National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for high thermal conductivity

  1. Continuous Processing of High Thermal Conductivity Polyethylene...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Processing of High Thermal Conductivity Polyethylene Fibers and Sheets Continuous Processing of High Thermal Conductivity Polyethylene Fibers and Sheets Massachusetts Institute of...

  2. Glass-like thermal conductivity in high efficiency thermoelectric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Glass-like thermal conductivity in high efficiency thermoelectric materials Glass-like thermal conductivity in high efficiency thermoelectric materials Discusses strategies to...

  3. Continuous Processing of High Thermal Conductivity Fibers and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    defects thermal conductivity drops significantly We aim to fabricate a continuous film with high thermal conductivity by disentangling and aligning polymer chains ...

  4. Continuous Processing of High Thermal Conductivity Polyethylene...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    conductivity polyethylene fibers and sheets will be developed to replace metals and ceramics in heat-transfer devices. Project innovations include using massively parallel...

  5. High thermal conductivity lossy dielectric using a multi layer configuration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tiegs, Terry N. (Lenoir City, TN); Kiggans, Jr., James O. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2003-01-01

    Systems and methods are described for loss dielectrics. A loss dielectric includes at least one high dielectric loss layer and at least one high thermal conductivity-electrically insulating layer adjacent the at least one high dielectric loss layer. A method of manufacturing a loss dielectric includes providing at least one high dielectric loss layer and providing at least one high thermal conductivity-electrically insulating layer adjacent the at least one high dielectric loss layer. The systems and methods provide advantages because the loss dielectrics are less costly and more environmentally friendly than the available alternatives.

  6. Process for fabricating composite material having high thermal conductivity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colella, Nicholas J. (Livermore, CA); Davidson, Howard L. (San Carlos, CA); Kerns, John A. (Livermore, CA); Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01

    A process for fabricating a composite material such as that having high thermal conductivity and having specific application as a heat sink or heat spreader for high density integrated circuits. The composite material produced by this process has a thermal conductivity between that of diamond and copper, and basically consists of coated diamond particles dispersed in a high conductivity metal, such as copper. The composite material can be fabricated in small or relatively large sizes using inexpensive materials. The process basically consists, for example, of sputter coating diamond powder with several elements, including a carbide forming element and a brazeable material, compacting them into a porous body, and infiltrating the porous body with a suitable braze material, such as copper-silver alloy, thereby producing a dense diamond-copper composite material with a thermal conductivity comparable to synthetic diamond films at a fraction of the cost.

  7. Developing a High Thermal Conductivity Fuel with Silicon Carbide Additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    baney, Ronald; Tulenko, James

    2012-11-20

    The objective of this research is to increase the thermal conductivity of uranium oxide (UO{sub 2}) without significantly impacting its neutronic properties. The concept is to incorporate another high thermal conductivity material, silicon carbide (SiC), in the form of whiskers or from nanoparticles of SiC and a SiC polymeric precursor into UO{sub 2}. This is expected to form a percolation pathway lattice for conductive heat transfer out of the fuel pellet. The thermal conductivity of SiC would control the overall fuel pellet thermal conductivity. The challenge is to show the effectiveness of a low temperature sintering process, because of a UO{sub 2}-SiC reaction at 1,377°C, a temperature far below the normal sintering temperature. Researchers will study three strategies to overcome the processing difficulties associated with pore clogging and the chemical reaction of SiC and UO{sub 2} at temperatures above 1,300°C:

  8. Methods for increasing the thermal conductivity of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miler, Josef L

    2006-01-01

    A two-part study was conducted to determine methods for producing ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene with high thermal conductivity by way of polymer chain orientation. The first portion of this report surveys current ...

  9. Low Thermal Conductivity, High Durability Thermal Barrier Coatings for IGCC Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, Eric; Gell, Maurice

    2015-01-15

    Advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBC) are crucial to improved energy efficiency in next generation gas turbine engines. The use of traditional topcoat materials, e.g. yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), is limited at elevated temperatures due to (1) the accelerated undesirable phase transformations and (2) corrosive attacks by calcium-magnesium-aluminum-silicate (CMAS) deposits and moisture. The first goal of this project is to use the Solution Precursor Plasma Spray (SPPS) process to further reduce the thermal conductivity of YSZ TBCs by introducing a unique microstructural feature of layered porosity, called inter-pass boundaries (IPBs). Extensive process optimization accompanied with hundreds of spray trials as well as associated SEM cross-section and laser-flash measurements, yielded a thermal conductivity as low as 0.62 Wm?¹K?¹ in SPPS YSZ TBCs, approximately 50% reduction of APS TBCs; while other engine critical properties, such as cyclic durability, erosion resistance and sintering resistance, were characterized to be equivalent or better than APS baselines. In addition, modifications were introduced to SPPS TBCs so as to enhance their resistance to CMAS under harsh IGCC environments. Several mitigation approaches were explored, including doping the coatings with Al?O? and TiO?, applying a CMAS infiltration-inhibiting surface layer, and filling topcoat cracks with blocking substances. The efficacy of all these modifications was assessed with a set of novel CMAS-TBC interaction tests, and the moisture resistance was tested in a custom-built high-temperature moisture rig. In the end, the optimal low thermal conductivity TBC system was selected based on all evaluation tests and its processing conditions were documented. The optimal coating consisted on a thick inner layer of YSZ coating made by the SPPS process having a thermal conductivity 50% lower than standard YSZ coatings topped with a high temperature tolerant CMAS resistant gadolinium zirconate Coating made by the SPPS process. Noteworthy was the fact that the YSZ to GZO interface made by the SPPS process was not the failure location as had been observed in APS coatings.

  10. Thermal Conductivity Enhancement of High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roshandell, Melina

    2013-01-01

    RL.In: Proceedings on thermal energy storage and energypolymer microcomposites for thermal energy storage. SAE Sochigher volumetric energy density and thermal conductivity.

  11. Composite material having high thermal conductivity and process for fabricating same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colella, N.J.; Davidson, H.L.; Kerns, J.A.; Makowiecki, D.M.

    1998-07-21

    A process is disclosed for fabricating a composite material such as that having high thermal conductivity and having specific application as a heat sink or heat spreader for high density integrated circuits. The composite material produced by this process has a thermal conductivity between that of diamond and copper, and basically consists of coated diamond particles dispersed in a high conductivity metal, such as copper. The composite material can be fabricated in small or relatively large sizes using inexpensive materials. The process basically consists, for example, of sputter coating diamond powder with several elements, including a carbide forming element and a brazeable material, compacting them into a porous body, and infiltrating the porous body with a suitable braze material, such as copper-silver alloy, thereby producing a dense diamond-copper composite material with a thermal conductivity comparable to synthetic diamond films at a fraction of the cost. 7 figs.

  12. Composite material having high thermal conductivity and process for fabricating same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colella, Nicholas J. (Livermore, CA); Davidson, Howard L. (San Carlos, CA); Kerns, John A. (Livermore, CA); Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A process for fabricating a composite material such as that having high thermal conductivity and having specific application as a heat sink or heat spreader for high density integrated circuits. The composite material produced by this process has a thermal conductivity between that of diamond and copper, and basically consists of coated diamond particles dispersed in a high conductivity metal, such as copper. The composite material can be fabricated in small or relatively large sizes using inexpensive materials. The process basically consists, for example, of sputter coating diamond powder with several elements, including a carbide forming element and a brazeable material, compacting them into a porous body, and infiltrating the porous body with a suitable braze material, such as copper-silver alloy, thereby producing a dense diamond-copper composite material with a thermal conductivity comparable to synthetic diamond films at a fraction of the cost.

  13. Differential heating: A versatile method for thermal conductivity measurements in high-energy-density matter

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ping, Y.; Fernandez-Panella, A.; Sio, H.; Correa, A.; Shepherd, R.; Landen, O.; London, R. A.; Sterne, P. A.; Whitley, H. D.; Fratanduono, D.; et al

    2015-09-04

    We propose a method for thermal conductivity measurements of high energy density matter based on differential heating. A temperature gradient is created either by surface heating of one material or at an interface between two materials by different energy deposition. The subsequent heat conduction across the temperature gradient is observed by various time-resolved probing techniques. Conceptual designs of such measurements using laser heating, proton heating, and x-ray heating are presented. As a result, the sensitivity of the measurements to thermal conductivity is confirmed by simulations.

  14. High Thermal Conductivity Cryogenic RF Feedthroughs for Higher Order Mode Couplers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles Reece; Edward Daly; Thomas Elliott; H. Phillips; Joseph Ozelis; Timothy Rothgeb; Katherine Wilson; Genfa Wu

    2005-05-01

    The use of higher-order-mode (HOM) pickup probes in the presence of significant fundamental RF fields can present a thermal challenge for CW or high average power SRF cavity applications. The electric field probes on the HOM-damping couplers on the JLab ''High Gradient'' (HG) and ''Low Loss'' (LL) seven-cell cavities for the CEBAF upgrade are exposed to approximately 10% of the peak magnetic field in the cavity. To avoid significant dissipative losses, these probes must remain superconducting during operation. Typical cryogenic rf feedthroughs provide a poor thermal conduction path for the probes and provide inadequate stabilization. We have developed solutions that meet the requirements, providing a direct thermal path from the niobium probe, thorough single-crystal sapphire, to bulk copper which can be thermally anchored. Designs, electromagnetic and thermal analyses, and performance data will be presented.

  15. High thermal conductivity lossy dielectric using co-densified multilayer configuration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tiegs, Terry N.; Kiggans, Jr., James O.

    2003-06-17

    Systems and methods are described for loss dielectrics. A method of manufacturing a lossy dielectric includes providing at least one high dielectric loss layer and providing at least one high thermal conductivity-electrically insulating layer adjacent the at least one high dielectric loss layer and then densifying together. The systems and methods provide advantages because the lossy dielectrics are less costly and more environmentally friendly than the available alternatives.

  16. Thermal Conductivity Enhancement of High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roshandell, Melina

    2013-01-01

    demand for improving the thermal conductivity of PCM has led us to study effect of aluminum and copper

  17. Cermet fuel thermal conductivity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvis, John Mark

    1988-01-01

    VITA 36 37 40 40 40 40 44 45 47 48 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Unit cell for derivation of model Page Heat Conduction Solution 22 3 Fission Gas Release Model 26 4A Metal Matrix Thermal Conductivity 4B Ceramic Fuel Thermal Conductivity 5... is based on the simple heat conduction equation. It is assumed that there is a uniform distribution of fuel particles in a regular array. A unit cell consists of a cube of matrix material of side length L, containing a spherical fuel particle of radius, r...

  18. Thermal Conduction in Aligned Carbon Nanotube–Polymer Nanocomposites with High Packing Density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marconnet, Amy M.

    Nanostructured composites containing aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are very promising as interface materials for electronic systems and thermoelectric power generators. We report the first data for the thermal conductivity ...

  19. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 85, 184201 (2012) Electrical and thermal conductivity of Al liquid at high pressures and temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinle-Neumann, Gerd

    2012-01-01

    perturbation theory to phase trajectories generated using first-principles molecular dynamics. Our results time-invariant electrical field and thermal gradient. First-principles calculations provide a directPHYSICAL REVIEW B 85, 184201 (2012) Electrical and thermal conductivity of Al liquid at high

  20. Thermal conductivity of sputtered amorphous Ge films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhan, Tianzhuo; Xu, Yibin; Goto, Masahiro; Tanaka, Yoshihisa; Kato, Ryozo; Sasaki, Michiko; Kagawa, Yutaka [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan)] [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    We measured the thermal conductivity of amorphous Ge films prepared by magnetron sputtering. The thermal conductivity was significantly higher than the value predicted by the minimum thermal conductivity model and increased with deposition temperature. We found that variations in sound velocity and Ge film density were not the main factors in the high thermal conductivity. Fast Fourier transform patterns of transmission electron micrographs revealed that short-range order in the Ge films was responsible for their high thermal conductivity. The results provide experimental evidences to understand the underlying nature of the variation of phonon mean free path in amorphous solids.

  1. Polymer Composites with Enhanced Thermal Conductivity: This research is funded by Honeywell Corporation and the Florida High Tech Corridor.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harmon, Julie P.

    Corporation and the Florida High Tech Corridor. The purpose is to develop polymeric composites used as underfills in fiber optic gyros. The composites must exhibit high thermal conductivity (TC), cure. This eliminates a significant problem encountered with epoxy systems, since, high polymerization exotherms destroy

  2. Thermal Conductivity of Polycrystalline Semiconductors and Ceramics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhaojie

    2012-01-01

    35, (3-6), Dames, C. ; Chen, G. , Thermal Conductivity ofProperties of Matter: Thermal conductivity: nonmetallicSociety), Dames, C. ; Chen, G. , Thermal Conductivity of

  3. Thermal Conductivity Enhancement of High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roshandell, Melina

    2013-01-01

    been considered for solar thermal energy storages. These areTNO Symposium on Thermal Storage of Solar Energy, Amsterdam,Symposium on Thermal Application of Solar Energy, Hakone (

  4. Thermal Conductivity Enhancement of High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roshandell, Melina

    2013-01-01

    energy storage system; thermal storage and heat transfer in1308. 32- Telkes, M. Thermal storage for solar heating andeditor. Phase change thermal storage materials. McGraw Hill

  5. Thermal Conductivity Enhancement of High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roshandell, Melina

    2013-01-01

    materials (PCM) in solar thermal concentrating technologyeffective and efficient solar thermal electricity generatorbeen considered for solar thermal energy storages. These are

  6. Thermal Conductivity Enhancement of High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roshandell, Melina

    2013-01-01

    been considered for solar thermal energy storages. These arePCMs for thermal energy storage in solar driven residentialfluid and thermal energy storage medium in the solar heat

  7. Determination of heat conductivity and thermal diffusivity of waste glass melter feed: Extension to high temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, Jarrett A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pokorny, Richard [Inst. of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czech Republic); Schweiger, Michael J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hrma, Pavel R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-01

    The heat conductivity ({lambda}) and the thermal diffusivity (a) of reacting glass batch, or melter feed, control the heat flux into and within the cold cap, a layer of reacting material floating on the pool of molten glass in an all-electric continuous waste glass melter. After previously estimating {lambda} of melter feed at temperatures up to 680 deg C, we focus in this work on the {lambda}(T) function at T > 680 deg C, at which the feed material becomes foamy. We used a customized experimental setup consisting of a large cylindrical crucible with an assembly of thermocouples, which monitored the evolution of the temperature field while the crucible with feed was heated at a constant rate from room temperature up to 1100°C. Approximating measured temperature profiles by polynomial functions, we used the heat transfer equation to estimate the {lambda}(T) approximation function, which we subsequently optimized using the finite-volume method combined with least-squares analysis. The heat conductivity increased as the temperature increased until the feed began to expand into foam, at which point the conductivity dropped. It began to increase again as the foam turned into a bubble-free glass melt. We discuss the implications of this behavior for the mathematical modeling of the cold cap.

  8. Thermal Conduction in Graphene and Graphene Multilayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Suchismita

    2009-01-01

    1 1.2 Thermal transport atxv Introduction xii 1.1 Thermal conductivity and65 4.13 Thermal conductivity of graphene as a function of

  9. Cylindrical thermal contact conductance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayers, George Harold

    2004-09-30

    calculation term LL interface pressure calculation term m asperity slope; least-squares slope MM interface pressure calculation term n expected number of contact spots xv Nuc joint conductance P pressure Pr Prandtl number Q heat rate q heat rate q? heat flux...

  10. Thermal Conductivity Enhancement of High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roshandell, Melina

    2013-01-01

    batteries. Solar Water Heater Solar water heater is becomingSolar Water Heater water heaters, thermal protection for electronics, spacecrafts, and solar

  11. Thermal Conductivity Enhancement of High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roshandell, Melina

    2013-01-01

    batteries. Solar Water Heater Solar water heater is becomingSolar Water Heater heaters, thermal protection for electronics, spacecrafts, and solar

  12. Thermal Conductivity Enhancement of High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roshandell, Melina

    2013-01-01

    for evening cooking in a solar cooker. Energy Convers ManageThermal performance of a solar cooker based on an evacuated

  13. Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadley, Haydn

    Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings A Dissertation Presented to The Faculty of the School ________________________________________________________________________ Abstract The dissertation begins by exploring the growth of 7YSZ coatings on vapor deposited NiCoCrAlY bond coats at different substrate rotation rates. The experiments show that as the rotation rate

  14. A high thermal conductivity waveguide window for use in a free electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. Elliott; V. Nguyen; L. Phillips; J. Preble (Jefferson Lab); T. Schultheiss; V. Christina; M. Cole; J. Rathke (Northrop Grumman Corp.)

    1999-04-01

    Design, analysis, and testing of a waveguide window with a goal of propagating greater than 100 kW average power operating at 1500 Mhz has been performed. This is made possible by the favorable material properties of beryllia (BeO). Brazing the window to a soft copper frame and then brazing the frame to a KOVAR flange provides the vacuum seal. RF analysis combined with thermal/structural analysis shows the benefits of the material. The KOVAR flange with a CTE, coefficient of thermal expansion, that matches that of BeO enables a strong braze joint. RF testing to 35 kW has been successful. The basics of this design can be expanded to applications with lower frequencies and higher average power. A paper similar to this was presented at LINAC 98.

  15. Thermal Conductivity Enhancement of High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roshandell, Melina

    2013-01-01

    that can operate with Stirling engines at 42% efficiency andfor high temperature Stirling engines which operates at 42%turbines such as Stirling engines, while high-temperature (>

  16. Thermal Conductivity Enhancement of High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roshandell, Melina

    2013-01-01

    537°C) steam for the steam turbine to generate electricity.as heat sources for steam turbines. Mainly three approachesto Stirling or Brayton steam turbine, moderate to high heat

  17. Thermal Conductivity Of Rubble Piles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luan, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Rubble piles are a common feature of solar system bodies. They are composed of monolithic elements of ice or rock bound by gravity. Voids occupy a significant fraction of the volume of a rubble pile. They can exist up to pressure $P\\approx \\epsy\\mu$, where $\\epsy$ is the monolithic material's yield strain and $\\mu$ its rigidity. At low $P$, contacts between neighboring elements are confined to a small fraction of their surface areas. As a result, the effective thermal conductivity of a rubble pile, $\\kcon\\approx k(P/(\\epsy\\mu))^{1/2}$, can be orders of magnitude smaller than, $k$, the thermal conductivity of its monolithic elements. In a fluid-free environment, only radiation can transfer energy across voids. It contributes an additional component, $\\krad=16\\ell\\sigma T^3/3$, to the total effective conductivity, $\\keff=\\kcon +\\krad$. Here $\\ell$, the inverse of the opacity per unit volume, is of order the size of the elements and voids. An important distinction between $\\kcon$ and $\\krad$ is that the former i...

  18. High Thermal Conductivity UO2-BeO Nulcear Fuel: Neutronic Performance Assessments and Overview of Fabrication 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naramore, Michael J

    2010-08-03

    is very prominent and porosity helps alleviate internal pressures to reduce fuel deformation. Therefore, a balance between thermal conductivity and fission gas accommodation is necessary to achieve a long lasting fuel [4]. 4> F c.> ::>oz 00 c.> 3 -l F...................................................................................................................78 APPENDIX G ..................................................................................................................82...

  19. Thermal Conductivity of Electrons and Muons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gnedin, Oleg Y.

    Thermal Conductivity of Electrons and Muons in Neutron Star Cores O.Y. Gnedin and D.G. Yakovlev A thermal conductivity of dense matter (ae ? ¸ 10 14 g cm \\Gamma3 ) in neutron star cores with various expressions valid for a wide class of models of dense matter. 1 #12; 1 Introduction Thermal conductivity

  20. Thermal Conductivity of Graphene Laminate H. Malekpour,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thermal Conductivity of Graphene Laminate H. Malekpour, K.-H. Chang, J.-C. Chen, C.-Y. Lu, D. L, Manchester, United Kingdom *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: We have investigated thermal conductivity and a set of suspended samples with the graphene laminate thickness from 9 to 44 m. The thermal conductivity

  1. Thermal conductivity of bulk nanostructured lead telluride

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hori, Takuma

    Thermal conductivity of lead telluride with embedded nanoinclusions was studied using Monte Carlo simulations with intrinsic phonon transport properties obtained from first-principles-based lattice dynamics. The ...

  2. Thermal Conductivity of Polycrystalline Semiconductors and Ceramics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhaojie

    2012-01-01

    F. , Properties of Advanced Semiconductor Materials GaN,materials In the semiconductor community, thermal conductivity is a very important property

  3. Development of an Innovative High-Thermal Conductivity UO2 Ceramic Composites Fuel Pellets with Carbon Nano-Tubes Using Spark Plasma Sintering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subhash, Ghatu; Wu, Kuang-Hsi; Tulenko, James

    2014-03-10

    Uranium dioxide (UO2) is the most common fuel material in commercial nuclear power reactors. Despite its numerous advantages such as high melting point, good high-temperature stability, good chemical compatibility with cladding and coolant, and resistance to radiation, it suffers from low thermal conductivity that can result in large temperature gradients within the UO2 fuel pellet, causing it to crack and release fission gases. Thermal swelling of the pellets also limits the lifetime of UO2 fuel in the reactor. To mitigate these problems, we propose to develop novel UO2 fuel with uniformly distributed carbon nanotubes (CNTs) that can provide high-conductivity thermal pathways and can eliminate fuel cracking and fission gas release due to high temperatures. CNTs have been investigated extensively for the past decade to explore their unique physical properties and many potential applications. CNTs have high thermal conductivity (6600 W/mK for an individual single- walled CNT and >3000 W/mK for an individual multi-walled CNT) and high temperature stability up to 2800°C in vacuum and about 750°C in air. These properties make them attractive candidates in preparing nano-composites with new functional properties. The objective of the proposed research is to develop high thermal conductivity of UO2–CNT composites without affecting the neutronic property of UO2 significantly. The concept of this goal is to utilize a rapid sintering method (5–15 min) called spark plasma sintering (SPS) in which a mixture of CNTs and UO2 powder are used to make composites with different volume fractions of CNTs. Incorporation of these nanoscale materials plays a fundamentally critical role in controlling the performance and stability of UO2 fuel. We will use a novel in situ growth process to grow CNTs on UO2 particles for rapid sintering and develop UO2-CNT composites. This method is expected to provide a uniform distribution of CNTs at various volume fractions so that a high thermally conductive UO2-CNT composite is obtained with a minimal volume fraction of CNTs. The mixtures are sintered in the SPS facility at a range of temperatures, pressures, and time durations so as to identify the optimal processing conditions to obtain the desired microstructure of sintered UO2-CNT pellets. The second objective of the proposed work is to identify the optimal volume fraction of CNTs in the microstructure of the composites that provides the desired high thermal conductivity yet retaining the mechanical strength required for efficient function as a reactor fuel. We will systematically study the resulting microstructure (grain size, porosity, distribution of CNTs, etc.) obtained at various SPS processing conditions using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscope (TEM). We will conduct indentation hardness measurements and uniaxial strength measurements as a function of volume fraction of CNTs to determine the mechanical strength and compare them to the properties of UO2. The fracture surfaces will be studied to determine the fracture characteristics that may relate to the observed cracking during service. Finally, we will perform thermal conductivity measurements on all the composites up to 1000° C. This study will relate the microstructure, mechanical properties, and thermal properties at various volume fractions of CNTs. The overall intent is to identify optimal processing conditions that will provide a well-consolidated compact with optimal microstructure and thermo-mechanical properties. The deliverables include: (1) fully characterized UO2-CNT composite with optimal CNT volume fraction and high thermal conductivity and (2) processing conditions for production of UO2-CNT composite pellets using SPS method.

  4. High conductivity composite metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhou, R.; Smith, J.L.; Embury, J.D.

    1998-01-06

    Electrical conductors and methods of producing them are disclosed, where the conductors possess both high strength and high conductivity. Conductors are comprised of carbon steel and a material chosen from a group consisting of copper, nickel, silver, and gold. Diffusion barriers are placed between these two materials. The components of a conductor are assembled and then the assembly is subjected to heat treating and mechanical deformation steps. 10 figs.

  5. Thermal conductivity measurements of Summit polycrystalline silicon.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clemens, Rebecca; Kuppers, Jaron D.; Phinney, Leslie Mary

    2006-11-01

    A capability for measuring the thermal conductivity of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) materials using a steady state resistance technique was developed and used to measure the thermal conductivities of SUMMiT{trademark} V layers. Thermal conductivities were measured over two temperature ranges: 100K to 350K and 293K to 575K in order to generate two data sets. The steady state resistance technique uses surface micromachined bridge structures fabricated using the standard SUMMiT fabrication process. Electrical resistance and resistivity data are reported for poly1-poly2 laminate, poly2, poly3, and poly4 polysilicon structural layers in the SUMMiT process from 83K to 575K. Thermal conductivity measurements for these polysilicon layers demonstrate for the first time that the thermal conductivity is a function of the particular SUMMiT layer. Also, the poly2 layer has a different variation in thermal conductivity as the temperature is decreased than the poly1-poly2 laminate, poly3, and poly4 layers. As the temperature increases above room temperature, the difference in thermal conductivity between the layers decreases.

  6. Thermal conductivity of bulk nanostructured lead telluride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hori, Takuma [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Chen, Gang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Shiomi, Junichiro, E-mail: shiomi@photon.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)

    2014-01-13

    Thermal conductivity of lead telluride with embedded nanoinclusions was studied using Monte Carlo simulations with intrinsic phonon transport properties obtained from first-principles-based lattice dynamics. The nanoinclusion/matrix interfaces were set to completely reflect phonons to model the maximum interface-phonon-scattering scenario. The simulations with the geometrical cross section and volume fraction of the nanoinclusions matched to those of the experiment show that the experiment has already reached the theoretical limit of thermal conductivity. The frequency-dependent analysis further identifies that the thermal conductivity reduction is dominantly attributed to scattering of low frequency phonons and demonstrates mutual adaptability of nanostructuring and local disordering.

  7. Increased thermal conductivity monolithic zeolite structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klett, James (Knoxville, TN); Klett, Lynn (Knoxville, TN); Kaufman, Jonathan (Leonardtown, MD)

    2008-11-25

    A monolith comprises a zeolite, a thermally conductive carbon, and a binder. The zeolite is included in the form of beads, pellets, powders and mixtures thereof. The thermally conductive carbon can be carbon nano-fibers, diamond or graphite which provide thermal conductivities in excess of about 100 W/mK to more than 1,000 W/mK. A method of preparing a zeolite monolith includes the steps of mixing a zeolite dispersion in an aqueous colloidal silica binder with a dispersion of carbon nano-fibers in water followed by dehydration and curing of the binder is given.

  8. Electrical and thermal conductivities in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faussurier, G. Blancard, C.; Combis, P.; Videau, L.

    2014-09-15

    Expressions for the electrical and thermal conductivities in dense plasmas are derived combining the Chester-Thellung-Kubo-Greenwood approach and the Kramers approximation. The infrared divergence is removed assuming a Drude-like behaviour. An analytical expression is obtained for the Lorenz number that interpolates between the cold solid-state and the hot plasma phases. An expression for the electrical resistivity is proposed using the Ziman-Evans formula, from which the thermal conductivity can be deduced using the analytical expression for the Lorenz number. The present method can be used to estimate electrical and thermal conductivities of mixtures. Comparisons with experiment and quantum molecular dynamics simulations are done.

  9. THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY AND OTHER PROPERTIES OF CEMENTITIOUS GROUTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ALLAN,M.

    1998-05-01

    The thermal conductivity and other properties cementitious grouts have been investigated in order to determine suitability of these materials for grouting vertical boreholes used with geothermal heat pumps. The roles of mix variables such as water/cement ratio, sand/cement ratio and superplasticizer dosage were measured. In addition to thermal conductivity, the cementitious grouts were also tested for bleeding, permeability, bond to HDPE pipe, shrinkage, coefficient of thermal expansion, exotherm, durability and environmental impact. This paper summarizes the results for selected grout mixes. Relatively high thermal conductivities were obtained and this leads to reduction in predicted bore length and installation costs. Improvements in shrinkage resistance and bonding were achieved.

  10. Measurement of thermal conductivity in proton irradiated silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marat Khafizov; Clarissa Yablinsky; Todd Allen; David Hurley

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the influence of proton irradiation on thermal conductivity in single crystal silicon. We apply laser based modulated thermoreflectance technique to extract the change in conductivity of the thin layer damaged by proton irradiation. Unlike time domain thermoreflectance techniques that require application of a metal film, we perform our measurement on uncoated samples. This provides greater sensitivity to the change in conductivity of the thin damaged layer. Using sample temperature as a parameter provides a means to deduce the primary defect structures that limit thermal transport. We find that under high temperature irradiation the degradation of thermal conductivity is caused primarily by extended defects.

  11. Spherical Accretion with Anisotropic Thermal Conduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prateek Sharma; Eliot Quataert; James M. Stone

    2008-07-05

    We study the effects of anisotropic thermal conduction on magnetized spherical accretion flows using global axisymmetric MHD simulations. In low collisionality plasmas, the Bondi spherical accretion solution is unstable to the magnetothermal instability (MTI). The MTI grows rapidly at large radii where the inflow is subsonic. For a weak initial field, the MTI saturates by creating a primarily radial magnetic field, i.e., by aligning the field lines with the background temperature gradient. The saturation is quasilinear in the sense that the magnetic field is amplified by a factor of $\\sim 10-30$ independent of the initial field strength (for weak fields). In the saturated state, the conductive heat flux is much larger than the convective heat flux, and is comparable to the field-free (Spitzer) value (since the field lines are largely radial). The MTI by itself does not appreciably change the accretion rate $\\dot M$ relative to the Bondi rate $\\dot M_B$. However, the radial field lines created by the MTI are amplified by flux freezing as the plasma flows in to small radii. Oppositely directed field lines are brought together by the converging inflow, leading to significant resistive heating. When the magnetic energy density is comparable to the gravitational potential energy density, the plasma is heated to roughly the virial temperature; the mean inflow is highly subsonic; most of the energy released by accretion is transported to large radii by thermal conduction; and the accretion rate $\\dot M \\ll \\dot M_B$. The predominantly radial magnetic field created by the MTI at large radii in spherical accretion flows may account for the stable Faraday rotation measure towards Sgr A* in the Galactic Center.

  12. Gas storage carbon with enhanced thermal conductivity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burchell, Timothy D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Rogers, Michael Ray (Knoxville, TN); Judkins, Roddie R. (Knoxville, TN)

    2000-01-01

    A carbon fiber carbon matrix hybrid adsorbent monolith with enhanced thermal conductivity for storing and releasing gas through adsorption and desorption is disclosed. The heat of adsorption of the gas species being adsorbed is sufficiently large to cause hybrid monolith heating during adsorption and hybrid monolith cooling during desorption which significantly reduces the storage capacity of the hybrid monolith, or efficiency and economics of a gas separation process. The extent of this phenomenon depends, to a large extent, on the thermal conductivity of the adsorbent hybrid monolith. This invention is a hybrid version of a carbon fiber monolith, which offers significant enhancements to thermal conductivity and potential for improved gas separation and storage systems.

  13. High conductance surge cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murray, M.M.; Wilfong, D.H.; Lomax, R.E.

    1998-12-08

    An electrical cable for connecting transient voltage surge suppressors to electrical power panels. A strip of electrically conductive foil defines a longitudinal axis, with a length of an electrical conductor electrically attached to the metallic foil along the longitudinal axis. The strip of electrically conductive foil and the length of an electrical conductor are covered by an insulating material. For impedance matching purposes, triangular sections can be removed from the ends of the electrically conductive foil at the time of installation. 6 figs.

  14. High conductance surge cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murray, Matthew M. (Espanola, NM); Wilfong, Dennis H. (Brooksville, FL); Lomax, Ralph E. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1998-01-01

    An electrical cable for connecting transient voltage surge suppressers to ectrical power panels. A strip of electrically conductive foil defines a longitudinal axis, with a length of an electrical conductor electrically attached to the metallic foil along the longitudinal axis. The strip of electrically conductive foil and the length of an electrical conductor are covered by an insulating material. For impedance matching purposes, triangular sections can be removed from the ends of the electrically conductive foil at the time of installation.

  15. Design, analysis, and testing of a high thermal conductivity waveguide window for use in a free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. Schultheiss; V. Christina; M. Cole; J. Rathke; T. Elliott; V. Nguyen; L. Phillips; J. Preble

    1998-08-01

    Design, analysis and testing of a waveguide window with a goal of propagating greater than 100 kW average power operating at 1500 Mhz has been performed. This is made possible by the favorable material properties of Beryllia (BeO). Brazing the window to a soft copper frame and then brazing the frame to a KOVAR flange provides the vacuum seal. RF analysis combined with thermal/structural analysis shows the benefits of the material. The KOVAR flange with a CTE,coefficient of thermal expansion, that matches that of BeO enables a strong braze joint. RF testing to 35 kW has been successful, and higher powers will be tested in the near future. The basics of this design can be expanded to applications with lower frequencies and higher average power.

  16. Effective Thermal Conductivity of Graded Nanocomposites with Interfacial Thermal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulino, Glaucio H.

    .M. Yin", G. H. Paulino", W.G. Buttlar", and L.Z. Sun'' '^Department of Civil and Environmental the effective thermal conductivity distribution in functionally graded materials (FGMs) considering the Kapitza is developed to derive the averaged heat flux field of the particle phase. Then the temperature gradient can

  17. The effect of thermal aging on the thermal conductivity of plasma sprayed and EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dinwiddie, R.B.; Beecher, S.C.; Porter, W.D.; Nagaraj, B.A.

    1996-05-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) applied to the hot gas components of turbine engines lead to enhanced fuel efficiency and component reliability. Understanding the mechanisms which control the thermal transport behavior of the TBCs is of primary importance. Electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EV-PVD) and air plasma spraying (APS) are the two most commonly used coating techniques. These techniques produce coatings with unique microstructures which control their performance and stability. The density of the APS coatings was controlled by varying the spray parameters. The low density APS yttria-partially stabilized zirconia (yttria-PSZ) coatings yielded a thermal conductivity that is lower than both the high density APS coatings and the EB-PVD coatings. The thermal aging of both fully and partially stabilized zirconia are compared. The thermal conductivity of the coatings permanently increases upon exposure to high temperatures. These increases are attributed to microstructural changes within the coatings. This increase in thermal conductivity can be modeled using a relationship which depends on both the temperature and time of exposure. Although the EB-PVD coatings are less susceptible to thermal aging effects, results suggest that they typically have a higher thermal conductivity than APS coatings before thermal aging. The increases in thermal conductivity due to thermal aging for plasma sprayed partially stabilized zirconia have been found to be less than for plasma sprayed fully stabilized zirconia coatings.

  18. Pretest Caluculations of Temperature Changes for Field Thermal Conductivity Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N.S. Brodsky

    2002-07-17

    A large volume fraction of the potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain may reside in the Tptpll (Tertiary, Paintbrush Group, Topopah Spring Tuff, crystal poor, lower lithophysal) lithostratigraphic unit. This unit is characterized by voids, or lithophysae, which range in size from centimeters to meters. A series of thermal conductivity field tests are planned in the Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB) Cross Drift. The objective of the pretest calculation described in this document is to predict changes in temperatures in the surrounding rock for these tests for a given heater power and a set of thermal transport properties. The calculation can be extended, as described in this document, to obtain thermal conductivity, thermal capacitance (density x heat capacity, J {center_dot} m{sup -3} {center_dot} K{sup -1}), and thermal diffusivity from the field data. The work has been conducted under the ''Technical Work Plan For: Testing and Monitoring'' (BSC 2001). One of the outcomes of this analysis is to determine the initial output of the heater. This heater output must be sufficiently high that it will provide results in a reasonably short period of time (within several weeks or a month) and be sufficiently high that the heat increase is detectable by the instruments employed in the test. The test will be conducted in stages and heater output will be step increased as the test progresses. If the initial temperature is set too high, the experiment will not have as many steps and thus fewer thermal conductivity data points will result.

  19. Thermal contact conductance of a paper handsheet/metal interface 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Kin Hung

    1990-01-01

    ) to determine the thermal contact conductance and effective thermal conductivity of anodized coatings. One chemically polished Aluminium 6061-T6 test specimen and seven specimens with anodized coatings varying in thickness from 60. 9 pm to 163. 8 pm were...

  20. Strain-controlled thermal conductivity in ferroic twinned films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Suzhi

    Large reversible changes of thermal conductivity are induced by mechanical stress, and the corresponding device is a key element for phononics applications. We show that the thermal conductivity ? of ferroic twinned thin ...

  1. Thermal conductivity of nanoparticle suspensions Shawn A. Putnam,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul

    Thermal conductivity of nanoparticle suspensions Shawn A. Putnam,a David G. Cahill, and Paul V We describe an optical beam deflection technique for measurements of the thermal diffusivity of fluid the thermal conductivity of ethanol-water mixtures; in nearly pure ethanol, the increase in thermal

  2. Mode dependent lattice thermal conductivity of single layer graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Zhiyong; Yang, Juekuan; Bi, Kedong; Chen, Yunfei, E-mail: yunfeichen@seu.edu.cn [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Design and Manufacture of Micro/Nano Biomedical Instruments and School of Mechanical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)

    2014-10-21

    Molecular dynamics simulation is performed to extract the phonon dispersion and phonon lifetime of single layer graphene. The mode dependent thermal conductivity is calculated from the phonon kinetic theory. The predicted thermal conductivity at room temperature exhibits important quantum effects due to the high Debye temperature of graphene. But the quantum effects are reduced significantly when the simulated temperature is as high as 1000 K. Our calculations show that out-of-plane modes contribute about 41.1% to the total thermal conductivity at room temperature. The relative contribution of out-of-plane modes has a little decrease with the increase of temperature. Contact with substrate can reduce both the total thermal conductivity of graphene and the relative contribution of out-of-plane modes, in agreement with previous experiments and theories. Increasing the coupling strength between graphene and substrate can further reduce the relative contribution of out-of-plane modes. The present investigations also show that the relative contribution of different mode phonons is not sensitive to the grain size of graphene. The obtained phonon relaxation time provides useful insight for understanding the phonon mean free path and the size effects in graphene.

  3. Highly directional thermal emitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ribaudo, Troy; Shaner, Eric A; Davids, Paul; Peters, David W

    2015-03-24

    A highly directional thermal emitter device comprises a two-dimensional periodic array of heavily doped semiconductor structures on a surface of a substrate. The array provides a highly directional thermal emission at a peak wavelength between 3 and 15 microns when the array is heated. For example, highly doped silicon (HDSi) with a plasma frequency in the mid-wave infrared was used to fabricate nearly perfect absorbing two-dimensional gratings structures that function as highly directional thermal radiators. The absorption and emission characteristics of the HDSi devices possessed a high degree of angular dependence for infrared absorption in the 10-12 micron range, while maintaining high reflectivity of solar radiation (.about.64%) at large incidence angles.

  4. Experimental thermal conductivity and contact conductance of graphite composites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Marian Christine

    1998-01-01

    Graphite fiber organic matrix composites were reviewed ics. for potential heat sink applications in the electronics packaging determined the effective transverse and longitudinal thermal industry. This experimental ...

  5. Lattice thermal conductivity of filled skutterudites: An anharmonicity perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geng, Huiyuan, E-mail: genghuiyuan@hit.edu.cn; Meng, Xianfu; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Jian [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2014-10-28

    We report a phenomenological model to calculate the high-temperature lattice thermal conductivity of filled skutterudite antimonides. The model needs no phonon resonant scattering terms. Instead, we assume that umklapp processes dominate the high-temperature phonon scattering. In order to represent the anharmonicity introduced by the filling atom, we introduce a Gaussian term into the relaxation time of the umklapp process. The developed model agrees remarkably well with the experimental results of RE{sub f}Co{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} and RE{sub f}Fe{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} (RE?=?Yb, Ba, and Ca) alloys. To further test the validity of our model, we calculate the lattice thermal conductivity of nanostructured or multi-filled skutterudites. The calculation results are also in good agreement with experiment, increasing our confidence in the developed anharmonicity model.

  6. Effect of interfacial interactions on the thermal conductivity and interfacial thermal conductance in tungsten–graphene layered structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jagannadham, K., E-mail: jag-kasichainula@ncsu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Graphene film was deposited by microwave plasma assisted deposition on polished oxygen free high conductivity copper foils. Tungsten–graphene layered film was formed by deposition of tungsten film by magnetron sputtering on the graphene covered copper foils. Tungsten film was also deposited directly on copper foil without graphene as the intermediate film. The tungsten–graphene–copper samples were heated at different temperatures up to 900?°C in argon atmosphere to form an interfacial tungsten carbide film. Tungsten film deposited on thicker graphene platelets dispersed on silicon wafer was also heated at 900?°C to identify the formation of tungsten carbide film by reaction of tungsten with graphene platelets. The films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. It was found that tungsten carbide film formed at the interface upon heating only above 650?°C. Transient thermoreflectance signal from the tungsten film surface on the samples was collected and modeled using one-dimensional heat equation. The experimental and modeled results showed that the presence of graphene at the interface reduced the cross-plane effective thermal conductivity and the interfacial thermal conductance of the layer structure. Heating at 650 and 900?°C in argon further reduced the cross-plane thermal conductivity and interface thermal conductance as a result of formation nanocrystalline tungsten carbide at the interface leading to separation and formation of voids. The present results emphasize that interfacial interactions between graphene and carbide forming bcc and hcp elements will reduce the cross-plane effective thermal conductivity in composites.

  7. High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production This...

  8. THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF POWDER INSULATIONS FOR CRYOGENIC STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Ho-Myung

    THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF POWDER INSULATIONS FOR CRYOGENIC STORAGE VESSELS Y. S. Choi1 '3 , M. N of the present work was to develop a precise instrument for measuring the thermal conductivity of powder cylinder is thermally anchored to the coldhead of a single stage Gifford-McMahon cryocooler, while

  9. Abnormal thermal conductivity in tetragonal tungsten bronze Ba...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    temperature interval. Substitution of Sr for Ba brings about a significant decrease in thermal conductivity at x???3 accompanied by development of a low-temperature...

  10. Development of a Test Technique to Determine the Thermal Conductivity...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Development of a Test Technique to Determine the Thermal Conductivity of Large Refractory Ceramic Test Specimens Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  11. Specific heat and thermal conductivity of explosives, mixtures...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Specific heat and thermal conductivity of explosives, mixtures, and plastic-bonded explosives determined experimentally Baytos, J.F. 45 MILITARY TECHNOLOGY, WEAPONRY, AND NATIONAL...

  12. Heat diode effect and negative differential thermal conductance...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Heat diode effect and negative differential thermal conductance across nanoscale metal-dielectric interfaces Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Heat diode effect and...

  13. Microscopic mechanism of low thermal conductivity in lead telluride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delaire, Olivier A [ORNL; Ma, Jie [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Themicroscopic physics behind low-lattice thermal conductivity of single-crystal rock salt lead telluride (PbTe) is investigated. Mode-dependent phonon (normal and umklapp) scattering rates and their impact on thermal conductivity were quantified by first-principles-based anharmonic lattice dynamics calculations that accurately reproduce thermal conductivity in a wide temperature range. The low thermal conductivity of PbTe is attributed to the scattering of longitudinal acoustic phonons by transverse optical phonons with large anharmonicity and small group velocity of the soft transverse acoustic phonons. This results in enhancing the relative contribution of optical phonons, which are usually minor heat carriers in bulk materials.

  14. On the thermal expansion of composite materials and cross-property connection between thermal expansion and thermal conductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sevostianov, Igor

    On the thermal expansion of composite materials and cross-property connection between thermal expansion and thermal conductivity Igor Sevostianov Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, New: Composite material Thermal expansion Cross-property Microstructure Thermal conductivity a b s t r a c

  15. Hot wire needle probe for thermal conductivity detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Condie, Keith Glenn; Rempe, Joy Lynn; Knudson, Darrell lee; Daw, Joshua Earl; Wilkins, Steven Curtis; Fox, Brandon S.; Heng, Ban

    2015-11-10

    An apparatus comprising a needle probe comprising a sheath, a heating element, a temperature sensor, and electrical insulation that allows thermal conductivity to be measured in extreme environments, such as in high-temperature irradiation testing. The heating element is contained within the sheath and is electrically conductive. In an embodiment, the heating element is a wire capable of being joule heated when an electrical current is applied. The temperature sensor is contained within the sheath, electrically insulated from the heating element and the sheath. The electrical insulation electrically insulates the sheath, heating element and temperature sensor. The electrical insulation fills the sheath having electrical resistance capable of preventing electrical conduction between the sheath, heating element, and temperature sensor. The control system is connected to the heating element and the temperature sensor.

  16. Conductive Thermal Interaction in Evaporative Cooling Process 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, B. S.; Degelman, L. O.

    1990-01-01

    between water and entering air for thermal comfort. This hybrid system outperforms the two-stage evaporative cooler without employing a complicated heat exchanger (indirect system), if the temperature of underground water is lower than the ambient wet...

