockmann, J.E.; Lucero, D.A.; Romero, T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pentecost, G. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The On-Line Aerosol Monitor (OLAM) is a light attenuation device designed and built at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) by EG&G Idaho. Its purpose is to provide an on-line indication of aerosol concentration in the PHEBUS-FP tests. It does this by measuring the attenuation of a light beam across a tube through which an aerosol is flowing. The OLAM does not inherently give an absolute response and must be calibrated. A calibration has been performed at Sandia National Laboratories` (SNL) Sandia Aerosol Research Laboratory (SARL) and the results are described here. Ammonium chloride and sodium chloride calibration aerosols are used for the calibration and the data for the sodium chloride aerosol is well described by a model presented in this report. Detectable instrument response is seen over a range of 0.1 cm{sup 3} of particulate material per m{sup 3} of gas to 10 cm{sup 3} of particulate material per m{sup 3} of gas.

  10. The HI Properties and Environment of Lyman-alpha Absorbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. L. Rosenberg

    2005-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from two projects in which we have used the HI 21cm emission line as a tracer of gas-rich galaxy populations in the vicinity of Lyman-alpha absorbers. In the first case, we examine the HI environment of SBS 1543+593, the nearest damped Lyman-alpha absorber. We use a VLA map of the region around this LSB galaxy which itself shows an extended HI disk to identify 3 gas rich neighbors within 185 kpc. While it is not clear whether we should expect local damped Lyman-alpha systems to reside in such gas-rich regions, we would expect this kind of environment to be more prevalent at higher redshifts where less of the gas is in the dense inner regions of galaxies or has been consumed by star formation. This local galaxy is the only system in which we can study the gaseous environment in this kind of detail. In the second case, we examine the HI environment surrounding 16 Lyman-alpha forest absorbers along 4 QSO sightlines. We do not detect any gas-rich galaxies at the absorber positions indicating that, at least down to our sensitivity limits, these absorption lines do not seem to be associated with galaxy halos. For half of the Lyman-alpha absorption systems there is a galaxy within 500 kpc, but for the other half there is not. In two cases there is no galaxy within 2 Mpc of the Lyman-alpha absorption systems indicating that absorbers do, in some cases, reside in voids.

  11. Excitation-emission spectra and fluorescence quantum yields for fresh and aged biogenic secondary organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Hyun Ji; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.

    2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Certain biogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOA) become absorbent and fluorescent when exposed to reduced nitrogen compounds such as ammonia, amines and their salts. Fluorescent SOA may potentially be mistaken for biological particles by detection methods relying on fluorescence. This work quantifies the spectral distribution and effective quantum yields of fluorescence of SOA generated from two monoterpenes, limonene and a-pinene, and two different oxidants, ozone (O3) and hydroxyl radical (OH). The SOA was generated in a smog chamber, collected on substrates, and aged by exposure to ~100 ppb ammonia vapor in air saturated with water vapor. Absorption and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of aqueous extracts of aged and control SOA samples were measured, and the effective absorption coefficients and fluorescence quantum yields (~0.005 for 349 nm excitation) were determined from the data. The strongest fluorescence for the limonene-derived SOA was observed for excitation = 420+- 50 nm and emission = 475 +- 38 nm. The window of the strongest fluorescence shifted to excitation = 320 +- 25 nm and emission = 425 +- 38 nm for the a-pinene-derived SOA. Both regions overlap with the excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of some of the fluorophores found in primary biological aerosols. Our study suggests that, despite the low quantum yield, the aged SOA particles should have sufficient fluorescence intensities to interfere with the fluorescence detection of common bioaerosols.

  12. Atmospheric effects of nuclar war aerosols in general circulation model simulations: Influence of smoke optical properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, S.L.; Ramaswamy, V.; Covey, C.

    1987-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A global atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) is modified to include radiative transfer parameterizations for the absorption and scattering of solar radiation and the absorption of thermal infrared (IR) radiation by smoke aerosols. The solar scattering modifications include a parameterization for diagnosing smoke optical properties as a function of the time- and space-dependent smoke particle radii. The aerosol IR modifications allow for both the ''grey'' absorber approximation and a broadband approximation that resolves the aerosol absorption in four spectral intervals. We examine the sensitivity of some GCM-simulated atmospheric and climatic effects to the optical properties and radiative transfer parameterizations used in studies of massive injections of smoke. Specifically, we test the model response to solar scattering versus nonscattering smoke, variations in prescribed smoke single scattering albedo and IR specific absorption, and interactive versus fixed smoke optical properties. Hypothetical nuclear war created smoke scenarios assume the July injection of 60 or 180 Tg of smoke over portions of the mid-latitude land areas of the northern hemisphere. Atmospheric transport and scavenging of the smoke are included. Nonscattering smoke cases produce roughly 40 Wm/sup -2/ more Earth-atmosphere solar irradiance absorption over the northern hemisphere, when compared to scattering smoke cases having equivalent specific absorption efficiencies. Varying the elemental carbon content of smoke over a plausible range produces a 4/sup 0/--6 /sup 0/C change in average mid-latitude land surface temperature, and a variation of about 0.1 in zonally averaged planetary albedo in the northern hemisphere.