  17. Morphology and thermal conductivity of yttria-stabilized zirconia coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadley, Haydn

    Morphology and thermal conductivity of yttria-stabilized zirconia coatings Hengbei Zhao a vapor deposition method was used to grow 7 wt.% Y2O3­ZrO2 (7YSZ) coatings and the effects of substrate rotation upon the coating porosity, morphology, texture, and thermal conductivity were explored

  18. Monte Carlo Simulations of Thermal Conductivity in Nanoporous Si Membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Monte Carlo Simulations of Thermal Conductivity in Nanoporous Si Membranes Stefanie Wolf1 transport in Si nanomeshes. Phonons are treated semiclassically as particles of specific energy and velocity, ii) the roughness amplitude of the pore surfaces on the thermal conductivity of the nanomeshes. We

  19. 3 omega method for specific heat and thermal conductivity measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Lu; W. Yi; D. L. Zhang

    2002-02-06

    We present a 3 omega method for simultaneously measuring the specific heat and thermal conductivity of a rod- or filament-like specimen using a way similar to a four-probe resistance measurement. The specimen in this method needs to be electrically conductive and with a temperature-dependent resistance, for acting both as a heater to create a temperature fluctuation and as a sensor to measure its thermal response. With this method we have successfully measured the specific heat and thermal conductivity of platinum wire specimens at cryogenic temperatures, and measured those thermal quantities of tiny carbon nanotube bundles some of which are only 10^-9 g in mass.

  20. Reexamination of Basal Plane Thermal Conductivity of Suspended Graphene Samples Measured by Electro-Thermal Micro-Bridge Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jo, Insun; Pettes, Michael; Lindsay, Lucas R; Ou, Eric; Weathers, Annie; Moore, Arden; Yao, Zhen; Shi, Li

    2015-01-01

    Thermal transport in suspended graphene samples has been measured in prior works and this work with the use of a suspended electro-thermal micro-bridge method. These measurement results are analyzed here to evaluate and eliminate the errors caused by the extrinsic thermal contact resistance. It is noted that the thermal resistance measured in a recent work increases linearly with the suspended length of the single-layer graphene samples synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), and that such a feature does not reveal the failure of Fourier s law despite the increase in the apparent thermal conductivity with length. The re-analyzed thermal conductivity of a single-layer CVD graphene sample reaches about ( 1680 180 )Wm-1K-1 at room temperature, which is close to the highest value reported for highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. In comparison, the thermal conductivity values measured for two suspended exfoliated bi-layer graphene samples are about ( 880 60 ) and ( 730 60 ) Wm-1K-1 at room temperature, and approach that of the natural graphite source above room temperature. However, the low-temperature thermal conductivities of these suspended graphene samples are still considerably lower than the graphite values, with the peak thermal conductivities shifted to much higher temperatures. Analysis of the thermal conductivity data reveals that the low temperature behavior is dominated by phonon scattering by polymer residue instead of by the lateral boundary.

  1. Thermal Conductivity from Core and Well log Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartmann, Andreas; Clauser, Christoph

    2008-01-01

    The relationships between thermal conductivity and other petrophysical properties have been analysed for a borehole drilled in a Tertiary Flysch sequence. We establish equations that permit us to predict rock thermal conductivity from logging data. A regression analysis of thermal conductivity, bulk density, and sonic velocity yields thermal conductivity with an average accuracy of better than 0.2 W/(m K). As a second step, logging data is used to compute a lithological depth profile, which in turn is used to calculate a thermal conductivity profile. From a comparison of the conductivity-depth profile and the laboratory data it can be concluded that thermal conductivity can be computed with an accuracy of less than 0.3 W/(m K)from conventional wireline data. The comparison of two different models shows that this approach can be practical even if old and incomplete logging data is used. The results can be used to infer thermal conductivity for boreholes without appropriate core data that are drilled in a simil...

  2. Odne Stokke Burheim Thermal Signature and Thermal Conductivities of PEM Fuel Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kjelstrup, Signe

    Odne Stokke Burheim Thermal Signature and Thermal Conductivities of PEM Fuel Cells Thesis-Holst for believing in me and for giving me the opportunity to join the work on the "Thermal Effects in Fuel cell The work presented here gives estimates on thermal gradients within the PEM fuel cell, an experimental

  3. Cryogenic cold war : closing the thermal conductivity gap 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kennedy, Julia Susan

    2013-07-01

    A critical analysis of published thermal conductivity data is presented which highlights failures in data extrapolation, unexplained sudden drops in previously observed material data sets and the clarity of equipment design. ...

  4. Investigation on thermal conductivity and AC impedance of graphite suspension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jianjian, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade, some groups have reported that nanofluids, which are liquids containing suspensions of nanoparticles, have substantially higher thermal conductivity than that of the base fluids. However, the reported ...

  5. Experimental investigations of solid-solid thermal interface conductance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Kimberlee C. (Kimberlee Chiyoko)

    2010-01-01

    Understanding thermal interface conductance is important for nanoscale systems where interfaces can play a critical role in heat transport. In this thesis, pump and probe transient thermoreflectance methods are used to ...

  6. Measurement and modeling thermal conductivity of baked products 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Islas Rubio, Alma Rosa

    1990-01-01

    MEASUREMENT AND MODELING THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF BAKED PRODUCTS A Thesis by ALMA ROSA ISLAS RUBIO Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies ot' Iexas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... on thermal conductivity. Water content did not appear to be a, significant factor over the limited water content range studied. The models k = 0. 0598 + 0. 1270D and k = 0. 0844 + 0. 0892D were developed for bread and cakes, respectively. The statistical...

  7. eXtremes of heat conduction: Pushing the boundaries of the thermal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul

    -called "nanofluids" (suspensions in liquids) ­ polymer composites and coatings Fischer (2007) Lehman (2005) #12;Critical aspect ratio for a fiber composite · Isotropic fiber composite with high conductivity fibers (andeXtremes of heat conduction: Pushing the boundaries of the thermal conductivity of materials David

  8. Effective thermal conductivity measurements relevant to deep borehole nuclear waste disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaikh, Samina

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this work was to measure the effective thermal conductivity of a number of materials (particle beds, and fluids) proposed for use in and around canisters for disposal of high level nuclear waste in deep ...

  9. Novel Transparent Phosphor Conversion Matrix with High Thermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transparent Phosphor Conversion Matrix with High Thermal Conductivity for Next-Generation Phosphor-Converted LED-based Solid State Lighting Novel Transparent Phosphor Conversion...

  10. Thermal radiation and conduction in microscale structures. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tien, C.L.

    1998-09-02

    The general objective of the current research program is to achieve a better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of thermal radiation and heat conduction in microscale structures commonly encountered in engineering applications. Specifically, the program includes both experimental and analytical investigations of radiative heat transfer in microstructures, conductive heat transfer in micro devices, and short-pulse laser material interactions. Future work is planned to apply the knowledge of microscale heat transfer gained in this project to developing thermal insulating aerogel materials, thermal design schemes for quantum well lasers, and short-pulse laser micro-fabrication techniques. A listing of publications by Chang-Lin Tien is included.

  11. Thermal Conductivity for a Noisy Disordered Harmonic Chain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cedric Bernardin

    2008-08-05

    We consider a $d$-dimensional disordered harmonic chain (DHC) perturbed by an energy conservative noise. We obtain uniform in the volume upper and lower bounds for the thermal conductivity defined through the Green-Kubo formula. These bounds indicate a positive finite conductivity. We prove also that the infinite volume homogenized Green-Kubo formula converges.

  12. The Thermal Conductivity of Low Density Concretes Containing Perlite 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yarbrough, D. W.

    1985-01-01

    CONDUCTIVITY OF LOW DENSITY CONCRETES CONTAINING PERLITE David W. Yarbrough Department of Chemical Engineering Tennessee Technological University Cookeville, Tennessee ABSTRACT The thermal conductivity, k, of low density concretes made from Portland... cement and perlite has been measured near room temperature using an unguarded linear heat flow apparatus. Perlite based concretes having densities from 44.3 1b/ft 3 to 66.6 1b/ft 3 were found to have thermal conductivities from 1.55 Btu?in/ft 2 ?h...

  13. Thermal conductivity changes upon neutron transmutation of {sup 10}B doped diamond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jagannadham, K., E-mail: jag-kasichainula@ncsu.edu [Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Verghese, K. [Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Butler, J. E. [Code 6174, Naval research Laboratory, Washington, District of Columbia 20375 (United States)

    2014-08-28

    {sup 10}B doped p-type diamond samples were subjected to neutron transmutation reaction using thermal neutron flux of 0.9 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup ?2} s{sup ?1} and fast neutron flux of 0.09 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup ?2} s{sup ?1}. Another sample of epilayer grown on type IIa (110) single crystal diamond substrate was subjected to equal thermal and fast neutron flux of 10{sup 14}?cm{sup ?2} s{sup ?1}. The defects in the diamond samples were previously characterized by different methods. In the present work, thermal conductivity of these diamond samples was determined at room temperature by transient thermoreflectance method. The thermal conductivity change in the samples as a function of neutron fluence is explained by the phonon scattering from the point defects and disordered regions. The thermal conductivity of the diamond samples decreased more rapidly initially and less rapidly for larger neutron fluence. In addition, the thermal conductivity in type IIb diamond decreased less rapidly with thermal neutron fluence compared to the decrease in type IIa diamond subjected to fast neutron fluence. It is concluded that the rate of production of defects during transmutation reaction is slower when thermal neutrons are used. The thermal conductivity of epilayer of diamond subjected to high thermal and fast neutron fluence is associated with the covalent carbon network in the composite structure consisting of disordered carbon and sp{sup 2} bonded nanocrystalline regions.

  14. Ceramic materials with low thermal conductivity and low coefficients of thermal expansion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Jesse (Christiansburg, VA); Hirschfeld, Deidre (Elliston, VA); Liu, Dean-Mo (Blacksburg, VA); Yang, Yaping (Blacksburg, VA); Li, Tingkai (Blacksburg, VA); Swanson, Robert E. (Blacksburg, VA); Van Aken, Steven (Blacksburg, VA); Kim, Jin-Min (Seoul, KR)

    1992-01-01

    Compositions having the general formula (Ca.sub.x Mg.sub.1-x)Zr.sub.4 (PO.sub.4).sub.6 where x is between 0.5 and 0.99 are produced by solid state and sol-gel processes. In a preferred embodiment, when x is between 0.5 and 0.8, the MgCZP materials have near-zero coefficients of thermal expansion. The MgCZPs of the present invention also show unusually low thermal conductivities, and are stable at high temperatures. Macrostructures formed from MgCZP are useful in a wide variety of high-temperature applications. In a preferred process, calcium, magnesium, and zirconium nitrate solutions have their pH adjusted to between 7 and 9 either before or after the addition of ammonium dihydrogen phosphate. After dehydration to a gel, and calcination at temperatures in excess of 850.degree. C. for approximately 16 hours, single phase crystalline MgCZP powders with particle sizes ranging from approximately 20 nm to 50 nm result. The MgCZP powders are then sintered at temperatures ranging from 1200.degree. C. to 1350.degree. C. to form solid macrostructures with near-zero bulk coefficients of thermal expansion and low thermal conductivities. Porous macrostructures of the MgCZP powders of the present invention are also formed by combination with a polymeric powder and a binding agent, and sintering at high temperatures. The porosity of the resulting macrostructures can be adjusted by varying the particle size of the polymeric powder used.

  15. Ceramic materials with low thermal conductivity and low coefficients of thermal expansion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, J.; Hirschfeld, D.; Liu, D.M.; Yang, Y.; Li, T.; Swanson, R.E.; Van Aken, S.; Kim, J.M.

    1992-04-07

    Compositions, having the general formula (Ca[sub x]Mg[sub 1[minus]x])Zr[sub 4](PO[sub 4])[sub 6] where x is between 0.5 and 0.99, are produced by solid state and sol-gel processes. In a preferred embodiment, when x is between 0.5 and 0.8, the MgCZP materials have near-zero coefficients of thermal expansion. The MgCZPs of the present invention also show unusually low thermal conductivities, and are stable at high temperatures. Macrostructures formed from MgCZP are useful in a wide variety of high-temperature applications. In a preferred process, calcium, magnesium, and zirconium nitrate solutions have their pH adjusted to between 7 and 9 either before or after the addition of ammonium dihydrogen phosphate. After dehydration to a gel, and calcination at temperatures in excess of 850 C for approximately 16 hours, single phase crystalline MgCZP powders with particle sizes ranging from approximately 20 nm to 50 nm result. The MgCZP powders are then sintered at temperatures ranging from 1200 C to 1350 C to form solid macrostructures with near-zero bulk coefficients of thermal expansion and low thermal conductivities. Porous macrostructures of the MgCZP powders of the present invention are also formed by combination with a polymeric powder and a binding agent, and sintering at high temperatures. The porosity of the resulting macrostructures can be adjusted by varying the particle size of the polymeric powder used. 7 figs.

  16. Influence of Chemisorption on the Thermal Conductivity of Single-Wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, Donald W.

    composites. However, direct ex- perimental measurements of the thermal properties of CNT- polymer composites to a polymer matrix greatly improves the system's thermal conductivity,8,9 while others report that the effect transfer in CNT-polymer composites without significantly sacrificing the high axial Young's modulus of CNTs

  17. Thermal conductivity at a disordered quantum critical point

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartnoll, Sean A; Santos, Jorge E

    2015-01-01

    Strongly disordered and strongly interacting quantum critical points are difficult to access with conventional field theoretic methods. They are, however, both experimentally important and theoretically interesting. In particular, they are expected to realize universal incoherent transport. Such disordered quantum critical theories have recently been constructed holographically by deforming a CFT by marginally relevant disorder. In this paper we find additional disordered fixed points via relevant disordered deformations of a holographic CFT. Using recently developed methods in holographic transport, we characterize the thermal conductivity in both sets of theories in 1+1 dimensions. The thermal conductivity is found to tend to a constant at low temperatures in one class of fixed points, and to scale as $T^{0.3}$ in the other. Furthermore, in all cases the thermal conductivity exhibits discrete scale invariance, with logarithmic in temperature oscillations superimposed on the low temperature scaling behavior....

  18. Thermally conductive cementitious grout for geothermal heat pump systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allan, Marita (Old Field, NY)

    2001-01-01

    A thermally conductive cement-sand grout for use with a geothermal heat pump system. The cement sand grout contains cement, silica sand, a superplasticizer, water and optionally bentonite. The present invention also includes a method of filling boreholes used for geothermal heat pump systems with the thermally conductive cement-sand grout. The cement-sand grout has improved thermal conductivity over neat cement and bentonite grouts, which allows shallower bore holes to be used to provide an equivalent heat transfer capacity. In addition, the cement-sand grouts of the present invention also provide improved bond strengths and decreased permeabilities. The cement-sand grouts can also contain blast furnace slag, fly ash, a thermoplastic air entraining agent, latex, a shrinkage reducing admixture, calcium oxide and combinations thereof.

  19. Electron thermal conductivity owing to collisions between degenerate electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. S. Shternin; D. G. Yakovlev

    2006-08-17

    We calculate the thermal conductivity of electrons produced by electron-electron Coulomb scattering in a strongly degenerate electron gas taking into account the Landau damping of transverse plasmons. The Landau damping strongly reduces this conductivity in the domain of ultrarelativistic electrons at temperatures below the electron plasma temperature. In the inner crust of a neutron star at temperatures T electron conductivity due to electron-ion (electron-phonon) scattering and becomes competitive with the the electron conductivity due to scattering of electrons by impurity ions.

  20. Materials for thermal conduction D.D.L. Chung *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Deborah D.L.

    - ductivity (such as metals, carbons, ceramics and composites), and thermal interface materials (such thermal conductors such as diamond, metal-matrix composites and carbon-matrix composites are being used but its CTE is high. Therefore, copper-matrix composites containing low CTE ®llers such as carbon ®bers

  1. Enhancing the thermoelectric figure of merit through the reduction of bipolar thermal conductivity with heterostructure barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahk, Je-Hyeong, E-mail: jbahk@purdue.edu; Shakouri, Ali [Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2014-08-04

    In this paper, we present theoretically that the thermoelectric figure of merit for a semiconductor material with a small band gap can be significantly enhanced near the intrinsic doping regime at high temperatures via the suppression of bipolar thermal conductivity when the minority carriers are selectively blocked by heterostructure barriers. This scheme is particularly effective in nanostructured materials where the lattice thermal conductivity is lowered by increased phonon scatterings at the boundaries, so that the electronic thermal conductivity including the bipolar term is limiting the figure of merit zT. We show that zT can be enhanced to above 3 for p-type PbTe, and above 2 for n-type PbTe at 900?K with minority carrier blocking, when the lattice thermal conductivity is as low as 0.3?W/m K.

  2. Enhancing thermal conductivity of fluids with graphite nanoparticles and carbon nanotube

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Zhiqiang (Lexington, KY); Lockwood, Frances E. (Georgetown, KY)

    2008-03-25

    A fluid media such as oil or water, and a selected effective amount of carbon nanomaterials necessary to enhance the thermal conductivity of the fluid. One of the preferred carbon nanomaterials is a high thermal conductivity graphite, exceeding that of the neat fluid to be dispersed therein in thermal conductivity, and ground, milled, or naturally prepared with mean particle size less than 500 nm, and preferably less than 200 nm, and most preferably less than 100 nm. The graphite is dispersed in the fluid by one or more of various methods, including ultrasonication, milling, and chemical dispersion. Carbon nanotubes with graphitic structure is another preferred source of carbon nanomaterial, although other carbon nanomaterials are acceptable. To confer long term stability, the use of one or more chemical dispersants is preferred. The thermal conductivity enhancement, compared to the fluid without carbon nanomaterial, is proportional to the amount of carbon nanomaterials (carbon nanotubes and/or graphite) added.

  3. Thermal conductivity of silicene from first-principles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Han; Bao, Hua, E-mail: hum@ghi.rwth-aachen.de, E-mail: hua.bao@sjtu.edu.cn [University of Michigan–Shanghai Jiao Tong University Joint Institute, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Hu, Ming, E-mail: hum@ghi.rwth-aachen.de, E-mail: hua.bao@sjtu.edu.cn [Institute of Mineral Engineering, Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Georesources and Materials Engineering, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen 52064 (Germany); Aachen Institute for Advanced Study in Computational Engineering Science (AICES), RWTH Aachen University, Aachen 52062 (Germany)

    2014-03-31

    Silicene, as a graphene-like two-dimensional material, now receives exceptional attention of a wide community of scientists and engineers beyond graphene. Despite extensive study on its electric property, little research has been done to accurately calculate the phonon transport of silicene so far. In this paper, thermal conductivity of monolayer silicene is predicted from first-principles method. At 300?K, the thermal conductivity of monolayer silicene is found to be 9.4?W/mK and much smaller than bulk silicon. The contributions from in-plane and out-of-plane vibrations to thermal conductivity are quantified, and the out-of-plane vibration contributes less than 10% of the overall thermal conductivity, which is different from the results of the similar studies on graphene. The difference is explained by the presence of small buckling, which breaks the reflectional symmetry of the structure. The flexural modes are thus not purely out-of-plane vibration and have strong scattering with other modes.

  4. Low Thermal Conductance Transition Edge Sensor (TES) for SPICA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khosropanah, P.; Dirks, B.; Kuur, J. van der; Ridder, M.; Bruijn, M.; Popescu, M.; Hoevers, H. [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Sorbonnelaan 2, 3584 CA Utrech (Netherlands); Gao, J. R. [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Sorbonnelaan 2, 3584 CA Utrech (Netherlands); Kavil Institute of NanoScience, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Morozov, D.; Mauskopf, P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Queens Buildings, The Parade, Cardiff, CF24 3AA (United Kingdom)

    2009-12-16

    We fabricated and characterized low thermal conductance transition edge sensors (TES) for SAFARI instrument on SPICA. The device is based on a superconducting Ti/Au bilayer deposited on suspended SiN membrane. The critical temperature of the device is 113 mK. The low thermal conductance is realized by using long and narrow SiN supporting legs. All measurements were performed having the device in a light-tight box, which to a great extent eliminates the loading of the background radiation. We measured the current-voltage (IV) characteristics of the device in different bath temperatures and determine the thermal conductance (G) to be equal to 320 fW/K. This value corresponds to a noise equivalent power (NEP) of 3x10{sup -19} W/{radical}(Hz). The current noise and complex impedance is also measured at different bias points at 55 mK bath temperature. The measured electrical (dark) NEP is 1x10{sup -18} W/{radical}(Hz), which is about a factor of 3 higher than what we expect from the thermal conductance that comes out of the IV curves. Despite using a light-tight box, the photon noise might still be the source of this excess noise. We also measured the complex impedance of the same device at several bias points. Fitting a simple first order thermal-electrical model to the measured data, we find an effective time constant of about 2.7 ms and a thermal capacity of 13 fJ/K in the middle of the transition.

  5. Theoretical investigation of the impact of grain boundaries and fission gases on UO2 thermal conductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Shiyu; Andersson, Anders D.; Germann, Timothy C.; Stanek, Christopher R.

    2012-05-02

    Thermal conductivity is one of the most important metrics of nuclear fuel performance. Therefore, it is crucial to understand the impact of microstructure features on thermal conductivity, especially since the microstructure evolves with burn-up or time in the reactor. For example, UO{sub 2} fuels are polycrystalline and for high-burnup fuels the outer parts of the pellet experience grain sub-division leading to a very fine grain structure. This is known to impact important physical properties such as thermal conductivity as fission gas release. In a previous study, we calculated the effect of different types of {Sigma}5 grain boundaries on UO{sub 2} thermal conductivity and predicted the corresponding Kapitza resistances, i.e. the resistance of the grain boundary in relation to the bulk thermal resistance. There have been reports of pseudoanisotropic effects for the thermal conductivity in cubic polycrystalline materials, as obtained from molecular dynamics simulations, which means that the conductivity appears to be a function of the crystallographic direction of the temperature gradient. However, materials with cubic symmetry should have isotropic thermal conductivity. For this reason it is necessary to determine the cause of this apparent anisotropy and in this report we investigate this effect in context of our earlier simulations of UO{sub 2} Kapitza resistances. Another source of thermal resistance comes from fission products and fission gases. Xe is the main fission gas and when generated in sufficient quantity it dissolves from the lattice and forms gas bubbles inside the crystalline structure. We have performed studies of how Xe atoms dissolved in the UO{sub 2} matrix or precipitated as bubbles impact thermal conductivity, both in bulk UO{sub 2} and in the presence of grain boundaries.

  6. A robust and well shielded thermal conductivity device for low temperature measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toews, W. H.; Hill, R. W.

    2014-04-15

    We present a compact mechanically robust thermal conductivity measurement apparatus for measurements at low temperatures (<1 K) and high magnetic fields on small high-purity single crystal samples. A high-conductivity copper box is used to enclose the sample and all the components. The box provides protection for the thermometers, heater, and most importantly the sample increasing the portability of the mount. In addition to physical protection, the copper box is also effective at shielding radio frequency electromagnetic interference and thermal radiation, which is essential for low temperature measurements. A printed circuit board in conjunction with a braided ribbon cable is used to organize the delicate wiring and provide mechanical robustness.

  7. Interfacial thermal conductance in spun-cast polymer films and polymer brushes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul

    Interfacial thermal conductance in spun-cast polymer films and polymer brushes Mark D. Losego inorganic materials and anharmonic polymers have potentially intriguing thermal transport behavior. The low thermal conductivity of amorphous polymers limits significant interfacial effects to polymer film

  8. Measurement of the anisotropic thermal conductivity of molybdenum disulfide by the time-resolved magneto-optic Kerr effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jun Choi, Gyung-Min; Cahill, David G.

    2014-12-21

    We use pump-probe metrology based on the magneto-optic Kerr effect to measure the anisotropic thermal conductivity of (001)-oriented MoS{sub 2} crystals. A ?20?nm thick CoPt multilayer with perpendicular magnetization serves as the heater and thermometer in the experiment. The low thermal conductivity and small thickness of the CoPt transducer improve the sensitivity of the measurement to lateral heat flow in the MoS{sub 2} crystal. The thermal conductivity of MoS{sub 2} is highly anisotropic with basal-plane thermal conductivity varying between 85–110 W?m{sup -1}?K{sup -1} as a function of laser spot size. The basal-plane thermal conductivity is a factor of ?50 larger than the c-axis thermal conductivity, 2.0±0.3?W?m{sup -1}?K{sup -1}.

  9. Thermal Conductivity of the Potential Repository Horizon Model Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Ramsey

    2002-08-29

    The purpose of this report is to assess the spatial variability and uncertainty of thermal conductivity in the host horizon for the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. More specifically, the lithostratigraphic units studied are located within the Topopah Spring Tuff (Tpt) and consist of the upper lithophysal zone (Tptpul), the middle nonlithophysal zone (Tptpmn), the lower lithophysal zone (Tptpll), and the lower nonlithophysal zone (Tptpln). The Tptpul is the layer directly above the repository host layers, which consist of the Tptpmn, Tptpll, and the Tptpln. Current design plans indicate that the largest portion of the repository will be excavated in the Tptpll (Board et al. 2002 [157756]). The main distinguishing characteristic among the lithophysal and nonlithophysal units is the percentage of large scale (cm-m) voids within the rock. The Tptpul and Tptpll, as their names suggest, have a higher percentage of lithophysae than the Tptpmn and the Tptpln. Understanding the influence of the lithophysae is of great importance to understanding bulk thermal conductivity and perhaps repository system performance as well. To assess the spatial variability and uncertainty of thermal conductivity, a model is proposed that is functionally dependent on the volume fraction of lithophysae and the thermal conductivity of the matrix portion of the rock. In this model, void space characterized as lithophysae is assumed to be air-saturated under all conditions, while void space characterized as matrix may be either water- or air-saturated. Lithophysae are assumed to be air-saturated under all conditions since the units being studied are all located above the water table in the region of interest, and the relatively strong capillary forces of the matrix will, under most conditions, preferentially retain any moisture present in the rock.

  10. The thermal conductivity of sediments as a function of porosity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, James W

    1979-01-01

    as thermal barriers to heat and tend to insulate the surrounding material. Fig, 1 shows how the temperature gradient changes when a high pressured zone is encountered. Assuming the flow of heat through any zone obeys Fourier's law, the following equation... = thermal con- aT ductivity of the material, and z is the depth below the mudline. It can be seen from Equation 1 that if the heat flux, q, is constant and the temperature gradient, ~, is increased as is the case for a high z pressured zone...

  11. Nanoscale size dependence parameters on lattice thermal conductivity of Wurtzite GaN nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mamand, S.M., E-mail: soran.mamand@univsul.net [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Sulaimani, Sulaimanyah, Iraqi Kurdistan (Iraq); Omar, M.S. [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Salahaddin, Arbil, Iraqi Kurdistan (Iraq)] [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Salahaddin, Arbil, Iraqi Kurdistan (Iraq); Muhammad, A.J. [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Kirkuk, Kirkuk (Iraq)] [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Kirkuk, Kirkuk (Iraq)

    2012-05-15

    Graphical abstract: Temperature dependence of calculated lattice thermal conductivity of Wurtzite GaN nanowires. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A modified Callaway model is used to calculate lattice thermal conductivity of Wurtzite GaN nanowires. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A direct method is used to calculate phonon group velocity for these nanowires. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 3-Gruneisen parameter, surface roughness, and dislocations are successfully investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dislocation densities are decreases with the decrease of wires diameter. -- Abstract: A detailed calculation of lattice thermal conductivity of freestanding Wurtzite GaN nanowires with diameter ranging from 97 to 160 nm in the temperature range 2-300 K, was performed using a modified Callaway model. Both longitudinal and transverse modes are taken into account explicitly in the model. A method is used to calculate the Debye and phonon group velocities for different nanowire diameters from their related melting points. Effect of Gruneisen parameter, surface roughness, and dislocations as structure dependent parameters are successfully used to correlate the calculated values of lattice thermal conductivity to that of the experimentally measured curves. It was observed that Gruneisen parameter will decrease with decreasing nanowire diameters. Scattering of phonons is assumed to be by nanowire boundaries, imperfections, dislocations, electrons, and other phonons via both normal and Umklapp processes. Phonon confinement and size effects as well as the role of dislocation in limiting thermal conductivity are investigated. At high temperatures and for dislocation densities greater than 10{sup 14} m{sup -2} the lattice thermal conductivity would be limited by dislocation density, but for dislocation densities less than 10{sup 14} m{sup -2}, lattice thermal conductivity would be independent of that.

  12. Modeling the Influence of Interaction Layer Formation on Thermal Conductivity of U–Mo Dispersion Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burkes, Douglas; Casella, Andrew M.; Huber, Tanja K.

    2015-01-01

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative Program continues to develop existing and new plate- and rod-type research and test reactor fuels with maximum attainable uranium loadings capable of potentially converting a number of the world’s remaining high-enriched uranium fueled reactors to low-enriched uranium fuel. Currently, the program is focused on assisting with the development and qualification of an even higher density fuel type consisting of a uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy dispersed in an aluminum matrix. Thermal conductivity is an important consideration in determining the operational temperature of the fuel plate and can be influenced by interaction layer formation between the fuel and matrix, porosity that forms during fabrication of the fuel plates, and upon the concentration of the dispersed phase within the matrix. This paper develops and validates a simple model to study the influence of interaction layer formation and conductivity, fuel particle size, and volume fraction of fuel dispersed in the matrix on the effective conductivity of the composite. The model shows excellent agreement with results previously presented in the literature. In particular, the thermal conductivity of the interaction layer does not appear to be important in determining the overall conductivity of the composite, while formation of the interaction layer and subsequent consumption of the matrix reveals a rather significant effect. The effective thermal conductivity of the composite can be influenced by the fuel particle distribution by minimizing interaction layer formation and preserving the higher thermal conductivity matrix.

  13. MESO-SCALE MODELING OF THE INFLUENCE OF INTERGRANULAR GAS BUBBLES ON EFFECTIVE THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul C. Millett; Michael Tonks

    2011-06-01

    Using a mesoscale modeling approach, we have investigated how intergranular fission gas bubbles, as observed in high-burnup nuclear fuel, modify the effective thermal conductivity in a polycrystalline material. The calculations reveal that intergranular porosity has a significantly higher resistance to heat transfer compared to randomly-distributed porosity. A model is developed to describe this conductivity reduction that considers an effective grain boundary Kapitza resistance as a function of the fractional coverage of grain boundaries by bubbles.

  14. Electrical conductivity and thermal dilepton rate from quenched lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olaf Kaczmarek; Anthony Francis

    2011-09-19

    We report on a continuum extrapolation of the vector current correlation function for light valence quarks in the deconfined phase of quenched QCD. This is achieved by performing a systematic analysis of the influence of cut-off effects on light quark meson correlators at $T\\simeq 1.45 T_c$ using clover improved Wilson fermions. We discuss resulting constraints on the electrical conductivity and the thermal dilepton rate in a quark gluon plasma. In addition new results at 1.2 and 3.0 $T_c$ will be presented.

  15. High quality transparent conducting oxide thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gessert, Timothy A. (Conifer, CO); Duenow, Joel N. (Golden, CO); Barnes, Teresa (Evergreen, CO); Coutts, Timothy J. (Golden, CO)

    2012-08-28

    A transparent conducting oxide (TCO) film comprising: a TCO layer, and dopants selected from the elements consisting of Vanadium, Molybdenum, Tantalum, Niobium, Antimony, Titanium, Zirconium, and Hafnium, wherein the elements are n-type dopants; and wherein the transparent conducting oxide is characterized by an improved electron mobility of about 42 cm.sup.2/V-sec while simultaneously maintaining a high carrier density of .about.4.4e.times.10.sup.20 cm.sup.-3.

  16. On the eective thermal conductivity of a three-dimensionally structured uid-saturated metal foam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daraio, Chiara

    thermal conductivity to a large extent, a fact that must be dealt with in the foam manufacturing process thermal conductivity in the volume averaged homogeneous energy equation. Antohe et al. [11] also requiredOn the eective thermal conductivity of a three- dimensionally structured ¯uid-saturated metal foam

  17. Method for determining thermal conductivity and thermal capacity per unit volume of earth in situ

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poppendiek, Heinz F. (LaJolla, CA)

    1982-01-01

    A method for determining the thermal conductivity of the earth in situ is based upon a cylindrical probe (10) having a thermopile (16) for measuring the temperature gradient between sets of thermocouple junctions (18 and 20) of the probe after it has been positioned in a borehole and has reached thermal equilibrium with its surroundings, and having means (14) for heating one set of thermocouple junctions (20) of the probe at a constant rate while the temperature gradient of the probe is recorded as a rise in temperature over several hours (more than about 3 hours). A fluid annulus thermally couples the probe to the surrounding earth. The recorded temperature curves are related to the earth's thermal conductivity, k.sub..infin., and to the thermal capacity per unit volume, (.gamma.c.sub.p).sub..infin., by comparison with calculated curves using estimates of k.sub..infin. and (.gamma.c.sub.p).sub..infin. in an equation which relates these parameters to a rise in the earth's temperature for a known and constant heating rate.

  18. A high-pressure route to thermoelectrics with low thermal conductivity: The solid solution series AgIn{sub x}Sb{sub 1?x}Te{sub 2} (x=0.1–0.6)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schröder, Thorsten; Rosenthal, Tobias; Souchay, Daniel; Petermayer, Christian; Grott, Sebastian; Scheidt, Ernst-Wilhelm; Gold, Christian; Scherer, Wolfgang; Oeckler, Oliver

    2013-10-15

    Metastable rocksalt-type phases of the solid solution series AgIn{sub x}Sb{sub 1?x}Te{sub 2} (x=0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.5 and 0.6) were prepared by high-pressure synthesis at 2.5 GPa and 400 °C. In these structures, the coordination number of In{sup 3+} is six, in contrast to chalcopyrite ambient-pressure AgInTe{sub 2} with fourfold In{sup 3+} coordination. Transmission electron microscopy shows that real-structure phenomena and a certain degree of short-range order are present, yet not very pronounced. All three cations are statistically disordered. The high degree of disorder is probably the reason why AgIn{sub x}Sb{sub 1?x}Te{sub 2} samples with 0.4thermal conductivities with a total ?<0.5 W/K m and a lattice contribution of ?{sub ph} ?0.3 W/K m at room temperature. These are lower than those of other rocksalt-type tellurides at room temperature; e.g. the well-known thermoelectric AgSbTe{sub 2} (? ?0.6 W/K m). The highest ZT value (0.15 at 300 K) is observed for AgIn{sub 0.5}Sb{sub 0.5}Te{sub 2}, mainly due to its high Seebeck coefficient of 160 µV/K. Temperature-dependent X-ray powder patterns indicate that the solid solutions are metastable at ambient pressure. At 150 °C, the quaternary compounds decompose into chalcopyrite-type AgInTe{sub 2} and rocksalt-type AgSbTe{sub 2}. - Graphical abstract: Reaction scheme, temperature characteristics of the ZT value and a selected-area electron diffraction pattern (background) of AgIn{sub 0.5}Sb{sub 0.5}Te{sub 2}, which crystallizes in a rocksalt-type structure with statistical cation disorder. Display Omitted - Highlights: • High-pressure synthesis yields the novel solid solution series AgIn{sub x}Sb{sub 1?x}Te{sub 2}. • In contrast to AgInTe{sub 2}, the compounds are inert at ambient pressure. • HRTEM shows no pronounced short-range order in the disordered NaCl-type structure. • The metastable phases exhibit very low total thermal conductivities <0.5 W/K m. • ZT values of 0.15 at room temperature were measured for AgIn{sub 0.5}Sb{sub 0.5}Te{sub 2}.

  19. High Performance Thermal Interface Technology Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Linderman; T. Brunschwiler; B. Smith; B. Michel

    2008-01-07

    An overview on recent developments in thermal interfaces is given with a focus on a novel thermal interface technology that allows the formation of 2-3 times thinner bondlines with strongly improved thermal properties at lower assembly pressures. This is achieved using nested hierarchical surface channels to control the particle stacking with highly particle-filled materials. Reliability testing with thermal cycling has also demonstrated a decrease in thermal resistance after extended times with longer overall lifetime compared to a flat interface.

  20. High thermal expansion, sealing glass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brow, Richard K. (Albuquerque, NM); Kovacic, Larry (Albuquerque, NM)

    1993-01-01

    A glass composition for hermetically sealing to high thermal expansion materials such as aluminum alloys, stainless steels, copper, and copper/beryllium alloys, which includes between about 10 and about 25 mole percent Na.sub.2 O, between about 10 and about 25 mole percent K.sub.2 O, between about 5 and about 15 mole percent Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, between about 35 and about 50 mole percent P.sub.2 O.sub.5 and between about 5 and about 15 mole percent of one of PbO, BaO, and mixtures thereof. The composition, which may also include between 0 and about 5 mole percent Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 and between 0 and about 10 mole percent B.sub.2 O.sub.3, has a thermal expansion coefficient in a range of between about 160 and 210.times.10-7/.degree.C. and a dissolution rate in a range of between about 2.times.10.sup.- 7 and 2.times.10.sup.-9 g/cm.sup.2 -min. This composition is suitable to hermetically seal to metallic electrical components which will be subjected to humid environments over an extended period of time.

  1. High thermal expansion, sealing glass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brow, R.K.; Kovacic, L.

    1993-11-16

    A glass composition is described for hermetically sealing to high thermal expansion materials such as aluminum alloys, stainless steels, copper, and copper/beryllium alloys, which includes between about 10 and about 25 mole percent Na[sub 2]O, between about 10 and about 25 mole percent K[sub 2]O, between about 5 and about 15 mole percent Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], between about 35 and about 50 mole percent P[sub 2]O[sub 5] and between about 5 and about 15 mole percent of one of PbO, BaO, and mixtures thereof. The composition, which may also include between 0 and about 5 mole percent Fe[sub 2]O[sub 3] and between 0 and about 10 mole percent B[sub 2]O[sub 3], has a thermal expansion coefficient in a range of between about 160 and 210[times]10[sup [minus]7]/C and a dissolution rate in a range of between about 2[times]10[sup [minus]7] and 2[times]10[sup [minus]9]g/cm[sup 2]-min. This composition is suitable to hermetically seal to metallic electrical components which will be subjected to humid environments over an extended period of time.

  2. Status of High Power Tests of Normal Conducting Short Standing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Status of High Power Tests of Normal Conducting Short Standing Wave Structures Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Status of High Power Tests of Normal Conducting Short...

  3. Electrical and thermal conductivities of reduced graphene oxide/polystyrene Wonjun Park, Jiuning Hu, Luis A. Jauregui, Xiulin Ruan, and Yong P. Chen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yong P.

    conductive polymer composites are used as heat sinks for device packaging requiring a high thermalElectrical and thermal conductivities of reduced graphene oxide/polystyrene composites Wonjun Park. The electrical conductivity (r) of RGO/PS composites with different RGO concentrations at room temperature shows

  4. Thermal Transport in Nanoporous Materials for Energy Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Jin

    2012-01-01

    Thermal Conductivity Measurement . . . . . . . . . . . . .Thermal ConductivityThermal Conductivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Thermal

  5. Computational modeling of thermal conductivity of single walled carbon nanotube polymer composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    was developed to study the thermal conductivity of single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polymer composites1 Computational modeling of thermal conductivity of single walled carbon nanotube polymer resistance on effective conductivity of composites were quantified. The present model is a useful tool

  6. Ultralow Thermal Conductivity in Organoclay Nanolaminates Synthesized via Simple Self-Assembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul

    Information ABSTRACT: Because interfaces impede phonon transport of thermal energy, nanostructuring canUltralow Thermal Conductivity in Organoclay Nanolaminates Synthesized via Simple Self-Assembly Mark of Chemistry, University of Illinois, Urbana Illinois 61801, United States § Materials and Manufacturing

  7. Reconstructing phonon mean-free-path contributions to thermal conductivity using nanoscale membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cuffe, John

    Knowledge of the mean-free-path distribution of heat-carrying phonons is key to understanding phonon-mediated thermal transport. We demonstrate that thermal conductivity measurements of thin membranes spanning a wide ...

  8. Reversible temperature regulation of electrical and thermal conductivity using liquid–solid phase transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Ruiting

    Reversible temperature tuning of electrical and thermal conductivities of materials is of interest for many applications, including seasonal regulation of building temperature, thermal storage and sensors. Here we introduce ...

  9. Ground surface temperature reconstructions: Using in situ estimates for thermal conductivity acquired with a fiber-optic distributed thermal perturbation sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freifeld, B.M.; Finsterle, S.; Onstott, T.C.; Toole, P.; Pratt, L.M.

    2008-10-10

    We have developed a borehole methodology to estimate formation thermal conductivity in situ with a spatial resolution of one meter. In parallel with a fiber-optic distributed temperature sensor (DTS), a resistance heater is deployed to create a controlled thermal perturbation. The transient thermal data is inverted to estimate the formation's thermal conductivity. We refer to this instrumentation as a Distributed Thermal Perturbation Sensor (DTPS), given the distributed nature of the DTS measurement technology. The DTPS was deployed in permafrost at the High Lake Project Site (67 degrees 22 minutes N, 110 degrees 50 minutes W), Nunavut, Canada. Based on DTPS data, a thermal conductivity profile was estimated along the length of a wellbore. Using the thermal conductivity profile, the baseline geothermal profile was then inverted to estimate a ground surface temperature history (GSTH) for the High Lake region. The GSTH exhibits a 100-year long warming trend, with a present-day ground surface temperature increase of 3.0 {+-} 0.8 C over the long-term average.

  10. Unusual Enhancement in Intrinsic Thermal Conductivity of Multilayer Graphene by Tensile Strains

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kuang, Youdi; Lindsay, Lucas R.; Huang, Baoling

    2015-01-01

    High basal plane thermal conductivity k of multi-layer graphene makes it promising for thermal management applications. Here we examine the effects of tensile strain on thermal transport in this system. Using a first principles Boltzmann-Peierls equation for phonon transport approach, we calculate the room-temperature in-plane lattice k of multi-layer graphene (up to four layers) and graphite under different isotropic tensile strains. The calculated in-plane k of graphite, finite mono-layer graphene and 3-layer graphene agree well with previous experiments. The dimensional transitions of the intrinsic k and the extent of the diffusive transport regime from mono-layer graphene to graphite are presented.more »We find a peak enhancement of intrinsic k for multi-layer graphene and graphite with increasing strain and the largest enhancement amplitude is about 40%. In contrast the calculated intrinsic k with tensile strain decreases for diamond and diverges for graphene, we show that the competition between the decreased mode heat capacities and the increased lifetimes of flexural phonons with increasing strain contribute to this k behavior. Similar k behavior is observed for 2-layer hexagonal boron nitride systems, suggesting that it is an inherent thermal transport property in multi-layer systems assembled of purely two dimensional atomic layers. This study provides insights into engineering k of multi-layer graphene and boron nitride by strain and into the nature of thermal transport in quasi-two-dimensional and highly anisotropic systems.« less

  11. Unusual Enhancement in Intrinsic Thermal Conductivity of Multilayer Graphene by Tensile Strains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuang, Youdi [Hong Kong Univ. of Science and Technology (Hong Kong); Lindsay, Lucas R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Huang, Baoling [Hong Kong Univ. of Science and Technology (Hong Kong)

    2015-01-01

    High basal plane thermal conductivity k of multi-layer graphene makes it promising for thermal management applications. Here we examine the effects of tensile strain on thermal transport in this system. Using a first principles Boltzmann-Peierls equation for phonon transport approach, we calculate the room-temperature in-plane lattice k of multi-layer graphene (up to four layers) and graphite under different isotropic tensile strains. The calculated in-plane k of graphite, finite mono-layer graphene and 3-layer graphene agree well with previous experiments. The dimensional transitions of the intrinsic k and the extent of the diffusive transport regime from mono-layer graphene to graphite are presented. We find a peak enhancement of intrinsic k for multi-layer graphene and graphite with increasing strain and the largest enhancement amplitude is about 40%. In contrast the calculated intrinsic k with tensile strain decreases for diamond and diverges for graphene, we show that the competition between the decreased mode heat capacities and the increased lifetimes of flexural phonons with increasing strain contribute to this k behavior. Similar k behavior is observed for 2-layer hexagonal boron nitride systems, suggesting that it is an inherent thermal transport property in multi-layer systems assembled of purely two dimensional atomic layers. This study provides insights into engineering k of multi-layer graphene and boron nitride by strain and into the nature of thermal transport in quasi-two-dimensional and highly anisotropic systems.

  12. Thermal conductivity of configurable two-dimensional carbon nanotube architecture and strain modulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhan, H. F.; Bell, J. M.; Gu, Y. T., E-mail: yuantong.gu@qut.edu.au [School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George St., Brisbane, Queensland 4000 (Australia); Zhang, G. [Institute of High Performance Computing, Agency for Science, Technology and Research, 1 Fusionopolis Way, Singapore 138632 (Singapore)

    2014-10-13

    We reported the thermal conductivity of the two-dimensional carbon nanotube (CNT)-based architecture, which can be constructed through welding of single-wall CNTs by electron beam. Using large-scale nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, the thermal conductivity is found to vary with different junction types due to their different phonon scatterings at the junction. The strong length and strain dependence of the thermal conductivity suggests an effective avenue to tune the thermal transport properties of the CNT-based architecture, benefiting the design of nanoscale thermal rectifiers or phonon engineering.