  13. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry of Environmental Aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaspar, Daniel J.; Cliff, John B.

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric particles influence many aspects of climate, air quality and human health. Understanding the composition, chemistry and behavior of atmospheric aerosols is a key remaining challenge in improving climate models. Furthermore, particles may be traced back to a particular source based on composition, stable isotope ratios, or the presence of particular surface chemistries. Finally, the characterization of atmospheric particles in the workplace plays an important role in understanding the potential for exposure and environmental and human health effects to engineered and natural nanoscale particles. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is a useful tool in determining any of several aspects of the structure, composition and chemistry of these particles. Often used in conjunction with other surface analysis and electron microscopy methods, SIMS has been used to determine or confirm reactions on and in particles, the presence of particular organic species on the surface of atmospheric aerosols and several other interesting and relevant findings. Various versions of SIMS instruments – dynamic SIMS, time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry or TOF-SIMS, nanoSIMS – have been used to determine specific aspects of aerosol structure and chemistry. This article describes the strengths of each type of SIMS instrument in the characterization of aerosols, along with guidance on sample preparation, specific characterization specific to the particular information sought in the analysis. Examples and guidance are given for each type of SIMS analysis.

  14. Group Report: Connections between Aerosol Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    14 Group Report: Connections between Aerosol Properties and Forcing of Climate S.E. XMWRZ, Rapporteur F.ARNOLD,J.-p.BLANCHET,PA. DURKEE, D.J.HOFMANN,W.A. HOPPEL, M.D. KING, A.A. LACE, T. NAKAJIMA

  15. Uncertainties and Frontiers in Aerosol Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;Transport Power Industry Biomass burning Residential Human activity Perspective Aerosol Sources (rather than, Mixing, Chemistry, Climate) Climate Effects Resource: AeroCom, an international model intercomparison of fossil fuel (coal, oil, diesel, gasoline), domestic wood burning, forest fires #12;Natural sources

  16. 8, 32273285, 2008 Aerosol DRE in Po

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    in turn reducing cloud cover by heating the lower atmosphere (the semi-direct effect, Hansen et al., 1997 Chemistry and Physics Discussions Aerosol direct radiative effect in the Po Valley region derived from direct radiative effect (ADRE) affecting the Po Valley and the adjacent North Adriatic Sea is studied

  17. Group Report: Connections between Aerosol Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    increases absorption of solar radiation in clouds. The net effect is expected to be enhancement of shortwave effect and causes surface warming. Absorption of solar or thermal radiation within the atmospheric column after cloud evaporation. 3. Indirect effects ofaerosols on heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry. Aerosol

  18. The impact of detailed urbanscale processing on the composition, distribution, and radiative forcing of anthropogenic aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    forcing of anthropogenic aerosols Jason Blake Cohen,1,2 Ronald G. Prinn,1 and Chien Wang1 Received 11 model to simulate the effects of cities around the world on aerosol chemistry, physics, and radiative values of total aerosol surface concentration, the total aerosol column abundance, the aerosol optical

  19. Aerosolcloudprecipitation interactions. Part 1. The nature and sources of cloud-active aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutledge, Steven

    Aerosol­cloud­precipitation interactions. Part 1. The nature and sources of cloud-active aerosols M Available online 13 March 2008 Keywords: aerosol precipitation CCN emissions clouds Atmospheric aerosol the chemical composition of aerosols, their microphysical properties, and the factors that enable them to act