  13. An Analytical Study Of A 2-Layer Transient Thermal Conduction...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The most demanding mathematical requirement is the ability to manipulate a 4 x 4 matrix. Testing the solution over a range of thermal diffusivity values expected in common...

  14. Tuning Interfacial Thermal Conductance of Graphene Embedded in Soft Materials by Vacancy Defects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Ying [Clemson University; Hu, Chongze [Clemson University; Huang, Jingsong [ORNL; Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL; Qiao, Rui [Engineering Science and Mechanics Department, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, USA

    2015-01-01

    Nanocomposites based on graphene dispersed in matrices of soft materials are promising thermal management materials. Their effective thermal conductivity depends on both the thermal conductivity of graphene and the conductance of the thermal transport across graphene-matrix interfaces. Here we report on molecular dynamics simulations of the thermal transport across the interfaces between defected graphene and soft materials in two different modes: in the across mode, heat enters graphene from one side of its basal plane and leaves through the other side; in the non-across mode, heat enters or leaves a graphene simultaneously from both sides of its basal plane. We show that, as the density of vacancy defects in graphene increases from 0 to 8%, the conductance of the interfacial thermal transport in the across mode increases from 160.4 16 to 207.8 11 MW/m2K, while that in the non-across mode increases from 7.2 0.1 to 17.8 0.6 MW/m2K. The molecular mechanisms for these variations of thermal conductance are clarified by using the phonon density of states and structural characteristics of defected graphenes. On the basis of these results and effective medium theory, we show that it is possible to enhance the effective thermal conductivity of thermal nanocomposites by tuning the density of vacancy defects in graphene despite the fact that graphene s thermal conductivity always decreases as vacancy defects are introduced.

  15. Design of a steady state thermal conductivity measurement device for CNT RET polymer composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louie, Brian Ming

    2011-01-01

    conductive particles along with CNTs in polymer composites.polymer composites. 2,12 The combination of highly conductive

  16. Investigation of the thermal conductivity of unconsolidated sand packs containing oil, water, and gas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gore, David Eugene

    1958-01-01

    INVESTIGATION OF THE THERNAL CONDUCTIVITY OF UNCONSOLIDATED SAND PACKS CONTAINING OIL, WATER, AND GAS A Thesis David E. Gore Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Nechanical College oi' Texas in Partial fulfillment... and thxee-phase fluid saturation on the thermal conductivity of sand packs. The current research was conducted using a sand and lubricating oil on which related studies had been pexfoxmed. The thermal conductivity measuxements were made undex condi...

  17. Magneto thermal conductivity of superconducting Nb with intermediate level of impurity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.S. Sharath Chandra, M.K. Chattopadhyay, S.B. Roy, V.C. Sahni, G.R. Myneni

    2012-03-01

    Niobium materials with intermediate purity level are used for fabrication of superconducting radio frequency cavities (SCRF), and thermal conductivity is an important parameter influencing the performance of such SCRF cavities. We report here the temperature and magnetic field dependence of thermal conductivity {kappa} for superconducting niobium (Nb) samples, for which the electron mean free path I{sub e}, the phonon mean free path I{sub g}, and the vortex core diameter 2r{sub C} are of the same order of magnitude. The measured thermal conductivity is analyzed using the effective gap model (developed for I{sub e} >> 2r{sub C} (Dubeck et al 1963 Phys. Rev. Lett. 10 98)) and the normal core model (developed for I{sub e} << 2r{sub C} (Ward and Dew-Hughes 1970 J. Phys. C: Solid St. Phys. 3 2245)). However, it is found that the effective gap model is not suitable for low temperatures when I{sub e} {approx} 2r{sub C}. The normal core model, on the other hand, is able to describe {kappa}(T,H) over the entire temperature range except in the field regime between H{sub C1} and H{sub C2} i.e. in the mixed state. It is shown that to understand the complete behavior of {kappa} in the mixed state, the scattering of quasi-particles from the vortex cores and the intervortex quasi-particle tunneling are to be invoked. The quasi-particle scattering from vortices for the present system is understood in terms of the framework of Sergeenkov and Ausloos (1995 Phys. Rev. B 52 3614) extending their approach to the case of Nb. The intervortex tunneling is understood within the framework of Schmidbauer et al (1970 Z. Phys. 240 30). Analysis of the field dependence of thermal conductivity shows that while the quasi-particle scattering from vortices dominates in the low fields, the intervortex quasi-particle tunneling dominates in high fields. Analysis of the temperature dependence of thermal conductivity shows that while the quasi-particle scattering is dominant at low temperatures, the intervortex quasi-particle tunneling is dominant at high temperatures.

  18. Study of thermal conductivity in organic solid wastes before composting J. HUET, C. Druilhe, G. Debenest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Study of thermal conductivity in organic solid wastes before composting J. HUET, C. Druilhe, G. Debenest ORBIT2012 1 STUDY OF THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY IN ORGANIC SOLID WASTES BEFORE COMPOSTING J. Huet and disposal. Composting can be defined as the process whereby aerobic micro-organisms convert organic

  19. Numerical and experimental investigations of the effective thermal conductivity of snow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Numerical and experimental investigations of the effective thermal conductivity of snow N. Calonne numerical simulations of the conductiv- ity of snow using microtomographic images. The full tensor of the effective thermal conductivity (keff) was computed from 30 threedimensional images of the snow microstruc

  20. Origin of Low Thermal Conductivity in Nuclear Fuels Quan Yin and Sergey Y. Savrasov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savrasov, Sergej Y.

    Origin of Low Thermal Conductivity in Nuclear Fuels Quan Yin and Sergey Y. Savrasov Department.41.Bm Today's nuclear fuels are based on 235 U and 239 Pu ele- ments where in a typical setup, a nuclear, the thermal conductivity of UO2 is very low, and the search for alternative materials continues

  1. Analysis of Thermal Conductivity in Composite H.T. Banks and Kathleen L. Bihari

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are desirable in many industrial ap- plications, including computers, microelectronics, machinery and appliances a composite adhesive would aid in the design of an eÆcient thermally conductive composite adhesive. In this work, we provide theoretical foundations for use in design of thermally conductive composite adhesives

  2. Experimental investigation of the thermal conductivity of porous adsorbents. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Secary, J.J.

    1989-01-01

    The thermal conductivities of Praseodymium-Cerium-Oxide (PCO) and Saran Carbon have been experimentally investigated using a steady-state heat transfer technique. The investigated substances are used as adsorbents in adsorption compressors being developed for spaceborne refrigeration applications. The objectives of the investigation were to determine the thermal conductivities and establish their temperature dependency. Data were collected for the PCO over a temperature range of 300 C to 600 C, and O (zero) C to 200 C for the Saran Carbon. The thermal conductivities were found to have a strong temperature dependency. In particular, the results for the PCO showed a temperature dependency indicative of some thermal radiation effects.

  3. Communication: Minimum in the thermal conductivity of supercooled water: A computer simulation study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bresme, F., E-mail: f.bresme@imperial.ac.uk [Chemical Physics Section, Department of Chemistry, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ, United Kingdom and Department of Chemistry, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim 7491 (Norway); Biddle, J. W.; Sengers, J. V.; Anisimov, M. A. [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, and Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)] [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, and Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2014-04-28

    We report the results of a computer simulation study of the thermodynamic properties and the thermal conductivity of supercooled water as a function of pressure and temperature using the TIP4P-2005 water model. The thermodynamic properties can be represented by a two-structure equation of state consistent with the presence of a liquid-liquid critical point in the supercooled region. Our simulations confirm the presence of a minimum in the thermal conductivity, not only at atmospheric pressure, as previously found for the TIP5P water model, but also at elevated pressures. This anomalous behavior of the thermal conductivity of supercooled water appears to be related to the maximum of the isothermal compressibility or the minimum of the speed of sound. However, the magnitudes of the simulated thermal conductivities are sensitive to the water model adopted and appear to be significantly larger than the experimental thermal conductivities of real water at low temperatures.

  4. Thermal conductivity in large-J two-dimensional antiferromagnets: Role of phonon scattering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chernyshev, A. L.; Brenig, Wolfram

    2015-08-05

    Different types of relaxation processes for magnon heat current are discussed, with a particular focus on coupling to three-dimensional phonons. There is thermal conductivity by these in-plane magnetic excitations using two distinct techniques: Boltzmann formalism within the relaxation-time approximation and memory-function approach. Also considered are the scattering of magnons by both acoustic and optical branches of phonons. We demonstrate an accord between the two methods, regarding the asymptotic behavior of the effective relaxation rates. It is strongly suggested that scattering from optical or zone-boundary phonons is important for magnon heat current relaxation in a high-temperature window of ?D?Tmore »« less

  5. Effect of substrate on thermal conductivity of single-walled carbon nanotubes This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    methods confirmed that CNTs demonstrate anomalously high thermal conduc- tivity. However, recent of thermal energy along an isolated single-walled CNT and analyze the effect of a rigid substrateEffect of substrate on thermal conductivity of single-walled carbon nanotubes This article has been

  6. Thermal interface conductance across a graphene/hexagonal boron nitride heterojunction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Chun-Chung; Li, Zhen; Cronin, Stephen B. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089 (United States); Shi, Li [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Texas Materials Institute, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2014-02-24

    We measure thermal transport across a graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) interface by electrically heating the graphene and measuring the temperature difference between the graphene and BN using Raman spectroscopy. Because the temperature of the graphene and BN are measured optically, this approach enables nanometer resolution in the cross-plane direction. A temperature drop of 60?K can be achieved across this junction at high electrical powers (14 mW). Based on the temperature difference and the applied power data, we determine the thermal interface conductance of this junction to be 7.4?×?10{sup 6}?Wm{sup ?2}K{sup ?1}, which is below the 10{sup 7}–10{sup 8}?Wm{sup ?2}K{sup ?1} values previously reported for graphene/SiO{sub 2} interface.

  7. 1-Dimensional Numerical Model of Thermal Conduction and Vapor Diffusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schörghofer, Norbert

    developed by Samar Khatiwala, 2001 extended to variable thermal properties and irregular grid by Norbert Sch for c. Upper boundary condition: a) Radiation Q + k T z z=0 = T4 z=0 Q is the incoming solar flux of Water Vapor with Phase Transitions developed by Norbert Sch¨orghofer, 2003­2004 3 phases: vapor, free

  8. Thermal Properties of Graphene and Applications for Thermal Management of High-Power Density Electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan, Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Raman Spectroscopy and Thermal Properties of Graphenegraphite heat spreaders for thermal management of high-powerthe Raman spectroscopy and thermal properties of a novel

  9. Effect of Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and micro porous layer (MPL) on thermal conductivity of fuel cell gas diffusion layers: Modeling and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    Effect of Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and micro porous layer (MPL) on thermal conductivity robust model is devel- oped for estimating GDL thermal conductivity. The model considers PTFE addition of thermal conductivity on PTFE, MPL, and compression is considered. Thermal contact resistances between GDL

  10. Low-Dimensional Conduction Mechanisms in Highly-Conductive and Transparent Conjugated Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ugur Katmis, Asli

    Electronic conduction in conjugated polymers is of emerging technological interest for high-performance optoelectronic and thermoelectric devices. A completely new aspect and understanding of the conduction mechanism on ...

  11. Thermal disconnect for high-temperature batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jungst, Rudolph George (Albuquerque, NM); Armijo, James Rudolph (Albuquerque, NM); Frear, Darrel Richard (Austin, TX)

    2000-01-01

    A new type of high temperature thermal disconnect has been developed to protect electrical and mechanical equipment from damage caused by operation at extreme temperatures. These thermal disconnects allow continuous operation at temperatures ranging from 250.degree. C. to 450.degree. C., while rapidly terminating operation at temperatures 50.degree. C. to 150.degree. C. higher than the continuous operating temperature.

  12. Proximity nanovalve with large phase-tunable thermal conductance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strambini, E., E-mail: e.strambini@sns.it; Giazotto, F., E-mail: f.giazotto@sns.it [NEST Istituto Nanoscienze-CNR and Scuola Normale Superiore, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bergeret, F. S., E-mail: sebastian-bergeret@ehu.es [Centro de Física de Materiales (CFM-MPC), Centro Mixto CSIC-UPV/EHU, Manuel de Lardizabal 4, E-20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), Manuel de Lardizabal 5, E-20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Institut für Physik, Carl von Ossietzky Universität, D-26111 Oldenburg (Germany)

    2014-08-25

    We propose a phase-controlled heat-flux quantum valve based on the proximity effect driven by a superconducting quantum interference proximity transistor (SQUIPT). Its operation relies on the phase-dependent quasiparticle density of states in the Josephson weak-link of the SQUIPT which controls thermal transport across the device. In a realistic Al/Cu-based setup the structure can provide efficient control of thermal current inducing temperature swings exceeding ?100?mK, and flux-to-temperature transfer coefficients up to ?500?mK/?{sub 0} below 100?mK. The nanovalve performances improve by lowering the bath temperature, making the proposed structure a promising building-block for the implementation of coherent caloritronic devices operating below 1?K.

  13. Duality of the Interfacial Thermal Conductance in Graphene-based Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Ying [Clemson University] [Clemson University; Huang, Jingsong [ORNL] [ORNL; Yang, Bao [University of Maryland] [University of Maryland; Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL] [ORNL; Qiao, Rui [Clemson University] [Clemson University

    2014-01-01

    The thermal conductance of graphene-matrix interfaces plays a key role in controlling the thermal transport properties of graphene-based nanocomposites. Using classical molecular dynamics simulations, we found that the interfacial thermal conductance depends strongly on the mode of heat transfer at the graphene-matrix interfaces: if heat enters graphene from one side of its basal plane and immediately leaves the graphene through the other side, the corresponding interfacial thermal conductance, G(across), is large; if heat enters graphene from both sides of its basal plane and leaves the graphene at a position far away on its basal plane, the corresponding interfacial thermal conductance, G(non-across), is small. For a single-layer graphene immersed in liquid octane, G(across) is ~150 MW/m2K while Gnon-across is ~5 MW/m2K. G(across) decreases with increasing multi-layer graphene thickness (i.e., number of layers in graphene) and approaches an asymptotic value of 100 MW/m2K for 7-layer graphenes. G(non-across) increases only marginally as the graphene sheet thickness increases. Such a duality of the interface thermal conductance for different probing methods and its dependence on graphene sheet thickness can be traced ultimately to the unique physical and chemical structure of graphene materials. The ramifications of these results in areas such as experimental measurement of thermal conductivity of graphene and the design of graphene-based thermal nanocomposites are discussed.

  14. Computational Efficient Upscaling Methodology for Predicting Thermal Conductivity of Nuclear Waste forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Dongsheng; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-09-28

    This study evaluated different upscaling methods to predict thermal conductivity in loaded nuclear waste form, a heterogeneous material system. The efficiency and accuracy of these methods were compared. Thermal conductivity in loaded nuclear waste form is an important property specific to scientific researchers, in waste form Integrated performance and safety code (IPSC). The effective thermal conductivity obtained from microstructure information and local thermal conductivity of different components is critical in predicting the life and performance of waste form during storage. How the heat generated during storage is directly related to thermal conductivity, which in turn determining the mechanical deformation behavior, corrosion resistance and aging performance. Several methods, including the Taylor model, Sachs model, self-consistent model, and statistical upscaling models were developed and implemented. Due to the absence of experimental data, prediction results from finite element method (FEM) were used as reference to determine the accuracy of different upscaling models. Micrographs from different loading of nuclear waste were used in the prediction of thermal conductivity. Prediction results demonstrated that in term of efficiency, boundary models (Taylor and Sachs model) are better than self consistent model, statistical upscaling method and FEM. Balancing the computation resource and accuracy, statistical upscaling is a computational efficient method in predicting effective thermal conductivity for nuclear waste form.

  15. THERMAL ANALYSIS OF GEOLOGIC HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE PACKAGES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hensel, S.; Lee, S.

    2010-04-20

    The engineering design of disposal of the high level waste (HLW) packages in a geologic repository requires a thermal analysis to provide the temperature history of the packages. Calculated temperatures are used to demonstrate compliance with criteria for waste acceptance into the geologic disposal gallery system and as input to assess the transient thermal characteristics of the vitrified HLW Package. The objective of the work was to evaluate the thermal performance of the supercontainer containing the vitrified HLW in a non-backfilled and unventilated underground disposal gallery. In order to achieve the objective, transient computational models for a geologic vitrified HLW package were developed by using a computational fluid dynamics method, and calculations for the HLW disposal gallery of the current Belgian geological repository reference design were performed. An initial two-dimensional model was used to conduct some parametric sensitivity studies to better understand the geologic system's thermal response. The effect of heat decay, number of co-disposed supercontainers, domain size, humidity, thermal conductivity and thermal emissivity were studied. Later, a more accurate three-dimensional model was developed by considering the conduction-convection cooling mechanism coupled with radiation, and the effect of the number of supercontainers (3, 4 and 8) was studied in more detail, as well as a bounding case with zero heat flux at both ends. The modeling methodology and results of the sensitivity studies will be presented.

  16. Thermal conductivity of single-walled carbon nanotubes J. Hone, M. Whitney, C. Piskoti, and A. Zettl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alex

    with a combination of nickel and yttrium. This method yields high-purity ``mats'' of tangled nanotube bundlesThermal conductivity of single-walled carbon nanotubes J. Hone, M. Whitney, C. Piskoti, and A of single- walled carbon nanotubes from 350 K to 8 K. (T) decreases smoothly with decreasing temperature

  17. Serpentine Thermal Coupling Between a Stream and a Conducting Body

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobayashi, H.; Lorente, S.; Anderson, R.; Bejan, A.

    2012-02-15

    Here we document the effect of flow configuration on the heat transfer performance of a serpentine shaped stream embedded in a conducting solid. Several configurations with fixed volume of fluid are considered: U-shaped with varying spacing between the parallel portions of the U, serpentine shapes with three elbows, and conducting soil with several parallelepipedal shapes. We show that the spacing must be greater than a critical value in order for the heat transfer density of the stream-solid configuration to be the highest that it can be. Spacings larger than this critical value do not yield improvements in heat transfer density. We also show that even though the heat transfer is time dependent, the stream-solid configuration has an effective number of heat transfer units Ntu that is nearly constant in time. The larger Ntu values correspond to the configurations with greater heat transfer density.

  18. Low-Dimensional Conduction Mechanisms in Highly Conductive and Transparent Conjugated Polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asli Ugur; Ferhat Katmis; Mingda Li; Lijun Wu; Yimei Zhu; Kripa K. Varanasi; Karen K. Gleason

    2015-08-15

    Electronic conduction in conjugated polymers is of emerging technological interest for high-performance optoelectronic and thermoelectric devices. A completely new aspect and understanding of the conduction mechanism on conducting polymers is introduced, allowing the applicability of materials to be optimized. The charge-transport mechanism is explained by direct experimental evidence with a very well supported theoretical model.

  19. LARGE SCALE PERMEABILITY TEST OF THE GRANITE IN THE STRIPA MINE AND THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY TEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lundstrom, L.

    2011-01-01

    No.2 LARGE SCALE PERMEABILITY TEST OF THE GRANITE' IN THEMINE AND, THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY TEST Lars Lundstrom and HakanSUMMARY REPORT Background TEST SITE Layout of test places

  20. Experimental study of thermal conductivity reduction of silicon-germanium nanocomposite for thermoelastic application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hohyun, 1978-

    2005-01-01

    To improve the thermoelectric energy conversion efficiency of silicon germanium (SiGe), two methods were used to decrease the thermal conductivity by increasing phonon boundary scattering at interfaces. In the first method, ...

  1. Thermal conductivity of fluids containing suspension of nanometer-sized particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Jack Jeinhao

    2006-01-01

    Nanofluids, which are fluids containing suspension of nanometer-sized particles, have been reported to possess substantially higher thermal conductivity than their respective base fluids. This thesis reports on an experimental ...

  2. Effective thermal conductivity method for predicting spent nuclear fuel cladding temperatures in a dry fill gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahney, Robert

    1997-12-19

    This paper summarizes the development of a reliable methodology for the prediction of peak spent nuclear fuel cladding temperature within the waste disposal package. The effective thermal conductivity method replaces other older methodologies.

  3. Basal-plane thermal conductivity of few-layer molybdenum disulfide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jo, Insun; Ou, Eric; Shi, Li; Pettes, Michael Thompson; Wu, Wei

    2014-05-19

    We report the in-plane thermal conductivity of suspended exfoliated few-layer molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) samples that were measured by suspended micro-devices with integrated resistance thermometers. The obtained room-temperature thermal conductivity values are (44–50) and (48–52) W m{sup ?1} K{sup ?1} for two samples that are 4 and 7 layers thick, respectively. For both samples, the peak thermal conductivity occurs at a temperature close to 120?K, above which the thermal conductivity is dominated by intrinsic phonon-phonon scattering although phonon scattering by surface disorders can still play an important role in these samples especially at low temperatures.

  4. Thermal contact conductance of metallic coated superconductor/copper interfaces at cryogenic temperatures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ochterbeck, Jay Matthew

    1990-01-01

    THERMAL CONTACT CONDUCTANCE OF METALLIC COATED SUPERCONDUCTOR/COPPER INTERFACES AT CRYOGENIC TEMPERATURES A Thesis by JAY MATTHEW OCHTERBECK Submitted to the 0%ce of Graduate Studies of Texas AJrM IJniversity in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1990 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering THERMAL CONTACT CONDUCTANCE OF METALLIC COATED SUPERCONDUCTOR/COPPER INTERFACES AT CRYOGENIC TEMPERATURES A Thesis JA'r '(IATTHEW OCHTERBECK Approved...

  5. Thermal Conductivity in Nanoporous Gold Films during Electron-Phonon Nonequilibrium

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hopkins, Patrick E.; Norris, Pamela M.; Phinney, Leslie M.; Policastro, Steven A.; Kelly, Robert G.

    2008-01-01

    The reduction of nanodevices has given recent attention to nanoporous materials due to their structure and geometry. However, the thermophysical properties of these materials are relatively unknown. In this article, an expression for thermal conductivity of nanoporous structures is derived based on the assumption that the finite size of the ligaments leads to electron-ligament wall scattering. This expression is then used to analyze the thermal conductivity of nanoporous structures in the event of electron-phonon nonequilibrium.

  6. EFFECT OF PTFE ON THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF GAS DIFFUSION LAYERS OF PEM FUEL CELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    The efficiency and performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) depends heavily on the heat, the added PTFE can change the thermal resistance of GDLs and, hence, affects the fuel cell heat managementEFFECT OF PTFE ON THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF GAS DIFFUSION LAYERS OF PEM FUEL CELLS Hamidreza

  7. Thermal conductivities of individual tin dioxide nanobelts Qing Hao, and Choongho Yu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    transport in low- dimension materials. Recently, superhigh and significantly suppressed thermal.12,13 Compared to the knowledge ob- tained for nanotubes and nanowires, little has been known that the thermal conductivities of the nano- belts were strongly suppressed compared to the bulk values. According

  8. Propagation of three--dimensional Alfv'en waves in a stratified, thermally conducting solar wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Propagation of three--dimensional Alfv'en waves in a stratified, thermally conducting solar wind S to the well--known thermal expansion of the solar corona [Parker, 1958, 1963, 1991]. In particular Alfv'en waves in the solar atmosphere and wind, taking into account relevant physical effects

  9. Analysis of the Temporal Evolution of Thermal Conductivity in Alumina-Water Nanofluid 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fortenberry, Stephen

    2009-09-30

    of several months. This corresponded to a change in the thermal conductivity enhancement realized due to the suspension of nanoparticles in fluid from an initial value of 11.2% to a final value of 7.2%. Temporal evolution of the nanofluid’s thermal...

  10. Nonlinear vs. bolometric radiation response and phonon thermal conductance in graphene-superconductor junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vora, Heli; Nielsen, Bent; Du, Xu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York (United States)

    2014-02-21

    Graphene is a promising candidate for building fast and ultra-sensitive bolometric detectors due to its weak electron-phonon coupling and low heat capacity. In order to realize a practical graphene-based bolometer, several important issues, including the nature of radiation response, coupling efficiency to the radiation and the thermal conductance need to be carefully studied. Addressing these issues, we present graphene-superconductor junctions as a viable option to achieve efficient and sensitive bolometers, with the superconductor contacts serving as hot electron barriers. For a graphene-superconductor device with highly transparent interfaces, the resistance readout in the presence of radio frequency radiation is dominated by non-linear response. On the other hand, a graphene-superconductor tunnel device shows dominantly bolometric response to radiation. For graphene devices fabricated on SiO{sub 2} substrates, we confirm recent theoretical predictions of T{sup 2} temperature dependence of phonon thermal conductance in the presence of disorder in the graphene channel at low temperatures.

  11. Thermal desorption treatability test conducted with VAC*TRAX Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-01-01

    In 1992, Congress passed the Federal Facilities Compliance Act, requiring the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to treat and dispose of its mixed waste in accordance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) treatment standards. In response to the need for mixed-waste treatment capacity, where off-site commercial treatment facilities do not exist or cannot be used, the DOE Albuquerque Operations Office (DOE-AL) organized a Treatment Selection Team to match mixed waste with treatment options and develop a strategy for treatment of mixed waste. DOE-AL manages nine sites with mixed-waste inventories. The Treatment Selection Team determined a need to develop mobile treatment units (MTUs) to treat waste at the sites where the wastes are generated. Treatment processes used for mixed wastes must remove the hazardous component (i.e., meet RCRA treatment standards) and contain the radioactive component in a form that will protect the worker, public, and environment. On the basis of the recommendations of the Treatment Selection Team, DOE-AL assigned projects to the sites to bring mixed-waste treatment capacity on-line. The three technologies assigned to the DOE Grand Junction Projects Office (DOE-GJPO) include thermal desorption (TD), evaporative oxidation, and waste water evaporation.

  12. High-Performance Home Technologies: Solar Thermal & Photovoltaic...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    High-Performance Home Technologies: Solar Thermal & Photovoltaic Systems; Volume 6 Building America Best Practices Series High-Performance Home Technologies: Solar Thermal &...

  13. High Thermal Efficiency and Low Emissions with Supercritical...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Thermal Efficiency and Low Emissions with Supercritical Gasoline Injection-Ignition in a Light Duty Engine High Thermal Efficiency and Low Emissions with Supercritical...

  14. Electrical and Thermal Transport Optimization of High Efficient...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electrical and Thermal Transport Optimization of High Efficient n-type Skutterudites Electrical and Thermal Transport Optimization of High Efficient n-type Skutterudites Work on...

  15. High Operating Temperature Heat Transfer Fluids for Solar Thermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Operating Temperature Heat Transfer Fluids for Solar Thermal Power Generation FY13 Q1 High Operating Temperature Heat Transfer Fluids for Solar Thermal Power Generation FY13...

  16. Heavy-Duty Engine Combustion Optimization for High Thermal Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Combustion Optimization for High Thermal Efficiency Targeting EPA 2010 Emissions Heavy-Duty Engine Combustion Optimization for High Thermal Efficiency Targeting EPA 2010 Emissions...

  17. Evaluation of Thermal to Electrical Energy Conversion of High...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermal to Electrical Energy Conversion of High Temperature Skutterudite-Based Thermoelectric Modules Evaluation of Thermal to Electrical Energy Conversion of High Temperature...

  18. Gallium ion implantation greatly reduces thermal conductivity and enhances electronic one of ZnO nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, Minggang, E-mail: xiamg@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Laboratory of Nanostructure and its Physics Properties, Department of Optical Information Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics, and MOE Key Laboratory for Non-equilibrium Synthesis and Modulation of Condensed Matter, School of Science, Xi'an Jiaotong University, 710049 China (China); Department of Physics and Centre for Computational Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Cheng, Zhaofang; Han, Jinyun; Zhang, Shengli [Laboratory of Nanostructure and its Physics Properties, Department of Optical Information Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics, and MOE Key Laboratory for Non-equilibrium Synthesis and Modulation of Condensed Matter, School of Science, Xi'an Jiaotong University, 710049 China (China); Zheng, Minrui [Department of Physics and Centre for Computational Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Sow, Chorng-Haur [Department of Physics and Centre for Computational Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); National University of Singapore Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Thong, John T. L. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Li, Baowen [Department of Physics and Centre for Computational Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); National University of Singapore Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Center for Phononics and Thermal Energy Science, School of Physics Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2014-05-15

    The electrical and thermal conductivities are measured for individual zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires with and without gallium ion (Ga{sup +}) implantation at room temperature. Our results show that Ga{sup +} implantation enhances electrical conductivity by one order of magnitude from 1.01 × 10{sup 3} ?{sup ?1}m{sup ?1} to 1.46 × 10{sup 4} ?{sup ?1}m{sup ?1} and reduces its thermal conductivity by one order of magnitude from 12.7 Wm{sup ?1}K{sup ?1} to 1.22 Wm{sup ?1}K{sup ?1} for ZnO nanowires of 100 nm in diameter. The measured thermal conductivities are in good agreement with those in theoretical simulation. The increase of electrical conductivity origins in electron donor doping by Ga{sup +} implantation and the decrease of thermal conductivity is due to the longitudinal and transverse acoustic phonons scattering by Ga{sup +} point scattering. For pristine ZnO nanowires, the thermal conductivity decreases only two times when its diameter reduces from 100 nm to 46 nm. Therefore, Ga{sup +}-implantation may be a more effective method than diameter reduction in improving thermoelectric performance.

  19. Regulation of thermal conductivity in hot galaxy clusters by MHD turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven A. Balbus; Christopher S. Reynolds

    2008-06-05

    The role of thermal conduction in regulating the thermal behavior of cooling flows in galaxy clusters is reexamined. Recent investigations have shown that the anisotropic Coulomb heat flux caused by a magnetic field in a dilute plasma drives a dynamical instability. A long standing problem of cooling flow theory has been to understand how thermal conduction can offset radiative core losses without completely preventing them. In this Letter we propose that magnetohydrodynamic turbulence driven by the heat flux instability regulates field-line insulation and drives a reverse convective thermal flux, both of which may mediate the stabilization of the cooling cores of hot clusters. This model suggests that turbulent mixing should accompany strong thermal gradients in cooling flows. This prediction seems to be supported by the spatial distribution of metals in the central galaxies of clusters, which shows a much stronger correlation with the ambient hot gas temperature gradient than with the parent stellar population.

  20. Invited Review Article: Error and uncertainty in Raman thermal conductivity

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLED Street LightingFrom theHighI _ Interview

  1. The measurement of thermal conductivity of jelly from 25 to 95 C 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yih-Rong

    1985-01-01

    of LMP jelly samples in the temperature range from 25 to 95 'C 53 16 Effect of pectin content on the thermal conductivity of HMP jelly samples in the temperature range from 25 to 95 'C . . . . . . . . . . 54 17 Jelly formation dependent upon pectin... conductivity of LMP jelly versus temperature at the moisture content between 60. 5 and 77. 1 percent, depicting how the regression lines fit to the experimental data 59 22 Comparison of linear r thermal conductivities and sugar solutions as content at 25...

  2. Lattice Anharmonicity and Thermal Conductivity from Compressive Sensing of First-Principles Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Fei; Nielson, Weston; Xia, Yi; Ozoli?š, Vidvuds

    2014-10-01

    First-principles prediction of lattice thermal conductivity ?L of strongly anharmonic crystals is a long-standing challenge in solid-state physics. Making use of recent advances in information science, we propose a systematic and rigorous approach to this problem, compressive sensing lattice dynamics. Compressive sensing is used to select the physically important terms in the lattice dynamics model and determine their values in one shot. Nonintuitively, high accuracy is achieved when the model is trained on first-principles forces in quasirandom atomic configurations. The method is demonstrated for Si, NaCl, and Cu12Sb4S13, an earth-abundant thermoelectric with strong phonon-phonon interactions that limit the room-temperature ?L to values near the amorphous limit.

  3. FAST STATIC AND DYNAMIC GRID LEVEL THERMAL SIMULATION CONSIDERING TEMPERATURE DEPENDENT THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF SILICON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziabari, Amirkoushyar

    2012-01-01

    Power Blurring: Fast Chip-Level Static and Transient ThermalOF CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ FAST STATIC AND DYNAMIC GRID LEVEL3.3.3 A Static Case Study………………………………………………. 3.3.4 Transient

  4. Measurements of the apparent thermal conductivity of multi-layer insulation between 20 K and 90 K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurd, Joseph A.; Van Sciver, Steven W.

    2014-01-29

    NASA has the need to efficiently store cryogenic propellants in space for long periods of time. One method to improve storage efficiency is to use multi-layer insulation (MLI), a technique that minimizes the boiling rate due to radiation heat transfer. Typically, the thermal performance of MLI is determined by measuring the rate of evaporation of liquid nitrogen from a calibrated cryostat. The main limitation with this method is that testing conditions are restricted by the boiling temperature of the LN{sub 2}, which may not match the requirements of the application. The Multi-Layer Insulation Thermal Conductivity Experiment (MIKE) at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory is capable of measuring the effective thermal conductivity of MLI at variable boundary temperatures. MIKE uses cryo-refrigerators to control boundary temperatures in the calorimeter and a calibrated thermal link to measure the heat load. To make the measurements requested by NASA, MIKE needed to be recalibrated for the 20 K to 90 K range. Also, due to the expectation of a lower heat transfer rate, the heat load support rod material was changed to one with a lower thermal conductivity to ensure the temperature difference seen on the cold rod could be measurable at the estimated heat load. Presented are the alterations to MIKE including calibration data and heat load measurements on new load-bearing MLI supplied by NASA.

  5. Superior thermoelectric performance in PbTe-PbS pseudo-binary. Extremely low thermal conductivity and modulated carrier concentration

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wu, D.; Zhao, L. -D.; Tong, X.; Li, W.; Wu, L.; Tan, Q.; Pei, Y.; Huang, L.; Li, J. -F.; Zhu, Y.; et al

    2015-05-19

    Lead chalcogenides have exhibited their irreplaceable role as thermoelectric materials at the medium temperature range, owing to highly degenerate electronic bands and intrinsically low thermal conductivities. PbTe-PbS pseudo-binary has been paid extensive attentions due to the even lower thermal conductivity which originates largely from the coexistence of both alloying and phase-separated precipitations. To investigate the competition between alloying and phase separation and its pronounced effect on the thermoelectric performance in PbTe-PbS, we systematically studied Spark Plasma Sintered (SPSed), 3 at% Na- doped (PbTe)1-x(PbS)x samples with x=10%, 15%, 20%, 25%, 30% and 35% by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observationsmore »and theoretical calculations. Corresponding to the lowest lattice thermal conductivity as a result of the balance between point defect- and precipitates- scattering, the highest figure of merit ZT~2.3 was obtained at 923 K when PbS phase fraction x is at 20%. The consistently lower lattice thermal conductivities in SPSed samples compared with corresponding ingots, resulting from the powdering and follow-up consolidation processes, also contribute to the observed superior ZT. Notably, the onset of carrier concentration modulation ~600 K due to excessive Na’s diffusion and re-dissolution leads to the observed saturations of electrical transport properties, which is believed equally crucial to the outstanding thermoelectric performance of SPSed PbTe-PbS samples.« less

  6. Method and apparatus for producing a carbon based foam article having a desired thermal-conductivity gradient

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klett, James W. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Cameron, Christopher Stan (Sanford, NC) [Sanford, NC

    2010-03-02

    A carbon based foam article is made by heating the surface of a carbon foam block to a temperature above its graphitizing temperature, which is the temperature sufficient to graphitize the carbon foam. In one embodiment, the surface is heated with infrared pulses until heat is transferred from the surface into the core of the foam article such that the graphitizing temperature penetrates into the core to a desired depth below the surface. The graphitizing temperature is maintained for a time sufficient to substantially entirely graphitize the portion of the foam article from the surface to the desired depth below the surface. Thus, the foam article is an integral monolithic material that has a desired conductivity gradient with a relatively high thermal conductivity in the portion of the core that was graphitized and a relatively low thermal conductivity in the remaining portion of the foam article.

  7. Approaching the Minimum Thermal Conductivity in Rhenium-Substituted Higher Manganese Silicides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Xi [University of Texas at Austin] [University of Texas at Austin; Girard, S. N. [University of Wisconsin, Madison] [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Meng, F. [University of Wisconsin, Madison] [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL] [ORNL; Jin, S [University of Wisconsin, Madison] [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Goodenough, J. B. [University of Texas at Austin] [University of Texas at Austin; Zhou, J. S. [University of Texas at Austin] [University of Texas at Austin; Shi, L [University of Texas at Austin] [University of Texas at Austin

    2014-01-01

    Higher manganese silicides (HMS) made of earth-abundant and non-toxic elements are regarded as promising p-type thermoelectric materials because their complex crystal structure results in low lattice thermal conductivity. It is shown here that the already low thermal conductivity of HMS can be reduced further to approach the minimum thermal conductivity via partial substitu- tion of Mn with heavier rhenium (Re) to increase point defect scattering. The solubility limit of Re in the obtained RexMn1 xSi1.8 is determined to be about x = 0.18. Elemental inhomogeneity and the formation of ReSi1.75 inclusions with 50 200 nm size are found within the HMS matrix. It is found that the power factor does not change markedly at low Re content of x 0.04 before it drops considerably at higher Re contents. Compared to pure HMS, the reduced lattice thermal conductivity in RexMn1 xSi1.8 results in a 25% increase of the peak figure of merit ZT to reach 0.57 0.08 at 800 K for x = 0.04. The suppressed thermal conductivity in the pure RexMn1 xSi1.8 can enable further investigations of the ZT limit of this system by exploring different impurity doping strategies to optimize the carrier concentration and power factor.

  8. Temperature dependence of thermal conductivities of coupled rotator lattice and the momentum diffusion in standard map

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yunyun Li; Nianbei Li; Baowen Li

    2015-01-29

    In contrary to other 1D momentum-conserving lattices such as the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam $\\beta$ (FPU-$\\beta$) lattice, the 1D coupled rotator lattice is a notable exception which conserves total momentum while exhibits normal heat conduction behavior. The temperature behavior of the thermal conductivities of 1D coupled rotator lattice had been studied in previous works trying to reveal the underlying physical mechanism for normal heat conduction. However, two different temperature behaviors of thermal conductivities have been claimed for the same coupled rotator lattice. These different temperature behaviors also intrigue the debate whether there is a phase transition of thermal conductivities as the function of temperature. In this work, we will revisit the temperature dependent thermal conductivities for the 1D coupled rotator lattice. We find that the temperature dependence follows a power law behavior which is different with the previously found temperature behaviors. Our results also support the claim that there is no phase transition for 1D coupled rotator lattice. We also give some discussion about the similarity of diffusion behaviors between the 1D coupled rotator lattice and the single kicked rotator also called the Chirikov standard map.

  9. Calculated transport properties of CdO: thermal conductivity and thermoelectric power factor

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lindsay, Lucas R.; Parker, David S.

    2015-10-01

    We present first principles calculations of the thermal and electronic transport properties of the oxide semiconductor CdO. In particular, we find from theory that the accepted thermal conductivity ? value of 0.7 Wm-1K-1 is approximately one order of magnitude too small; our calculations of ? of CdO are in good agreement with recent measurements. We also find that alloying of MgO with CdO is an effective means to reduce the lattice contribution to ?, despite MgO having a much larger thermal conductivity. We further consider the electronic structure of CdO in relation to thermoelectric performance, finding that large thermoelectric powermore »factors may occur if the material can be heavily doped p-type. This work develops insight into the nature of thermal and electronic transport in an important oxide semiconductor.« less

  10. Thermal Strategies for High Efficiency Thermoelectric Power Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Strategies for High Efficiency Thermoelectric Power Generation Thermal Strategies for High Efficiency Thermoelectric Power Generation Developing integrated TE system configurations...

  11. Metal stud wall systems -- Thermal disaster, or modern wall systems with highly efficient thermal insulation?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosny, J.; Christian, J.E.; Desjarlais, A.O. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Buildings Technology Center

    1997-11-01

    Because steel has higher thermal conductivity than wood and intense heat transfer occurs through the metal wall components, thermal performances of a metal stud wall are significantly lower than for similar wood stud walls. A reduction of the in-cavity R-value caused by the wood studs is about 10% in wood stud walls. That is why metal stud walls are believed to be considerably less thermally effective than similar made of wood. However, properly designed metal stud walls can be as thermally effective as wood stud walls. Relatively high R-values may be achieved by installing insulating sheathing, which is widely used as a remedy for a weak thermal performance of metal stud walls. A series of the promising metal stud wall configurations is analyzed using results of finite difference computer modeling and guarded hotbox tests. Some of these walls were designed and tested in the ORNL Building Technology Center, some were tested in other laboratories, and some walls were developed and forgotten long time ago. Also, a novel concept of combined foam-metal studs is considered. The main aim of the present paper is to prove that it is possible to build metal stud walls which perform as well as wood stud walls. The key lies in designing; metal stud wall systems have to be treated in a special way with particular consideration to the high thermal conduction of metal components. In the discussed collection of the efficient metal stud wall configurations, reductions of the in-cavity R-value caused by metal studs are between 10 and 20%.

  12. Pump-probe measurements of the thermal conductivity tensor for materials lacking in-plane symmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feser, Joseph P. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); Liu, Jun; Cahill, David G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and Frederick-Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    We previously demonstrated an extension of time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) which utilizes offset pump and probe laser locations to measure in-plane thermal transport properties of multilayers. However, the technique was limited to systems of transversely isotropic materials studied using axisymmetric laser intensities. Here, we extend the mathematics so that data reduction can be performed on non-transversely isotropic systems. An analytic solution of the diffusion equation for an N-layer system is given, where each layer has a homogenous but otherwise arbitrary thermal conductivity tensor and the illuminating spots have arbitrary intensity profiles. As a demonstration, we use both TDTR and time-resolved magneto-optic Kerr effect measurements to obtain thermal conductivity tensor elements of <110> ?-SiO{sub 2}. We show that the out-of-phase beam offset sweep has full-width half-maxima that contains nearly independent sensitivity to the in-plane thermal conductivity corresponding to the scanning direction. Also, we demonstrate a Nb-V alloy as a low thermal conductivity TDTR transducer layer that helps improve the accuracy of in-plane measurements.

  13. An experimental measurement of the thermal conductivity and diffusivity of a porous solid-liquid system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunn, James Elliott

    1959-01-01

    . 6. The Relation of to SE for Values of K Calculated by the Heat Neter K SE Nethod 10 13 15 17 22 7. The Relation of the Thermal Conductivity of Fluid Saturated Sandstone to the Thermal Conductivity of the Saturating Fluid 8. The Variation... of pressures and temperatures and at flow and non-flow states (3)~(6), (7), The advent of widespread interest in increasing petroleum recovery from subterranean reservoirs by applying heat to an oil-bearing for- mation (8), (9), (10) has created a need...

  14. Predicting Thermal Conductivity Evolution of Polycrystalline Materials Under Irradiation Using Multiscale Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Dongsheng; Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2012-03-01

    A multiscale methodology was developed to predict the evolution of thermal conductivity of polycrystalline fuel under irradiation. In the mesoscale level, phase field model was used to predict the evolution of gas bubble microstructure. Generation of gas atoms and vacancies were taken into consideration. In the macroscopic scale, a statistical continuum mechanics model was applied to predict the anisotropic thermal conductivity evolution during irradiation. Microstructure predicted by phase field model was fed into statistical continuum mechanics model to predict properties and behavior. Influence of irradiation intensity, exposition time and morphology were investigated. This approach provides a deep understanding on microstructure evolution and property prediction from a basic scientific viewpoint.

  15. Highly defective oxides as sinter resistant thermal barrier coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Ramesh

    2005-08-16

    A thermal barrier coating material formed of a highly defective cubic matrix structure having a concentration of a stabilizer sufficiently high that the oxygen vacancies created by the stabilizer interact within the matrix to form multi-vacancies, thereby improving the sintering resistance of the material. The concentration of stabilizer within the cubic matrix structure is greater than that concentration of stabilizer necessary to give the matrix a peak ionic conductivity value. The concentration of stabilizer may be at least 30 wt. %. Embodiments include a cubic matrix of zirconia stabilized by at least 30-50 wt. % yttria, and a cubic matrix of hafnia stabilized by at least 30-50 wt. % gadolinia.