  20. Aerosol Properties and Radiative Forcing over Kanpur during Severe Aerosol Loading Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaskaoutis, D. G.; Sinha, P. R.; Vinoj, V.; Kosmopoulos, P. G.; Tripathi, S. N.; Misra, Amit; Sharma, M.; Singh, R. P.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric aerosols over India exhibit large spatio-temporal fluctuation driven by the local monsoon system, emission rates and seasonally-changed air masses. The northern part of India is well-known for its high aerosol loading throughout the year due to anthropogenic emissions, dust influence and biomass burning. On certain circumstances and, under favorable weather conditions, the aerosol load can be severe, causing significant health concerns and climate implications. The present work analyzes the aerosol episode (AE) days and examines the modification in aerosol properties and radiative forcing during the period 2001-2010 based on Kanpur-AERONET sun photometer data. As AEs are considered the days having daily-mean aerosol optical depth (AOD) above the decadal mean + 1 STD (standard deviation); the threshold value is defined at 0.928. The results identify 277 out of 2095 days (13.2%) of AEs over Kanpur, which are most frequently observed during post-monsoon (78 cases, 18.6%) and monsoon (76, 14.7%) seasons due to biomass-burning episodes and dust influence, respectively. On the other hand, the AEs in winter and pre-monsoon are lower in both absolute and percentage values (65, 12.5% and 58, 9.1%, respectively). The modification in aerosol properties on the AE days is strongly related to season. Thus, in post-monsoon and winter the AEs are associated with enhanced presence of fine-mode aerosols and Black Carbon from anthropogenic pollution and any kind of burning, while in pre-monsoon and monsoon seasons they are mostly associated with transported dust. Aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) calculated using SBDART shows much more surface (~-69 to -97 Wm-2) and Top of Atmosphere cooling (-20 to -30 Wm-2) as well as atmospheric heating (~43 to 71 Wm-2) during the AE days compared to seasonal means. These forcing values are mainly controlled by the higher AODs and the modified aerosol characteristics (Angstrom ?, SSA) during the AE days in each season and may cause severe climate implications over Ganges Basin with further consequences on atmospheric heating, cloud microphysics, monsoon rainfall and melting of Himalayan glaciers.

  1. Recent activities in the Aerosol Generation and Transport Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, R.E.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    General statements may be made on the behavior of single-component and multi-component aerosols in the Nuclear Safety Pilot Plant vessel. The removal processes for U/sub 3/O/sub 8/, Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ + Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ aerosols are enhanced in a steam-air atmosphere. Steam-air seems to have little effect on removal of concrete aerosol from the vessel atmosphere. A steam-air environment causes a change in aerosol shape from chain-agglomerate to basically spherical for U/sub 3/O/sub 8/, Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ + Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ aerosol; for concrete the change in aerosol shape is from chain-agglomerate to partially spherical. The mass ratio of the individual components of a multi-component aerosol seems to have an observable influence on the resultant behavior of these aerosols in steam. The enhanced rate of removal of the U/sub 3/O/sub 8/, the Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and the mixed U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ + Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ aerosols from the atmosphere of the NSPP vessel by steam-air is probably caused by the change in aerosol shape and the condensation of steam on the aerosol surfaces combining to increase the effect of gravitational settling. The apparent lack of an effect by steam-air on the removal rate of concrete aerosol could result from a differing physical/chemical response of the surfaces of this aerosol to condensing steam.

  2. Establishing the Connections Between Galaxies and Mg II Absorbing Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher W. Churchill

    1996-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    HIRES/Keck spectra of Mg II (2796) absorption arising in the "halos" of 15 identified 0.4 < z < 0.9 galaxies are presented. Comparison of the galaxy and absorbing gas properties reveal that the spatial distribution of galactic/halo gas does not follow a smooth galactocentric dependence. The kinematics of absorbing gas in z < 1 galaxies are not suggestive of a single systematic velocity field (i.e. rotation or radial flow) and show little dependence on the QSO-galaxy impact parameter. From the full HIRES dataset of 41 systems (0.4 < z < 1.7), strong redshift evolution in the cloud-cloud velocity dispersion is measured. Direct evidence for turbulent or bulk motion in "high velocity" clouds is found by comparing Fe II and Mg II Doppler parameters.

  3. Method for increasing boron10 contents of neutron absorbing articles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hortman, M.T.; Naum, R.G.

    1981-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for increasing the boron10 content of a neutron absorbing article, such as one in flat, flexible sheet shape, includes coating a surface of such article with a solidifiable liquid synthetic organic polymeric material, such as a phenol formaldehyde type resin, applying boron carbide particles to the polymeric material and solidifying the polymer, such as by curing to cross-linked permanently set form, so as to hold the neutron absorbing boron carbide particles in place thereon. In highly preferred embodiments of the invention the boron carbide particles applied will extend beyond the surface of the external material and will serve as anchoring means for applications of subsequent coatings and the plurality of coatings, usually after initial partial curing to solidify them and make them formretaining, will be permanently cross-linked simultaneously. In another aspect of the invention the plurality of flat neutron absorbing articles may be joined together by contacting surfaces thereof with such a coating material, preferably containing boron carbide particles, and curing it.

  4. Neutron absorbing article and method for manufacture thereof

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsyth, P.F.; Mcmurtry, C.H.; Naum, R.G.

    1980-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A composite, neutron absorbing, coated article, suitable for installation in storage racks for spent nuclear fuel and for other neutron absorbing applications, includes a backing member, preferably of flexible material such as woven fiberglass cloth, a synthetic organic polymeric coating or a plurality of such coatings on the backing member, preferably of cured phenolic resin, such as phenol formaldehyde or trimethylolphenol formaldehyde and boron carbide particles held to the backing member by the cured coating or a plurality of such coatings. Also within the invention is a method for the manufacture of the neutron absorbing coated article and the use of such an article. In a preferred method the backing member is first coated on both sides thereof with a filling coating of thermosettable liquid phenolic resin, which is then partially cured to solid state, one side of the backing member is then coated with a mixture of thermosettable liquid resin and finely divided boron carbide particles and the resin is partially cured to solid state, the other side is coated with a similar mixture, larger boron carbide particles are applied to it and the resin is partially cured to solid state, such side of the article is coated with thermosettable liquid phenolic resin, the resin is partially cured to solid state and such resin, including previously applied partially cured resins, is cured to final cross-linked and permanently set form.

  5. Real-time detection of ambient aerosols using photothermal interferometry: Folded Jamin interferometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Real-time detection of ambient aerosols using photothermal interferometry: Folded Jamin of instrumentation that can directly measure ambient aerosol absorption through photothermal interferometry. The hallmark of this approach is its ability to directly measure aerosol absorption without interference from

  6. The impact of meteorological conditions and variation in chemical composition of aerosols on regional cloud formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Creamean, Jessie Marie

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MISSION A Global 3D View of Aerosols and Clouds, Bulletin ofJ.H. Seinfeld, Secondary aerosol formation from atmosphericJ.H. Seinfeld, Secondary aerosol formation from atmospheric

  7. Local Environmental Pollution Strongly Influences Culturable Bacterial Aerosols at an Urban Aquatic Superfund Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uriarte, Maria

    Local Environmental Pollution Strongly Influences Culturable Bacterial Aerosols at an Urban Aquatic Information ABSTRACT: In polluted environments, when microbial aerosols originate locally, species composition of the aerosols should reflect the polluted source. To test the connection between local environmental pollution

  8. FOSSIL ENERGY, CO2, CLIMATE CHANGE, AND THE AEROSOL PROBLEM Stephen E. Schwartz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    been masked by the aerosol cooling forcing. Allowable future CO2 emissions so as not to commit of the greenhouse gas forcing due to cooling forcing by tropospheric aerosols; as aerosols, unlike CO2, are short

  9. Modeling the Direct and Indirect Effects of Atmospheric Aerosols on Tropical Cyclones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Keun-Hee

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    precipitation even in the weakest hurricane. When comparing the model performance between aerosol indirect and direct effect by ensemble experiments, the adjustment time of the circulation due to modification of the aerosol radiative forcing by aerosol layers...

  10. Aerosol indirect effects -- general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quaas, Johannes

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    such as cloud contamination or 3D radiation effects (Loebeffect relationship behind the aerosol – cloud/radiationradiation resulting in the “aerosol direct effect”. Hy- drophilic aerosols can serve as cloud

  11. Aerosol indirect effects ? general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quaas, Johannes

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    such as cloud contamination or 3D radiation effects (Loebeffect relationship behind the aerosol – cloud/radiationradiation resulting in the “aerosol direct effect”. Hy- drophilic aerosols can serve as cloud

  12. MELCOR aerosol transport module modification for NSSR-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrill, B.J.; Hagrman, D.L.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes modifications of the MELCOR computer code aerosol transport module that will increase the accuracy of calculations for safety analysis of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The modifications generalize aerosol deposition models to consider gases other than air, add specialized models for aerosol deposition during high speed gas flows in ducts, and add models for resuspension of aerosols that are entrained in coolants when these coolants flash. Particular attention has been paid to the adhesion of aerosol particles once they are transported to duct walls. The results of calculations with the modified models have been successfully compared to data from Light Water Reactor Aerosol Containment Experiments (LACE) conducted by an international consortium at Hanford, Washington.

  13. Climate Engineering with Stratospheric Aerosols and Associated Engineering Parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kravitz, Benjamin S.

    2013-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate engineering with stratospheric aerosols, an idea inspired by large volcaniceruptions, could cool the Earth’s surface and thus alleviate some of the predicted dangerous impacts of anthropogenic climate change. However, the effectiveness of climate engineering to achieve a particular climate goal, and any associated side effects, depend on certain aerosol parameters and how the aerosols are deployed in the stratosphere. Through the examples of sulfate and black carbon aerosols, this paper examines "engineering" parameters-aerosol composition, aerosol size, and spatial and temporal variations in deployment-for stratospheric climate engineering. The effects of climate engineering are sensitive to these parameters, suggesting that a particle could be found ordesigned to achieve specific desired climate outcomes. This prospect opens the possibility for discussion of societal goals for climate engineering.