  16. Microstructure changes and thermal conductivity reduction in UO2 following 3.9 MeV He2+ ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janne Pakrinen; Marat Khafizov; Lingfeng He; Chris Wetland; Jian Gan; Andrew T. Nelson; David H Hurley; Anter El-Azab; Todd R Allen

    2014-11-01

    The microstructural changes and associated effects on thermal conductivity were examined in UO2 after irradiation using 3.9 MeV He2+ ions. Lattice expansion of UO2 was observed in x-ray diffraction after ion irradiation up to 5×1016 He2+/cm2 at low-temperature (< 200 °C). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed homogenous irradiation damage across an 8 µm thick plateau region, which consisted of small dislocation loops accompanied by dislocation segments. Dome-shaped blisters were observed at the peak damage region (depth around 8.5 µm) in the sample subjected to 5×1016 He2+/cm2, the highest fluence reached, while similar features were not detected at 9×1015 He2+/cm2. Laser-based thermo-reflectance measurements showed that the thermal conductivity for the irradiated layer decreased about 55 % for the high fluence sample and 35% for the low fluence sample as compared to an un-irradiated reference sample. Detailed analysis for the thermal conductivity indicated that the conductivity reduction was caused by the irradiation induced point defects.

  17. Thermal fuse for high-temperature batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jungst, Rudolph G. (Albuquerque, NM); Armijo, James R. (Albuquerque, NM); Frear, Darrel R. (Austin, TX)

    2000-01-01

    A thermal fuse, preferably for a high-temperature battery, comprising leads and a body therebetween having a melting point between approximately 400.degree. C. and 500.degree. C. The body is preferably an alloy of Ag--Mg, Ag--Sb, Al--Ge, Au--In, Bi--Te, Cd--Sb, Cu--Mg, In--Sb, Mg--Pb, Pb--Pd, Sb--Zn, Sn--Te, or Mg--Al.

  18. Electron thermal conductivity owing to collisions between degenerate electrons P. S. Shternin and D. G. Yakovlev

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electron thermal conductivity owing to collisions between degenerate electrons P. S. Shternin and D of electrons produced by electron-electron Coulomb scattering in a strongly degenerate electron gas taking in the domain of ultrarelativistic electrons at temperatures below the electron plasma temperature. In the inner

  19. Models of stationary siphon flows in stratified, thermally conducting coronal loops: II Shocked Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Models of stationary siphon flows in stratified, thermally conducting coronal loops: II ­ Shocked to explore the conditions for the presence of stationary shocks in critical and supersonic siphon flows of stationary siphon flows in a semicircular solar coronal loop of constant cross section. The model was based

  20. EFFECTIVE THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF LITHIUM CERAMIC PEBBLE BEDS FOR FUSION BLANKETS: A REVIEW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    EFFECTIVE THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF LITHIUM CERAMIC PEBBLE BEDS FOR FUSION BLANKETS: A REVIEW A. ABOU-1597, ali@fusion.ucla.edu The use of lithium ceramic pebble beds has been considered in many blanket designs for the fusion reactors. Lithium ceramics have received a significant interest as tritium breeders for the fusion

  1. Thermal conductivity of the one-dimensional Fermi-Hubbard model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Karrasch; D. M. Kennes; F. Heidrich-Meisner

    2015-06-18

    We study the thermal conductivity of the one-dimensional Fermi-Hubbard model at finite temperature using a density matrix renormalization group approach. The integrability of this model gives rise to ballistic thermal transport. We calculate the temperature dependence of the thermal Drude weight at half filling for various interactions and moreover, we compute its filling dependence at infinite temperature. The finite-frequency contributions originating from the fact that the energy current is not a conserved quantity are investigated as well. We report evidence that breaking the integrability through a nearest-neighbor interaction leads to vanishing Drude weights and diffusive energy transport. Moreover, we demonstrate that energy spreads ballistically in local quenches with initially inhomogeneous energy density profiles in the integrable case. We discuss the relevance of our results for thermalization in ultra-cold quantum gas experiments and for transport measurements with quasi-one dimensional materials.

  2. Process for introducing electrical conductivity into high-temperature polymeric materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liepins, R.; Jorgensen, B.S.; Liepins, L.Z.

    1993-12-21

    High-temperature electrically conducting polymers are described. The in situ reactions: AgNO[sub 3] + RCHO [yields] Ag + RCOOH and R[sub 3]M [yields] M + 3R, where M=Au or Pt have been found to introduce either substantial bulk or surface conductivity in high-temperature polymers. The reactions involving the R[sub 3]M were caused to proceed thermally suggesting the possibility of using laser means for initiating such reactions in selected areas or volumes of the polymeric materials. The polymers successfully investigated to date are polyphenylquinoxaline, polytolylquinoxaline, polyquinoline, polythiazole, and pyrone.

  3. Process for introducing electrical conductivity into high-temperature polymeric materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liepins, R.; Jorgensen, B.S.; Liepins, L.Z.

    1987-08-27

    High-temperature electrically conducting polymers. The in situ reactions: AgNO/sub 3/ + RCHO ..-->.. Ag/sup 0/ + RCOOH and R/sub 3/M ..-->.. M/sup 0/ + 3R, where M = Au or Pt have been found to introduce either substantial bulk or surface conductivity in high- temperature polymers. The reactions involving the R/sub 3/M were caused to proceed thermally suggesting the possibility of using laser means for initiating such reactions in selected areas or volumes of the polymeric materials. The polymers successfully investigated to date are polyphenylquinoxaline, polytolylquinoxaline, polyquinoline, polythiazole, and pyrrone. 3 tabs.

  4. Anisotropic thermal transport in highly ordered TiO2 nanotube arrays Liying Guo,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhiqun

    Anisotropic thermal transport in highly ordered TiO2 nanotube arrays Liying Guo,1 Jun Wang,2 Zhiqun amorphous and anatase TiO2 nanotube arrays. Strong anisotropic thermal conductivity is observed: 0.617 W K-1 for amorphous TiO2 nanotube arrays. The anatase TiO2 nanotube arrays are found to have a higher and anisotropic

  5. Experimental investigation of size effect on thermal conductivity for ultra-thin amorphous poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) films 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Ick Chan

    2009-05-15

    An investigation was conducted to determine whether a “size effect” phenomenon for one particular thermophysical property, thermal conductivity, actually exists for amorphous poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) films with thicknesses ranging from 40 nm...

  6. A High Conducting Oxide Sulfide Composite Lithium Superionic Conductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rangasamy, Ezhiylmurugan [ORNL] [ORNL; Keum, Jong Kahk [ORNL] [ORNL; Sahu, Gayatri [ORNL] [ORNL; Rondinone, Adam Justin [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL] [ORNL; Liang, Chengdu [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    A hybrid superionic conductor was fabricated utilizing the space charge effect between the LLZO and LPS interfaces. This space-charge effect resulted in an improvement over the individual bulk conductivities of the two systems. Sample with higher weight fractions of LLZO are limited by the porosity and grain boundary resistance arising from non-sintered membranes. By combining the properties of LLZO and LPS, the high temperature sintering step has been avoided thus facilitating easier materials processing. The interfacial resistances were also measured to be minimal at ambient conditions. This procedure thus opens a new avenue for improving the ionic conductivity and electrochemical properties of existing solid state electrolytes. High frequency impedance analyses could aid in resolving the ionic conductivity contributions from the space charge layer in the higher conducting composites while mechanical property investigations could illustrate an improvement in the composite electrolyte in comparison with the crystalline LPS membranes.

  7. Analytical evaluation of thermal conductance and heat capacities of one-dimensional material systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saygi, Salih

    2014-02-15

    We theoretically predict some thermal properties versus temperature dependence of one dimensional (1D) material nanowire systems. A known method is used to provide an efficient and reliable analytical procedure for wide temperature range. Predicted formulas are expressed in terms of Bloch-Grüneisen functions and Debye functions. Computing results has proved that the expressions are in excellent agreement with the results reported in the literature even if it is in very low dimension limits of nanowire systems. Therefore the calculation method is a fully predictive approach to calculate thermal conductivity and heat capacities of nanowire material systems.

  8. Thermal and Electric Conductivities of Coulomb Crystals in the Inner Crust of a Neutron Star

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. A. Baiko; D. G. Yakovlev

    1996-04-28

    Thermal and electric conductivities of relativistic degenerate electrons are calculated for the case when electrons scatter by phonons in Coulomb crystals made of spherical finite--size nuclei at densities $10^{11}$~g/cm$^3 neutron star. In combination with the results of the previous article (for lower $\\rho$), simple unified fits are obtained which describe the kinetic coefficients in the range $10^3$~g/cm$^3 neutron stars and evolution of their magnetic fields. The difference between the kinetic coefficients in the neutron star crust composed of ground state and accreted matters is analyzed. Thermal drift of the magnetic field in the neutron star crust is discussed.

  9. ROTATING SOLAR JETS IN SIMULATIONS OF FLUX EMERGENCE WITH THERMAL CONDUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Fang; Fan, Yuhong; McIntosh, Scott W.

    2014-07-01

    We study the formation of coronal jets through numerical simulation of the emergence of a twisted magnetic flux rope into a pre-existing open magnetic field. Reconnection inside the emerging flux rope in addition to that between the emerging and pre-existing fields give rise to the violent eruption studied. The simulated event closely resembles the coronal jets ubiquitously observed by the X-Ray Telescope on board Hinode and demonstrates that heated plasma is driven into the extended atmosphere above. Thermal conduction implemented in the model allows us to qualitatively compare simulated and observed emission from such events. We find that untwisting field lines after the reconnection drive spinning outflows of plasma in the jet column. The Poynting flux in the simulated jet is dominated by the untwisting motions of the magnetic fields loaded with high-density plasma. The simulated jet is comprised of ''spires'' of untwisting field that are loaded with a mixture of cold and hot plasma and exhibit rotational motion of order 20 km s{sup –1} and match contemporary observations.

  10. Process of making cryogenically cooled high thermal performance crystal optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuzay, T.M.

    1992-06-23

    A method is disclosed for constructing a cooled optic wherein one or more cavities are milled, drilled or formed using casting or ultrasound laser machining techniques in a single crystal base and filled with porous material having high thermal conductivity at cryogenic temperatures. A non-machined strain-free single crystal can be bonded to the base to produce superior optics. During operation of the cooled optic, N[sub 2] is pumped through the porous material at a sub-cooled cryogenic inlet temperature and with sufficient system pressure to prevent the fluid bulk temperature from reaching saturation. 7 figs.

  11. Anomalous pressure dependence of thermal conductivities of large mass ratio compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindsay, Lucas R; Broido, David; Carrete, Jesus; Mingo, Natalio; Reinecke, Tom

    2015-01-01

    The lattice thermal conductivities ( ) of binary compound materials are examined as a function of hydrostatic pressure, P, using a first-principles approach. Compound materials with relatively small mass ratios, such as MgO, show an increase in with P, consistent with measurements. Conversely, compounds with large mass ratios (e.g., BSb, BAs, BeTe, BeSe) exhibit decreasing with increasing P, a behavior that cannot be understood using simple theories of . This anomalous P dependence of arises from the fundamentally different nature of the intrinsic scattering processes for heat-carrying acoustic phonons in large mass ratio compounds compared to those with small mass ratios. This work demonstrates the power of first principles methods for thermal properties and advances the understanding of thermal transport in non-metals.

  12. An apparatus for the measurement of thermal conductivity of liquid neon 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jensen, Jerald Norman

    1967-01-01

    AN APPARATUS FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF LIQUID NEON A Thesis By JERALD NORMAN JENSEN Submitted. to the Graduate College of the Texas A & M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1967 Ma)or Su'bisect: Physics AN APPAHATUS FOH THE J'lEASURENENT OF THEHiiLM CONDUCTIVITY OF LIQUID NEOiV A Thesis JEHALD NOLAN JENSEN Approved as to style and content by: tH *i *f D p tm~t (I"ember) , i~ember Nay 1967 !$ ~c g tg...

  13. Effect of alkali addition on DC conductivity and thermal properties of vanadium-bismo-borate glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khasa, S., E-mail: skhasa@rediff.com; Dahiya, M. S., E-mail: skhasa@rediff.com [Physics Department, Deenbandhu Chhotu Ram University of Science and Technology, Murthal-131039 (India); Agarwal, A. [Physics Department, Guru Jambheshwara University of Science and Technology, Hisar-125001 (India)

    2014-04-24

    The DC Conductivity and Differential Thermal Analysis of glasses with composition (30?x)Li{sub 2}O?xV{sub 2}O{sub 5}?20Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}?50B{sub 2}O{sub 3}(x=15, 10, 5) has been carried out in order to study the effect of replacing the Transition Metal Oxide (TMO) with alkali oxide. A significant increase in the DC conductivity has been observed with increase in alkali content. Again the thermal measurements have shown the decrease in both glass transition temperature (T{sub g}) and crystallization temperature (T{sub x}). The Glass Stability (GS) and Glass Forming Ability (GFA) have also been calculated and these also were found to decrease with increase in alkali oxide content at the cost of TMO.

  14. Thermal conductivity studies of novel nanofluids based on metallic silver decorated mesoporous silica nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tadjarodi, Azadeh; Zabihi, Fatemeh

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Metallic silver was decorated in mSiO{sub 2} with grafted hemiaminal functional groups. • Synthesized nanoparticles were used for preparation of glycerol based nanofluids. • The effect of temperature, weight fraction of mSiO{sub 2} and concentration of silver nanoparticles on thermal conductivity of nanofluids was investigated. - Abstract: In the present study, the mesoporous structure of silica (mSiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles as well as hemiaminal grafted mSiO{sub 2} decorated by metallic silver (Ag/mSiO{sub 2}) has been used for the preparation of glycerol based nanofluids. Structural and morphological characterization of the synthesized products have been carried out using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV–vis spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption isotherms. The thermal conductivity and viscosity of the nanofluids have been measured as a function of temperature for various weight fractions and silver concentrations of mSiO{sub 2} and Ag/mSiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, respectively. The results show that the thermal conductivity of the nanofluids increase up to 9.24% as the weight fraction of mSiO{sub 2} increases up to 4 wt%. Also, increasing the percent of the silver decorated mSiO{sub 2} (Ag/mSiO{sub 2}) up to 2.98% caused an enhancement in the thermal conductivity of the base fluid up to 10.95%. Furthermore, the results show that the nanofluids have Newtonian behavior in the tested temperature range for various concentrations of nanoparticles.

  15. Unglazed transpired solar collector having a low thermal-conductance absorber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christensen, C.B.; Kutscher, C.F.; Gawlik, K.M.

    1997-12-02

    An unglazed transpired solar collector using solar radiation to heat incoming air for distribution, comprises an unglazed absorber formed of low thermal-conductance material having a front surface for receiving the solar radiation and openings in the unglazed absorber for passage of the incoming air such that the incoming air is heated as it passes towards the front surface of the absorber and the heated air passes through the openings in the absorber for distribution. 3 figs.

  16. Unglazed transpired solar collector having a low thermal-conductance absorber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christensen, Craig B. (Boulder, CO); Kutscher, Charles F. (Golden, CO); Gawlik, Keith M. (Boulder, CO)

    1997-01-01

    An unglazed transpired solar collector using solar radiation to heat incoming air for distribution, comprising an unglazed absorber formed of low thermal-conductance material having a front surface for receiving the solar radiation and openings in the unglazed absorber for passage of the incoming air such that the incoming air is heated as it passes towards the front surface of the absorber and the heated air passes through the openings in the absorber for distribution.

  17. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 84, 054203 (2011) Electrical and thermal conductivity of liquid sodium from first-principles calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alfè, Dario

    2011-01-01

    and technological point of view. For example, it is used as coolant in fast-breeding nuclear reactors, and in heatPHYSICAL REVIEW B 84, 054203 (2011) Electrical and thermal conductivity of liquid sodium from first on the electrical and thermal conductivity of liquid sodium at 400 K, calculated using density functional theory

  18. E. In Situ Polymerization of Cyclic Butylene Terephthalate(CBT) Oligomers with Conductive fillers for Thermal Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harmon, Julie P.

    copolymers with Thermal conductivity Composites This research is funded by Honeywell Corporation. For the generous assistance in measuring thermal conductivities of our composites. The original purpose% diamond composites, tested by Cool Polymer, Inc. in #12;Warwick. Cool Polymers measured a value of 4.21 W

  19. ELECTRON THERMAL CONDUCTION AS A POSSIBLE PHYSICAL MECHANISM TO MAKE THE INNER HELIOSHEATH THINNER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izmodenov, V. V. [Department of Mechanics and Mathematics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, 1 Leninskie gory, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation); Alexashov, D. B.; Ruderman, M. S., E-mail: izmod@ipmnet.ru [Space Research Institute (IKI) of Russian Academy of Sciences, 84/32 Profsoyuznaya Street, Moscow, 117997 (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-01

    We show that electron thermal conductivity may strongly affect the heliosheath plasma flow and the global pattern of the solar wind's interaction with the local interstellar medium. In particular, it leads to strong reduction of the inner heliosheath thickness, which makes it possible to explain (qualitatively) why Voyager 1 (V1) has crossed the heliopause at an unexpectedly small heliocentric distance of 122 AU. To estimate the effect of thermal conductivity, we consider a limiting case when thermal conduction is very effective. To do that, we assume the plasma flow in the entire heliosphere is nearly isothermal. Due to this effect, the heliospheric distance of the termination shock has increased by about 15 AU in the V1 direction compared with the adiabatic case with ? = 5/3. The heliospheric distance of the heliopause has decreased by about 27 AU. As a result, the thickness of the inner heliosheath in the model has decreased by about 42 AU and has become equal to 32 AU.

  20. Electronically conductive ceramics for high temperature oxidizing environments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kucera, Gene H. (Downers Grove, IL); Smith, James L. (Lemont, IL); Sim, James W. (Evergreen Park, IL)

    1986-01-01

    A high temperature, ceramic composition having electronic conductivity as measured by resistivity below about 500 ohm-cm, chemical stability particularly with respect to cathode conditions in a molten carbonate fuel cell, and composed of an alkali metal, transition metal oxide containing a dopant metal in the crystalline structure to replace a portion of the alkali metal or transition metal.

  1. Electronically conductive ceramics for high temperature oxidizing environments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kucera, G.H.; Smith, J.L.; Sim, J.W.

    1983-11-10

    This invention pertains to a high temperature, ceramic composition having electronic conductivity as measured by resistivity below about 500 ohm-cm, chemical stability particularly with respect to cathode conditions in a molten carbonate fuel cell, and composed of an alkali metal, transition metal oxide containing a dopant metal in the crystalline structure to replace a portion of the alkali metal or transition metal.

  2. Hierarchical nanostructured conducting polymer hydrogel with high electrochemical activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    and have been used in many applications such as bioelectronics and energy storage devices. They are often demonstrated great potential for a broad range of applications from energy storage devices such as biofuelHierarchical nanostructured conducting polymer hydrogel with high electrochemical activity Lijia

  3. Electrical conductivity of wadsleyite at high temperatures and high pressures Lidong Dai a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electrical conductivity of wadsleyite at high temperatures and high pressures Lidong Dai a,b , Shun 2009 Editor: L. Stixrude Keywords: electrical conductivity wadsleyite oxygen fugacity frequency water The electrical conductivity of wadsleyite aggregates has been determined under the broad range of thermodynamic

  4. High Thermal Conductivity Polymer Composites for Low-Cost Heat...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Aerospace Heat recovery at moderate temperatures Benefits Lower cost Lightweight Corrosion resistance Multifunctionality Transition and...

  5. Novel Transparent Phosphor Conversion Matrix with High Thermal Conductivity

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills and Reduce CarbonEnergyDepartment13Department of EnergyMEAs

  6. Continuous Processing of High Thermal Conductivity Fibers and Sheets

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p aDepartmentEnergy comparingDeep Vadose Zone - Professor Gang Chen,

  7. Continuous Processing of High Thermal Conductivity Polyethylene Fibers and

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p aDepartmentEnergy comparingDeep Vadose Zone - Professor Gang

  8. Continuous Processing of High Thermal Conductivity Polyethylene Fibers and Sheets

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p aDepartmentEnergy comparingDeep Vadose Zone - Professor

  9. Glass-like thermal conductivity in high efficiency thermoelectric materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,Executive CompensationEnergyGet Current: Switch onDepartment2GlassGlass|

  10. Determination of temperature-dependent heat conductivity and thermal diffusivity of waste glass melter feed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pokorny, Richard; Rice, Jarrett A.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2013-06-01

    The cold cap is a layer of reacting glass batch floating on the surface of melt in an all-electric continuous glass melter. The heat needed for the conversion of the melter feed to molten glass must be transferred to and through the cold cap. Since the heat flux into the cold cap determines the rate of melting, the heat conductivity is a key property of the reacting feed. We designed an experimental setup consisting of a large cylindrical crucible with an assembly of thermocouples that monitors the evolution of the temperature field while the crucible is heated at a constant rate. Then we used two methods to calculate the heat conductivity and thermal diffusivity of the reacting feed: the approximation of the temperature field by polynomial functions and the finite-volume method coupled with least-squares analysis. Up to 680°C, the heat conductivity of the reacting melter feed was represented by a linear function of temperature.

  11. Method and apparatus for connecting high voltage leads to a high temperature super-conducting transformer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golner, Thomas M.; Mehta, Shirish P.

    2005-07-26

    A method and apparatus for connecting high voltage leads to a super-conducting transformer is provided that includes a first super-conducting coil set, a second super-conducting coil set, and a third super-conducting coil set. The first, second and third super-conducting coil sets are connected via an insulated interconnect system that includes insulated conductors and insulated connectors that are utilized to connect the first, second, and third super-conducting coil sets to the high voltage leads.

  12. Thermal conductivity of the quark matter for the SU(2) light-flavor sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seung-il Nam

    2015-03-04

    We investigate the thermal conductivity ($\\kappa$) of the quark matter at finite quark chemical potential $(\\mu)$ and temperature $(T)$, employing the Green-Kubo formula, for the SU(2) light-flavor sector with the finite current-quark mass $m=5$ MeV. As a theoretical framework, we construct an effective thermodynamic potential from the $(\\mu,T)$-modified liquid-instanton model (mLIM). Note that all the relevant model parameters are designated as functions of $T$, using the trivial-holonomy caloron solution. By solving the self-consistent equation of mLIM, we acquire the constituent-quark mass $M_0$ as a function of $T$ and $\\mu$, satisfying the universal-class patterns of the chiral phase transition. From the numerical results for $\\kappa$, we observe that there emerges a peak at $\\mu\\approx200$ MeV for the low-$T$ region, i.e. $T\\lesssim100$ MeV. As $T$ increase over $T\\approx100$ MeV, the curve for $\\kappa$ is almost saturated as a function of $T$ in the order of $\\sim10^{-1}\\,\\mathrm{GeV}^2$, and grows with respect to $\\mu$ smoothly. At the normal nuclear-matter density $\\rho_0=0.17\\,\\mathrm{fm}^{-3}$, $\\kappa$ shows its maximum $6.22\\,\\mathrm{GeV}^2$ at $T\\approx10$ MeV, then decreases exponentially down to $\\kappa\\approx0.2\\,\\mathrm{GeV}^2$. We also compute the ratio of $\\kappa$ and the entropy density, i.e. $\\kappa/s$ as a function of $(\\mu,T)$ which is a monotonically decreasing function for a wide range of $T$, then approaches a lower bound at very high $T$: $\\kappa/s_\\mathrm{min}\\gtrsim0.3\\,\\mathrm{GeV}^{-1}$ in the vicinity of $\\mu=0$.

  13. ASHRAE Transactions: Research 263 Determination of the ground's thermal conductivity is a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is a significant challenge facing designers of ground-source heat pump (GSHP) systems applied in commercial buildings. The ground heat exchanger size and cost are highly dependent on the ground thermal properties parameters in ground heat exchanger design, and they are among the most difficult to quantify with sufficient

  14. Prediction of Thermal Conductivity for Irradiated SiC/SiC Composites by Informing Continuum Models with Molecular Dynamics Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Gao, Fei; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2014-05-01

    This article proposes a new method to estimate the thermal conductivity of SiC/SiC composites subjected to neutron irradiation. The modeling method bridges different scales from the atomic scale to the scale of a 2D SiC/SiC composite. First, it studies the irradiation-induced point defects in perfect crystalline SiC using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to compute the defect thermal resistance as a function of vacancy concentration and irradiation dose. The concept of defect thermal resistance is explored explicitly in the MD data using vacancy concentrations and thermal conductivity decrements due to phonon scattering. Point defect-induced swelling for chemical vapor deposited (CVD) SiC as a function of irradiation dose is approximated by scaling the corresponding MD results for perfect crystal ?-SiC to experimental data for CVD-SiC at various temperatures. The computed thermal defect resistance, thermal conductivity as a function of grain size, and definition of defect thermal resistance are used to compute the thermal conductivities of CVD-SiC, isothermal chemical vapor infiltrated (ICVI) SiC and nearly-stoichiometric SiC fibers. The computed fiber and ICVI-SiC matrix thermal conductivities are then used as input for an Eshelby-Mori-Tanaka approach to compute the thermal conductivities of 2D SiC/SiC composites subjected to neutron irradiation within the same irradiation doses. Predicted thermal conductivities for an irradiated Tyranno-SA/ICVI-SiC composite are found to be comparable to available experimental data for a similar composite ICVI-processed with these fibers.

  15. R. SCHUMANNand K. ELK:Thermal Conductivity of the Periodic Anderson Model 221 phys. stat. sol. (b)119, 221 (1983)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schumann, Rolf

    1983-01-01

    using the alloy-analogy approximation. Then the energy-dependent conductivity u(o)is obtained from the thermopower S and the thermal conductivity ~tis calculated starting with the energy-dependent conductivity a, of this distribution can be evaluated [l],according to +co -co l) PSI? 103, DDR-8072 Dresden, GDR. #12;222 R

  16. Thermal conductor for high-energy electrochemical cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Joseph A. (Minneapolis, MN); Domroese, Michael K. (South St. Paul, MN); Lindeman, David D. (Hudson, WI); Radewald, Vern E. (Austin, TX); Rouillard, Roger (Beloeil, CA); Trice, Jennifer L. (Eagan, MN)

    2000-01-01

    A thermal conductor for use with an electrochemical energy storage device is disclosed. The thermal conductor is attached to one or both of the anode and cathode contacts of an electrochemical cell. A resilient portion of the conductor varies in height or position to maintain contact between the conductor and an adjacent wall structure of a containment vessel in response to relative movement between the conductor and the wall structure. The thermal conductor conducts current into and out of the electrochemical cell and conducts thermal energy between the electrochemical cell and thermally conductive and electrically resistive material disposed between the conductor and the wall structure. The thermal conductor may be fabricated to include a resilient portion having one of a substantially C-shaped, double C-shaped, Z-shaped, V-shaped, O-shaped, S-shaped, or finger-shaped cross-section. An elastomeric spring element may be configured so as to be captured by the resilient conductor for purposes of enhancing the functionality of the thermal conductor. The spring element may include a protrusion that provides electrical insulation between the spring conductor and a spring conductor of an adjacently disposed electrochemical cell in the presence of relative movement between the cells and the wall structure. The thermal conductor may also be fabricated from a sheet of electrically conductive material and affixed to the contacts of a number of electrochemical cells.

  17. Subsurface Temperature, Moisture, Thermal Conductivity and Heat Flux, Barrow, Area A, B, C, D

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Cable, William; Romanovsky, Vladimir

    Subsurface temperature data are being collected along a transect from the center of the polygon through the trough (and to the center of the adjacent polygon for Area D). Each transect has five 1.5m vertical array thermistor probes with 16 thermistors each. This dataset also includes soil pits that have been instrumented for temperature, water content, thermal conductivity, and heat flux at the permafrost table. Area C has a shallow borehole of 2.5 meters depth is instrumented in the center of the polygon.

  18. Subsurface Temperature, Moisture, Thermal Conductivity and Heat Flux, Barrow, Area A, B, C, D

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Cable, William; Romanovsky, Vladimir

    2014-03-31

    Subsurface temperature data are being collected along a transect from the center of the polygon through the trough (and to the center of the adjacent polygon for Area D). Each transect has five 1.5m vertical array thermistor probes with 16 thermistors each. This dataset also includes soil pits that have been instrumented for temperature, water content, thermal conductivity, and heat flux at the permafrost table. Area C has a shallow borehole of 2.5 meters depth is instrumented in the center of the polygon.

  19. Gold-titania interface toughening and thermal conductance enhancement using an organophosphonate nanolayer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chow, Philippe K.; O'Brien, Peter; Ramanath, Ganpati; Cardona Quintero, Y.; Ramprasad, R.; Hubert Mutin, P.; Lane, Michael

    2013-05-20

    We demonstrate that a mercaptan-terminated organophosphonate nanolayer at gold-titania interfaces can give rise to two- to three-fold enhancement in the interfacial fracture toughness and thermal conductance. Electron spectroscopy reveals that interfacial delamination occurs at the metal-molecule interface near the gold-sulfur bonds, consistent with density functional theory calculations of bond energies. Qualitative correlation between interfacial fracture toughness and bond energies suggest that organophosphonate nanolayers are resilient to humidity-induced degradation. These results, and the versatility of organophosphonates as surface functionalization agents for technologically relevant materials, unlock uncharted avenues for molecular engineering of interfaces in materials and devices for a variety of applications.

  20. High-resolution urban thermal sharpener (HUTS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominguez, Anthony; Kleissl, Jan; Luvall, Jeffrey C; Rickman, Douglas L

    2011-01-01

    of zoning in urban ecosystems with remote sensing, Remote Sensing of Environment  Yaghoobian, N. , J.  of thermal imagery.  Remote Sensing of Environment 107 , 

  1. Automated Process for the Fabrication of Highly Customized Thermally...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Highly Customized Thermally Insulated Cladding Systems Addthis 1 of 2 Resin casting prototype Image: Worcester Polytechnic Institute 2 of 2 A project member completes...

  2. High Power Tests of Normal Conducting Single-Cell Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolgashev, V.A.; Tantawi, S.G.; Nantista, C.D.; /SLAC; Higashi, Y.; Higo, T.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2007-11-07

    We report the results of the first high power tests of single-cell traveling-wave and standing-wave structures. These tests are part of an experimental and theoretical study of rf breakdown in normal conducting structures at 11.4 GHz. The goal of this study is to determine the gradient potential of normal-conducting rf-powered particle beam accelerators. The test setup consists of reusable mode converters and short test structures and is powered by SLAC's XL-4 klystron. This setup was created for economical testing of different cell geometries, cell materials and preparation techniques with short turn-around time. The mode launchers and structures were manufactured at SLAC and KEK and tested in the SLAC Klystron Test Lab.

  3. Preparation of silica aerogels with improved mechanical properties and extremely low thermal conductivities through modified sol-gel process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuo, Yanjia

    2010-01-01

    Reported silica aerogels have a thermal conductivity as low as 15 mW/mK. The fragility of silica aerogels, however, makes them impractical for structural applications. The purpose of the study is to improve the ductility ...

  4. Colloidal graphite/graphene nanostructures using collagen showing enhanced thermal conductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soumya Bhattacharya; Purbarun Dhar; Sarit K Das; Ranjan Ganguly; Thomas Webster; Suprabha Nayar

    2015-11-27

    Time kinetics of interaction of natural graphite (GR) to colloidal graphene (G) collagen (C) nanocomposites was studied at ambient conditions, and observed that just one day at ambient conditions is enough to form colloidal graphene directly from graphite using the protein collagen. Neither controlled temperature and pressure ambiance nor sonication was needed for the same; thereby rendering the process biomimetic. Detailed spectroscopy, X ray diffraction, electron microscopy as well as fluorescence and luminescence assisted characterization of the colloidal dispersions on day one and day seven reveals graphene and collagen interaction and subsequent rearrangement to form an open structure. Detailed confocal microscopy, in the liquid state, reveals the initial attack at the zigzag edges of GR, the enhancement of auto fluorescence and finally the opening up of graphitic stacks of GR to form near transparent G. Atomic Force Microscopy studies prove the existence of both collagen and graphene and the disruption of periodicity at the atomic level. Thermal conductivity of the colloid shows a 17% enhancement for a volume fraction of less than 0.00005 of G. Time variant increase in thermal conductivity provides qualitative evidence for the transient exfoliation of GR to G. The composite reveals interesting properties that could propel it as a future material for advanced bio applications including therapeutics.

  5. Ultra low thermal expansion, highly thermal shock resistant ceramic

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Limaye, S.Y.

    1996-01-30

    Three families of ceramic compositions having the given formula: {phi}{sub 1+X}Zr{sub 4}P{sub 6{minus}2X}Si{sub 2X}O{sub 24}, {phi}{sub 1+X}Zr{sub 4{minus}2X}Y{sub 2X}P{sub 6}O{sub 24} and {phi}{sub 1+X}Zr{sub 4{minus}X}Y{sub X}P{sub 6{minus}2X}Si{sub X}O{sub 24} wherein {phi} is either strontium or barium and X has a value from about 0.2 to about 0.8 have been disclosed. Ceramics formed from these compositions exhibit very low, generally near neutral, thermal expansion over a wide range of elevated temperatures. 7 figs.

  6. Ultra low thermal expansion, highly thermal shock resistant ceramic

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Limaye, Santosh Y. (1440 Sandpiper Cir. #38, Salt Lake City, UT 84117)

    1996-01-01

    Three families of ceramic compositions having the given formula: .phi..sub.1+X Zr.sub.4 P.sub.6-2X Si.sub.2X O.sub.24, .phi..sub.1+X Zr.sub.4-2X Y.sub.2X P.sub.6 O.sub.24 and .phi..sub.1+X Zr.sub.4-X Y.sub.X P.sub.6-2X Si.sub.X O.sub.24 wherein .phi. is either Strontium or Barium and X has a value from about 0.2 to about 0.8 have been disclosed. Ceramics formed from these compositions exhibit very low, generally near neutral, thermal expansion over a wide range of elevated temperatures.

  7. Oxidation of Metals, Vol. 61, Nos. 3/4, April 2004 ( 2004) Thermal Conductivity, Phase Stability, and Oxidation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trice, Rodney W.

    . INTRODUCTION Thermal-barrier coatings (TBCs) have been used to protect gas-turbine- engine components since, and Oxidation Resistance of Y3Al5O12 (YAG)/Y2O3­ZrO2 (YSZ) Thermal-Barrier Coatings Y. J. Su, R. W. Trice,# K­aluminum garnet (YAG) into a typical YSZ TBC system. The thermal conductivity of as-sprayed YAG/YSZ coatings

  8. An experimental investigation of thermal contact conductance across carbon fiber/epoxy resin composites as a function of interface pressure 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoades, Michael Everett

    1989-01-01

    &M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1989 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering AN EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF THERMAL CONTACT CONDUCTANCE ACROSS CARBON FIBER/EPOXY RESIN COMPOSITES AS A... This work investigates thermal contact conductance across carbon fiber/epoxy resin composites at discrete contact pressures. Samples with unidirectional, continuous fibers oriented at zero and ninety degrees to the contact interface are analyzed in 90...

  9. Accepted by the Journal of Building Physics (2007) Microstructure and Thermal Conductivity of Hydrated Calcium Silicate Board Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentz, Dale P.

    2007-01-01

    and an assessment of pore size based on scanning electron microscopy. The experimentally measured thermal components and their spatial arrangement within the composite structure, e.g., the material's microstructure and pore size are examined for two calcium silicate boards of different densities. Thermal conductivities

  10. Impacts of Soil and Pipe Thermal Conductivity on Performance of Horizontal Pipe in a Ground-source Heat Pump 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Y.; Yao, Y.; Na, W.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper the composition and thermal property of soil are discussed. The main factors that impact the soil thermal conductivity and several commonly-used pipe materials are studied. A model of heat exchanger with horizontal pipes of ground-source...

  11. Thermal imaging diagnostics of high-current electron beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pushkarev, A.; Kholodnaya, G.; Sazonov, R.; Ponomarev, D. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Ave., Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2012-10-15

    The thermal imaging diagnostics of measuring pulsed electron beam energy density is presented. It provides control of the electron energy spectrum and a measure of the density distribution of the electron beam cross section, the spatial distribution of electrons with energies in the selected range, and the total energy of the electron beam. The diagnostics is based on the thermal imager registration of the imaging electron beam thermal print in a material with low bulk density and low thermal conductivity. Testing of the thermal imaging diagnostics has been conducted on a pulsed electron accelerator TEU-500. The energy of the electrons was 300-500 keV, the density of the electron current was 0.1-0.4 kA/cm{sup 2}, the duration of the pulse (at half-height) was 60 ns, and the energy in the pulse was up to 100 J. To register the thermal print, a thermal imager Fluke-Ti10 was used. Testing showed that the sensitivity of a typical thermal imager provides the registration of a pulsed electron beam heat pattern within one pulse with energy density over 0.1 J/cm{sup 2} (or with current density over 10 A/cm{sup 2}, pulse duration of 60 ns and electron energy of 400 keV) with the spatial resolution of 0.9-1 mm. In contrast to the method of using radiosensitive (dosimetric) materials, thermal imaging diagnostics does not require either expensive consumables, or plenty of processing time.

  12. On linearization and preconditioning for radiation diffusion coupled to material thermal conduction equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Tao, E-mail: fengtao2@mail.ustc.edu.cn [School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230052 (China) [School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230052 (China); Graduate School of China Academy Engineering Physics, Beijing 100083 (China); An, Hengbin, E-mail: an_hengbin@iapcm.ac.cn [National Key Laboratory of Computational Physics, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China)] [National Key Laboratory of Computational Physics, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Yu, Xijun, E-mail: yuxj@iapcm.ac.cn [National Key Laboratory of Computational Physics, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China)] [National Key Laboratory of Computational Physics, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Li, Qin, E-mail: liqin@lsec.cc.ac.cn [Chinese Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science, Beijing 100190 (China)] [Chinese Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science, Beijing 100190 (China); Zhang, Rongpei, E-mail: zhangrongpei@163.com [Graduate School of China Academy Engineering Physics, Beijing 100083 (China)] [Graduate School of China Academy Engineering Physics, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2013-03-01

    Jacobian-free Newton–Krylov (JFNK) method is an effective algorithm for solving large scale nonlinear equations. One of the most important advantages of JFNK method is that there is no necessity to form and store the Jacobian matrix of the nonlinear system when JFNK method is employed. However, an approximation of the Jacobian is needed for the purpose of preconditioning. In this paper, JFNK method is employed to solve a class of non-equilibrium radiation diffusion coupled to material thermal conduction equations, and two preconditioners are designed by linearizing the equations in two methods. Numerical results show that the two preconditioning methods can improve the convergence behavior and efficiency of JFNK method.

  13. Thermal conductivity of bulk and nanowire Mg?SixSn1–x alloys from first principles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Wu; Lindsay, L.; Broido, D. A.; Stewart, Derek A.; Mingo, Natalio

    2012-11-29

    The lattice thermal conductivity (?) of the thermoelectric materials, Mg?Si, Mg?Sn, and their alloys, are calculated for bulk and nanowires, without adjustable parameters. We find good agreement with bulk experimental results. For large nanowire diameters, size effects are stronger for the alloy than for the pure compounds. For example, in 200 nm diameter nanowires ? is lower than its bulk value by 30%, 20%, and 20% for Mg?Si?.?Sn?.?, Mg?Si, and Mg?Sn, respectively. For nanowires less than 20 nm thick, the relative decrease surpasses 50%, and it becomes larger in the pure compounds than in the alloy. At room temperature, ?more »of Mg?SixSn1–x is less sensitive to nanostructuring size effects than SixGe1–x, but more sensitive than PbTexSe1–x. This suggests that further improvement of Mg?SixSn1–x as a nontoxic thermoelectric may be possible.« less

  14. Method of making improved gas storage carbon with enhanced thermal conductivity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burchell, Timothy D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Rogers, Michael R. (Knoxville, TN)

    2002-11-05

    A method of making an adsorbent carbon fiber based monolith having improved methane gas storage capabilities is disclosed. Additionally, the monolithic nature of the storage carbon allows it to exhibit greater thermal conductivity than conventional granular activated carbon or powdered activated carbon storage beds. The storage of methane gas is achieved through the process of physical adsorption in the micropores that are developed in the structure of the adsorbent monolith. The disclosed monolith is capable of storing greater than 150 V/V of methane [i.e., >150 STP (101.325 KPa, 298K) volumes of methane per unit volume of storage vessel internal volume] at a pressure of 3.5 MPa (500 psi).

  15. Thermal and Electric Conductivities of Coulomb Crystals in Neutron Stars and White Dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. A. Baiko; D. G. Yakovlev

    1996-04-28

    Thermal and electric conductivities are calculated for degenerate electrons scattered by phonons in a crystal made of atomic nuclei. The exact phonon spectrum and the Debye--Waller factor are taken into account. Monte Carlo calculations are performed for body-centered cubic (bcc) crystals made of C, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ca, and Fe nuclei in the density range from $10^3$ to $10^{11}$ g cm$^{-3}$ at temperatures lower than the melting temperature but higher than the temperature at which the Umklapp processes begin to be "frozen out". A simplified method of calculation is proposed, which makes it possible to describe the results in terms of simple analytic expressions, to extend these expressions to any species of nucleus, and to consider face-centered cubic (fcc) crystals. The kinetic coefficients are shown to depend tangibly on the lattice type. The results are applicable to studies of heat transfer and evolution of the magnetic field in the cores of white dwarfs and in the crusts of neutron stars. The thermal drift of the magnetic field in the crust of a neutron star is discussed.

  16. High-performance, transparent conducting oxides based on cadmium stannate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coutts, T.J.; Wu, X.; Mulligan, W.P.; Webb, J.M.

    1996-06-01

    We discuss the modeling of thin films of transparent conducting oxides and we compare the predictions with the observed properties of cadmium stannate. Thin films of this material were deposited using radio-frequency magnetron sputtering. The Drude free-carrier model is used to model the optical and electrical properties. The model demonstrates the need for high mobilities. The free-carrier absorbance in the visible spectrum is used as a comparative figure-of-merit for cadmium stannate and tin oxide. This shows that free-carrier absorbance is much less in cadmium stannate than in tin oxide. X-ray diffraction shows that annealed films consist of a single-phase spinel structure. The post-deposition annealing sequence is shown to be crucial to forming a single phase, which is vital for optimal optical and electrical properties. The films are typically high mobility (up to 65 cm{sup 2}V{sup -1}s{sup -1}) and have carrier concentrations as high as 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3}. Resistivities are as low as 1.3 10{sup -4} {Omega} cm, the lowest values reported for cadmium stannate. Atomic force microscopy indicates that the root-mean-square surface roughness is approximately {+-}15A. Cadmium stannate etches readily in both hydrofluoric and hydrochloric acid, which is a commanding advantage over tin oxide. 11 refs., 15 figs.

  17. High strength-high conductivity Cu--Fe composites produced by powder compaction/mechanical reduction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Verhoeven, John D. (Ames, IA); Spitzig, William A. (Ames, IA); Gibson, Edwin D. (Ames, IA); Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA)

    1991-08-27

    A particulate mixture of Cu and Fe is compacted and mechanically reduced to form an "in-situ" Cu-Fe composite having high strength and high conductivity. Compaction and mechanical reduction of the particulate mixture are carried out at a temperature and time at temperature selected to avoid dissolution of Fe into the Cu matrix particulates to a harmful extent that substantially degrades the conductivity of the Cu-Fe composite.

  18. High strength-high conductivity Cu-Fe composites produced by powder compaction/mechanical reduction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Verhoeven, J.D.; Spitzig, W.A.; Gibson, E.D.; Anderson, I.E.

    1991-08-27

    A particulate mixture of Cu and Fe is compacted and mechanically reduced to form an ''in-situ'' Cu-Fe composite having high strength and high conductivity. Compaction and mechanical reduction of the particulate mixture are carried out at a temperature and time at temperature selected to avoid dissolution of Fe into the Cu matrix particulates to a harmful extent that substantially degrades the conductivity of the Cu-Fe composite. 5 figures.

  19. Density dependence of the room temperature thermal conductivity of atomic layer deposition-grown amorphous alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3})

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorham, Caroline S.; Gaskins, John T.; Hopkins, Patrick E.; Parsons, Gregory N.; Losego, Mark D.

    2014-06-23

    We report on the thermal conductivity of atomic layer deposition-grown amorphous alumina thin films as a function of atomic density. Using time domain thermoreflectance, we measure the thermal conductivity of the thin alumina films at room temperature. The thermal conductivities vary ?35% for a nearly 15% change in atomic density and are substrate independent. No density dependence of the longitudinal sound speeds is observed with picosecond acoustics. The density dependence of the thermal conductivity agrees well with a minimum limit to thermal conductivity model that is modified with a differential effective-medium approximation.

  20. Application Of High-Resolution Thermal Infrared Sensors For Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Application Of High-Resolution Thermal Infrared Sensors For Geothermal Exploration At The Salton Sea, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  1. High carrier concentration p-type transparent conducting oxide films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yan, Yanfa; Zhang, Shengbai

    2005-06-21

    A p-type transparent conducting oxide film is provided which is consisting essentially of, the transparent conducting oxide and a molecular doping source, the oxide and doping source grown under conditions sufficient to deliver the doping source intact onto the oxide.