  14. Total aerosol effect: forcing or radiative flux perturbation?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lohmann, Ulrike; Storelvmo, Trude; Jones, Andy; Rotstayn, Leon; Menon, Surabi; Quaas, Johannes; Ekman, Annica; Koch, Dorothy; Ruedy, Reto

    2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Uncertainties in aerosol forcings, especially those associated with clouds, contribute to a large extent to uncertainties in the total anthropogenic forcing. The interaction of aerosols with clouds and radiation introduces feedbacks which can affect the rate of rain formation. Traditionally these feedbacks were not included in estimates of total aerosol forcing. Here we argue that they should be included because these feedbacks act quickly compared with the time scale of global warming. We show that for different forcing agents (aerosols and greenhouse gases) the radiative forcings as traditionally defined agree rather well with estimates from a method, here referred to as radiative flux perturbations (RFP), that takes these fast feedbacks and interactions into account. Thus we propose replacing the direct and indirect aerosol forcing in the IPCC forcing chart with RFP estimates. This implies that it is better to evaluate the total anthropogenic aerosol effect as a whole.

  15. CO2 Capture with Liquid-to-Solid Absorbents: CO2 Capture Process Using Phase-Changing Absorbents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IMPACCT Project: GE and the University of Pittsburgh are developing a unique CO2 capture process in which a liquid absorbent, upon contact with CO2, changes into a solid phase. Once in solid form, the material can be separated and the CO2 can be released for storage by heating. Upon heating, the absorbent returns to its liquid form, where it can be reused to capture more CO2. The approach is more efficient than other solventbased processes because it avoids the heating of extraneous solvents such as water. This ultimately leads to a lower cost of CO2 capture and will lower the additional cost to produce electricity for coal-fired power plants that retrofit their facilities to include this technology.

  16. A multi-frequency induction heating system for a thermally triggered gel polymer dynamic vibration absorber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, John Israel, 1972-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since its invention in the early part of the twentieth century, the dynamic vibration absorber (DVA) has played an important role in vibration suppression. In its simplest form, a dynamic vibration absorber is a mechanical ...

  17. Stackable differential mobility analyzer for aerosol measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cheng, Meng-Dawn (Oak Ridge, TN); Chen, Da-Ren (Creve Coeur, MO)

    2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-stage differential mobility analyzer (MDMA) for aerosol measurements includes a first electrode or grid including at least one inlet or injection slit for receiving an aerosol including charged particles for analysis. A second electrode or grid is spaced apart from the first electrode. The second electrode has at least one sampling outlet disposed at a plurality different distances along its length. A volume between the first and the second electrode or grid between the inlet or injection slit and a distal one of the plurality of sampling outlets forms a classifying region, the first and second electrodes for charging to suitable potentials to create an electric field within the classifying region. At least one inlet or injection slit in the second electrode receives a sheath gas flow into an upstream end of the classifying region, wherein each sampling outlet functions as an independent DMA stage and classifies different size ranges of charged particles based on electric mobility simultaneously.

  18. Electromagnetic scattering and absorption by aerosol agglomerates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Hsingyi.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Calculation of scattering and absorption by smoke aerosols is required in many applications, including characterization of atmospheric aerosols, prediction of climatic impact of smoke, evaluation of smoke effectiveness in obscuration, calculation of heat transfer from flames, and evaluation of various scenarios of nuclear winter. In this dissertation two procedures were developed to accurately make these calculations utilizing realistic models of smoke agglomerates including oriented chains and fractal geometries. First the Iterative Extended Boundary Condition Method (IEBCM) was utilized to calculate the electromagnetic (EM) scattering and absorption of elongated aerosol particles. The computation efficiency and capability of IEBCM were improved by implementing the sectioning and the segmentation procedures. The sectioning procedure resulted in improving the computational efficiency and the segmentation method made it possible to make calculations for particles with aspect ratios as high as 250. The other procedure employed the Volume Integral Equation Formulation (VIEF) to compute the EM scattering and absorption by agglomerates of complex geometries. The validity of the procedure was checked first by comparing the obtained results with those obtained from the Mie solution for a spherical object and with the IEBCM for nonspherical objects. The comparison between results showed excellent agreement and hence validated the accuracy of the VIEF. The VIEF solution was then used to make calculations for five types of fractal agglomerates of smoke aerosol particles with fractal dimensions in the range from 1.7 to 1.9. The results obtained were compared with those based on the fractal theory recently published by Berry and Percival, and some differences were observed.

  19. Evaluation of the carbon content of aerosols from the burn- ing of biomass in the Brazilian Amazon using thermal, op- tical and thermal-optical analysis methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soto-Garcia, Lydia L.; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Andreae, Tracey W.; taxo, Paulo Ar-; Maenhaut, Willy; Kirchstetter, Thomas; Novakov, T.; Chow, Judith C.; Mayol-Bracero, Olga L.

    2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Aerosol samples were collected at a pasture site in the Amazon Basin as part of the project LBA-SMOCC-2002 (Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia - Smoke Aerosols, Clouds, Rainfall and Climate: Aerosols from Biomass Burning Perturb Global and Regional Climate). Sampling was conducted during the late dry season, when the aerosol composition was dominated by biomass burning emissions, especially in the submicron fraction. A 13-stage Dekati low-pressure impactor (DLPI) was used to collect particles with nominal aerodynamic diameters (D{sub p}) ranging from 0.03 to 0.10 m. Gravimetric analyses of the DLPI substrates and filters were performed to obtain aerosol mass concentrations. The concentrations of total, apparent elemental, and organic carbon (TC, EC{sub a}, and OC) were determined using thermal and thermal-optical analysis (TOA) methods. A light transmission method (LTM) was used to determine the concentration of equivalent black carbon (BC{sub e}) or the absorbing fraction at 880 nm for the size-resolved samples. During the dry period, due to the pervasive presence of fires in the region upwind of the sampling site, concentrations of fine aerosols (D{sub p} < 2.5 {mu}m: average 59.8 {mu}g m{sup -3}) were higher than coarse aerosols (D{sub p} > 2.5 {mu}m: 4.1 {mu}g m{sup -3}). Carbonaceous matter, estimated as the sum of the particulate organic matter (i.e., OC x 1.8) plus BC{sub e}, comprised more than 90% to the total aerosol mass. Concentrations of EC{sub a} (estimated by thermal analysis with a correction for charring) and BCe (estimated by LTM) averaged 5.2 {+-} 1.3 and 3.1 {+-} 0.8 {mu}g m{sup -3}, respectively. The determination of EC was improved by extracting water-soluble organic material from the samples, which reduced the average light absorption {angstrom} exponent of particles in the size range of 0.1 to 1.0 {mu}m from > 2.0 to approximately 1.2. The size-resolved BC{sub e} measured by the LTM showed a clear maximum between 0.4 and 0.6 m in diameter. The concentrations of OC and BC{sub e} varied diurnally during the dry period, and this variation is related to diurnal changes in boundary layer thickness and in fire frequency.

  20. Progress on the MICE Liquid Absorber Cooling and Cryogenic Distribution System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PROGRESS ON THE MICE LIQUID ABSORBER COOLING AND CRYOGENIC DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMprogress made on the design of the cryogenic cooling system

  1. Unglazed transpired solar collector having a low thermal-conductance absorber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christensen, Craig B. (Boulder, CO); Kutscher, Charles F. (Golden, CO); Gawlik, Keith M. (Boulder, CO)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An unglazed transpired solar collector using solar radiation to heat incoming air for distribution, comprising an unglazed absorber formed of low thermal-conductance material having a front surface for receiving the solar radiation and openings in the unglazed absorber for passage of the incoming air such that the incoming air is heated as it passes towards the front surface of the absorber and the heated air passes through the openings in the absorber for distribution.

  2. Progress on the MICE Liquid Absorber Cooling and Cryogenic Distribution System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBNL-57692 PROGRESS ON THE MICE LIQUID ABSORBER COOLING ANDthe progress made on the design of the cryogenic cooling

  3. Unglazed transpired solar collector having a low thermal-conductance absorber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christensen, C.B.; Kutscher, C.F.; Gawlik, K.M.

    1997-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An unglazed transpired solar collector using solar radiation to heat incoming air for distribution, comprises an unglazed absorber formed of low thermal-conductance material having a front surface for receiving the solar radiation and openings in the unglazed absorber for passage of the incoming air such that the incoming air is heated as it passes towards the front surface of the absorber and the heated air passes through the openings in the absorber for distribution. 3 figs.

  4. Minimax design of vibration absorbers for linear damped systems Brandon Brown, Tarunraj Singh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Tarunraj

    motion of transmission line towers [3]. Since the vibration absorber was introduced in 1909 by Frahm [4

  5. aerosols influencing atmospheric: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and other anthropogenic influences have substantially altered the composition and size-distribution of atmospheric aerosol particles over the last century. This, in turn,...

  6. aerodyne aerosol mass: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    independent measurements of fine particle volume or particle-into-liquid sampler (PILS) ion chromatography measurements for 3 field campaigns with different dominant aerosol...