  2. High elastic modulus polymer electrolytes suitable for preventing thermal runaway in lithium batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mullin, Scott; Panday, Ashoutosh; Balsara, Nitash Pervez; Singh, Mohit; Eitouni, Hany Basam; Gomez, Enrique Daniel

    2014-04-22

    A polymer that combines high ionic conductivity with the structural properties required for Li electrode stability is useful as a solid phase electrolyte for high energy density, high cycle life batteries that do not suffer from failures due to side reactions and dendrite growth on the Li electrodes, and other potential applications. The polymer electrolyte includes a linear block copolymer having a conductive linear polymer block with a molecular weight of at least 5000 Daltons, a structural linear polymer block with an elastic modulus in excess of 1.times.10.sup.7 Pa and an ionic conductivity of at least 1.times.10.sup.-5 Scm.sup.-1. The electrolyte is made under dry conditions to achieve the noted characteristics. In another aspect, the electrolyte exhibits a conductivity drop when the temperature of electrolyte increases over a threshold temperature, thereby providing a shutoff mechanism for preventing thermal runaway in lithium battery cells.

  3. Glass-ceramic hermetic seals to high thermal expansion metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kramer, D.P.; Massey, R.T.

    1987-04-28

    A process for forming glass-ceramic materials from an alkaline silica-lithia glass composition comprising 60-72 mole-% SiO/sub 2/, 18-27 mole-% Li/sub 2/O, 0-5 mole-% Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, 0-6 mole-% K/sub 2/O, 0-3 mole-% B/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and 0.5-2.5 mole-% P/sub 2/O/sub 5/, which comprises heating said glass composition at a first temperature within the 950-1050/degree/C range for 5-60 minutes, and then at a devitrification temperature within the 700-900/degree/C range for about 5-300 minutes to obtain a glass-ceramic having a thermal expansion coefficient of up to 210 x 10/sup /minus/7///degree/C. These ceramics form strong, hermetic seals with high expansion metals such as stainless steel alloys. An intermediate nucleation heating step conducted at a temperature within the range of 675-750/degree/C for 10-120 minutes may be employed between the first stage and the devitrification stage. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  4. Heavy-Duty Engine Technology for High Thermal Efficiency at EPA...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology for High Thermal Efficiency at EPA 2010 Emissions Regulations Heavy-Duty Engine Technology for High Thermal Efficiency at EPA 2010 Emissions Regulations Presentation...

  5. Thermal-stress modeling of an optical microphone at high temperature...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Thermal-stress modeling of an optical microphone at high temperature. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Thermal-stress modeling of an optical microphone at high...

  6. Handbook for Planning and Conducting Charrettes for High-Performance Projects: Second Edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindsay, G.; Todd, J. A.; Hayter, S. J.; Ellis, P. G.

    2009-09-01

    This handbook furnishes guidance for planning and conducting a high-performance building charrette, sometimes called a "greening charrette."

  7. Thermal Behavior of Advanced UO{sub 2} Fuel at High Burnup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muller, E.; Lambert, T.; Silberstein, K.; Therache, B.

    2007-07-01

    To improve the fuel performance, advanced UO{sub 2} products are developed to reduce significantly Pellet-Cladding Interaction and Fission Gas Release to increase high burnup safety margins on Light Water Reactors. To achieve the expected improvements, doping elements are currently used, to produce large grain viscoplastic UO{sub 2} fuel microstructures. In that scope, AREVA NP is conducting the qualification of a new UO{sub 2} fuel pellet obtained by optimum chromium oxide doping. To assess the fuel thermal performance, especially the fuel conductivity degradation with increasing burnup and also the kinetics of fission gas release under transient operating conditions, an instrumented in-pile experiment, called REMORA, has been developed by the CEA. One segment base irradiated for five cycles in a French EDF commercial PWR ({approx} 62 GWd/tM) was consequently re-instrumented with a fuel centerline thermocouple and an advanced pressure sensor. The design of this specific sensor is based on the counter-pressure principle and avoids any drift phenomenon due to nuclear irradiation. This rodlet was then irradiated in the GRIFFONOS rig of the Osiris experimental reactor at CEA Saclay. This device, located in the periphery of the core, is designed to perform test under conditions close to those prevailing in French PWR reactor. Power variations are carried out by translating the device relatively to the core. Self - powered neutron detectors are positioned in the loop in order to monitor the power the whole time of the irradiation. The re-irradiation of the REMORA experiment consisted of a stepped ramp to power in order to point out a potential degradation of the fuel thermal conductivity with increasing burnup. During the first part of the irradiation, most of the measurements were performed at low power in order to take into account the irradiation effects on UO{sub 2} thermal conductivity at high burnup in low range of temperature. The second part of the irradiation consisted in power cycling with one steady-state at several powers (290 W/cm and 360 W/cm) to assess both the thermal conductivity at higher temperature (until 1600 deg. C) and the fission gas release kinetic. This paper summarizes and discusses the main results assessed for this advanced UO{sub 2} fuel: on the one hand, the thermal performances indicate that the fuel thermal conductivity is similar to the one of the standard UO{sub 2} fuel type (the thermal conductivity damage under irradiation can be modelling alike) and, on the other hand, the test results show low fission gas release in comparison with UO{sub 2} standard fuel. (authors)

  8. A Discussion of Conductivity Testing in High Temperature Membranes (lessons learned in assessing transport)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation on conductivity testing in high temperature membranes given by Jim Boncella of Los Alamos National Laboratory at the High Temperature Membrane Working Group meeting in October 2005.

  9. Highly Conductive Solvent-Free Polymer Electrolytes for Lithium Rechargeable Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Filler, Zhong Shi and Braja Mandal

    2004-10-21

    In order to obviate the deficiencies of currently used electrolytes in lithium rechargeable batteries, there is a compelling need for the development of solvent-free, highly conducting solid polymer electrolytes (SPEs). The problem will be addressed by synthesizing a new class of block copolymers and plasticizers, which will be used in the formulation of highly conducting electrolytes for lithium-ion batteries. The main objective of this Phase-I effort is to determine the efficacy and commercial prospects of new specifically designed SPEs for use in electric and hybrid electric vehicle (EV/HEV) batteries. This goal will be achieved by preparing the SPEs on a small scale with thorough analyses of their physical, chemical, thermal, mechanical and electrochemical properties. SPEs will play a key role in the formulation of next generation lithium-ion batteries and will have a major impact on the future development of EVs/HEVs and a broad range of consumer products, e.g., computers, camcorders, cell phones, cameras, and power tools.

  10. Transmission eigenvalue distributions in highly conductive molecular junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergfield, Justin P; Barr, Joshua D; Stafford, Charles A

    2012-01-01

    Transmission eigenvalue distributions in highly conductivesingle-molecule junction; transmission eigenchannels Openuniquely characterized by its transmission eigenvalues ? n .

  11. Studies of non-diffusive heat conduction through spatially periodic and time-harmonic thermal excitations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Kimberlee C. (Kimberlee Chiyoko)

    2015-01-01

    Studies of non-diffusive heat conduction provide insight into the fundamentals of heat transport in condensed matter. The mean free paths (MFPs) of phonons that are most important for conducting heat are well represented ...

  12. Proppant Fracture Conductivity with High Proppant Loading and High Closure Stress 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivers, Matthew Charles

    2011-08-08

    conditions. Proppant performance and fracture fluids, which carry the proppant into the fracture, and their subsequent clean-up during production, were studied. High strength proppant is ideal for deep fracture stimulations and in this study different... proppant loadings at different stresses were tested to see the impact of crushing and fracture width reduction on fracture conductivity. The preliminary test results indicated that oil at reservoir conditions improves clean-up of fracture fluid left...

  13. JOM, February 2013, Volume 65, Issue 2, pp 234-245 234 A Review of Thermal Conductivity of Polymer Matrix Syntactic Foams Effect of Hollow Particle Wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Nikhil

    JOM, February 2013, Volume 65, Issue 2, pp 234-245 234 A Review of Thermal Conductivity of Polymer compositions of syntactic foams. Basic understating of the relationship between thermal conductivity Introduction Hollow particle filled polymer matrix composites, called syntactic foams, are used in weight

  14. DDbar Correlations probing Thermalization in High-Energy Nuclear Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Schweda; X. Zhu; M. Bleicher; S. L. Huang; H. Stoecker; N. Xu; P. Zhuang

    2006-10-30

    We propose to measure azimuthal correlations of heavy-flavor hadrons to address the status of thermalization at the partonic stage of light quarks and gluons in high-energy nuclear collisions. In particular, we show that hadronic interactions at the late stage cannot significantly disturb the initial back-to-back azimuthal correlations of DDbar pairs. Thus, a decrease or the complete absence of these initial correlations does indicate frequent interactions of heavy-flavor quarks and also light partons in the partonic stage, which are essential for the early thermalization of light partons.

  15. Microwave magnetic dynamics in highly conducting magnetic nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kostylev, M.; Ivanov, E.; Samarin, S. [School of Physics M013, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Ding, J.; Adeyeye, A. O. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

    2014-05-07

    We performed low-noise broadband microstrip ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurements of the resonant modes of an array of metallic ferromagnetic nanostripes. In addition to a strong signal of the fundamental mode, we observed up to five weak-amplitude peaks in the field-resolved FMR traces, depending on the frequency. These higher-order absorption peaks have been theoretically identified as due to resonant excitation of odd and even standing spin waves across the direction of confinement in array plane (i.e., across the stripe width). The theory we developed suggests that the odd modes become excited in the spatially uniform microwave field of the FMR setup due to the large conductivity of metals. This promotes excitation of large-amplitude eddy currents in the sample by the incident microwave magnetic field and ultimately results in excitation of these modes. Following this theory, we found that the eddy current contribution is present only for patterned materials and when the microwave magnetic field is incident on one surface of sample surface, as it is in the case of a microstrip FMR.

  16. Pressure dependence of harmonic and an harmonic lattice dynamics in MgO: A ?rst-principles calculation and implications for lattice thermal conductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Xiaoli [Physics Department, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama (United States); Dong, Jianjun [Physics Department, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama (United States)

    2009-05-01

    We report a recent first-principles calculation of harmonic and anharmonic lattice dynamics of MgO. The 2nd order harmonic and 3rd order anharmonic interatomic interaction terms are computed explicitly, and their pressure dependences are discussed. The phonon mode Grueneisen parameters derived based on our calculated 3rd order lattice anharmonicity are in good agreement with those estimated using the finite difference method. The implications for lattice thermal conductivity at high pressure are discussed based on a simple kinetic transport theory.

  17. High-speed quantum memory with thermal motion of atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Tikhonov; T. Golubeva; Yu. Golubev

    2015-02-26

    We discuss the influence of atomic thermal motion on the efficiency of multimode quantum memory in two configurations: over the free expand of atoms cooled beforehand in a magneto-optical trap, and over complete mixing of atoms in a closed cell at room temperature. We consider the high-speed quantum memory, and assume that writing and retrieval are short enough, and the displacements of atoms during these stages are negligibly small. At the same time we take in account thermal motion during the storage time, which, as well known, must be much longer than durations of all the other memory processes for successful application of memory cell in communication and computation. We will analyze this influence in terms of eigenmodes of the full memory cycle and show that distortion of the eigenmodes, caused by thermal motion, leads to the efficiency reduction. We will demonstrate, that in the multimode memory this interconnection has complicated character.

  18. High Temperature Variable Conductance Heat Pipes for Radioisotope Stirling Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarau, Calin; Walker, Kara L.; Anderson, William G.

    2009-03-16

    In a Stirling radioisotope system, heat must continually be removed from the GPHS modules, to maintain the GPHS modules and surrounding insulation at acceptable temperatures. Normally, the Stirling converter provides this cooling. If the Stirling engine stops in the current system, the insulation is designed to spoil, preventing damage to the GPHS, but also ending the mission. An alkali-metal Variable Conductance Heat Pipe (VCHP) is under development to allow multiple stops and restarts of the Stirling engine. The status of the ongoing effort in developing this technology is presented in this paper. An earlier, preliminary design had a radiator outside the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) casing, used NaK as the working fluid, and had the reservoir located on the cold side adapter flange. The revised design has an internal radiator inside the casing, with the reservoir embedded inside the insulation. A large set of advantages are offered by this new design. In addition to reducing the overall size and mass of the VCHP, simplicity, compactness and easiness in assembling the VCHP with the ASRG are significantly enhanced. Also, the permanently elevated temperatures of the entire VCHP allows the change of the working fluid from a binary compound (NaK) to single compound (Na). The latter, by its properties, allows higher performance and further mass reduction of the system. Preliminary design and analysis shows an acceptable peak temperature of the ASRG case of 140 deg. C while the heat losses caused by the addition of the VCHP are 1.8 W.

  19. Journal of Power Sources 161 (2006) 11061115 Direct measurement of through-plane thermal conductivity and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mench, Matthew M.

    2006-01-01

    and Diagnostics Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University® membrane; Diffusion media; Thermal contact resistance 1. Introduction Detailed knowledge of the internal management. In a fuel cell, local variation in temperature can be attributed to the waste heat generation

  20. ANALYTIC CRITERIA FOR THE MECHANICAL AND THERMAL STABILITY OF MAGNETIC STARS WITH FINITE ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pressure changes with the mass density as roughly 4/3 , and the Joule heating rate goes as roughly for dynamical, secular, and pulsational stability, but the Joule heating rate directly affects the secularANALYTIC CRITERIA FOR THE MECHANICAL AND THERMAL STABILITY OF MAGNETIC STARS WITH FINITE ELECTRICAL

  1. Critical dynamics of thermal conductivity at the normal-superconducting transition Smitha Vishveshwara1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vishveshwara1 and Matthew P. A. Fisher2 1 Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 2 Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California expecta- tions. Recent attention has focused on thermal transport experiments,2 which have shed light

  2. Origin of the high work function and high conductivity of MoO3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Yuzheng; Robertson, John

    2014-12-04

    ) and organic photovoltaics (OPVs) [6-12], and as an anode or hole transfer dopant for graphene and MoS2 devices [10-15]. Given its high work function, band gap and defect induced conductivity, it is important to understand how these properties arise... functional. The partial DOS in Fig 2(b) shows that CBM consists of Mo d orbitals while the VBM consists of O p orbitals. This is because MoO3 is a standard closed shell d0 system. The Mo-O bonds are polar, resulting in a large band gap. We now discuss...

  3. CMDF Workshop, Caltech, 05.08.23 Applied Cluster Computing Technologies Group Modeling thermal conductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    conductivity: a Green-Kubo approach Fabiano Oyafuso, Paul von Allmen, Markus Bühler Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Optimize ZT (efficiency) · engineering of phonon & electronic energy dispersions Focus of this work fitting (Genetic Algorithm) Boltzmann Transport Equation Green Kubo formalism Lattice contribution

  4. Temperature, thermal-conductivity, and heat-flux data,Raft River...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    conductivity; United States; USGS Authors Urban, T.C.; Diment, W.H.; Nathenson, M.; Smith, E.P.; Ziagos, J.P.; Shaeffer and M.H. Published Open-File Report - U. S. Geological...

  5. A new approach to low-conductivity, environmentally acceptable thermal insulation. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buckley, B.; Day, J.; Ferrero-Heredia, M.; Shanklin, E.; Varadarajan, G.; Woodruff, L.

    1996-02-01

    The object of this work was to develop a low-conductivity, economical, environmentally benign insulation. Specific objectives were to develop the following: (1) a very low conductivity use as ``super insulation`` in refrigerators, and (2) a general-purpose insulation for buildings and other applications. The technical goals of this work were to minimize gas phase, solid phase, and radiative conductivity. The novel approach pursued to achieve low gas phase conductivity was to blow foam with a removable gas or vapor, encapsulate the foam panel in a pouch made with a barrier film, and introduce a very low conductivity gas as the insulating gas phase. For super insulation and general-purpose insulation, the gases of choice were xenon and krypton, respectively. To control cost, the gases were present at low pressure, and the insulating panel was encapsulated with an impermeable polymeric film. Solid-phase conductivity was minimized by using low-density, open-cell, polyurethane foam. For super insulation, radiative heat transfer was impeded by placing aluminized Mylar films between relatively transparent 70-mil foam slabs. For general-purpose insulation, it was projected to impede radiative heat transfer by achieving the same very small cell size with open-cell CO{sub 2}-blown foam as is now achieved with closed-cell CO{sub 2}-blown foam.

  6. Tunable architecture for flexible and highly conductive graphene-polymer Amlie Nol1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Tunable architecture for flexible and highly conductive graphene-polymer composites Amélie Noël1 a good candidate for conductive inks based on a graphene/polymer nanocomposite material that gathers conductive composite materials through physical blending with emulsifier-free latex. The nanocomposite

  7. NDT&E International 40 (2007) 405418 High-frequency eddy current conductivity spectroscopy for residual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagy, Peter B.

    2007-01-01

    NDT&E International 40 (2007) 405­418 High-frequency eddy current conductivity spectroscopy Available online 11 February 2007 Abstract Recent research results indicated that eddy current conductivity-conductivity engine alloys the eddy current penetration depth could not be forced below 0.2 mm without expanding

  8. Reduction of thermal conductivity of anharmonic lattices Lei Wang1 and Baowen Li1,2,3,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Baowen

    /or heat "modulator." The physical mechanism for thermal diode and thermal transistor may be extended

  9. Equilibrium Statistical-Thermal Models in High-Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdel Nasser Tawfik

    2014-10-25

    We review some recent highlights from the applications of statistical-thermal models to different experimental measurements and lattice QCD thermodynamics, that have been made during the last decade. We start with a short review of the historical milestones on the path of constructing statistical-thermal models for heavy-ion physics. We discovered that Heinz Koppe formulated in 1948 an almost complete recipe for the statistical-thermal models. In 1950, Enrico Fermi generalized this statistical approach, in which he started with a general cross-section formula and inserted into it simplifying assumptions about the matrix element of the interaction process that likely reflects many features of the high-energy reactions dominated by density in the phase space of final states. In 1964, Hagedorn systematically analysed the high-energy phenomena using all tools of statistical physics and introduced the concept of limiting temperature based on the statistical bootstrap model. It turns to be quite often that many-particle systems can be studied with the help of statistical-thermal methods. The analysis of yield multiplicities in high-energy collisions gives an overwhelming evidence for the chemical equilibrium in the final state. The strange particles might be an exception, as they are suppressed at lower beam energies. However, their relative yields fulfill statistical equilibrium, as well. We review the equilibrium statistical-thermal models for particle production, fluctuations and collective flow in heavy-ion experiments. We also review their reproduction of the lattice QCD thermodynamics at vanishing and finite chemical potential. During the last decade, five conditions have been suggested to describe the universal behavior of the chemical freeze out parameters.

  10. Measuring the thermal boundary conductance between graphite and thin film by time-domain thermoreflectance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Variable Delay CCD Detector Aperture /2 plate Optical Isolator Electro-Optic Modulator Pump Beam Probe Beam in this study: (a) sectional view; and (b) TBC model. Probe HOPG Al thin film Pump z dHOPG dAlkAl kHOPG DAl()sinh( )sinh( 1 )cosh( f M f qdqdkq qd kq qd f (2) Volumetric heat capacity [106 Jm-3 K-1 ] Thermal

  11. Simulated evolution of fractures and fracture networks subject to thermal cooling: A coupled discrete element and heat conduction model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Hai; Plummer, Mitchell; Podgorney, Robert

    2013-02-01

    Advancement of EGS requires improved prediction of fracture development and growth during reservoir stimulation and long-term operation. This, in turn, requires better understanding of the dynamics of the strongly coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) processes within fractured rocks. We have developed a physically based rock deformation and fracture propagation simulator by using a quasi-static discrete element model (DEM) to model mechanical rock deformation and fracture propagation induced by thermal stress and fluid pressure changes. We also developed a network model to simulate fluid flow and heat transport in both fractures and porous rock. In this paper, we describe results of simulations in which the DEM model and network flow & heat transport model are coupled together to provide realistic simulation of the changes of apertures and permeability of fractures and fracture networks induced by thermal cooling and fluid pressure changes within fractures. Various processes, such as Stokes flow in low velocity pores, convection-dominated heat transport in fractures, heat exchange between fluid-filled fractures and solid rock, heat conduction through low-permeability matrices and associated mechanical deformations are all incorporated into the coupled model. The effects of confining stresses, developing thermal stress and injection pressure on the permeability evolution of fracture and fracture networks are systematically investigated. Results are summarized in terms of implications for the development and evolution of fracture distribution during hydrofracturing and thermal stimulation for EGS.

  12. High temperature solar thermal technology: The North Africa Market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    High temperature solar thermal (HTST) technology offers an attractive option for both industrialized and non-industrialized countries to generate electricity and industrial process steam. The purpose of this report is to assess the potential market for solar thermal applications in the North African countries of Algeria, Egypt, Morocco and Tunisia. North Africa was selected because of its outstanding solar resource base and the variety of applications to be found there. Diminishing oil and gas resources, coupled with expanding energy needs, opens a large potential market for the US industry. The US high temperature solar trough industry has little competition globally and could build a large market in these areas. The US is already familiar with certain solar markets in North Africa due to the supplying of substantial quantities of US-manufactured flat plate collectors to this region.

  13. Time Domain Reflectometry Surface Reflections for Dielectric Constant in Highly Conductive Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowack, Robert L.

    Time Domain Reflectometry Surface Reflections for Dielectric Constant in Highly Conductive Soils reflectometry TDR mea- surement in highly conductive soils. It makes use of information contained in the TDR signal from the reflection at the surface of the soil rather than the reflection from the end

  14. Thermal conductance of the junction between single-walled carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    conductances of the carbon nanotube (CNT) junctions that would be found in a CNT aerogel are predicted using of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) (e.g., aligned films, mats, and aerogels) are candidates for use in electronic issue in all of these applications. Our focus here is related to single-walled CNT aerogels, which

  15. The thermally stimulated conductivity in amorphous thin film As?Se? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryant, John Duffie

    1972-01-01

    V with a 14 -3 density of 9. 73 x 10 cm . The thermal velocity of the carriers 6 -18 was 6. 34 x 10 cm/sec, and the capture cross section was 2. 7 x 10 2 cm . These results indicate that the Nett-Davis model is more ap- plicable to amorphous As Se... II-3 Sample Holder Design (not to scale) 15 16 17 11-4 Output Curve for Chromel-Constantan Thermo- couple (Voltage vs. Temperature) (ref. 29) 19 II-5 System Cooling Curve (Temperature vs. Time) 20 II-6 System Heating Curve for a Constant Heater...

  16. Metal Hydride Thermal Storage: Reversible Metal Hydride Thermal Storage for High-Temperature Power Generation Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-12-05

    HEATS Project: PNNL is developing a thermal energy storage system based on a Reversible Metal Hydride Thermochemical (RMHT) system, which uses metal hydride as a heat storage material. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun is not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. PNNL’s metal hydride material can reversibly store heat as hydrogen cycles in and out of the material. In a RHMT system, metal hydrides remain stable in high temperatures (600- 800°C). A high-temperature tank in PNNL’s storage system releases heat as hydrogen is absorbed, and a low-temperature tank stores the heat until it is needed. The low-cost material and simplicity of PNNL’s thermal energy storage system is expected to keep costs down. The system has the potential to significantly increase energy density.

  17. Thermal Impact of Fasteners in High-Performance Wood-Framed Walls: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, D.

    2011-01-01

    Buildings are heavy consumers of energy, and residential building design is rapidly addressing topics to maximize energy conservation en route to net-zero energy consumption. Annual energy analysis of a building informs the choice among disparate energy measures, for cost, durability, occupant comfort, and whole-house energy use. Physics-based and empirical models of elements of a building are used in such analyses. High-performance wood-framed walls enable builders to construct homes that use much less than 40% of the energy consumed by similar homes built to minimum code. Modeling for these walls has considered physical features such as framing factor, insulation and framing properties, roughness and convective effects, and air leakage. The thermal effects of fasteners used to construct these walls have not been fully evaluated, even though their thermal conductivity is orders of magnitudes higher than that of other building materials. Drywall screws and siding nails are considered in this finite element thermal conductivity analysis of wall sections that represent wood-framed walls that are often used in high-performance homes. Nails and screws reduce even the best walls' insulating performance by approximately 3% and become increasingly significant as the framing factor increases.

  18. High Energy Density Thermal Batteries: Thermoelectric Reactors for Efficient Automotive Thermal Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-11-15

    HEATS Project: Sheetak is developing a new HVAC system to store the energy required for heating and cooling in EVs. This system will replace the traditional refrigerant-based vapor compressors and inefficient heaters used in today’s EVs with efficient, light, and rechargeable hot-and-cold thermal batteries. The high energy density thermal battery—which does not use any hazardous substances—can be recharged by an integrated solid-state thermoelectric energy converter while the vehicle is parked and its electrical battery is being charged. Sheetak’s converters can also run on the electric battery if needed and provide the required cooling and heating to the passengers—eliminating the space constraint and reducing the weight of EVs that use more traditional compressors and heaters.

  19. Method for the thermal characterization, visualization, and integrity evaluation of conducting material samples or complex structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ortiz, Marcos G. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1992-01-01

    A method for modeling a conducting material sample or structure (herein called a system) as at least two regions which comprise an electrical network of resistances, for measuring electric resistance between at least two selected pairs of external leads attached to the surface of the system, wherein at least one external lead is attached to the surface of each of the regions, and, using basic circuit theory, for translating measured resistances into temperatures or thermophysical properties in corresponding regions of the system.

  20. Thermal conductivity and contact resistance of metal foams This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    distribution in metal foams is necessary for design and modelling of thermal-hydraulic systems incorporating conductivity and TCR in metal foams is described. Measurements are performed in a vacuum under varying

  1. 332 Journal of The Anterican Ceranaic Society -Aksay et al. Vol. 62, NO.7-8 "H.Marchandise. "Thermal Conductivity of Uranium Dioxide." Commission of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aksay, Ilhan A.

    . E. Youngblwd. "Thermal DiffusivityiConductivity of Alumina with a Zirconia Dispersed Phase." Am, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and Department of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering, College of Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 ROBERT F. DAVIS*$' Department of Materials

  2. Thermal dilepton rate and electrical conductivity: An analysis of vector current correlation functions in quenched lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. -T. Ding; A. Francis; O. Kaczmarek; F. Karsch; E. Laermann; W. Soeldner

    2011-02-04

    We calculate the vector current correlation function for light valence quarks in the deconfined phase of QCD. The calculations have been performed in quenched lattice QCD at T=1.45 Tc for four values of the lattice cut-off on lattices up to size 128^3x48. This allows to perform a continuum extrapolation of the correlation function in the Euclidean time interval tau*T -in [0.2, 0.5], which extends to the largest temporal separations possible at finite temperature, to better than 1% accuracy. In this interval, at the value of the temperature investigated, we find that the vector correlation function never deviates from the free correlator for massless quarks by more than 9%. We also determine the first two non-vanishing thermal moments of the vector meson spectral function. The second thermal moment deviates by less than 7% from the free value. With these constraints, we then proceed to extract information on the spectral representation of the vector correlator and discuss resulting consequences for the electrical conductivity and the thermal dilepton rate in the plasma phase.

  3. Fully-coupled engineering and mesoscale simulations of thermal conductivity in UO2 fuel using an implicit multiscale approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Tonks; Derek Gaston; Cody Permann; Paul Millett; Glen Hansen; Chris Newman

    2009-08-01

    Reactor fuel performance is sensitive to microstructure changes during irradiation (such as fission gas and pore formation). This study proposes an approach to capture microstructural changes in the fuel by a two-way coupling of a mesoscale phase field irradiation model to an engineering scale, finite element calculation. This work solves the multiphysics equation system at the engineering-scale in a parallel, fully-coupled, fully-implicit manner using a preconditioned Jacobian-free Newton Krylov method (JFNK). A sampling of the temperature at the Gauss points of the coarse scale is passed to a parallel sequence of mesoscale calculations within the JFNK function evaluation phase of the calculation. The mesoscale thermal conductivity is calculated in parallel, and the result is passed back to the engineering-scale calculation. As this algorithm is fully contained within the JFNK function evaluation, the mesoscale calculation is nonlinearly consistent with the engineering-scale calculation. Further, the action of the Jacobian is also consistent, so the composite algorithm provides the strong nonlinear convergence properties of Newton's method. The coupled model using INL's \\bison\\ code demonstrates quadratic nonlinear convergence and good parallel scalability. Initial results predict the formation of large pores in the hotter center of the pellet, but few pores on the outer circumference. Thus, the thermal conductivity is is reduced in the center of the pellet, leading to a higher internal temperature than that in an unirradiated pellet.

  4. Impact of Temperature-dependent resistivity and thermal conduction on plasmoid Instabilities in current sheets in the solar corona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Lei; Lin, Jun; Ziegler, Udo

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we investigate, by means of two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations, the impact of temperature-dependent resistivity and thermal conduction on the development of plasmoid instabilities in reconnecting current sheets in the solar corona. We find that the plasma temperature in the current sheet region increases with time and it becomes greater than that in the inflow region. As secondary magnetic islands appear, the highest temperature is not always found at the reconnection $X$-points, but also inside the secondary islands. One of the effects of anisotropic thermal conduction is to decrease the temperature of the reconnecting $X-$points and transfer the heat into the $O-$points, the plasmoids, where it gets trapped. In the cases with temperature-dependent magnetic diffusivity, $\\eta \\sim T^{-3/2}$, the decrease in plasma temperature at the $X-$points leads to: (i) increase in the magnetic diffusivity until the characteristic time for magnetic diffusion becomes comparable to that of therma...

  5. Method for the thermal characterization, visualization, and integrity evaluation of conducting material samples or complex structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ortiz, M.G.

    1992-11-24

    Disclosed is a method for modeling a conducting material sample or structure (herein called a system) as at least two regions which comprise an electrical network of resistances, for measuring electric resistance between at least two selected pairs of external leads attached to the surface of the system, wherein at least one external lead is attached to the surface of each of the regions, and, using basic circuit theory, for translating measured resistances into temperatures or thermophysical properties in corresponding regions of the system. 16 figs.

  6. Thermal interaction between free convection and forced convection along a vertical conducting wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shu, Jian-Jun

    2015-01-01

    A theoretical study is presented in this paper to investigate the conjugate heat transfer across a vertical finite wall separating two forced and free convection flows at different temperatures. The heat conduction in the wall is in the transversal direction and countercurrent boundary layers are formed on the both sides of the wall. The governing equations of this problem and their corresponding boundary conditions are all cast into a dimensionless form by using a non-similarity transformation. These resultant equations with multiple singular points are solved numerically using a very efficient singular perturbation method. The effects of the resistance parameters and Prandtl numbers on heat transfer characteristics are investigated.

  7. Suppression of thermal conductivity in graphene nanoribbons with rough edges Alexander V. Savin,1,2 Yuri S. Kivshar,2 and Bambi Hu3,4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Moscow 119991, Russia 2Nonlinear Physics Center, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian, the thermal properties of graphene are also of both fundamental and practical im- portance. SeveralSuppression of thermal conductivity in graphene nanoribbons with rough edges Alexander V. Savin,1

  8. Thermal Properties of Graphene and Applications for Thermal Management of High-Power Density Electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan, Zhong

    2013-01-01

    on Thermal Management, Las Gatos, CA, Nov. 2012 [3] Z. Yan,Thermal Management, Las Gatos, CA, Nov. 2012 Young Scientist

  9. High-Temperature Air-Cooled Power Electronics Thermal Design (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waye, S.

    2014-06-01

    This presentation discusses the status of research at NREL on high temperature air-cooled power electronics thermal design.

  10. Co-Percolating Graphene-Wrapped Silver Nanowire Network for High Performance, Highly Stable, Transparent Conducting Electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Ruiyi; Das, Suprem R; Jeong, Changwook; Khan, Mohammad Ryyan; Janes, David B; Alam, Muhammad A

    2013-04-25

    Transparent conducting electrodes (TCEs) require high transparency and low sheet resistance for applications in photovoltaics, photodetectors, flat panel displays, touch screen devices, and imagers. Indium tin oxide (ITO), or other transparent conductive oxides, have been used, and provide a baseline sheet resistance (RS) vs. transparency (T) relationship. Several alternative material systems have been investigated. The development of high-performance hybrid structures provides a route towards robust, scalable and low-cost approaches for realizing high-performance TCE.

  11. Thermal Conductivity Measurement of Xe-Implanted Uranium Dioxide Thick Films using Multilayer Laser Flash Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Andrew T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-30

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program's Advanced Fuels campaign is currently pursuing use of ion beam assisted deposition to produce uranium dioxide thick films containing xenon in various morphologies. To date, this technique has provided materials of interest for validation of predictive fuel performance codes and to provide insight into the behavior of xenon and other fission gasses under extreme conditions. In addition to the structural data provided by such thick films, it may be possible to couple these materials with multilayer laser flash analysis in order to measure the impact of xenon on thermal transport in uranium dioxide. A number of substrate materials (single crystal silicon carbide, molybdenum, and quartz) containing uranium dioxide films ranging from one to eight microns in thickness were evaluated using multilayer laser flash analysis in order to provide recommendations on the most promising substrates and geometries for further investigation. In general, the uranium dioxide films grown to date using ion beam assisted deposition were all found too thin for accurate measurement. Of the substrates tested, molybdenum performed the best and looks to be the best candidate for further development. Results obtained within this study suggest that the technique does possess the necessary resolution for measurement of uranium dioxide thick films, provided the films are grown in excess of fifty microns. This requirement is congruent with the material needs when viewed from a fundamental standpoint, as this length scale of material is required to adequately sample grain boundaries and possible second phases present in ceramic nuclear fuel.

  12. High-voltage pulse switching hardware for electro-optic studies of conducting aqueous solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Augustine, Mathew P.

    High-voltage pulse switching hardware for electro-optic studies of conducting aqueous solutions 22 April 2002 The hardware necessary for the electro-optic study of conducting polyelectrolyte is to present the design of hardware that is applicable, available, and practical for biological electro

  13. Highly conductive paper for energy-storage devices Liangbing Hua,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    Highly conductive paper for energy-storage devices Liangbing Hua,1 , Jang Wook Choia,1 , Yuan Yanga, is explored in this study as a platform for energy-storage devices by integration with 1D nanomaterials. Here be a highly scalable and low-cost solution for high-performance energy storage devices. conformal coating

  14. Measuring Frac-pack Conductivity at Reservoir Temperature and High Closure Stress 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandes, Preston X.

    2010-10-12

    through it and then measured conductivity by pumping oil to represent true reservoir conditions. Proppant performance and fracture fluids clean-up during production were examined. High strength proppant is ideal for deep fracture stimulations...

  15. ANISOTROPIC THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY IN A DIRTY TYPE II SUPERCONDUCTOR J.P.M. Van der Veeken, P.H. Kes and D. de Klerk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ANISOTROPIC THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY IN A DIRTY TYPE II SUPERCONDUCTOR J.P.M. Van der Veeken, P.H. Kes, The results are compared with calculations by Watts - Tobin and Imai. For dirty type II superconductors) of the total conductivities. ii) The theoretical calculations are valid only for BCS - superconductors

  16. Partitioning planning studies: Preliminary evaluation of metal and radionuclide partitioning the high-temperature thermal treatment systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liekhus, K.; Grandy, J.; Chambers, A.

    1997-03-01

    A preliminary study of toxic metals and radionuclide partitioning during high-temperature processing of mixed waste has been conducted during Fiscal Year 1996 within the Environmental Management Technology Evaluation Project. The study included: (a) identification of relevant partitioning mechanisms that cause feed material to be distributed between the solid, molten, and gas phases within a thermal treatment system; (b) evaluations of existing test data from applicable demonstration test programs as a means to identify and understand elemental and species partitioning; and, (c) evaluation of theoretical or empirical partitioning models for use in predicting elemental or species partitioning in a thermal treatment system. This preliminary study was conducted to identify the need for and the viability of developing the tools capable of describing and predicting toxic metals and radionuclide partitioning in the most applicable mixed waste thermal treatment processes. This document presents the results and recommendations resulting from this study that may serve as an impetus for developing and implementing these predictive tools.

  17. Emission parameters and thermal management of single high-power 980-nm laser diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bezotosnyi, V V; Krokhin, O N; Oleshchenko, V A; Pevtsov, V F; Popov, Yu M; Cheshev, E A [P N Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-02-28

    We report emission parameters of high-power cw 980-nm laser diodes (LDs) with a stripe contact width of 100 ?m. On copper heat sinks of the C-mount type, a reliable output power of 10 W is obtained at a pump current of 10 A. Using a heat flow model derived from analysis of calculated and measured overall efficiencies at pump currents up to 20 A, we examine the possibility of raising the reliable power limit of a modified high-power LD mounted on heat sinks of the F-mount type using submounts with optimised geometric parameters and high thermal conductivity. The possibility of increasing the maximum reliable cw output power to 20 W with the use of similar laser crystals is discussed. (lasers)

  18. Advanced thermal barrier coatings for operation in high hydrogen content fueled gas turbines.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sampath, Sanjay

    2015-04-02

    The Center for Thermal Spray Research (CTSR) at Stony Brook University in partnership with its industrial Consortium for Thermal Spray Technology is investigating science and technology related to advanced metallic alloy bond coats and ceramic thermal barrier coatings for applications in the hot section of gasified coal-based high hydrogen turbine power systems. In conjunction with our OEM partners (GE and Siemens) and through strategic partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) (materials degradation group and high temperature materials laboratory), a systems approach, considering all components of the TBC (multilayer ceramic top coat, metallic bond coat & superalloy substrate) is being taken during multi-layered coating design, process development and subsequent environmental testing. Recent advances in process science and advanced in situ thermal spray coating property measurement enabled within CTSR has been incorporated for full-field enhancement of coating and process reliability. The development of bond coat processing during this program explored various aspects of processing and microstructure and linked them to performance. The determination of the bond coat material was carried out during the initial stages of the program. Based on tests conducted both at Stony Brook University as well as those carried out at ORNL it was determined that the NiCoCrAlYHfSi (Amdry) bond coats had considerable benefits over NiCoCrAlY bond coats. Since the studies were also conducted at different cycling frequencies, thereby addressing an associated need for performance under different loading conditions, the Amdry bond coat was selected as the material of choice going forward in the program. With initial investigations focused on the fabrication of HVOF bond coats and the performance of TBC under furnace cycle tests , several processing strategies were developed. Two-layered HVOF bond coats were developed to render optimal balance of density and surface roughness and resulted in improved TBC lifetimes. Processing based approaches of identifying optimal processing regimes deploying advanced in-situ coating property measurements and in-flight diagnostic tools were used to develop process maps for bond coats. Having established a framework for the bond coat processing using the HVOF process, effort were channeled towards fabrication of APS and VPS bond coats with the same material composition. Comparative evaluation of the three deposition processes with regard to their microstrcuture , surface profiles and TBC performance were carried out and provided valuable insights into factors that require concurrent consideration for the development of bond coats for advanced TBC systems. Over the course of this program several advancements were made on the development of durable thermal barrier coatings. Process optimization techniques were utilized to identify processing regimes for both conventional YSZ as well as other TBC compositions such as Gadolinium Zirconate and other Co-doped materials. Measurement of critical properties for these formed the initial stages of the program to identify potential challenges in their implementation as part of a TBC system. High temperature thermal conductivity measurements as well as sintering behavior of both YSZ and GDZ coatings were evaluated as part of initial efforts to undersand the influence of processing on coating properties. By effectively linking fundamental coating properties of fracture toughness and elastic modulus to the cyclic performance of coatings, a durability strategy for APS YSZ coatings was developed. In order to meet the goals of fabricating a multimaterial TBC system further research was carried out on the development of a gradient thermal conductivity model and the evaluation of sintering behavior of multimaterial coatings. Layer optimization for desired properties in the multimaterial TBC was achieved by an iterative feedback approach utilizing process maps and in-situ and ex-situ coating property sensors. Addressing the challenges pertaining to the integration of th

  19. Design and optimization of a high thermal flux research reactor via Kriging-based algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kempf, Stephanie Anne

    2011-01-01

    In response to increasing demands for the services of research reactors, a 5 MW LEU-fueled research reactor core is developed and optimized to provide high thermal flux within specified limits upon thermal hydraulic ...

  20. Assessment of optical performance of three non-tracking, non-imaging, external compound parabolic concentrators designed for high temperature solar thermal collector units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cisneros, Jesus

    2010-01-01

    S. A. (2004). "Solar thermal collectors and applications".for High Temperature Solar Thermal Collector Units A thesisfor Solar Thermal Collectors……………………………..7 Solar Thermal

  1. Method for producing high carrier concentration p-Type transparent conducting oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Xiaonan (Evergreen, CO); Yan, Yanfa (Littleton, CO); Coutts, Timothy J. (Golden, CO); Gessert, Timothy A. (Conifer, CO); Dehart, Clay M. (Westminster, CO)

    2009-04-14

    A method for producing transparent p-type conducting oxide films without co-doping plasma enhancement or high temperature comprising: a) introducing a dialkyl metal at ambient temperature and a saturated pressure in a carrier gas into a low pressure deposition chamber, and b) introducing NO alone or with an oxidizer into the chamber under an environment sufficient to produce a metal-rich condition to enable NO decomposition and atomic nitrogen incorporation into the formed transparent metal conducting oxide.

  2. Article for thermal energy storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

    2000-06-27

    A thermal energy storage composition is provided which is in the form of a gel. The composition includes a phase change material and silica particles, where the phase change material may comprise a linear alkyl hydrocarbon, water/urea, or water. The thermal energy storage composition has a high thermal conductivity, high thermal energy storage, and may be used in a variety of applications such as in thermal shipping containers and gel packs.

  3. Highly Stable, Anion Conductive, Comb-Shaped Copolymers for Alkaline Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, NW; Leng, YJ; Hickner, MA; Wang, CY

    2013-07-10

    To produce an anion-conductive and durable polymer electrolyte for alkaline fuel cell applications, a series of quaternized poly(2,6-dimethyl phenylene oxide)s containing long alkyl side chains pendant to the nitrogen-centered cation were synthesized using a Menshutkin reaction to form comb-shaped structures. The pendant alkyl chains were responsible for the development of highly conductive ionic domains, as confirmed by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The comb-shaped polymers having one alkyl side chain showed higher hydroxide conductivities than those with benzyltrimethyl ammonium moieties or structures with more than one alkyl side chain per cationic site. The highest conductivity was observed for comb-shaped polymers with benzyldimethylhexadecyl ammonium cations. The chemical stabilities of the comb-shaped membranes were evaluated under severe, accelerated-aging conditions, and degradation was observed by measuring IEC and ion conductivity changes during aging. The comb-shaped membranes retained their high ion conductivity in 1 M NaOH at 80 degrees C for 2000 h. These cationic polymers were employed as ionomers in catalyst layers for alkaline fuel cells. The results indicated that the C-16 alkyl side chain ionomer had a slightly better initial performance, despite its low IEC value, but very poor durability in the fuel cell. In contrast, 90% of the initial performance was retained for the alkaline fuel cell with electrodes containing the C-6 side chain after 60 h of fuel cell operation.

  4. Thermal Properties of Graphene and Applications for Thermal Management of High-Power Density Electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan, Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Noise Reduction in Graphene Transistors: Experiment andand Thermal Properties of Graphene Nanoribbons EncapsulatedGating of Single-layer Graphene with Single- stranded

  5. High performance electrodes in vanadium redox flow batteries through oxygen-enriched thermal activation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mench, Matthew M.

    National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA h i g h l i g h t s Thermal activation of carbon paper: Vanadium redox flow battery Carbon paper Kinetics Surface area Thermal activation Electrode a b s t r a cHigh performance electrodes in vanadium redox flow batteries through oxygen-enriched thermal

  6. Automated Process for the Fabrication of Highly Customized Thermally...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    older buildings therefore consume significant amounts of energy for heating and cooling in the US. Adding thermal insulation to the external facades of a building is one...

  7. Nonlinear Electron Heat Conduction Equation and Self similar method for 1-D Thermal Waves in Laser Heating of Solid Density DT Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Mohammadian Pourtalari; M. A. Jafarizadeh; M. Ghoranneviss

    2011-11-23

    Electron heat conduction is one of the ways that energy transports in laser heating of fusible target material. The aim of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) is to show that the thermal conductivity is strongly dependent on temperature and the equation of electron heat conduction is a nonlinear equation. In this article, we solve the one-dimensional (1-D) nonlinear electron heat conduction equation with a self-similar method (SSM). This solution has been used to investigate the propagation of 1-D thermal wave from a deuterium-tritium (DT) plane source which occurs when a giant laser pulse impinges onto a DT solid target. It corresponds to the physical problem of rapid heating of a boundary layer of material in which the energy of laser pulse is released in a finite initial thickness.