  7. aerosol particle concentration: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the chemical and physical characterization of aerosols using a single particle mass spectrometry based technique University of California eScholarship Repository Summary: Real-...

  8. aerosol particle charger: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Introduction The Universal Serial Bus (USB) port Allen, Jont 9 New approaches for the chemical and physical characterization of aerosols using a single particle mass spectrometry...

  9. aerosol mass spectrometer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2004. The concentration of a species Zhang, Qi 8 Development of a thermal desorption chemical ionization mobility mass spectrometer for the speciation of ultrafine aerosols. Open...

  10. aerosol particles generated: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the chemical and physical characterization of aerosols using a single particle mass spectrometry based technique University of California eScholarship Repository Summary: Real-...

  11. aerosol retrieval validation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    off the coast of Chile and Peru, where aerosol-cloud interactions are important to the energy balance (15), and limitations in current observing and modeling capabilities...

  12. aerosol detection equipment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Daniel, Rosenfeld 464 Mixtures of pollution, dust, sea salt, and volcanic aerosol during ACE-Asia: Radiative properties Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Websites...

  13. Atmospheric Aerosol Chemistry, Climate Change, and Air Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aerosols, or OA, containing nitrogen- containing organic compounds (NOC) and only carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen (CHO). They uncovered a new method for investigating OA that may lead...

  14. The Time Evolution of Aerosol Size Distribution Over the Mexico...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Size Distribution Over the Mexico City Plateau. The Time Evolution of Aerosol Size Distribution Over the Mexico City Plateau. Abstract: As part of the MILAGRO field campaign, the...

  15. aerosol mass spectrometry: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    analysis of aerosol organic nitrates with electron ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry MIT - DSpace Summary: Four hydroxynitrates (R(OH)R'ONO2) representative of...

  16. aerosol assisted chemical: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    soluble in water: 2. Isolation of acid, neutral, and basic fractions by modified size Weber, Rodney 5 Simulating Aerosols Using a Chemical Transport Model with Assimilation of...

  17. aerosol particle formation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1. Introduction 2 Current models tend to under-predict secondary organic aerosol (SOA Weber, Rodney 3 Modeling particle formation during low-pressure silane oxidation: Detailed...

  18. aerosol characterization system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    soluble in water: 2. Isolation of acid, neutral, and basic fractions by modified size Weber, Rodney 4 Desert dust aerosol age characterized by massage tracking of tracers...

  19. ambient fine aerosols: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    soluble in water: 2. Isolation of acid, neutral, and basic fractions by modified size Weber, Rodney 4 Chemical characterization of the ambient organic aerosol soluble in water:...

  20. aerosol chemical characteristion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    soluble in water: 2. Isolation of acid, neutral, and basic fractions by modified size Weber, Rodney 5 Simulating Aerosols Using a Chemical Transport Model with Assimilation of...

  1. aerosol characterization experiment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    soluble in water: 2. Isolation of acid, neutral, and basic fractions by modified size Weber, Rodney 8 Desert dust aerosol age characterized by massage tracking of tracers...

  2. aerosol generation characterization: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    soluble in water: 2. Isolation of acid, neutral, and basic fractions by modified size Weber, Rodney 5 Desert dust aerosol age characterized by massage tracking of tracers...

  3. aerosol monitor development: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Paris May 2003John Matthews Monitoring the Aerosol Phase Function University of New Mexico 12;AstroParticles & Atmosphere, Paris May 2003John Matthews 12;AstroParticles &...

  4. aerosol characteristic researching: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    as they have significant impacts both on localregional air pollution and global climate. Recent for Aerosol and Cloud Chemistry, Aerodyne Research, Incorporated, Billerica,...

  5. aerosol challenge model: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    climate change is important because of its strong capability in causing extinction of solar radiation. A three-dimensional interactive aerosol-climate model has been used to...

  6. aircraft exhaust aerosol: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Window Location on a King Air 200 Aircraft:aerosol.atmos.und.edu) Objective A Raytheon Beechcraft King Air 200 aircraft has been used to obtain Condensation Particle...

  7. Behavior of aerosols in a steam-air environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, R.E.; Tobias, M.L.; Longest, A.W.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The behavior of aerosols assumed to be characteristic of those generated during light water reactor (LWR) accident sequences and released into containment is being studied in the Nuclear Safety Pilot Plant (NSPP) which is located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The program plan for the NSPP aerosol project provides for the study of the behavior, within containment, of simulated LWR accident aerosols emanating from fuel, reactor core structural materials, and from concrete-molten core materials interactions. The aerodynamic behavior of each of these aerosols was studied individually to establish its characteristics; current experiments involve mixtures of these aerosols to establish their interaction and collective behavior within containment. Tests have been conducted with U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ aerosols, Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ aerosols, and concrete aerosols in an environment of either dry air (relative humidity (RH) less than 20%) or steam-air (relative humidity (RH) approximately 100%) with aerosol mass concentration being the primary experimental variable.