  8. Thick Thermal Barrier Coatings (TTBCs) for Low Emission, High Efficiency Diesel Engine Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Brad Beardsley, Caterpillar Inc.; Dr. Darrell Socie, University of Illinois; Dr. Ed Redja, University of Illinois; Dr. Christopher Berndt, State University of New York at Stony Brook

    2006-03-02

    The objective of this program was to advance the fundamental understanding of thick thermal barrier coating (TTBC) systems for application to low heat rejection diesel engine combustion chambers. Previous reviews of thermal barrier coating technology concluded that the current level of understanding of coating system behavior is inadequate and the lack of fundamental understanding may impede the application of thermal barrier coating to diesel engines.(1) Areas of TTBC technology examined in this program include powder characteristics and chemistry; bond coating composition, coating design, microstructure and thickness as they affect properties, durability, and reliability; and TTBC "aging" effects (microstructural and property changes) under diesel engine operating conditions. Fifteen TTBC ceramic powders were evaluated. These powders were selected to investigate the effects of different chemistries, different manufacturing methods, lot-to-lot variations, different suppliers and varying impurity levels. Each of the fifteen materials has been sprayed using 36 parameters selected by a design of experiments (DOE) to determine the effects of primary gas (Ar and N2), primary gas flow rate, voltage, arc current, powder feed rate, carrier gas flow rate, and spraying distance. The deposition efficiency, density, and thermal conductivity of the resulting coatings were measured. A coating with a high deposition efficiency and low thermal conductivity is desired from an economic standpoint. An optimum combination of thermal conductivity and disposition efficiency was found for each lot of powder in follow-on experiments and disposition parameters were chosen for full characterization.(2) Strengths of the optimized coatings were determined using 4-point bending specimens. The tensile strength was determined using free-standing coatings made by spraying onto mild steel substrates which were subsequently removed by chemical etching. The compressive strengths of the coatings were determined using composite specimens of ceramic coated onto stainless steel substrates, tested with the coating in compression and the steel in tension. The strength of the coating was determined from an elastic bi-material analysis of the resulting failure of the coating in compression.(3) Altough initial comparisons of the materials would appear to be straight forward from these results, the results of the aging tests of the materials are necessary to insure that trends in properties remain after long term exposure to a diesel environment. Some comparisons can be made, such as the comparison between for lot-to-lot variation. An axial fatigue test to determine the high cycle fatigue behavior of TTBCs was developed at the University of Illinois under funding from this program.(4) A fatigue test apparatus has been designed and initial work performed which demonstrates the ability to provide a routine method of axial testing of coating. The test fixture replaces the normal load frame and fixtures used to transmit the hydraulic oil loading to the sample with the TTBC specimen itself. The TTBC specimen is a composite metal/coating with stainless steel ends. The coating is sprayed onto a mild steel center tube section onto which the stainless steel ends are press fit. The specimen is then machined. After machining, the specimen is placed in an acid bath which etches the mild steel away leaving the TTBC attached to the the stainless steel ends. Plugs are then installed in the ends and the composite specimen loaded in the test fixture where the hydraulic oil pressurizes each end to apply the load. Since oil transmits the load, bending loads are minimized. This test fixture has been modified to allow piston ends to be attached to the specimen which allows tensile loading as well as compressive loading of the specimen. In addition to the room temperature data, specimens have been tested at 800 Degrees C with the surprising result that at high temperature, the TTBC exhibits much higher fatigue strength. Testing of the TTBC using tension/compression cycling has been con

  9. Binary inorganic salt mixtures as high conductivity liquid electrolytes for .100 uC fuel cells{

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angell, C. Austen

    Binary inorganic salt mixtures as high conductivity liquid electrolytes for .100 uC fuel cells cations (e.g. ammonium) as electrolytes in fuel cells operating in the temperature range 100­200 uC, where cell operating with optimized electrodes in the same temperature range, while open circuit voltages

  10. CRAD, Conduct of Operations- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February, 2007 assessment of the Conduct of Operations Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  11. CRAD, Conduct of Operations- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February, 2007 assessment of the Conduct of Operations Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  12. Information content of slug tests for estimating hydraulic properties in realistic, high-conductivity aquifer scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Information content of slug tests for estimating hydraulic properties in realistic, high for partially-penetrating slug tests in unconfined aquifers (Malama et al., in press) provides a semi the ultimate goal of determining aquifer properties such as hydraulic conductivity K and specific storage Ss

  13. Thermal and Electrical Transport in Oxide Heterostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravichandran, Jayakanth

    2011-01-01

    of thermal conductivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.4 Thermal transport in2.3.2 Thermal transport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  14. Temperature dependence of thermal conductivity of AlxGa1-xN thin films measured by the differential 3 technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engineering, University of California­Riverside, Riverside, California 92521 (Received 2 July 2004; accepted conductivity of AlxGa1-xN thin films (x=0 and 0.4) grown by the hydride vapor phase epitaxy. ThermalN thin films (x=0 and 0.4) grown by the hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). The accurate values

  15. Heat Transfer -1 You are given the following information for a fluid with thermal conductivity of k = 0.0284 W/m-K that

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Heat Transfer - 1 You are given the following information for a fluid with thermal conductivity the flow is laminar near the wall. a) (30 points) Determine the corresponding heat transfer coefficient the heat transfer coefficient as a function of x. c) (25 points) Determine the average heat transfer

  16. Status of High Power Tests of Normal Conducting Single-Cell Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolgashev, V.A.; Tantawi, S.G.; /SLAC; Higashi, Y.; Higo, T.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2011-11-04

    We report the results of ongoing high power tests of single-cell standing wave structures. These tests are part of an experimental and theoretical study of rf breakdown in normal conducting structures at 11.4 GHz. The goal of this study is to determine the maximum gradient possibilities for normal-conducting rf powered particle beam accelerators. The test setup consists of reusable mode launchers and short test structures powered by SLACs XL-4 klystron. The mode launchers and structures were manufactured at SLAC and KEK and tested at the SLAC klystron test laboratory.

  17. Advanced Metal-Hydrides-Based Thermal Battery: A New Generation of High Density Thermal Battery Based on Advanced Metal Hydrides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-12-01

    HEATS Project: The University of Utah is developing a compact hot-and-cold thermal battery using advanced metal hydrides that could offer efficient climate control system for EVs. The team’s innovative designs of heating and cooling systems for EVs with high energy density, low-cost thermal batteries could significantly reduce the weight and eliminate the space constraint in automobiles. The thermal battery can be charged by plugging it into an electrical outlet while charging the electric battery and it produces heat and cold through a heat exchanger when discharging. The ultimate goal of the project is a climate-controlling thermal battery that can last up to 5,000 charge and discharge cycles while substantially increasing the driving range of EVs, thus reducing the drain on electric batteries.

  18. Highly conducting SrMoO{sub 3} thin films for microwave applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radetinac, Aldin Mani, Arzhang; Ziegler, Jürgen; Alff, Lambert; Komissinskiy, Philipp; Melnyk, Sergiy; Nikfalazar, Mohammad; Zheng, Yuliang; Jakoby, Rolf

    2014-09-15

    We have measured the microwave resistance of highly conducting perovskite oxide SrMoO{sub 3} thin film coplanar waveguides. The epitaxial SrMoO{sub 3} thin films were grown by pulsed laser deposition and showed low mosaicity and smooth surfaces with a root mean square roughness below 0.3?nm. Layer-by-layer growth could be achieved for film thicknesses up to 400?nm as monitored by reflection high-energy electron diffraction and confirmed by X-ray diffraction. We obtained a constant microwave resistivity of 29???·cm between 0.1 and 20?GHz by refining the frequency dependence of the transmission coefficients. Our result shows that SrMoO{sub 3} is a viable candidate as a highly conducting electrode material for all-oxide microwave electronic devices.

  19. Thermal conductivity of MgO, MgSiO3 perovskite and post-perovskite in the Earth's deep mantle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haigis, Volker; Jahn, Sandro; 10.1016/j.epsl.2012.09.002

    2012-01-01

    We report lattice thermal conductivities of MgO and MgSiO3 in the perovskite and post-perovskite structures at conditions of the Earth's lower mantle, obtained from equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. Using an advanced ionic interaction potential, the full conductivity tensor was calculated by means of the Green-Kubo method, and the conductivity of MgSiO3 post-perovskite was found to be significantly anisotropic. The thermal conductivities of all three phases were parameterized as a function of density and temperature. Assuming a Fe-free lower-mantle composition with mole fractions xMgSiO3 = 0.66 and xMgO = 0.34, the conductivity of the two-phase aggregate was calculated along a model geotherm. It was found to vary considerably with depth, rising from 9.5 W/(mK) at the top of the lower mantle to 20.5 W/(mK) at the top of the thermal boundary layer above the core-mantle boundary. Extrapolation of experimental data suggests that at deep-mantle conditions, the presence of a realistic amount of iron impur...

  20. Femtosecond Chemically Activated Reactions: Concept of Nonstatistical Activation at High Thermal Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sang Kyu

    Femtosecond Chemically Activated Reactions: Concept of Nonstatistical Activation at High Thermal Femtosecond chemical activation of reactions at very high thermal energies, much above the bond energy activation, collision-free, and temporally and spatially defined. Introduction Since the work in the 1920s

  1. technology offer SandTES -High Temperature Sand Thermal Energy Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szmolyan, Peter

    technology offer SandTES - High Temperature Sand Thermal Energy Storage key words: High Temperature Energy Storage | Fluidized Bed | Sand | The invention consists of a fluidized bed with internal heat together with Dr. Eisl of ENRAG GmbH. Background Thermal energy storage (TES) systems are essential

  2. In situ Formation of Highly Conducting Covalent Au-C Contacts for Single-Molecule Junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Z.L.; Hybertsen, M.; Skouta, R.; Vazquez, H.; Widawsky, J.R.; Schneebeli, S.; Chen, W.; Breslow, R.; Venkataraman, L.

    2011-06-01

    Charge transport across metal-molecule interfaces has an important role in organic electronics. Typically, chemical link groups such as thiols or amines are used to bind organic molecules to metal electrodes in single-molecule circuits, with these groups controlling both the physical structure and the electronic coupling at the interface. Direct metal-carbon coupling has been shown through C60, benzene and {pi}-stacked benzene but ideally the carbon backbone of the molecule should be covalently bonded to the electrode without intervening link groups. Here, we demonstrate a method to create junctions with such contacts. Trimethyl tin (SnMe{sub 3})-terminated polymethylene chains are used to form single-molecule junctions with a break-junction technique. Gold atoms at the electrode displace the SnMe{sub 3} linkers, leading to the formation of direct Au-C bonded single-molecule junctions with a conductance that is {approx}100 times larger than analogous alkanes with most other terminations. The conductance of these Au-C bonded alkanes decreases exponentially with molecular length, with a decay constant of 0.97 per methylene, consistent with a non-resonant transport mechanism. Control experiments and ab initio calculations show that high conductances are achieved because a covalent Au-C sigma ({sigma}) bond is formed. This offers a new method for making reproducible and highly conducting metal-organic contacts.

  3. Short time scale thermal mechanical shock wave propagation in high performance microelectronic packaging configuration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagaraj, Mahavir

    2004-11-15

    The generalized theory of thermoelasticity was employed to characterize the coupled thermal and mechanical wave propagation in high performance microelectronic packages. Application of a Gaussian heat source of spectral profile similar to high...

  4. Solar Thermal Energy Storage Device: Hybrid Nanostructures for High-Energy-Density Solar Thermal Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-09

    HEATS Project: MIT is developing a thermal energy storage device that captures energy from the sun; this energy can be stored and released at a later time when it is needed most. Within the device, the absorption of sunlight causes the solar thermal fuel’s photoactive molecules to change shape, which allows energy to be stored within their chemical bonds. A trigger is applied to release the stored energy as heat, where it can be converted into electricity or used directly as heat. The molecules would then revert to their original shape, and can be recharged using sunlight to begin the process anew. MIT’s technology would be 100% renewable, rechargeable like a battery, and emissions-free. Devices using these solar thermal fuels—called Hybrisol—can also be used without a grid infrastructure for applications such as de-icing, heating, cooking, and water purification.

  5. Origin of high Li? conduction in doped Li?La?Zr?O?? garnets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Yan; Rangasamy, Ezhiylmurugan; Liang, Chengdu; An, Ke

    2015-08-06

    Substitution of a native ion in the crystals with a foreign ion that differs in valence (aliovalent doping) has been widely attempted to upgrade solid-state ionic conductors for various charge carriers including O²?, H?, Li?, Na?, etc. The doping helps promote the high-conductive framework and dredge the tunnel for fast ion transport. The garnet-type Li?La?Zr?O?? (LLZO) is a fast Li? solid conductor, which received much attention as an electrolyte candidate for all-solid-state lithium ion batteries, showing great potential to offer high energy density and minimize battery safety concerns to meet extensive applications in large energy storage systems such as thosemore »for electric vehicles and aerospace. In the Li-stuffed garnet framework of LLZO, the 3D pathway formed by the incompletely occupied tetrahedral sites bridged by a single octahedron enables the superior Li? conductivity. For optimal performance, many aliovalent-doping efforts have been made throughout metal elements (Al³?, Ta??) and metalloid elements (Ga³?, Te??) in the periodic table with various valences to stabilize the high-conductive phase and increase the Li vacancy concentration.« less

  6. Origin of high Li? conduction in doped Li?La?Zr?O?? garnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Rangasamy, Ezhiylmurugan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Liang, Chengdu [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); An, Ke [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Substituting a native ion in the crystals with a foreign ion that has a difference in valence, termed as aliovalent doping, has been widely attempted to upgrade solid-state ionic conductors for various charge carriers including O²?, H?, Li?, Na?, and so forth.(1-4) The doping aids to promote the high-conductive framework and dredge the tunnel for fast ion transport. The garnet-type Li?La?Zr?O?? (LLZO) is a fast Li? solid conductor, which received vast attention as an electrolyte candidate for all-solid-state lithium ion batteries, showing great potential to offer high energy density and minimize battery safety concerns to meet extensive applications in large energy storage systems such as electric vehicles and aerospace.(5-8) In the Li-stuffed garnet framework of LLZO, the 3D pathway formed through the incompletely occupied tetrahedral sites bridged by a single octahedron enables the superior Li? conductivity.(9, 10) For the purpose of optimal performance, many efforts of aliovalent doping have been made throughout metal elements (Al³?, Ta??) and metalloid elements (Ga³?, Te??) in the periodic table with various valences(11-14) to stabilize the high-conductive phase and increase the Li vacancy concentration.(7, 10, 15)

  7. Thermal Analysis of ZPPR High Pu Content Stored Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles W. Solbrig; Chad Pope; Jason Andrus

    2014-09-01

    This paper estimates the temperature of high Pu content ZPPR fuel while in storage to determine the probablilty of fuel damage during storage. The Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) is an experimental reactor which has been decomissioned. It ran only at extremely low power, for testing nuclear reactor designs and was operated as a criticality facility from April 18, 1969 until decommissioned in 1990. Its fuel was manufactured in 1967 and has been in storage since the reactor was decomissioned. Heat is generated in the fuel due to Pu and Am decay and is a concern for possible fuel damage. Any damage to the cladding would be expected to lead to the fuel hydriding and oxidizing over a long period of storage as was described in the analysis of the damage to the ZPPR uranium fuel resulting in the fuel becoming unuseable and a large potential source of contamination. (Ref. Solbrig, 1994). A series of computer runs were made to scope out the range of temperatures that can occur in the ZPPR fuel in storage. The maximum calculated conservative fuel temperature is high (292 degrees C [558 degrees F]) in spite of the fact that the fuel element heat generation rates seem quite low, between 35 and 10 W for containers (called clamshells) full of fuel. However, the ZPPR storage bins, built for safeguards, are very effective insulators. The calculated clamshells and the cavity doors temperatures are also high. No record exists of people receiving skin burns by touching the cavity doors or clamshells, which indicates the computed temperatures may be higher than actual. (Note, gloves are worn when handling hotter clamshells.) Given the high calculated temperatures, a cursory measurement program was conducted to calibrate the calculated results. The measurement of bin doors, cavity doors, and clamshell temperatures would be easy to make if it were not for regulations resulting from security and potential contamination. Due to conservative assumptions in the model like high heat transfer contact resistance between contact surfaces (such as between the fuel and the clamshell), the calculated temperatures are intended to be overestimated. The temperatures of the stored fuel in a particular clamshell are dependent, among other parameters, on the distribution of fuel in the surrounding storage compartments, the heat generation rate of the fuel, and the orientation of fuel in the clamshell (parallel or perpendicular to the door). The distribution of fuel in this analysis was selected to give higher temperatures than actual distributions might give. Due to possible contamination and security concerns, fuel temperatures could not be measured but the bin doors, storage sleeve doors, and clamshell temperatures could be and were measured. The comparison of these three temperatures to the calculations indicates that the temperatures calculated with conservative assumptions are higher than the actual temperatures. This implies that the calculated fuel temperatures are higher than actual also. The maximum calculated fuel temperature with the most conservative assumptions (292 degrees C, (558 degrees F)) is significantly below the no fuel failure criterion of 600 degrees C (1,112 degrees F). Some fuel failures have occurred but these results indicate that the failures are not due to high temperatures encountered in fuel storage.

  8. Thermal and high magnetic field treatment of materials and associated apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kisner, Roger A.; Wilgen, John B.; Ludtka, Gerard M.; Jaramillo, Roger A.; Mackiewicz-Ludtka, Gail

    2010-06-29

    An apparatus and method for altering characteristics, such as can include structural, magnetic, electrical, optical or acoustical characteristics, of an electrically-conductive workpiece utilizes a magnetic field within which the workpiece is positionable and schemes for thermally treating the workpiece by heating or cooling techniques in conjunction with the generated magnetic field so that the characteristics of the workpiece are effected by both the generated magnetic field and the thermal treatment of the workpiece.

  9. Thermal And Mechanical Analysis of High-power Light-emitting Diodes with Ceramic Packages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Hu; L. Yang; M. -W. Shin

    2008-01-07

    In this paper we present the thermal and mechanical analysis of high-power light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with ceramic packages. Transient thermal measurements and thermo-mechanical simulation were performed to study the thermal and mechanical characteristics of ceramic packages. Thermal resistance from the junction to the ambient was decreased from 76.1 oC/W to 45.3 oC/W by replacing plastic mould to ceramic mould for LED packages. Higher level of thermo-mechanical stresses in the chip were found for LEDs with ceramic packages despite of less mismatching coefficients of thermal expansion comparing with plastic packages. The results suggest that the thermal performance of LEDs can be improved by using ceramic packages, but the mounting process of the high power LEDs with ceramic packages is critically important and should be in charge of delaminating interface layers in the packages.

  10. High-Performance Home Technologies: Solar Thermal & Photovoltaic Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baechler, M.; Gilbride, T.; Ruiz, K.; Steward, H.; Love, P.

    2007-06-01

    This document is the sixth volume of the Building America Best Practices Series. It presents information that is useful throughout the United States for enhancing the energy efficiency practices in the specific climate zones that are presented in the first five Best Practices volumes. It provides an introduction to current photovoltaic and solar thermal building practices. Information about window selection and shading is included.

  11. Evaluation of the Thermal Performance for a Wire Mesh/Hollow Glass Microsphere Composite Structure as a Conduction Barrier 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mckenna, Sean

    2010-01-15

    ]. For instance, application of microsphere insulated pressure vessels for hydrogen storage on vehicles showed good thermal performance [15]. In addition, Mueller [16] in examining cryogenic liquefaction and storage, considered critical in a potential human...

  12. Uniform estimates for transmission problems with high contrast in heat conduction and electromagnetism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caloz, Gabriel; Péron, Victor

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we prove uniform a priori estimates for transmission problems with constant coefficients on two subdomains, with a special emphasis for the case when the ratio between these coefficients is large. In the most part of the work, the interface between the two subdomains is supposed to be Lipschitz. We first study a scalar transmission problem which is handled through a converging asymptotic series. Then we derive uniform a priori estimates for Maxwell transmission problem set on a domain made up of a dielectric and a highly conducting material. The technique is based on an appropriate decomposition of the electric field, whose gradient part is estimated thanks to the first part. As an application, we develop an argument for the convergence of an asymptotic expansion as the conductivity tends to infinity.

  13. Thermal Conductivity Enhancement of High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roshandell, Melina

    2013-01-01

    3 Fig. 1.2. Solar power plant operation [Different types of solar power plants have been designed andAmong the concentrating solar power plants (CSPP) are Solar

  14. Thermal Conductivity Enhancement of High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roshandell, Melina

    2013-01-01

    3 Fig. 1.2. Solar power plant operation [Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications AMaterials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications

  15. Thermal Conductivity Enhancement of High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roshandell, Melina

    2013-01-01

    storage: heat storage materials, Solar Energy 30 (1983) 313–and phase change materials, Solar Energy 62 (1998) 19–28 99-heat storage materials. Solar Energy Mater Solar Sells 1992;

  16. Thermal Conductivity Enhancement of High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roshandell, Melina

    2013-01-01

    3 Fig. 1.2. Solar power plant operation [Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications Afor Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications by Melina

  17. Thermal Conductivity Enhancement of High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roshandell, Melina

    2013-01-01

    164. Golden, Colorado, USA: Solar Energy Research Institute;heat storage materials, Solar Energy 30 (1983) 313–332 13-experimental. Trans ASME, J Solar Energy Eng 1990;112:125–

  18. Thermal Conductivity Enhancement of High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roshandell, Melina

    2013-01-01

    40. 10- Lane GA. Solar heat storage—latent heat materials,332 13- Lane, G.A. Solar Heat Storage: Latent Heat Material,14-Lane, G.A. Solar Heat Storage: Latent Heat Material, vol.

  19. Thermal Conductivity Enhancement of High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roshandell, Melina

    2013-01-01

    global warming affects. Recent advances on deployment of solar energy to generate electricity shows potential

  20. High Thermal Conductivity Polymer Composites for Low-Cost Heat Exchangers

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nA Guide to TappingWORK BREAKDOWNEnergy howBuildingMap showing

  1. Advanced Multiphysics Thermal-Hydraulics Models for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jain, Prashant K [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Engineering design studies to determine the feasibility of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from using highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel are ongoing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This work is part of an effort sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Reactor Conversion Program. HFIR is a very high flux pressurized light-water-cooled and moderated flux-trap type research reactor. HFIR s current missions are to support neutron scattering experiments, isotope production, and materials irradiation, including neutron activation analysis. Advanced three-dimensional multiphysics models of HFIR fuel were developed in COMSOL software for safety basis (worst case) operating conditions. Several types of physics including multilayer heat conduction, conjugate heat transfer, turbulent flows (RANS model) and structural mechanics were combined and solved for HFIR s inner and outer fuel elements. Alternate design features of the new LEU fuel were evaluated using these multiphysics models. This work led to a new, preliminary reference LEU design that combines a permanent absorber in the lower unfueled region of all of the fuel plates, a burnable absorber in the inner element side plates, and a relocated and reshaped (but still radially contoured) fuel zone. Preliminary results of estimated thermal safety margins are presented. Fuel design studies and model enhancement continue.

  2. Abnormal thermal conductivity in tetragonal tungsten bronze Ba{sub 6?x}Sr{sub x}Nb{sub 10}O{sub 30}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolodiazhnyi, T. Sakurai, H.; Vasylkiv, O.; Borodianska, H.; Mozharivskyj, Y.

    2014-03-17

    Ba{sub 6?x}Sr{sub x}Nb{sub 10}O{sub 30} solid solution with 0???x???6 crystallizes in centrosymmetric tetragonal “tungsten bronze” structure (space group P4/mbm). We report on the x dependence of thermal conductivity of polycrystalline samples measured in the 2–400?K temperature interval. Substitution of Sr for Ba brings about a significant decrease in thermal conductivity at x???3 accompanied by development of a low-temperature (T???10–30?K) “plateau” region reminiscent of a glass-like compounds. We explain this behaviour based on a size-driven site occupancy and atomic displacement parameters associated with an alkaline earth atomic positions in the title compounds.

  3. Giant Thermal Rectification from Polyethylene Nanofiber Thermal Diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Teng

    2015-01-01

    The realization of phononic computing is held hostage by the lack of high performance thermal devices. Here we show through theoretical analysis and molecular dynamics simulations that unprecedented thermal rectification factors (as large as 1.20) can be achieved utilizing the phase dependent thermal conductivity of polyethylene nanofibers. More importantly, such high thermal rectifications only need very small temperature differences (< 20 oC) across the device, which is a significant advantage over other thermal diodes which need temperature biases on the order of the operating temperature. Taking this into consideration, we show that the dimensionless temperature-scaled rectification factors of the polymer nanofiber diodes range from 12 to 25 - much larger than other thermal diodes (< 8). The polymer nanofiber thermal diode consists of a crystalline portion whose thermal conductivity is highly phase-sensitive and a cross-linked portion which has a stable phase. Nanoscale size effect can be utilized t...

  4. Simulation of the high temperature impression of thermal barrier coatings with columnar microstructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutchinson, John W.

    Thermal barrier systems used in gas turbines utilize various ternary oxides as the outermost insulatingSimulation of the high temperature impression of thermal barrier coatings with columnar of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA c Materials

  5. High Resolution Viscosity Measurement by Thermal Noise Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandoval, Felipe Aguilar; Bellon, Ludovic; Melo, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    An interferometric method is implemented in order to accurately assess the thermal fluctuations of a micro-cantilever sensor in liquid environments. The power spectrum density (PSD) of thermal fluctuations together with Sader's model of the cantilever allow for the indirect measurement of the liquid viscosity with good accuracy. The good quality of the deflection signal and the characteristic low noise of the instrument allow for the detection and corrections of drawbacks due to both the cantilever shape irregularities and the uncertainties on the position of the laser spot at the fluctuating end of the cantilever. Variation of viscosity below 0.03 mPa$\\cdot$s was detected with the alternative to achieve measurements with a volume as low as 50 $\\mu$L.

  6. High-speed thermal cycling system and method of use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hansen, A.D.A.; Jaklevic, J.M.

    1996-04-16

    A thermal cycling system and method of use are described. The thermal cycling system is based on the circulation of temperature-controlled water directly to the underside of thin-walled polycarbonate plates. The water flow is selected from a manifold fed by pumps from heated reservoirs. The plate wells are loaded with typically 15-20 microliters of reagent mix for the PCR process. Heat transfer through the thin polycarbonate is sufficiently rapid that the contents reach thermal equilibrium with the water in less than 15 seconds. Complete PCR amplification runs of 40 three-step cycles have been performed in as little as 14.5 minutes, with the results showing substantially enhanced specificity compared to conventional technology requiring run times in excess of 100 minutes. The plate clamping station is designed to be amenable to robotic loading and unloading of the system. It includes a heated lid, thus eliminating the need for mineral oil overlay of the reactants. The present system includes three or more plate holder stations, fed from common reservoirs but operating with independent switching cycles. The system can be modularly expanded. 13 figs.

  7. High-speed thermal cycling system and method of use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hansen, Anthony D. A. (Berkely, CA); Jaklevic, Joseph M. (Lafayette, CA)

    1996-01-01

    A thermal cycling system and method of use are described. The thermal cycling system is based on the-circulation of temperature-controlled water directly to the underside of thin-walled polycarbonate microtiter plates. The water flow is selected from a manifold fed by pumps from heated reservoirs. The plate wells are loaded with typically 15-20 .mu.l of reagent mix for the PCR process. Heat transfer through the thin polycarbonate is sufficiently rapid that the contents reach thermal equilibrium with the water in less than 15 seconds. Complete PCR amplification runs of 40 three-step cycles have been performed in as little as 14.5 minutes, with the results showing substantially enhanced specificity compared to conventional technology requiring run times in excess of 100 minutes. The plate clamping station is designed to be amenable to robotic loading and unloading of the system. It includes a heated lid, thus eliminating the need for mineral oil overlay of the reactants. The present system includes three or more plate holder stations, fed from common reservoirs but operating with independent switching cycles. The system can be modularly expanded.

  8. Ceramic membranes for catalytic membrane reactors with high ionic conductivities and low expansion properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mackay, Richard (Lafayette, CO); Sammells, Anthony F. (Boulder, CO)

    2000-01-01

    Ceramics of the composition: Ln.sub.x Sr.sub.2-x-y Ca.sub.y B.sub.z M.sub.2-z O.sub.5+.delta. where Ln is an element selected from the fblock lanthanide elements and yttrium or mixtures thereof; B is an element selected from Al, Ga, In or mixtures thereof; M is a d-block transition element of mixtures thereof; 0.01.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1.0; 0.01.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.0.7; 0.01.ltoreq.z.ltoreq.1.0 and .delta. is a number that varies to maintain charge neutrality are provided. These ceramics are useful in ceramic membranes and exhibit high ionic conductivity, high chemical stability under catalytic membrane reactor conditions and low coefficients of expansion. The materials of the invention are particularly useful in producing synthesis gas.

  9. Air-Stable, High-Conduction Solid Electrolytes of Arsenic-Substituted Li4SnS4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahu, Gayatri [ORNL] [ORNL; Lin, Zhan [ORNL] [ORNL; Li, Juchuan [ORNL] [ORNL; Liu, Zengcai [ORNL] [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL] [ORNL; Liang, Chengdu [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Lithium-ion-conducting solid electrolytes show promise for enabling high-energy secondary battery chemistries and solving safety issues associated with conventional lithium batteries. Achieving the combination of high ionic conductivity and outstanding chemical stability in solid electrolytes is a grand challenge for the synthesis of solid electrolytes. Herein we report the design of aliovalent substitution of Li4SnS4 to achieve high conduction and excellent air stability based on the hard and soft acids and bases theory. The composition of Li3.833Sn0.833As 0.166S4 has a high ionic conductivity of 1.39 mS/cm 1 at 25 C. Considering the high Li+ transference number, this phase conducts Li+ as well as carbonate-based liquid electrolytes. This research also addresses the compatibility of the sulfide-based solid electrolytes through chemical passivation.

  10. Point defect distribution in high-mobility conductive SrTiO{sub 3} crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gentils, A. [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse, CNRS-IN2P3-Universite Paris-Sud 11, 91405 Orsay Campus (France); CEMHTI Site Cyclotron, CNRS, 3A rue de la Ferollerie, 45071 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); Copie, O.; Bibes, M.; Bouzehouane, K.; Jacquet, E.; Carretero, C.; Barthelemy, A. [Unite Mixte de Physique CNRS/Thales associee a l'Universite Paris-Sud, Campus de Polytechnique, 1 Avenue A. Fresnel, 91767 Palaiseau (France); Herranz, G. [Unite Mixte de Physique CNRS/Thales associee a l'Universite Paris-Sud, Campus de Polytechnique, 1 Avenue A. Fresnel, 91767 Palaiseau (France); Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona, ICMAB-CSIC, Campus de la UAB, Bellaterra 08193, Catalonia (Spain); Fortuna, F. [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse, CNRS-IN2P3-Universite Paris-Sud 11, 91405 Orsay Campus (France); Basletic, M.; Tafra, E.; Hamzic, A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Bijenicka 32, P.O. Box 331, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2010-04-01

    We have carried out positron-annihilation spectroscopy to characterize the spatial distribution and the nature of vacancy defects in insulating as-received as well as in reduced SrTiO{sub 3} substrates exhibiting high-mobility conduction. The substrates were reduced either by ion etching the substrate surfaces or by doping with vacancies during thin-film deposition at low pressure and high temperature. We show that Ti vacancies are native defects homogeneously distributed in as-received substrates. In contrast, the dominant vacancy defects are the same both in ion etched crystals and substrates reduced during the film growth, and they consist of nonhomogeneous distributions of cation-oxygen vacancy complexes. Their spatial extension is tuned from a few microns in ion-etched samples to the whole substrate in specimens reduced during film deposition. Our results shed light on the transport mechanisms of conductive SrTiO{sub 3} crystals and on strategies for defect-engineered oxide quantum wells, wires, and dots.

  11. Epitaxial growth of highly conductive RuO{sub 2} thin films on (100) Si

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia, Q.X.; Song, S.G.; Wu, X.D.; Cho, J.H.; Foltyn, S.R.; Findikoglu, A.T.; Smith, J.L.

    1996-02-01

    Conductive RuO{sub 2} thin films have been heteroepitaxially grown by pulsed laser deposition on Si substrates with yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) buffer layers. The RuO{sub 2} thin films deposited under optimized processing conditions are {ital a}-axis oriented normal to the Si substrate surface with a high degree of in-plane alignment with the major axes of the (100) Si substrate. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy analysis on the RuO{sub 2}/YSZ/Si multilayer shows an atomically sharp interface between the RuO{sub 2} and the YSZ. Electrical measurements show that the crystalline RuO{sub 2} thin films are metallic over a temperature range from 4.2 to 300 K and are highly conductive with a room-temperature resistivity of 37{plus_minus}2 {mu}{Omega}cm. The residual resistance ratio ({ital R}{sub 300K}/{ital R}{sub 4.2K}) above 5 for our RuO{sub 2} thin films is the highest ever reported for such films on Si substrates. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Project Profile: High-Temperature Thermal Array for Next-Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the heat transfer fluid (HTF) system used in concentrating solar power (CSP) systems. The technology, called the high-temperature thermal array, aims to achieve the SunShot...

  13. NEUTRONIC AND THERMAL HYDRAULIC DESIGNS OF ANNULAR FUEL FOR HIGH POWER DENSITY BWRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morra, P.

    As a promising new fuel for high power density light water reactors, the feasibility of using annular fuel for BWR services is explored from both thermal hydraulic and neutronic points of view. Keeping the bundle size ...

  14. Thermal hydraulic design of a salt-cooled highly efficient environmentally friendly reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitman, Joshua (Joshua J.)

    2009-01-01

    A 1 OOOMWth liquid-salt cooled thermal spectrum reactor was designed with a long fuel cycle, and high core exit temperature. These features are desirable in a reactor designed to provide process heat applications such as ...

  15. Quantifying the economic and commercial potential of a high strength, low thermal coefficient super-alloy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liew, Heng Lee Henry

    2008-01-01

    Inspired by the importance of having a favourable sheathing material for superconducting wires, a high-strength, low thermal coefficient (CTE) super-alloy has been developed. Known as Incoloy 908, this super-alloy's material ...

  16. Phonon-hopping thermal conduction in quantum dot superlattices Manu Shamsa, Weili Liu, and Alexander A. Balandina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of California--Riverside, Riverside, California 92521 Jianlin Liu Quantum Structures Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California--Riverside, Riverside, California 92521 Received 18 April or polycrystalline materials in terms of thermal transport. © 2005 American Institute of Physics. DOI: 10

  17. Thermal Management of Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    phonon transmission and interface thermal conductance acrossF. Miao, et al. , "Superior Thermal Conductivity of Single-Advanced Materials for Thermal Management of Electronic

  18. Thermal, Power, and Co-location Aware Resource Allocation in Heterogeneous High Performance Computing Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maciejewski, Anthony A. "Tony"

    --The rapid increase in power consumption of high performance computing (HPC) systems has led to an increase interference I. INTRODUCTION The power consumption of high-performance comput- ing (HPC) systems and dataThermal, Power, and Co-location Aware Resource Allocation in Heterogeneous High Performance

  19. Handbook for Planning and Conducting Charrettes for High-Performance Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindsey, G.; Todd, J. A.; Hayter, S. J.

    2003-08-01

    The purpose of this handbook is to furnish guidance for planning and conducting a"high-performance building" charrette, sometimes called a"greening charrette." The handbook answers typical questions that will arise, such as"What is a charrette?""Why conduct a charrette?""What topics should we cover during the charrette?" and"Whom should we invite?" It also contains samples of agendas, invitation letters, and other commonly used charrette materials. This handbook also outlines the characteristics of a good charrette facilitator. It gives suggestions for the types of experts to invite to the event to motivate participants and answer their questions. The handbook includes sample presentations that can be used by these experts to ensure they address the required technical content. It suggests the types of participants, including technical, political, and community representatives, to invite to the charrette. It offers advice for forming effective breakout groups to ensure that a broad range of complementary expertise is represented in each group. We have also included guidance on how best to include key decision makers and stakeholders who are able to attend only portions of the event.

  20. Highly Flexible Self-Assembled V2O5 Cathodes Enabled by Conducting Diblock Copolymers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    An, Hyosung; Mike, Jared; Smith, Kendall A.; Swank, Lisa; Lin, Yen-Hao; L. Pesek, Stacy; Verduzco, Rafael; Lutkenhaus, Jodie L.

    2015-09-22

    Mechanically robust battery electrodes are desired for applications in wearable devices, flexible displays, and structural energy and power. In this regard, the challenge is to balance mechanical and electrochemical properties in materials that are inherently brittle. Here, we demonstrate a unique water-based self-assembly approach that incorporates a diblock copolymer bearing electron- and ion-conducting blocks, poly(3-hexylthiophene)-block-poly(ethyleneoxide) (P3HT-b-PEO), with V2O5 to form a flexible, tough, carbon-free hybrid battery cathode. V2O5 is a promising lithium intercalation material, but it remains limited by its poor conductivity and mechanical properties. Our approach leads to a unique electrode structure consisting of interlocking V2O5 layers glued togethermore »with micellar aggregates of P3HT-b-PEO, which results in robust mechanical properties, far exceeding the those obtained from conventional fluoropolymer binders. Only 5 wt % polymer is required to triple the flexibility of V2O5, and electrodes comprised of 10 wt % polymer have unusually high toughness (293 kJ/m3) and specific energy (530 Wh/kg), both higher than reduced graphene oxide paper electrodes. Furthermore, addition of P3HT-b-PEO enhances lithium-ion diffusion, eliminates cracking during cycling, and boosts cyclability relative to V2O5 alone. These results highlight the importance of tradeoffs between mechanical and electrochemical performance, where polymer content can be used to tune both aspects.« less

  1. High Temperature Fuel Cell Performance High Temperature Fuel Cell Performance of of Sulfonated Sulfonated Poly(phenylene Poly(phenylene) Proton) Proton Conducting Conducting Polymers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation by Sandia National Laboratories to the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting held in Honolulu, Hawaii October 8, 2004.

  2. Thermal Properties of Graphene and Applications for Thermal Management of High-Power Density Electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan, Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Turin and A. A. Balandin, Electronics Letters 40, 81 (2004).REFERENCES G. E. Moore, Electronics 38 (1965). E. Pop, Nanofor High-power Electronics” PCSI-38:38th Conference on the

  3. Highly conductive PEDOT:PSS on flexible substrate as ITO-free anode for polymer solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Del Mauro, A. De Girolamo; Ricciardi, R.; Montanino, M.; Morvillo, P.; Minarini, C. [Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development (ENEA), Portici Research Centre, p.le E. Fermi 1, 80055 Portici (Italy)

    2014-05-15

    In this work, highly conductive anode based on PEDOT:PSS is proposed as substitute of Indio-Tin Oxide (ITO) in flexible solar cells. The anodic conductive polymer was spin coated on a 125 ?m thick polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) substrate. The obtained film was characterized in terms of structure and physical- chemical proprieties. The obtained results are very promising and the conductive film will be investigated in future as electrode in a complete polymeric solar cell.

  4. Thermal dileptons in high-energy nuclear collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanja Damjanovic

    2008-12-16

    Clear signs of excess dileptons above the known sources were found at the SPS since long. However, a real clarification of these observations was only recently achieved by NA60, measuring dimuons with unprecedented precision in 158A GeV In-In collisions. The excess mass spectrum in the region M rho -> mu+mu- annihilation. The associated rho spectral function shows a strong broadening, but essentially no shift in mass. In the region M>1 GeV, the excess is found to be prompt, not due to enhanced charm production. The inverse slope parameter Teff associated with the transverse momentum spectra rises with mass up to the rho, followed by a sudden decline above. While the initial rise, coupled to a hierarchy in hadron freeze-out, points to radial flow of a hadronic decay source, the decline above signals a transition to a low-flow source, presumably of partonic origin. The mass spectra show the steep rise towards low masses characteristic for Planck-like radiation. The polarization of the excess referred to the Collins Soper frame is found to be isotropic. All observations are consistent with a global interpretation of the excess as thermal radiation. We conclude with a short discussion of a possible link to direct photons.

  5. High elastic modulus polymer electrolytes suitable for preventing thermal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article)lasers (Journal Article)SciTech Connect HighHigh elastic

  6. High elastic modulus polymer electrolytes suitable for preventing thermal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article)lasers (Journal Article)SciTech Connect HighHigh elasticrunaway in

  7. Black Conductive Titanium Oxide High-Capacity Materials for Battery Electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, W.

    2011-05-18

    Stoichiometric titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) is one of the most widely studied transitionmetal oxides because of its many potential applications in photoelectrochemical systems, such as dye-sensitized TiO{sub 2} electrodes for photovoltaic solar cells, and water-splitting catalysts for hydrogen generation, and in environmental purification for creating or degrading specific compounds. However, TiO{sub 2} has a wide bandgap and high electrical resistivity, which limits its use as an electrode. A set of non-stoichiometric titanium oxides called the Magneli phases, having a general formula of Ti{sub n}O{sub 2n-1} with n between 4 and 10, exhibits lower bandgaps and resistivities, with the highest electrical conductivities reported for Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7}. These phases have been formulated under different conditions, but in all reported cases the resulting oxides have minimum grain sizes on the order of micrometers, regardless of the size of the starting titanium compounds. In this method, nanoparticles of TiO{sub 2} or hydrogen titanates are first coated with carbon using either wet or dry chemistry methods. During this process the size and shape of the nanoparticles are 'locked in.' Subsequently the carbon-coated nanoparticles are heated. This results in the transformation of the original TiO{sub 2} or hydrogen titanates to Magneli phases without coarsening, so that the original size and shape of the nanoparticles are maintained to a precise degree. People who work on batteries, fuel cells, ultracapacitors, electrosynthesis cells, electro-chemical devices, and soil remediation have applications that could benefit from using nanoscale Magneli phases of titanium oxide. Application of these electrode materials may not be limited to substitution for TiO{sub 2} electrodes. Combining the robustness and photosensitivity of TiO{sub 2} with higher electrical conductivity may result in a general electrode material.

  8. Thermal properties of high-volume fly ash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentz, Dale P.

    , the utilization of high-volume fly ash concrete mixtures to reduce CO2 emissions and cement consumption per unit, reducing cement consumption and the CO2 emissions accompanying its production, on a per volume unit a transient plane source method. Because the specimens being examined are well hydrated, estimates

  9. High-Performance Home Technologies: Solar Thermal & Photovoltaic Systems;

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing ProgramsDepartmentHigh-EfficiencyPatrick Hughes

  10. Power efficiency for very high temperature solar thermal cavity receivers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McDougal, Allan R. (LaCanada-Flintridge, CA); Hale, Robert R. (Upland, CA)

    1984-01-01

    This invention is an improved solar energy cavity receiver for exposing materials and components to high temperatures. The receiver includes a housing having an internal reflective surface defining a cavity and having an inlet for admitting solar radiation thereto. A photothermal absorber is positioned in the cavity to receive radiation from the inlet. A reflective baffle is positioned between the absorber and the inlet to severely restrict the re-radiation of energy through the inlet. The front surface of the baffle defines a narrow annulus with the internal reflective surface of the housing. The front surface of the baffle is contoured to reflect incoming radiation onto the internal surface of the housing, from which it is reflected through the annulus and onto the front surface of the absorber. The back surface of the baffle intercepts infrared radiation from the front of the absorber. With this arrangement, a high percentage of the solar power input is retained in the cavity; thus, high internal temperatures are attained.

  11. Thermal conductivity of a graphite bipolar plate (BPP) and its thermal contact resistance with fuel cell gas diffusion layers: Effect of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    cell gas diffusion layers: Effect of compression, PTFE, micro porous layer (MPL), BPP out decreases with compression. GDL-BPP TCR increases with MPL and PTFE, regardless of the PTFE loading. High PTFE loading, MPL, and BPP out- of-flatness increase the TCR dramatically. The graphite BPP-GDL TCR

  12. Thermal Assessment of Very High Temperature Reactors: Direct and Indirect Brayton Power Cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herranz, Luis E. [Unit of Nuclear Safety Research, CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Linares, Jose I.; Moratilla, Beatriz Y.; Lopez, Rodrigo [Department of Mechanical Engineering, COMILLAS, 28015 Madrid (Spain)

    2006-07-01

    Search for a sustainable energy supply system has driven nuclear engineering towards what has been termed Generation IV. One of the main objectives of these innovative nuclear designs is to reach a high thermal efficiency in their power cycles. This way a substantial fuel saving and waste reduction is achieved, which would enhance competitiveness of the nuclear kWh. This paper investigates the thermal performance of helium-cooled power cycles based on the characteristic working parameters of Very High Temperature Reactor systems both at present and at the near future. Direct (C(IC){sup 2}HTRTX) and indirect (C(IC){sup 2}(IHX)TX) cycle baselines have been modelled and both have shown an excellent thermal performance ( with thermal efficiencies near or even higher than 50%). Enhancement of associated technology would increase thermal performance (i.e., and wnet) of both cycles drastically. The analysis of the results indicate that from the thermal performance standpoint, the cycle C(IC){sup 2}HTRTX would be a better option. However, when advances in associated technologies are considered, the efficiency gap between the two baselines analyzed become smaller. In no case net power turned out to be a differential feature between the layouts. (authors)

  13. Highly conductive electrolyte composites containing glass and ceramic, and method of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hash, M.C.; Bloom, I.D.

    1992-10-13

    An electrolyte composite is manufactured by pressurizing a mixture of sodium ion conductive glass and an ionically conductive compound at between 12,000 and 24,000 pounds per square inch to produce a pellet. The resulting pellet is then sintered at relatively lower temperatures (800--1200 C), for example 1000 C, than are typically required (1400 C) when fabricating single constituent ceramic electrolytes. The resultant composite is 100 percent conductive at 250 C with conductivity values of 2.5 to 4[times]10[sup [minus]2](ohm-cm)[sup [minus]1]. The matrix exhibits chemical stability against sodium for 100 hours at 250 to 300 C. 1 figure.

  14. Conductive shape memory nanocomposites for high speed electrical Xiaofan Luo and Patrick T. Mather*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    by combining SMPs with conductive fillers including carbon black,8­11 carbon nanotubes (CNTs),12­14 short carbon fibers,8,10,15 nickel,9,16 and polypyrrole.13,17 A brief summary of previously reported conductive

  15. Highly conductive composites for fuel cell flow field plates and bipolar plates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jang, Bor Z; Zhamu, Aruna; Song, Lulu

    2014-10-21

    This invention provides a fuel cell flow field plate or bipolar plate having flow channels on faces of the plate, comprising an electrically conductive polymer composite. The composite is composed of (A) at least 50% by weight of a conductive filler, comprising at least 5% by weight reinforcement fibers, expanded graphite platelets, graphitic nano-fibers, and/or carbon nano-tubes; (B) polymer matrix material at 1 to 49.9% by weight; and (C) a polymer binder at 0.1 to 10% by weight; wherein the sum of the conductive filler weight %, polymer matrix weight % and polymer binder weight % equals 100% and the bulk electrical conductivity of the flow field or bipolar plate is at least 100 S/cm. The invention also provides a continuous process for cost-effective mass production of the conductive composite-based flow field or bipolar plate.

  16. NDT&E International 40 (2007) 555565 Lift-off effect in high-frequency eddy current conductivity spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagy, Peter B.

    2007-01-01

    NDT&E International 40 (2007) 555­565 Lift-off effect in high-frequency eddy current conductivity online 12 June 2007 Abstract Precision eddy current measurements have been shown to be capable, the eddy current inspection frequency has to be as high as 50­80 MHz. Unfortunately, spurious self

  17. Microstructural Evolution of 7 wt.% Y2O3 ZrO2 Thermal Barrier Coatings due to Stress Relaxation at Elevated Temperatures and the Concomitant changes in Thermal Conductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petorak, Christopher [Purdue University; Ilavsky, Dr. Jan [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Wang, Hsin [ORNL; Porter, Wallace D [ORNL; Trice, Rodney [Purdue University

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the combined effect of stress and temperature on the microstructure of air plasma-sprayed 7 wt.% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} thermal barrier coatings, and relate microstructural changes to the thermal conductivity, k{sub th}. To simulate TBC service conditions, stand-alone tubes of YSZ were stress relaxed, starting from a compressive stress of 60 MPa, at temperatures of 1000 C or 1200 C. The duration of the stress relaxation test was either 5 min or 3 h. Detailed scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Porod's specific surface area (SSA) analysis of small angle neutron scattering (SANS) results were used to determine which void systems, either interlamellar pores or intralamellar cracks, contributed to the observed relaxation of stress in the coatings. SEM investigations revealed closure of intralamellar cracks located perpendicular to the stress direction. For thinner YSZ coatings, SANS measurements indicated a statistically significant reduction in the total SSA and SSA associated with intralamellar cracks after stress relaxation at the times, temperatures, and stress investigated compared to those samples that were exposed to identical times and temperatures, but no stress. The SSA associated with the interlamellar pores was not significantly smaller in YSZ coatings stress relaxed from 60 MPa at 1200 C for 3 h compared to as-sprayed coatings. The thermal conductivity of the coatings was strongly influenced by stress, with increases in kth observed after only 5 min at 60 MPa and 1200 C. Reductions in the total SSA were directly linked to increases in k{sub th}.

  18. Mechanisms Underpinning Degradation of Protective Oxides and Thermal Barrier Coatings in High Hydrogen Content (HHC) - Fueled Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mumm, Daniel

    2013-08-31

    The overarching goal of this research program has been to evaluate the potential impacts of coal-derived syngas and high-hydrogen content fuels on the degradation of turbine hot-section components through attack of protective oxides and thermal barrier coatings. The primary focus of this research program has been to explore mechanisms underpinning the observed degradation processes, and connections to the combustion environments and characteristic non-combustible constituents. Based on the mechanistic understanding of how these emerging fuel streams affect materials degradation, the ultimate goal of the program is to advance the goals of the Advanced Turbine Program by developing materials design protocols leading to turbine hot-section components with improved resistance to service lifetime degradation under advanced fuels exposures. This research program has been focused on studying how: (1) differing combustion environments – relative to traditional natural gas fired systems – affect both the growth rate of thermally grown oxide (TGO) layers and the stability of these oxides and of protective thermal barrier coatings (TBCs); and (2) how low levels of fuel impurities and characteristic non-combustibles interact with surface oxides, for instance through the development of molten deposits that lead to hot corrosion of protective TBC coatings. The overall program has been comprised of six inter-related themes, each comprising a research thrust over the program period, including: (i) evaluating the role of syngas and high hydrogen content (HHC) combustion environments in modifying component surface temperatures, heat transfer to the TBC coatings, and thermal gradients within these coatings; (ii) understanding the instability of TBC coatings in the syngas and high hydrogen environment with regards to decomposition, phase changes and sintering; (iii) characterizing ash deposition, molten phase development and infiltration, and associated corrosive/thermo-chemical attack mechanisms; (iv) developing a mechanics-based analysis of the driving forces for crack growth and delamination, based on molten phase infiltration, misfit upon cooling, and loss of compliance; (v) understanding changes in TGO growth mechanisms associated with these emerging combustion product streams; and (vi) identifying degradation resistant alternative materials (including new compositions or bi-layer concepts) for use in mitigating the observed degradation modes. To address the materials stability concerns, this program integrated research thrusts aimed at: (1) Conducting tests in simulated syngas and HHC environments to evaluate materials evolution and degradation mechanisms; assessing thermally grown oxide development unique to HHC environmental exposures; carrying out high-resolution imaging and microanalysis to elucidate the evolution of surface deposits (molten phase formation and infiltration); exploring thermo-chemical instabilities; assessing thermo-mechanical drivers and thermal gradient effects on degradation; and quantitatively measuring stress evolution due to enhanced sintering and thermo-chemical instabilities induced in the coating. (2) Executing experiments to study the melting and infiltration of simulated ash deposits, and identifying reaction products and evolving phases associated with molten phase corrosion mechanisms; utilizing thermal spray techniques to fabricate test coupons with controlled microstructures to study mechanisms of instability and degradation; facilitating thermal gradient testing; and developing new materials systems for laboratory testing; (3) Correlating information on the resulting combustion environments to properly assess materials exposure conditions and guide the development of lab-scale simulations of material exposures; specification of representative syngas and high-hydrogen fuels with realistic levels of impurities and contaminants, to explore differences in heat transfer, surface degradation, and deposit formation; and facilitating combustion rig testing of materials test coupons.

  19. Highly conductive electrolyte composites containing glass and ceramic, and method of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hash, Mark C. (Joliet, IL); Bloom, Ira D. (Bolingbrook, IL)

    1992-01-01

    An electrolyte composite is manufactured by pressurizing a mixture of sodium ion conductive glass and an ionically conductive compound at between 12,000 and 24,000 pounds per square inch to produce a pellet. The resulting pellet is then sintered at relatively lower temperatures (800.degree. C.-1200.degree. C.), for example 1000.degree. C., than are typically required (1400.degree. C.) when fabricating single constituent ceramic electrolytes. The resultant composite is 100 percent conductive at 250.degree. C. with conductivity values of 2.5 to 4.times.10.sup.-2 (ohm-cm).sup.-1. The matrix exhibits chemical stability against sodium for 100 hours at 250.degree. to 300.degree. C.

  20. Design and global optimization of high-efficiency solar thermal systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .5298) Photonic crystals; (350.6050) Solar energy. References and links 1. W. Spirkl and H. Ries, "Solar. Harder and P. Wurfel, "Theoretical limits of thermophotovoltaic solar energy conversion," Semicond. SciDesign and global optimization of high-efficiency solar thermal systems with tungsten cermets David

  1. The Influence of High Pressure Thermal Behavior on Friction-induced material transfer During Dry Machining of Titanium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdel-Aal, H. A.; El Mansori, M.

    2011-05-04

    In this paper we study failure of coated carbide tools due to thermal loading. The study emphasizes the role assumed by the thermo-physical properties of the tool material in enhancing or preventing mass attrition of the cutting elements within the tool. It is shown that within a comprehensive view of the nature of conduction in the tool zone, thermal conduction is not solely affected by temperature. Rather it is a function of the so called thermodynamic forces. These are the stress, the strain, strain rate, rate of temperature rise, and the temperature gradient. Although that within such consideration description of thermal conduction is non-linear, it is beneficial to employ such a form because it facilitates a full mechanistic understanding of thermal activation of tool wear.

  2. A High-Conduction Ge Substituted Li3AsS4 Solid Electrolyte with Exceptional Low Activation Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahu, Gayatri [ORNL; Rangasamy, Ezhiylmurugan [ORNL; Li, Juchuan [ORNL; Chen, Yan [ORNL; An, Ke [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL; Liang, Chengdu [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Lithium-ion conducting solid electrolytes show potential to enable high-energy-density secondary batteries and offer distinctive safety features as an advantage over traditional liquid electrolytes. Achieving the combination of high ionic conductivity, low activation energy, and outstanding electrochemical stability in crystalline solid electrolytes is a challenge for the synthesis of novel solid electrolytes. Herein we report an exceptionally low activation energy (Ea) and high room temperature superionic conductivity via facile aliovalent substitution of Li3AsS4 by Ge, which increased the conductivity by two orders of magnitude as compared to the parent compound. The composition Li3.334Ge0.334As0.666S4 has a high ionic conductivity of 1.12 mScm-1 at 27oC. Local Li+ hopping in this material is accompanied by distinctive low activation energy Ea of 0.17 eV being the lowest of Li+ solid conductors. Furthermore, this study demonstrates the efficacy of surface passivation of solid electrolyte to achieve compatibility with metallic lithium electrodes.

  3. Method of forming a dense, high temperature electronically conductive composite layer on a porous ceramic substrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Isenberg, A.O.

    1992-04-21

    An electrochemical device, containing a solid oxide electrolyte material and an electrically conductive composite layer, has the composite layer attached by: (A) applying a layer of LaCrO[sub 3], YCrO[sub 3] or LaMnO[sub 3] particles, on a portion of a porous ceramic substrate, (B) heating to sinter bond the particles to the substrate, (C) depositing a dense filler structure between the doped particles, (D) shaving off the top of the particles, and (E) applying an electronically conductive layer over the particles as a contact. 7 figs.

  4. Hydrogen production by high-temperature water splitting using electron-conducting membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Tae H.; Wang, Shuangyan; Dorris, Stephen E.; Balachandran, Uthamalingam

    2004-04-27

    A device and method for separating water into hydrogen and oxygen is disclosed. A first substantially gas impervious solid electron-conducting membrane for selectively passing hydrogen is provided and spaced from a second substantially gas impervious solid electron-conducting membrane for selectively passing oxygen. When steam is passed between the two membranes at disassociation temperatures the hydrogen from the disassociation of steam selectively and continuously passes through the first membrane and oxygen selectively and continuously passes through the second membrane, thereby continuously driving the disassociation of steam producing hydrogen and oxygen.

  5. Visco-thermal effects in acoustic metamaterials: from total transmission to total reflection and high absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molerón, Miguel; Daraio, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically and experimentally investigate visco-thermal effects on the acoustic propagation through metamaterials consisting of rigid slabs with subwavelength slits embedded in air. We demonstrate that this unavoidable loss mechanism is not merely a refinement, but it plays a dominant role in the actual acoustic response of the structure. Specifically, in the case of very narrow slits, the visco-thermal losses avoid completely the excitation of Fabry-Perot resonances, leading to 100% reflection. This is exactly opposite to the perfect transmission predicted in the idealised lossless case. Moreover, for a wide range of geometrical parameters, there exists an optimum slit width at which the energy dissipated in the structure can be as high as 50%. This work provides a clear evidence that visco-thermal effects are necessary to describe realistically the acoustic response of locally resonant metamaterials.

  6. Turbulent thermalization process in high-energy heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jürgen Berges; Björn Schenke; Sören Schlichting; Raju Venugopalan

    2014-09-05

    We discuss the onset of the thermalization process in high-energy heavy-ion collisions from a weak coupling perspective, using classical-statistical real-time lattice simulations as a first principles tool to study the pre-equilibrium dynamics. Most remarkably, we find that the thermalization process is governed by a universal attractor, where the space-time evolution of the plasma becomes independent of the initial conditions and exhibits the self-similar dynamics characteristic of wave turbulence. We discuss the consequences of our weak coupling results for the thermalization process in heavy-ion experiments and briefly comment on the use of weak coupling techniques at larger values of the coupling.

  7. Lifetime improvement of sheathed thermocouples for use in high-temperature and thermal transient operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCulloch, R.W.; Clift, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    Premature failure of small-diameter, magnesium-oxide-insulated sheathed thermocouples occurred when they were placed within nuclear fuel rod simulators (FRSs) to measure high temperatures and to follow severe thermal transients encountered during simulation of nuclear reactor accidents in Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) thermal-hydraulic test facilities. Investigation of thermally cycled thermocouples yielded three criteria for improvement of thermocouple lifetime: (1) reduction of oxygen impurities prior to and during their fabrication, (2) refinement of thermoelement grain size during their fabrication, and (3) elimination of prestrain prior to use above their recrystallization temperature. The first and third criteria were satisfied by improved techniques of thermocouple assembly and by a recovery anneal prior to thermocouple use.

  8. Epoxy-based carbon films with high electrical conductivity attached to an alumina substrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Deborah D.L.

    of nanotubes. The carbon film with 2.5 vol.% nickel showed resistivity 6 · 10À3 X cm. Ó 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All, and multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) were used as conductive fillers. Nickel nanoparticle (Inco 210 H, Inco Ltd gave crack-free and scratch resistant carbon films. Interconnected filamentary nickel nanoparticles

  9. High Electrical Conductivity in Ni3(2,3,6,7,10,11-hexaiminotriphenylene)2, a Semiconducting Metal-Organic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    not allow in-plane conjugation.17,18 Bridging the divide between 2D inorganic and organic materials currently dominated by purely inorganic compounds.24 Clearly, the synthesis and characterization of new s-organic framework (MOF). The new material can be isolated as a highly conductive black powder or dark blue

  10. Thermal Transport in Graphene Multilayers and Nanoribbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subrina, Samia

    2011-01-01

    1 CHAPTER 2 Thermal transport atvalues of graphene’s thermal conductivity and different1 Thermal conductivity : metals and non - metallic

  11. High-efficiency white organic light-emitting diodes using thermally activated delayed fluorescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishide, Jun-ichi; Hiraga, Yasuhide; Nakanotani, Hajime; Adachi, Chihaya

    2014-06-09

    White organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs) have attracted much attention recently, aimed for next-generation lighting sources because of their high potential to realize high electroluminescence efficiency, flexibility, and low-cost manufacture. Here, we demonstrate high-efficiency WOLED using red, green, and blue thermally activated delayed fluorescence materials as emissive dopants to generate white electroluminescence. The WOLED has a maximum external quantum efficiency of over 17% with Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage coordinates of (0.30, 0.38).

  12. Hydrogen production by high temperature water splitting using electron conducting membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Wang, Shuangyan; Dorris, Stephen E.; Lee, Tae H.

    2006-08-08

    A device and method for separating water into hydrogen and oxygen is disclosed. A first substantially gas impervious solid electron-conducting membrane for selectively passing protons or hydrogen is provided and spaced from a second substantially gas impervious solid electron-conducting membrane for selectively passing oxygen. When steam is passed between the two membranes at dissociation temperatures the hydrogen from the dissociation of steam selectively and continuously passes through the first membrane and oxygen selectively and continuously passes through the second membrane, thereby continuously driving the dissociation of steam producing hydrogen and oxygen. The oxygen is thereafter reacted with methane to produce syngas which optimally may be reacted in a water gas shift reaction to produce CO2 and H2.

  13. Highly conductive thermoplastic composites for rapid production of fuel cell bipolar plates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianhua [Blacksburg, VA; Baird, Donald G [Blacksburg, VA; McGrath, James E [Blacksburg, VA

    2008-04-29

    A low cost method of fabricating bipolar plates for use in fuel cells utilizes a wet lay process for combining graphite particles, thermoplastic fibers, and reinforcing fibers to produce a plurality of formable sheets. The formable sheets are then molded into a bipolar plates with features impressed therein via the molding process. The bipolar plates formed by the process have conductivity in excess of 150 S/cm and have sufficient mechanical strength to be used in fuel cells. The bipolar plates can be formed as a skin/core laminate where a second polymer material is used on the skin surface which provides for enhanced conductivity, chemical resistance, and resistance to gas permeation.

  14. Optimization of Acetylene Black Conductive Additive andPolyvinylidene Difluoride Composition for High Power RechargeableLithium-Ion Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, G.; Zheng, H.; Battaglia, V.S.; Simens, A.S.; Minor, A.M.; Song, X.

    2007-07-01

    Fundamental electrochemical methods were applied to study the effect of the acetylene black (AB) and the polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) polymer binder on the performance of high-power designed rechargeable lithium ion cells. A systematic study of the AB/PVDF long-range electronic conductivity at different weight ratios is performed using four-probe direct current tests and the results reported. There is a wide range of AB/PVDF ratios that satisfy the long-range electronic conductivity requirement of the lithium-ion cathode electrode; however, a significant cell power performance improvement is observed at small AB/PVDF composition ratios that are far from the long-range conductivity optimum of 1 to 1.25. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) tests indicate that the interfacial impedance decreases significantly with increase in binder content. The hybrid power pulse characterization results agree with the EIS tests and also show improvement for cells with a high PVDF content. The AB to PVDF composition plays a significant role in the interfacial resistance. We believe the higher binder contents lead to a more cohesive conductive carbon particle network that results in better overall all local electronic conductivity on the active material surface and hence reduced charge transfer impedance.

  15. A C++ Framework for Conducting High-Speed, Long-Term Particle Tracking Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kabel, A.C.; /SLAC

    2006-02-06

    For the purpose of conducting parallel, long-term tracking studies of storage rings such as the ones described in [3], [4], maximum execution speed is essential. We describe an approach involving metaprogramming techniques in C++ which results in execution speeds rivaling hand-optimized assembler code for a particular tracking lattice while retaining the generality and flexibility of an all-purpose tracking code.

  16. Efficient Heat Storage Materials: Metallic Composites Phase-Change Materials for High-Temperature Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-11-21

    HEATS Project: MIT is developing efficient heat storage materials for use in solar and nuclear power plants. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun’s not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. MIT is designing nanostructured heat storage materials that can store a large amount of heat per unit mass and volume. To do this, MIT is using phase change materials, which absorb a large amount of latent heat to melt from solid to liquid. MIT’s heat storage materials are designed to melt at high temperatures and conduct heat well—this makes them efficient at storing and releasing heat and enhances the overall efficiency of the thermal storage and energy-generation process. MIT’s low-cost heat storage materials also have a long life cycle, which further enhances their efficiency.

  17. Thermal effect on magnetic parameters of high-coercivity cobalt ferrite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chagas, E. F. Ponce, A. S.; Prado, R. J.; Silva, G. M.; Bettini, J.; Baggio-Saitovitch, E.

    2014-07-21

    We prepared very high-coercivity cobalt ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by a combustion method and using short-time high-energy mechanical milling to increase strain and the structural defects density. The coercivity (H{sub C}) of the milled sample reached 3.75 kOe—a value almost five times higher than that obtained for the non-milled material (0.76 kOe). To investigate the effect of the temperature on the magnetic behavior of the milled sample, we performed a thermal treatment on the milled sample at 300, 400, and 600?°C for 30 and 180?min. We analyzed the changes in the magnetic behavior of the nanoparticles due to the thermal treatment using the hysteresis curves, Williamson-Hall analysis, and transmission electron microscopy. The thermal treatment at 600?°C causes decreases in the microstructural strain and density of structural defects resulting in a significant decrease in H{sub C}. Furthermore, this thermal treatment increases the size of the nanoparticles and, as a consequence, there is a substantial increase in the saturation magnetization (M{sub S}). The H{sub C} of the samples treated at 600?°C for 30 and 180?min were 2.24 and 1.93 kOe, respectively, and the M{sub S} of these same samples increased from 57?emu/g to 66 and 70?emu/g, respectively. The H{sub C} and the M{sub S} are less affected by the thermal treatment at 300 and 400?°C.

  18. MAGNETIC RESONANCE ELECTRICAL IMPEDANCE TOMOGRAPHY (MR-EIT): A new technique for high resolution conductivity imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eyüboðlu, Murat

    MAGNETIC RESONANCE ELECTRICAL IMPEDANCE TOMOGRAPHY (MR-EIT): A new technique for high resolution are measured by using conventional electrical impedance tomography techniques and high resolution magnetic and the point spread function is not space invariant. On the other hand, magnetic field and electrical current

  19. The origin of thermal component in the transverse momentum spectra in high energy hadronic processes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bylinkin, Alexander A.; Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics; Kharzeev, Dmitri E.; Brookhaven National Lab.; Rostovtsev, Andrei A.

    2014-12-15

    The transverse momentum spectra of hadrons produced in high energy collisions can be decomposed into two components: the exponential ("thermal") and the power ("hard") ones. Recently, the H1 Collaboration has discovered that the relative strength of these two components in Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) depends drastically upon the global structure of the event - namely, the exponential component is absent in the diffractive events characterized by a rapidity gap. We discuss the possible origin of this effect and speculate that it is linked to confinement. Specifically, we argue that the thermal component is due to the effective event horizon introducedmore »by the confining string, in analogy to the Hawking-Unruh effect. In diffractive events, the t-channel exchange is color-singlet and there is no fragmenting string - so the thermal component is absent. The slope of the soft component of the hadron spectrum in this picture is determined by the saturation momentum that drives the deceleration in the color field, and thus the Hawking-Unruh temperature. We analyze the data on non-diffractive pp collisions and find that the slope of the thermal component of the hadron spectrum is indeed proportional to the saturation momentum.« less

  20. The origin of thermal component in the transverse momentum spectra in high energy hadronic processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander A. Bylinkin; Dmitri E. Kharzeev; Andrei A. Rostovtsev

    2014-07-15

    The transverse momentum spectra of hadrons produced in high energy collisions can be decomposed into two components: the exponential ("thermal") and the power ("hard") ones. Recently, the H1 Collaboration has discovered that the relative strength of these two components in Deep Inelastic Scattering depends drastically upon the global structure of the event - namely, the exponential component is absent in the diffractive events characterized by a rapidity gap. We discuss the possible origin of this effect, and speculate that it is linked to confinement. Specifically, we argue that the thermal component is due to the effective event horizon introduced by the confining string, in analogy to the Hawking-Unruh effect. In diffractive events, the $t$-channel exchange is color-singlet and there is no fragmenting string -- so the thermal component is absent. The slope of the soft component of the hadron spectrum in this picture is determined by the saturation momentum that drives the deceleration in the color field, and thus the Hawking-Unruh temperature. We analyze the data on non-diffractive $pp$ collisions and find that the slope of the thermal component of the hadron spectrum is indeed proportional to the saturation momentum.

  1. EUV Non-thermal Line Broadening and High-energy particles during Solar Flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawate, Tomoko

    2013-01-01

    We have studied the relationship between the location of EUV nonthermal broadening and high-energy particles during the large flares by using EUV imaging spectrometer onboard {\\it Hinode}, Nobeyama Radio Polarimeter, Nobeyama Radioheliograph, and Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard {\\it Solar Dynamic Observatory}. We have analyzed the five large flare events which contain thermal rich, intermediate, and thermal poor flares classified by the definition discussed in the paper. We found that, in the case of thermal rich flares, the nonthermal broadening of \\ion{Fe}{24} occurred at the top of the flaring loop at the beginning of the flares. The source of the 17 GHz microwave is located at the footpoint of the flare loop. On the other hand, in the case of intermediate/thermal poor flares, the nonthermal broadening of \\ion{Fe}{24} occurred at the footpoint of the flare loop at the beginning of the flares. The source of the 17 GHz microwave is located at the top of the flaring loop. We discussed the difference betw...

  2. The origin of thermal component in the transverse momentum spectra in high energy hadronic processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bylinkin, Alexander A.; Kharzeev, Dmitri E.; Rostovtsev, Andrei A.

    2014-12-15

    The transverse momentum spectra of hadrons produced in high energy collisions can be decomposed into two components: the exponential ("thermal") and the power ("hard") ones. Recently, the H1 Collaboration has discovered that the relative strength of these two components in Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) depends drastically upon the global structure of the event - namely, the exponential component is absent in the diffractive events characterized by a rapidity gap. We discuss the possible origin of this effect and speculate that it is linked to confinement. Specifically, we argue that the thermal component is due to the effective event horizon introduced by the confining string, in analogy to the Hawking-Unruh effect. In diffractive events, the t-channel exchange is color-singlet and there is no fragmenting string - so the thermal component is absent. The slope of the soft component of the hadron spectrum in this picture is determined by the saturation momentum that drives the deceleration in the color field, and thus the Hawking-Unruh temperature. We analyze the data on non-diffractive pp collisions and find that the slope of the thermal component of the hadron spectrum is indeed proportional to the saturation momentum.

  3. High performance low cost interconnections for flip chip attachment with electrically conductive adhesive. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    This final report is a compilation of final reports from each of the groups participating in the program. The main three groups involved in this effort are the Thomas J. Watson Research Center of IBM Corporation in Yorktown Heights, New York, Assembly Process Design of IBM Corporation in Endicott, New York, and SMT Laboratory of Universal Instruments Corporation in Binghamton, New York. The group at the research center focused on the conductive adhesive materials development and characterization. The group in process development focused on processing of the Polymer-Metal-Solvent Paste (PMSP) to form conductive adhesive bumps, formation of the Polymer-Metal Composite (PMC) on semiconductor devices and study of the bonding process to circuitized organic carriers, and the long term durability and reliability of joints formed using the process. The group at Universal Instruments focused on development of an equipment set and bonding parameters for the equipment to produce bond assembly tooling. Reports of each of these individual groups are presented here reviewing their technical efforts and achievements.

  4. Conducting Nanosponge Electroporation for Affordable and High-Efficiency Disinfection of Bacteria and Viruses in Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    byproducts formation, energy and time intensiveness, and pathogen recovery. Here, we report an innovative more than 3 logs (99.9%) of microorganism removal, voltages as high as 103 to 105 volts are required

  5. Nano Res (2010) 3: 564573564 Uniform, Highly Conductive, and Patterned Transparent Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Chongwu

    2010-01-01

    problem. In addition, our method also allows the preparation of high quality patterned films of silver. Carbon nanotube (CNT) films [11­15] and, more recently, graphene films [16­19] have attracted significant

  6. Cu-Bi as a Model System For Liquid Phase Sintered Thermal Interface Management Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    and controllable properties that can be tailored for use in TIM applications. Figure 2. Representative and respective thermal conductivity Heat Sink Si Device TIMHEAT HEAT Heat Sink Si Device TIM Heat Sink Si Device TIM 1) High thermal conductivity to conduct heat from silicon device to heat sink 2) High compliance

  7. High field pulsed microwiggler comprising a conductive tube with periodically space slots

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warren, R.W.

    1992-09-01

    A microwiggler assembly produces large magnetic fields for oscillating charged particle beams, particularly electron beams for free electron laser (FEL) application. A tube of electrically conductive material is formed with radial slots axially spaced at the period of the electron beam. The slots have alternate 180[degree] relationships and are formed to a maximum depth of 0.6 to 0.7 times the tube circumference. An optimum slot depth is selected to eliminate magnetic quadrupole fields within the microwiggler as determined from a conventional pulsed wire technique. Suitable slot configurations include single slits, double slits, triple slits, and elliptical slots. An axial electron beam direction is maintained by experimentally placing end slits adjacent entrance and exit portions of the assembly, where the end slit depth is determined by use of the pulsed wire technique outside the tube. 10 figs.

  8. High field pulsed microwiggler comprising a conductive tube with periodically space slots

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warren, Roger W. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1992-01-01

    A microwiggler assembly produces large magnetic fields for oscillating ched particle beams, particularly electron beams for free electron laser (FEL) application. A tube of electrically conductive material is formed with radial slots axially spaced at the period of the electron beam. The slots have alternate 180.degree. relationships and are formed to a maximum depth of 0.6 to 0.7 times the tube circumference. An optimum slot depth is selected to eliminate magnetic quadrupole fields within the microwiggler as determined from a conventional pulsed wire technique. Suitable slot configurations include single slits, double slits, triple slits, and elliptical slots. An axial electron beam direction is maintained by experimentally placing end slits adjacent entrance and exit portions of the assembly, where the end slit depth is determined by use of the pulsed wire technique outside the tube.

  9. High-temperature electrically conductive ceramic composite and method for making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beck, David E. (Knoxville, TN); Gooch, Jack G. (Seymour, TN); Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN); Masters, David R. (Knoxville, TN)

    1983-01-01

    The present invention relates to a metal-oxide ceramic composition useful in induction heating applications for treating uranium and uranium alloys. The ceramic composition is electrically conductive at room temperature and is nonreactive with molten uranium. The composition is prepared from a particulate admixture of 20 to 50 vol. % niobium and zirconium oxide which may be stabilized with an addition of a further oxide such as magnesium oxide, calcium oxide, or yttria. The composition is prepared by blending the powders, pressing or casting the blend into the desired product configuration, and then sintering the casting or compact in an inert atmosphere. In the casting operation, calcium aluminate is preferably added to the admixture in place of a like quantity of zirconia for providing a cement to help maintain the integrity of the sintered product.

  10. Accelerated screening methods for determining chemical and thermal stability of refrigerant-lubricant mixtures, Part II: Experimental comparison and verification of methods. Volume 2, In situ conductivity data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kauffman, R.

    1995-09-01

    Data are presented for the accelerated screening methods for determining chemical and thermal stability of refrigerant-lubricant mixtures.

  11. RELAP5 model of the high flux isotope reactor with low enriched fuel thermal flux profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banfield, J.; Mervin, B.; Hart, S.; Ritchie, J.; Walker, S.; Ruggles, A.; Maldonado, G. I. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Univ. of Tennessee Knoxville, Knoxville, TN 37996-2300 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) currently uses highly enriched uranium (HEU) fabricated into involute-shaped fuel plates. It is desired that HFIR be able to use low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel while preserving the current performance capability for its diverse missions in material irradiation studies, isotope production, and the use of neutron beam lines for basic research. Preliminary neutronics and depletion simulations of HFIR with LEU fuel have arrived to feasible fuel loadings that maintain the neutronics performance of the reactor. This article illustrates preliminary models developed for the analysis of the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the LEU core to ensure safe operation of the reactor. The beginning of life (BOL) LEU thermal flux profile has been modeled in RELAP5 to facilitate steady state simulation of the core cooling, and of anticipated and unanticipated transients. Steady state results are presented to validate the new thermal power profile inputs. A power ramp, slow depressurization at the outlet, and flow coast down transients are also evaluated. (authors)

  12. Thermal annealing recovery of fracture toughness in HT9 steel after irradation to high doses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Baek, Jong-Hyuk; Anderoglu, Osman; Maloy, Stuart A.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.

    2014-12-31

    The HT9 ferritic/martensitic steel with a nominal chemistry of Fe(bal.)–12%Cr–1%MoVW has been used as a primary core material for fast fission reactors such as FFTF because of its high resistance to radiationinduced swelling and embrittlement. Both static and dynamic fracture test results have shown that the HT9 steel can become brittle when it is exposed to high dose irradiation at a relatively low temperature 430 C). This article aims at a comprehensive discussion on the thermal annealing recovery of fracture toughness in the HT9 steel after irradiation up to 3–148 dpa at 378–504 C. A specimen reuse technique has been established and applied to this study: the fracture specimens were tested Charpy specimens or broken halves of Charpy bars (13 3 4 mm). The post-anneal fracture test results indicated that much of the radiation-induced damage can be recovered by a simple thermal annealing schedule: the fracture toughness was incompletely recovered by 550 C annealing, while nearly complete or complete recovery occurred after 650 C annealing. This indicates that thermal annealing is a feasible damage mitigation technique for the reactor components made of HT9 steel. The partial recovery is probably due to the non-removable microstructural damages such as void or gas bubble formation, elemental segregation and precipitation.

  13. Establishing Specifications for Low Enriched Uranium Fuel Operations Conducted Outside the High Flux Isotope Reactor Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinkston, Daniel [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Renfro, David G [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL

    2010-10-01

    The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has funded staff at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to study the conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from the current, high enriched uranium fuel to low enriched uranium fuel. The LEU fuel form is a metal alloy that has never been used in HFIR or any HFIR-like reactor. This report provides documentation of a process for the creation of a fuel specification that will meet all applicable regulations and guidelines to which UT-Battelle, LLC (UTB) the operating contractor for ORNL - must adhere. This process will allow UTB to purchase LEU fuel for HFIR and be assured of the quality of the fuel being procured.

  14. Besides these questions regarding the efficiency of condensation or thermal conduction in the inner flow, we note that there are other important questions regarding EC theory and implementation, including

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Besides these questions regarding the efficiency of condensation or thermal conduction in the inner with jumps in the power-law component, yet the recovery phase and recurrence of such disk- rate drops occur,10] is bounded, but set manually in code CHW Compton-heated winds based on reliable prescription [11

  15. "Flexible aerogel as a superior thermal insulation for high temperature superconductor cable applications"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Shannon O. [Aspen Aerogel, Inc.; Demko, Jonathan A [ORNL; Tomich, A. [Aspen Aerogel, Inc.

    2010-01-01

    High temperature superconducting (HTS) cables are an advanced technology that can both strengthen and improve the national electrical distribution infrastructure. HTS cables require sufficient cooling to overcome inherent low temperature heat loading. Heat loads are minimized by the use of cryogenic envelopes or cryostats. Cryostats require improvement in efficiency, reliability, and cost reduction to meet the demanding needs of HTS conductors (1G and 2G wires). Aspen Aerogels has developed a compression resistant aerogel thermal insulation package to replace compression sensitive multi-layer insulation (MLI), the incumbent thermal insulation, in flexible cryostats for HTS cables. Oak Ridge National Laboratory tested a prototype aerogel package in a lab-scale pipe apparatus to measure the rate of heat invasion. The lab-scale pipe test results of the aerogel solution will be presented and directly compared to MLI. A compatibility assessment of the aerogel material with HTS system components will also be presented. The aerogel thermal insulation solution presented will meet the demanding needs of HTS cables.

  16. Donor binding energy and thermally activated persistent photoconductivity in high mobility ,,001... AlAs quantum wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grayson, Matthew

    material parameters such as the donor binding energy and doping efficiency have been obscured by substrateDonor binding energy and thermally activated persistent photoconductivity in high mobility ,,001. Graysonb Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Northwestern University, Evanston

  17. On conduction, cooling flows and galaxy formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabian, A C; Morris, R G

    2002-01-01

    On the basis of the universal gas fraction in clusters of galaxies, we estimate that the effective thermal conductivity required to balance radiative cooling in the cores, where the gas temperature is 3-10keV, is about one tenth of the Spitzer rate. This confirms that thermal conduction can be important for the energy balance provided that it is not highly suppressed by magnetic fields in the gas. We determine the global effective conductivity in a sample of 29 clusters using published X-ray data on the inferred cooling rates and show that most lie between one and one tenth of the Spitzer rate. More work on the profiles in cooling flow clusters is required to test the conduction hypothesis further. We examine the possibility that conduction operates during galaxy formation, and show that it provides a simple explanation for the upper-mass cutoff in galaxy masses.

  18. On conduction, cooling flows and galaxy formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. C. Fabian; L. M. Voigt; R. G. Morris

    2002-06-25

    On the basis of the universal gas fraction in clusters of galaxies, we estimate that the effective thermal conductivity required to balance radiative cooling in the cores, where the gas temperature is 3-10keV, is about one tenth of the Spitzer rate. This confirms that thermal conduction can be important for the energy balance provided that it is not highly suppressed by magnetic fields in the gas. We determine the global effective conductivity in a sample of 29 clusters using published X-ray data on the inferred cooling rates and show that most lie between one and one tenth of the Spitzer rate. More work on the profiles in cooling flow clusters is required to test the conduction hypothesis further. We examine the possibility that conduction operates during galaxy formation, and show that it provides a simple explanation for the upper-mass cutoff in galaxy masses.

  19. Thermalization of color gauge fields in high energy heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iwazaki, Aiichi [International Politics Economics, Nishogakusha University, Ohi Kashiwa Chiba 277-8585 (Japan)

    2008-03-15

    We discuss the quantum mechanical decay of the color magnetic field generated initially during high-energy heavy-ion collisions. The decay is caused by Nielsen-Olesen unstable modes and is accomplished possibly in a period <1 fm/c. We show that the decay products (i.e., incoherent gluons) may be thermalized in a sufficiently short period (<1 fm/c). The precise determination of the period is made by calculating the two-point function of the color magnetic field in a color glass condensate model.

  20. Fabrication of highly textured lithium cobalt oxide films by rapid thermal annealing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bates, John B. (Marietta, GA)

    2002-01-01

    Systems and methods are described for fabrication of highly textured lithium cobalt oxide films by rapid thermal annealing. A method of forming a lithium cobalt oxide film includes depositing a film of lithium cobalt oxide on a substrate; rapidly heating the film of lithium cobalt oxide to a target temperature; and maintaining the film of lithium cobalt oxide at the target temperature for a target annealing time of at most, approximately 60 minutes. The systems and methods provide advantages because they require less time to implement and are, therefore less costly than previous techniques.

  1. Fabrication of highly textured lithium cobalt oxide films by rapid thermal annealing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bates, John B. (Marietta, GA)

    2003-04-29

    Systems and methods are described for fabrication of highly textured lithium cobalt oxide films by rapid thermal annealing. A method of forming a lithium cobalt oxide film includes depositing a film of lithium cobalt oxide on a substrate; rapidly heating the film of lithium cobalt oxide to a target temperature; and maintaining the film of lithium cobalt oxide at the target temperature for a target annealing time of at most, approximately 60 minutes. The systems and methods provide advantages because they require less time to implement and are, therefore less costly than previous techniques.

  2. Fabrication of highly textured lithium cobalt oxide films by rapid thermal annealing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bates, John B.

    2003-05-13

    Systems and methods are described for fabrication of highly textured lithium cobalt oxide films by rapid thermal annealing. A method of forming a lithium cobalt oxide film includes depositing a film of lithium cobalt oxide on a substrate; rapidly heating the film of lithium cobalt oxide to a target temperature; and maintaining the film of lithium cobalt oxide at the target temperature for a target annealing time of at most, approximately 60 minutes. The systems and methods provide advantages because they require less time to implement and are, therefore less costly than previous techniques.

  3. Initial demonstration of the NRC`s capability to conduct a performance assessment for a High-Level Waste Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Codell, R.; Eisenberg, N.; Fehringer, D.; Ford, W.; Margulies, T.; McCartin, T.; Park, J.; Randall, J.

    1992-05-01

    In order to better review licensing submittals for a High-Level Waste Repository, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff has expanded and improved its capability to conduct performance assessments. This report documents an initial demonstration of this capability. The demonstration made use of the limited data from Yucca Mountain, Nevada to investigate a small set of scenario classes. Models of release and transport of radionuclides from a repository via the groundwater and direct release pathways provided preliminary estimates of releases to the accessible environment for a 10,000 year simulation time. Latin hypercube sampling of input parameters was used to express results as distributions and to investigate model sensitivities. This methodology demonstration should not be interpreted as an estimate of performance of the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. By expanding and developing the NRC staff capability to conduct such analyses, NRC would be better able to conduct an independent technical review of the US Department of Energy (DOE) licensing submittals for a high-level waste (HLW) repository. These activities were divided initially into Phase 1 and Phase 2 activities. Additional phases may follow as part of a program of iterative performance assessment at the NRC. The NRC staff conducted Phase 1 activities primarily in CY 1989 with minimal participation from NRC contractors. The Phase 2 activities were to involve NRC contractors actively and to provide for the transfer of technology. The Phase 2 activities are scheduled to start in CY 1990, to allow Sandia National Laboratories to complete development and transfer of computer codes and the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA) to be in a position to assist in the acquisition of the codes.

  4. High-efficiency scintillation detector for combined detection of thermal and fast neutrons and gamma radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chiles, M.M.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Blakeman, E.D.

    1987-02-27

    A scintillation based radiation detector for the combined detection of thermal neutrons, high-energy neutrons and gamma rays in a single detecting unit. The detector consists of a pair of scintillators sandwiched together and optically coupled to the light sensitive face of a photomultiplier tube. A light tight radiation pervious housing is disposed about the scintillators and a portion of the photomultiplier tube to hold the arrangement in assembly and provides a radiation window adjacent the outer scintillator through which the radiation to be detected enters the detector. The outer scintillator is formed of a material in which scintillations are produced by thermal-neutrons and the inner scintillator is formed of a material in which scintillations are produced by high-energy neutrons and gamma rays. The light pulses produced by events detected in both scintillators are coupled to the photomultiplier tube which produces a current pulse in response to each detected event. These current pulses may be processed in a conventional manner to produce a count rate output indicative of the total detected radiation event count rate. Pulse discrimination techniques may be used to distinguish the different radiations and their energy distribution.

  5. High-efficiency scintillation detector for combined of thermal and fast neutrons and gamma radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chiles, Marion M. (Knoxville, TN); Mihalczo, John T. (Oak Ridge, TN); Blakeman, Edward D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1989-01-01

    A scintillation based radiation detector for the combined detection of thermal neutrons, high-energy neutrons and gamma rays in a single detecting unit. The detector consists of a pair of scintillators sandwiched together and optically coupled to the light sensitive face of a photomultiplier tube. A light tight radiation pervious housing is disposed about the scintillators and a portion of the photomultiplier tube to hold the arrangement in assembly and provides a radiation window adjacent the outer scintillator through which the radiation to be detected enters the detector. The outer scintillator is formed of a material in which scintillations are produced by thermal-neutrons and the inner scintillator is formed of a material in which scintillations are produced by high-energy neutrons and gamma rays. The light pulses produced by events detected in both scintillators are coupled to the photomultiplier tube which produces a current pulse in response to each detected event. These current pulses may be processed in a conventional manner to produce a count rate output indicative of the total detected radiation even count rate. Pulse discrimination techniques may be used to distinguish the different radiations and their energy distribution.

  6. Evaluation of annual efficiencies of high temperature central receiver concentrated solar power plants with thermal energy storage.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehrhart, Brian David; Gill, David Dennis

    2013-07-01

    The current study has examined four cases of a central receiver concentrated solar power plant with thermal energy storage using the DELSOL and SOLERGY computer codes. The current state-of-the-art base case was compared with a theoretical high temperature case which was based on the scaling of some input parameters and the estimation of other parameters based on performance targets from the Department of Energy SunShot Initiative. This comparison was done for both current and high temperature cases in two configurations: a surround field with an external cylindrical receiver and a north field with a single cavity receiver. There is a fairly dramatic difference between the design point and annual average performance, especially in the solar field and receiver subsystems, and also in energy losses due to the thermal energy storage being full to capacity. Additionally, there are relatively small differences (<2%) in annual average efficiencies between the Base and High Temperature cases, despite an increase in thermal to electric conversion efficiency of over 8%. This is due the increased thermal losses at higher temperature and operational losses due to subsystem start-up and shut-down. Thermal energy storage can mitigate some of these losses by utilizing larger thermal energy storage to ensure that the electric power production system does not need to stop and re-start as often, but solar energy is inherently transient. Economic and cost considerations were not considered here, but will have a significant impact on solar thermal electric power production strategy and sizing.

  7. Cooperative Enhancement of Energy Transfer in a High-Density Thermal Vapor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Weller; R. J. Bettles; C. L. Vaillant; M. A. Zentile; R. M. Potvliege; C. S. Adams; I. G. Hughes

    2013-08-01

    We present an experimental study of energy transfer in a thermal vapor of atomic rubidium. We measure the fluorescence spectrum in the visible and near infra-red as a function of atomic density using confocal microscopy. At low density we observe energy transfer consistent with the well-known energy pooling process. In contrast, above a critical density we observe a dramatic enhancement of the fluorescence from high-lying states that is not to be expected from kinetic theory. We show that the density threshold for excitation on the D1 and D2 resonance line corresponds to the value at which the dipole-dipole interactions begins to dominate, thereby indicate the key role of these interactions in the enhanced emission.