  8. Influence of moisture on the behavior of aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, R.E.; Longest, A.W.; Tobias, M.L.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The behavior of aerosols assumed to be characteristic of those generated during light water reactor (LWR) accident sequences and released into containment has been studied in the Nuclear Safety Pilot Plant (NSPP) located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). It has been observed that in a saturated steam-air environment a change occurs in the shape of aerosol agglomerates of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ aerosol, Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ aerosol, and mixed U/sub 3/O/sub 8/-Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ aerosol from branched-chain to spherical, and that the rate of reduction in the airborne aerosol mass concentration is increased relative to the rate observed in a dry atmosphere. The effect of a steam-air environment on the behavior of concrete aerosol is different. The shape of the agglomerated concrete aerosol is intermediate between branched-chain and spherical and the effect on the rate of reduction in airborne mass concentration appears to be slight. In a related project the shape of an agglomerated Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ aerosol was observed to change from branched-chain to spherical at, or near, 100% relative humidity.

  9. LWR aerosol containment experiments (LACE) program and initial test results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muhlestein, L.D.; Hilliard, R.K.; Bloom, G.R.; McCormack, J.D.

    1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Objectives of the test program are to demonstrate, at large-scale, inherent radioactive aerosol retention behavior for postulated high consequence LWR accident situations, and to provide a data base to be used for aerosol behavior and thermal hydraulic computer code validation. The LACE program is being performed in two phases. The first phase is scoping studies of aerosol retention for a containment by pass sequence (Event V). The second phase considers three accident situations where significant inherent aerosol retention could considerably reduce the calculated consequences of the postulated accidents.

  10. Aerosol behavior experiments on light water reactor primary systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahn, F.J.; Collen, J.; Wright, A.L.

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of three experimental programs relevant to the behavior of aerosols in the primary systems of light water reactors (LWRs) are presented. These are the Large-Scale Aerosol Transport Test programs performed at the Marviken test facility in Sweden, parts of the LWR Aerosol Containment Experiments (LACE) performed at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory, and the TRAP-MELT validation project performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The Marviken experiments focused on the behavior of aerosols released from fuel and structural materials in a damaged core. Data on the transport of these aerosols and their physical characteristics were obtained in five experiments that simulated LWR primary systems. The LACE program data include results from the containment bypass accident tests, which focused on aerosol transport in pipes. The TRAP-MELT validation project data include results from two types of experiments: (a) aerosol transport tests to investigate aerosol wall plateout in a vertical pipe geometry and (b) aerosol resuspension tests to provide a data base from which analytical models can be developed. Typical results from these programs are presented and discussed.

  11. Iron Speciation and Mixing in Single Aerosol Particles from the...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    iron from atmospheric aerosol is an essential nutrient that can control oceanic productivity, thereby impacting the global carbon budget and climate. Particles collected on...

  12. alkali sulfate aerosol: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    chemical transport model and comparison with observations integrals over the aerosol size distribution when only the lower-order moments of the distribution are known...

  13. aerosol main physical: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mass light-scattering efficiencies were calculated from both an averaged aerosol size distribution and from distributions modified to reflect the effects of cloud. These...

  14. aerosol monitors including: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    schemes which explicitly simulate the microphysical processes that determine the particle size distribution. These models enable aerosol optical ... Ridley, David Andrew 33...

  15. aerosols nanometriques application: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mass light-scattering efficiencies were calculated from both an averaged aerosol size distribution and from distributions modified to reflect the effects of cloud. These...

  16. aerosols teresa application: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mass light-scattering efficiencies were calculated from both an averaged aerosol size distribution and from distributions modified to reflect the effects of cloud. These...

  17. aerosol cfd model: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of aerosol dynamics in the atmosphere. The approach taken represents the particle size distribution as the superposition of three lognormal subdistributions, called modes....

  18. analysis od aerosol: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    closely. The retrieval produces a tighter fit to the RSS data. Climatologies Aerosol size distribution climatology used in GISS GCM does not agree with observations Liu et...

  19. aerosol bolus dispersion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a significant scientific risk. Even the optimal altitude of injection and aerosol size distribution are poorly known. Past attention focused on guns and airplanes as means...

  20. aerosol particles originating: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of aerosol dynamics in the atmosphere. The approach taken represents the particle size distribution as the superposition of three lognormal subdistributions, called modes....