  8. Heteroepitaxial growth of highly conductive metal oxide RuO{sub 2} thin films by pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia, Q.X.; Wu, X.D.; Foltyn, S.R.; Findikoglu, A.T.; Tiwari, P.; Zheng, J.P.; Jow, T.R.

    1995-09-18

    Highly conductive ruthenium oxide (RuO{sub 2}) has been epitaxially grown on LaAlO{sub 3} substrates by pulsed laser deposition. The RuO{sub 2} film is ({ital h}00) oriented normal to the substrate surface. The heteroepitaxial growth of RuO{sub 2} on LaAlO{sub 3} is demonstrated by the strong in-plane orientation of thin films with respect to the major axes of the substrate. High crystallinity of RuO{sub 2} thin films is also determined from Rutherford backscattering channeling measurements. Electrical measurements on the RuO{sub 2} thin films demonstrate a quite low room-temperature resistivity of 35{plus_minus}2 {mu}{Omega} cm at deposition temperatures of above 500 {degree}C. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  9. Thermally Stable Nanocatalyst for High Temperature Reactions: Pt-Mesoporous Silica Core-Shell Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joo, Sang Hoon; Park, J.Y.; Tsung, C.-K.; Yamada, Y.; Yang, P.; Somorjai, G.A.

    2008-10-25

    Recent advances in colloidal synthesis enabled the precise control of size, shape and composition of catalytic metal nanoparticles, allowing their use as model catalysts for systematic investigations of the atomic-scale properties affecting catalytic activity and selectivity. The organic capping agents stabilizing colloidal nanoparticles, however, often limit their application in high-temperature catalytic reactions. Here we report the design of a high-temperature stable model catalytic system that consists of Pt metal core coated with a mesoporous silica shell (Pt{at}mSiO{sub 2}). While inorganic silica shells encaged the Pt cores up to 750 C in air, the mesopores directly accessible to Pt cores made the Pt{at}mSiO{sub 2} nanoparticles as catalytically active as bare Pt metal for ethylene hydrogenation and CO oxidation. The high thermal stability of Pt{at}mSiO{sub 2} nanoparticles permitted high-temperature CO oxidation studies, including ignition behavior, which was not possible for bare Pt nanoparticles because of their deformation or aggregation. The results suggest that the Pt{at}mSiO{sub 2} nanoparticles are excellent nanocatalytic systems for high-temperature catalytic reactions or surface chemical processes, and the design concept employed in the Pt{at}mSiO{sub 2} core-shell catalyst can be extended to other metal-metal oxide compositions.

  10. Non-thermal high-energy emission from colliding winds of massive stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Reimer; M. Pohl; O. Reimer

    2005-10-25

    Colliding winds of massive star binary systems are considered as potential sites of non-thermal high-energy photon production. This is motivated merely by the detection of synchrotron radio emission from the expected colliding wind location. Here we investigate the properties of high-energy photon production in colliding winds of long-period WR+OB-systems. We found that in the dominating leptonic radiation process anisotropy and Klein-Nishina effects may yield spectral and variability signatures in the gamma-ray domain at or above the sensitivity of current or upcoming gamma-ray telescopes. Analytical formulae for the steady-state particle spectra are derived assuming diffusive particle acceleration out of a pool of thermal wind particles, and taking into account adiabatic and all relevant radiative losses. For the first time we include their advection/convection in the wind collision zone, and distinguish two regions within this extended region: the acceleration region where spatial diffusion is superior to convective/advective motion, and the convection region defined by the convection time shorter than the diffusion time scale. The calculation of the Inverse Compton radiation uses the full Klein-Nishina cross section, and takes into account the anisotropic nature of the scattering process. This leads to orbital flux variations by up to several orders of magnitude which may, however, be blurred by the geometry of the system. The calculations are applied to the typical WR+OB-systems WR 140 and WR 147 to yield predictions of their expected spectral and temporal characteristica and to evaluate chances to detect high-energy emission with the current and upcoming gamma-ray experiments. (abridged)

  11. Design of a novel conduction heating based stress-thermal cycling apparatus for composite materials and its utilization to characterize composite microcrack damage thresholds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ju, Jaehyung

    2006-10-30

    load causes fiber/matrix interface failure. Subsequent exposure to higher stresses in the cryogenic temperature region results in composite matrix microcracking due to the additional stresses associated with the fiber-matrix thermal expansion mismatch....

  12. Non-thermal Cosmic Backgrounds and prospects for future high-energy observations of blazars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Giommi; S. Colafrancesco

    2006-02-10

    We discuss the contribution of the blazar population to the extragalactic background radiation across the electromagnetic (e.m.) spectrum with particular reference to the microwave, hard-X-ray and gamma-ray bands. Our estimates are based on a recently derived blazar radio LogN-LogS that was built by combining several radio and multi-frequency surveys. We show that blazar emission integrated over cosmic time gives rise to a considerable broad-band non-thermal cosmic background that dominates the extragalactic brightness in the high-energy part of the e.m. spectrum. We also estimate the number of blazars that are expected to be detected by future planned or hypothetical missions operating in the X-ray and gamma-ray energy bands.

  13. High thermal expansion sealing glass for use in radio frequency applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kilgo, Riley D. (Albuquerque, NM); Brow, Richard K. (Rolla, MO); Kovacic, Larry (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides a glass composition for hermetically sealing to high thermal expansion materials such as aluminum alloys, stainless steels, and copper alloys, which includes between about 10 and about 25 mole percent Na.sub.2 O, between about 10 and about 25 mole percent K.sub.2 O, between about 4 and about 15 mole percent Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, between about 35 and about 50 mole percent P.sub.2 O.sub.5, B.sub.2 O.sub.3 in a concentration not exceeding 10 mole percent, and MXO in a concentration not exceeding 12 mole percent, wherein MXO is a metal oxide selected from the group consisting of PbO, BaO, CaO and MgO or a mixture thereof. This composition is suitable to hermetically seal to components for use in RF-interconnection applications.

  14. ELSEVIER Earth and Planetary Science Letters 163 (1998) 149165 High geothermal gradient metamorphism during thermal subsidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandiford, Mike

    1998-01-01

    metamorphism during thermal subsidence Mike Sandiford L , Martin Hand, Sandra McLaren Department of Geology producing elements during thermal subsidence following rifting produces two concomitant changes subsidence reduces the heat flowing into the deeper crust from the mantle. Because the process of thermal

  15. Thermal degradation mechanisms in GaAs solar cells with high-temperature contacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobin, S.P.; Bajgar, C.; Vernon, S.M.; Keavney, C.J.; Chung, M.A.; Ruby, D.S.

    1988-01-01

    This objective of this work was to characterize the thermal stability of GaAs solar cells with high-temperature contacts. High-temperature stability is important for threat environments in space, for compatibility with high-temperature assembly techniques, and for enhanced reliability of cells. Our contact system, described previously, relies on a Pt solid-phase ohmic contact, a TiN barrier layer, and an Au conductor, with contact to a heavily doped p-GaAs contact layer. The behavior of both flat-plate and concentrator cells has been characterized as a function of temperature (400-600/degree/C) and time (5-15 minutes) of the anneal. We find that GaAs cells experience minimal electrical degradation up to 550/degree/C for 5 minutes, or to 490/degree/C for 15 minutes. Increases in the 2kT perimeter dark current are responsible for small decreases in Voc and FF up to these temperatures. At higher temperatures a drastic decrease in efficiency is caused by metallurgical reactions at isolated regions along the grid lines. The reaction, which appears to involve Au-Ga, is initiated at the edges of the grid lines. Away from edges, the contacts are metallurgically stable to at least 600/degree/C. 4 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Method for manufacturing solid-state thermal neutron detectors with simultaneous high thermal neutron detection efficiency (>50%) and neutron to gamma discrimination (>1.0E4)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nikolic, Rebecca J.; Conway, Adam M.; Heineck, Daniel; Voss, Lars F.; Wang, Tzu Fang; Shao, Qinghui

    2013-10-15

    Methods for manufacturing solid-state thermal neutron detectors with simultaneous high thermal neutron detection efficiency (>50%) and neutron to gamma discrimination (>10.sup.4) are provided. A structure is provided that includes a p+ region on a first side of an intrinsic region and an n+ region on a second side of the intrinsic region. The thickness of the intrinsic region is minimized to achieve a desired gamma discrimination factor of at least 1.0E+04. Material is removed from one of the p+ region or the n+ region and into the intrinsic layer to produce pillars with open space between each pillar. The open space is filed with a neutron sensitive material. An electrode is placed in contact with the pillars and another electrode is placed in contact with the side that is opposite of the intrinsic layer with respect to the first electrode.

  17. Seasonal trend of photosynthetic parameters and stomatal conductance of blue oak (Quercus douglasii) under prolonged summer drought and high temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, L; Baldocchi, DD

    2003-09-01

    OAK-B135 Understanding seasonal changes in photosynthetic parameters and stomatal conductance is crucial for modeling long-term carbon uptake and energy fluxes of ecosystems. Gas exchange measurements of CO{sub 2} and light response curves on blue oak leaves (Quercus douglasii H. & A.) were conducted weekly throughout the growing season to study the seasonality of photosynthetic capacity (V{sub cmax}) and Ball-Berry slope (m) under prolonged summer drought and high temperature. A leaf photosynthetic model was used to determine V{sub cmax}. There was a pronounced seasonal pattern in V{sub cmax}. The maximum value of V{sub cmax}, 127 {micro}molm{sup -2} s{sup -1},was reached shortly after leaf expansion in early summer, when air temperature was moderate and soil water availability was high. Thereafter, V{sub cmax} declined as the soil water profile became depleted and the trees experienced extreme air temperatures, exceeding 40 C. The decline in V{sub cmax} was gradual in midsummer, however, despite extremely low predawn leaf water potentials ({Psi}{sub pd}, {approx} -4.0 MPa). Overall, temporal changes in V{sub cmax} were well correlated with changes in leaf nitrogen content. During spring leaf development, high rates of leaf dark respiration (R{sub d}, 5-6 {micro}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) were observed. Once a leaf reached maturity, R{sub d} remained low, around 0.5 {micro}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}. In contrast to the strong seasonality of V{sub cmax}, m and marginal water cost per unit carbon gain ({partial_derivative}E/{partial_derivative}A) were relatively constant over the season, even when leaf {Psi}{sub pd} dropped to -6.8 MPa. The constancy of {partial_derivative}E/{partial_derivative}A suggests that stomata behaved optimally under severe water-stress conditions. We discuss the implications of our findings in the context of modeling carbon and water vapor exchange between ecosystems and the atmosphere.

  18. Thermally actuated thermionic switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barrus, D.M.; Shires, C.D.

    1982-09-30

    A thermally actuated thermionic switch which responds to an increase of temperature by changing from a high impedance to a low impedance at a predictable temperature set point. The switch has a bistable operation mode switching only on temperature increases. The thermionic material may be a metal which is liquid at the desired operation temperature and held in matrix in a graphite block reservoir, and which changes state (ionizes, for example) so as to be electrically conductive at a desired temperature.

  19. High-temperature-staged fluidized-bed combustion (HITS), bench scale experimental test program conducted during 1980. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, R E; Jassowski, D M; Newton, R A; Rudnicki, M L

    1981-04-01

    An experimental program was conducted to evaluate the process feasibility of the first stage of the HITS two-stage coal combustion system. Tests were run in a small (12-in. ID) fluidized bed facility at the Energy Engineering Laboratory, Aerojet Energy Conversion Company, Sacramento, California. The first stage reactor was run with low (0.70%) and high (4.06%) sulfur coals with ash fusion temperatures of 2450/sup 0/ and 2220/sup 0/F, respectively. Limestone was used to scavenge the sulfur. The produced low-Btu gas was burned in a combustor. Bed temperature and inlet gas percent oxygen were varied in the course of testing. Key results are summarized as follows: the process was stable and readily controllable, and generated a free-flowing char product using coals with low (2220/sup 0/F) and high (2450/sup 0/F) ash fusion temperatures at bed temperatures of at least 1700/sup 0/ and 1800/sup 0/F, respectively; the gaseous product was found to have a total heating value of about 120 Btu/SCF at 1350/sup 0/F, and the practicality of cleaning the hot product gas and delivering it to the combustor was demonstrated; sulfur capture efficiencies above 80% were demonstrated for both low and high sulfur coals with a calcium/sulfur mole ratio of approximately two; gasification rates of about 5,000 SCF/ft/sup 2/-hr were obtained for coal input rates ranging from 40 to 135 lbm/hr, as required to maintain the desired bed temperatures; and the gaseous product yielded combustion temperatures in excess of 3000/sup 0/F when burned with preheated (900/sup 0/F) air. The above test results support the promise of the HITS system to provide a practical means of converting high sulfur coal to a clean gas for industrial applications. Sulfur capture, gas heating value, and gas production rate are all in the range required for an effective system. Planning is underway for additional testing of the system in the 12-in. fluid bed facility, including demonstration of the second stage char burnup reactor.

  20. An experimental and theoretical high temperature kinetic study of the thermal unimolecular dissociation of fluoroethane.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giri, B. R.; Kiefer, J. H.; Xu, H.; Klippenstein, S. J.; Tranter, R. S.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Univ. of Illinois

    2008-01-01

    The thermal dissociation of fluoroethane has been studied using shock tube (ST)/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) at 500 and 1200 Torr over the temperature range 1200-1550 K. The ST/TOF-MS experiments confirm that elimination of HF is the only reaction channel and rate coefficients for this reaction were extracted from concentration/time profiles derived from the mass spectra. Results from a novel diaphragmless shock tube coupled to the TOF-MS are also presented and demonstrate the unique ability of this apparatus to generate sufficiently reproducible shock waves that signal averaging can be performed over multiple experiments; something that is not possible with a conventional shock tube. The dissociation is also studied with ab initio transition state theory based master equation simulations. A modest increase in the calculated barrier height i.e., by 1 kcal mol{sup -1} yields predicted high pressure rate coefficients that are in good agreement with the existing literature data. The present pressure dependent observations are accurately reproduced for a downwards energy transfer for neon at 1200 to 1500 K of {approx} 270 cm{sup -1}, which is somewhat smaller than that found in previous studies on fluorinated ethanes with the same bath gases.

  1. High-resolution thermal expansion measurements under helium-gas pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manna, Rudra Sekhar; Wolf, Bernd; Souza, Mariano de; Lang, Michael

    2012-08-15

    We report on the realization of a capacitive dilatometer, designed for high-resolution measurements of length changes of a material for temperatures 1.4 K Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To T Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 300 K and hydrostatic pressure P Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 250 MPa. Helium ({sup 4}He) is used as a pressure-transmitting medium, ensuring hydrostatic-pressure conditions. Special emphasis has been given to guarantee, to a good approximation, constant-pressure conditions during temperature sweeps. The performance of the dilatometer is demonstrated by measurements of the coefficient of thermal expansion at pressures P Asymptotically-Equal-To 0.1 MPa (ambient pressure) and 104 MPa on a single crystal of azurite, Cu{sub 3}(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}(OH){sub 2}, a quasi-one-dimensional spin S = 1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet. The results indicate a strong effect of pressure on the magnetic interactions in this system.

  2. A compact and miniaturized high resolution capacitance dilatometer for measuring thermal expansion and magnetostriction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuechler, R.; Bauer, T.; Brando, M.; Steglich, F.

    2012-09-15

    We describe the design, construction, calibration, and two different applications of a miniature capacitance dilatometer. The device is suitable for thermal expansion and magnetostriction measurements from 300 K down to about 25 mK, with a resolution of 0.02 A at low temperatures. The main body of the dilatometer is fabricated from a single block of a Be-Cu alloy by electrical discharge milling. This creates an extremely compact high-resolution measuring cell. We have successfully tested and operated dilatometers of this new type with the commonly used physical property measurement system by quantum design, as well as with several other cryogenic refrigeration systems down to 25 mK and in magnetic fields up to 20 T. Here, the capacitance is measured with a commercially available capacitance bridge. Using a piezoelectric rotator from Attocube Systems, the cell can be rotated at T= 25 mK inside of an inner vacuum chamber of 40 mm diameter. The miniaturized design for the one-axis rotation setup allows a rotation of 360 Degree-Sign .

  3. High-Temperature Phase Change Materials (PCM) Candidates for Thermal Energy Storage (TES) Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomez, J. C.

    2011-09-01

    It is clearly understood that lower overall costs are a key factor to make renewable energy technologies competitive with traditional energy sources. Energy storage technology is one path to increase the value and reduce the cost of all renewable energy supplies. Concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies have the ability to dispatch electrical output to match peak demand periods by employing thermal energy storage (TES). Energy storage technologies require efficient materials with high energy density. Latent heat TES systems using phase change material (PCM) are useful because of their ability to charge and discharge a large amount of heat from a small mass at constant temperature during a phase transformation like melting-solidification. PCM technology relies on the energy absorption/liberation of the latent heat during a physical transformation. The main objective of this report is to provide an assessment of molten salts and metallic alloys proposed as candidate PCMs for TES applications, particularly in solar parabolic trough electrical power plants at a temperature range from 300..deg..C to 500..deg.. C. The physical properties most relevant for PCMs service were reviewed from the candidate selection list. Some of the PCM candidates were characterized for: chemical stability with some container materials; phase change transformation temperatures; and latent heats.

  4. Development and Performance Evaluation of High Temperature Concrete for Thermal Energy Storage for Solar Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Panneer Selvam, Micah Hale and Matt strasser

    2013-03-31

    Thermal energy can be stored by the mechanism of sensible or latent heat or heat from chemical reactions. Sensible heat is the means of storing energy by increasing the temperature of the solid or liquid. Since the concrete as media cost per kWhthermal is $1, this seems to be a very economical material to be used as a TES. This research is focused on extending the concrete TES system for higher temperatures (500 �ºC to 600 �ºC) and increasing the heat transfer performance using novel construction techniques. To store heat at high temperature special concretes are developed and tested for its performance. The storage capacity costs of the developed concrete is in the range of $0.91-$3.02/kWhthermal Two different storage methods are investigated. In the first one heat is transported using molten slat through a stainless steel tube and heat is transported into concrete block through diffusion. The cost of the system is higher than the targeted DOE goal of $15/kWhthermal The increase in cost of the system is due to stainless steel tube to transfer the heat from molten salt to the concrete blocks.The other method is a one-tank thermocline system in which both the hot and cold fluid occupy the same tank resulting in reduced storage tank volume. In this model, heated molten salt enters the top of the tank which contains a packed bed of quartzite rock and silica sand as the thermal energy storage (TES) medium. The single-tank storage system uses about half the salt that is required by the two-tank system for a required storage capacity. This amounts to a significant reduction in the cost of the storage system. The single tank alternative has also been proven to be cheaper than the option which uses large concrete modules with embedded heat exchangers. Using computer models optimum dimensions are determined to have an round trip efficiency of 84%. Additionally, the cost of the structured concrete thermocline configuration provides the TES capacity cost of $33.80$/kWhthermal compared with $30.04/kWhthermal for a packed-bed thermocline (PBTC) configuration and $46.11/kWhthermal for a two-tank liquid configuration.

  5. Enhanced Semiconductor Nanocrystal Conductance via Solution Grown Contacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheldon, Matthew T.

    2010-01-01

    dependent on the thermal activation of free carriers orlow temperatures when the thermal activation of carriers isa high temperature thermal activation analysis. The high

  6. Local texture and percolative paths for long-range conduction in high critical current density TIBa2Ca,Cu,08+, deposits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    Local texture and percolative paths for long-range conduction in high critical current density TIBa for publication 25 October 1993) A possible microstructural origin of the high critical current densities which studies addressing these critical issues are reported here. Samples were prepared according to procedures

  7. A System for Conducting Sophisticated Mechanical Tests in Situ with High Energy Synchrotron X-Rays Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeremy Weiss

    2012-08-02

    This is the final technical report for the SBIR Phase I project titled 'A System for Conducting Sophisticated Mechanical Tests in Situ with High Energy Synchrotron X-Rays.' Experiments using diffraction of synchrotron radiation that help scientists understand engineering material failure modes, such as fracture and fatigue, require specialized machinery. This machinery must be able to induce these failure modes in a material specimen while adhering to strict size, weight, and geometric limitations prescribed by diffraction measurement techniques. During this Phase I project, Mechanical Solutions, Inc. (MSI) developed one such machine capable of applying uniaxial mechanical loading to a material specimen in both tension and compression, with zero backlash while transitioning between the two. Engineers currently compensate for a lack of understanding of fracture and fatigue by employing factors of safety in crucial system components. Thus, mechanical and structural parts are several times bigger, thicker, and heavier than they need to be. The scientific discoveries that result from diffraction experiments which utilize sophisticated mechanical loading devices will allow for broad material, weight, fuel, and cost savings in engineering design across all industries, while reducing the number of catastrophic failures in transportation, power generation, infrastructure, and all other engineering systems. With an existing load frame as the starting point, the research focused on two main areas: (1) the design of a specimen alignment and gripping system that enables pure uniaxial tension and compression loading (and no bending, shear, or torsion), and (2) development of a feedback control system that is adaptive and thus can maintain a load set point despite changing specimen material properties (e.g. a decreasing stiffness during yield).

  8. Where solar thermal meets photovoltaic for high-efficiency power conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bierman, David M. (David Matthew)

    2014-01-01

    To develop disruptive techniques which generate power from the Sun, one must understand the aspects of existing technologies that limit performance. Solar thermal and solar photovoltaic schemes dominate today's solar market ...

  9. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of cross-shaped spiral fuel in high power density BWRs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conboy, Thomas M

    2007-01-01

    Preliminary analysis of the cross-shaped spiral (CSS) fuel assembly suggests great thermal-hydraulic upside. According to computational models, the increase in rod surface area, combined with an increase in coolant turbulence ...

  10. Triptycene Polyimides: Soluble Polymers with High Thermal Stability and Low Refractive Indices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swager, Timothy Manning

    A series of soluble, thermally stable aromatic polyimides were synthesized using commercially available five- and six-membered ring anhydrides and 2,6-diaminotriptycene derivatives. All of these triptycene polyimides (TPIs) ...

  11. Micro-machined thermo-conductivity detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Conrad (Antioch, CA)

    2003-01-01

    A micro-machined thermal conductivity detector for a portable gas chromatograph. The detector is highly sensitive and has fast response time to enable detection of the small size gas samples in a portable gas chromatograph which are in the order of nanoliters. The high sensitivity and fast response time are achieved through micro-machined devices composed of a nickel wire, for example, on a silicon nitride window formed in a silicon member and about a millimeter square in size. In addition to operating as a thermal conductivity detector, the silicon nitride window with a micro-machined wire therein of the device can be utilized for a fast response heater for PCR applications.

  12. Optimization of Acetylene Black Conductive Additive and Polyvinylidene Difluoride Composition for High Power Rechargeable Lithium-Ion Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, G.; Zheng, H.; Battaglia, V.S.; Simens, A.S.; Minor, A.M.; Song, X.

    2007-01-01

    polymer phase in higher AB concentration composite results in AB conductivecomposites. (A) Free polymer phases provide adhesion to pull the AB conductivepolymer binder in a composite will associate with the smaller size conductive

  13. Optimizing Neutron Thermal Scattering Effects in very High Temperature Reactors. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawari, Ayman; Ougouag, Abderrafi

    2014-07-08

    This project aims to develop a holistic understanding of the phenomenon of neutron thermalization in the VHTR. Neutron thermalization is dependent on the type and structure of the moderating material. The fact that the moderator (and reflector) in the VHTR is a solid material will introduce new and interesting considerations that do not apply in other (e.g. light water) reactors. The moderator structure is expected to undergo radiation induced changes as the irradiation (or burnup) history progresses. In this case, the induced changes in structure will have a direct impact on many properties including the neutronic behavior. This can be easily anticipated if one recognizes the dependence of neutron thermalization on the scattering law of the moderator. For the pebble bed reactor, it is anticipated that the moderating behavior can be tailored, e.g. using moderators that consist of composite materials, which could allow improved optimization of the moderator-to-fuel ratio.

  14. Compact and high-particle-flux thermal-lithium-beam probe system for measurement of two-dimensional electron density profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shibata, Y. Manabe, T.; Ohno, N.; Takagi, M.; Kajita, S.; Tsuchiya, H.; Morisaki, T.

    2014-09-15

    A compact and high-particle-flux thermal-lithium-beam source for two-dimensional measurement of electron density profiles has been developed. The thermal-lithium-beam oven is heated by a carbon heater. In this system, the maximum particle flux of the thermal lithium beam was ?4 × 10{sup 19} m{sup ?2} s{sup ?1} when the temperature of the thermal-lithium-beam oven was 900 K. The electron density profile was evaluated in the small tokamak device HYBTOK-II. The electron density profile was reconstructed using the thermal-lithium-beam probe data and this profile was consistent with the electron density profile measured with a Langmuir electrostatic probe. We confirm that the developed thermal-lithium-beam probe can be used to measure the two-dimensional electron density profile with high time and spatial resolutions.

  15. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01

    1978, High temperature underground thermal energy storage,in Proceedings, Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop:High temperature underground thermal energy storage, in ATES

  16. Vacuum 73 (2004) 475480 Application of high-power plasma gun for thermal cycle testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    2004-01-01

    for the efficient decomposi- tion of exhaust gases to reduce NOx emission [4] or to treat CO2 gases for reduction of refractory foams Shahram Sharafata, *, Akira Kobayashib , Nasr M. Ghoniema a Mechanical & Aerospace-gun was utilized to perform durability tests of advanced silicon carbide (SiC) foam materials under extreme thermal

  17. Thin-film 'Thermal Well' Emitters and Absorbers for High-Efficiency Thermophotovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tong, Jonathan K; Huang, Yi; Boriskina, Svetlana V; Chen, Gang

    2015-01-01

    A new approach is introduced to significantly improve the performance of thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems by using low-dimensional thermal emitters and photovoltaic (PV) cells. By reducing the thickness of both the emitter and the PV cell, strong spectral selectivity in both thermal emission and absorption can be achieved by confining photons in trapped waveguide modes inside the thin-films that act as thermal analogs to quantum wells. Simultaneously, photo-excited carriers travel shorter distances across the thin-films reducing bulk recombination losses resulting in a lower saturation current in the PV cell. We predict a TPV efficiency enhancement with near-field coupling between the thermal emitter and the PV cell of up to 38.7% using a germanium (Ge) emitter at 1000 K and a gallium antimonide (GaSb) cell with optimized thicknesses separated by 100 nm. Even in the far-field limit, the efficiency is predicted to reach 31.5%, which is an order of magnitude higher than the Shockley Queisser limit of 1.6% for a...

  18. Fast Lithium Ion Conduction in Li2SnS3: Synthesis, Physicochemical Characterization, and Electronic Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holzwarth, Natalie

    Fast Lithium Ion Conduction in Li2SnS3: Synthesis, Physicochemical Characterization, and Electronic conduction. The high thermal stability, significant lithium ion conductivity, and environmental stability make Li2SnS3 a promising new solid-state electrolyte for lithium ion batteries. 1. INTRODUCTION

  19. CsSnI[subscript 3]: Semiconductor or Metal? High Electrical Conductivity and Strong Near-Infrared Photoluminescence from a Single Material. High Hole Mobility and Phase-Transitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, In; Song, Jung-Hwan; Im, Jino; Androulakis, John; Malliakas, Christos D.; Li, Hao; Freeman, Arthur J.; Kenney, John T.; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G. (NWU); (OmniPV)

    2012-10-29

    CsSnI{sub 3} is an unusual perovskite that undergoes complex displacive and reconstructive phase transitions and exhibits near-infrared emission at room temperature. Experimental and theoretical studies of CsSnI{sub 3} have been limited by the lack of detailed crystal structure characterization and chemical instability. Here we describe the synthesis of pure polymorphic crystals, the preparation of large crack-/bubble-free ingots, the refined single-crystal structures, and temperature-dependent charge transport and optical properties of CsSnI{sub 3}, coupled with ab initio first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations. In situ temperature-dependent single-crystal and synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction studies reveal the origin of polymorphous phase transitions of CsSnI{sub 3}. The black orthorhombic form of CsSnI{sub 3} demonstrates one of the largest volumetric thermal expansion coefficients for inorganic solids. Electrical conductivity, Hall effect, and thermopower measurements on it show p-type metallic behavior with low carrier density, despite the optical band gap of 1.3 eV. Hall effect measurements of the black orthorhombic perovskite phase of CsSnI{sub 3} indicate that it is a p-type direct band gap semiconductor with carrier concentration at room temperature of {approx} 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} and a hole mobility of {approx} 585 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1}. The hole mobility is one of the highest observed among p-type semiconductors with comparable band gaps. Its powders exhibit a strong room-temperature near-IR emission spectrum at 950 nm. Remarkably, the values of the electrical conductivity and photoluminescence intensity increase with heat treatment. The DFT calculations show that the screened-exchange local density approximation-derived band gap agrees well with the experimentally measured band gap. Calculations of the formation energy of defects strongly suggest that the electrical and light emission properties possibly result from Sn defects in the crystal structure, which arise intrinsically. Thus, although stoichiometric CsSnI{sub 3} is a semiconductor, the material is prone to intrinsic defects associated with Sn vacancies. This creates highly mobile holes which cause the materials to appear metallic.

  20. Highly stable silicon dioxide films deposited by means of rapid thermal -low-pressure chemical vapor deposition onto InP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    grown by rapid thermal, low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (RT-LPCVD), using pure oxygen (0,) and 2Highly stable silicon dioxide films deposited by means of rapid thermal - low-pressure chemical vapor deposition onto InP A. Katz, A. Feingold, U. K. Chakrabarti, and S. J. Peat-ton AT&T Bell

  1. LDRD final report on polyphosphaacetylenes, new hybrid conducting organic-inorganic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamison, G.M.; Loy, D.A.; Saunders, R.S.; Alam, T.M.

    1996-06-01

    Thermal, electrochemical and transition metal mediated reactions of phosphaacetylene monomers were conducted in attempts to form novel polyphosphaacetylenes as a new class of potentially electrically conducting polymers. Molecular modeling was used to simulate the molecular conformations of optimized, isolated oligomers to identify the proper monomeric repeat units for highly conjugated molecules. Electrodeposition of suitable monomers led to low molecular weight oligomers. Thermal polymerization of phosphaacetylene monomers bearing aromatic substituents ed to the formation of polyhedral cage oligomers. Under metathesis polymerization conditions the phosphaacetylene monomers form unique complexes via an unprecedented sequence of intermediates which suggest that metathesis to linear oligomers is achievable. Conductivity measurements on electrodeposited oligomers indicate modest electrical conductivity.

  2. THR-TH: a high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor core thermal hydraulics code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vondy, D.R.

    1984-07-01

    The ORNL version of PEBBLE, the (RZ) pebble bed thermal hydraulics code, has been extended for application to a prismatic gas cooled reactor core. The supplemental treatment is of one-dimensional coolant flow in up to a three-dimensional core description. Power density data from a neutronics and exposure calculation are used as the basic information for the thermal hydraulics calculation of heat removal. Two-dimensional neutronics results may be expanded for a three-dimensional hydraulics calculation. The geometric description for the hydraulics problem is the same as used by the neutronics code. A two-dimensional thermal cell model is used to predict temperatures in the fuel channel. The capability is available in the local BOLD VENTURE computation system for reactor core analysis with capability to account for the effect of temperature feedback by nuclear cross section correlation. Some enhancements have also been added to the original code to add pebble bed modeling flexibility and to generate useful auxiliary results. For example, an estimate is made of the distribution of fuel temperatures based on average and extreme conditions regularly calculated at a number of locations.

  3. Modeling and Control of High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF) Thermal Spray: A Tutorial Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mingheng; Christofides, Panagiotis D.

    2009-01-01

    Fluid Dynamics Analysis of a Wire- Feed, High-Velocity Oxygen Fuel (Fluid Dynamic Modeling of Gas Flow Charac- teristics in a High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel

  4. On the oxidation of high-temperature alloys, and its role in failure of thermal barrier coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loeffel, Kaspar Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems are applied to superalloy turbine blades to provide thermal insulation and oxidation protection. A TBC system consists of (a) an outer oxide layer that imparts thermal insulation, and ...

  5. Characterization and modeling of thermal diffusion and aggregation in nanofluids.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gharagozloo, Patricia E.; Goodson, Kenneth E.

    2010-05-01

    Fluids with higher thermal conductivities are sought for fluidic cooling systems in applications including microprocessors and high-power lasers. By adding high thermal conductivity nanoscale metal and metal oxide particles to a fluid the thermal conductivity of the fluid is enhanced. While particle aggregates play a central role in recent models for the thermal conductivity of nanofluids, the effect of particle diffusion in a temperature field on the aggregation and transport has yet to be studied in depth. The present work separates the effects of particle aggregation and diffusion using parallel plate experiments, infrared microscopy, light scattering, Monte Carlo simulations, and rate equations for particle and heat transport in a well dispersed nanofluid. Experimental data show non-uniform temporal increases in thermal conductivity above effective medium theory and can be well described through simulation of the combination of particle aggregation and diffusion. The simulation shows large concentration distributions due to thermal diffusion causing variations in aggregation, thermal conductivity and viscosity. Static light scattering shows aggregates form more quickly at higher concentrations and temperatures, which explains the increased enhancement with temperature reported by other research groups. The permanent aggregates in the nanofluid are found to have a fractal dimension of 2.4 and the aggregate formations that grow over time are found to have a fractal dimension of 1.8, which is consistent with diffusion limited aggregation. Calculations show as aggregates grow the viscosity increases at a faster rate than thermal conductivity making the highly aggregated nanofluids unfavorable, especially at the low fractal dimension of 1.8. An optimum nanoparticle diameter for these particular fluid properties is calculated to be 130 nm to optimize the fluid stability by reducing settling, thermal diffusion and aggregation.

  6. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01

    Recycling of Wasted Energy : Thermal to Electrical EnergyRecycling of Wasted Energy : Thermal to Electrical Energyelectric energy generation and thermal energy conduction

  7. High-Frequency Eddy Current Conductivity Spectroscopy for Near-Surface Residual Stress Profiling in Surface-Treated Nickel-Base Superalloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abu-Nabah, Bassam A.; Nagy, Peter B. [Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221-0070 (United States)

    2007-03-21

    Recent research indicated that eddy current conductivity measurements can be exploited for nondestructive evaluation of subsurface residual stress in surface-treated components. This technique is based on the so-called piezoresistive effect, i.e., the stress-dependence of electric conductivity. Previous experimental studies were conducted on excessively peened (Almen 10-16A peening intensity levels) nickel-base superalloy specimens that exhibited harmful cold work in excess of 30% plastic strain. The main reason for choosing peening intensities above recommended normal levels was that the eddy current penetration depth could not be decreased below 0.2 mm without conducting accurate measurements above 10 MHz, which is beyond the operational range of most commercially available eddy current instruments. In this paper we report the development of a new high-frequency eddy current conductivity measuring system that offers an extended inspection frequency range up to 80 MHz with a single probe coil. In addition, the new system offers better reproducibility, accuracy, and measurement speed than the previously used conventional system.

  8. Linking high and low temperature plasticity in bulk metallic glasses: thermal activation, extreme value statistics and kinetic freezing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. M. Derlet; R. Maaß

    2013-11-15

    At temperatures well below their glass transition, the deformation properties of bulk metallic glasses are characterised by a sharp transition from elasticity to plasticity, a reproducible yield stress, and an approximately linear decrease of this stress with increasing temperature. In the present work it shown that when the well known properties of the under-cooled liquid regime, in terms of the underlying potential energy landscape, are assumed to be also valid at low temperature, a simple thermal activation model is able to reproduce the observed onset of macro-scopic yield. At these temperatures, the thermal accessibility of the complex potential energy landscape is drastically reduced, and the statistics of extreme value and the phenomenon of kinetic freezing become important, affecting the spatial heterogeneity of the irreversible structural transitions mediating the elastic-to-plastic transition. As the temperature increases and approaches the glass transition temperature, the theory is able to smoothly transit to the high temperature deformation regime where plasticity is known to be well described by thermally activated viscoplastic models.

  9. Thermally Activated, Inverted Interfacial Electron Transfer Kinetics: High Driving Force Reactions between Tin Oxide Nanoparticles and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    activation limit as: where In the equations, G* is the activation free energy, Hab is the coupling constant to the interest in these systems for solar energy conversion.10-12 In such systems, the two important interfacial behavior can also be observed via pH-induced manipulation of the conduction band-edge energy and, therefore

  10. Optimization of Acetylene Black Conductive Additive and Polyvinylidene Difluoride Composition for High Power Rechargeable Lithium-Ion Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, G.; Zheng, H.; Battaglia, V.S.; Simens, A.S.; Minor, A.M.; Song, X.

    2007-01-01

    7), A365 G. M. Ehrlich, Lithium-ion Batteries, 3rd ed ed. (High Power Rechargeable Lithium-Ion Cells G. Liu a,z , H.local environment. (A) lithium-ion mass transfer in the

  11. Design and characterization of convective thermal cyclers for high-speed DNA analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agrawal, Nitin

    2009-05-15

    . (B) Duplex PCR for a mixture containing primers and template for a 1.3 kb target from a ?-DNA template and a 242 bp human L32 gene target. (C) Duplex PCR for a mixture of 191 bp influenza-A amplicon and 242 bp human L32 gene target... Rayleigh number Racrit Critical Rayleigh number s Directional coordinate T Temperature t Time Tm Primer melting temperature u velocity x Mean efficiency per cycle Y Copy yield Greek letters ? Thermal expansion coefficient ? Kinematic viscosity...

  12. Conduction cooled tube supports

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Worley, Arthur C. (Mt. Tabor, NJ); Becht, IV, Charles (Morristown, NJ)

    1984-01-01

    In boilers, process tubes are suspended by means of support studs that are in thermal contact with and attached to the metal roof casing of the boiler and the upper bend portions of the process tubes. The support studs are sufficiently short that when the boiler is in use, the support studs are cooled by conduction of heat to the process tubes and the roof casing thereby maintaining the temperature of the stud so that it does not exceed 1400.degree. F.

  13. High quality ZnO:Al transparent conducting oxide films synthesized by pulsed filtered cathodic arc deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anders, Andre; Lim, Sunnie H.N.; Yu, Kin Man; Andersson, Joakim; Rosen, Johanna; McFarland, Mike; Brown, Jeff

    2009-04-24

    Aluminum-doped zinc oxide, ZnO:Al or AZO, is a well-known n-type transparent conducting oxide with great potential in a number of applications currently dominated by indium tin oxide (ITO). In this study, the optical and electrical properties of AZO thin films deposited on glass and silicon by pulsed filtered cathodic arc deposition are systematically studied. In contrast to magnetron sputtering, this technique does not produce energetic negative ions, and therefore ion damage can be minimized. The quality of the AZO films strongly depends on the growth temperature while only marginal improvements are obtained with post-deposition annealing. The best films, grown at a temperature of about 200?C, have resistivities in the low to mid 10-4 Omega cm range with a transmittance better than 85percent in the visible part of the spectrum. It is remarkable that relatively good films of small thickness (60 nm) can be fabricated using this method.

  14. Differences between direct current and alternating current capacitance nonlinearities in high-k dielectrics and their relation to hopping conduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khaldi, O.; Kassmi, M.; Gonon, P. Vallée, C.; Mannequin, C.; Sylvestre, A.; Jomni, F.

    2014-08-28

    Capacitance nonlinearities were studied in atomic layer deposited HfO{sub 2} films using two types of signals: a pure ac voltage of large magnitude (ac nonlinearities) and a small ac voltage superimposed to a large dc voltage (dc nonlinearities). In theory, ac and dc nonlinearities should be of the same order of magnitude. However, in practice, ac nonlinearities are found to be an order of magnitude higher than dc nonlinearities. Besides capacitance nonlinearities, hopping conduction is studied using low-frequency impedance measurements and is discussed through the correlated barrier hopping model. The link between hopping and nonlinearity is established. The ac nonlinearities are ascribed to the polarization of isolated defect pairs, while dc nonlinearities are attributed to electrode polarization which originates from defect percolation paths. Both the ac and dc capacitance nonlinearities display an exponential variation with voltage, which results from field-induced lowering of the hopping barrier energy.

  15. Observation of interference effects via four photon excitation of highly excited Rydberg states in thermal cesium vapor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kondo, Jorge M; Guttridge, Alex; Wade, Christopher G; De Melo, Natalia R; Adams, Charles S; Weatherill, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    We report on the observation of Electromagnetically Induced Transparency (EIT) and Absorption (EIA) of highly-excited Rydberg states in thermal Cs vapor using a 4-step excitation scheme. The advantage of this 4-step scheme is that the final transition to the Rydberg state has a large dipole moment and one can achieve similar Rabi frequencies to 2 or 3 step excitation schemes using two orders of magnitude less laser power. Consequently each step is driven by a relatively low power infra-red diode laser opening up the prospect for new applications. The observed lineshapes are in good agreement with simulations based on multilevel optical Bloch equations.

  16. Device for thermal transfer and power generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weaver, Stanton Earl (Northville, NY); Arik, Mehmet (Niskayuna, NY)

    2011-04-19

    A system is provided. The system includes a device that includes top and bottom thermally conductive substrates positioned opposite to one another, wherein a top surface of the bottom thermally conductive substrate is substantially atomically flat and a thermal blocking layer disposed between the top and bottom thermally conductive substrates. The device also includes top and bottom electrodes separated from one another between the top and bottom thermally conductive substrates to define a tunneling path, wherein the top electrode is disposed on the thermal blocking layer and the bottom electrode is disposed on the bottom thermally conductive substrate.

  17. Factors affecting thermal infrared images at selected field sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisson, J.B.; Ferguson, J.S.

    1993-07-01

    A thermal infrared (TIR) survey was conducted to locate surface ordnance in and around the Naval Ordnance Disposal Area, and a thermal anomaly was found. This report documents studies conducted to identify the position of cause of the thermal anomaly. Also included are results of a long path Fourier transform infrared survey, soil sampling activities, soil gas surveys, and buried heater studies. The results of these studies indicated that the thermal anomaly was caused by a gravel pad, which had thermal properties different than those of the surrounding soil. Results from this investigation suggest that TIR is useful for locating surface objects having a high thermal inertia compared to the surrounding terrain, but TIR is of very limited use for characterizing buried waste or other similar buried objects at the INEL.

  18. COMPARISON OF THERMAL PROPERTIES OF THERMAL BARRIER COATING DEPOSITED ON IN738 USING STANDARD AIR PLASMA SPRAY WITH 100HE PLASMA SPRAY SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uppu, N.; Mensah, P.F.; Ofori, D.

    2006-07-01

    A typical blade material is made of Nickel super alloy and can bear temperatures up to 950°C. But the operating temperature of a gas turbine is above the melting point of super alloy nearly at 1500°C. This could lead to hot corrosions, high temperature oxidation, creep, thermal fatigue may takes place on the blade material. Though the turbine has an internal cooling system, the cooling is not adequate to reduce the temperature of the blade substrate. Therefore to protect the blade material as well as increase the efficiency of the turbine, thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) must be used. A TBC coating of 250 ?m thick can reduce the temperature by up to 200° C. Air Plasma Spray Process (APS) and High Enthalpy Plasma Spray Process (100HE) were the processes used for coating the blades with the TBCs. Because thermal conductivity increases with increase in temperature, it is desired that these processes yield very low thermal conductivities at high temperatures in order not to damage the blade. An experiment was carried out using Flash line 5000 apparatus to compare the thermal conductivity of both processes.The apparatus could also be used to determine the thermal diffusivity and specific heat of the TBCs. 75 to 2800 K was the temperature range used in the experimentation. It was found out that though 100HE has high deposition efficiency, the thermal conductivity increases with increase in temperatures whiles APS yielded low thermal conductivities.

  19. Building America Best Practices Series, Volume 6: High-Performance Home Technologies: Solar Thermal & Photovoltaic Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baechler, Michael C.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Ruiz, Kathleen A.; Steward, Heidi E.; Love, Pat M.

    2007-06-04

    This guide is was written by PNNL for the US Department of Energy's Building America program to provide information for residential production builders interested in building near zero energy homes. The guide provides indepth descriptions of various roof-top photovoltaic power generating systems for homes. The guide also provides extensive information on various designs of solar thermal water heating systems for homes. The guide also provides construction company owners and managers with an understanding of how solar technologies can be added to their homes in a way that is cost effective, practical, and marketable. Twelve case studies provide examples of production builders across the United States who are building energy-efficient homes with photovoltaic or solar water heating systems.

  20. Evidence for radial flow of thermal dileptons in high-energy nuclear collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NA60 Collaboration; R. Arnaldi

    2007-11-12

    The NA60 experiment at the CERN SPS has studied low-mass dimuon production in 158 AGeV In-In collisions. An excess of pairs above the known meson decays has been reported before. We now present precision results on the associated transverse momentum spectra. The slope parameter Teff extracted from the spectra rises with dimuon mass up to the rho, followed by a sudden decline above. While the initial rise is consistent with the expectations for radial flow of a hadronic decay source, the decline signals a transition to an emission source with much smaller flow. This may well represent the first direct evidence for thermal radiation of partonic origin in nuclear collisions.